WorldWideScience

Sample records for timing sequence information

  1. Timing and sequencing of events marking the transition to adulthood in two informal settlements in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beguy, Donatien; Kabiru, Caroline W; Zulu, Eliya M; Ezeh, Alex C

    2011-06-01

    Young people living in poor urban informal settlements face unique challenges as they transition to adulthood. This exploratory paper uses retrospective information from the baseline survey of a 3-year prospective study to examine the timing and sequencing of four key markers (first sex, marriage, birth, and independent housing) of the transition to adulthood among 3,944 adolescents in two informal settlements in Nairobi city, Kenya. Event history analysis techniques are employed to examine the timing of the events. Results indicate that there is no significant gender difference with regard to first sexual debut among adolescents. For many boys and girls, the first sexual experience occurs outside of marriage or other union. For males, the sequencing of entry begins with entry into first sex, followed by independent housing. Conversely, for females, the sequencing begins with first sex and then parenthood. Apart from sexual debut, the patterns of entry into union and parenthood do not differ much from what was observed for Nairobi as a whole. The space constraints that typify the two slums may have influenced the pattern of leaving home observed. We discuss these and other findings in light of their implications for young people's health and well-being in resource-poor settings in urban areas.

  2. Automatic Time Sequence Alignment in Contrast Enhanced MRI by Maximization of Mutual Information

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Positano, Vicenzo

    2001-01-01

    The use of contrast medium allows joining the high-resolution anatomical information provided by standard magnetic resonance with functional information obtained by means of the diffusion of contrast...

  3. Foundations of Sequence-to-Sequence Modeling for Time Series

    OpenAIRE

    Kuznetsov, Vitaly; Mariet, Zelda

    2018-01-01

    The availability of large amounts of time series data, paired with the performance of deep-learning algorithms on a broad class of problems, has recently led to significant interest in the use of sequence-to-sequence models for time series forecasting. We provide the first theoretical analysis of this time series forecasting framework. We include a comparison of sequence-to-sequence modeling to classical time series models, and as such our theory can serve as a quantitative guide for practiti...

  4. Information decomposition method to analyze symbolical sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korotkov, E.V.; Korotkova, M.A.; Kudryashov, N.A.

    2003-01-01

    The information decomposition (ID) method to analyze symbolical sequences is presented. This method allows us to reveal a latent periodicity of any symbolical sequence. The ID method is shown to have advantages in comparison with application of the Fourier transformation, the wavelet transform and the dynamic programming method to look for latent periodicity. Examples of the latent periods for poetic texts, DNA sequences and amino acids are presented. Possible origin of a latent periodicity for different symbolical sequences is discussed

  5. Effects of Sequences of Cognitions on Group Performance Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Inge; Chiu, Ming Ming

    2017-04-01

    Extending past research showing that sequences of low cognitions (low-level processing of information) and high cognitions (high-level processing of information through questions and elaborations) influence the likelihoods of subsequent high and low cognitions, this study examines whether sequences of cognitions are related to group performance over time; 54 primary school students (18 triads) discussed and wrote an essay about living in another country (32,375 turns of talk). Content analysis and statistical discourse analysis showed that within each lesson, groups with more low cognitions or more sequences of low cognition followed by high cognition added more essay words. Groups with more high cognitions, sequences of low cognition followed by low cognition, or sequences of high cognition followed by an action followed by low cognition, showed different words and sequences, suggestive of new ideas. The links between cognition sequences and group performance over time can inform facilitation and assessment of student discussions.

  6. Sequencing Information Management System (SIMS). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, C.

    1996-02-15

    A feasibility study to develop a requirements analysis and functional specification for a data management system for large-scale DNA sequencing laboratories resulted in a functional specification for a Sequencing Information Management System (SIMS). This document reports the results of this feasibility study, and includes a functional specification for a SIMS relational schema. The SIMS is an integrated information management system that supports data acquisition, management, analysis, and distribution for DNA sequencing laboratories. The SIMS provides ad hoc query access to information on the sequencing process and its results, and partially automates the transfer of data between laboratory instruments, analysis programs, technical personnel, and managers. The SIMS user interfaces are designed for use by laboratory technicians, laboratory managers, and scientists. The SIMS is designed to run in a heterogeneous, multiplatform environment in a client/server mode. The SIMS communicates with external computational and data resources via the internet.

  7. Image encryption using random sequence generated from generalized information domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xia-Yan; Wu Jie-Hua; Zhang Guo-Ji; Li Xuan; Ren Ya-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    A novel image encryption method based on the random sequence generated from the generalized information domain and permutation–diffusion architecture is proposed. The random sequence is generated by reconstruction from the generalized information file and discrete trajectory extraction from the data stream. The trajectory address sequence is used to generate a P-box to shuffle the plain image while random sequences are treated as keystreams. A new factor called drift factor is employed to accelerate and enhance the performance of the random sequence generator. An initial value is introduced to make the encryption method an approximately one-time pad. Experimental results show that the random sequences pass the NIST statistical test with a high ratio and extensive analysis demonstrates that the new encryption scheme has superior security. (paper)

  8. Time sequence photography of Roosters Comb

    Science.gov (United States)

    The importance of understanding natural landscape changes is key in properly determining rangeland ecology. Time sequence photography allows a landscape snapshot to be documented and enables the ability to compare natural changes overtime. Photographs of Roosters Comb were taken from the same vantag...

  9. Time, Quantum and Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Leaf [Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States)

    2004-04-09

    Time, Quantum and Information, a paean to Professor Carl Friedrich von Weizsaecker, commemorates his 90th birthday. The range of Professor Weizsaecker's endeavours is an exhilarating example of what can be accomplished by one freely-soaring human spirit, who is at the same time a physicist, a philosopher, and a humanitarian. The editors, Lutz Castell and Otfried Ischebeck, have assembled an admirable collection of essays and articles written by Weizsaecker?s past students, collaborators, colleagues and acquaintances. Time, Quantum and Information offers the reader a panoply of unique insights into twentieth century science and history. Entangled with the stories about Weizsaecker?s influence on the lives of some of the contributors are discussions of the activities of German scientists during and following World War II, emphasizing their reluctance to work on atomic weapons following the war. By outlining Weizsaecker?s role in the early development of numerous tributaries of physical science, the book gives us a new glimpse into the origins of some of its disparate domains, such as nuclear physics, the physics of stellar nucleosynthesis, cosmic ray physics, fluid turbulence, and the formation of the solar system. We physicists have all studied Weizsaecker?s semi-empirical mass formula describing the binding energy of nuclei. We are aware too that both he and Hans Bethe independently discovered the nuclear cycles that provide stars with their enduring energy output. We have studied the Weizsaecker--Williams technique of calculating the bremsstrahlung of relativistic electrons. But how many of us know of Weizsaecker's work in fluid turbulence that he, like Werner Heisenberg under whom he had earned his doctorate, pursued while holed up in Farm Hall? And how many of us are aware of his introduction of turbulent viscosity to account for the origin of planetary orbits, involving the migration of mass inwards and angular momentum outwards? Moreover, before

  10. Time, Quantum and Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, Leaf

    2004-01-01

    Time, Quantum and Information, a paean to Professor Carl Friedrich von Weizsaecker, commemorates his 90th birthday. The range of Professor Weizsaecker's endeavours is an exhilarating example of what can be accomplished by one freely-soaring human spirit, who is at the same time a physicist, a philosopher, and a humanitarian. The editors, Lutz Castell and Otfried Ischebeck, have assembled an admirable collection of essays and articles written by Weizsaecker?s past students, collaborators, colleagues and acquaintances. Time, Quantum and Information offers the reader a panoply of unique insights into twentieth century science and history. Entangled with the stories about Weizsaecker?s influence on the lives of some of the contributors are discussions of the activities of German scientists during and following World War II, emphasizing their reluctance to work on atomic weapons following the war. By outlining Weizsaecker?s role in the early development of numerous tributaries of physical science, the book gives us a new glimpse into the origins of some of its disparate domains, such as nuclear physics, the physics of stellar nucleosynthesis, cosmic ray physics, fluid turbulence, and the formation of the solar system. We physicists have all studied Weizsaecker?s semi-empirical mass formula describing the binding energy of nuclei. We are aware too that both he and Hans Bethe independently discovered the nuclear cycles that provide stars with their enduring energy output. We have studied the Weizsaecker--Williams technique of calculating the bremsstrahlung of relativistic electrons. But how many of us know of Weizsaecker's work in fluid turbulence that he, like Werner Heisenberg under whom he had earned his doctorate, pursued while holed up in Farm Hall? And how many of us are aware of his introduction of turbulent viscosity to account for the origin of planetary orbits, involving the migration of mass inwards and angular momentum outwards? Moreover, before finally

  11. Time fluctuation analysis of forest fire sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Orozco, Carmen D.; Kanevski, Mikhaïl; Tonini, Marj; Golay, Jean; Pereira, Mário J. G.

    2013-04-01

    Forest fires are complex events involving both space and time fluctuations. Understanding of their dynamics and pattern distribution is of great importance in order to improve the resource allocation and support fire management actions at local and global levels. This study aims at characterizing the temporal fluctuations of forest fire sequences observed in Portugal, which is the country that holds the largest wildfire land dataset in Europe. This research applies several exploratory data analysis measures to 302,000 forest fires occurred from 1980 to 2007. The applied clustering measures are: Morisita clustering index, fractal and multifractal dimensions (box-counting), Ripley's K-function, Allan Factor, and variography. These algorithms enable a global time structural analysis describing the degree of clustering of a point pattern and defining whether the observed events occur randomly, in clusters or in a regular pattern. The considered methods are of general importance and can be used for other spatio-temporal events (i.e. crime, epidemiology, biodiversity, geomarketing, etc.). An important contribution of this research deals with the analysis and estimation of local measures of clustering that helps understanding their temporal structure. Each measure is described and executed for the raw data (forest fires geo-database) and results are compared to reference patterns generated under the null hypothesis of randomness (Poisson processes) embedded in the same time period of the raw data. This comparison enables estimating the degree of the deviation of the real data from a Poisson process. Generalizations to functional measures of these clustering methods, taking into account the phenomena, were also applied and adapted to detect time dependences in a measured variable (i.e. burned area). The time clustering of the raw data is compared several times with the Poisson processes at different thresholds of the measured function. Then, the clustering measure value

  12. Information needs changing over time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothma, Theo; Bergenholtz, Henning

    2013-01-01

    For the past twenty years phrases such as “stable information needs”, “unstable information needs” or “information needs changing over time” are found in many contributions to information science. At first view these concepts seem to be easy and clearly understandable. However, after some...... considerations different questions arise: For which types of information need do we see that these needs are changing over time – for all types, or only for certain types? How do information needs relate to changes in the world, or to changes in the human understanding of the world? We will show...

  13. Information-Theoretical Analysis of EEG Microstate Sequences in Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic von Wegner

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We present an open-source Python package to compute information-theoretical quantities for electroencephalographic data. Electroencephalography (EEG measures the electrical potential generated by the cerebral cortex and the set of spatial patterns projected by the brain's electrical potential on the scalp surface can be clustered into a set of representative maps called EEG microstates. Microstate time series are obtained by competitively fitting the microstate maps back into the EEG data set, i.e., by substituting the EEG data at a given time with the label of the microstate that has the highest similarity with the actual EEG topography. As microstate sequences consist of non-metric random variables, e.g., the letters A–D, we recently introduced information-theoretical measures to quantify these time series. In wakeful resting state EEG recordings, we found new characteristics of microstate sequences such as periodicities related to EEG frequency bands. The algorithms used are here provided as an open-source package and their use is explained in a tutorial style. The package is self-contained and the programming style is procedural, focusing on code intelligibility and easy portability. Using a sample EEG file, we demonstrate how to perform EEG microstate segmentation using the modified K-means approach, and how to compute and visualize the recently introduced information-theoretical tests and quantities. The time-lagged mutual information function is derived as a discrete symbolic alternative to the autocorrelation function for metric time series and confidence intervals are computed from Markov chain surrogate data. The software package provides an open-source extension to the existing implementations of the microstate transform and is specifically designed to analyze resting state EEG recordings.

  14. Information Flow for Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis; Vasilikos, Panagiotis

    2017-01-01

    One of the key demands of cyberphysical systems is that they meet their safety goals. Timed Automata has established itself as a formalism for modelling and analysing the real-time safety aspects of cyberphysical systems. Increasingly it is also demanded that cyberphysical systems meet a number o...... of security goals for confidentiality and integrity. Information Flow Control is an approach to ensuring that there are no flows of information that violate the stated security policy....

  15. Always look on both sides: phylogenetic information conveyed by simple sequence repeat allele sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Barthe

    Full Text Available Simple sequence repeat (SSR markers are widely used tools for inferences about genetic diversity, phylogeography and spatial genetic structure. Their applications assume that variation among alleles is essentially caused by an expansion or contraction of the number of repeats and that, accessorily, mutations in the target sequences follow the stepwise mutation model (SMM. Generally speaking, PCR amplicon sizes are used as direct indicators of the number of SSR repeats composing an allele with the data analysis either ignoring the extent of allele size differences or assuming that there is a direct correlation between differences in amplicon size and evolutionary distance. However, without precisely knowing the kind and distribution of polymorphism within an allele (SSR and the associated flanking region (FR sequences, it is hard to say what kind of evolutionary message is conveyed by such a synthetic descriptor of polymorphism as DNA amplicon size. In this study, we sequenced several SSR alleles in multiple populations of three divergent tree genera and disentangled the types of polymorphisms contained in each portion of the DNA amplicon containing an SSR. The patterns of diversity provided by amplicon size variation, SSR variation itself, insertions/deletions (indels, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs observed in the FRs were compared. Amplicon size variation largely reflected SSR repeat number. The amount of variation was as large in FRs as in the SSR itself. The former contributed significantly to the phylogenetic information and sometimes was the main source of differentiation among individuals and populations contained by FR and SSR regions of SSR markers. The presence of mutations occurring at different rates within a marker's sequence offers the opportunity to analyse evolutionary events occurring on various timescales, but at the same time calls for caution in the interpretation of SSR marker data when the distribution of within

  16. The"minimum information about an environmental sequence" (MIENS) specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, P.; Kottmann, R.; Field, D.; Knight, R.; Cole, J.R.; Amaral-Zettler, L.; Gilbert, J.A.; Karsch-Mizrachi, I.; Johnston, A.; Cochrane, G.; Vaughan, R.; Hunter, C.; Park, J.; Morrison, N.; Rocca-Serra, P.; Sterk, P.; Arumugam, M.; Baumgartner, L.; Birren, B.W.; Blaser, M.J.; Bonazzi, V.; Bork, P.; Buttigieg, P. L.; Chain, P.; Costello, E.K.; Huot-Creasy, H.; Dawyndt, P.; DeSantis, T.; Fierer, N.; Fuhrman, J.; Gallery, R.E.; Gibbs, R.A.; Giglio, M.G.; Gil, I. San; Gonzalez, A.; Gordon, J.I.; Guralnick, R.; Hankeln, W.; Highlander, S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Jansson, J.; Kennedy, J.; Knights, D.; Koren, O.; Kuczynski, J.; Kyrpides, N.; Larsen, R.; Lauber, C.L.; Legg, T.; Ley, R.E.; Lozupone, C.A.; Ludwig, W.; Lyons, D.; Maguire, E.; Methe, B.A.; Meyer, F.; Nakieny, S.; Nelson, K.E.; Nemergut, D.; Neufeld, J.D.; Pace, N.R.; Palanisamy, G.; Peplies, J.; Peterson, J.; Petrosino, J.; Proctor, L.; Raes, J.; Ratnasingham, S.; Ravel, J.; Relman, D.A.; Assunta-Sansone, S.; Schriml, L.; Sodergren, E.; Spor, A.; Stombaugh, J.; Tiedje, J.M.; Ward, D.V.; Weinstock, G.M.; Wendel, D.; White, O.; Wikle, A.; Wortman, J.R.; Glockner, F.O.; Bushman, F.D.; Charlson, E.; Gevers, D.; Kelley, S.T.; Neubold, L.K.; Oliver, A.E.; Pruesse, E.; Quast, C.; Schloss, P.D.; Sinha, R.; Whitely, A.

    2010-10-15

    We present the Genomic Standards Consortium's (GSC) 'Minimum Information about an ENvironmental Sequence' (MIENS) standard for describing marker genes. Adoption of MIENS will enhance our ability to analyze natural genetic diversity across the Tree of Life as it is currently being documented by massive DNA sequencing efforts from myriad ecosystems in our ever-changing biosphere.

  17. Minimum information about a marker gene sequence (MIMARKS) and minimum information about any (x) sequence (MIxS) specifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yilmaz, Pelin; Kottmann, Renzo; Field, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    Here we present a standard developed by the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) for reporting marker gene sequences--the minimum information about a marker gene sequence (MIMARKS). We also introduce a system for describing the environment from which a biological sample originates. The 'environment...

  18. Nonlinear analysis of river flow time sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porporato, Amilcare; Ridolfi, Luca

    1997-06-01

    Within the field of chaos theory several methods for the analysis of complex dynamical systems have recently been proposed. In light of these ideas we study the dynamics which control the behavior over time of river flow, investigating the existence of a low-dimension deterministic component. The present article follows the research undertaken in the work of Porporato and Ridolfi [1996a] in which some clues as to the existence of chaos were collected. Particular emphasis is given here to the problem of noise and to nonlinear prediction. With regard to the latter, the benefits obtainable by means of the interpolation of the available time series are reported and the remarkable predictive results attained with this nonlinear method are shown.

  19. PIMS sequencing extension: a laboratory information management system for DNA sequencing facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldwin Stephen A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facilities that provide a service for DNA sequencing typically support large numbers of users and experiment types. The cost of services is often reduced by the use of liquid handling robots but the efficiency of such facilities is hampered because the software for such robots does not usually integrate well with the systems that run the sequencing machines. Accordingly, there is a need for software systems capable of integrating different robotic systems and managing sample information for DNA sequencing services. In this paper, we describe an extension to the Protein Information Management System (PIMS that is designed for DNA sequencing facilities. The new version of PIMS has a user-friendly web interface and integrates all aspects of the sequencing process, including sample submission, handling and tracking, together with capture and management of the data. Results The PIMS sequencing extension has been in production since July 2009 at the University of Leeds DNA Sequencing Facility. It has completely replaced manual data handling and simplified the tasks of data management and user communication. Samples from 45 groups have been processed with an average throughput of 10000 samples per month. The current version of the PIMS sequencing extension works with Applied Biosystems 3130XL 96-well plate sequencer and MWG 4204 or Aviso Theonyx liquid handling robots, but is readily adaptable for use with other combinations of robots. Conclusions PIMS has been extended to provide a user-friendly and integrated data management solution for DNA sequencing facilities that is accessed through a normal web browser and allows simultaneous access by multiple users as well as facility managers. The system integrates sequencing and liquid handling robots, manages the data flow, and provides remote access to the sequencing results. The software is freely available, for academic users, from http://www.pims-lims.org/.

  20. PIMS sequencing extension: a laboratory information management system for DNA sequencing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshin, Peter V; Postis, Vincent Lg; Ashworth, Denise; Baldwin, Stephen A; McPherson, Michael J; Barton, Geoffrey J

    2011-03-07

    Facilities that provide a service for DNA sequencing typically support large numbers of users and experiment types. The cost of services is often reduced by the use of liquid handling robots but the efficiency of such facilities is hampered because the software for such robots does not usually integrate well with the systems that run the sequencing machines. Accordingly, there is a need for software systems capable of integrating different robotic systems and managing sample information for DNA sequencing services. In this paper, we describe an extension to the Protein Information Management System (PIMS) that is designed for DNA sequencing facilities. The new version of PIMS has a user-friendly web interface and integrates all aspects of the sequencing process, including sample submission, handling and tracking, together with capture and management of the data. The PIMS sequencing extension has been in production since July 2009 at the University of Leeds DNA Sequencing Facility. It has completely replaced manual data handling and simplified the tasks of data management and user communication. Samples from 45 groups have been processed with an average throughput of 10000 samples per month. The current version of the PIMS sequencing extension works with Applied Biosystems 3130XL 96-well plate sequencer and MWG 4204 or Aviso Theonyx liquid handling robots, but is readily adaptable for use with other combinations of robots. PIMS has been extended to provide a user-friendly and integrated data management solution for DNA sequencing facilities that is accessed through a normal web browser and allows simultaneous access by multiple users as well as facility managers. The system integrates sequencing and liquid handling robots, manages the data flow, and provides remote access to the sequencing results. The software is freely available, for academic users, from http://www.pims-lims.org/.

  1. Comprehensive Information Retrieval and Model Input Sequence (CIRMIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrichs, D.R.

    1977-04-01

    The Comprehensive Information Retrieval and Model Input Sequence (CIRMIS) was developed to provide the research scientist with man--machine interactive capabilities in a real-time environment, and thereby produce results more quickly and efficiently. The CIRMIS system was originally developed to increase data storage and retrieval capabilities and ground-water model control for the Hanford site. The overall configuration, however, can be used in other areas. The CIRMIS system provides the user with three major functions: retrieval of well-based data, special application for manipulating surface data or background maps, and the manipulation and control of ground-water models. These programs comprise only a portion of the entire CIRMIS system. A complete description of the CIRMIS system is given in this report. 25 figures, 7 tables

  2. Timing crisis information release via television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiuchang; Zhao, Dingtao; Yang, Feng; Du, Shaofu; Marinova, Dora

    2010-10-01

    When and how often to release information on television are important issues in crisis and emergency risk communication. There is a lot of crisis information, including warnings and news, to which people should have access, but most of it is not significantly urgent to interrupt the broadcasting of television programmes. Hence, the right timing for the release of crisis information should be selected based on the importance of the crisis and any associated communication requirements. Using recursive methods, this paper builds an audience coverage model of crisis information release. Based on 2007 Household Using TV (HUT) data for Hefei City, China, the optimal combination of broadcasting sequence (with frequencies between one and eight times) is obtained using the implicit enumeration method. The developed model is applicable to effective transmission of crisis information, with the aim of reducing interference with the normal television transmission process and decreasing the psychological effect on audiences. The same model can be employed for other purposes, such as news coverage and weather and road information. © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © Overseas Development Institute, 2010.

  3. Recurrence time statistics: versatile tools for genomic DNA sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yinhe; Tung, Wen-Wen; Gao, J B

    2004-01-01

    With the completion of the human and a few model organisms' genomes, and the genomes of many other organisms waiting to be sequenced, it has become increasingly important to develop faster computational tools which are capable of easily identifying the structures and extracting features from DNA sequences. One of the more important structures in a DNA sequence is repeat-related. Often they have to be masked before protein coding regions along a DNA sequence are to be identified or redundant expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are to be sequenced. Here we report a novel recurrence time based method for sequence analysis. The method can conveniently study all kinds of periodicity and exhaustively find all repeat-related features from a genomic DNA sequence. An efficient codon index is also derived from the recurrence time statistics, which has the salient features of being largely species-independent and working well on very short sequences. Efficient codon indices are key elements of successful gene finding algorithms, and are particularly useful for determining whether a suspected EST belongs to a coding or non-coding region. We illustrate the power of the method by studying the genomes of E. coli, the yeast S. cervisivae, the nematode worm C. elegans, and the human, Homo sapiens. Computationally, our method is very efficient. It allows us to carry out analysis of genomes on the whole genomic scale by a PC.

  4. Waiting Time Distributions for Pattern Occurrence in a Constrained Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeri Stefanov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A binary sequence of zeros and ones is called a (d,k-sequence if it does not contain runs of zeros of length either less than d or greater than k, where d and k are arbitrary, but fixed, non-negative integers and d < k. Such sequences find an abundance of applications in communications, in particular for magnetic and optical recording. Occasionally, one requires that (d,k-sequences do not contain a specific pattern w. Therefore, distribution results concerning pattern occurrence in (d,k-sequences are of interest. In this paper we study the distribution of the waiting time until the r th occurrence of a pattern w in a random (d,k-sequence generated by a Markov source. Numerical examples are also provided.

  5. Time-stretch microscopy based on time-wavelength sequence reconstruction from wideband incoherent source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Chi; Xu, Yiqing; Wei, Xiaoming; Tsia, Kevin K.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Time-stretch microscopy has emerged as an ultrafast optical imaging concept offering the unprecedented combination of the imaging speed and sensitivity. However, dedicated wideband and coherence optical pulse source with high shot-to-shot stability has been mandated for time-wavelength mapping—the enabling process for ultrahigh speed wavelength-encoded image retrieval. From the practical point of view, exploiting methods to relax the stringent requirements (e.g., temporal stability and coherence) for the source of time-stretch microscopy is thus of great value. In this paper, we demonstrated time-stretch microscopy by reconstructing the time-wavelength mapping sequence from a wideband incoherent source. Utilizing the time-lens focusing mechanism mediated by a narrow-band pulse source, this approach allows generation of a wideband incoherent source, with the spectral efficiency enhanced by a factor of 18. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, time-stretch imaging with the scan rate as high as MHz and diffraction-limited resolution is achieved based on the wideband incoherent source. We note that the concept of time-wavelength sequence reconstruction from wideband incoherent source can also be generalized to any high-speed optical real-time measurements, where wavelength is acted as the information carrier

  6. Human genome and genetic sequencing research and informed consent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwakawa, Mayumi

    2003-01-01

    On March 29, 2001, the Ethical Guidelines for Human Genome and Genetic Sequencing Research were established. They have intended to serve as ethical guidelines for all human genome and genetic sequencing research practice, for the purpose of upholding respect for human dignity and rights and enforcing use of proper methods in the pursuit of human genome and genetic sequencing research, with the understanding and cooperation of the public. The RadGenomics Project has prepared a research protocol and informed consent document that follow these ethical guidelines. We have endeavored to protect the privacy of individual information, and have established a procedure for examination of research practices by an ethics committee. Here we report our procedure in order to offer this concept to the patients. (authors)

  7. MACSIMS : multiple alignment of complete sequences information management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plewniak Frédéric

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the post-genomic era, systems-level studies are being performed that seek to explain complex biological systems by integrating diverse resources from fields such as genomics, proteomics or transcriptomics. New information management systems are now needed for the collection, validation and analysis of the vast amount of heterogeneous data available. Multiple alignments of complete sequences provide an ideal environment for the integration of this information in the context of the protein family. Results MACSIMS is a multiple alignment-based information management program that combines the advantages of both knowledge-based and ab initio sequence analysis methods. Structural and functional information is retrieved automatically from the public databases. In the multiple alignment, homologous regions are identified and the retrieved data is evaluated and propagated from known to unknown sequences with these reliable regions. In a large-scale evaluation, the specificity of the propagated sequence features is estimated to be >99%, i.e. very few false positive predictions are made. MACSIMS is then used to characterise mutations in a test set of 100 proteins that are known to be involved in human genetic diseases. The number of sequence features associated with these proteins was increased by 60%, compared to the features available in the public databases. An XML format output file allows automatic parsing of the MACSIM results, while a graphical display using the JalView program allows manual analysis. Conclusion MACSIMS is a new information management system that incorporates detailed analyses of protein families at the structural, functional and evolutionary levels. MACSIMS thus provides a unique environment that facilitates knowledge extraction and the presentation of the most pertinent information to the biologist. A web server and the source code are available at http://bips.u-strasbg.fr/MACSIMS/.

  8. Representation of protein-sequence information by amino acid subalphabets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.A.F.; Brunak, Søren

    2004-01-01

    -sequence information, using machine learning strategies, where the primary goal is the discovery of novel powerful representations for use in AI techniques. In the case of proteins and the 20 different amino acids they typically contain, it is also a secondary goal to discover how the current selection of amino acids...

  9. Life, Information, Entropy, and Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crofts, Antony R.

    2008-01-01

    Attempts to understand how information content can be included in an accounting of the energy flux of the biosphere have led to the conclusion that, in information transmission, one component, the semantic content, or “the meaning of the message,” adds no thermodynamic burden over and above costs arising from coding, transmission and translation. In biology, semantic content has two major roles. For all life forms, the message of the genotype encoded in DNA specifies the phenotype, and hence the organism that is tested against the real world through the mechanisms of Darwinian evolution. For human beings, communication through language and similar abstractions provides an additional supra-phenotypic vehicle for semantic inheritance, which supports the cultural heritages around which civilizations revolve. The following three postulates provide the basis for discussion of a number of themes that demonstrate some important consequences. (i) Information transmission through either pathway has thermodynamic components associated with data storage and transmission. (ii) The semantic content adds no additional thermodynamic cost. (iii) For all semantic exchange, meaning is accessible only through translation and interpretation, and has a value only in context. (1) For both pathways of semantic inheritance, translational and copying machineries are imperfect. As a consequence both pathways are subject to mutation and to evolutionary pressure by selection. Recognition of semantic content as a common component allows an understanding of the relationship between genes and memes, and a reformulation of Universal Darwinism. (2) The emergent properties of life are dependent on a processing of semantic content. The translational steps allow amplification in complexity through combinatorial possibilities in space and time. Amplification depends on the increased potential for complexity opened by 3D interaction specificity of proteins, and on the selection of useful variants

  10. Protein Function Prediction Based on Sequence and Structure Information

    KAUST Repository

    Smaili, Fatima Z.

    2016-05-25

    The number of available protein sequences in public databases is increasing exponentially. However, a significant fraction of these sequences lack functional annotation which is essential to our understanding of how biological systems and processes operate. In this master thesis project, we worked on inferring protein functions based on the primary protein sequence. In the approach we follow, 3D models are first constructed using I-TASSER. Functions are then deduced by structurally matching these predicted models, using global and local similarities, through three independent enzyme commission (EC) and gene ontology (GO) function libraries. The method was tested on 250 “hard” proteins, which lack homologous templates in both structure and function libraries. The results show that this method outperforms the conventional prediction methods based on sequence similarity or threading. Additionally, our method could be improved even further by incorporating protein-protein interaction information. Overall, the method we use provides an efficient approach for automated functional annotation of non-homologous proteins, starting from their sequence.

  11. A time warping approach to multiple sequence alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas-Gil, Ana; Matias, Catherine

    2017-04-25

    We propose an approach for multiple sequence alignment (MSA) derived from the dynamic time warping viewpoint and recent techniques of curve synchronization developed in the context of functional data analysis. Starting from pairwise alignments of all the sequences (viewed as paths in a certain space), we construct a median path that represents the MSA we are looking for. We establish a proof of concept that our method could be an interesting ingredient to include into refined MSA techniques. We present a simple synthetic experiment as well as the study of a benchmark dataset, together with comparisons with 2 widely used MSA softwares.

  12. Arbitrary digital pulse sequence generator with delay-loop timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hošák, Radim; Ježek, Miroslav

    2018-04-01

    We propose an idea of an electronic multi-channel arbitrary digital sequence generator with temporal granularity equal to two clock cycles. We implement the generator with 32 channels using a low-cost ARM microcontroller and demonstrate its capability to produce temporal delays ranging from tens of nanoseconds to hundreds of seconds, with 24 ns timing granularity and linear scaling of delay with respect to the number of delay loop iterations. The generator is optionally synchronized with an external clock source to provide 100 ps jitter and overall sequence repeatability within the whole temporal range. The generator is fully programmable and able to produce digital sequences of high complexity. The concept of the generator can be implemented using different microcontrollers and applied for controlling of various optical, atomic, and nuclear physics measurement setups.

  13. Harmonic spectral components in time sequences of Markov correlated events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetti, Piero; Carbone, Anna

    2017-07-01

    The paper concerns the analysis of the conditions allowing time sequences of Markov correlated events give rise to a line power spectrum having a relevant physical interest. It is found that by specializing the Markov matrix in order to represent closed loop sequences of events with arbitrary distribution, generated in a steady physical condition, a large set of line spectra, covering all possible frequency values, is obtained. The amplitude of the spectral lines is given by a matrix equation based on a generalized Markov matrix involving the Fourier transform of the distribution functions representing the time intervals between successive events of the sequence. The paper is a complement of a previous work where a general expression for the continuous power spectrum was given. In that case the Markov matrix was left in a more general form, thus preventing the possibility of finding line spectra of physical interest. The present extension is also suggested by the interest of explaining the emergence of a broad set of waves found in the electro and magneto-encephalograms, whose frequency ranges from 0.5 to about 40Hz, in terms of the effects produced by chains of firing neurons within the complex neural network of the brain. An original model based on synchronized closed loop sequences of firing neurons is proposed, and a few numerical simulations are reported as an application of the above cited equation.

  14. CISAPS: Complex Informational Spectrum for the Analysis of Protein Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalambos Chrysostomou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex informational spectrum analysis for protein sequences (CISAPS and its web-based server are developed and presented. As recent studies show, only the use of the absolute spectrum in the analysis of protein sequences using the informational spectrum analysis is proven to be insufficient. Therefore, CISAPS is developed to consider and provide results in three forms including absolute, real, and imaginary spectrum. Biologically related features to the analysis of influenza A subtypes as presented as a case study in this study can also appear individually either in the real or imaginary spectrum. As the results presented, protein classes can present similarities or differences according to the features extracted from CISAPS web server. These associations are probable to be related with the protein feature that the specific amino acid index represents. In addition, various technical issues such as zero-padding and windowing that may affect the analysis are also addressed. CISAPS uses an expanded list of 611 unique amino acid indices where each one represents a different property to perform the analysis. This web-based server enables researchers with little knowledge of signal processing methods to apply and include complex informational spectrum analysis to their work.

  15. SPARSE: quadratic time simultaneous alignment and folding of RNAs without sequence-based heuristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Sebastian; Otto, Christina; Miladi, Milad; Möhl, Mathias; Backofen, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: RNA-Seq experiments have revealed a multitude of novel ncRNAs. The gold standard for their analysis based on simultaneous alignment and folding suffers from extreme time complexity of O(n6). Subsequently, numerous faster ‘Sankoff-style’ approaches have been suggested. Commonly, the performance of such methods relies on sequence-based heuristics that restrict the search space to optimal or near-optimal sequence alignments; however, the accuracy of sequence-based methods breaks down for RNAs with sequence identities below 60%. Alignment approaches like LocARNA that do not require sequence-based heuristics, have been limited to high complexity (≥ quartic time). Results: Breaking this barrier, we introduce the novel Sankoff-style algorithm ‘sparsified prediction and alignment of RNAs based on their structure ensembles (SPARSE)’, which runs in quadratic time without sequence-based heuristics. To achieve this low complexity, on par with sequence alignment algorithms, SPARSE features strong sparsification based on structural properties of the RNA ensembles. Following PMcomp, SPARSE gains further speed-up from lightweight energy computation. Although all existing lightweight Sankoff-style methods restrict Sankoff’s original model by disallowing loop deletions and insertions, SPARSE transfers the Sankoff algorithm to the lightweight energy model completely for the first time. Compared with LocARNA, SPARSE achieves similar alignment and better folding quality in significantly less time (speedup: 3.7). At similar run-time, it aligns low sequence identity instances substantially more accurate than RAF, which uses sequence-based heuristics. Availability and implementation: SPARSE is freely available at http://www.bioinf.uni-freiburg.de/Software/SPARSE. Contact: backofen@informatik.uni-freiburg.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25838465

  16. Time Separation Between Events in a Sequence: a Regional Property?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirwood, R.; Fitzenz, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquake sequences are loosely defined as events occurring too closely in time and space to appear unrelated. Depending on the declustering method, several, all, or no event(s) after the first large event might be recognized as independent mainshocks. It can therefore be argued that a probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA, traditionally dealing with mainshocks only) might already include the ground shaking effects of such sequences. Alternatively all but the largest event could be classified as an ';aftershock' and removed from the earthquake catalog. While in PSHA the question is only whether to keep or remove the events from the catalog, for Risk Management purposes, the community response to the earthquakes, as well as insurance risk transfer mechanisms, can be profoundly affected by the actual timing of events in such a sequence. In particular the repetition of damaging earthquakes over a period of weeks to months can lead to businesses closing and families evacuating from the region (as happened in Christchurch, New Zealand in 2011). Buildings that are damaged in the first earthquake may go on to be damaged again, even while they are being repaired. Insurance also functions around a set of critical timeframes - including the definition of a single 'event loss' for reinsurance recoveries within the 192 hour ';hours clause', the 6-18 month pace at which insurance claims are settled, and the annual renewal of insurance and reinsurance contracts. We show how temporal aspects of earthquake sequences need to be taken into account within models for Risk Management, and what time separation between events are most sensitive, both in terms of the modeled disruptions to lifelines and business activity as well as in the losses to different parties (such as insureds, insurers and reinsurers). We also explore the time separation between all events and between loss causing events for a collection of sequences from across the world and we point to the need to

  17. Protein sequences bound to mineral surfaces persist into deep time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demarchi, Beatrice; Hall, Shaun; Roncal-Herrero, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    of Laetoli (3.8 Ma) and Olduvai Gorge (1.3 Ma) in Tanzania. By tracking protein diagenesis back in time we find consistent patterns of preservation, demonstrating authenticity of the surviving sequences. Molecular dynamics simulations of struthiocalcin-1 and -2, the dominant proteins within the eggshell......, reveal that distinct domains bind to the mineral surface. It is the domain with the strongest calculated binding energy to the calcite surface that is selectively preserved. Thermal age calculations demonstrate that the Laetoli and Olduvai peptides are 50 times older than any previously authenticated...

  18. The minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Dawn; Garrity, George; Gray, Tanya; Morrison, Norman; Selengut, Jeremy; Sterk, Peter; Tatusova, Tatiana; Thomson, Nicholas; Allen, Michael J; Angiuoli, Samuel V; Ashburner, Michael; Axelrod, Nelson; Baldauf, Sandra; Ballard, Stuart; Boore, Jeffrey; Cochrane, Guy; Cole, James; Dawyndt, Peter; De Vos, Paul; dePamphilis, Claude; Edwards, Robert; Faruque, Nadeem; Feldman, Robert; Gilbert, Jack; Gilna, Paul; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Goldstein, Philip; Guralnick, Robert; Haft, Dan; Hancock, David; Hermjakob, Henning; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Hugenholtz, Phil; Joint, Ian; Kagan, Leonid; Kane, Matthew; Kennedy, Jessie; Kowalchuk, George; Kottmann, Renzo; Kolker, Eugene; Kravitz, Saul; Kyrpides, Nikos; Leebens-Mack, Jim; Lewis, Suzanna E; Li, Kelvin; Lister, Allyson L; Lord, Phillip; Maltsev, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; Martiny, Jennifer; Methe, Barbara; Mizrachi, Ilene; Moxon, Richard; Nelson, Karen; Parkhill, Julian; Proctor, Lita; White, Owen; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Spiers, Andrew; Stevens, Robert; Swift, Paul; Taylor, Chris; Tateno, Yoshio; Tett, Adrian; Turner, Sarah; Ussery, David; Vaughan, Bob; Ward, Naomi; Whetzel, Trish; Gil, Ingio San; Wilson, Gareth; Wipat, Anil

    2008-01-01

    With the quantity of genomic data increasing at an exponential rate, it is imperative that these data be captured electronically, in a standard format. Standardization activities must proceed within the auspices of open-access and international working bodies. To tackle the issues surrounding the development of better descriptions of genomic investigations, we have formed the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC). Here, we introduce the minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification with the intent of promoting participation in its development and discussing the resources that will be required to develop improved mechanisms of metadata capture and exchange. As part of its wider goals, the GSC also supports improving the ‘transparency’ of the information contained in existing genomic databases. PMID:18464787

  19. The minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Field, D; Garrity, G; Gray, T

    2008-01-01

    With the quantity of genomic data increasing at an exponential rate, it is imperative that these data be captured electronically, in a standard format. Standardization activities must proceed within the auspices of open-access and international working bodies. To tackle the issues surrounding the...... that will be required to develop improved mechanisms of metadata capture and exchange. As part of its wider goals, the GSC also supports improving the 'transparency' of the information contained in existing genomic databases....... the development of better descriptions of genomic investigations, we have formed the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC). Here, we introduce the minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification with the intent of promoting participation in its development and discussing the resources...

  20. Left Gastric Vein Visualization with Hepatopetal Flow Information in Healthy Subjects Using Non-Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Balanced Steady-State Free-Precession Sequence and Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Akihiro; Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Ohno, Tsuyoshi; Ono, Ayako; Yamashita, Rikiya; Arizono, Shigeki; Kido, Aki; Sakashita, Naotaka; Togashi, Kaori

    2018-01-01

    To selectively visualize the left gastric vein (LGV) with hepatopetal flow information by non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography under a hypothesis that change in the LGV flow direction can predict the development of esophageal varices; and to optimize the acquisition protocol in healthy subjects. Respiratory-gated three-dimensional balanced steady-state free-precession scans were conducted on 31 healthy subjects using two methods (A and B) for visualizing the LGV with hepatopetal flow. In method A, two time-spatial labeling inversion pulses (Time-SLIP) were placed on the whole abdomen and the area from the gastric fornix to the upper body, excluding the LGV area. In method B, nonselective inversion recovery pulse was used and one Time-SLIP was placed on the esophagogastric junction. The detectability and consistency of LGV were evaluated using the two methods and ultrasonography (US). Left gastric veins by method A, B, and US were detected in 30 (97%), 24 (77%), and 23 (74%) subjects, respectively. LGV flow by US was hepatopetal in 22 subjects and stagnant in one subject. All hepatopetal LGVs by US coincided with the visualized vessels in both methods. One subject with non-visualized LGV in method A showed stagnant LGV by US. Hepatopetal LGV could be selectively visualized by method A in healthy subjects.

  1. Exploiting sequence and stability information for directing nanobody stability engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Patrick; Flock, Tilman; Soler, Nicolas; Zaiss, Moritz; Vincke, Cécile; Sterckx, Yann; Kastelic, Damjana; Muyldermans, Serge; Hoheisel, Jörg D

    2017-09-01

    Variable domains of camelid heavy-chain antibodies, commonly named nanobodies, have high biotechnological potential. In view of their broad range of applications in research, diagnostics and therapy, engineering their stability is of particular interest. One important aspect is the improvement of thermostability, because it can have immediate effects on conformational stability, protease resistance and aggregation propensity of the protein. We analyzed the sequences and thermostabilities of 78 purified nanobody binders. From this data, potentially stabilizing amino acid variations were identified and studied experimentally. Some mutations improved the stability of nanobodies by up to 6.1°C, with an average of 2.3°C across eight modified nanobodies. The stabilizing mechanism involves an improvement of both conformational stability and aggregation behavior, explaining the variable degree of stabilization in individual molecules. In some instances, variations predicted to be stabilizing actually led to thermal destabilization of the proteins. The reasons for this contradiction between prediction and experiment were investigated. The results reveal a mutational strategy to improve the biophysical behavior of nanobody binders and indicate a species-specificity of nanobody architecture. This study illustrates the potential and limitations of engineering nanobody thermostability by merging sequence information with stability data, an aspect that is becoming increasingly important with the recent development of high-throughput biophysical methods. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Secure information release in timed automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasilikos, Panagiotis; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2018-01-01

    . In this paper, we develop a formal approach of information flow for timed automata that allows intentional information leaks. The security of a timed automaton is then defined using a bisimulation relation that takes account of the non-determinism and the clocks of timed automata. Finally, we define...... of security goals for confidentiality and integrity. Notions of security based on Information flow control, such as non-interference, provide strong guarantees that no information is leaked; however, many cyberphysical systems leak intentionally some information in order to achieve their purposes...... an algorithm that traverses a timed automaton and imposes information flow constraints on it and we prove that our algorithm is sound with respect to our security notion....

  3. Prediction of glutathionylation sites in proteins using minimal sequence information and their experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Debojyoti; Sharma, Deepak; Kumar, Mukesh; Sandur, Santosh K

    2016-09-01

    S-glutathionylation of proteins plays an important role in various biological processes and is known to be protective modification during oxidative stress. Since, experimental detection of S-glutathionylation is labor intensive and time consuming, bioinformatics based approach is a viable alternative. Available methods require relatively longer sequence information, which may prevent prediction if sequence information is incomplete. Here, we present a model to predict glutathionylation sites from pentapeptide sequences. It is based upon differential association of amino acids with glutathionylated and non-glutathionylated cysteines from a database of experimentally verified sequences. This data was used to calculate position dependent F-scores, which measure how a particular amino acid at a particular position may affect the likelihood of glutathionylation event. Glutathionylation-score (G-score), indicating propensity of a sequence to undergo glutathionylation, was calculated using position-dependent F-scores for each amino-acid. Cut-off values were used for prediction. Our model returned an accuracy of 58% with Matthew's correlation-coefficient (MCC) value of 0.165. On an independent dataset, our model outperformed the currently available model, in spite of needing much less sequence information. Pentapeptide motifs having high abundance among glutathionylated proteins were identified. A list of potential glutathionylation hotspot sequences were obtained by assigning G-scores and subsequent Protein-BLAST analysis revealed a total of 254 putative glutathionable proteins, a number of which were already known to be glutathionylated. Our model predicted glutathionylation sites in 93.93% of experimentally verified glutathionylated proteins. Outcome of this study may assist in discovering novel glutathionylation sites and finding candidate proteins for glutathionylation.

  4. Alpha-gamma phase amplitude coupling subserves information transfer during perceptual sequence learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzvi, Elinor; Bauhaus, Leon J; Kessler, Till U; Liebrand, Matthias; Wöstmann, Malte; Krämer, Ulrike M

    2018-03-01

    Cross-frequency coupling is suggested to serve transfer of information between wide-spread neuronal assemblies and has been shown to underlie many cognitive functions including learning and memory. In previous work, we found that alpha (8-13 Hz) - gamma (30-48 Hz) phase amplitude coupling (αγPAC) is decreased during sequence learning in bilateral frontal cortex and right parietal cortex. We interpreted this to reflect decreased demands for visuo-motor mapping once the sequence has been encoded. In the present study, we put this hypothesis to the test by adding a "simple" condition to the standard serial reaction time task (SRTT) with minimal needs for visuo-motor mapping. The standard SRTT in our paradigm entailed a perceptual sequence allowing for implicit learning of a sequence of colors with randomly assigned motor responses. Sequence learning in this case was thus not associated with reduced demands for visuo-motor mapping. Analysis of oscillatory power revealed a learning-related alpha decrease pointing to a stronger recruitment of occipito-parietal areas when encoding the perceptual sequence. Replicating our previous findings but in contrast to our hypothesis, αγPAC was decreased in sequence compared to random trials over right frontal and parietal cortex. It also tended to be smaller compared to trials requiring a simple motor sequence. We additionally analyzed αγPAC in resting-state data of a separate cohort. PAC in electrodes over right parietal cortex was significantly stronger compared to sequence trials and tended to be higher compared to simple and random trials of the SRTT data. We suggest that αγPAC in right parietal cortex reflects a "default-mode" brain state, which gets perturbed to allow for encoding of visual regularities into memory. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Swab-to-Sequence: Real-time Data Analysis Platform for the Biomolecule Sequencer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DNA was successfully sequenced on the ISS in 2016, but the DNA sequenced was prepared on the ground. With FY’16 IRAD funds, the same team developed a...

  6. Distress vocalization sequences broadcasted by bats carry redundant information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechavarría, Julio C; Beetz, M Jerome; Macias, Silvio; Kössl, Manfred

    2016-07-01

    Distress vocalizations (also known as alarm or screams) are an important component of the vocal repertoire of a number of animal species, including bats, humans, monkeys and birds, among others. Although the behavioral relevance of distress vocalizations is undeniable, at present, little is known about the rules that govern vocalization production when in alarmful situations. In this article, we show that when distressed, bats of the species Carollia perspicillata produce repetitive vocalization sequences in which consecutive syllables are likely to be similar to one another regarding their physical attributes. The uttered distress syllables are broadband (12-73 kHz) with most of their energy focussing at 23 kHz. Distress syllables are short (~4 ms), their average sound pressure level is close to 70 dB SPL, and they are produced at high repetition rates (every 14 ms). We discuss that, because of their physical attributes, bat distress vocalizations could serve a dual purpose: (1) advertising threatful situations to conspecifics, and (2) informing the threatener that the bats are ready to defend themselves. We also discuss possible advantages of advertising danger/discomfort using repetitive utterances, a calling strategy that appears to be ubiquitous across the animal kingdom.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA sequencing of cat hair: an informative forensic tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarditi, Christy R; Grahn, Robert A; Evans, Jeffrey J; Kurushima, Jennifer D; Lyons, Leslie A

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 81.7 million cats are in 37.5 million U.S. households. Shed fur can be criminal evidence because of transfer to victims, suspects, and/or their belongings. To improve cat hairs as forensic evidence, the mtDNA control region from single hairs, with and without root tags, was sequenced. A dataset of a 402-bp control region segment from 174 random-bred cats representing four U.S. geographic areas was generated to determine the informativeness of the mtDNA region. Thirty-two mtDNA mitotypes were observed ranging in frequencies from 0.6-27%. Four common types occurred in all populations. Low heteroplasmy, 1.7%, was determined. Unique mitotypes were found in 18 individuals, 10.3% of the population studied. The calculated discrimination power implied that 8.3 of 10 randomly selected individuals can be excluded by this region. The genetic characteristics of the region and the generated dataset support the use of this cat mtDNA region in forensic applications. 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences. Published 2010. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A.

  8. Same-day genomic and epigenomic diagnosis of brain tumors using real-time nanopore sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euskirchen, Philipp; Bielle, Franck; Labreche, Karim; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Rosenberg, Shai; Daniau, Mailys; Schmitt, Charlotte; Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Bourdeaut, Franck; Dehais, Caroline; Marie, Yannick; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Idbaih, Ahmed

    2017-11-01

    Molecular classification of cancer has entered clinical routine to inform diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment decisions. At the same time, new tumor entities have been identified that cannot be defined histologically. For central nervous system tumors, the current World Health Organization classification explicitly demands molecular testing, e.g., for 1p/19q-codeletion or IDH mutations, to make an integrated histomolecular diagnosis. However, a plethora of sophisticated technologies is currently needed to assess different genomic and epigenomic alterations and turnaround times are in the range of weeks, which makes standardized and widespread implementation difficult and hinders timely decision making. Here, we explored the potential of a pocket-size nanopore sequencing device for multimodal and rapid molecular diagnostics of cancer. Low-pass whole genome sequencing was used to simultaneously generate copy number (CN) and methylation profiles from native tumor DNA in the same sequencing run. Single nucleotide variants in IDH1, IDH2, TP53, H3F3A, and the TERT promoter region were identified using deep amplicon sequencing. Nanopore sequencing yielded ~0.1X genome coverage within 6 h and resulting CN and epigenetic profiles correlated well with matched microarray data. Diagnostically relevant alterations, such as 1p/19q codeletion, and focal amplifications could be recapitulated. Using ad hoc random forests, we could perform supervised pan-cancer classification to distinguish gliomas, medulloblastomas, and brain metastases of different primary sites. Single nucleotide variants in IDH1, IDH2, and H3F3A were identified using deep amplicon sequencing within minutes of sequencing. Detection of TP53 and TERT promoter mutations shows that sequencing of entire genes and GC-rich regions is feasible. Nanopore sequencing allows same-day detection of structural variants, point mutations, and methylation profiling using a single device with negligible capital cost. It

  9. Clinical decision support for whole genome sequence information leveraging a service-oriented architecture: a prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Brandon M; Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information could soon be routinely available to clinicians to support the personalized care of their patients. At such time, clinical decision support (CDS) integrated into the clinical workflow will likely be necessary to support genome-guided clinical care. Nevertheless, developing CDS capabilities for WGS information presents many unique challenges that need to be overcome for such approaches to be effective. In this manuscript, we describe the development of a prototype CDS system that is capable of providing genome-guided CDS at the point of care and within the clinical workflow. To demonstrate the functionality of this prototype, we implemented a clinical scenario of a hypothetical patient at high risk for Lynch Syndrome based on his genomic information. We demonstrate that this system can effectively use service-oriented architecture principles and standards-based components to deliver point of care CDS for WGS information in real-time.

  10. Value of freeway travel time information

    OpenAIRE

    Soriguera Martí, Francesc

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the value of highway travel time information systems. This is achieved by using notions of expected utility theory to develop a departure time selection and route choice model. The model assumes that every driver has a level of accepted lateness for his trip and some perceived knowledge of the travel times on the route. Only these two inputs support his decisions. The decision making process does not require the consideration of a complex cost function and does not involve...

  11. Real time application of whole genome sequencing for outbreak investigation - What is an achievable turnaround time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGann, Patrick; Bunin, Jessica L; Snesrud, Erik; Singh, Seema; Maybank, Rosslyn; Ong, Ana C; Kwak, Yoon I; Seronello, Scott; Clifford, Robert J; Hinkle, Mary; Yamada, Stephen; Barnhill, Jason; Lesho, Emil

    2016-07-01

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is increasingly employed in clinical settings, though few assessments of turnaround times (TAT) have been performed in real-time. In this study, WGS was used to investigate an unfolding outbreak of vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) among 3 patients in the ICU of a tertiary care hospital. Including overnight culturing, a TAT of just 48.5 h for a comprehensive report was achievable using an Illumina Miseq benchtop sequencer. WGS revealed that isolates from patient 2 and 3 differed from that of patient 1 by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), indicating nosocomial transmission. However, the unparalleled resolution provided by WGS suggested that nosocomial transmission involved two separate events from patient 1 to patient 2 and 3, and not a linear transmission suspected by the time line. Rapid TAT's are achievable using WGS in the clinical setting and can provide an unprecedented level of resolution for outbreak investigations. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Refined repetitive sequence searches utilizing a fast hash function and cross species information retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reneker Jeff

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Searching for small tandem/disperse repetitive DNA sequences streamlines many biomedical research processes. For instance, whole genomic array analysis in yeast has revealed 22 PHO-regulated genes. The promoter regions of all but one of them contain at least one of the two core Pho4p binding sites, CACGTG and CACGTT. In humans, microsatellites play a role in a number of rare neurodegenerative diseases such as spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1. SCA1 is a hereditary neurodegenerative disease caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the coding sequence of the gene. In bacterial pathogens, microsatellites are proposed to regulate expression of some virulence factors. For example, bacteria commonly generate intra-strain diversity through phase variation which is strongly associated with virulence determinants. A recent analysis of the complete sequences of the Helicobacter pylori strains 26695 and J99 has identified 46 putative phase-variable genes among the two genomes through their association with homopolymeric tracts and dinucleotide repeats. Life scientists are increasingly interested in studying the function of small sequences of DNA. However, current search algorithms often generate thousands of matches – most of which are irrelevant to the researcher. Results We present our hash function as well as our search algorithm to locate small sequences of DNA within multiple genomes. Our system applies information retrieval algorithms to discover knowledge of cross-species conservation of repeat sequences. We discuss our incorporation of the Gene Ontology (GO database into these algorithms. We conduct an exhaustive time analysis of our system for various repetitive sequence lengths. For instance, a search for eight bases of sequence within 3.224 GBases on 49 different chromosomes takes 1.147 seconds on average. To illustrate the relevance of the search results, we conduct a search with and without added annotation terms for the

  13. Protein Function Prediction Based on Sequence and Structure Information

    KAUST Repository

    Smaili, Fatima Z.

    2016-01-01

    operate. In this master thesis project, we worked on inferring protein functions based on the primary protein sequence. In the approach we follow, 3D models are first constructed using I-TASSER. Functions are then deduced by structurally matching

  14. The Development of a Course Sequence in Real-Time Systems Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    This project deals with the development of a senior level course sequence in software intensive real - time systems . The sequence consists of a course...for an engineering industrial career in real - time systems development. The course sequence emphasizes practical standards, techniques, and tools for...system development. Few universities include real - time systems development in their undergraduate Computer Engineering or Computer Science curriculum

  15. Event Sequence Analysis of the Air Intelligence Agency Information Operations Center Flight Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larsen, Glen

    1998-01-01

    This report applies Event Sequence Analysis, methodology adapted from aircraft mishap investigation, to an investigation of the performance of the Air Intelligence Agency's Information Operations Center (IOC...

  16. Functional region prediction with a set of appropriate homologous sequences-an index for sequence selection by integrating structure and sequence information with spatial statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The detection of conserved residue clusters on a protein structure is one of the effective strategies for the prediction of functional protein regions. Various methods, such as Evolutionary Trace, have been developed based on this strategy. In such approaches, the conserved residues are identified through comparisons of homologous amino acid sequences. Therefore, the selection of homologous sequences is a critical step. It is empirically known that a certain degree of sequence divergence in the set of homologous sequences is required for the identification of conserved residues. However, the development of a method to select homologous sequences appropriate for the identification of conserved residues has not been sufficiently addressed. An objective and general method to select appropriate homologous sequences is desired for the efficient prediction of functional regions. Results We have developed a novel index to select the sequences appropriate for the identification of conserved residues, and implemented the index within our method to predict the functional regions of a protein. The implementation of the index improved the performance of the functional region prediction. The index represents the degree of conserved residue clustering on the tertiary structure of the protein. For this purpose, the structure and sequence information were integrated within the index by the application of spatial statistics. Spatial statistics is a field of statistics in which not only the attributes but also the geometrical coordinates of the data are considered simultaneously. Higher degrees of clustering generate larger index scores. We adopted the set of homologous sequences with the highest index score, under the assumption that the best prediction accuracy is obtained when the degree of clustering is the maximum. The set of sequences selected by the index led to higher functional region prediction performance than the sets of sequences selected by other sequence

  17. Real Time Earthquake Information System in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, K.; Kato, T.

    2003-12-01

    An early earthquake notification system in Japan had been developed by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) as a governmental organization responsible for issuing earthquake information and tsunami forecasts. The system was primarily developed for prompt provision of a tsunami forecast to the public with locating an earthquake and estimating its magnitude as quickly as possible. Years after, a system for a prompt provision of seismic intensity information as indices of degrees of disasters caused by strong ground motion was also developed so that concerned governmental organizations can decide whether it was necessary for them to launch emergency response or not. At present, JMA issues the following kinds of information successively when a large earthquake occurs. 1) Prompt report of occurrence of a large earthquake and major seismic intensities caused by the earthquake in about two minutes after the earthquake occurrence. 2) Tsunami forecast in around three minutes. 3) Information on expected arrival times and maximum heights of tsunami waves in around five minutes. 4) Information on a hypocenter and a magnitude of the earthquake, the seismic intensity at each observation station, the times of high tides in addition to the expected tsunami arrival times in 5-7 minutes. To issue information above, JMA has established; - An advanced nationwide seismic network with about 180 stations for seismic wave observation and about 3,400 stations for instrumental seismic intensity observation including about 2,800 seismic intensity stations maintained by local governments, - Data telemetry networks via landlines and partly via a satellite communication link, - Real-time data processing techniques, for example, the automatic calculation of earthquake location and magnitude, the database driven method for quantitative tsunami estimation, and - Dissemination networks, via computer-to-computer communications and facsimile through dedicated telephone lines. JMA operationally

  18. Highly accurate fluorogenic DNA sequencing with information theory-based error correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zitian; Zhou, Wenxiong; Qiao, Shuo; Kang, Li; Duan, Haifeng; Xie, X Sunney; Huang, Yanyi

    2017-12-01

    Eliminating errors in next-generation DNA sequencing has proved challenging. Here we present error-correction code (ECC) sequencing, a method to greatly improve sequencing accuracy by combining fluorogenic sequencing-by-synthesis (SBS) with an information theory-based error-correction algorithm. ECC embeds redundancy in sequencing reads by creating three orthogonal degenerate sequences, generated by alternate dual-base reactions. This is similar to encoding and decoding strategies that have proved effective in detecting and correcting errors in information communication and storage. We show that, when combined with a fluorogenic SBS chemistry with raw accuracy of 98.1%, ECC sequencing provides single-end, error-free sequences up to 200 bp. ECC approaches should enable accurate identification of extremely rare genomic variations in various applications in biology and medicine.

  19. Prediction of peptide drift time in ion mobility mass spectrometry from sequence-based features

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Bing; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Peng; Ji, Zhiwei; Deng, Shuping; Li, Chi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS), an analytical technique which combines the features of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS), can rapidly separates ions on a millisecond time-scale. IMMS becomes a powerful tool to analyzing complex mixtures, especially for the analysis of peptides in proteomics. The high-throughput nature of this technique provides a challenge for the identification of peptides in complex biological samples. As an important parameter, peptide drift time can be used for enhancing downstream data analysis in IMMS-based proteomics.Results: In this paper, a model is presented based on least square support vectors regression (LS-SVR) method to predict peptide ion drift time in IMMS from the sequence-based features of peptide. Four descriptors were extracted from peptide sequence to represent peptide ions by a 34-component vector. The parameters of LS-SVR were selected by a grid searching strategy, and a 10-fold cross-validation approach was employed for the model training and testing. Our proposed method was tested on three datasets with different charge states. The high prediction performance achieve demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the prediction model.Conclusions: Our proposed LS-SVR model can predict peptide drift time from sequence information in relative high prediction accuracy by a test on a dataset of 595 peptides. This work can enhance the confidence of protein identification by combining with current protein searching techniques. 2013 Wang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  20. Prediction of peptide drift time in ion mobility mass spectrometry from sequence-based features

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Bing

    2013-05-09

    Background: Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS), an analytical technique which combines the features of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS), can rapidly separates ions on a millisecond time-scale. IMMS becomes a powerful tool to analyzing complex mixtures, especially for the analysis of peptides in proteomics. The high-throughput nature of this technique provides a challenge for the identification of peptides in complex biological samples. As an important parameter, peptide drift time can be used for enhancing downstream data analysis in IMMS-based proteomics.Results: In this paper, a model is presented based on least square support vectors regression (LS-SVR) method to predict peptide ion drift time in IMMS from the sequence-based features of peptide. Four descriptors were extracted from peptide sequence to represent peptide ions by a 34-component vector. The parameters of LS-SVR were selected by a grid searching strategy, and a 10-fold cross-validation approach was employed for the model training and testing. Our proposed method was tested on three datasets with different charge states. The high prediction performance achieve demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the prediction model.Conclusions: Our proposed LS-SVR model can predict peptide drift time from sequence information in relative high prediction accuracy by a test on a dataset of 595 peptides. This work can enhance the confidence of protein identification by combining with current protein searching techniques. 2013 Wang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  1. Conceptual Modeling of Time-Varying Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Heidi; Jensen, Christian S.

    2004-01-01

    A wide range of database applications manage information that varies over time. Many of the underlying database schemas of these were designed using the Entity-Relationship (ER) model. In the research community as well as in industry, it is common knowledge that the temporal aspects of the mini......-world are important, but difficult to capture using the ER model. Several enhancements to the ER model have been proposed in an attempt to support the modeling of temporal aspects of information. Common to the existing temporally extended ER models, few or no specific requirements to the models were given...

  2. [Possibilities in the differential diagnosis of brain neoplasms using the long and short time sequences of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gajewicz, W.; Goraj, B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Currently to perform proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) with single voxel spectroscopy (SVS) technique long and/or short echo time sequences are used in order to provide complementary information. PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to compare the usefulness of STEAM (time echo, TE, 20

  3. Effects of informed consent for individual genome sequencing on relevant knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaphingst, K A; Facio, F M; Cheng, M-R; Brooks, S; Eidem, H; Linn, A; Biesecker, B B; Biesecker, L G

    2012-11-01

    Increasing availability of individual genomic information suggests that patients will need knowledge about genome sequencing to make informed decisions, but prior research is limited. In this study, we examined genome sequencing knowledge before and after informed consent among 311 participants enrolled in the ClinSeq™ sequencing study. An exploratory factor analysis of knowledge items yielded two factors (sequencing limitations knowledge; sequencing benefits knowledge). In multivariable analysis, high pre-consent sequencing limitations knowledge scores were significantly related to education [odds ratio (OR): 8.7, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.45-31.10 for post-graduate education, and OR: 3.9; 95% CI: 1.05, 14.61 for college degree compared with less than college degree] and race/ethnicity (OR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.09, 5.38 for non-Hispanic Whites compared with other racial/ethnic groups). Mean values increased significantly between pre- and post-consent for the sequencing limitations knowledge subscale (6.9-7.7, p benefits knowledge subscale (7.0-7.5, p < 0.0001); increase in knowledge did not differ by sociodemographic characteristics. This study highlights gaps in genome sequencing knowledge and underscores the need to target educational efforts toward participants with less education or from minority racial/ethnic groups. The informed consent process improved genome sequencing knowledge. Future studies could examine how genome sequencing knowledge influences informed decision making. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. On the Concept of Cis-regulatory Information: From Sequence Motifs to Logic Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpine, Ryan; Istrail, Sorin

    The regulatory genome is about the “system level organization of the core genomic regulatory apparatus, and how this is the locus of causality underlying the twin phenomena of animal development and animal evolution” (E.H. Davidson. The Regulatory Genome: Gene Regulatory Networks in Development and Evolution, Academic Press, 2006). Information processing in the regulatory genome is done through regulatory states, defined as sets of transcription factors (sequence-specific DNA binding proteins which determine gene expression) that are expressed and active at the same time. The core information processing machinery consists of modular DNA sequence elements, called cis-modules, that interact with transcription factors. The cis-modules “read” the information contained in the regulatory state of the cell through transcription factor binding, “process” it, and directly or indirectly communicate with the basal transcription apparatus to determine gene expression. This endowment of each gene with the information-receiving capacity through their cis-regulatory modules is essential for the response to every possible regulatory state to which it might be exposed during all phases of the life cycle and in all cell types. We present here a set of challenges addressed by our CYRENE research project aimed at studying the cis-regulatory code of the regulatory genome. The CYRENE Project is devoted to (1) the construction of a database, the cis-Lexicon, containing comprehensive information across species about experimentally validated cis-regulatory modules; and (2) the software development of a next-generation genome browser, the cis-Browser, specialized for the regulatory genome. The presentation is anchored on three main computational challenges: the Gene Naming Problem, the Consensus Sequence Bottleneck Problem, and the Logic Function Inference Problem.

  5. Sequences and timing of dental eruption in semi-free-ranging mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setchell, Joanna M; Wickings, E Jean

    2004-01-01

    The chronology of tooth emergence is often used to examine the growth and development of individuals and to compare life histories across species. Emergence patterns are also used to age animals and to infer life history influences for extinct species. However, comparative studies of primates are hindered by a lack of dental development data for many species. Here we describe the sequences and timing of tooth emergence for a large sample of semi-free-ranging mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) and compare this with other life history variables for this species. Deciduous dentition emerged in the sequence i1 i2 c p3 p4. The augmented sequence (including information about variability in emergence sequence) was i1 i2 [c p3] p4 for the female maxilla and the male mandible, and i1 i2 c p3 p4 for the female mandible and the male maxilla. Deciduous dentition was complete by 5.0 months in females and 6.4 months in males. The permanent dentition began to emerge at 26 months, and complete adult dentition had emerged by 68 months for males and 85 months for females. Sex differences occurred in the augmented eruption sequences: females M1 I1 I2 [M2 C] P3 P4 M3, males M1 I1 [I2 M2] [P4 = P3 = C] M3. The order of tooth eruption and the occurrence of sequence polymorphisms were very similar to those observed for baboons and macaques. Comparison with life history variables showed that mandrills have complete deciduous dentition at weaning, females possess both adult incisors and M1 when they first reproduce, but still have deciduous canines and premolars, and that both sexes have full adult dentition before they attain their full adult stature and mass.

  6. Location of core diagnostic information across various sequences in brain MRI and implications for efficiency of MRI scanner utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aseem; Chatterjee, Arindam; Goyal, Manu; Parsons, Matthew S; Bartel, Seth

    2015-04-01

    Targeting redundancy within MRI can improve its cost-effective utilization. We sought to quantify potential redundancy in our brain MRI protocols. In this retrospective review, we aggregated 207 consecutive adults who underwent brain MRI and reviewed their medical records to document clinical indication, core diagnostic information provided by MRI, and its clinical impact. Contributory imaging abnormalities constituted positive core diagnostic information whereas absence of imaging abnormalities constituted negative core diagnostic information. The senior author selected core sequences deemed sufficient for extraction of core diagnostic information. For validating core sequences selection, four readers assessed the relative ease of extracting core diagnostic information from the core sequences. Potential redundancy was calculated by comparing the average number of core sequences to the average number of sequences obtained. Scanning had been performed using 9.4±2.8 sequences over 37.3±12.3 minutes. Core diagnostic information was deemed extractable from 2.1±1.1 core sequences, with an assumed scanning time of 8.6±4.8 minutes, reflecting a potential redundancy of 74.5%±19.1%. Potential redundancy was least in scans obtained for treatment planning (14.9%±25.7%) and highest in scans obtained for follow-up of benign diseases (81.4%±12.6%). In 97.4% of cases, all four readers considered core diagnostic information to be either easily extractable from core sequences or the ease to be equivalent to that from the entire study. With only one MRI lacking clinical impact (0.48%), overutilization did not seem to contribute to potential redundancy. High potential redundancy that can be targeted for more efficient scanner utilization exists in brain MRI protocols.

  7. Toxic Mixtures in Time-The Sequence Makes the Poison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashauer, Roman; O'Connor, Isabel; Escher, Beate I

    2017-03-07

    "The dose makes the poison". This principle assumes that once a chemical is cleared out of the organism (toxicokinetic recovery), it no longer has any effect. However, it overlooks the other process of re-establishing homeostasis, toxicodynamic recovery, which can be fast or slow depending on the chemical. Therefore, when organisms are exposed to two toxicants in sequence, the toxicity can differ if their order is reversed. We test this hypothesis with the freshwater crustacean Gammarus pulex and four toxicants that act on different targets (diazinon, propiconazole, 4,6-dinitro-o-cresol, 4-nitrobenzyl chloride). We found clearly different toxicity when the exposure order of two toxicants was reversed, while maintaining the same dose. Slow toxicodynamic recovery caused carry-over toxicity in subsequent exposures, thereby resulting in a sequence effect-but only when toxicodynamic recovery was slow relative to the interval between exposures. This suggests that carry-over toxicity is a useful proxy for organism fitness and that risk assessment methods should be revised as they currently could underestimate risk. We provide the first evidence that carry-over toxicity occurs among chemicals acting on different targets and when exposure is several days apart. It is therefore not only the dose that makes the poison but also the exposure sequence.

  8. Knowledge for the future - Time eats information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornwachs, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The need to pass knowledge on to future generations is not unique to radioactive waste management. Think, for instance, of chemical waste, space debris, the location of land mines, or the genetic code of manipulated organisms, etc.. In all these cases we have to handle the impacts and effects of technologies over the long term. The time frame of these effects surmounts the lifetime of one generation and more. In order to enable future generations to handle this precarious legacy we need to hand on suitable information. However, this is not enough; we have to facilitate the understanding of the very meaning of this information, too. This can be referred to as a 'wicked problem', since the legacy of the nuclear age is distributed all over the world and huge amounts of wastes have been accumulated. There is not yet any solution available which could reduce the half-life of nuclear waste on a large industrial scale. Information is constantly decaying, e.g. due to copy processes and the limited lifetime of information carriers such as paper, chemical, electronic and nano-storage technologies. For time frames greater than 1 000 years none of the present technologies seems to be long lasting enough or effective by itself. It can be shown that no presently known information and communication technology (ICT) can preserve written or electronically stored information over 4 000 years, say. The preservation effort would have to include the reception, deciphering, and the semantically correct understanding. The decay of information entails the decay of knowledge. This leads to a decrease of possibilities to act. However, we and future generations need this knowledge (including the basics of physics and relevant technology) in order to be able to take action in the future. This task is still unresolved, both for nuclear waste management and for other issues. One can only try to pass knowledge on to future generations via institutions. However, an organisational

  9. Changes of flora-information over time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib

    2014-01-01

    Changes in Flora-information over time can be divided into three different categories: (1) “Real changes” (species enter the region by natural dispersal or become extinct). (2) “Floristic changes” (species known from elsewhere are discovered). (3) “Taxonomic changes” (species are discovered...... to the Linnaean methods, but these methods were also applied to the flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea before the end of the 18th century. An intensive activity involving floristic and taxonomic changes took place in Ethiopia and Eritrea in the 19th century, particularly before ca. 1850, after which a period....... Recent studies of the Orchidaceae family in Scandinavia has demonstrated considerable changes in our information about that family in Scandinavia during the last 50 years, both real, floristic and taxonomic changes. Similar, or even greater, changes are to be expected in the flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea...

  10. Fisher information framework for time series modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, R. C.; Plastino, A.

    2017-08-01

    A robust prediction model invoking the Takens embedding theorem, whose working hypothesis is obtained via an inference procedure based on the minimum Fisher information principle, is presented. The coefficients of the ansatz, central to the working hypothesis satisfy a time independent Schrödinger-like equation in a vector setting. The inference of (i) the probability density function of the coefficients of the working hypothesis and (ii) the establishing of constraint driven pseudo-inverse condition for the modeling phase of the prediction scheme, is made, for the case of normal distributions, with the aid of the quantum mechanical virial theorem. The well-known reciprocity relations and the associated Legendre transform structure for the Fisher information measure (FIM, hereafter)-based model in a vector setting (with least square constraints) are self-consistently derived. These relations are demonstrated to yield an intriguing form of the FIM for the modeling phase, which defines the working hypothesis, solely in terms of the observed data. Cases for prediction employing time series' obtained from the: (i) the Mackey-Glass delay-differential equation, (ii) one ECG signal from the MIT-Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital (MIT-BIH) cardiac arrhythmia database, and (iii) one ECG signal from the Creighton University ventricular tachyarrhythmia database. The ECG samples were obtained from the Physionet online repository. These examples demonstrate the efficiency of the prediction model. Numerical examples for exemplary cases are provided.

  11. Interfacing real-time information with OILMAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howlett, E.; Jayko, K.; Spaulding, M.

    1993-01-01

    OILMAP is a state-of-the-art, microcomputer-based oil spill response system applicable to oil spill contingency planning and real-time response for any location in the world. OILMAP has a graphic user interface and was designed in a modular framework so that different spill models could be incorporated into the system, as well as a suite of sophisticated data management tools, without increasing the complexity of the user interface. The basic OILMAP configuration contains a surface trajectory model intended for rapid, first-order estimates of spill movement. A variety of additional models are available within the OILMAP shell to address issues such as weathering, cleanup activities, and probabilities of oiling. A simplified geographic information system (GIS) allows display and manipulation of point, line, and area data geographically referenced to the spill domain. The GIS can import raster data so that images collected by satellite and aerial photography may be displayed. Several new capabilities have been implemented for OILMAP that allow real-time data to be integrated. These features include linking with the OILTRACKER free-floating buoys via a global positioning system, linking of hydrodynamic data from the Ocean Data and Information Network, the Harvard ocean forecasting system, and SeaSonde radar, and the capability of importing spill observations from any remotely sensed data. A further link between OILMAP's GIS and spill models has been developed which allows model predictions to be corrected to observed oil locations while the model runs. 13 refs., 6 figs

  12. Financial time series analysis based on information categorization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qiang; Shang, Pengjian; Feng, Guochen

    2014-12-01

    The paper mainly applies the information categorization method to analyze the financial time series. The method is used to examine the similarity of different sequences by calculating the distances between them. We apply this method to quantify the similarity of different stock markets. And we report the results of similarity in US and Chinese stock markets in periods 1991-1998 (before the Asian currency crisis), 1999-2006 (after the Asian currency crisis and before the global financial crisis), and 2007-2013 (during and after global financial crisis) by using this method. The results show the difference of similarity between different stock markets in different time periods and the similarity of the two stock markets become larger after these two crises. Also we acquire the results of similarity of 10 stock indices in three areas; it means the method can distinguish different areas' markets from the phylogenetic trees. The results show that we can get satisfactory information from financial markets by this method. The information categorization method can not only be used in physiologic time series, but also in financial time series.

  13. Elman RNN based classification of proteins sequences on account of their mutual information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Pooja; Nath Pandey, Paras

    2012-10-21

    In the present work we have employed the method of estimating residue correlation within the protein sequences, by using the mutual information (MI) of adjacent residues, based on structural and solvent accessibility properties of amino acids. The long range correlation between nonadjacent residues is improved by constructing a mutual information vector (MIV) for a single protein sequence, like this each protein sequence is associated with its corresponding MIVs. These MIVs are given to Elman RNN to obtain the classification of protein sequences. The modeling power of MIV was shown to be significantly better, giving a new approach towards alignment free classification of protein sequences. We also conclude that sequence structural and solvent accessible property based MIVs are better predictor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Continuous- and Discrete-Time Stimulus Sequences for High Stimulus Rate Paradigm in Evoked Potential Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To obtain reliable transient auditory evoked potentials (AEPs from EEGs recorded using high stimulus rate (HSR paradigm, it is critical to design the stimulus sequences of appropriate frequency properties. Traditionally, the individual stimulus events in a stimulus sequence occur only at discrete time points dependent on the sampling frequency of the recording system and the duration of stimulus sequence. This dependency likely causes the implementation of suboptimal stimulus sequences, sacrificing the reliability of resulting AEPs. In this paper, we explicate the use of continuous-time stimulus sequence for HSR paradigm, which is independent of the discrete electroencephalogram (EEG recording system. We employ simulation studies to examine the applicability of the continuous-time stimulus sequences and the impacts of sampling frequency on AEPs in traditional studies using discrete-time design. Results from these studies show that the continuous-time sequences can offer better frequency properties and improve the reliability of recovered AEPs. Furthermore, we find that the errors in the recovered AEPs depend critically on the sampling frequencies of experimental systems, and their relationship can be fitted using a reciprocal function. As such, our study contributes to the literature by demonstrating the applicability and advantages of continuous-time stimulus sequences for HSR paradigm and by revealing the relationship between the reliability of AEPs and sampling frequencies of the experimental systems when discrete-time stimulus sequences are used in traditional manner for the HSR paradigm.

  15. Identifying Statistical Dependence in Genomic Sequences via Mutual Information Estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Szpankowski

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Questions of understanding and quantifying the representation and amount of information in organisms have become a central part of biological research, as they potentially hold the key to fundamental advances. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of information-theoretic tools for the task of identifying segments of biomolecules (DNA or RNA that are statistically correlated. We develop a precise and reliable methodology, based on the notion of mutual information, for finding and extracting statistical as well as structural dependencies. A simple threshold function is defined, and its use in quantifying the level of significance of dependencies between biological segments is explored. These tools are used in two specific applications. First, they are used for the identification of correlations between different parts of the maize zmSRp32 gene. There, we find significant dependencies between the 5′ untranslated region in zmSRp32 and its alternatively spliced exons. This observation may indicate the presence of as-yet unknown alternative splicing mechanisms or structural scaffolds. Second, using data from the FBI's combined DNA index system (CODIS, we demonstrate that our approach is particularly well suited for the problem of discovering short tandem repeats—an application of importance in genetic profiling.

  16. Retrieving rupture history using waveform inversions in time sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, L.; Xu, C.; Zhang, X.

    2017-12-01

    The rupture history of large earthquakes is generally regenerated using the waveform inversion through utilizing seismological waveform records. In the waveform inversion, based on the superposition principle, the rupture process is linearly parameterized. After discretizing the fault plane into sub-faults, the local source time function of each sub-fault is usually parameterized using the multi-time window method, e.g., mutual overlapped triangular functions. Then the forward waveform of each sub-fault is synthesized through convoluting the source time function with its Green function. According to the superposition principle, these forward waveforms generated from the fault plane are summarized in the recorded waveforms after aligning the arrival times. Then the slip history is retrieved using the waveform inversion method after the superposing of all forward waveforms for each correspond seismological waveform records. Apart from the isolation of these forward waveforms generated from each sub-fault, we also realize that these waveforms are gradually and sequentially superimposed in the recorded waveforms. Thus we proposed a idea that the rupture model is possibly detachable in sequent rupture times. According to the constrained waveform length method emphasized in our previous work, the length of inverted waveforms used in the waveform inversion is objectively constrained by the rupture velocity and rise time. And one essential prior condition is the predetermined fault plane that limits the duration of rupture time, which means the waveform inversion is restricted in a pre-set rupture duration time. Therefore, we proposed a strategy to inverse the rupture process sequentially using the progressively shift rupture times as the rupture front expanding in the fault plane. And we have designed a simulation inversion to test the feasibility of the method. Our test result shows the prospect of this idea that requiring furthermore investigation.

  17. Sequencing games with Just-in-Time arrival, and related games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohmann, E.R.M.A.; Borm, P.E.M.; Slikker, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper sequencing situations with Just-in-Time (JiT) arrival are introduced. This new type of one-machine sequencing situations assumes that a job is available to be handled by the machine as soon as its predecessor is finished. A basic predecessor dependent set-up time is incorporated in the

  18. The use of synthetic input sequences in time series modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Dair Jose de; Letellier, Christophe; Gomes, Murilo E.D.; Aguirre, Luis A.

    2008-01-01

    In many situations time series models obtained from noise-like data settle to trivial solutions under iteration. This Letter proposes a way of producing a synthetic (dummy) input, that is included to prevent the model from settling down to a trivial solution, while maintaining features of the original signal. Simulated benchmark models and a real time series of RR intervals from an ECG are used to illustrate the procedure

  19. Accessible surface area of proteins from purely sequence information and the importance of global features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraggi, Eshel; Zhou, Yaoqi; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    We present a new approach for predicting the accessible surface area of proteins. The novelty of this approach lies in not using residue mutation profiles generated by multiple sequence alignments as descriptive inputs. Rather, sequential window information and the global monomer and dimer compositions of the chain are used. We find that much of the lost accuracy due to the elimination of evolutionary information is recouped by the use of global features. Furthermore, this new predictor produces similar results for proteins with or without sequence homologs deposited in the Protein Data Bank, and hence shows generalizability. Finally, these predictions are obtained in a small fraction (1/1000) of the time required to run mutation profile based prediction. All these factors indicate the possible usability of this work in de-novo protein structure prediction and in de-novo protein design using iterative searches. Funded in part by the financial support of the National Institutes of Health through Grants R01GM072014 and R01GM073095, and the National Science Foundation through Grant NSF MCB 1071785.

  20. Time sequence determination of parent–daughter radionuclides using gamma-spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, J. L.; Britton, R. E.; Abrecht, D. G.; Davies, A. V.

    2017-05-06

    The acquisition of time-stamped list (TLIST) data provides additional information useful to gamma-spectrometry analysis. A novel technique is described that uses non-linear least-squares fitting and the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm to simultaneously determine parent-daughter atoms from time sequence measurements of only the daughter radionuclide. This has been demonstrated for the radioactive decay of short-lived radon progeny (214Pb/214Bi, 212Pb/212Bi) described using the Bateman first-order differential equation. The calculated atoms are in excellent agreement with measured atoms, with a difference of 1.3 – 4.8% for parent atoms and 2.4% - 10.4% for daughter atoms. Measurements are also reported with reduced uncertainty. The technique has potential to redefine gamma-spectrometry analysis.

  1. DeepProbe: Information Directed Sequence Understanding and Chatbot Design via Recurrent Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Zi; Chang, Keng-hao; Zhang, Ruofei

    2017-01-01

    Information extraction and user intention identification are central topics in modern query understanding and recommendation systems. In this paper, we propose DeepProbe, a generic information-directed interaction framework which is built around an attention-based sequence to sequence (seq2seq) recurrent neural network. DeepProbe can rephrase, evaluate, and even actively ask questions, leveraging the generative ability and likelihood estimation made possible by seq2seq models. DeepProbe makes...

  2. Time and activity sequence prediction of business process instances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polato, Mirko; Sperduti, Alessandro; Burattin, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    The ability to know in advance the trend of running process instances, with respect to different features, such as the expected completion time, would allow business managers to timely counteract to undesired situations, in order to prevent losses. Therefore, the ability to accurately predict...... future features of running business process instances would be a very helpful aid when managing processes, especially under service level agreement constraints. However, making such accurate forecasts is not easy: many factors may influence the predicted features. Many approaches have been proposed...

  3. Wet-etch sequence optimisation incorporating time dependent chemical maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruif, B.J. de

    2015-01-01

    Wafer fabrication is the major cost contributor in semiconductor manufacturing. One of the steps in the fabrication is the removal of exposed layers in an automatic wet-etch station with chemicals. In time, these chemicals get polluted and their effectiveness decreases. Therefore, the chemicals in

  4. Subfamily logos: visualization of sequence deviations at alignment positions with high information content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beitz Eric

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition of relevant sequence deviations can be valuable for elucidating functional differences between protein subfamilies. Interesting residues at highly conserved positions can then be mutated and experimentally analyzed. However, identification of such sites is tedious because automated approaches are scarce. Results Subfamily logos visualize subfamily-specific sequence deviations. The display is similar to classical sequence logos but extends into the negative range. Positive, upright characters correspond to residues which are characteristic for the subfamily, negative, upside-down characters to residues typical for the remaining sequences. The symbol height is adjusted to the information content of the alignment position. Residues which are conserved throughout do not appear. Conclusion Subfamily logos provide an intuitive display of relevant sequence deviations. The method has proven to be valid using a set of 135 aligned aquaporin sequences in which established subfamily-specific positions were readily identified by the algorithm.

  5. MIPS: a database for protein sequences, homology data and yeast genome information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, H W; Albermann, K; Heumann, K; Liebl, S; Pfeiffer, F

    1997-01-01

    The MIPS group (Martinsried Institute for Protein Sequences) at the Max-Planck-Institute for Biochemistry, Martinsried near Munich, Germany, collects, processes and distributes protein sequence data within the framework of the tripartite association of the PIR-International Protein Sequence Database (,). MIPS contributes nearly 50% of the data input to the PIR-International Protein Sequence Database. The database is distributed on CD-ROM together with PATCHX, an exhaustive supplement of unique, unverified protein sequences from external sources compiled by MIPS. Through its WWW server (http://www.mips.biochem.mpg.de/ ) MIPS permits internet access to sequence databases, homology data and to yeast genome information. (i) Sequence similarity results from the FASTA program () are stored in the FASTA database for all proteins from PIR-International and PATCHX. The database is dynamically maintained and permits instant access to FASTA results. (ii) Starting with FASTA database queries, proteins have been classified into families and superfamilies (PROT-FAM). (iii) The HPT (hashed position tree) data structure () developed at MIPS is a new approach for rapid sequence and pattern searching. (iv) MIPS provides access to the sequence and annotation of the complete yeast genome (), the functional classification of yeast genes (FunCat) and its graphical display, the 'Genome Browser' (). A CD-ROM based on the JAVA programming language providing dynamic interactive access to the yeast genome and the related protein sequences has been compiled and is available on request. PMID:9016498

  6. A method for partitioning the information contained in a protein sequence between its structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possenti, Andrea; Vendruscolo, Michele; Camilloni, Carlo; Tiana, Guido

    2018-05-23

    Proteins employ the information stored in the genetic code and translated into their sequences to carry out well-defined functions in the cellular environment. The possibility to encode for such functions is controlled by the balance between the amount of information supplied by the sequence and that left after that the protein has folded into its structure. We study the amount of information necessary to specify the protein structure, providing an estimate that keeps into account the thermodynamic properties of protein folding. We thus show that the information remaining in the protein sequence after encoding for its structure (the 'information gap') is very close to what needed to encode for its function and interactions. Then, by predicting the information gap directly from the protein sequence, we show that it may be possible to use these insights from information theory to discriminate between ordered and disordered proteins, to identify unknown functions, and to optimize artificially-designed protein sequences. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Field-based species identification in eukaryotes using real-time nanopore sequencing.

    OpenAIRE

    Papadopulos, Alexander; Devey, Dion; Helmstetter, Andrew; Parker, Joe

    2017-01-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing and informatics have revolutionised biology over the past four decades, but technological limitations have left many applications unexplored. Recently, portable, real-time, nanopore sequencing (RTnS) has become available. This offers opportunities to rapidly collect and analyse genomic data anywhere. However, the generation of datasets from large, complex genomes has been constrained to laboratories. The portability and long DNA sequences of RTnS offer great potenti...

  8. Ten Times More Information in Your Real-Time TM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, David; Moschini, Ugo

    2012-01-01

    One way of estimating the information content of a message is to compress it. Previous papers have shown that the information content of housekeeping telemetry packets is quite low as when they are stored in files they compress extremely well. Compressing packets and sending more of them in the same

  9. Informational and linguistic analysis of large genomic sequence collections via efficient Hadoop cluster algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro Petrillo, Umberto; Roscigno, Gianluca; Cattaneo, Giuseppe; Giancarlo, Raffaele

    2018-06-01

    Information theoretic and compositional/linguistic analysis of genomes have a central role in bioinformatics, even more so since the associated methodologies are becoming very valuable also for epigenomic and meta-genomic studies. The kernel of those methods is based on the collection of k-mer statistics, i.e. how many times each k-mer in {A,C,G,T}k occurs in a DNA sequence. Although this problem is computationally very simple and efficiently solvable on a conventional computer, the sheer amount of data available now in applications demands to resort to parallel and distributed computing. Indeed, those type of algorithms have been developed to collect k-mer statistics in the realm of genome assembly. However, they are so specialized to this domain that they do not extend easily to the computation of informational and linguistic indices, concurrently on sets of genomes. Following the well-established approach in many disciplines, and with a growing success also in bioinformatics, to resort to MapReduce and Hadoop to deal with 'Big Data' problems, we present KCH, the first set of MapReduce algorithms able to perform concurrently informational and linguistic analysis of large collections of genomic sequences on a Hadoop cluster. The benchmarking of KCH that we provide indicates that it is quite effective and versatile. It is also competitive with respect to the parallel and distributed algorithms highly specialized to k-mer statistics collection for genome assembly problems. In conclusion, KCH is a much needed addition to the growing number of algorithms and tools that use MapReduce for bioinformatics core applications. The software, including instructions for running it over Amazon AWS, as well as the datasets are available at http://www.di-srv.unisa.it/KCH. umberto.ferraro@uniroma1.it. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  10. Magnetic resonance for T-staging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The most informative pair of sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Kam Y.; Kan, Wai K.; Sze, Wai M.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the most informative pair of sequences in magnetic resonance (MR) for T-staging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The MR images of 134 patients with newly diagnosed NRC, from 1996 to 2002, were retrospectively reviewed. All the patients were scanned using 1.5 Tesla MR systems. The images of the nasopharynx were reviewed by two qualified radiologists to determine the positive findings and the T-stage by Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) (6th edition) System, using each sequence separately. The T-stage derived from a single MR sequence was then compared with the T-stage based on the five selected sequences to assess the number and percentage of patients who were being understaged. Therefore, the overall percentage accuracy of each single sequence could be determined. A pair of sequences providing information to achieve almost 100% diagnostic accuracy was then derived. The overall percentage accuracy of five individual sequences of the nasopharynx is as follows: contrast-enhanced (CE) fat suppression (FS) axial T1 (94.8%), CE FS coronal T1 (88.1%), FS axial T2 (85.8%), non-contrast enhanced (NE) axial T1 (78.4%) and NE coronal T1 (77.6%). CE FS axial T1 has the best accuracy. All the structures that are missed in CE FS axial T1 which lead to apparent understaging, are appreciated in NE axial T1-weighted images. Individual sequences supplement each other in the NPC staging. CE FS axial T1 is the most informative individual sequence. Combination of CE FS axial T1 and NE axial T1 of the nasopharynx provides sufficient information to achieve almost 100% diagnostic accuracy in T-staging; therefore, both should be included in the MR-staging protocol. (author)

  11. The role of INGVterremoti blog in information management during the earthquake sequence in central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Pignone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the role the INGVterremoti blog in information management during the first part of the earthquake sequence in central Italy (August 24 to September 30. In the last four years, we have been working on the INGVterremoti blog in order to provide quick updates on the ongoing seismic activity in Italy and in-depth scientific information. These include articles on specific historical earthquakes, seismic hazard, geological interpretations, source models from different type of data, effects at the surface, and so on. We have delivered information in quasi-real-time also about all the recent magnitude M≥4.0 earthquakes in Italy, the strongest events in the Mediterranean and in the world. During the 2016 central Italy, the INGVterremoti blog has continuously released information about seismic sequences with three types of posts: i updates on the ongoing seismic activity; ii reports on the activities carried out by the INGV teams in the field and any other working groups; iii in-depth scientific articles describing some specific analysis and results. All the blog posts have been shared automatically and in real time on the other social media of the INGVterremoti platform, also to counter the bad information and to fight rumors. These include Facebook, Twitter and INGVterremoti App on IOS and Android. As well, both the main INGV home page (http://www.ingv.it and the INGV earthquake portal (http://terremoti.ingv.it have published the contents of the blog on dedicated pages that were fed automatically. The work done day by day on the INGVterremoti blog has been coordinated with the INGV Press Office that has written several press releases based on the contents of the blog. Since August 24, 53 articles were published on the blog they have had more than 1.9 million views and 1 million visitors. The peak in the number of views, which was more than 800,000 in a single day, was registered on August 24, 2016, following the M 6

  12. Time-Resolved Transposon Insertion Sequencing Reveals Genome-Wide Fitness Dynamics during Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanhua Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Transposon insertion sequencing (TIS is a powerful high-throughput genetic technique that is transforming functional genomics in prokaryotes, because it enables genome-wide mapping of the determinants of fitness. However, current approaches for analyzing TIS data assume that selective pressures are constant over time and thus do not yield information regarding changes in the genetic requirements for growth in dynamic environments (e.g., during infection. Here, we describe structured analysis of TIS data collected as a time series, termed pattern analysis of conditional essentiality (PACE. From a temporal series of TIS data, PACE derives a quantitative assessment of each mutant’s fitness over the course of an experiment and identifies mutants with related fitness profiles. In so doing, PACE circumvents major limitations of existing methodologies, specifically the need for artificial effect size thresholds and enumeration of bacterial population expansion. We used PACE to analyze TIS samples of Edwardsiella piscicida (a fish pathogen collected over a 2-week infection period from a natural host (the flatfish turbot. PACE uncovered more genes that affect E. piscicida’s fitness in vivo than were detected using a cutoff at a terminal sampling point, and it identified subpopulations of mutants with distinct fitness profiles, one of which informed the design of new live vaccine candidates. Overall, PACE enables efficient mining of time series TIS data and enhances the power and sensitivity of TIS-based analyses.

  13. Property - preserving convergent sequences of invariant sets for linear discrete - time systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Athanasopoulos, N.; Lazar, M.; Bitsoris, G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: New sequences of monotonically increasing sets are introduced, for linear discrete-time systems subject to input and state constraints. The elements of the set sequences are controlled invariant and admissible regions of stabilizability. They are generated from the iterative application of

  14. MR pulse sequences for selective relaxation time measurements: a phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Jensen, M

    1990-01-01

    a Siemens Magnetom wholebody magnetic resonance scanner operating at 1.5 Tesla was used. For comparison six imaging pulse sequences for relaxation time measurements were tested on the same phantom. The spectroscopic pulse sequences all had an accuracy better than 10% of the reference values....

  15. Using timing information in speaker verification

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Heerden, CJ

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of temporal information as a feature for use in speaker verification systems. The relevance of temporal information in a speaker’s utterances is investigated, both with regard to improving the robustness of modern...

  16. Time-Resolved Transposon Insertion Sequencing Reveals Genome-Wide Fitness Dynamics during Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guanhua; Billings, Gabriel; Hubbard, Troy P; Park, Joseph S; Yin Leung, Ka; Liu, Qin; Davis, Brigid M; Zhang, Yuanxing; Wang, Qiyao; Waldor, Matthew K

    2017-10-03

    Transposon insertion sequencing (TIS) is a powerful high-throughput genetic technique that is transforming functional genomics in prokaryotes, because it enables genome-wide mapping of the determinants of fitness. However, current approaches for analyzing TIS data assume that selective pressures are constant over time and thus do not yield information regarding changes in the genetic requirements for growth in dynamic environments (e.g., during infection). Here, we describe structured analysis of TIS data collected as a time series, termed pattern analysis of conditional essentiality (PACE). From a temporal series of TIS data, PACE derives a quantitative assessment of each mutant's fitness over the course of an experiment and identifies mutants with related fitness profiles. In so doing, PACE circumvents major limitations of existing methodologies, specifically the need for artificial effect size thresholds and enumeration of bacterial population expansion. We used PACE to analyze TIS samples of Edwardsiella piscicida (a fish pathogen) collected over a 2-week infection period from a natural host (the flatfish turbot). PACE uncovered more genes that affect E. piscicida 's fitness in vivo than were detected using a cutoff at a terminal sampling point, and it identified subpopulations of mutants with distinct fitness profiles, one of which informed the design of new live vaccine candidates. Overall, PACE enables efficient mining of time series TIS data and enhances the power and sensitivity of TIS-based analyses. IMPORTANCE Transposon insertion sequencing (TIS) enables genome-wide mapping of the genetic determinants of fitness, typically based on observations at a single sampling point. Here, we move beyond analysis of endpoint TIS data to create a framework for analysis of time series TIS data, termed pattern analysis of conditional essentiality (PACE). We applied PACE to identify genes that contribute to colonization of a natural host by the fish pathogen

  17. FTA real-time transit information assessment : white paper on literature review of real-time transit information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real-time transit information systems are key technology applications within the transit industry designed to provide better customer service by disseminating timely and accurate information. Riders use this information to make various decisions abou...

  18. 76 FR 42536 - Real-Time System Management Information Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ...-Time System Management Information Program AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION... Real-Time System Management Information Program and general information about current and planned... establishing requirements for the Real-Time System Management Information Program on November 8, 2010, at 75 FR...

  19. 75 FR 68418 - Real-Time System Management Information Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-08

    ...-Time System Management Information Program AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION...) to establish a Real-Time System Management Information Program that provides, in all States, the... traveler information. The purposes of the Real-Time System Management Information Program are to: (1...

  20. ESPRIT-Forest: Parallel clustering of massive amplicon sequence data in subquadratic time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yunpeng; Zheng, Wei; Yao, Jin; Yang, Yujie; Mai, Volker; Mao, Qi; Sun, Yijun

    2017-04-01

    The rapid development of sequencing technology has led to an explosive accumulation of genomic sequence data. Clustering is often the first step to perform in sequence analysis, and hierarchical clustering is one of the most commonly used approaches for this purpose. However, it is currently computationally expensive to perform hierarchical clustering of extremely large sequence datasets due to its quadratic time and space complexities. In this paper we developed a new algorithm called ESPRIT-Forest for parallel hierarchical clustering of sequences. The algorithm achieves subquadratic time and space complexity and maintains a high clustering accuracy comparable to the standard method. The basic idea is to organize sequences into a pseudo-metric based partitioning tree for sub-linear time searching of nearest neighbors, and then use a new multiple-pair merging criterion to construct clusters in parallel using multiple threads. The new algorithm was tested on the human microbiome project (HMP) dataset, currently one of the largest published microbial 16S rRNA sequence dataset. Our experiment demonstrated that with the power of parallel computing it is now compu- tationally feasible to perform hierarchical clustering analysis of tens of millions of sequences. The software is available at http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/∼yijunsun/lab/ESPRIT-Forest.html.

  1. Asynchronous, Decentralized DS-CDMA Using Feedback-Controlled Spreading Sequences for Time-Dispersive Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Teruhiko; Chiba, Kazuki; Hamamura, Masanori; Tachikawa, Shin'ichi

    We propose a novel asynchronous direct-sequence codedivision multiple access (DS-CDMA) using feedback-controlled spreading sequences (FCSSs) (FCSS/DS-CDMA). At the receiver of FCSS/DS-CDMA, the code-orthogonalizing filter (COF) produces a spreading sequence, and the receiver returns the spreading sequence to the transmitter. Then the transmitter uses the spreading sequence as its updated version. The performance of FCSS/DS-CDMA is evaluated over time-dispersive channels. The results indicate that FCSS/DS-CDMA greatly suppresses both the intersymbol interference (ISI) and multiple access interference (MAI) over time-invariant channels. FCSS/DS-CDMA is applicable to the decentralized multiple access.

  2. SPARSE: quadratic time simultaneous alignment and folding of RNAs without sequence-based heuristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Sebastian; Otto, Christina; Miladi, Milad; Möhl, Mathias; Backofen, Rolf

    2015-08-01

    RNA-Seq experiments have revealed a multitude of novel ncRNAs. The gold standard for their analysis based on simultaneous alignment and folding suffers from extreme time complexity of [Formula: see text]. Subsequently, numerous faster 'Sankoff-style' approaches have been suggested. Commonly, the performance of such methods relies on sequence-based heuristics that restrict the search space to optimal or near-optimal sequence alignments; however, the accuracy of sequence-based methods breaks down for RNAs with sequence identities below 60%. Alignment approaches like LocARNA that do not require sequence-based heuristics, have been limited to high complexity ([Formula: see text] quartic time). Breaking this barrier, we introduce the novel Sankoff-style algorithm 'sparsified prediction and alignment of RNAs based on their structure ensembles (SPARSE)', which runs in quadratic time without sequence-based heuristics. To achieve this low complexity, on par with sequence alignment algorithms, SPARSE features strong sparsification based on structural properties of the RNA ensembles. Following PMcomp, SPARSE gains further speed-up from lightweight energy computation. Although all existing lightweight Sankoff-style methods restrict Sankoff's original model by disallowing loop deletions and insertions, SPARSE transfers the Sankoff algorithm to the lightweight energy model completely for the first time. Compared with LocARNA, SPARSE achieves similar alignment and better folding quality in significantly less time (speedup: 3.7). At similar run-time, it aligns low sequence identity instances substantially more accurate than RAF, which uses sequence-based heuristics. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  3. Importance of the temporal structure of movement sequences on the ability of monkeys to use serial order information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffains, Marc; Legallet, Eric; Apicella, Paul

    2011-10-01

    The capacity to acquire motor skills through repeated practice of a sequence of movements underlies many everyday activities. Extensive research in humans has dealt with the importance of spatial and temporal factors on motor sequence learning, standing in contrast to the few studies available in animals, particularly in nonhuman primates. In the present experiments, we studied the effect of the serial order of stimuli and associated movements in macaque monkeys overtrained to make arm-reaching movements in response to spatially distinct visual targets. Under different conditions, the temporal structure of the motor sequence was varied by changing the duration of the interval between successive target stimuli or by adding a cue that reliably signaled the onset time of the forthcoming target stimulus. In each condition, the extent to which the monkeys are sensitive to the spatial regularities was assessed by comparing performance when stimulus locations follow a repeating sequence, as opposed to a random sequence. We observed no improvement in task performance on repeated sequence blocks, compared to random sequence blocks, when target stimuli are relatively distant from each other in time. On the other hand, the shortening of the time interval between successive target stimuli or, more efficiently, the addition of a temporal cue before the target stimulus yielded a performance advantage under repeated sequence, reflected in a decrease in the latency of arm and saccadic eye movements accompanied by an increased tendency for eye movements to occur in an anticipatory manner. Contrary to the effects on movement initiation, the serial order of stimuli and movements did not markedly affect the execution of movement. Moreover, the location of a given target in the random sequence influenced task performance based on the location of the preceding target, monkeys being faster in responding as a result of familiarity caused by extensive practice with some target transitions

  4. Prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities using primary sequence information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitish K Mishra

    Full Text Available Membrane transport proteins (transporters move hydrophilic substrates across hydrophobic membranes and play vital roles in most cellular functions. Transporters represent a diverse group of proteins that differ in topology, energy coupling mechanism, and substrate specificity as well as sequence similarity. Among the functional annotations of transporters, information about their transporting substrates is especially important. The experimental identification and characterization of transporters is currently costly and time-consuming. The development of robust bioinformatics-based methods for the prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities is therefore an important and urgent task.Support vector machine (SVM-based computational models, which comprehensively utilize integrative protein sequence features such as amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, physico-chemical composition, biochemical composition, and position-specific scoring matrices (PSSM, were developed to predict the substrate specificity of seven transporter classes: amino acid, anion, cation, electron, protein/mRNA, sugar, and other transporters. An additional model to differentiate transporters from non-transporters was also developed. Among the developed models, the biochemical composition and PSSM hybrid model outperformed other models and achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 76.69% with a Mathews correlation coefficient (MCC of 0.49 and a receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC of 0.833 on our main dataset. This model also achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 78.88% and MCC of 0.41 on an independent dataset.Our analyses suggest that evolutionary information (i.e., the PSSM and the AAIndex are key features for the substrate specificity prediction of transport proteins. In comparison, similarity-based methods such as BLAST, PSI-BLAST, and hidden Markov models do not provide accurate predictions

  5. Applications of statistical physics and information theory to the analysis of DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Ivo

    2000-10-01

    DNA carries the genetic information of most living organisms, and the of genome projects is to uncover that genetic information. One basic task in the analysis of DNA sequences is the recognition of protein coding genes. Powerful computer programs for gene recognition have been developed, but most of them are based on statistical patterns that vary from species to species. In this thesis I address the question if there exist universal statistical patterns that are different in coding and noncoding DNA of all living species, regardless of their phylogenetic origin. In search for such species-independent patterns I study the mutual information function of genomic DNA sequences, and find that it shows persistent period-three oscillations. To understand the biological origin of the observed period-three oscillations, I compare the mutual information function of genomic DNA sequences to the mutual information function of stochastic model sequences. I find that the pseudo-exon model is able to reproduce the mutual information function of genomic DNA sequences. Moreover, I find that a generalization of the pseudo-exon model can connect the existence and the functional form of long-range correlations to the presence and the length distributions of coding and noncoding regions. Based on these theoretical studies I am able to find an information-theoretical quantity, the average mutual information (AMI), whose probability distributions are significantly different in coding and noncoding DNA, while they are almost identical in all studied species. These findings show that there exist universal statistical patterns that are different in coding and noncoding DNA of all studied species, and they suggest that the AMI may be used to identify genes in different living species, irrespective of their taxonomic origin.

  6. Internet-accessible real-time weather information system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, R.G.P.; Joseph, A.; Desa, E.; Mehra, P.; Desa, E.; Gouveia, A.D.

    An internet-accessible real-time weather information system has been developed. This system provides real-time accessibility to weather information from a multitude of spatially distributed weather stations. The Internet connectivity also offers...

  7. Correction of projective distortion in long-image-sequence mosaics without prior information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenhui; Mao, Hongwei; Abousleman, Glen; Si, Jennie

    2010-04-01

    Image mosaicking is the process of piecing together multiple video frames or still images from a moving camera to form a wide-area or panoramic view of the scene being imaged. Mosaics have widespread applications in many areas such as security surveillance, remote sensing, geographical exploration, agricultural field surveillance, virtual reality, digital video, and medical image analysis, among others. When mosaicking a large number of still images or video frames, the quality of the resulting mosaic is compromised by projective distortion. That is, during the mosaicking process, the image frames that are transformed and pasted to the mosaic become significantly scaled down and appear out of proportion with respect to the mosaic. As more frames continue to be transformed, important target information in the frames can be lost since the transformed frames become too small, which eventually leads to the inability to continue further. Some projective distortion correction techniques make use of prior information such as GPS information embedded within the image, or camera internal and external parameters. Alternatively, this paper proposes a new algorithm to reduce the projective distortion without using any prior information whatsoever. Based on the analysis of the projective distortion, we approximate the projective matrix that describes the transformation between image frames using an affine model. Using singular value decomposition, we can deduce the affine model scaling factor that is usually very close to 1. By resetting the image scale of the affine model to 1, the transformed image size remains unchanged. Even though the proposed correction introduces some error in the image matching, this error is typically acceptable and more importantly, the final mosaic preserves the original image size after transformation. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this new correction algorithm on two real-world unmanned air vehicle (UAV) sequences. The proposed method is

  8. Single Machine Scheduling and Due Date Assignment with Past-Sequence-Dependent Setup Time and Position-Dependent Processing Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Li Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers single machine scheduling and due date assignment with setup time. The setup time is proportional to the length of the already processed jobs; that is, the setup time is past-sequence-dependent (p-s-d. It is assumed that a job's processing time depends on its position in a sequence. The objective functions include total earliness, the weighted number of tardy jobs, and the cost of due date assignment. We analyze these problems with two different due date assignment methods. We first consider the model with job-dependent position effects. For each case, by converting the problem to a series of assignment problems, we proved that the problems can be solved in On4 time. For the model with job-independent position effects, we proved that the problems can be solved in On3 time by providing a dynamic programming algorithm.

  9. Real-time DNA barcoding in a rainforest using nanopore sequencing: opportunities for rapid biodiversity assessments and local capacity building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantz, Aaron; Peñafiel, Nicolás; Arteaga, Alejandro; Bustamante, Lucas; Pichardo, Frank; Coloma, Luis A; Barrio-Amorós, César L; Salazar-Valenzuela, David; Prost, Stefan

    2018-04-01

    Advancements in portable scientific instruments provide promising avenues to expedite field work in order to understand the diverse array of organisms that inhabit our planet. Here, we tested the feasibility for in situ molecular analyses of endemic fauna using a portable laboratory fitting within a single backpack in one of the world's most imperiled biodiversity hotspots, the Ecuadorian Chocó rainforest. We used portable equipment, including the MinION nanopore sequencer (Oxford Nanopore Technologies) and the miniPCR (miniPCR), to perform DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction amplification, and real-time DNA barcoding of reptile specimens in the field. We demonstrate that nanopore sequencing can be implemented in a remote tropical forest to quickly and accurately identify species using DNA barcoding, as we generated consensus sequences for species resolution with an accuracy of >99% in less than 24 hours after collecting specimens. The flexibility of our mobile laboratory further allowed us to generate sequence information at the Universidad Tecnológica Indoamérica in Quito for rare, endangered, and undescribed species. This includes the recently rediscovered Jambato toad, which was thought to be extinct for 28 years. Sequences generated on the MinION required as few as 30 reads to achieve high accuracy relative to Sanger sequencing, and with further multiplexing of samples, nanopore sequencing can become a cost-effective approach for rapid and portable DNA barcoding. Overall, we establish how mobile laboratories and nanopore sequencing can help to accelerate species identification in remote areas to aid in conservation efforts and be applied to research facilities in developing countries. This opens up possibilities for biodiversity studies by promoting local research capacity building, teaching nonspecialists and students about the environment, tackling wildlife crime, and promoting conservation via research-focused ecotourism.

  10. Acting in Good Time – Conceptual Reflections on the Sequencing of Political Reform Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Beyer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Times New Roman', serif; font-size: small;">Thus far, the sequencing of political reform processes has been discussed on a separate basis in the context of different scientific debates. Existing analysis in macroeconomics and democracy theory focuses on shock-therapeutic versus gradual reform policies, the succession of specific reform steps or the right timing of reforms. An analytical approach to sequences has been elaborated. Theoretical concepts of social change, which refer to path dependence or the punctuated development of historical sequences, have evolved in the context of institutionalist research. The present article summarises the state of research and extends it with conceptual reflections on the motivation of sequential political action, which can then serve as a starting point for differentiation between sequencing processes in further research.

  11. MIToS.jl: mutual information tools for protein sequence analysis in the Julia language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zea, Diego J.; Anfossi, Diego; Nielsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Motivation: MIToS is an environment for mutual information analysis and a framework for protein multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) and protein structures (PDB) management in Julia language. It integrates sequence and structural information through SIFTS, making Pfam MSAs analysis straightforward....... MIToS streamlines the implementation of any measure calculated from residue contingency tables and its optimization and testing in terms of protein contact prediction. As an example, we implemented and tested a BLOSUM62-based pseudo-count strategy in mutual information analysis. Availability...... and Implementation: The software is totally implemented in Julia and supported for Linux, OS X and Windows. It’s freely available on GitHub under MIT license: http://mitos.leloir.org.ar. Contacts:diegozea@gmail.com or cmb@leloir.org.ar Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics...

  12. Evaluation of automatic time gain compensated in-vivo ultrasound sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Martin Christian; Røeboe, Kristian Frostholm; Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    2010-01-01

    algorithm for automatic time gain compensation (TGC) on in-vivo ultrasound sequences. Forty ultrasound sequences were recorded from the abdomen of two healthy volunteers. Each sequence of 5 sec was recorded with 40 frames/sec. Post processing each frame, a mask is created wherein anechoic and hyper echoic...... regions are mapped. Near field hyper intensity and deep areas with low signal strength are also included in the mask. The algorithm uses this mask to create a parallel image where anechoic and hyper echoic regions are eliminated. From this, the mean power is calculated as a function of depth. The power...

  13. Sequencing the real time of the elderly: Evidence from South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erofili Grapsa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Understanding how the elderly in developing countries spend their time has received little attention. Moreover, the potential of time use data to discern variation in activity patterns has not been fully realized by methods which use a mean added time approach. Objective: To uncover patterns of time use among the elderly (60 years and older in South Africa by applying an innovative methodology that incorporates the timing, duration, and frequency of activities in the analysis. Methods: We use sequence analysis, which treats the daily series of activities of each individual as a sequence, and cluster analysis, to group these sequences into common clusters of time use behaviour. We then estimate multinomial logit regressions to identify the characteristics of the elderly which predict cluster membership. Results: We find that the time use behaviour of the elderly in South Africa can be divided into five distinct clusters, according to the relative importance in their day of personal care, household maintenance, work, mass media, and social or cultural activities. In comparison to men, women are overrepresented in the cluster where household work dominates, while they are underrepresented in the cluster of the elderly who engage in production work. A range of other individual and household characteristics are also important in predicting cluster membership. Contribution: Sequence and cluster analysis permit a nuanced examination of the differences and commonalities in time use patterns among the elderly in South Africa. There is considerable potential to extend these methods to other studies of time use behaviour.

  14. Light water reactor sequence timing: its significance to probabilistic safety assessment modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bley, D.C.; Buttemer, D.R.; Stetkar, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper examines event sequence timing in light water reactor plants from the viewpoint of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The analytical basis for the ideas presented here come primarily from the authors' work in support of more than 20 PSA studies over the past several years. Timing effects are important for establishing success criteria for support and safety system response and for identifying the time available for operator recovery actions. The principal results of this paper are as follows: 1. Analysis of event sequence timing is necessary for meaningful probabilistic safety assessment - both the success criteria for systems performance and the probability of recovery are tightly linked to sequence timing. 2. Simple engineering analyses based on first principles are often sufficient to provide adequate resolution of the time available for recovery of PSA scenarios. Only those parameters that influence sequence timing and its variability and uncertainty need be examined. 3. Time available for recovery is the basic criterion for evaluation of human performance, whether time is an explicit parameter of the operator actions analysis or not. (author)

  15. Sequencing Genetics Information: Integrating Data into Information Literacy for Undergraduate Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Don

    2010-01-01

    This case study describes an information literacy lab for an undergraduate biology course that leads students through a range of resources to discover aspects of genetic information. The lab provides over 560 students per semester with the opportunity for hands-on exploration of resources in steps that simulate the pathways of higher-level…

  16. A Teaching-Learning Sequence of Colour Informed by History and Philosophy of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurício, Paulo; Valente, Bianor; Chagas, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present a teaching-learning sequence on colour intended to a pre-service elementary teacher programme informed by History and Philosophy of Science. Working in a socio-constructivist framework, we made an excursion on the history of colour. Our excursion through history of colour, as well as the reported misconception on colour…

  17. Information-Theoretic Properties of Auditory Sequences Dynamically Influence Expectation and Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agres, Kat; Abdallah, Samer; Pearce, Marcus

    2018-01-01

    A basic function of cognition is to detect regularities in sensory input to facilitate the prediction and recognition of future events. It has been proposed that these implicit expectations arise from an internal predictive coding model, based on knowledge acquired through processes such as statistical learning, but it is unclear how different types of statistical information affect listeners' memory for auditory stimuli. We used a combination of behavioral and computational methods to investigate memory for non-linguistic auditory sequences. Participants repeatedly heard tone sequences varying systematically in their information-theoretic properties. Expectedness ratings of tones were collected during three listening sessions, and a recognition memory test was given after each session. Information-theoretic measures of sequential predictability significantly influenced listeners' expectedness ratings, and variations in these properties had a significant impact on memory performance. Predictable sequences yielded increasingly better memory performance with increasing exposure. Computational simulations using a probabilistic model of auditory expectation suggest that listeners dynamically formed a new, and increasingly accurate, implicit cognitive model of the information-theoretic structure of the sequences throughout the experimental session. Copyright © 2017 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  18. A DNA sequence element that advances replication origin activation time in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Thomas J; Kolor, Katherine; Fangman, Walton L; Brewer, Bonita J; Raghuraman, M K

    2013-11-06

    Eukaryotic origins of DNA replication undergo activation at various times in S-phase, allowing the genome to be duplicated in a temporally staggered fashion. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the activation times of individual origins are not intrinsic to those origins but are instead governed by surrounding sequences. Currently, there are two examples of DNA sequences that are known to advance origin activation time, centromeres and forkhead transcription factor binding sites. By combining deletion and linker scanning mutational analysis with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to measure fork direction in the context of a two-origin plasmid, we have identified and characterized a 19- to 23-bp and a larger 584-bp DNA sequence that are capable of advancing origin activation time.

  19. Does timing and sequencing of transitions to adulthood make a difference? Stress, smoking, and physical activity among young Australian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Sandra; Lee, Christina

    2006-01-01

    The major changes of the transition to adulthood are argued to be stressful, and health-related behaviors such as smoking and physical activity may be adopted, consolidated, or abandoned at this time. On the other hand, research has suggested that the normative transitions of emerging adulthood, although involving considerable change, may be associated with low stress because they are perceived as both positive and normal at this life stage. This article examines relations between the timing and sequencing of life transitions and stress and health-related behaviors, focusing on the transition to young adulthood among Australian women. A total of 853 women aged 22 to 27 provided information about the timing and sequencing of 6 life transitions: moving out of home, stopping full-time education, starting full-time work, having the first live-in relationship, marriage, and motherhood-and stress, smoking, and physical activity. Most had moved out of home, stopped full-time education, and started full-time work, but only 14% had undertaken all 6 transitions. Overall, 70% of participants had made transitions "in order." Overall, the findings suggest that the relations between timing and sequencing of transitions, and indicators of health, are moderate for smoking, but small for stress and for physical activity. These effects remained after controlling for socioeconomic status of the participants' families of origin. Matching current social norms for the timing and sequencing of life changes may be of less importance for women's well-being than is commonly believed. Although the significant relations between early or "out of order" transitions and smoking are of concern, the smaller relations with stress and with sedentariness suggest that such transitions may have limited negative consequences, and support the view that individuals are active in choosing the life path that is appropriate for them and their circumstances.

  20. Is There a Time for Everything? Attitudes Related to Women's Sequencing of Career and Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sherry E.

    1992-01-01

    Examined business students' (n=203) attitudes relating to sequencing of career and family events for women. Results indicated gender, attitudes regarding women's timing of career and children, and women's ability to balance work and family demands were significantly related. There was a relationship between attitudes toward timing of marriage and…

  1. MendeLIMS: a web-based laboratory information management system for clinical genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Susan M; Ji, Hanlee P

    2014-08-27

    Large clinical genomics studies using next generation DNA sequencing require the ability to select and track samples from a large population of patients through many experimental steps. With the number of clinical genome sequencing studies increasing, it is critical to maintain adequate laboratory information management systems to manage the thousands of patient samples that are subject to this type of genetic analysis. To meet the needs of clinical population studies using genome sequencing, we developed a web-based laboratory information management system (LIMS) with a flexible configuration that is adaptable to continuously evolving experimental protocols of next generation DNA sequencing technologies. Our system is referred to as MendeLIMS, is easily implemented with open source tools and is also highly configurable and extensible. MendeLIMS has been invaluable in the management of our clinical genome sequencing studies. We maintain a publicly available demonstration version of the application for evaluation purposes at http://mendelims.stanford.edu. MendeLIMS is programmed in Ruby on Rails (RoR) and accesses data stored in SQL-compliant relational databases. Software is freely available for non-commercial use at http://dna-discovery.stanford.edu/software/mendelims/.

  2. Improving probe set selection for microbial community analysis by leveraging taxonomic information of training sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Tao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population levels of microbial phylotypes can be examined using a hybridization-based method that utilizes a small set of computationally-designed DNA probes targeted to a gene common to all. Our previous algorithm attempts to select a set of probes such that each training sequence manifests a unique theoretical hybridization pattern (a binary fingerprint to a probe set. It does so without taking into account similarity between training gene sequences or their putative taxonomic classifications, however. We present an improved algorithm for probe set selection that utilizes the available taxonomic information of training gene sequences and attempts to choose probes such that the resultant binary fingerprints cluster into real taxonomic groups. Results Gene sequences manifesting identical fingerprints with probes chosen by the new algorithm are more likely to be from the same taxonomic group than probes chosen by the previous algorithm. In cases where they are from different taxonomic groups, underlying DNA sequences of identical fingerprints are more similar to each other in probe sets made with the new versus the previous algorithm. Complete removal of large taxonomic groups from training data does not greatly decrease the ability of probe sets to distinguish those groups. Conclusions Probe sets made from the new algorithm create fingerprints that more reliably cluster into biologically meaningful groups. The method can readily distinguish microbial phylotypes that were excluded from the training sequences, suggesting novel microbes can also be detected.

  3. Improving probe set selection for microbial community analysis by leveraging taxonomic information of training sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegger, Paul M; Della Vedova, Gianluca; Jiang, Tao; Borneman, James

    2011-10-10

    Population levels of microbial phylotypes can be examined using a hybridization-based method that utilizes a small set of computationally-designed DNA probes targeted to a gene common to all. Our previous algorithm attempts to select a set of probes such that each training sequence manifests a unique theoretical hybridization pattern (a binary fingerprint) to a probe set. It does so without taking into account similarity between training gene sequences or their putative taxonomic classifications, however. We present an improved algorithm for probe set selection that utilizes the available taxonomic information of training gene sequences and attempts to choose probes such that the resultant binary fingerprints cluster into real taxonomic groups. Gene sequences manifesting identical fingerprints with probes chosen by the new algorithm are more likely to be from the same taxonomic group than probes chosen by the previous algorithm. In cases where they are from different taxonomic groups, underlying DNA sequences of identical fingerprints are more similar to each other in probe sets made with the new versus the previous algorithm. Complete removal of large taxonomic groups from training data does not greatly decrease the ability of probe sets to distinguish those groups. Probe sets made from the new algorithm create fingerprints that more reliably cluster into biologically meaningful groups. The method can readily distinguish microbial phylotypes that were excluded from the training sequences, suggesting novel microbes can also be detected.

  4. 78 FR 21246 - Definition of Factual Information and Time Limits for Submission of Factual Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ...-3303-01] RIN 0625-AA91 Definition of Factual Information and Time Limits for Submission of Factual... Definition of Factual Information and Time Limits for Submission of Factual Information, 77 FR 40534 (July 10... are: (1) Modifying the definition of factual information and modifying the time limits as described in...

  5. Information performances and illative sequences: Sequential organization of explanations of chemical phase equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nathaniel James Swanton

    While there is consensus that conceptual change is surprisingly difficult, many competing theories of conceptual change co-exist in the literature. This dissertation argues that this discord is partly the result of an inadequate account of the unwritten rules of human social interaction that underlie the field's preferred methodology---semi-structured interviewing. To better understand the contributions of interaction during explanations, I analyze eight undergraduate general chemistry students as they attempt to explain to various people, for various reasons, why phenomena involving chemical phase equilibrium occur. Using the methods of interaction analysis, I characterize the unwritten, but systematic, rules that these participants follow as they explain. The result is a description of the contributions of interaction to explaining. Each step in each explanation is a jointly performed expression of a subject-predicate relation, an interactive accomplishment I call an information performance (in-form, for short). Unlike clauses, in-forms need not have a coherent grammatical structure. Unlike speaker turns, in-forms have the clear function of expressing information. Unlike both clauses and speaker turns, in-forms are a co-construction, jointly performed by both the primary speaker and the other interlocutor. The other interlocutor strongly affects the form and content of each explanation by giving or withholding feedback at the end of each in-form, moments I call feedback-relevant places. While in-forms are the bricks out of which the explanation is constructed, they are secured by a series of inferential links I call an illative sequence. Illative sequences are forward-searching, starting with a remembered fact or observation and following a chain of inferences in the hope it leads to the target phenomenon. The participants treat an explanation as a success if the illative sequence generates an in-form that describes the phenomenon. If the illative sequence does

  6. Time- and sequence-dependent responses to cisplatin and radiation in the rat kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rongen, Eric van; Kuijpers, W.C.; Baten-Wittwer, Andrea

    1991-01-01

    The influence of time interval and sequence between administration of cisplatin and a radiation dose was studied in the rat kidney. Changes in glomerular function were only detected after 30 weeks following the higher drug dose (6.0 mg/kg). X-rays alone caused measurable alterations in both glomerular and tubular function after 16 weeks. In the combined treatment the influence of time and sequence was significant. If cisplatin was given at 7 to 1 days before X-rays the effect of time was minimal. Administration of cisplatin 12 h to 15 min before irradiation resulted in an increase of radiation damage with decreasing time interval. Total damage sharply decreased when both modalities were given at the same time, and decreased further with increasing time between irradiation and drug administration. (author)

  7. The analysis of energy-time sequences in the nuclear power plants construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milivojevic, S.; Jovanovic, V.; Riznic, J.

    1983-01-01

    The current nuclear energy development pose many problems; one of them is nuclear power plant construction. They are evaluated energy and time features of the construction and their relative ratios by the analysis of available data. The results point at the reached efficiency of the construction and, in the same time, they are the basis for real estimation of energy-time sequences of the construction in the future. (author)

  8. The existence and global attractivity of almost periodic sequence solution of discrete-time neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhenkun; Wang Xinghua; Gao Feng

    2006-01-01

    In this Letter, we discuss discrete-time analogue of a continuous-time cellular neural network. Sufficient conditions are obtained for the existence of a unique almost periodic sequence solution which is globally attractive. Our results demonstrate dynamics of the formulated discrete-time analogue as mathematical models for the continuous-time cellular neural network in almost periodic case. Finally, a computer simulation illustrates the suitability of our discrete-time analogue as numerical algorithms in simulating the continuous-time cellular neural network conveniently

  9. Multi-scale coding of genomic information: From DNA sequence to genome structure and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arneodo, Alain; Vaillant, Cedric; Audit, Benjamin; Argoul, Francoise; D'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Thermes, Claude

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how chromatin is spatially and dynamically organized in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells and how this affects genome functions is one of the main challenges of cell biology. Since the different orders of packaging in the hierarchical organization of DNA condition the accessibility of DNA sequence elements to trans-acting factors that control the transcription and replication processes, there is actually a wealth of structural and dynamical information to learn in the primary DNA sequence. In this review, we show that when using concepts, methodologies, numerical and experimental techniques coming from statistical mechanics and nonlinear physics combined with wavelet-based multi-scale signal processing, we are able to decipher the multi-scale sequence encoding of chromatin condensation-decondensation mechanisms that play a fundamental role in regulating many molecular processes involved in nuclear functions.

  10. Inferring the Clonal Structure of Viral Populations from Time Series Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatien F Chedom

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA virus populations will undergo processes of mutation and selection resulting in a mixed population of viral particles. High throughput sequencing of a viral population subsequently contains a mixed signal of the underlying clones. We would like to identify the underlying evolutionary structures. We utilize two sources of information to attempt this; within segment linkage information, and mutation prevalence. We demonstrate that clone haplotypes, their prevalence, and maximum parsimony reticulate evolutionary structures can be identified, although the solutions may not be unique, even for complete sets of information. This is applied to a chain of influenza infection, where we infer evolutionary structures, including reassortment, and demonstrate some of the difficulties of interpretation that arise from deep sequencing due to artifacts such as template switching during PCR amplification.

  11. Quo vadis? : persuasive computing using real time queue information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meys, Wouter; Groen, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    By presenting tourists with real-time information an increase in efficiency and satisfaction of their day planning can be achieved. At the same time, real-time information services can offer the municipality the opportunity to spread the tourists throughout the city centre. An important factor for

  12. Phylum-Level Conservation of Regulatory Information in Nematodes despite Extensive Non-coding Sequence Divergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Kacy L.; Arthur, Robert K.; Ruvinsky, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Gene regulatory information guides development and shapes the course of evolution. To test conservation of gene regulation within the phylum Nematoda, we compared the functions of putative cis-regulatory sequences of four sets of orthologs (unc-47, unc-25, mec-3 and elt-2) from distantly-related nematode species. These species, Caenorhabditis elegans, its congeneric C. briggsae, and three parasitic species Meloidogyne hapla, Brugia malayi, and Trichinella spiralis, represent four of the five major clades in the phylum Nematoda. Despite the great phylogenetic distances sampled and the extensive sequence divergence of nematode genomes, all but one of the regulatory elements we tested are able to drive at least a subset of the expected gene expression patterns. We show that functionally conserved cis-regulatory elements have no more extended sequence similarity to their C. elegans orthologs than would be expected by chance, but they do harbor motifs that are important for proper expression of the C. elegans genes. These motifs are too short to be distinguished from the background level of sequence similarity, and while identical in sequence they are not conserved in orientation or position. Functional tests reveal that some of these motifs contribute to proper expression. Our results suggest that conserved regulatory circuitry can persist despite considerable turnover within cis elements. PMID:26020930

  13. Phylum-Level Conservation of Regulatory Information in Nematodes despite Extensive Non-coding Sequence Divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kacy L Gordon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory information guides development and shapes the course of evolution. To test conservation of gene regulation within the phylum Nematoda, we compared the functions of putative cis-regulatory sequences of four sets of orthologs (unc-47, unc-25, mec-3 and elt-2 from distantly-related nematode species. These species, Caenorhabditis elegans, its congeneric C. briggsae, and three parasitic species Meloidogyne hapla, Brugia malayi, and Trichinella spiralis, represent four of the five major clades in the phylum Nematoda. Despite the great phylogenetic distances sampled and the extensive sequence divergence of nematode genomes, all but one of the regulatory elements we tested are able to drive at least a subset of the expected gene expression patterns. We show that functionally conserved cis-regulatory elements have no more extended sequence similarity to their C. elegans orthologs than would be expected by chance, but they do harbor motifs that are important for proper expression of the C. elegans genes. These motifs are too short to be distinguished from the background level of sequence similarity, and while identical in sequence they are not conserved in orientation or position. Functional tests reveal that some of these motifs contribute to proper expression. Our results suggest that conserved regulatory circuitry can persist despite considerable turnover within cis elements.

  14. [Study on quality evaluation of sequence and SSR information in transcriptome of Astragalus membranacus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yue; Yang, Song; Liu, Zhen-Peng; Ren, Wei-Chao; Liu, Jie; Ma, Wei

    2016-04-01

    In this study, 454/Roche GS FLX sequencing technology was used to obtain the data of the Astragalus membranaceus. Four hundred and fifty-four Sequencing System Software was applied to carry out the transcription of the group from scratch. Using MISA tools, 9 893 unigenes were selected for the sequence of the genome of A. membranaceus, and the information of SSR locus was analyzed. According to the result, the average length of reads was 413 bp, about 86% of the reads was involved in the splicing, the length of the N50 was 1 205 bp, the number of unigenes was measured by the whole transcript. 1 729 SSR loci in the A. membranaceus transcriptome were searched, the occurrence frequency of SSR was 9.24%, the frequency of SSR in the whole transcriptome was 13.42%, the average length of SSR was 7.97 kb. One hundred and twenty-seven kinds of core repeat sequences were found, the dominant type was TG/AC type of dinucleotide, it appeared to account for 4.25% of the total SSR locus. The results of the sequence of the transcription of the A. membranaceus transcriptome revealed the overall expression, and a large number of unigenessequence was obtained, and the SSR locus in the genome of the A. membranaceus is high, and the type is diverse, and the polymorphism of the gene is high. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  15. Time-clustering behavior of sharp fluctuation sequences in Chinese stock markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Ying; Zhuang Xintian; Liu Zhiying; Huang Weiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Sharp fluctuations (in particular, extreme fluctuations) of asset prices have a great impact on financial markets and risk management. Therefore, investigating the time dynamics of sharp fluctuation is a challenge in the financial fields. Using two different representations of the sharp fluctuations (inter-event times and series of counts), the time clustering behavior in the sharp fluctuation sequences of stock markets in China is studied with several statistical tools, including coefficient of variation, Allan Factor, Fano Factor as well as R/S (rescaled range) analysis. All of the empirical results indicate that the time dynamics of the sharp fluctuation sequences can be considered as a fractal process with a high degree of time-clusterization of the events. It can help us to get a better understanding of the nature and dynamics of sharp fluctuation of stock price in stock markets.

  16. Towards rationally redesigning bacterial signaling systems using information encoded in abundant sequence data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ryan; Morcos, Faruck; Levine, Herbert; Onuchic, Jose

    2014-03-01

    An important challenge in biology is to distinguish the subset of residues that allow bacterial two-component signaling (TCS) proteins to preferentially interact with their correct TCS partner such that they can bind and transfer signal. Detailed knowledge of this information would allow one to search sequence-space for mutations that can systematically tune the signal transmission between TCS partners as well as re-encode a TCS protein to preferentially transfer signals to a non-partner. Motivated by the notion that this detailed information is found in sequence data, we explore the mutual sequence co-evolution between signaling partners to infer how mutations can positively or negatively alter their interaction. Using Direct Coupling Analysis (DCA) for determining evolutionarily conserved interprotein interactions, we apply a DCA-based metric to quantify mutational changes in the interaction between TCS proteins and demonstrate that it accurately correlates with experimental mutagenesis studies probing the mutational change in the in vitro phosphotransfer. Our methodology serves as a potential framework for the rational design of TCS systems as well as a framework for the system-level study of protein-protein interactions in sequence-rich systems. This research has been supported by the NSF INSPIRE award MCB-1241332 and by the CTBP sponsored by the NSF (Grant PHY-1308264).

  17. Sequence exploration reveals information bias among molecular markers used in phylogenetic reconstruction for Colletotrichum species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampersad, Sephra N; Hosein, Fazeeda N; Carrington, Christine Vf

    2014-01-01

    The Colletotrichum gloeosporioides species complex is among the most destructive fungal plant pathogens in the world, however, identification of isolates of quarantine importance to the intra-specific level is confounded by a number of factors that affect phylogenetic reconstruction. Information bias and quality parameters were investigated to determine whether nucleotide sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees accurately reflect the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relatedness of individuals. Sequence exploration of GAPDH, ACT, TUB2 and ITS markers indicated that the query sequences had different patterns of nucleotide substitution but were without evidence of base substitution saturation. Regions of high entropy were much more dispersed in the ACT and GAPDH marker alignments than for the ITS and TUB2 markers. A discernible bimodal gap in the genetic distance frequency histograms was produced for the ACT and GAPDH markers which indicated successful separation of intra- and inter-specific sequences in the data set. Overall, analyses indicated clear differences in the ability of these markers to phylogenetically separate individuals to the intra-specific level which coincided with information bias.

  18. Application of the accident management information needs methodology to a severe accident sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, L.W.; Hanson, D.J.; Nelson, W.R.; Solberg, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an Accident Management Research Program that emphasizes the application of severe accident research results to enhance the capability of plant operating personnel to effectively manage severe accidents. A methodology to identify and assess the information needs of the operating staff of a nuclear power plant during a severe accident has been developed as part of the research program designed to resolve this issue. The methodology identifies the information needs of the plant personnel during a wide range of accident conditions, the existing plant measurements capable of supplying these information needs and what, if any minor additions to instrument and display systems would enhance the capability to manage accidents, known limitations on the capability of these measurements to function properly under the conditions that will be present during a wide range of severe accidents, and areas in which the information systems could mislead plant personnel. This paper presents an application of this methodology to a severe accident sequence to demonstrate its use in identifying the information which is available for management of the event. The methodology has been applied to a severe accident sequence in a Pressurized Water Reactor with a large dry containment. An examination of the capability of the existing measurements was then performed to determine whether the information needs can be supplied

  19. Fully immunized child: coverage, timing and sequencing of routine immunization in an urban poor settlement in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutua, Martin Kavao; Kimani-Murage, Elizabeth; Ngomi, Nicholas; Ravn, Henrik; Mwaniki, Peter; Echoka, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    More efforts have been put in place to increase full immunization coverage rates in the last decade. Little is known about the levels and consequences of delaying or vaccinating children in different schedules. Vaccine effectiveness depends on the timing of its administration, and it is not optimal if given early, delayed or not given as recommended. Evidence of non-specific effects of vaccines is well documented and could be linked to timing and sequencing of immunization. This paper documents the levels of coverage, timing and sequencing of routine childhood vaccines. The study was conducted between 2007 and 2014 in two informal urban settlements in Nairobi. A total of 3856 children, aged 12-23 months and having a vaccination card seen were included in analysis. Vaccination dates recorded from the cards seen were used to define full immunization coverage, timeliness and sequencing. Proportions, medians and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to assess and describe the levels of full immunization coverage, vaccination delays and sequencing. The findings indicate that 67 % of the children were fully immunized by 12 months of age. Missing measles and third doses of polio and pentavalent vaccine were the main reason for not being fully immunized. Delays were highest for third doses of polio and pentavalent and measles. About 22 % of fully immunized children had vaccines in an out-of-sequence manner with 18 % not receiving pentavalent together with polio vaccine as recommended. Results show higher levels of missed opportunities and low coverage of routine childhood vaccinations given at later ages. New strategies are needed to enable health care providers and parents/guardians to work together to increase the levels of completion of all required vaccinations. In particular, more focus is needed on vaccines given in multiple doses (polio, pentavalent and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines).

  20. Efficient forward propagation of time-sequences in convolutional neural networks using Deep Shifting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.L. Groenland (Koen); S.M. Bohte (Sander)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWhen a Convolutional Neural Network is used for on-the-fly evaluation of continuously updating time-sequences, many redundant convolution operations are performed. We propose the method of Deep Shifting, which remembers previously calculated results of convolution operations in order

  1. Time and Number Discrimination in a Bisection Task with a Sequence of Stimuli: A Developmental Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droit-Volet, Sylvie; Clement, Angelique; Fayol, Michel

    2003-01-01

    This study tested 5- and 8-year-olds and adults in a bisection task with a sequence of stimuli in which time and number co-varied. Findings indicated that the number of stimuli interfered with 5-year-olds' performance on the temporal bisection task. Number interference decreased both with age and counting strategy. In the numerical bisection task,…

  2. Look closer: Time sequence photography of Roosters Comb in the Sheep Creek Range, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    The importance of understanding natural landscape changes is key in properly determining rangeland ecology. Time sequence photography allows a snapshot of a landscape to be documented and enables the ability to compare natural changes overtime. Photographs of Roosters Comb were taken from the same v...

  3. Real-time subway information for improving transit ridership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the standardization of transit schedule information has yielded a dramatic increase in the accessibility of computerized transit schedules and given rise to real-time service schedules. Two such real-time service schedules are the Ge...

  4. Timing, timing, timing: Fast decoding of object information from intracranial field potentials in human visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hesheng; Agam, Yigal; Madsen, Joseph R.; Kreiman, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Summary The difficulty of visual recognition stems from the need to achieve high selectivity while maintaining robustness to object transformations within hundreds of milliseconds. Theories of visual recognition differ in whether the neuronal circuits invoke recurrent feedback connections or not. The timing of neurophysiological responses in visual cortex plays a key role in distinguishing between bottom-up and top-down theories. Here we quantified at millisecond resolution the amount of visual information conveyed by intracranial field potentials from 912 electrodes in 11 human subjects. We could decode object category information from human visual cortex in single trials as early as 100 ms post-stimulus. Decoding performance was robust to depth rotation and scale changes. The results suggest that physiological activity in the temporal lobe can account for key properties of visual recognition. The fast decoding in single trials is compatible with feed-forward theories and provides strong constraints for computational models of human vision. PMID:19409272

  5. Denoising time-resolved microscopy image sequences with singular value thresholding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furnival, Tom, E-mail: tjof2@cam.ac.uk; Leary, Rowan K., E-mail: rkl26@cam.ac.uk; Midgley, Paul A., E-mail: pam33@cam.ac.uk

    2017-07-15

    Time-resolved imaging in microscopy is important for the direct observation of a range of dynamic processes in both the physical and life sciences. However, the image sequences are often corrupted by noise, either as a result of high frame rates or a need to limit the radiation dose received by the sample. Here we exploit both spatial and temporal correlations using low-rank matrix recovery methods to denoise microscopy image sequences. We also make use of an unbiased risk estimator to address the issue of how much thresholding to apply in a robust and automated manner. The performance of the technique is demonstrated using simulated image sequences, as well as experimental scanning transmission electron microscopy data, where surface adatom motion and nanoparticle structural dynamics are recovered at rates of up to 32 frames per second. - Highlights: • Correlations in space and time are harnessed to denoise microscopy image sequences. • A robust estimator provides automated selection of the denoising parameter. • Motion tracking and automated noise estimation provides a versatile algorithm. • Application to time-resolved STEM enables study of atomic and nanoparticle dynamics.

  6. Progress in methodology for probabilistic assessment of accidents: timing of accident sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanore, J.M.; Villeroux, C.; Bouscatie, F.; Maigret, N.

    1981-09-01

    There is an important problem for probabilistic studies of accident sequences using the current event tree techniques. Indeed this method does not take into account the dependence in time of the real accident scenarios, involving the random behaviour of the systems (lack or delay in intervention, partial failures, repair, operator actions ...) and the correlated evolution of the physical parameters. A powerful method to perform the probabilistic treatment of these complex sequences (dynamic evolution of systems and associated physics) is Monte-Carlo simulation, very rare events being treated with the help of suitable weighting and biasing techniques. As a practical example the accident sequences related to the loss of the residual heat removal system in a fast breeder reactor has been treated with that method

  7. Mapping and characterizing N6-methyladenine in eukaryotic genomes using single molecule real-time sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shijia; Beaulaurier, John; Deikus, Gintaras; Wu, Tao; Strahl, Maya; Hao, Ziyang; Luo, Guanzheng; Gregory, James A; Chess, Andrew; He, Chuan; Xiao, Andrew; Sebra, Robert; Schadt, Eric E; Fang, Gang

    2018-05-15

    N6-methyladenine (m6dA) has been discovered as a novel form of DNA methylation prevalent in eukaryotes, however, methods for high resolution mapping of m6dA events are still lacking. Single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing has enabled the detection of m6dA events at single-nucleotide resolution in prokaryotic genomes, but its application to detecting m6dA in eukaryotic genomes has not been rigorously examined. Herein, we identified unique characteristics of eukaryotic m6dA methylomes that fundamentally differ from those of prokaryotes. Based on these differences, we describe the first approach for mapping m6dA events using SMRT sequencing specifically designed for the study of eukaryotic genomes, and provide appropriate strategies for designing experiments and carrying out sequencing in future studies. We apply the novel approach to study two eukaryotic genomes. For green algae, we construct the first complete genome-wide map of m6dA at single nucleotide and single molecule resolution. For human lymphoblastoid cells (hLCLs), joint analyses of SMRT sequencing and independent sequencing data suggest that putative m6dA events are enriched in the promoters of young, full length LINE-1 elements (L1s). These analyses demonstrate a general method for rigorous mapping and characterization of m6dA events in eukaryotic genomes. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  8. Software for rapid time dependent ChIP-sequencing analysis (TDCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myschyshyn, Mike; Farren-Dai, Marco; Chuang, Tien-Jui; Vocadlo, David

    2017-11-25

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) and associated methods are widely used to define the genome wide distribution of chromatin associated proteins, post-translational epigenetic marks, and modifications found on DNA bases. An area of emerging interest is to study time dependent changes in the distribution of such proteins and marks by using serial ChIP-seq experiments performed in a time resolved manner. Despite such time resolved studies becoming increasingly common, software to facilitate analysis of such data in a robust automated manner is limited. We have designed software called Time-Dependent ChIP-Sequencing Analyser (TDCA), which is the first program to automate analysis of time-dependent ChIP-seq data by fitting to sigmoidal curves. We provide users with guidance for experimental design of TDCA for modeling of time course (TC) ChIP-seq data using two simulated data sets. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this fitting strategy is widely applicable by showing that automated analysis of three previously published TC data sets accurately recapitulates key findings reported in these studies. Using each of these data sets, we highlight how biologically relevant findings can be readily obtained by exploiting TDCA to yield intuitive parameters that describe behavior at either a single locus or sets of loci. TDCA enables customizable analysis of user input aligned DNA sequencing data, coupled with graphical outputs in the form of publication-ready figures that describe behavior at either individual loci or sets of loci sharing common traits defined by the user. TDCA accepts sequencing data as standard binary alignment map (BAM) files and loci of interest in browser extensible data (BED) file format. TDCA accurately models the number of sequencing reads, or coverage, at loci from TC ChIP-seq studies or conceptually related TC sequencing experiments. TC experiments are reduced to intuitive parametric values that facilitate biologically

  9. The cortisol awakening response is associated with performance of a serial sequence reaction time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodyl, Nicolette A; Schneider, Luke; Vallence, Ann-Maree; Clow, Angela; Ridding, Michael C; Pitcher, Julia B

    2016-02-01

    There is emerging evidence of a relationship between the cortisol awakening response (CAR) and the neural mechanisms underlying learning and memory. The aim of this study was to determine whether the CAR is associated with acquisition, retention and overnight consolidation or improvement of a serial sequence reaction time task. Salivary samples were collected at 0, 15, 30 and 45 min after awakening in 39 healthy adults on 2 consecutive days. The serial sequence reaction time task was repeated each afternoon. Participants completed the perceived stress scale and provided salivary samples prior to testing for cortisol assessment. While the magnitude of the CAR (Z score) was not associated with either baseline performance or the timed improvement during task acquisition of the serial sequence task, a positive correlation was observed with reaction times during the stable performance phase on day 1 (r=0.373, p=0.019). Residuals derived from the relationship between baseline and stable phase reaction times on day 1 were used as a surrogate for the degree of learning: these residuals were also correlated with the CAR mean increase on day 1 (r=0.357, p=0.048). Task performance on day 2 was not associated with the CAR obtained on this same day. No association was observed between the perceived stress score, cortisol at testing or task performance. These data indicate that a smaller CAR in healthy adults is associated with a greater degree of learning and faster performance of a serial sequence reaction time task. These results support recognition of the CAR as an important factor contributing to cognitive performance throughout the day. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Moving target detection based on temporal-spatial information fusion for infrared image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toing, Wu-qin; Xiong, Jin-yu; Zeng, An-jun; Wu, Xiao-ping; Xu, Hao-peng

    2009-07-01

    Moving target detection and localization is one of the most fundamental tasks in visual surveillance. In this paper, through analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of the traditional approaches about moving target detection, a novel approach based on temporal-spatial information fusion is proposed for moving target detection. The proposed method combines the spatial feature in single frame and the temporal properties within multiple frames of an image sequence of moving target. First, the method uses the spatial image segmentation for target separation from background and uses the local temporal variance for extracting targets and wiping off the trail artifact. Second, the logical "and" operator is used to fuse the temporal and spatial information. In the end, to the fusion image sequence, the morphological filtering and blob analysis are used to acquire exact moving target. The algorithm not only requires minimal computation and memory but also quickly adapts to the change of background and environment. Comparing with other methods, such as the KDE, the Mixture of K Gaussians, etc., the simulation results show the proposed method has better validity and higher adaptive for moving target detection, especially in infrared image sequences with complex illumination change, noise change, and so on.

  11. Dynamical decoupling sequences for multi-qubit dephasing suppression and long-time quantum memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz-Silva, Gerardo A; Lee, Seung-Woo; Green, Todd J; Viola, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    We consider a class of multi-qubit dephasing models that combine classical noise sources and linear coupling to a bosonic environment, and are controlled by arbitrary sequences of dynamical decoupling pulses. Building on a general transfer filter-function framework for open-loop control, we provide an exact representation of the controlled dynamics for arbitrary stationary non-Gaussian classical and quantum noise statistics, with analytical expressions emerging when all dephasing sources are Gaussian. This exact characterization is used to establish two main results. First, we construct multi-qubit sequences that ensure maximum high-order error suppression in both the time and frequency domain and that can be exponentially more efficient than existing ones in terms of total pulse number. Next, we show how long-time multi-qubit storage may be achieved by meeting appropriate conditions for the emergence of a fidelity plateau under sequence repetition, thereby generalizing recent results for single-qubit memory under Gaussian dephasing. In both scenarios, the key step is to endow multi-qubit sequences with a suitable displacement anti-symmetry property, which is of independent interest for applications ranging from environment-assisted entanglement generation to multi-qubit noise spectroscopy protocols. (paper)

  12. Romanian crustal earthquake sequences: evidence for space and time clustering in correlation with seismic source properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, E.; Popa, M.; Radulian, M.

    2002-01-01

    The study of seismic sequences is important from both scientific point of view, and its socio-economical impact on human society. In this paper we analyze the crustal earthquake sequences in correlation with the seismogenic zones delimited on the Romanian territory using geological and tectonic information available. We consider on one hand the sequences typical for the Carpathians foreland region (Ramnicu Sarat, Vrancioaia and Sinaia seismic zones), which are associated with the Vrancea subduction process and, on the other hand the sequences typical for the contact between the Pannonian Basin and Carpathians orogen (Banat seismic zone). To analyze the seismicity and source properties, we applied the fractal statistics and relative methods such as spectral ratio and deconvolution with the empirical Green's functions. On the basis of the retrieved source parameters for small and moderate size events the scaling relations for the characteristic properties of the seismic source are estimated. The scaling and earthquake clustering properties are correlated with the geological and rheological properties of the studied seismic areas. (authors)

  13. How could disclosing incidental information from whole-genome sequencing affect patient behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Kurt D; Green, Robert C

    2013-06-01

    In this article, we argue that disclosure of incidental findings from whole-genome sequencing has the potential to motivate individuals to change health behaviors through psychological mechanisms that differ from typical risk assessment interventions. Their ability to do so, however, is likely to be highly contingent upon the nature of the incidental findings and how they are disclosed, the context of the disclosure and the characteristics of the patient. Moreover, clinicians need to be aware that behavioral responses may occur in unanticipated ways. This article argues for commentators and policy makers to take a cautious but optimistic perspective while empirical evidence is collected through ongoing research involving whole-genome sequencing and the disclosure of incidental information.

  14. A Proposed Clinical Decision Support Architecture Capable of Supporting Whole Genome Sequence Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon M. Welch

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Whole genome sequence (WGS information may soon be widely available to help clinicians personalize the care and treatment of patients. However, considerable barriers exist, which may hinder the effective utilization of WGS information in a routine clinical care setting. Clinical decision support (CDS offers a potential solution to overcome such barriers and to facilitate the effective use of WGS information in the clinic. However, genomic information is complex and will require significant considerations when developing CDS capabilities. As such, this manuscript lays out a conceptual framework for a CDS architecture designed to deliver WGS-guided CDS within the clinical workflow. To handle the complexity and breadth of WGS information, the proposed CDS framework leverages service-oriented capabilities and orchestrates the interaction of several independently-managed components. These independently-managed components include the genome variant knowledge base, the genome database, the CDS knowledge base, a CDS controller and the electronic health record (EHR. A key design feature is that genome data can be stored separately from the EHR. This paper describes in detail: (1 each component of the architecture; (2 the interaction of the components; and (3 how the architecture attempts to overcome the challenges associated with WGS information. We believe that service-oriented CDS capabilities will be essential to using WGS information for personalized medicine.

  15. A proposed clinical decision support architecture capable of supporting whole genome sequence information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Brandon M; Loya, Salvador Rodriguez; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-04-04

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information may soon be widely available to help clinicians personalize the care and treatment of patients. However, considerable barriers exist, which may hinder the effective utilization of WGS information in a routine clinical care setting. Clinical decision support (CDS) offers a potential solution to overcome such barriers and to facilitate the effective use of WGS information in the clinic. However, genomic information is complex and will require significant considerations when developing CDS capabilities. As such, this manuscript lays out a conceptual framework for a CDS architecture designed to deliver WGS-guided CDS within the clinical workflow. To handle the complexity and breadth of WGS information, the proposed CDS framework leverages service-oriented capabilities and orchestrates the interaction of several independently-managed components. These independently-managed components include the genome variant knowledge base, the genome database, the CDS knowledge base, a CDS controller and the electronic health record (EHR). A key design feature is that genome data can be stored separately from the EHR. This paper describes in detail: (1) each component of the architecture; (2) the interaction of the components; and (3) how the architecture attempts to overcome the challenges associated with WGS information. We believe that service-oriented CDS capabilities will be essential to using WGS information for personalized medicine.

  16. Real-time alerts and reminders using information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanderer, Jonathan P; Sandberg, Warren S; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M

    2011-09-01

    Adoption of information systems throughout the hospital environment has enabled the development of real-time physiologic alerts and clinician reminder systems. These clinical tools can be made available through the deployment of anesthesia information management systems (AIMS). Creating usable alert systems requires understanding of technical considerations. Various successful implementations are reviewed, encompassing cost reduction, improved revenue capture, timely antibiotic administration, and postoperative nausea and vomiting prophylaxis. Challenges to the widespread use of real-time alerts and reminders include AIMS adoption rates and the difficulty in choosing appropriate areas and approaches for information systems support. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. MRI of bone marrow: opposed-phase gradient-echo sequences with long repetition time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiderer, M.; Staebler, A.; Wagner, H.

    1999-01-01

    Signal intensity for opposed-phase gradient-echo (GE) sequences of tissues composed of fat- and water-equivalent cells such as red bone marrow is extremely sensitive to variation of the ratio of both cell populations (fat-to-water ratio Q F/W ). Because most bone marrow pathology results in variation of Q F/W , GE sequences are characterized by high-contrast imaging of pathology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of TR, TE, FA, Q F/W and histology on signal intensity. Signal intensity of opposed-phase GE sequences as a function of TR, TE, FA, and Q F/W was measured for a fat-water phantom and cadaver specimens of normal bone marrow (red and yellow) and pathological bone marrow (tumors). All specimens were correlated to histology. Opposed-phase GE imaging of red bone marrow pathology results in low-signal-intensity imaging of intact red bone marrow and high-signal-intensity positive contrast imaging of pathology associated with a change in Q F/W . In first-order approximation the signal intensity of pathology is linearly correlated to the change in Q F/W . Opposed-phase GE imaging is a sensitive imaging technique for red bone marrow pathology. Relative contrast of red bone marrow pathology is similar to fat-suppressed imaging techniques. Acquisition time is identical to T1-weighted SE sequences. (orig.)

  18. Time Correlations of Lightning Flash Sequences in Thunderstorms Revealed by Fractal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Xueqiang; Chen, Mingli; Zhang, Guangshu

    2018-01-01

    By using the data of lightning detection and ranging system at the Kennedy Space Center, the temporal fractal and correlation of interevent time series of lightning flash sequences in thunderstorms have been investigated with Allan factor (AF), Fano factor (FF), and detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) methods. AF, FF, and DFA methods are powerful tools to detect the time-scaling structures and correlations in point processes. Totally 40 thunderstorms with distinguishing features of a single-cell storm and apparent increase and decrease in the total flash rate were selected for the analysis. It is found that the time-scaling exponents for AF (αAF) and FF (αFF) analyses are 1.62 and 0.95 in average, respectively, indicating a strong time correlation of the lightning flash sequences. DFA analysis shows that there is a crossover phenomenon—a crossover timescale (τc) ranging from 54 to 195 s with an average of 114 s. The occurrence of a lightning flash in a thunderstorm behaves randomly at timescales τc but shows strong time correlation at scales >τc. Physically, these may imply that the establishment of an extensive strong electric field necessary for the occurrence of a lightning flash needs a timescale >τc, which behaves strongly time correlated. But the initiation of a lightning flash within a well-established extensive strong electric field may involve the heterogeneities of the electric field at a timescale τc, which behave randomly.

  19. Cycle-time determination and process control of sequencing batch membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampe, J

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a method to determine the cycle time for sequencing batch membrane bioreactors (SBMBRs) is introduced. One of the advantages of SBMBRs is the simplicity of adapting them to varying wastewater composition. The benefit of this flexibility can only be fully utilised if the cycle times are optimised for the specific inlet load conditions. This requires either proactive and ongoing operator adjustment or active predictive instrument-based control. Determination of the cycle times for conventional sequencing batch reactor (SBR) plants is usually based on experience. Due to the higher mixed liquor suspended solids concentrations in SBMBRs and the limited experience with their application, a new approach to calculate the cycle time had to be developed. Based on results from a semi-technical pilot plant, the paper presents an approach for calculating the cycle time in relation to the influent concentration according to the Activated Sludge Model No. 1 and the German HSG (Hochschulgruppe) Approach. The approach presented in this paper considers the increased solid contents in the reactor and the resultant shortened reaction times. This allows for an exact calculation of the nitrification and denitrification cycles with a tolerance of only a few minutes. Ultimately the same approach can be used for a predictive control strategy and for conventional SBR plants.

  20. Real-time information support for managing plant emergency responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, D.G.; Lord, R.J.; Wilkinson, C.D.

    1983-01-01

    The Three Mile Island Unit 2 accident highlighted the need to develop a systematic approach to managing plant emergency responses, to identify a better decision-making process, and to implement real-time information support for decision-making. The overall process management function is described and general information requirements for management of plant emergencies are identified. Basic information systems are being incorporated and future extensions and problem areas are discussed. (U.K.)

  1. Quantum mutual information and the one-time pad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, Benjamin; Westmoreland, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Alice and Bob share a correlated composite quantum system AB. If AB is used as the key for a one-time pad cryptographic system, we show that the maximum amount of information that Alice can send securely to Bob is the quantum mutual information of AB

  2. TOMROP: a sequence for determining the longitudinal relaxation time T1 in NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graumann, R.; Barfuss, H.; Fischer, H.; Hentschel, D.; Oppelt, A.

    1987-01-01

    We developed the pulse sequence TOMROP (T One by Multiple Read Out Pulses) for determining precisely the spatial distribution of the longitudinal relaxation time T 1 in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR): a series of small-angle selection pulses is used to read out longitudinal magnetization from its initial state till thermal equilibrium. Hence, one measurement will produce several images with different T 1 weightings whose pixel brilliance depends exponentially from read-out time. T 1 can be determined from these independent of initial magnetization and selection pulse angle. The measuring time corresponds to the time needed in multi-echo imaging for the determination of the transversal relaxation time T 2 . We demonstrate this new method using head images of volunteers produced with a 0.23 T test facility. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Learning Bounds of ERM Principle for Sequences of Time-Dependent Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingchen Yao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many generalization results in learning theory are established under the assumption that samples are independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.. However, numerous learning tasks in practical applications involve the time-dependent data. In this paper, we propose a theoretical framework to analyze the generalization performance of the empirical risk minimization (ERM principle for sequences of time-dependent samples (TDS. In particular, we first present the generalization bound of ERM principle for TDS. By introducing some auxiliary quantities, we also give a further analysis of the generalization properties and the asymptotical behaviors of ERM principle for TDS.

  4. Phylogenetic relationships and timing of diversification in gonorynchiform fishes inferred using nuclear gene DNA sequences (Teleostei: Ostariophysi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Near, Thomas J; Dornburg, Alex; Friedman, Matt

    2014-11-01

    The Gonorynchiformes are the sister lineage of the species-rich Otophysi and provide important insights into the diversification of ostariophysan fishes. Phylogenies of gonorynchiforms inferred using morphological characters and mtDNA gene sequences provide differing resolutions with regard to the sister lineage of all other gonorynchiforms (Chanos vs. Gonorynchus) and support for monophyly of the two miniaturized lineages Cromeria and Grasseichthys. In this study the phylogeny and divergence times of gonorynchiforms are investigated with DNA sequences sampled from nine nuclear genes and a published morphological character matrix. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses reveal substantial congruence among individual gene trees with inferences from eight genes placing Gonorynchus as the sister lineage to all other gonorynchiforms. Seven gene trees resolve Cromeria and Grasseichthys as a clade, supporting previous inferences using morphological characters. Phylogenies resulting from either concatenating the nuclear genes, performing a multispecies coalescent species tree analysis, or combining the morphological and nuclear gene DNA sequences resolve Gonorynchus as the living sister lineage of all other gonorynchiforms, strongly support the monophyly of Cromeria and Grasseichthys, and resolve a clade containing Parakneria, Cromeria, and Grasseichthys. The morphological dataset, which includes 13 gonorynchiform fossil taxa that range in age from Early Cretaceous to Eocene, was analyzed in combination with DNA sequences from the nine nuclear genes and a relaxed molecular clock to estimate times of evolutionary divergence. This "tip dating" strategy accommodates uncertainty in the phylogenetic resolution of fossil taxa that provide calibration information in the relaxed molecular clock analysis. The estimated age of the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of living gonorynchiforms is slightly older than estimates from previous node dating efforts, but the molecular tip dating

  5. An investigation of fMRI time series stationarity during motor sequence learning foot tapping tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhei-aldin, Othman; VanSwearingen, Jessie; Karim, Helmet; Huppert, Theodore; Sparto, Patrick J; Erickson, Kirk I; Sejdić, Ervin

    2014-04-30

    Understanding complex brain networks using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is of great interest to clinical and scientific communities. To utilize advanced analysis methods such as graph theory for these investigations, the stationarity of fMRI time series needs to be understood as it has important implications on the choice of appropriate approaches for the analysis of complex brain networks. In this paper, we investigated the stationarity of fMRI time series acquired from twelve healthy participants while they performed a motor (foot tapping sequence) learning task. Since prior studies have documented that learning is associated with systematic changes in brain activation, a sequence learning task is an optimal paradigm to assess the degree of non-stationarity in fMRI time-series in clinically relevant brain areas. We predicted that brain regions involved in a "learning network" would demonstrate non-stationarity and may violate assumptions associated with some advanced analysis approaches. Six blocks of learning, and six control blocks of a foot tapping sequence were performed in a fixed order. The reverse arrangement test was utilized to investigate the time series stationarity. Our analysis showed some non-stationary signals with a time varying first moment as a major source of non-stationarity. We also demonstrated a decreased number of non-stationarities in the third block as a result of priming and repetition. Most of the current literature does not examine stationarity prior to processing. The implication of our findings is that future investigations analyzing complex brain networks should utilize approaches robust to non-stationarities, as graph-theoretical approaches can be sensitive to non-stationarities present in data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Time integration and statistical regulation applied to mobile objects detection in a sequence of images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letang, Jean-Michel

    1993-01-01

    This PhD thesis deals with the detection of moving objects in monocular image sequences. The first section presents the inherent problems of motion analysis in real applications. We propose a method robust to perturbations frequently encountered during acquisition of outdoor scenes. It appears three main directions for investigations, all of them pointing out the importance of the temporal axis, which is a specific dimension for motion analysis. In the first part, the image sequence is considered as a set of temporal signals. The temporal multi-scale decomposition enables the characterization of various dynamical behaviors of the objects being in the scene at a given instant. A second module integrates motion information. This elementary trajectography of moving objects provides a temporal prediction map, giving a confidence level of motion presence. Interactions between both sets of data are expressed within a statistical regularization. Markov random field models supply a formal framework to convey a priori knowledge of the primitives to be evaluated. A calibration method with qualitative boxes is presented to estimate model parameters. Our approach requires only simple computations and leads to a rather fast algorithm, that we evaluate in the last section over various typical sequences. (author) [fr

  7. Information Retrieval and Criticality in Parity-Time-Symmetric Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Kohei; Ashida, Yuto; Ueda, Masahito

    2017-11-10

    By investigating information flow between a general parity-time (PT-)symmetric non-Hermitian system and an environment, we find that the complete information retrieval from the environment can be achieved in the PT-unbroken phase, whereas no information can be retrieved in the PT-broken phase. The PT-transition point thus marks the reversible-irreversible criticality of information flow, around which many physical quantities such as the recurrence time and the distinguishability between quantum states exhibit power-law behavior. Moreover, by embedding a PT-symmetric system into a larger Hilbert space so that the entire system obeys unitary dynamics, we reveal that behind the information retrieval lies a hidden entangled partner protected by PT symmetry. Possible experimental situations are also discussed.

  8. Theoretical information measurement in nonrelativistic time-dependent approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafizade, S. A.; Hassanabadi, H.; Zarrinkamar, S.

    2018-02-01

    The information-theoretic measures of time-dependent Schrödinger equation are investigated via the Shannon information entropy, variance and local Fisher quantities. In our calculations, we consider the two first states n = 0,1 and obtain the position Sx (t) and momentum Sp (t) Shannon entropies as well as Fisher information Ix (t) in position and momentum Ip (t) spaces. Using the Fourier transformed wave function, we obtain the results in momentum space. Some interesting features of the information entropy densities ρs (x,t) and γs (p,t), as well as the probability densities ρ (x,t) and γ (p,t) for time-dependent states are demonstrated. We establish a general relation between variance and Fisher's information. The Bialynicki-Birula-Mycielski inequality is tested and verified for the states n = 0,1.

  9. Decision time as information in judgment and choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Calseyde, Philippe P.F.M.; Keren, Gideon; Zeelenberg, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    People often observe others' decisions and the corresponding time it took them to reach the decision. Following a signaling perspective, we demonstrate that people derive information from the time that others needed in reaching a decision. Specifically, the findings of multiple experiments and a

  10. Library Information System Time-Sharing (LISTS) Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Donald V.

    The Library Information System Time-Sharing (LISTS) experiment was based on three innovations in data processing technology: (1) the advent of computer time-sharing on third-generation machines, (2) the development of general-purpose file-management software and (3) the introduction of large, library-oriented data bases. The main body of the…

  11. A time series based sequence prediction algorithm to detect activities of daily living in smart home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marufuzzaman, M; Reaz, M B I; Ali, M A M; Rahman, L F

    2015-01-01

    The goal of smart homes is to create an intelligent environment adapting the inhabitants need and assisting the person who needs special care and safety in their daily life. This can be reached by collecting the ADL (activities of daily living) data and further analysis within existing computing elements. In this research, a very recent algorithm named sequence prediction via enhanced episode discovery (SPEED) is modified and in order to improve accuracy time component is included. The modified SPEED or M-SPEED is a sequence prediction algorithm, which modified the previous SPEED algorithm by using time duration of appliance's ON-OFF states to decide the next state. M-SPEED discovered periodic episodes of inhabitant behavior, trained it with learned episodes, and made decisions based on the obtained knowledge. The results showed that M-SPEED achieves 96.8% prediction accuracy, which is better than other time prediction algorithms like PUBS, ALZ with temporal rules and the previous SPEED. Since human behavior shows natural temporal patterns, duration times can be used to predict future events more accurately. This inhabitant activity prediction system will certainly improve the smart homes by ensuring safety and better care for elderly and handicapped people.

  12. Importance of Viral Sequence Length and Number of Variable and Informative Sites in Analysis of HIV Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novitsky, Vlad; Moyo, Sikhulile; Lei, Quanhong; DeGruttola, Victor; Essex, M

    2015-05-01

    To improve the methodology of HIV cluster analysis, we addressed how analysis of HIV clustering is associated with parameters that can affect the outcome of viral clustering. The extent of HIV clustering and tree certainty was compared between 401 HIV-1C near full-length genome sequences and subgenomic regions retrieved from the LANL HIV Database. Sliding window analysis was based on 99 windows of 1,000 bp and 45 windows of 2,000 bp. Potential associations between the extent of HIV clustering and sequence length and the number of variable and informative sites were evaluated. The near full-length genome HIV sequences showed the highest extent of HIV clustering and the highest tree certainty. At the bootstrap threshold of 0.80 in maximum likelihood (ML) analysis, 58.9% of near full-length HIV-1C sequences but only 15.5% of partial pol sequences (ViroSeq) were found in clusters. Among HIV-1 structural genes, pol showed the highest extent of clustering (38.9% at a bootstrap threshold of 0.80), although it was significantly lower than in the near full-length genome sequences. The extent of HIV clustering was significantly higher for sliding windows of 2,000 bp than 1,000 bp. We found a strong association between the sequence length and proportion of HIV sequences in clusters, and a moderate association between the number of variable and informative sites and the proportion of HIV sequences in clusters. In HIV cluster analysis, the extent of detectable HIV clustering is directly associated with the length of viral sequences used, as well as the number of variable and informative sites. Near full-length genome sequences could provide the most informative HIV cluster analysis. Selected subgenomic regions with a high extent of HIV clustering and high tree certainty could also be considered as a second choice.

  13. Costs of travel time uncertainty and benefits of travel time information: Conceptual model and numerical examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, D.F.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    2006-01-01

    A negative effect of congestion that tends to be overlooked is travel time uncertainty. Travel time uncertainty causes scheduling costs due to early or late arrival. The negative effects of travel time uncertainty can be reduced by providing travellers with travel time information, which improves

  14. Real-time SPARSE-SENSE cardiac cine MR imaging: optimization of image reconstruction and sequence validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Juliane; Nensa, Felix; Bomas, Bettina; Schemuth, Haemi P; Maderwald, Stefan; Gratz, Marcel; Quick, Harald H; Schlosser, Thomas; Nassenstein, Kai

    2016-12-01

    Improved real-time cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) sequences have currently been introduced, but so far only limited practical experience exists. This study aimed at image reconstruction optimization and clinical validation of a new highly accelerated real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE sequence. Left ventricular (LV) short-axis stacks of a real-time free-breathing SPARSE-SENSE sequence with high spatiotemporal resolution and of a standard segmented cine SSFP sequence were acquired at 1.5 T in 11 volunteers and 15 patients. To determine the optimal iterations, all volunteers' SPARSE-SENSE images were reconstructed using 10-200 iterations, and contrast ratios, image entropies, and reconstruction times were assessed. Subsequently, the patients' SPARSE-SENSE images were reconstructed with the clinically optimal iterations. LV volumetric values were evaluated and compared between both sequences. Sufficient image quality and acceptable reconstruction times were achieved when using 80 iterations. Bland-Altman plots and Passing-Bablok regression showed good agreement for all volumetric parameters. 80 iterations are recommended for iterative SPARSE-SENSE image reconstruction in clinical routine. Real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE yielded comparable volumetric results as the current standard SSFP sequence. Due to its intrinsic low image acquisition times, real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE imaging with iterative image reconstruction seems to be an attractive alternative for LV function analysis. • A highly accelerated real-time CMR sequence using SPARSE-SENSE was evaluated. • SPARSE-SENSE allows free breathing in real-time cardiac cine imaging. • For clinically optimal SPARSE-SENSE image reconstruction, 80 iterations are recommended. • Real-time SPARSE-SENSE imaging yielded comparable volumetric results as the reference SSFP sequence. • The fast SPARSE-SENSE sequence is an attractive alternative to standard SSFP sequences.

  15. Inter-Firm Information Sharing in Enterprise Resource Planning Systems: a call for timely but limited access to customer information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Busing

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Current trends in Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP suggest that supply chain management and tight control over scheduling jobs within the supply chain are key tactical planning issues. Modern ERP software packages, in conjunction with the World Wide Web, allow for automated exchange of information within a company and also between two or more companies (i.e., conveyance of customer information to suppliers of parts and components for the purposes of effective planning and control. While ease of information exchange between a customer and supplier is increasingly critical to the success of modern-day planning and control efforts, the issue of information security is also a very real concern. Suppliers can benefit from gaining access to a customer's dispatch list and material requirements plan (MRP in order to determine real-time priority of jobs in queue at various work centers within their own organization. Other customer information, however, should remain secure and unavailable to supplier firms for competitive reasons such as threat of forward integration. This paper presents a previously tested priority-sequencing rule that explicitly considers downstream shop conditions in determining which job to run next The rule proves to perform well on mean flow time and lateness as well as on variability of these measures. The rule is extended here to incorporate the case where a downstream work center is outside official corporate boundaries. With the call for free exchange of information comes the threat of other, perhaps proprietary, information being accessed by vendors or others outside the official corporate boundaries. The paper will propose information that should be freely exchanged between customers and suppliers and information that should remain secure. Finally, practical measures to manage access to web-enabled ERP information will be proposed.

  16. A Scaffold Analysis Tool Using Mate-Pair Information in Genome Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan-Gyu Kim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a Windows-based program, ConPath, as a scaffold analyzer. ConPath constructs scaffolds by ordering and orienting separate sequence contigs by exploiting the mate-pair information between contig-pairs. Our algorithm builds directed graphs from link information and traverses them to find the longest acyclic graphs. Using end read pairs of fixed-sized mate-pair libraries, ConPath determines relative orientations of all contigs, estimates the gap size of each adjacent contig pair, and reports wrong assembly information by validating orientations and gap sizes. We have utilized ConPath in more than 10 microbial genome projects, including Mannheimia succiniciproducens and Vibro vulnificus, where we verified contig assembly and identified several erroneous contigs using the four types of error defined in ConPath. Also, ConPath supports some convenient features and viewers that permit investigation of each contig in detail; these include contig viewer, scaffold viewer, edge information list, mate-pair list, and the printing of complex scaffold structures.

  17. pplacer: linear time maximum-likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic placement of sequences onto a fixed reference tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodner Robin B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Likelihood-based phylogenetic inference is generally considered to be the most reliable classification method for unknown sequences. However, traditional likelihood-based phylogenetic methods cannot be applied to large volumes of short reads from next-generation sequencing due to computational complexity issues and lack of phylogenetic signal. "Phylogenetic placement," where a reference tree is fixed and the unknown query sequences are placed onto the tree via a reference alignment, is a way to bring the inferential power offered by likelihood-based approaches to large data sets. Results This paper introduces pplacer, a software package for phylogenetic placement and subsequent visualization. The algorithm can place twenty thousand short reads on a reference tree of one thousand taxa per hour per processor, has essentially linear time and memory complexity in the number of reference taxa, and is easy to run in parallel. Pplacer features calculation of the posterior probability of a placement on an edge, which is a statistically rigorous way of quantifying uncertainty on an edge-by-edge basis. It also can inform the user of the positional uncertainty for query sequences by calculating expected distance between placement locations, which is crucial in the estimation of uncertainty with a well-sampled reference tree. The software provides visualizations using branch thickness and color to represent number of placements and their uncertainty. A simulation study using reads generated from 631 COG alignments shows a high level of accuracy for phylogenetic placement over a wide range of alignment diversity, and the power of edge uncertainty estimates to measure placement confidence. Conclusions Pplacer enables efficient phylogenetic placement and subsequent visualization, making likelihood-based phylogenetics methodology practical for large collections of reads; it is freely available as source code, binaries, and a web service.

  18. Genome-wide analysis of replication timing by next-generation sequencing with E/L Repli-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Claire; Sasaki, Takayo; Vera, Daniel; Wilson, Korey; Sima, Jiao; Rivera-Mulia, Juan Carlos; Trevilla-García, Claudia; Nogues, Coralin; Nafie, Ebtesam; Gilbert, David M

    2018-05-01

    This protocol is an extension to: Nat. Protoc. 6, 870-895 (2014); doi:10.1038/nprot.2011.328; published online 02 June 2011Cycling cells duplicate their DNA content during S phase, following a defined program called replication timing (RT). Early- and late-replicating regions differ in terms of mutation rates, transcriptional activity, chromatin marks and subnuclear position. Moreover, RT is regulated during development and is altered in diseases. Here, we describe E/L Repli-seq, an extension of our Repli-chip protocol. E/L Repli-seq is a rapid, robust and relatively inexpensive protocol for analyzing RT by next-generation sequencing (NGS), allowing genome-wide assessment of how cellular processes are linked to RT. Briefly, cells are pulse-labeled with BrdU, and early and late S-phase fractions are sorted by flow cytometry. Labeled nascent DNA is immunoprecipitated from both fractions and sequenced. Data processing leads to a single bedGraph file containing the ratio of nascent DNA from early versus late S-phase fractions. The results are comparable to those of Repli-chip, with the additional benefits of genome-wide sequence information and an increased dynamic range. We also provide computational pipelines for downstream analyses, for parsing phased genomes using single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to analyze RT allelic asynchrony, and for direct comparison to Repli-chip data. This protocol can be performed in up to 3 d before sequencing, and requires basic cellular and molecular biology skills, as well as a basic understanding of Unix and R.

  19. A reliable information management for real-time systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, Takuo; Tomita, Seiji

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a system configuration suitable for the hard realtime systems in which integrity and durability of information are important. On most hard real-time systems, where response time constraints are critical, the data which program access are volatile, and may be lost in case the systems are down. But for some real-time systems, the value-added intelligent network (IN) systems, e.g., integrity and durability of the stored data are very important. We propose a distributed system configuration for such hard real-time systems, comprised of service control modules and data management modules. The service control modules process transactions and responses based on deadline control, and the data management modules deal the stored data based on information recovery schemes well-restablished in fault real-time systems. (author)

  20. Large deviation estimates for exceedance times of perpetuity sequences and their dual processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buraczewski, Dariusz; Collamore, Jeffrey F.; Damek, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    In a variety of problems in pure and applied probability, it is of relevant to study the large exceedance probabilities of the perpetuity sequence $Y_n := B_1 + A_1 B_2 + \\cdots + (A_1 \\cdots A_{n-1}) B_n$, where $(A_i,B_i) \\subset (0,\\infty) \\times \\reals$. Estimates for the stationary tail dist......-time exceedance probabilities of $\\{ M_n^\\ast \\}$, yielding a new result concerning the convergence of $\\{ M_n^\\ast \\}$ to its stationary distribution.......In a variety of problems in pure and applied probability, it is of relevant to study the large exceedance probabilities of the perpetuity sequence $Y_n := B_1 + A_1 B_2 + \\cdots + (A_1 \\cdots A_{n-1}) B_n$, where $(A_i,B_i) \\subset (0,\\infty) \\times \\reals$. Estimates for the stationary tail...... distribution of $\\{ Y_n \\}$ have been developed in the seminal papers of Kesten (1973) and Goldie (1991). Specifically, it is well-known that if $M := \\sup_n Y_n$, then ${\\mathbb P} \\left\\{ M > u \\right\\} \\sim {\\cal C}_M u^{-\\xi}$ as $u \\to \\infty$. While much attention has been focused on extending...

  1. Artificial Intelligence In Processing A Sequence Of Time-Varying Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler, W.; Tucker, D.; Buckley, J.; Hess, R. G.; Powell, V. G.

    1985-04-01

    A computer system is described for unsupervised analysis of five sets of ultrasound images of the heart. Each set consists of 24 frames taken at 33 millisecond intervals. The images are acquired in real time with computer control of the ultrasound apparatus. After acquisition the images are segmented by a sequence of image-processing programs; features are extracted and stored in a version of the Carnegie- Mellon Blackboard. Region classification is accomplished by a fuzzy logic expert system FLOPS based on OPS5. Preliminary results are given.

  2. A Novel Computational Method for Detecting DNA Methylation Sites with DNA Sequence Information and Physicochemical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Gaofeng; Jiang, Limin; Tang, Jijun; Guo, Fei

    2018-02-08

    DNA methylation is an important biochemical process, and it has a close connection with many types of cancer. Research about DNA methylation can help us to understand the regulation mechanism and epigenetic reprogramming. Therefore, it becomes very important to recognize the methylation sites in the DNA sequence. In the past several decades, many computational methods-especially machine learning methods-have been developed since the high-throughout sequencing technology became widely used in research and industry. In order to accurately identify whether or not a nucleotide residue is methylated under the specific DNA sequence context, we propose a novel method that overcomes the shortcomings of previous methods for predicting methylation sites. We use k -gram, multivariate mutual information, discrete wavelet transform, and pseudo amino acid composition to extract features, and train a sparse Bayesian learning model to do DNA methylation prediction. Five criteria-area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC), accuracy (ACC), sensitivity (SN), and specificity-are used to evaluate the prediction results of our method. On the benchmark dataset, we could reach 0.8632 on AUC, 0.8017 on ACC, 0.5558 on MCC, and 0.7268 on SN. Additionally, the best results on two scBS-seq profiled mouse embryonic stem cells datasets were 0.8896 and 0.9511 by AUC, respectively. When compared with other outstanding methods, our method surpassed them on the accuracy of prediction. The improvement of AUC by our method compared to other methods was at least 0.0399 . For the convenience of other researchers, our code has been uploaded to a file hosting service, and can be downloaded from: https://figshare.com/s/0697b692d802861282d3.

  3. A Novel Computational Method for Detecting DNA Methylation Sites with DNA Sequence Information and Physicochemical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaofeng Pan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is an important biochemical process, and it has a close connection with many types of cancer. Research about DNA methylation can help us to understand the regulation mechanism and epigenetic reprogramming. Therefore, it becomes very important to recognize the methylation sites in the DNA sequence. In the past several decades, many computational methods—especially machine learning methods—have been developed since the high-throughout sequencing technology became widely used in research and industry. In order to accurately identify whether or not a nucleotide residue is methylated under the specific DNA sequence context, we propose a novel method that overcomes the shortcomings of previous methods for predicting methylation sites. We use k-gram, multivariate mutual information, discrete wavelet transform, and pseudo amino acid composition to extract features, and train a sparse Bayesian learning model to do DNA methylation prediction. Five criteria—area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC, Matthew’s correlation coefficient (MCC, accuracy (ACC, sensitivity (SN, and specificity—are used to evaluate the prediction results of our method. On the benchmark dataset, we could reach 0.8632 on AUC, 0.8017 on ACC, 0.5558 on MCC, and 0.7268 on SN. Additionally, the best results on two scBS-seq profiled mouse embryonic stem cells datasets were 0.8896 and 0.9511 by AUC, respectively. When compared with other outstanding methods, our method surpassed them on the accuracy of prediction. The improvement of AUC by our method compared to other methods was at least 0.0399 . For the convenience of other researchers, our code has been uploaded to a file hosting service, and can be downloaded from: https://figshare.com/s/0697b692d802861282d3.

  4. Continuous real-time water information: an important Kansas resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loving, Brian L.; Putnam, James E.; Turk, Donita M.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous real-time information on streams, lakes, and groundwater is an important Kansas resource that can safeguard lives and property, and ensure adequate water resources for a healthy State economy. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates approximately 230 water-monitoring stations at Kansas streams, lakes, and groundwater sites. Most of these stations are funded cooperatively in partnerships with local, tribal, State, or other Federal agencies. The USGS real-time water-monitoring network provides long-term, accurate, and objective information that meets the needs of many customers. Whether the customer is a water-management or water-quality agency, an emergency planner, a power or navigational official, a farmer, a canoeist, or a fisherman, all can benefit from the continuous real-time water information gathered by the USGS.

  5. Real-time information and processing system for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oprea, I.; Oprea, M.; Stoica, M.; Badea, E.; Guta, V.

    1999-01-01

    The real-time information and processing system has as main task to record, collect, process and transmit the radiation level and weather data, being proposed for radiation protection, environmental monitoring around nuclear facilities and for civil defence. Such a system can offer information in order to provide mapping, data base, modelling and communication and to assess the consequences of nuclear accidents. The system incorporates a number of stationary or mobile radiation monitoring equipment, weather parameter measuring station, a GIS-based information processing center and the communication network, all running on a real-time operating system. It provides the automatic data collection on-line and off-line, remote diagnostic, advanced presentation techniques, including a graphically oriented executive support, which has the ability to respond to an emergency by geographical representation of the hazard zones on the map.The system can be integrated into national or international environmental monitoring systems, being based on local intelligent measuring and transmission units, simultaneous processing and data presentation using a real-time operating system for PC and geographical information system (GIS). Such an integrated system is composed of independent applications operating under the same computer, which is capable to improve the protection of the population and decision makers efforts, updating the remote GIS data base. All information can be managed directly from the map by multilevel data retrieving and presentation by using on-line dynamic evolution of the events, environment information, evacuation optimization, image and voice processing

  6. LigandRFs: random forest ensemble to identify ligand-binding residues from sequence information alone

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2014-12-03

    Background Protein-ligand binding is important for some proteins to perform their functions. Protein-ligand binding sites are the residues of proteins that physically bind to ligands. Despite of the recent advances in computational prediction for protein-ligand binding sites, the state-of-the-art methods search for similar, known structures of the query and predict the binding sites based on the solved structures. However, such structural information is not commonly available. Results In this paper, we propose a sequence-based approach to identify protein-ligand binding residues. We propose a combination technique to reduce the effects of different sliding residue windows in the process of encoding input feature vectors. Moreover, due to the highly imbalanced samples between the ligand-binding sites and non ligand-binding sites, we construct several balanced data sets, for each of which a random forest (RF)-based classifier is trained. The ensemble of these RF classifiers forms a sequence-based protein-ligand binding site predictor. Conclusions Experimental results on CASP9 and CASP8 data sets demonstrate that our method compares favorably with the state-of-the-art protein-ligand binding site prediction methods.

  7. Position-specific prediction of methylation sites from sequence conservation based on information theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yinan; Guo, Yanzhi; Hu, Yayun; Li, Menglong

    2015-07-23

    Protein methylation plays vital roles in many biological processes and has been implicated in various human diseases. To fully understand the mechanisms underlying methylation for use in drug design and work in methylation-related diseases, an initial but crucial step is to identify methylation sites. The use of high-throughput bioinformatics methods has become imperative to predict methylation sites. In this study, we developed a novel method that is based only on sequence conservation to predict protein methylation sites. Conservation difference profiles between methylated and non-methylated peptides were constructed by the information entropy (IE) in a wider neighbor interval around the methylation sites that fully incorporated all of the environmental information. Then, the distinctive neighbor residues were identified by the importance scores of information gain (IG). The most representative model was constructed by support vector machine (SVM) for Arginine and Lysine methylation, respectively. This model yielded a promising result on both the benchmark dataset and independent test set. The model was used to screen the entire human proteome, and many unknown substrates were identified. These results indicate that our method can serve as a useful supplement to elucidate the mechanism of protein methylation and facilitate hypothesis-driven experimental design and validation.

  8. Molecular phylogeny and radiation time of erysiphales inferred from the nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Y.; Sato, Y.; Takamatsu, S.

    2000-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of Erysiphales within Ascomycota were inferred from the newly determined sequences of the 18S rDNA and partial sequences of the 28S rDNA including the D1 and D2 regions of 10 Erysiphales taxa. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the Erysiphales form a distinct clade among ascomycetous fungi suggesting that the Erysiphales diverged from a single ancestral taxon. The Myxotrichaceae of the Onygenales was distantly related to the other onygenalean families and was the sister group to the Erysiphales calde, with which it combined to form a clade. The Erysiphales/Myxotrichaceae clade was also closely related to some discomycetous fungi (Leotiales, Cyttariales and Thelebolaceae) including taxa that form cleistothecial ascomata. The present molecular analyses as well as previously reported morphological observations suggest the possible existence of a novel evolutionary pathway from cleistothecial discomycetous fungi to Erysiphales and Myxotrichaceae. However, since most of these fungi, except for the Erysiphales, are saprophytic on dung and/or plant materials, the questions of how and why an obligate biotroph like the Erysiphales radiated from the saprophytic fungi remain to be addressed. We also estimated the radiation time of the Erysiphales using the 18S rDNA sequences and the two molecular clockes that have been previously reported. The calculation showed that the Erysiphales split from the Myxotrichaceae 190–127 myr ago. Since the radiation time of the Erysiphales does not exceed 230 myr ago, even when allowance is made for the uncertainty of the molecular clocks, it is possible to consider that the Erysiphales evolved after the radiation of angiosperms. The results of our calculation also showed that the first radiation within the Erysiphales (138–92 myr ago) coincided with the date of a major diversification of angiosperms (130–90 myr ago). These results may support our early assumption that the radiation of the Erysiphales

  9. Space and time sequence and mosaicism of neurogenesis in hippocampal area CA1 in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarevskaya, G.D.; Reznikov, K. Yu.

    1986-01-01

    The study of the times and sequence of neuron formation in various structures of the mammalian brain has made substantial progress thanks to the use of autoradiographic techniques, by which the germinative precursors of neurons can be tagged with tritium-thymidine and the subsequent fate of the labeled cells can be followed. The authors study the space and time sequence of neuron formation and look for the presence of mosaicism of neurogenesis in area CA1 of Ammon's horn of the mouse hippocampus, one of the most regularly arranged hippocampal areas. An analysis of the distribution of intensively labeled neurons in areas CA1 showed the presence of groups of intensively labeled neurons alternating with unlabeled and weakly labeled cells.. Mice receiving tritium-thymidine on the 13th-16th day of embryogenesis were most marked when the isotope was injected on the 14th-15th day of embroygeneisis. The investigation showed that a mosaic pattern of neurogenesis exists in the hippocampus, just as in the neocortex, and it can be regarded as the result of asynchronous production of neurons by local areas of the germinative zone, each of which constructs a radial segment of cortex

  10. Fuzzy time-series based on Fibonacci sequence for stock price forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tai-Liang; Cheng, Ching-Hsue; Jong Teoh, Hia

    2007-07-01

    Time-series models have been utilized to make reasonably accurate predictions in the areas of stock price movements, academic enrollments, weather, etc. For promoting the forecasting performance of fuzzy time-series models, this paper proposes a new model, which incorporates the concept of the Fibonacci sequence, the framework of Song and Chissom's model and the weighted method of Yu's model. This paper employs a 5-year period TSMC (Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company) stock price data and a 13-year period of TAIEX (Taiwan Stock Exchange Capitalization Weighted Stock Index) stock index data as experimental datasets. By comparing our forecasting performances with Chen's (Forecasting enrollments based on fuzzy time-series. Fuzzy Sets Syst. 81 (1996) 311-319), Yu's (Weighted fuzzy time-series models for TAIEX forecasting. Physica A 349 (2004) 609-624) and Huarng's (The application of neural networks to forecast fuzzy time series. Physica A 336 (2006) 481-491) models, we conclude that the proposed model surpasses in accuracy these conventional fuzzy time-series models.

  11. An efficient genetic algorithm for a hybrid flow shop scheduling problem with time lags and sequence-dependent setup time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahmand-Mehr Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a hybrid flow shop scheduling problem with a new approach considering time lags and sequence-dependent setup time in realistic situations is presented. Since few works have been implemented in this field, the necessity of finding better solutions is a motivation to extend heuristic or meta-heuristic algorithms. This type of production system is found in industries such as food processing, chemical, textile, metallurgical, printed circuit board, and automobile manufacturing. A mixed integer linear programming (MILP model is proposed to minimize the makespan. Since this problem is known as NP-Hard class, a meta-heuristic algorithm, named Genetic Algorithm (GA, and three heuristic algorithms (Johnson, SPTCH and Palmer are proposed. Numerical experiments of different sizes are implemented to evaluate the performance of presented mathematical programming model and the designed GA in compare to heuristic algorithms and a benchmark algorithm. Computational results indicate that the designed GA can produce near optimal solutions in a short computational time for different size problems.

  12. Event-sequence time series analysis in ground-based gamma-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barres de Almeida, U.; Chadwick, P.; Daniel, M.; Nolan, S.; McComb, L.

    2008-01-01

    The recent, extreme episodes of variability detected from Blazars by the leading atmospheric Cerenkov experiments motivate the development and application of specialized statistical techniques that enable the study of this rich data set to its furthest extent. The identification of the shortest variability timescales supported by the data and the actual variability structure observed in the light curves of these sources are some of the fundamental aspects being studied, that answers can bring new developments on the understanding of the physics of these objects and on the mechanisms of production of VHE gamma-rays in the Universe. Some of our efforts in studying the time variability of VHE sources involve the application of dynamic programming algorithms to the problem of detecting change-points in a Poisson sequence. In this particular paper we concentrate on the more primary issue of the applicability of counting statistics to the analysis of time-series on VHE gamma-ray astronomy.

  13. Improved hybrid information filtering based on limited time window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wen-Jun; Guo, Qiang; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2014-12-01

    Adopting the entire collecting information of users, the hybrid information filtering of heat conduction and mass diffusion (HHM) (Zhou et al., 2010) was successfully proposed to solve the apparent diversity-accuracy dilemma. Since the recent behaviors are more effective to capture the users' potential interests, we present an improved hybrid information filtering of adopting the partial recent information. We expand the time window to generate a series of training sets, each of which is treated as known information to predict the future links proven by the testing set. The experimental results on one benchmark dataset Netflix indicate that by only using approximately 31% recent rating records, the accuracy could be improved by an average of 4.22% and the diversity could be improved by 13.74%. In addition, the performance on the dataset MovieLens could be preserved by considering approximately 60% recent records. Furthermore, we find that the improved algorithm is effective to solve the cold-start problem. This work could improve the information filtering performance and shorten the computational time.

  14. Digital Sequences and a Time Reversal-Based Impact Region Imaging and Localization Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Qian, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    To reduce time and cost of damage inspection, on-line impact monitoring of aircraft composite structures is needed. A digital monitor based on an array of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) is developed to record the impact region of impacts on-line. It is small in size, lightweight and has low power consumption, but there are two problems with the impact alarm region localization method of the digital monitor at the current stage. The first one is that the accuracy rate of the impact alarm region localization is low, especially on complex composite structures. The second problem is that the area of impact alarm region is large when a large scale structure is monitored and the number of PZTs is limited which increases the time and cost of damage inspections. To solve the two problems, an impact alarm region imaging and localization method based on digital sequences and time reversal is proposed. In this method, the frequency band of impact response signals is estimated based on the digital sequences first. Then, characteristic signals of impact response signals are constructed by sinusoidal modulation signals. Finally, the phase synthesis time reversal impact imaging method is adopted to obtain the impact region image. Depending on the image, an error ellipse is generated to give out the final impact alarm region. A validation experiment is implemented on a complex composite wing box of a real aircraft. The validation results show that the accuracy rate of impact alarm region localization is approximately 100%. The area of impact alarm region can be reduced and the number of PZTs needed to cover the same impact monitoring region is reduced by more than a half. PMID:24084123

  15. Whole exome sequencing in neurogenetic odysseys: An effective, cost- and time-saving diagnostic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Córdoba

    Full Text Available Diagnostic trajectories for neurogenetic disorders frequently require the use of considerable time and resources, exposing patients and families to so-called "diagnostic odysseys". Previous studies have provided strong evidence for increased diagnostic and clinical utility of whole-exome sequencing in medical genetics. However, specific reports assessing its utility in a setting such as ours- a neurogeneticist led academic group serving in a low-income country-are rare.To assess the diagnostic yield of WES in patients suspected of having a neurogenetic condition and explore the cost-effectiveness of its implementation in a research group located in an Argentinean public hospital.This is a prospective study of the clinical utility of WES in a series of 40 consecutive patients selected from a Neurogenetic Clinic of a tertiary Hospital in Argentina. We evaluated patients retrospectively for previous diagnostic trajectories. Diagnostic yield, clinical impact on management and economic diagnostic burden were evaluated.We demonstrated the clinical utility of Whole Exome Sequencing in our patient cohort, obtaining a diagnostic yield of 40% (95% CI, 24.8%-55.2% among a diverse group of neurological disorders. The average age at the time of WES was 23 (range 3-70. The mean time elapsed from symptom onset to WES was 11 years (range 3-42. The mean cost of the diagnostic workup prior to WES was USD 1646 (USD 1439 to 1853, which is 60% higher than WES cost in our center.WES for neurogenetics proved to be an effective, cost- and time-saving approach for the molecular diagnosis of this heterogeneous and complex group of patients.

  16. Spectral information for detection of acoustic time to arrival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Michael S.; Russo, Frank A.; MacDonald, Ewen

    2013-01-01

    The exponential increase of intensity for an approaching sound source provides salient information for a listener to make judgments of time to arrival (TTA). Specifically, a listener will experience a greater rate of increasing intensity for higher than for lower frequencies during a sound source...

  17. Development of time sensitivity and information processing speed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Droit-Volet

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine whether age-related changes in the speed of information processing are the best predictors of the increase in sensitivity to time throughout childhood. Children aged 5 and 8 years old, as well adults, were given two temporal bisection tasks, one with short (0.5/1-s and the other with longer (4/8-s anchor durations. In addition, the participants' scores on different neuropsychological tests assessing both information processing speed and other dimensions of cognitive control (short-term memory, working memory, selective attention were calculated. The results showed that the best predictor of individual variances in sensitivity to time was information processing speed, although working memory also accounted for some of the individual differences in time sensitivity, albeit to a lesser extent. In sum, the faster the information processing speed of the participants, the higher their sensitivity to time was. These results are discussed in the light of the idea that the development of temporal capacities has its roots in the maturation of the dynamic functioning of the brain.

  18. Real-time traveler information market assessment white paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-22

    This report takes a multi-modal look at the lay of the land of the real-time traveler information : market in the United States. This includes identification and characterization of the gaps in the : domestic industry with respect to data cover...

  19. Wavelet analysis of molecular dynamics: Efficient extraction of time-frequency information in ultrafast optical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, Javier; Castro, Enrique; Chin, Alex W.; Almeida, Javier; Huelga, Susana F.; Plenio, Martin B.

    2013-01-01

    New experimental techniques based on nonlinear ultrafast spectroscopies have been developed over the last few years, and have been demonstrated to provide powerful probes of quantum dynamics in different types of molecular aggregates, including both natural and artificial light harvesting complexes. Fourier transform-based spectroscopies have been particularly successful, yet “complete” spectral information normally necessitates the loss of all information on the temporal sequence of events in a signal. This information though is particularly important in transient or multi-stage processes, in which the spectral decomposition of the data evolves in time. By going through several examples of ultrafast quantum dynamics, we demonstrate that the use of wavelets provide an efficient and accurate way to simultaneously acquire both temporal and frequency information about a signal, and argue that this greatly aids the elucidation and interpretation of physical process responsible for non-stationary spectroscopic features, such as those encountered in coherent excitonic energy transport

  20. Robust Parallel Machine Scheduling Problem with Uncertainties and Sequence-Dependent Setup Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A parallel machine scheduling problem in plastic production is studied in this paper. In this problem, the processing time and arrival time are uncertain but lie in their respective intervals. In addition, each job must be processed together with a mold while jobs which belong to one family can share the same mold. Therefore, time changing mold is required for two consecutive jobs that belong to different families, which is known as sequence-dependent setup time. This paper aims to identify a robust schedule by min–max regret criterion. It is proved that the scenario incurring maximal regret for each feasible solution lies in finite extreme scenarios. A mixed integer linear programming formulation and an exact algorithm are proposed to solve the problem. Moreover, a modified artificial bee colony algorithm is developed to solve large-scale problems. The performance of the presented algorithm is evaluated through extensive computational experiments and the results show that the proposed algorithm surpasses the exact method in terms of objective value and computational time.

  1. Analytical and clinical evaluation of the Abbott RealTime hepatitis B sequencing assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Hee Jae; Kim, Ji-Youn; Lee, Myoung-Keun; Lee, Nam Yong; Kim, Jong-Won; Ki, Chang-Seok

    2016-12-01

    Long-term nucleoside analogue (NA) treatment leads to selection for drug-resistant mutations in patients undergoing hepatitis B virus (HBV) therapy. The Abbott RealTime HBV Sequencing assay (Abbott assay; Abbott Molecular Inc., Des Plaines, IL, USA) targets the reverse transcriptase region of the polymerase gene and as such has the ability to detect NA resistance-associated mutations in HBV. We evaluated the analytical performance of the Abbott assay and compared its diagnostic performance to that of a laboratory-developed nested-PCR and sequencing method. The analytical sensitivity of the Abbott assay was determined using a serially-diluted WHO International Standard. To validate the clinical performances of the Abbott assay and the laboratory-developed assay, 89 clinical plasma samples with various levels of HBV DNA were tested using both assays. The limit of detection of the Abbott assay, was 210IU/ml and it successfully detected mutations when the mutant types were present at levels ≥20%. Among 89 clinical specimens, 43 and 42 were amplification positive in the Abbott and laboratory-developed assays, respectively, with 87.6% overall agreement (78/89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 78.6-93.4). The Abbott assay failed to detect the minor mutant populations in two specimens, and therefore overall concordance was 85.3% (76/89), and the kappa value was 0.79 (95% CI, 0.67-0.90). The Abbott assay showed comparable diagnostic performance to laboratory-developed nested PCR followed by direct sequencing, and may be useful as a routine method for detecting HBV NA resistance-associated mutations in clinical laboratory settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Through Increasing "Information Literacy" Capital and Habitus (Agency): The Complementary Impact on Composition Skills When Appropriately Sequenced

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karas, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Through a case study approach of a cohort of community college students at a single community college, the impact on success rates in composition courses was analyzed based on the sequence of completing an information literacy course. Two student cohorts were sampled based on completing an information literacy course prior to, or concurrently with…

  3. The transmission of accelerator timing information around CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beetham, C.G.; Kohler, K.; Parker, C.R.C.B.; Ribes, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    Prior to the construction of the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider, machine timing information was transmitted around CERN's accelerators using a labyrinth of dedicated copper wires. However, at an early stage in the design of the LEP control system, it was decided to use an integrated communication system based on Time Division Multiplex (TDM) techniques. Therefore it was considered appropriate to use this facility to transmit timing information over long distances. This note describes the overall system, with emphasis placed on the connectivity requirements for the CCITT G.703 series of recommendations. In addition the methods used for error detection and correction, and also for redundancy, are described. The cost implications of using such a TDM based system are also analyzed. Finally the performance and reliability obtained by using this approach are discussed. (author)

  4. Mars Exploration 2003 to 2013 - An Integrated Perspective: Time Sequencing the Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, G.; McKay, C.

    2000-01-01

    The science goals for the Mars exploration program, together with the HEDS precursor environmental and technology needs, serve as a solid starting point for re-planning the program in an orderly way. Most recently, the community has recognized the significance of subsurface sampling as a key component in "following the water". Accessing samples from hundreds and even thousands of meters beneath the surface is a challenge that will call for technology development and for one or more demonstration missions. Recent mission failures and concerns about the complexity of the previously planned MSR missions indicate that, before we are ready to undertake sample return and deep sampling, the Mars exploration program needs to include: 1) technology development missions; and 2) basic landing site assessment missions. These precursor missions should demonstrate the capability for reliable & accurate soft landing and in situ propellant production. The precursor missions will need to carry out close-up site observations, ground-penetrating radar mapping from orbit and conduct seismic surveys. Clearly the programs should be planned as a single, continuous exploration effort. A prudent minimum list of missions, including surface rovers with ranges of more than 10 km, can be derived from the numerous goals and requirements; they can be sequenced in an orderly way to ensure that time is available to feed forward the results of the precursor missions. One such sequence of missions is proposed for the decade beginning in 2003.

  5. Methodology for time-dependent reliability analysis of accident sequences and complex reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula, H.M.

    1984-01-01

    The work presented here is of direct use in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and is of value to utilities as well as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Specifically, this report presents a methodology and a computer program to calculate the expected number of occurrences for each accident sequence in an event tree. The methodology evaluates the time-dependent (instantaneous) and the average behavior of the accident sequence. The methodology accounts for standby safety system and component failures that occur (a) before they are demanded, (b) upon demand, and (c) during the mission (system operation). With respect to failures that occur during the mission, this methodology is unique in the sense that it models components that can be repaired during the mission. The expected number of system failures during the mission provides an upper bound for the probability of a system failure to run - the mission unreliability. The basic event modeling includes components that are continuously monitored, periodically tested, and those that are not tested or are otherwise nonrepairable. The computer program ASA allows practical applications of the method developed. This work represents a required extension of the presently available methodology and allows a more realistic PRA of nuclear power plants

  6. Abdominal MR imaging using a HASTE sequence : image comparison on the different echo times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kwang Bo; Lee, Moon Gyu; Lim, Tae Hwan; Jeong, Yoong Ki; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Auh, Yong Ho

    1999-01-01

    To determine the optimal parameters of abdominal HASTE imaging by means of a comparison of intermediate and long TE (echo time). We evaluated 30 consecutive patients who had undergone liver MR during a three-month period. Twelve patients were diagnosed as normal, four as having liver cirrhosis, and 14 were found to be suffering form hepatic hemangioma. On the basis of measured signal intensity of the liver, spleen, pancreas and gallbladder, and of fat, muscle, hemangioma, and background, we calculated the ratios of signal to noise (S/N), signal difference to noise (SD/N), and signal intensity (SI). Image quality was compared using these three ratios, and using two HASTE sequences with TEs of 90 msec and 134 msec, images were qualitatively evaluated. S/N ratio of the liver was higher when TE was 90 msec(p<.05), though S/N, SD/N and SI rations of the spleen, gallbladder, and pancreas-and of hemangiom-were higher when TE was 134 msec (p<.05). However, in muscle, all these three ratios were higher at a TE of 90 msec. SD/N ratio and SI of fat were higher at a TE of 134 msec. Overall image quality was better at a TE of 134 msec than at one of 90msec. A HASTE sequence with a TE of 134msec showed greater tissue contrast and stronger T2-weighted images than one with a TE of 90msec

  7. Modeling information diffusion in time-varying community networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xuelian; Zhao, Narisa

    2017-12-01

    Social networks are rarely static, and they typically have time-varying network topologies. A great number of studies have modeled temporal networks and explored social contagion processes within these models; however, few of these studies have considered community structure variations. In this paper, we present a study of how the time-varying property of a modular structure influences the information dissemination. First, we propose a continuous-time Markov model of information diffusion where two parameters, mobility rate and community attractiveness, are introduced to address the time-varying nature of the community structure. The basic reproduction number is derived, and the accuracy of this model is evaluated by comparing the simulation and theoretical results. Furthermore, numerical results illustrate that generally both the mobility rate and community attractiveness significantly promote the information diffusion process, especially in the initial outbreak stage. Moreover, the strength of this promotion effect is much stronger when the modularity is higher. Counterintuitively, it is found that when all communities have the same attractiveness, social mobility no longer accelerates the diffusion process. In addition, we show that the local spreading in the advantage group has been greatly enhanced due to the agglomeration effect caused by the social mobility and community attractiveness difference, which thus increases the global spreading.

  8. Observing Bridge Dynamic Deflection in Green Time by Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chengxin; Zhang, Guojian; Zhao, Yongqian; Chen, Mingzhi

    2018-01-01

    As traditional surveying methods are limited to observe bridge dynamic deflection; information technology is adopted to observe bridge dynamic deflection in Green time. Information technology used in this study means that we use digital cameras to photograph the bridge in red time as a zero image. Then, a series of successive images are photographed in green time. Deformation point targets are identified and located by Hough transform. With reference to the control points, the deformation values of these deformation points are obtained by differencing the successive images with a zero image, respectively. Results show that the average measurement accuracies of C0 are 0.46 pixels, 0.51 pixels and 0.74 pixels in X, Z and comprehensive direction. The average measurement accuracies of C1 are 0.43 pixels, 0.43 pixels and 0.67 pixels in X, Z and comprehensive direction in these tests. The maximal bridge deflection is 44.16mm, which is less than 75mm (Bridge deflection tolerance value). Information technology in this paper can monitor bridge dynamic deflection and depict deflection trend curves of the bridge in real time. It can provide data support for the site decisions to the bridge structure safety.

  9. Computer experiments of the time-sequence of individual steps in multiple Coulomb-excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, J. de; Dannhaueser, G.

    1982-01-01

    The way in which the multiple E2 steps in the Coulomb-excitation of a rotational band of a nucleus follow one another is elucidated for selected examples using semiclassical computer experiments. The role a given transition plays for the excitation of a given final state is measured by a quantity named ''importance function''. It is found that these functions, calculated for the highest rotational state, peak at times forming a sequence for the successive E2 transitions starting from the ground state. This sequential behaviour is used to approximately account for the effects on the projectile orbit of the sequential transfer of excitation energy and angular momentum from projectile to target. These orbits lead to similar deflection functions and cross sections as those obtained from a symmetrization procedure approximately accounting for the transfer of angular momentum and energy. (Auth.)

  10. Integrating the sequence dependent setup time open shop problem and preventive maintenance policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Naboureh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In most industrial environments, it is usually considered that machines are accessible throughout the planning horizon, but in real situation, machines may be unavailable due to a scheduled preventive maintenance where the periods of unavailability are known in advance. The main idea of this paper is to consider different preventive maintenance policies on machines regarding open shop scheduling problem (OSSP with sequence dependent setup times (SDST using immune algorithm. The preventive maintenance (PM policies are planned for maximizing availability of machines or keeping minimum level of reliability through the production horizon. The objective function of the paper is to minimize makespan. In total, the proposed algorithm extensively is compared with six adaptations of existing heuristic and meta-heuristic methods for the problem through data sets from benchmarks based on Taillard’s instances with some adjustments. The results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms other algorithms for this problem.

  11. A Novel Ant Colony Algorithm for the Single-Machine Total Weighted Tardiness Problem with Sequence Dependent Setup Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fardin Ahmadizar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the NP-hard single-machine total weighted tardiness problem with sequence dependent setup times. Incorporating fuzzy sets and genetic operators, a novel ant colony optimization algorithm is developed for the problem. In the proposed algorithm, artificial ants construct solutions as orders of jobs based on the heuristic information as well as pheromone trails. To calculate the heuristic information, three well-known priority rules are adopted as fuzzy sets and then aggregated. When all artificial ants have terminated their constructions, genetic operators such as crossover and mutation are applied to generate new regions of the solution space. A local search is then performed to improve the performance quality of some of the solutions found. Moreover, at run-time the pheromone trails are locally as well as globally updated, and limited between lower and upper bounds. The proposed algorithm is experimented on a set of benchmark problems from the literature and compared with other metaheuristics.

  12. Autonomous Information Fading and Provision to Achieve High Response Time in Distributed Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaodong; Arfaoui, Helene; Mori, Kinji

    In highly dynamic electronic commerce environment, the need for adaptability and rapid response time to information service systems has become increasingly important. In order to cope with the continuously changing conditions of service provision and utilization, Faded Information Field (FIF) has been proposed. FIF is a distributed information service system architecture, sustained by push/pull mobile agents to bring high-assurance of services through a recursive demand-oriented provision of the most popular information closer to the users to make a tradeoff between the cost of information service allocation and access. In this paper, based on the analysis of the relationship that exists among the users distribution, information provision and access time, we propose the technology for FIF design to resolve the competing requirements of users and providers to improve users' access time. In addition, to achieve dynamic load balancing with changing users preference, the autonomous information reallocation technology is proposed. We proved the effectiveness of the proposed technology through the simulation and comparison with the conventional system.

  13. Real time information management for improving productivity in metallurgical complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bascur, O.A.; Kennedy, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Applying the latest information technologies in industrial plants has become a serious challenge to management and technical teams. The availability of real time and historical operations information to identify the most critical part of the processing system from mechanical integrity is a must for global plant optimization. Expanded use of plant information on the desktop is a standard tool for revenue improvement, cost reduction, and adherence to production constraints. The industrial component desktop supports access to information for process troubleshooting, continuous improvement and innovation by plant and staff personnel. Collaboration between groups enables the implementation of an overall process effectiveness index based on losses due to equipment availability, production and product quality. The key to designing technology is to use the Internet based technologies created by Microsoft for its marketplace-office automation and the Web. Time derived variables are used for process analysis, troubleshooting and performance assessment. Connectivity between metallurgical complexes, research centers and their business system has become a reality. Two case studies of large integrated mining/metallurgical complexes are highlighted. (author)

  14. Finite-Time Approach to Microeconomic and Information Exchange Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serghey A. Amelkin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Finite-time approach allows one to optimize regimes of processes in macrosystems when duration of the processes is restricted. Driving force of the processes is difference of intensive variables: temperatures in thermodynamics, values in economics, etc. In microeconomic systems two counterflow fluxes appear due to the only driving force. They are goods and money fluxes. Another possible case is two fluxes with the same direction. The processes of information exchange can be described by this formalism.

  15. Performances and recent evolutions of EMSC Real Time Information services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazet-Roux, G.; Godey, S.; Bossu, R.

    2009-04-01

    The EMSC (http://www.emsc-csem.org) operates Real Time Earthquake Information services for the public and the scientific community which aim at providing rapid and reliable information on the seismic-ity of the Euro-Mediterranean region and on significant earthquakes worldwide. These services are based on parametric data rapidly provided by 66 seismological networks which are automatically merged and processed at EMSC. A web page which is updated every minute displays a list and a map of the latest earthquakes as well as additional information like location maps, moment tensors solutions or past regional seismicity. Since 2004, the performances and the popularity of these services have dramatically increased. The number of messages received from the contributors and the number of published events have been multiplied by 2 since 2004 and by 1.6 since 2005 respectively. The web traffic and the numbers of users of the Earthquake Notification Service (ENS) have been multiplied by 15 and 7 respectively. In terms of performances of the ENS, the median dissemination time for Euro-Med events is minutes in 2008. In order to further improve its performances and especially the speed and robustness of the reception of real time data, EMSC has recently implemented a software named QWIDS (Quake Watch Information Distribution System) which provides a quick and robust data exchange system through permanent TCP connections. At the difference with emails that can sometimes be delayed or lost, QWIDS is an actual real time communication system that ensures the data delivery. In terms of hardware, EMSC imple-mented a high availability, dynamic load balancing, redundant and scalable web servers infrastructure, composed of two SUN T2000 and one F5 BIG-IP switch. This will allow coping with constantly increas-ing web traffic and the occurrence of huge peaks of traffic after widely felt earthquakes.

  16. New scheduling rules for a dynamic flexible flow line problem with sequence-dependent setup times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Hamidreza; Ghodsypour, Seyed Hassan; Davoudpour, Hamid

    2017-09-01

    In the literature, the application of multi-objective dynamic scheduling problem and simple priority rules are widely studied. Although these rules are not efficient enough due to simplicity and lack of general insight, composite dispatching rules have a very suitable performance because they result from experiments. In this paper, a dynamic flexible flow line problem with sequence-dependent setup times is studied. The objective of the problem is minimization of mean flow time and mean tardiness. A 0-1 mixed integer model of the problem is formulated. Since the problem is NP-hard, four new composite dispatching rules are proposed to solve it by applying genetic programming framework and choosing proper operators. Furthermore, a discrete-event simulation model is made to examine the performances of scheduling rules considering four new heuristic rules and the six adapted heuristic rules from the literature. It is clear from the experimental results that composite dispatching rules that are formed from genetic programming have a better performance in minimization of mean flow time and mean tardiness than others.

  17. RStrucFam: a web server to associate structure and cognate RNA for RNA-binding proteins from sequence information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pritha; Mathew, Oommen K; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-10-07

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) interact with their cognate RNA(s) to form large biomolecular assemblies. They are versatile in their functionality and are involved in a myriad of processes inside the cell. RBPs with similar structural features and common biological functions are grouped together into families and superfamilies. It will be useful to obtain an early understanding and association of RNA-binding property of sequences of gene products. Here, we report a web server, RStrucFam, to predict the structure, type of cognate RNA(s) and function(s) of proteins, where possible, from mere sequence information. The web server employs Hidden Markov Model scan (hmmscan) to enable association to a back-end database of structural and sequence families. The database (HMMRBP) comprises of 437 HMMs of RBP families of known structure that have been generated using structure-based sequence alignments and 746 sequence-centric RBP family HMMs. The input protein sequence is associated with structural or sequence domain families, if structure or sequence signatures exist. In case of association of the protein with a family of known structures, output features like, multiple structure-based sequence alignment (MSSA) of the query with all others members of that family is provided. Further, cognate RNA partner(s) for that protein, Gene Ontology (GO) annotations, if any and a homology model of the protein can be obtained. The users can also browse through the database for details pertaining to each family, protein or RNA and their related information based on keyword search or RNA motif search. RStrucFam is a web server that exploits structurally conserved features of RBPs, derived from known family members and imprinted in mathematical profiles, to predict putative RBPs from sequence information. Proteins that fail to associate with such structure-centric families are further queried against the sequence-centric RBP family HMMs in the HMMRBP database. Further, all other essential

  18. An accurate and rapid continuous wavelet dynamic time warping algorithm for unbalanced global mapping in nanopore sequencing

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Renmin

    2017-12-24

    Long-reads, point-of-care, and PCR-free are the promises brought by nanopore sequencing. Among various steps in nanopore data analysis, the global mapping between the raw electrical current signal sequence and the expected signal sequence from the pore model serves as the key building block to base calling, reads mapping, variant identification, and methylation detection. However, the ultra-long reads of nanopore sequencing and an order of magnitude difference in the sampling speeds of the two sequences make the classical dynamic time warping (DTW) and its variants infeasible to solve the problem. Here, we propose a novel multi-level DTW algorithm, cwDTW, based on continuous wavelet transforms with different scales of the two signal sequences. Our algorithm starts from low-resolution wavelet transforms of the two sequences, such that the transformed sequences are short and have similar sampling rates. Then the peaks and nadirs of the transformed sequences are extracted to form feature sequences with similar lengths, which can be easily mapped by the original DTW. Our algorithm then recursively projects the warping path from a lower-resolution level to a higher-resolution one by building a context-dependent boundary and enabling a constrained search for the warping path in the latter. Comprehensive experiments on two real nanopore datasets on human and on Pandoraea pnomenusa, as well as two benchmark datasets from previous studies, demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. In particular, cwDTW can almost always generate warping paths that are very close to the original DTW, which are remarkably more accurate than the state-of-the-art methods including FastDTW and PrunedDTW. Meanwhile, on the real nanopore datasets, cwDTW is about 440 times faster than FastDTW and 3000 times faster than the original DTW. Our program is available at https://github.com/realbigws/cwDTW.

  19. Information transfer via implicit encoding with delay time modulation in a time-delay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kye, Won-Ho, E-mail: whkye@kipo.go.kr [Korean Intellectual Property Office, Government Complex Daejeon Building 4, 189, Cheongsa-ro, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-20

    A new encoding scheme for information transfer with modulated delay time in a time-delay system is proposed. In the scheme, the message is implicitly encoded into the modulated delay time. The information transfer rate as a function of encoding redundancy in various noise scales is presented and it is analyzed that the implicit encoding scheme (IES) has stronger resistance against channel noise than the explicit encoding scheme (EES). In addition, its advantages in terms of secure communication and feasible applications are discussed. -- Highlights: ► We propose new encoding scheme with delay time modulation. ► The message is implicitly encoded with modulated delay time. ► The proposed scheme shows stronger resistance against channel noise.

  20. Elementary Statistical Models for Vector Collision-Sequence Interference Effects with Poisson-Distributed Collision Times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    In a recent paper (Lewis, 2008) a class of models suitable for application to collision-sequence interference was introduced. In these models velocities are assumed to be completely randomized in each collision. The distribution of velocities was assumed to be Gaussian. The integrated induced dipole moment μk, for vector interference, or the scalar modulation μk, for scalar interference, was assumed to be a function of the impulse (integrated force) fk, or its magnitude fk, experienced by the molecule in a collision. For most of (Lewis, 2008) it was assumed that μk fk and μk fk, but it proved to be possible to extend the models, so that the magnitude of the induced dipole moment is equal to an arbitrary power or sum of powers of the intermolecular force. This allows estimates of the in filling of the interference dip by the dis proportionality of the induced dipole moment and force. One particular such model, using data from (Herman and Lewis, 2006), leads to the most realistic estimate for the in filling of the vector interference dip yet obtained. In (Lewis, 2008) the drastic assumption was made that collision times occurred at equal intervals. In the present paper that assumption is removed: the collision times are taken to form a Poisson process. This is much more realistic than the equal-intervals assumption. The interference dip is found to be a Lorentzian in this model

  1. Plastid, nuclear and reverse transcriptase sequences in the mitochondrial genome of Oenothera: is genetic information transferred between organelles via RNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, W; Brennicke, A

    1987-01-01

    We describe an open reading frame (ORF) with high homology to reverse transcriptase in the mitochondrial genome of Oenothera. This ORF displays all the characteristics of an active plant mitochondrial gene with a possible ribosome binding site and 39% T in the third codon position. It is located between a sequence fragment from the plastid genome and one of nuclear origin downstream from the gene encoding subunit 5 of the NADH dehydrogenase. The nuclear derived sequence consists of 528 nucleotides from the small ribosomal RNA and contains an expansion segment unique to nuclear rRNAs. The plastid sequence contains part of the ribosomal protein S4 and the complete tRNA(Ser). The observation that only transcribed sequences have been found i more than one subcellular compartment in higher plants suggests that interorganellar transfer of genetic information may occur via RNA and subsequent local reverse transcription and genomic integration. PMID:14650433

  2. Not All Order Memory Is Equal: Test Demands Reveal Dissociations in Memory for Sequence Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, Tanya R.; MacLeod, Colin M.

    2017-01-01

    Remembering the order of a sequence of events is a fundamental feature of episodic memory. Indeed, a number of formal models represent temporal context as part of the memory system, and memory for order has been researched extensively. Yet, the nature of the code(s) underlying sequence memory is still relatively unknown. Across 4 experiments that…

  3. Lost time: Bindings do not represent temporal order information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Birte; Frings, Christian

    2018-06-04

    Many accounts of human action control assume bindings between features of stimuli and responses of individual events. One widely accepted assumption about these bindings is that they do not contain temporal-order representations regarding the integrated elements. Even though several theories either explicitly or implicitly include it, this assumption has never been tested directly. One reason for this lack of evidence is likely that typical stimulus-response binding paradigms are inapt for such a test. Adapting a new paradigm of response-response binding to include order switches between response integration and retrieval, we were able to analyze possible representation of order information in bindings for the first time. Binding effects were identical for intact and switched response orders, indicating that bindings indeed include no temporal-order information.

  4. Situation models and memory: the effects of temporal and causal information on recall sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownstein, Aaron L; Read, Stephen J

    2007-10-01

    Participants watched an episode of the television show Cheers on video and then reported free recall. Recall sequence followed the sequence of events in the story; if one concept was observed immediately after another, it was recalled immediately after it. We also made a causal network of the show's story and found that recall sequence followed causal links; effects were recalled immediately after their causes. Recall sequence was more likely to follow causal links than temporal sequence, and most likely to follow causal links that were temporally sequential. Results were similar at 10-minute and 1-week delayed recall. This is the most direct and detailed evidence reported on sequential effects in recall. The causal network also predicted probability of recall; concepts with more links and concepts on the main causal chain were most likely to be recalled. This extends the causal network model to more complex materials than previous research.

  5. Later School Start Times: What Informs Parent Support or Opposition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunietz, Galit Levi; Matos-Moreno, Amilcar; Singer, Dianne C; Davis, Matthew M; O'Brien, Louise M; Chervin, Ronald D

    2017-07-15

    To investigate parental knowledge about adolescent sleep needs, and other beliefs that may inform their support for or objection to later school start times. In 2014, we conducted a cross-sectional, Internet-based survey of a nationally representative sample of parents as part of the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. Parents with teens aged 13-17 years reported their children's sleep patterns and school schedules, and whether the parents supported later school start times (8:30 am or later). Responses associated with parental support of later school start times were examined with logistic regression analysis. Overall, 88% of parents reported school start times before 8:30 am, and served as the analysis sample (n = 554). In this group, 51% expressed support for later school start times. Support was associated with current school start times before 7:30 am (odds ratio [OR] = 3.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2, 8.4]); parental opinion that their teen's current school start time was "too early" (OR = 3.8 [1.8, 7.8]); and agreement with American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations about school start times (OR = 4.7 [2.2, 10.1]). Support also was associated with anticipation of improved school performance (OR = 3.0 [1.5, 5.9]) or increased sleep duration (OR = 4.0 [1.8, 8.9]) with later school start times. Conversely, parents who anticipated too little time for after-school activities (OR = 0.5 [0.3, 0.9]) and need for different transportation plans (OR = 0.5 [0.2, 0.9]) were often less supportive. Parental education about healthy sleep needs and anticipated health benefits may increase their support for later school start times. Educational efforts should also publicize the positive experiences of communities that have made this transition, with regard to limited adverse effect on after-school activity schedules and transportation. © 2017 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  6. The application of GPS time information in the telemetry ground station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Songtao; Zhang Yusong; Sun Xiurui

    2001-01-01

    GPS time information is a kind of practicable information resource that can be shared all over the world. Now it is the most accurate wireless time information. The major of this paper is the application information of GPS time information in telemetry. The main point introduces how to make use of the GPS time information to produce GPS-IRIG-B time code for proving ground and how to send time information to related equipment in telemetry ground station

  7. Inferring Fitness Effects from Time-Resolved Sequence Data with a Delay-Deterministic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nené, Nuno R; Dunham, Alistair S; Illingworth, Christopher J R

    2018-05-01

    A common challenge arising from the observation of an evolutionary system over time is to infer the magnitude of selection acting upon a specific genetic variant, or variants, within the population. The inference of selection may be confounded by the effects of genetic drift in a system, leading to the development of inference procedures to account for these effects. However, recent work has suggested that deterministic models of evolution may be effective in capturing the effects of selection even under complex models of demography, suggesting the more general application of deterministic approaches to inference. Responding to this literature, we here note a case in which a deterministic model of evolution may give highly misleading inferences, resulting from the nondeterministic properties of mutation in a finite population. We propose an alternative approach that acts to correct for this error, and which we denote the delay-deterministic model. Applying our model to a simple evolutionary system, we demonstrate its performance in quantifying the extent of selection acting within that system. We further consider the application of our model to sequence data from an evolutionary experiment. We outline scenarios in which our model may produce improved results for the inference of selection, noting that such situations can be easily identified via the use of a regular deterministic model. Copyright © 2018 Nené et al.

  8. Application of a time-dependent coalescence process for inferring the history of population size changes from DNA sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanski, A; Kimmel, M; Chakraborty, R

    1998-05-12

    Distribution of pairwise differences of nucleotides from data on a sample of DNA sequences from a given segment of the genome has been used in the past to draw inferences about the past history of population size changes. However, all earlier methods assume a given model of population size changes (such as sudden expansion), parameters of which (e.g., time and amplitude of expansion) are fitted to the observed distributions of nucleotide differences among pairwise comparisons of all DNA sequences in the sample. Our theory indicates that for any time-dependent population size, N(tau) (in which time tau is counted backward from present), a time-dependent coalescence process yields the distribution, p(tau), of the time of coalescence between two DNA sequences randomly drawn from the population. Prediction of p(tau) and N(tau) requires the use of a reverse Laplace transform known to be unstable. Nevertheless, simulated data obtained from three models of monotone population change (stepwise, exponential, and logistic) indicate that the pattern of a past population size change leaves its signature on the pattern of DNA polymorphism. Application of the theory to the published mtDNA sequences indicates that the current mtDNA sequence variation is not inconsistent with a logistic growth of the human population.

  9. A method for investigating relative timing information on phylogenetic trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Daniel; Matsen, Frederick A; Stadler, Tanja

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we present a new way to describe the timing of branching events in phylogenetic trees. Our description is in terms of the relative timing of diversification events between sister clades; as such it is complementary to existing methods using lineages-through-time plots which consider diversification in aggregate. The method can be applied to look for evidence of diversification happening in lineage-specific "bursts", or the opposite, where diversification between 2 clades happens in an unusually regular fashion. In order to be able to distinguish interesting events from stochasticity, we discuss 2 classes of neutral models on trees with relative timing information and develop a statistical framework for testing these models. These model classes include both the coalescent with ancestral population size variation and global rate speciation-extinction models. We end the paper with 2 example applications: first, we show that the evolution of the hepatitis C virus deviates from the coalescent with arbitrary population size. Second, we analyze a large tree of ants, demonstrating that a period of elevated diversification rates does not appear to have occurred in a bursting manner.

  10. TRX-LOGOS - a graphical tool to demonstrate DNA information content dependent upon backbone dynamics in addition to base sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Connor H; Schulze, Katharina V; Babbitt, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    It is now widely-accepted that DNA sequences defining DNA-protein interactions functionally depend upon local biophysical features of DNA backbone that are important in defining sites of binding interaction in the genome (e.g. DNA shape, charge and intrinsic dynamics). However, these physical features of DNA polymer are not directly apparent when analyzing and viewing Shannon information content calculated at single nucleobases in a traditional sequence logo plot. Thus, sequence logos plots are severely limited in that they convey no explicit information regarding the structural dynamics of DNA backbone, a feature often critical to binding specificity. We present TRX-LOGOS, an R software package and Perl wrapper code that interfaces the JASPAR database for computational regulatory genomics. TRX-LOGOS extends the traditional sequence logo plot to include Shannon information content calculated with regard to the dinucleotide-based BI-BII conformation shifts in phosphate linkages on the DNA backbone, thereby adding a visual measure of intrinsic DNA flexibility that can be critical for many DNA-protein interactions. TRX-LOGOS is available as an R graphics module offered at both SourceForge and as a download supplement at this journal. To demonstrate the general utility of TRX logo plots, we first calculated the information content for 416 Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor binding sites functionally confirmed in the Yeastract database and matched to previously published yeast genomic alignments. We discovered that flanking regions contain significantly elevated information content at phosphate linkages than can be observed at nucleobases. We also examined broader transcription factor classifications defined by the JASPAR database, and discovered that many general signatures of transcription factor binding are locally more information rich at the level of DNA backbone dynamics than nucleobase sequence. We used TRX-logos in combination with MEGA 6.0 software

  11. High-density rhesus macaque oligonucleotide microarray design using early-stage rhesus genome sequence information and human genome annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magness Charles L

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently, few genomic reagents specific for non-human primate research have been available. To address this need, we have constructed a macaque-specific high-density oligonucleotide microarray by using highly fragmented low-pass sequence contigs from the rhesus genome project together with the detailed sequence and exon structure of the human genome. Using this method, we designed oligonucleotide probes to over 17,000 distinct rhesus/human gene orthologs and increased by four-fold the number of available genes relative to our first-generation expressed sequence tag (EST-derived array. Results We constructed a database containing 248,000 exon sequences from 23,000 human RefSeq genes and compared each human exon with its best matching sequence in the January 2005 version of the rhesus genome project list of 486,000 DNA contigs. Best matching rhesus exon sequences for each of the 23,000 human genes were then concatenated in the proper order and orientation to produce a rhesus "virtual transcriptome." Microarray probes were designed, one per gene, to the region closest to the 3' untranslated region (UTR of each rhesus virtual transcript. Each probe was compared to a composite rhesus/human transcript database to test for cross-hybridization potential yielding a final probe set representing 18,296 rhesus/human gene orthologs, including transcript variants, and over 17,000 distinct genes. We hybridized mRNA from rhesus brain and spleen to both the EST- and genome-derived microarrays. Besides four-fold greater gene coverage, the genome-derived array also showed greater mean signal intensities for genes present on both arrays. Genome-derived probes showed 99.4% identity when compared to 4,767 rhesus GenBank sequence tag site (STS sequences indicating that early stage low-pass versions of complex genomes are of sufficient quality to yield valuable functional genomic information when combined with finished genome information from

  12. Crafting a Real-Time Information Aggregator for Mobile Messaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenq-Shiou Leu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile messaging is evolving beyond SMS (Short Message Service text messaging with the introduction of MMS (Multimedia Messaging Service. In the past, such a scheme is used for peer-to-peer communication. Messages are generally displayed on a cellular phone with a limited-sized screen. However, such a visualizing process is not suitable to broadcast real-time SMS/MMS messages to people in public. To facilitate the instancy and publicity, we develop a real-time information aggregator—Visualizing SMS and MMS Messages System (VSMMS—to realize the concept by integrating SMS and MMS messaging over GSM/GPRS/UMTS onto a remote display device. The device exhibits messages on a larger display device in public. VSMMS features a revolutionized variation of mass media broadcasting. In this paper, we practically illustrate how to design and implement VSMMS and use a M/M/1 model to conduct a theoretical analysis about the message delay in the system queue. Meanwhile, we make an empirical performance evaluation about the message transmission time over different networks.

  13. Real-time UAV trajectory generation using feature points matching between video image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Younggi; Song, Jeongheon; Han, Dongyeob

    2017-09-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), equipped with navigation systems and video capability, are currently being deployed for intelligence, reconnaissance and surveillance mission. In this paper, we present a systematic approach for the generation of UAV trajectory using a video image matching system based on SURF (Speeded up Robust Feature) and Preemptive RANSAC (Random Sample Consensus). Video image matching to find matching points is one of the most important steps for the accurate generation of UAV trajectory (sequence of poses in 3D space). We used the SURF algorithm to find the matching points between video image sequences, and removed mismatching by using the Preemptive RANSAC which divides all matching points to outliers and inliers. The inliers are only used to determine the epipolar geometry for estimating the relative pose (rotation and translation) between image sequences. Experimental results from simulated video image sequences showed that our approach has a good potential to be applied to the automatic geo-localization of the UAVs system

  14. Expansion and Compression of Time Correlate with Information Processing in an Enumeration Task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Wutz

    Full Text Available Perception of temporal duration is subjective and is influenced by factors such as attention and context. For example, unexpected or emotional events are often experienced as if time subjectively expands, suggesting that the amount of information processed in a unit of time can be increased. Time dilation effects have been measured with an oddball paradigm in which an infrequent stimulus is perceived to last longer than standard stimuli in the rest of the sequence. Likewise, time compression for the oddball occurs when the duration of the standard items is relatively brief. Here, we investigated whether the amount of information processing changes when time is perceived as distorted. On each trial, an oddball stimulus of varying numerosity (1-14 items and duration was presented along with standard items that were either short (70 ms or long (1050 ms. Observers were instructed to count the number of dots within the oddball stimulus and to judge its relative duration with respect to the standards on that trial. Consistent with previous results, oddballs were reliably perceived as temporally distorted: expanded for longer standard stimuli blocks and compressed for shorter standards. The occurrence of these distortions of time perception correlated with perceptual processing; i.e. enumeration accuracy increased when time was perceived as expanded and decreased with temporal compression. These results suggest that subjective time distortions are not epiphenomenal, but reflect real changes in sensory processing. Such short-term plasticity in information processing rate could be evolutionarily advantageous in optimizing perception and action during critical moments.

  15. Sequence- vs. chip-assisted genomic selection: accurate biological information is advised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Enciso, Miguel; Rincón, Juan C; Legarra, Andrés

    2015-05-09

    The development of next-generation sequencing technologies (NGS) has made the use of whole-genome sequence data for routine genetic evaluations possible, which has triggered a considerable interest in animal and plant breeding fields. Here, we investigated whether complete or partial sequence data can improve upon existing SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) array-based selection strategies by simulation using a mixed coalescence - gene-dropping approach. We simulated 20 or 100 causal mutations (quantitative trait nucleotides, QTN) within 65 predefined 'gene' regions, each 10 kb long, within a genome composed of ten 3-Mb chromosomes. We compared prediction accuracy by cross-validation using a medium-density chip (7.5 k SNPs), a high-density (HD, 17 k) and sequence data (335 k). Genetic evaluation was based on a GBLUP method. The simulations showed: (1) a law of diminishing returns with increasing number of SNPs; (2) a modest effect of SNP ascertainment bias in arrays; (3) a small advantage of using whole-genome sequence data vs. HD arrays i.e. ~4%; (4) a minor effect of NGS errors except when imputation error rates are high (≥20%); and (5) if QTN were known, prediction accuracy approached 1. Since this is obviously unrealistic, we explored milder assumptions. We showed that, if all SNPs within causal genes were included in the prediction model, accuracy could also dramatically increase by ~40%. However, this criterion was highly sensitive to either misspecification (including wrong genes) or to the use of an incomplete gene list; in these cases, accuracy fell rapidly towards that reached when all SNPs from sequence data were blindly included in the model. Our study shows that, unless an accurate prior estimate on the functionality of SNPs can be included in the predictor, there is a law of diminishing returns with increasing SNP density. As a result, use of whole-genome sequence data may not result in a highly increased selection response over high

  16. Timely diagnosis of sitosterolemia by next generation sequencing in two children with severe hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonuomo, Paola Sabrina; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Pisciotta, Livia; Rabacchi, Claudio; Papadia, Francesco; Bruzzi, Patrizia; Tummolo, Albina; Bartuli, Andrea; Cortese, Claudio; Bertolini, Stefano; Calandra, Sebastiano

    2017-07-01

    Severe hypercholesterolemia associated or not with xanthomas in a child may suggest the diagnosis of homozygous autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH) or sitosterolemia, depending on the transmission of hypercholesterolemia in the patient's family. Sitosterolemia is a recessive disorder characterized by high plasma levels of cholesterol and plant sterols due to mutations in the ABCG5 or the ABCG8 gene, leading to a loss of function of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) heterodimer transporter G5-G8. We aimed to perform the molecular characterization of two children with severe primary hypercholesterolemia. Case #1 was a 2 year-old girl with high LDL-cholesterol (690 mg/dl) and tuberous and intertriginous xanthomas. Case #2 was a 7 year-old boy with elevated LDL-C (432 mg/dl) but no xanthomas. In both cases, at least one parent had elevated LDL-cholesterol levels. For the molecular diagnosis, we applied targeted next generation sequencing (NGS), which unexpectedly revealed that both patients were compound heterozygous for nonsense mutations: Case #1 in ABCG5 gene [p.(Gln251*)/p.(Arg446*)] and Case #2 in ABCG8 gene [p.(Ser107*)/p.(Trp361*)]. Both children had extremely high serum sitosterol and campesterol levels, thus confirming the diagnosis of sisterolemia. A low-fat/low-sterol diet was promptly adopted with and without the addition of ezetimibe for Case #1 and Case #2, respectively. In both patients, serum total and LDL-cholesterol decreased dramatically in two months and progressively normalized. Targeted NGS allows the rapid diagnosis of sitosterolemia in children with severe hypercholesterolemia, even though their family history does not unequivocally suggest a recessive transmission of hypercholesterolemia. A timely diagnosis is crucial to avoid delays in treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. In-situ high resolution particle sampling by large time sequence inertial spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prodi, V.; Belosi, F.

    1990-09-01

    In situ sampling is always preferred, when possible, because of the artifacts that can arise when the aerosol has to flow through long sampling lines. On the other hand, the amount of possible losses can be calculated with some confidence only when the size distribution can be measured with a sufficient precision and the losses are not too large. This makes it desirable to sample directly in the vicinity of the aerosol source or containment. High temperature sampling devices with a detailed aerodynamic separation are extremely useful to this purpose. Several measurements are possible with the inertial spectrometer (INSPEC), but not with cascade impactors or cyclones. INSPEC - INertial SPECtrometer - has been conceived to measure the size distribution of aerosols by separating the particles while airborne according to their size and collecting them on a filter. It consists of a channel of rectangular cross-section with a 90 degree bend. Clean air is drawn through the channel, with a thin aerosol sheath injected close to the inner wall. Due to the bend, the particles are separated according to their size, leaving the original streamline by a distance which is a function of particle inertia and resistance, i.e. of aerodynamic diameter. The filter collects all the particles of the same aerodynamic size at the same distance from the inlet, in a continuous distribution. INSPEC particle separation at high temperature (up to 800 C) has been tested with Zirconia particles as calibration aerosols. The feasibility study has been concerned with resolution and time sequence sampling capabilities under high temperature (700 C)

  18. Real-time validation of receiver state information in optical space-time block code systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamia, John; Kurzweg, Timothy

    2014-06-15

    Free space optical interconnect (FSOI) systems are a promising solution to interconnect bottlenecks in high-speed systems. To overcome some sources of diminished FSOI performance caused by close proximity of multiple optical channels, multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems implementing encoding schemes such as space-time block coding (STBC) have been developed. These schemes utilize information pertaining to the optical channel to reconstruct transmitted data. The STBC system is dependent on accurate channel state information (CSI) for optimal system performance. As a result of dynamic changes in optical channels, a system in operation will need to have updated CSI. Therefore, validation of the CSI during operation is a necessary tool to ensure FSOI systems operate efficiently. In this Letter, we demonstrate a method of validating CSI, in real time, through the use of moving averages of the maximum likelihood decoder data, and its capacity to predict the bit error rate (BER) of the system.

  19. Hyaline articular cartilage: relaxation times, pulse-sequence parameters and MR appearance at 1.5 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalkias, S.M. [Dept. of Radiology, A.H.E.P.A. General Hospital of the Aristotelian Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece); Pozzi-Mucelli, R.S. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Trieste (Italy); Pozzi-Mucelli, M. [Orthopaedic Clinic, Univ. of Trieste (Italy); Frezza, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Trieste (Italy); Longo, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Trieste (Italy)

    1994-08-01

    In order to optimize the parameters for the best visualization of the internal architecture of the hyaline articular cartilage a study both ex vivo and in vivo was performed. Accurate T1 and T2 relaxation times of articular cartilage were obtained with a particular mixed sequence and then used for the creation of isocontrast intensity graphs. These graphs subsequently allowed in all pulse sequences (spin echo, SE and gradient echo, GRE) the best combination of repetition time (TR), echo time (TE) and flip angle (FA) for optimization of signal differences between MR cartilage zones. For SE sequences maximum contrast between cartilage zones can be obtained by using a long TR (> 1,500 ms) with a short TE (< 30 ms), whereas for GRE sequences maximum contrast is obtained with the shortest TE (< 15 ms) combined with a relatively long TR (> 400 ms) and an FA greater than 40 . A trilaminar appearance was demonstrated with a superficial and deep hypointense zone in all sequences and an intermediate zone that was moderately hyperintense on SE T1-weighted images, slightly more hyperintense on proton density Rho and SE T2-weighted images and even more hyperintense on GRE images. (orig.)

  20. Advanced Fire Information System - A real time fire information system for Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, P. E.; Roy, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) lead by the Meraka Institute and supported by the South African National Space Agency (SANSA) developed the Advanced Fire Information System (AFIS) to provide near real time fire information to a variety of operational and science fire users including disaster managers, fire fighters, farmers and forest managers located across Southern and Eastern Africa. The AFIS combines satellite data with ground based observations and statistics and distributes the information via mobile phone technology. The system was launched in 2004, and Eskom (South Africa' and Africa's largest power utility) quickly became the biggest user and today more than 300 Eskom line managers and support staff receive cell phone and email fire alert messages whenever a wildfire is within 2km of any of the 28 000km of Eskom electricity transmission lines. The AFIS uses Earth observation satellites from NASA and Europe to detect possible actively burning fires and their fire radiative power (FRP). The polar orbiting MODIS Terra and Aqua satellites provide data at around 10am, 15pm, 22am and 3am daily, while the European Geostationary MSG satellite provides 15 minute updates at lower spatial resolution. The AFIS processing system ingests the raw satellite data and within minutes of the satellite overpass generates fire location and FRP based fire intensity information. The AFIS and new functionality are presented including an incident report and permiting system that can be used to differentiate between prescribed burns and uncontrolled wild fires, and the provision of other information including 5-day fire danger forecasts, vegetation curing information and historical burned area maps. A new AFIS mobile application for IOS and Android devices as well as a fire reporting tool are showcased that enable both the dissemination and alerting of fire information and enable user upload of geo tagged photographs and on the fly creation of fire reports

  1. A comparison of EGFR mutation testing methods in lung carcinoma: direct sequencing, real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Angulo

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to compare two EGFR testing methodologies (a commercial real-time PCR kit and a specific EGFR mutant immunohistochemistry, with direct sequencing and to investigate the limit of detection (LOD of both PCR-based methods. We identified EGFR mutations in 21 (16% of the 136 tumours analyzed by direct sequencing. Interestingly, the Therascreen EGFR Mutation Test kit was able to characterize as wild-type one tumour that could not be analyzed by direct sequencing of the PCR product. We then compared the LOD of the kit and that of direct sequencing using the available mutant tumours. The kit was able to detect the presence of a mutation in a 1% dilution of the total DNA in nine of the 18 tumours (50%, which tested positive with the real-time quantitative PCR method. In all cases, EGFR mutation was identified at a dilution of 5%. Where the mutant DNA represented 30% of the total DNA, sequencing was able to detect mutations in 12 out of 19 cases (63%. Additional experiments with genetically defined standards (EGFR ΔE746-A750/+ and EGFR L858R/+ yielded similar results. Immunohistochemistry (IHC staining with exon 19-specific antibody was seen in eight out of nine cases with E746-A750del detected by direct sequencing. Neither of the two tumours with complex deletions were positive. Of the five L858R-mutated tumours detected by the PCR methods, only two were positive for the exon 21-specific antibody. The specificity was 100% for both antibodies. The LOD of the real-time PCR method was lower than that of direct sequencing. The mutation specific IHC produced excellent specificity.

  2. SEGMENTATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL TIME LAPSE IMAGE SEQUENCES FOR THE DETERMINATION OF SHORE LINES CAPTURED BY HAND-HELD SMARTPHONE CAMERAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kröhnert

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of globally environmental issues gains importance since the last years with still rising trends. Especially disastrous floods may cause in serious damage within very short times. Although conventional gauging stations provide reliable information about prevailing water levels, they are highly cost-intensive and thus just sparsely installed. Smartphones with inbuilt cameras, powerful processing units and low-cost positioning systems seem to be very suitable wide-spread measurement devices that could be used for geo-crowdsourcing purposes. Thus, we aim for the development of a versatile mobile water level measurement system to establish a densified hydrological network of water levels with high spatial and temporal resolution. This paper addresses a key issue of the entire system: the detection of running water shore lines in smartphone images. Flowing water never appears equally in close-range images even if the extrinsics remain unchanged. Its non-rigid behavior impedes the use of good practices for image segmentation as a prerequisite for water line detection. Consequently, we use a hand-held time lapse image sequence instead of a single image that provides the time component to determine a spatio-temporal texture image. Using a region growing concept, the texture is analyzed for immutable shore and dynamic water areas. Finally, the prevalent shore line is examined by the resultant shapes. For method validation, various study areas are observed from several distances covering urban and rural flowing waters with different characteristics. Future work provides a transformation of the water line into object space by image-to-geometry intersection.

  3. Segmentation of Environmental Time Lapse Image Sequences for the Determination of Shore Lines Captured by Hand-Held Smartphone Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröhnert, M.; Meichsner, R.

    2017-09-01

    The relevance of globally environmental issues gains importance since the last years with still rising trends. Especially disastrous floods may cause in serious damage within very short times. Although conventional gauging stations provide reliable information about prevailing water levels, they are highly cost-intensive and thus just sparsely installed. Smartphones with inbuilt cameras, powerful processing units and low-cost positioning systems seem to be very suitable wide-spread measurement devices that could be used for geo-crowdsourcing purposes. Thus, we aim for the development of a versatile mobile water level measurement system to establish a densified hydrological network of water levels with high spatial and temporal resolution. This paper addresses a key issue of the entire system: the detection of running water shore lines in smartphone images. Flowing water never appears equally in close-range images even if the extrinsics remain unchanged. Its non-rigid behavior impedes the use of good practices for image segmentation as a prerequisite for water line detection. Consequently, we use a hand-held time lapse image sequence instead of a single image that provides the time component to determine a spatio-temporal texture image. Using a region growing concept, the texture is analyzed for immutable shore and dynamic water areas. Finally, the prevalent shore line is examined by the resultant shapes. For method validation, various study areas are observed from several distances covering urban and rural flowing waters with different characteristics. Future work provides a transformation of the water line into object space by image-to-geometry intersection.

  4. An HMM posterior decoder for sequence feature prediction that includes homology information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Käll, Lukas; Krogh, Anders Stærmose; Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.

    2005-01-01

    Motivation: When predicting sequence features like transmembrane topology, signal peptides, coil-coil structures, protein secondary structure or genes, extra support can be gained from homologs. Results: We present here a general hidden Markov model (HMM) decoding algorithm that combines probabil......Motivation: When predicting sequence features like transmembrane topology, signal peptides, coil-coil structures, protein secondary structure or genes, extra support can be gained from homologs. Results: We present here a general hidden Markov model (HMM) decoding algorithm that combines......://phobius.cgb.ki.se/poly.html . An implementation of the algorithm is available on request from the authors....

  5. A conceptual framework for intelligent real-time information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schudy, Robert

    1987-01-01

    By combining artificial intelligence concepts with the human information processing model of Rasmussen, a conceptual framework was developed for real time artificial intelligence systems which provides a foundation for system organization, control and validation. The approach is based on the description of system processing terms of an abstraction hierarchy of states of knowledge. The states of knowledge are organized along one dimension which corresponds to the extent to which the concepts are expressed in terms of the system inouts or in terms of the system response. Thus organized, the useful states form a generally triangular shape with the sensors and effectors forming the lower two vertices and the full evaluated set of courses of action the apex. Within the triangle boundaries are numerous processing paths which shortcut the detailed processing, by connecting incomplete levels of analysis to partially defined responses. Shortcuts at different levels of abstraction include reflexes, sensory motor control, rule based behavior, and satisficing. This approach was used in the design of a real time tactical decision aiding system, and in defining an intelligent aiding system for transport pilots.

  6. A New Dynamic Multicriteria Decision-Making Approach for Green Supplier Selection in Construction Projects under Time Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Yin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, due to the lack of natural resources and environment problems which have been appearing increasingly, green building is more and more involved in the construction industry. The evaluation and selection of green supplier are a significant part of the development of green building. In this paper, we propose a new dynamic multicriteria decision-making approach in construction projects under time sequence to deal with these problems. First, the paper establishes 4 main criteria and 17 subcriteria for green supplier selection in construction projects. Then, a method considering interaction between criteria and the influence of constructors subjective preference and objective criteria information is proposed. It uses the interval-valued intuitionistic fuzzy geometric weighted Heronian means (IVIFGWHM operator and multitarget nonlinear programming model to calculate the comprehensive evaluation results of potential green suppliers. The proposed method is much easier for constructors to select green supplier and make the localization of green supplier more practical and accurate in construction projects. Finally, a case study about a green building project is given to verify practicality and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  7. Toward allotetraploid cotton genome assembly: integration of a high-density molecular genetic linkage map with DNA sequence information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Cotton is the world’s most important natural textile fiber and a significant oilseed crop. Decoding cotton genomes will provide the ultimate reference and resource for research and utilization of the species. Integration of high-density genetic maps with genomic sequence information will largely accelerate the process of whole-genome assembly in cotton. Results In this paper, we update a high-density interspecific genetic linkage map of allotetraploid cultivated cotton. An additional 1,167 marker loci have been added to our previously published map of 2,247 loci. Three new marker types, InDel (insertion-deletion) and SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) developed from gene information, and REMAP (retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism), were used to increase map density. The updated map consists of 3,414 loci in 26 linkage groups covering 3,667.62 cM with an average inter-locus distance of 1.08 cM. Furthermore, genome-wide sequence analysis was finished using 3,324 informative sequence-based markers and publicly-available Gossypium DNA sequence information. A total of 413,113 EST and 195 BAC sequences were physically anchored and clustered by 3,324 sequence-based markers. Of these, 14,243 ESTs and 188 BACs from different species of Gossypium were clustered and specifically anchored to the high-density genetic map. A total of 2,748 candidate unigenes from 2,111 ESTs clusters and 63 BACs were mined for functional annotation and classification. The 337 ESTs/genes related to fiber quality traits were integrated with 132 previously reported cotton fiber quality quantitative trait loci, which demonstrated the important roles in fiber quality of these genes. Higher-level sequence conservation between different cotton species and between the A- and D-subgenomes in tetraploid cotton was found, indicating a common evolutionary origin for orthologous and paralogous loci in Gossypium. Conclusion This study will serve as a valuable genomic resource

  8. Performance of Real-time Earthquake Information System in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, H.; Horiuchi, S.; Wu, C.; Yamamoto, S.

    2008-12-01

    Horiuchi et al. (2005) developed a real-time earthquake information system (REIS) using Hi-net, a densely deployed nationwide seismic network, which consists of about 800 stations operated by NIED, Japan. REIS determines hypocenter locations and earthquake magnitudes automatically within a few seconds after P waves arrive at the closest station and calculates focal mechanisms within about 15 seconds. Obtained hypocenter parameters are transferred immediately by using XML format to a computer in Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), who started the service of EEW to special users in June 2005. JMA also developed EEW using 200 stations. The results by the two systems are merged. Among all the first issued EEW reports by both systems, REIS information accounts for about 80 percent. This study examines the rapidity and credibility of REIS by analyzing the 4050 earthquakes which occurred around the Japan Islands since 2005 with magnitude larger than 3.0. REIS re-determines hypocenter parameters every one second according to the revision of waveform data. Here, we discuss only about the results by the first reports. On rapidness, our results show that about 44 percent of the first reports are issued within 5 seconds after the P waves arrives at the closest stations. Note that this 5-second time window includes time delay due to data package and transmission delay of about 2 seconds. REIS waits till two stations detect P waves for events in the network but four stations outside the network so as to get reliable solutions. For earthquakes with hypocentral distance less than 100km, 55 percent of earthquakes are warned in 5 seconds and 87 percent are warned in 10 seconds. Most of events having long time delay are small and triggered by S wave arrivals. About 80 percent of events have difference in epicenter distances less than 20km relative to JMA manually determined locations. Because of the existence of large lateral heterogeneity in seismic velocity, the difference depends

  9. The effect of chromatic and luminance information on reaction times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donell, Beatriz M; Barraza, Jose F; Colombo, Elisa M

    2010-07-01

    We present a series of experiments exploring the effect of chromaticity on reaction time (RT) for a variety of stimulus conditions, including chromatic and luminance contrast, luminance, and size. The chromaticity of these stimuli was varied along a series of vectors in color space that included the two chromatic-opponent-cone axes, a red-green (L-M) axis and a blue-yellow [S - (L + M)] axis, and intermediate noncardinal orientations, as well as the luminance axis (L + M). For Weber luminance contrasts above 10-20%, RTs tend to the same asymptote, irrespective of chromatic direction. At lower luminance contrast, the addition of chromatic information shortens the RT. RTs are strongly influenced by stimulus size when the chromatic stimulus is modulated along the [S - (L + M)] pathway and by stimulus size and adaptation luminance for the (L-M) pathway. RTs are independent of stimulus size for stimuli larger than 0.5 deg. Data are modeled with a modified version of Pieron's formula with an exponent close to 2, in which the stimulus intensity term is replaced by a factor that considers the relative effects of chromatic and achromatic information, as indexed by the RMS (square-root of the cone contrast) value at isoluminance and the Weber luminance contrast, respectively. The parameters of the model reveal how RT is linked to stimulus size, chromatic channels, and adaptation luminance and how they can be interpreted in terms of two chromatic mechanisms. This equation predicts that, for isoluminance, RTs for a stimulus lying on the S-cone pathway are higher than those for a stimulus lying on the L-M-cone pathway, for a given RMS cone contrast. The equation also predicts an asymptotic trend to the RT for an achromatic stimulus when the luminance contrast is sufficiently large.

  10. A semiparametric hazard model of activity timing and sequencing decisions during visits to theme parks using experimental design data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemperman, A.D.A.M.; Borgers, A.W.J.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    2002-01-01

    In this study we introduce a semi parametric hazard-based duration model to predict the timing and sequence of theme park visitors' activity choice behavior. The model is estimated on the basis of observations of consumer choices in various hypothetical theme parks. These parks are constructed by

  11. The effect of vowel height on Voice Onset Time in stop consonants in CV sequences in spontaneous Danish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Johannes; Tøndering, John

    2013-01-01

    Voice onset time has been reported to vary with the height of vowels following the stop consonant. This paper investigates the effects of vowel height on VOT in Danish CV sequences with stop consonants in Danish spontaneous speech. A significant effect of vowel height on VOT was found...

  12. Real-time whole-genome sequencing for routine typing, surveillance, and outbreak detection of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, Katrine Grimstrup; Scheutz, Flemming; Lund, Ole

    2014-01-01

    suspected VTEC isolates. During a 7-week period in the fall of 2012, all incoming isolates were concurrently subjected to WGS using IonTorrent PGM. Real-time bioinformatics analysis was performed using web-tools (www.genomicepidemiology.org) for species determination, multilocus sequence type (MLST) typing...

  13. Intelligent Traffic Information System a Real-Time Traffic Information System on the Shiraz Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sodagaran Amir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Real-time traffic information system is an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS that allows commuters to make their traveling plan better. In this regard, an intelligent and real-time traffic information system was developed based on the video detection and an image processing algorithm was applied to measure traffic-flow according to the average speed of vehicles. Then, traffic status of each pass way is broadcasted to the electronic boards installed on all decision making entrance / exit. Different levels of congestion related to the routes ahead are shown on the boards with different colors in order to assist commuters. This system was implemented on the Shiraz Dry River’s bypasses which account as vital routes to moderate traffic of city center. Experimental results are promising due to the proximity of determined traffic status by the system compared to the detection done by traffic experts. Average speed improvement is another result of using this system. This intelligent system developed and implemented in Shiraz city for the first time in Iran.s.

  14. HemeBIND: a novel method for heme binding residue prediction by combining structural and sequence information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jianjun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate prediction of binding residues involved in the interactions between proteins and small ligands is one of the major challenges in structural bioinformatics. Heme is an essential and commonly used ligand that plays critical roles in electron transfer, catalysis, signal transduction and gene expression. Although much effort has been devoted to the development of various generic algorithms for ligand binding site prediction over the last decade, no algorithm has been specifically designed to complement experimental techniques for identification of heme binding residues. Consequently, an urgent need is to develop a computational method for recognizing these important residues. Results Here we introduced an efficient algorithm HemeBIND for predicting heme binding residues by integrating structural and sequence information. We systematically investigated the characteristics of binding interfaces based on a non-redundant dataset of heme-protein complexes. It was found that several sequence and structural attributes such as evolutionary conservation, solvent accessibility, depth and protrusion clearly illustrate the differences between heme binding and non-binding residues. These features can then be separately used or combined to build the structure-based classifiers using support vector machine (SVM. The results showed that the information contained in these features is largely complementary and their combination achieved the best performance. To further improve the performance, an attempt has been made to develop a post-processing procedure to reduce the number of false positives. In addition, we built a sequence-based classifier based on SVM and sequence profile as an alternative when only sequence information can be used. Finally, we employed a voting method to combine the outputs of structure-based and sequence-based classifiers, which demonstrated remarkably better performance than the individual classifier alone

  15. ADAPTATION OF JOHNSON SEQUENCING ALGORITHM FOR JOB SCHEDULING TO MINIMISE THE AVERAGE WAITING TIME IN CLOUD COMPUTING ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOUVIK PAL

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is an emerging paradigm of Internet-centric business computing where Cloud Service Providers (CSPs are providing services to the customer according to their needs. The key perception behind cloud computing is on-demand sharing of resources available in the resource pool provided by CSP, which implies new emerging business model. The resources are provisioned when jobs arrive. The job scheduling and minimization of waiting time are the challenging issue in cloud computing. When a large number of jobs are requested, they have to wait for getting allocated to the servers which in turn may increase the queue length and also waiting time. This paper includes system design for implementation which is concerned with Johnson Scheduling Algorithm that provides the optimal sequence. With that sequence, service times can be obtained. The waiting time and queue length can be reduced using queuing model with multi-server and finite capacity which improves the job scheduling model.

  16. Real-time learning of predictive recognition categories that chunk sequences of items stored in working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eGrossberg

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available How are sequences of events that are temporarily stored in a cognitive working memory unitized, or chunked, through learning? Such sequential learning is needed by the brain in order to enable language, spatial understanding, and motor skills to develop. In particular, how does the brain learn categories, or list chunks, that become selectively tuned to different temporal sequences of items in lists of variable length as they are stored in working memory, and how does this learning process occur in real time? The present article introduces a neural model that simulates learning of such list chunks. In this model, sequences of items are temporarily stored in an Item-and-Order, or competitive queuing, working memory before learning categorizes them using a categorization network, called a Masking Field, which is a self-similar, multiple-scale, recurrent on-center off-surround network that can weigh the evidence for variable-length sequences of items as they are stored in the working memory through time. A Masking Field hereby activates the learned list chunks that represent the most predictive item groupings at any time, while suppressing less predictive chunks. In a network with a given number of input items, all possible ordered sets of these item sequences, up to a fixed length, can be learned with unsupervised or supervised learning. The self-similar multiple-scale properties of Masking Fields interacting with an Item-and-Order working memory provide a natural explanation of George Miller's Magical Number Seven and Nelson Cowan's Magical Number Four. The article explains why linguistic, spatial, and action event sequences may all be stored by Item-and-Order working memories that obey similar design principles, and thus how the current results may apply across modalities. Item-and-Order properties may readily be extended to Item-Order-Rank working memories in which the same item can be stored in multiple list positions, or ranks, as in the list

  17. The Most Likely Nemesis to Timely, Accurate Electronic Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-02-04

    NETWORKS, TRAINING, COMMERCIAL OFF-THE-SHELF, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY , INTERNET , COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT, ELECTRONIC INFORMATION 15.Abstract...infected over 200,000 Internet computers . While the objective appeared to be to create a log-jam on the Internet and not actually alter information on...Brigadier General Robert M. Shea, USMC, Director for Command, Control, Communications and Computers for the Marine Corps, cites information overload problems

  18. Real-Time PCR Assay for a Unique Chromosomal Sequence of Bacillus anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    13061 Neisseria lactamica .............................................................. 23970 Bacillus coagulans ...NEG Bacillus coagulane 7050 NEG NEG Bacillus cereus 13472 NEG NEG Bacillus licheniforms 12759 NEG NEG Bacillus cereus 13824 NEG NEG Bacillus ...Assay for a Unique Chromosomal Sequence of Bacillus anthracis Elizabeth Bode,1 William Hurtle,2† and David Norwood1* United States Army Medical

  19. First-time characterization of JY-1-like sequence in goats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-07-11

    Jul 11, 2015 ... Material and Methods. Nine well-recognized .... available, the bovine JY-1 gene sequence (GenBank accession no. .... Since no phenotypes on fecundity and sexual precocity are currently available for goats, it may not be ...

  20. Ion torrent personal genome machine sequencing for genomic typing of Neisseria meningitidis for rapid determination of multiple layers of typing information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Ulrich; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Claus, Heike; Jünemann, Sebastian; Prior, Karola; Harmsen, Dag

    2012-06-01

    Neisseria meningitidis causes invasive meningococcal disease in infants, toddlers, and adolescents worldwide. DNA sequence-based typing, including multilocus sequence typing, analysis of genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance, and sequence typing of vaccine antigens, has become the standard for molecular epidemiology of the organism. However, PCR of multiple targets and consecutive Sanger sequencing provide logistic constraints to reference laboratories. Taking advantage of the recent development of benchtop next-generation sequencers (NGSs) and of BIGSdb, a database accommodating and analyzing genome sequence data, we therefore explored the feasibility and accuracy of Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) sequencing for genomic typing of meningococci. Three strains from a previous meningococcus serogroup B community outbreak were selected to compare conventional typing results with data generated by semiconductor chip-based sequencing. In addition, sequencing of the meningococcal type strain MC58 provided information about the general performance of the technology. The PGM technology generated sequence information for all target genes addressed. The results were 100% concordant with conventional typing results, with no further editing being necessary. In addition, the amount of typing information, i.e., nucleotides and target genes analyzed, could be substantially increased by the combined use of genome sequencing and BIGSdb compared to conventional methods. In the near future, affordable and fast benchtop NGS machines like the PGM might enable reference laboratories to switch to genomic typing on a routine basis. This will reduce workloads and rapidly provide information for laboratory surveillance, outbreak investigation, assessment of vaccine preventability, and antibiotic resistance gene monitoring.

  1. Statistical performance and information content of time lag analysis and redundancy analysis in time series modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeler, David G; Viedma, Olga; Moreno, José M

    2009-11-01

    Time lag analysis (TLA) is a distance-based approach used to study temporal dynamics of ecological communities by measuring community dissimilarity over increasing time lags. Despite its increased use in recent years, its performance in comparison with other more direct methods (i.e., canonical ordination) has not been evaluated. This study fills this gap using extensive simulations and real data sets from experimental temporary ponds (true zooplankton communities) and landscape studies (landscape categories as pseudo-communities) that differ in community structure and anthropogenic stress history. Modeling time with a principal coordinate of neighborhood matrices (PCNM) approach, the canonical ordination technique (redundancy analysis; RDA) consistently outperformed the other statistical tests (i.e., TLAs, Mantel test, and RDA based on linear time trends) using all real data. In addition, the RDA-PCNM revealed different patterns of temporal change, and the strength of each individual time pattern, in terms of adjusted variance explained, could be evaluated, It also identified species contributions to these patterns of temporal change. This additional information is not provided by distance-based methods. The simulation study revealed better Type I error properties of the canonical ordination techniques compared with the distance-based approaches when no deterministic component of change was imposed on the communities. The simulation also revealed that strong emphasis on uniform deterministic change and low variability at other temporal scales is needed to result in decreased statistical power of the RDA-PCNM approach relative to the other methods. Based on the statistical performance of and information content provided by RDA-PCNM models, this technique serves ecologists as a powerful tool for modeling temporal change of ecological (pseudo-) communities.

  2. Life, Information, Entropy, and Time: Vehicles for Semantic Inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crofts, Antony R

    2007-01-01

    Attempts to understand how information content can be included in an accounting of the energy flux of the biosphere have led to the conclusion that, in information transmission, one component, the semantic content, or "the meaning of the message," adds no thermodynamic burden over and above costs arising from coding, transmission and translation. In biology, semantic content has two major roles. For all life forms, the message of the genotype encoded in DNA specifies the phenotype, and hence the organism that is tested against the real world through the mechanisms of Darwinian evolution. For human beings, communication through language and similar abstractions provides an additional supra-phenotypic vehicle for semantic inheritance, which supports the cultural heritages around which civilizations revolve. The following three postulates provide the basis for discussion of a number of themes that demonstrate some important consequences. (i) Information transmission through either pathway has thermodynamic components associated with data storage and transmission. (ii) The semantic content adds no additional thermodynamic cost. (iii) For all semantic exchange, meaning is accessible only through translation and interpretation, and has a value only in context. (1) For both pathways of semantic inheritance, translational and copying machineries are imperfect. As a consequence both pathways are subject to mutation and to evolutionary pressure by selection. Recognition of semantic content as a common component allows an understanding of the relationship between genes and memes, and a reformulation of Universal Darwinism. (2) The emergent properties of life are dependent on a processing of semantic content. The translational steps allow amplification in complexity through combinatorial possibilities in space and time. Amplification depends on the increased potential for complexity opened by 3D interaction specificity of proteins, and on the selection of useful variants by

  3. Real-time whole-genome sequencing for routine typing, surveillance, and outbreak detection of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Joensen, Katrine Grimstrup; Scheutz, Flemming; Lund, Ole; Hasman, Henrik; Kaas, Rolf Sommer; Nielsen, Eva M.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2014-01-01

    Fast and accurate identification and typing of pathogens are essential for effective surveillance and outbreak detection. The current routine procedure is based on a variety of techniques, making the procedure laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. With whole-genome sequencing (WGS) becoming cheaper, it has huge potential in both diagnostics and routine surveillance. The aim of this study was to perform a real-time evaluation of WGS for routine typing and surveillance of verocytotoxin-prod...

  4. Real-Time Whole-Genome Sequencing for Routine Typing, Surveillance, and Outbreak Detection of Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Joensen, Katrine Grimstrup; Scheutz, Flemming; Lund, Ole; Hasman, Henrik; Kaas, Rolf S.; Nielsen, Eva M.; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    Fast and accurate identification and typing of pathogens are essential for effective surveillance and outbreak detection. The current routine procedure is based on a variety of techniques, making the procedure laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. With whole-genome sequencing (WGS) becoming cheaper, it has huge potential in both diagnostics and routine surveillance. The aim of this study was to perform a real-time evaluation of WGS for routine typing and surveillance of verocytotoxin-prod...

  5. An Observational Study of Children's Involvement in Informed Consent for Exome Sequencing Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Victoria A; Werner-Lin, Allison; Walser, Sarah A; Biswas, Sawona; Bernhardt, Barbara A

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this study was to examine children's involvement in consent sessions for exome sequencing research and associations of involvement with provider and parent communication. Participants included 44 children (8-17 years) from five cohorts who were offered participation in an exome sequencing study. The consent sessions were audiotaped, transcribed, and coded. Providers attempted to facilitate the child's involvement in the majority (73%) of sessions, and most (75%) children also verbally participated. Provider facilitation was strongly associated with likelihood of child participation. These findings underscore that strategies such as asking for children's opinions and soliciting their questions show respect for children and may increase the likelihood that they are engaged and involved in decisions about research participation.

  6. Combining information from linkage and association mapping for next-generation sequencing longitudinal family data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliu, Brunilda; Uh, Hae-Won; Tsonaka, Roula; Boehringer, Stefan; Helmer, Quinta; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J

    2014-01-01

    In this analysis, we investigate the contributions that linkage-based methods, such as identical-by-descent mapping, can make to association mapping to identify rare variants in next-generation sequencing data. First, we identify regions in which cases share more segments identical-by-descent around a putative causal variant than do controls. Second, we use a two-stage mixed-effect model approach to summarize the single-nucleotide polymorphism data within each region and include them as covariates in the model for the phenotype. We assess the impact of linkage disequilibrium in determining identical-by-descent states between individuals by using markers with and without linkage disequilibrium for the first part and the impact of imputation in testing for association by using imputed genome-wide association studies or raw sequence markers for the second part. We apply the method to next-generation sequencing longitudinal family data from Genetic Association Workshop 18 and identify a significant region at chromosome 3: 40249244-41025167 (p-value = 2.3 × 10(-3)).

  7. Information Literacy Policy Development in Canada: Is It Time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara Bradley

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article examines policy issues related to information literacy in Canada. It provides some background on the information literacy concept, reflecting on popular definitions offered by American, British, and Australian library associations, before advocating for a broader definition that views information literacy as a human right. Information literacy is also considered in relationship to the proliferation of other “literacies,” such as digital, web, media, and information technology, that are the subject of increased advocacy and attention from interest groups and educators. The ongoing need for improved information literacy levels is analyzed not only in the context of inputs (the increasing complexity of the information environment but also in terms of potential personal, social, and economic outcomes that can be realized through widespread information literacy education efforts. The paper argues that information literacy must become a priority not only among academic librarians but also school, public, and special librarians, as well as others outside of the library sector, if significant improvements in information literacy levels are to be realized. Such a coordinated approach can only be achieved in the context of policies that require, and adequately support, widespread efforts at improving information literacy levels. After a review of the ad-hoc state of information literacy education in Canada today, this paper analyzes information literacy-related policy development efforts in Canada to date in the four arenas where one would expect to see such activity: the Government of Canada, provincial governments, library associations, and other stakeholder groups. This article aims to start a wide-reaching discussion about information literacy and associated policy issues in Canada.

  8. A model of human motor sequence learning explains facilitation and interference effects based on spike-timing dependent plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability to learn sequential behaviors is a fundamental property of our brains. Yet a long stream of studies including recent experiments investigating motor sequence learning in adult human subjects have produced a number of puzzling and seemingly contradictory results. In particular, when subjects have to learn multiple action sequences, learning is sometimes impaired by proactive and retroactive interference effects. In other situations, however, learning is accelerated as reflected in facilitation and transfer effects. At present it is unclear what the underlying neural mechanism are that give rise to these diverse findings. Here we show that a recently developed recurrent neural network model readily reproduces this diverse set of findings. The self-organizing recurrent neural network (SORN model is a network of recurrently connected threshold units that combines a simplified form of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP with homeostatic plasticity mechanisms ensuring network stability, namely intrinsic plasticity (IP and synaptic normalization (SN. When trained on sequence learning tasks modeled after recent experiments we find that it reproduces the full range of interference, facilitation, and transfer effects. We show how these effects are rooted in the network's changing internal representation of the different sequences across learning and how they depend on an interaction of training schedule and task similarity. Furthermore, since learning in the model is based on fundamental neuronal plasticity mechanisms, the model reveals how these plasticity mechanisms are ultimately responsible for the network's sequence learning abilities. In particular, we find that all three plasticity mechanisms are essential for the network to learn effective internal models of the different training sequences. This ability to form effective internal models is also the basis for the observed interference and facilitation effects. This suggests that

  9. Measurement of solute proton spin-lattice relaxation times in water using the 1,3,3,1 sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, S.S.; Mole, P.A.; Coulson, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    1 H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of the N-CH3 proton resonances of phosphocreatine (PCr) and creatine (Cr) in water solutions were obtained using the 1,3,3,1 pulse sequence. These T1 values were equivalent to those obtained in D 2 O and water using either the conventional inversion-recovery experiment or the 1,3,3,1 pulse sequence. Thus, the 1,3,3,1 sequence of proton NMR can provide an independent means along with phosphorous NMR for assess PCr and for the study of the creatine kinase reaction (PCr + ADP in equilibrium ATP + Cr) in aqueous solutions and perhaps in biological preparations

  10. Real-time tracking of tumor motions and deformations along the leaf travel direction with the aid of a synchronized dynamic MLC leaf sequencer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacke, Martin; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Advanced radiotherapeutical techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) are based on an accurate knowledge of the location of the radiation target. An accurate dose delivery, therefore, requires a method to account for the inter- and intrafractional target motion and the target deformation occurring during the course of treatment. A method to compensate in real time for changes in the position and shape of the target is the use of a dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) technique which can be devised to automatically arrange the treatment field according to real-time image information. So far, various approaches proposed for leaf sequencers have had to rely on a priori known target motion data and have aimed to optimize the overall treatment time. Since for a real-time dose delivery the target motion is not known a priori, the velocity range of the leading leaves is restricted by a safety margin to c x v max while the following leaves can travel with an additional maximum speed to compensate for the respective target movements. Another aspect to be considered is the tongue and groove effect. A uniform radiation field can only be achieved if the leaf movements are synchronized. The method presented in this note is the first to combine a synchronizing sequencer and real-time tracking with a dynamic MLC. The newly developed algorithm is capable of online optimizing the leaf velocities by minimizing the overall treatment time while at the same time it synchronizes the leaf trajectories in order to avoid the tongue and groove effect. The simultaneous synchronization is performed with the help of an online-calculated mid-time leaf trajectory which is common for all leaf pairs and which takes into account the real-time target motion and deformation information. (note)

  11. Real-time tracking of tumor motions and deformations along the leaf travel direction with the aid of a synchronized dynamic MLC leaf sequencer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacke, Martin; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe

    2007-11-21

    Advanced radiotherapeutical techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) are based on an accurate knowledge of the location of the radiation target. An accurate dose delivery, therefore, requires a method to account for the inter- and intrafractional target motion and the target deformation occurring during the course of treatment. A method to compensate in real time for changes in the position and shape of the target is the use of a dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) technique which can be devised to automatically arrange the treatment field according to real-time image information. So far, various approaches proposed for leaf sequencers have had to rely on a priori known target motion data and have aimed to optimize the overall treatment time. Since for a real-time dose delivery the target motion is not known a priori, the velocity range of the leading leaves is restricted by a safety margin to c x v(max) while the following leaves can travel with an additional maximum speed to compensate for the respective target movements. Another aspect to be considered is the tongue and groove effect. A uniform radiation field can only be achieved if the leaf movements are synchronized. The method presented in this note is the first to combine a synchronizing sequencer and real-time tracking with a dynamic MLC. The newly developed algorithm is capable of online optimizing the leaf velocities by minimizing the overall treatment time while at the same time it synchronizes the leaf trajectories in order to avoid the tongue and groove effect. The simultaneous synchronization is performed with the help of an online-calculated mid-time leaf trajectory which is common for all leaf pairs and which takes into account the real-time target motion and deformation information.

  12. Application of the accident management information needs methodology to a severe accident sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, L.W.; Hanson, D.J.; Nelson, W.R.; Solberg, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting an accident management research program that emphasizes the use of severe accident research to enhance the ability of plant operating personnel to effectively manage severe accidents. Hence, it is necessary to ensure that the plant instrumentation and information systems adequately provide this information to the operating staff during accident conditions. A methodology to identify and assess the information needs of the operating staff of a nuclear power plant during a severe accident has been developed. The methodology identifies (a) the information needs of the plant personnel during a wide range of accident conditions, (b) the existing plant measurements capable of supplying these information needs and minor additions to instrument and display systems that would enhance management capabilities, (c) measurement capabilities and limitations during severe accident conditions, and (d) areas in which the information systems could mislead plant personnel

  13. Application of the accident management information needs methodology to a severe accident sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, L.W.; Hanson, D.J.; Nelson, W.R. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls (USA)); Solberg, D.E. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA))

    1989-11-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting an accident management research program that emphasizes the use of severe accident research to enhance the ability of plant operating personnel to effectively manage severe accidents. Hence, it is necessary to ensure that the plant instrumentation and information systems adequately provide this information to the operating staff during accident conditions. A methodology to identify and assess the information needs of the operating staff of a nuclear power plant during a severe accident has been developed. The methodology identifies (a) the information needs of the plant personnel during a wide range of accident conditions, (b) the existing plant measurements capable of supplying these information needs and minor additions to instrument and display systems that would enhance management capabilities, (c) measurement capabilities and limitations during severe accident conditions, and (d) areas in which the information systems could mislead plant personnel.

  14. An Adaptive Method for Switching between Pedestrian/Car Indoor Positioning Algorithms based on Multilayer Time Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhining Gu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR positioning algorithms can be used to obtain a target’s location only for movement with step features and not for driving, for which the trilateral Bluetooth indoor positioning method can be used. In this study, to obtain the precise locations of different states (pedestrian/car using the corresponding positioning algorithms, we propose an adaptive method for switching between the PDR and car indoor positioning algorithms based on multilayer time sequences (MTSs. MTSs, which consider the behavior context, comprise two main aspects: filtering of noisy data in small-scale time sequences and using a state chain to reduce the time delay of algorithm switching in large-scale time sequences. The proposed method can be expected to realize the recognition of stationary, walking, driving, or other states; switch to the correct indoor positioning algorithm; and improve the accuracy of localization compared to using a single positioning algorithm. Our experiments show that the recognition of static, walking, driving, and other states improves by 5.5%, 45.47%, 26.23%, and 21% on average, respectively, compared with convolutional neural network (CNN method. The time delay decreases by approximately 0.5–8.5 s for the transition between states and by approximately 24 s for the entire process.

  15. An Adaptive Method for Switching between Pedestrian/Car Indoor Positioning Algorithms based on Multilayer Time Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhining; Guo, Wei; Li, Chaoyang; Zhu, Xinyan; Guo, Tao

    2018-02-27

    Pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR) positioning algorithms can be used to obtain a target's location only for movement with step features and not for driving, for which the trilateral Bluetooth indoor positioning method can be used. In this study, to obtain the precise locations of different states (pedestrian/car) using the corresponding positioning algorithms, we propose an adaptive method for switching between the PDR and car indoor positioning algorithms based on multilayer time sequences (MTSs). MTSs, which consider the behavior context, comprise two main aspects: filtering of noisy data in small-scale time sequences and using a state chain to reduce the time delay of algorithm switching in large-scale time sequences. The proposed method can be expected to realize the recognition of stationary, walking, driving, or other states; switch to the correct indoor positioning algorithm; and improve the accuracy of localization compared to using a single positioning algorithm. Our experiments show that the recognition of static, walking, driving, and other states improves by 5.5%, 45.47%, 26.23%, and 21% on average, respectively, compared with convolutional neural network (CNN) method. The time delay decreases by approximately 0.5-8.5 s for the transition between states and by approximately 24 s for the entire process.

  16. Simplifying complex sequence information: a PCP-consensus protein binds antibodies against all four Dengue serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, David M; Lewis, Jessica A; Lu, Wenzhe; Schein, Catherine H

    2012-09-14

    Designing proteins that reflect the natural variability of a pathogen is essential for developing novel vaccines and drugs. Flaviviruses, including Dengue (DENV) and West Nile (WNV), evolve rapidly and can "escape" neutralizing monoclonal antibodies by mutation. Designing antigens that represent many distinct strains is important for DENV, where infection with a strain from one of the four serotypes may lead to severe hemorrhagic disease on subsequent infection with a strain from another serotype. Here, a DENV physicochemical property (PCP)-consensus sequence was derived from 671 unique sequences from the Flavitrack database. PCP-consensus proteins for domain 3 of the envelope protein (EdomIII) were expressed from synthetic genes in Escherichia coli. The ability of the purified consensus proteins to bind polyclonal antibodies generated in response to infection with strains from each of the four DENV serotypes was determined. The initial consensus protein bound antibodies from DENV-1-3 in ELISA and Western blot assays. This sequence was altered in 3 steps to incorporate regions of maximum variability, identified as significant changes in the PCPs, characteristic of DENV-4 strains. The final protein was recognized by antibodies against all four serotypes. Two amino acids essential for efficient binding to all DENV antibodies are part of a discontinuous epitope previously defined for a neutralizing monoclonal antibody. The PCP-consensus method can significantly reduce the number of experiments required to define a multivalent antigen, which is particularly important when dealing with pathogens that must be tested at higher biosafety levels. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Soviet applied information sciences in a time of change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengston, J.; Cronin, R.R.; Davidson, R.B.

    1991-07-01

    The Foreign Applied Sciences Assessment Center (FASAC) conducts reviews of selected areas of foreign basic and applied science by US scientists who are technically expert and active in the fields reviewed. Several of the FASAC assessments of Soviet science have involved various aspects of the information sciences, including enabling technologies and applications, as well as the core information sciences. This report draws upon those FASAC assessment reports, the expert judgment of some of the authors of those reports, and other public sources to characterize the current state of the information sciences in the Soviet Union and the effects of information science capabilities upon other areas of Soviet science and technology. This report also provides estimates of the likely effect of the political and social reforms underway in the Soviet Union on future Soviet progress in the information sciences and, at a more general level, in science and technology. 41 refs., 7 tabs.

  18. A Proteomic Workflow Using High-Throughput De Novo Sequencing Towards Complementation of Genome Information for Improved Comparative Crop Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turetschek, Reinhard; Lyon, David; Desalegn, Getinet; Kaul, Hans-Peter; Wienkoop, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    The proteomic study of non-model organisms, such as many crop plants, is challenging due to the lack of comprehensive genome information. Changing environmental conditions require the study and selection of adapted cultivars. Mutations, inherent to cultivars, hamper protein identification and thus considerably complicate the qualitative and quantitative comparison in large-scale systems biology approaches. With this workflow, cultivar-specific mutations are detected from high-throughput comparative MS analyses, by extracting sequence polymorphisms with de novo sequencing. Stringent criteria are suggested to filter for confidential mutations. Subsequently, these polymorphisms complement the initially used database, which is ready to use with any preferred database search algorithm. In our example, we thereby identified 26 specific mutations in two cultivars of Pisum sativum and achieved an increased number (17 %) of peptide spectrum matches.

  19. Measurement of informal care: an empirical study into the valid measurement of time spent on informal caregiving.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Bernard van den; Spauwen, Pol

    2006-01-01

    The incorporation of informal care into economic evaluations of health care is troublesome. The debate focuses on the valuation of time spent on informal caregiving, while time measurement, a related and may be even a more important issue, tends to be neglected. Valid time measurement is a necessary

  20. 77 FR 40534 - Modification of Regulations Regarding the Definition of Factual Information and Time Limits for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... classification of factual information than the current definition. Currently, 19 CFR 351.301 sets forth the time... definition of factual information and the time limits for the submission of factual information; (3) modifying the definition of factual information but maintaining all time limits; and, (4) modifying the...

  1. Valuation of Travel Time and TravelIer Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, Piet

    2003-01-01

    The value of travel time plays an important role in cost benefit analysis of infrastructureprojects. However, the issue of uncertainty on travel times and the implications this has forestimations of travel time values has received much less attention in the literature. In thispaper we compare

  2. Controlling the structure of sequence-defined poly(phosphodiester)s for optimal MS/MS reading of digital information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalian, J-A; Al Ouahabi, A; Cavallo, G; König, N F; Poyer, S; Lutz, J-F; Charles, L

    2017-11-01

    Digital polymers are monodisperse chains with a controlled sequence of co-monomers, defined as letters of an alphabet, and are used to store information at the molecular level. Reading such messages is hence a sequencing task that can be efficiently achieved by tandem mass spectrometry. To improve their readability, structure of sequence-controlled synthetic polymers can be optimized, based on considerations regarding their fragmentation behavior. This strategy is described here for poly(phosphodiester)s, which were synthesized as monodisperse chains with more than 100 units but exhibited extremely complex dissociation spectra. In these polymers, two repeating units that differ by a simple H/CH 3 variation were defined as the 0 and 1 bit of the ASCII code and spaced by a phosphate moiety. They were readily ionized in negative ion mode electrospray but dissociated via cleavage at all phosphate bonds upon collisional activation. Although allowing a complete sequence coverage of digital poly(phosphodiester)s, this fragmentation behavior was not efficient for macromolecules with more than 50 co-monomers, and data interpretation was very tedious. The structure of these polymers was then modified by introducing alkoxyamine linkages at appropriate location throughout the chain. A first design consisted of placing these low dissociation energy bonds between each monomeric bit: while cleavage of this sole bond greatly simplified MS/MS spectra, efficient sequencing was limited to chains with up to about 50 units. In contrast, introduction of alkoxyamine bonds between each byte (i.e. a set of eight co-monomers) was a more successful strategy. Long messages (so far, up to 8 bytes) could be read in MS 3 experiments, where single-byte containing fragments released during the first activation stage were further dissociated for sequencing. The whole sequence of such byte-truncated poly(phosphodiester)s could be easily re-constructed based on a mass tagging system which permits

  3. Life, Information, Entropy, and Time: Vehicles for Semantic Inheritance

    OpenAIRE

    Crofts, Antony R.

    2007-01-01

    Attempts to understand how information content can be included in an accounting of the energy flux of the biosphere have led to the conclusion that, in information transmission, one component, the semantic content, or “the meaning of the message,” adds no thermodynamic burden over and above costs arising from coding, transmission and translation. In biology, semantic content has two major roles. For all life forms, the message of the genotype encoded in DNA specifies the phenotype, and hence ...

  4. Pricing of Claims in Discrete Time with Partial Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rognlien Dahl, Kristina, E-mail: kristrd@math.uio.no [University of Oslo, Department of Mathematics (Norway)

    2013-10-15

    We consider the pricing problem of a seller with delayed price information. By using Lagrange duality, a dual problem is derived, and it is proved that there is no duality gap. This gives a characterization of the seller's price of a contingent claim. Finally, we analyze the dual problem, and compare the prices offered by two sellers with delayed and full information respectively.

  5. Pricing of Claims in Discrete Time with Partial Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rognlien Dahl, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    We consider the pricing problem of a seller with delayed price information. By using Lagrange duality, a dual problem is derived, and it is proved that there is no duality gap. This gives a characterization of the seller’s price of a contingent claim. Finally, we analyze the dual problem, and compare the prices offered by two sellers with delayed and full information respectively

  6. Model-Based Generation of Synthetic 3D Time-Lapse Sequences of Motile Cells with Growing Filopodia

    OpenAIRE

    Sorokin , Dmitry ,; Peterlik , Igor; Ulman , Vladimír ,; Svoboda , David; Maška , Martin

    2017-01-01

    International audience; The existence of benchmark datasets is essential to objectively evaluate various image analysis methods. Nevertheless, manual annotations of fluorescence microscopy image data are very laborious and not often practicable, especially in the case of 3D+t experiments. In this work, we propose a simulation system capable of generating 3D time-lapse sequences of single motile cells with filopodial protrusions, accompanied by inherently generated ground truth. The system con...

  7. Estimation of time-delayed mutual information and bias for irregularly and sparsely sampled time-series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albers, D.J.; Hripcsak, George

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Time-delayed mutual information for irregularly sampled time-series. ► Estimation bias for the time-delayed mutual information calculation. ► Fast, simple, PDF estimator independent, time-delayed mutual information bias estimate. ► Quantification of data-set-size limits of the time-delayed mutual calculation. - Abstract: A method to estimate the time-dependent correlation via an empirical bias estimate of the time-delayed mutual information for a time-series is proposed. In particular, the bias of the time-delayed mutual information is shown to often be equivalent to the mutual information between two distributions of points from the same system separated by infinite time. Thus intuitively, estimation of the bias is reduced to estimation of the mutual information between distributions of data points separated by large time intervals. The proposed bias estimation techniques are shown to work for Lorenz equations data and glucose time series data of three patients from the Columbia University Medical Center database.

  8. Time to Improve Informed Consent for Dialysis: An International Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Frank; Stewart, Cameron; Burgess, Hannah; Davison, Sara N; Moss, Alvin H; Murtagh, Fliss E M; Germain, Michael; Tranter, Shelley; Brown, Mark

    2017-06-07

    The literature reveals that current nephrology practice in obtaining informed consent for dialysis falls short of ethical and legal requirements. Meeting these requirements represents a significant challenge, especially because the benefits and risks of dialysis have shifted significantly with the growing number of older, comorbid patients. The importance of informed consent for dialysis is heightened by several concerns, including: ( 1 ) the proportion of predialysis patients and patients on dialysis who lack capacity in decision making and ( 2 ) whether older, comorbid, and frail patients understand their poor prognosis and the full implications to their independence and functional status of being on dialysis. This article outlines the ethical and legal requirements for a valid informed consent to dialysis: ( 1 ) the patient was competent, ( 2 ) the consent was made voluntarily, and ( 3 ) the patient was given sufficient information in an understandable manner to make the decision. It then considers the application of these requirements to practice across different countries. In the process of informed consent, the law requires a discussion by the physician of the material risks associated with dialysis and alternative options. We argue that, legally and ethically, this discussion should include both the anticipated trajectory of the illness and the effect on the life of the patient with particular regard to the outcomes most important to the individual. In addition, a discussion should occur about the option of a conservative, nondialysis pathway. These requirements ensure that the ethical principle of respect for patient autonomy is honored in the context of dialysis. Nephrologists need to be open to, comfortable with, and skillful in communicating this information. From these clear, open, ethically, and legally valid consent discussions, a significant dividend will hopefully flow for patients, families, and nephrologists alike. Copyright © 2017 by the

  9. On the time evolution of holographic n-partite information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alishahiha, Mohsen; Mozaffar, M. Reza Mohammadi; Tanhayi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    We study various scaling behaviors of n-partite information during a process of thermalization for n disjoint system consisting of n parallel strips whose widths are much larger than the separation between them. By making use of the holographic description for entanglement entropy we explore holographic description of the n-partite information by which we show that it has a definite sign: it is positive for even n and negative for odd n. This might thought of as an intrinsic property of a field theory which has gravity dual.

  10. Sequence-Specific Model for Peptide Retention Time Prediction in Strong Cation Exchange Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussakovsky, Daniel; Neustaeter, Haley; Spicer, Victor; Krokhin, Oleg V

    2017-11-07

    The development of a peptide retention prediction model for strong cation exchange (SCX) separation on a Polysulfoethyl A column is reported. Off-line 2D LC-MS/MS analysis (SCX-RPLC) of S. cerevisiae whole cell lysate was used to generate a retention dataset of ∼30 000 peptides, sufficient for identifying the major sequence-specific features of peptide retention mechanisms in SCX. In contrast to RPLC/hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) separation modes, where retention is driven by hydrophobic/hydrophilic contributions of all individual residues, SCX interactions depend mainly on peptide charge (number of basic residues at acidic pH) and size. An additive model (incorporating the contributions of all 20 residues into the peptide retention) combined with a peptide length correction produces a 0.976 R 2 value prediction accuracy, significantly higher than the additive models for either HILIC or RPLC. Position-dependent effects on peptide retention for different residues were driven by the spatial orientation of tryptic peptides upon interaction with the negatively charged surface functional groups. The positively charged N-termini serve as a primary point of interaction. For example, basic residues (Arg, His, Lys) increase peptide retention when located closer to the N-terminus. We also found that hydrophobic interactions, which could lead to a mixed-mode separation mechanism, are largely suppressed at 20-30% of acetonitrile in the eluent. The accuracy of the final Sequence-Specific Retention Calculator (SSRCalc) SCX model (∼0.99 R 2 value) exceeds all previously reported predictors for peptide LC separations. This also provides a solid platform for method development in 2D LC-MS protocols in proteomics and peptide retention prediction filtering of false positive identifications.

  11. Quantum superarrivals and information transfer through a time ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the boundary condition being perturbed, propagates from the barrier to the detectors measuring re- flected and transmitted probabilities. The speed of propagation of this effect depends upon the rate of reducing or raising the barrier height, thus suggesting an application for secure information transfer using superarrivals.

  12. Leisure Time Activities and Mental Health in Informal Dementia Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüz, Benjamin; Czerniawski, Alana; Davie, Nicola; Miller, Lisa; Quinn, Michael G; King, Carolyn; Carr, Andrea; Elliott, Kate-Ellen J; Robinson, Andrew; Scott, Jenn L

    2015-07-01

    Dementia prevalence and the demand for dementia care are increasing. Informal caregiving accounts for a large proportion of dementia care, but can come at high cost for caregivers. Informal dementia caregivers are at higher risk for mental health problems than the general population. This study examines whether perceived change in leisure activities is one working mechanism linking stress and burden experience in dementia caregiving to lower mental health (depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and reduced satisfaction with life), and whether there are group-based leisure activities that can buffer this detrimental effect. A total of 346 informal Australian dementia caregivers (88.15% female, age 18-82 years) participated in an online study. Mediation and moderation analyses using multiple regression demonstrated that perceived changes in leisure activities linked caregiving stress and burden to lower mental health, and that membership in groups engaging in affiliation or social activities attenuates negative effects of caregiving. Informal dementia caregivers benefit from satisfying leisure activities. In particular, engaging in social activities and self-help groups buffered the negative impact of caregiving. © 2015 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  13. Quantum superarrivals and information transfer through a time ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... the boundary condition being perturbed, propagates from the barrier to the detectors measuring reflected and transmitted probabilities. The speed of propagation of this effect depends upon the rate of reducing or raising the barrier height, thus suggesting an application for secure information transfer using superarrivals.

  14. Magnifying visual target information and the role of eye movements in motor sequence learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massing, Matthias; Blandin, Yannick; Panzer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    An experiment investigated the influence of eye movements on learning a simple motor sequence task when the visual display was magnified. The task was to reproduce a 1300 ms spatial-temporal pattern of elbow flexions and extensions. The spatial-temporal pattern was displayed in front of the participants. Participants were randomly assigned to four groups differing on eye movements (free to use their eyes/instructed to fixate) and the visual display (small/magnified). All participants had to perform a pre-test, an acquisition phase, a delayed retention test, and a transfer test. The results indicated that participants in each practice condition increased their performance during acquisition. The participants who were permitted to use their eyes in the magnified visual display outperformed those who were instructed to fixate on the magnified visual display. When a small visual display was used, the instruction to fixate induced no performance decrements compared to participants who were permitted to use their eyes during acquisition. The findings demonstrated that a spatial-temporal pattern can be learned without eye movements, but being permitting to use eye movements facilitates the response production when the visual angle is increased. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Army Secure Operating System: Information Security for Real Time Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anderson, Eric

    1984-01-01

    The Army Secure Operating System (ASOS) project, under the management of the U.S. Army CECOM organization, will provide real time systems software necessary for fielding modern Battlefield Automation Systems...

  16. Application of travel time information for traffic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    This report summarizes findings and implementations of probe vehicle data collection based on Bluetooth MAC address matching : technology. Probe vehicle travel time data are studied in the following field deployment case studies: analysis of traffic ...

  17. Legionella confirmation in cooling tower water. Comparison of culture, real-time PCR and next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Maha; Shaheed, Raja A; Al-Ali, Haider H; Al-Ghamdi, Abdullah S; Al-Hamaqi, Ghadeer M; Maan, Hawraa S; Al-Mahfoodh, Zainab A; Al-Seba, Hussain Z

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the presence of Legionella spp in cooling tower water. Legionella proliferation in cooling tower water has serious public health implications as it can be transmitted to humans via aerosols and cause Legionnaires' disease. Samples of cooling tower water were collected from King Fahd Hospital of the University (KFHU) (Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, 2015/2016). The water samples were analyzed by a standard Legionella culture method, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and 16S rRNA next-generation sequencing. In addition, the bacterial community composition was evaluated. All samples were negative by conventional Legionella culture. In contrast, all water samples yielded positive results by real-time PCR (105 to 106 GU/L). The results of 16S rRNA next generation sequencing showed high similarity and reproducibility among the water samples. The majority of sequences were Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria, and Legionella was the predominant genus. The hydrogen-oxidizing gram-negative bacterium Hydrogenophaga was present at high abundance, indicating high metabolic activity. Sphingopyxis, which is known for its resistance to antimicrobials and as a pioneer in biofilm formation, was also detected. Our findings indicate that monitoring of Legionella in cooling tower water would be enhanced by use of both conventional culturing and molecular methods.

  18. Effectiveness of different approaches to disseminating traveler information on travel time reliability. [supporting datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-30

    Travel time reliability information includes static data about traffic speeds or trip times that capture historic variations from day to day, and it can help individuals understand the level of variation in traffic. Unlike real-time travel time infor...

  19. The Coding of Biological Information: From Nucleotide Sequence to Protein Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štambuk, Nikola

    The paper reviews the classic results of Swanson, Dayhoff, Grantham, Blalock and Root-Bernstein, which link genetic code nucleotide patterns to the protein structure, evolution and molecular recognition. Symbolic representation of the binary addresses defining particular nucleotide and amino acid properties is discussed, with consideration of: structure and metric of the code, direct correspondence between amino acid and nucleotide information, and molecular recognition of the interacting protein motifs coded by the complementary DNA and RNA strands.

  20. Assessing Change in High School Student Information Literacy Using the Tool for Real-Time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalik, Cindy L.; Yutzey, Susan D.; Piazza, Laura M.

    2012-01-01

    Change in high school student information literacy (IL) knowledge and skills, from freshman year to senior year in high school was the focus of this quasi-experimental research project. Researchers used a free information literacy skills assessment tool entitled TRAILS (Tool for Real-time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills) to measure…

  1. Development of a real-time PCR for detection of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius using a novel automated comparison of whole-genome sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen M Verstappen

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is an opportunistic pathogen in dogs and cats and occasionally causes infections in humans. S. pseudintermedius is often resistant to multiple classes of antimicrobials. It requires a reliable detection so that it is not misidentified as S. aureus. Phenotypic and currently-used molecular-based diagnostic assays lack specificity or are labour-intensive using multiplex PCR or nucleic acid sequencing. The aim of this study was to identify a specific target for real-time PCR by comparing whole genome sequences of S. pseudintermedius and non-pseudintermedius.Genome sequences were downloaded from public repositories and supplemented by isolates that were sequenced in this study. A Perl-script was written that analysed 300-nt fragments from a reference genome sequence of S. pseudintermedius and checked if this sequence was present in other S. pseudintermedius genomes (n = 74 and non-pseudintermedius genomes (n = 138. Six sequences specific for S. pseudintermedius were identified (sequence length between 300-500 nt. One sequence, which was located in the spsJ gene, was used to develop primers and a probe. The real-time PCR showed 100% specificity when testing for S. pseudintermedius isolates (n = 54, and eight other staphylococcal species (n = 43. In conclusion, a novel approach by comparing whole genome sequences identified a sequence that is specific for S. pseudintermedius and provided a real-time PCR target for rapid and reliable detection of S. pseudintermedius.

  2. Integrating genomic information with protein sequence and 3D atomic level structure at the RCSB protein data bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prlic, Andreas; Kalro, Tara; Bhattacharya, Roshni; Christie, Cole; Burley, Stephen K; Rose, Peter W

    2016-12-15

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB) now contains more than 120,000 three-dimensional (3D) structures of biological macromolecules. To allow an interpretation of how PDB data relates to other publicly available annotations, we developed a novel data integration platform that maps 3D structural information across various datasets. This integration bridges from the human genome across protein sequence to 3D structure space. We developed novel software solutions for data management and visualization, while incorporating new libraries for web-based visualization using SVG graphics. The new views are available from http://www.rcsb.org and software is available from https://github.com/rcsb/. andreas.prlic@rcsb.orgSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  3. The PAZAR database of gene regulatory information coupled to the ORCA toolkit for the study of regulatory sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Arenillas, David; Lim, Jonathan; Swanson, Magdalena I.; Jiang, Steven; McCallum, Anthony; Kirov, Stefan; Wasserman, Wyeth W.

    2009-01-01

    The PAZAR database unites independently created and maintained data collections of transcription factor and regulatory sequence annotation. The flexible PAZAR schema permits the representation of diverse information derived from experiments ranging from biochemical protein–DNA binding to cellular reporter gene assays. Data collections can be made available to the public, or restricted to specific system users. The data ‘boutiques’ within the shopping-mall-inspired system facilitate the analysis of genomics data and the creation of predictive models of gene regulation. Since its initial release, PAZAR has grown in terms of data, features and through the addition of an associated package of software tools called the ORCA toolkit (ORCAtk). ORCAtk allows users to rapidly develop analyses based on the information stored in the PAZAR system. PAZAR is available at http://www.pazar.info. ORCAtk can be accessed through convenient buttons located in the PAZAR pages or via our website at http://www.cisreg.ca/ORCAtk. PMID:18971253

  4. Time-reversibility in seismic sequences: Application to the seismicity of Mexican subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telesca, L.; Flores-Márquez, E. L.; Ramírez-Rojas, A.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the time-reversibility of series associated with the seismicity of five seismic areas of the subduction zone beneath the Southwest Pacific Mexican coast, applying the horizontal visibility graph method to the series of earthquake magnitudes, interevent times, interdistances and magnitude increments. We applied the Kullback-Leibler divergence D that is a metric for quantifying the degree of time-irreversibility in time series. Our findings suggest that among the five seismic areas, Jalisco-Colima is characterized by time-reversibility in all the four seismic series. Our results are consistent with the peculiar seismo-tectonic characteristics of Jalisco-Colima, which is the closest to the Middle American Trench and belongs to the Mexican volcanic arc.

  5. Acceptability of, and Information Needs Regarding, Next-Generation Sequencing in People Tested for Hereditary Cancer: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiser, Bettina; Storey, Ben; Quinn, Veronica; Rahman, Belinda; Andrews, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) for patients at risk of hereditary cancer syndromes can also identify non-cancer related mutations, as well as variants of unknown significance. This study aimed to determine what benefits and shortcomings patients perceive in relation to NGS, as well as their interest and information preferences in regards to such testing. Eligible patients had previously received inconclusive results from clinical mutation testing for cancer susceptibility. Semi-structured telephone interviews were subjected to qualitative analysis guided by the approach developed by Miles and Huberman. The majority of the 19 participants reported they would be interested in panel/genomic testing. Advantages identified included that it would enable better preparation and allow implementation of individualized preventative strategies, with few disadvantages mentioned. Almost all participants said they would want all results, not just those related to their previous diagnosis. Participants felt that a face-to-face discussion supplemented by an information booklet would be the best way to convey information and achieve informed consent. All participants wanted their information stored and reviewed in accordance with new developments. Although the findings indicate strong interest among these individuals, it seems that the consent process, and the interpretation and communication of results will be areas that will require revision to meet the needs of patients.

  6. Massively parallel sequencing of 165 ancestry informative SNPs in two Chinese Tibetan-Burmese minority ethnicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; He, Guanglin; Luo, Tao; Zhao, Xueying; Liu, Jing; Wang, Mengge; Zhou, Di; Chen, Xu; Li, Chengtao; Hou, Yiping

    2018-05-01

    The Tibeto-Burman language, one subfamily of the Sino-Tibetan languages, is spoken by over 60 million people all over East Asia. Yet the ethnic origin and genetic architecture of Tibeto-Burman speaking populations remain largely unexplored. In the present study, 169 Chinese individuals from Tibeto-Burman speaking populations (two ethnic groups: Tibetan and Yi) in four different geographic regions in western China were analyzed using the Precision ID Ancestry Panel (165 AISNPs) and the Ion PGM System. The performance and corresponding forensic statistical parameters of this AISNPs panel were investigated. Comprehensive population genetic comparisons (143 populations based on Kidd' SNPs, 92 populations on the basis of Seldin' SNPs and 31 populations based on the Precision ID Ancestry Panel) and ancestry inference were further performed. Sequencing performance demonstrated that the Precision ID Ancestry Panel is effective and robust. Forensic characteristics suggested that this panel not only can be used for ancestry estimation of Tibeto-Burman populations but also for individual identification. Tibetan and Yi shared a common genetic ancestry origin but experienced the complex history of gene flow, local adaptation, and isolation, and constructed the specific genetic landscape of human genetic diversity of Highlander and Lowlander populations. Tibetan-Burman populations and other East Asian populations showed sufficient genetic difference and could be distinguished into three distinct groups. Furthermore, analysis of population structure revealed that significant genetic difference was existed inter-continent populations and strong genetic affinity was observed within-continent populations. Additional population-specific AISNPs and a relatively more comprehensive database with sufficient reference population data remain necessary to get better-scale resolution within a geographically proximate populations in East Asia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  7. Analysis of dispatching rules in a stochastic dynamic job shop manufacturing system with sequence-dependent setup times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Jain, Ajai

    2014-12-01

    Stochastic dynamic job shop scheduling problem with consideration of sequence-dependent setup times are among the most difficult classes of scheduling problems. This paper assesses the performance of nine dispatching rules in such shop from makespan, mean flow time, maximum flow time, mean tardiness, maximum tardiness, number of tardy jobs, total setups and mean setup time performance measures viewpoint. A discrete event simulation model of a stochastic dynamic job shop manufacturing system is developed for investigation purpose. Nine dispatching rules identified from literature are incorporated in the simulation model. The simulation experiments are conducted under due date tightness factor of 3, shop utilization percentage of 90% and setup times less than processing times. Results indicate that shortest setup time (SIMSET) rule provides the best performance for mean flow time and number of tardy jobs measures. The job with similar setup and modified earliest due date (JMEDD) rule provides the best performance for makespan, maximum flow time, mean tardiness, maximum tardiness, total setups and mean setup time measures.

  8. TAGUCHI METHOD FOR THREE-STAGE ASSEMBLY FLOW SHOP SCHEDULING PROBLEM WITH BLOCKING AND SEQUENCE-DEPENDENT SET UP TIMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AREF MALEKI-DARONKOLAEI

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article considers a three-stage assembly flowshop scheduling problem minimizing the weighted sum of mean completion time and makespan with sequence-dependent setup times at the first stage and blocking times between each stage. To tackle such an NP-hard, two meta-heuristic algorithms are presented. The novelty of our approach is to develop a variable neighborhood search algorithm (VNS and a well-known simulated annealing (SA for the problem. Furthermore, to enhance the performance of the (SA, its parameters are optimized by the use of Taguchi method, but to setting parameters of VNS just one parameter has been used without Taguchi. The computational results show that the proposed VNS is better in mean and standard deviation for all sizes of the problem than SA, but on the contrary about CPU Time SA outperforms VNS.

  9. 77 FR 50963 - Modification of Regulations Regarding the Definition of Factual Information and Time Limits for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ... Modification of Regulations Regarding the Definition of Factual Information and Time Limits for Submission of... proposed modification to the definition of factual information and to the time limits for the submission of... modification to the definition of factual information and to the time limits for the submission of factual...

  10. Combined use of real-time PCR and nested sequence-based typing in survey of human Legionella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, T; Zhou, H; Ren, H; Shi, W; Jin, H; Jiang, X; Xu, Y; Zhou, M; Li, J; Wang, J; Shao, Z; Xu, X

    2016-07-01

    Legionnaires' disease (LD) is a globally distributed systemic infectious disease. The burden of LD in many regions is still unclear, especially in Asian countries including China. A survey of Legionella infection using real-time PCR and nested sequence-based typing (SBT) was performed in two hospitals in Shanghai, China. A total of 265 bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) specimens were collected from hospital A between January 2012 and December 2013, and 359 sputum specimens were collected from hospital B throughout 2012. A total of 71 specimens were positive for Legionella according to real-time PCR focusing on the 5S rRNA gene. Seventy of these specimens were identified as Legionella pneumophila as a result of real-time PCR amplification of the dotA gene. Results of nested SBT revealed high genetic polymorphism in these L. pneumophila and ST1 was the predominant sequence type. These data revealed that the burden of LD in China is much greater than that recognized previously, and real-time PCR may be a suitable monitoring technology for LD in large sample surveys in regions lacking the economic and technical resources to perform other methods, such as urinary antigen tests and culture methods.

  11. Delayed High School Starting Times. Information Capsule. Volume 0908

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazer, Christie

    2009-01-01

    Educators around the nation are considering pushing high school starting times back until later in the morning, based on evidence suggesting that amount of sleep and circadian rhythms play a part in adolescents' academic performance. While research confirms that adolescents do not get enough sleep and that insufficient sleep can negatively…

  12. Time Variability of the Dust Sublimation Zones in Pre-Main Sequence Disk Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitko, Michael L.; Carpenter, W. J.; Grady, C. A.; Russel, R. W.; Lynch, D. K.; Rudy, R. J.; Mazuk, S. M.; Venturini, C. C.; Kimes, R. L.; Beerman, L. C.; hide

    2007-01-01

    The dust sublimation zone (DSZ) is the region of pre-main sequence (PMS) disks where dust grains most easily anneal, sublime, and condense out of the gas. Because of this, it is a location where crystalline material may be enhanced and redistributed throughout the rest of the disk. A decade-long program to monitor the thermal emission of the grains located in this region demonstrates that large changes in emitted flux occur in many systems. Changes in the thermal emission between 3 and 13.5 microns were observed in HD 31648 (MWC 480), HD 163296 (MWC 275), and DG Tau. This emission is consistent with it being produced at the DSZ, where the transition from a disk of gas to one of gas+dust occurs. In the case of DG Tau, the outbursts were accompanied by increased emission on the 10 micron silicate band on one occasion, while on another occasion it went into absorption. This requires lofting of the material above the disk into the line of sight. Such changes will affect the determination of the inner disk structure obtained through interferometry measurements, and this has been confirmed in the case of HD 163296. Cyclic variations in the heating of the DSZ will lead to the annealing of large grains, the sublimation of smaller grains, possibly followed by re-condensation as the zone enters a cooling phase. Lofting of dust above the disk plane, and outward acceleration by stellar winds and radiation pressure, can re-distribute the processed material to cooler regions of the disk, where cometesimals form. This processing is consistent with the detection of the preferential concentration of large crystalline grains in the inner few AU of PMS disks using interferometric spectroscopy with the VLTI.

  13. The sequencing of adverbial clauses of time in academic English: Random forest modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Ali Rezaee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Adverbial clauses of time are positioned either before or after their associated main clauses. This study aims to assess the importance of discourse-pragmatics and processing-related constraints on the positioning of adverbial clauses of time in research articles of applied linguistics written by authors for whom English is considered a native language. Previous research has revealed that the ordering is co-determined by various factors from the domains of semantics and discourse-pragmatics (bridging, iconicity, and subordinator and language processing (deranking, length, and complexity. This research conducts a multifactorial analysis on the motivators of the positioning of adverbial clauses of time in 100 research articles of applied linguistics. The study will use a random forest of conditional inference trees as the statistical technique to measure the weights of the aforementioned variables. It was found that iconicity and bridging, which are factors associated with discourse and semantics, are the two most salient predictors of clause ordering.

  14. Sequence History Update Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanampompan, Teerapat; Gladden, Roy; Fisher, Forest; DelGuercio, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The Sequence History Update Tool performs Web-based sequence statistics archiving for Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Using a single UNIX command, the software takes advantage of sequencing conventions to automatically extract the needed statistics from multiple files. This information is then used to populate a PHP database, which is then seamlessly formatted into a dynamic Web page. This tool replaces a previous tedious and error-prone process of manually editing HTML code to construct a Web-based table. Because the tool manages all of the statistics gathering and file delivery to and from multiple data sources spread across multiple servers, there is also a considerable time and effort savings. With the use of The Sequence History Update Tool what previously took minutes is now done in less than 30 seconds, and now provides a more accurate archival record of the sequence commanding for MRO.

  15. Informational and Causal Architecture of Discrete-Time Renewal Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Marzen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Renewal processes are broadly used to model stochastic behavior consisting of isolated events separated by periods of quiescence, whose durations are specified by a given probability law. Here, we identify the minimal sufficient statistic for their prediction (the set of causal states, calculate the historical memory capacity required to store those states (statistical complexity, delineate what information is predictable (excess entropy, and decompose the entropy of a single measurement into that shared with the past, future, or both. The causal state equivalence relation defines a new subclass of renewal processes with a finite number of causal states despite having an unbounded interevent count distribution. We use the resulting formulae to analyze the output of the parametrized Simple Nonunifilar Source, generated by a simple two-state hidden Markov model, but with an infinite-state ϵ-machine presentation. All in all, the results lay the groundwork for analyzing more complex processes with infinite statistical complexity and infinite excess entropy.

  16. Cerebral activation related to implicit sequence learning in a Double Serial Reaction Time task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, FHCE; Maguire, RP; Leenders, KL; de Jong, BM

    2006-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we examined the distribution of cerebral activations related to implicitly learning a series of fixed stimulus-response combinations. In a novel - bimanual - variant of the Serial Reaction Time task (SRT), simultaneous finger movements of the two

  17. Comparable Educational Benefits in Half the Time: An Alternating Organic Chemistry Laboratory Sequence Targeting Prehealth Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sherri C.; Colabroy, Keri L.; Baar, Marsha R.

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory is a mainstay in STEM education, promoting the development of critical thinking skills, dexterity, and scientific curiosity. The goals in the laboratory for nonchemistry, prehealth majors, though, could be distinguished from those for chemistry majors. In service courses such as organic chemistry, much laboratory time is often spent…

  18. An information-theoretic approach to the modeling and analysis of whole-genome bisulfite sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, Garrett; Abante, Jordi; Feinberg, Andrew P; Goutsias, John

    2018-03-07

    DNA methylation is a stable form of epigenetic memory used by cells to control gene expression. Whole genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) has emerged as a gold-standard experimental technique for studying DNA methylation by producing high resolution genome-wide methylation profiles. Statistical modeling and analysis is employed to computationally extract and quantify information from these profiles in an effort to identify regions of the genome that demonstrate crucial or aberrant epigenetic behavior. However, the performance of most currently available methods for methylation analysis is hampered by their inability to directly account for statistical dependencies between neighboring methylation sites, thus ignoring significant information available in WGBS reads. We present a powerful information-theoretic approach for genome-wide modeling and analysis of WGBS data based on the 1D Ising model of statistical physics. This approach takes into account correlations in methylation by utilizing a joint probability model that encapsulates all information available in WGBS methylation reads and produces accurate results even when applied on single WGBS samples with low coverage. Using the Shannon entropy, our approach provides a rigorous quantification of methylation stochasticity in individual WGBS samples genome-wide. Furthermore, it utilizes the Jensen-Shannon distance to evaluate differences in methylation distributions between a test and a reference sample. Differential performance assessment using simulated and real human lung normal/cancer data demonstrate a clear superiority of our approach over DSS, a recently proposed method for WGBS data analysis. Critically, these results demonstrate that marginal methods become statistically invalid when correlations are present in the data. This contribution demonstrates clear benefits and the necessity of modeling joint probability distributions of methylation using the 1D Ising model of statistical physics and of

  19. Measurement of traffic parameters in image sequence using spatio-temporal information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Daeho; Park, Youngtae

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel method for measurement of traffic parameters, such as the number of passed vehicles, velocity and occupancy rate, by video image analysis. The method is based on a region classification followed by spatio-temporal image analysis. Local detection region images in traffic lanes are classified into one of four categories: the road, the vehicle, the reflection and the shadow, by using statistical and structural features. Misclassification at a frame is corrected by using temporally correlated features of vehicles in the spatio-temporal image. This capability of error correction results in the accurate estimation of traffic parameters even in high traffic congestion. Also headlight detection is employed for nighttime operation. Experimental results show that the accuracy is more than 94% in our test database of diverse operating conditions such as daytime, shadowy daytime, highway, urban way, rural way, rainy day, snowy day, dusk and nighttime. The average processing time is 30 ms per frame when four traffic lanes are processed, and real-time operation could be realized while ensuring robust detection performance even for high-speed vehicles up to 150 km h −1

  20. MitoGen: A Framework for Generating 3D Synthetic Time-Lapse Sequences of Cell Populations in Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, David; Ulman, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    The proper analysis of biological microscopy images is an important and complex task. Therefore, it requires verification of all steps involved in the process, including image segmentation and tracking algorithms. It is generally better to verify algorithms with computer-generated ground truth datasets, which, compared to manually annotated data, nowadays have reached high quality and can be produced in large quantities even for 3D time-lapse image sequences. Here, we propose a novel framework, called MitoGen, which is capable of generating ground truth datasets with fully 3D time-lapse sequences of synthetic fluorescence-stained cell populations. MitoGen shows biologically justified cell motility, shape and texture changes as well as cell divisions. Standard fluorescence microscopy phenomena such as photobleaching, blur with real point spread function (PSF), and several types of noise, are simulated to obtain realistic images. The MitoGen framework is scalable in both space and time. MitoGen generates visually plausible data that shows good agreement with real data in terms of image descriptors and mean square displacement (MSD) trajectory analysis. Additionally, it is also shown in this paper that four publicly available segmentation and tracking algorithms exhibit similar performance on both real and MitoGen-generated data. The implementation of MitoGen is freely available.

  1. A Hybrid Metaheuristic Approach for Minimizing the Total Flow Time in A Flow Shop Sequence Dependent Group Scheduling Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Costa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Production processes in Cellular Manufacturing Systems (CMS often involve groups of parts sharing the same technological requirements in terms of tooling and setup. The issue of scheduling such parts through a flow-shop production layout is known as the Flow-Shop Group Scheduling (FSGS problem or, whether setup times are sequence-dependent, the Flow-Shop Sequence-Dependent Group Scheduling (FSDGS problem. This paper addresses the FSDGS issue, proposing a hybrid metaheuristic procedure integrating features from Genetic Algorithms (GAs and Biased Random Sampling (BRS search techniques with the aim of minimizing the total flow time, i.e., the sum of completion times of all jobs. A well-known benchmark of test cases, entailing problems with two, three, and six machines, is employed for both tuning the relevant parameters of the developed procedure and assessing its performances against two metaheuristic algorithms recently presented by literature. The obtained results and a properly arranged ANOVA analysis highlight the superiority of the proposed approach in tackling the scheduling problem under investigation.

  2. Real-time flow - determination of vena cava inferior on two different levels via 'RACE' pulse sequence in MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helzel, M.V.; Mueller, E.

    1993-01-01

    A new and simple parameter for quantiative evaluation of liver perfusion is outlined: Post-sinusoidal quantitative measurement of the entire liver venous flow: This is a result of the differences in evaluated flow volumes at two different levels in the inferior V.cava. The first level is the height of diaphragm, and the second is situated just cranial of the renal vessels. Normal values obtained from a group of healthy volunteers are presented. A gradient-echo pulse sequence called RACE, enabling flow measurements in real-time, is outlined. (orig.) [de

  3. Sequencing of Isotope-Labeled Small RNA Using Femtosecond Laser Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata-Nishimura, Mizuki; Ando, Yoshinari; Kobayashi, Tohru; Matsuo, Yukari; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Kawai, Jun

    2010-04-01

    A novel method for the analysis of sequences of small RNAs using nucleotide triphosphates labeled with stable isotopes has been developed using time-of-flight mass spectroscopy combined with femtosecond laser ablation (fsLA-TOF-MS). Small RNAs synthesized with nucleotides enriched in 13C and 15N were efficiently atomized and ionized by single-shot fsLA and the isotope ratios 13C/12C and 15N/14N were evaluated using the TOF-MS method. By comparing the isotope ratios among four different configurations, the number of nucleotide contents of the control RNA sample were successfully reproduced.

  4. Sequence-specific validation of LAMP amplicons in real-time optomagnetic detection of Dengue serotype 2 synthetic DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minero, Gabriel Khose Antonio; Nogueira, Catarina; Rizzi, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    We report on an optomagnetic technique optimised for real-time molecular detection of Dengue fever virus under ideal as well as non-ideal laboratory conditions using two different detection approaches. The first approach is based on the detection of the hydrodynamic volume of streptavidin coated...... magnetic nanoparticles attached to biotinylated LAMP amplicons. We demonstrate detection of sub-femtomolar Dengue DNA target concentrations in the ideal contamination-free lab environment within 20 min. The second detection approach is based on sequence-specific binding of functionalised magnetic...... claim detection of down to 100 fM of Dengue target after 20 min of LAMP with a contamination background....

  5. 30 CFR 48.3 - Training plans; time of submission; where filed; information required; time for approval; method...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training plans; time of submission; where filed....3 Training plans; time of submission; where filed; information required; time for approval; method... training plan shall be filed with the District Manager for the area in which the mine is located. (c) Each...

  6. Reconsidering the generation time hypothesis based on nuclear ribosomal ITS sequence comparisons in annual and perennial angiosperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiz-Palacios Omar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differences in plant annual/perennial habit are hypothesized to cause a generation time effect on divergence rates. Previous studies that compared rates of divergence for internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2 sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA in angiosperms have reached contradictory conclusions about whether differences in generation times (or other life history features are associated with divergence rate heterogeneity. We compared annual/perennial ITS divergence rates using published sequence data, employing sampling criteria to control for possible artifacts that might obscure any actual rate variation caused by annual/perennial differences. Results Relative rate tests employing ITS sequences from 16 phylogenetically-independent annual/perennial species pairs rejected rate homogeneity in only a few comparisons, with annuals more frequently exhibiting faster substitution rates. Treating branch length differences categorically (annual faster or perennial faster regardless of magnitude with a sign test often indicated an excess of annuals with faster substitution rates. Annuals showed an approximately 1.6-fold rate acceleration in nucleotide substitution models for ITS. Relative rates of three nuclear loci and two chloroplast regions for the annual Arabidopsis thaliana compared with two closely related Arabidopsis perennials indicated that divergence was faster for the annual. In contrast, A. thaliana ITS divergence rates were sometimes faster and sometimes slower than the perennial. In simulations, divergence rate differences of at least 3.5-fold were required to reject rate constancy in > 80 % of replicates using a nucleotide substitution model observed for the combination of ITS1 and ITS2. Simulations also showed that categorical treatment of branch length differences detected rate heterogeneity > 80% of the time with a 1.5-fold or greater rate difference. Conclusion Although rate homogeneity was not rejected

  7. Multi-Functional Sensing for Swarm Robots Using Time Sequence Classification: HoverBot, an Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus P. Nemitz

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Scaling up robot swarms to collectives of hundreds or even thousands without sacrificing sensing, processing, and locomotion capabilities is a challenging problem. Low-cost robots are potentially scalable, but the majority of existing systems have limited capabilities, and these limitations substantially constrain the type of experiments that could be performed by robotics researchers. Instead of adding functionality by adding more components and therefore increasing the cost, we demonstrate how low-cost hardware can be used beyond its standard functionality. We systematically review 15 swarm robotic systems and analyse their sensing capabilities by applying a general sensor model from the sensing and measurement community. This work is based on the HoverBot system. A HoverBot is a levitating circuit board that manoeuvres by pulling itself towards magnetic anchors that are embedded into the robot arena. We show that HoverBot’s magnetic field readouts from its Hall-effect sensor can be associated to successful movement, robot rotation and collision measurands. We build a time series classifier based on these magnetic field readouts. We modify and apply signal processing techniques to enable the online classification of the time-variant magnetic field measurements on HoverBot’s low-cost microcontroller. We enabled HoverBot with successful movement, rotation, and collision sensing capabilities by utilising its single Hall-effect sensor. We discuss how our classification method could be applied to other sensors to increase a robot’s functionality while retaining its cost.

  8. Estimation of isolation times of the island species in the Drosophila simulans complex from multilocus DNA sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon R McDermott

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The Drosophila simulans species complex continues to serve as an important model system for the study of new species formation. The complex is comprised of the cosmopolitan species, D. simulans, and two island endemics, D. mauritiana and D. sechellia. A substantial amount of effort has gone into reconstructing the natural history of the complex, in part to infer the context in which functional divergence among the species has arisen. In this regard, a key parameter to be estimated is the initial isolation time (t of each island species. Loci in regions of low recombination have lower divergence within the complex than do other loci, yet divergence from D. melanogaster is similar for both classes. This might reflect gene flow of the low-recombination loci subsequent to initial isolation, but it might also reflect differential effects of changing population size on the two recombination classes of loci when the low-recombination loci are subject to genetic hitchhiking or pseudohitchhikingNew DNA sequence variation data for 17 loci corroborate the prior observation from 13 loci that DNA sequence divergence is reduced in genes of low recombination. Two models are presented to estimate t and other relevant parameters (substitution rate correction factors in lineages leading to the island species and, in the case of the 4-parameter model, the ratio of ancestral to extant effective population size from the multilocus DNA sequence data.In general, it appears that both island species were isolated at about the same time, here estimated at approximately 250,000 years ago. It also appears that the difference in divergence patterns of genes in regions of low and higher recombination can be reconciled by allowing a modestly larger effective population size for the ancestral population than for extant D. simulans.

  9. Evolution of simeprevir-resistant variants over time by ultra-deep sequencing in HCV genotype 1b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuta, Norio; Suzuki, Fumitaka; Sezaki, Hitomi; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Hosaka, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Mariko; Saitoh, Satoshi; Ikeda, Kenji; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2014-08-01

    Using ultra-deep sequencing technology, the present study was designed to investigate the evolution of simeprevir-resistant variants (amino acid substitutions of aa80, aa155, aa156, and aa168 positions in HCV NS3 region) over time. In Toranomon Hospital, 18 Japanese patients infected with HCV genotype 1b, received triple therapy of simeprevir/PEG-IFN/ribavirin (DRAGON or CONCERT study). Sustained virological response rate was 67%, and that was significantly higher in patients with IL28B rs8099917 TT than in those with non-TT. Six patients, who did not achieve sustained virological response, were tested for resistant variants by ultra-deep sequencing, at the baseline, at the time of re-elevation of viral loads, and at 96 weeks after the completion of treatment. Twelve of 18 resistant variants, detected at re-elevation of viral load, were de novo resistant variants. Ten of 12 de novo resistant variants become undetectable over time, and that five of seven resistant variants, detected at baseline, persisted over time. In one patient, variants of Q80R at baseline (0.3%) increased at 96-week after the cessation of treatment (10.2%), and de novo resistant variants of D168E (0.3%) also increased at 96-week after the cessation of treatment (9.7%). In conclusion, the present study indicates that the emergence of simeprevir-resistant variants after the start of treatment could not be predicted at baseline, and the majority of de novo resistant variants become undetectable over time. Further large-scale prospective studies should be performed to investigate the clinical utility in detecting simeprevir-resistant variants. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Intelligent Access to Sequence and Structure Databases (IASSD) - an interface for accessing information from major web databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, Sayak; Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Basu, Protip; Banik, Rahul; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Vishal, Vineet; Bera, Abhisek Ranjan; Chakraborty, Hirak Jyoti; Das, Sasti Gopal

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of age of big data and advances in high throughput technology accessing data has become one of the most important step in the entire knowledge discovery process. Most users are not able to decipher the query result that is obtained when non specific keywords or a combination of keywords are used. Intelligent access to sequence and structure databases (IASSD) is a desktop application for windows operating system. It is written in Java and utilizes the web service description language (wsdl) files and Jar files of E-utilities of various databases such as National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and Protein Data Bank (PDB). Apart from that IASSD allows the user to view protein structure using a JMOL application which supports conditional editing. The Jar file is freely available through e-mail from the corresponding author.

  11. Efficiency achievements from a user-developed real-time modifiable clinical information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Roderick O; Patrick, Jon; Besiso, Ali

    2015-02-01

    recovered within a few days in time savings to clinicians. An analysis of the differences between Cerner FirstNet and NEDIMS for sequences of patient journeys showed an average difference of 127 seconds and 15.2 clicks. A simulation model of workflows for typical patient journeys for a normal daily attendance of 165 patients showed that NEDIMS saved 23.9 hours of staff time per day compared with Cerner FirstNet. The results of this investigation show that information systems that are designed by a clinical team using a technology that enables real-time adaptation provides much greater efficiency for the ED. Staff consider that a point-and-click user interface constantly interrupts their train of thought in a way that does not happen when writing on paper. This is partially overcome by the reduction of cognitive load that arises from minimizing the number of clicks to complete a task in the context of global versus local workflow optimization. Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Calculation of T2 relaxation time from ultrafast single shot sequences for differentiation of liver tumors. Comparison of echo-planar, HASTE, and spin-echo sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yasuko; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Tang, Yi; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Mutsumasa

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of T2 calculation from single shot imaging sequences such as echo-planar imaging (EPI) and half-Fourier single shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) imaging. For the phantom study, we prepared vials containing different concentrations of agarose, copper sulfate, and nickel chloride. The temperature of the phantom was kept at 22 deg C. MR images were obtained with a 1.5-Tesla superconductive magnet. Spin-echo (SE)-type EPI and HASTE sequences with different TEs were obtained for T2 calculation, and the T2 values were compared with those obtained from the Carr-Purcell-Meiborm-Gill (CPMG) sequence. The clinical study group consisted of 30 consecutive patients referred for MR imaging to characterize focal liver lesions. A total of 40 focal liver lesions were evaluated, including 25 primary or metastatic solid masses and 15 non-solid lesions. Single shot SE-type EPI and HASTE were both performed with TEs of 64 and 90 msec. In the phantom study, the T2 values obtained from both single shot sequences showed significant correlations with those from the CPMG sequence (T2 on EPI vs. T2 on CPMG: r=0.98, p<0.01; T2 on HASTE vs. T2 on CPMG: r=0.99, p<0.01). In the clinical study, mean T2 values for liver calculated from EPI (42 msec) were significantly shorter than those calculated from the HASTE sequence (58 msec) (p<0.001). Mean T2 values for solid tumors were 95 msec with HASTE and 72 msec with EPI, and mean T2 values for non-solid lesions were 128 msec with HASTE and 159 msec with EPI. Although mean T2 values between solid and non-solid lesions were significantly different for both EPI and HASTE sequences (p=0.01 for HASTE, p<0.001 for EPI), the overlap of solid and non-solid lesions was less frequent in EPI than in HASTE. With single shot sequences, it is possible to obtain the T2 values that show excellent correlation with the CPMG sequence. Although both HASTE and EPI are useful to calculate T2 values, EPI appears to be more

  13. Sequence polymorphism can produce serious artefacts in real-time PCR assays: hard lessons from Pacific oysters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camara Mark D

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since it was first described in the mid-1990s, quantitative real time PCR (Q-PCR has been widely used in many fields of biomedical research and molecular diagnostics. This method is routinely used to validate whole transcriptome analyses such as DNA microarrays, suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH or differential display techniques such as cDNA-AFLP (Amplification Fragment Length Polymorphism. Despite efforts to optimize the methodology, misleading results are still possible, even when standard optimization approaches are followed. Results As part of a larger project aimed at elucidating transcriptome-level responses of Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas to various environmental stressors, we used microarrays and cDNA-AFLP to identify Expressed Sequence Tag (EST fragments that are differentially expressed in response to bacterial challenge in two heat shock tolerant and two heat shock sensitive full-sib oyster families. We then designed primers for these differentially expressed ESTs in order to validate the results using Q-PCR. For two of these ESTs we tested fourteen primer pairs each and using standard optimization methods (i.e. melt-curve analysis to ensure amplification of a single product, determined that of the fourteen primer pairs tested, six and nine pairs respectively amplified a single product and were thus acceptable for further testing. However, when we used these primers, we obtained different statistical outcomes among primer pairs, raising unexpected but serious questions about their reliability. We hypothesize that as a consequence of high levels of sequence polymorphism in Pacific oysters, Q-PCR amplification is sub-optimal in some individuals because sequence variants in priming sites results in poor primer binding and amplification in some individuals. This issue is similar to the high frequency of null alleles observed for microsatellite markers in Pacific oysters. Conclusion This study highlights

  14. Ultrasensitive quantitation of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 oncogene sequences by nested real time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Revilla Rubén

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed an ultrasensitive method based on conventional PCR preamplification followed by nested amplification through real time PCR (qPCR in the presence of the DNA intercalating agent EvaGreen. Results Amplification mixtures calibrated with a known number of pHV101 copies carrying a 645 base pair (bp-long insert of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 E6 oncogene were used to generate the E6-1 amplicon of 645 bp by conventional PCR and then the E6-2 amplicon of 237 bp by nested qPCR. Direct and nested qPCR mixtures for E6-2 amplification corresponding to 2.5 × 102-2.5 × 106 initial pHV101 copies had threshold cycle (Ct values in the ranges of 18.7-29.0 and 10.0-25.0, respectively. The Ct of qPCR mixtures prepared with 1/50 volumes of preamplified mixtures containing 50 ng of DNA of the SiHa cell line (derived from an invasive cervical cancer with one HPV16 genome per cell was 19.9. Thermal fluorescence extinction profiles of E6-2 amplicons generated from pHV101 and SiHa DNA were identical, with a peak at 85.5°C. Conclusions Our method based on conventional preamplification for 15 cycles increased 10,750 times the sensitivity of nested qPCR for the quantitation of the E6 viral oncogene and confirmed that the SiHa cell line contains one E6-HPV16 copy per cell.

  15. Just-in-time information presentation and the acquisition of complex cognitive skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, L.; Kirschner, P.A.; Merriënboer, J.J.G. van; Baumer, A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a model for just-in-time (JIT) presentation of information. Learners receive the information needed to carry out a task precisely at the time it is needed. The model is twofold: supportive information is best presented before practising task clusters while

  16. Just-in-time information presentation and the acquisition of complex cognitive skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, Liesbeth; Kirschner, Paul A.; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J.G.; Baumer, Anita

    This paper describes a model for just-in-time (JIT) presentation of information. Learners receive the information needed to carry out a task precisely at the time it is needed. The model is twofold: supportive information is best presented before practising task clusters while prerequisite

  17. The 2017 North Korea M6 seismic sequence: moment tensor, source time function, and aftershocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, S.; Zhan, Z.; Chu, R.; He, X.

    2017-12-01

    On September 3rd, 2017, an M6 seismic event occurred in North Korea, with location near previous nuclear test sites. The event features strong P waves and short period Rayleigh waves are observed in contrast to weak S waves, suggesting mostly explosion mechanism. We performed joint inversion for moment tensor and depth with both local and teleseismic waveforms, and find that the event is shallow with mostly isotropic yet substantial non-isotropic components. Deconvolution of seismic waveforms of this event with respect to previous nuclear test events shows clues of complexity in source time function. The event is followed by smaller earthquakes, as early as 8.5 minutes and lasted at least to October. The later events occurred in a compact region, and show clear S waves, suggesting double couple focal mechanism. Via analyzing Rayleigh wave spectrum, these smaller events are found to be shallow. Relative locations, difference in waveforms of the events are used to infer their possible links and generation mechanism.

  18. Evolutionary time-scale of the begomoviruses: evidence from integrated sequences in the Nicotiana genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Lefeuvre

    Full Text Available Despite having single stranded DNA genomes that are replicated by host DNA polymerases, viruses in the family Geminiviridae are apparently evolving as rapidly as some RNA viruses. The observed substitution rates of geminiviruses in the genera Begomovirus and Mastrevirus are so high that the entire family could conceivably have originated less than a million years ago (MYA. However, the existence of geminivirus related DNA (GRD integrated within the genomes of various Nicotiana species suggests that the geminiviruses probably originated >10 MYA. Some have even suggested that a distinct New-World (NW lineage of begomoviruses may have arisen following the separation by continental drift of African and American proto-begomoviruses ∼110 MYA. We evaluate these various geminivirus origin hypotheses using Bayesian coalescent-based approaches to date firstly the Nicotiana GRD integration events, and then the divergence of the NW and Old-World (OW begomoviruses. Besides rejecting the possibility of a<2 MYA OW-NW begomovirus split, we could also discount that it may have occurred concomitantly with the breakup of Gondwanaland 110 MYA. Although we could only confidently narrow the date of the split down to between 2 and 80 MYA, the most plausible (and best supported date for the split is between 20 and 30 MYA--a time when global cooling ended the dispersal of temperate species between Asia and North America via the Beringian land bridge.

  19. Real-Time Whole-Genome Sequencing for Routine Typing, Surveillance, and Outbreak Detection of Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheutz, Flemming; Lund, Ole; Hasman, Henrik; Kaas, Rolf S.; Nielsen, Eva M.; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    Fast and accurate identification and typing of pathogens are essential for effective surveillance and outbreak detection. The current routine procedure is based on a variety of techniques, making the procedure laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. With whole-genome sequencing (WGS) becoming cheaper, it has huge potential in both diagnostics and routine surveillance. The aim of this study was to perform a real-time evaluation of WGS for routine typing and surveillance of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC). In Denmark, the Statens Serum Institut (SSI) routinely receives all suspected VTEC isolates. During a 7-week period in the fall of 2012, all incoming isolates were concurrently subjected to WGS using IonTorrent PGM. Real-time bioinformatics analysis was performed using web-tools (www.genomicepidemiology.org) for species determination, multilocus sequence type (MLST) typing, and determination of phylogenetic relationship, and a specific VirulenceFinder for detection of E. coli virulence genes was developed as part of this study. In total, 46 suspected VTEC isolates were characterized in parallel during the study. VirulenceFinder proved successful in detecting virulence genes included in routine typing, explicitly verocytotoxin 1 (vtx1), verocytotoxin 2 (vtx2), and intimin (eae), and also detected additional virulence genes. VirulenceFinder is also a robust method for assigning verocytotoxin (vtx) subtypes. A real-time clustering of isolates in agreement with the epidemiology was established from WGS, enabling discrimination between sporadic and outbreak isolates. Overall, WGS typing produced results faster and at a lower cost than the current routine. Therefore, WGS typing is a superior alternative to conventional typing strategies. This approach may also be applied to typing and surveillance of other pathogens. PMID:24574290

  20. Real-time whole-genome sequencing for routine typing, surveillance, and outbreak detection of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joensen, Katrine Grimstrup; Scheutz, Flemming; Lund, Ole; Hasman, Henrik; Kaas, Rolf S; Nielsen, Eva M; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2014-05-01

    Fast and accurate identification and typing of pathogens are essential for effective surveillance and outbreak detection. The current routine procedure is based on a variety of techniques, making the procedure laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. With whole-genome sequencing (WGS) becoming cheaper, it has huge potential in both diagnostics and routine surveillance. The aim of this study was to perform a real-time evaluation of WGS for routine typing and surveillance of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC). In Denmark, the Statens Serum Institut (SSI) routinely receives all suspected VTEC isolates. During a 7-week period in the fall of 2012, all incoming isolates were concurrently subjected to WGS using IonTorrent PGM. Real-time bioinformatics analysis was performed using web-tools (www.genomicepidemiology.org) for species determination, multilocus sequence type (MLST) typing, and determination of phylogenetic relationship, and a specific VirulenceFinder for detection of E. coli virulence genes was developed as part of this study. In total, 46 suspected VTEC isolates were characterized in parallel during the study. VirulenceFinder proved successful in detecting virulence genes included in routine typing, explicitly verocytotoxin 1 (vtx1), verocytotoxin 2 (vtx2), and intimin (eae), and also detected additional virulence genes. VirulenceFinder is also a robust method for assigning verocytotoxin (vtx) subtypes. A real-time clustering of isolates in agreement with the epidemiology was established from WGS, enabling discrimination between sporadic and outbreak isolates. Overall, WGS typing produced results faster and at a lower cost than the current routine. Therefore, WGS typing is a superior alternative to conventional typing strategies. This approach may also be applied to typing and surveillance of other pathogens.

  1. Real-Time Human Detection for Aerial Captured Video Sequences via Deep Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouar AlDahoul

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Human detection in videos plays an important role in various real life applications. Most of traditional approaches depend on utilizing handcrafted features which are problem-dependent and optimal for specific tasks. Moreover, they are highly susceptible to dynamical events such as illumination changes, camera jitter, and variations in object sizes. On the other hand, the proposed feature learning approaches are cheaper and easier because highly abstract and discriminative features can be produced automatically without the need of expert knowledge. In this paper, we utilize automatic feature learning methods which combine optical flow and three different deep models (i.e., supervised convolutional neural network (S-CNN, pretrained CNN feature extractor, and hierarchical extreme learning machine for human detection in videos captured using a nonstatic camera on an aerial platform with varying altitudes. The models are trained and tested on the publicly available and highly challenging UCF-ARG aerial dataset. The comparison between these models in terms of training, testing accuracy, and learning speed is analyzed. The performance evaluation considers five human actions (digging, waving, throwing, walking, and running. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed methods are successful for human detection task. Pretrained CNN produces an average accuracy of 98.09%. S-CNN produces an average accuracy of 95.6% with soft-max and 91.7% with Support Vector Machines (SVM. H-ELM has an average accuracy of 95.9%. Using a normal Central Processing Unit (CPU, H-ELM’s training time takes 445 seconds. Learning in S-CNN takes 770 seconds with a high performance Graphical Processing Unit (GPU.

  2. Archetypes and architecture of time: an artistic inquiry into the nature of time, space and information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ast, Olga

    2013-09-01

    This paper and poster seek to address several fundamental questions about time. What are the natural phenomena and cognitive structures that underlie the human perception of time? What social constructs have evolved around questioning its nature? How did they arise and evolve over the ages? I have been exploring the subject of time merging my background as a conceptual artist with principles of scientific study. My focus has been on the changing visualizations of time through the evolution of human society, from the earliest depictions of the flowing river or the circular uroboros - a snake eating its own tail - to the linear arrow and the paintings of Dali and Magritte, who depict time with modern metaphors of a clock, a train, or the 4th dimension. How have these images influenced scientific, religious and philosophical thought surrounding time? Drawn by now from our collective subconscious, do they naturally bias us towards particular conventional models? And finally, how can an analysis of the visual metaphors of time contribute to the larger dialogue, one that involves scientists, technologists and philosophers, each with their own theories on the subject? This project attempts to answer these questions, and to propose that art is an essential voice in any discussion about time. Can artists and scientists working together bring us closer to an answer to the age-old question - what is time?

  3. Archetypes and architecture of time: an artistic inquiry into the nature of time, space and information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ast Olga

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper and poster seek to address several fundamental questions about time. What are the natural phenomena and cognitive structures that underlie the human perception of time? What social constructs have evolved around questioning its nature? How did they arise and evolve over the ages? I have been exploring the subject of time merging my background as a conceptual artist with principles of scientific study. My focus has been on the changing visualizations of time through the evolution of human society, from the earliest depictions of the flowing river or the circular uroboros – a snake eating its own tail – to the linear arrow and the paintings of Dali and Magritte, who depict time with modern metaphors of a clock, a train, or the 4th dimension. How have these images influenced scientific, religious and philosophical thought surrounding time? Drawn by now from our collective subconscious, do they naturally bias us towards particular conventional models? And finally, how can an analysis of the visual metaphors of time contribute to the larger dialogue, one that involves scientists, technologists and philosophers, each with their own theories on the subject? This project attempts to answer these questions, and to propose that art is an essential voice in any discussion about time. Can artists and scientists working together bring us closer to an answer to the age-old question – what is time?

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of articular cartilage of the knee using ultrashort echo time (uTE) sequences with spiral acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Hajimu; Fujii, Masahiko; Iwama, Yuki; Aoyama, Nobukazu; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of ultrashort echo time (uTE) sequence for visualisation of calcified deep layers of articular cartilage. MRI with a uTE sequence was performed on five healthy volunteers. Signals from the calcified deep layers of the articular knee cartilage were evaluated on uTE subtraction images and computed tomography images. The calcified deep layers of the articular cartilage changed from having a low to a high signal when imaged with a uTE sequence. The reported uTE sequence was effective in imaging the deep layers of the knee cartilage.

  5. Analysis of hepatitis C NS5A resistance associated polymorphisms using ultra deep single molecule real time (SMRT) sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergfors, Assar; Leenheer, Daniël; Bergqvist, Anders; Ameur, Adam; Lennerstrand, Johan

    2016-02-01

    Development of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) resistance against direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), including NS5A inhibitors, is an obstacle to successful treatment of HCV when DAAs are used in sub-optimal combinations. Furthermore, it has been shown that baseline (pre-existing) resistance against DAAs is present in treatment naïve-patients and this will potentially complicate future treatment strategies in different HCV genotypes (GTs). Thus the aim was to detect low levels of NS5A resistant associated variants (RAVs) in a limited sample set of treatment-naïve patients of HCV GT1a and 3a, since such polymorphisms can display in vitro resistance as high as 60000 fold. Ultra-deep single molecule real time (SMRT) sequencing with the Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) RSII instrument was used to detect these RAVs. The SMRT sequencing was conducted on ten samples; three of them positive with Sanger sequencing (GT1a Q30H and Y93N, and GT3a Y93H), five GT1a samples, and two GT3a non-positive samples. The same methods were applied to the HCV GT1a H77-plasmid in a dilution series, in order to determine the error rates of replication, which in turn was used to determine the limit of detection (LOD), as defined by mean + 3SD, of minority variants down to 0.24%. We found important baseline NS5A RAVs at levels between 0.24 and 0.5%, which could potentially have clinical relevance. This new method with low level detection of baseline RAVs could be useful in predicting the most cost-efficient combination of DAA treatment, and reduce the treatment duration for an HCV infected individual. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of Sequencing of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy and Breast Reconstruction on Timing and Rate of Complications and Patient Satisfaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adesiyun, Tolulope A.; Lee, Bernard T.; Yueh, Janet H.; Chen, Chen; Colakoglu, Salih; Anderson, Katarina E.M.; Nguyen, Minh-Doan T.; Recht, Abram

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: There are few long-term studies of how the sequencing of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) and breast reconstruction (BR) affects the time to development of complications or patient satisfaction with BR. We therefore studied this issue. Methods and Materials: One hundred thirteen women who underwent BR at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (Boston, MA) from 1999-2006 and also received PMRT were included. Complications requiring surgery were categorized as early (within 90 days of BR) or late. The median length of follow-up after BR was 46.5 months. Patients' general and esthetic satisfaction was assessed with a validated questionnaire. Results: Complications occurred among 32% of 57 women receiving PMRT before BR and 44% of 57 patients having BR before PMRT (p = 0.176). Early complications were more frequent in patients who had PMRT first (18%) than for those with BR first (11%) (p = 0.210); conversely, late complication rates in the two groups were 14% and 33%, respectively (p = 0.009). General satisfaction was comparable between the PMRT-first and BR-first groups (68% and 68%, respectively; p = 0.995); esthetic satisfaction rates were also similar (50% and 62%, respectively; p = 0.238). Conclusions: The sequencing of PMRT and BR did not have a substantial impact on the total risk of complications or patients' general and esthetic satisfaction. However, early complications tended to develop in patients having PMRT first, whereas patients having BR first had a higher risk of late complications. Additional study of the effects of sequencing of PMRT on particular types of reconstructions may help devise strategies for reducing these risks.

  7. Quantitative assessment of hematopoietic chimerism by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction of sequence polymorphism systems after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiao-ying; Li, Guo-xuan; Qin, Ya-zhen; Wang, Yu; Wang, Feng-rong; Liu, Dai-hong; Xu, Lan-ping; Chen, Huan; Han, Wei; Wang, Jing-zhi; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Li, Jin-lan; Li, Ling-di; Liu, Kai-yan; Huang, Xiao-jun

    2011-08-01

    Analysis of changes in recipient and donor hematopoietic cell origin is extremely useful to monitor the effect of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and sequential adoptive immunotherapy by donor lymphocyte infusions. We developed a sensitive, reliable and rapid real-time PCR method based on sequence polymorphism systems to quantitatively assess the hematopoietic chimerism after HSCT. A panel of 29 selected sequence polymorphism (SP) markers was screened by real-time PCR in 101 HSCT patients with leukemia and other hematological diseases. The chimerism kinetics of bone marrow samples of 8 HSCT patients in remission and relapse situations were followed longitudinally. Recipient genotype discrimination was possible in 97.0% (98 of 101) with a mean number of 2.5 (1-7) informative markers per recipient/donor pair. Using serial dilutions of plasmids containing specific SP markers, the linear correlation (r) of 0.99, the slope between -3.2 and -3.7 and the sensitivity of 0.1% were proved reproducible. By this method, it was possible to very accurately detect autologous signals in the range from 0.1% to 30%. The accuracy of the method in the very important range of autologous signals below 5% was extraordinarily high (standard deviation real-time PCR method over short tandem repeat PCR chimerism assays is the absence of PCR competition and plateau biases, with demonstrated greater sensitivity and linearity. Finally, we prospectively analyzed bone marrow samples of 8 patients who received allografts and presented the chimerism kinetics of remission and relapse situations that illustrated the sensitivity level and the promising clinical application of this method. This SP-based real-time PCR assay provides a rapid, sensitive, and accurate quantitative assessment of mixed chimerism that can be useful in predicting graft rejection and early relapse.

  8. PINGU: PredIction of eNzyme catalytic residues usinG seqUence information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarshini P Pai

    Full Text Available Identification of catalytic residues can help unveil interesting attributes of enzyme function for various therapeutic and industrial applications. Based on their biochemical roles, the number of catalytic residues and sequence lengths of enzymes vary. This article describes a prediction approach (PINGU for such a scenario. It uses models trained using physicochemical properties and evolutionary information of 650 non-redundant enzymes (2136 catalytic residues in a support vector machines architecture. Independent testing on 200 non-redundant enzymes (683 catalytic residues in predefined prediction settings, i.e., with non-catalytic per catalytic residue ranging from 1 to 30, suggested that the prediction approach was highly sensitive and specific, i.e., 80% or above, over the incremental challenges. To learn more about the discriminatory power of PINGU in real scenarios, where the prediction challenge is variable and susceptible to high false positives, the best model from independent testing was used on 60 diverse enzymes. Results suggested that PINGU was able to identify most catalytic residues and non-catalytic residues properly with 80% or above accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. The effect of false positives on precision was addressed in this study by application of predicted ligand-binding residue information as a post-processing filter. An overall improvement of 20% in F-measure and 0.138 in Correlation Coefficient with 16% enhanced precision could be achieved. On account of its encouraging performance, PINGU is hoped to have eventual applications in boosting enzyme engineering and novel drug discovery.

  9. One-year retention of general and sequence-specific skills in a probabilistic, serial reaction time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Jennifer C; Howard, James H; Howard, Darlene V

    2010-05-01

    Procedural skills such as riding a bicycle and playing a musical instrument play a central role in daily life. Such skills are learned gradually and are retained throughout life. The present study investigated 1-year retention of procedural skill in a version of the widely used serial reaction time task (SRTT) in young and older motor-skill experts and older controls in two experiments. The young experts were college-age piano and action video-game players, and the older experts were piano players. Previous studies have reported sequence-specific skill retention in the SRTT as long as 2 weeks but not at 1 year. Results indicated that both young and older experts and older non-experts revealed sequence-specific skill retention after 1 year with some evidence that general motor skill was retained as well. These findings are consistent with theoretical accounts of procedural skill learning such as the procedural reinstatement theory as well as with previous studies of retention of other motor skills.

  10. Informed consent for exome sequencing research in families with genetic disease: the emerging issue of incidental findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, Amanda L; Bollinger, Juli; Raraigh, Karen S; Tichnell, Crystal; Murray, Brittney; Blout, Carrie Lynn; Telegrafi, Aida Bytyci; James, Cynthia A

    2014-11-01

    Genomic sequencing technology is increasingly used in genetic research. Studies of informed consent for exome and genome sequencing (ES/GS) research have largely involved hypothetical scenarios or healthy individuals enrolling in population-based studies. Studies have yet to explore the consent experiences of adults with inherited disease. We conducted a qualitative interview study of 15 adults recently enrolled in a large-scale ES/GS study (11 affected adults, four parents of affected children). Our study had two goals: (1) to explore three theoretical barriers to consent for ES/GS research (interpretive/technical complexity, possibility of incidental findings, and risks of loss of privacy); and (2) to explore how interviewees experienced the consent process. Interviewees could articulate study goals and processes, describe incidental findings, discuss risks of privacy loss, and reflect on their consent experience. Few expected the study would identify the genetic cause of their condition. All elected to receive incidental findings. Interviewees acknowledged paying little attention to potential implications of incidental findings in light of more pressing goals of supporting research regarding their own medical conditions. Interviewees suggested that experience living with a genetic condition prepared them to adjust to incidental findings. Interviewees also expressed little concern about loss of confidentiality of study data. Some experienced the consent process as very long. None desired reconsent prior to return of study results. Families with inherited disease likely would benefit from a consent process in which study risks and benefits were discussed in the context of prior experiences with genetic research and genetic disease. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effect of time delay on the upper bound of the time derivative of information entropy in a stochastic dynamical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Min-Min; Mei Dong-Cheng; Wang Can-Jun

    2011-01-01

    The effects of the time delay on the upper bound of the time derivative of information entropy are investigated in a time-delayed dynamical system driven by correlated noise. Using the Markov approximation of the stochastic delay differential equations and the Schwartz inequality principle, we obtain an analytical expression for the upper bound U B (t) of the time derivative of the information entropy. The results show that there is a critical value of τ (delay time), and U B (t) presents opposite behaviours on difference sides of the critical value. For the case of the weak additive noise, τ can induce a reentrance transition. Delay time τ also causes a reversal behaviour in U B (t)-λ plot, where λ denotes the degree of the correlation between the two noises. (general)

  12. An accurate and rapid continuous wavelet dynamic time warping algorithm for unbalanced global mapping in nanopore sequencing

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Renmin; Li, Yu; Wang, Sheng; Gao, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Long-reads, point-of-care, and PCR-free are the promises brought by nanopore sequencing. Among various steps in nanopore data analysis, the global mapping between the raw electrical current signal sequence and the expected signal sequence from

  13. Diversity and dynamics of dominant and rare bacterial taxa in replicate sequencing batch reactors operated under different solids retention time

    KAUST Repository

    Bagchi, Samik

    2014-10-19

    In this study, 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was applied in order to provide a better insight on the diversity and dynamics of total, dominant, and rare bacterial taxa in replicate lab-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) operated at different solids retention time (SRT). Rank-abundance curves showed few dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and a long tail of rare OTUs in all reactors. Results revealed that there was no detectable effect of SRT (2 vs. 10 days) on Shannon diversity index and OTU richness of both dominant and rare taxa. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis showed that the total, dominant, and rare bacterial taxa were highly dynamic during the entire period of stable reactor performance. Also, the rare taxa were more dynamic than the dominant taxa despite expected low invasion rates because of the use of sterile synthetic media.

  14. Comparison of lesion conspicuity of radiofrequency ablation zones among MR sequences according to time in the normal rabbit liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, Myong Seo; Kim, Seung Kwon; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Kwag, Hyon Joo

    2007-01-01

    To compare the lesion conspicuity of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) zones among MR sequences according to time in the normal rabbit liver. RFA zones were created in 12 rabbit livers with a 17-gauge internally cooled electrode (1-cm active tip, 30 Watts, 3 minutes). Three rabbits were sacrificed immediately, three days, two weeks, and six weeks after the RFA procedure, respectively. Before sacrifice, T1-, T2-weighted images (WI), and gadolinium-enhanced (GE)-T1WI images were obtained. The lesion conspicuity of the RAF zone and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the RFA zone to the liver parenchyma were analyzed and compared among the MR sequences according to time. On T1WI, the RFA zones were only clearly seen on acute phase. On T2WI, the RFA zones were clearly seen on all phases except the hyperacute phase. On GE T1WI, the RFA zones were clearly seen on all phases. The CNRs of the RFA zone to the liver parenchyma of GE-T1WI (8.1-12.4) were significantly higher than the CNRs of TIWI (1.6-2.7) and T2WI (1.7-6.3) on all phases (ρ < 0.05), but the visual lesion conspicuity between GE T1WI and T2WI were similar. On hyperacute phase, GE T1WI showed better lesion conspicuity of the RFA zone than T1WI and T2WI. On other phases, GE T1WI and T2WI showed similar lesion conspicuity

  15. Evaluating the Impacts of Real-Time Information on Subway Ridership in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-21

    It is now common for transit operators to provide real-time information (RTI) to passengers about the location or predicted arrival times of transit vehicles. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) in New York City has recently made RTI avai...

  16. Sequence Analysis of IncA/C and IncI1 Plasmids Isolated from Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Newport Using Single-Molecule Real-Time Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Guojie; Allard, Marc; Hoffmann, Maria; Muruvanda, Tim; Luo, Yan; Payne, Justin; Meng, Kevin; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick; Brown, Eric; Meng, Jianghong

    2018-04-05

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) plasmids play an important role in disseminating antimicrobial resistance genes. To elucidate the antimicrobial resistance gene compositions in A/C incompatibility complex (IncA/C) plasmids carried by animal-derived MDR Salmonella Newport, and to investigate the spread mechanism of IncA/C plasmids, this study characterizes the complete nucleotide sequences of IncA/C plasmids by comparative analysis. Complete nucleotide sequencing of plasmids and chromosomes of six MDR Salmonella Newport strains was performed using PacBio RSII. Open reading frames were assigned using prokaryotic genome annotation pipeline (PGAP). To understand genomic diversity and evolutionary relationships among Salmonella Newport IncA/C plasmids, we included three complete IncA/C plasmid sequences with similar backbones from Salmonella Newport and Escherichia coli: pSN254, pAM04528, and peH4H, and additional 200 draft chromosomes. With the exception of canine isolate CVM22462, which contained an additional IncI1 plasmid, each of the six MDR Salmonella Newport strains contained only the IncA/C plasmid. These IncA/C plasmids (including references) ranged in size from 80.1 (pCVM21538) to 176.5 kb (pSN254) and carried various resistance genes. Resistance genes floR, tetA, tetR, strA, strB, sul, and mer were identified in all IncA/C plasmids. Additionally, bla CMY-2 and sugE were present in all IncA/C plasmids, excepting pCVM21538. Plasmid pCVM22462 was capable of being transferred by conjugation. The IncI1 plasmid pCVM22462b in CVM22462 carried bla CMY-2 and sugE. Our data showed that MDR Salmonella Newport strains carrying similar IncA/C plasmids clustered together in the phylogenetic tree using chromosome sequences and the IncA/C plasmids from animal-derived Salmonella Newport contained diverse resistance genes. In the current study, we analyzed genomic diversities and phylogenetic relationships among MDR Salmonella Newport using complete plasmids and chromosome

  17. Modelling financial markets with agents competing on different time scales and with different amount of information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlmuth, Johannes; Andersen, Jørgen Vitting

    2006-05-01

    We use agent-based models to study the competition among investors who use trading strategies with different amount of information and with different time scales. We find that mixing agents that trade on the same time scale but with different amount of information has a stabilizing impact on the large and extreme fluctuations of the market. Traders with the most information are found to be more likely to arbitrage traders who use less information in the decision making. On the other hand, introducing investors who act on two different time scales has a destabilizing effect on the large and extreme price movements, increasing the volatility of the market. Closeness in time scale used in the decision making is found to facilitate the creation of local trends. The larger the overlap in commonly shared information the more the traders in a mixed system with different time scales are found to profit from the presence of traders acting at another time scale than themselves.

  18. Time-varying and time-invariant dimensions of depression in children and adolescents: Implications for cross-informant agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, David A; Martin, Joan M; Jacquez, Farrah M; Tram, Jane M; Zelkowitz, Rachel; Nick, Elizabeth A; Rights, Jason D

    2017-07-01

    The longitudinal structure of depression in children and adolescents was examined by applying a Trait-State-Occasion structural equation model to 4 waves of self, teacher, peer, and parent reports in 2 age groups (9 to 13 and 13 to 16 years old). Analyses revealed that the depression latent variable consisted of 2 longitudinal factors: a time-invariant dimension that was completely stable over time and a time-varying dimension that was not perfectly stable over time. Different sources of information were differentially sensitive to these 2 dimensions. Among adolescents, self- and parent reports better reflected the time-invariant aspects. For children and adolescents, peer and teacher reports better reflected the time-varying aspects. Relatively high cross-informant agreement emerged for the time-invariant dimension in both children and adolescents. Cross-informant agreement for the time-varying dimension was high for adolescents but very low for children. Implications emerge for theoretical models of depression and for its measurement, especially when attempting to predict changes in depression in the context of longitudinal studies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Online discussion compensates for suboptimal timing of supportive information presentation in a digitally supported learning environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noroozi, O.; Busstra, M.C.; Mulder, M.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Tobi, H.; Geelen, A.; Veer, van 't P.; Chizari, M.

    2012-01-01

    This study used a sequential set-up to investigate the consecutive effects of timing of supportive information presentation (information before vs. information during the learning task clusters) in interactive digital learning materials (IDLMs) and type of collaboration (personal discussion vs.

  20. Genetic differentiation between fake abalone and genuine Haliotis species using the forensically informative nucleotide sequencing (FINS) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Wai Y; Reid, David G; Kam, Wan L; Lau, Yuk Y; Sham, Wing C; Tam, Silvia Y K; Sin, Della W M; Mok, Chuen S

    2011-05-25

    Abalones ( Haliotis species) are a popular delicacy and commonly preserved in dried form either whole or in slices or small pieces for consumption in Asian countries. Driven by the huge profit from trading abalones, dishonest traders may substitute other molluscan species for processed abalone, of which the morphological characteristics are frequently lost in the processed form. For protection of consumer rights and law enforcement against fraud, there is a need for an effective methodology to differentiate between fake and genuine abalone. This paper describes a method (validated according to the international forensic guidelines provided by SWGDAM) for the identification of fake abalone species using forensically informative nucleotide sequence (FINS) analysis. A study of the local market revealed that many claimed "abalone slice" samples on sale are not genuine. The fake abalone samples were found to be either volutids of the genus Cymbium (93%) or the muricid Concholepas concholepas (7%). This is the first report of Cymbium species being used for the preparation and sale as "abalone" in dried sliced form in Hong Kong.

  1. Lncident: A Tool for Rapid Identification of Long Noncoding RNAs Utilizing Sequence Intrinsic Composition and Open Reading Frame Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyu Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available More and more studies have demonstrated that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs play critical roles in diversity of biological process and are also associated with various types of disease. How to rapidly identify lncRNAs and messenger RNA is the fundamental step to uncover the function of lncRNAs identification. Here, we present a novel method for rapid identification of lncRNAs utilizing sequence intrinsic composition features and open reading frame information based on support vector machine model, named as Lncident (LncRNAs identification. The 10-fold cross-validation and ROC curve are used to evaluate the performance of Lncident. The main advantage of Lncident is high speed without the loss of accuracy. Compared with the exiting popular tools, Lncident outperforms Coding-Potential Calculator, Coding-Potential Assessment Tool, Coding-Noncoding Index, and PLEK. Lncident is also much faster than Coding-Potential Calculator and Coding-Noncoding Index. Lncident presents an outstanding performance on microorganism, which offers a great application prospect to the analysis of microorganism. In addition, Lncident can be trained by users’ own collected data. Furthermore, R package and web server are simultaneously developed in order to maximize the convenience for the users. The R package “Lncident” can be easily installed on multiple operating system platforms, as long as R is supported.

  2. Evaluation of short repetition time, partial flip angle, gradient recalled echo pulse sequences in cervical spine imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enzmann, D.; Rubin, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    A short repetition time (TR), partial flip angle, gradient recalled echo pulse sequence (GRASS) was prospectively studied to optimize it for the diagnosis of cervical disk and cord disease in 98 patients. Changes in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast were measured as the following parameters were varied: flip angle (3 0 to 18 0 ), TR (22-60 msec), and echo time (TE) (12.5-25 msec). Flip angle was the single most important parameter. For disk disease, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) SNR peaked at an 8 0 flip angle in the axial view but at a 4 0 flip angle in the sagittal view. In the sagittal view, disk-CSF contrast decreased progressively from a flip angle of 3 0 , while in the axial view it peaked at 10 0 . For cord lesions the findings were similar except that lesion-cord contrast could be increased by lengthening both TR and TE. No one combination of parameters proved greatly superior for either disk disease or cord disease. The selection of parameters required balancing of several factors that often had opposing effects

  3. Revealing the microbiota of marketed edible insects through PCR-DGGE, metagenomic sequencing and real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osimani, Andrea; Milanović, Vesna; Garofalo, Cristiana; Cardinali, Federica; Roncolini, Andrea; Sabbatini, Riccardo; De Filippis, Francesca; Ercolini, Danilo; Gabucci, Claudia; Petruzzelli, Annalisa; Tonucci, Franco; Clementi, Francesca; Aquilanti, Lucia

    2018-07-02

    The present study aimed to identify the microbiota present in six species of processed edible insects produced in Thailand and marketed worldwide via the internet, namely, giant water bugs (Belostoma lutarium), black ants (Polyrhachis), winged termites (alates, Termitoidae), rhino beetles (Hyboschema contractum), mole crickets (Gryllotalpidae), and silkworm pupae (Bombyx mori). For each species, two samples of boiled, dried and salted insects were purchased. The microbial DNA was extracted from the insect samples and subjected to polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), high-throughput sequencing and qualitative real-time PCR assays. The microbiota of the analyzed samples were widely characterized by the presence of spore-forming bacteria mainly represented by the genera Bacillus and Clostridium. Moreover, the genera Anaerobacillus, Paenibacillus, Geobacillus, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Massilia, Delftia, Lactobacillus, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Vagococcus, and Vibrio were also detected. Real-time PCR allowed for ascertainment of the absence of Coxiella burnetii, Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in all samples. The results of this study confirm the importance of combining different molecular techniques to characterize the biodiversity of complex ecosystems such as edible insects. The presence of potential human pathogens suggests the need for a careful application of good manufacturing practices during insect processing. This study provides further data that will be useful in risk analyses of edible insects as a novel food source. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Possibility of the real-time dynamic strain field monitoring deduced from GNSS data: case study of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Y.; Ohzono, M.; Takahashi, H.; Kawamoto, S.; Hino, R.

    2017-12-01

    A large and destructive earthquake (Mjma 7.3) occurred on April 15, 2016 in Kumamoto region, southwestern Japan. This earthquake was accompanied approximately 32 s later by an M 6 earthquake in central Oita region, which hypocenter located 80 km northeast from the hypocenter of the mainshock of the Kumamoto earthquake. This triggered earthquake also had the many aftershocks in and around the Oita region. It is important to understand how to occur such chain-reacted earthquake sequences. We used the 1Hz dual-frequency phase and range data from GEONET in Kyushu island. The data were processed using GIPSY-OASIS (version 6.4). We adopoted kinematic PPP strategy for the coordinate estimation. The reference GPS satellite orbit and 5 s clock information were obtained using the CODE product. We also applied simple sidereal filter technique for the estimated time series. Based on the obtained 1Hz GNSS time series, we estimated the areal strain and principle strain field using the method of the Shen et al. (1996). For the assessment of the dynamic strain, firstly we calculated the averaged absolute value of areal strain field between 60-85s after the origin time of the mainshock of the Kumamoto earthquake which was used as the "reference" static strain field. Secondly, we estimated the absolute value of areal strain in each time step. Finally, we calculated the strain ratio in each time step relative to the "reference". Based on this procedure, we can extract the spatial and temporal characteristic of the dynamic strain in each time step. Extracted strain ratio clearly shows the spatial and temporal dynamic strain characteristic. When an attention is paid to a region of triggered Oita earthquake, the timing of maximum dynamic strain ratio in the epicenter just corresponds to the origin time of the triggered event. It strongly suggested that the large dynamic strain may trigger the Oita event. The epicenter of the triggered earthquake located within the geothermal region. In

  5. Visualization of Time-Series Sensor Data to Inform the Design of Just-In-Time Adaptive Stress Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmin, Moushumi; Raij, Andrew; Epstien, David; Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Beck, J Gayle; Vhaduri, Sudip; Preston, Kenzie; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-09-01

    We investigate needs, challenges, and opportunities in visualizing time-series sensor data on stress to inform the design of just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs). We identify seven key challenges: massive volume and variety of data, complexity in identifying stressors, scalability of space, multifaceted relationship between stress and time, a need for representation at multiple granularities, interperson variability, and limited understanding of JITAI design requirements due to its novelty. We propose four new visualizations based on one million minutes of sensor data (n=70). We evaluate our visualizations with stress researchers (n=6) to gain first insights into its usability and usefulness in JITAI design. Our results indicate that spatio-temporal visualizations help identify and explain between- and within-person variability in stress patterns and contextual visualizations enable decisions regarding the timing, content, and modality of intervention. Interestingly, a granular representation is considered informative but noise-prone; an abstract representation is the preferred starting point for designing JITAIs.

  6. A genetic algorithm for finding good balanced sequences in a customer assignment problem with no state information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, W.; Hordijk, A.; Heidergott, B.F.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the control problem of optimal assignment of tasks to servers in a multi-server queue with inhomogeneous servers. In order to improve the performance of the system, we use a periodic deterministic sequence of job assignments to servers called a billiard sequence. We then use

  7. Optimizing multiple sequence alignments using a genetic algorithm based on three objectives: structural information, non-gaps percentage and totally conserved columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortuño, Francisco M; Valenzuela, Olga; Rojas, Fernando; Pomares, Hector; Florido, Javier P; Urquiza, Jose M; Rojas, Ignacio

    2013-09-01

    Multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) are widely used approaches in bioinformatics to carry out other tasks such as structure predictions, biological function analyses or phylogenetic modeling. However, current tools usually provide partially optimal alignments, as each one is focused on specific biological features. Thus, the same set of sequences can produce different alignments, above all when sequences are less similar. Consequently, researchers and biologists do not agree about which is the most suitable way to evaluate MSAs. Recent evaluations tend to use more complex scores including further biological features. Among them, 3D structures are increasingly being used to evaluate alignments. Because structures are more conserved in proteins than sequences, scores with structural information are better suited to evaluate more distant relationships between sequences. The proposed multiobjective algorithm, based on the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm, aims to jointly optimize three objectives: STRIKE score, non-gaps percentage and totally conserved columns. It was significantly assessed on the BAliBASE benchmark according to the Kruskal-Wallis test (P algorithm also outperforms other aligners, such as ClustalW, Multiple Sequence Alignment Genetic Algorithm (MSA-GA), PRRP, DIALIGN, Hidden Markov Model Training (HMMT), Pattern-Induced Multi-sequence Alignment (PIMA), MULTIALIGN, Sequence Alignment Genetic Algorithm (SAGA), PILEUP, Rubber Band Technique Genetic Algorithm (RBT-GA) and Vertical Decomposition Genetic Algorithm (VDGA), according to the Wilcoxon signed-rank test (P 0.05) with the advantage of being able to use less structures. Structural information is included within the objective function to evaluate more accurately the obtained alignments. The source code is available at http://www.ugr.es/~fortuno/MOSAStrE/MO-SAStrE.zip.

  8. Time Resolution Dependence of Information Measures for Spiking Neurons: Scaling and Universality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Crutchfield

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The mutual information between stimulus and spike-train response is commonly used to monitor neural coding efficiency, but neuronal computation broadly conceived requires more refined and targeted information measures of input-output joint processes. A first step towards that larger goal is todevelop information measures for individual output processes, including information generation (entropy rate, stored information (statisticalcomplexity, predictable information (excess entropy, and active information accumulation (bound information rate. We calculate these for spike trains generated by a variety of noise-driven integrate-and-fire neurons as a function of time resolution and for alternating renewal processes. We show that their time-resolution dependence reveals coarse-grained structural properties of interspike interval statistics; e.g., $tau$-entropy rates that diverge less quickly than the firing rate indicate interspike interval correlations. We also find evidence that the excess entropy and regularized statistical complexity of different types of integrate-and-fire neurons are universal in the continuous-time limit in the sense that they do not depend on mechanism details. This suggests a surprising simplicity in the spike trains generated by these model neurons. Interestingly, neurons with gamma-distributed ISIs and neurons whose spike trains are alternating renewal processes do not fall into the same universality class. These results lead to two conclusions. First, the dependence of information measures on time resolution reveals mechanistic details about spike train generation. Second, information measures can be used as model selection tools for analyzing spike train processes.

  9. Anomalous stress diffusion, Omori's law and Continuous Time Random Walk in the 2010 Efpalion aftershock sequence (Corinth rift, Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michas, Georgios; Vallianatos, Filippos; Karakostas, Vassilios; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Sammonds, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Efpalion aftershock sequence occurred in January 2010, when an M=5.5 earthquake was followed four days later by another strong event (M=5.4) and numerous aftershocks (Karakostas et al., 2012). This activity interrupted a 15 years period of low to moderate earthquake occurrence in Corinth rift, where the last major event was the 1995 Aigion earthquake (M=6.2). Coulomb stress analysis performed in previous studies (Karakostas et al., 2012; Sokos et al., 2012; Ganas et al., 2013) indicated that the second major event and most of the aftershocks were triggered due to stress transfer. The aftershocks production rate decays as a power-law with time according to the modified Omori law (Utsu et al., 1995) with an exponent larger than one for the first four days, while after the occurrence of the second strong event the exponent turns to unity. We consider the earthquake sequence as a point process in time and space and study its spatiotemporal evolution considering a Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) model with a joint probability density function of inter-event times and jumps between the successive earthquakes (Metzler and Klafter, 2000). Jump length distribution exhibits finite variance, whereas inter-event times scale as a q-generalized gamma distribution (Michas et al., 2013) with a long power-law tail. These properties are indicative of a subdiffusive process in terms of CTRW. Additionally, the mean square displacement of aftershocks is constant with time after the occurrence of the first event, while it changes to a power-law with exponent close to 0.15 after the second major event, illustrating a slow diffusive process. During the first four days aftershocks cluster around the epicentral area of the second major event, while after that and taking as a reference the second event, the aftershock zone is migrating slowly with time to the west near the epicentral area of the first event. This process is much slower from what would be expected from normal diffusion, a

  10. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE REAL TIME INTEGRATED TRAFFIC INFORMATION SYSTEM (RITIS FOR INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofyar Z. TAMIN

    2001-01-01

    One of the most important information is the best routes from each origin zone to each destination zone which have already considered the effect of congestion. This information will be the main data for the development of the Route Guidance System (RGS so that each driver can choose his best route through the road network. The best route information will be changed in a short-time-interval basis depending on the traffic condition. Moreover, this approach can also be extended to provide the short-time-interval environmental information. The system has been tested and validated in Bandung and it showed remarkably good results for Bandung condition.

  11. Job resignation after cancer diagnosis among working survivors in Japan: timing, reasons and change of information needs over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Miyako; Tsuchiya, Miyako; Horio, Yoshitsugu; Funazaki, Hatsumi; Aogi, Kenjiro; Miyauchi, Kazue; Arai, Yasuaki

    2018-01-01

    Despite advances in work-related policies for cancer survivors, support systems for working survivors in healthcare settings in Japan remain underdeveloped. We aimed to reveal (i) the present situation of cancer survivors' job resignation, the timing of resignation, and reasons for resignation; (ii) healthcare providers' screening behaviors of cancer survivors' work-related difficulties and (iii) changes to cancer survivors' information/support needs over time since diagnosis. We conducted an anonymous, cross-sectional survey using a convenience sample of re-visiting outpatients at three cancer centers in Japan in 2015. The questionnaire covered participants' demographic and clinical characteristics, change to job status, timing of and reasons for job resignation, screening experience regarding work-related difficulties by healthcare providers, and information/support needs at four distinct timings (at diagnosis, between diagnosis and initial treatment, between initial treatment and return-to-work, and after return-to-work). The results of 950 participants were eligible for statistical analysis. Only 23.5% of participants were screened about work-related issues by healthcare providers despite 21.3% participants reporting resigning at least once. Among participants who resigned, 40.2% decided to do so before initial treatment began. Regarding reasons for resignation, self-regulating and pessimistic reasons were ranked highly. Respondents' work-related information and support needs were observed to change over time. While treatment-related information (schedule and cost) was ranked highly at diagnosis, the need for more individually tailored information and support on work increased after treatment began. This study provides important basic data for developing effective support systems for working survivors of cancer in hospital settings. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Local sequence information in cellular retinoic acid-binding protein I: specific residue roles in beta-turns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondi, Kenneth S; Gierasch, Lila M

    2003-01-01

    We have recently shown that two of the beta-turns (III and IV) in the ten-stranded, beta-clam protein, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein I (CRABP I), are favored in short peptide fragments, arguing that they are encoded by local interactions (K. S. Rotondi and L. M. Gierasch, Biochemistry, 2003, Vol. 42, pp. 7976-7985). In this paper we examine these turns in greater detail to dissect the specific local interactions responsible for their observed native conformational biases. Conformations of peptides corresponding to the turn III and IV fragments were examined under conditions designed to selectively disrupt stabilizing interactions, using pH variation, chaotrope addition, or mutagenesis to probe specific side-chain influences. We find that steric constraints imposed by excluded volume effects between near neighbor residues (i,i+2), favorable polar (i,i+2) interactions, and steric permissiveness of glycines are the principal factors accounting for the observed native bias in these turns. Longer-range stabilizing interactions across the beta-turns do not appear to play a significant role in turn stability in these short peptides, in contrast to their importance in hairpins. Additionally, our data add to a growing number of examples of the 3:5 type I turn with a beta-bulge as a class of turns with high propensity to form locally defined structure. Current work is directed at the interplay between the local sequence information in the turns and more long-range influences in the mechanism of folding of this predominantly beta-sheet protein. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Comparison of different pulse sequences for in vivo determination of T1 relaxation times in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Henriksen, O

    1988-01-01

    ). T1 measurements were performed on the human brain using a whole body MR scanner operating at 1.5 tesla. Three different pulse sequences were compared including two 6-points inversion recovery (IR) sequences with TR = 2.0 s and 4.0, respectively, and a 12-points partial saturation inversion recovery...

  14. Multiplex, Rapid, and Sensitive Isothermal Detection of Nucleic-Acid Sequence by Endonuclease Restriction-Mediated Real-Time Multiple Cross Displacement Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Dongxin; Luo, Lijuan; Li, Hua; Cao, Xiaolong; Liu, Kai; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    We have devised a novel isothermal amplification technology, termed endonuclease restriction-mediated real-time multiple cross displacement amplification (ET-MCDA), which facilitated multiplex, rapid, specific and sensitive detection of nucleic-acid sequences at a constant temperature. The ET-MCDA integrated multiple cross displacement amplification strategy, restriction endonuclease cleavage and real-time fluorescence detection technique. In the ET-MCDA system, the functional cross primer E-CP1 or E-CP2 was constructed by adding a short sequence at the 5' end of CP1 or CP2, respectively, and the new E-CP1 or E-CP2 primer was labeled at the 5' end with a fluorophore and in the middle with a dark quencher. The restriction endonuclease Nb.BsrDI specifically recognized the short sequence and digested the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5' end short sequences and their complementary sequences), which released the quenching, resulting on a gain of fluorescence signal. Thus, the ET-MCDA allowed real-time detection of single or multiple targets in only a single reaction, and the positive results were observed in as short as 12 min, detecting down to 3.125 fg of genomic DNA per tube. Moreover, the analytical specificity and the practical application of the ET-MCDA were also successfully evaluated in this study. Here, we provided the details on the novel ET-MCDA technique and expounded the basic ET-MCDA amplification mechanism.

  15. Real-time 3D reconstruction of road curvature in far look-ahead distance from analysis of image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, Reinhold

    1995-12-01

    A system for visual road recognition in far look-ahead distance, implemented in the autonomous road vehicle VaMP (a passenger car), is described. Visual cues of a road in a video image are the bright lane markings and the edges formed at the road borders. In a distance of more than 100 m, the most relevant road cue is the homogeneous road area, limited by the two border edges. These cues can be detected by the image processing module KRONOS applying edge detection techniques and areal 2D segmentation based on resolution triangles (analogous to a resolution pyramid). An estimation process performs an update of a state vector, which describes spatial road shape and vehicle orientation relative to the road. This state vector is estimated every 40 ms by exploiting knowledge about the vehicle movement (spatio-temporal model of vehicle dynamics) and the road design rules (clothoidal segments). Kalman filter techniques are applied to obtain an optimal estimate of the state vector by evaluating the measurements of the road border positions in the image sequence taken by a set of CCD cameras. The road consists of segments with piecewise constant curvature parameters. The borders between these segments can be detected by applying methods which have been developed for detection of discontinuities during time-discrete measurements. The road recognition system has been tested in autonomous rides with VaMP on public Autobahnen in real traffic at speeds up to 130 km/h.

  16. Biogeography of the Pistia clade (Araceae): based on chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA sequences and Bayesian divergence time inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Susanne S; Zhang, Li-Bing

    2004-06-01

    Pistia stratiotes (water lettuce) and Lemna (duckweeds) are the only free-floating aquatic Araceae. The geographic origin and phylogenetic placement of these unrelated aroids present long-standing problems because of their highly modified reproductive structures and wide geographical distributions. We sampled chloroplast (trnL-trnF and rpl20-rps12 spacers, trnL intron) and mitochondrial sequences (nad1 b/c intron) for all genera implicated as close relatives of Pistia by morphological, restriction site, and sequencing data, and present a hypothesis about its geographic origin based on the consensus of trees obtained from the combined data, using Bayesian, maximum likelihood, parsimony, and distance analyses. Of the 14 genera closest to Pistia, only Alocasia, Arisaema, and Typhonium are species-rich, and the latter two were studied previously, facilitating the choice of representatives that span the roots of these genera. Results indicate that Pistia and the Seychelles endemic Protarum sechellarum are the basalmost branches in a grade comprising the tribes Colocasieae (Ariopsis, Steudnera, Remusatia, Alocasia, Colocasia), Arisaemateae (Arisaema, Pinellia), and Areae (Arum, Biarum, Dracunculus, Eminium, Helicodiceros, Theriophonum, Typhonium). Unexpectedly, all Areae genera are embedded in Typhonium, which throws new light on the geographic history of Areae. A Bayesian analysis of divergence times that explores the effects of multiple fossil and geological calibration points indicates that the Pistia lineage is 90 to 76 million years (my) old. The oldest fossils of the Pistia clade, though not Pistia itself, are 45-my-old leaves from Germany; the closest outgroup, Peltandreae (comprising a few species in Florida, the Mediterranean, and Madagascar), is known from 60-my-old leaves from Europe, Kazakhstan, North Dakota, and Tennessee. Based on the geographic ranges of close relatives, Pistia likely originated in the Tethys region, with Protarum then surviving on the

  17. Just-in-time, Schematic Supportive Information Presentation During Cognitive Skill Acquisition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, Liesbeth; Lehnen, Chris; Van Gerven, Pascal; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Kester, L., Lehnen, C., Van Gerven, P.W. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2006). Just-in-time, Schematic Supportive Information Presentation During Cognitive Skill Acquisition. Computers in Human Behavior, 22, 93-112 .

  18. Just-in-time information presentation and the acquisition of complex cognitive skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, Liesbeth; Kirschner, Paul A.; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen; Bäumer, Anita

    2008-01-01

    Kester, L., Kirschner, P., van Merriënboer, J. J. G., & Bäumer, A. (2001). Just-in-time information presentation and the acquisition of complex cognitive skills. Computers in Human Behavior, 17, 373-391.

  19. Evaluating effectiveness of real-time advanced traveler information systems using a small test vehicle fleet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    ADVANCE was an in-vehicle advanced traveler information system (ATIS) providing route guidance in real time that operated in the northwestern portion and northwest suburbs of Chicago, Illinois. It used probe vehicles to generate dynamically travel ti...

  20. Quantum process tomography with informational incomplete data of two J-coupled heterogeneous spins relaxation in a time window much greater than T1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Thiago O.; Vianna, Reinaldo O.; Sarthour, Roberto S.; Oliveira, Ivan S.

    2015-11-01

    We reconstruct the time dependent quantum map corresponding to the relaxation process of a two-spin system in liquid-state NMR at room temperature. By means of quantum tomography techniques that handle informational incomplete data, we show how to properly post-process and normalize the measurements data for the simulation of quantum information processing, overcoming the unknown number of molecules prepared in a non-equilibrium magnetization state (Nj) by an initial sequence of radiofrequency pulses. From the reconstructed quantum map, we infer both longitudinal (T1) and transversal (T2) relaxation times, and introduce the J-coupling relaxation times ({T}1J,{T}2J), which are relevant for quantum information processing simulations. We show that the map associated to the relaxation process cannot be assumed approximated unital and trace-preserving for times greater than {T}2J.

  1. Timing of schema activation and memory: Inhibited access to inconsistent information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksterhuis, A.; Knippenberg, A. van

    1995-01-01

    In the present experiment, recognition of consistent and inconsistent information was measured as a function of time of schema activation. A schema was either activated before or after encoding, or not at all. Schema activation after encoding reduced recognition of inconsistent information while

  2. 75 FR 75725 - Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Tax Time Card Account Pilot...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... Information: Tax Time Card Account Pilot, Screening, Focus Groups, and Study AGENCY: Financial Management... general public and other Federal agencies to take this opportunity to comment on a continuing information... Account Pilot Screening, Focus Groups, and Study.'' DATES: Written comments should be received on or...

  3. Real-Time Pathogen Detection in the Era of Whole-Genome Sequencing and Big Data: Comparison of k-mer and Site-Based Methods for Inferring the Genetic Distances among Tens of Thousands of Salmonella Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Pettengill

    Full Text Available The adoption of whole-genome sequencing within the public health realm for molecular characterization of bacterial pathogens has been followed by an increased emphasis on real-time detection of emerging outbreaks (e.g., food-borne Salmonellosis. In turn, large databases of whole-genome sequence data are being populated. These databases currently contain tens of thousands of samples and are expected to grow to hundreds of thousands within a few years. For these databases to be of optimal use one must be able to quickly interrogate them to accurately determine the genetic distances among a set of samples. Being able to do so is challenging due to both biological (evolutionary diverse samples and computational (petabytes of sequence data issues. We evaluated seven measures of genetic distance, which were estimated from either k-mer profiles (Jaccard, Euclidean, Manhattan, Mash Jaccard, and Mash distances or nucleotide sites (NUCmer and an extended multi-locus sequence typing (MLST scheme. When analyzing empirical data (whole-genome sequence data from 18,997 Salmonella isolates there are features (e.g., genomic, assembly, and contamination that cause distances inferred from k-mer profiles, which treat absent data as informative, to fail to accurately capture the distance between samples when compared to distances inferred from differences in nucleotide sites. Thus, site-based distances, like NUCmer and extended MLST, are superior in performance, but accessing the computing resources necessary to perform them may be challenging when analyzing large databases.

  4. Real-Time Pathogen Detection in the Era of Whole-Genome Sequencing and Big Data: Comparison of k-mer and Site-Based Methods for Inferring the Genetic Distances among Tens of Thousands of Salmonella Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettengill, James B; Pightling, Arthur W; Baugher, Joseph D; Rand, Hugh; Strain, Errol

    2016-01-01

    The adoption of whole-genome sequencing within the public health realm for molecular characterization of bacterial pathogens has been followed by an increased emphasis on real-time detection of emerging outbreaks (e.g., food-borne Salmonellosis). In turn, large databases of whole-genome sequence data are being populated. These databases currently contain tens of thousands of samples and are expected to grow to hundreds of thousands within a few years. For these databases to be of optimal use one must be able to quickly interrogate them to accurately determine the genetic distances among a set of samples. Being able to do so is challenging due to both biological (evolutionary diverse samples) and computational (petabytes of sequence data) issues. We evaluated seven measures of genetic distance, which were estimated from either k-mer profiles (Jaccard, Euclidean, Manhattan, Mash Jaccard, and Mash distances) or nucleotide sites (NUCmer and an extended multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) scheme). When analyzing empirical data (whole-genome sequence data from 18,997 Salmonella isolates) there are features (e.g., genomic, assembly, and contamination) that cause distances inferred from k-mer profiles, which treat absent data as informative, to fail to accurately capture the distance between samples when compared to distances inferred from differences in nucleotide sites. Thus, site-based distances, like NUCmer and extended MLST, are superior in performance, but accessing the computing resources necessary to perform them may be challenging when analyzing large databases.

  5. Bus-stop Based Real Time Passenger Information System - Case Study Maribor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čelan, Marko; Klemenčič, Mitja; Mrgole, Anamarija L.; Lep, Marjan

    2017-10-01

    Real time passenger information system is one of the key element of promoting public transport. For the successful implementation of real time passenger information systems, various components should be considered, such as: passenger needs and requirements, stakeholder involvement, technological solution for tracking, data transfer, etc. This article carrying out designing and evaluation of real time passenger information (RTPI) in the city of Maribor. The design phase included development of methodology for selection of appropriate macro and micro location of the real-time panel, development of a real-time passenger algorithm, definition of a technical specification, financial issues and time frame. The evaluation shows that different people have different requirements; therefore, the system should be adaptable to be used by various types of people, according to the age, the purpose of journey, experience of using public transport, etc. The average difference between perceived waiting time for a bus is 35% higher than the actual waiting time and grow with the headway increase. Experiences from Maribor have shown that the reliability of real time passenger system (from technical point of view) must be close to 100%, otherwise the system may have negative impact on passengers and may discourage the use of public transport. Among considered events of arrivals during the test period, 92% of all prediction were accurate. The cost benefit analysis has focused only on potential benefits from reduced perceived users waiting time and foreseen costs of real time information system in Maribor for 10 years’ period. Analysis shows that the optimal number for implementing real time passenger information system at the bus stops in Maribor is set on 83 bus stops (approx. 20 %) with the highest number of passenger. If we consider all entries at the chosen bus stops, the total perceived waiting time on yearly level could be decreased by about 60,000 hours.

  6. Generalized Hough transform based time invariant action recognition with 3D pose information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muench, David; Huebner, Wolfgang; Arens, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Human action recognition has emerged as an important field in the computer vision community due to its large number of applications such as automatic video surveillance, content based video-search and human robot interaction. In order to cope with the challenges that this large variety of applications present, recent research has focused more on developing classifiers able to detect several actions in more natural and unconstrained video sequences. The invariance discrimination tradeoff in action recognition has been addressed by utilizing a Generalized Hough Transform. As a basis for action representation we transform 3D poses into a robust feature space, referred to as pose descriptors. For each action class a one-dimensional temporal voting space is constructed. Votes are generated from associating pose descriptors with their position in time relative to the end of an action sequence. Training data consists of manually segmented action sequences. In the detection phase valid human 3D poses are assumed as input, e.g. originating from 3D sensors or monocular pose reconstruction methods. The human 3D poses are normalized to gain view-independence and transformed into (i) relative limb-angle space to ensure independence of non-adjacent joints or (ii) geometric features. In (i) an action descriptor consists of the relative angles between limbs and their temporal derivatives. In (ii) the action descriptor consists of different geometric features. In order to circumvent the problem of time-warping we propose to use a codebook of prototypical 3D poses which is generated from sample sequences of 3D motion capture data. This idea is in accordance with the concept of equivalence classes in action space. Results of the codebook method are presented using the Kinect sensor and the CMU Motion Capture Database.

  7. Memory Efficient Sequence Analysis Using Compressed Data Structures (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Jared

    2011-10-13

    Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Jared Simpson on Memory efficient sequence analysis using compressed data structures at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  8. Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplifications Tools (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quake, Steve

    2011-10-12

    Stanford University's Steve Quake on "Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplification Tools" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  9. MedTime: a temporal information extraction system for clinical narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Kai; Chen, Hsinchun; Brown, Randall A

    2013-12-01

    Temporal information extraction from clinical narratives is of critical importance to many clinical applications. We participated in the EVENT/TIMEX3 track of the 2012 i2b2 clinical temporal relations challenge, and presented our temporal information extraction system, MedTime. MedTime comprises a cascade of rule-based and machine-learning pattern recognition procedures. It achieved a micro-averaged f-measure of 0.88 in both the recognitions of clinical events and temporal expressions. We proposed and evaluated three time normalization strategies to normalize relative time expressions in clinical texts. The accuracy was 0.68 in normalizing temporal expressions of dates, times, durations, and frequencies. This study demonstrates and evaluates the integration of rule-based and machine-learning-based approaches for high performance temporal information extraction from clinical narratives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The determination of high-resolution spatio-temporal glacier motion fields from time-lapse sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Ellen; Maas, Hans-Gerd

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive method for the determination of glacier surface motion vector fields at high spatial and temporal resolution. These vector fields can be derived from monocular terrestrial camera image sequences and are a valuable data source for glaciological analysis of the motion behaviour of glaciers. The measurement concepts for the acquisition of image sequences are presented, and an automated monoscopic image sequence processing chain is developed. Motion vector fields can be derived with high precision by applying automatic subpixel-accuracy image matching techniques on grey value patterns in the image sequences. Well-established matching techniques have been adapted to the special characteristics of the glacier data in order to achieve high reliability in automatic image sequence processing, including the handling of moving shadows as well as motion effects induced by small instabilities in the camera set-up. Suitable geo-referencing techniques were developed to transform image measurements into a reference coordinate system.The result of monoscopic image sequence analysis is a dense raster of glacier surface point trajectories for each image sequence. Each translation vector component in these trajectories can be determined with an accuracy of a few centimetres for points at a distance of several kilometres from the camera. Extensive practical validation experiments have shown that motion vector and trajectory fields derived from monocular image sequences can be used for the determination of high-resolution velocity fields of glaciers, including the analysis of tidal effects on glacier movement, the investigation of a glacier's motion behaviour during calving events, the determination of the position and migration of the grounding line and the detection of subglacial channels during glacier lake outburst floods.

  11. Genome-Wide Prediction and Analysis of 3D-Domain Swapped Proteins in the Human Genome from Sequence Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Atul Kumar; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    3D-domain swapping is one of the mechanisms of protein oligomerization and the proteins exhibiting this phenomenon have many biological functions. These proteins, which undergo domain swapping, have acquired much attention owing to their involvement in human diseases, such as conformational diseases, amyloidosis, serpinopathies, proteionopathies etc. Early realisation of proteins in the whole human genome that retain tendency to domain swap will enable many aspects of disease control management. Predictive models were developed by using machine learning approaches with an average accuracy of 78% (85.6% of sensitivity, 87.5% of specificity and an MCC value of 0.72) to predict putative domain swapping in protein sequences. These models were applied to many complete genomes with special emphasis on the human genome. Nearly 44% of the protein sequences in the human genome were predicted positive for domain swapping. Enrichment analysis was performed on the positively predicted sequences from human genome for their domain distribution, disease association and functional importance based on Gene Ontology (GO). Enrichment analysis was also performed to infer a better understanding of the functional importance of these sequences. Finally, we developed hinge region prediction, in the given putative domain swapped sequence, by using important physicochemical properties of amino acids.

  12. Investigation of timing effects in modified composite quadrupolar echo pulse sequences by mean of average Hamiltonian theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane

    2018-01-01

    The utility of the average Hamiltonian theory and its antecedent the Magnus expansion is presented. We assessed the concept of convergence of the Magnus expansion in quadrupolar spectroscopy of spin-1 via the square of the magnitude of the average Hamiltonian. We investigated this approach for two specific modified composite pulse sequences: COM-Im and COM-IVm. It is demonstrated that the size of the square of the magnitude of zero order average Hamiltonian obtained on the appropriated basis is a viable approach to study the convergence of the Magnus expansion. The approach turns to be efficient in studying pulse sequences in general and can be very useful to investigate coherent averaging in the development of high resolution NMR technique in solids. This approach allows comparing theoretically the two modified composite pulse sequences COM-Im and COM-IVm. We also compare theoretically the current modified composite sequences (COM-Im and COM-IVm) to the recently published modified composite pulse sequences (MCOM-I, MCOM-IV, MCOM-I_d, MCOM-IV_d).

  13. Inter-laboratory evaluation of the EUROFORGEN Global ancestry-informative SNP panel by massively parallel sequencing using the Ion PGM™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eduardoff, M; Gross, T E; Santos, C; de la Puente, M; Ballard, D; Strobl, C; Børsting, C; Morling, N; Fusco, L; Hussing, C; Egyed, B; Souto, L; Uacyisrael, J; Syndercombe Court, D; Carracedo, Á; Lareu, M V; Schneider, P M; Parson, W; Phillips, C; Parson, W; Phillips, C

    2016-07-01

    The EUROFORGEN Global ancestry-informative SNP (AIM-SNPs) panel is a forensic multiplex of 128 markers designed to differentiate an individual's ancestry from amongst the five continental population groups of Africa, Europe, East Asia, Native America, and Oceania. A custom multiplex of AmpliSeq™ PCR primers was designed for the Global AIM-SNPs to perform massively parallel sequencing using the Ion PGM™ system. This study assessed individual SNP genotyping precision using the Ion PGM™, the forensic sensitivity of the multiplex using dilution series, degraded DNA plus simple mixtures, and the ancestry differentiation power of the final panel design, which required substitution of three original ancestry-informative SNPs with alternatives. Fourteen populations that had not been previously analyzed were genotyped using the custom multiplex and these studies allowed assessment of genotyping performance by comparison of data across five laboratories. Results indicate a low level of genotyping error can still occur from sequence misalignment caused by homopolymeric tracts close to the target SNP, despite careful scrutiny of candidate SNPs at the design stage. Such sequence misalignment required the exclusion of component SNP rs2080161 from the Global AIM-SNPs panel. However, the overall genotyping precision and sensitivity of this custom multiplex indicates the Ion PGM™ assay for the Global AIM-SNPs is highly suitable for forensic ancestry analysis with massively parallel sequencing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 3T MRI of the knee with optimised isotropic 3D sequences. Accurate delineation of intra-articular pathology without prolonged acquisition times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulaal, Osamah M.; Rainford, Louise; Galligan, Marie; McGee, Allison [University College Dublin, Radiography and Diagnostic Imaging, School of Medicine, Belfield, Dublin (Ireland); MacMahon, Peter; Kavanagh, Eoin [Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); University College Dublin, School of Medicine, Dublin (Ireland); Cashman, James [Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Dublin (Ireland); University College Dublin, School of Medicine, Dublin (Ireland)

    2017-11-15

    To investigate optimised isotropic 3D turbo spin echo (TSE) and gradient echo (GRE)-based pulse sequences for visualisation of articular cartilage lesions within the knee joint. Optimisation of experimental imaging sequences was completed using healthy volunteers (n=16) with a 3-Tesla (3T) MRI scanner. Imaging of patients with knee cartilage abnormalities (n=57) was then performed. Acquired sequences included 3D proton density-weighted (PDW) TSE (SPACE) with and without fat-suppression (FS), and T2*W GRE (TrueFISP) sequences, with acquisition times of 6:51, 6:32 and 5:35 min, respectively. One hundred sixty-one confirmed cartilage lesions were detected and categorised (Grade II n=90, Grade III n=71). The highest sensitivity and specificity for detecting cartilage lesions were obtained with TrueFISP with values of 84.7% and 92%, respectively. Cartilage SNR mean for PDW SPACE-FS was the highest at 72.2. TrueFISP attained the highest CNR means for joint fluid/cartilage (101.5) and joint fluid/ligament (156.5), and the lowest CNR for cartilage/meniscus (48.5). Significant differences were identified across the three sequences for all anatomical structures with respect to SNR and CNR findings (p-value <0.05). Isotropic TrueFISP at 3T, optimised for acquisition time, accurately detects cartilage defects, although it demonstrated the lowest contrast between cartilage and meniscus. (orig.)

  15. Relationships between functional genes in Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus isolates and phenotypic characteristics associated with fermentation time and flavor production in yogurt elucidated using multilocus sequence typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjun; Yu, Jie; Sun, Zhihong; Song, Yuqin; Wang, Xueni; Wang, Hongmei; Wuren, Tuoya; Zha, Musu; Menghe, Bilige; Heping, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) is well known for its worldwide application in yogurt production. Flavor production and acid producing are considered as the most important characteristics for starter culture screening. To our knowledge this is the first study applying functional gene sequence multilocus sequence typing technology to predict the fermentation and flavor-producing characteristics of yogurt-producing bacteria. In the present study, phenotypic characteristics of 35 L. bulgaricus strains were quantified during the fermentation of milk to yogurt and during its subsequent storage; these included fermentation time, acidification rate, pH, titratable acidity, and flavor characteristics (acetaldehyde concentration). Furthermore, multilocus sequence typing analysis of 7 functional genes associated with fermentation time, acid production, and flavor formation was done to elucidate the phylogeny and genetic evolution of the same L. bulgaricus isolates. The results showed that strains significantly differed in fermentation time, acidification rate, and acetaldehyde production. Combining functional gene sequence analysis with phenotypic characteristics demonstrated that groups of strains established using genotype data were consistent with groups identified based on their phenotypic traits. This study has established an efficient and rapid molecular genotyping method to identify strains with good fermentation traits; this has the potential to replace time-consuming conventional methods based on direct measurement of phenotypic traits. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hybrid Pareto artificial bee colony algorithm for multi-objective single machine group scheduling problem with sequence-dependent setup times and learning effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Lei; Guan, Zailin; Saif, Ullah; Zhang, Fei; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Group scheduling is significant for efficient and cost effective production system. However, there exist setup times between the groups, which require to decrease it by sequencing groups in an efficient way. Current research is focused on a sequence dependent group scheduling problem with an aim to minimize the makespan in addition to minimize the total weighted tardiness simultaneously. In most of the production scheduling problems, the processing time of jobs is assumed as fixed. However, the actual processing time of jobs may be reduced due to "learning effect". The integration of sequence dependent group scheduling problem with learning effects has been rarely considered in literature. Therefore, current research considers a single machine group scheduling problem with sequence dependent setup times and learning effects simultaneously. A novel hybrid Pareto artificial bee colony algorithm (HPABC) with some steps of genetic algorithm is proposed for current problem to get Pareto solutions. Furthermore, five different sizes of test problems (small, small medium, medium, large medium, large) are tested using proposed HPABC. Taguchi method is used to tune the effective parameters of the proposed HPABC for each problem category. The performance of HPABC is compared with three famous multi objective optimization algorithms, improved strength Pareto evolutionary algorithm (SPEA2), non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGAII) and particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO). Results indicate that HPABC outperforms SPEA2, NSGAII and PSO and gives better Pareto optimal solutions in terms of diversity and quality for almost all the instances of the different sizes of problems.

  17. Ontology-driven data integration and visualization for exploring regional geologic time and paleontological information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengbin; Ma, Xiaogang; Chen, Jianguo

    2018-06-01

    Initiatives of open data promote the online publication and sharing of large amounts of geologic data. How to retrieve information and discover knowledge from the big data is an ongoing challenge. In this paper, we developed an ontology-driven data integration and visualization pilot system for exploring information of regional geologic time, paleontology, and fundamental geology. The pilot system (http://www2.cs.uidaho.edu/%7Emax/gts/)

  18. Multiplex, rapid and sensitive isothermal detection of nucleic-acid sequence by endonuclease restriction-mediated real-time multiple cross displacement amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi eWang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We have devised a novel isothermal amplification technology, termed endonuclease restriction-mediated real-time multiple cross displacement amplification (ET-MCDA, which facilitated multiplex, rapid, specific and sensitive detection of nucleic-acid sequences at a constant temperature. The ET-MCDA integrated multiple cross displacement amplification strategy, restriction endonuclease cleavage and real-time fluorescence detection technique. In the ET-MCDA system, the functional cross primer E-CP1 or E-CP2 was constructed by adding a short sequence at the 5’ end of CP1 or CP2, respectively, and the new E-CP1 or E-CP2 primer was labelled at the 5’ end with a fluorophore and in the middle with a dark quencher. The restriction endonuclease Nb.BsrDI specifically recognized the short sequence and digested the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5’ end short sequences and their complementary sequences, which released the quenching, resulting on a gain of fluorescence signal. Thus, the ET-MCDA allowed real-time detection of single or multiple targets in only a single reaction, and the positive results were observed in as short as 12 minutes, detecting down to 3.125 fg of genomic DNA per tube. Moreover, the analytical specificity and the practical application of the ET-MCDA were also successfully evaluated in this study. Here we provided the details on the novel ET-MCDA technique and expounded the basic ET-MCDA amplification mechanism.

  19. An Efficient Method to Search Real-Time Bulk Data for an Information Processing System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Jin; Kim, Jong Myung; Suh, Yong Suk; Keum, Jong Yong; Park, Heui Youn

    2005-01-01

    The Man Machine Interface System (MMIS) of System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor (SMART) is designed with fully digitalized features. The Information Processing System (IPS) of the MMIS acquires and processes plant data from other systems. In addition, the IPS provides plant operation information to operators in the control room. The IPS is required to process bulky data in a real-time. So, it is necessary to consider a special processing method with regards to flexibility and performance because more than a few thousands of Plant Information converges on the IPS. Among other things, the processing time for searching for data from the bulk data consumes much more than other the processing times. Thus, this paper explores an efficient method for the search and examines its feasibility

  20. Process time optimization of robotic remote laser cutting by utilizing customized beam patterns and redundancy space task sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Sigurd

    This dissertation is written as a part of the ROBOCUT project which concerns the development of a new laser cutting technology that seeks to increase the performance of traditional and remote laser cutting by using beam shaping technologies. The resulting customized beam patterns are obtained by ...... axes of the laser cutting system and transforming the sequencing problem into a generalized traveling salesman problem (GTSP)....

  1. The gut microbiotassay – a high-throughput real-time PCR chip combined with next generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann-Bank, Marie Louise; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mølbak, Lars

    it demonstrated distinct quantities of bacteria in the different gut sections, with the highest number found in colon as expected. From the sequence data it was evident that primer systems targeting lower taxonomical levels, contributed with a higher resolution, revealing species that primer system targeting...

  2. Diversity and dynamics of dominant and rare bacterial taxa in replicate sequencing batch reactors operated under different solids retention time

    KAUST Repository

    Bagchi, Samik; Garcia Tellez, Berenice; Rao, Hari Ananda; Lamendella, Regina; Saikaly, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was applied in order to provide a better insight on the diversity and dynamics of total, dominant, and rare bacterial taxa in replicate lab-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) operated at different

  3. Highway travel time information system based on cumulative count curves and new tracking technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soriguera Marti, F.; Martinez-Diaz, M.; Perez Perez, I.

    2016-07-01

    Travel time is probably the most important indicator of the level of service of a highway, and it is also the most appreciated information for its users. Administrations and private companies make increasing efforts to improve its real time estimation. The appearance of new technologies makes the precise measurement of travel times easier than never before. However, direct measurements of travel time are, by nature, outdated in real time, and lack of the desired forecasting capabilities. This paper introduces a new methodology to improve the real time estimation of travel times by using the equipment usually present in most highways, i.e., loop detectors, in combination with Automatic Vehicle Identification or Tracking Technologies. One of the most important features of the method is the usage of cumulative counts at detectors as an input, avoiding the drawbacks of common spot-speed methodologies. Cumulative count curves have great potential for freeway travel time information systems, as they provide spatial measurements and thus allow the calculation of instantaneous travel times. In addition, they exhibit predictive capabilities. Nevertheless, they have not been used extensively mainly because of the error introduced by the accumulation of the detector drift. The proposed methodology solves this problem by correcting the deviations using direct travel time measurements. The method results highly beneficial for its accuracy as well as for its low implementation cost. (Author)

  4. Extracting Low-Frequency Information from Time Attenuation in Elastic Waveform Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuebao; Liu, Hong; Shi, Ying; Wang, Weihong

    2017-03-01

    Low-frequency information is crucial for recovering background velocity, but the lack of low-frequency information in field data makes inversion impractical without accurate initial models. Laplace-Fourier domain waveform inversion can recover a smooth model from real data without low-frequency information, which can be used for subsequent inversion as an ideal starting model. In general, it also starts with low frequencies and includes higher frequencies at later inversion stages, while the difference is that its ultralow frequency information comes from the Laplace-Fourier domain. Meanwhile, a direct implementation of the Laplace-transformed wavefield using frequency domain inversion is also very convenient. However, because broad frequency bands are often used in the pure time domain waveform inversion, it is difficult to extract the wavefields dominated by low frequencies in this case. In this paper, low-frequency components are constructed by introducing time attenuation into the recorded residuals, and the rest of the method is identical to the traditional time domain inversion. Time windowing and frequency filtering are also applied to mitigate the ambiguity of the inverse problem. Therefore, we can start at low frequencies and to move to higher frequencies. The experiment shows that the proposed method can achieve a good inversion result in the presence of a linear initial model and records without low-frequency information.

  5. Western scrub-jays allocate longer observation time to more valuable information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Arii; Grodzinski, Uri; Clayton, Nicola S

    2014-07-01

    When humans mentally reconstruct past events and imagine future scenarios, their subjective experience of mentally time travelling is accompanied by the awareness of doing so. Despite recent popularity of studying episodic memory in animals, such phenomenological consciousness has been extremely difficult to demonstrate without agreed behavioural markers of consciousness in non-linguistic subjects. We presented western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) with a task requiring them to allocate observing time between two peepholes to see food being hidden in either of two compartments, one where observing the hiding location was necessary to later relocate the food, and another where food could easily be found without watching. Jays first separately experienced these consequences of possessing information in each compartment and subsequently, once given a choice, made more looks and spent more time looking into the compartment where information was necessary than into the compartment where it was unnecessary. Thus, the jays can collect information to solve a future problem. Moreover, they can differentiate sources of information according to their potential value and modify behaviour to efficiently collect important, usable information. This is the first evidence of metacognition in a species that passes the behavioural criteria for both retrospective and prospective mental time travel.

  6. Real time alert system: a disease management system leveraging health information exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Vibha; Sheley, Meena E; Xu, Shawn; Downs, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    Rates of preventive and disease management services can be improved by providing automated alerts and reminders to primary care providers (PCPs) using of health information technology (HIT) tools. Using Adaptive Turnaround Documents (ATAD), an existing Health Information Exchange (HIE) infrastructure and office fax machines, we developed a Real Time Alert (RTA) system. RTA is a computerized decision support system (CDSS) that is able to deliver alerts to PCPs statewide for recommended services around the time of the patient visit. RTA is also able to capture structured clinical data from providers using existing fax technology. In this study, we evaluate RTA's performance for alerting PCPs when their patients with asthma have an emergency room visit anywhere in the state. Our results show that RTA was successfully able to deliver "just in time" patient-relevant alerts to PCPs across the state. Furthermore, of those ATADs faxed back and automatically interpreted by the RTA system, 35% reported finding the provided information helpful. The PCPs who reported finding information helpful also reported making a phone call, sending a letter or seeing the patient for follow up care. We have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of electronically exchanging important patient related information with the PCPs statewide. This is despite a lack of a link with their electronic health records. We have shown that using our ATAD technology, a PCP can be notified quickly of an important event such as a patient's asthma related emergency room admission so further follow up can happen in near real time.

  7. Information-sharing tendency on Twitter and time evolution of tweeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, H. W.; Kim, H. S.; Lee, K.; Choi, M. Y.

    2013-03-01

    While topics on Twitter may be categorized according to their predictability and sustainability, some topics have characteristics depending on the time scale. Here we propose a good measure for the transition of sustainability, which we call the information-sharing tendency, and find that the unpredictability on Twitter is provoked by the exposure of Twitter users to external environments, e.g., mass media and other social network services. In addition, it is demonstrated that the numbers of articles and comments on on-line newspapers serve as plausible measures of exposure. From such measures of exposure, the time evolution of tweeting can be described, when the information-sharing tendency is known.

  8. The use of mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing and whole genome sequencing to inform tuberculosis prevention and control activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2013-07-01

    Molecular strain typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been possible for only about 20 years; it has significantly improved our understanding of the evolution and epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and tuberculosis disease. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing, based on 24 variable number tandem repeat unit loci, is highly discriminatory, relatively easy to perform and interpret and is currently the most widely used molecular typing system for tuberculosis surveillance. Nevertheless, clusters identified by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit typing sometimes cannot be confirmed or adequately defined by contact tracing and additional methods are needed. Recently, whole genome sequencing has been used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms and other mutations, between genotypically indistinguishable isolates from the same cluster, to more accurately trace transmission pathways. Rapidly increasing speed and quality and reduced costs will soon make large scale whole genome sequencing feasible, combined with the use of sophisticated bioinformatics tools, for epidemiological surveillance of tuberculosis.

  9. Real-time decision support and information gathering system for financial domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chiu-Che; Gmytrasiewicz, Piotr J.

    2006-05-01

    The challenge of the investment domain is that a large amount of diverse information can be potentially relevant to an investment decision, and that, frequently, the decisions have to be made in a timely manner. This presents the potential for better decision support, but poses the challenge of building a decision support agent that gathers information from different sources and incorporates it for timely decision support. These problems motivate us to investigate ways in which the investors can be equipped with a flexible real-time decision support system to be practical in time-critical situations. The flexible real-time decision support system considers a tradeoff between decision quality and computation cost. For this purpose, we propose a system that uses the object oriented Bayesian knowledge base (OOBKB) design to create a decision model at the most suitable level of detail to guide the information gathering activities, and to produce an investment recommendation within a reasonable length of time. The decision models our system uses are implemented as influence diagrams. We validate our system with experiments in a simplified investment domain. The experiments show that our system produces a quality recommendation under different urgency situations. The contribution of our system is that it provides the flexible decision recommendation for an investor under time constraints in a complex environment.

  10. A study of archaeal enzymes involved in polar lipid synthesis linking amino acid sequence information, genomic contexts and lipid composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Daiyasu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular membrane lipids, of which phospholipids are the major constituents, form one of the characteristic features that distinguish Archaea from other organisms. In this study, we focused on the steps in archaeal phospholipid synthetic pathways that generate polar lipids such as archaetidylserine, archaetidylglycerol, and archaetidylinositol. Only archaetidylserine synthase (ASS, from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, has been experimentally identified. Other enzymes have not been fully examined. Through database searching, we detected many archaeal hypothetical proteins that show sequence similarity to members of the CDP alcohol phosphatidyltransferase family, such as phosphatidylserine synthase (PSS, phosphatidylglycerol synthase (PGS and phosphatidylinositol synthase (PIS derived from Bacteria and Eukarya. The archaeal hypothetical proteins were classified into two groups, based on the sequence similarity. Members of the first group, including ASS from M. thermautotrophicus, were closely related to PSS. The rough agreement between PSS homologue distribution within Archaea and the experimentally identified distribution of archaetidylserine suggested that the hypothetical proteins are ASSs. We found that an open reading frame (ORF tends to be adjacent to that of ASS in the genome, and that the order of the two ORFs is conserved. The sequence similarity of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase to the product of the ORF next to the ASS gene, together with the genomic context conservation, suggests that the ORF encodes archaetidylserine decarboxylase, which may transform archaetidylserine to archaetidylethanolamine. The second group of archaeal hypothetical proteins was related to PGS and PIS. The members of this group were subjected to molecular phylogenetic analysis, together with PGSs and PISs and it was found that they formed two distinct clusters in the molecular phylogenetic tree. The distribution of members of each cluster within Archaea

  11. Entraining IDyOT: timing in the information dynamics of thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Forth

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel hypothetical account of entrainment in music and language, in context of the Information Dynamics of Thinking model, IDyOT. The extended model affords an alternative view of entrainment, and its companion term, pulse, from earlier accounts. The model is based on hiearchical, statistical prediction, modeling expectations of both what an event will be and when it will happen. As such,it constitutes a kind of predictive coding, with a particular novel hypothetical implementation. Here, we focus on the model’s mechanism for predicting when a perceptual event will happen, given an existing sequence of past events, which maybe musical or linguistic. We propose a range of tests to validate or falsify the model, at various different levels of abstraction, and argue that computational modelling in particular, and this model in particular, can offer a means of providing limited but useful evidence for evolutionary hypotheses.

  12. WE-G-BRD-02: Characterizing Information Loss in a Sparse-Sampling-Based Dynamic MRI Sequence (k-T BLAST) for Lung Motion Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, T; Nofiele, J; Sawant, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Rapid MRI is an attractive, non-ionizing tool for soft-tissue-based monitoring of respiratory motion in thoracic and abdominal radiotherapy. One big challenge is to achieve high temporal resolution while maintaining adequate spatial resolution. K-t BLAST, sparse-sampling and reconstruction sequence based on a-priori information represents a potential solution. In this work, we investigated how much “true” motion information is lost as a-priori information is progressively added for faster imaging. Methods: Lung tumor motions in superior-inferior direction obtained from ten individuals were replayed into an in-house, MRI-compatible, programmable motion platform (50Hz refresh and 100microns precision). Six water-filled 1.5ml tubes were placed on it as fiducial markers. Dynamic marker motion within a coronal slice (FOV: 32×32cm"2, resolution: 0.67×0.67mm"2, slice-thickness: 5mm) was collected on 3.0T body scanner (Ingenia, Philips). Balanced-FFE (TE/TR: 1.3ms/2.5ms, flip-angle: 40degrees) was used in conjunction with k-t BLAST. Each motion was repeated four times as four k-t acceleration factors 1, 2, 5, and 16 (corresponding frame rates were 2.5, 4.7, 9.8, and 19.1Hz, respectively) were compared. For each image set, one average motion trajectory was computed from six marker displacements. Root mean square error (RMS) was used as a metric of spatial accuracy where measured trajectories were compared to original data. Results: Tumor motion was approximately 10mm. The mean(standard deviation) of respiratory rates over ten patients was 0.28(0.06)Hz. Cumulative distributions of tumor motion frequency spectra (0–25Hz) obtained from the patients showed that 90% of motion fell on 3.88Hz or less. Therefore, the frame rate must be a double or higher for accurate monitoring. The RMS errors over patients for k-t factors of 1, 2, 5, and 16 were.10(.04),.17(.04), .21(.06) and.26(.06)mm, respectively. Conclusions: K-t factor of 5 or higher can cover the high

  13. Just-in-time information improved decision-making in primary care: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie McGowan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The "Just-in-time Information" (JIT librarian consultation service was designed to provide rapid information to answer primary care clinical questions during patient hours. This study evaluated whether information provided by librarians to answer clinical questions positively impacted time, decision-making, cost savings and satisfaction. METHODS AND FINDING: A randomized controlled trial (RCT was conducted between October 2005 and April 2006. A total of 1,889 questions were sent to the service by 88 participants. The object of the randomization was a clinical question. Each participant had clinical questions randomly allocated to both intervention (librarian information and control (no librarian information groups. Participants were trained to send clinical questions via a hand-held device. The impact of the information provided by the service (or not provided by the service, additional resources and time required for both groups was assessed using a survey sent 24 hours after a question was submitted. The average time for JIT librarians to respond to all questions was 13.68 minutes/question (95% CI, 13.38 to 13.98. The average time for participants to respond their control questions was 20.29 minutes/question (95% CI, 18.72 to 21.86. Using an impact assessment scale rating cognitive impact, participants rated 62.9% of information provided to intervention group questions as having a highly positive cognitive impact. They rated 14.8% of their own answers to control question as having a highly positive cognitive impact, 44.9% has having a negative cognitive impact, and 24.8% with no cognitive impact at all. In an exit survey measuring satisfaction, 86% (62/72 responses of participants scored the service as having a positive impact on care and 72% (52/72 indicated that they would use the service frequently if it were continued. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, providing timely information to clinical questions had a highly positive impact on

  14. Just-in-time information improved decision-making in primary care: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Jessie; Hogg, William; Campbell, Craig; Rowan, Margo

    2008-01-01

    The "Just-in-time Information" (JIT) librarian consultation service was designed to provide rapid information to answer primary care clinical questions during patient hours. This study evaluated whether information provided by librarians to answer clinical questions positively impacted time, decision-making, cost savings and satisfaction. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted between October 2005 and April 2006. A total of 1,889 questions were sent to the service by 88 participants. The object of the randomization was a clinical question. Each participant had clinical questions randomly allocated to both intervention (librarian information) and control (no librarian information) groups. Participants were trained to send clinical questions via a hand-held device. The impact of the information provided by the service (or not provided by the service), additional resources and time required for both groups was assessed using a survey sent 24 hours after a question was submitted. The average time for JIT librarians to respond to all questions was 13.68 minutes/question (95% CI, 13.38 to 13.98). The average time for participants to respond their control questions was 20.29 minutes/question (95% CI, 18.72 to 21.86). Using an impact assessment scale rating cognitive impact, participants rated 62.9% of information provided to intervention group questions as having a highly positive cognitive impact. They rated 14.8% of their own answers to control question as having a highly positive cognitive impact, 44.9% has having a negative cognitive impact, and 24.8% with no cognitive impact at all. In an exit survey measuring satisfaction, 86% (62/72 responses) of participants scored the service as having a positive impact on care and 72% (52/72) indicated that they would use the service frequently if it were continued. In this study, providing timely information to clinical questions had a highly positive impact on decision-making and a high approval rating from

  15. Poor sleep quality predicts deficient emotion information processing over time in early adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffer-Dudek, Nirit; Sadeh, Avi; Dahl, Ronald E; Rosenblat-Stein, Shiran

    2011-11-01

    There is deepening understanding of the effects of sleep on emotional information processing. Emotion information processing is a key aspect of social competence, which undergoes important maturational and developmental changes in adolescence; however, most research in this area has focused on adults. Our aim was to test the links between sleep and emotion information processing during early adolescence. Sleep and facial information processing were assessed objectively during 3 assessment waves, separated by 1-year lags. Data were obtained in natural environments-sleep was assessed in home settings, and facial information processing was assessed at school. 94 healthy children (53 girls, 41 boys), aged 10 years at Time 1. N/A. Facial information processing was tested under neutral (gender identification) and emotional (emotional expression identification) conditions. Sleep was assessed in home settings using actigraphy for 7 nights at each assessment wave. Waking > 5 min was considered a night awakening. Using multilevel modeling, elevated night awakenings and decreased sleep efficiency significantly predicted poor performance only in the emotional information processing condition (e.g., b = -1.79, SD = 0.52, confidence interval: lower boundary = -2.82, upper boundary = -0.076, t(416.94) = -3.42, P = 0.001). Poor sleep quality is associated with compromised emotional information processing during early adolescence, a sensitive period in socio-emotional development.

  16. Sequence polymorphism in an insect RNA virus field population: A snapshot from a single point in space and time reveals stochastic differences among and within individual hosts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenger, Drake C., E-mail: drake.stenger@ars.usda.gov [USDA, Agricultural Research Service, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center, 9611 South Riverbend Ave., Parlier, CA 93648-9757 (United States); Krugner, Rodrigo [USDA, Agricultural Research Service, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center, 9611 South Riverbend Ave., Parlier, CA 93648-9757 (United States); Nouri, Shahideh; Ferriol, Inmaculada; Falk, Bryce W. [Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Sisterson, Mark S. [USDA, Agricultural Research Service, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center, 9611 South Riverbend Ave., Parlier, CA 93648-9757 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Population structure of Homalodisca coagulata Virus-1 (HoCV-1) among and within field-collected insects sampled from a single point in space and time was examined. Polymorphism in complete consensus sequences among single-insect isolates was dominated by synonymous substitutions. The mutant spectrum of the C2 helicase region within each single-insect isolate was unique and dominated by nonsynonymous singletons. Bootstrapping was used to correct the within-isolate nonsynonymous:synonymous arithmetic ratio (N:S) for RT-PCR error, yielding an N:S value ~one log-unit greater than that of consensus sequences. Probability of all possible single-base substitutions for the C2 region predicted N:S values within 95% confidence limits of the corrected within-isolate N:S when the only constraint imposed was viral polymerase error bias for transitions over transversions. These results indicate that bottlenecks coupled with strong negative/purifying selection drive consensus sequences toward neutral sequence space, and that most polymorphism within single-insect isolates is composed of newly-minted mutations sampled prior to selection. -- Highlights: •Sampling protocol minimized differential selection/history among isolates. •Polymorphism among consensus sequences dominated by negative/purifying selection. •Within-isolate N:S ratio corrected for RT-PCR error by bootstrapping. •Within-isolate mutant spectrum dominated by new mutations yet to undergo selection.

  17. The impact of real-time and predictive traffic information on travelers' behavior on the I-4 corridor. Final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Real time and predicted traffic information plays a key role in the successful implementation of advanced traveler information systems (ATIS) and advance traffic management systems (ATMS). Traffic information is essentially valuable to both transport...

  18. Information-Theoretic Performance Analysis of Sensor Networks via Markov Modeling of Time Series Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Jha, Devesh K; Ray, Asok; Wettergren, Thomas A; Yue Li; Jha, Devesh K; Ray, Asok; Wettergren, Thomas A; Wettergren, Thomas A; Li, Yue; Ray, Asok; Jha, Devesh K

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents information-theoretic performance analysis of passive sensor networks for detection of moving targets. The proposed method falls largely under the category of data-level information fusion in sensor networks. To this end, a measure of information contribution for sensors is formulated in a symbolic dynamics framework. The network information state is approximately represented as the largest principal component of the time series collected across the network. To quantify each sensor's contribution for generation of the information content, Markov machine models as well as x-Markov (pronounced as cross-Markov) machine models, conditioned on the network information state, are constructed; the difference between the conditional entropies of these machines is then treated as an approximate measure of information contribution by the respective sensors. The x-Markov models represent the conditional temporal statistics given the network information state. The proposed method has been validated on experimental data collected from a local area network of passive sensors for target detection, where the statistical characteristics of environmental disturbances are similar to those of the target signal in the sense of time scale and texture. A distinctive feature of the proposed algorithm is that the network decisions are independent of the behavior and identity of the individual sensors, which is desirable from computational perspectives. Results are presented to demonstrate the proposed method's efficacy to correctly identify the presence of a target with very low false-alarm rates. The performance of the underlying algorithm is compared with that of a recent data-driven, feature-level information fusion algorithm. It is shown that the proposed algorithm outperforms the other algorithm.

  19. Attentional bias for emotional information in older adults: the role of emotion and future time perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeyer, Ineke; De Raedt, Rudi

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that older adults display a positivity bias at the level of information processing. However, because studies investigating attentional bias for emotional information in older adults have produced mixed findings, research identifying inter-individual differences that may explain these inconsistent results is necessary. Therefore, we investigated whether mood, symptoms of depression, symptoms of anxiety and future time perspective are related to attentional bias in older adults. Thirty-seven healthy older adults and 25 healthy middle-aged adults completed questionnaires to assess mood, symptoms of depression, symptoms of anxiety and future time perspective. Attentional bias towards happy, sad and neutral information was measured using a modified exogenous cueing paradigm with long cue presentations, to measure maintained attention versus avoidance of emotional stimuli. Older adults showed attentional avoidance for all emotional faces, whereas no attentional biases were found in the middle-aged group. Moreover, in the older adult group, avoidance for negative information was related to anxiety. Future time perspective was unrelated to attentional bias. These findings suggest that anxiety may lead to inter-individual differences in attentional bias in older adults, and that avoidance from negative information may be an emotion regulation strategy.

  20. Implications of sequence and timing of exposure for synergy between the pyrethroid insecticide alpha-cypermethrin and the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyling, Nicolai V; Arthur, Samuel; Pedersen, Kathrine E; Dhakal, Suraj; Cedergreen, Nina; Fredensborg, Brian L

    2018-03-30

    Combining low doses of chemical insecticides with entomopathogens constitutes a sustainable pest control method, but the significance of the timing and sequence of exposures needs clarification. We studied lethal effects of combinations of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (KVL03-122) and the pyrethroid alpha-cypermethrin on the beetle Tenebrio molitor under varying timing and sequence of exposure. Synergy over time was evaluated in relation to the model of independent action (IA). We expected that increased progression of disease caused by B. bassiana would make beetles more susceptible to the insecticide, leading to enhanced synergy. Synergistic effects between B. bassiana and alpha-cypermethrin were observed when B. bassiana was applied first, but only when the interval between applications was >48 h. With 72 h between exposures, mortality had increased to 100% after 8 days, in contrast to the 60% mortality expected. No synergy was observed when the insecticide was applied prior to fungal exposure within 24 h. The sequence and timing of exposure do matter to achieve synergistic mortality by combining B. bassiana and alpha-cypermethrin, and the IA model proved to be a strong tool with which to evaluate the interactions of the two stressors over time. Pest control strategies could include B. bassiana followed by low-dose exposures to alpha-cypermethrin after 2-3 days. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Field deployment to quantify the value of real-time information by integrating driver routing decisions and route assignment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Advanced Traveler Information Systems (ATIS) have been proposed as a mechanism to generate and : distribute real-time travel information to drivers for the purpose of improving travel experience : represented by experienced travel time and enhancing ...

  2. Molecular Properties of Poliovirus Isolates: Nucleotide Sequence Analysis, Typing by PCR and Real-Time RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Cara C; Kilpatrick, David R; Iber, Jane C; Chen, Qi; Kew, Olen M

    2016-01-01

    Virologic surveillance is essential to the success of the World Health Organization initiative to eradicate poliomyelitis. Molecular methods have been used to detect polioviruses in tissue culture isolates derived from stool samples obtained through surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis. This chapter describes the use of realtime PCR assays to identify and serotype polioviruses. In particular, a degenerate, inosine-containing, panpoliovirus (panPV) PCR primer set is used to distinguish polioviruses from NPEVs. The high degree of nucleotide sequence diversity among polioviruses presents a challenge to the systematic design of nucleic acid-based reagents. To accommodate the wide variability and rapid evolution of poliovirus genomes, degenerate codon positions on the template were matched to mixed-base or deoxyinosine residues on both the primers and the TaqMan™ probes. Additional assays distinguish between Sabin vaccine strains and non-Sabin strains. This chapter also describes the use of generic poliovirus specific primers, along with degenerate and inosine-containing primers, for routine VP1 sequencing of poliovirus isolates. These primers, along with nondegenerate serotype-specific Sabin primers, can also be used to sequence individual polioviruses in mixtures.

  3. The laboratory information float, time-based competition, and point-of-care testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B A

    1994-01-01

    A new term, the laboratory information float, should be substituted for turnaround-time when evaluating the performance of the clinical laboratory because it includes the time necessary to make test results both available (ready to use) and accessible (easy to use) to clinicians ordering tests. The laboratory information float can be greatly reduced simply by telescoping the analytic phase of laboratory testing into the preanalytic phase. Significant costs are incurred by such a change, some of which can be reduced by developing a mobile clinical laboratory (sometimes referred to as a "lab-on-a-slab" or "rolling thunder") to transport the analytic devices directly to patient care units. The mobile clinical laboratory should be equipped with an integrated personal computer that can communicate continuously with the host laboratory information system and achieve some semblance of continuous flow processing despite test performance in point-of-care venues. Equipping clinicians with palmtop computers will allow the mobile clinician to access test results and order tests on the run. Such devices can be easily configured to operate in a passive mode, accessing relevant information automatically instead of forcing clinicians to query the laboratory information system periodically for the test results necessary to render care to their patients. The laboratory information float of the year 2,000 will surely be measured in minutes through the judicious deployment of relevant technology such as mobile clinical laboratories and palmtop computers.

  4. Motor preparation is modulated by the resolution of the response timing information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Anthony N; Mackinnon, Colum D

    2010-03-31

    In the present experiment, the temporal predictability of response time was systematically manipulated to examine its effect on the time course of motor pre-programming and release of the intended movement by an acoustic startle stimulus. Participants performed a ballistic right wrist extension task in four different temporal conditions: 1) a variable foreperiod simple RT task, 2) a fixed foreperiod simple RT task, 3) a low resolution countdown anticipation-timing task, and 4) a high resolution anticipation-timing task. For each task, a startling acoustic stimulus (124dB) was presented at several intervals prior to the "go" signal ("go" -150ms, -500ms, and -1500ms). Results from the startle trials showed that the time course of movement pre-programming was affected by the temporal uncertainty of the imperative "go" cue. These findings demonstrate that the resolution of the timing information regarding the response cue has a marked effect on the timing of movement preparation such that under conditions of low temporal resolution, participants plan the movement well in advance in accordance with the anticipated probability of onset of the cue, whereas movement preparation is delayed until less than 500ms prior to response time when continuous temporal information is provided. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Rate of information processing and reaction time of aircraft pilots and non-pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Barkhuizen

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Reaction time and rate of information processing are cited as critical components in the make-up of pilots. A need was identified to establish the validity of various chronometric measures in the selection of pilots. Fifty-eight military and commercial pilots and twenty non-pilots were subjected to Schepers’ Computerised Information Processing Test Battery, which measures reaction time, form discrimination time, colour discrimination time, rate of information processing (perceptual and rate of information processing (conceptual. Five hypotheses and one postulate were formulated and tested. The results indicate that pilots could be differentiated from non-pilots with 92,3% accuracy. However, the results need to be cross-validated before they are used for selection. Opsomming Reaksietyd en tempo van inligtingverwerking word as kritieke komponente in die samestelling van vlieëniers beskou. ‘n Behoefte is geïdentifiseer om die geldigheid van verskeie chronometriese metinge in vlieënierskeuring te bepaal. Agt en vyftig militêre en kommersiële vlieëniers en twintig nie-vlieëniers is onderwerp aan Schepers se Gerekenariseerde Inligtingverwerkingstoets-battery wat reaksietyd, vormdiskriminasietyd, kleurdiskriminasietyd, tempo van inligtingverwerking (perseptueel en tempo van inligtingverwerking (konseptueel meet. Vyf hipoteses en een postulaat is gestel en getoets. Die resultate dui daarop dat vlieëniers met 92,3% akkuraatheid van nievlieëniers onderskei kan word. Die resultate behoort egter eers gekruisvalideer te word voordat dit finaal vir keuring gebruik kan word.

  6. Informal Science and Youth Development: Creating Convergence in Out-of-School Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noam, Gil G.; Shah, Ashima

    2014-01-01

    This chapter highlights the fit between youth-development-oriented programming and informal science activities in out-of-school time (OST) and illustrates how science and youth development can and should co-occur. The clover model and Dimensions of Success tool are introduced as lenses for designing and assessing science program quality in OST.…

  7. Planck 2015 results: VII. High Frequency Instrument data processing: Time-ordered information and beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.

    2016-01-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) has observed the full sky at six frequencies (100, 143, 217, 353, 545, and 857 GHz) in intensity and at four frequencies in linear polarization (100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz). In order to obtain sky maps, the time-ordered information (TOI) containing the d...

  8. Flipping the analytical coin : closing the information flow loop in high speed (real time) analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.E. Shahroudi

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAnalysis modules tend to be set up as one way flow of information, i.e a clear distinction between cause and effect or input and output. However, as the speed of analysis approaches real time (or faster than movie rate), it becomes increasingly difficult for an external user to

  9. Sources of Popular Literature Online: New York Times Information Bank and the Magazine Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Alex M.; Slade, Rod

    1979-01-01

    A comparison of the Magazine Index (MI) and the New York Times Information Bank (IB) showed the two data bases have little in common, mainly due to differences in focus, indexing, vocabulary, use online, and output. For business and government users, IB is the best choice; for more general and academic purposes, MI provides access to more…

  10. Real-time information dissemination requirements for Illinois per new federal rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Travelers on U.S. freeways could now be better-informed than ever before, because of a new federal legislation. : The Final Rule 23 CFR 511 has mandated that after November 8, 2014, states provide real-time traveler data : along all limited-access ro...

  11. An Understanding Information Management System for a Real-Time Interactive Distance Education Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Aiguo

    2009-01-01

    A real-time interactive distance lecture is a joint work that should be accomplished by the effort of the lecturer and his students in remote sites. It is important for the lecturer to get understanding information from the students which cannot be efficiently collected by only using video/audio channels between the lecturer and the students. This…

  12. Students' Geocognition of Deep Time, Conceptualized in an Informal Educational Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee M.; Brzusek, Robert F.; Wandersee, James H.

    2009-01-01

    Students in a Landscape Architecture Design 1 course (N = 25) at a research university in the southern US developed design solutions implementing geologic time for an informal education site. Those students who employed abstract metaphors for their designs (n = 8) were more successful than students who proceeded with a linear design construct.…

  13. Perseverance time of informal carers. A new concept in dementia care. Validation and exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraijo, H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and aim Because of the expected increase of dementia patients in the next decades and the growing demand for formal care, an important question appears: how to predict and influence the caring possibilities of informal carers. We introduce the concept perseverance time, describedas

  14. Changes of flora-information over time: Examples from Ethiopia and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in Flora-information over time can be divided into three different categories: (1) “Real changes” (species enter the region by natural dispersal or become extinct). (2) “Floristic changes” (species known from elsewhere are discovered). (3) “Taxonomic changes” (species are discovered and described, taxonomic ...

  15. A revealed-preference study of behavioural impacts of real-time traffic information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knockaert, J.S.A.; Tseng, Y.; Verhoef, E.T.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate the impact of real-time traffic information on traveller behaviour by using repeated day-to-day revealed-preference (RP) observations from a reward experiment. We estimate a trip scheduling model of morning peak behaviour that allows us to determine the impact of

  16. Possible chaoticity for the time series of the amount of nuclear information released by the newsmedia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, T.

    1995-01-01

    The amount of information concerning nuclear problems was time analysed which has been released by three types of the newsmedia in Japan, the press, television and magazines during the past 20 years. The time series of the logarithmic value of the amount released by some of the newsmedia was found to be possibly chaotic, or at least to be non-stochastic. Such a characteristic of time series can be interpreted as a result of the exertion of a certain sort of selection process in the interior of the newsmedia in deciding an event as news to be released. (author)

  17. Real-Time Data Processing Systems and Products at the Alaska Earthquake Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, N. A.; Hansen, R. A.

    2007-05-01

    The Alaska Earthquake Information Center (AEIC) receives data from over 400 seismic sites located within the state boundaries and the surrounding regions and serves as a regional data center. In 2007, the AEIC reported ~20,000 seismic events, with the largest event of M6.6 in Andreanof Islands. The real-time earthquake detection and data processing systems at AEIC are based on the Antelope system from BRTT, Inc. This modular and extensible processing platform allows an integrated system complete from data acquisition to catalog production. Multiple additional modules constructed with the Antelope toolbox have been developed to fit particular needs of the AEIC. The real-time earthquake locations and magnitudes are determined within 2-5 minutes of the event occurrence. AEIC maintains a 24/7 seismologist-on-duty schedule. Earthquake alarms are based on the real- time earthquake detections. Significant events are reviewed by the seismologist on duty within 30 minutes of the occurrence with information releases issued for significant events. This information is disseminated immediately via the AEIC website, ANSS website via QDDS submissions, through e-mail, cell phone and pager notifications, via fax broadcasts and recorded voice-mail messages. In addition, automatic regional moment tensors are determined for events with M>=4.0. This information is posted on the public website. ShakeMaps are being calculated in real-time with the information currently accessible via a password-protected website. AEIC is designing an alarm system targeted for the critical lifeline operations in Alaska. AEIC maintains an extensive computer network to provide adequate support for data processing and archival. For real-time processing, AEIC operates two identical, interoperable computer systems in parallel.

  18. Real-Time Diffusion of Information on Twitter and the Financial Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafti, Ali; Zotti, Ryan; Jank, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Do spikes in Twitter chatter about a firm precede unusual stock market trading activity for that firm? If so, Twitter activity may provide useful information about impending financial market activity in real-time. We study the real-time relationship between chatter on Twitter and the stock trading volume of 96 firms listed on the Nasdaq 100, during 193 days of trading in the period from May 21, 2012 to September 18, 2013. We identify observations featuring firm-specific spikes in Twitter activity, and randomly assign each observation to a ten-minute increment matching on the firm and a number of repeating time indicators. We examine the extent that unusual levels of chatter on Twitter about a firm portend an oncoming surge of trading of its stock within the hour, over and above what would normally be expected for the stock for that time of day and day of week. We also compare the findings from our explanatory model to the predictive power of Tweets. Although we find a compelling and potentially informative real-time relationship between Twitter activity and trading volume, our forecasting exercise highlights how difficult it can be to make use of this information for monetary gain.

  19. The development of KAERI management information system (II) -The development of Time Sheet Management System-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sin Bok; Kim, Yeong Taek; Park, Soo Jin; Ko, Yeong Cheol; Lee, Jong Bok; Han, Eun Sook; Kim, Hyeon Jeong

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the work done for the development, operation and maintenance of Time Sheet Management System. This work is a part of the development KAERI management information system. Manpower management is essential to cope with the external circumstances promptly and to maximize the productivity of the organization. This work aims at setting up a basis for the manpower management system. It is widely recognized that neither timely decision making nor competitive edge can be secured with the traditional management technology in so a rapidly changing situations home and abroad, which can be characterized by openness and informality. The necessity of efficient and scientific man-power management by time-study has emerged on the reorganization of KAERI by expanding matrix system in order to enhance the R and D productivity. (Author)

  20. Energy discrimination for positron emission tomography using the time information of the first detected photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, A. C.; Lemaire, W.; Lecoq, P.; Fontaine, R.; Pratte, J.-F.

    2018-01-01

    The advantages of Time-of-Flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET) have pushed the development of detectors with better time resolution. In particular, Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) have evolved tremendously in the past decade and arrays with a fully digital readout are the next logical step (dSiPM). New multi-timestamp methods use the precise time information of multiple photons to estimate the time of a PET event with greater accuracy, resulting in excellent time resolution. We propose a method which uses the same timestamps as the time estimator to perform energy discrimination, thus using data obtained within 5 ns of the beginning of the event. Having collected all the necessary information, the dSiPM could then be disabled for the remaining scintillation while dedicated electronics process the collected data. This would reduce afterpulsing as the SPAD would be turned off for several hundred nanoseconds, emptying the majority of traps. The proposed method uses a strategy based on subtraction and minimal electronics to reject energy below a selected threshold. This method achieves an error rate of less than 3% for photopeak discrimination (threshold at 400 keV) for dark count rates up to 100 cps/μm2, time-to-digital converter resolution up to 50 ps and a photon detection efficiency ranging from 10 to 70%.

  1. Bacterial microbiota of Kazakhstan cheese revealed by single molecule real time (SMRT) sequencing and its comparison with Belgian, Kalmykian and Italian artisanal cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zheng, Yi; Xu, Haiyan; Xi, Xiaoxia; Hou, Qiangchuan; Feng, Shuzhen; Wuri, Laga; Bian, Yanfei; Yu, Zhongjie; Kwok, Lai-Yu; Sun, Zhihong; Sun, Tiansong

    2017-01-09

    In Kazakhstan, traditional artisanal cheeses have a long history and are widely consumed. The unique characteristics of local artisanal cheeses are almost completely preserved. However, their microbial communities have rarely been reported. The current study firstly generated the Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) sequencing bacterial diversity profiles of 6 traditional artisanal cheese samples of Kazakhstan origin, followed by comparatively analyzed the microbiota composition between the current dataset and those from cheeses originated from Belgium, Russian Republic of Kalmykia (Kalmykia) and Italy. Across the Kazakhstan cheese samples, a total of 238 bacterial species belonging to 14 phyla and 140 genera were identified. Lactococcus lactis (28.93%), Lactobacillus helveticus (26.43%), Streptococcus thermophilus (12.18%) and Lactobacillus delbrueckii (12.15%) were the dominant bacterial species for these samples. To further evaluate the cheese bacterial diversity of Kazakhstan cheeses in comparison with those from other geographic origins, 16S rRNA datasets of 36 artisanal cheeses from Belgium, Russian Republic of Kalmykia (Kalmykia) and Italy were retrieved from public databases. The cheese bacterial microbiota communities were largely different across sample origins. By principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), the structure of the Kazakhstan artisanal cheese samples was found to be different from those of the other geographic origins. Furthermore, the redundancy analysis (RDA) identified 16 bacterial OTUs as the key variables responsible for such microbiota structural difference. Our results together suggest that the diversity of bacterial communities in different groups is stratified by geographic region. This study does not only provide novel information on the bacterial microbiota of traditional artisanal cheese of Kazakhstan at species level, but also interesting insights into the bacterial diversity of artisanal

  2. ICT-Enabled Time-Critical Clinical Practices: Examining the Affordances of an Information Processing Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Hoon

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a case study of a decision-support system deployment at The Alfred Hospital, in Melbourne, Australia. This work outlines Information and Communications Technology (ICT affordances and their actualisations in time-critical clinical practices to enable better information processing. From our study findings, we present a stage-wise model describing the role played by ICT in the context of the Trauma Centre practices. This addresses a knowledge gap surrounding the role and impact of ICT in the delivery of quality improvements to processes and culture in time-critical environments, amid increasing expenditure on ICT globally. Our model has implications for research and practice, such that we observe for the first time how information standards, synergy and renewal are developed between the system and its users in order to reduce error rates in the healthcare context. Through the study findings, we demonstrate that healthcare quality can be further refined as ICT allows for knowledge dissemination and informs existing practices.

  3. Techniques for optimizing human-machine information transfer related to real-time interactive display systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granaas, Michael M.; Rhea, Donald C.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years the needs of ground-based researcher-analysts to access real-time engineering data in the form of processed information has expanded rapidly. Fortunately, the capacity to deliver that information has also expanded. The development of advanced display systems is essential to the success of a research test activity. Those developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR), range from simple alphanumerics to interactive mapping and graphics. These unique display systems are designed not only to meet basic information display requirements of the user, but also to take advantage of techniques for optimizing information display. Future ground-based display systems will rely heavily not only on new technologies, but also on interaction with the human user and the associated productivity with that interaction. The psychological abilities and limitations of the user will become even more important in defining the difference between a usable and a useful display system. This paper reviews the requirements for development of real-time displays; the psychological aspects of design such as the layout, color selection, real-time response rate, and interactivity of displays; and an analysis of some existing WATR displays.

  4. Comparison of multiple DNA dyes for real-time PCR: effects of dye concentration and sequence composition on DNA amplification and melting temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guðnason, Haukur; Dufva, Hans Martin; Bang, Dang Duong

    2007-01-01

    investigate 15 different intercalating DNA dyes for their inhibitory effects on PCR, effects on DNA melting temperature and possible preferential binding to GC-rich sequences. Our results demonstrated that in contrast to the results of SYBR Green I, two intercalating dyes SYTO-13 and SYTO-82 do not inhibit......The importance of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has increased steadily in clinical applications over the last decade. Many applications utilize SYBR Green I dye to follow the accumulation of amplicons in real time. SYBR Green I has, however, a number of limitations that include...... the inhibition of PCR, preferential binding to GC-rich sequences and effects on melting curve analysis. Although a few alternative dyes without some of these limitations have been recently proposed, no large-scale investigation into the properties of intercalating dyes has been performed. In this study, we...

  5. Data assimilation of citizen collected information for real-time flood hazard mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayama, T.; Takara, K. T.

    2017-12-01

    Many studies in data assimilation in hydrology have focused on the integration of satellite remote sensing and in-situ monitoring data into hydrologic or land surface models. For flood predictions also, recent studies have demonstrated to assimilate remotely sensed inundation information with flood inundation models. In actual flood disaster situations, citizen collected information including local reports by residents and rescue teams and more recently tweets via social media also contain valuable information. The main interest of this study is how to effectively use such citizen collected information for real-time flood hazard mapping. Here we propose a new data assimilation technique based on pre-conducted ensemble inundation simulations and update inundation depth distributions sequentially when local data becomes available. The propose method is composed by the following two-steps. The first step is based on weighting average of preliminary ensemble simulations, whose weights are updated by Bayesian approach. The second step is based on an optimal interpolation, where the covariance matrix is calculated from the ensemble simulations. The proposed method was applied to case studies including an actual flood event occurred. It considers two situations with more idealized one by assuming continuous flood inundation depth information is available at multiple locations. The other one, which is more realistic case during such a severe flood disaster, assumes uncertain and non-continuous information is available to be assimilated. The results show that, in the first idealized situation, the large scale inundation during the flooding was estimated reasonably with RMSE effective. Nevertheless, the applications of the proposed data assimilation method demonstrated a high potential of this method for assimilating citizen collected information for real-time flood hazard mapping in the future.

  6. Unsupervised Symbolization of Signal Time Series for Extraction of the Embedded Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper formulates an unsupervised algorithm for symbolization of signal time series to capture the embedded dynamic behavior. The key idea is to convert time series of the digital signal into a string of (spatially discrete symbols from which the embedded dynamic information can be extracted in an unsupervised manner (i.e., no requirement for labeling of time series. The main challenges here are: (1 definition of the symbol assignment for the time series; (2 identification of the partitioning segment locations in the signal space of time series; and (3 construction of probabilistic finite-state automata (PFSA from the symbol strings that contain temporal patterns. The reported work addresses these challenges by maximizing the mutual information measures between symbol strings and PFSA states. The proposed symbolization method has been validated by numerical simulation as well as by experimentation in a laboratory environment. Performance of the proposed algorithm has been compared to that of two commonly used algorithms of time series partitioning.

  7. A validation of ground ambulance pre-hospital times modeled using geographic information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Alka B; Waters, Nigel M; Blanchard, Ian E; Doig, Christopher J; Ghali, William A

    2012-10-03

    Evaluating geographic access to health services often requires determining the patient travel time to a specified service. For urgent care, many research studies have modeled patient pre-hospital time by ground emergency medical services (EMS) using geographic information systems (GIS). The purpose of this study was to determine if the modeling assumptions proposed through prior United States (US) studies are valid in a non-US context, and to use the resulting information to provide revised recommendations for modeling travel time using GIS in the absence of actual EMS trip data. The study sample contained all emergency adult patient trips within the Calgary area for 2006. Each record included four components of pre-hospital time (activation, response, on-scene and transport interval). The actual activation and on-scene intervals were compared with those used in published models. The transport interval was calculated within GIS using the Network Analyst extension of Esri ArcGIS 10.0 and the response interval was derived using previously established methods. These GIS derived transport and response intervals were compared with the actual times using descriptive methods. We used the information acquired through the analysis of the EMS trip data to create an updated model that could be used to estimate travel time in the absence of actual EMS trip records. There were 29,765 complete EMS records for scene locations inside the city and 529 outside. The actual median on-scene intervals were longer than the average previously reported by 7-8 minutes. Actual EMS pre-hospital times across our study area were significantly higher than the estimated times modeled using GIS and the original travel time assumptions. Our updated model, although still underestimating the total pre-hospital time, more accurately represents the true pre-hospital time in our study area. The widespread use of generalized EMS pre-hospital time assumptions based on US data may not be appropriate in a

  8. Characterizing Information Processing With a Mobile Device: Measurement of Simple and Choice Reaction Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Daniel; Linder, Susan; Hirsch, Joshua; Dey, Tanujit; Kana, Daniel; Ringenbach, Shannon; Schindler, David; Alberts, Jay

    2017-10-01

    Information processing is typically evaluated using simple reaction time (SRT) and choice reaction time (CRT) paradigms in which a specific response is initiated following a given stimulus. The measurement of reaction time (RT) has evolved from monitoring the timing of mechanical switches to computerized paradigms. The proliferation of mobile devices with touch screens makes them a natural next technological approach to assess information processing. The aims of this study were to determine the validity and reliability of using of a mobile device (Apple iPad or iTouch) to accurately measure RT. Sixty healthy young adults completed SRT and CRT tasks using a traditional test platform and mobile platforms on two occasions. The SRT was similar across test modality: 300, 287, and 280 milliseconds (ms) for the traditional, iPad, and iTouch, respectively. The CRT was similar within mobile devices, though slightly faster on the traditional: 359, 408, and 384 ms for traditional, iPad, and iTouch, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.79 to 0.85 for SRT and from 0.75 to 0.83 for CRT. The similarity and reliability of SRT across platforms and consistency of SRT and CRT across test conditions indicate that mobile devices provide the next generation of assessment platforms for information processing.

  9. Spike rate and spike timing contributions to coding taste quality information in rat periphery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon eLawhern

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available There is emerging evidence that individual sensory neurons in the rodent brain rely on temporal features of the discharge pattern to code differences in taste quality information. In contrast, in-vestigations of individual sensory neurons in the periphery have focused on analysis of spike rate and mostly disregarded spike timing as a taste quality coding mechanism. The purpose of this work was to determine the contribution of spike timing to taste quality coding by rat geniculate ganglion neurons using computational methods that have been applied successfully in other sys-tems. We recorded the discharge patterns of narrowly-tuned and broadly-tuned neurons in the rat geniculate ganglion to representatives of the five basic taste qualities. We used mutual in-formation to determine significant responses and the van Rossum metric to characterize their temporal features. While our findings show that spike timing contributes a significant part of the message, spike rate contributes the largest portion of the message relayed by afferent neurons from rat fungiform taste buds to the brain. Thus, spike rate and spike timing together are more effective than spike rate alone in coding stimulus quality information to a single basic taste in the periphery for both narrowly-tuned specialist and broadly-tuned generalist neurons.

  10. Ground and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services Time Tradeoffs Assessed with Geographic Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widener, Michael J; Ginsberg, Zac; Schleith, Daniel; Floccare, Douglas J; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Galvagno, Samuel

    2015-07-01

    We describe how geographic information systems (GIS) can be used to assess and compare estimated transport time for helicopter and ground emergency medical services. Recent research shows that while the odds of a trauma patient's survival increase with helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS), they may not increase to the extent necessary to make HEMS cost effective. This study offers an analytic tool to objectively quantify the patient travel time advantage that HEMS offers compared to ground emergency medical services (GEMS). Using helicopter dispatch data from the Maryland State Police from 2000-2011, we computed transport time estimates for HEMS and GEMS, compare these results to a reference transport time of 60 min, and use geospatial interpolation to extrapolate the total response times for each mode across the study region. Mapping the region's trauma incidents and modeling response times, our findings indicate the GIS framework for calculating transportation time tradeoffs is useful in identifying which areas can be better served by HEMS or GEMS. The use of GIS and the analytical methodology described in this study present a method to compare transportation by air and ground in the prehospital setting that accounts for how mode, distance, and road infrastructure impact total transport time. Whether used to generate regional maps in advance or applied real-time, the presented framework provides a tool to identify earlier incident locations that favor HEMS over GEMS transport modes.

  11. Measuring and managing radiologist workload: measuring radiologist reporting times using data from a Radiology Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, Ian A.; MacDonald, Sharon L.S.; Floyd, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, there has been no objective method of measuring the time required for radiologists to produce reports during normal work. We have created a technique for semi-automated measurement of radiologist reporting time, and through it produced a robust set of absolute time requirements and relative value units for consultant reporting of diagnostic examinations in our hospital. A large sample of reporting times, recorded automatically by the Radiology Information System (COMRAD, Software Innovations, Christchurch, New Zealand) along with the description of each examination being reported, was placed in a database. Analysis was confined to diagnostic reporting by consultant radiologists. A spreadsheet was produced, listing the total number and the frequency of reporting times of each distinct examination. Outliers with exceptionally long report times (more than 10min for plain radiography, 30min for ultrasound, or 60min for CT or MRI with some exceptions) were culled; this removed 9.5% of the total. Complex CTs requiring separate workstation time were assigned times by consensus. The median time for the remainder of each sample was the assigned absolute reporting time in minutes and seconds. Relative value units were calculated using the reporting time for a single view department chest X-ray of 1min 38s including verifying a report made using speech recognition software. A schedule of absolute and relative values, based on over 179,000 reports, forms Table 2 of this paper. The technique provides a schedule of reporting times with reduced subjective input, which is more robust than existing systems for measuring reporting time.

  12. Production Cells in Construction: Considering Time, Space and Information Linkages to Seek Broader Implementations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Nunes Mariz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of production cells in manufacturing has achieved many benefits, motivating researchers to apply them in the construction environment. The aim of this research is to identify time, space, and information linkages in construction’s production cells applications, seeking opportunities for broader implementations. We adopted a literature review approach focusing on cases in the Brazilian construction sector that addressed cell applications. Subsequently, comparative tables of these publications were prepared, analyzing the consideration of time, space, and information linkages, as well as identified results. The article pointed out that there is a gap in publications that address the application of a production cell in almost all construction flows, except the job site flow, reflecting the tendency of most companies of applying lean concepts firstly in physical flows. By analyzing these aspects (group of features that enhance the use of the cell, it was found that “material flow and pull systems” and “operators interaction” were the aspects most often considered, but mostly partially. Few cases reported the use of “flexibility” and “equipment maintenance”. No case reported comprehensive considerations of the three important linkages of time, space, and information. Space was the linkage better considered compared to time and information linkages. Lead time reduction, cost savings and increased productivity were among the greatest benefits reported from the applications of production cells. There is also a positive correlation between the linkages coverage and the number of benefits obtained. Further research is suggested in order to investigate the results of a more comprehensive application considering all linkages.

  13. Time-resolved echo-shared parallel MRA of the lung: observer preference study of image quality in comparison with non-echo-shared sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, C.; Puderbach, M.; Zaporozhan, J.; Plathow, C.; Kauczor, H.-U.; Ley, S.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality of time-resolved echo-shared parallel MRA of the lung. The pulmonary vasculature of nine patients (seven females, two males; median age: 44 years) with pulmonary disease was examined using a time-resolved MRA sequence combining echo sharing with parallel imaging (time-resolved echo-shared angiography technique, or TREAT). The sharpness of the vessel borders, conspicuousness of peripheral lung vessels, artifact level, and overall image quality of TREAT was assessed independently by four readers in a side-by-side comparison with non-echo-shared time-resolved parallel MRA data (pMRA) previously acquired in the same patients. Furthermore, the SNR of pulmonary arteries (PA) and veins (PV) achieved with both pulse sequences was compared. The mean voxel size of TREAT MRA was decreased by 24% compared with the non-echo-shared MRA. Regarding the sharpness of the vessel borders, conspicuousness of peripheral lung vessels, and overall image quality the TREAT sequence was rated superior in 75-76% of all cases. If the TREAT images were preferred over the pMRA images, the advantage was rated as major in 61-71% of all cases. The level of artifacts was not increased with the TREAT sequence. The mean interobserver agreement for all categories ranged between fair (artifact level) and good (overall image quality). The maximum SNR of TREAT did not differ from non-echo-shared parallel MRA (PA: TREAT: 273±45; pMRA: 280±71; PV: TREAT: 273±33; pMRA: 258±62). TREAT achieves a higher spatial resolution than non-echo-shared parallel MRA which is also perceived as an improved image quality. (orig.)

  14. Real-Time Traffic Information for Emergency Evacuation Operations: Phase A Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Zhang, Li [Mississippi State University (MSU); Mahmoud, Anas M. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Wen, Yi [Mississippi State University (MSU)

    2010-05-01

    There are many instances in which it is possible to plan ahead for an emergency evacuation (e.g., an explosion at a chemical processing facility). For those cases, if an accident (or an attack) were to happen, then the best evacuation plan for the prevailing network and weather conditions would be deployed. In other cases (e.g., the derailment of a train transporting hazardous materials), there may not be any previously developed plan to be implemented and decisions must be made ad-hoc on how to proceed with an emergency evacuation. In both situations, the availability of real-time traffic information plays a critical role in the management of the evacuation operations. To improve public safety during a vehicular emergency evacuation it is necessary to detect losses of road capacity (due to incidents, for example) as early as possible. Once these bottlenecks are identified, re-routing strategies must be determined in real-time and deployed in the field to help dissipate the congestion and increase the efficiency of the evacuation. Due to cost constraints, only large urban areas have traffic sensor deployments that permit access to some sort of real-time traffic information; any evacuation taking place in any other areas of the country would have to proceed without real-time traffic information. The latter was the focus of this SERRI/DHS (Southeast Region Research Initiative/Department of Homeland Security) sponsored project. That is, the main objective on the project was to improve the operations during a vehicular emergency evacuation anywhere by using newly developed real-time traffic-information-gathering technologies to assess traffic conditions and therefore to potentially detect incidents on the main evacuation routes. Phase A of the project consisted in the development and testing of a prototype system composed of sensors that are engineered in such a way that they can be rapidly deployed in the field where and when they are needed. Each one of these sensors

  15. G-quadruplex and G-rich sequence stimulate Pif1p-catalyzed downstream duplex DNA unwinding through reducing waiting time at ss/dsDNA junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Wu, Wen-Qiang; Liu, Na-Nv; Duan, Xiao-Lei; Li, Ming; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Hou, Xi-Miao; Xi, Xu-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Alternative DNA structures that deviate from B-form double-stranded DNA such as G-quadruplex (G4) DNA can be formed by G-rich sequences that are widely distributed throughout the human genome. We have previously shown that Pif1p not only unfolds G4, but also unwinds the downstream duplex DNA in a G4-stimulated manner. In the present study, we further characterized the G4-stimulated duplex DNA unwinding phenomenon by means of single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer. It was found that Pif1p did not unwind the partial duplex DNA immediately after unfolding the upstream G4 structure, but rather, it would dwell at the ss/dsDNA junction with a ‘waiting time’. Further studies revealed that the waiting time was in fact related to a protein dimerization process that was sensitive to ssDNA sequence and would become rapid if the sequence is G-rich. Furthermore, we identified that the G-rich sequence, as the G4 structure, equally stimulates duplex DNA unwinding. The present work sheds new light on the molecular mechanism by which G4-unwinding helicase Pif1p resolves physiological G4/duplex DNA structures in cells. PMID:27471032

  16. Effect of the time window on the heat-conduction information filtering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiang; Song, Wen-Jun; Hou, Lei; Zhang, Yi-Lu; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2014-05-01

    Recommendation systems have been proposed to filter out the potential tastes and preferences of the normal users online, however, the physics of the time window effect on the performance is missing, which is critical for saving the memory and decreasing the computation complexity. In this paper, by gradually expanding the time window, we investigate the impact of the time window on the heat-conduction information filtering model with ten similarity measures. The experimental results on the benchmark dataset Netflix indicate that by only using approximately 11.11% recent rating records, the accuracy could be improved by an average of 33.16% and the diversity could be improved by 30.62%. In addition, the recommendation performance on the dataset MovieLens could be preserved by only considering approximately 10.91% recent records. Under the circumstance of improving the recommendation performance, our discoveries possess significant practical value by largely reducing the computational time and shortening the data storage space.

  17. Real-Time Scheduling for Preventing Information Leakage with Preemption Overheads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAEK, H.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Real-time systems (RTS are characterized by tasks executing in a timely manner to meet its deadlines as a real-time constraint. Most studies of RTS have focused on these criteria as primary design points. However, recent increases in security threats to various real-time systems have shown that enhanced security support must be included as an important design point, retro-fitting such support to existing systems as necessary. In this paper, we propose a new pre-flush technique referred to as flush task reservation for FP scheduling (FTR-FP to conditionally sanitize the state of resources shared by real-time tasks by invoking a flush task (FT in order to mitigate information leakage/corruption of real-time systems. FTR-FP extends existing works exploiting FTs to be applicable more general scheduling algorithms and security model. We also propose modifications to existing real-time scheduling algorithms to implement a pre-flush technique as a security constraint, and analysis technique to verify schedulability of the real-time scheduling. For better analytic capability, our analysis technique provides a count of the precise number of preemptions that a task experiences offline. Our evaluation results demonstrate that our proposed schedulability analysis improves the performance of existing scheduling algorithms in terms of schedulability and preemption cost.

  18. Recent advances towards azobenzene-based light-driven real-time information-transmitting materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume García-Amorós

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Photochromic switches that are able to transmit information in a quick fashion have attracted a growing interest within materials science during the last few decades. Although very fast photochromic switching materials working within hundreds of nanoseconds based on other chromophores, such as spiropyranes, have been successfully achieved, reaching such fast relaxation times for azobenzene-based photochromic molecular switches is still a challenge. This review focuses on the most recent achievements on azobenzene-based light-driven real-time information-transmitting systems. Besides, the main relationships between the structural features of the azo-chromophore and the thermal cis-to-trans isomerisation, the kinetics and mechanism are also discussed as a key point for reaching azoderivatives endowed with fast thermal back-isomerisation kinetics.

  19. Evaluating time to cancer recurrence as a surrogate marker for survival from an information theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Ariel; Molenberghs, Geert

    2008-10-01

    The last two decades have seen a lot of development in the area of surrogate marker validation. One of these approaches places the evaluation in a meta-analytic framework, leading to definitions in terms of trial- and individual-level association. A drawback of this methodology is that different settings have led to different measures at the individual level. Using information theory, Alonso et al. proposed a unified framework, leading to a new definition of surrogacy, which offers interpretational advantages and is applicable in a wide range of situations. In this work, we illustrate how this information-theoretic approach can be used to evaluate surrogacy when both endpoints are of a time-to-event type. Two meta-analyses, in early and advanced colon cancer, respectively, are then used to evaluate the performance of time to cancer recurrence as a surrogate for overall survival.

  20. The master two-dimensional gel database of human AMA cell proteins: towards linking protein and genome sequence and mapping information (update 1991)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J E; Leffers, H; Rasmussen, H H

    1991-01-01

    autoantigens" and "cDNAs". For convenience we have included an alphabetical list of all known proteins recorded in this database. In the long run, the main goal of this database is to link protein and DNA sequencing and mapping information (Human Genome Program) and to provide an integrated picture......The master two-dimensional gel database of human AMA cells currently lists 3801 cellular and secreted proteins, of which 371 cellular polypeptides (306 IEF; 65 NEPHGE) were added to the master images during the last 10 months. These include: (i) very basic and acidic proteins that do not focus...

  1. New information technologies as a means of quality improvement of part-time students’ training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Нестеренко В. В.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ways and means aimed at facilitating the quality of part-time students’ training at an institution of higher education are considered in the article. The principles the conditions facilitating quality increase of adult part-time students’ training are based on as well as criteria of their effectiveness assessment are described. The definition of the notion «distance learning» has been given. Tuition by correspondence as a special form of continuous education allowing the use of elements of distance educational technologies is examined. The role of informational technologies in correspondence form of education providing essential improvement of students’ training quality is described.

  2. Core journals in library and information science: measuring the level of specialization over time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, J.; Frandsen, T. F.

    2013-01-01

    years. The method is applied to a selection of core journals in library and information science (1990-2012). The reference lists of each journal are compared year by year, and the percentage of re-citations is calculated by dividing the number of re-citations with the total number of citations each year......Introduction. Specialization in science is a process that occurs over time. The present paper presents a bibliometric method for measuring the degree of specialization over time. Methods. The method is based on bibliographic coupling, and counts the percentage of recitations given in subsequent...

  3. Data acquisition system for a positron tomograph using time-of-flight information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertin, Francois.

    1981-12-01

    Progress in nuclear instrumentation has led to the development of scintillators much faster than the NaI crystal traditionally used in nuclear medicine. As a result it is now possible to measure time-of-flight, i.e. the time between the arrival of two γ rays emitted in coincidence on two detectors. With this extra information the β + annihilation site may be located. The introduction of time-of-flight in tomographic techniques called for research along two lines: - ''theoretical'' research leading to the creation of a new image reconstruction algorithm taking into account time-of-flight information - applied research leading to the development of an efficient measurement line and sophisticated data acquisition and processing electronics. This research has been carried out at LETI and is briefly outlined in chapter I. Chapter II shows how the introduction of time-of-flight and the modification of the reconstruction algorithm complicate the electronic and informatic equipment of the tomograph. Several acquisition and processing strategies are proposed, then the need to use an intermediate mass storage and hence to design a complex acquisition operator is demonstrated. Chapter III examines the structure of the acquisition operator and the resulting block diagram is presented in detail in chapter IV [fr

  4. TIME Impact - a new user-friendly tuberculosis (TB) model to inform TB policy decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, R M G J; Lalli, M; Sumner, T; Hamilton, M; Pedrazzoli, D; Bonsu, F; Hippner, P; Pillay, Y; Kimerling, M; Ahmedov, S; Pretorius, C; White, R G

    2016-03-24

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death from infectious disease worldwide, predominantly affecting low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where resources are limited. As such, countries need to be able to choose the most efficient interventions for their respective setting. Mathematical models can be valuable tools to inform rational policy decisions and improve resource allocation, but are often unavailable or inaccessible for LMICs, particularly in TB. We developed TIME Impact, a user-friendly TB model that enables local capacity building and strengthens country-specific policy discussions to inform support funding applications at the (sub-)national level (e.g. Ministry of Finance) or to international donors (e.g. the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria).TIME Impact is an epidemiological transmission model nested in TIME, a set of TB modelling tools available for free download within the widely-used Spectrum software. The TIME Impact model reflects key aspects of the natural history of TB, with additional structure for HIV/ART, drug resistance, treatment history and age. TIME Impact enables national TB programmes (NTPs) and other TB policymakers to better understand their own TB epidemic, plan their response, apply for funding and evaluate the implementation of the response.The explicit aim of TIME Impact's user-friendly interface is to enable training of local and international TB experts towards independent use. During application of TIME Impact, close involvement of the NTPs and other local partners also builds critical understanding of the modelling methods, assumptions and limitations inherent to modelling. This is essential to generate broad country-level ownership of the modelling data inputs and results. In turn, it stimulates discussions and a review of the current evidence and assumptions, strengthening the decision-making process in general.TIME Impact has been effectively applied in a variety of settings. In South Africa, it

  5. Obese and overweight individuals are less sensitive to information about meal times in portion size judgements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, A R; Mason, A; Rogers, P J; Brunstrom, J M

    2017-11-16

    Obesity is related to a tendency to discount the future. Information regarding inter-meal interval (IMI) allows meal planning. We sought to assess how obese, overweight, and lean people select portion sizes based on the length of an IMI. We hypothesised that individuals with a high BMI would discount information about the IMI. In addition, we investigated how reduced sensitivity to IMIs relates to monetary temporal discounting. Participants (lean, n=35; overweight, n=31; obese, n=22), selected lunchtime portion sizes in response to information about the timings of their next meal. In seven trials, the time of the IMI was systematically manipulated, ranging from 'right now' to '8 h'. Participants then completed a monetary temporal discounting task. BMI was included as a continuous measure. For each participant, we conducted a linear regression of portion size on IMI to yield a gradient that reflected reduced sensitivity to future meal timings. As expected, participants selected larger portion sizes in response to a long IMI. Consistent with our hypothesis, individuals with a high BMI discounted information about the IMI (β=-3.49, P=0.015; confidence interval (CI) 6.29 to -0.70). Monetary discounting also negatively predicted BMI (β=-8.1, P=0.003; CI=-13.43 to -2.77), but did not correlate with IMI sensitivity (P>0.05). These results are the first to demonstrate that temporal discounting operates in planning from one meal to the next, and is more prevalent in obese and overweight, relative to lean individuals. Participants with a high BMI discounted concerns about potential future fullness and hunger in the IMI. Our observations might begin to explain associations between obesity and irregular meal timings or help to form the basis for a targeted intervention that promotes future thinking in meal planning.International Journal of Obesity accepted article preview online, 16 November 2017. doi:10.1038/ijo.2017.275.

  6. Competitor timing information affects nest site selection in a migratory bird

    OpenAIRE

    Samplonius, Jelmer Menno

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The costs of competition should lead to competitor avoidance. However, science has shown that animals may prefer settling near competitors to benefit from information about habitat quality. High quality habitat may translate to higher densities and reproductive success, but also to earlier reproductive timing. The former two have been studied as social cues, but competitor phenology has not. Climate change advances phenologies across trophic levels, so it is key to understand how...

  7. Age-appropriate information technology on the advance: Putting paid to olden times

    OpenAIRE

    Heng, Stefab

    2009-01-01

    Ageing society opens up enormous economic potential. Whereas for a long time social interpretation homed in on the doomsday scenarios of demographic change, it is the economic potential that is now emerging with increasing clarity. Information and communication technologies stand a good chance of benefiting from this trend. Older people are not intrinsically technology refuseniks, as evidenced by the growing number of silver agers using the internet. Successful products will be far removed...

  8. Combining real-time PCR and next-generation DNA sequencing to provide quantitative comparisons of fungal aerosol populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannemiller, Karen C.; Lang-Yona, Naama; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Rudich, Yinon; Peccia, Jordan

    2014-02-01

    We examined fungal communities associated with the PM10 mass of Rehovot, Israel outdoor air samples collected in the spring and fall seasons. Fungal communities were described by 454 pyrosequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the fungal ribosomal RNA encoding gene. To allow for a more quantitative comparison of fungal exposure in humans, the relative abundance values of specific taxa were transformed to absolute concentrations through multiplying these values by the sample's total fungal spore concentration (derived from universal fungal qPCR). Next, the sequencing-based absolute concentrations for Alternaria alternata, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Epicoccum nigrum, and Penicillium/Aspergillus spp. were compared to taxon-specific qPCR concentrations for A. alternata, C. cladosporioides, E. nigrum, and Penicillium/Aspergillus spp. derived from the same spring and fall aerosol samples. Results of these comparisons showed that the absolute concentration values generated from pyrosequencing were strongly associated with the concentration values derived from taxon-specific qPCR (for all four species, p 0.70). The correlation coefficients were greater for species present in higher concentrations. Our microbial aerosol population analyses demonstrated that fungal diversity (number of fungal operational taxonomic units) was higher in the spring compared to the fall (p = 0.02), and principal coordinate analysis showed distinct seasonal differences in taxa distribution (ANOSIM p = 0.004). Among genera containing allergenic and/or pathogenic species, the absolute concentrations of Alternaria, Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Cladosporium were greater in the fall, while Cryptococcus, Penicillium, and Ulocladium concentrations were greater in the spring. The transformation of pyrosequencing fungal population relative abundance data to absolute concentrations can improve next-generation DNA sequencing-based quantitative aerosol exposure assessment.

  9. Improving imperfect data from health management information systems in Africa using space-time geostatistics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W Gething

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Reliable and timely information on disease-specific treatment burdens within a health system is critical for the planning and monitoring of service provision. Health management information systems (HMIS exist to address this need at national scales across Africa but are failing to deliver adequate data because of widespread underreporting by health facilities. Faced with this inadequacy, vital public health decisions often rely on crudely adjusted regional and national estimates of treatment burdens.This study has taken the example of presumed malaria in outpatients within the largely incomplete Kenyan HMIS database and has defined a geostatistical modelling framework that can predict values for all data that are missing through space and time. The resulting complete set can then be used to define treatment burdens for presumed malaria at any level of spatial and temporal aggregation. Validation of the model has shown that these burdens are quantified to an acceptable level of accuracy at the district, provincial, and national scale.The modelling framework presented here provides, to our knowledge for the first time, reliable information from imperfect HMIS data to support evidence-based decision-making at national and sub-national levels.

  10. Development of Highly Informative Genome-Wide Single Sequence Repeat Markers for Breeding Applications in Sesame and Construction of a Web Resource: SisatBase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komivi Dossa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The sequencing of the full nuclear genome of sesame (Sesamum indicum L. provides the platform for functional analyses of genome components and their application in breeding programs. Although the importance of microsatellites markers or simple sequence repeats (SSR in crop genotyping, genetics, and breeding applications is well established, only a little information exist concerning SSRs at the whole genome level in sesame. In addition, SSRs represent a suitable marker type for sesame molecular breeding in developing countries where it is mainly grown. In this study, we identified 138,194 genome-wide SSRs of which 76.5% were physically mapped onto the 13 pseudo-chromosomes. Among these SSRs, up to three primers pairs were supplied for 101,930 SSRs and used to in silico amplify the reference genome together with two newly sequenced sesame accessions. A total of 79,957 SSRs (78% were polymorphic between the three genomes thereby suggesting their promising use in different genomics-assisted breeding applications. From these polymorphic SSRs, 23 were selected and validated to have high polymorphic potential in 48 sesame accessions from different growing areas of Africa. Furthermore, we have developed an online user-friendly database, SisatBase (http://www.sesame-bioinfo.org/SisatBase/, which provides free access to SSRs data as well as an integrated platform for functional analyses. Altogether, the reference SSR and SisatBase would serve as useful resources for genetic assessment, genomic studies, and breeding advancement in sesame, especially in developing countries.

  11. It is time to improve the quality of medical information distributed to students across social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Benjamin E; Kontovounisios, Christos

    2018-01-01

    The ubiquitous nature of social media has meant that its effects on fields outside of social communication have begun to be felt. The generation undergoing medical education are of the generation referred to as "digital natives", and as such routinely incorporate social media into their education. Social media's incorporation into medical education includes its use as a platform to distribute information to the public ("distributive education") and as a platform to provide information to a specific audience ("push education"). These functions have proved beneficial in many regards, such as enabling constant access to the subject matter, other learners, and educators. However, the usefulness of using social media as part of medical education is limited by the vast quantities of poor quality information and the time required to find information of sufficient quality and relevance, a problem confounded by many student's preoccupation with "efficient" learning. In this Perspective, the authors discuss whether social media has proved useful as a tool for medical education. The current growth in the use of social media as a tool for medical education seems to be principally supported by students' desire for efficient learning rather than by the efficacy of social media as a resource for medical education. Therefore, improvements in the quality of information required to maximize the impact of social media as a tool for medical education are required. Suggested improvements include an increase in the amount of educational content distributed on social media produced by academic institutions, such as universities and journals.

  12. Using structural knowledge in the protein data bank to inform the search for potential host-microbe protein interactions in sequence space: application to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Gaurang; Mande, Shekhar C

    2017-04-04

    A comprehensive map of the human-M. tuberculosis (MTB) protein interactome would help fill the gaps in our understanding of the disease, and computational prediction can aid and complement experimental studies towards this end. Several sequence-based in silico approaches tap the existing data on experimentally validated protein-protein interactions (PPIs); these PPIs serve as templates from which novel interactions between pathogen and host are inferred. Such comparative approaches typically make use of local sequence alignment, which, in the absence of structural details about the interfaces mediating the template interactions, could lead to incorrect inferences, particularly when multi-domain proteins are involved. We propose leveraging the domain-domain interaction (DDI) information in PDB complexes to score and prioritize candidate PPIs between host and pathogen proteomes based on targeted sequence-level comparisons. Our method picks out a small set of human-MTB protein pairs as candidates for physical interactions, and the use of functional meta-data suggests that some of them could contribute to the in vivo molecular cross-talk between pathogen and host that regulates the course of the infection. Further, we present numerical data for Pfam domain families that highlights interaction specificity on the domain level. Not every instance of a pair of domains, for which interaction evidence has been found in a few instances (i.e. structures), is likely to functionally interact. Our sorting approach scores candidates according to how "distant" they are in sequence space from known examples of DDIs (templates). Thus, it provides a natural way to deal with the heterogeneity in domain-level interactions. Our method represents a more informed application of local alignment to the sequence-based search for potential human-microbial interactions that uses available PPI data as a prior. Our approach is somewhat limited in its sensitivity by the restricted size and

  13. End-User Applications of Real-Time Earthquake Information in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cua, G. B.; Gasparini, P.; Giardini, D.; Zschau, J.; Filangieri, A. R.; Reakt Wp7 Team

    2011-12-01

    The primary objective of European FP7 project REAKT (Strategies and Tools for Real-Time Earthquake Risk Reduction) is to improve the efficiency of real-time earthquake risk mitigation methods and their capability of protecting structures, infrastructures, and populations. REAKT aims to address the issues of real-time earthquake hazard and response from end-to-end, with efforts directed along the full spectrum of methodology development in earthquake forecasting, earthquake early warning, and real-time vulnerability systems, through optimal decision-making, and engagement and cooperation of scientists and end users for the establishment of best practices for use of real-time information. Twelve strategic test cases/end users throughout Europe have been selected. This diverse group of applications/end users includes civil protection authorities, railway systems, hospitals, schools, industrial complexes, nuclear plants, lifeline systems, national seismic networks, and critical structures. The scale of target applications covers a wide range, from two school complexes in Naples, to individual critical structures, such as the Rion Antirion bridge in Patras, and the Fatih Sultan Mehmet bridge in Istanbul, to large complexes, such as the SINES industrial complex in Portugal and the Thessaloniki port area, to distributed lifeline and transportation networks and nuclear plants. Some end-users are interested in in-depth feasibility studies for use of real-time information and development of rapid response plans, while others intend to install real-time instrumentation and develop customized automated control systems. From the onset, REAKT scientists and end-users will work together on concept development and initial implementation efforts using the data products and decision-making methodologies developed with the goal of improving end-user risk mitigation. The aim of this scientific/end-user partnership is to ensure that scientific efforts are applicable to operational

  14. An assessment of time involved in pre-test case review and counseling for a whole genome sequencing clinical research program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Janet L; Faucett, W Andrew; Smith-Packard, Bethanny; Wagner, Monisa; Williams, Marc S

    2014-08-01

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is being used for evaluation of individuals with undiagnosed disease of suspected genetic origin. Implementing WGS into clinical practice will place an increased burden upon care teams with regard to pre-test patient education and counseling about results. To quantitate the time needed for appropriate pre-test evaluation of participants in WGS testing, we documented the time spent by our clinical research group on various activities related to program preparation, participant screening, and consent prior to WGS. Participants were children or young adults with autism, intellectual or developmental disability, and/or congenital anomalies, who have remained undiagnosed despite previous evaluation, and their biologic parents. Results showed that significant time was spent in securing allocation of clinical research space to counsel participants and families, and in acquisition and review of participant's medical records. Pre-enrollment chart review identified two individuals with existing diagnoses resulting in savings of $30,000 for the genome sequencing alone, as well as saving hours of personnel time for genome interpretation and communication of WGS results. New WGS programs should plan for costs associated with additional pre-test administrative planning and patient evaluation time that will be required to provide high quality care.

  15. Incorporating Real-time Earthquake Information into Large Enrollment Natural Disaster Course Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, K. P.; Benz, H.; Hayes, G. P.; Villasenor, A.

    2010-12-01

    Although most would agree that the occurrence of natural disaster events such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and floods can provide effective learning opportunities for natural hazards-based courses, implementing compelling materials into the large-enrollment classroom environment can be difficult. These natural hazard events derive much of their learning potential from their real-time nature, and in the modern 24/7 news-cycle where all but the most devastating events are quickly out of the public eye, the shelf life for an event is quite limited. To maximize the learning potential of these events requires that both authoritative information be available and course materials be generated as the event unfolds. Although many events such as hurricanes, flooding, and volcanic eruptions provide some precursory warnings, and thus one can prepare background materials to place the main event into context, earthquakes present a particularly confounding situation of providing no warning, but where context is critical to student learning. Attempting to implement real-time materials into large enrollment classes faces the additional hindrance of limited internet access (for students) in most lecture classrooms. In Earth 101 Natural Disasters: Hollywood vs Reality, taught as a large enrollment (150+ students) general education course at Penn State, we are collaborating with the USGS’s National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) to develop efficient means to incorporate their real-time products into learning activities in the lecture hall environment. Over time (and numerous events) we have developed a template for presenting USGS-produced real-time information in lecture mode. The event-specific materials can be quickly incorporated and updated, along with key contextual materials, to provide students with up-to-the-minute current information. In addition, we have also developed in-class activities, such as student determination of population exposure to severe ground

  16. Using Concurrent Cardiovascular Information to Augment Survival Time Data from Orthostatic Tilt Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiveson, Alan H.; Fiedler, James; Lee, Stuart M. M.; Westby, Christian M.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Orthostatic Intolerance (OI) is the propensity to develop symptoms of fainting during upright standing. OI is associated with changes in heart rate, blood pressure and other measures of cardiac function. Problem: NASA astronauts have shown increased susceptibility to OI on return from space missions. Current methods for counteracting OI in astronauts include fluid loading and the use of compression garments. Multivariate trajectory spread is greater as OI increases. Pairwise comparisons at the same time within subjects allows incorporation of pass/fail outcomes. Path length, convex hull area, and covariance matrix determinant do well as statistics to summarize this spread Missing data problems Time series analysis need many more time points per OTT session treatment of trend? how incorporate survival information?

  17. Correlation between use time of machine and decline curve for emerging enterprise information systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yao-Chung; Lai, Chin-Feng; Chuang, Chi-Cheng; Hou, Cheng-Yu

    2018-04-01

    With the progress of science and technology, more and more machines are adpot to help human life better and more convenient. When the machines have been used for a longer period of time so that the machine components are getting old, the amount of power comsumption will increase and easily cause the machine to overheat. This also causes a waste of invisible resources. If the Internet of Everything (IoE) technologies are able to be applied into the enterprise information systems for monitoring the machines use time, it can not only make energy can be effectively used, but aslo create a safer living environment. To solve the above problem, the correlation predict model is established to collect the data of power consumption converted into power eigenvalues. This study takes the power eigenvalue as the independent variable and use time as the dependent variable in order to establish the decline curve. Ultimately, the scoring and estimation modules are employed to seek the best power eigenvalue as the independent variable. To predict use time, the correlation is discussed between the use time and the decline curve to improve the entire behavioural analysis of the facilitate recognition of the use time of machines.

  18. Sequence Learning with Passive RFID Sensors for Real-Time Bed-Egress Recognition in Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Asanga; Ranasinghe, Damith C; Fumeaux, Christophe; Hill, Keith D; Visvanathan, Renuka

    2017-07-01

    Getting out of bed and ambulating without supervision is identified as one of the major causes of patient falls in hospitals and nursing homes. Therefore, increased supervision is proposed as a key strategy toward falls prevention. An emerging generation of batteryless, lightweight, and wearable sensors are creating new possibilities for ambulatory monitoring, where the unobtrusive nature of such sensors makes them particularly adapted for monitoring older people. In this study, we investigate the use of a batteryless radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag response to analyze bed-egress movements. We propose a bed-egress movement detection framework that includes a novel sequence learning classifier with a set of features derived from bed-egress motion analysis. We analyzed data from 14 healthy older people (66-86 years old) who wore a wearable embodiment of a batteryless accelerometer integrated RFID sensor platform loosely attached over their clothes at sternum level, and undertook a series of activities including bed-egress in two clinical room settings. The promising results indicate the efficacy of our batteryless bed-egress monitoring framework.

  19. Effects of imaging gradients in sequences with varying longitudinal storage time-Case of diffusion exchange imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasič, Samo; Lundell, Henrik; Topgaard, Daniel; Dyrby, Tim B

    2018-04-01

    To illustrate the potential bias caused by imaging gradients in correlation MRI sequences using longitudinal magnetization storage (LS) and examine the case of filter exchange imaging (FEXI) yielding maps of the apparent exchange rate (AXR). The effects of imaging gradients in FEXI were observed on yeast cells. To analyze the AXR bias, signal evolution was calculated by applying matrix exponential operators. A sharp threshold for the slice thickness was identified, below which the AXR is increasingly underestimated. The bias can be understood in terms of an extended low-pass diffusion filtering during the LS interval, which is more pronounced at lower exchange rates. For a total exchange rate constant larger than 1 s -1 , the AXR bias is expected to be negligible when slices thicker than 2.5 mm are used. In correlation experiments like FEXI, relying on LS with variable duration, imaging gradients may cause disrupting effects that cannot be easily mitigated and should be carefully considered for unbiased results. In typical clinical applications of FEXI, the imaging gradients are expected to cause a negligible AXR bias. However, the AXR bias may be significant in preclinical settings or whenever thin imaging slices are used. Magn Reson Med 79:2228-2235, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Optimisation of chromatographic resolution using objective functions including both time and spectral information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Lapasió, J R; Pous-Torres, S; Ortiz-Bolsico, C; García-Alvarez-Coque, M C

    2015-01-16

    The optimisation of the resolution in high-performance liquid chromatography is traditionally performed attending only to the time information. However, even in the optimal conditions, some peak pairs may remain unresolved. Such incomplete resolution can be still accomplished by deconvolution, which can be carried out with more guarantees of success by including spectral information. In this work, two-way chromatographic objective functions (COFs) that incorporate both time and spectral information were tested, based on the peak purity (analyte peak fraction free of overlapping) and the multivariate selectivity (figure of merit derived from the net analyte signal) concepts. These COFs are sensitive to situations where the components that coelute in a mixture show some spectral differences. Therefore, they are useful to find out experimental conditions where the spectrochromatograms can be recovered by deconvolution. Two-way multivariate selectivity yielded the best performance and was applied to the separation using diode-array detection of a mixture of 25 phenolic compounds, which remained unresolved in the chromatographic order using linear and multi-linear gradients of acetonitrile-water. Peak deconvolution was carried out using the combination of orthogonal projection approach and alternating least squares. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Valued Information at the Right Time (VIRT) and the Navy's Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC) - A Win/Win Proposition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Acevedo, Rafael A

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis I examine the theory of Valued Information at the Right Time (VIRT) and the benefits its implementation can provide to the Navy's best example of accurate information-sharing, the Cooperative Engagement Capability...

  2. Value of Information for Optimal Adaptive Routing in Stochastic Time-Dependent Traffic Networks: Algorithms and Computational Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    Real-time information is important for travelers' routing decisions in uncertain networks by enabling online adaptation to revealed traffic conditions. Usually there are spatial and/or temporal limitations in traveler information. In this research, a...

  3. Whisper: Tracing the Spatiotemporal Process of Information Diffusion in Real Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Nan; Lin, Yu-Ru; Sun, Xiaohua; Lazer, D; Liu, Shixia; Qu, Huamin

    2012-12-01

    When and where is an idea dispersed? Social media, like Twitter, has been increasingly used for exchanging information, opinions and emotions about events that are happening across the world. Here we propose a novel visualization design, "Whisper", for tracing the process of information diffusion in social media in real time. Our design highlights three major characteristics of diffusion processes in social media: the temporal trend, social-spatial extent, and community response of a topic of interest. Such social, spatiotemporal processes are conveyed based on a sunflower metaphor whose seeds are often dispersed far away. In Whisper, we summarize the collective responses of communities on a given topic based on how tweets were retweeted by groups of users, through representing the sentiments extracted from the tweets, and tracing the pathways of retweets on a spatial hierarchical layout. We use an efficient flux line-drawing algorithm to trace multiple pathways so the temporal and spatial patterns can be identified even for a bursty event. A focused diffusion series highlights key roles such as opinion leaders in the diffusion process. We demonstrate how our design facilitates the understanding of when and where a piece of information is dispersed and what are the social responses of the crowd, for large-scale events including political campaigns and natural disasters. Initial feedback from domain experts suggests promising use for today's information consumption and dispersion in the wild.

  4. Contribution of the time of flight information to the positron tomographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laval, M.; Allemand, R.; Campagnolo, R.; Garderet, P.; Gariod, R.; Guinet, P.; Moszinski, M.; Tournier, E.; Vacher, J.

    1982-09-01

    The TOF measurement enables positrons to be localized along the line joining two detectors. The accuracy of this measurement is mainly controled by the scintillator performances: light yield, and decay time constant are the key parameters. The main advantage of using the TOF information can be expressed in terms of sensitivity gain: for example the ratio of the required total counts to obtain the same random noise in a positron image without and with the TOF information. This gain ranges from 1 to more than 10, depending on the TOF performance but also on the activity distribution. Other advantages are inherent on the TOF method: - the very high count rate capabilities of the detectors enables fast dymanic studies with for example O 15 ; - the random coincidences to be found in an imaged object are the lowest that can be achieved; - a small amount of radiation scattered by the object is rejected outside of the field of reconstruction

  5. Improved Performance and Quality of Configurators by Receiving Real-Time Information from Suppliers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansdottir, Katrin; Shafiee, Sara; Bonev, Martin

    with including suppliers’ product specifications as sub-models and how these can be addressed by integrating configurators across supply chains to receive real-time information from suppliers. Based on established literature on the illustrated technical integration of configurators across the supply chains......Companies providing customized products are increasingly applying configurators in order to support the sales and design activities. Yet, especially for engineer-to-order (ETO) companies such activities are often divided across different organizations, where throughout the configuration process...... product specification has to be retrieved across the supply chains. Therefore, it is required that relevant information from suppliers is included in the configuration process, either as sub-models or by integrating configurators across the supply chains. This study investigates the challenges associated...

  6. Prediction of the human response time with the similarity and quantity of information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sungjin; Heo, Gyunyoung; Chang, Soon Heung

    2006-01-01

    Memory is one of brain processes that are important when trying to understand how people process information. Although a large number of studies have been made on the human performance, little is known about the similarity effect in human performance. The purpose of this paper is to propose and validate the quantitative and predictive model on the human response time in the user interface with the concept of similarity. However, it is not easy to explain the human performance with only similarity or information amount. We are confronted by two difficulties: making the quantitative model on the human response time with the similarity and validating the proposed model by experimental work. We made the quantitative model based on the Hick's law and the law of practice. In addition, we validated the model with various experimental conditions by measuring participants' response time in the environment of computer-based display. Experimental results reveal that the human performance is improved by the user interface's similarity. We think that the proposed model is useful for the user interface design and evaluation phases

  7. The predictive model on the user reaction time using the information similarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Jin; Heo, Gyun Young; Chang, Soon Heung

    2005-01-01

    Human performance is frequently degraded because people forget. Memory is one of brain processes that are important when trying to understand how people process information. Although a large number of studies have been made on the human performance, little is known about the similarity effect in human performance. The purpose of this paper is to propose and validate the quantitative and predictive model on the human response time in the user interface with the concept of similarity. However, it is not easy to explain the human performance with only similarity or information amount. We are confronted by two difficulties: making the quantitative model on the human response time with the similarity and validating the proposed model by experimental work. We made the quantitative model based on the Hick's law and the law of practice. In addition, we validated the model with various experimental conditions by measuring participants' response time in the environment of computer-based display. Experimental results reveal that the human performance is improved by the user interface's similarity. We think that the proposed model is useful for the user interface design and evaluation phases

  8. Brain response during the M170 time interval is sensitive to socially relevant information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arviv, Oshrit; Goldstein, Abraham; Weeting, Janine C; Becker, Eni S; Lange, Wolf-Gero; Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Deciphering the social meaning of facial displays is a highly complex neurological process. The M170, an event related field component of MEG recording, like its EEG counterpart N170, was repeatedly shown to be associated with structural encoding of faces. However, the scope of information encoded during the M170 time window is still being debated. We investigated the neuronal origin of facial processing of integrated social rank cues (SRCs) and emotional facial expressions (EFEs) during the M170 time interval. Participants viewed integrated facial displays of emotion (happy, angry, neutral) and SRCs (indicated by upward, downward, or straight head tilts). We found that the activity during the M170 time window is sensitive to both EFEs and SRCs. Specifically, highly prominent activation was observed in response to SRC connoting dominance as compared to submissive or egalitarian head cues. Interestingly, the processing of EFEs and SRCs appeared to rely on different circuitry. Our findings suggest that vertical head tilts are processed not only for their sheer structural variance, but as social information. Exploring the temporal unfolding and brain localization of non-verbal cues processing may assist in understanding the functioning of the social rank biobehavioral system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Development and Implementation of Real-Time Information Delivery Systems for Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Steve; Sullivan, Don; Ambrosia, Vince; Brass, James; Dann, R. Scott

    2000-01-01

    The disaster management community has an on-going need for real-time data and information, especially during catastrophic events. Currently, twin engine or jet aircraft with limited altitude and duration capabilities collect much of the data. Flight safety is also an issue. Clearly, much of the needed data could be delivered via over-the-horizon transfer through a uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAV) platform to mission managers at various locations on the ground. In fact, because of the ability to stay aloft for long periods of time, and to fly above dangerous situations, UAV's are ideally suited for disaster missions. There are numerous situations that can be considered disastrous for the human population. Some, such as fire or flood, can continue over a period of days. Disaster management officials rely on data from the site to respond in an optimum way with warnings, evacuations, rescue, relief, and to the extent possible, damage control. Although different types of disasters call for different types of response, most situations can be improved by having visual images and other remotely sensed data available. "Disaster Management" is actually made up of a number of activities, including: - Disaster Prevention and Mitigation - Emergency Response Planning - Disaster Management (real-time deployment of resources, during an event) - Disaster / Risk Modeling All of these activities could benefit from real-time information, but a major focus for UAV-based technology is in real-time deployment of resources (i.e., emergency response teams), based on changing conditions at the location of the event. With all these potential benefits, it is desirable to demonstrate to user agencies the ability to perform disaster management missions as described. The following demonstration project is the first in a program designed to prove the feasibility of supporting disaster missions with UAV technology and suitable communications packages on-board. A several-year program is envisioned

  10. The EDGE-CALIFA survey: the influence of galactic rotation on the molecular depletion time across the Hubble sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, D.; Kalinova, V.; Utomo, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Bolatto, A. D.; Levy, R. C.; Wong, T.; Sanchez, S. F.; Leroy, A. K.; Ostriker, E.; Blitz, L.; Vogel, S.; Mast, D.; García-Benito, R.; Husemann, B.; Dannerbauer, H.; Ellmeier, L.; Cao, Y.

    2018-04-01

    We present a kpc-scale analysis of the relationship between the molecular depletion time (τ^mol_dep) and the orbital time (τorb) across the field of 39 face-on local galaxies, selected from the EDGE-CALIFA sample. We find that, on average, 5 per cent of the available molecular gas is converted into stars per orbital time, or τ^mol_dep˜ 20 τ_orb. The resolved relation shows a scatter of ˜0.5 dex. The scatter is ascribable to galaxies of different morphologies that follow different τ^mol_dep-τorb relations which decrease in steepness from early- to late types. The morphologies appear to be linked with the star formation rate surface density, the molecular depletion time, and the orbital time, but they do not correlate with the molecular gas content of the galaxies in our sample. We speculate that in our molecular gas rich, early-type galaxies, the morphological quenching (in particular the disc stabilization via shear), rather than the absence of molecular gas, is the main factor responsible for their current inefficient star formation.

  11. Roles of repetitive sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-12-31

    The DNA of higher eukaryotes contains many repetitive sequences. The study of repetitive sequences is important, not only because many have important biological function, but also because they provide information on genome organization, evolution and dynamics. In this paper, I will first discuss some generic effects that repetitive sequences will have upon genome dynamics and evolution. In particular, it will be shown that repetitive sequences foster recombination among, and turnover of, the elements of a genome. I will then consider some examples of repetitive sequences, notably minisatellite sequences and telomere sequences as examples of tandem repeats, without and with respectively known function, and Alu sequences as an example of interspersed repeats. Some other examples will also be considered in less detail.

  12. Time-Varying Distortions of Binaural Information by Bilateral Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Francisco A.; Portnuff, Cory D. F.; Goupell, Matthew J.; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    In patients with bilateral hearing loss, the use of two hearing aids (HAs) offers the potential to restore the benefits of binaural hearing, including sound source localization and segregation. However, existing evidence suggests that bilateral HA users’ access to binaural information, namely interaural time and level differences (ITDs and ILDs), can be compromised by device processing. Our objective was to characterize the nature and magnitude of binaural distortions caused by modern digital behind-the-ear HAs using a variety of stimuli and HA program settings. Of particular interest was a common frequency-lowering algorithm known as nonlinear frequency compression, which has not previously been assessed for its effects on binaural information. A binaural beamforming algorithm was also assessed. Wide dynamic range compression was enabled in all programs. HAs were placed on a binaural manikin, and stimuli were presented from an arc of loudspeakers inside an anechoic chamber. Stimuli were broadband noise bursts, 10-Hz sinusoidally amplitude-modulated noise bursts, or consonant–vowel–consonant speech tokens. Binaural information was analyzed in terms of ITDs, ILDs, and interaural coherence, both for whole stimuli and in a time-varying sense (i.e., within a running temporal window) across four different frequency bands (1, 2, 4, and 6 kHz). Key findings were: (a) Nonlinear frequency compression caused distortions of high-frequency envelope ITDs and significantly reduced interaural coherence. (b) For modulated stimuli, all programs caused time-varying distortion of ILDs. (c) HAs altered the relationship between ITDs and ILDs, introducing large ITD–ILD conflicts in some cases. Potential perceptual consequences of measured distortions are discussed. PMID:27698258

  13. Storing quantum information in XXZ spin rings with periodically time-controlled interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F; Mazzarella, G

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a general scheme to realize massive quantum memories in simple systems of interacting qubits. Such systems are described by spin rings with XXZ intersite couplings of suitably time-periodically controlled amplitudes. We show that initially localized excitations undergo perfect periodic revivals, allowing for the simultaneous storage of arbitrary sets of different local states. This novel approach to the problem of storing quantum information hints at a new way to control and suppress the effect of decoherence on a quantum computer realized in a system with nonvanishing interactions between the constituent qubits

  14. Storing quantum information in XXZ spin rings with periodically time-controlled interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F; Mazzarella, G [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. R. Caianiello' , Universita di Salerno, INFM UdR di Salerno, INFN Sezione di Napoli, Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Via S. Allende, 84081 Baronissi, SA (Italy)

    2005-10-01

    We introduce a general scheme to realize massive quantum memories in simple systems of interacting qubits. Such systems are described by spin rings with XXZ intersite couplings of suitably time-periodically controlled amplitudes. We show that initially localized excitations undergo perfect periodic revivals, allowing for the simultaneous storage of arbitrary sets of different local states. This novel approach to the problem of storing quantum information hints at a new way to control and suppre