WorldWideScience

Sample records for timing array current

  1. Timed arrays wideband and time varying antenna arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Haupt, Randy L

    2015-01-01

    Introduces timed arrays and design approaches to meet the new high performance standards The author concentrates on any aspect of an antenna array that must be viewed from a time perspective. The first chapters briefly introduce antenna arrays and explain the difference between phased and timed arrays. Since timed arrays are designed for realistic time-varying signals and scenarios, the book also reviews wideband signals, baseband and passband RF signals, polarization and signal bandwidth. Other topics covered include time domain, mutual coupling, wideband elements, and dispersion. The auth

  2. Flexible eddy current coil arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krampfner, Y.; Johnson, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    A novel approach was devised to overcome certain limitations of conventional eddy current testing. The typical single-element hand-wound probe was replaced with a two dimensional array of spirally wound probe elements deposited on a thin, flexible polyimide substrate. This provides full and reliable coverage of the test area and eliminates the need for scanning. The flexible substrate construction of the array allows the probes to conform to irregular part geometries, such as turbine blades and tubing, thereby eliminating the need for specialized probes for each geometry. Additionally, the batch manufacturing process of the array can yield highly uniform and reproducible coil geometries. The array is driven by a portable computer-based eddy current instrument, smartEDDY/sup TM/, capable of two-frequency operation, and offers a great deal of versatility and flexibility due to its software-based architecture. The array is coupled to the instrument via an 80-switch multiplexer that can be configured to address up to 1600 probes. The individual array elements may be addressed in any desired sequence, as defined by the software

  3. Design and array signal suggestion of array type pulsed eddy current probe for health monitoring of metal tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Kil [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Kunsan National University, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    An array type probe for monitoring metal tubes is proposed in this paper which utilizes peak value and peak time of a pulsed eddy current(PEC) signal. The probe consists of an array of encircling coils along a tube and the outside of coils is shielded by ferrite to prevent source magnetic fields from directly affecting sensor signals since it is the magnetic fields produced by eddy currents that reflect the condition of metal tubes. The positions of both exciter and sensor coils are consecutively moved automatically so that manual scanning is not necessary. At one position of send-receive coils, peak value and peak time are extracted from a sensor PEC signal and these data are accumulated for all positions to form an array type peak value signal and an array type peak time signal. Numerical simulation was performed using the backward difference method in time and the finite element method for spatial analysis. Simulation results showed that peak value increases and the peak appears earlier as the defect depth or length increases. The proposed array signals are shown to be excellent in reflecting the defect location as well as variations of defect depth and length within the array probe.

  4. Near-surface current meter array measurements of internal gravity waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H.B.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    We have developed various processing algorithms used to estimate the wave forms produced by hydrodynamic Internal Waves. Furthermore, the estimated Internal Waves are used to calculate the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) which relates the current and strain rate subsurface fields to surface scattering phenomenon imaged by radar. Following a brief discussion of LLNL`s measurement platform (a 10 sensor current meter array) we described the generation of representative current and strain rate space-time images from measured or simulated data. Then, we present how our simulation capability highlighted limitations in estimating strain rate. These limitations spurred the application of beamforming techniques to enhance our estimates, albeit at the expense of collapsing our space-time images to 1-D estimates. Finally, we discuss progress with regard to processing the current meter array data captured during the recent Loch Linnhe field trials.

  5. Soldered Contact and Current Risetime Effects on Negative Polarity Wire Array Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalenski, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.; Greenly, J. B.; Blesener, I. C.; McBride, R. D.; Hammer, D. A.; Knapp, P. F.

    2009-01-01

    The Cornell University COBRA pulser is a nominal 1 MA machine, capable of driving up to 32 wire cylindrical Z-pinch arrays. COBRA can operate with variable current risetimes ranging from 100 ns to 200 ns (short and long pulse, respectively). Wires are typically strung with a ''press'' contact to the electrode hardware, where the wire is loosely pulled against the hardware and held there to establish electrical contact. The machine is normally negative, but a bolt-on convolute can be used to modify the current path and effectively produce positive polarity operation at the load.Previous research with single wires on a 1-5 kA pulser has shown that soldering the wire, thereby improving the wire/electrode contact, and operating in positive polarity can improve the energy deposition into the wire and enhance wire core expansion. Negative polarity showed no difference. Previous experiments on the negative polarity, 20 MA, 100 ns Z accelerator have shown that improving the contact improved the x-ray yield.Cornell data were collected on 16-wire Aluminum Z-pinch arrays in negative polarity. Experiments were conducted with both short and long current pulses with soldered and no-soldered wire/electrode contacts. The initiation, ablation, implosion and stagnation phases were compared for these four conditions. Time dependent x-ray signals were measured using diodes and diamond detectors. An inductive voltage monitor was used to infer minimum current radius achieved, as defined by a uniform shell of current moving radially inward, producing a time dependent inductance. Total energy data were collected with a metal-strip bolometer. Self-emission data were collected by an XUV 4-frame camera and an optical streak camera.In negative polarity and with short pulses, soldering appeared to produce a smaller radius pinch and decrease variations in the x-ray pulse shape. The bolometer, laser backlighter, 4-frame and streak cameras showed negligible differences in the initiation ablation

  6. rasdaman Array Database: current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merticariu, George; Toader, Alexandru

    2015-04-01

    rasdaman (Raster Data Manager) is a Free Open Source Array Database Management System which provides functionality for storing and processing massive amounts of raster data in the form of multidimensional arrays. The user can access, process and delete the data using SQL. The key features of rasdaman are: flexibility (datasets of any dimensionality can be processed with the help of SQL queries), scalability (rasdaman's distributed architecture enables it to seamlessly run on cloud infrastructures while offering an increase in performance with the increase of computation resources), performance (real-time access, processing, mixing and filtering of arrays of any dimensionality) and reliability (legacy communication protocol replaced with a new one based on cutting edge technology - Google Protocol Buffers and ZeroMQ). Among the data with which the system works, we can count 1D time series, 2D remote sensing imagery, 3D image time series, 3D geophysical data, and 4D atmospheric and climate data. Most of these representations cannot be stored only in the form of raw arrays, as the location information of the contents is also important for having a correct geoposition on Earth. This is defined by ISO 19123 as coverage data. rasdaman provides coverage data support through the Petascope service. Extensions were added on top of rasdaman in order to provide support for the Geoscience community. The following OGC standards are currently supported: Web Map Service (WMS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), and Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS). The Web Map Service is an extension which provides zoom and pan navigation over images provided by a map server. Starting with version 9.1, rasdaman supports WMS version 1.3. The Web Coverage Service provides capabilities for downloading multi-dimensional coverage data. Support is also provided for several extensions of this service: Subsetting Extension, Scaling Extension, and, starting with version 9.1, Transaction Extension, which

  7. Sensitivity of Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemens, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    For the better part of the last decade, the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) has been using the Green Bank and Arecibo radio telescopes to monitor millisecond pulsars. NANOGrav, along with similar international collaborations, the European Pulsar Timing Array and the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array in Australia, form a consortium of consortia: the International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA). The goal of the IPTA is to directly detect low-frequency gravitational waves which cause small changes to the times of arrival of radio pulses from millisecond pulsars. In this talk I will discuss the work of NANOGrav and the IPTA as well as our sensitivity to gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. I will show that a detection is possible by the end of the decade.

  8. LLNL current meter array--concept and system description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantrom, D.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    A measurement capability using a horizontal array of 10 S4 current meters mounted on a stiff floating structure with 35 m aperture has been developed to support interpretation of radar imaging of surface effects associated with internal waves. This system has been fielded three times and most recently, has collected data alongside the sea-surface footprint of a land-fixed radar imaging ship-generated internal waves. The underlying need for this measurement capability is described. The specifications resulting from this need are presented and the engineering design and deployment procedures of the platform and systems that resulted are described The current meter data are multiplexed along with meteorological and system status data on board the floating platform and are telemetered to a shore station and on to a data acquisition system. The raw data are recorded, and are then processed to form space-time images of current and strain rate (a spatial derivative of the current field). Examples of raw and processed data associated with ship-generated internal waves are presented.

  9. Ion cyclotron and lower hybrid arrays applicable to current drive in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosia, G.; Ragona, R. [Department of Physics, Università di Torino (Italy); Helou, W.; Goniche, M.; Hillaret, J. [CEA/DSM/IRFM F-13 108 St Paul Les Durance (France)

    2014-02-12

    This paper presents concepts for Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Current Drive arrays applicable to fusion reactors and based on periodically loaded line power division. It is shown that, in large arrays, such as the ones proposed for fusion reactor applications, these schemes can offer, in principle, a number of practical advantages, compared with currently adopted ones, such as in-blanket operation at significantly reduced power density, lay out suitable for water cooling, single ended or balanced power feed, simple and load independent impedance matching In addition, a remote and accurate real time measurement of the complex impedance of all array elements as well as detection, location, and measurement of the complex admittance of a single arc occurring anywhere in the structure is possible.

  10. Fast commutation of high current in double wire array Z-pinch loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.; Gondarenko, N.A.; Velikovich, A.L.

    1997-01-01

    A dynamic model of multi-MA current commutation in a double wire array Z-pinch load is proposed and studied theoretically. Initially, the load is configured as nested concentric wire arrays, with the current driven through the outer array and imploding it. Once the outer array or the annular plasma shell formed from it approaches the inner array, the imploded plasma might penetrate through the gaps between the wires, but the azimuthal magnetic field is trapped due to both the high conductivity of the inner wires and the inductive coupling between the two parts of the array, causing a rapid switching of the total current to the inner part of the array. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  11. Mixed arrays - problems with current methods and rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mennerdahl, D.

    1987-01-01

    Simplified methods are used to control the criticality safety of mixed arrays (non-identical units) in storage or in transport. The basis for these methods is that the analyses of arrays of identical units are sufficient for drawing proper conclusions on mixed arrays. In a recent study of the rules for transport, two general flaws in such methods have been identified. One flaw is caused by increased neutron return rate to the central part of the array. The other flaw is caused by increased neutron coupling between two or more fissile units in an array. In both cases, replacement of fissile units with other units, which appear to be less reactive, can lead to criticality. This paper shows that the two flaws are common in also in current methods used for storage of fissile materials. (author)

  12. A superconducting quadrupole array for transport of multiple high current beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltens, A.; Shuman, D.

    1999-01-01

    We present a conceptual design of a superconducting quadrupole magnet array for the side-by-side transport of multiple high current particle beams in induction linear accelerators. The magnetic design uses a modified cosine 20 current distribution inside a square cell boundary. Each interior magnet's neighbors serve as the return flux paths and the poles are placed as close as possible to each other to facilitate this. No iron is present in the basic 2-D magnetic design; it will work at any current level without correction windings. Special 1/8th quadrupoles are used along the transverse periphery of the array to contain and channel flux back into the array, making every channel look as part of an infinite array. This design provides a fixed dimension array boundary equal to the quadrupole radius that can be used for arrays of any number of quadrupole channels, at any field level. More importantly, the design provides magnetic field separation between the array and the induction cores which may be surrounding it. Flux linkage between these two components can seriously affect the operation of both of them

  13. Statistical interpretation of transient current power-law decay in colloidal quantum dot arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibatov, R T, E-mail: ren_sib@bk.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, 432000, 42 Leo Tolstoy Street, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-01

    A new statistical model of the charge transport in colloidal quantum dot arrays is proposed. It takes into account Coulomb blockade forbidding multiple occupancy of nanocrystals and the influence of energetic disorder of interdot space. The model explains power-law current transients and the presence of the memory effect. The fractional differential analogue of the Ohm law is found phenomenologically for nanocrystal arrays. The model combines ideas that were considered as conflicting by other authors: the Scher-Montroll idea about the power-law distribution of waiting times in localized states for disordered semiconductors is applied taking into account Coulomb blockade; Novikov's condition about the asymptotic power-law distribution of time intervals between successful current pulses in conduction channels is fulfilled; and the carrier injection blocking predicted by Ginger and Greenham (2000 J. Appl. Phys. 87 1361) takes place.

  14. Statistical interpretation of transient current power-law decay in colloidal quantum dot arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibatov, R T

    2011-01-01

    A new statistical model of the charge transport in colloidal quantum dot arrays is proposed. It takes into account Coulomb blockade forbidding multiple occupancy of nanocrystals and the influence of energetic disorder of interdot space. The model explains power-law current transients and the presence of the memory effect. The fractional differential analogue of the Ohm law is found phenomenologically for nanocrystal arrays. The model combines ideas that were considered as conflicting by other authors: the Scher-Montroll idea about the power-law distribution of waiting times in localized states for disordered semiconductors is applied taking into account Coulomb blockade; Novikov's condition about the asymptotic power-law distribution of time intervals between successful current pulses in conduction channels is fulfilled; and the carrier injection blocking predicted by Ginger and Greenham (2000 J. Appl. Phys. 87 1361) takes place.

  15. Tunneling Current Probe for Noncontract Wafer-Level Photodiode Array Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Verdun, Horacio

    1999-01-01

    The Tunneling Current Probe (TCP) is an automated picometer-sensitive proximity sensor and current measurement system which measures the current through a photodiode detector array element by establishing a tunneling current...

  16. The TAIGA timing array HiSCORE - first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tluczykont M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of gamma rays up to several 100 TeV are particularly important to spectrally resolve the cutoff regime of the long-sought Pevatrons, the cosmic-ray PeV accelerators. One component of the TAIGA hybrid detector is the TAIGA-HiSCORE timing array, which currently consists of 28 wide angle (0.6 sr air Cherenkov timing stations distributed on an area of 0.25 km2. The HiSCORE concept is based on (non-imaging air shower front sampling with Cherenkov light. First results are presented.

  17. A Multichannel Calorimetric Simultaneous Assay Platform Using a Microampere Constant-Current Looped Enthalpy Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien-Chin Wei

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Calorimetric biochemical measurements offer various advantages such as low waste, low cost, low sample consumption, short operating time, and labor-savings. Multichannel calorimeters can enhance the possibility of performing higher-throughput biochemical measurements. An enthalpy sensor (ES array is a key device in multichannel calorimeters. Most ES arrays use Wheatstone bridge amplifiers to condition the sensor signals, but such an approach is only suitable for null detection and low resistance sensors. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a multichannel calorimetric simultaneous assay (MCSA platform. An adjustable microampere constant-current (AMCC source was designed for exciting the ES array using a microampere current loop measurement circuit topology. The MCSA platform comprises a measurement unit, which contains a multichannel calorimeter and an automatic simultaneous injector, and a signal processing unit, which contains multiple ES signal conditioners and a data processor. This study focused on the construction of the MCSA platform; in particular, construction of the measurement circuit and calorimeter array in a single block. The performance of the platform, including current stability, temperature sensitivity and heat sensitivity, was evaluated. The sensor response time and calorimeter constants were given. The capability of the platform to detect relative enzyme activity was also demonstrated. The experimental results show that the proposed MCSA is a flexible and powerful biochemical measurement device with higher throughput than existing alternatives.

  18. Low dark current InGaAs detector arrays for night vision and astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougal, Michael; Geske, Jon; Wang, Chad; Liao, Shirong; Getty, Jonathan; Holmes, Alan

    2009-05-01

    Aerius Photonics has developed large InGaAs arrays (1K x 1K and greater) with low dark currents for use in night vision applications in the SWIR regime. Aerius will present results of experiments to reduce the dark current density of their InGaAs detector arrays. By varying device designs and passivations, Aerius has achieved a dark current density below 1.0 nA/cm2 at 280K on small-pixel, detector arrays. Data is shown for both test structures and focal plane arrays. In addition, data from cryogenically cooled InGaAs arrays will be shown for astronomy applications.

  19. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Real Time Stereoscopic Array Trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrum, K.; Anderson, J.; Buckley, J.; Cundiff, T.; Dawson, J.; Drake, G.; Duke, C.; Haberichter, B.; Krawzcynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Madhavan, A.; Schroedter, M.; Smith, A.

    2009-05-01

    Future large arrays of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) such as AGIS and CTA are conceived to comprise of 50 - 100 individual telescopes each having a camera with 10**3 to 10**4 pixels. To maximize the capabilities of such IACT arrays with a low energy threshold, a wide field of view and a low background rate, a sophisticated array trigger is required. We describe the design of a stereoscopic array trigger that calculates image parameters and then correlates them across a subset of telescopes. Fast Field Programmable Gate Array technology allows to use lookup tables at the array trigger level to form a real-time pattern recognition trigger tht capitalizes on the multiple view points of the shower at different shower core distances. A proof of principle system is currently under construction. It is based on 400 MHz FPGAs and the goal is for camera trigger rates of up to 10 MHz and a tunable cosmic-ray background suppression at the array level.

  20. Studies of Polar Current Systems Using the IMS Scandinavian Magnetometer Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untiedt, J.; Baumjohann, W.

    1993-09-01

    As a contribution to the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS, 1976 1979) a two-dimensional array of 42 temporary magnetometer stations was run in Scandinavia, supplementary to the permanent observatories and concentrated in the northern part of the region. This effort aimed at the time-dependent (periods above about 100 s) determination of the two-dimensional structure of substorm-related magnetic fields at the Earth's surface with highest reasonable spatial resolution (about 100 km, corresponding to the height of the ionosphere) near the footpoints of field-aligned electric currents that couple the disturbed magnetosphere to the ionosphere at auroral latitudes. It has been of particular advantage for cooperative studies that not only simultaneous data were available from all-sky cameras, riometers, balloons, rockets, and satellites, but also from the STARE radar facility yielding colocated two-dimensional ionospheric electric field distributions. In many cases it therefore was possible to infer the three-dimensional regional structure of substorm-related ionospheric current systems. The first part of this review outlines the basic relationships and methods that have been used or have been developed for such studies. The second short part presents typical equivalent current patterns observed by the magnetometer array in the course of substorms. Finally we review main results of studies that have been based on the magnetometer array observations and on additional data, omitting studies on geomagnetic pulsations. These studies contributed to a clarification of the nature of auroral electrojets including the Harang discontinuity and of ionospheric current systems related to auroral features such as the break-up at midnight, the westward traveling surge, eastward drifting omega bands, and spirals.

  1. Energy transfer, orbital angular momentum, and discrete current in a double-ring fiber array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexeyev, C. N.; Volyar, A. V.; Yavorsky, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    We study energy transfer and orbital angular momentum of supermodes in a double-ring array of evanescently coupled monomode optical fibers. The structure of supermodes and the spectra of their propagation constants are obtained. The geometrical parameters of the array, at which the energy is mostly confined within the layers, are determined. The developed method for finding the supermodes of concentric arrays is generalized for the case of multiring arrays. The orbital angular momentum carried by a supermode of a double-ring array is calculated. The discrete lattice current is introduced. It is shown that the sum of discrete currents over the array is a conserved quantity. The connection of the total discrete current with orbital angular momentum of discrete optical vortices is made.

  2. Energy transfer, orbital angular momentum, and discrete current in a double-ring fiber array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeyev, C. N.; Volyar, A. V. [Taurida National V.I. Vernadsky University, Vernadsky Prospekt, 4, Simferopol, 95007, Crimea (Ukraine); Yavorsky, M. A. [Taurida National V.I. Vernadsky University, Vernadsky Prospekt, 4, Simferopol, 95007, Crimea (Ukraine); Universite Bordeaux and CNRS, LOMA, UMR 5798, FR-33400 Talence (France)

    2011-12-15

    We study energy transfer and orbital angular momentum of supermodes in a double-ring array of evanescently coupled monomode optical fibers. The structure of supermodes and the spectra of their propagation constants are obtained. The geometrical parameters of the array, at which the energy is mostly confined within the layers, are determined. The developed method for finding the supermodes of concentric arrays is generalized for the case of multiring arrays. The orbital angular momentum carried by a supermode of a double-ring array is calculated. The discrete lattice current is introduced. It is shown that the sum of discrete currents over the array is a conserved quantity. The connection of the total discrete current with orbital angular momentum of discrete optical vortices is made.

  3. Three-dimensional real-time synthetic aperture imaging using a rotating phased array transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Dufait, Remi; Schoisswohl, Armin

    2002-01-01

    phased array, which is rotated over the volume of interest. The data is acquired using coded signals and synthetic transmit aperture imaging. Only one group of elements transmits at a time. The delays are set such as to form a cylindrical wave. The back-scattered signal carries information not only from......Current 3D real-time imaging is done either with sparse 2D arrays, or with mechanically moved phased arrays. The former results in a poor resolution and contrast due to a limited amount of elements. The latter has the disadvantage of low frame rates due to the sequential acquisition of the volume...... line-by-line and plane-by-plane. This paper describes an approach which combines mechanically moved phased array with synthetic transmit aperture imaging, resulting in high volume acquisition rates without a trade-off in image quality. The scan method uses a conventional fully populated 64 element...

  4. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Gerald J.; Way, Austin J.; Safron, Nathaniel S.; Evensen, Harold T.; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G0 = 4e2/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm−1, fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm−1, which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm−1 and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies. PMID:27617293

  5. Real time processor for array speckle interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, G.; Florez, J.; Borelli, R.; Fong, W.; Miko, J.; Trujillo, C.

    1989-01-01

    With the construction of several new large aperture telescopes and the development of large format array detectors in the near IR, the ability to obtain diffraction limited seeing via IR array speckle interferometry offers a powerful tool. We are constructing a real-time processor to acquire image frames, perform array flat-fielding, execute a 64 x 64 element 2D complex FFT, and to average the power spectrum all within the 25 msec coherence time for speckles at near IR wavelength. The processor is a compact unit controlled by a PC with real time display and data storage capability. It provides the ability to optimize observations and obtain results on the telescope rather than waiting several weeks before the data can be analyzed and viewed with off-line methods

  6. Eddy Current Signal Analysis for Transmit-Receive Pancake Coil on ECT Array Probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyang Beom

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the eddy current signals come from a pair of transmit-receive (T/R) pancake coil on ECT array Probe are analyzed with the variations of the lift-of and of the distance between transmit and receive coils. To obtain the electromagnetic characteristics of the probes, the governing equation describing the eddy current problems is derived from Maxwell's equation and is solved using three-dimensional finite element method. Eddy current signals from T/R coils on ECT array probe have quite different characteristics compared with ones from impedance coil on rotating pancake coil probe. The results in this paper ran be helpful when the field eddy current signals from ECT array probe are evaluated

  7. Demonstration of array eddy current technology for real-time monitoring of laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Evgueni; Boulware, Paul; Gaah, Kingsley

    2018-03-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) at various fabrication stages is required to assure quality of feedstock and solid builds. Industry efforts are shifting towards solutions that can provide real-time monitoring of additive manufacturing (AM) fabrication process layer-by-layer while the component is being built to reduce or eliminate dependence on post-process inspection. Array eddy current (AEC), electromagnetic NDE technique was developed and implemented to directly scan the component without physical contact with the powder and fused layer surfaces at elevated temperatures inside a LPBF chamber. The technique can detect discontinuities, surface irregularities, and undesirable metallurgical phase transformations in magnetic and nonmagnetic conductive materials used for laser fusion. The AEC hardware and software were integrated with the L-PBF test bed. Two layer-by-layer tests of Inconel 625 coupons with AM built discontinuities and lack of fusion were conducted inside the L-PBF chamber. The AEC technology demonstrated excellent sensitivity to seeded, natural surface, and near-surface-embedded discontinuities, while also detecting surface topography. The data was acquired and imaged in a layer-by-layer sequence demonstrating the real-time monitoring capabilities of this new technology.

  8. Volumetric real-time imaging using a CMUT ring array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Jung Woo; Oralkan, Ömer; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Gencel, Mustafa; Stephens, Douglas N; O'Donnell, Matthew; Sahn, David J; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2012-06-01

    A ring array provides a very suitable geometry for forward-looking volumetric intracardiac and intravascular ultrasound imaging. We fabricated an annular 64-element capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array featuring a 10-MHz operating frequency and a 1.27-mm outer radius. A custom software suite was developed to run on a PC-based imaging system for real-time imaging using this device. This paper presents simulated and experimental imaging results for the described CMUT ring array. Three different imaging methods--flash, classic phased array (CPA), and synthetic phased array (SPA)--were used in the study. For SPA imaging, two techniques to improve the image quality--Hadamard coding and aperture weighting--were also applied. The results show that SPA with Hadamard coding and aperture weighting is a good option for ring-array imaging. Compared with CPA, it achieves better image resolution and comparable signal-to-noise ratio at a much faster image acquisition rate. Using this method, a fast frame rate of up to 463 volumes per second is achievable if limited only by the ultrasound time of flight; with the described system we reconstructed three cross-sectional images in real-time at 10 frames per second, which was limited by the computation time in synthetic beamforming.

  9. Surface inspection technique with an eddy current testing array probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimizu, Akira; Endo, Hisashi; Tooma, Masahiro; Otani, Kenichi; Ouchi, Hirofumi; Yoshida, Isao; Nonaka, Yoshio

    2010-01-01

    An eddy current testing (ECT) system has been developed for inspecting weld surfaces of components in the reactor pressure vessel of nuclear plants. The system can be applied to curved surfaces with an ECT array probe, it can discriminate flaws from other signal factors by using a combination of arrayed coils signal-phase. The system is applied to a mock-up of core internal components and the signal discrimination using the signal-phase clearly separated flaw and noise signals. (author)

  10. Two-dimensional random arrays for real time volumetric imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Richard E.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Smith, Stephen W.

    1994-01-01

    real time volumetric imaging system, which employs a wide transmit beam and receive mode parallel processing to increase image frame rate. Depth-of-field comparisons were made from simulated on-axis and off-axis beamplots at ranges from 30 to 160 mm for both coaxial and offset transmit and receive......Two-dimensional arrays are necessary for a variety of ultrasonic imaging techniques, including elevation focusing, 2-D phase aberration correction, and real time volumetric imaging. In order to reduce system cost and complexity, sparse 2-D arrays have been considered with element geometries...... selected ad hoc, by algorithm, or by random process. Two random sparse array geometries and a sparse array with a Mills cross receive pattern were simulated and compared to a fully sampled aperture with the same overall dimensions. The sparse arrays were designed to the constraints of the Duke University...

  11. High-performance integrated pick-up circuit for SPAD arrays in time-correlated single photon counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acconcia, Giulia; Cominelli, Alessandro; Peronio, Pietro; Rech, Ivan; Ghioni, Massimo

    2017-05-01

    The analysis of optical signals by means of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) has been subject to a widespread interest in recent years. The development of multichannel high-performance Time Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) acquisition systems has undergone a fast trend. Concerning the detector performance, best in class results have been obtained resorting to custom technologies leading also to a strong dependence of the detector timing jitter from the threshold used to determine the onset of the photogenerated current flow. In this scenario, the avalanche current pick-up circuit plays a key role in determining the timing performance of the TCSPC acquisition system, especially with a large array of SPAD detectors because of electrical crosstalk issues. We developed a new current pick-up circuit based on a transimpedance amplifier structure able to extract the timing information from a 50-μm-diameter custom technology SPAD with a state-of-art timing jitter as low as 32ps and suitable to be exploited with SPAD arrays. In this paper we discuss the key features of this structure and we present a new version of the pick-up circuit that also provides quenching capabilities in order to minimize the number of interconnections required, an aspect that becomes more and more crucial in densely integrated systems.

  12. Experimental investigation of the ribbon-array ablation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhenghong; Xu Rongkun; Chu Yanyun; Yang Jianlun; Xu Zeping; Ye Fan; Chen Faxin; Xue Feibiao; Ning Jiamin; Qin Yi; Meng Shijian; Hu Qingyuan; Si Fenni; Feng Jinghua; Zhang Faqiang; Chen Jinchuan; Li Linbo; Chen Dingyang; Ding Ning; Zhou Xiuwen

    2013-01-01

    Ablation processes of ribbon-array loads, as well as wire-array loads for comparison, were investigated on Qiangguang-1 accelerator. The ultraviolet framing images indicate that the ribbon-array loads have stable passages of currents, which produce axially uniform ablated plasma. The end-on x-ray framing camera observed the azimuthally modulated distribution of the early ablated ribbon-array plasma and the shrink process of the x-ray radiation region. Magnetic probes measured the total and precursor currents of ribbon-array and wire-array loads, and there exists no evident difference between the precursor currents of the two types of loads. The proportion of the precursor current to the total current is 15% to 20%, and the start time of the precursor current is about 25 ns later than that of the total current. The melting time of the load material is about 16 ns, when the inward drift velocity of the ablated plasma is taken to be 1.5 × 10 7 cm/s.

  13. Phased-array antenna system for electron Bernstein wave heating and current drive experiments in QUEST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idei, H.; Sakaguchi, M.; Kalinnikova, E.I.

    2010-11-01

    The phased-array antenna system for Electron Bernstein Wave Heating and Current Drive (EBWH/CD) experiments has been developed in the QUEST. The antenna was designed to excite a pure O-mode wave in the oblique injection for the EBWH/CD experiments, and was tested at a low power level. The measured two orthogonal fields were in excellent agreements with the fields evaluated by a developed Kirchhoff code. The heat load and thermal stress in CW 200 kW operation were analyzed with finite element codes. The phased array has been fast scanned [∼10 4 degree/s] to control the incident polarization and angle to follow time evolutions of the plasma current and density. The RF startup and sustainment experiments were conducted using the developed antenna system. The plasma current (< ∼15 kA) with an aspect ratio of 1.5 was started up and sustained by only RF injection. The long pulse discharge of 10 kA was attained for 40 s with the 30 kW injection. (author)

  14. Optimization of focality and direction in dense electrode array transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Seyhmus; Dannhauer, Moritz; Erem, Burak; Macleod, Rob; Tucker, Don; Turovets, Sergei; Luu, Phan; Erdogmus, Deniz; Brooks, Dana H.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) aims to alter brain function non-invasively via electrodes placed on the scalp. Conventional tDCS uses two relatively large patch electrodes to deliver electrical current to the brain region of interest (ROI). Recent studies have shown that using dense arrays containing up to 512 smaller electrodes may increase the precision of targeting ROIs. However, this creates a need for methods to determine effective and safe stimulus patterns as the number of degrees of freedom is much higher with such arrays. Several approaches to this problem have appeared in the literature. In this paper, we describe a new method for calculating optimal electrode stimulus patterns for targeted and directional modulation in dense array tDCS which differs in some important aspects with methods reported to date. Approach. We optimize stimulus pattern of dense arrays with fixed electrode placement to maximize the current density in a particular direction in the ROI. We impose a flexible set of safety constraints on the current power in the brain, individual electrode currents, and total injected current, to protect subject safety. The proposed optimization problem is convex and thus efficiently solved using existing optimization software to find unique and globally optimal electrode stimulus patterns. Main results. Solutions for four anatomical ROIs based on a realistic head model are shown as exemplary results. To illustrate the differences between our approach and previously introduced methods, we compare our method with two of the other leading methods in the literature. We also report on extensive simulations that show the effect of the values chosen for each proposed safety constraint bound on the optimized stimulus patterns. Significance. The proposed optimization approach employs volume based ROIs, easily adapts to different sets of safety constraints, and takes negligible time to compute. An in-depth comparison study gives

  15. Conformable eddy current array delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summan, Rahul; Pierce, Gareth; Macleod, Charles; Mineo, Carmelo; Riise, Jonathan; Morozov, Maxim; Dobie, Gordon; Bolton, Gary; Raude, Angélique; Dalpé, Colombe; Braumann, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    The external surface of stainless steel containers used for the interim storage of nuclear material may be subject to Atmospherically Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking (AISCC). The inspection of such containers poses a significant challenge due to the large quantities involved; therefore, automating the inspection process is of considerable interest. This paper reports upon a proof-of-concept project concerning the automated NDT of a set of test containers containing artificially generated AISCCs. An Eddy current array probe with a conformable padded surface from Eddyfi was used as the NDT sensor and end effector on a KUKA KR5 arc HW robot. A kinematically valid cylindrical raster scan path was designed using the KUKA|PRC path planning software. Custom software was then written to interface measurement acquisition from the Eddyfi hardware with the motion control of the robot. Preliminary results and analysis are presented from scanning two canisters.

  16. Developing infrared array controller with software real time operating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, Shigeyuki; Miyata, Takashi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Motohara, Kentaro; Uchimoto, Yuka Katsuno; Onaka, Takashi; Kataza, Hirokazu

    2008-07-01

    Real-time capabilities are required for a controller of a large format array to reduce a dead-time attributed by readout and data transfer. The real-time processing has been achieved by dedicated processors including DSP, CPLD, and FPGA devices. However, the dedicated processors have problems with memory resources, inflexibility, and high cost. Meanwhile, a recent PC has sufficient resources of CPUs and memories to control the infrared array and to process a large amount of frame data in real-time. In this study, we have developed an infrared array controller with a software real-time operating system (RTOS) instead of the dedicated processors. A Linux PC equipped with a RTAI extension and a dual-core CPU is used as a main computer, and one of the CPU cores is allocated to the real-time processing. A digital I/O board with DMA functions is used for an I/O interface. The signal-processing cores are integrated in the OS kernel as a real-time driver module, which is composed of two virtual devices of the clock processor and the frame processor tasks. The array controller with the RTOS realizes complicated operations easily, flexibly, and at a low cost.

  17. A High-Sensitivity Flexible Eddy Current Array Sensor for Crack Monitoring of Welded Structures under Varying Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; He, Yuting; Du, Jinqiang

    2018-06-01

    This paper develops a high-sensitivity flexible eddy current array (HS-FECA) sensor for crack monitoring of welded structures under varying environment. Firstly, effects of stress, temperature and crack on output signals of the traditional flexible eddy current array (FECA) sensor were investigated by experiments that show both stress and temperature have great influences on the crack monitoring performance of the sensor. A 3-D finite element model was established using Comsol AC/DC module to analyze the perturbation effects of crack on eddy currents and output signals of the sensor, which showed perturbation effect of cracks on eddy currents is reduced by the current loop when crack propagates. Then, the HS-FECA sensor was proposed to boost the sensitivity to cracks. Simulation results show that perturbation effect of cracks on eddy currents excited by the HS-FECA sensor gradually grows stronger when the crack propagates, resulting in much higher sensitivity to cracks. Experimental result further shows that the sensitivity of the new sensor is at least 19 times that of the original one. In addition, both stress and temperature variations have little effect on signals of the new sensor.

  18. Arrays of Synthetic Atoms: Nanocapacitor Batteries with Large Energy Density and Small Leak Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-28

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2017-0169 TR-2017-0169 ARRAYS OF SYNTHETIC ATOMS: NANOCAPACITOR BATTERIES WITH LARGE ENERGY DENSITY AND SMALL LEAK...1-0247 Arrays of Synthetic Atoms: Nanocapacitor Batteries with Large Energy Density and Small Leak Currents 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...large dielectric strength to a nanoscale rechargeable battery . We fabricated arrays of one-, two- and three-dimensional synthetic atoms and comparison

  19. Real-Time Hand-Held Magnetometer Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    measurements, we swung a target, pendulum-style, from the ceiling above the array. We could easily observe that the height of the target was varying... crystal oscillator clock signal. The Microblaze processor boots up with the program already present in its RAM at startup. MR-2104 Real-Time

  20. Fatigue Crack Length Sizing Using a Novel Flexible Eddy Current Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruifang Xie

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The eddy current probe, which is flexible, array typed, highly sensitive and capable of quantitative inspection is one practical requirement in nondestructive testing and also a research hotspot. A novel flexible planar eddy current sensor array for the inspection of microcrack presentation in critical parts of airplanes is developed in this paper. Both exciting and sensing coils are etched on polyimide films using a flexible printed circuit board technique, thus conforming the sensor to complex geometric structures. In order to serve the needs of condition-based maintenance (CBM, the proposed sensor array is comprised of 64 elements. Its spatial resolution is only 0.8 mm, and it is not only sensitive to shallow microcracks, but also capable of sizing the length of fatigue cracks. The details and advantages of our sensor design are introduced. The working principal and the crack responses are analyzed by finite element simulation, with which a crack length sizing algorithm is proposed. Experiments based on standard specimens are implemented to verify the validity of our simulation and the efficiency of the crack length sizing algorithm. Experimental results show that the sensor array is sensitive to microcracks, and is capable of crack length sizing with an accuracy within ±0.2 mm.

  1. A LaBr{sub 3}: Ce fast-timing array for DESPEC at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Oliver J., E-mail: O.J.Roberts@brighton.ac.uk [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Brighton, Brighton BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom); Bruce, Alison M. [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Brighton, Brighton BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom); Regan, Patrick H. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); National Physics Laboratory, Teddington, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Podolyák, Zsolt; Townsley, Christopher M. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Smith, John F.; Mulholland, Kieran F. [School of Engineering, The University of the West of Scotland, Paisley PA1 2BE (United Kingdom); Smith, Andrew [The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    The design of a fast-timing γ-ray detection array aimed at measuring sub-nanosecond half-lives using LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillation crystals is presented. This array will complement novel and existing charged particle and neutron detector arrays at the low-energy branch of a fragment separator (Super-FRS) to be built within the NuSTAR collaboration as part of the future Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR). The array will be used in conjunction with the Advanced Implantation Detector Array (AIDA), to measure implant-decay correlations. Monte-Carlo simulations have been performed to determine the design of the proposed fast-timing array around a localised implantation point. In particular, simulations were used to determine the full-energy peak efficiencies for single cylindrical, conical and ‘hybrid’ detector geometries, as well as complete array configurations of ‘hybrid’ and ∅1.5 in.×2 in. cylindrical crystals. Timing precision calculations were then used to determine the timing response for each configuration based on its simulated efficiency. An informed decision based on the simulated efficiencies and timing precision calculations allowed the optimum configuration for the array to be determined.

  2. Detecting stochastic backgrounds of gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemens, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    For the past decade the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) has been using the Green Bank Telescope and the Arecibo Observatory to monitor millisecond pulsars. NANOGrav, along with two other international collaborations, the European Pulsar Timing Array and the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array in Australia, form a consortium of consortia: the International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA). The goal of the IPTA is to directly detect low-frequency gravitational waves which cause small changes to the times of arrival of radio pulses from millisecond pulsars. In this talk I will discuss the work of NANOGrav and the IPTA, as well as our sensitivity to stochastic backgrounds of gravitational waves. I will show that a detection of the background produced by supermassive black hole binaries is possible by the end of the decade. Supported by the NANOGrav Physics Frontiers Center.

  3. Nanoelectrode array for electrochemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yelton, William G [Sandia Park, NM; Siegal, Michael P [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-12-01

    A nanoelectrode array comprises a plurality of nanoelectrodes wherein the geometric dimensions of the electrode controls the electrochemical response, and the current density is independent of time. By combining a massive array of nanoelectrodes in parallel, the current signal can be amplified while still retaining the beneficial geometric advantages of nanoelectrodes. Such nanoelectrode arrays can be used in a sensor system for rapid, non-contaminating field analysis. For example, an array of suitably functionalized nanoelectrodes can be incorporated into a small, integrated sensor system that can identify many species rapidly and simultaneously under field conditions in high-resistivity water, without the need for chemical addition to increase conductivity.

  4. Pulsar timing arrays and gravity tests in the radiative regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. J.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we focus on testing gravity theories in the radiative regime using pulsar timing array observations. After reviewing current techniques to measure the dispersion and alternative polarization of gravitational waves, we extend the framework to the most general situations, where the combinations of a massive graviton and alternative polarization modes are considered. The atlas of the Hellings-Downs functions is completed by the new calculations for these dispersive alternative polarization modes. We find that each mode and corresponding graviton mass introduce characteristic features in the Hellings-Downs function. Thus, in principal, we can not only detect each polarization mode, measure the corresponding graviton mass, but also discriminate the different scenarios. In this way, we can test gravity theories in the radiative regime in a generalized fashion, and such method is a direct experiment, where one can address the gauge symmetry of the gravity theories in their linearized limits. Although current pulsar timing still lacks enough stable pulsars and sensitivity for such practices, we expect that future telescopes with larger collecting areas could make such experiments feasible.

  5. Real Time Photovoltaic Array Simulator for Testing Grid-Connected PV Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sera, Dezso; Valentini, Massimo; Raducu, Alin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a real time flexible PV array simulator is presented. It is a system that can simulate different PV panel arrays in specific environmental conditions. To evaluate performance of the Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) of grid-connected Photovoltaic (PV) inverters only measurements...... undertaken with an appropriate PV array simulator provide accurate and reproducible results. Thus the PV array simulator has been developed and implemented. MPPT efficiency tests on a commercial grid-connected PV inverter have been performed to validate the PV array simulator....

  6. Real-time object tracking system based on field-programmable gate array and convolution neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congyi Lyu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Vision-based object tracking has lots of applications in robotics, like surveillance, navigation, motion capturing, and so on. However, the existing object tracking systems still suffer from the challenging problem of high computation consumption in the image processing algorithms. The problem can prevent current systems from being used in many robotic applications which have limitations of payload and power, for example, micro air vehicles. In these applications, the central processing unit- or graphics processing unit-based computers are not good choices due to the high weight and power consumption. To address the problem, this article proposed a real-time object tracking system based on field-programmable gate array, convolution neural network, and visual servo technology. The time-consuming image processing algorithms, such as distortion correction, color space convertor, and Sobel edge, Harris corner features detector, and convolution neural network were redesigned using the programmable gates in field-programmable gate array. Based on the field-programmable gate array-based image processing, an image-based visual servo controller was designed to drive a two degree of freedom manipulator to track the target in real time. Finally, experiments on the proposed system were performed to illustrate the effectiveness of the real-time object tracking system.

  7. Volumetric Real-Time Imaging Using a CMUT Ring Array

    OpenAIRE

    Choe, Jung Woo; Oralkan, Ömer; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Gencel, Mustafa; Stephens, Douglas N.; O’Donnell, Matthew; Sahn, David J.; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2012-01-01

    A ring array provides a very suitable geometry for forward-looking volumetric intracardiac and intravascular ultrasound imaging. We fabricated an annular 64-element capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array featuring a 10-MHz operating frequency and a 1.27-mm outer radius. A custom software suite was developed to run on a PC-based imaging system for real-time imaging using this device.

  8. Cluster Computing For Real Time Seismic Array Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, M.; Giudicepietro, F.

    A seismic array is an instrument composed by a dense distribution of seismic sen- sors that allow to measure the directional properties of the wavefield (slowness or wavenumber vector) radiated by a seismic source. Over the last years arrays have been widely used in different fields of seismological researches. In particular they are applied in the investigation of seismic sources on volcanoes where they can be suc- cessfully used for studying the volcanic microtremor and long period events which are critical for getting information on the volcanic systems evolution. For this reason arrays could be usefully employed for the volcanoes monitoring, however the huge amount of data produced by this type of instruments and the processing techniques which are quite time consuming limited their potentiality for this application. In order to favor a direct application of arrays techniques to continuous volcano monitoring we designed and built a small PC cluster able to near real time computing the kinematics properties of the wavefield (slowness or wavenumber vector) produced by local seis- mic source. The cluster is composed of 8 Intel Pentium-III bi-processors PC working at 550 MHz, and has 4 Gigabytes of RAM memory. It runs under Linux operating system. The developed analysis software package is based on the Multiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm and is written in Fortran. The message-passing part is based upon the LAM programming environment package, an open-source imple- mentation of the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The developed software system includes modules devote to receiving date by internet and graphical applications for the continuous displaying of the processing results. The system has been tested with a data set collected during a seismic experiment conducted on Etna in 1999 when two dense seismic arrays have been deployed on the northeast and the southeast flanks of this volcano. A real time continuous acquisition system has been simulated by

  9. A Time Modulated Printed Dipole Antenna Array for Beam Steering Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Gahley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents time modulated beam steered antenna array without phase shifters. The beam steering is analyzed considering a two-element time modulated antenna array (TMAA of printed dipoles with microstrip via-hole balun. The proposed array resonates at the Industrial, Scientific, and Medical (ISM radio bands, 2.45 GHz and 5.8 GHz, and offers wide bandwidth inherited due to modified structure of ground plane. Array elements are excited by complex exponential excitation signal through broadband power divider and radio frequency (RF switches to achieve amplitude and phase variation without phase shifters. Differential Evolution algorithm is used to modify the time sequences of the RF switches connected to the antennas to generate radiation pattern with optimum dynamic efficiency by suppressing sideband radiations. Also switch-on time instant of RF switch connected to the subsequent element is modulated to steer the beam towards different directions. The proposed prototype is fabricated followed by parametric optimization. The fabrication results agree significantly well with simulated results.

  10. Primary gamma ray selection in a hybrid timing/imaging Cherenkov array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postnikov E.B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is a methodical study on hybrid reconstruction techniques for hybrid imaging/timing Cherenkov observations. This type of hybrid array is to be realized at the gamma-observatory TAIGA intended for very high energy gamma-ray astronomy (> 30 TeV. It aims at combining the cost-effective timing-array technique with imaging telescopes. Hybrid operation of both of these techniques can lead to a relatively cheap way of development of a large area array. The joint approach of gamma event selection was investigated on both types of simulated data: the image parameters from the telescopes, and the shower parameters reconstructed from the timing array. The optimal set of imaging parameters and shower parameters to be combined is revealed. The cosmic ray background suppression factor depending on distance and energy is calculated. The optimal selection technique leads to cosmic ray background suppression of about 2 orders of magnitude on distances up to 450 m for energies greater than 50 TeV.

  11. Anisotropy of energy losses in high-current Z-pinches produced by the implosion of cylindrical tungsten wire arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, V. V.; Volkov, G. S.; Grabovski, E. V.; Gritsuk, A. N.; Lakhtyushko, N. I.; Medovshchikov, S. F.; Oleinik, G. M.; Svetlov, E. V.

    2014-02-01

    Results are presented from measurements of the anisotropy of energy losses in high-current Z-pinches produced by the implosion of wire arrays at the ANGARA-5-1 facility at load currents of up to 4MA. The energy losses were measured in the radial direction and along the pinch axis from the anode side. The main diagnostics were time-integrated thermocouple calorimeters, nanosecond X-ray diodes (XRDs) with different filters, and a foil radiation calorimeter with a time resolution of 2 μs. The azimuthal anisotropy of energy losses was measured for different wire array configurations and different shapes of the high-voltage electrode. The presence of strong initial azimuthal inhomogeneity of the wire mass distribution (sectioned arrays), as well as the use of conical electrodes instead of plane ones, does not increase the azimuthal inhomogeneity of the total energy losses. For cylindrical wire arrays, energy losses in the radial direction are compared with those along the pinch axis. According to XRD and calorimetric measurements, the radiation yield per unit solid angle along the pinch axis is two to three times lower than that in the radial direction. In the axial direction, the energy flux density of the expanding plasma is two to three times lower than the radiation intensity. The measured radiation yield across the pinch is 2.5-5 kJ/sr, while that along the pinch axis is 1-2 kJ/sr. The results obtained by means of XRDs agree to within measurement errors with those obtained using the radiation calorimeter. It is found that the energy per unit solid angle carried by the expanding plasma in the radial direction does not exceed 10% of the soft X-ray yield. Analysis of the structure of time-integrated pinhole images and signals from the radial and axial XRDs shows that radiation emitted in the radial direction from the hot central region of the pinch is partially screened by the less dense surrounding plasma halo, whereas radiation emitted in the axial direction is a

  12. Directional spectrum of ocean waves from array measurements using phase/time/path difference methods

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Menon, H.B.

    Wave direction has for the first time been consistently, accurately and unambiguously evaluated from array measurements using the phase/time/path difference (PTPD) methods of Esteva in case of polygonal arrays and Borgman in case of linear arrays...

  13. Maximum-likelihood methods for array processing based on time-frequency distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yimin; Mu, Weifeng; Amin, Moeness G.

    1999-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel time-frequency maximum likelihood (t-f ML) method for direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation for non- stationary signals, and compares this method with conventional maximum likelihood DOA estimation techniques. Time-frequency distributions localize the signal power in the time-frequency domain, and as such enhance the effective SNR, leading to improved DOA estimation. The localization of signals with different t-f signatures permits the division of the time-frequency domain into smaller regions, each contains fewer signals than those incident on the array. The reduction of the number of signals within different time-frequency regions not only reduces the required number of sensors, but also decreases the computational load in multi- dimensional optimizations. Compared to the recently proposed time- frequency MUSIC (t-f MUSIC), the proposed t-f ML method can be applied in coherent environments, without the need to perform any type of preprocessing that is subject to both array geometry and array aperture.

  14. Two-Dimensional Time-Domain Antenna Arrays for Optimum Steerable Energy Pattern with Low Side Lobes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Reyna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This document presents the synthesis of different two-dimensional time-domain antenna arrays for steerable energy patterns with side lobe levels. The research is focused on the uniform and nonuniform distributions of true-time exciting delays and positions of antenna elements. The uniform square array, random array, uniform concentric ring array, and rotated nonuniform concentric ring array geometries are particularly studied. These geometries are synthesized by using the well-known sequential quadratic programming. The synthesis regards the optimal true-time exciting delays and optimal positions of pulsed antenna elements. The results show the capabilities of the different antenna arrays to steer the beam in their energy pattern in time domain and how their performance is in frequency domain after the synthesis in time domain.

  15. High current beam transport with multiple beam arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C.H.

    1985-05-01

    Highlights of recent experimental and theoretical research progress on the high current beam transport of single and multiple beams by the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) are presented. In the single beam transport experiment (SBTE), stability boundaries and the emittance growth of a space charge dominated beam in a long quadrupole transport channel were measured and compared with theory and computer simulations. Also, a multiple beam ion induction linac (MBE-4) is being constructed at LBL which will permit study of multiple beam transport arrays, and acceleration and bunch length compression of individually focused beamlets. Various design considerations of MBE-4 regarding scaling laws, nonlinear effects, misalignments, and transverse and longitudinal space charge effects are summarized. Some aspects of longitudinal beam dynamics including schemes to generate the accelerating voltage waveforms and to amplify beam current are also discussed

  16. Current scaling of radiated power for 40-mm diameter single wire arrays on Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, T. J.; Cuneo, M. E.; Spielman, R. B.; Chandler, G. A.; Leeper, R. J.; Seaman, J. F.; McGurn, J.; Lazier, S.; Torres, J.; Jobe, D.; Gilliland, T.; Nielsen, D.; Hawn, R.; Bailey, J. E.; Lake, P.; Carlson, A. L.; Seamen, H.; Moore, T.; Smelser, R.; Pyle, J.; Wagoner, T. C.; LePell, P. D.; Deeney, C.; Douglas, M. R.; McDaniel, D.; Struve, K.; Mazarakis, M.; Stygar, W. A.

    2004-11-01

    In order to estimate the radiated power that can be expected from the next-generation Z-pinch driver such as ZR at 28 MA, current-scaling experiments have been conducted on the 20 MA driver Z. We report on the current scaling of single 40 mm diameter tungsten 240 wire arrays with a fixed 110 ns implosion time. The wire diameter is decreased in proportion to the load current. Reducing the charge voltage on the Marx banks reduces the load current. On one shot, firing only three of the four levels of the Z machine further reduced the load current. The radiated energy scaled as the current squared as expected but the radiated power scaled as the current to the 3.52±0.42 power due to increased x-ray pulse width at lower current. As the current is reduced, the rise time of the x-ray pulse increases and at the lowest current value of 10.4 MA, a shoulder appears on the leading edge of the x-ray pulse. In order to determine the nature of the plasma producing the leading edge of the x-ray pulse at low currents further shots were taken with an on-axis aperture to view on-axis precursor plasma. This aperture appeared to perturb the pinch in a favorable manner such that with the aperture in place there was no leading edge to the x-ray pulses at lower currents and the radiated power scaled as the current squared ±0.75. For a full-current shot we will present x-ray images that show precursor plasma emitting on-axis 77 ns before the main x-ray burst.

  17. Comparison between SuperDARN flow vectors and equivalent ionospheric currents from ground magnetometer arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weygand, J. M.; Amm, O.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2012-01-01

    seasons. This comparison is done over a range of spatial separations, magnetic latitudes, magnetic local times, and auroral electrojet activity to investigate under what conditions the vectors are anti-parallel to one another. Our results show that in general the equivalent ionospheric currents are anti...... that may influence the alignment include ionospheric conductivity gradients and quiet time backgrounds. Our results can be used to approximate the macroscopic (similar to 1000 km) ionospheric convection patterns. The SECS maps represent a value-added product from the raw magnetometer database and can...... be used for contextual interpretation; they can help with our understanding of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling mechanisms using ground arrays and the magnetospheric spacecraft data, and they can be used as input for other techniques....

  18. The effects of insulating coatings and current prepulse on tungsten planar wire array Z-pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M., E-mail: limo@nint.ac.cn; Li, Y. [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Radiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an 710024 (China); Sheng, L.; Wang, L. P.; Zhao, C.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, M.; Peng, B. D.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, S. G.; Qiu, M. T. [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Radiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an 710024 (China); Li, X. W. [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents experimental results on the effects of insulating coatings and current prepulse on tungsten planar wire array Z-pinches on ∼100 ns main current facility. Optical framing images indicated that without a current prepulse the wire ablation process was asymmetrical and the implosion was zippered. The x-ray peak power was ∼320 GW. By using insulating coatings on the wire surface the asymmetry remained, and the processes of ablation and implosion were delayed by ∼30 ns. The x-ray burst was narrow and decreased to ∼200 GW. When current prepulses were used on both standard and insulated wire arrays, implosion symmetry was improved and the x-ray burst was improved (to ∼520 GW peak power). In addition, there was a strong emitting precursor column for insulated loads with the current prepulse.

  19. Development of a time synchronization methodology for a wireless seismic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moure-García, David; Torres-González, Pedro; del Río, Joaquín; Mihai, Daniel; Domínguez Cerdeña, Itahiza

    2017-04-01

    Seismic arrays have multiple applications. In the past, the main use was nuclear tests monitoring that began in mid-twentieth century. The major difference with a seismic network is the hypocenter location procedure. With a seismic network the hypocenter's 3D coordinates are calculated while using an array, the source direction of the seismic signal is determined. Seismic arrays are used in volcanology to obtain the source azimuth of volcanic signals related to fluids movement, magma and/or gases, that do not show a clear seismic phases' onset. A key condition in the seismic array operativity is the temporal synchronization of all the sensors, better than 1 microsecond. Because of that, usually all sensors are connected to the acquisition system by cable to ensure an identical sampling time. In this work we present the design of a wireless low-cost and low-power consumption volcanic monitoring seismic array where all nodes (sensors) acquire data synchronously and transmit them to the center node where a coherent signal is pursued in near real time.

  20. Predictions of fast wave heating, current drive, and current drive antenna arrays for advanced tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Baity, F.W.; Carter, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the advanced tokamak program is to optimize plasma performance leading to a compact tokamak reactor through active, steady state control of the current profile using non-inductive current drive and profile control. To achieve these objectives requires compatibility and flexibility in the use of available heating and current drive systems--ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF), neutral beams, and lower hybrid. For any advanced tokamak, the following are important challenges to effective use of fast waves in various roles of direct electron heating, minority ion heating, and current drive: (1) to employ the heating and current drive systems to give self-consistent pressure and current profiles leading to the desired advanced tokamak operating modes; (2) to minimize absorption of the fast waves by parasitic resonances, which limit current drive; (3) to optimize and control the spectrum of fast waves launched by the antenna array for the required mix of simultaneous heating and current drive. The authors have addressed these issues using theoretical and computational tools developed at a number of institutions by benchmarking the computations against available experimental data and applying them to the specific case of TPX

  1. On-Line Monitoring of Environment-Assisted Cracking in Nuclear Piping Using Array Probe Direct Current Potential Drop

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Y.; Choi, S.; Yoon, J. Y.; Nam, W. C.; Hwang, I. S.; Bromberg, Leslie; Stahle, Peter W; Ballinger, Ronald G

    2015-01-01

    A direct current potential drop method utilizing array probes with measurement ends maintaining an equalized potential designated as equi-potential switching array probe direct current potential drop (ESAP-DCPD) technique has been developed earlier at Seoul National University. This paper validates ESAP-DCPD technique by showing consistency among experimental measurements, analytical solution and numerical predictions using finite element analysis (FEA) of electric field changes with crack gr...

  2. Real-time algorithm for acoustic imaging with a microphone array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xun

    2009-05-01

    Acoustic phased array has become an important testing tool in aeroacoustic research, where the conventional beamforming algorithm has been adopted as a classical processing technique. The computation however has to be performed off-line due to the expensive cost. An innovative algorithm with real-time capability is proposed in this work. The algorithm is similar to a classical observer in the time domain while extended for the array processing to the frequency domain. The observer-based algorithm is beneficial mainly for its capability of operating over sampling blocks recursively. The expensive experimental time can therefore be reduced extensively since any defect in a testing can be corrected instantaneously.

  3. 3D Pattern Synthesis of Time-Modulated Conformal Arrays with a Multiobjective Optimization Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentao Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the synthesis of the three-dimensional (3D radiation patterns of the time-modulated conformal arrays. Due to the nature of periodic time modulation, harmonic radiation patterns are generated at the multiples of the modulation frequency in time-modulated arrays. Thus, the optimization goal of the time-modulated conformal array includes the optimization of the sidelobe level at the operating frequency and the sideband levels (SBLs at the harmonic frequency, and the design can be regarded as a multiobjective problem. The multiobjective particle swarm optimization (MOPSO is applied to optimize the switch-on instants and pulse durations of the time-modulated conformal array. To significantly reduce the optimization variables, the modified Bernstein polynomial is employed in the synthesis process. Furthermore, dual polarized patch antenna is designed as radiator to achieve low cross-polarization level during the beam scanning. A 12 × 13 (156-element conical conformal microstrip array is simulated to demonstrate the proposed synthesis mechanism, and good results reveal the promising ability of the proposed algorithm in solving the synthesis of the time-modulated conformal arrays problem.

  4. Effects of Mass Ablation on the Scaling of X-Ray Power with Current in Wire-Array Z Pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, R. W.; Sinars, D. B.; Waisman, E. M.; Cuneo, M. E.; Yu, E. P.; Haill, T. A.; Hanshaw, H. L.; Brunner, T. A.; Jennings, C. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Porter, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    X-ray production by imploding wire-array Z pinches is studied using radiation magnetohydrodynamics simulation. It is found that the density distribution created by ablating wire material influences both x-ray power production, and how the peak power scales with applied current. For a given array there is an optimum ablation rate that maximizes the peak x-ray power, and produces the strongest scaling of peak power with peak current. This work is consistent with trends in wire-array Z pinch x-ray power scaling experiments on the Z accelerator

  5. Gravitational wave searches with pulsar timing arrays: Cancellation of clock and ephemeris noises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinto, Massimo

    2018-04-01

    We propose a data processing technique to cancel monopole and dipole noise sources (such as clock and ephemeris noises, respectively) in pulsar timing array searches for gravitational radiation. These noises are the dominant sources of correlated timing fluctuations in the lower-part (≈10-9-10-8 Hz ) of the gravitational wave band accessible by pulsar timing experiments. After deriving the expressions that reconstruct these noises from the timing data, we estimate the gravitational wave sensitivity of our proposed processing technique to single-source signals to be at least one order of magnitude higher than that achievable by directly processing the timing data from an equal-size array. Since arrays can generate pairs of clock and ephemeris-free timing combinations that are no longer affected by correlated noises, we implement with them the cross-correlation statistic to search for an isotropic stochastic gravitational wave background. We find the resulting optimal signal-to-noise ratio to be more than one order of magnitude larger than that obtainable by correlating pairs of timing data from arrays of equal size.

  6. Photoelectrocatalytic properties of Ag nanoparticles loaded TiO2 nanotube arrays prepared by pulse current deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Kunpeng; Sun Lan; Wang Chenglin; Lai Yuekun; Wang Mengye; Chen Hongbo; Lin Changjian

    2010-01-01

    A pulse current deposition technique was adopted to construct highly dispersed Ag nanoparticles on TiO 2 nanotube arrays which were prepared by the electrochemical anodization. The morphology, crystallinity, elemental composition, and UV-vis absorption of Ag/TiO 2 nanotube arrays were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). In particular, the photoelectrochemical properties and photoelectrocatalytic activity under UV light irradiation and the photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation for newly synthesized Ag/TiO 2 nanotube arrays were investigated. The maximum incident photon to charge carrier efficiency (IPCE) value of Ag/TiO 2 nanotube arrays was 51%, much higher than that of pure TiO 2 nanotube arrays. Ag/TiO 2 nanotube arrays exhibited higher photocatalytic activities than the pure TiO 2 nanotube arrays under both UV and visible light irradiation. The photoelectrocatalytic activity of Ag/TiO 2 nanotube arrays under UV light irradiation was 1.6-fold enhancement compared with pure TiO 2 nanotube arrays. This approach can be used in synthesizing various metal-loaded nanotube arrays materials.

  7. ISS Solar Array Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James P.; Martin, Keith D.; Thomas, Justin R.; Caro, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Solar Array Management (SAM) software toolset provides the capabilities necessary to operate a spacecraft with complex solar array constraints. It monitors spacecraft telemetry and provides interpretations of solar array constraint data in an intuitive manner. The toolset provides extensive situational awareness to ensure mission success by analyzing power generation needs, array motion constraints, and structural loading situations. The software suite consists of several components including samCS (constraint set selector), samShadyTimers (array shadowing timers), samWin (visualization GUI), samLock (array motion constraint computation), and samJet (attitude control system configuration selector). It provides high availability and uptime for extended and continuous mission support. It is able to support two-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) array positioning and supports up to ten simultaneous constraints with intuitive 1D and 2D decision support visualizations of constraint data. Display synchronization is enabled across a networked control center and multiple methods for constraint data interpolation are supported. Use of this software toolset increases flight safety, reduces mission support effort, optimizes solar array operation for achieving mission goals, and has run for weeks at a time without issues. The SAM toolset is currently used in ISS real-time mission operations.

  8. Circular Array of Magnetic Sensors for Current Measurement: Analysis for Error Caused by Position of Conductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao; Qian, Zheng; Liu, Huayi; Qu, Jiaqi

    2018-02-14

    This paper analyzes the measurement error, caused by the position of the current-carrying conductor, of a circular array of magnetic sensors for current measurement. The circular array of magnetic sensors is an effective approach for AC or DC non-contact measurement, as it is low-cost, light-weight, has a large linear range, wide bandwidth, and low noise. Especially, it has been claimed that such structure has excellent reduction ability for errors caused by the position of the current-carrying conductor, crosstalk current interference, shape of the conduction cross-section, and the Earth's magnetic field. However, the positions of the current-carrying conductor-including un-centeredness and un-perpendicularity-have not been analyzed in detail until now. In this paper, for the purpose of having minimum measurement error, a theoretical analysis has been proposed based on vector inner and exterior product. In the presented mathematical model of relative error, the un-center offset distance, the un-perpendicular angle, the radius of the circle, and the number of magnetic sensors are expressed in one equation. The comparison of the relative error caused by the position of the current-carrying conductor between four and eight sensors is conducted. Tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors are used in the experimental prototype to verify the mathematical model. The analysis results can be the reference to design the details of the circular array of magnetic sensors for current measurement in practical situations.

  9. Electromagnetic Field Theory in (N+1)-Space-Time : AModern Time-Domain Tensor/Array Introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hoop, A.T.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a modern time-domain introduction is presented for electromagnetic field theory in (N+1)-spacetime. It uses a consistent tensor/array notation that accommodates the description of electromagnetic phenomena in N-dimensional space (plus time), a requirement that turns up in present-day

  10. Towards gamma-ray astronomy with timing arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tluczykont, M; Epimakhov, S; Astapov, I; Barbashina, N; Beregnev, S; Eremin, T; Bogdanov, A; Bogorodskii, D; Budnev, N; Chvalaev, O; Dyachok, A; Gafarov, A; Gress, O; Gress, T; Boreyko, V; Gorbunov, N; Grebenyuk, V; Grinyuk, A; Brückner, M; Chiavassa, A

    2015-01-01

    The gamma-ray energy regime beyond 10 TeV is crucial for the search for the most energetic Galactic accelerators. The energy spectra of most known gamma-ray emitters only reach up to few 10s of TeV, with 80 TeV from the Crab Nebula being the highest energy so far observed significantly. Uncovering their spectral shape up to few 100 TeV could answer the question whether some of these objects are cosmic ray Pevatrons, i.e. Galactic PeV accelerators.Sensitive observations in this energy range and beyond require very large effective detector areas of several 10s to 100 square-km. While imaging air Cherenkov telescopes have proven to be the instruments of choice in the GeV to TeV energy range, very large area telescope arrays are limited by the number of required readout channels per instrumented square-km (due to the large number of channels per telescope). Alternatively, the shower-front sampling technique allows to instrument large effective areas and also naturally provides large viewing angles of the instrument. Solely measuring the shower front light density and timing (hence timing- arrays), the primary particle properties are reconstructed on the basis of the measured lateral density function and the shower front arrival times. This presentation gives an overview of the technique, its goals, and future perspective. (paper)

  11. Real time processor for array speckle interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Gordon; Florez, Jose; Borelli, Renan; Fong, Wai; Miko, Joseph; Trujillo, Carlos

    1989-02-01

    The authors are constructing a real-time processor to acquire image frames, perform array flat-fielding, execute a 64 x 64 element two-dimensional complex FFT (fast Fourier transform) and average the power spectrum, all within the 25 ms coherence time for speckles at near-IR (infrared) wavelength. The processor will be a compact unit controlled by a PC with real-time display and data storage capability. This will provide the ability to optimize observations and obtain results on the telescope rather than waiting several weeks before the data can be analyzed and viewed with offline methods. The image acquisition and processing, design criteria, and processor architecture are described.

  12. Predictions of of fast wave heating, current drive, and current drive antenna arrays for advanced tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Baity, F.W.; Carter, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the advanced tokamak program is to optimize plasma performance leading to a compact tokamak reactor through active, steady state control of the current profile using non-inductive current drive and profile control. To achieve this objective requires compatibility and flexibility in the use of available heating and current drive systems - ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF), neutral beams, and lower hybrid. For any advanced tokamak, the following are important challenges to effective use of fast waves in various role of direct electron heating, minority ion heating, and current drive: (1) to employ the heating and current drive systems to give self-consistent pressure and current profiles leading to the desired advanced tokamak operating modes; (2) to minimize absorption of the fast waves by parasitic resonances, which limit current drive; (3) to optimize and control the spectrum of fast waves launched by the antenna array for the required mix of simultaneous heating and current drive. The paper addresses these issues using theoretical and computational tools developed at a number of institutions by benchmarking the computations against available experimental data and applying them to the specific case of TPX. (author). 6 refs, 3 figs

  13. Shielding in ungated field emitter arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, J. R. [U.S. Navy Reserve, Navy Operational Support Center New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana 70143 (United States); Jensen, K. L. [Code 6854, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Shiffler, D. A. [Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Petillo, J. J. [Leidos, Billerica, Massachusetts 01821 (United States)

    2015-05-18

    Cathodes consisting of arrays of high aspect ratio field emitters are of great interest as sources of electron beams for vacuum electronic devices. The desire for high currents and current densities drives the cathode designer towards a denser array, but for ungated emitters, denser arrays also lead to increased shielding, in which the field enhancement factor β of each emitter is reduced due to the presence of the other emitters in the array. To facilitate the study of these arrays, we have developed a method for modeling high aspect ratio emitters using tapered dipole line charges. This method can be used to investigate proximity effects from similar emitters an arbitrary distance away and is much less computationally demanding than competing simulation approaches. Here, we introduce this method and use it to study shielding as a function of array geometry. Emitters with aspect ratios of 10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} are modeled, and the shielding-induced reduction in β is considered as a function of tip-to-tip spacing for emitter pairs and for large arrays with triangular and square unit cells. Shielding is found to be negligible when the emitter spacing is greater than the emitter height for the two-emitter array, or about 2.5 times the emitter height in the large arrays, in agreement with previously published results. Because the onset of shielding occurs at virtually the same emitter spacing in the square and triangular arrays, the triangular array is preferred for its higher emitter density at a given emitter spacing. The primary contribution to shielding in large arrays is found to come from emitters within a distance of three times the unit cell spacing for both square and triangular arrays.

  14. Microelectrode Arrays and the Use of PEG-Functionalized Diblock Copolymer Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakshi Uppal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available PEG-modified diblock copolymer surfaces have been examined for their compatibility with microelectrode array based analytical methods. The use of PEG-modified polymer surfaces on the arrays was initially problematic because the redox couples used in the experiments were adsorbed by the polymer. This led the current measured by cyclic voltammetry for the redox couple to be unstable and increase with time. However, two key findings allow the experiments to be successful. First, after multiple cyclic voltammograms the current associated with the redox couple does stabilize so that a good baseline current can be established. Second, the rate at which the current stabilizes is consistent every time a particular coated array is used. Hence, multiple analytical experiments can be conducted on an array coated with a PEG-modified diblock copolymer and the data obtained is comparable as long as the data for each experiment is collected at a consistent time point.

  15. Plasma dynamics in aluminium wire array Z-pinch implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bland, S.N.

    2001-01-01

    The wire array Z-pinch is the world's most powerful laboratory X-ray source. An achieved power of ∼280TW has generated great interest in the use of these devices as a source of hohlraum heating for inertial confinement fusion experiments. However, the physics underlying how wire array Z-pinches implode is not well understood. This thesis presents the first detailed measurements of plasma dynamics in wire array experiments. The MAGPIE generator, with currents of up to 1.4MA, 150ns 10-90% rise-time, was used to implode arrays of 16mm diameter typically containing between 8 and 64 15μm aluminium wires. Diagnostics included: end and side-on laser probing with interferometry, schlieren and shadowgraphy channels; radial and axial streak photography; gated X-ray imaging; XUV and hard X-ray spectrometry; filtered XRDs and diamond PCDs; and a novel X-ray backlighting system to probe high density plasma. It was found that the plasma formed from the wires consisted of cold, dense cores, which ablated producing hot, low density coronal plasma. After an initial acceleration around the cores, coronal plasma streams flowed force-free towards the axis, with an instability wavelength determined by the core size. At ∼50% of the implosion time, the streams collided on axis forming a precursor plasma which appeared to be uniform, stable, and inertially confined. The existence of core-corona structure significantly affected implosion dynamics. For arrays with <64 wires, the wire cores remained in their original positions until ∼80% of the implosion time before accelerating rapidly. At 64 wires a transition in implosion trajectories to 0-D like occurred indicating a possible merger of current carrying plasma close to the cores - the cores themselves did not merge. During implosion, the cores initially developed uncorrelated instabilities that then transformed into a longer wavelength global mode of instability. The study of nested arrays (2 concentric arrays, one inside the other

  16. Gravitational wave detection and data analysis for pulsar timing arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasteren, Rutger van

    2011-01-01

    Long-term precise timing of Galactic millisecond pulsars holds great promise for measuring long-period (months-to-years) astrophysical gravitational waves. In this work we develop a Bayesian data analysis method for projects called pulsar timing arrays; projects aimed to detect these gravitational

  17. Effect of growth time to the properties of Al-doped ZnO nanorod arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, A. S.; Mamat, M. H.; Malek, M. F.; Saidi, S. A.; Yusoff, M. M.; Mohamed, R.; Sin, N. D. Md; Suriani, A. B.; Rusop, M.

    2018-05-01

    Aluminum (Al)-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod array films were successfully deposited at different growth time on zinc oxide (ZnO) seed layer coated glass substrate using sol-gel immersion method. The morphology images of the films showed that the thicknesses of the films were increased parallel with the increment of growth period. The surface topology of the films displayed an increment of roughness as the growth period increased. Optical properties of the samples exposed that the percentage of transmittances reduced at higher growth time. Besides, the Urbach energy of the films slightly increased as the immersion time increased. The current-voltage (I-V) measurement indicated that the resistance increased as the immersion time increased owing to the appearance of intrinsic layer on top of the nanorods.

  18. Signal-Conditioning Block of a 1 × 200 CMOS Detector Array for a Terahertz Real-Time Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Ryul Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A signal conditioning block of a 1 × 200 Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS detector array is proposed to be employed with a real-time 0.2 THz imaging system for inspecting large areas. The plasmonic CMOS detector array whose pixel size including an integrated antenna is comparable to the wavelength of the THz wave for the imaging system, inevitably carries wide pixel-to-pixel variation. To make the variant outputs from the array uniform, the proposed signal conditioning block calibrates the responsivity of each pixel by controlling the gate bias of each detector and the voltage gain of the lock-in amplifiers in the block. The gate bias of each detector is modulated to 1 MHz to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the imaging system via the electrical modulation by the conditioning block. In addition, direct current (DC offsets of the detectors in the array are cancelled by initializing the output voltage level from the block. Real-time imaging using the proposed signal conditioning block is demonstrated by obtaining images at the rate of 19.2 frame-per-sec of an object moving on the conveyor belt with a scan width of 20 cm and a scan speed of 25 cm/s.

  19. Use of microsecond current prepulse for dramatic improvements of wire array Z-pinch implosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calamy, H.; Lassalle, F.; Loyen, A.; Zucchini, F.; Chittenden, J. P.; Hamann, F.; Maury, P.; Georges, A.; Bedoch, J. P.; Morell, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Sphinx machine [F. Lassalle et al., 'Status on the SPHINX machine based on the 1microsecond LTD technology'] based on microsecond linear transformer driver (LTD) technology is used to implode an aluminium wire array with an outer diameter up to 140 mm and maximum current from 3.5 to 5 MA. 700 to 800 ns implosion Z-pinch experiments are performed on this driver essentially with aluminium. Best results obtained before the improvement described in this paper were 1-3 TW radial total power, 100-300 kJ total yield, and 20-30 kJ energy above 1 keV. An auxiliary generator was added to the Sphinx machine in order to allow a multi microsecond current to be injected through the wire array load before the start of the main current. Amplitude and duration of this current prepulse are adjustable, with maxima ∼10 kA and 50 μs. This prepulse dramatically changes the ablation phase leading to an improvement of the axial homogeneity of both the implosion and the final radiating column. Total power was multiplied by a factor of 6, total yield by a factor of 2.5 with a reproducible behavior. This paper presents experimental results, magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and analysis of the effect of such a long current prepulse

  20. Micromachined silicon parallel acoustic delay lines as time-delayed ultrasound detector array for real-time photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y.; Chang, C.-C.; Wang, L. V.; Zou, J.

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the development of a new 16-channel parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) array for real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT). The PADLs were directly fabricated from single-crystalline silicon substrates using deep reactive ion etching. Compared with other acoustic delay lines (e.g., optical fibers), the micromachined silicon PADLs offer higher acoustic transmission efficiency, smaller form factor, easier assembly, and mass production capability. To demonstrate its real-time photoacoustic imaging capability, the silicon PADL array was interfaced with one single-element ultrasonic transducer followed by one channel of data acquisition electronics to receive 16 channels of photoacoustic signals simultaneously. A PAT image of an optically-absorbing target embedded in an optically-scattering phantom was reconstructed, which matched well with the actual size of the imaged target. Because the silicon PADL array allows a signal-to-channel reduction ratio of 16:1, it could significantly simplify the design and construction of ultrasonic receivers for real-time PAT.

  1. Micromachined silicon parallel acoustic delay lines as time-delayed ultrasound detector array for real-time photoacoustic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y; Chang, C-C; Zou, J; Wang, L V

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the development of a new 16-channel parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) array for real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT). The PADLs were directly fabricated from single-crystalline silicon substrates using deep reactive ion etching. Compared with other acoustic delay lines (e.g., optical fibers), the micromachined silicon PADLs offer higher acoustic transmission efficiency, smaller form factor, easier assembly, and mass production capability. To demonstrate its real-time photoacoustic imaging capability, the silicon PADL array was interfaced with one single-element ultrasonic transducer followed by one channel of data acquisition electronics to receive 16 channels of photoacoustic signals simultaneously. A PAT image of an optically-absorbing target embedded in an optically-scattering phantom was reconstructed, which matched well with the actual size of the imaged target. Because the silicon PADL array allows a signal-to-channel reduction ratio of 16:1, it could significantly simplify the design and construction of ultrasonic receivers for real-time PAT. (paper)

  2. Development of portable phased array UT system for real-time flaw imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, M.

    1995-01-01

    Many functions and features of phased array UT technology must be useful for NDE in the industrial field. Some phased array UT systems have been developed for the inspection of nuclear pressure vessel and turbine components. However, phased array UT is still a special NDE technique and it has not been used widely in the past. The reasons of that are system size, cost, operator performance, equipment design and others. TOSHIBA has newly developed PC controlled portable phased array system to solve those problems. The portable phased array UT system is very compact and light but it is able to drive up to 32-channel linear array probe, to display real-time linear/sector B-scan, to display accumulated B-scan with an encoder and to display profile overlaid B-scan. The first applications were turbine component inspections for precise flaw investigation and flaw image data recording

  3. Depairing critical current achieved in superconducting thin films with through-thickness arrays of artificial pinning centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinner, Rafael B; Wimbush, Stuart C; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L; Blamire, Mark G; Robinson, Adam P

    2011-01-01

    Large area arrays of through-thickness nanoscale pores have been milled into superconducting Nb thin films via a process utilizing anodized aluminum oxide thin film templates. These pores act as artificial flux pinning centers, increasing the superconducting critical current, J c , of the Nb films. By optimizing the process conditions including anodization time, pore size and milling time, J c values approaching and in some cases matching the Ginzburg-Landau depairing current of 30 MA cm -2 at 5 K have been achieved-a J c enhancement over as-deposited films of more than 50 times. In the field dependence of J c , a matching field corresponding to the areal pore density has also been clearly observed. The effect of backfilling the pores with magnetic material has then been investigated. While backfilling with Co has been successfully achieved, the effect of the magnetic material on J c has been found to be largely detrimental compared to voids, although a distinct influence of the magnetic material in producing a hysteretic J c versus applied field behavior has been observed. This behavior has been tested for compatibility with currently proposed models of magnetic pinning and found to be most closely explained by a model describing the magnetic attraction between the flux vortices and the magnetic inclusions.

  4. Assessment of Measurement Distortions in GNSS Antenna Array Space-Time Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thyagaraja Marathe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antenna array processing techniques are studied in GNSS as effective tools to mitigate interference in spatial and spatiotemporal domains. However, without specific considerations, the array processing results in biases and distortions in the cross-ambiguity function (CAF of the ranging codes. In space-time processing (STP the CAF misshaping can happen due to the combined effect of space-time processing and the unintentional signal attenuation by filtering. This paper focuses on characterizing these degradations for different controlled signal scenarios and for live data from an antenna array. The antenna array simulation method introduced in this paper enables one to perform accurate analyses in the field of STP. The effects of relative placement of the interference source with respect to the desired signal direction are shown using overall measurement errors and profile of the signal strength. Analyses of contributions from each source of distortion are conducted individually and collectively. Effects of distortions on GNSS pseudorange errors and position errors are compared for blind, semi-distortionless, and distortionless beamforming methods. The results from characterization can be useful for designing low distortion filters that are especially important for high accuracy GNSS applications in challenging environments.

  5. Real time interrogation technique for fiber Bragg grating enhanced fiber loop ringdown sensors array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunlong; Li, Ruoming; Shi, Yuechun; Zhang, Jintao; Chen, Xiangfei; Liu, Shengchun

    2015-06-01

    A novel fiber Bragg grating aided fiber loop ringdown (FLRD) sensor array and the wavelength-time multiplexing based interrogation technique for the FLRD sensors array are proposed. The interrogation frequency of the system is formulated and the interrelationships among the parameters of the system are analyzed. To validate the performance of the proposed system, a five elements array is experimentally demonstrated, and the system shows the capability of real time monitoring every FLRD element with interrogation frequency of 125.5 Hz.

  6. Stochastic synaptic plasticity with memristor crossbar arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Naous, Rawan

    2016-11-01

    Memristive devices have been shown to exhibit slow and stochastic resistive switching behavior under low-voltage, low-current operating conditions. Here we explore such mechanisms to emulate stochastic plasticity in memristor crossbar synapse arrays. Interfaced with integrate-and-fire spiking neurons, the memristive synapse arrays are capable of implementing stochastic forms of spike-timing dependent plasticity which parallel mean-rate models of stochastic learning with binary synapses. We present theory and experiments with spike-based stochastic learning in memristor crossbar arrays, including simplified modeling as well as detailed physical simulation of memristor stochastic resistive switching characteristics due to voltage and current induced filament formation and collapse. © 2016 IEEE.

  7. Stochastic synaptic plasticity with memristor crossbar arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Naous, Rawan; Al-Shedivat, Maruan; Neftci, Emre; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Salama, Khaled N.

    2016-01-01

    Memristive devices have been shown to exhibit slow and stochastic resistive switching behavior under low-voltage, low-current operating conditions. Here we explore such mechanisms to emulate stochastic plasticity in memristor crossbar synapse arrays. Interfaced with integrate-and-fire spiking neurons, the memristive synapse arrays are capable of implementing stochastic forms of spike-timing dependent plasticity which parallel mean-rate models of stochastic learning with binary synapses. We present theory and experiments with spike-based stochastic learning in memristor crossbar arrays, including simplified modeling as well as detailed physical simulation of memristor stochastic resistive switching characteristics due to voltage and current induced filament formation and collapse. © 2016 IEEE.

  8. Development of a Photovoltaic Array Emulator System in Real Time Considering Climatic Conditions Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo E. Ardila-Franco

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of an emulator that has the ability to replicate, in real time, the behavior of photovoltaic panels (PV arrays considering different conditions of irradiation and temperature for each one. The emulator consists of a data acquisition card, a programmable source and a computer. It is based on the bypass diode model that provides a better approximation to real operating conditions. The solution is computed by a simplified equation that uses the Lambert W function, which reduces the computation time. After that, it generates a solution table of values of current as a function of voltage on terminals, temperature and irradiation. Real-time emulation is performed by means of a search algorithm in the solutions table of the closest value to the voltage imposed on the terminals.

  9. Calibration of Hall sensor array for critical current measurement of YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yunpeng; Wang, Gang; Liu, Liyuan; Yang, Xinsheng; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract : HAS (Hall sensor array) is a powerful tool to detect the uniformity of HTS (high temperature superconductor) tape through mapping the distribution of remanent or shielding field along the surface of the tape. However, measurement of HTS tape with ferromagnetic parts by HSA is still an issue because the ferromagnetic substrate has influence on the magnetic field around the HTS layer. In this work, a continuous HSA system has been designed to measure the critical current of the YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate. The relationship between the remanent field and critical current was calibrated by the finite element method. The result showed that the HSA is an effective method for evaluating the critical current of the HTS tape with ferromagnetic substrate. - Highlight: • A continuous Hall sensor array system has been designed. • The inhomogeneity of YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate can be detected by HAS. • Finite element method is an effective method for calibrating the remanent field.

  10. Calibration of Hall sensor array for critical current measurement of YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yunpeng; Wang, Gang; Liu, Liyuan [Key laboratory of Magnetic levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education), Superconductor and New Energy R& D Center, Mail Stop 165#, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China); Yang, Xinsheng, E-mail: xsyang@swjtu.edu.cn [Key laboratory of Magnetic levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education), Superconductor and New Energy R& D Center, Mail Stop 165#, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China); Zhao, Yong [Key laboratory of Magnetic levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education), Superconductor and New Energy R& D Center, Mail Stop 165#, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China); Superconductivity Research Group, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wale, Sydney 2052, NSW (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Abstract : HAS (Hall sensor array) is a powerful tool to detect the uniformity of HTS (high temperature superconductor) tape through mapping the distribution of remanent or shielding field along the surface of the tape. However, measurement of HTS tape with ferromagnetic parts by HSA is still an issue because the ferromagnetic substrate has influence on the magnetic field around the HTS layer. In this work, a continuous HSA system has been designed to measure the critical current of the YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate. The relationship between the remanent field and critical current was calibrated by the finite element method. The result showed that the HSA is an effective method for evaluating the critical current of the HTS tape with ferromagnetic substrate. - Highlight: • A continuous Hall sensor array system has been designed. • The inhomogeneity of YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate can be detected by HAS. • Finite element method is an effective method for calibrating the remanent field.

  11. Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Array Effects on Wave Current and Sediment Circulation: Monterey Bay CA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Jones, Craig; Magalen, Jason

    2014-09-01

    The goal s of this study were to develop tools to quantitatively characterize environments where wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices may be installed and to assess e ffects on hydrodynamics and lo cal sediment transport. A large hypothetical WEC array was investigated using wave, hydrodynamic, and sediment transport models and site - specific average and storm conditions as input. The results indicated that there were significant changes in sediment s izes adjacent to and in the lee of the WEC array due to reduced wave energy. The circulation in the lee of the array was also altered; more intense onshore currents were generated in the lee of the WECs . In general, the storm case and the average case show ed the same qualitative patterns suggesting that these trends would be maintained throughout the year. The framework developed here can be used to design more efficient arrays while minimizing impacts on nearshore environmen ts.

  12. The ASTRI mini-array within the future Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vercellone Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA is a large collaborative effort aimed at the design and operation of an observatory dedicated to very high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics in the energy range from a few tens of GeV to above 100 TeV, which will yield about an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity with respect to the current major arrays (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS. Within this framework, the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics is leading the ASTRI project, whose main goals are the design and installation on Mt. Etna (Sicily of an end-to-end dual-mirror prototype of the CTA small size telescope (SST and the installation at the CTA Southern site of a dual-mirror SST mini-array composed of nine units with a relative distance of about 300 m. The innovative dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder optical solution adopted for the ASTRI Project allows us to substantially reduce the telescope plate-scale and, therefore, to adopt silicon photo-multipliers as light detectors. The ASTRI mini-array is a wider international effort. The mini-array, sensitive in the energy range 1–100 TeV and beyond with an angular resolution of a few arcmin and an energy resolution of about 10–15%, is well suited to study relatively bright sources (a few × 10−12 erg cm−2 s−1 at 10 TeV at very high energy. Prominent sources such as extreme blazars, nearby well-known BL Lac objects, Galactic pulsar wind nebulae, supernovae remnants, micro-quasars, and the Galactic Center can be observed in a previously unexplored energy range. The ASTRI mini-array will extend the current IACTs sensitivity well above a few tens of TeV and, at the same time, will allow us to compare our results on a few selected targets with those of current (HAWC and future high-altitude extensive air-shower detectors.

  13. Fault Analysis in Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ye

    Fault analysis in solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays is a fundamental task to increase reliability, efficiency and safety in PV systems. Conventional fault protection methods usually add fuses or circuit breakers in series with PV components. But these protection devices are only able to clear faults and isolate faulty circuits if they carry a large fault current. However, this research shows that faults in PV arrays may not be cleared by fuses under some fault scenarios, due to the current-limiting nature and non-linear output characteristics of PV arrays. First, this thesis introduces new simulation and analytic models that are suitable for fault analysis in PV arrays. Based on the simulation environment, this thesis studies a variety of typical faults in PV arrays, such as ground faults, line-line faults, and mismatch faults. The effect of a maximum power point tracker on fault current is discussed and shown to, at times, prevent the fault current protection devices to trip. A small-scale experimental PV benchmark system has been developed in Northeastern University to further validate the simulation conclusions. Additionally, this thesis examines two types of unique faults found in a PV array that have not been studied in the literature. One is a fault that occurs under low irradiance condition. The other is a fault evolution in a PV array during night-to-day transition. Our simulation and experimental results show that overcurrent protection devices are unable to clear the fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition". However, the overcurrent protection devices may work properly when the same PV fault occurs in daylight. As a result, a fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition" might be hidden in the PV array and become a potential hazard for system efficiency and reliability.

  14. Direct current injection and thermocapillary flow for purification of aligned arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xu; Islam, Ahmad E.; Seabron, Eric; Dunham, Simon N.; Du, Frank; Lin, Jonathan; Wilson, William L.; Rogers, John A., E-mail: jrogers@illinois.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Wahab, Muhammad A.; Alam, Muhammad A. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Li, Yuhang [Institute of Solid Mechanics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Tomic, Bojan [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Huang, Jiyuan [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Burns, Branden [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Song, Jizhou [Department of Engineering Mechanics and Soft Matter Research Center, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Huang, Yonggang [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Center for Engineering and Health, and Skin Disease Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2015-04-07

    Aligned arrays of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) represent ideal configurations for use of this class of material in high performance electronics. Development of means for removing the metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs) in as-grown arrays represents an essential challenge. Here, we introduce a simple scheme that achieves this type of purification using direct, selective current injection through interdigitated electrodes into the m-SWNTs, to allow their complete removal using processes of thermocapillarity and dry etching. Experiments and numerical simulations establish the fundamental aspects that lead to selectivity in this process, thereby setting design rules for optimization. Single-step purification of arrays that include thousands of SWNTs demonstrates the effectiveness and simplicity of the procedures. The result is a practical route to large-area aligned arrays of purely s-SWNTs with low-cost experimental setups.

  15. Direct current injection and thermocapillary flow for purification of aligned arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Xu; Islam, Ahmad E.; Seabron, Eric; Dunham, Simon N.; Du, Frank; Lin, Jonathan; Wilson, William L.; Rogers, John A.; Wahab, Muhammad A.; Alam, Muhammad A.; Li, Yuhang; Tomic, Bojan; Huang, Jiyuan; Burns, Branden; Song, Jizhou; Huang, Yonggang

    2015-01-01

    Aligned arrays of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) represent ideal configurations for use of this class of material in high performance electronics. Development of means for removing the metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs) in as-grown arrays represents an essential challenge. Here, we introduce a simple scheme that achieves this type of purification using direct, selective current injection through interdigitated electrodes into the m-SWNTs, to allow their complete removal using processes of thermocapillarity and dry etching. Experiments and numerical simulations establish the fundamental aspects that lead to selectivity in this process, thereby setting design rules for optimization. Single-step purification of arrays that include thousands of SWNTs demonstrates the effectiveness and simplicity of the procedures. The result is a practical route to large-area aligned arrays of purely s-SWNTs with low-cost experimental setups

  16. Smart Wireless Power Transfer Operated by Time-Modulated Arrays via a Two-Step Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Masotti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper introduces a novel method for agile and precise wireless power transmission operated by a time-modulated array. The unique, almost real-time reconfiguration capability of these arrays is fully exploited by a two-step procedure: first, a two-element time-modulated subarray is used for localization of tagged sensors to be energized; the entire 16-element TMA then provides the power to the detected tags, by exploiting the fundamental and first-sideband harmonic radiation. An investigation on the best array architecture is carried out, showing the importance of the adopted nonlinear/full-wave computer-aided-design platform. Very promising simulated energy transfer performance of the entire nonlinear radiating system is demonstrated.

  17. Spatio-temporal change detection from multidimensional arrays: Detecting deforestation from MODIS time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Meng; Pebesma, Edzer; Sanchez, Alber; Verbesselt, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Growing availability of long-term satellite imagery enables change modeling with advanced spatio-temporal statistical methods. Multidimensional arrays naturally match the structure of spatio-temporal satellite data and can provide a clean modeling process for complex spatio-temporal analysis over large datasets. Our study case illustrates the detection of breakpoints in MODIS imagery time series for land cover change in the Brazilian Amazon using the BFAST (Breaks For Additive Season and Trend) change detection framework. BFAST includes an Empirical Fluctuation Process (EFP) to alarm the change and a change point time locating process. We extend the EFP to account for the spatial autocorrelation between spatial neighbors and assess the effects of spatial correlation when applying BFAST on satellite image time series. In addition, we evaluate how sensitive EFP is to the assumption that its time series residuals are temporally uncorrelated, by modeling it as an autoregressive process. We use arrays as a unified data structure for the modeling process, R to execute the analysis, and an array database management system to scale computation. Our results point to BFAST as a robust approach against mild temporal and spatial correlation, to the use of arrays to ease the modeling process of spatio-temporal change, and towards communicable and scalable analysis.

  18. Pulse Splitting for Harmonic Beamforming in Time-Modulated Linear Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Poli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel strategy for harmonic beamforming in time-modulated linear arrays is proposed. The pulse splitting technique is exploited to simultaneously generate two harmonic patterns, one at the central frequency and another at a preselected harmonic of arbitrary order, while controlling the maximum level of the remaining sideband radiations. An optimization strategy based on the particle swarm optimizer is developed in order to determine the optimal parameters describing the pulse sequence used to modulate the excitation weights of the array elements. Representative numerical results are reported and discussed to point out potentialities and limitations of the proposed approach.

  19. Blind Time-Frequency Analysis for Source Discrimination in Multisensor Array Processing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amin, Moeness

    1999-01-01

    .... We have clearly demonstrated, through analysis and simulations, the offerings of time-frequency distributions in solving key problems in sensor array processing, including direction finding, source...

  20. DFB laser array driver circuit controlled by adjustable signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Weikang; Du, Yinchao; Guo, Yu; Li, Wei; Wang, Hao

    2018-01-01

    In order to achieve the intelligent controlling of DFB laser array, this paper presents the design of an intelligence and high precision numerical controlling electric circuit. The system takes MCU and FPGA as the main control chip, with compact, high-efficiency, no impact, switching protection characteristics. The output of the DFB laser array can be determined by an external adjustable signal. The system transforms the analog control model into a digital control model, which improves the performance of the driver. The system can monitor the temperature and current of DFB laser array in real time. The output precision of the current can reach ± 0.1mA, which ensures the stable and reliable operation of the DFB laser array. Such a driver can benefit the flexible usage of the DFB laser array.

  1. Real-time imaging of vertically aligned carbon nanotube array growth kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puretzky, A A; Eres, G; Rouleau, C M; Ivanov, I N; Geohegan, D B

    2008-01-01

    In situ time-lapse photography and laser irradiation are applied to understand unusual coordinated growth kinetics of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays including pauses in growth, retraction, and local equilibration in length. A model is presented which explains the measured kinetics and determines the conditions for diffusion-limited growth. Laser irradiation of the growing nanotube arrays is first used to prove that the nanotubes grow from catalyst particles at their bases, and then increase their growth rate and terminal lengths

  2. Simulating the Sky as Seen by the Square Kilometer Array using the MIT Array Performance Simulator (MAPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lynn D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Doeleman, S. S.; Fish, V. L.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Oberoi, D.; Wayth, R. B.

    2009-05-01

    The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) is a proposed next-generation radio telescope that will operate at frequencies of 0.1-30 GHz and be 50-100 times more sensitive than existing radio arrays. Meeting the performance goals of this instrument will require innovative new hardware and software developments, a variety of which are now under consideration. Key to evaluating the performance characteristics of proposed SKA designs and testing the feasibility of new data calibration and processing algorithms is the ability to carry out realistic simulations of radio wavelength arrays under a variety of observing conditions. The MIT Array Performance Simulator (MAPS) (http://www.haystack.mit.edu/ast/arrays/maps/index.html) is an observations simulation package designed to achieve this goal. MAPS accepts an input source list or sky model and generates a model visibility set for a user-defined "virtual observatory'', incorporating such factors as array geometry, primary beam shape, field-of-view, and time and frequency resolution. Optionally, effects such as thermal noise, out-of-beam sources, variable station beams, and time/location-dependent ionospheric effects can be included. We will showcase current capabilities of MAPS for SKA applications by presenting results from an analysis of the effects of realistic sky backgrounds on the achievable image fidelity and dynamic range of SKA-like arrays comprising large numbers of small-diameter antennas.

  3. First Year Observations of Antarctic Circumpolar Current Variability and Internal Wave Activity from the DIMES Mooring Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brearley, J. A.; Sheen, K. L.; Naveira-Garabato, A. C.

    2012-04-01

    A key component of DIMES (Diapycnal and Isopycnal Mixing Experiment in the Southern Ocean) is the deployment of a two-year cross-shaped mooring array in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current to the east of Drake Passage close to 57°W. Motivation for the cluster arises from the need to understand how eddies dissipate in the Southern Ocean, and specifically how much energy is extracted from the mesoscale by breaking internal waves, which in turn leads to turbulent mixing. The location of the mooring cluster was chosen to fulfil these objectives, being situated in a region of pronounced finestructure with high eddy kinetic energy and rough topography. The array, comprising 34 current meters and Microcats and a downward-looking ADCP, was first deployed in December 2009 and serviced in December 2010. Time series of current meter results from the most heavily-instrumented 'C' mooring indicate that a strong (up to 80 cms-1) surface-intensified north-eastward directed ACC occupies the region for most of the year, with over 85% of the variability in current speed being accounted for by equivalent barotropic fluctuations. A strong mean poleward heat flux is observed at the site, which compares favourably in magnitude with literature results from other ACC locations. Interestingly, four episodes of mid-depth (~2000 m) current speed maxima, each of a few days duration, were found during the 360-day time series, a situation also observed by the lowered ADCP during mooring servicing in December 2010. Early results indicate that these episodes, which coincide with time minima in stratification close to 2000 m, could profoundly influence the nature of eddy-internal wave interactions at these times. Quantification of the energy budget at the mooring cluster has been a key priority. When compared with previous moorings located in Drake Passage (Bryden, 1977), a near threefold-increase in mean eddy kinetic energy (EKE) is observed despite a small reduction in the mean kinetic energy

  4. Mathematical analysis of the real time array PCR (RTA PCR) process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksman, Johan Frederik; Pierik, A.

    2012-01-01

    Real time array PCR (RTA PCR) is a recently developed biochemical technique that measures amplification curves (like with quantitative real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT PCR)) of a multitude of different templates in a sample. It combines two different methods in order to profit from the

  5. Arraying proteins by cell-free synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyue; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2007-10-01

    Recent advances in life science have led to great motivation for the development of protein arrays to study functions of genome-encoded proteins. While traditional cell-based methods have been commonly used for generating protein arrays, they are usually a time-consuming process with a number of technical challenges. Cell-free protein synthesis offers an attractive system for making protein arrays, not only does it rapidly converts the genetic information into functional proteins without the need for DNA cloning, but also presents a flexible environment amenable to production of folded proteins or proteins with defined modifications. Recent advancements have made it possible to rapidly generate protein arrays from PCR DNA templates through parallel on-chip protein synthesis. This article reviews current cell-free protein array technologies and their proteomic applications.

  6. The Real-Time Dose Measurement Scintillating Fiber Array for Brachytherapy Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynes, Lawrence

    2007-03-01

    Brachytherapy is a treatment modality that uses tiny radioactive sources (few mm in length) by delivering enough doses to kill cancer tumors or plaque build-up. The type of sources used in hospitals include both gamma and beta emitters. Presently, the technique suffers from not having a single detector with the capability of providing accurate dose distribution information within sub-mm accuracy. The current standard is based primarily on well chambers and film dosimetry. The Center for Advanced Medical Instrumentation (CAMI) at Hampton University is developing a Scintillating Fiber Based Beta Detector prototype in collaboration with the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) to address this problem. The device is composed of an array of 1x1 mm^2 scintillating fibers optically coupled to photo-multiplier tubes for photon-to-current conversion. A CAMAC LabView based data acquisition system is used for real time data collection and histogramming, data analysis. A set of data were collected at the nearby Bon Secours DePaul Medical Center using a GammaMed 12i HDR after-loader housing a 6.62 mCi Ir-192 source. Preliminary comparison between our device and film dosimetry will be discussed.

  7. A Readout Integrated Circuit (ROIC) employing self-adaptive background current compensation technique for Infrared Focal Plane Array (IRFPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tong; Zhao, Jian; He, Yong; Jiang, Bo; Su, Yan

    2018-05-01

    A novel self-adaptive background current compensation circuit applied to infrared focal plane array is proposed in this paper, which can compensate the background current generated in different conditions. Designed double-threshold detection strategy is to estimate and eliminate the background currents, which could significantly reduce the hardware overhead and improve the uniformity among different pixels. In addition, the circuit is well compatible to various categories of infrared thermo-sensitive materials. The testing results of a 4 × 4 experimental chip showed that the proposed circuit achieves high precision, wide application and high intelligence. Tape-out of the 320 × 240 readout circuit, as well as the bonding, encapsulation and imaging verification of uncooled infrared focal plane array, have also been completed.

  8. Versatile directional searches for gravitational waves with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, D. R.; Zhu, X.-J.; Hobbs, G.; Coles, W.; Shannon, R. M.; Wang, J. B.; Tiburzi, C.; Manchester, R. N.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Dai, S.; Dempsey, J.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Lasky, P.; Levin, Y.; Osłowski, S.; Ravi, V.; Reardon, D.; Rosado, P.; Spiewak, R.; van Straten, W.; Toomey, L.; Wen, L.; You, X.

    2016-02-01

    By regularly monitoring the most stable millisecond pulsars over many years, pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are positioned to detect and study correlations in the timing behaviour of those pulsars. Gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are an exciting potentially detectable source of such correlations. We describe a straightforward technique by which a PTA can be `phased-up' to form time series of the two polarization modes of GWs coming from a particular direction of the sky. Our technique requires no assumptions regarding the time-domain behaviour of a GW signal. This method has already been used to place stringent bounds on GWs from individual SMBHBs in circular orbits. Here, we describe the methodology and demonstrate the versatility of the technique in searches for a wide variety of GW signals including bursts with unmodelled waveforms. Using the first six years of data from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, we conduct an all-sky search for a detectable excess of GW power from any direction. For the lines of sight to several nearby massive galaxy clusters, we carry out a more detailed search for GW bursts with memory, which are distinct signatures of SMBHB mergers. In all cases, we find that the data are consistent with noise.

  9. Array capabilities and future arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, D.

    1993-01-01

    Early results from the new third-generation instruments GAMMASPHERE and EUROGAM are confirming the expectation that such arrays will have a revolutionary effect on the field of high-spin nuclear structure. When completed, GAMMASHPERE will have a resolving power am order of magnitude greater that of the best second-generation arrays. When combined with other instruments such as particle-detector arrays and fragment mass analysers, the capabilites of the arrays for the study of more exotic nuclei will be further enhanced. In order to better understand the limitations of these instruments, and to design improved future detector systems, it is important to have some intelligible and reliable calculation for the relative resolving power of different instrument designs. The derivation of such a figure of merit will be briefly presented, and the relative sensitivities of arrays currently proposed or under construction presented. The design of TRIGAM, a new third-generation array proposed for Chalk River, will also be discussed. It is instructive to consider how far arrays of Compton-suppressed Ge detectors could be taken. For example, it will be shown that an idealised open-quote perfectclose quotes third-generation array of 1000 detectors has a sensitivity an order of magnitude higher again than that of GAMMASPHERE. Less conventional options for new arrays will also be explored

  10. A time-of-flight array for 1 to 2 GeV/c particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sum, V.; Berdoz, A.R.; Davis, C.A.

    1992-09-01

    A time-of-flight detector array has been developed for an experiment searching for the strangeness -2 H-particle. The array consists of 40 logs of plastic scintillator with dimensions 2.00 x 0.085 x 0.050 m 3 . The photomultiplier tubes are coupled to the scintillators without the use of light guides, and the mounting of the bars is designed for easy adjustment and servicing. The average intrinsic time resolution was found to be 110 ps σ. 8 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  11. A time-of-flight array for 1 to 2 GeV/c particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sum, V; Berdoz, A R; Davis, C A [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Dept. of Physics; and others

    1992-09-01

    A time-of-flight detector array has been developed for an experiment searching for the strangeness -2 H-particle. The array consists of 40 logs of plastic scintillator with dimensions 2.00 x 0.085 x 0.050 m{sup 3}. The photomultiplier tubes are coupled to the scintillators without the use of light guides, and the mounting of the bars is designed for easy adjustment and servicing. The average intrinsic time resolution was found to be 110 ps {sigma}. 8 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Design and control of phased ICRF antenna arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulding, R.H.; Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Phased antenna arrays operating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are used to produce highly directional wave spectra, primarily for use in current drive experiments. RF current drive using phased antennas has been demonstrated in both the JET and DIII-D tokamaks, and both devices are planning to operate new four-element arrays beginning early next year. Features of antenna design that are relevant to phased operation and production of directional spectra are reviewed. Recent advances in the design of the feed circuits and the related control systems for these arrays should substantially improve their performance, by reducing the coupling seen by the matching networks and rf power supplies caused by the mutual impedance of the array elements. The feed circuit designs for the DIII-D and JET phased antenna arrays are compared. The two configurations differ significantly due to the fact that one power amplifier is used for the entire array in the former case, and one per element in the latter. The JET system uses automatic feedback control of matching, phase and amplitude of antenna currents, and the transmitter power balance. The design of this system is discussed, and a time dependent model used to predict its behavior is described

  13. Increasing Pulsar Timing Array Sensitivity Through Addition of Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCesar, Megan E.; Crawford, Fronefield; Ferrara, Elizabeth; Lynch, Ryan; Mingarelli, Chiara; Levin Preston, Lina; Ransom, Scott; Romano, Joseph; Simon, Joseph; Spiewak, Renee; Stovall, Kevin; Swiggum, Joe; Taylor, Stephen; Green Bank North Celestial Cap Pulsar Survey, Fermi LAT Collaboration, Fermi Pulsar Search Consortium

    2018-01-01

    Siemens et al. (2013) and Taylor et al. (2016) demonstrated the importance of increasing the number of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) in order to increase the sensitivity of the array and decrease the time-to-detection of a gravitational wave background (GWB). In particular, they predict that adding four MSPs per year to the NANOGrav and International PTAs will likely yield a GWB detection in less than a decade. A more even distribution of MSPs across the sky is also important for discriminating a GWB signal from a non-quadrupolar background (Sampson et al., in prep). Pulsar surveys and targeted searches have consistently led to additions of 4 or more MSPs per year to PTAs. I will describe these ongoing efforts, particularly in the context of the Green Bank North Celestial Cap pulsar survey and Fermi-guided searches at Green Bank and Arecibo that seek to find MSPs in low-pulsar-density regions of the sky.

  14. The effect of applied electric field on pulsed radio frequency and pulsed direct current plasma jet array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, J. T.; Liu, X. Y.; Liu, J. H.; Xiong, Z. L.; Liu, D. W.; Lu, X. P.; Iza, F.; Kong, M. G.

    2012-01-01

    Here we compare the plasma plume propagation characteristics of a 3-channel pulsed RF plasma jet array and those of the same device operated by a pulsed dc source. For the pulsed-RF jet array, numerous long life time ions and metastables accumulated in the plasma channel make the plasma plume respond quickly to applied electric field. Its structure similar as “plasma bullet” is an anode glow indeed. For the pulsed dc plasma jet array, the strong electric field in the vicinity of the tube is the reason for the growing plasma bullet in the launching period. The repulsive forces between the growing plasma bullets result in the divergence of the pulsed dc plasma jet array. Finally, the comparison of 309 nm and 777 nm emissions between these two jet arrays suggests the high chemical activity of pulsed RF plasma jet array.

  15. A DP based scheme for real-time reconfiguration of solar cell arrays exposed to dynamic changing inhomogeneous illuminations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Liping; Brehm, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The overall energy conversion efficiency of solar cell arrays is highly effected by partial shading effects. Especially for solar panel arrays installed in environments which are exposed to inhomogeneous dynamic changing illuminations such as on roof tops of electrical vehicles the overall system...... efficiency is drastically reduced. Dynamic real-time reconfiguration of the solar panel array can reduce effects on the output efficiency due to partial shading. This results in a maximized power output of the panel array when exposed to dynamic changing illuminations. The optimal array configuration...... with respect to shading patterns can be stated as a combinatorial optimization problem and this paper proposes a dynamic programming (DP) based algorithm which finds the optimal feasible solution to reconfigure the solar panel array for maximum efficiency in real-time with linear time complexity. It is shown...

  16. Validating eddy current array probes for inspecting steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, S.P.; Cecco, V.S.; Obrutsky, L.S.

    1997-01-01

    A CANDU nuclear reactor was shut down for over one year because steam generator (SG) tubes had failed with outer diameter stress-corrosion cracking (ODSCC) in the U-bend section. Novel, single-pass eddy current transmit-receive probes, denoted as C3, were successful in detecting all significant cracks so that the cracked tubes could be plugged and the unit restarted. Significant numbers of tubes with SCC were removed from a SG in order to validate the results of the new probe. Results from metallurgical examinations were used to obtain probability-of-detection (POD) and sizing accuracy plots to quantify the performance of this new inspection technique. Though effective, the above approach of relying on tubes removed from a reactor is expensive, in terms of both economic and radiation-exposure costs. This led to a search for more affordable methods to validate inspection techniques and procedures. Methods are presented for calculating POD curves based on signal-to-noise studies using field data. Results of eddy current scans of tubes with laboratory-induced ODSCC are presented with associated POD curves. These studies appear promising in predicting realistic POD curves for new inspection technologies. They are being used to qualify an improved eddy current array probe in preparation for field use. (author)

  17. Signal encoding method for a time-of-flight PET detector using a silicon photomultiplier array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sun Il; Lee, Jae Sung

    2014-10-01

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a promising photosensor for magnetic resonance (MR) compatible time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. The compact size of the SiPM allows direct one-to-one coupling between the scintillation crystal and the photosensor, yielding better timing and energy resolutions than the light sharing methods that have to be used in photomultiplier tube (PMT) PET systems. However, the one-to-one coupling scheme requires a huge volume of readout and processing electronics if no electric signal multiplexing or encoding scheme is properly applied. In this paper, we develop an electric signal encoding scheme for SiPM array based TOF PET detector blocks with the aim of reducing the complexity and volume of the signal readout and processing electronics. In an M×N SiPM array, the output signal of each channel in the SiPM array is divided into two signal lines. These output lines are then tied together in row and column lines. The row and column signals are used to measure the energy and timing information (or vice versa) of each incident gamma-ray event, respectively. Each SiPM channel was directly coupled to a 3×3×20 mm3 LGSO crystal. The reference detector, which was used to measure timing, consisted of an R9800 PMT and a 4×4×10 mm3 LYSO crystal and had a single time resolution of ~200 ps (FWHM). Leading edge discriminators were used to determine coincident events. Dedicated front-end electronics were developed, and the timing and energy resolutions of SiPM arrays with different array sizes (4×4, 8×8, and 12×12) were compared. Breakdown voltage of each SiPM channel was measured using energy spectra within various bias voltages. Coincidence events were measured using a 22Na point source. The average coincidence time resolution of 4×4, 8×8, and 12×12 SiPM arrays were 316 ps, 320 ps, and 335 ps (FWHM), respectively. The energy resolution of 4×4, 8×8, and 12×12 SiPM arrays were 11.8%, 12.5%, and 12.8% (FWHM

  18. Effects of Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Arrays on Wave, Current, and Sediment Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruehl, K.; Roberts, J. D.; Jones, C.; Magalen, J.; James, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The characterization of the physical environment and commensurate alteration of that environment due to Wave Energy Conversion (WEC) devices, or arrays of devices, must be understood to make informed device-performance predictions, specifications of hydrodynamic loads, and environmental evaluations of eco-system responses (e.g., changes to circulation patterns, sediment dynamics, and water quality). Hydrodynamic and sediment issues associated with performance of wave-energy devices will primarily be nearshore where WEC infrastructure (e.g., anchors, piles) are exposed to large forces from the surface-wave action and currents. Wave-energy devices will be subject to additional corrosion, fouling, and wear of moving parts caused by suspended sediments in the water column. The alteration of the circulation and sediment transport patterns may also alter local ecosystems through changes in benthic habitat, circulation patterns, or other environmental parameters. Sandia National Laboratories is developing tools and performing studies to quantitatively characterize the environments where WEC devices may be installed and to assess potential affects to hydrodynamics and local sediment transport. The primary tools are wave, hydrodynamic, and sediment transport models. To ensure confidence in the resulting evaluation of system-wide effects, the models are appropriately constrained and validated with measured data where available. An extension of the US EPA's EFDC code, SNL-EFDC, provides a suitable platform for modeling the necessary hydrodynamics;it has been modified to directly incorporate output from a SWAN wave model of the region. Model development and results are presented. In this work, a model is exercised for Monterey Bay, near Santa Cruz where a WEC array could be deployed. Santa Cruz is located on the northern coast of Monterey Bay, in Central California, USA. This site was selected for preliminary research due to the readily available historical hydrodynamic data

  19. Anisotrophic currents and flux jumps in high-Tc superconducting films with self-organized arrays of planar defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurchenko, V.V.; Qviller, A.J.; Mozhaev, P.B.; Mozhaeva, J.E.; Hansen, J.B.; Jacobsen, C.S.; Kotelyanskii, I.M.; Pan, A.V.; Johansen, T.H.

    2010-01-01

    Regular arrays of planar defects with a period of a few nanometers can be introduced in superconducting YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ (YBCO) thin films by depositing them on vicinal (also called miscut or tilted) substrates. This results in the anisotropy of critical currents flowing in the plane of the film. We present results of real-time magneto-optical imaging (MOI) of magnetic flux distribution and dynamics in a series of YBCO thin films deposited on NdGaO 3 substrates with different miscut angles θ. MOI allows reconstructing the current flow profiles. From the angle formed between domains with different directions of the current flow we determine the anisotropy parameter of the in-plane current, as well as its field and temperature dependences. The artificially introduced defects also have a dramatic effect on the dynamics of the flux propagation: for 10 o o the magnetic flux propagates along the easy channels intermittently, i.e. in a form of flux jumps. This behavior is indicative of thermo-magnetic instability in superconductors, but we argue that this effect can be of a different nature.

  20. Integrating Scientific Array Processing into Standard SQL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misev, Dimitar; Bachhuber, Johannes; Baumann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    We live in a time that is dominated by data. Data storage is cheap and more applications than ever accrue vast amounts of data. Storing the emerging multidimensional data sets efficiently, however, and allowing them to be queried by their inherent structure, is a challenge many databases have to face today. Despite the fact that multidimensional array data is almost always linked to additional, non-array information, array databases have mostly developed separately from relational systems, resulting in a disparity between the two database categories. The current SQL standard and SQL DBMS supports arrays - and in an extension also multidimensional arrays - but does so in a very rudimentary and inefficient way. This poster demonstrates the practicality of an SQL extension for array processing, implemented in a proof-of-concept multi-faceted system that manages a federation of array and relational database systems, providing transparent, efficient and scalable access to the heterogeneous data in them.

  1. Optimization of the short-circuit current in an InP nanowire array solar cell through opto-electronic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Kivisaari, Pyry; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Anttu, Nicklas

    2016-09-23

    InP nanowire arrays with axial p-i-n junctions are promising devices for next-generation photovoltaics, with a demonstrated efficiency of 13.8%. However, the short-circuit current in such arrays does not match their absorption performance. Here, through combined optical and electrical modeling, we study how the absorption of photons and separation of the resulting photogenerated electron-hole pairs define and limit the short-circuit current in the nanowires. We identify how photogenerated minority carriers in the top n segment (i.e. holes) diffuse to the ohmic top contact where they recombine without contributing to the short-circuit current. In our modeling, such contact recombination can lead to a 60% drop in the short-circuit current. To hinder such hole diffusion, we include a gradient doping profile in the n segment to create a front surface barrier. This approach leads to a modest 5% increase in the short-circuit current, limited by Auger recombination with increased doping. A more efficient approach is to switch the n segment to a material with a higher band gap, like GaP. Then, a much smaller number of holes is photogenerated in the n segment, strongly limiting the amount that can diffuse and disappear into the top contact. For a 500 nm long top segment, the GaP approach leads to a 50% higher short-circuit current than with an InP top segment. Such a long top segment could facilitate the fabrication and contacting of nanowire array solar cells. Such design schemes for managing minority carriers could open the door to higher performance in single- and multi-junction nanowire-based solar cells.

  2. Time delay interferometry with moving spacecraft arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinto, Massimo; Estabrook, F.B.; Armstrong, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Space-borne interferometric gravitational wave detectors, sensitive in the low-frequency (millihertz) band, will fly in the next decade. In these detectors the spacecraft-to-spacecraft light-travel-times will necessarily be unequal, time varying, and (due to aberration) have different time delays on up and down links. The reduction of data from moving interferometric laser arrays in solar orbit will in fact encounter nonsymmetric up- and down-link light time differences that are about 100 times larger than has previously been recognized. The time-delay interferometry (TDI) technique uses knowledge of these delays to cancel the otherwise dominant laser phase noise and yields a variety of data combinations sensitive to gravitational waves. Under the assumption that the (different) up- and down-link time delays are constant, we derive the TDI expressions for those combinations that rely only on four interspacecraft phase measurements. We then turn to the general problem that encompasses time dependence of the light-travel times along the laser links. By introducing a set of noncommuting time-delay operators, we show that there exists a quite general procedure for deriving generalized TDI combinations that account for the effects of time dependence of the arms. By applying our approach we are able to re-derive the 'flex-free' expression for the unequal-arm Michelson combinations X 1 , and obtain the generalized expressions for the TDI combinations called relay, beacon, monitor, and symmetric Sagnac

  3. Quality Assessment of Refractory Protective Coatings Using Multi-Frequency Eddy Current MWM-Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilberstein, Vladimir; Evans, Leslie; Huguenin, Carolene; Grundy, David; Lyons, Robert; Goldfine, Neil; Mulligan, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Demands for increased range, rate of fire, and muzzle velocity have prompted development of new refractory metal coatings. Nondestructive measurement of coating electrical conductivity and thickness is crucial to the process development and statistical process control. This paper presents absolute property coating characterization results for Ta coatings obtained with a Meandering Winding Magnetometer (MWM registered ) eddy-current sensor and MWM-Array sensor. The measured coating conductivity indicates the ratio of the intended α-Ta to the undesirable β-Ta

  4. Computer programs for the acquisition and analysis of eddy-current array probe data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pate, J.R.; Dodd, C.V.

    1996-07-01

    Objective of the Improved Eddy-Curent ISI (in-service inspection) for Steam Generators Tubing program is to upgrade and validate eddy-current inspections, including probes, instrumentation, and data processing techniques for ISI of new, used, and repaired steam generator tubes; to improve defect detection, classification and characterization as affected by diameter and thickness variations, denting, probe wobble, tube sheet, tube supports, copper and sludge deposits, even when defect types and other variables occur in combination; to transfer this advanced technology to NRC's mobile NDE laboratory and staff. This report documents computer programs that were developed for acquisition of eddy-current data from specially designed 16-coil array probes. Complete code as well as instructions for use are provided

  5. Effects of drive current rise-time and initial load density distribution on Z-pinch characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Yao-Yong; Guo Yong-Hui; Wang Wen-Sheng; Qiu Ai-Ci

    2005-01-01

    A two-dimensional, three-temperature radiation magneto-hydrodynamics model is applied to the investigation of evolutional trends in x-ray radiation power, energy, peak plasma temperature and density as functions of drive current rise-time and initial load density distribution by using the typical experimental parameters of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch on the Qiangguang-Ⅰ generator. The numerical results show that as the drive current rise-time is shortened, x-ray radiation peak power, energy, peak plasma density and peak ion temperature increase approximately linearly, but among them the x-ray radiation peak power increases more quickly. As the initial plasma density distribution in the radial direction becomes gradually flattened, the peak radiation power and the peak ion-temperature almost exponentially increase, while the radiation energy and the peak plasma density change only a little. The main effect of shortening drive current rise-time is to enhance compression of plasma, and the effect of flattening initial load density distribution in the radial direction is to raise the plasma temperature. Both of the approaches elevate the x-ray peak radiation power.

  6. A Pt/TiO(2)/Ti Schottky-type selection diode for alleviating the sneak current in resistance switching memory arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woo Young; Kim, Gun Hwan; Seok, Jun Yeong; Kim, Kyung Min; Song, Seul Ji; Lee, Min Hwan; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2010-05-14

    This study examined the properties of Schottky-type diodes composed of Pt/TiO(2)/Ti, where the Pt/TiO(2) and TiO(2)/Ti junctions correspond to the blocking and ohmic contacts, respectively, as the selection device for a resistive switching cross-bar array. An extremely high forward-to-reverse current ratio of approximately 10(9) was achieved at 1 V when the TiO(2) film thickness was 19 nm. TiO(2) film was grown by atomic layer deposition at a substrate temperature of 250 degrees C. Conductive atomic force microscopy revealed that the forward current flew locally, which limits the maximum forward current density to current measurement showed a local forward current density as high as approximately 10(5) A cm(-2). Therefore, it is expected that this type of Schottky diode effectively suppresses the sneak current without adverse interference effects in a nano-scale resistive switching cross-bar array with high block density.

  7. System for evaluating weld quality using eddy currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Evgueni I.; Hay, Jacob

    2017-12-12

    Electromagnetic and eddy current techniques for fast automated real-time and near real-time inspection and monitoring systems for high production rate joining processes. An eddy current system, array and method for the fast examination of welds to detect anomalies such as missed seam (MS) and lack of penetration (LOP) the system, array and methods capable of detecting and sizing surface and slightly subsurface flaws at various orientations in connection with at least the first and second weld pass.

  8. Diameter- and current-density-dependent growth orientation of hexagonal CdSe nanowire arrays via electrodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hongyu; Li Xiaohong; Chen Yan; Guo Defeng; Xie Yanwu; Li Wei; Zhang Xiangyi; Liu Baoting

    2009-01-01

    Controlling the growth orientation of semiconductor nanowire arrays is of vital importance for their applications in the fields of nanodevices. In the present work, hexagonal CdSe nanowire arrays with various preferential growth orientations have been successfully yielded by employing the electrodeposition technique using porous alumina as templates (PATs). We demonstrate by experimental and theoretical efforts that the growth orientation of the CdSe nanowires can be effectively manipulated by varying either the nanopore diameter of the PATs or the deposited current density, which has significant effects on the optical properties of the CdSe nanowires. The present study provides an alternative approach to tuning the growth direction of electrodeposited nanowires and thus is of importance for the fabrication of nanodevices with controlled functional properties.

  9. Diameter- and current-density-dependent growth orientation of hexagonal CdSe nanowire arrays via electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Hongyu; Li Xiaohong; Chen Yan; Guo Defeng; Xie Yanwu; Li Wei; Zhang Xiangyi [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Liu Baoting, E-mail: xyzh66@ysu.edu.c [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China)

    2009-10-21

    Controlling the growth orientation of semiconductor nanowire arrays is of vital importance for their applications in the fields of nanodevices. In the present work, hexagonal CdSe nanowire arrays with various preferential growth orientations have been successfully yielded by employing the electrodeposition technique using porous alumina as templates (PATs). We demonstrate by experimental and theoretical efforts that the growth orientation of the CdSe nanowires can be effectively manipulated by varying either the nanopore diameter of the PATs or the deposited current density, which has significant effects on the optical properties of the CdSe nanowires. The present study provides an alternative approach to tuning the growth direction of electrodeposited nanowires and thus is of importance for the fabrication of nanodevices with controlled functional properties.

  10. Linear-array systems for aerospace NDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Robert A.; Willsher, Stephen J.; Bending, Jamie M.

    1999-01-01

    Rapid large-area inspection of composite structures for impact damage and multi-layered aluminum skins for corrosion has been a recognized priority for several years in both military and civil aerospace applications. Approaches to this requirement have followed two clearly different routes: the development of novel large-area inspection systems, and the enhancement of current ultrasonic or eddy-current methods to reduce inspection times. Ultrasonic inspection is possible with standard flaw detection equipment but the addition of a linear ultrasonic array could reduce inspection times considerably. In order to investigate their potential, 9-element and 17-element linear ultrasonic arrays for composites, and 64-element arrays for aluminum skins, have been developed to DERA specifications for use with the ANDSCAN area scanning system. A 5 m 2 composite wing surface has been scanned with a scan resolution of approximately 3 mm in 6 hours. With subsequent software and hardware improvements all four composite wing surfaces (top/bottom, left/right) of a military fighter aircraft can potentially be inspected in less than a day. Array technology has been very widely used in the medical ultrasound field although rarely above 10 MHz, whereas lap-joint inspection requires a pulse center-frequency of 12 to 20 MHz in order to resolve the separate interfaces in the lap joint. A 128 mm-long multi-element array of 5 mmx2 mm ultrasonic elements for use with the ANDSCAN scanning software was produced to a DERA specification by an NDT manufacturer with experience in the medical imaging field. This paper analyses the performance of the transducers that have been produced and evaluates their use in scanning systems of different configurations

  11. Nucleation size of hcp-CoPt dot arrays characterized by time dependence of coercivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, N; Kitakami, O [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan); Mitsuzuka, K; Shimatsu, T; Aoi, H, E-mail: kikuchin@tagen.tohoku.ac.j [Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    The magnetization reversal process for dot arrays is likely to start from a nucleation followed by propagation process. In this study, we estimated the nucleation diameter D{sub n} for dot arrays made from thin hcp-CoPt perpendicular films (thickness {delta}=3 nm) and Co/Pt multilayered films ({delta}=9 nm), respectively. The dot diameter, D, was varied from 30 to 200 nm for CoPt dot arrays, and from 40 to 80 nm for Co/Pt dot arrays. The remanence coercivity was measured at measurement times t' = 10{sup 3} s and 10{sup -5} s (pulse field), and defined as H{sub r} and H{sub r}{sup P}. The energy barrier {Delta}E was evaluated by fitting H{sub r} and H{sub r}{sup P} to Sharrock's equation. The value of D{sub n} was estimated from {Delta}E, {delta} and the effective magnetic anisotropy of dot arrays including the demagnetizing energy due to the dot shape K{sub u}{sup eff}. D{sub n} was independent of Din both series of dot arrays, and about 17 nm for CoPt dot arrays and about 11 nm for Co/Pt dot arrays. These values were close to both the grain size and the exchange length of these films.

  12. Ultra Light Axionic Dark Matter: Galactic Halos and Implications for Observations with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Martino, Ivan; Broadhurst, Tom; Tye, S.-H. Henry; Chiueh, Tzihong; Shive, Hsi-Yu; Lazkoz, Ruth

    2018-01-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm successfully explains the cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshifts. However, it fails when probing the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy satellites. Moreover, the lack of experimental detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) favors alternative candidates such as light axionic dark matter that naturally arise in string theory. Cosmological N-body simulations have shown that axionic dark matter forms a solitonic core of size of ≃ 150 pc in the innermost region of the galactic halos. The oscillating scalar field associated to the axionic dark matter halo produces an oscillating gravitational potential that induces a time dilation of the pulse arrival time of ≃ 400 ns/(m_B/10^{-22} eV) for pulsar within such a solitonic core. Over the whole galaxy, the averaged predicted signal may be detectable with current and forthcoming pulsar timing array telescopes.

  13. A Four-Gap Glass-RPC Time-of-Flight Array with 90 ps Time Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Akindinov, A; Formenti, F; Golovine, V; Klempt, W; Kluge, A; Martemyanov, A N; Martinengo, P; Pinhão, J; Smirnitsky, A V; Spegel, M; Szymanski, P; Zalipska, J

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the performance of a prototype developed in the context of the ALICE time-of-flight research and development system. The detector module consists of a 32-channel array of 3 x 3 cm2 glass resistive plate chamber (RPC) cells, each of which has four accurately space gaps of 0.3 mm thickness arranged as a pair of double-gap resisitive plate chambers. Operated with a nonflammable gas mixture at atmospheric pressure, the system achieved a time resolution of 90 ps at 98% efficiency with good uniformity and moderate crosstalk. This result shows the feasibility of large-area high-resolution time-of-flight systems based on RPCs at affordable cost.

  14. Sensor Fusion Techniques for Phased-Array Eddy Current and Phased-Array Ultrasound Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrowood, Lloyd F. [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2018-03-15

    Sensor (or Data) fusion is the process of integrating multiple data sources to produce more consistent, accurate and comprehensive information than is provided by a single data source. Sensor fusion may also be used to combine multiple signals from a single modality to improve the performance of a particular inspection technique. Industrial nondestructive testing may utilize multiple sensors to acquire inspection data depending upon the object under inspection and the anticipated types of defects that can be identified. Sensor fusion can be performed at various levels of signal abstraction with each having its strengths and weaknesses. A multimodal data fusion strategy first proposed by Heideklang and Shokouhi that combines spatially scattered detection locations to improve detection performance of surface-breaking and near-surface cracks in ferromagnetic metals is shown using a surface inspection example and is then extended for volumetric inspections. Utilizing data acquired from an Olympus Omniscan MX2 from both phased array eddy current and ultrasound probes on test phantoms, single and multilevel fusion techniques are employed to integrate signals from the two modalities. Preliminary results demonstrate how confidence in defect identification and interpretation benefit from sensor fusion techniques. Lastly, techniques for integrating data into radiographic and volumetric imagery from computed tomography are described and results are presented.

  15. A Novel Read Scheme for Large Size One-Resistor Resistive Random Access Memory Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zackriya, Mohammed; Kittur, Harish M; Chin, Albert

    2017-02-10

    The major issue of RRAM is the uneven sneak path that limits the array size. For the first time record large One-Resistor (1R) RRAM array of 128x128 is realized, and the array cells at the worst case still have good Low-/High-Resistive State (LRS/HRS) current difference of 378 nA/16 nA, even without using the selector device. This array has extremely low read current of 9.7 μA due to both low-current RRAM device and circuit interaction, where a novel and simple scheme of a reference point by half selected cell and a differential amplifier (DA) were implemented in the circuit design.

  16. Development of a LaBr3(Ce Fast-timing Array for FAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts O.J.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A γ-ray spectrometer with fast-timing capabilities, constructed of LaBr3(Ce:5% detectors, is under development for use at the future Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR. The physics aims of this device are to measure the half-lives of excited states in the region of ~50 ps to several ns, in exotic nuclei. Monte-Carlo simulations using the GEANT4 software package have determined the final design of this fast-timing array by calculating the full-energy peak efficiencies of several different detector geometries. The results of the simulated efficiencies for each configuration were used to calculate the timing precision. Consequently, an array of thirty six, ø3.8×5.1 cm cylindrical crystals was found to be the optimum configuration. The detectors were purchased and subsequently characterised, with each detector found to have intrinsic energy and timing resolutions of ~ 2.8 % (FWHM and ~ 210 ps (FWHM for the 1173 and 1332 keV decays from 60Co.

  17. Leakage analysis of crossbar memristor arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.

    2014-07-01

    Crossbar memristor arrays provide a promising high density alternative for the current memory and storage technologies. These arrays suffer from parasitic current components that significantly increase the power consumption, and could ruin the readout operation. In this work we study the trade-off between the crossbar array density and the power consumption required for its readout. Our analysis is based on simulating full memristor arrays on a SPICE platform.

  18. Design Concept of Array ECT Sensor for Steam Generator Tubing Inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chan Hee; Lee, Tae Hun; Yoo, Hyun Ju [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd. CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The eddy current testing, which is one of the nondestructive examination methods, is widely used for the inspection of heat exchangers including steam generator tubing in the nuclear power plant. It uses electromagnetic induction to detect flaws in conductive materials. Two types of eddy current probes are conventionally used for the inspection of steam generator tubing according to the main purpose. One is the bobbin probe technology and the other is the rotating probe. During the inspection, they have restrictions for the flaw detection or the inspection speed. An array probe can be alternative to the bobbin and rotating probes. The design concept of array coils with high sensitivity is described in this paper. It is expected that the eddy current testing using this type of array sensors may provide high detectability and resolution for flaws in steam generator tubing. Eddy current technology has some barriers for the inspection of steam generator tubing in the nuclear power plant. Bobbin probes offer poor circumferential crack detection and rotating probes are time and money consuming due to the mechanical rotation. Array probe inspection technique can replace bobbin and rotating probe techniques due to its sensitivity for flaw detection and inspection speed. In general, circular-shaped coils are considered in an array eddy current probe.

  19. Evaluation and field validation of Eddy-Current array probes for steam generator tube inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, C.V.; Pate, J.R.

    1996-07-01

    The objective of the Improved Eddy-Current ISI for Steam Generator Tubing program is to upgrade and validate eddy-current inspections, including probes, instrumentation, and data processing techniques for inservice inspection of new, used, and repaired steam generator tubes; to improve defect detection, classification, and characterization as affected by diameter and thickness variations, denting, probe wobble, tube sheet, tube supports, copper and sludge deposits, even when defect types and other variables occur in combination; to transfer this advanced technology to NRC's mobile NDE laboratory and staff. This report describes the design of specialized high-speed 16-coil eddy-current array probes. Both pancake and reflection coils are considered. Test results from inspections using the probes in working steam generators are given. Computer programs developed for probe calculations are also supplied

  20. Development of FIR arrays with integrating amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Erick T.

    1988-08-01

    The development of optimized photoconductor arrays suitable for far infrared space astronomical applications are described. Although the primary impetus is the production of a 16 by 16 element Ge:Ga demonstration array for SIRTF, the extension of this technology to Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) is considered. The optimization of Ge:Ga and Ge:Be photoconductor materials is discussed. In collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, measurements of FIR photoconductors with quantum efficiencies greater than 20 percent at 100 micrometers, and dark currents below 300 electrons/s are presented. Integrating J-FET amplifier technology is discussed. The current generation of integrating amplifiers has a demonstrated read noise of less than 20 electrons for an integration time of 100 s. The design is shown for a stackable 16 x n Ge:Ga array that utilizes a 16-channel monolithic version of the J-FET integrator. A part of the design is the use of a thin, thermally insulating substrate that allows the electronics to operate at the optimum temperature of 50 K while maintaining thermal and optical isolation from the detectors at 2 K. The power dissipation for the array is less than 16 mW. The array design may particularly be applicable to high resolution imaging spectrometers for LDR.

  1. Photon-Counting Arrays for Time-Resolved Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Michel Antolovic

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a camera comprising 512 × 128 pixels capable of single-photon detection and gating with a maximum frame rate of 156 kfps. The photon capture is performed through a gated single-photon avalanche diode that generates a digital pulse upon photon detection and through a digital one-bit counter. Gray levels are obtained through multiple counting and accumulation, while time-resolved imaging is achieved through a 4-ns gating window controlled with subnanosecond accuracy by a field-programmable gate array. The sensor, which is equipped with microlenses to enhance its effective fill factor, was electro-optically characterized in terms of sensitivity and uniformity. Several examples of capture of fast events are shown to demonstrate the suitability of the approach.

  2. Bi-dimensional arrays of SPAD for time-resolved single photon imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tudisco, S.; Lanzano, L.; Musumeci, F.; Neri, L.; Privitera, S.; Scordino, A.; Condorelli, G.; Fallica, G.; Mazzillo, M.; Sanfilippo, D.; Valvo, G.

    2009-01-01

    Many scientific areas like astronomy, biophysics, biomedicine, nuclear and plasma science, etc. are interested in the development of a new time-resolved single photon imaging device. Such a device represents today one of the most challenging goals in the field of photonics. In collaboration with Catania R and D staff of ST-Microelectronics (STM) we created, during the last few years, a new avalanche photosensor-Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) able to detect and count, with excellent performance, single photons. Further we will discuss the possible realization of a single photon imaging device through the many elements integration (bi-dimensional arrays) of SPADs. In order to achieve the goal, it is also important to develop an appropriate readout strategy able to address the time information of each individual sensor and in order to read a great number of elements easily. First prototypes were designed and manufactured by STM and the results are reported here. In the paper we will discuss in particular: (i) sensor performance (gain, photodetection efficiency, timing, after-pulsing, etc.); (ii) array performance (layout, cross-talk, etc.); (iii) readout strategy (quenching, electronics), and (iv) first imaging results (general performance).

  3. Short-wavelength infrared imaging using low dark current InGaAs detector arrays and vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser illuminators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdougal, Michael; Geske, Jon; Wang, Chad; Follman, David

    2011-06-01

    We describe the factors that go into the component choices for a short wavelength IR (SWIR) imager, which include the SWIR sensor, the lens, and the illuminator. We have shown the factors for reducing dark current, and shown that we can achieve well below 1.5 nA/cm2 for 15 μm devices at 7 °C. In addition, we have mated our InGaAs detector arrays to 640×512 readout integrated integrated circuits to make focal plane arrays (FPAs). The resulting FPAs are capable of imaging photon fluxes with wavelengths between 1 and 1.6 μm at low light levels. The dark current associated with these FPAs is extremely low, exhibiting a mean dark current density of 0.26 nA/cm2 at 0 °C. Noise due to the readout can be reduced from 95 to 57 electrons by using off-chip correlated double sampling. In addition, Aerius has developed laser arrays that provide flat illumination in scenes that are normally light-starved. The illuminators have 40% wall-plug efficiency and provide low-speckle illumination, and provide artifact-free imagery versus conventional laser illuminators.

  4. Pulsar Timing Array Based Search for Supermassive Black Hole Binaries in the Square Kilometer Array Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Mohanty, Soumya D

    2017-04-14

    The advent of next generation radio telescope facilities, such as the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), will usher in an era where a pulsar timing array (PTA) based search for gravitational waves (GWs) will be able to use hundreds of well timed millisecond pulsars rather than the few dozens in existing PTAs. A realistic assessment of the performance of such an extremely large PTA must take into account the data analysis challenge posed by an exponential increase in the parameter space volume due to the large number of so-called pulsar phase parameters. We address this problem and present such an assessment for isolated supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) searches using a SKA era PTA containing 10^{3} pulsars. We find that an all-sky search will be able to confidently detect nonevolving sources with a redshifted chirp mass of 10^{10}  M_{⊙} out to a redshift of about 28 (corresponding to a rest-frame chirp mass of 3.4×10^{8}  M_{⊙}). We discuss the important implications that the large distance reach of a SKA era PTA has on GW observations from optically identified SMBHB candidates. If no SMBHB detections occur, a highly unlikely scenario in the light of our results, the sky-averaged upper limit on strain amplitude will be improved by about 3 orders of magnitude over existing limits.

  5. ASIC Readout Circuit Architecture for Large Geiger Photodiode Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile, Stefan; Lipson, Jerold

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a new class of readout integrated circuit (ROIC) arrays to be operated with Geiger avalanche photodiode (GPD) arrays, by integrating multiple functions at the pixel level (smart-pixel or active pixel technology) in 250-nm CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) processes. In order to pack a maximum of functions within a minimum pixel size, the ROIC array is a full, custom application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) design using a mixed-signal CMOS process with compact primitive layout cells. The ROIC array was processed to allow assembly in bump-bonding technology with photon-counting infrared detector arrays into 3-D imaging cameras (LADAR). The ROIC architecture was designed to work with either common- anode Si GPD arrays or common-cathode InGaAs GPD arrays. The current ROIC pixel design is hardwired prior to processing one of the two GPD array configurations, and it has the provision to allow soft reconfiguration to either array (to be implemented into the next ROIC array generation). The ROIC pixel architecture implements the Geiger avalanche quenching, bias, reset, and time to digital conversion (TDC) functions in full-digital design, and uses time domain over-sampling (vernier) to allow high temporal resolution at low clock rates, increased data yield, and improved utilization of the laser beam.

  6. Using adaptive antenna array in LTE with MIMO for space-time processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdourahamane Ahmed Ali

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The actual methods of improvement the existent wireless transmission systems are proposed. Mathematical apparatus is considered and proved by models, graph of which are shown, using the adaptive array antenna in LTE with MIMO for space-time processing. The results show that improvements, which are joined with space-time processing, positively reflects on LTE cell size or on throughput

  7. Time Reversal Acoustic Structural Health Monitoring Using Array of Embedded Sensors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Time Reversal Acoustic (TRA) structural health monitoring with an embedded sensor array represents a new approach to in-situ nondestructive evaluation of air-space...

  8. Status On Multi-microsecond Prepulse Technique On Sphinx Machine Going From Nested To Single Wire Array For 800 ns Implosion Time Z-pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, P.; Calamy, H.; Grunenwald, J.; Lassalle, F.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A.; Georges, A.; Morell, A.; Bedoch, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    The Sphinx machine[1] is a 6 MA, 1 μS driver based on the LTD technology, used for Z-pinch experiments. Important improvements of Sphinx radiation output were recently obtained using a multi-microsecond current prepulse[2]. Total power per unit of length is multiplied by a factor of 6 and FWHM divided by a factor of 2.5. Early breakdown of the wires during the prepulse phase dramatically changes the ablation phase leading to an improvement of axial homogeneity of both the implosion and the final radiating column. As a consequence, the cathode bubble observed on classical shots is definitively removed. The implosion is then centered and zippering effect is reduced, leading to simultaneous x-ray emission of the whole length. A great reproducibility is obtained. Nested arrays were used before to mitigate the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during the implosion phase. Further experiments with pre-pulse technique are described here were inner array was removed. The goal of these experiments was to see if long prepulse could give stable enough implosion with single array and at the same time increase the η parameter by reducing the mass of the load. Experimental results of single wire array loads of typical dimension 5 cm in height with implosion time between 700 and 900 ns and diameter varying between 80 and 140 mm are given. Parameters of the loads were varying in term of radius and number of wires. Comparisons with nested wire array loads are done and trends are proposed. Characteristics of both the implosion and the final radiating column are shown. 2D MHD numerical simulations of single wire array become easier as there is no interaction between outer and inner array anymore. A systematic study was done using injection mass model to benchmark simulation with experiments.

  9. Status On Multi-microsecond Prepulse Technique On Sphinx Machine Going From Nested To Single Wire Array For 800 ns Implosion Time Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maury, P.; Calamy, H.; Grunenwald, J.; Lassalle, F.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A.; Georges, A.; Morell, A.; Bedoch, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    The Sphinx machine [1] is a 6 MA, 1 μS driver based on the LTD technology, used for Z-pinch experiments. Important improvements of Sphinx radiation output were recently obtained using a multi-microsecond current prepulse [2] . Total power per unit of length is multiplied by a factor of 6 and FWHM divided by a factor of 2.5. Early breakdown of the wires during the prepulse phase dramatically changes the ablation phase leading to an improvement of axial homogeneity of both the implosion and the final radiating column. As a consequence, the cathode bubble observed on classical shots is definitively removed. The implosion is then centered and zippering effect is reduced, leading to simultaneous x-ray emission of the whole length. A great reproducibility is obtained. Nested arrays were used before to mitigate the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during the implosion phase. Further experiments with pre-pulse technique are described here were inner array was removed. The goal of these experiments was to see if long prepulse could give stable enough implosion with single array and at the same time increase the η parameter by reducing the mass of the load. Experimental results of single wire array loads of typical dimension 5 cm in height with implosion time between 700 and 900 ns and diameter varying between 80 and 140 mm are given. Parameters of the loads were varying in term of radius and number of wires. Comparisons with nested wire array loads are done and trends are proposed. Characteristics of both the implosion and the final radiating column are shown. 2D MHD numerical simulations of single wire array become easier as there is no interaction between outer and inner array anymore. A systematic study was done using injection mass model to benchmark simulation with experiments.

  10. Daytime Solar Heating of Photovoltaic Arrays in Low Density Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galofaro, J.; Vayner, B.; Ferguson, D.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the current work is to determine the out-gassing rate of H2O molecules for a solar array placed under daytime solar heating (full sunlight) conditions typically encountered in a Low Earth Orbital (LEO) environment. Arc rates are established for individual arrays held at 14 C and are used as a baseline for future comparisons. Radiated thermal solar flux incident to the array is simulated by mounting a stainless steel panel equipped with resistive heating elements several centimeters behind the array. A thermal plot of the heater plate temperature and the array temperature as a function of heating time is then obtained. A mass spectrometer is used to record the levels of partial pressure of water vapor in the test chamber after each of the 5 heating/cooling cycles. Each of the heating cycles was set to time duration of 40 minutes to simulate the daytime solar heat flux to the array over a single orbit. Finally the array is cooled back to ambient temperature after 5 complete cycles and the arc rates of the solar arrays is retested. A comparison of the various data is presented with rather some unexpected results.

  11. Do Changes in Current Flow as a Result of Arrays of Tidal Turbines Have an Effect on Benthic Communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kregting, Louise; Elsaesser, Bjoern; Kennedy, Robert; Smyth, David; O'Carroll, Jack; Savidge, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of tidal energy converters have the potential to provide clean renewable energy for future generations. Benthic communities may, however, be affected by changes in current speeds resulting from arrays of tidal converters located in areas characterised by strong currents. Current speed, together with bottom type and depth, strongly influence benthic community distributions; however the interaction of these factors in controlling benthic dynamics in high energy environments is poorly understood. The Strangford Lough Narrows, the location of SeaGen, the world's first single full-scale, grid-compliant tidal energy extractor, is characterised by spatially heterogenous high current flows. A hydrodynamic model was used to select a range of benthic community study sites that had median flow velocities between 1.5-2.4 m/s in a depth range of 25-30 m. 25 sites were sampled for macrobenthic community structure using drop down video survey to test the sensitivity of the distribution of benthic communities to changes in the flow field. A diverse range of species were recorded which were consistent with those for high current flow environments and corresponding to very tide-swept faunal communities in the EUNIS classification. However, over the velocity range investigated, no changes in benthic communities were observed. This suggested that the high physical disturbance associated with the high current flows in the Strangford Narrows reflected the opportunistic nature of the benthic species present with individuals being continuously and randomly affected by turbulent forces and physical damage. It is concluded that during operation, the removal of energy by marine tidal energy arrays in the far-field is unlikely to have a significant effect on benthic communities in high flow environments. The results are of major significance to developers and regulators in the tidal energy industry when considering the environmental impacts for site licences.

  12. The anodization synthesis of copper oxide nanosheet arrays and their photoelectrochemical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Xia [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Zheng, Hongmei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials and Devices of Anhui Province, Hefei 230009 (China); Xu, Guangqing, E-mail: gqxu1979@hfut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials and Devices of Anhui Province, Hefei 230009 (China); Zhao, Jiebo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Cui, Lihua [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beifang University of Nationalities, Yinchuan 750021 (China); Cui, Jiewu; Qin, Yongqiang; Wang, Yan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Zhang, Yong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials and Devices of Anhui Province, Hefei 230009 (China); Wu, Yucheng, E-mail: ycwu@hfut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials and Devices of Anhui Province, Hefei 230009 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Graphical abstract: Current-time and potential-time curves of the copper foil anodization process, CV of copper substrate in anodization solution and SEM morphologies of anodization products on Cu substrates obtained at different time. - Highlights: • Copper oxides nanosheet arrays were achieved via anodization method. • The growth mechanisms of the copper anodization process were studied. • Photoelectrochemical performances of copper oxides NSAs were studied. - Abstract: We studied the growth of copper oxide nanosheet arrays on copper foil via a simple anodization method. The structures, morphologies, and elemental compositions of the specimens were characterized with an X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscope, high resolution transmission electron microscope, and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer. The copper oxide (Cu{sub 2}O and CuO) nanosheet arrays were comprised of 30-nm-thick nanosheets that stand vertically on the Cu substrate. The anodizing parameters, such as the current density, temperature, and polyethylene glycol concentration, were optimized to obtain the regular nanosheet arrays. The optical absorption properties of the anodized products were evaluated using a diffuse reflectance spectrometer, and broad and strong optical absorption bands arising from the UV to visible region were observed. The photoelectrochemical performance of the nanosheet arrays was measured with chronoamperometry and cyclic voltammetry on an electrochemical workstation equipped with a Xe lamp (wavelength >400 nm). A negative photocurrent was obtained due to the p-type semiconductor of the copper oxides. The copper oxide nanosheet arrays achieve the highest photocurrent of 0.4 mA/cm{sup 2} at the current density of 1.0 A/dm{sup 2}, temperature of 70 °C, and polyethylene glycol concentration of 0.5 g/L.

  13. Operational method of a ferroelectric (Fe)-NAND flash memory array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shouyu; Takahashi, Mitue; Li, Qiu-Hong; Sakai, Shigeki; Takeuchi, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Operations of arrayed ferroelectric (Fe)-NAND flash memory cells: erase, program and read were demonstrated for the first time using a small cell array of four word lines by two NAND strings. The memory cells and select-gate transistors were all n-channel Pt/SrBi 2 Ta 2 O 9 /Hf-Al-O/Si ferroelectric-gate field effect transistors. The erase was performed by applying 10 µs wide 7 V pulses to n- and p-wells. The program was performed by applying 10 µs wide 7 V pulses to selected word lines. Accumulated read currents of 51 programmed patterns in the Fe-NAND flash memory cell array successfully showed distribution of the two distinguishable '0' and '1' states. The margin between the two states became wider by applying a verification technique in programming a cell out of the eight. Retention times of bit-line currents were obtained over 33 h for both the '0' and '1' states in a program pattern

  14. Dense Array Optimization of Cross-Flow Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherl, Isabel; Strom, Benjamin; Brunton, Steven; Polagye, Brian

    2017-11-01

    Cross-flow turbines, where the axis of rotation is perpendicular to the freestream flow, can be used to convert the kinetic energy in wind or water currents to electrical power. By taking advantage of mean and time-resolved wake structures, the optimal density of an array of cross-flow turbines has the potential for higher power output per unit area of land or sea-floor than an equivalent array of axial-flow turbines. In addition, dense arrays in tidal or river channels may be able to further elevate efficiency by exploiting flow confinement and surface proximity. In this work, a two-turbine array is optimized experimentally in a recirculating water channel. The spacing between turbines, as well as individual and coordinated turbine control strategies are optimized. Array efficiency is found to exceed the maximum efficiency for a sparse array (i.e., no interaction between turbines) for stream-wise rotor spacing of less than two diameters. Results are discussed in the context of wake measurements made behind a single rotor.

  15. An IBM PC-based math model for space station solar array simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    This report discusses and documents the design, development, and verification of a microcomputer-based solar cell math model for simulating the Space Station's solar array Initial Operational Capability (IOC) reference configuration. The array model is developed utilizing a linear solar cell dc math model requiring only five input parameters: short circuit current, open circuit voltage, maximum power voltage, maximum power current, and orbit inclination. The accuracy of this model is investigated using actual solar array on orbit electrical data derived from the Solar Array Flight Experiment/Dynamic Augmentation Experiment (SAFE/DAE), conducted during the STS-41D mission. This simulator provides real-time simulated performance data during the steady state portion of the Space Station orbit (i.e., array fully exposed to sunlight). Eclipse to sunlight transients and shadowing effects are not included in the analysis, but are discussed briefly. Integrating the Solar Array Simulator (SAS) into the Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) subsystem is also discussed.

  16. Analysis of mean time to data loss of fault-tolerant disk arrays RAID-6 based on specialized Markov chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, P. A.; D'K Novikova Freyre Shavier, G.

    2018-03-01

    This scientific paper is devoted to the analysis of the mean time to data loss of redundant disk arrays RAID-6 with alternation of data considering different failure rates of disks both in normal state of the disk array and in degraded and rebuild states, and also nonzero time of the disk replacement. The reliability model developed by the authors on the basis of the Markov chain and obtained calculation formula for estimation of the mean time to data loss (MTTDL) of the RAID-6 disk arrays are also presented. At last, the technique of estimation of the initial reliability parameters and examples of calculation of the MTTDL of the RAID-6 disk arrays for the different numbers of disks are also given.

  17. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): A Nanosecond Time Scale Stereoscopic Array Trigger System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krennrich, Frank; Buckley, J.; Byrum, K.; Dawson, J.; Drake, G.; Horan, D.; Krawzcynski, H.; Schroedter, M.

    2008-04-01

    Imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope arrays (VERITAS, HESS) have shown unprecedented background suppression capabilities for reducing cosmic-ray induced air showers, muons and night sky background fluctuations. Next-generation arrays with on the order of 100 telescopes offer larger collection areas, provide the possibility to see the air shower from more view points on the ground, have the potential to improve the sensitivity and give additional background suppression. Here we discuss the design of a fast array trigger system that has the potential to perform a real time image analysis allowing substantially improved background rate suppression at the trigger level.

  18. Aluminium K-shell radiation from 800 ns implosion time nested wire arrays. First results on the 1 MJ SPHINX generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayol, F.; Lassalle, F.; Mangeant, C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses experiments to analyze the performances of plasma radiation sources for K-shell production with long implosion time increased up to 800 ns. SPHINX generator is used to implode single and nested aluminium wire arrays Z-pinches with maximum current 3.4 MA to 3.8 MA. Results show more than 10 kJ of energy radiated above 1 keV, with pulse widths of 30-50 ns for a total radiation yield around 100 kJ [ru

  19. Anisotrophic currents and flux jumps in high-T{sub c} superconducting films with self-organized arrays of planar defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurchenko, V.V., E-mail: vitaliy.yurchenko@fys.uio.n [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.B. 1048, Blindern, 0316 Oslo (Norway); Qviller, A.J. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.B. 1048, Blindern, 0316 Oslo (Norway); Mozhaev, P.B.; Mozhaeva, J.E. [Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby DK-2800 (Denmark); Institute of Physics and Technology RAS, Moscow 117218 (Russian Federation); Hansen, J.B.; Jacobsen, C.S. [Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby DK-2800 (Denmark); Kotelyanskii, I.M. [Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics RAS, Fryazino, 141190 Moscow District (Russian Federation); Pan, A.V. [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong 2522 (Australia); Johansen, T.H. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.B. 1048, Blindern, 0316 Oslo (Norway)

    2010-10-01

    Regular arrays of planar defects with a period of a few nanometers can be introduced in superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}(YBCO) thin films by depositing them on vicinal (also called miscut or tilted) substrates. This results in the anisotropy of critical currents flowing in the plane of the film. We present results of real-time magneto-optical imaging (MOI) of magnetic flux distribution and dynamics in a series of YBCO thin films deposited on NdGaO{sub 3} substrates with different miscut angles {theta}. MOI allows reconstructing the current flow profiles. From the angle formed between domains with different directions of the current flow we determine the anisotropy parameter of the in-plane current, as well as its field and temperature dependences. The artificially introduced defects also have a dramatic effect on the dynamics of the flux propagation: for 10{sup o}<{theta}<14{sup o} the magnetic flux propagates along the easy channels intermittently, i.e. in a form of flux jumps. This behavior is indicative of thermo-magnetic instability in superconductors, but we argue that this effect can be of a different nature.

  20. Progress on the design of a data push architecture for an array of optimized time tagging pixels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, S.; Cords, D.; Mani, S.; Holbrook, B.; Atlas, E.

    1993-06-01

    A pixel array has been proposed which features a completely data driven architecture. A pixel cell has been designed that has been optimized for this readout. It retains the features of preceding designs which allow low noise operation, time stamping, analog signal processing, XY address recording, ghost elimination and sparse data transmission. The pixel design eliminates a number of problems inherent in previous designs, by the use of sampled data techniques, destructive readout, and current mode output drivers. This architecture and pixel design is directed at applications such as a forward spectrometer at the SSC, an e + e - B factory at SLAC, and fixed target experiments at FNAL

  1. Preparation of Janus Particles and Alternating Current Electrokinetic Measurements with a Rapidly Fabricated Indium Tin Oxide Electrode Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Liang; Jiang, Hong-Ren

    2017-06-23

    This article provides a simple method to prepare partially or fully coated metallic particles and to perform the rapid fabrication of electrode arrays, which can facilitate electrical experiments in microfluidic devices. Janus particles are asymmetric particles that contain two different surface properties on their two sides. To prepare Janus particles, a monolayer of silica particles is prepared by a drying process. Gold (Au) is deposited on one side of each particle using a sputtering device. The fully coated metallic particles are completed after the second coating process. To analyze the electrical surface properties of Janus particles, alternating current (AC) electrokinetic measurements, such as dielectrophoresis (DEP) and electrorotation (EROT)- which require specifically designed electrode arrays in the experimental device- are performed. However, traditional methods to fabricate electrode arrays, such as the photolithographic technique, require a series of complicated procedures. Here, we introduce a flexible method to fabricate a designed electrode array. An indium tin oxide (ITO) glass is patterned by a fiber laser marking machine (1,064 nm, 20 W, 90 to 120 ns pulse-width, and 20 to 80 kHz pulse repetition frequency) to create a four-phase electrode array. To generate the four-phase electric field, the electrodes are connected to a 2-channel function generator and to two invertors. The phase shift between the adjacent electrodes is set at either 90° (for EROT) or 180° (for DEP). Representative results of AC electrokinetic measurements with a four-phase ITO electrode array are presented.

  2. Josephson junction arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bindslev Hansen, J.; Lindelof, P.E.

    1985-01-01

    In this review we intend to cover recent work involving arrays of Josephson junctions. The work on such arrays falls naturally into three main areas of interest: 1. Technical applications of Josephson junction arrays for high-frequency devices. 2. Experimental studies of 2-D model systems (Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition, commensurate-incommensurate transition in frustrated (flux) lattices). 3. Investigations of phenomena associated with non-equilibrium superconductivity in and around Josephson junctions (with high current density). (orig./BUD)

  3. 1024-Pixel CMOS Multimodality Joint Cellular Sensor/Stimulator Array for Real-Time Holistic Cellular Characterization and Cell-Based Drug Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Seok; Aziz, Moez Karim; Li, Sensen; Chi, Taiyun; Grijalva, Sandra Ivonne; Sung, Jung Hoon; Cho, Hee Cheol; Wang, Hua

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a fully integrated CMOS multimodality joint sensor/stimulator array with 1024 pixels for real-time holistic cellular characterization and drug screening. The proposed system consists of four pixel groups and four parallel signal-conditioning blocks. Every pixel group contains 16 × 16 pixels, and each pixel includes one gold-plated electrode, four photodiodes, and in-pixel circuits, within a pixel footprint. Each pixel supports real-time extracellular potential recording, optical detection, charge-balanced biphasic current stimulation, and cellular impedance measurement for the same cellular sample. The proposed system is fabricated in a standard 130-nm CMOS process. Rat cardiomyocytes are successfully cultured on-chip. Measured high-resolution optical opacity images, extracellular potential recordings, biphasic current stimulations, and cellular impedance images demonstrate the unique advantages of the system for holistic cell characterization and drug screening. Furthermore, this paper demonstrates the use of optical detection on the on-chip cultured cardiomyocytes to real-time track their cyclic beating pattern and beating rate.

  4. SNP Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Louhelainen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The papers published in this Special Issue “SNP arrays” (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Arrays focus on several perspectives associated with arrays of this type. The range of papers vary from a case report to reviews, thereby targeting wider audiences working in this field. The research focus of SNP arrays is often human cancers but this Issue expands that focus to include areas such as rare conditions, animal breeding and bioinformatics tools. Given the limited scope, the spectrum of papers is nothing short of remarkable and even from a technical point of view these papers will contribute to the field at a general level. Three of the papers published in this Special Issue focus on the use of various SNP array approaches in the analysis of three different cancer types. Two of the papers concentrate on two very different rare conditions, applying the SNP arrays slightly differently. Finally, two other papers evaluate the use of the SNP arrays in the context of genetic analysis of livestock. The findings reported in these papers help to close gaps in the current literature and also to give guidelines for future applications of SNP arrays.

  5. Fabrication of multi-emitter array of CNT for enhancement of current density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouhan, Vijay, E-mail: vchouhan@post.kek.jp [Department of Accelerator Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Noguchi, Tsuneyuki [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization-KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kato, Shigeki [Department of Accelerator Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization-KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2011-11-11

    We studied and compared field emission properties of two kinds of emitters of randomly oriented multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), viz. continuous film emitter (CFE) and multi-emitter array (MEA). The CFE has a continuous film of MWNTs while the MEA consists of many equidistant small circular emitters. Both types of emitters were prepared by dispersing MWNTs over a titanium (Ti) film (for CFEs) or Ti circular islands (for MEAs) deposited on tantalum (Ta) followed by rooting of MWNTs into the Ti film or the Ti islands at high temperature. Emission properties of both types of emitters were analyzed with changing their emission areas. In case of the CFEs, current density decreased with an increase in emission area whereas consistent current densities were achieved from MEAs with different emission areas. In other words, the total emission current was achieved in proportion to the emission area in the case of MEAs. Additionally a high current density of 22 A/cm{sup 2} was achieved at an electric field of 8 V/{mu}m from MEAs, which was far better than that obtained from CFEs. The high current density in MEAs was attributed to edge effect, in which higher emission current is achieved from the edge of film emitter. The results indicate that the field emission characteristics can be greatly improved if a cathode contains many small equidistant circular emitters instead of a continuous film. The outstanding stability of the CFE and the MEA has been demonstrated for 2100 and 1007 h, respectively.

  6. Experiments with a Gas-Puff-On-Wire-Array Load on the GIT-12 Generator for Al K-shell Radiation Production at Microsecond Implosion Times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishlov, Alexander V.; Baksht, Rina B.; Chaikovsky, Stanislav A.; Fedunin, Anatoly V.; Fursov, Fedor I.; Kovalchuk, Boris M.; Kokshenev, Vladimir A.; Kurmaev, Nikolai E.; Labetsky, Aleksey Yu.; Oreshkin, Vladimir I.; Rousskikh, Alexander G.; Lassalle, Francis; Bayol, Frederic

    2006-01-01

    Results of the experiments carried out on the GIT-12 generator at the current level of 3.5 MA and the Z-pinch implosion times from 700 ns to 1.1 μs are presented. A multi-shell (triple-shell) load configuration with the outer gas puffs (neon) and the inner wire array (aluminum) was used in the experiments. In the course of the research, implosion dynamics of the triple-shell z-pinch was studied, and the radiation yield in the spectral range of neon and aluminum K-lines have been measured. Optimization of the inner wire array parameters aimed at obtaining the maximum aluminum K-shell radiation yield has been carried out. As a result of optimization of the gas-puff-on-wire-array Z-pinch load, the aluminum K-shell radiation yield (hv> 1.55 keV) up to 4 kJ/cm in the radiation pulse with FWHM less than 30 ns has been obtained. Comparison of the experimental results with the results of preliminary 1D RMHD simulations allows a conclusion that at least 2/3 of the generator current is switched from a gas puff to an aluminum wire array. The radiation yield in the spectral range of neon K-lines (0.92-1.55 keV) increases considerably in the shots with the inner wire array in comparison with the shots carried out with the outer gas puffs only. The radiation yield in the spectral range above 1 keV registered in the experiments reached 10 kJ/cm. The presence of a high portion of the neon plasma inside an inner wire array can limit the radiation yield in the spectral range above 1.55 keV

  7. A Steel Ball Surface Quality Inspection Method Based on a Circumferential Eddy Current Array Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huayu; Xie, Fengqin; Cao, Maoyong; Zhong, Mingming

    2017-07-01

    To efficiently inspect surface defects on steel ball bearings, a new method based on a circumferential eddy current array (CECA) sensor was proposed here. The best probe configuration, in terms of the coil quality factor (Q-factor), magnetic field intensity, and induced eddy current density on the surface of a sample steel ball, was determined using 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-coil probes, for analysis and comparison. The optimal lift-off from the measured steel ball, the number of probe coils, and the frequency of excitation current suitable for steel ball inspection were obtained. Using the resulting CECA sensor to inspect 46,126 steel balls showed a miss rate of ~0.02%. The sensor was inspected for surface defects as small as 0.05 mm in width and 0.1 mm in depth.

  8. Photovoltaic array: Power conditioner interface characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, C. C.; Hill, G. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The electrical output (power, current, and voltage) of flat plate solar arrays changes constantly, due primarily to changes in cell temperature and irradiance level. As a result, array loads such as dc-to-ac power conditioners must be capable of accommodating widely varying input levels while maintaining operation at or near the maximum power point of the array. The array operating characteristics and extreme output limits necessary for the systematic design of array load interfaces under a wide variety of climatic conditions are studied. A number of interface parameters are examined, including optimum operating voltage, voltage energy, maximum power and current limits, and maximum open circuit voltage. The effect of array degradation and I-V curve fill factor or the array power conditioner interface is also discussed. Results are presented as normalized ratios of power conditioner parameters to array parameters, making the results universally applicable to a wide variety of system sizes, sites, and operating modes.

  9. Calculation of the self-consistent current distribution and coupling of an RF antenna array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballico, M.; Puri, S.

    1993-10-01

    A self-consistent calculation of the antenna current distribution and fields in an axisymmetric cylindrical geometry for the ICRH antenna-plasma coupling problem is presented. Several features distinguish this calculation from other codes presently available. 1. Variational form: The formulation of the self consistent antenna current problem in a variational form allows good convergence and stability of the algorithm. 2. Multiple straps: Allows modelling of (a) the current distribution across the width of the strap (by dividing it up into sub straps) (b) side limiters and septum (c) antenna cross-coupling. 3. Analytic calculation of the antenna field and calculation of the antenna self-consistent current distribution, (given the surface impedance matrix) gives rapid calculation. 4. Framed for parallel computation on several different parallel architectures (as well as serial) gives a large speed improvement to the user. Results are presented for both Alfven wave heating and current drive antenna arrays, showing the optimal coupling to be achieved for toroidal mode numbers 8< n<10 for typical ASDEX upgrade plasmas. Simulations of the ASDEX upgrade antenna show the importance of the current distribution across the antenna and of image currents flowing in the side limiters, and an analysis of a proposed asymmetric ITER antenna is presented. (orig.)

  10. Radiation effects in semiconductor laser diode arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of radiation events are important for many of the present and future applications that involve optoelectronic components. Laser diodes show a strong resistance to degradation by gamma rays, prompt x-rays and (to a lesser extent), neutrons. This is due to the short carrier lifetime that is associated with stimulated emission and the high current injection conditions that are present in these devices. Radiation-resistant properties should carry over to many of the more recently developed devices such as multi-stripe array and broad area laser diodes. There are, however, additional considerations for radiation tolerance that are introduced by these devices. Arrays and other high power laser diodes have larger active region volumes than lower power single stripe devices. In addition, evanescent field coupling between stripes, the material quality available from newer MOCVD epitaxial growth techniques, and stripe definition methods may all influence the radiation tolerance of the high power laser diode devices. Radiation tests have been conducted on various GaAs-GaAlAs laser diode array and broad area devices. Tests involving total gamma dose have indicated that high power laser diodes and arrays have small degradations in light power output with current input after 4 MRad(Si) of radiation from a Co 60 source. Additional test results involving flash x-rays indicate that high power diode lasers and arrays are tolerant to 10 12 rads(Si)/sec, when observed on microsecond or millisecond time scales. High power diode laser devices were also irradiated with neutrons to a fluence of 10 14 neutrons/cm 2 with some degradation of threshold current level

  11. Implementation of High Time Delay Accuracy of Ultrasonic Phased Array Based on Interpolation CIC Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peilu; Li, Xinghua; Li, Haopeng; Su, Zhikun; Zhang, Hongxu

    2017-10-12

    In order to improve the accuracy of ultrasonic phased array focusing time delay, analyzing the original interpolation Cascade-Integrator-Comb (CIC) filter, an 8× interpolation CIC filter parallel algorithm was proposed, so that interpolation and multichannel decomposition can simultaneously process. Moreover, we summarized the general formula of arbitrary multiple interpolation CIC filter parallel algorithm and established an ultrasonic phased array focusing time delay system based on 8× interpolation CIC filter parallel algorithm. Improving the algorithmic structure, 12.5% of addition and 29.2% of multiplication was reduced, meanwhile the speed of computation is still very fast. Considering the existing problems of the CIC filter, we compensated the CIC filter; the compensated CIC filter's pass band is flatter, the transition band becomes steep, and the stop band attenuation increases. Finally, we verified the feasibility of this algorithm on Field Programming Gate Array (FPGA). In the case of system clock is 125 MHz, after 8× interpolation filtering and decomposition, time delay accuracy of the defect echo becomes 1 ns. Simulation and experimental results both show that the algorithm we proposed has strong feasibility. Because of the fast calculation, small computational amount and high resolution, this algorithm is especially suitable for applications with high time delay accuracy and fast detection.

  12. Implementation of High Time Delay Accuracy of Ultrasonic Phased Array Based on Interpolation CIC Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peilu Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the accuracy of ultrasonic phased array focusing time delay, analyzing the original interpolation Cascade-Integrator-Comb (CIC filter, an 8× interpolation CIC filter parallel algorithm was proposed, so that interpolation and multichannel decomposition can simultaneously process. Moreover, we summarized the general formula of arbitrary multiple interpolation CIC filter parallel algorithm and established an ultrasonic phased array focusing time delay system based on 8× interpolation CIC filter parallel algorithm. Improving the algorithmic structure, 12.5% of addition and 29.2% of multiplication was reduced, meanwhile the speed of computation is still very fast. Considering the existing problems of the CIC filter, we compensated the CIC filter; the compensated CIC filter’s pass band is flatter, the transition band becomes steep, and the stop band attenuation increases. Finally, we verified the feasibility of this algorithm on Field Programming Gate Array (FPGA. In the case of system clock is 125 MHz, after 8× interpolation filtering and decomposition, time delay accuracy of the defect echo becomes 1 ns. Simulation and experimental results both show that the algorithm we proposed has strong feasibility. Because of the fast calculation, small computational amount and high resolution, this algorithm is especially suitable for applications with high time delay accuracy and fast detection.

  13. Comparison of Thermal Detector Arrays for Off-Axis THz Holography and Real-Time THz Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Hack

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In terahertz (THz materials science, imaging by scanning prevails when low power THz sources are used. However, the application of array detectors operating with high power THz sources is increasingly reported. We compare the imaging properties of four different array detectors that are able to record THz radiation directly. Two micro-bolometer arrays are designed for infrared imaging in the 8–14 μm wavelength range, but are based on different absorber materials (i vanadium oxide; (ii amorphous silicon; (iii a micro-bolometer array optimized for recording THz radiation based on silicon nitride; and (iv a pyroelectric array detector for THz beam profile measurements. THz wavelengths of 96.5 μm, 118.8 μm, and 393.6 μm from a powerful far infrared laser were used to assess the technical performance in terms of signal to noise ratio, detector response and detectivity. The usefulness of the detectors for beam profiling and digital holography is assessed. Finally, the potential and limitation for real-time digital holography are discussed.

  14. Comparison of Thermal Detector Arrays for Off-Axis THz Holography and Real-Time THz Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Erwin; Valzania, Lorenzo; Gäumann, Gregory; Shalaby, Mostafa; Hauri, Christoph P; Zolliker, Peter

    2016-02-06

    In terahertz (THz) materials science, imaging by scanning prevails when low power THz sources are used. However, the application of array detectors operating with high power THz sources is increasingly reported. We compare the imaging properties of four different array detectors that are able to record THz radiation directly. Two micro-bolometer arrays are designed for infrared imaging in the 8-14 μm wavelength range, but are based on different absorber materials (i) vanadium oxide; (ii) amorphous silicon; (iii) a micro-bolometer array optimized for recording THz radiation based on silicon nitride; and (iv) a pyroelectric array detector for THz beam profile measurements. THz wavelengths of 96.5 μm, 118.8 μm, and 393.6 μm from a powerful far infrared laser were used to assess the technical performance in terms of signal to noise ratio, detector response and detectivity. The usefulness of the detectors for beam profiling and digital holography is assessed. Finally, the potential and limitation for real-time digital holography are discussed.

  15. Influence of anodization parameters on the morphology of TiO 2 nanotube arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvar, Hamid; Goodarzi, Saba; Seif, Ahmad; Azadmehr, Amir R.

    2011-07-01

    TiO 2 nanotube arrays can be fabricated by electrochemical anodization in organic and inorganic electrolytes. Morphology of these nanotube arrays changes when anodization parameters such as applied voltage, type of electrolyte, time and temperature are varied. Nanotube arrays fabricated by anodization of commercial titanium in electrolytes containing NH 4F solution and either sulfuric or phosphoric acid were studied at room temperature; time of anodization was kept constant. Applied voltage, fluoride ion concentration, and acid concentrations were varied and their influences on TiO 2 nanotubes were investigated. The current density of anodizing was recorded by computer controlled digital multimeter. The surface morphology (top-view) of nanotube arrays were observed by SEM. The nanotube arrays in this study have inner diameters in range of 40-80 nm.

  16. Reduced-Rank Array Modes of the California Current Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Andrew M.; Arango, Hernan G.; Edwards, Christopher A.

    2018-01-01

    The information content of the ocean observing array spanning the U.S. west coast is explored using the reduced-rank array modes (RAMs) derived from a four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation system covering a period of three decades. RAMs are an extension of the original formulation of array modes introduced by Bennett (1985) but in the reduced model state-space explored by the 4D-Var system, and reveal the extent to which this space is activated by the observations. The projection of the RAMs onto the empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) of the 4D-Var background error correlation matrix provides a quantitative measure of the effectiveness of the measurements in observing the circulation. It is found that much of the space spanned by the background error covariance is unconstrained by the present ocean observing system. The RAM spectrum is also used to introduce a new criterion to prevent 4D-Var from overfitting the model to the observations.

  17. RF-MMW Dipole Antenna Arrays From Laser Illuminated GaAs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Umphenour, D

    1998-01-01

    High resistivity photoconductive Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) can be used as elemental Hertzian dipole antenna arrays in which the time varying dipole current is produced by temporally modulating a laser (0.63um...

  18. Radiation-hardened optically reconfigurable gate array exploiting holographic memory characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Daisaku; Watanabe, Minoru

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we present a proposal for a radiation-hardened optically reconfigurable gate array (ORGA). The ORGA is a type of field programmable gate array (FPGA). The ORGA configuration can be executed by the exploitation of holographic memory characteristics even if 20% of the configuration data are damaged. Moreover, the optoelectronic technology enables the high-speed reconfiguration of the programmable gate array. Such a high-speed reconfiguration can increase the radiation tolerance of its programmable gate array to 9.3 × 104 times higher than that of current FPGAs. Through experimentation, this study clarified the configuration dependability using the impulse-noise emulation and high-speed configuration capabilities of the ORGA with corrupt configuration contexts. Moreover, the radiation tolerance of the programmable gate array was confirmed theoretically through probabilistic calculation.

  19. Precise on-machine extraction of the surface normal vector using an eddy current sensor array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yongqing; Lian, Meng; Liu, Haibo; Ying, Yangwei; Sheng, Xianjun

    2016-01-01

    To satisfy the requirements of on-machine measurement of the surface normal during complex surface manufacturing, a highly robust normal vector extraction method using an Eddy current (EC) displacement sensor array is developed, the output of which is almost unaffected by surface brightness, machining coolant and environmental noise. A precise normal vector extraction model based on a triangular-distributed EC sensor array is first established. Calibration of the effects of object surface inclination and coupling interference on measurement results, and the relative position of EC sensors, is involved. A novel apparatus employing three EC sensors and a force transducer was designed, which can be easily integrated into the computer numerical control (CNC) machine tool spindle and/or robot terminal execution. Finally, to test the validity and practicability of the proposed method, typical experiments were conducted with specified testing pieces using the developed approach and system, such as an inclined plane and cylindrical and spherical surfaces. (paper)

  20. Precise on-machine extraction of the surface normal vector using an eddy current sensor array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongqing; Lian, Meng; Liu, Haibo; Ying, Yangwei; Sheng, Xianjun

    2016-11-01

    To satisfy the requirements of on-machine measurement of the surface normal during complex surface manufacturing, a highly robust normal vector extraction method using an Eddy current (EC) displacement sensor array is developed, the output of which is almost unaffected by surface brightness, machining coolant and environmental noise. A precise normal vector extraction model based on a triangular-distributed EC sensor array is first established. Calibration of the effects of object surface inclination and coupling interference on measurement results, and the relative position of EC sensors, is involved. A novel apparatus employing three EC sensors and a force transducer was designed, which can be easily integrated into the computer numerical control (CNC) machine tool spindle and/or robot terminal execution. Finally, to test the validity and practicability of the proposed method, typical experiments were conducted with specified testing pieces using the developed approach and system, such as an inclined plane and cylindrical and spherical surfaces.

  1. A Steel Ball Surface Quality Inspection Method Based on a Circumferential Eddy Current Array Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huayu Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To efficiently inspect surface defects on steel ball bearings, a new method based on a circumferential eddy current array (CECA sensor was proposed here. The best probe configuration, in terms of the coil quality factor (Q-factor, magnetic field intensity, and induced eddy current density on the surface of a sample steel ball, was determined using 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-coil probes, for analysis and comparison. The optimal lift-off from the measured steel ball, the number of probe coils, and the frequency of excitation current suitable for steel ball inspection were obtained. Using the resulting CECA sensor to inspect 46,126 steel balls showed a miss rate of ~0.02%. The sensor was inspected for surface defects as small as 0.05 mm in width and 0.1 mm in depth.

  2. Improvement of Data Acquisition of the BRTR (PS-43) Seismic Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, N. M.; Kocak, S.; Semin, K. U.; Necmioglu, O.; Destici, T. C.; Teoman, U.

    2010-05-01

    Bogazici University, Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute(KOERI) is currently operating the BRTR( PS-43) seismic arrays located in the vicinity of Ankara and town Keskin, providing real-time data to IDC. PS-43 is composed of two sub-arrays, the medium-period array with a ~45km radius located in Ankara and the short-period array with ~3 km radius located in Keskin. In 2009, data availabilty of the BRTR is exceeded %98 that value is the requirment of IDC. Substantial contribution to obtain this availabiliy is implementing the improvements that mainly replacement of the grid type parabolic antennas with the heavy-duty dish antennas at necessary sites called the repeater sites RE-BRTR (CCF), RE-PS43 (Mt. Elmadag), CF-PS43 (Central Recording Building) and all MP sites. Even this renewed system is at the tentative stage, communication status of the seismic arrays are solid and continuous. BRTR is expecting another improvement, June 2010, about the power system at Mt. Elmadag and the MP site BR237. Completion of this improvement will be stabilize of our current mission.

  3. Physical Limitations To Nonuniformity Correction In IR Focal Plane Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribner, D. A.; Kruer, M. R.; Gridley, J. C.; Sarkady, K.

    1988-05-01

    Simple nonuniformity correction algorithms currently in use can be severely limited by nonlinear response characteristics of the individual pixels in an IR focal plane array. Although more complicated multi-point algorithms improve the correction process they too can be limited by nonlinearities. Furthermore, analysis of single pixel noise power spectrums usually show some level of 1 /f noise. This in turn causes pixel outputs to drift independent of each other thus causing the spatial noise (often called fixed pattern noise) of the array to increase as a function of time since the last calibration. Measurements are presented for two arrays (a HgCdTe hybrid and a Pt:Si CCD) describing pixel nonlinearities, 1/f noise, and residual spatial noise (after nonuniforming correction). Of particular emphasis is spatial noise as a function of the lapsed time since the last calibration and the calibration process selected. The resulting spatial noise is examined in terms of its effect on the NEAT performance of each array tested and comparisons are made. Finally, a discussion of implications for array developers is given.

  4. Eddy current array probe for detection of surface breaking cracks in the extrados of feeder bends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obrutsky, L.S.; Cassidy, R.A.; Chaplin, K.; Martin, P.; Bureau, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    A new eddy current array probe has been implemented as a straightforward and promising technique for detection of outer diameter (OD) surface-breaking cracks on the extrados of feeder bends. The design is based on previous work performed at AECL, which had demonstrated that eddy current probes with laterally displaced transmit-receive coils can overcome some of the limitations of inspecting ferritic steel components for surface-breaking cracks. The Feeder Integrity Joint Program-CANDU Owners Group Inc. (FIJP-COG) Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) Team members commissioned AECL to work in collaboration with the probe manufacturer ZETEC, to develop a field usable eddy current array probe. The objective was to acquire a technique with the following capabilities: fast scanning non-contact inspection technique for surface breaking discontinuities; full inspection of the bend extrados OD surface in a single scan; ability to inspect first and second bends with similar settings and capabilities; permanent record for future reference; axial and circumferential crack detection in a single scan; capability to detect OD surface-breaking cracks, which can provide additional information to that provided by ultrasonic testing (UT) for flaw characterization, and detection threshold: Surface breaking cracks equivalent to a 0.5 mm deep, 10 mm long EDM notch located on the OD of the bend extrados. This paper discusses the basis for probe design, summarizes the experimental work to evaluate probe capabilities and analyzes the results from the field trial. (author)

  5. Eddy current array probe for detection of surface breaking cracks in the extrados of feeder bends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obrutsky, L.S.; Cassidy, R.A.; Chaplin, K. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: obrutskyl@aecl.ca; Martin, P. [NB Power, Point Lepreau NGS, Point Lepreau, New Brunswick (Canada)]. E-mail: PMartin@nbpower.com; Bureau, J.F. [Zetec, Quebec, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: jean-francois.bureau@zetec.com

    2006-07-01

    A new eddy current array probe has been implemented as a straightforward and promising technique for detection of outer diameter (OD) surface-breaking cracks on the extrados of feeder bends. The design is based on previous work performed at AECL, which had demonstrated that eddy current probes with laterally displaced transmit-receive coils can overcome some of the limitations of inspecting ferritic steel components for surface-breaking cracks. The Feeder Integrity Joint Program-CANDU Owners Group Inc. (FIJP-COG) Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) Team members commissioned AECL to work in collaboration with the probe manufacturer ZETEC, to develop a field usable eddy current array probe. The objective was to acquire a technique with the following capabilities: fast scanning non-contact inspection technique for surface breaking discontinuities; full inspection of the bend extrados OD surface in a single scan; ability to inspect first and second bends with similar settings and capabilities; permanent record for future reference; axial and circumferential crack detection in a single scan; capability to detect OD surface-breaking cracks, which can provide additional information to that provided by ultrasonic testing (UT) for flaw characterization, and detection threshold: Surface breaking cracks equivalent to a 0.5 mm deep, 10 mm long EDM notch located on the OD of the bend extrados. This paper discusses the basis for probe design, summarizes the experimental work to evaluate probe capabilities and analyzes the results from the field trial. (author)

  6. A Portable Array-Type Optical Fiber Sensing Instrument for Real-Time Gas Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San-Shan Hung

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel optical fiber array-type of sensing instrument with temperature compensation for real-time detection was developed to measure oxygen, carbon dioxide, and ammonia simultaneously. The proposed instrument is multi-sensing array integrated with real-time measurement module for portable applications. The sensing optical fibers were etched and polished before coating to increase sensitivities. The ammonia and temperature sensors were each composed of a dye-coated single-mode fiber with constructing a fiber Bragg grating and a long-period filter grating for detecting light intensity. Both carbon dioxide and oxygen sensing structures use multimode fibers where 1-hydroxy-3,6,8-pyrene trisulfonic acid trisodium salt is coated for carbon dioxide sensing and Tris(2,2′-bipyridyl dichlororuthenium(II hexahydrate and Tris(bipyridineruthenium(II chloride are coated for oxygen sensing. Gas-induced fluorescent light intensity variation was applied to detect gas concentration. The portable gas sensing array was set up by integrating with photo-electronic measurement modules and a human-machine interface to detect gases in real time. The measured data have been processed using piecewise-linear method. The sensitivity of the oxygen sensor were 1.54%/V and 9.62%/V for concentrations less than 1.5% and for concentrations between 1.5% and 6%, respectively. The sensitivity of the carbon dioxide sensor were 8.33%/V and 9.62%/V for concentrations less than 2% and for concentrations between 2% and 5%, respectively. For the ammonia sensor, the sensitivity was 27.78%/V, while ammonia concentration was less than 2%.

  7. A Portable Array-Type Optical Fiber Sensing Instrument for Real-Time Gas Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, San-Shan; Chang, Hsing-Cheng; Chang, I-Nan

    2016-12-08

    A novel optical fiber array-type of sensing instrument with temperature compensation for real-time detection was developed to measure oxygen, carbon dioxide, and ammonia simultaneously. The proposed instrument is multi-sensing array integrated with real-time measurement module for portable applications. The sensing optical fibers were etched and polished before coating to increase sensitivities. The ammonia and temperature sensors were each composed of a dye-coated single-mode fiber with constructing a fiber Bragg grating and a long-period filter grating for detecting light intensity. Both carbon dioxide and oxygen sensing structures use multimode fibers where 1-hydroxy-3,6,8-pyrene trisulfonic acid trisodium salt is coated for carbon dioxide sensing and Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) dichlororuthenium(II) hexahydrate and Tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) chloride are coated for oxygen sensing. Gas-induced fluorescent light intensity variation was applied to detect gas concentration. The portable gas sensing array was set up by integrating with photo-electronic measurement modules and a human-machine interface to detect gases in real time. The measured data have been processed using piecewise-linear method. The sensitivity of the oxygen sensor were 1.54%/V and 9.62%/V for concentrations less than 1.5% and for concentrations between 1.5% and 6%, respectively. The sensitivity of the carbon dioxide sensor were 8.33%/V and 9.62%/V for concentrations less than 2% and for concentrations between 2% and 5%, respectively. For the ammonia sensor, the sensitivity was 27.78%/V, while ammonia concentration was less than 2%.

  8. Real-time data acquisition and parallel data processing solution for TJ-II Bolometer arrays diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, E. [Departamento de Sistemas Electronicos y de Control, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Crta. Valencia Km. 7, 28031 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: eduardo.barrera@upm.es; Ruiz, M. [Grupo de Investigacion en Instrumentacion y Acustica Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Crta. Valencia Km. 7, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Lopez, S. [Departamento de Sistemas Electronicos y de Control, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Crta. Valencia Km. 7, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Machon, D. [Departamento de Sistemas Electronicos y de Control, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Crta. Valencia Km. 7, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Vega, J. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ochando, M. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-15

    Maps of local plasma emissivity of TJ-II plasmas are determined using three-array cameras of silicon photodiodes (AXUV type from IRD). They have assigned the top and side ports of the same sector of the vacuum vessel. Each array consists of 20 unfiltered detectors. The signals from each of these detectors are the inputs to an iterative algorithm of tomographic reconstruction. Currently, these signals are acquired by a PXI standard system at approximately 50 kS/s, with 12 bits of resolution and are stored for off-line processing. A 0.5 s discharge generates 3 Mbytes of raw data. The algorithm's load exceeds the CPU capacity of the PXI system's controller in a continuous mode, making unfeasible to process the samples in parallel with their acquisition in a PXI standard system. A new architecture model has been developed, making possible to add one or several processing cards to a standard PXI system. With this model, it is possible to define how to distribute, in real-time, the data from all acquired signals in the system among the processing cards and the PXI controller. This way, by distributing the data processing among the system controller and two processing cards, the data processing can be done in parallel with the acquisition. Hence, this system configuration would be able to measure even in long pulse devices.

  9. Quality Assurance of Real-Time Oceanographic Data from the Cabled Array of the Ocean Observatories Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawka, O. E.; Nelson, J. S.; Manalang, D.; Kelley, D. S.

    2016-02-01

    The Cabled Array component of the NSF-funded Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) provides access to real-time physical, chemical, geological, and biological data from water column and seafloor platforms/instruments at sites spanning the southern half of the Juan de Fuca Plate. The Quality Assurance (QA) program for OOI data is designed to ensure that data products meet OOI science requirements. This overall data QA plan establishes the guidelines for assuring OOI data quality and summarizes Quality Control (QC) protocols and procedures, based on best practices, which can be utilized to ensure the highest quality data across the OOI program. This presentation will highlight, specifically, the QA/QC approach being utilized for the OOI Cabled Array infrastructure and data and will include a summary of both shipboard and shore-based protocols currently in use. Aspects addressed will be pre-deployment instrument testing and calibration checks, post-deployment and pre-recovery field verification of data, and post-recovery "as-found" testing of instruments. Examples of QA/QC data will be presented and specific cases of cabled data will be discussed in the context of quality assessments and adjustment/correction of OOI datasets overall for inherent sensor drift and/or instrument fouling.

  10. The International Pulsar Timing Array project: using pulsars as a gravitational wave detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobbs, G.; Archibald, A.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Backer, D.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N.D.R.; Burgay, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Champion, D.; Cognard, I.; Coles, W.; Cordes, J.; Demorest, P.; Desvignes, G.; Ferdman, R.D.; Finn, L.; Freire, P.; Gonzalez, M.; Hessels, J.; Hotan, A.; Janssen, G.; Jenet, F.; Jessner, A.; Jordan, C.; Kaspi, V.; Kramer, M.; Kondratiev, V.; Lazio, J.; Lazaridis, K.; Lee, K.J.; Levin, Y.; Lommen, A.; Lorimer, D.; Lynch, R.; Lyne, A.; Manchester, R.; McLaughlin, M.; Nice, D.; Oslowski, S.; Pilia, M.; Possenti, A.; Purver, M.; Ransom, S.; Reynolds, J.; Sanidas, S.; Sarkissian, J.; Sesana, A.; Shannon, R.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I.; Stappers, B.; Stinebring, D.; Theureau, G.; van Haasteren, R.; van Straten, W.; Verbiest, J.P.W.; Yardley, D.R.B.; You, X.P.

    2010-01-01

    The International Pulsar Timing Array project combines observations of pulsars from both northern and southern hemisphere observatories with the main aim of detecting ultra-low frequency (similar to 10(-9)-10(-8) Hz) gravitational waves. Here we introduce the project, review the methods used to

  11. The generalized centroid difference method for picosecond sensitive determination of lifetimes of nuclear excited states using large fast-timing arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Régis, J.-M., E-mail: regis@ikp.uni-koeln.de [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Mach, H. [Departamento de Física Atómica y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Simpson, G.S. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie Grenoble, 53, rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Jolie, J.; Pascovici, G.; Saed-Samii, N.; Warr, N. [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Bruce, A. [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Brighton, Lewes Road, Brighton BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom); Degenkolb, J. [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Fraile, L.M. [Departamento de Física Atómica y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fransen, C. [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Ghita, D.G. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 77125 Bucharest (Romania); and others

    2013-10-21

    A novel method for direct electronic “fast-timing” lifetime measurements of nuclear excited states via γ–γ coincidences using an array equipped with N∈N equally shaped very fast high-resolution LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillator detectors is presented. Analogous to the mirror symmetric centroid difference method, the generalized centroid difference method provides two independent “start” and “stop” time spectra obtained by a superposition of the N(N−1)γ–γ time difference spectra of the N detector fast-timing system. The two fast-timing array time spectra correspond to a forward and reverse gating of a specific γ–γ cascade. Provided that the energy response and the electronic time pick-off of the detectors are almost equal, a mean prompt response difference between start and stop events is calibrated and used as a single correction for lifetime determination. These combined fast-timing arrays mean γ–γ time-walk characteristics can be determined for 40keVtiming array delivered an absolute time resolving power of 3 ps for 10 000 γ–γ events per total fast timing array start and stop time spectrum. The new method is tested over the total dynamic range by the measurements of known picosecond lifetimes in standard γ-ray sources.

  12. Pulsar timing arrays: the promise of gravitational wave detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommen, Andrea N

    2015-12-01

    We describe the history, methods, tools, and challenges of using pulsars to detect gravitational waves. Pulsars act as celestial clocks detecting gravitational perturbations in space-time at wavelengths of light-years. The field is poised to make its first detection of nanohertz gravitational waves in the next 10 years. Controversies remain over how far we can reduce the noise in the pulsars, how many pulsars should be in the array, what kind of source we will detect first, and how we can best accommodate our large bandwidth systems. We conclude by considering the important question of how to plan for a post-detection era, beyond the first detection of gravitational waves.

  13. Anisotrophic currents and flux jumps in high-T-c superconducting films with self-organized arrays of planar defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yurchenko, V.V.; Qviller, A.J.; Mozhaev, P.B.

    2010-01-01

    Regular arrays of planar defects with a period of a few nanometers can be introduced in superconducting YBa2Cu3O7-delta (YBCO) thin films by depositing them on vicinal (also called miscut or tilted) substrates. This results in the anisotropy of critical currents flowing in the plane of the film. ...

  14. Digital pulse-timing technique for the neutron detector array NEDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modamio, V., E-mail: victor.modamio@lnl.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Valiente-Dobón, J.J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Jaworski, G. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Hüyük, T. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Triossi, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Egea, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Department of Electronic Engineering, Universitat de València, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); Di Nitto, A. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Söderström, P.-A. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Agramunt Ros, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Angelis, G. de [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); France, G. de [GANIL, CEA/DSAM and CNRS/IN2P3, F-14076 Caen (France); Erduran, M.N. [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University, 34303 Istanbul (Turkey); and others

    2015-03-01

    A new digital pulse-timing algorithm, to be used with the future neutron detector array NEDA, has been developed and tested. The time resolution of four 5 in. diameter photomultiplier tubes (XP4512, R4144, R11833-100, and ET9390-kb), coupled to a cylindrical 5 in. by 5 in. BC501A liquid scintillator detector was measured by employing digital sampling electronics and a constant fraction discriminator (CFD) algorithm. The zero crossing of the CFD algorithm was obtained with a cubic spline interpolation, which was continuous up to the second derivative. The performance of the algorithm was studied at sampling rates of 500 MS/s and 200 MS/s. The time resolution obtained with the digital electronics was compared to the values acquired with a standard analog CFD. The result of this comparison shows that the time resolution from the analog and the digital measurements at 500 MS/s and at 200 MS/s are within 15% for all the tested photomultiplier tubes.

  15. Compact wire array sources: power scaling and implosion physics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Jason Dimitri; Chuvatin, Alexander S. (Laboratoire du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France); Jones, M. C.; Vesey, Roger Alan; Waisman, Eduardo M.; Ivanov, V. V. (University of Nevada - Reno, Reno, NV); Esaulov, Andrey A. (University of Nevada - Reno, Reno, NV); Ampleford, David J.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich (University of Nevada - Reno, Reno, NV); Coverdale, Christine Anne; Rudakov, L. I. (Icarus Research, Bethesda, MD); Jones, Brent Manley; Safronova, Alla S. (University of Nevada - Reno, Reno, NV); Vigil, Marcelino Patricio

    2008-09-01

    A series of ten shots were performed on the Saturn generator in short pulse mode in order to study planar and small-diameter cylindrical tungsten wire arrays at {approx}5 MA current levels and 50-60 ns implosion times as candidates for compact z-pinch radiation sources. A new vacuum hohlraum configuration has been proposed in which multiple z pinches are driven in parallel by a pulsed power generator. Each pinch resides in a separate return current cage, serving also as a primary hohlraum. A collection of such radiation sources surround a compact secondary hohlraum, which may potentially provide an attractive Planckian radiation source or house an inertial confinement fusion fuel capsule. Prior to studying this concept experimentally or numerically, advanced compact wire array loads must be developed and their scaling behavior understood. The 2008 Saturn planar array experiments extend the data set presented in Ref. [1], which studied planar arrays at {approx}3 MA, 100 ns in Saturn long pulse mode. Planar wire array power and yield scaling studies now include current levels directly applicable to multi-pinch experiments that could be performed on the 25 MA Z machine. A maximum total x-ray power of 15 TW (250 kJ in the main pulse, 330 kJ total yield) was observed with a 12-mm-wide planar array at 5.3 MA, 52 ns. The full data set indicates power scaling that is sub-quadratic with load current, while total and main pulse yields are closer to quadratic; these trends are similar to observations of compact cylindrical tungsten arrays on Z. We continue the investigation of energy coupling in these short pulse Saturn experiments using zero-dimensional-type implosion modeling and pinhole imaging, indicating 16 cm/?s implosion velocity in a 12-mm-wide array. The same phenomena of significant trailing mass and evidence for resistive heating are observed at 5 MA as at 3 MA. 17 kJ of Al K-shell radiation was obtained in one Al planar array fielded at 5.5 MA, 57 ns and we

  16. Advances on Frequency Diverse Array Radar and Its Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wenqin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Unlike the conventional phased array that provides only angle-dependent transmit beampattern, Frequency Diverse Array (FDA employs a small frequency increment across its array elements to produce automatic beam scanning without requiring phase shifters or mechanical steering. FDA can produce both rangedependent and time-variant transmit beampatterns, which overcomes the disadvantages of conventional phased arrays that produce only angle-dependent beampattern. Thus, FDA has many promising applications. Based on a previous study conducted by the author, “Frequency Diverse Array Radar: Concept, Principle and Application” (Journal of Electronics & Information Technology, 2016, 38(4: 1000–1011, the current study introduces basic FDA radar concepts, principles, and application characteristics and reviews recent advances on FDA radar and its applications. In addition, several new promising applications of FDA technology are discussed, such as radar electronic warfare and radar-communications, as well as open technical challenges such as beampattern variance, effective receiver design, adaptive signal detection and estimation, and the implementation of practical FDA radar demos.

  17. Single and nested tungsten-wire-array dynamics and applications to inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuneo, Michael

    2005-10-01

    Wire array z-pinches show great promise as x-ray sources for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The double z-pinch hohlraum, for example, has produced capsule radiation drive symmetric to within 3%. This ICF concept will require that each of two 20-mm-diam arrays scale to x-ray powers ˜1 PW, to drive high-yield (>0.2 GJ) capsules to ignition. High-yield fusion will also require a temporally shaped radiation pulse to drive a low-entropy capsule implosion. Recently, improved understanding of high current (11-19 MA) single and nested wire-array dynamics has enabled significant progress towards these goals. As at lower currents, a single wire array (and both the outer and inner arrays of a nested system) shows a wire ablation phase, axial modulation of the ablation rate, a larger ablation rate for larger diameter wires, trailing mass and trailing current. These processes and others produce a broad mass profile that may impact the optimization of x-ray output for single and nested arrays. Our new insights into wire array physics have led to 20-mm-diam single and nested arrays with peak powers of 150-190 TW at implosion times of 55-90 ns, increased from 60-120 TW at 95-110 ns, improving power scaling. Radiation pulse shapes required for 3-shock isentropic compression of high-yield ICF capsules have also been demonstrated with nested wire arrays operating in current-transfer mode. In collaboration with: D.B. Sinars, R.A. Vesey, E.M. Waisman, W.A. Stygar, D.E. Bliss, S.V. Lebedev, J.P. Chittenden, P.V. Sasorov, R.W. Lemke, E.P. Yu, B.B. Afeyan, G.R. Bennett, M.G. Mazarakis, M.R. Lopez, M.E. Savage, J.L. Porter, T.A. Mehlhorn.

  18. Wire Array Solar Cells: Fabrication and Photoelectrochemical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurgeon, Joshua Michael

    Despite demand for clean energy to reduce our addiction to fossil fuels, the price of these technologies relative to oil and coal has prevented their widespread implementation. Solar energy has enormous potential as a carbon-free resource but is several times the cost of coal-produced electricity, largely because photovoltaics of practical efficiency require high-quality, pure semiconductor materials. To produce current in a planar junction solar cell, an electron or hole generated deep within the material must travel all the way to the junction without recombining. Radial junction, wire array solar cells, however, have the potential to decouple the directions of light absorption and charge-carrier collection so that a semiconductor with a minority-carrier diffusion length shorter than its absorption depth (i.e., a lower quality, potentially cheaper material) can effectively produce current. The axial dimension of the wires is long enough for sufficient optical absorption while the charge-carriers are collected along the shorter radial dimension in a massively parallel array. This thesis explores the wire array solar cell design by developing potentially low-cost fabrication methods and investigating the energy-conversion properties of the arrays in photoelectrochemical cells. The concept was initially investigated with Cd(Se, Te) rod arrays; however, Si was the primary focus of wire array research because its semiconductor properties make low-quality Si an ideal candidate for improvement in a radial geometry. Fabrication routes for Si wire arrays were explored, including the vapor-liquid-solid growth of wires using SiCl4. Uniform, vertically aligned Si wires were demonstrated in a process that permits control of the wire radius, length, and spacing. A technique was developed to transfer these wire arrays into a low-cost, flexible polymer film, and grow multiple subsequent arrays using a single Si(111) substrate. Photoelectrochemical measurements on Si wire array

  19. Asymmetrical floating point array processors, their application to exploration and exploitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geriepy, B L

    1983-01-01

    An asymmetrical floating point array processor is a special-purpose scientific computer which operates under asymmetrical control of a host computer. Although an array processor can receive fixed point input and produce fixed point output, its primary mode of operation is floating point. The first generation of array processors was oriented towards time series information. The next generation of array processors has proved much more versatile and their applicability ranges from petroleum reservoir simulation to speech syntheses. Array processors are becoming commonplace in mining, the primary usage being construction of grids-by usual methods or by kriging. The Australian mining community is among the world's leaders in regard to computer-assisted exploration and exploitation systems. Part of this leadership role must be providing guidance to computer vendors in regard to current and future requirements.

  20. Magnetic properties of strip-like Josephson-junction arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D.-X; Moreno, J.J.; Hernando, A.; Sanchez, A.

    2000-01-01

    Zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) magnetic properties of strip-like Josephson-junction (JJ) arrays with very strong demagnetizing effects are calculated from basic laws. Similar to slab-like JJ arrays without considering demagnetizing effects, a vortex state evolves to a critical state (CS) with increasing maximum JJ currents in the ZFC case, and a vortex state always remains with a negative low-field susceptibility in the FC case. However, the strong demagnetizing effects cause qualitative changes in the CS, where the overall feature of the field and current profiles turns out to be similar to that in type-II superconducting strips, but not like the ordinary Bean CS in slab-like JJ arrays, the CS current profile is never flat and the critical current is no longer a step function of the maximum JJ current as in slab-like JJ arrays. The calculated results of different types of JJ arrays indicate that although the intergranular CS in granular superconductors may have a common origin, the discovered paramagnetic Meissner effect in them is still difficult to explain. (author)

  1. ArrayBridge: Interweaving declarative array processing with high-performance computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Haoyuan [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Floratos, Sofoklis [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Blanas, Spyros [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Byna, Suren [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Prabhat, Prabhat [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wu, Kesheng [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Brown, Paul [Paradigm4, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

    2017-05-04

    Scientists are increasingly turning to datacenter-scale computers to produce and analyze massive arrays. Despite decades of database research that extols the virtues of declarative query processing, scientists still write, debug and parallelize imperative HPC kernels even for the most mundane queries. This impedance mismatch has been partly attributed to the cumbersome data loading process; in response, the database community has proposed in situ mechanisms to access data in scientific file formats. Scientists, however, desire more than a passive access method that reads arrays from files. This paper describes ArrayBridge, a bi-directional array view mechanism for scientific file formats, that aims to make declarative array manipulations interoperable with imperative file-centric analyses. Our prototype implementation of ArrayBridge uses HDF5 as the underlying array storage library and seamlessly integrates into the SciDB open-source array database system. In addition to fast querying over external array objects, ArrayBridge produces arrays in the HDF5 file format just as easily as it can read from it. ArrayBridge also supports time travel queries from imperative kernels through the unmodified HDF5 API, and automatically deduplicates between array versions for space efficiency. Our extensive performance evaluation in NERSC, a large-scale scientific computing facility, shows that ArrayBridge exhibits statistically indistinguishable performance and I/O scalability to the native SciDB storage engine.

  2. A Large Array of Small Antennas to Support Future NASA Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D. L.; Weinreb, S.; Preston, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    A team of engineers and scientists at JPL is currently working on the design of an array of small radio antennas with a total collecting area up to twenty times that of the largest existing (70 m) DSN antennas. An array of this size would provide obvious advantages for high data rate telemetry reception and for spacecraft navigation. Among these advantages are an order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity for telemetry downlink, flexible sub-arraying to track multiple spacecraft simultaneously, increased reliability through the use of large numbers of identical array elements, very accurate real-time angular spacecraft tracking, and a dramatic reduction in cost per unit area. NASA missions in many disciplines, including planetary science, would benefit from this increased DSN capability. The science return from planned missions could be increased, and opportunities for less expensive or completely new kinds of missions would be created. The DSN array would also bean immensely valuable instrument for radio astronomy. Indeed, it would be by far the most sensitive radio telescope in the world. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Compensated readout for high-density MOS-gated memristor crossbar array

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.

    2015-01-01

    Leakage current is one of the main challenges facing high-density MOS-gated memristor arrays. In this study, we show that leakage current ruins the memory readout process for high-density arrays, and analyze the tradeoff between the array density and its power consumption. We propose a novel readout technique and its underlying circuitry, which is able to compensate for the transistor leakage-current effect in the high-density gated memristor array.

  4. Accelerated failure time regression for backward recurrence times and current durations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, N; Fine, J P; Hansen, O H

    2011-01-01

    Backward recurrence times in stationary renewal processes and current durations in dynamic populations observed at a cross-section may yield estimates of underlying interarrival times or survival distributions under suitable stationarity assumptions. Regression models have been proposed for these......Backward recurrence times in stationary renewal processes and current durations in dynamic populations observed at a cross-section may yield estimates of underlying interarrival times or survival distributions under suitable stationarity assumptions. Regression models have been proposed...... for these situations, but accelerated failure time models have the particularly attractive feature that they are preserved when going from the backward recurrence times to the underlying survival distribution of interest. This simple fact has recently been noticed in a sociological context and is here illustrated...... by a study of current duration of time to pregnancy...

  5. Rectenna array measurement results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The measured performance characteristics of a rectenna array are reviewed and compared to the performance of a single element. It is shown that the performance may be extrapolated from the individual element to that of the collection of elements. Techniques for current and voltage combining were demonstrated. The array performance as a function of various operating parameters is characterized and techniques for overvoltage protection and automatic fault clearing in the array demonstrated. A method for detecting failed elements also exists. Instrumentation for deriving performance effectiveness is described. Measured harmonic radiation patterns and fundamental frequency scattered patterns for a low level illumination rectenna array are presented.

  6. SCINTILLATION ARCS IN LOW-FREQUENCY OBSERVATIONS OF THE TIMING-ARRAY MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR J0437–4715

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Ord, S. M.; Tremblay, S. E.; McSweeney, S. J.; Tingay, S. J. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102 (Australia)

    2016-02-10

    Low-frequency observations of pulsars provide a powerful means for probing the microstructure in the turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). Here we report on high-resolution dynamic spectral analysis of our observations of the timing-array millisecond pulsar PSR J0437–4715 with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), enabled by our recently commissioned tied-array beam processing pipeline for voltage data recorded from the high time resolution mode of the MWA. A secondary spectral analysis reveals faint parabolic arcs akin to those seen in high-frequency observations of pulsars with the Green Bank and Arecibo telescopes. Data from Parkes observations at a higher frequency of 732 MHz reveal a similar parabolic feature with a curvature that scales approximately as the square of the observing wavelength (λ{sup 2}) to the MWA's frequency of 192 MHz. Our analysis suggests that scattering toward PSR J0437–4715 predominantly arises from a compact region about 115 pc from the Earth, which matches well with the expected location of the edge of the Local Bubble that envelopes the local Solar neighborhood. As well as demonstrating new and improved pulsar science capabilities of the MWA, our analysis underscores the potential of low-frequency pulsar observations for gaining valuable insights into the local ISM and for characterizing the ISM toward timing-array pulsars.

  7. Single-electron tunnel junction array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likharev, K.K.; Bakhvalov, N.S.; Kazacha, G.S.; Serdyukova, S.I.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have carried out an analysis of statics and dynamics of uniform one-dimensional arrays of ultrasmall tunnel junctions. The correlated single-electron tunneling in the junctions of the array results in its behavior qualitatively similar to that of the Josephson transmission line. In particular, external electric fields applied to the array edges can inject single-electron-charged solitons into the array interior. Shape of such soliton and character of its interactions with other solitons and the array edges are very similar to those of the Josephson vortices (sine-Gordon solitons) in the Josephson transmission line. Under certain conditions, a coherent motion of the soliton train along the array is possible, resulting in generation of narrowband SET oscillations with frequency f/sub s/ = /e where is the dc current flowing along the array

  8. Directional absorption by phased arrays of plasmonic nanoantennae probed with time-reversed Fourier microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano, Gabriel; Barten, Tommy; Grzela, Grzegorz; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that an ordered array of aluminum nanopyramids, behaving as a phased array of optical antennae, strongly modifies light absorption in thin layers of dye molecules. Photoluminescence measurements as a function of the illumination angle are performed using a time-reversed Fourier microscope. This technique enables a variable-angle plane-wave illumination of nanostructures in a microscope-based setup. Our measurements reveal an enhancement of the light conversion in certain directions of illumination, which indicate the efficient diffractive coupling between the free space radiation and the surface plasmons. Numerical simulations confirm that surface modes supported by the periodic array enhance the intensity of the pump field in the space between particles, where the dye molecules are located, yielding a directional plasmonic-mediated enhancement of the optical absorption. This combined experimental and numerical characterization of the angular dependence of light absorption in nanostructures can be beneficial for the design and optimization of devices in which the harvesting of light plays a major role. (paper)

  9. A Procedure for Modeling Photovoltaic Arrays under Any Configuration and Shading Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gonzalez Montoya

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic (PV arrays can be connected following regular or irregular connection patterns to form regular configurations (e.g., series-parallel, total cross-tied, bridge-linked, etc. or irregular configurations, respectively. Several reported works propose models for a single configuration; hence, making the evaluation of arrays with different configuration is a considerable time-consuming task. Moreover, if the PV array adopts an irregular configuration, the classical models cannot be used for its analysis. This paper proposes a modeling procedure for PV arrays connected in any configuration and operating under uniform or partial shading conditions. The procedure divides the array into smaller arrays, named sub-arrays, which can be independently solved. The modeling procedure selects the mesh current solution or the node voltage solution depending on the topology of each sub-array. Therefore, the proposed approach analyzes the PV array using the least number of nonlinear equations. The proposed solution is validated through simulation and experimental results, which demonstrate the proposed model capacity to reproduce the electrical behavior of PV arrays connected in any configuration.

  10. Real-time field programmable gate array architecture for computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Estrada, Miguel; Torres-Huitzil, Cesar

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for real-time generic convolution of a mask and an image. The architecture is intended for fast low-level image processing. The field programmable gate array (FPGA)-based architecture takes advantage of the availability of registers in FPGAs to implement an efficient and compact module to process the convolutions. The architecture is designed to minimize the number of accesses to the image memory and it is based on parallel modules with internal pipeline operation in order to improve its performance. The architecture is prototyped in a FPGA, but it can be implemented on dedicated very- large-scale-integrated devices to reach higher clock frequencies. Complexity issues, FPGA resources utilization, FPGA limitations, and real-time performance are discussed. Some results are presented and discussed.

  11. Gravitational waves from a supercooled electroweak phase transition and their detection with pulsar timing arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobakhidze, Archil; Lagger, Cyril; Manning, Adrian [University of Sydney, ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, School of Physics, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Yue, Jason [National Taiwan Normal University, Department of Physics, Taipei (China)

    2017-08-15

    We investigate the properties of a stochastic gravitational wave background produced by a first-order electroweak phase transition in the regime of extreme supercooling. We study a scenario whereby the percolation temperature that signifies the completion of the transition, T{sub p}, is as low as a few MeV (nucleosynthesis temperature), while most of the true vacuum bubbles are formed much earlier at the nucleation temperature, T{sub n} ∝ 50 GeV. This implies that the gravitational wave spectrum is mainly produced by the collisions of large bubbles and characterised by a large amplitude and a peak frequency as low as f ∝ 10{sup -9}-10{sup -7} Hz. We show that such a scenario can occur in (but not limited to) a model based on a non-linear realisation of the electroweak gauge group, so that the Higgs vacuum configuration is altered by a cubic coupling. In order to carefully quantify the evolution of the phase transition of this model over such a wide temperature range we go beyond the usual fast transition approximation, taking into account the expansion of the Universe as well as the behaviour of the nucleation probability at low temperatures. Our computation shows that there exists a range of parameters for which the gravitational wave spectrum lies at the edge between the exclusion limits of current pulsar timing array experiments and the detection band of the future Square Kilometre Array observatory. (orig.)

  12. Transition-edge sensor arrays for UV-optical-IR astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burney, J.; Bay, T.J.; Barral, J.; Brink, P.L.; Cabrera, B.; Castle, J.P.; Miller, A.J.; Nam, S.; Rosenberg, D.; Romani, R.W.; Tomada, A.

    2006-01-01

    Our research group has developed and characterized transition-edge sensor (TES) arrays for near IR-optical-near UV astrophysical observations. These detectors have a time-stamp accuracy of 0.3μs and an energy resolution of 0.16eV for 2.33eV photons at very high rates (30kHz). We have installed a 6x6 array of these TESs in an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator equipped with windows for direct imaging. We discuss new instrumentation progress and current data in all aspects related to successful operation of this camera system, including: detector and array performance, position dependence and cross-talk, low-temperature and readout electronics, quantum and system efficiency, IR filtering, and focus and imaging

  13. Wire Array Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Evans, Dan

    Over the past five years, the cost of solar panels has dropped drastically and, in concert, the number of installed modules has risen exponentially. However, solar electricity is still more than twice as expensive as electricity from a natural gas plant. Fortunately, wire array solar cells have emerged as a promising technology for further lowering the cost of solar. Si wire array solar cells are formed with a unique, low cost growth method and use 100 times less material than conventional Si cells. The wires can be embedded in a transparent, flexible polymer to create a free-standing array that can be rolled up for easy installation in a variety of form factors. Furthermore, by incorporating multijunctions into the wire morphology, higher efficiencies can be achieved while taking advantage of the unique defect relaxation pathways afforded by the 3D wire geometry. The work in this thesis shepherded Si wires from undoped arrays to flexible, functional large area devices and laid the groundwork for multijunction wire array cells. Fabrication techniques were developed to turn intrinsic Si wires into full p-n junctions and the wires were passivated with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H. Single wire devices yielded open circuit voltages of 600 mV and efficiencies of 9%. The arrays were then embedded in a polymer and contacted with a transparent, flexible, Ni nanoparticle and Ag nanowire top contact. The contact connected >99% of the wires in parallel and yielded flexible, substrate free solar cells featuring hundreds of thousands of wires. Building on the success of the Si wire arrays, GaP was epitaxially grown on the material to create heterostructures for photoelectrochemistry. These cells were limited by low absorption in the GaP due to its indirect bandgap, and poor current collection due to a diffusion length of only 80 nm. However, GaAsP on SiGe offers a superior combination of materials, and wire architectures based on these semiconductors were investigated for multijunction

  14. Study of Implosion of Twisted Nested Arrays at the Angara-5-1 Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrofanov, K. N.; Zukakishvili, G. G.; Aleksandrov, V. V.; Grabovski, E. V.; Frolov, I. N.; Gribov, A. N.

    2018-01-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the implosion of twisted nested arrays in which the wires of the outer and inner arrays are twisted about the array axis in opposite directions (clockwise and counterclockwise). Experiments with twisted arrays were carried out at the Angara-5-1 facility at currents of up to 4 MA. The currents through the arrays were switched either simultaneously or the current pulse through the outer array was delayed by 10-15 ns with the help of an anode spark gap. It is shown that, in such arrays, the currents flow along the inclined wires and, accordingly, there are both the azimuthal and axial components of the discharge current. The process of plasma implosion in twisted arrays depends substantially on the value of the axial (longitudinal) magnetic field generated inside the array by the azimuthal currents. Two-dimensional simulations of the magnetic field in twisted nested arrays were performed in the ( r, z) geometry with allowance for the skin effect in the discharge electrodes. It is shown that, depending on the geometry of the discharge electrodes, different configurations of the magnetic field can be implemented inside twisted nested arrays. The calculated magnetic configurations are compared with the results of measurements of the magnetic field inside such arrays. It is shown that the configuration of the axial magnetic field inside a twisted nested array depends substantially on the distribution of the azimuthal currents between the inner and outer arrays.

  15. Nonlinear time-series analysis of current signal in cathodic contact glow discharge electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allagui, Anis; Abdelkareem, Mohammad Ali; Rojas, Andrea Espinel; Bonny, Talal; Elwakil, Ahmed S.

    2016-01-01

    In the standard two-electrode configuration employed in electrolytic process, when the control dc voltage is brought to a critical value, the system undergoes a transition from conventional electrolysis to contact glow discharge electrolysis (CGDE), which has also been referred to as liquid-submerged micro-plasma, glow discharge plasma electrolysis, electrode effect, electrolytic plasma, etc. The light-emitting process is associated with the development of an irregular and erratic current time-series which has been arbitrarily labelled as “random,” and thus dissuaded further research in this direction. Here, we examine the current time-series signals measured in cathodic CGDE configuration in a concentrated KOH solution at different dc bias voltages greater than the critical voltage. We show that the signals are, in fact, not random according to the NIST SP. 800-22 test suite definition. We also demonstrate that post-processing low-pass filtered sequences requires less time than the native as-measured sequences, suggesting a superposition of low frequency chaotic fluctuations and high frequency behaviors (which may be produced by more than one possible source of entropy). Using an array of nonlinear time-series analyses for dynamical systems, i.e., the computation of largest Lyapunov exponents and correlation dimensions, and re-construction of phase portraits, we found that low-pass filtered datasets undergo a transition from quasi-periodic to chaotic to quasi-hyper-chaotic behavior, and back again to chaos when the voltage controlling-parameter is increased. The high frequency part of the signals is discussed in terms of highly nonlinear turbulent motion developed around the working electrode.

  16. Tracking and Navigation of Future NASA Spacecraft with the Square Kilometer Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, G. M.; Jones, D. L.; Connally, M. J.; Weinreb, S.; Preston, R. A.

    2001-12-01

    The international radio astronomy community is currently working on the design of an array of small radio antennas with a total collecting area of one square kilometer - more than a hundred times that of the largest existing (100-m) steerable antennas. An array of this size would provide obvious advantages for high data rate telemetry reception and for spacecraft navigation. Among these advantages are a two-orders-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity for telemetry downlink, flexible sub-arraying to track multiple spacecraft simultaneously, increased reliability through the use of large numbers of identical array elements, very accurate real-time angular spacecraft tracking, and a dramatic reduction in cost per unit area. NASA missions in many disciplines, including planetary science, would benefit from this increased ground-based tracking capability. The science return from planned missions could be increased, and opportunities for less expensive or completely new kinds of missions would be created.

  17. Real-time odor discrimination using a bioelectronic sensor array based on the insect electroantennogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myrick, A J; Hetling, J R; Park, K-C; Baker, T C

    2008-01-01

    Current trends in artificial nose research are strongly influenced by knowledge of biological olfactory systems. Insects have evolved over millions of years to detect and maneuver toward a food source or mate, or away from predators. The insect olfactory system is able to identify volatiles on a time scale that matches their ability to maneuver. Here, biological olfactory sense organs, insect antennae, have been exploited in a hybrid-device biosensor, demonstrating the ability to identify individual strands of odor in a plume passing over the sensor on a sub-second time scale. A portable system was designed to utilize the electrophysiological responses recorded from a sensor array composed of male or female antennae from four or eight different species of insects (a multi-channel electroantennogram, EAG). A computational analysis strategy that allows discrimination between odors in real time is described in detail. Following a training period, both semi-parametric and k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classifiers with the ability to discard ambiguous responses are applied toward the classification of up to eight odors. EAG responses to individual strands in an odor plume are classified or discarded as ambiguous with a delay (sensor response to classification report) on the order of 1 s. The dependence of classification error rate on several parameters is described. Finally, the performance of the approach is compared to that of a minimal conditional risk classifier

  18. Soft X-ray radiation power characteristics of tungsten wire arrays on Yang accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Siqun; Ouyang Kai; Huang Xianbin; Dan Jiakun; Zhou Rongguo; Yang Liang

    2013-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to research the X-ray radiation characteristics of tungsten wire arrays on Yang accelerator. In those experiments, we charged the Marx generator of 60 kV, and the load current of 0.85-1.00 MA, the rise time of 75-90 ns (10%-90%). A soft X-ray scintillator powermeter which responded flatly to 50-1800 eV X-rays was used to measure the power of soft X-ray emitted from implosion plasma. In this paper, we present the measuring results of time-resolved soft X-ray radiation power, and discuss the radiation characteristics of implosion plasma by analyzing the correlations of soft X-ray radiant power and the diameter, length, wire number of the tungsten wire arrays. The optimizing wire array configuration parameters on Yang are as follows: 8 mm array diameter, 15 mm wire length, and 24 wire number. We also present the radiant power difference in radial and axial directions of the wire arrays. (authors)

  19. Antenna Arrays and Automotive Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rabinovich, Victor

    2013-01-01

    This book throws a lifeline to designers wading through mounds of antenna array patents looking for the most suitable systems for their projects. Drastically reducing the research time required to locate solutions to the latest challenges in automotive communications, it sorts and systematizes material on cutting-edge antenna arrays that feature multi-element communication systems with enormous potential for the automotive industry. These new systems promise to make driving safer and more efficient, opening up myriad applications, including vehicle-to-vehicle traffic that prevents collisions, automatic toll collection, vehicle location and fine-tuning for cruise control systems. This book’s exhaustive coverage begins with currently deployed systems, frequency ranges and key parameters. It proceeds to examine system geometry, analog and digital beam steering technology (including "smart" beams formed in noisy environments), maximizing signal-to-noise ratios, miniaturization, and base station technology that ...

  20. Constraining Alternative Theories of Gravity Using Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Neil J.; O'Beirne, Logan; Taylor, Stephen R.; Yunes, Nicolás

    2018-05-01

    The opening of the gravitational wave window by ground-based laser interferometers has made possible many new tests of gravity, including the first constraints on polarization. It is hoped that, within the next decade, pulsar timing will extend the window by making the first detections in the nanohertz frequency regime. Pulsar timing offers several advantages over ground-based interferometers for constraining the polarization of gravitational waves due to the many projections of the polarization pattern provided by the different lines of sight to the pulsars, and the enhanced response to longitudinal polarizations. Here, we show that existing results from pulsar timing arrays can be used to place stringent limits on the energy density of longitudinal stochastic gravitational waves. However, unambiguously distinguishing these modes from noise will be very difficult due to the large variances in the pulsar-pulsar correlation patterns. Existing upper limits on the power spectrum of pulsar timing residuals imply that the amplitude of vector longitudinal (VL) and scalar longitudinal (SL) modes at frequencies of 1/year are constrained, AVL<4 ×10-16 and ASL<4 ×10-17, while the bounds on the energy density for a scale invariant cosmological background are ΩVLh2<4 ×10-11 and ΩSLh2<3 ×10-13.

  1. Time-resolved optical spectrometer based on a monolithic array of high-precision TDCs and SPADs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, Davide; Markovic, Bojan; Di Sieno, Laura; Contini, Davide; Bassi, Andrea; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto; Zappa, Franco

    2013-12-01

    We present a compact time-resolved spectrometer suitable for optical spectroscopy from 400 nm to 1 μm wavelengths. The detector consists of a monolithic array of 16 high-precision Time-to-Digital Converters (TDC) and Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPAD). The instrument has 10 ps resolution and reaches 70 ps (FWHM) timing precision over a 160 ns full-scale range with a Differential Non-Linearity (DNL) better than 1.5 % LSB. The core of the spectrometer is the application-specific integrated chip composed of 16 pixels with 250 μm pitch, containing a 20 μm diameter SPAD and an independent TDC each, fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS technology. In front of this array a monochromator is used to focus different wavelengths into different pixels. The spectrometer has been used for fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy: 5 nm spectral resolution over an 80 nm bandwidth is achieved. Lifetime spectroscopy of Nile blue is demonstrated.

  2. Experimental investigation of localized stress-induced leakage current distribution in gate dielectrics using array test circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeonwoo; Teramoto, Akinobu; Kuroda, Rihito; Suwa, Tomoyuki; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2018-04-01

    Localized stress-induced leakage current (SILC) has become a major problem in the reliability of flash memories. To reduce it, clarifying the SILC mechanism is important, and statistical measurement and analysis have to be carried out. In this study, we applied an array test circuit that can measure the SILC distribution of more than 80,000 nMOSFETs with various gate areas at a high speed (within 80 s) and a high accuracy (on the 10-17 A current order). The results clarified that the distributions of localized SILC in different gate areas follow a universal distribution assuming the same SILC defect density distribution per unit area, and the current of localized SILC defects does not scale down with the gate area. Moreover, the distribution of SILC defect density and its dependence on the oxide field for measurement (E OX-Measure) were experimentally determined for fabricated devices.

  3. Solar panels offer array of hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The installation of what is believed to be the largest array of solar thermal panels currently in use at a UK NHS hospital has taken place at an ideal time for the facility in question, Harlow's Princess Alexandra Hospital, with the hospital's gas bill alone having risen by 153% over the past nine months thanks to soaring energy prices, and the estates department keen to mitigate the effects in any way possible. Jonathan Baillie reports.

  4. Phased-array radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookner, E.

    1985-02-01

    The operating principles, technology, and applications of phased-array radars are reviewed and illustrated with diagrams and photographs. Consideration is given to the antenna elements, circuitry for time delays, phase shifters, pulse coding and compression, and hybrid radars combining phased arrays with lenses to alter the beam characteristics. The capabilities and typical hardware of phased arrays are shown using the US military systems COBRA DANE and PAVE PAWS as examples.

  5. Infrasound array criteria for automatic detection and front velocity estimation of snow avalanches: towards a real-time early-warning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, E.; Ripepe, M.; Ulivieri, G.; Kogelnig, A.

    2015-11-01

    Avalanche risk management is strongly related to the ability to identify and timely report the occurrence of snow avalanches. Infrasound has been applied to avalanche research and monitoring for the last 20 years but it never turned into an operational tool to identify clear signals related to avalanches. We present here a method based on the analysis of infrasound signals recorded by a small aperture array in Ischgl (Austria), which provides a significant improvement to overcome this limit. The method is based on array-derived wave parameters, such as back azimuth and apparent velocity. The method defines threshold criteria for automatic avalanche identification by considering avalanches as a moving source of infrasound. We validate the efficiency of the automatic infrasound detection with continuous observations with Doppler radar and we show how the velocity of a snow avalanche in any given path around the array can be efficiently derived. Our results indicate that a proper infrasound array analysis allows a robust, real-time, remote detection of snow avalanches that is able to provide the number and the time of occurrence of snow avalanches occurring all around the array, which represent key information for a proper validation of avalanche forecast models and risk management in a given area.

  6. Firmware-only implementation of Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) in Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinyuan Wu; Zonghan Shi; Irena Y Wang

    2003-01-01

    A Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) implemented in general purpose field-programmable gate array (FPGA) for the Fermilab CKM experiment will be presented. The TDC uses a delay chain and register array structure to produce lower bits in addition to higher bits from a clock counter. Lacking the direct controls custom chips, the FPGA implementation of the delay chain and register array structure had to address two major problems: (1) the logic elements used for the delay chain and register array structure must be placed and routed by the FPGA compiler in a predictable manner, to assure uniformity of the TDC binning and short-term stability. (2) The delay variation due to temperature and power supply voltage must be compensated for to assure long-term stability. They used the chain structures in the existing FPGAs that the venders designed for general purpose such as carry algorithm or logic expansion to solve the first problem. To compensate for delay variations, they studied several digital compensation strategies that can be implemented in the same FPGA device. Some bench-top test results will also be presented in this document

  7. HgCdTe e-avalanche photodiode detector arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Singh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Initial results on the MWIR e-APD detector arrays with 30 μm pitch fabricated on LPE grown compositionally graded p-HgCdTe epilayers are presented. High dynamic resistance times active area (R0A product 2 × 106 Ω-cm2, low dark current density 4 nA/cm2 and high gain 5500 at -8 V were achieved in the n+-υ-p+ HgCdTe e-APD at 80 K. LPE based HgCdTe e-APD development makes this technology amenable for adoption in the foundries established for the conventional HgCdTe photovoltaic detector arrays without any additional investment.

  8. Particle sorting by Paramecium cilia arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Richard; Whiting, James G H; Wheway, Gabrielle; Melhuish, Chris; Adamatzky, Andrew

    Motile cilia are cell-surface organelles whose purposes, in ciliated protists and certain ciliated metazoan epithelia, include generating fluid flow, sensing and substance uptake. Certain properties of cilia arrays, such as beating synchronisation and manipulation of external proximate particulate matter, are considered emergent, but remain incompletely characterised despite these phenomena having being the subject of extensive modelling. This study constitutes a laboratory experimental characterisation of one of the emergent properties of motile cilia: manipulation of adjacent particulates. The work demonstrates through automated videomicrographic particle tracking that interactions between microparticles and somatic cilia arrays of the ciliated model organism Paramecium caudatum constitute a form of rudimentary 'sorting'. Small particles are drawn into the organism's proximity by cilia-induced fluid currents at all times, whereas larger particles may be held immobile at a distance from the cell margin when the cell generates characteristic feeding currents in the surrounding media. These findings can contribute to the design and fabrication of biomimetic cilia, with potential applications to the study of ciliopathies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Preliminary experimental results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinches on primary test stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xian-Bin; Zhou, Shao-Tong; Dan, Jia-Kun; Ren, Xiao-Dong, E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Wang, Kun-Lun; Zhang, Si-Qun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Cai, Hong-Chun; Duan, Shu-Chao; Ouyang, Kai; Chen, Guang-Hua; Ji, Ce; Wei, Bing; Feng, Shu-Ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-Ping; Deng, Jian-Jun [Key Laboratory of Pulsed Power, Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-108, Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China); Zhou, Xiu-Wen; Yang, Yi [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-987, Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China)

    2015-07-15

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a 20 TW pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ∼10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%–90%) current to a short-circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. Preliminary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 13 mm to 30 mm, consisting of 132–300 tungsten wires with 5–10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to characterize the x-ray radiation from wire-array Z pinches. The x-ray peak power (∼50 TW) and total radiated energy (∼500 kJ) were obtained from a single 20-mm-diam array with 80-ns stagnation time. The highest x-ray peak power up to 80 TW with 2.4 ns FWHM was achieved by using a nested array with 20-mm outer diameter, and the total x-ray energy from the nested array is comparable to that of single array. Implosion velocity estimated from the time-resolved image measurement exceeds 30 cm/μs. The detailed experimental results and other findings are presented and discussed.

  10. Blending of phased array data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijster, Arno; van Groenestijn, Gert-Jan; van Neer, Paul; Blacquière, Gerrit; Volker, Arno

    2018-04-01

    The use of phased arrays is growing in the non-destructive testing industry and the trend is towards large 2D arrays, but due to limitations, it is currently not possible to record the signals from all elements, resulting in aliased data. In the past, we have presented a data interpolation scheme `beyond spatial aliasing' to overcome this aliasing. In this paper, we present a different approach: blending and deblending of data. On the hardware side, groups of receivers are blended (grouped) in only a few transmit/recording channels. This allows for transmission and recording with all elements, in a shorter acquisition time and with less channels. On the data processing side, this blended data is deblended (separated) by transforming it to a different domain and applying an iterative filtering and thresholding. Two different filtering methods are compared: f-k filtering and wavefield extrapolation filtering. The deblending and filtering methods are demonstrated on simulated experimental data. The wavefield extrapolation filtering proves to outperform f-k filtering. The wavefield extrapolation method can deal with groups of up to 24 receivers, in a phased array of 48 × 48 elements.

  11. Protein Functionalized Nanodiamond Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various nanoscale elements are currently being explored for bio-applications, such as in bio-images, bio-detection, and bio-sensors. Among them, nanodiamonds possess remarkable features such as low bio-cytotoxicity, good optical property in fluorescent and Raman spectra, and good photostability for bio-applications. In this work, we devise techniques to position functionalized nanodiamonds on self-assembled monolayer (SAMs arrays adsorbed on silicon and ITO substrates surface using electron beam lithography techniques. The nanodiamond arrays were functionalized with lysozyme to target a certain biomolecule or protein specifically. The optical properties of the nanodiamond-protein complex arrays were characterized by a high throughput confocal microscope. The synthesized nanodiamond-lysozyme complex arrays were found to still retain their functionality in interacting with E. coli.

  12. GMR biosensor arrays: a system perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, D A; Gaster, R S; Lin, T; Osterfeld, S J; Han, S; Murmann, B; Wang, S X

    2010-05-15

    Giant magnetoresistive biosensors are becoming more prevalent for sensitive, quantifiable biomolecular detection. However, in order for magnetic biosensing to become competitive with current optical protein microarray technology, there is a need to increase the number of sensors while maintaining the high sensitivity and fast readout time characteristic of smaller arrays (1-8 sensors). In this paper, we present a circuit architecture scalable for larger sensor arrays (64 individually addressable sensors) while maintaining a high readout rate (scanning the entire array in less than 4s). The system utilizes both time domain multiplexing and frequency domain multiplexing in order to achieve this scan rate. For the implementation, we propose a new circuit architecture that does not use a classical Wheatstone bridge to measure the small change in resistance of the sensor. Instead, an architecture designed around a transimpedance amplifier is employed. A detailed analysis of this architecture including the noise, distortion, and potential sources of errors is presented, followed by a global optimization strategy for the entire system comprising the magnetic tags, sensors, and interface electronics. To demonstrate the sensitivity, quantifiable detection of two blindly spiked samples of unknown concentrations has been performed at concentrations below the limit of detection for the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Lastly, the multiplexing capability and reproducibility of the system was demonstrated by simultaneously monitoring sensors functionalized with three unique proteins at different concentrations in real-time. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cavity syncronisation of underdamped Josephson junction arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbara, P.; Filatrella, G.; Lobb, C.

    2003-01-01

    the junctions in the array and an electromagnetic cavity. Here we show that a model of a one-dimensional array of Josephson junctions coupled to a resonator can produce many features of the coherent be havior above threshold, including coherent radiation of power and the shape of the array current...

  14. Estimation of Acoustic Particle Motion and Source Bearing Using a Drifting Hydrophone Array Near a River Current Turbine to Assess Disturbances to Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Paul G.

    River hydrokinetic turbines may be an economical alternative to traditional energy sources for small communities on Alaskan rivers. However, there is concern that sound from these turbines could affect sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), an important resource for small, subsistence based communities, commercial fisherman, and recreational anglers. The hearing sensitivity of sockeye salmon has not been quantified, but behavioral responses to sounds at frequencies less than a few hundred Hertz have been documented for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and particle motion is thought to be the primary mode of stimulation. Methods of measuring acoustic particle motion are well-established, but have rarely been necessary in energetic areas, such as river and tidal current environments. In this study, the acoustic pressure in the vicinity of an operating river current turbine is measured using a freely drifting hydrophone array. Analysis of turbine sound reveals tones that vary in frequency and magnitude with turbine rotation rate, and that may sockeye salmon may sense. In addition to pressure, the vertical components of particle acceleration and velocity are estimated by calculating the finite difference of the pressure signals from the hydrophone array. A method of determining source bearing using an array of hydrophones is explored. The benefits and challenges of deploying drifting hydrophone arrays for marine renewable energy converter monitoring are discussed.

  15. Evaluation of methods for oligonucleotide array data via quantitative real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li-Xuan; Beyer, Richard P; Hudson, Francesca N; Linford, Nancy J; Morris, Daryl E; Kerr, Kathleen F

    2006-01-17

    There are currently many different methods for processing and summarizing probe-level data from Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays. It is of great interest to validate these methods and identify those that are most effective. There is no single best way to do this validation, and a variety of approaches is needed. Moreover, gene expression data are collected to answer a variety of scientific questions, and the same method may not be best for all questions. Only a handful of validation studies have been done so far, most of which rely on spike-in datasets and focus on the question of detecting differential expression. Here we seek methods that excel at estimating relative expression. We evaluate methods by identifying those that give the strongest linear association between expression measurements by array and the "gold-standard" assay. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is generally considered the "gold-standard" assay for measuring gene expression by biologists and is often used to confirm findings from microarray data. Here we use qRT-PCR measurements to validate methods for the components of processing oligo array data: background adjustment, normalization, mismatch adjustment, and probeset summary. An advantage of our approach over spike-in studies is that methods are validated on a real dataset that was collected to address a scientific question. We initially identify three of six popular methods that consistently produced the best agreement between oligo array and RT-PCR data for medium- and high-intensity genes. The three methods are generally known as MAS5, gcRMA, and the dChip mismatch mode. For medium- and high-intensity genes, we identified use of data from mismatch probes (as in MAS5 and dChip mismatch) and a sequence-based method of background adjustment (as in gcRMA) as the most important factors in methods' performances. However, we found poor reliability for methods using mismatch probes for low-intensity genes

  16. Evaluation of methods for oligonucleotide array data via quantitative real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Daryl E

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are currently many different methods for processing and summarizing probe-level data from Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays. It is of great interest to validate these methods and identify those that are most effective. There is no single best way to do this validation, and a variety of approaches is needed. Moreover, gene expression data are collected to answer a variety of scientific questions, and the same method may not be best for all questions. Only a handful of validation studies have been done so far, most of which rely on spike-in datasets and focus on the question of detecting differential expression. Here we seek methods that excel at estimating relative expression. We evaluate methods by identifying those that give the strongest linear association between expression measurements by array and the "gold-standard" assay. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR is generally considered the "gold-standard" assay for measuring gene expression by biologists and is often used to confirm findings from microarray data. Here we use qRT-PCR measurements to validate methods for the components of processing oligo array data: background adjustment, normalization, mismatch adjustment, and probeset summary. An advantage of our approach over spike-in studies is that methods are validated on a real dataset that was collected to address a scientific question. Results We initially identify three of six popular methods that consistently produced the best agreement between oligo array and RT-PCR data for medium- and high-intensity genes. The three methods are generally known as MAS5, gcRMA, and the dChip mismatch mode. For medium- and high-intensity genes, we identified use of data from mismatch probes (as in MAS5 and dChip mismatch and a sequence-based method of background adjustment (as in gcRMA as the most important factors in methods' performances. However, we found poor reliability for methods

  17. Time-Domain Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Techniques Suitable for Solid-State Imaging Sensor Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Henderson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully demonstrated video-rate CMOS single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD-based cameras for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM by applying innovative FLIM algorithms. We also review and compare several time-domain techniques and solid-state FLIM systems, and adapt the proposed algorithms for massive CMOS SPAD-based arrays and hardware implementations. The theoretical error equations are derived and their performances are demonstrated on the data obtained from 0.13 μm CMOS SPAD arrays and the multiple-decay data obtained from scanning PMT systems. In vivo two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging data of FITC-albumin labeled vasculature of a P22 rat carcinosarcoma (BD9 rat window chamber are used to test how different algorithms perform on bi-decay data. The proposed techniques are capable of producing lifetime images with enough contrast.

  18. HARMONIC SPACE ANALYSIS OF PULSAR TIMING ARRAY REDSHIFT MAPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roebber, Elinore; Holder, Gilbert, E-mail: roebbere@physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics and McGill Space Institute, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montréal, QC, H3A 2T8 (Canada)

    2017-01-20

    In this paper, we propose a new framework for treating the angular information in the pulsar timing array (PTA) response to a gravitational wave (GW) background based on standard cosmic microwave background techniques. We calculate the angular power spectrum of the all-sky gravitational redshift pattern induced at the Earth for both a single bright source of gravitational radiation and a statistically isotropic, unpolarized Gaussian random GW background. The angular power spectrum is the harmonic transform of the Hellings and Downs curve. We use the power spectrum to examine the expected variance in the Hellings and Downs curve in both cases. Finally, we discuss the extent to which PTAs are sensitive to the angular power spectrum and find that the power spectrum sensitivity is dominated by the quadrupole anisotropy of the gravitational redshift map.

  19. Characterization of SPAD Array for Multifocal High-Content Screening Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Tsikouras

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Current instruments used to detect specific protein-protein interactions in live cells for applications in high-content screening (HCS are limited by the time required to measure the lifetime. Here, a 32 × 1 single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD array was explored as a detector for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM in HCS. Device parameters and characterization results were interpreted in the context of the application to determine if the SPAD array could satisfy the requirements of HCS-FLIM. Fluorescence lifetime measurements were performed using a known fluorescence standard; and the recovered fluorescence lifetime matched literature reported values. The design of a theoretical 32 × 32 SPAD array was also considered as a detector for a multi-point confocal scanning microscope.

  20. Observing the dynamics of supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingarelli, C M F; Grover, K; Sidery, T; Smith, R J E; Vecchio, A

    2012-08-24

    Pulsar timing arrays are a prime tool to study unexplored astrophysical regimes with gravitational waves. Here, we show that the detection of gravitational radiation from individually resolvable supermassive black hole binary systems can yield direct information about the masses and spins of the black holes, provided that the gravitational-wave-induced timing fluctuations both at the pulsar and at Earth are detected. This in turn provides a map of the nonlinear dynamics of the gravitational field and a new avenue to tackle open problems in astrophysics connected to the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes. We discuss the potential, the challenges, and the limitations of these observations.

  1. Real-time tracking with a 3D-flow processor array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosetto, D.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of real-time track-finding has been performed to date with CAM (Content Addressable Memories) or with fast coincidence logic, because the processing scheme was though to have much slower performance. Advances in technology together with a new architectural approach make it feasible to also explore the computing technique for real-time track finding thus giving the advantages of implementing algorithms that can find more parameters such as calculate the sagitta, curvature, pt, etc. with respect to the CAM approach. This report describes real-time track finding using a new computing approach technique based on the 3D-flow array processor system. This system consists of a fixed interconnection architexture scheme, allowing flexible algorithm implementation on a scalable platform. The 3D-Flow parallel processing system for track finding is scalable in size and performance by either increasing the number of processors, or increasing the speed or else the number of pipelined stages. The present article describes the conceptual idea and the design stage of the project

  2. Real-time tracking with a 3D-Flow processor array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosetto, D.

    1993-06-01

    The problem of real-time track-finding has been performed to date with CAM (Content Addressable Memories) or with fast coincidence logic, because the processing scheme was thought to have much slower performance. Advances in technology together with a new architectural approach make it feasible to also explore the computing technique for real-time track finding thus giving the advantages of implementing algorithms that can find more parameters such as calculate the sagitta, curvature, pt, etc., with respect to the CAM approach. The report describes real-time track finding using new computing approach technique based on the 3D-Flow array processor system. This system consists of a fixed interconnection architecture scheme, allowing flexible algorithm implementation on a scalable platform. The 3D-Flow parallel processing system for track finding is scalable in size and performance by either increasing the number of processors, or increasing the speed or else the number of pipelined stages. The present article describes the conceptual idea and the design stage of the project

  3. Time-dependent optical response of three-dimensional Au nanoparticle arrays formed on silica nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mario, Lorenzo; Otomalo, Tadele Orbula; Catone, Daniele; O'Keeffe, Patrick; Tian, Lin; Turchini, Stefano; Palpant, Bruno; Martelli, Faustino

    2018-03-01

    We present stationary and transient absorption measurements on 3D Au nanoparticle (NP)-decorated Si O2 nanowire arrays. The 3D NP array has been produced by the dewetting of a thin Au film deposited on silica nanowires produced by oxidation of silicon nanowires. The experimental behaviors of the spectral and temporal dynamics observed in the experiment are accurately described by a two-step, three-temperature model. Using an arbitrary set of Au NPs with different aspect ratios, we demonstrate that the width of the experimental spectra, the energy shift of their position with time, and the asymmetry between the two positive wings in the dynamical variation of absorption can all be attributed to the nonuniform shape distribution of the Au NPs in the sample.

  4. Hot spot dynamics in carbon nanotube array devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Michael; Steiner, Mathias; Seo, Jung-Woo T; Hersam, Mark C; Avouris, Phaedon

    2015-03-11

    We report on the dynamics of spatial temperature distributions in aligned semiconducting carbon nanotube array devices with submicrometer channel lengths. By using high-resolution optical microscopy in combination with electrical transport measurements, we observe under steady state bias conditions the emergence of time-variable, local temperature maxima with dimensions below 300 nm, and temperatures above 400 K. On the basis of time domain cross-correlation analysis, we investigate how the intensity fluctuations of the thermal radiation patterns are correlated with the overall device current. The analysis reveals the interdependence of electrical current fluctuations and time-variable hot spot formation that limits the overall device performance and, ultimately, may cause device degradation. The findings have implications for the future development of carbon nanotube-based technologies.

  5. Testing and assembly of the detectors for the Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera on ACT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriage, T.A.; Chervenak, J.A.; Doriese, W.B.

    2006-01-01

    The Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera (MBAC) for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope consists of three Transition Edge Sensor (TES) arrays to make simultaneous observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background in three frequency bands. MBAC TESs are NASA Goddard Pop-Up Detectors (PUD) which are read-out by NIST time-domain multiplexers. MBAC is constructed by stacking 1x32 TES columns to form the 32x32 element arrays. The arrays are modular (connectorized) at the 1x32 column level such that array assembly is reversible and camera repair possible. Prior to assembly, each column is tested in a quick (2h) cycling 4 He/ 3 He adsorption refrigerator. Tests include measurements of TES current-voltage curves and TES complex impedance

  6. Testing and assembly of the detectors for the Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera on ACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriage, T.A. [Physics Department, Princeton University, Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)]. E-mail: marriage@princeton.edu; Chervenak, J.A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Doriese, W.B. [National Institute of Standards, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    The Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera (MBAC) for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope consists of three Transition Edge Sensor (TES) arrays to make simultaneous observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background in three frequency bands. MBAC TESs are NASA Goddard Pop-Up Detectors (PUD) which are read-out by NIST time-domain multiplexers. MBAC is constructed by stacking 1x32 TES columns to form the 32x32 element arrays. The arrays are modular (connectorized) at the 1x32 column level such that array assembly is reversible and camera repair possible. Prior to assembly, each column is tested in a quick (2h) cycling {sup 4}He/{sup 3}He adsorption refrigerator. Tests include measurements of TES current-voltage curves and TES complex impedance.

  7. Method of achieving ultra-wideband true-time-delay beam steering for active electronically scanned arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loui, Hung; Brock, Billy C.

    2016-10-25

    The various embodiments presented herein relate to beam steering an array antenna by modifying intermediate frequency (IF) waveforms prior to conversion to RF signals. For each channel, a direct digital synthesis (DDS) component can be utilized to generate a waveform or modify amplitude, timing and phase of a waveform relative to another waveform, whereby the generation/modification can be performed prior to the IF input port of a mixer on each channel. A local oscillator (LO) signal can be utilized to commonly drive each of the mixers. After conversion at the RF output port of each of the mixers, each RF signal can be transmitted by a respective antenna element in the antenna array. Initiation of transmission of each RF signal can be performed simultaneously at each antenna. The process can be reversed during receive whereby timing, amplitude, and phase of the received can be modified digitally post ADC conversion.

  8. Advancing Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Fender, Rob; Govoni, Federica; Green, Jimi; Hoare, Melvin; Jarvis, Matt; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Keane, Evan; Koopmans, Leon; Kramer, Michael; Maartens, Roy; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Mellema, Garrelt; Oosterloo, Tom; Prandoni, Isabella; Pritchard, Jonathan; Santos, Mario; Seymour, Nick; Stappers, Ben; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Tian, Wen Wu; Umana, Grazia; Wagg, Jeff; Bourke, Tyler L; AASKA14

    2015-01-01

    In 2014 it was 10 years since the publication of the comprehensive ‘Science with the Square Kilometre Array’ book and 15 years since the first such volume appeared in 1999. In that time numerous and unexpected advances have been made in the fields of astronomy and physics relevant to the capabilities of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). The SKA itself progressed from an idea to a developing reality with a baselined Phase 1 design (SKA1) and construction planned from 2017. To facilitate the publication of a new, updated science book, which will be relevant to the current astrophysical context, the meeting "Advancing Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array" was held in Giardina Naxos, Sicily. Articles were solicited from the community for that meeting to document the scientific advances enabled by the first phase of the SKA and those pertaining to future SKA deployments, with expected gains of 5 times the Phase 1 sensitivity below 350 MHz, about 10 times the Phase 1 sensitivity above 350 MHz and with f...

  9. Development of an automation technique for the establishment of functional lipid bilayer arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J S; Vogel, J; Geschke, O; Emnéus, J; Nielsen, C H; Perry, M; Vissing, T; Hansen, C R

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, a technique for establishing multiple black lipid membranes (BLMs) in arrays of micro structured ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) films, and supported by a micro porous material was developed. Rectangular 8 × 8 arrays with apertures having diameters of 301 ± 5 µm were fabricated in ETFE Teflon film by laser ablation using a carbon dioxide laser. Multiple lipid membranes could be formed across the micro structured 8 × 8 array ETFE partitions. Success rates for the establishment of cellulose-supported BLMs across the multiple aperture arrays were above 95%. However, the time course of the membrane thinning process was found to vary considerably between multiple aperture bilayer experiments. An airbrush partition pretreatment technique was developed to increase the reproducibility of the multiple lipid bilayers formation during the time course from the establishment of the lipid membranes to the formation of bilayers. The results showed that multiple lipid bilayers could be reproducible formed across the airbrush-pretreated 8 × 8 rectangular arrays. The ionophoric peptide valinomycin was incorporated into established membrane arrays, resulting in ionic currents that could be effectively blocked by tetraethylammonium. This shows that functional bimolecular lipid membranes were established, and furthermore outlines that the established lipid membrane arrays could host functional membrane-spanning molecules

  10. The Next-Generation Very Large Array: Technical Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Mark; Selina, Rob

    2018-01-01

    As part of its mandate as a national observatory, the NRAO is looking toward the long range future of radio astronomy and fostering the long term growth of the US astronomical community. NRAO has sponsored a series of science and technical community meetings to consider the science mission and design of a next-generation Very Large Array (ngVLA), building on the legacies of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Very Large Array (VLA).The basic ngVLA design emerging from these discussions is an interferometric array with approximately ten times the sensitivity and ten times higher spatial resolution than the VLA and ALMA radio telescopes, optimized for operation in the wavelength range 0.3cm to 3cm. The ngVLA would open a new window on the Universe through ultra-sensitive imaging of thermal line and continuum emission down to milli-arcsecond resolution, as well as unprecedented broadband continuum polarimetric imaging of non-thermal processes. The specifications and concepts for major ngVLA system elements are rapidly converging.We will provide an overview of the current system design of the ngVLA. The concepts for major system elements such as the antenna, receiving electronics, and central signal processing will be presented. We will also describe the major development activities that are presently underway to advance the design.

  11. A Ferrite LTCC-Based Monolithic SIW Phased Antenna Array

    KAUST Repository

    Nafe, Ahmed A.; Ghaffar, Farhan A.; Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad; Shamim, Atif

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a novel configuration for realizing monolithic SIW-based phased antenna arrays using Ferrite LTCC technology. Unlike the current common schemes for realizing SIW phased arrays that rely on surface-mount component (p-i-n diodes, etc) for controlling the phase of the individual antenna elements, here the phase is tuned by biasing of the ferrite filling of the SIW. This approach eliminates the need for mounting of any additional RF components and enables seamless monolithic integration of phase shifters and antennas in SIW technology. As a proof of concept, a two-element slotted SIW-based phased array is designed, fabricated and measured. The prototype exhibits a gain of 4.9 dBi at 13.2 GHz and a maximum E-plane beam-scanning of 28 degrees using external windings for biasing the phase shifters. Moreover, the array can achieve a maximum beam-scanning of 19 degrees when biased with small windings that are embedded in the package. This demonstration marks the first time a fully monolithic SIW-based phased array is realized in Ferrite LTCC technology and paves the way for future larger-size implementations.

  12. A Ferrite LTCC-Based Monolithic SIW Phased Antenna Array

    KAUST Repository

    Nafe, Ahmed

    2016-11-17

    In this work, we present a novel configuration for realizing monolithic SIW-based phased antenna arrays using Ferrite LTCC technology. Unlike the current common schemes for realizing SIW phased arrays that rely on surface-mount component (p-i-n diodes, etc) for controlling the phase of the individual antenna elements, here the phase is tuned by biasing of the ferrite filling of the SIW. This approach eliminates the need for mounting of any additional RF components and enables seamless monolithic integration of phase shifters and antennas in SIW technology. As a proof of concept, a two-element slotted SIW-based phased array is designed, fabricated and measured. The prototype exhibits a gain of 4.9 dBi at 13.2 GHz and a maximum E-plane beam-scanning of 28 degrees using external windings for biasing the phase shifters. Moreover, the array can achieve a maximum beam-scanning of 19 degrees when biased with small windings that are embedded in the package. This demonstration marks the first time a fully monolithic SIW-based phased array is realized in Ferrite LTCC technology and paves the way for future larger-size implementations.

  13. Spatially resolved detection of mutually locked Josephson junctions in arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keck, M.; Doderer, T.; Huebener, R.P.; Traeuble, T.; Dolata, R.; Weimann, T.; Niemeyer, J.

    1997-01-01

    Mutual locking due to the internal coupling in two-dimensional arrays of Josephson junctions was investigated. The appearance of Shapiro steps in the current versus voltage curve of a coupled on-chip detector junction is used to indicate coherent oscillations in the array. A highly coherent state is observed for some range of the array bias current. By scanning the array with a low-power electron beam, mutually locked junctions remain locked while the unlocked junctions generate a beam-induced additional voltage drop at the array. This imaging technique allows the detection of the nonlocked or weakly locked Josephson junctions in a (partially) locked array state. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  14. The International Pulsar Timing Array project: using pulsars as a gravitational wave detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, G; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO, PO Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Archibald, A [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, PQ, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arzoumanian, Z [CRESST/USRA, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Backer, D [Astronomy Department and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, PO Box 218, Hawthorn VIC 3122 (Australia); Burgay, M [Universita di Cagliari, Dipartimento di Fisica, SP Monserrato-Sestu km 0.7, 09042 Monserrato (Canada) (Italy); Cognard, I; Desvignes, G; Ferdman, R D [Station de Radioastronomie de Nanay, Observatoire de Paris, 18330 Nancay (France); Coles, W [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Cordes, J [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Demorest, P [National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Finn, L [Center for Gravitational Wave Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Freire, P [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf Dem Huegel 69, 53121, Bonn (Germany); Gonzalez, M [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Hessels, J [Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, Kruislaan 403, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hotan, A, E-mail: george.hobbs@csiro.a [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University, Bentley, WA (Australia)

    2010-04-21

    The International Pulsar Timing Array project combines observations of pulsars from both northern and southern hemisphere observatories with the main aim of detecting ultra-low frequency (approx 10{sup -9}-10{sup -8} Hz) gravitational waves. Here we introduce the project, review the methods used to search for gravitational waves emitted from coalescing supermassive binary black-hole systems in the centres of merging galaxies and discuss the status of the project.

  15. Characteristics of VCSELs and VCSEL arrays for optical data links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaw, Craig A.; Jiang, Wenbin; Lebby, Michael S.; Kiely, Philip A.; Claisse, Paul R.

    1997-05-01

    High performance, low cost, and highly reliable vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) have been developed and are currently being used in both parallel and serial optical interconnect applications. For example, Motorola's OPTOBUSTM parallel optical interconnect relies heavily on the unique characteristics of arrays of GaAs based VCSELs emitting at 850 nm to achieve its stringent performance goals at low cost. Representative parametric results of discrete VCSELs and VCSEL arrays will be compared, including `optical power output-current' and `current-voltage' curves, optical wall plug efficiencies, and modulation characteristics. The use of statistical parameter analysis across a wafer and subsequent parametric wafer maps has proven to be a valuable tool for maintaining control of the fabrication process. The consistency of VCSEL parameters across individual VCSEL arrays will be discussed. VCSELs are very robust devices. Life times at room ambient in excess of 3E6 hours have been reported by several groups. Degradation behavior of selected device parameters will be discussed. Failure analysis demonstrating the effect of proton implant depth on reliability will be presented. ESD damage at forward bias is shown to be process related, while ESD damage at reverse bias is shown to be material related. These VCSELs are ESD Class 1 devices.

  16. All-carbon multi-electrode array for real-time in vitro measurements of oxidizable neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picollo, Federico; Battiato, Alfio; Bernardi, Ettore; Plaitano, Marilena; Franchino, Claudio; Gosso, Sara; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Carbone, Emilio; Olivero, Paolo; Carabelli, Valentina

    2016-02-01

    We report on the ion beam fabrication of all-carbon multi electrode arrays (MEAs) based on 16 graphitic micro-channels embedded in single-crystal diamond (SCD) substrates. The fabricated SCD-MEAs are systematically employed for the in vitro simultaneous amperometric detection of the secretory activity from populations of chromaffin cells, demonstrating a new sensing approach with respect to standard techniques. The biochemical stability and biocompatibility of the SCD-based device combined with the parallel recording of multi-electrodes array allow: i) a significant time saving in data collection during drug screening and/or pharmacological tests over a large number of cells, ii) the possibility of comparing altered cell functionality among cell populations, and iii) the repeatition of acquisition runs over many cycles with a fully non-toxic and chemically robust bio-sensitive substrate.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Arrays for Intracellular Delivery and Biological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshadi, Masoud

    Introducing nucleic acids into mammalian cells is a crucial step to elucidate biochemical pathways, modify gene expression in immortalized cells, primary cells, and stem cells, and intoduces new approaches for clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. Current gene transfer technologies, including lipofection, electroporation, and viral delivery, have enabled break-through advances in basic and translational science to enable derivation and programming of embryonic stem cells, advanced gene editing using CRISPR (Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats), and development of targeted anti-tumor therapy using chimeric antigen receptors in T-cells (CAR-T). Despite these successes, current transfection technologies are time consuming and limited by the inefficient introduction of test molecules into large populations of target cells, and the cytotoxicity of the techniques. Moreover, many cell types cannot be consistently transfected by lipofection or electroporation (stem cells, T-cells) and viral delivery has limitations to the size of experimental DNA that can be packaged. In this dissertation, a novel coverslip-like platform consisting of an array of aligned hollow carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded in a sacrificial template is developed that enhances gene transfer capabilities, including high efficiency, low toxicity, in an expanded range of target cells, with the potential to transfer mixed combinations of protein and nucleic acids. The CNT array devices are fabricated by a scalable template-based manufacturing method using commercially available membranes, eliminating the need for nano-assembly. High efficient transfection has been demonstrated by delivering various cargos (nanoparticles, dye and plasmid DNA) into populations of cells, achieving 85% efficiency of plasmid DNA delivery into immortalized cells. Moreover, the CNT-mediated transfection of stem cells shows 3 times higher efficiency compared to current lipofection methods. Evaluating the cell

  18. A New Time Calibration Method for Switched-capacitor-array-based Waveform Samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H; Chen, C-T; Eclov, N; Ronzhin, A; Murat, P; Ramberg, E; Los, S; Moses, W; Choong, W-S; Kao, C-M

    2014-12-11

    We have developed a new time calibration method for the DRS4 waveform sampler that enables us to precisely measure the non-uniform sampling interval inherent in the switched-capacitor cells of the DRS4. The method uses the proportionality between the differential amplitude and sampling interval of adjacent switched-capacitor cells responding to a sawtooth-shape pulse. In the experiment, a sawtooth-shape pulse with a 40 ns period generated by a Tektronix AWG7102 is fed to a DRS4 evaluation board for calibrating the sampling intervals of all 1024 cells individually. The electronic time resolution of the DRS4 evaluation board with the new time calibration is measured to be ~2.4 ps RMS by using two simultaneous Gaussian pulses with 2.35 ns full-width at half-maximum and applying a Gaussian fit. The time resolution dependencies on the time difference with the new time calibration are measured and compared to results obtained by another method. The new method could be applicable for other switched-capacitor-array technology-based waveform samplers for precise time calibration.

  19. Versatile, reprogrammable area pixel array detector for time-resolved synchrotron x-ray applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruner, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The final technical report for DOE grant DE-SC0004079 is presented. The goal of the grant was to perform research, development and application of novel imaging x-ray detectors so as to effectively utilize the high intensity and brightness of the national synchrotron radiation facilities to enable previously unfeasible time-resolved x-ray research. The report summarizes the development of the resultant imaging x-ray detectors. Two types of detector platforms were developed: The first is a detector platform (called a Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD) that can image continuously at over a thousand images per second while maintaining high efficiency for wide dynamic range signals ranging from 1 to hundreds of millions of x-rays per pixel per image. Research on an even higher dynamic range variant is also described. The second detector platform (called the Keck Pixel Array Detector) is capable of acquiring a burst of x-ray images at a rate of millions of images per second.

  20. A Topological Array Trigger for AGIS, the Advanced Gamma ray Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krennrich, F.; Anderson, J.; Buckley, J.; Byrum, K.; Dawson, J.; Drake, G.; Haberichter, W.; Imran, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Kreps, A.; Schroedter, M.; Smith, A.

    2008-12-01

    Next generation ground based γ-ray observatories such as AGIS1 and CTA2 are expected to cover a 1 km2 area with 50-100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The stereoscopic view ol air showers using multiple view points raises the possibility to use a topological array trigger that adds substantial flexibility, new background suppression capabilities and a reduced energy threshold. In this paper we report on the concept and technical implementation of a fast topological trigger system, that makes use of real time image processing of individual camera patterns and their combination in a stereoscopic array analysis. A prototype system is currently under construction and we discuss the design and hardware of this topological array trigger system.

  1. Development of a fast time-to-digital converter (TDC) using a programmable gate array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mine, Shun-ichi; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Yamada, Sakue.

    1994-09-01

    A fast time-to-digital converter with a 5 ns step was designed and tested by utilizing a user-programmable gate array. The stabilities against temperature and supply voltage variation were measured. A module was built with this TDC, and was successfully used in the first-level trigger system of the ZEUS detector to reject proton-beam induced background events. (author)

  2. Real-time two-photon lithography in controlled flow to create a single-microparticle array and particle-cluster array for optofluidic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bing; Shi, Yang; Lao, Zhaoxin; Ni, Jincheng; Li, Guoqiang; Hu, Yanlei; Li, Jiawen; Chu, Jiaru; Wu, Dong; Sugioka, Koji

    2018-01-30

    Microarray technology provides an excellent platform for biomedical and biochemical research including basic scientific studies, drug discovery, and diagnostics. Here, we develop a novel method referred to as real-time two-photon lithography in a controlled flow in which femtosecond laser two-photon lithography is performed in situ in the sequential mode stopping and flowing the flow of liquid resin containing microparticles to achieve 100% trapping on a one-bead-to-one-trap basis. Polydisperse particles can be all trapped to form a desired array by freely designing trap structures, resulting in an unprecedentedly high capture efficiency of ∼100%. No persistent pressure is needed after trapping which reduces the complexity of the system. In addition, trapping of particle-cluster arrays with a controlled number of particles is also achieved via this method. The trapped particles inside the microchip are successfully applied as microlenses for high quality imaging. The present technology marks an essential step towards a versatile platform for the integration of bead-based assays and paves the way for developing innovative microfluidics, optofluidics, micro-optics and single-cell analysis devices.

  3. SU-E-P-35: Real-Time Patient Transit Dose Verification of Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy by a 2D Ionization Chamber Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the real-time dose verification method in volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) with a 2D array ion chamber array. Methods: The 2D ion chamber array was fixed on the panel of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Source-detector distance (SDD)was 140cm. 8mm RW3 solid water was added to the detector panel to achieve maximum readings.The patient plans for esophageal, prostate and liver cancers were selected to deliver on the cylindrical Cheese phantom 5 times in order to validate the reproducibility of doses. Real-time patient transit dose measurements were performed at each fraction. Dose distributions wereevaluated using gamma index criteria of 3mm DTA and 3% dose difference referred to the firsttime Result. Results: The gamma index pass rate in the Cheese phantom were about 98%; The gamma index pass rate for esophageal, liver and prostate cancer patient were about 92%,94%, and 92%, respectively; Gamma pass rate for all single fraction were more than 90%. Conclusion: The 2D array is capable of monitoring the real time transit doses during VMAT delivery. It is helpful to improve the treatment accuracy.

  4. Smart time-pulse coding photoconverters as basic components 2D-array logic devices for advanced neural networks and optical computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilenko, Vladimir G.; Nikolsky, Alexander I.; Lazarev, Alexander A.; Michalnichenko, Nikolay N.

    2004-04-01

    The article deals with a conception of building arithmetic-logic devices (ALD) with a 2D-structure and optical 2D-array inputs-outputs as advanced high-productivity parallel basic operational training modules for realization of basic operation of continuous, neuro-fuzzy, multilevel, threshold and others logics and vector-matrix, vector-tensor procedures in neural networks, that consists in use of time-pulse coding (TPC) architecture and 2D-array smart optoelectronic pulse-width (or pulse-phase) modulators (PWM or PPM) for transformation of input pictures. The input grayscale image is transformed into a group of corresponding short optical pulses or time positions of optical two-level signal swing. We consider optoelectronic implementations of universal (quasi-universal) picture element of two-valued ALD, multi-valued ALD, analog-to-digital converters, multilevel threshold discriminators and we show that 2D-array time-pulse photoconverters are the base elements for these devices. We show simulation results of the time-pulse photoconverters as base components. Considered devices have technical parameters: input optical signals power is 200nW_200μW (if photodiode responsivity is 0.5A/W), conversion time is from tens of microseconds to a millisecond, supply voltage is 1.5_15V, consumption power is from tens of microwatts to a milliwatt, conversion nonlinearity is less than 1%. One cell consists of 2-3 photodiodes and about ten CMOS transistors. This simplicity of the cells allows to carry out their integration in arrays of 32x32, 64x64 elements and more.

  5. Algorithm for real-time detection of signal patterns using phase synchrony: an application to an electrode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Saman; MacKay, William A.; van Dam, R. Michael; Thompson, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Real-time analysis of multi-channel spatio-temporal sensor data presents a considerable technical challenge for a number of applications. For example, in brain-computer interfaces, signal patterns originating on a time-dependent basis from an array of electrodes on the scalp (i.e. electroencephalography) must be analyzed in real time to recognize mental states and translate these to commands which control operations in a machine. In this paper we describe a new technique for recognition of spatio-temporal patterns based on performing online discrimination of time-resolved events through the use of correlation of phase dynamics between various channels in a multi-channel system. The algorithm extracts unique sensor signature patterns associated with each event during a training period and ranks importance of sensor pairs in order to distinguish between time-resolved stimuli to which the system may be exposed during real-time operation. We apply the algorithm to electroencephalographic signals obtained from subjects tested in the neurophysiology laboratories at the University of Toronto. The extension of this algorithm for rapid detection of patterns in other sensing applications, including chemical identification via chemical or bio-chemical sensor arrays, is also discussed.

  6. Chromatographic peak resolution using Microsoft Excel Solver. The merit of time shifting input arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2008-12-05

    Resolution of overlapped chromatographic peaks is generally accomplished by modeling the peaks as Gaussian or modified Gaussian functions. It is possible, even preferable, to use actual single analyte input responses for this purpose and a nonlinear least squares minimization routine such as that provided by Microsoft Excel Solver can then provide the resolution. In practice, the quality of the results obtained varies greatly due to small shifts in retention time. I show here that such deconvolution can be considerably improved if one or more of the response arrays are iteratively shifted in time.

  7. Intracavitary ultrasound phased arrays for thermal therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Erin

    Currently, the success of hyperthermia and thermal surgery treatments is limited by the technology used in the design and fabrication of clinical heating devices and the completeness of the thermometry systems used for guidance. For both hyperthermia and thermal surgery, electrically focused ultrasound generated by phased arrays provides a means of controlling localized energy deposition in body tissues. Intracavitary applicators can be used to bring the energy source close to a target volume, such as the prostate, thereby minimizing normal tissue damage. The work performed in this study was aimed at improving noninvasive prostate thermal therapies and utilized three research approaches: (1) Acoustic, thermal and optimization simulations, (2) Design and fabrication of multiple phased arrays, (3) Ex vivo and in vivo experimental testing of the heating capabilities of the phased arrays. As part of this study, a novel aperiodic phased array design was developed which resulted in a 30- 45% reduction in grating lobe levels when compared to conventional phased arrays. Measured acoustic fields generated by the constructed aperiodic arrays agreed closely with the fields predicted by the theoretical simulations and covered anatomically appropriate ranges. The power capabilities of these arrays were demonstrated to be sufficient for the purposes of hyperthermia and thermal surgery. The advantage of using phased arrays in place of fixed focus transducers was shown by demonstrating the ability of electronic scanning to increase the size of the necrosed tissue volume while providing a more uniform thermal dose, which can ultimately reduce patient treatment times. A theoretical study on the feasibility of MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) thermometry for noninvasive temperature feedback control was investigated as a means to improve transient and steady state temperature distributions achieved in hyperthermia treatments. MRI guided ex vivo and in vivo experiments demonstrated

  8. The mini-dome Fresnel lens photovoltaic concentrator array - Current status of component and prototype panel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piszczor, M. F.; Swartz, C. K.; O'Neill, M. J.; Mcdanal, A. J.; Fraas, L. M.

    1990-01-01

    NASA Lewis and ENTECH have been developing a high-efficiency, lightweight space photovoltaic concentrator array. The emphasis of the program has shifted to fabrication and testing of the minidome Fresnel lens and other array components. Protototype lenses have been tested for optical efficiency, with results around 90 percent, and tracking error performance. The results of these tests have been very consistent with the predicted analytical performance. Work has also progressed in the fabrication of the array support structure. Recent advances in 30 percent efficient stacked cell technology will have a significant effect on the array performance. It is concluded that near-term array performance goals of 300 W/sq m and 100 W/kg are feasible.

  9. Radar techniques using array antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Wirth, Wulf-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Radar Techniques Using Array Antennas is a thorough introduction to the possibilities of radar technology based on electronic steerable and active array antennas. Topics covered include array signal processing, array calibration, adaptive digital beamforming, adaptive monopulse, superresolution, pulse compression, sequential detection, target detection with long pulse series, space-time adaptive processing (STAP), moving target detection using synthetic aperture radar (SAR), target imaging, energy management and system parameter relations. The discussed methods are confirmed by simulation stud

  10. Preparation and elementary research on electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution of highly ordered titanium dioxide nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qinglong; Liao Junsheng; Bai Yun

    2010-01-01

    Well ordered and uniform titanium dioxide nanotube arrays were fabricated by anodiaing process from a bath containing 1% NaF, 1mol/L Na 2 SO 4 , 0.5 mol/L H 2 SO 4 at room temperature. Surface morphology of titanium dioxide nanotube arrays were observed with SEM. The formation process of titanium dioxide nanotube arrays was suggested by current-time transient. Its catalytic hydrogen evolution behavior was studied by electrochemical measurements in a 5%(mass fraction) H 2 SO 4 solution. The results showed that the titanium dioxide nanotube arrays on titanium had better hydrogen evolution activity and trace palladium lead to the maximum electrocatalytic activity of hydrogen production. (authors)

  11. A dynamical approach in exploring the unknown mass in the Solar system using pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y. J.; Lee, K. J.; Caballero, R. N.

    2018-04-01

    The error in the Solar system ephemeris will lead to dipolar correlations in the residuals of pulsar timing array for widely separated pulsars. In this paper, we utilize such correlated signals, and construct a Bayesian data-analysis framework to detect the unknown mass in the Solar system and to measure the orbital parameters. The algorithm is designed to calculate the waveform of the induced pulsar-timing residuals due to the unmodelled objects following the Keplerian orbits in the Solar system. The algorithm incorporates a Bayesian-analysis suit used to simultaneously analyse the pulsar-timing data of multiple pulsars to search for coherent waveforms, evaluate the detection significance of unknown objects, and to measure their parameters. When the object is not detectable, our algorithm can be used to place upper limits on the mass. The algorithm is verified using simulated data sets, and cross-checked with analytical calculations. We also investigate the capability of future pulsar-timing-array experiments in detecting the unknown objects. We expect that the future pulsar-timing data can limit the unknown massive objects in the Solar system to be lighter than 10-11-10-12 M⊙, or measure the mass of Jovian system to a fractional precision of 10-8-10-9.

  12. Characterization of photovoltaic array performance: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Jr., R. G.

    1986-09-15

    Characterization of the electrical performance of a photovoltaic array can take many forms depending on the end use of the data. Typical uses include buyer-seller negotiations, system performance prediction, and performance measurement. Buyer-seller negotiations may deal with specifying the size (power) of an array to be purchased under some standard reporting conditions, and may treat the warranty conditions governing allowable degradation of this performance with time. System design, on the other hand, requires prediction of performance under varying field conditions, not standard reporting conditions, and must include the non-ideal realities of operating systems: array shadowing, steep angles of incidence, soiling, and array-load energy utilization. Typical uses of predicted array performance include array sizing tradeoffs, tracking-pointing comparisons, load-array interface analyses and system economic evaluations. The third use, performance measurement, refers to the characterization of an as-built array as opposed to prediction of the performance of an array to be built. This may be done to assess actual array performance or to measure performance degradation over time.

  13. New bi-dimensional SPAD arrays for time resolved single photon imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, R. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and Sez., INFN di Catania, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Tudisco, S., E-mail: tudisco@lns.infn.it [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and Sez., INFN di Catania, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Piemonte, C. [FBK-Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via S. Croce 77, 38122 Trento (Italy); Lo Presti, D. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and Sez., INFN di Catania, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Anzalone, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and Sez., INFN di Catania, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Musumeci, F.; Scordino, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and Sez., INFN di Catania, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Serra, N.; Zorzi, N. [FBK-Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via S. Croce 77, 38122 Trento (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Some of the first results concerning the electrical and optical performances of new bi-dimensional single photon avalanche diodes arrays for imaging applications are briefly presented. The planned arrays were realized at the Fondazione Bruno Kessler—Trento and tested at LNS–INFN. The proposed new solution, utilizing a new architecture with integrated quenching resistors, allows to simplify the electronic readout.

  14. New bi-dimensional SPAD arrays for time resolved single photon imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, R.; Tudisco, S.; Piemonte, C.; Lo Presti, D.; Anzalone, A.; Musumeci, F.; Scordino, A.; Serra, N.; Zorzi, N.

    2013-01-01

    Some of the first results concerning the electrical and optical performances of new bi-dimensional single photon avalanche diodes arrays for imaging applications are briefly presented. The planned arrays were realized at the Fondazione Bruno Kessler—Trento and tested at LNS–INFN. The proposed new solution, utilizing a new architecture with integrated quenching resistors, allows to simplify the electronic readout

  15. The gravitational wave background from massive black hole binaries in Illustris: spectral features and time to detection with pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Blecha, Laura; Hernquist, Lars; Sesana, Alberto; Taylor, Stephen R.

    2017-11-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) around the world are using the incredible consistency of millisecond pulsars to measure low-frequency gravitational waves from (super)massive black hole (MBH) binaries. We use comprehensive MBH merger models based on cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to predict the spectrum of the stochastic gravitational wave background (GWB). We use real time-of-arrival specifications from the European, NANOGrav, Parkes, and International PTA (IPTA) to calculate realistic times to detection of the GWB across a wide range of model parameters. In addition to exploring the parameter space of environmental hardening processes (in particular: stellar scattering efficiencies), we have expanded our models to include eccentric binary evolution which can have a strong effect on the GWB spectrum. Our models show that strong stellar scattering and high characteristic eccentricities enhance the GWB strain amplitude near the PTA-sensitive `sweet-spot' (near the frequency f = 1 yr-1), slightly improving detection prospects in these cases. While the GWB amplitude is degenerate between cosmological and environmental parameters, the location of a spectral turnover at low frequencies (f ≲ 0.1 yr-1) is strongly indicative of environmental coupling. At high frequencies (f ≳ 1 yr-1), the GWB spectral index can be used to infer the number density of sources and possibly their eccentricity distribution. Even with merger models that use pessimistic environmental and eccentricity parameters, if the current rate of PTA expansion continues, we find that the IPTA is highly likely to make a detection within about 10 yr.

  16. Theoretical models of Kapton heating in solar array geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Thomas L.

    1992-01-01

    In an effort to understand pyrolysis of Kapton in solar arrays, a computational heat transfer program was developed. This model allows for the different materials and widely divergent length scales of the problem. The present status of the calculation indicates that thin copper traces surrounded by Kapton and carrying large currents can show large temperature increases, but the other configurations seen on solar arrays have adequate heat sinks to prevent substantial heating of the Kapton. Electron currents from the ambient plasma can also contribute to heating of thin traces. Since Kapton is stable at temperatures as high as 600 C, this indicates that it should be suitable for solar array applications. There are indications that the adhesive sued in solar arrays may be a strong contributor to the pyrolysis problem seen in solar array vacuum chamber tests.

  17. Big Data Challenges for Large Radio Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dayton L.; Wagstaff, Kiri; Thompson, David; D'Addario, Larry; Navarro, Robert; Mattmann, Chris; Majid, Walid; Lazio, Joseph; Preston, Robert; Rebbapragada, Umaa

    2012-01-01

    Future large radio astronomy arrays, particularly the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will be able to generate data at rates far higher than can be analyzed or stored affordably with current practices. This is, by definition, a "big data" problem, and requires an end-to-end solution if future radio arrays are to reach their full scientific potential. Similar data processing, transport, storage, and management challenges face next-generation facilities in many other fields.

  18. EPOXI Uplink Array Experiment of June 27, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilnrotter, V.; Tsao, P. C.; Lee, D. K.; Cornish, T. P.; Paal, L.; Jamnejad, V.

    2008-08-01

    Uplink array technology is currently being developed for NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) to provide greater range and data throughput for future NASA missions, including manned missions to Mars and exploratory missions to the outer planets, the Kuiper Belt, and beyond. The DSN uplink arrays employ N microwave antennas transmitting at 7.2 GHz (X-band) to produce signals that add coherently at the spacecraft, hence providing a power gain of N^2 over a single antenna. This gain can be traded off directly for an N^2 higher data rate at a given distance such as Mars, providing, for example, high-definition video broadcast from Earth to a future human mission, or it can provide a given data rate for commands and software uploads at a distance N times greater than would be possible with a single antenna. The uplink arraying concept has been recently demonstrated using the three operational 34-m antennas of the Apollo Complex at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex in California, which transmitted arrayed signals to the EPOXI spacecraft (an acronym formed from EPOCh and DIXI: Extrasolar Planetary Observation and Characterization and Deep Impact Extended Investigation). Both two-element and three-element uplink arrays were configured, and the theoretical array gains of 6 dB and 9.5 dB, respectively, were demonstrated experimentally. This required initial phasing of the array elements, the generation of accurate frequency predicts to maintain phase from each antenna despite relative velocity components due to Earth rotation and spacecraft trajectory, and monitoring of the ground-system phase for possible drifts caused by thermal effects over the 16-km fiber-optic signal distribution network. This article provides a description of the equipment and techniques used to demonstrate the uplink arraying concept in a relevant operational environment. Data collected from the EPOXI spacecraft are also analyzed to verify array calibration, array gain, and system stability

  19. Characterization of the electrical output of flat-plate photovoltaic arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, C. C.; Hill, G. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The electric output of flat-plate photovoltaic arrays changes constantly, due primarily to changes in cell temperature and irradiance level. As a result, array loads such as direct-current to alternating-current power conditioners must be able to accommodate widely varying input levels, while maintaining operation at or near the array maximum power point.The results of an extensive computer simulation study that was used to define the parameters necessary for the systematic design of array/power-conditioner interfaces are presented as normalized ratios of power-conditioner parameters to array parameters, to make the results universally applicable to a wide variety of system sizes, sites, and operating modes. The advantages of maximum power tracking and a technique for computing average annual power-conditioner efficiency are discussed.

  20. The Owens Valley Millimeter Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padin, S.; Scott, S.L.; Woody, D.P.; Scoville, N.Z.; Seling, T.V.

    1991-01-01

    The telescopes and signal processing systems of the Owens Valley Millimeter Array are considered, and improvements in the sensitivity and stability of the instrument are characterized. The instrument can be applied to map sources in the 85 to 115 GHz and 218 to 265 GHz bands with a resolution of about 1 arcsec in the higher frequency band. The operation of the array is fully automated. The current scientific programs for the array encompass high-resolution imaging of protoplanetary/protostellar disk structures, observations of molecular cloud complexes associated with spiral structure in nearby galaxies, and observations of molecular structures in the nuclei of spiral and luminous IRAS galaxies. 9 refs

  1. The turbulent life of juvenile icebergs: Observations from an array of high-rate time-lapse cameras in LeConte Bay, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienholz, C.; Amundson, J. M.; Jackson, R. H.; Motyka, R. J.; Nash, J. D.; Sutherland, D.

    2017-12-01

    Tidewater glacier behavior is driven by poorly understood processes occurring at the ice-ocean interface, including sedimentation and erosion, iceberg calving, and submarine melting. These processes are inherently difficult to observe, calling for innovative field techniques and numerical models. As part of a multi-year field effort to constrain ocean-glacier heat and mass exchange, we deployed an array of high-rate time-lapse cameras (sampling intervals between 15 seconds and 2 minutes) to monitor the terminus of LeConte Glacier and its proglacial fjord. The camera array has operated continuously for more than a year. Our high sampling rates enable tracking of iceberg motion with optical flow algorithms, which have been used widely in computer vision but less so in glaciology and oceanography. Such algorithms track individual features (e.g., corners of icebergs), which is ideal for iceberg-rich fjords, where motion can vary substantially over short temporal and spatial scales (e.g., due to complex surface currents or different iceberg sizes). We process our data to quantify subdaily to seasonal patterns in surface currents and relate them to forcing from tides, wind, and glacier runoff. Flow is most variable close to the glacier terminus due to frequent calving events and turbulent plume dynamics. Farther down fjord, more consistent patterns emerge, driven by tides, wind, and runoff and altered by fjord geometry. Our tracking results compare favorably to and complement our Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler measurements from boats and moorings. Given their high spatial and temporal resolution, our observations will place important surface constraints on forthcoming hydrodynamic modeling efforts. The deployment of the cameras in a harsh environment and the corresponding image processing provided an opportunity to test hardware and software thoroughly, which will prove useful for similar systems at other glaciers.

  2. Temperature-sensitive junction transformations for mid-wavelength HgCdTe photovoltaic infrared detector arrays by laser beam induced current microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Weicheng [College of Photoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China); National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); Hu, Weida, E-mail: wdhu@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Lin, Tie; Yin, Fei; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Lu, Wei [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); Cheng, Xiang' ai, E-mail: xiang-ai-cheng@126.com; Wang, Rui [College of Photoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China)

    2014-11-10

    In this paper, we report on the disappearance of the photosensitive area extension effect and the unusual temperature dependence of junction transformation for mid-wavelength, n-on-p HgCdTe photovoltaic infrared detector arrays. The n-type region is formed by B{sup +} ion implantation on Hg-vacancy-doped p-type HgCdTe. Junction transformations under different temperatures are visually captured by a laser beam induced current microscope. A physical model of temperature dependence on junction transformation is proposed and demonstrated by using numerical simulations. It is shown that Hg-interstitial diffusion and temperature activated defects jointly lead to the p-n junction transformation dependence on temperature, and the weaker mixed conduction compared with long-wavelength HgCdTe photodiode contributes to the disappearance of the photosensitive area extension effect in mid-wavelength HgCdTe infrared detector arrays.

  3. IRIS Arrays: Observing Wavefields at Multiple Scales and Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumy, D. F.; Woodward, R.; Frassetto, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) provides instruments for creating and operating seismic arrays at a wide range of scales. As an example, for over thirty years the IRIS PASSCAL program has provided instruments to individual Principal Investigators to deploy arrays of all shapes and sizes on every continent. These arrays have ranged from just a few sensors to hundreds or even thousands of sensors, covering areas with dimensions of meters to thousands of kilometers. IRIS also operates arrays directly, such as the USArray Transportable Array (TA) as part of the EarthScope program. Since 2004, the TA has rolled across North America, at any given time spanning a swath of approximately 800 km by 2,500 km, and thus far sampling 2% of the Earth's surface. This achievement includes all of the lower-48 U.S., southernmost Canada, and now parts of Alaska. IRIS has also facilitated specialized arrays in polar environments and on the seafloor. In all cases, the data from these arrays are freely available to the scientific community. As the community of scientists who use IRIS facilities and data look to the future they have identified a clear need for new array capabilities. In particular, as part of its Wavefields Initiative, IRIS is exploring new technologies that can enable large, dense array deployments to record unaliased wavefields at a wide range of frequencies. Large-scale arrays might utilize multiple sensor technologies to best achieve observing objectives and optimize equipment and logistical costs. Improvements in packaging and power systems can provide equipment with reduced size, weight, and power that will reduce logistical constraints for large experiments, and can make a critical difference for deployments in harsh environments or other situations where rapid deployment is required. We will review the range of existing IRIS array capabilities with an overview of previous and current deployments and examples of data and results. We

  4. Effect of wire shape on wire array discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, N.; Tanaka, Y.; Yushita, Y.; Nagata, M.; Teramoto, Y.; Katsuki, S.; Akiyama, H.

    2001-01-01

    Although considerable investigations have been reported on z-pinches to achieve nuclear fusion, little attention has been given from the point of view of how a wire array consisting of many parallel wires explodes. Instability existing in the wire array discharge has been shown. In this paper, the effect of wire shape in the wire array on unstable behavior of the wire array discharge is represented by numerical analysis. The claws on the wire formed in installation of wire may cause uniform current distribution on wire array. The effect of error of wire diameter in production is computed by Monte Carlo Method. (author)

  5. Effect of wire shape on wire array discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimomura, N.; Tanaka, Y.; Yushita, Y.; Nagata, M. [University of Tokushima, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Tokushima (Japan); Teramoto, Y.; Katsuki, S.; Akiyama, H. [Kumamoto University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Although considerable investigations have been reported on z-pinches to achieve nuclear fusion, little attention has been given from the point of view of how a wire array consisting of many parallel wires explodes. Instability existing in the wire array discharge has been shown. In this paper, the effect of wire shape in the wire array on unstable behavior of the wire array discharge is represented by numerical analysis. The claws on the wire formed in installation of wire may cause uniform current distribution on wire array. The effect of error of wire diameter in production is computed by Monte Carlo Method. (author)

  6. Array display tool ADT reference manual. Version 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, K. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    Array Display Tool (ADT) is a Motif program to display arrays of process variables from the Advanced Photon Source control system. A typical use is to display the horizontal and vertical monitor readings. A picture of the ADT interface is here. The screen layout, apart from the menu bar, consists of two types of graphic areas in which the values for the arrays of process variables are shown: Display areas, which display one or more arrays as a function of index, and a zoom area. In the zoom area specified arrays only are displayed as a function of lattice position along with symbols for the major elements of the lattice. There can be several display areas, but at most one zoom area. When the screen is resized these areas change size proportionally. There are a number of options in the View Menu to change the way the values are displayed. It is also possible via the Options Menu to: (1) Store the current values internally. (2) Store the values from a snapshot file internally. (3) Display one of the stored sets of values along with the current values. (4) Display the difference of the current values with one of the stored sets of values. (5) Write the current values to a snapshot file. There are several (currently 5) slots in which you can store values internally. In addition you can display the values with specified reference values subtracted

  7. Real time Aanderaa current meter data collection system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    AshokKumar, K.; Diwan, S.G.

    Aanderaa current meters are widely used for recording the current speed and such other 4 parameters by deploying them over extended period of time. Normally data are recorded on magnetic tape and after recovery of current meters, data are read...

  8. Factors affecting the performance of large-aperture microphone arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Harvey F.; Patterson, William R.; Sachar, Joshua

    2002-05-01

    Large arrays of microphones have been proposed and studied as a possible means of acquiring data in offices, conference rooms, and auditoria without requiring close-talking microphones. When such an array essentially surrounds all possible sources, it is said to have a large aperture. Large-aperture arrays have attractive properties of spatial resolution and signal-to-noise enhancement. This paper presents a careful comparison of theoretical and measured performance for an array of 256 microphones using simple delay-and-sum beamforming. This is the largest currently functional, all digital-signal-processing array that we know of. The array is wall-mounted in the moderately adverse environment of a general-purpose laboratory (8 m×8 m×3 m). The room has a T60 reverberation time of 550 ms. Reverberation effects in this room severely impact the array's performance. However, the width of the main lobe remains comparable to that of a simplified prediction. Broadband spatial resolution shows a single central peak with 10 dB gain about 0.4 m in diameter at the -3 dB level. Away from that peak, the response is approximately flat over most of the room. Optimal weighting for signal-to-noise enhancement degrades the spatial resolution minimally. Experimentally, we verify that signal-to-noise gain is less than proportional to the square root of the number of microphones probably due to the partial correlation of the noise between channels, to variation of signal intensity with polar angle about the source, and to imperfect correlation of the signal over the array caused by reverberations. We show measurements of the relative importance of each effect in our environment.

  9. Fabrication of titanium dioxide nanotube arrays using organic electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoriya, Sorachon

    This dissertation focuses on fabrication and improvement of morphological features of TiO2 nanotube arrays in the selected organic electrolytes including dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO; see Chapter 4) and diethylene glycol (DEG; see Chapter 5). Using a polar dimethyl sulfoxide containing hydrofluoric acid, the vertically oriented TiO2 nanotube arrays with well controlled morphologies, i.e. tube lengths ranging from few microns up to 101 microm, pore diameters from 100 nm to 150 nm, and wall thicknesses from 15 nm to 50 nm were achieved. Various anodization variables including fluoride ion concentration, voltage, anodization time, water content, and reuse of the anodized electrolyte could be manipulated under proper conditions to control the nanotube array morphology. Anodization current behaviors associated with evolution of nanotube length were analyzed in order to clarify and better understand the formation mechanism of nanotubes grown in the organic electrolytes. Typically observed for DMSO electrolyte, the behavior that anodization current density gradually decreases with time is a reflection of a constant growth rate of nanotube arrays. Large fluctuation of anodization current was significantly observed probably due to the large change in electrolyte properties during anodization, when anodizing in high conductivity electrolytes such as using high HF concentration and reusing the anodized electrolyte as a second time. It is believed that the electrolyte properties such as conductivity and polarity play important role in affecting ion solvation and interactions in the solution consequently determining the formation of oxide film. Fabrication of the TiO2 nanotube array films was extended to study in the more viscous diethylene glycol (DEG) electrolyte. The arrayed nanotubes achieved from DEG electrolytes containing either HF or NH4 F are fully separated, freely self-standing structure with open pores and a wide variation of tube-to-tube spacing ranging from

  10. The Expanded Very Large Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perley, Rick

    2012-10-01

    The Expanded Very Large Array Project, begun in 2001, is now completed -- on time, on budget, and ``on spec.'' The major goal of the project was to multiply the key observational capabilities of the Very Large Array -- the world's most powerful, versatile, and productive radio telescope -- by a factor of at least an order of magnitude by implementation of modern technologies. The result of the project is an operationally new telescope -- renamed the Jansky Very Large Array -- which is capable of new science unimagined in 1980, when the original VLA was completed. In this talk, I will review the goals of the project, and describe the new capabilities of the Jansky Very Large Array. Already, the array is providing fabulous new insights into the physics of the universe,and I will spend the majority of the time describing examples of new results.

  11. An SDR-Based Real-Time Testbed for GNSS Adaptive Array Anti-Jamming Algorithms Accelerated by GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailong Xu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, software-defined radio (SDR has become a common approach to evaluate new algorithms. However, in the field of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS adaptive array anti-jamming, previous work has been limited due to the high computational power demanded by adaptive algorithms, and often lack flexibility and configurability. In this paper, the design and implementation of an SDR-based real-time testbed for GNSS adaptive array anti-jamming accelerated by a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU are documented. This testbed highlights itself as a feature-rich and extendible platform with great flexibility and configurability, as well as high computational performance. Both Space-Time Adaptive Processing (STAP and Space-Frequency Adaptive Processing (SFAP are implemented with a wide range of parameters. Raw data from as many as eight antenna elements can be processed in real-time in either an adaptive nulling or beamforming mode. To fully take advantage of the parallelism resource provided by the GPU, a batched method in programming is proposed. Tests and experiments are conducted to evaluate both the computational and anti-jamming performance. This platform can be used for research and prototyping, as well as a real product in certain applications.

  12. Phase-locked, high power, mid-infrared quantum cascade laser arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, W.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate phase-locked, high power quantum cascade laser arrays, which are combined using a monolithic, tree array multimode interferometer, with emission wavelengths around 4.8 μm. A maximum output power of 15 W was achieved from an eight-element laser array, which has only a slightly higher threshold current density and a similar slope efficiency compared to a Fabry-Perot laser of the same length. Calculated multimode interferometer splitting loss is on the order of 0.27 dB for the in-phase supermode. In-phase supermode operation with nearly ideal behavior is demonstrated over the working current range of the array.

  13. Null stream analysis of Pulsar Timing Array data: localisation of resolvable gravitational wave sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Janna; Veitch, John; Sesana, Alberto; Vecchio, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    Super-massive black hole binaries are expected to produce a gravitational wave (GW) signal in the nano-Hertz frequency band which may be detected by pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) in the coming years. The signal is composed of both stochastic and individually resolvable components. Here we develop a generic Bayesian method for the analysis of resolvable sources based on the construction of `null-streams' which cancel the part of the signal held in common for each pulsar (the Earth-term). For an array of N pulsars there are N - 2 independent null-streams that cancel the GW signal from a particular sky location. This method is applied to the localisation of quasi-circular binaries undergoing adiabatic inspiral. We carry out a systematic investigation of the scaling of the localisation accuracy with signal strength and number of pulsars in the PTA. Additionally, we find that source sky localisation with the International PTA data release one is vastly superior than what is achieved by its constituent regional PTAs.

  14. BINARY: an optical freezing array for assessing temperature and time dependence of heterogeneous ice nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Budke

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A new optical freezing array for the study of heterogeneous ice nucleation in microliter-sized droplets is introduced, tested and applied to the study of immersion freezing in aqueous Snomax® suspensions. In the Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARraY (BINARY ice nucleation can be studied simultaneously in 36 droplets at temperatures down to −40 °C (233 K and at cooling rates between 0.1 and 10 K min−1. The droplets are separated from each other in individual compartments, thus preventing a Wegener–Bergeron–Findeisen type water vapor transfer between droplets as well as avoiding the seeding of neighboring droplets by formation and surface growth of frost halos. Analysis of freezing and melting occurs via an automated real-time image analysis of the optical brightness of each individual droplet. As an application ice nucleation in water droplets containing Snomax® at concentrations from 1 ng mL−1 to 1 mg mL−1 was investigated. Using different cooling rates, a small time dependence of ice nucleation induced by two different classes of ice nucleators (INs contained in Snomax® was detected and the corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient was quantified. The observed time dependence is smaller than those of other types of INs reported in the literature, suggesting that the BINARY setup is suitable for quantifying time dependence for most other INs of atmospheric interest, making it a useful tool for future investigations.

  15. BINARY: an optical freezing array for assessing temperature and time dependence of heterogeneous ice nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budke, C.; Koop, T.

    2015-02-01

    A new optical freezing array for the study of heterogeneous ice nucleation in microliter-sized droplets is introduced, tested and applied to the study of immersion freezing in aqueous Snomax® suspensions. In the Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARraY (BINARY) ice nucleation can be studied simultaneously in 36 droplets at temperatures down to -40 °C (233 K) and at cooling rates between 0.1 and 10 K min-1. The droplets are separated from each other in individual compartments, thus preventing a Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen type water vapor transfer between droplets as well as avoiding the seeding of neighboring droplets by formation and surface growth of frost halos. Analysis of freezing and melting occurs via an automated real-time image analysis of the optical brightness of each individual droplet. As an application ice nucleation in water droplets containing Snomax® at concentrations from 1 ng mL-1 to 1 mg mL-1 was investigated. Using different cooling rates, a small time dependence of ice nucleation induced by two different classes of ice nucleators (INs) contained in Snomax® was detected and the corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient was quantified. The observed time dependence is smaller than those of other types of INs reported in the literature, suggesting that the BINARY setup is suitable for quantifying time dependence for most other INs of atmospheric interest, making it a useful tool for future investigations.

  16. The Cherenkov Telescope Array For Very High-Energy Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaret, Philip

    2015-08-01

    The field of very high energy (VHE) astrophysics had been revolutionized by the results from ground-based gamma-ray telescopes, including the current imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope (IACT) arrays: HESS, MAGIC and VERITAS. A worldwide consortium of scientists from 29 countries has formed to propose the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) that will capitalize on the power of this technique to greatly expand the scientific reach of ground-based gamma-ray telescopes. CTA science will include key topics such as the origin of cosmic rays and cosmic particle acceleration, understanding extreme environments in regions close to neutron stars and black holes, and exploring physics frontiers through, e.g., the search for WIMP dark matter, axion-like particles and Lorentz invariance violation. CTA is envisioned to consist of two large arrays of Cherenkov telescopes, one in the southern hemisphere and one in the north. Each array will contain telescopes of different sizes to provide a balance between cost and array performance over an energy range from below 100 GeV to above 100 TeV. Compared to the existing IACT arrays, CTA will have substantially better angular resolution and energy resolution, will cover a much wider energy range, and will have up to an order of magnitude better sensitivity. CTA will also be operated as an open observatory and high-level CTA data will be placed into the public domain; these aspects will enable broad participation in CTA science from the worldwide scientific community to fully capitalize on CTA's potential. This talk will: 1) review the scientific motivation and capabilities of CTA, 2) provide an overview of the technical design and the status of prototype development, and 3) summarize the current status of the project in terms of its proposed organization and timeline. The plans for access to CTA data and opportunities to propose for CTA observing time will be highlighed.Presented on behalf of the CTA Consortium.

  17. Experimental Study of Arcing on High-voltage Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayner, Boris; Galofaro, Joel; Ferguson, Dale

    2005-01-01

    The main obstacle to the implementation of a high-voltage solar array in space is arcing on the conductor-dielectric junctions exposed to the surrounding plasma. One obvious solution to this problem would be the installation of fully encapsulated solar arrays which were not having exposed conductors at all. However, there are many technological difficulties that must be overcome before the employment of fully encapsulated arrays will turn into reality. An alternative solution to raise arc threshold by modifications of conventionally designed solar arrays looks more appealing, at least in the nearest future. A comprehensive study of arc inception mechanism [1-4] suggests that such modifications can be done in the following directions: i) to insulate conductor-dielectric junction from a plasma environment (wrapthrough interconnects); ii) to change a coverglass geometry (overhang); iii) to increase a coverglass thickness; iiii) to outgas areas of conductor-dielectric junctions. The operation of high-voltage array in LEO produces also the parasitic current power drain on the electrical system. Moreover, the current collected from space plasma by solar arrays determines the spacecraft floating potential that is very important for the design of spacecraft and its scientific apparatus. In order to verify the validity of suggested modifications and to measure current collection five different solar array samples have been tested in large vacuum chamber. Each sample (36 silicon based cells) consists of three strings containing 12 cells connected in series. Thus, arc rate and current collection can be measured on every string independently, or on a whole sample when strings are connected in parallel. The heater installed in the chamber provides the possibility to test samples under temperature as high as 80 C that simulates the LEO operational temperature. The experimental setup is described below.

  18. Current relaxation time scales in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.

    1987-02-01

    An approximate normal mode analysis of plasma current diffusion in tokamaks is presented. The work is based on numerical solutions of the current diffusion equation in cylindrical geometry. Eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are shown for a broad range of plasma conductivity profile shapes. Three classes of solutions are considered which correspond to three types of tokamak operation. Convenient approximations to the three lowest eigenvalues in each class are presented and simple formulae for the current relaxation time scales are given

  19. Phase transition in a modified square Josephson-junction array

    CERN Document Server

    Han, J

    1999-01-01

    We study the phase transition in a modified square proximity-coupled Josephson-junction array with small superconducting islands at the center of each plaquette. We find that the modified square array undergoes a Kosterlitz-Thouless-Berezinskii-like phase transition, but at a lower temperature than the simple square array with the same single-junction critical current. The IV characteristics, as well as the phase transition, resemble qualitatively those of a disordered simple square array. The effects of the presence of the center islands in the modified square array are discussed.

  20. Minority n out of m coincidence circuits for time-differential experiments with multi-detector arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunsfurth, J.; Geske, K.

    1976-01-01

    Two n out of m minority coincidence circuits (n<=8, 15<=m<=31), employed for time-differential experiments are presented. Specifications like obtainable prompt coincidence resolution time, expandability to higher detector numbers m, implementation variants and their consequences, and some application modes are discussed. Hardware expenses on electronics for m-detector arrays usually rise nearly proportional to m factorial. In the coincidence system proposed here, the rise in hardware expenses can be reduced to slightly more than proportional to m, without sacrifice in experimental quality and flexibility. (Auth.)

  1. Microneedle array electrode for human EEG recording.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüttge, Regina; van Nieuwkasteele-Bystrova, Svetlana Nikolajevna; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria; Vander Sloten, Jos; Verdonck, Pascal; Nyssen, Marc; Haueisen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Microneedle array electrodes for EEG significantly reduce the mounting time, particularly by circumvention of the need for skin preparation by scrubbing. We designed a new replication process for numerous types of microneedle arrays. Here, polymer microneedle array electrodes with 64 microneedles,

  2. The potential of TaqMan Array Cards for detection of multiple biological agents by real-time PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip A Rachwal

    Full Text Available The TaqMan Array Card architecture, normally used for gene expression studies, was evaluated for its potential to detect multiple bacterial agents by real-time PCR. Ten PCR assays targeting five biological agents (Bacillus anthracis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis were incorporated onto Array Cards. A comparison of PCR performance of each PCR in Array Card and singleplex format was conducted using DNA extracted from pure bacterial cultures. When 100 fg of agent DNA was added to Array Card channels the following levels of agent detection (where at least one agent PCR replicate returned a positive result were observed: Y. pestis 100%, B. mallei & F. tularensis 93%; B. anthracis 71%; B. pseudomallei 43%. For B. mallei & pseudomallei detection the BPM2 PCR, which detects both species, outperformed PCR assays specific to each organism indicating identification of the respective species would not be reproducible at the 100 fg level. Near 100% levels of detection were observed when 100 fg of DNA was added to each PCR in singleplex format with singleplex PCRs also returning sporadic positives at the 10 fg per PCR level. Before evaluating the use of Array Cards for the testing of environmental and clinical sample types, with potential levels of background DNA and PCR inhibitors, users would therefore have to accept a 10-fold reduction in sensitivity of PCR assays on the Array Card format, in order to benefit for the capacity to test multiple samples for multiple agents. A two PCR per agent strategy would allow the testing of 7 samples for the presence of 11 biological agents or 3 samples for 23 biological agents per card (with negative control channels.

  3. Optimal array factor radiation pattern synthesis for linear antenna array using cat swarm optimization: validation by an electromagnetic simulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gopi RAM; Durbadal MANDAL; Sakti Prasad GHOSHAL; Rajib KAR

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an optimal design of linear antenna arrays having microstrip patch antenna elements has been carried out. Cat swarm optimization (CSO) has been applied for the optimization of the control parameters of radiation pattern of an antenna array. The optimal radiation patterns of isotropic antenna elements are obtained by optimizing the current excitation weight of each element and the inter-element spacing. The antenna arrays of 12, 16, and 20 elements are taken as examples. The arrays are de-signed by using MATLAB computation and are validated through Computer Simulation Technology-Microwave Studio (CST-MWS). From the simulation results it is evident that CSO is able to yield the optimal design of linear antenna arrays of patch antenna elements.

  4. Seismic Background Noise Analysis of BRTR (PS-43) Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezgi Bakir, Mahmure; Meral Ozel, Nurcan; Umut Semin, Korhan

    2015-04-01

    The seismic background noise variation of BRTR array, composed of two sub arrays located in Ankara and in Ankara-Keskin, has been investigated by calculating Power Spectral Density and Probability Density Functions for seasonal and diurnal noise variations between 2005 and 2011. PSDs were computed within the frequency range of 100 s - 10 Hz. The results show us a little change in noise conditions in terms of time and location. Especially, noise level changes were observed at 3-5 Hz in diurnal variations at Keskin array and there is a 5-7 dB difference in day and night time in cultural noise band (1-10 Hz). On the other hand, noise levels of medium period array is high in 1-2 Hz frequency rather than short period array. High noise levels were observed in daily working times when we compare it to night-time in cultural noise band. The seasonal background noise variation at both sites also shows very similar properties to each other. Since these stations are borehole instruments and away from the coasts, we saw a small change in noise levels caused by microseism. Comparison between Keskin short period array and Ankara medium period array show us Keskin array is quiter than Ankara array.

  5. ESPRIT And Uniform Linear Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, R. H.; Goldburg, M.; Ottersten, B. E.; Swindlehurst, A. L.; Viberg, M.; Kailath, T.

    1989-11-01

    Abstract ¬â€?ESPRIT is a recently developed and patented technique for high-resolution estimation of signal parameters. It exploits an invariance structure designed into the sensor array to achieve a reduction in computational requirements of many orders of magnitude over previous techniques such as MUSIC, Burg's MEM, and Capon's ML, and in addition achieves performance improvement as measured by parameter estimate error variance. It is also manifestly more robust with respect to sensor errors (e.g. gain, phase, and location errors) than other methods as well. Whereas ESPRIT only requires that the sensor array possess a single invariance best visualized by considering two identical but other-wise arbitrary arrays of sensors displaced (but not rotated) with respect to each other, many arrays currently in use in various applications are uniform linear arrays of identical sensor elements. Phased array radars are commonplace in high-resolution direction finding systems, and uniform tapped delay lines (i.e., constant rate A/D converters) are the rule rather than the exception in digital signal processing systems. Such arrays possess many invariances, and are amenable to other types of analysis, which is one of the main reasons such structures are so prevalent. Recent developments in high-resolution algorithms of the signal/noise subspace genre including total least squares (TLS) ESPRIT applied to uniform linear arrays are summarized. ESPRIT is also shown to be a generalization of the root-MUSIC algorithm (applicable only to the case of uniform linear arrays of omni-directional sensors and unimodular cisoids). Comparisons with various estimator bounds, including CramerRao bounds, are presented.

  6. Maximum time-dependent space-charge limited diode currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griswold, M. E. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Fisch, N. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Recent papers claim that a one dimensional (1D) diode with a time-varying voltage drop can transmit current densities that exceed the Child-Langmuir (CL) limit on average, apparently contradicting a previous conjecture that there is a hard limit on the average current density across any 1D diode, as t → ∞, that is equal to the CL limit. However, these claims rest on a different definition of the CL limit, namely, a comparison between the time-averaged diode current and the adiabatic average of the expression for the stationary CL limit. If the current were considered as a function of the maximum applied voltage, rather than the average applied voltage, then the original conjecture would not have been refuted.

  7. The investigation of the phase-locking stability in linear arrays of Josephson junctions and arrays closed into a superconducting loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darula, M.; Seidel, P.; Misanik, B.; Busse, F.; Heinz, E.; Benacka, S.

    1994-01-01

    The phase-locking stability is investigated theoretically in two structures: linear arrays of Josephson junctions shunted by resistive load and arrays closed into superconducting loop. In both cases the quasi-identical junctions are supposed to be in arrays. The stability as a function of spread in Josephson junction parameters as well as a function of other circuit parameters is investigated. Using Floquet theory it is shown that spread in critical currents of Josephson junction limit the stability of phase-locking state. From the simulations it follows that the phase-locking in arrays closed into superconducting loop is more stable against the spread in junction parameters than in the case of linear array of Josephson junctions. (orig.)

  8. Feasibility study of using a Zener diode as the selection device for bipolar RRAM and WORM memory arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yingtao; Fu, Liping; Tao, Chunlan; Jiang, Xinyu; Sun, Pengxiao

    2014-01-01

    Cross-bar arrays are usually used for the high density application of resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices. However, cross-talk interference limits an increase in the integration density. In this paper, the Zener diode is proposed as a selection device to suppress the sneak current in bipolar RRAM arrays. Measurement results show that the Zener diode can act as a good selection device, and the sneak current can be effectively suppressed. The readout margin is sufficiently improved compared to that obtained without the selection device. Due to the improvement for the reading disturbance, the size of the cross-bar array can be enhanced to more than 10 3  × 10 3 . Furthermore, the possibility of using a write-once-read-many-times (WORM) cross-bar array is also demonstrated by connecting the Zener diode and the bipolar RRAM in series. These results strongly suggest that using a Zener diode as a selection device opens up great opportunities to realize high density bipolar RRAM arrays. (paper)

  9. 'Optical' soft x-ray arrays for fluctuation diagnostics in magnetic fusion energy experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado-Aparicio, L.F.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Finkenthal, M.; Kaita, R.; Roquemore, L.; Johnson, D.; Majeski, R.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing large pixel count, fast (≥100 kHz) and continuously sampling soft x-ray (SXR) array for the diagnosis of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and turbulent fluctuations in magnetic fusion energy plasmas. The arrays are based on efficient scintillators, high thoughput multiclad fiber optics, and multichannel light amplification and integration. Compared to conventional x-ray diode arrays, such systems can provide vastly increased spatial coverage, and access to difficult locations with small neutron noise and damage. An eight-channel array has been built using columnar CsI:Tl as an SXR converter and a multianode photomultiplier tube as photoamplifier. The overall system efficiency is measured using laboratory SXR sources, while the time response and signal-to-noise performance have been evaluated by recording MHD activity from the spherical tori (ST) Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade and National Spherical Torus Experiment, both at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

  10. Infrared LED Array For Silicon Strip Detector Qualification

    CERN Document Server

    Dirkes, Guido; Hartmann, Frank; Heier, Stefan; Schwerdtfeger, Wolfgang; Waldschmitt, M; Weiler, K W; Weseler, Siegfried

    2003-01-01

    The enormous amount of silicon strip detector modules for the CMS tracker requires a test-sytem to allow qualification of each individual detector module and its front-end electronics within minutes. The objective is to test the detector with a physical signal. Signals are generated in the detector by illumination with lightpulses emitted by a LED at 950~nm and with a rise time of 10~ns. In order to avoid a detector moving, an array of 64 LEDs is used, overlaping the complete detector width. The total length of an array is 15~cm. The spot size of an individual LED is controlled by apertures to illuminate about 25 strips. Furthermore it is possible to simulate the high leakage current of irradiated sensors by constant illumination of the sensor. This provides an effective mean to identfy pinholes on a sensor.

  11. Array-based techniques for fingerprinting medicinal herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Charlie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Poor quality control of medicinal herbs has led to instances of toxicity, poisoning and even deaths. The fundamental step in quality control of herbal medicine is accurate identification of herbs. Array-based techniques have recently been adapted to authenticate or identify herbal plants. This article reviews the current array-based techniques, eg oligonucleotides microarrays, gene-based probe microarrays, Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH-based arrays, Diversity Array Technology (DArT and Subtracted Diversity Array (SDA. We further compare these techniques according to important parameters such as markers, polymorphism rates, restriction enzymes and sample type. The applicability of the array-based methods for fingerprinting depends on the availability of genomics and genetics of the species to be fingerprinted. For the species with few genome sequence information but high polymorphism rates, SDA techniques are particularly recommended because they require less labour and lower material cost.

  12. The Applicability of Incoherent Array Processing to IMS Seismic Array Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, S. J.

    2012-04-01

    The seismic arrays of the International Monitoring System for the CTBT differ greatly in size and geometry, with apertures ranging from below 1 km to over 60 km. Large and medium aperture arrays with large inter-site spacings complicate the detection and estimation of high frequency phases since signals are often incoherent between sensors. Many such phases, typically from events at regional distances, remain undetected since pipeline algorithms often consider only frequencies low enough to allow coherent array processing. High frequency phases that are detected are frequently attributed qualitatively incorrect backazimuth and slowness estimates and are consequently not associated with the correct event hypotheses. This can lead to missed events both due to a lack of contributing phase detections and by corruption of event hypotheses by spurious detections. Continuous spectral estimation can be used for phase detection and parameter estimation on the largest aperture arrays, with phase arrivals identified as local maxima on beams of transformed spectrograms. The estimation procedure in effect measures group velocity rather than phase velocity and the ability to estimate backazimuth and slowness requires that the spatial extent of the array is large enough to resolve time-delays between envelopes with a period of approximately 4 or 5 seconds. The NOA, AKASG, YKA, WRA, and KURK arrays have apertures in excess of 20 km and spectrogram beamforming on these stations provides high quality slowness estimates for regional phases without additional post-processing. Seven arrays with aperture between 10 and 20 km (MJAR, ESDC, ILAR, KSRS, CMAR, ASAR, and EKA) can provide robust parameter estimates subject to a smoothing of the resulting slowness grids, most effectively achieved by convolving the measured slowness grids with the array response function for a 4 or 5 second period signal. The MJAR array in Japan recorded high SNR Pn signals for both the 2006 and 2009 North Korea

  13. In vivo photothermal treatment with real-time monitoring by optical fiber-needle array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Taeseok Daniel; Park, Kwanjun; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Im, Nu-Ri; Kim, Byoungjae; Kim, TaeHoon; Seo, Sohyun; Lee, Jae-Seung; Kim, Beop-Min; Choi, Youngwoon; Baek, Seung-Kuk

    2017-07-01

    Photothermal treatment (PTT) using gold nanoshells (gold-NSs) is accepted as a method for treating cancer. However, owing to restrictions in therapeutic depth and skin damage caused by excessive light exposure, its application has been limited to lesions close to the epidermis. Here, we demonstrate an in vivo PTT method that uses gold-NSs with a flexible optical fiber-needle array (OFNA), which is an array of multiple needles in which multimode optical fibers are inserted, one in each, for light delivery. The light for PTT was directly administrated to subcutaneous tissues through the OFNA, causing negligible thermal damage to the skin. Enhancement of light energy delivery assisted by the OFNA in a target area was confirmed by investigation using artificial tissues. The ability of OFNA to treat cancer without causing cutaneous thermal damage was also verified by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and optical coherence tomography in cancer models in mice. In addition, the OFNA allowed for observation of the target site through an imaging fiber bundle. By imaging the activation of the injected gold-NSs, we were able to obtain information on the PTT process in real-time.

  14. Proton-recoil proportional-counter array for neutron-image construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, C.L.; Eichholz, J.J.; DeVolpi, A.

    1984-01-01

    The fuel-motion measurement capability of the fast-neutron hodoscope has been upgraded by the addition of a 360-detector proton-recoil proportional-counter array, which detects high-energy fission neutrons. The current sensitive amplifier/discriminator module for each detector fits into a 12.7 by 12.7 by 102 mm package and cost less than $100 per module. It has a 50 ns rise time, a noise level of 100 nA, and a deadtime per event of 200 ns. Provision has been provided for the independent adjustment of the input current versus discriminator voltage for each module. The new proportional-counters cost approximately $400 each. Each detector has been tested to have the same gain versus voltage response. A space-charge model relating count-rate changes to space-charge effects has also been developed. The new detector array has been operational for approximately two years and has become the main detector system in fuel-motion analysis. It has significantly improved the linearity, stability, count-rate capability, and setup ease of the hodoscope

  15. Dual-Polarization, Multi-Frequency Antenna Array for use with Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, John

    2013-01-01

    Advancements in common aperture antenna technology were employed to utilize its proprietary genetic algorithmbased modeling tools in an effort to develop, build, and test a dual-polarization array for Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) applications. Final program results demonstrate the ability to achieve a lightweight, thin, higher-gain aperture that covers the desired spectral band. NASA employs various passive microwave and millimeter-wave instruments, such as spectral radiometers, for a range of remote sensing applications, from measurements of the Earth's surface and atmosphere, to cosmic background emission. These instruments such as the HIRAD, SFMR (Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer), and LRR (Lightweight Rainfall Radiometer), provide unique data accumulation capabilities for observing sea surface wind, temperature, and rainfall, and significantly enhance the understanding and predictability of hurricane intensity. These microwave instruments require extremely efficient wideband or multiband antennas in order to conserve space on the airborne platform. In addition, the thickness and weight of the antenna arrays is of paramount importance in reducing platform drag, permitting greater time on station. Current sensors are often heavy, single- polarization, or limited in frequency coverage. The ideal wideband antenna will have reduced size, weight, and profile (a conformal construct) without sacrificing optimum performance. The technology applied to this new HIRAD array will allow NASA, NOAA, and other users to gather information related to hurricanes and other tropical storms more cost effectively without sacrificing sensor performance or the aircraft time on station. The results of the initial analysis and numerical design indicated strong potential for an antenna array that would satisfy all of the design requirements for a replacement HIRAD array. Multiple common aperture antenna methodologies were employed to achieve exceptional gain over the entire

  16. Development of a solid-state multi-sensor array camera for real time imaging of magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, D; Gaydecki, P; Quek, S; Torres, V

    2007-01-01

    The development of a real-time magnetic field imaging camera based on solid-state sensors is described. The final laboratory comprises a 2D array of 33 x 33 solid state, tri-axial magneto-inductive sensors, and is located within a large current-carrying coil. This may be excited to produce either a steady or time-varying magnetic field. Outputs from several rows of sensors are routed to a sub-master controller and all sub-masters route to a master-controller responsible for data coordination and signal pre-processing. The data are finally streamed to a host computer via a USB interface and the image generated and displayed at a rate of several frames per second. Accurate image generation is predicated on a knowledge of the sensor response, magnetic field perturbations and the nature of the target respecting permeability and conductivity. To this end, the development of the instrumentation has been complemented by extensive numerical modelling of field distribution patterns using boundary element methods. Although it was originally intended for deployment in the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of reinforced concrete, it was soon realised during the course of the work that the magnetic field imaging system had many potential applications, for example, in medicine, security screening, quality assurance (such as the food industry), other areas of nondestructive evaluation (NDE), designs associated with magnetic fields, teaching and research

  17. Development of a solid-state multi-sensor array camera for real time imaging of magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, D.; Gaydecki, P.; Quek, S.; Torres, V.

    2007-07-01

    The development of a real-time magnetic field imaging camera based on solid-state sensors is described. The final laboratory comprises a 2D array of 33 x 33 solid state, tri-axial magneto-inductive sensors, and is located within a large current-carrying coil. This may be excited to produce either a steady or time-varying magnetic field. Outputs from several rows of sensors are routed to a sub-master controller and all sub-masters route to a master-controller responsible for data coordination and signal pre-processing. The data are finally streamed to a host computer via a USB interface and the image generated and displayed at a rate of several frames per second. Accurate image generation is predicated on a knowledge of the sensor response, magnetic field perturbations and the nature of the target respecting permeability and conductivity. To this end, the development of the instrumentation has been complemented by extensive numerical modelling of field distribution patterns using boundary element methods. Although it was originally intended for deployment in the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of reinforced concrete, it was soon realised during the course of the work that the magnetic field imaging system had many potential applications, for example, in medicine, security screening, quality assurance (such as the food industry), other areas of nondestructive evaluation (NDE), designs associated with magnetic fields, teaching and research.

  18. Fabrication of ZnO Nanowires Arrays by Anodization and High-Vacuum Die Casting Technique, and Their Piezoelectric Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chin-Guo; Chang, Ho; Wang, Jian-Hao

    2016-01-01

    In this investigation, anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) with arrayed and regularly arranged nanopores is used as a template in the high-vacuum die casting of molten zinc metal (Zn) into the nanopores. The proposed technique yields arrayed Zn nanowires with an aspect ratio of over 600. After annealing, arrayed zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires are obtained. Varying the anodizing time yields AAO templates with thicknesses of approximately 50 μm, 60 μm, and 70 μm that can be used in the fabrication of nanowires of three lengths with high aspect ratios. Experimental results reveal that a longer nanowire generates a greater measured piezoelectric current. The ZnO nanowires that are fabricated using an alumina template are anodized for 7 h and produce higher piezoelectric current of up to 69 pA. PMID:27023546

  19. Fabrication of ZnO Nanowires Arrays by Anodization and High-Vacuum Die Casting Technique, and Their Piezoelectric Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chin-Guo; Chang, Ho; Wang, Jian-Hao

    2016-03-24

    In this investigation, anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) with arrayed and regularly arranged nanopores is used as a template in the high-vacuum die casting of molten zinc metal (Zn) into the nanopores. The proposed technique yields arrayed Zn nanowires with an aspect ratio of over 600. After annealing, arrayed zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires are obtained. Varying the anodizing time yields AAO templates with thicknesses of approximately 50 μm, 60 μm, and 70 μm that can be used in the fabrication of nanowires of three lengths with high aspect ratios. Experimental results reveal that a longer nanowire generates a greater measured piezoelectric current. The ZnO nanowires that are fabricated using an alumina template are anodized for 7 h and produce higher piezoelectric current of up to 69 pA.

  20. Hafnium Films and Magnetic Shielding for TIME, A mm-Wavelength Spectrometer Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunacek, J.; Bock, J.; Bradford, C. M.; Butler, V.; Chang, T.-C.; Cheng, Y.-T.; Cooray, A.; Crites, A.; Frez, C.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Hoscheit, B.; Kim, D. W.; Li, C.-T.; Marrone, D.; Moncelsi, L.; Shirokoff, E.; Steinbach, B.; Sun, G.; Trumper, I.; Turner, A.; Uzgil, B.; Weber, A.; Zemcov, M.

    2018-04-01

    TIME is a mm-wavelength grating spectrometer array that will map fluctuations of the 157.7-μm emission line of singly ionized carbon ([CII]) during the epoch of reionization (redshift z ˜ 5-9). Sixty transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers populate the output arc of each of the 32 spectrometers, for a total of 1920 detectors. Each bolometer consists of gold absorber on a ˜ 3 × 3 mm silicon nitride micro-mesh suspended near the corners by 1 × 1 × 500 μm silicon nitride legs targeting a photon-noise-dominated NEP ˜ 1 × 10^{-17} W/√{Hz} . Hafnium films are explored as a lower-T_c alternative to Ti (500 mK) for TIME TESs, allowing thicker support legs for improved yield. Hf T_c is shown to vary between 250 and 450 mK when varying the resident Ar pressure during deposition. Magnetic shielding designs and simulations are presented for the TIME first-stage SQUIDs. Total axial field suppression is predicted to be 5 × 10^7.

  1. Time structure measurement of the ATLAS RPC gap current

    CERN Document Server

    Aielli, G; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The current absorbed by an RPC represents the sum of the charge delivered in the gas by the ionizing events interesting the gap, integrated by the electrodes time constant. This is typically of the order of tens of ms thus dominating the gas discharge time scale and characterizing the granular structure observed in the current signal. In most cases this structure is considered as noise to be further integrated to observe the average gap current, used often as a detector monitoring parameter or to precisely measure the uncorrelated background rate effects. A remarkable case is given if a large number of particles is passing trough the detector within an integration time constant producing a current peak clearly detectable above the average noise. The ATLAS RPC system is equipped with a dedicated current monitoring based on an ADC capable of reading out the average value as well as the transient peaks of the currents above a given threshold. A study on such data was used to spot the gap HV noise, to monitor the...

  2. Temperature and pinning strength dependence of the critical current of a superconductor with a square periodic array of pinning sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benkraouda, M.; Obaidat, I.M.; Al Khawaja, U.

    2006-01-01

    We have conducted extensive series of molecular dynamic simulations on driven vortex lattices interacting with periodic square arrays of pinning sites. In solving the over damped equation of vortex motion we took into account the vortex-vortex repulsion interaction, the attractive vortex-pinning interaction, and the driving Lorentz force at several values of temperature. We have studied the effect of varying the driving Lorentz force and varying the pinning strength on the critical current for several pinning densities, and temperature values. We have found that the pinning strength play an important role in enhancing the critical current over the whole temperature range. At low temperatures, the critical current was found to increase linearly with increasing the pinning strengths for all pinning densities. As the temperature increases, the effect of small pinning strengths diminishes and becomes insignificant at high temperatures

  3. Multichannel wireless ECoG array ASIC devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMichele, Glenn A; Cogan, Stuart F; Troyk, Philip R; Chen, Hongnan; Hu, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    Surgical resection of epileptogenic foci is often a beneficial treatment for patients suffering debilitating seizures arising from intractable epilepsy [1], [2], [3]. Electrodes placed subdurally on the surface of the brain in the form of an ECoG array is one of the multiple methods for localizing epileptogenic zones for the purpose of defining the region for surgical resection. Currently, transcutaneous wires from ECoG grids limit the duration of time that implanted grids can be used for diagnosis. A wireless ECoG recording and stimulation system may be a solution to extend the diagnostic period. To avoid the transcutaneous connections, a 64-channel wireless silicon recording/stimulating ASIC was developed as the electronic component of a wireless ECoG array that uses SIROF electrodes on a polyimide substrate[4]. Here we describe two new ASIC devices that have been developed and tested as part of the on-going wireless ECoG system design.

  4. Engineering of highly ordered TiO2 nanopore arrays by anodization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huijie; Huang, Zhennan; Zhang, Li; Ding, Jie; Ma, Zhaoxia; Liu, Yong; Kou, Shengzhong; Yang, Hangsheng

    2016-07-01

    Finite element analysis was used to simulate the current density distributions in the TiO2 barrier layer formed at the initial stage of Ti anodization. The morphology modification of the barrier layer was found to induce current density distribution change. By starting the anodization with proper TiO2 barrier layer morphology, the current density distribution can be adjusted to favor the formation of either nanotube arrays or nanopore arrays of anodic TiO2. We also found that the addition of sodium acetate into the electrolyte suppressed both the field-assisted chemical dissolution of TiO2 and the TiF62- hydrolysis induced TiO2 deposition during anodization, and thus further favored the nanopore formation. Accordingly, highly ordered anodic TiO2 nanopore arrays, similar to anodic aluminum oxide nanopore arrays, were successfully prepared.

  5. Morphologies and optical and electrical properties of InGaN/GaN micro-square array light-emitting diode chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dan; Ma, Shufang; Jia, Zhigang; Liu, Peizhi; Jia, Wei; Shang, Lin; Zhai, Guangmei; Xu, Bingshe

    2018-04-10

    InGaN/GaN micro-square array light-emitting diode (LED) chips (micro-chips) have been prepared via the focused ion beam (FIB) etching technique, which can not only reduce ohmic contact degradation but also control the aspect ratio precisely in three-dimensional (3D) structure LED (3D-LED) device fabrication. The effects of FIB beam current and micro-square array depth on morphologies and optical and electrical properties of the micro-chips have been studied. Our results show that sidewall surface morphology and optical and electrical properties of the micro-chips degrade with increased beam current. After potassium hydroxide etching with different times, an optimal current-voltage and luminescence performance can be obtained. Combining the results of cathodoluminescence mappings and light output-current characteristics, the light extraction efficiency of the micro-chips is reduced as FIB etch depth increases. The mechanisms of micro-square depth on light extraction have been revealed by 3D finite difference time domain.

  6. In situ synthesis of protein arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyue; Stoevesandt, Oda; Taussig, Michael J

    2008-02-01

    In situ or on-chip protein array methods use cell free expression systems to produce proteins directly onto an immobilising surface from co-distributed or pre-arrayed DNA or RNA, enabling protein arrays to be created on demand. These methods address three issues in protein array technology: (i) efficient protein expression and availability, (ii) functional protein immobilisation and purification in a single step and (iii) protein on-chip stability over time. By simultaneously expressing and immobilising many proteins in parallel on the chip surface, the laborious and often costly processes of DNA cloning, expression and separate protein purification are avoided. Recently employed methods reviewed are PISA (protein in situ array) and NAPPA (nucleic acid programmable protein array) from DNA and puromycin-mediated immobilisation from mRNA.

  7. Light Trapping with Silicon Light Funnel Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Prajapati

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Silicon light funnels are three-dimensional subwavelength structures in the shape of inverted cones with respect to the incoming illumination. Light funnel (LF arrays can serve as efficient absorbing layers on account of their light trapping capabilities, which are associated with the presence of high-density complex Mie modes. Specifically, light funnel arrays exhibit broadband absorption enhancement of the solar spectrum. In the current study, we numerically explore the optical coupling between surface light funnel arrays and the underlying substrates. We show that the absorption in the LF array-substrate complex is higher than the absorption in LF arrays of the same height (~10% increase. This, we suggest, implies that a LF array serves as an efficient surface element that imparts additional momentum components to the impinging illumination, and hence optically excites the substrate by near-field light concentration, excitation of traveling guided modes in the substrate, and mode hybridization.

  8. High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan, Jing; Yang, Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang, Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing, Zhenxue

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 × 2 detector binning, the projection

  9. Amorphous and crystalline TiO2 nanotube arrays for enhanced Li-ion intercalation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Dongsheng; Cai, Chuan; Wang, Ying

    2011-04-01

    We have employed a simple process of anodizing Ti foils to prepare TiO2 nanotube arrays which show enhanced electrochemical properties for applications as Li-ion battery electrode materials. The lengths and pore diameters of TiO2 nanotubes can be finely tuned by varying voltage, electrolyte composition, or anodization time. The as-prepared nanotubes are amorphous and can be converted into anatase nanotubes with heat treatment at 480 degrees C. Rutile crystallites emerge in the anatase nanotube when the annealing temperature is increased to 580 degrees C, resulting in TiO2 nanotubes of mixed phases. The morphological features of nanotubes remain unchanged after annealing. Li-ion insertion performance has been studied for amorphous and crystalline TiO2 nanotube arrays. Amorphous nanotubes with a length of 3.0 microm and an outer diameter of 125 nm deliver a capacity of 91.2 microA h cm(-2) at a current density of 400 microA cm(-2), while those with a length of 25 microm and an outer diameter of 158 nm display a capacity of 533 microA h cm-2. When the 3-microm long nanotubes become crystalline, they deliver lower capacities: the anatase nanotubes and nanotubes of mixed phases show capacities of 53.8 microA h cm-2 and 63.1 microA h cm(-2), respectively at the same current density. The amorphous nanotubes show excellent capacity retention ability over 50 cycles. The cycled nanotubes show little change in morphology compared to the nanotubes before electrochemical cycling. All the TiO2 nanotubes demonstrate higher capacities than amorphous TiO2 compact layer reported in literature. The amorphous TiO2 nanotubes with a length of 1.9 microm exhibit a capacity five times higher than that of TiO2 compact layer even when the nanotube array is cycled at a current density 80 times higher than that for the compact layer. These results suggest that anodic TiO2 nanotube arrays are promising electrode materials for rechargeable Li-ion batteries.

  10. Numerical simulations of odorant detection by biologically inspired sensor arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuech, R; Stacey, M T; Barad, M F; Koehl, M A R

    2012-01-01

    The antennules of many marine crustaceans enable them to rapidly locate sources of odorant in turbulent environmental flows and may provide biological inspiration for engineered plume sampling systems. A substantial gap in knowledge concerns how the physical interaction between a sensing device and the chemical filaments forming a turbulent plume affects odorant detection and filters the information content of the plume. We modeled biological arrays of chemosensory hairs as infinite arrays of odorant flux-detecting cylinders and simulated the fluid flow around and odorant flux into the hair-like sensors as they intercepted a single odorant filament. As array geometry and sampling kinematics were varied, we quantified distortion of the flux time series relative to the spatial shape of the original odorant filament as well as flux metrics that may be important to both organisms and engineered systems attempting to measure plume structure and/or identify chemical composition. The most important predictor of signal distortion is the ratio of sensor diameter to odorant filament width. Achieving high peak properties (e.g. sharpness) of the flux time series and maximizing the total number of odorant molecules detected appear to be mutually exclusive design goals. Sensor arrays inspired specifically by the spiny lobster Panulirus argus and mantis shrimp Gonodactylaceus falcatus introduce little signal distortion but these species' neural systems may not be able to resolve plume structure at the level of individual filaments via temporal properties of the odorant flux. Current chemical sensors are similarly constrained. Our results suggest either that the spatial distribution of flux across the aesthetasc array is utilized by P. argus and G. falcatus, or that such high spatiotemporal resolution is unnecessary for effective plume tracking.

  11. Apparatuses and method for converting electromagnetic radiation to direct current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotter, Dale K; Novack, Steven D

    2014-09-30

    An energy conversion device may include a first antenna and a second antenna configured to generate an AC current responsive to incident radiation, at least one stripline, and a rectifier coupled with the at least one stripline along a length of the at least one stripline. An energy conversion device may also include an array of nanoantennas configured to generate an AC current in response to receiving incident radiation. Each nanoantenna of the array includes a pair of resonant elements, and a shared rectifier operably coupled to the pair of resonant elements, the shared rectifier configured to convert the AC current to a DC current. The energy conversion device may further include a bus structure operably coupled with the array of nanoantennas and configured to receive the DC current from the array of nanoantennas and transmit the DC current away from the array of nanoantennas.

  12. Synthetic focused array of electrical prospecting using pole-pole array potential data; Sanjigen denki tansaho ni okeru nikyokuho den`i data wo mochiita denryu shusoku haichi no goseiho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    Various methods have been put into practice for the conventional two-dimensional pole configuration using a single line in three-dimensional electrical prospecting. Pole configuration effective for the three-dimensional exploration has not been investigated. This paper describes synthetic focused array using four pairs of guarded poles based on pole-pole array potential data in the case of arrangement of measuring points on a grid. Results of the numerical simulation are also described. For the focused array, laterolog of electrical logging is applied to the surface prospecting. Directivity can be given to the current from the main pole by controlling the current from guarded pole. It was found from the simulation that the resistivity anomaly is concentrated directly on the embedded ball for the focused array rather than for the pole-pole array. It was also found that two conductive balls can be clearly separated for the focused array rather than for the dipole-dipole array. Accordingly, it was considered that results approximating the original structures can be obtained by analyzing using the both arrays. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Wire Array Z-pinches on Sphinx Machine: Experimental Results and Relevant Points of Microsecond Implosion Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamy, H.; Hamann, F.; Lassalle, F.; Bayol, F.; Mangeant, C.; Morell, A.; Huet, D.; Bedoch, J. P.; Chittenden, J. P.; Lebedev, S. V.; Jennings, C. A.; Bland, S. N.

    2006-01-01

    Centre d'Etudes de Gramat (France) has developed an efficient long implosion time (800 ns) Aluminum plasma radiation source (PRS). Based on the LTD technology, the SPHINX facility is developed as a 1-3MJ, 1μs rise time, 4-10 MA current driver. In this paper, it was used in 1MJ, 4MA configuration to drive Aluminum nested wire arrays Z-pinches with K-shell yield up to 20 kJ and a FWHM of the x-ray pulse of about 50 ns. We present latest SPHINX experiments and some of the main physic issues of the microsecond regime. Experimental setup and results are described with the aim of giving trends that have been obtained. The main features of microsecond implosion of wire arrays can be analyzed thanks to same methods and theories as used for faster Z-pinches. The effect of load polarity was examined. The stability of the implosion , one of the critical point of microsecond wire arrays due to the load dimensions imposed by the time scale, is tackled. A simple scaling from 100 ns Z-pinch results to 800 ns ones gives good results and the use of nested arrays improves dramatically the implosion quality and the Kshell yield of the load. However, additional effects such as the impact of the return current can geometry on the implosion have to be taken into account on our loads. Axial inhomogeneity of the implosion the origin of which is not yet well understood occurs in some shots and impacts the radiation output. The shape of the radiative pulse is discussed and compared with the homogeneity of the implosion. Numerical 2D R-Z and R-θ simulations are used to highlight some experimental results and understand the plasma conditions during these microsecond wire arrays implosions.

  14. Wire Array Z-pinches on Sphinx Machine: Experimental Results and Relevant Points of Microsecond Implosion Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calamy, H.; Hamann, F.; Lassalle, F.; Bayol, F.; Mangeant, C.; Morell, A.; Huet, D.; Bedoch, J.P.; Chittenden, J.P.; Lebedev, S.V.; Jennings, C.A.; Bland, S.N.

    2006-01-01

    Centre d'Etudes de Gramat (France) has developed an efficient long implosion time (800 ns) Aluminum plasma radiation source (PRS). Based on the LTD technology, the SPHINX facility is developed as a 1-3MJ, 1μs rise time, 4-10 MA current driver. In this paper, it was used in 1MJ, 4MA configuration to drive Aluminum nested wire arrays Z-pinches with K-shell yield up to 20 kJ and a FWHM of the x-ray pulse of about 50 ns. We present latest SPHINX experiments and some of the main physic issues of the microsecond regime. Experimental setup and results are described with the aim of giving trends that have been obtained. The main features of microsecond implosion of wire arrays can be analyzed thanks to same methods and theories as used for faster Z-pinches. The effect of load polarity was examined. The stability of the implosion , one of the critical point of microsecond wire arrays due to the load dimensions imposed by the time scale, is tackled. A simple scaling from 100 ns Z-pinch results to 800 ns ones gives good results and the use of nested arrays improves dramatically the implosion quality and the Kshell yield of the load. However, additional effects such as the impact of the return current can geometry on the implosion have to be taken into account on our loads. Axial inhomogeneity of the implosion the origin of which is not yet well understood occurs in some shots and impacts the radiation output. The shape of the radiative pulse is discussed and compared with the homogeneity of the implosion. Numerical 2D R-Z and R-θ simulations are used to highlight some experimental results and understand the plasma conditions during these microsecond wire arrays implosions

  15. Studies of implosion processes of nested tungsten wire-array Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Cheng; Ding Ning; Liu Quan; Yang Zhenhua

    2006-01-01

    Nested wire-array is a kind of promising structured-load because it can improve the quality of Z-pinch plasma and enhance the radiation power of X-ray source. Based on the zero-dimensional model, the assumption of wire-array collision, and the criterion of optimized load (maximal load kinetic energy), optimization of the typical nested wire-array as a load of Z machine at Sandia Laboratory was carried out. It was shown that the load has been basically optimized. The Z-pinch process of the typical load was numerically studied by means of one-dimensional three-temperature radiation magneto-hydrodynamics (RMHD) code. The obtained results reproduce the dynamic process of the Z-pinch and show the implosion trajectory of nested wire-array and the transfer process of drive current between the inner and outer array. The experimental and computational X-ray pulse was compared, and it was suggested that the assumption of wire-array collision was reasonable in nested wire-array Z-pinch at least for the current level of Z machine. (authors)

  16. Constraints on the Dynamical Environments of Supermassive Black-Hole Binaries Using Pulsar-Timing Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephen R; Simon, Joseph; Sampson, Laura

    2017-05-05

    We introduce a technique for gravitational-wave analysis, where Gaussian process regression is used to emulate the strain spectrum of a stochastic background by training on population-synthesis simulations. This leads to direct Bayesian inference on astrophysical parameters. For pulsar timing arrays specifically, we interpolate over the parameter space of supermassive black-hole binary environments, including three-body stellar scattering, and evolving orbital eccentricity. We illustrate our approach on mock data, and assess the prospects for inference with data similar to the NANOGrav 9-yr data release.

  17. Time walk correction for TOF-PET detectors based on a monolithic scintillation crystal coupled to a photosensor array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinke, R.; Loehner, H.; Schaart, D.R.; Dam, H.T. van; Seifert, S.; Beekman, F.J.; Dendooven, P.

    2010-01-01

    When optimizing the timing performance of a time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET) detector based on a monolithic scintillation crystal coupled to a photosensor array, time walk as a function of annihilation photon interaction location inside the crystal needs to be considered. In order to determine the 3D spatial coordinates of the annihilation photon interaction location, a maximum likelihood estimation algorithm was developed, based on a detector characterization by a scan of a 511 keV photon beam across the front and one of the side surfaces of the crystal. The time walk effect was investigated using a 20 mmx20 mmx12 mm LYSO crystal coupled to a fast 4x4 multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT). In the plane parallel to the photosensor array, a spatial resolution of 2.4 mm FWHM is obtained. In the direction perpendicular to the MAPMT (depth-of-interaction, DOI), the resolution ranges from 2.3 mm FWHM near the MAPMT to 4 mm FWHM at a distance of 10 mm. These resolutions are uncorrected for the ∼1mm beam diameter. A coincidence timing resolution of 358 ps FWHM is obtained in coincidence with a BaF 2 detector. A time walk depending on the 3D annihilation photon interaction location is observed. Throughout the crystal, the time walk spans a range of 100 ps. Calibration of the time walk vs. interaction location allows an event-by-event correction of the time walk.

  18. Linear Array Ultrasonic Transducers: Sensitivity and Resolution Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramb, V.A.

    2005-01-01

    The University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) under contract by the US Air Force has designed and integrated a fully automated inspection system for the inspection of turbine engines that incorporates linear phased array ultrasonic transducers. Phased array transducers have been successfully implemented into weld and turbine blade root inspections where the defect types are well known and characterized. Embedded defects in aerospace turbine engine components are less well defined, however. In order to determine the applicability of linear arrays to aerospace inspections the sensitivity of array transducers to embedded defects in engine materials must be characterized. In addition, the implementation of array transducers into legacy inspection procedures must take into account any differences in sensitivity between the array transducer and that of the single element transducer currently used. This paper discusses preliminary results in a study that compares the sensitivity of linear array and conventional single element transducers to synthetic hard alpha defects in a titanium alloy

  19. Digital electrostatic acoustic transducer array

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo

    2016-12-19

    In this paper we present the fabrication and characterization of an array of electrostatic acoustic transducers. The array is micromachined on a silicon wafer using standard micro-machining techniques. Each array contains 2n electrostatic transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a hexagonal membrane shape structure, which is separated from the substrate by 3µm air gap. The membrane is made out 5µm thick polyimide layer that has a bottom gold electrode on the substrate and a gold top electrode on top of the membrane (250nm). The wafer layout design was diced in nine chips with different array configurations, with variation of the membrane dimensions. The device was tested with 90 V giving and sound output level as high as 35dB, while actuating all the elements at the same time.

  20. Digital electrostatic acoustic transducer array

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo; Castro, David; Conchouso Gonzalez, David; Kosel, Jü rgen; Foulds, Ian G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the fabrication and characterization of an array of electrostatic acoustic transducers. The array is micromachined on a silicon wafer using standard micro-machining techniques. Each array contains 2n electrostatic transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a hexagonal membrane shape structure, which is separated from the substrate by 3µm air gap. The membrane is made out 5µm thick polyimide layer that has a bottom gold electrode on the substrate and a gold top electrode on top of the membrane (250nm). The wafer layout design was diced in nine chips with different array configurations, with variation of the membrane dimensions. The device was tested with 90 V giving and sound output level as high as 35dB, while actuating all the elements at the same time.

  1. Real-time PCR array as a universal platform for the detection of genetically modified crops and its application in identifying unapproved genetically modified crops in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Junichi; Shigemitsu, Natsuki; Futo, Satoshi; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Hino, Akihiro; Furui, Satoshi; Kitta, Kazumi

    2009-01-14

    We developed a novel type of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array with TaqMan chemistry as a platform for the comprehensive and semiquantitative detection of genetically modified (GM) crops. Thirty primer-probe sets for the specific detection of GM lines, recombinant DNA (r-DNA) segments, endogenous reference genes, and donor organisms were synthesized, and a 96-well PCR plate was prepared with a different primer-probe in each well as the real-time PCR array. The specificity and sensitivity of the array were evaluated. A comparative analysis with the data and publicly available information on GM crops approved in Japan allowed us to assume the possibility of unapproved GM crop contamination. Furthermore, we designed a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet application, Unapproved GMO Checker version 2.01, which helps process all the data of real-time PCR arrays for the easy assumption of unapproved GM crop contamination. The spreadsheet is available free of charge at http://cse.naro.affrc.go.jp/jmano/index.html .

  2. The gravitational-wave discovery space of pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Curt; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Vallisneri, Michele; Lazio, Joseph; Majid, Walid

    2014-02-01

    Recent years have seen a burgeoning interest in using pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) as gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. To date, that interest has focused mainly on three particularly promising source types: supermassive black hole binaries, cosmic strings, and the stochastic background from early-Universe phase transitions. In this paper, by contrast, our aim is to investigate the PTA potential for discovering unanticipated sources. We derive significant constraints on the available discovery space based solely on energetic and statistical considerations: we show that a PTA detection of GWs at frequencies above ˜10-5 Hz would either be an extraordinary coincidence or violate "cherished beliefs;" we show that for PTAs GW memory can be more detectable than direct GWs, and that, as we consider events at ever higher redshift, the memory effect increasingly dominates an event's total signal-to-noise ratio. The paper includes also a simple analysis of the effects of pulsar red noise in PTA searches, and a demonstration that the effects of periodic GWs in the ˜10-7-10-4.5 Hz band would not be degenerate with small errors in standard pulsar parameters (except in a few narrow bands).

  3. Fully digital routing logic for single-photon avalanche diode arrays in highly efficient time-resolved imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cominelli, Alessandro; Acconcia, Giulia; Ghioni, Massimo; Rech, Ivan

    2018-03-01

    Time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) is a powerful optical technique, which permits recording fast luminous signals with picosecond precision. Unfortunately, given its repetitive nature, TCSPC is recognized as a relatively slow technique, especially when a large time-resolved image has to be recorded. In recent years, there has been a fast trend toward the development of TCPSC imagers. Unfortunately, present systems still suffer from a trade-off between number of channels and performance. Even worse, the overall measurement speed is still limited well below the saturation of the transfer bandwidth toward the external processor. We present a routing algorithm that enables a smart connection between a 32×32 detector array and five shared high-performance converters able to provide an overall conversion rate up to 10 Gbit/s. The proposed solution exploits a fully digital logic circuit distributed in a tree structure to limit the number and length of interconnections, which is a major issue in densely integrated circuits. The behavior of the logic has been validated by means of a field-programmable gate array, while a fully integrated prototype has been designed in 180-nm technology and analyzed by means of postlayout simulations.

  4. Fabrication of ZnO Nanowires Arrays by Anodization and High-Vacuum Die Casting Technique, and Their Piezoelectric Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Guo Kuo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, anodic aluminum oxide (AAO with arrayed and regularly arranged nanopores is used as a template in the high-vacuum die casting of molten zinc metal (Zn into the nanopores. The proposed technique yields arrayed Zn nanowires with an aspect ratio of over 600. After annealing, arrayed zinc oxide (ZnO nanowires are obtained. Varying the anodizing time yields AAO templates with thicknesses of approximately 50 μm, 60 μm, and 70 μm that can be used in the fabrication of nanowires of three lengths with high aspect ratios. Experimental results reveal that a longer nanowire generates a greater measured piezoelectric current. The ZnO nanowires that are fabricated using an alumina template are anodized for 7 h and produce higher piezoelectric current of up to 69 pA.

  5. Frequency-multiplexed bias and readout of a 16-pixel superconducting nanowire single-photon detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerner, S.; Kuzmin, A.; Wuensch, S.; Charaev, I.; Boes, F.; Zwick, T.; Siegel, M.

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate a 16-pixel array of microwave-current driven superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors with an integrated and scalable frequency-division multiplexing architecture, which reduces the required number of bias and readout lines to a single microwave feed line. The electrical behavior of the photon-sensitive nanowires, embedded in a resonant circuit, as well as the optical performance and timing jitter of the single detectors is discussed. Besides the single pixel measurements, we also demonstrate the operation of a 16-pixel array with a temporal, spatial, and photon-number resolution.

  6. Dynamic characteristics of far-field radiation of current modulated phase-locked diode laser arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, R. A.; Hartnett, K.

    1987-01-01

    A versatile and powerful streak camera/frame grabber system for studying the evolution of the near and far field radiation patterns of diode lasers was assembled and tested. Software needed to analyze and display the data acquired with the steak camera/frame grabber system was written and the total package used to record and perform preliminary analyses on the behavior of two types of laser, a ten emitter gain guided array and a flared waveguide Y-coupled array. Examples of the information which can be gathered with this system are presented.

  7. Terabyte IDE RAID-5 Disk Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Sanders et al.

    2003-09-30

    High energy physics experiments are currently recording large amounts of data and in a few years will be recording prodigious quantities of data. New methods must be developed to handle this data and make analysis at universities possible. We examine some techniques that exploit recent developments in commodity hardware. We report on tests of redundant arrays of integrated drive electronics (IDE) disk drives for use in offline high energy physics data analysis. IDE redundant array of inexpensive disks (RAID) prices now are less than the cost per terabyte of million-dollar tape robots! The arrays can be scaled to sizes affordable to institutions without robots and used when fast random access at low cost is important.

  8. An Effective Amperometric Biosensor Based on Gold Nanoelectrode Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yingchun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A sensitive amperometric biosensor based on gold nanoelectrode array (NEA was investigated. The gold nanoelectrode array was fabricated by template-assisted electrodeposition on general electrodes, which shows an ordered well-defined 3D structure of nanowires. The sensitivity of the gold NEA to hydrogen peroxide is 37 times higher than that of the conventional electrode. The linear range of the platinum NEA toward H2O2is from 1 × 10−6to 1 × 10−2 M, covering four orders of magnitudes with detection limit of 1 × 10−7 M and a single noise ratio (S/N of four. The enzyme electrode exhibits an excellent response performance to glucose with linear range from 1 × 10−5to 1 × 10−2 M and a fast response time within 8 s. The Michaelis–Menten constantkm and the maximum current densityi maxof the enzyme electrode were 4.97 mM and 84.60 μA cm−2, respectively. This special nanoelectrode may find potential application in other biosensors based on amperometric signals.

  9. Application of Seismic Array Processing to Tsunami Early Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, C.; Meng, L.

    2015-12-01

    Tsunami wave predictions of the current tsunami warning systems rely on accurate earthquake source inversions of wave height data. They are of limited effectiveness for the near-field areas since the tsunami waves arrive before data are collected. Recent seismic and tsunami disasters have revealed the need for early warning to protect near-source coastal populations. In this work we developed the basis for a tsunami warning system based on rapid earthquake source characterisation through regional seismic array back-projections. We explored rapid earthquake source imaging using onshore dense seismic arrays located at regional distances on the order of 1000 km, which provides faster source images than conventional teleseismic back-projections. We implement this method in a simulated real-time environment, and analysed the 2011 Tohoku earthquake rupture with two clusters of Hi-net stations in Kyushu and Northern Hokkaido, and the 2014 Iquique event with the Earthscope USArray Transportable Array. The results yield reasonable estimates of rupture area, which is approximated by an ellipse and leads to the construction of simple slip models based on empirical scaling of the rupture area, seismic moment and average slip. The slip model is then used as the input of the tsunami simulation package COMCOT to predict the tsunami waves. In the example of the Tohoku event, the earthquake source model can be acquired within 6 minutes from the start of rupture and the simulation of tsunami waves takes less than 2 min, which could facilitate a timely tsunami warning. The predicted arrival time and wave amplitude reasonably fit observations. Based on this method, we propose to develop an automatic warning mechanism that provides rapid near-field warning for areas of high tsunami risk. The initial focus will be Japan, Pacific Northwest and Alaska, where dense seismic networks with the capability of real-time data telemetry and open data accessibility, such as the Japanese HiNet (>800

  10. Analysis of the current density characteristics in through-mask electrochemical micromachining (TMEMM for fabrication of micro-hole arrays on invar alloy film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-som JIN

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Invar alloy consisting of 64% iron and 36% nickel has been widely used for the production of shadow masks for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs because of its low thermal expansion coefficient (1.86 × 10−6 cm/°C. To fabricate micro-hole arrays on 30 μm invar alloy film, through-mask electrochemical micromachining (TMEMM was developed and combined with a portion of the photolithography etching process. For precise hole shapes, patterned photoresist (PR film was applied as an insulating mask. To investigate the relationship between the current density and the material removal rate, the principle of the electrochemical machining was studied with a focus on the equation. The finite element method (FEM was used to verify the influence of each parameter on the current density on the invar alloy film surface. The parameters considered were the thickness of the PR mask, inter-electrode gap (IEG, and electrolyte concentration. Design of experiments (DOE was used to figure out the contribution of each parameter. A simulation was conducted with varying parameters to figure out their relationships with the current density. Optimization was conducted to select the suitable conditions. An experiment was carried out to verify the simulation results. It was possible to fabricate micro-hole arrays on invar alloy film using TMEMM, which is a promising method that can be applied to fabrications of OLEDs shadow masks.

  11. Phased antenna arrays for fast wave power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosia, G.; Jacquinot, J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for the generation of travelling waves in the Ion Cyclotron frequency range in JET is presented. The success of the method relies on the control of the array toroidal current, which in turn, is obtained by a coordinated vectorial control of the array power sources and tuning networks. This method has general application to present and future ICRF arrays. For uninterrupted, periodically fed and resonant toroidal arrays, phased operation requires only conventional tuning devices. For localised arrays, phased operation is inefficient at low plasma coupling. This inefficiency can be however removed with the addition of external coupling structures either at the antenna or at the generator ends. The performances of JET A1 antennae in phased operation is presented. The design philosophy for the JET A2 phased arrays is also discussed. These methods are applicable and extensible to Next Step Devices design

  12. An integral field spectrograph utilizing mirrorlet arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Gong, Qian

    2016-09-01

    An integral field spectrograph (IFS) has been developed that utilizes a new and novel optical design to observe two spatial dimensions simultaneously with one spectral dimension. This design employs an optical 2-D array of reflecting and focusing mirrorlets. This mirrorlet array is placed at the imaging plane of the front-end telescope to generate a 2-D array of tiny spots replacing what would be the slit in a traditional slit spectrometer design. After the mirrorlet in the optical path, a grating on a concave mirror surface will image the spot array and provide high-resolution spectrum for each spatial element at the same time; therefore, the IFS simultaneously obtains the 3-D data cube of two spatial and one spectral dimensions. The new mirrorlet technology is currently in-house and undergoing laboratory testing at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Section 1 describes traditional classes of instruments that are used in Heliophysics missions and a quick introduction to the new IFS design. Section 2 discusses the details of the most generic mirrorlet IFS, while section 3 presents test results of a lab-based instrument. An example application to a Heliophysics mission to study solar eruptive events in extreme ultraviolet wavelengths is presented in section 4 that has high spatial resolution (0.5 arc sec pixels) in the two spatial dimensions and high spectral resolution (66 mÅ) across a 15 Å spectral window. Section 4 also concludes with some other optical variations that could be employed on the more basic IFS for further capabilities of this type of instrument.

  13. An Integral Field Spectrograph Utilizing Mirrorlet Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Gong, Qian

    2016-01-01

    An integral field spectrograph (IFS) has been developed that utilizes a new and novel optical design to observe two spatial dimensions simultaneously with one spectral dimension. This design employs an optical 2-D array of reflecting and focusing mirrorlets. This mirrorlet array is placed at the imaging plane of the front-end telescope to generate a 2-D array of tiny spots replacing what would be the slit in a traditional slit spectrometer design. After the mirrorlet in the optical path, a grating on a concave mirror surface will image the spot array and provide high-resolution spectrum for each spatial element at the same time; therefore, the IFS simultaneously obtains the 3-D data cube of two spatial and one spectral dimensions. The new mirrorlet technology is currently in-house and undergoing laboratory testing at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Section 1 describes traditional classes of instruments that are used in Heliophysics missions and a quick introduction to the new IFS design. Section 2 discusses the details of the most generic mirrorlet IFS, while section 3 presents test results of a lab-based instrument. An example application to a Heliophysics mission to study solar eruptive events in extreme ultraviolet wavelengths is presented in section 4 that has high spatial resolution (0.5 arc sec pixels) in the two spatial dimensions and high spectral resolution (66 m) across a 15 spectral window. Section 4 also concludes with some other optical variations that could be employed on the more basic IFS for further capabilities of this type of instrument.

  14. Effect of discrete wires on the implosion dynamics of wire array Z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, S. V.; Beg, F. N.; Bland, S. N.; Chittenden, J. P.; Dangor, A. E.; Haines, M. G.; Kwek, K. H.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.

    2001-01-01

    A phenomenological model of wire array Z-pinch implosions, based on the analysis of experimental data obtained on the mega-ampere generator for plasma implosion experiments (MAGPIE) generator [I. H. Mitchell , Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 1533 (1996)], is described. The data show that during the first ∼80% of the implosion the wire cores remain stationary in their initial positions, while the coronal plasma is continuously jetting from the wire cores to the array axis. This phase ends by the formation of gaps in the wire cores, which occurs due to the nonuniformity of the ablation rate along the wires. The final phase of the implosion starting at this time occurs as a rapid snowplow-like implosion of the radially distributed precursor plasma, previously injected in the interior of the array. The density distribution of the precursor plasma, being peaked on the array axis, could be a key factor providing stability of the wire array implosions operating in the regime of discrete wires. The modified ''initial'' conditions for simulations of wire array Z-pinch implosions with one-dimension (1D) and two-dimensions (2D) in the r--z plane, radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) codes, and a possible scaling to a larger drive current are discussed

  15. Challenging aspects of contemporary cochlear implant electrode array design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistrík, Pavel; Jolly, Claude; Sieber, Daniel; Hochmair, Ingeborg

    2017-12-01

    A design comparison of current perimodiolar and lateral wall electrode arrays of the cochlear implant (CI) is provided. The focus is on functional features such as acoustic frequency coverage and tonotopic mapping, battery consumption and dynamic range. A traumacity of their insertion is also evaluated. Review of up-to-date literature. Perimodiolar electrode arrays are positioned in the basal turn of the cochlea near the modiolus. They are designed to initiate the action potential in the proximity to the neural soma located in spiral ganglion. On the other hand, lateral wall electrode arrays can be inserted deeper inside the cochlea, as they are located along the lateral wall and such insertion trajectory is less traumatic. This class of arrays targets primarily surviving neural peripheral processes. Due to their larger insertion depth, lateral wall arrays can deliver lower acoustic frequencies in manner better corresponding to cochlear tonotopicity. In fact, spiral ganglion sections containing auditory nerve fibres tuned to low acoustic frequencies are located deeper than 1 and half turn inside the cochlea. For this reason, a significant frequency mismatch might be occurring for apical electrodes in perimodiolar arrays, detrimental to speech perception. Tonal languages such as Mandarin might be therefore better treated with lateral wall arrays. On the other hand, closer proximity to target tissue results in lower psychophysical threshold levels for perimodiolar arrays. However, the maximal comfort level is also lower, paradoxically resulting in narrower dynamic range than that of lateral wall arrays. Battery consumption is comparable for both types of arrays. Lateral wall arrays are less likely to cause trauma to cochlear structures. As the current trend in cochlear implantation is the maximal protection of residual acoustic hearing, the lateral wall arrays seem more suitable for hearing preservation CI surgeries. Future development could focus on combining the

  16. On the possiblity of using vertically pointing Central Laser Facilities to calibrate the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaug, Markus

    2014-01-01

    A Central Laser Facility is a system composed of a laser placed at a certain distance from a light-detector array, emitting fast light pulses, typically in the vertical direction, with the aim to calibrate that array. During calibration runs, all detectors are pointed towards the same portion of the laser beam at a given altitude. Central Laser Facilities are used for various currently operating ultra-high-energy cosmic ray and imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope arrays. In view of the future Cherenkov Telescope Array, a similar device could provide a fast calibration of the whole installation at different wavelengths. The relative precision (i.e. each individual telescope with respect to the rest of the array is expected) to be better than 5%, while an absolute calibration should reach a precisions of 6–11%, if certain design requirements are met. Additionally, a preciser monitoring of the sensitivity of each telescope can be made on time-scales of days to years

  17. An array of low-background 3He proportional counters for theSudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amsbaugh, J.F.; Anaya, J.M.; Banar, J.; Bowles, T.J.; Browne,M.C.; Bullard, T.V.; Burritt, T.H.; Cox-Mobrand, G.A.; Dai, X.; H.Deng,X.; Di Marco, M.; Doe, P.J.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Duba, C.A.; Duncan, F.A.; Earle, E.D.; Elliott, S.R.; Esch, E.-I.; Fergani, H.; Formaggio, J.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Franklin, J.E.; Geissbuehler, P.; Germani, J.V.; Goldschmidt, A.; Guillian, E.; Hallin, A.L.; Harper, G.; Harvey, P.J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Heise, J.; Hime, A.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Kormos, L.L.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C.B.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lesko,K.T.; Loach, J.C.; Majerus, S.; Manor, J.; McGee, S.; Miknaitis, K.K.S.; Miller, G.G.; Morissette, B.; Myers, A.; Oblath, N.S.; O' Kee, H.M.; Ollerhead, R.W.; Peeters, S.J.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Prior, G.; Reitzner,S.D.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Skensved, P.; Smith, A.R.; Smith,M.W.E.; Steiger, T.D.; Stonehill,L.C.; Thornewell, P.M.; Tolich, N.; VanDevender, B.A.; VanWechel, T.D.; Wall, B.L.; Tseung, H.W.C.; Wendland,J.; West, N.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Wouters, J.M.

    2007-02-01

    An array of Neutral-Current Detectors (NCDs) has been builtin order to make a unique measurement of the total active ux of solarneutrinos in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). Data in the thirdphase of the SNO experiment were collected between November 2004 andNovember 2006, after the NCD array was added to improve theneutral-current sensitivity of the SNO detector. This array consisted of36 strings of proportional counters lled with a mixture of 3He and CF4gas capable of detecting the neutrons liberated by the neutrino-deuteronneutral current reaction in the D2O, and four strings lled with a mixtureof 4He and CF4 gas for background measurements. The proportional counterdiameter is 5 cm. The total deployed array length was 398 m. The SNO NCDarray is the lowest-radioactivity large array of proportional countersever produced. This article describes the design, construction,deployment, and characterization of the NCD array, discusses theelectronics and data acquisition system, and considers event signaturesand backgrounds.

  18. Development of high-performance phased-array UT system 'DYNARAY' and its application examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehara, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    This article outlined the history leading to develop high-performance phased-array (PA) UT system called DYNARAY, with up to 256 phased-array active channels and maximum 4096 focal laws, lowering the inspection time. As examples it was applied to in-service inspection of reactor pressure vessel welded joints using module of PA-UT probe or eddy-current probe, inspection of seal welds of dry storage containers using scanner of PA-UT, crack detection of end ring of generators using PA-UT probe and UT inspection of cast austenitic stainless steel using 500 kHz probe. Advanced data acquisition and analysis functions for PA-UT system had been developed. (T. Tanaka)

  19. Nonlinear optical localization in embedded chalcogenide waveguide arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Mingshan; Huang, Sheng; Wang, Qingqing; Chen, Kevin P.; Petek, Hrvoje

    2014-01-01

    We report the nonlinear optical localization in an embedded waveguide array fabricated in chalcogenide glass. The array, which consists of seven waveguides with circularly symmetric cross sections, is realized by ultrafast laser writing. Light propagation in the chalcogenide waveguide array is studied with near infrared laser pulses centered at 1040 nm. The peak intensity required for nonlinear localization for the 1-cm long waveguide array was 35.1 GW/cm 2 , using 10-nJ pulses with 300-fs pulse width, which is 70 times lower than that reported in fused silica waveguide arrays and with over 7 times shorter interaction distance. Results reported in this paper demonstrated that ultrafast laser writing is a viable tool to produce 3D all-optical switching waveguide circuits in chalcogenide glass

  20. NECTAR: New electronics for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Christopher Lindsay; Bolmont, J.; Corona, P.; Delagnes, E.; Dzahini, D.; Feinstein, F.; Gascon, D.; Glicenstein, J.-F.; Nayman, P.; Rarbi, F.; Ribo, M.; Sanuy, A.; Siero, X.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Toussenel, F.; Vincent, P.; Vorobiov, S.

    2012-12-01

    The international CTA consortium is currently in the preparatory phase for the development of the next-generation Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA [1]), based on the return of experience from the three major current-generation arrays H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS. To achieve an unprecedented sensitivity and energy range for TeV gamma rays, a new kind of flexible and powerful yet inexpensive front-end hardware will be required for the order of 105 channels of photodetectors in up to 100 telescopes. One possible solution is the NECTAr (New Electronics for the Cherenkov Telescope Array) system, based on the integration of as much as possible of the front-end electronics (amplifiers, fast analogue samplers, memory and ADCs) into a single ASIC for very fast readout performance and a significant reduction of the cost and the lower consumption per channel, while offering a high degree of flexibility both for the triggering and the readout of the telescope. The current status of its development is presented, along with newest results from measurements and simulation studies.

  1. Proposed biomimetic molecular sensor array for astrobiology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, D. C.; Grant, W. D.; Piletsky, S.; Sims, M. R.

    2001-08-01

    A key objective of future astrobiology lander missions, e.g. to Mars and Europa, is the detection of biomarkers - molecules whose presence indicates the existence of either current or extinct life. To address limitations of current analytical methods for biomarker detection, we describe the methodology of a new project for demonstration of a robust molecular-recognition sensor array for astrobiology biomarkers. The sensor array will be realised by assembling components that have been demonstrated individually in previous or current research projects. The major components are (1) robust artificial molecular receptors comprised of molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) recognition systems and (2) a sensor array comprised of both optical and electrochemical sensor elements. These components will be integrated together using ink-jet printing technology coupled with in situ photo-polymerisation of MIPs. For demonstration, four model biomarkers are chosen as targets and represent various classes of potential biomarkers. Objectives of the proposed work include (1) demonstration of practical proof-of-concept, (2) identify areas for further development and (3) provide performance and design data for follow-up projects leading to astrobiology missions.

  2. The Integration of Environmental Constraints into Tidal Array Optimisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Feu, Roan; de Trafford, Sebastian; Culley, Dave; Hill, Jon; Funke, Simon W.; Kramer, Stephan C.; Piggott, Matthew D.

    2015-04-01

    It has been estimated by The Carbon Trust that the marine renewable energy sector, of which tidal stream turbines are projected to play a large part, could produce 20% of the UK's present electricity requirements. This has lead to the important question of how this technology can be deployed in an economically and environmentally friendly manner. Work is currently under way to understand how the tidal turbines that constitute an array can be arranged to maximise the total power generated by that array. The work presented here continues this through the inclusion of environmental constraints. The benefits of the renewable energy sector to our environment at large are not in question. However, the question remains as to the effects this burgeoning sector will have on local environments, and how to mitigate these effects if they are detrimental. For example, the presence of tidal arrays can, through altering current velocity, drastically change the sediment transport into and out of an area along with re-suspending existing sediment. This can have the effects of scouring or submerging habitat, mobilising contaminants within the existing sediment, reducing food supply and altering the turbidity of the water. All of which greatly impact upon any fauna in the affected region. This work pays particular attention to the destruction of habitat of benthic fauna, as this is quantifiable as a direct result of change in the current speed; a primary factor in determining sediment accumulation on the sea floor. OpenTidalFarm is an open source tool that maximises the power generated by an array through repositioning the turbines within it. It currently uses a 2D shallow water model with turbines represented as bump functions of increased friction. The functional of interest, power extracted by the array, is evaluated from the flow field which is calculated at each iteration using a finite element method. A gradient-based local optimisation is then used through solving the

  3. Heterogeneous NiCo2O4@polypyrrole core/sheath nanowire arrays on Ni foam for high performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Li, Minchan; Lv, Fucong; Yang, Mingyang; Tao, Pengpeng; Tang, Yougen; Liu, Hongtao; Lu, Zhouguang

    2015-10-01

    A novel heterogeneous NiCo2O4@PPy core/sheath nanowire arrays are directly grown on Ni foam involving three facile steps, hydrothermal synthesis and calcination of NiCo2O4 nanowire arrays and subsequent in-situ oxidative polymerization of polypyrrole (PPy). When investigated as binder- and conductive additive-free electrodes for supercapacitors (SCs) in 6 M KOH, the NiCo2O4@PPy core/sheath nanowire arrays exhibit high areal capacitance of 3.49 F cm-2 at a discharge current density of 5 mA cm-2, which is almost 1.5 times as much as the pristine NiCo2O4 (2.30 F cm-2). More importantly, it can remain 3.31 F cm-2 (94.8% retention) after 5000 cycles. The as-obtained electrode also displays excellent rate capability, whose areal capacitance can still remain 2.79 F cm-2 while the discharge current density is increased to 50 mA cm-2. The remarkable electrochemical performance is mainly attributed to the unique heterogeneous core/sheath nanowire-array architectures.

  4. Design of DSP-based high-power digital solar array simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Zhilong; Tong, Weichao; Feng, Jian; Ji, Yibo

    2013-12-01

    To satisfy rigid performance specifications, a feedback control was presented for zoom optical lens plants. With the increasing of global energy consumption, research of the photovoltaic(PV) systems get more and more attention. Research of the digital high-power solar array simulator provides technical support for high-power grid-connected PV systems research.This paper introduces a design scheme of the high-power digital solar array simulator based on TMS320F28335. A DC-DC full-bridge topology was used in the system's main circuit. The switching frequency of IGBT is 25kHz.Maximum output voltage is 900V. Maximum output current is 20A. Simulator can be pre-stored solar panel IV curves.The curve is composed of 128 discrete points .When the system was running, the main circuit voltage and current values was feedback to the DSP by the voltage and current sensors in real-time. Through incremental PI,DSP control the simulator in the closed-loop control system. Experimental data show that Simulator output voltage and current follow a preset solar panels IV curve. In connection with the formation of high-power inverter, the system becomes gridconnected PV system. The inverter can find the simulator's maximum power point and the output power can be stabilized at the maximum power point (MPP).

  5. Status of development of the Gamma Ray Energy Tracking Array (GRETA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, I.Y.; Schmid, G.J.; Vetter, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The current generation of large gamma-ray detector arrays, Gammasphere, Eurogam and GASP, are based on modules of Compton suppressed Ge detectors. Due to the solid angle occupied by the Compton shields and to gamma rays escaping the detector, the total peak efficiency of such a design is limited to about 20% for a 1.3 MeV gamma ray. A shell consisting of closely packed Ge detectors has been suggested as the solution to the efficiency limitation. In this case, the entire solid angle is covered by Ge detectors, and by adding the signal from neighboring detectors, the escaped energy is recovered and much higher efficiency can be achieved (e.g. 60% for a 1.3 MeV gamma ray). However, for high multiplicity cascades, the summing of two gamma rays hitting neighboring detectors reduces the efficiency and increases the background. In order to reduce this summing, a large number of detectors is required. For example, with a multiplicity of 25, one needs about 1500 detectors to keep the probability of false summing below 10% and the cost of such a detector array will be prohibitive. Rather than such an approach, the authors are developing a new concept for a gamma-ray array; a shell of closely-packed Ge detectors consisting of 100-200 highly-segmented elements. The high granularity of the segmented Ge detector enables the authors to resolve each of the scattering interactions and determine its position and energy. A tracking algorithm, using the position and energy information, will then identify the interactions belonging to a particular gamma ray and its energy is obtained by summing only these interactions. Such an array can reach a total efficiency about 60%, with a resolving power 1000 times higher than that of current arrays.

  6. Embedded Electro-Optic Sensor Network for the On-Site Calibration and Real-Time Performance Monitoring of Large-Scale Phased Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Kyoung

    2005-01-01

    This final report summarizes the progress during the Phase I SBIR project entitled "Embedded Electro-Optic Sensor Network for the On-Site Calibration and Real-Time Performance Monitoring of Large-Scale Phased Arrays...

  7. Time development of electric fields and currents in space plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Y. Lui

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Two different approaches, referred to as Bu and Ej, can be used to examine the time development of electric fields and currents in space plasmas based on the fundamental laws of physics. From the Bu approach, the required equation involves the generalized Ohm's law with some simplifying assumptions. From the Ej approach, the required equation can be derived from the equation of particle motion, coupled self-consistently with Maxwell's equation, and the definition of electric current density. Recently, some strong statements against the Ej approach have been made. In this paper, we evaluate these statements by discussing (1 some limitations of the Bu approach in solving the time development of electric fields and currents, (2 the procedure in calculating self-consistently the time development of the electric current in space plasmas without taking the curl of the magnetic field in some cases, and (3 the dependency of the time development of magnetic field on electric current. It is concluded that the Ej approach can be useful to understand some magnetospheric problems. In particular, statements about the change of electric current are valid theoretical explanations of change in magnetic field during substorms.

  8. Control of intravascular catheters using an array of active steering coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudino, N; Heilman, J A; Derakhshan, J J; Sunshine, J L; Duerk, J L; Griswold, M A

    2011-07-01

    To extend the concept of deflecting the tip of a catheter with the magnetic force created in an MRI system through the use of an array of independently controllable steering coils located in the catheter tip, and to present methods for visualization of the catheter and/or surrounding areas while the catheter is deflected. An array of steering coils made of 42-gauge wire was built over a 2.5 Fr (0.83 mm) fiber braided microcatheter. Two of the coils were 70 turn axial coils separated by 1 cm, and the third was a 15-turn square side coil that was 2 x 4 mm2. Each coil was driven independently by a pulse width modulation (PWM) current source controlled by a microprocessor that received commands from a MATLAB routine that dynamically set current amplitude and direction for each coil. The catheter was immersed in a water phantom containing 1% Gd-DTPA that was placed at the isocenter of a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Deflections of the catheter tip were measured from image-based data obtained with a real-time radio frequency (RF) spoiled gradient echo sequence (GRE). The small local magnetic fields generated by the steering coils were exploited to generate a hyperintense signal at the catheter tip by using a modified GRE sequence that did not include slice-select rewinding gradients. Imaging and excitation modes were implemented by synchronizing the excitation of the steering coil array with the scanner by ensuring that no current was driven through the coils during the data acquisition window; this allowed visualization of the surrounding tissue while not affecting the desired catheter position. Deflections as large as 2.5 cm were measured when exciting the steering coils sequentially with a 100 mA maximum current per coil. When exciting a single axial coil, the deflection was half this value with 30% higher current. A hyperintense catheter tip useful for catheter tracking was obtained by imaging with the modified GRE sequence. Clear visualization of the areas surrounding the

  9. Optical True Time Delay for Phased Array Antennas Composed of 2×2 Optical MEMS Switches and Fiber Delay Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Back-Song; Lee; Jong-Dug; Shin; Boo-Gyoun; Kim

    2003-01-01

    We proposed an optical true time delay (TTD) for phased array antennas (PAAs) composed of 2×2 optical MEMS switches, single-mode fiber delay lines, and a fixed wavelength laser diode. A 3-bit TTD for 10 GHz PAAs was implemented with a time delay error less than ± 0.2 ps.

  10. Silicon Photomultipliers: Dark Current and its Statistical Spread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto PAGANO

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this paper is to investigate on a statistical basis at the wafer level the relationship existing among the dark currents of the single pixel compared to the whole Silicon Photomultiplier array. This is the first time to our knowledge that such a comparison is made, crucial to pass this new technology to the semiconductor manufacturing standards. In particular, emission microscopy measurements and current measurements allowed us to conclude that optical trenches strongly improve the device performances.

  11. Subharmonic structure of Shapiro steps in frustrated superconducting arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.; Kim, B.J.; Choi, M.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Two-dimensional superconducting arrays with combined direct and alternating applied currents are studied both analytically and numerically. In particular, we investigate in detail current-voltage characteristics of a square array with 1/2 flux quantum per plaquette and triangular arrays with 1/2 and 1/4 flux quantum per plaquette. At zero temperature reduced equations of motion are obtained through the use of the translational symmetry present in the systems. The reduced equations lead to a series of subharmonic steps in addition to the standard integer and fractional giant Shapiro steps, producing devil's staircase structure. This devil's staircase structure reflects the existence of dynamically generated states in addition to the states originating from degenerate ground states in equilibrium. Widths of the subharmonic steps as functions of the amplitudes of alternating currents display Bessel-function-type behavior. We also present results of extensive numerical simulations, which indeed reveal the subharmonic steps together with their stability against small thermal fluctuations. Implications for topological invariance are also discussed

  12. Utilization of antenna arrays in HF systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Bertel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Times;">Different applications of radio systems are based on the implementation of antenna arrays. Classically, radio direction

    Times;">finding operates with a multi channel receiving system connected to an array of receiving antennas. More

    Times;">recently, MIMO architectures have been proposed to increase the capacity of radio links by the use of antenna

    Times;">arrays at both the transmitter and receiver.

    Times;">The first part of this paper describes some novel experimental work carried out to examine the feasibility of applying

    Times;">MIMO techniques for communications within the HF radio band. A detailed correlation analysis of a variety

    Times;">of different antenna array configurations is presented. The second section of the paper also deals with HF

    Times;">MIMO communications, focusing on the problem from a modelling point of view. The third part presents a sensitivity

    Times;">analysis of different antenna array structures for HF direction finding applications. The results demonstrate

    Times;">that when modelling errors, heterogeneous antenna arrays are more robust in comparison to homogeneous structures


  13. Off-axis current drive and real-time control of current profile in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Ide, S.; Oikawa, T.; Fujita, T.; Ishikawa, M.; Seki, M.; Matsunaga, G.; Hatae, T.; Naito, O.; Hamamatsu, K.; Sueoka, M.; Hosoyama, H.; Nakazato, M.

    2008-01-01

    Aiming at optimization of current profile in high-β plasmas for higher confinement and stability, a real-time control system of the minimum of the safety factor (q min ) using the off-axis current drive has been developed. The off-axis current drive can raise the safety factor in the centre and help to avoid instability that limits the performance of the plasma. The system controls the injection power of lower-hybrid waves, and hence its off-axis driven current in order to control q min . The real-time control of q min is demonstrated in a high-β plasma, where q min follows the temporally changing reference q min,ref from 1.3 to 1.7. Applying the control to another high-β discharge (β N = 1.7, β p = 1.5) with m/n = 2/1 neo-classical tearing mode (NTM), q min was raised above 2 and the NTM was suppressed. The stored energy increased by 16% with the NTM suppressed, since the resonant rational surface was eliminated. For the future use for current profile control, current density profile for off-axis neutral beam current drive (NBCD) is for the first time measured, using the motional Stark effect diagnostic. Spatially localized NBCD profile was clearly observed at the normalized minor radius ρ of about 0.6-0.8. The location was also confirmed by multi-chordal neutron emission profile measurement. The total amount of the measured beam driven current was consistent with the theoretical calculation using the ACCOME code. The CD location in the calculation was inward shifted than the measurement

  14. Seismometer array station processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, F.A.; Lea, T.G.; Douglas, A.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of the design, construction and initial testing of two types of Seismometer Array Station Processor (SASP), one to work with data stored on magnetic tape in analogue form, the other with data in digital form. The purpose of a SASP is to detect the short period P waves recorded by a UK-type array of 20 seismometers and to edit these on to a a digital library tape or disc. The edited data are then processed to obtain a rough location for the source and to produce seismograms (after optimum processing) for analysis by a seismologist. SASPs are an important component in the scheme for monitoring underground explosions advocated by the UK in the Conference of the Committee on Disarmament. With digital input a SASP can operate at 30 times real time using a linear detection process and at 20 times real time using the log detector of Weichert. Although the log detector is slower, it has the advantage over the linear detector that signals with lower signal-to-noise ratio can be detected and spurious large amplitudes are less likely to produce a detection. It is recommended, therefore, that where possible array data should be recorded in digital form for input to a SASP and that the log detector of Weichert be used. Trial runs show that a SASP is capable of detecting signals down to signal-to-noise ratios of about two with very few false detections, and at mid-continental array sites it should be capable of detecting most, if not all, the signals with magnitude above msub(b) 4.5; the UK argues that, given a suitable network, it is realistic to hope that sources of this magnitude and above can be detected and identified by seismological means alone. (author)

  15. Ferrite LTCC based phased array antennas

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffar, Farhan A.

    2016-11-02

    Two phased array antennas realized in multilayer ferrite LTCC technology are presented in this paper. The use of embedded bias windings in these designs allows the negation of external magnets which are conventionally employed with bulk ferrite medium. This reduces the required magnetostatic field strength by 90% as compared to the traditional designs. The phase shifters are implemented using the SIW technology. One of the designs is operated in the half mode waveguide topology while the other design is based on standard full mode waveguide operation. The two phase shifter designs are integrated with two element patch antenna array and slotted SIW array respectively. The array designs demonstrate a beam steering of 30° and ±19° respectively for a current excitation of 200 mA. The designs, due to their small factor can be easily integrated in modern communication systems which is not possible in the case of bulk ferrite based designs.

  16. Source of the Vrancea, Romania intermediate-depth earthquakes: variability test of the source time function using a small-aperture array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, E.; Radulian, M.; Popa, M.; Placinta, A.O.; Cioflan, C. O.; Grecu, B.

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of the present work is to investigate the possibility to detect and calibrate the source parameters of the Vrancea intermediate-depth earthquakes using a small-aperture array, Bucovina Seismic Array (BURAR). BURAR array was installed in 1999 in joint cooperation between Romania and USA. The array is situated in the northern part of Romania, in Eastern Carpathians, at about 250 km distance from the Vrancea epicentral area. The array consists of 10 stations (nine short period and one broad band instruments installed in boreholes). For our study we selected 30 earthquakes (3.8 iU MD iU 6.0) occurred between 2002 and 2004, including two recent Vrancea events, which are the best ever recorded earthquakes on the Romanian territory: September 27, 2004 (45.70 angle N, 26.45 angle E, h = 166 km, M w = 4.7) and October 27, 2004 (45.84 angle N, 26.63 angle E, h = 105 km, M w 6.0). Empirical Green function deconvolution and spectral ratio methods are applied for pairs of collocated events with similar focal mechanism. Stability tests are performed for the retrieved source time function using the array elements. Empirical scaling and calibration relationships are also determined. Possible variation with depth along the subducting slab, in agreement with assumed differences in the seismic and tectonic regime between the upper (h = 60 -110 km) and lower (h = 110 - 180 km) lithospheric seismic active segments, and variation in the attenuation of the seismic waves propagating toward BURAR site, are also investigated. (authors)

  17. Micro-array versus nano-array platforms: a comparative study for ODN detection based on SPR enhanced ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celen, Burcu; Piskin, Erhan; Demirel, Goekhan

    2011-01-01

    The rapid and sensitive detection of DNA has recently attracted worldwide attention for a variety of disease diagnoses and detection of harmful bacteria in food and drink. In this paper, we carried out a comparative study based on surface plasmon resonance enhanced ellipsometry (SPREE) for the detection of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) using micro- and nano-array platforms. The micro-arrayed surfaces were fabricated by a photolithography approach using different types of mask having varying size and shape. Well-ordered arrays of high aspect ratio polymeric nanotubes were also obtained using high molecular weight polystyrene (PS) and anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes having 200 nm pore diameters. The SPREE sensors were then prepared by direct coupling of thiolated probe-ODNs, which contain suitable spacer arms, on gold-coated micro- and nano-arrayed surfaces. We experimentally demonstrated that, for the first time, gold-coated free standing polymeric nano-arrayed platforms can easily be produced and lead to a significant sensor sensitivity gain compared to that of the conventional SPREE surfaces of about four times. We believe that such an enhancement in sensor response could be useful for next generation sensor systems.

  18. Micro-array versus nano-array platforms: a comparative study for ODN detection based on SPR enhanced ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celen, Burcu; Demirel, Gökhan; Piskin, Erhan

    2011-04-01

    The rapid and sensitive detection of DNA has recently attracted worldwide attention for a variety of disease diagnoses and detection of harmful bacteria in food and drink. In this paper, we carried out a comparative study based on surface plasmon resonance enhanced ellipsometry (SPREE) for the detection of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) using micro- and nano-array platforms. The micro-arrayed surfaces were fabricated by a photolithography approach using different types of mask having varying size and shape. Well-ordered arrays of high aspect ratio polymeric nanotubes were also obtained using high molecular weight polystyrene (PS) and anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes having 200 nm pore diameters. The SPREE sensors were then prepared by direct coupling of thiolated probe-ODNs, which contain suitable spacer arms, on gold-coated micro- and nano-arrayed surfaces. We experimentally demonstrated that, for the first time, gold-coated free standing polymeric nano-arrayed platforms can easily be produced and lead to a significant sensor sensitivity gain compared to that of the conventional SPREE surfaces of about four times. We believe that such an enhancement in sensor response could be useful for next generation sensor systems.

  19. Capillarity-based preparation system for optical colorimetric sensor arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao-Gang; Yi, Xin; Bu, Xiang-Nan; Hou, Chang-Jun; Huo, Dan-Qun; Yang, Mei; Fa, Huan-Bao; Lei, Jin-Can

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, optical colorimetric sensor arrays have demonstrated beneficial features, including rapid response, high selectivity, and high specificity; as a result, it has been extensively applied in food inspection and chemical studies, among other fields. There are instruments in the current market available for the preparation of an optical colorimetric sensor array, but it lacks the corresponding research of the preparation mechanism. Therefore, in connection with the main features of this kind of sensor array such as consistency, based on the preparation method of contact spotting, combined with a capillary fluid model, Washburn equation, Laplace equation, etc., this paper develops a diffusion model of an optical colorimetric sensor array during its preparation and sets up an optical colorimetric sensor array preparation system based on this diffusion model. Finally, this paper compares and evaluates the sensor arrays prepared by the system and prepared manually in three aspects such as the quality of array point, response of array, and response result, and the results show that the performance index of the sensor array prepared by a system under this diffusion model is better than that of the sensor array of manual spotting, which meets the needs of the experiment.

  20. Optical Fiber Array Assemblies for Space Flight on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Jelanie; Matuszeski, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Custom fiber optic bundle array assemblies developed by the Photonics Group at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center were an enabling technology for both the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) and the Laser Ranging (LR) Investigation on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) currently in operation. The unique assembly array designs provided considerable decrease in size and weight and met stringent system level requirements. This is the first time optical fiber array bundle assemblies were used in a high performance space flight application. This innovation was achieved using customized Diamond Switzerland AVIM optical connectors. For LOLA, a five fiber array was developed for the receiver telescope to maintain precise alignment for each of the 200/220 micron optical fibers collecting 1,064 nm wavelength light being reflected back from the moon. The array splits to five separate detectors replacing the need for multiple telescopes. An image illustration of the LOLA instrument can be found at the top of the figure. For the laser ranging, a seven-optical-fiber array of 400/440 micron fibers was developed to transmit light from behind the LR receiver telescope located on the end of the high gain antenna system (HGAS). The bundle was routed across two moving gimbals, down the HGAS boom arm, over a deployable mandrel and across the spacecraft to a detector on the LOLA instrument. The routing of the optical fiber bundle and its end locations is identified in the figure. The Laser Ranging array and bundle is currently accepting light at a wavelength of 532 nm sent to the moon from laser stations at Greenbelt MD and other stations around the world to gather precision ranging information from the Earth to the LRO spacecraft. The LR bundle assembly is capable of withstanding temperatures down to -55 C at the connectors, and 20,000 mechanical gimbal cycles at temperatures as cold as -20 C along the length of the seven-fiber bundle (that is packaged into the gimbals). The total

  1. Investigating the Trade-Off Between Power Generation and Environmental Impact of Tidal-Turbine Arrays Using Array Layout Optimisation and Habitat Sustainability Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Feu, R. J.; Funke, S. W.; Kramer, S. C.; Hill, J.; Piggott, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    The installation of tidal turbines into the ocean will inevitably affect the environment around them. However, due to the relative infancy of this sector the extent and severity of such effects is unknown. The layout of an array of turbines is an important factor in determining not only the array's final yield but also how it will influence regional hydrodynamics. This in turn could affect, for example, sediment transportation or habitat suitability. The two potentially competing objectives of extracting energy from the tidal current, and of limiting any environmental impact consequent to influencing that current, are investigated here. This relationship is posed as a multi-objective optimisation problem. OpenTidalFarm, an array layout optimisation tool, and MaxEnt, habitat sustainability modelling software, are used to evaluate scenarios off the coast of the UK. MaxEnt is used to estimate the likelihood of finding a species in a given location based upon environmental input data and presence data of the species. Environmental features which are known to impact habitat, specifically those affected by the presence of an array, such as bed shear stress, are chosen as inputs. MaxEnt then uses a maximum-entropy modelling approach to estimate population distribution across the modelled area. OpenTidalFarm is used to maximise the power generated by an array, or multiple arrays, through adjusting the position and number of turbines within them. It uses a 2D shallow water model with turbine arrays represented as adjustable friction fields. It has the capability to also optimise for user created functionals that can be expressed mathematically. This work uses two functionals; power extracted by the array, and the suitability of habitat as predicted by MaxEnt. A gradient-based local optimisation is used to adjust the array layout at each iteration. This work presents arrays that are optimised for both yield and the viability of habitat for chosen species. In each scenario

  2. Numerical study of read scheme in one-selector one-resistor crossbar array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungho; Kim, Hee-Dong; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2015-12-01

    A comprehensive numerical circuit analysis of read schemes of a one selector-one resistance change memory (1S1R) crossbar array is carried out. Three schemes-the ground, V/2, and V/3 schemes-are compared with each other in terms of sensing margin and power consumption. Without the aid of a complex analytical approach or SPICE-based simulation, a simple numerical iteration method is developed to simulate entire current flows and node voltages within a crossbar array. Understanding such phenomena is essential in successfully evaluating the electrical specifications of selectors for suppressing intrinsic drawbacks of crossbar arrays, such as sneaky current paths and series line resistance problems. This method provides a quantitative tool for the accurate analysis of crossbar arrays and provides guidelines for developing an optimal read scheme, array configuration, and selector device specifications.

  3. Flow and flow-induced vibration of a square array of cylinders in steady currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Ming [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 2751 (Australia); Cheng, Liang; An, Hongwei; Tong, Feifei, E-mail: m.zhao@uws.edu.au [School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2015-08-15

    Flow and flow-induced vibration of a square array of cylinders are investigated by two-dimensional numerical simulations. Flow past 36 cylinders in an inline arranged square array and 33 cylinders in a staggered arranged square array is firstly simulated, for Re = 100 and the spacing ratios of L/D = 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5. Only one vortex street is observed in the wake of the cylinder array when the spacing ratio is 1.5 in the inline arrangement and 1.5 and 2 in the staggered arrangement, indicating that the critical spacing ratio for the single-vortex street mode in the staggered arrangement is higher than that in the inline arrangement. The vortex shedding from the cylinders is suppressed at L/D = 3 for both inline and staggered arrangements. Vortex shedding from each individual cylinder is observed when L/D = 4. Flow-induced vibration of 36 cylinders in an inline square arrangement is studied for a constant Reynolds number of 100, two spacing ratios of 2 and 5, a constant mass ratio of 2.5 and a wide range of reduced velocities. It is found that for a spacing ratio of 2, the vibration of the cylinders in the four downstream columns does not start until the reduced velocity exceeds 4.5. The vibration of the cylinders progresses downstream with increasing reduced velocity. For a spacing ratio of 5, the vibrations of the cylinders in the most upstream column are similar to that of a single cylinder. The vibration amplitudes of the downstream cylinders peak at higher reduced velocities than that of a single cylinder. The maximum possible response amplitudes occur at the most downstream cylinders. (paper)

  4. Flat-plate photovoltaic array design optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is presented which integrates the results of specific studies in the areas of photovoltaic structural design optimization, optimization of array series/parallel circuit design, thermal design optimization, and optimization of environmental protection features. The analysis is based on minimizing the total photovoltaic system life-cycle energy cost including repair and replacement of failed cells and modules. This approach is shown to be a useful technique for array optimization, particularly when time-dependent parameters such as array degradation and maintenance are involved.

  5. Development and first experimental tests of Faraday cup array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokůpek, J; Kaufman, J; Margarone, D; Krůs, M; Velyhan, A; Krása, J; Burris-Mog, T; Busold, S; Deppert, O; Cowan, T E; Korn, G

    2014-01-01

    A new type of Faraday cup, capable of detecting high energy charged particles produced in a high intensity laser-matter interaction environment, has recently been developed and demonstrated as a real-time detector based on the time-of-flight technique. An array of these Faraday cups was designed and constructed to cover different observation angles with respect to the target normal direction. Thus, it allows reconstruction of the spatial distribution of ion current density in the subcritical plasma region and the ability to visualise its time evolution through time-of-flight measurements, which cannot be achieved with standard laser optical interferometry. This is a unique method for two-dimensional visualisation of ion currents from laser-generated plasmas. A technical description of the new type of Faraday cup is introduced along with an ad hoc data analysis procedure. Experimental results obtained during campaigns at the Petawatt High-Energy Laser for Heavy Ion Experiments (GSI, Darmstadt) and at the Prague Asterix Laser System (AS CR) are presented. Advantages and limitations of the used diagnostic system are discussed.

  6. New electronics for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (NECTAr)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumann, C.L.; Delagnes, E.; Bolmont, J.; Corona, P.; Dzahini, D.; Feinstein, F.; Gascón, D.; Glicenstein, J.-F.; Guilloux, F.; Nayman, P.; Rarbi, F.; Sanuy, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Toussenel, F.; Vincent, P.; Vorobiov, S.

    2012-01-01

    The international CTA consortium has recently entered into its preparatory phase towards the construction of the next-generation Cherenkov Telescope Array CTA. This experiment will be a successor, and based on the return of experience from the three major current-generation arrays H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS, and aims to significantly improve upon the sensitivity as well as the energy range of its highly successful predecessors. Construction is planned to begin by 2013, and when finished, CTA will be able to explore the highest-energy gamma ray sky in unprecedented detail. To achieve this increase in sensitivity and energy range, CTA will employ the order of 100 telescopes of three different sizes on two sites, with around 1000–4000 channels per camera, depending on the telescope size. To equip and reliably operate the order of 100000 channels of photodetectors (compared to 6000 of the H.E.S.S. array), a new kind of flexible and powerful yet inexpensive front-end hardware will be required. One possible solution is pursued by the NECTAr (New Electronics for the Cherenkov Telescope Array) project. Its main feature is the integration of as much as possible of the front-end electronics (amplifiers, fast analogue samplers, memory and ADCs) into a single ASIC, which will allow very fast readout performances while significantly reducing the cost and the power consumption per channel. Also included is a low-cost FPGA for digital treatment and online data processing, as well as an Ethernet connection. Other priorities of NECTAr are the modularity of the system, a high degree of flexibility in the trigger system as well as the possibility of flexible readout modes to optimise the signal-to-noise ratio while at the same time allowing a significant reduction of data rates, both of which could improve the sensitivity of CTA compared to current detection systems. This paper gives an overview over the development work for the Nectar system, with particular focus on its main

  7. New electronics for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (NECTAr)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumann, C.L., E-mail: christopher.naumann@lpnhe.in2p3.fr [LPNHE, IN2P3/CNRS Universite Paris VI and Universite Paris VII and IN2P3/CNRS, Paris (France); Delagnes, E. [IRFU, CEA/DSM, Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bolmont, J.; Corona, P. [LPNHE, IN2P3/CNRS Universite Paris VI and Universite Paris VII and IN2P3/CNRS, Paris (France); Dzahini, D. [LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier, INPG and IN2P3/CNRS, Grenoble (France); Feinstein, F. [LUPM, Universite Montpellier II and IN2P3/CNRS, Montpellier (France); Gascon, D. [ICC-UB, Universitat Barcelona (Spain); Glicenstein, J.-F.; Guilloux, F. [IRFU, CEA/DSM, Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Nayman, P. [LPNHE, IN2P3/CNRS Universite Paris VI and Universite Paris VII and IN2P3/CNRS, Paris (France); Rarbi, F. [LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier, INPG and IN2P3/CNRS, Grenoble (France); Sanuy, A. [ICC-UB, Universitat Barcelona (Spain); Tavernet, J.-P.; Toussenel, F.; Vincent, P. [LPNHE, IN2P3/CNRS Universite Paris VI and Universite Paris VII and IN2P3/CNRS, Paris (France); Vorobiov, S. [LUPM, Universite Montpellier II and IN2P3/CNRS, Montpellier (France); DESY Zeuthen, Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany)

    2012-12-11

    The international CTA consortium has recently entered into its preparatory phase towards the construction of the next-generation Cherenkov Telescope Array CTA. This experiment will be a successor, and based on the return of experience from the three major current-generation arrays H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS, and aims to significantly improve upon the sensitivity as well as the energy range of its highly successful predecessors. Construction is planned to begin by 2013, and when finished, CTA will be able to explore the highest-energy gamma ray sky in unprecedented detail. To achieve this increase in sensitivity and energy range, CTA will employ the order of 100 telescopes of three different sizes on two sites, with around 1000-4000 channels per camera, depending on the telescope size. To equip and reliably operate the order of 100000 channels of photodetectors (compared to 6000 of the H.E.S.S. array), a new kind of flexible and powerful yet inexpensive front-end hardware will be required. One possible solution is pursued by the NECTAr (New Electronics for the Cherenkov Telescope Array) project. Its main feature is the integration of as much as possible of the front-end electronics (amplifiers, fast analogue samplers, memory and ADCs) into a single ASIC, which will allow very fast readout performances while significantly reducing the cost and the power consumption per channel. Also included is a low-cost FPGA for digital treatment and online data processing, as well as an Ethernet connection. Other priorities of NECTAr are the modularity of the system, a high degree of flexibility in the trigger system as well as the possibility of flexible readout modes to optimise the signal-to-noise ratio while at the same time allowing a significant reduction of data rates, both of which could improve the sensitivity of CTA compared to current detection systems. This paper gives an overview over the development work for the Nectar system, with particular focus on its main

  8. New electronics for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (NECTAr)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, C. L.; Delagnes, E.; Bolmont, J.; Corona, P.; Dzahini, D.; Feinstein, F.; Gascón, D.; Glicenstein, J.-F.; Guilloux, F.; Nayman, P.; Rarbi, F.; Sanuy, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Toussenel, F.; Vincent, P.; Vorobiov, S.

    2012-12-01

    The international CTA consortium has recently entered into its preparatory phase towards the construction of the next-generation Cherenkov Telescope Array CTA. This experiment will be a successor, and based on the return of experience from the three major current-generation arrays H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS, and aims to significantly improve upon the sensitivity as well as the energy range of its highly successful predecessors. Construction is planned to begin by 2013, and when finished, CTA will be able to explore the highest-energy gamma ray sky in unprecedented detail. To achieve this increase in sensitivity and energy range, CTA will employ the order of 100 telescopes of three different sizes on two sites, with around 1000-4000 channels per camera, depending on the telescope size. To equip and reliably operate the order of 100000 channels of photodetectors (compared to 6000 of the H.E.S.S. array), a new kind of flexible and powerful yet inexpensive front-end hardware will be required. One possible solution is pursued by the NECTAr (New Electronics for the Cherenkov Telescope Array) project. Its main feature is the integration of as much as possible of the front-end electronics (amplifiers, fast analogue samplers, memory and ADCs) into a single ASIC, which will allow very fast readout performances while significantly reducing the cost and the power consumption per channel. Also included is a low-cost FPGA for digital treatment and online data processing, as well as an Ethernet connection. Other priorities of NECTAr are the modularity of the system, a high degree of flexibility in the trigger system as well as the possibility of flexible readout modes to optimise the signal-to-noise ratio while at the same time allowing a significant reduction of data rates, both of which could improve the sensitivity of CTA compared to current detection systems. This paper gives an overview over the development work for the Nectar system, with particular focus on its main

  9. Non-equilibrium coherent vortex states and subharmonic giant Shapiro steps in Josephson junction arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, D.; Jose, J.V.; Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA

    1994-01-01

    This is a review of recent work on the dynamic response of Josephson junction arrays driven by dc and ac currents. The arrays are modeled by the resistively shunted Josephson junction model, appropriate for proximity effect junctions, including self-induced magnetic fields as well as disorder. The relevance of the self-induced fields is measured as a function of a parameter κ = λ L /a, with λ L the London penetration depth of the arrays, and a the lattice spacing. The transition from Type II (κ > 1) to Type I (κ < 1) behavior is studied in detail. The authors compare the results for models with self, self + nearest-neighbor, and full inductance matrices. In the κ = ∞ limit, they find that when the initial state has at least one vortex-antivortex pair, after a characteristic transient time these vortices unbind and radiate other vortices. These radiated vortices settle into a parity-broken, time-periodic, axisymmetric coherent vortex state (ACVS), characterized by alternate rows of positive and negative vortices lying along a tilted axis. The ACVS produces subharmonic steps in the current voltage (IV) characteristics, typical of giant Shapiro steps. For finite κ they find that the IV's show subharmonic giant Shapiro steps, even at zero external magnetic field. They find that these subharmonic steps are produced by a whole family of coherent vortex oscillating patterns, with their structure changing as a function of κ. In general, they find that these patterns are due to a breakdown of translational invariance produced, for example, by disorder of antisymmetric edge-fields. The zero field case results are in good qualitative agreement with experiments in Nb-Au-Nb arrays

  10. OPTIMAL STRATEGIES FOR CONTINUOUS GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTION IN PULSAR TIMING ARRAYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J. A.; Siemens, X.; Creighton, J. D. E.

    2012-01-01

    Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are expected to emit a continuous gravitational wave signal in the pulsar timing array (PTA) frequency band (10 –9 to 10 –7 Hz). The development of data analysis techniques aimed at efficient detection and characterization of these signals is critical to the gravitational wave detection effort. In this paper, we leverage methods developed for LIGO continuous wave gravitational searches and explore the use of the F-statistic for such searches in pulsar timing data. Babak and Sesana have used this approach in the context of PTAs to show that one can resolve multiple SMBHB sources in the sky. Our work improves on several aspects of prior continuous wave search methods developed for PTA data analysis. The algorithm is implemented fully in the time domain, which naturally deals with the irregular sampling typical of PTA data and avoids spectral leakage problems associated with frequency domain methods. We take into account the fitting of the timing model and have generalized our approach to deal with both correlated and uncorrelated colored noise sources. We also develop an incoherent detection statistic that maximizes over all pulsar-dependent contributions to the likelihood. To test the effectiveness and sensitivity of our detection statistics, we perform a number of Monte Carlo simulations. We produce sensitivity curves for PTAs of various configurations and outline an implementation of a fully functional data analysis pipeline. Finally, we present a derivation of the likelihood maximized over the gravitational wave phases at the pulsar locations, which results in a vast reduction of the search parameter space.

  11. A semi-automatic calibration method for seismic arrays applied to an Alaskan array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, K. G.; Tibuleac, I. M.; Hansen, R. A.

    2001-12-01

    Well-calibrated, small (less than 22 km) aperture seismic arrays are of great importance for event location and characterization. We have implemented the crosscorrelation method of Tibuleac and Herrin (Seis. Res. Lett. 1997) as a semi-automatic procedure, applicable to any seismic array. With this we are able to process thousands of phases with several days of computer time on a Sun Blade 1000 workstation. Complicated geology beneath elements and elevation differences amonst the array stations made station corrections necessary. 328 core phases (including PcP, PKiKP, PKP, PKKP) were used in order to determine the static corrections. To demonstrate this application and method, we have analyzed P and PcP arrivals at the ILAR array (Eielson, Alaska) between years 1995-2000. The arrivals were picked by PIDC, for events (mb>4.0) well located by the USGS. We calculated backazimuth and horizontal velocity residuals for all events. We observed large backazimuth residuals for regional and near-regional phases. We are discussing the possibility of a dipping Moho (strike E-W, dip N) beneath the array versus other local structure that would produce the residuals.

  12. Wide-area SWIR arrays and active illuminators

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougal, Michael; Hood, Andrew; Geske, Jon; Wang, Chad; Renner, Daniel; Follman, David; Heu, Paula

    2012-01-01

    We describe the factors that go into the component choices for a short wavelength (SWIR) imager, which include the SWIR sensor, the lens, and the illuminator. We have shown the factors for reducing dark current, and shown that we can achieve well below 1.5 nA/cm2 for 15 μm devices at 7°C. We have mated our InGaAs detector arrays to 640x512 readout integrated integrated circuits (ROICs) to make focal plane arrays (FPAs). In addition, we have fabricated high definition 1920x1080 FPAs for wide field of view imaging. The resulting FPAs are capable of imaging photon fluxes with wavelengths between 1 and 1.6 microns at low light levels. The dark current associated with these FPAs is extremely low, exhibiting a mean dark current density of 0.26 nA/cm2 at 0°C. FLIR has also developed a high definition, 1920x1080, 15 um pitch SWIR sensor. In addition, FLIR has developed laser arrays that provide flat illumination in scenes that are normally light-starved. The illuminators have 40% wall-plug efficiency and provide low-speckle illumination, provide artifact-free imagery versus conventional laser illuminators.

  13. Array processors based on Gaussian fraction-free method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, S; Sedukhin, S [Aizu Univ., Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima (Japan); Sedukhin, I

    1998-03-01

    The design of algorithmic array processors for solving linear systems of equations using fraction-free Gaussian elimination method is presented. The design is based on a formal approach which constructs a family of planar array processors systematically. These array processors are synthesized and analyzed. It is shown that some array processors are optimal in the framework of linear allocation of computations and in terms of number of processing elements and computing time. (author)

  14. Real-time 3D imaging methods using 2D phased arrays based on synthetic focusing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Jun; Song, Tai-Kyong

    2008-07-01

    A fast 3D ultrasound imaging technique using a 2D phased array transducer based on the synthetic focusing method for nondestructive testing or medical imaging is proposed. In the proposed method, each column of a 2D array is fired successively to produce transverse fan beams focused at a fixed depth along a given longitudinal direction and the resulting pulse echoes are received at all elements of a 2D array used. After firing all column arrays, a frame of high-resolution image along a given longitudinal direction is obtained with dynamic focusing employed in the longitudinal direction on receive and in the transverse direction on both transmit and receive. The volume rate of the proposed method can be increased much higher than that of the conventional 2D array imaging by employing an efficient sparse array technique. A simple modification to the proposed method can further increase the volume scan rate significantly. The proposed methods are verified through computer simulations.

  15. Uncooled Terahertz real-time imaging 2D arrays developed at LETI: present status and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, François; Meilhan, Jérôme; Dussopt, Laurent; Nicolas, Jean-Alain; Monnier, Nicolas; Sicard, Gilles; Siligaris, Alexandre; Hiberty, Bruno

    2017-05-01

    As for other imaging sensor markets, whatever is the technology, the commercial spread of terahertz (THz) cameras has to fulfil simultaneously the criteria of high sensitivity and low cost and SWAP (size, weight and power). Monolithic silicon-based 2D sensors integrated in uncooled THz real-time cameras are good candidates to meet these requirements. Over the past decade, LETI has been studying and developing such arrays with two complimentary technological approaches, i.e. antenna-coupled silicon bolometers and CMOS Field Effect Transistors (FET), both being compatible to standard silicon microelectronics processes. LETI has leveraged its know-how in thermal infrared bolometer sensors in developing a proprietary architecture for THz sensing. High technological maturity has been achieved as illustrated by the demonstration of fast scanning of large field of view and the recent birth of a commercial camera. In the FET-based THz field, recent works have been focused on innovative CMOS read-out-integrated circuit designs. The studied architectures take advantage of the large pixel pitch to enhance the flexibility and the sensitivity: an embedded in-pixel configurable signal processing chain dramatically reduces the noise. Video sequences at 100 frames per second using our 31x31 pixels 2D Focal Plane Arrays (FPA) have been achieved. The authors describe the present status of these developments and perspectives of performance evolutions are discussed. Several experimental imaging tests are also presented in order to illustrate the capabilities of these arrays to address industrial applications such as non-destructive testing (NDT), security or quality control of food.

  16. Analysis of the impacts of Wave Energy Converter arrays on the nearshore wave climate in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dea, A.; Haller, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    As concerns over the use of fossil fuels increase, more and more effort is being put into the search for renewable and reliable sources of energy. Developments in ocean technologies have made the extraction of wave energy a promising alternative. Commercial exploitation of wave energy would require the deployment of arrays of Wave Energy Converters (WECs) that include several to hundreds of individual devices. Interactions between WECs and ocean waves result in both near-field and far-field changes in the incident wave field, including a significant decrease in wave height and a redirection of waves in the lee of the array, referred to as the wave shadow. Nearshore wave height and direction are directly related to the wave radiation stresses that drive longshore currents, rip currents and nearshore sediment transport, which suggests that significant far-field changes in the wave field due to WEC arrays could have an impact on littoral processes. The goal of this study is to investigate the changes in nearshore wave conditions and radiation stress forcing as a result of an offshore array of point-absorber type WECs using a nested SWAN model, and to determine how array size, configuration, spacing and distance from shore influence these changes. The two sites of interest are the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC) test sites off the coast of Newport Oregon, the North Energy Test Site (NETS) and the South Energy Test Site (SETS). NETS and SETS are permitted wave energy test sites located approximately 4 km and 10 km offshore, respectively. Twenty array configurations are simulated, including 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 devices in two and three staggered rows in both closely spaced (three times the WEC diameter) and widely spaced (ten times the WEC diameter) arrays. Daily offshore wave spectra are obtained from a regional WAVEWATCH III hindcast for 2011, which are then propagated across the continental shelf using SWAN. Arrays are represented in SWAN

  17. Generation of ultra-fast cumulative water jets by sub-microsecond underwater electrical explosion of conical wire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafer, D.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Gleizer, S.; Gruzinsky, K.; Krasik, Ya. E. [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2015-12-15

    The results of experiments with underwater electrical explosion of modified conical arrays of copper and aluminum wires are presented. A pulsed generator producing a 550 kA-amplitude current with a 400 ns rise time was used in the explosion of the arrays. The array explosion generates water flows converging at the axis of the cone. This flow generates a fast-moving water jet with a velocity exceeding 1.8 × 10{sup 5 }cm/s, which was observed being ejected from the surface of the water covering the array. The positions of the water jet were measured by multiple-exposure fast framing imaging. In experiments, the apex angle of the array, the thickness of the water layer above the arrays, or the material of the wires was altered, which changed the resulting velocities and shapes of the emitted jets. A model that considers the converging stationary flow of a slightly compressible fluid is suggested. The velocities and shapes of the jets obtained by this model agree well with the experimentally measured jet velocities.

  18. Rectenna array measurement results. [Satellite power transmission and reception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The measured performance characteristics of a rectenna array are reviewed and compared to the performance of a single element. It is shown that the performance may be extrapolated from the individual element to that of the collection of elements. Techniques for current and voltage combining are demonstrated. The array performance as a function of various operating parameters is characterized and techniques for overvoltage protection and automatic fault clearing in the array are demonstrated. A method for detecting failed elements also exists. Instrumentation for deriving performance effectiveness is described. Measured harmonic radiation patterns and fundamental frequency scattered patterns for a low level illumination rectenna array are presented.

  19. Ion-assisted functional monolayer coating of nanorod arrays in hydrogen plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, E.; Levchenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.; Keidar, M.; Xu, S.

    2007-01-01

    Uniformity of postprocessing of large-area, dense nanostructure arrays is currently one of the greatest challenges in nanoscience and nanofabrication. One of the major issues is to achieve a high level of control in specie fluxes to specific surface areas of the nanostructures. As suggested by the numerical experiments in this work, this goal can be achieved by manipulating microscopic ion fluxes by varying the plasma sheath and nanorod array parameters. The dynamics of ion-assisted deposition of functional monolayer coatings onto two-dimensional carbon nanorod arrays in a hydrogen plasma is simulated by using a multiscale hybrid numerical simulation. The numerical results show evidence of a strong correlation between the aspect ratios and nanopattern positioning of the nanorods, plasma sheath width, and densities and distributions of microscopic ion fluxes. When the spacing between the nanorods and/or their aspect ratios are larger, and/or the plasma sheath is wider, the density of microscopic ion current flowing to each of the individual nanorods increases, thus reducing the time required to apply a functional monolayer coating down to 11 s for a 7-μm-wide sheath, and to 5 s for a 50-μm-wide sheath. The computed monolayer coating development time is consistent with previous experimental reports on plasma-assisted functionalization of related carbon nanostructures [B. N. Khare et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 81, 5237 (2002)]. The results are generic in that they can be applied to a broader range of plasma-based processes and nanostructures, and contribute to the development of deterministic strategies of postprocessing and functionalization of various nanoarrays for nanoelectronic, biomedical, and other emerging applications

  20. Minimisation of Power loss from partially shaded solar cell arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maine, Tony; Bell, John [Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia). Built Environment Engineering; Martin, Stewart [University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, SA (Australia). School of Electrical and Information Engineering

    2008-07-01

    In conventional wiring schemes the output from a partially shaded solar cell array drops rapidly to that of the fully shaded array even when only a small fraction is shaded. In this paper circuit simulation has been used to show that by dynamically reconfiguring the array, the power losses due to shading can be significantly reduced. Reconfiguration is achieved by using switching microcircuits with on-chip photo detectors to determine which parts of the array are in shade. The currents from the shaded and unshaded sections of the array are separated and then connected in parallel to a maximum power point tracker. It is shown that by using this reconfiguration that the power output from a partially shaded array can be increased by at least 100% compared with that from a conventional series connected array over a range of shading conditions. (orig.)

  1. Real-time 2-D Phased Array Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Fogh, Nikolaj

    2018-01-01

    Echocardiography examination of the blood flow is currently either restricted to 1-D techniques in real-time or experimental off-line 2-D methods. This paper presents an implementation of transverse oscillation for real-time 2-D vector flow imaging (VFI) on a commercial BK Ultrasound scanner....... A large field-of-view (FOV) sequence for studying flow dynamics at 11 frames per second (fps) and a sequence for studying peak systolic velocities (PSV) with a narrow FOV at 36 fps were validated. The VFI sequences were validated in a flow-rig with continuous laminar parabolic flow and in a pulsating flow...

  2. High-Performance Carbon Dioxide Electrocatalytic Reduction by Easily Fabricated Large-Scale Silver Nanowire Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Chuhao; Shao, Yang; Lu, Qi; Gao, Shenghan; Huang, Kai; Wu, Hui; Yao, Kefu

    2018-05-17

    An efficient and selective catalyst is in urgent need for carbon dioxide electroreduction and silver is one of the promising candidates with affordable costs. Here we fabricated large-scale vertically standing Ag nanowire arrays with high crystallinity and electrical conductivity as carbon dioxide electroreduction catalysts by a simple nanomolding method that was usually considered not feasible for metallic crystalline materials. A great enhancement of current densities and selectivity for CO at moderate potentials was achieved. The current density for CO ( j co ) of Ag nanowire array with 200 nm in diameter was more than 2500 times larger than that of Ag foil at an overpotential of 0.49 V with an efficiency over 90%. The origin of enhanced performances are attributed to greatly increased electrochemically active surface area (ECSA) and higher intrinsic activity compared to those of polycrystalline Ag foil. More low-coordinated sites on the nanowires which can stabilize the CO 2 intermediate better are responsible for the high intrinsic activity. In addition, the impact of surface morphology that induces limited mass transportation on reaction selectivity and efficiency of nanowire arrays with different diameters was also discussed.

  3. Development and Calibration of a Field-Deployable Microphone Phased Array for Propulsion and Airframe Noise Flyover Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Culliton, William G.; McSwain, Robert G.; Ravetta, Patricio A.; Johns, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    A new aeroacoustic measurement capability has been developed consisting of a large channelcount, field-deployable microphone phased array suitable for airframe noise flyover measurements for a range of aircraft types and scales. The array incorporates up to 185 hardened, weather-resistant sensors suitable for outdoor use. A custom 4-mA current loop receiver circuit with temperature compensation was developed to power the sensors over extended cable lengths with minimal degradation of the signal to noise ratio and frequency response. Extensive laboratory calibrations and environmental testing of the sensors were conducted to verify the design's performance specifications. A compact data system combining sensor power, signal conditioning, and digitization was assembled for use with the array. Complementing the data system is a robust analysis system capable of near real-time presentation of beamformed and deconvolved contour plots and integrated spectra obtained from array data acquired during flyover passes. Additional instrumentation systems needed to process the array data were also assembled. These include a commercial weather station and a video monitoring / recording system. A detailed mock-up of the instrumentation suite (phased array, weather station, and data processor) was performed in the NASA Langley Acoustic Development Laboratory to vet the system performance. The first deployment of the system occurred at Finnegan Airfield at Fort A.P. Hill where the array was utilized to measure the vehicle noise from a number of sUAS (small Unmanned Aerial System) aircraft. A unique in-situ calibration method for the array microphones using a hovering aerial sound source was attempted for the first time during the deployment.

  4. Selecting Sums in Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund

    2008-01-01

    In an array of n numbers each of the \\binomn2+nUnknown control sequence '\\binom' contiguous subarrays define a sum. In this paper we focus on algorithms for selecting and reporting maximal sums from an array of numbers. First, we consider the problem of reporting k subarrays inducing the k largest...... sums among all subarrays of length at least l and at most u. For this problem we design an optimal O(n + k) time algorithm. Secondly, we consider the problem of selecting a subarray storing the k’th largest sum. For this problem we prove a time bound of Θ(n · max {1,log(k/n)}) by describing...... an algorithm with this running time and by proving a matching lower bound. Finally, we combine the ideas and obtain an O(n· max {1,log(k/n)}) time algorithm that selects a subarray storing the k’th largest sum among all subarrays of length at least l and at most u....

  5. Real-time imaging systems for superconducting nanowire single-photon detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofherr, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Superconducting nanowire singe-photon detectors (SNSPD) are promising detectors in the field of applications, where single-photon resolution is required like in quantum optics, spectroscopy or astronomy. These cryogenic detectors gain from a broad spectrum in the optical and infrared range and deliver low dark counts and low jitter. This work provides a piece of deeper physical understanding of detector functionality in combination with highly engineered readout development. A detailed analysis focuses on the intrinsic detection mechanism of SNSPDs related to the detection in the infrared regime and the evolution of dark counts. With this fundamental knowledge, the next step is the development of a multi-pixel readout at cryogenic conditions. It is demonstrated, how two auspicious multi-pixel readout concepts can be realized, which enables statistical framing like in imaging applications using RSFQ electronics with fast framing rates and the readout of a detector array with continuous real-time single-photon resolution.

  6. Electronic correlations and disorder in transport through one-dimensional nanoparticle arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Bascones, E.; Estevez, V.; Trinidad, J. A.; MacDonald, A. H.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze and clarify the transport properties of a one-dimensional metallic nanoparticle array with interaction between charges restricted to charges placed in the same conductor. We study the threshold voltage, the I-V curves and the potential drop through the array and their dependence on the array parameters including the effect of charge and resistance disorder. We show that very close to threshold the current depends linearly on voltage with a slope independent on the array size. At in...

  7. Signal Processing for a Lunar Array: Minimizing Power Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addario, Larry; Simmons, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Motivation for the study is: (1) Lunar Radio Array for low frequency, high redshift Dark Ages/Epoch of Reionization observations (z =6-50, f=30-200 MHz) (2) High precision cosmological measurements of 21 cm H I line fluctuations (3) Probe universe before first star formation and provide information about the Intergalactic Medium and evolution of large scale structures (5) Does the current cosmological model accurately describe the Universe before reionization? Lunar Radio Array is for (1) Radio interferometer based on the far side of the moon (1a) Necessary for precision measurements, (1b) Shielding from earth-based and solar RFI (12) No permanent ionosphere, (2) Minimum collecting area of approximately 1 square km and brightness sensitivity 10 mK (3)Several technologies must be developed before deployment The power needed to process signals from a large array of nonsteerable elements is not prohibitive, even for the Moon, and even in current technology. Two different concepts have been proposed: (1) Dark Ages Radio Interferometer (DALI) (2)( Lunar Array for Radio Cosmology (LARC)

  8. Biasing, acquisition, and interpretation of a dense Langmuir probe array in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaworski, M. A.; Kallman, J.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Marsala, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Ruzic, D. N. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 60181 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    A dense array of 99 Langmuir probes has been installed in the lower divertor region of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). This array is instrumented with a system of electronics that allows flexibility in the choice of probes to bias as well as the type of measurement (including standard swept, single probe, triple probe, and operation as passive floating potential and scrape-off-layer SOL current monitors). The use of flush-mounted probes requires careful interpretation. The time dependent nature of the SOL makes swept-probe traces difficult to interpret. To overcome these challenges, the single- and triple-Langmuir probe signals are used in complementary fashion to determine the temperature and density at the probe location. A comparison to midplane measurements is made.

  9. Study on Millimeter-Wave Vivaldi Rectenna and Arrays with High Conversion Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Nan Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel Vivaldi rectenna operated at 35 GHz with high millimeter wave to direct current (MMW-to-DC conversion efficiency is presented and the arrays are investigated. The measured conversion efficiency is 51.6% at 35 GHz and the efficiency higher than 30% is from 33.2 GHz to 36.6 GHz when the input MMW power is 79.4 mW. The receiving Vivaldi antenna loaded with metamaterial units has a high gain of 10.4 dBi at 35 GHz. A SIW- (substrate integrated waveguide- to-microstrip transition is designed not only to integrate the antenna with the rectifying circuit directly but also to provide the DC bypass for the rectifying circuit. When the power density is 8.7 mW/cm2, the received MMW power of the antenna is 5.6 mW, and the maximum conversion efficiency of the rectenna element is 31.5%. The output DC voltage of the element is nearly the same as that of the parallel array and is about half of the series array. The DC power obtained by the 1 × 2 rectenna arrays is about two times as much as that of the element. The conversion efficiencies of the arrays are very close to that of the element. Large scale arrays could be expended for collecting more DC power.

  10. RAPID DETERMINATION OF FOCAL DEPTH USING A GLOBAL NETWORK OF SMALL-APERTURE SEISMIC ARRAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seats, K.; Koper, K.; Benz, H.

    2009-12-01

    The National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year with the mission of locating and characterizing seismic events around the world. A key component of this task is quickly determining the focal depth of each seismic event, which has a first-order effect on estimates of ground shaking used in the impact assessment applications of emergency response activities. Current methods of depth estimation used at the NEIC include arrival time inversion both with and without depth phases, a Bayesian depth constraint based on historical seismicity (1973-present), and moment tensor inversion primarily using P- and S-wave waveforms. In this study, we explore the possibility of automated modeling of waveforms from vertical-component arrays of the International Monitoring System (IMS) to improve rapid depth estimation at NEIC. Because these arrays are small-aperture, they are effective at increasing signal to noise ratios for frequencies of 1 Hz and higher. Currently, NEIC receives continuous real-time data from 23 IMS arrays. Following work done by previous researchers, we developed a technique that acts as an array of arrays. For a given epicentral location we calculate fourth root beams for each IMS array in the distance range of 30 to 95 degrees at the expected slowness vector of the first arrival. Because the IMS arrays are small-aperture, these beams highlight energy that has slowness similar to the first arrival, such as depth phases. The beams are rectified by taking the envelope and then automatically aligned on the largest peak within 5 seconds of the expected arrival time. The station beams are then combined into network beams assuming a range of depths varying from 10 km to 700 km in increments of 1 km. The network beams are computed assuming both pP and sP propagation, and a measure of beam power is output as a function of depth for both propagation models, as well as their sum. We

  11. Mapping and monitoring nuclear waste repositories with subsurface electrical resistivity arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asch, T.; Morrison, H.F.

    1987-01-01

    The siting and future integrity of nuclear waste repositories is critically dependent on the local ground water regime. Electrical methods seem particularly promising in mapping and monitoring this regime since the electrical conductivity of rocks depends almost entirely on the fluid saturation, salinity and distribution. The most important recent developments in resistivity include the use of numerical modeling and resistivity mapping using subsurface electrodes. The latter yields far greater accuracy and resolution than can be obtained with surface arrays. To illustrate the power of subsurface-surface arrays the authors studied an idealized two dimensional model of a nuclear repository. Since they are interested in emphasizing the anomaly caused by the repository, or subsequent changes over time in its vicinity, the authors discovered that it is very useful to express the apparent resistivity results as percentage differences from either the background (for surface arrays) or from the apparent resistivities observed at a particular depth of the current source (for subsurface arrays). Percent differencing with respect to data at the repository depth dramatically reduce near-surface and topographic effects that usually confound quantitative interpretation of surface surveys. Thus, dc resistivity appears to have great potential for nuclear waste repository mapping and monitoring

  12. Currents in the DIII-D Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azari, A.; Eidietis, N. W.

    2012-10-01

    Loss of vertical control of an elongated tokamak plasma results in a vertical displacement event (VDE) which can induce large currents on open field lines and exert high JxB forces on in-vessel components. An array of first-wall tile current monitors on DIII-D provides direct measurement of the poloidal halo currents. These measurements are analyzed to create a database of halo current magnitude and asymmetry, which are found to lie within the ranges seen by numerous other tokamaks in the ITPA Disruption Database. In addition, an analysis of halo asymmetry rotation is presented, as rotation at the resonance frequencies of in-vessel components could lead to significant amplification of the halo forces. Halo current rotation is found to be far more prevalent in old (1997-2002) DIII-D halo current data than recent data (2009), perhaps due to a change in divertor geometry over that time.

  13. Performance measurements of hybrid PIN diode arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jernigan, J.G.; Arens, J.F.; Collins, T.; Herring, J.; Shapiro, S.L.; Wilburn, C.D.

    1990-05-01

    We report on the successful effort to develop hybrid PIN diode arrays and to demonstrate their potential as components of vertex detectors. Hybrid pixel arrays have been fabricated by the Hughes Aircraft Co. by bump bonding readout chips developed by Hughes to an array of PIN diodes manufactured by Micron Semiconductor Inc. These hybrid pixel arrays were constructed in two configurations. One array format having 10 x 64 pixels, each 120 μm square, and the other format having 256 x 256 pixels, each 30 μm square. In both cases, the thickness of the PIN diode layer is 300 μm. Measurements of detector performance show that excellent position resolution can be achieved by interpolation. By determining the centroid of the charge cloud which spreads charge into a number of neighboring pixels, a spatial resolution of a few microns has been attained. The noise has been measured to be about 300 electrons (rms) at room temperature, as expected from KTC and dark current considerations, yielding a signal-to-noise ratio of about 100 for minimum ionizing particles. 4 refs., 13 figs

  14. Tilted hexagonal post arrays: DNA electrophoresis in anisotropic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Dorfman, Kevin D

    2014-02-01

    Using Brownian dynamics simulations, we show that DNA electrophoresis in a hexagonal array of micron-sized posts changes qualitatively when the applied electric field vector is not coincident with the lattice vectors of the array. DNA electrophoresis in such "tilted" post arrays is superior to the standard "un-tilted" approach; while the time required to achieve a resolution of unity in a tilted post array is similar to an un-tilted array at a low-electric field strengths, this time (i) decreases exponentially with electric field strength in a tilted array and (ii) increases exponentially with electric field strength in an un-tilted array. Although the DNA dynamics in a post array are complicated, the electrophoretic mobility results indicate that the "free path," i.e. the average distance of ballistic trajectories of point-sized particles launched from random positions in the unit cell until they intersect the next post, is a useful proxy for the detailed DNA trajectories. The analysis of the free path reveals a fundamental connection between anisotropy of the medium and DNA transport therein that goes beyond simply improving the separation device. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. X-ray detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The object of the invention (an ionization chamber X-ray detector array for use with high speed computerised tomographic imaging apparatus) is to reduce the time required to produce a tomographic image. The detector array described determines the distribution of X-ray intensities in one or more flat, coplanar X-ray beams. It comprises three flat anode sheets parallel to the X-ray beam, a plurality of rod-like cathodes between the anodes, a detector gas between the electrodes and a means for applying a potential between the electrodes. Each of the X-ray sources is collimated to give a narrow, planar section of X-ray photons. Sets of X-ray sources in the array are pulsed simultaneously to obtain X-ray transmission data for tomographic image reconstruction. (U.K.)

  16. Protein kinase substrate identification on functional protein arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Fang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decade, kinases have emerged as attractive therapeutic targets for a number of different diseases, and numerous high throughput screening efforts in the pharmaceutical community are directed towards discovery of compounds that regulate kinase function. The emerging utility of systems biology approaches has necessitated the development of multiplex tools suitable for proteomic-scale experiments to replace lower throughput technologies such as mass spectroscopy for the study of protein phosphorylation. Recently, a new approach for identifying substrates of protein kinases has applied the miniaturized format of functional protein arrays to characterize phosphorylation for thousands of candidate protein substrates in a single experiment. This method involves the addition of protein kinases in solution to arrays of immobilized proteins to identify substrates using highly sensitive radioactive detection and hit identification algorithms. Results To date, the factors required for optimal performance of protein array-based kinase substrate identification have not been described. In the current study, we have carried out a detailed characterization of the protein array-based method for kinase substrate identification, including an examination of the effects of time, buffer compositions, and protein concentration on the results. The protein array approach was compared to standard solution-based assays for assessing substrate phosphorylation, and a correlation of greater than 80% was observed. The results presented here demonstrate how novel substrates for protein kinases can be quickly identified from arrays containing thousands of human proteins to provide new clues to protein kinase function. In addition, a pooling-deconvolution strategy was developed and applied that enhances characterization of specific kinase-substrate relationships and decreases reagent consumption. Conclusion Functional protein microarrays are an

  17. Field emission properties of ZnO nanosheet arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naik, Kusha Kumar; Rout, Chandra Sekhar; Khare, Ruchita; More, Mahendra A.; Chakravarty, Disha; Late, Dattatray J.; Thapa, Ranjit

    2014-01-01

    Electron emission properties of electrodeposited ZnO nanosheet arrays grown on Indium tin oxide coated glass substrates have been studied. Influence of oxygen vacancies on electronic structures and field emission properties of ZnO nanosheets are investigated using density functional theory. The oxygen vacancies produce unshared d electrons which form an impurity energy state; this causes shifting of Fermi level towards the vacuum, and so the barrier energy for electron extraction reduces. The ZnO nanosheet arrays exhibit a low turn-on field of 2.4 V/μm at 0.1 μA/cm 2 and current density of 50.1 μA/cm 2 at an applied field of 6.4 V/μm with field enhancement factor, β = 5812 and good field emission current stability. The nanosheet arrays grown by a facile electrodeposition process have great potential as robust high performance vertical structure electron emitters for future flat panel displays and vacuum electronic device applications

  18. Update-in-Place Analysis for True Multidimensional Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Fitzgerald

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Applicative languages have been proposed for defining algorithms for parallel architectures because they are implicitly parallel and lack side effects. However, straightforward implementations of applicative-language compilers may induce large amounts of copying to preserve program semantics. The unnecessary copying of data can increase both the execution time and the memory requirements of an application. To eliminate the unnecessary copying of data, the Sisal compiler uses both build-in-place and update-in-place analyses. These optimizations remove unnecessary array copy operations through compile-time analysis. Both build-in-place and update-in-place are based on hierarchical ragged arrays, i.e., the vector-of-vectors array model. Although this array model is convenient for certain applications, many optimizations are precluded, e.g., vectorization. To compensate for this deficiency, new languages, such as Sisal 2.0, have extended array models that allow for both high-level array operations to be performed and efficient implementations to be devised. In this article, we introduce a new method to perform update-in-place analysis that is applicable to arrays stored either in hierarchical or in contiguous storage. Consequently, the array model that is appropriate for an application can be selected without the loss of performance. Moreover, our analysis is more amenable for distributed memory and large software systems.

  19. Performance Analysis of Digital loudspeaker Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bo Rohde; Kontomichos, Fotios; Mourjopoulos, John

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of digital loudspeaker arrays shows that the ways in which bits are mapped to the drivers influence the quality of the audio result. Specifically, a "bit-summed" rather than the traditional "bit-mapped" strategy greatly reduces the number of times drivers make binary transitions per...... period of the input frequency. Detailed simulations compare the results for a 32-loudspeaker array with a similar configuration with analog excitation of the drivers. Ideally, drivers in digital arrays should be very small and span a small area, but that sets limits on the low-frequency response...

  20. Evaluation of Methods for In-Situ Calibration of Field-Deployable Microphone Phased Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M.; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Culliton, William G.; McSwain, Robert G.

    2017-01-01

    Current field-deployable microphone phased arrays for aeroacoustic flight testing require the placement of hundreds of individual sensors over a large area. Depending on the duration of the test campaign, the microphones may be required to stay deployed at the testing site for weeks or even months. This presents a challenge in regards to tracking the response (i.e., sensitivity) of the individual sensors as a function of time in order to evaluate the health of the array. To address this challenge, two different methods for in-situ tracking of microphone responses are described. The first relies on the use of an aerial sound source attached as a payload on a hovering small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS) vehicle. The second relies on the use of individually excited ground-based sound sources strategically placed throughout the array pattern. Testing of the two methods was performed in microphone array deployments conducted at Fort A.P. Hill in 2015 and at Edwards Air Force Base in 2016. The results indicate that the drift in individual sensor responses can be tracked reasonably well using both methods. Thus, in-situ response tracking methods are useful as a diagnostic tool for monitoring the health of a phased array during long duration deployments.

  1. Cold plasma decontamination using flexible jet arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konesky, Gregory

    2010-04-01

    Arrays of atmospheric discharge cold plasma jets have been used to decontaminate surfaces of a wide range of microorganisms quickly, yet not damage that surface. Its effectiveness in decomposing simulated chemical warfare agents has also been demonstrated, and may also find use in assisting in the cleanup of radiological weapons. Large area jet arrays, with short dwell times, are necessary for practical applications. Realistic situations will also require jet arrays that are flexible to adapt to contoured or irregular surfaces. Various large area jet array prototypes, both planar and flexible, are described, as is the application to atmospheric decontamination.

  2. Radiation Resistance and Gain of Homogeneous Ring Quasi-Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, H. L.

    1954-01-01

    In a previous paper homogeneous ring quasi-arrays of tangential or radial dipoles were introduced, i.e. systems of dipoles arranged equidistantly along a circle, the dipoles being oriented in tangential or radial directions and carrying currents with the same amplitude, but with a phase that incr......In a previous paper homogeneous ring quasi-arrays of tangential or radial dipoles were introduced, i.e. systems of dipoles arranged equidistantly along a circle, the dipoles being oriented in tangential or radial directions and carrying currents with the same amplitude, but with a phase...... that increases uniformly along the circle. Such quasi-arrays are azimuthally omnidirectional, and the radiated field will be mainly horizontally polarized and concentrated around the plane of the circle. In this paper expressions are obtained for the radiation resistance and the gain of homogeneous ring quasi...

  3. Design of Hybrid Nanostructural Arrays to Manipulate SERS-Active Substrates by Nanosphere Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoyu; Wen, Jiahong; Zhang, Mengning; Wang, Dunhui; Wang, Yaxin; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Yongjun; Yang, Jinghai; Du, Youwei

    2017-03-01

    An easy-handling and low-cost method is utilized to controllably fabricate nanopattern arrays as the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) active substrates with high density of SERS-active areas (hot spots). A hybrid silver array of nanocaps and nanotriangles are prepared by combining magnetron sputtering and plasma etching. By adjusting the etching time of polystyrene (PS) colloid spheres array in silver nanobowls, the morphology of the arrays can be easily manipulated to control the formation and distribution of hot spots. The experimental results show that the hybrid nanostructural arrays have large enhancement factor, which is estimated to be seven times larger than that in the array of nanocaps and three times larger than that in the array of nanorings and nanoparticles. According to the results of finite-difference time-domain simulation, the excellent SERS performance of this array is ascribed to the high density of hot spots and enhanced electromagnetic field.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of Mn-doped ZnO column arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Mei; Guo Zhixing; Qiu Kehui; Long Jianping; Yin Guangfu; Guan Denggao; Liu Sutian; Zhou Shijie

    2010-01-01

    Mn-doped ZnO column arrays were successfully synthesized by conventional sol-gel process. Effect of Mn/Zn atomic ratio and reaction time were investigated, and the morphology, tropism and optical properties of Mn-doped ZnO column arrays were characterized by SEM, XRD and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The result shows that a Mn/Zn atomic ratio of 0.1 and growth time of 12 h are the optimal condition for the preparation of densely distributed ZnO column arrays. XRD analysis shows that Mn-doped ZnO column arrays are highly c-axis oriented. As for Mn-doped ZnO column arrays, obvious increase of photoluminescence intensity is observed at the wavelength of ∼395 nm and ∼413 nm, compared to pure ZnO column arrays.

  5. MUSIC: An 8 channel readout ASIC for SiPM arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Sergio; Gascón, David; Fernández, Gerard; Sanuy, Andreu; Mauricio, Joan; Graciani, Ricardo; Sanchez, David

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an 8 channel ASIC for SiPM anode readout based on a novel low input impedance current conveyor (under patent1). This Multiple Use SiPM Integrated Circuit (MUSIC) has been designed to serve several purposes, including, for instance, the readout of SiPM arrays for some of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) cameras. The current division scheme at the very front end part of the circuit splits the input current into differently scaled copies which are connected to independent current mirrors. The circuit contains a tunable pole zero cancellation of the SiPM recovery time constant to deal with sensors from different manufacturers. Decay times up to 100 ns are supported covering most of the available SiPM devices in the market. MUSIC offers three main features: (1) differential output of the sum of the individual input channels; (2) 8 individual single ended analog outputs and; (3) 8 individual binary outputs. The digital outputs encode the amount of collected charge in the duration of the digital signal using a time over threshold technique. For each individual channel, the user must select the analog or digital output. Each functionality, the signal sum and the 8 A/D outputs, include a selectable dual-gain configuration. Moreover, the signal sum implements dual-gain output providing a 15 bit dynamic range. Full die simulation results of the MUSIC designed using AMS 0.35 µm SiGe technology are presented: total die size of 9 mm2, 500 MHz bandwidth for channel sum and 150 MHz bandwidth for A/D channels, low input impedance (≍32 Ω), single photon output pulse width at half maximum (FWHM) between 5 and 10 ns and with a power consumption of ≍ 30 mW/ch plus ≍ 200 mW for the 8 ch sum. Encapsulated prototype samples of the MUSIC are expected by March 2016.

  6. Study of Plasma Flow Modes in Imploding Nested Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrofanov, K. N.; Aleksandrov, V. V.; Gritsuk, A. N.; Branitsky, A. V.; Frolov, I. N.; Grabovski, E. V.; Sasorov, P. V.; Ol'khovskaya, O. G.; Zaitsev, V. I.

    2018-02-01

    Results from experimental studies of implosion of nested wire and fiber arrays at currents of up to 4 MA at the Angara-5-1 facility are presented. Depending on the ratio between the radii of the inner and outer arrays, different modes of the plasma flow in the space between the inner and outer arrays were implemented: the sub-Alfvénic ( V r V A ) modes and a mode with the formation of the transition shock wave (SW) region between the cascades. By varying the material of the outer array (tungsten wires or kapron fibers), it is shown that the plasma flow mode between the inner and outer arrays depends on the ratio between the plasma production rates ṁ in / ṁ out in the inner and outer arrays. The obtained experimental results are compared with the results of one-dimensional MHD simulation of the plasma flow between the arrays. Stable implosion of the inner array plasma was observed in experiments with combined nested arrays consisting of a fiber outer array and a tungsten inner array. The growth rates of magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability in the inner array plasma at different numbers of fibers in the outer array and different ratios between the radii of the inner and outer arrays are compared. Suppression of MRT instability during the implosion of the inner array plasma results in the formation of a stable compact Z-pinch and generation of a soft X-ray pulse. A possible scenario of interaction between the plasmas of the inner and outer arrays is offered. The stability of the inner array plasma in the stage of final compression depends on the character of interaction of plasma jets from the outer array with the magnetic field of the inner array.

  7. Time-dependent transport of a localized surface plasmon through a linear array of metal nanoparticles: Precursor and normal mode contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compaijen, P. J.; Malyshev, V. A.; Knoester, J.

    2018-02-01

    We theoretically investigate the time-dependent transport of a localized surface plasmon excitation through a linear array of identical and equidistantly spaced metal nanoparticles. Two different signals propagating through the array are found: one traveling with the group velocity of the surface plasmon polaritons of the system and damped exponentially, and the other running with the speed of light and decaying in a power-law fashion, as x-1 and x-2 for the transversal and longitudinal polarizations, respectively. The latter resembles the Sommerfeld-Brillouin forerunner and has not been identified in previous studies. The contribution of this signal dominates the plasmon transport at large distances. In addition, even though this signal is spread in the propagation direction and has the lateral dimension larger than the wavelength, the field profile close to the chain axis does not change with distance, indicating that this part of the signal is confined to the array.

  8. Langevin dynamics simulations of large frustrated Josephson junction arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groenbech-Jensen, N.; Bishop, A.R.; Lomdahl, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    Long-time Langevin dynamics simulations of large (N x N,N = 128) 2-dimensional arrays of Josephson junctions in a uniformly frustrating external magnetic field are reported. The results demonstrate: (1) Relaxation from an initially random flux configuration as a universal fit to a glassy stretched-exponential type of relaxation for the intermediate temperatures T(0.3 T c approx-lt T approx-lt 0.7 T c ), and an activated dynamic behavior for T ∼ T c ; (2) a glassy (multi-time, multi-length scale) voltage response to an applied current. Intrinsic dynamical symmetry breaking induced by boundaries as nucleation sites for flux lattice defects gives rise to transverse and noisy voltage response

  9. Langevin dynamics simulations of large frustrated Josephson junction arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronbech-Jensen, N.; Bishop, A.R.; Lomdahl, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    Long-time Langevin dynamics simulations of large (N x N, N = 128) 2-dimensional arrays of Josephson junctions in a uniformly frustrating external magnetic field are reported. The results demonstrate: Relaxation from an initially random flux configuration as a ''universal'' fit to a ''glassy'' stretched-exponential type of relaxation for the intermediate temperatures T (0.3 T c approx-lt T approx-lt 0.7 T c ), and an ''activated dynamic'' behavior for T ∼ T c A glassy (multi-time, multi-length scale) voltage response to an applied current. Intrinsic dynamical symmetry breaking induced by boundaries as nucleation sites for flux lattice defects gives rise to transverse and noisy voltage response

  10. Focal plane array with modular pixel array components for scalability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Randolph R; Campbell, David V; Shinde, Subhash L; Rienstra, Jeffrey L; Serkland, Darwin K; Holmes, Michael L

    2014-12-09

    A modular, scalable focal plane array is provided as an array of integrated circuit dice, wherein each die includes a given amount of modular pixel array circuitry. The array of dice effectively multiplies the amount of modular pixel array circuitry to produce a larger pixel array without increasing die size. Desired pixel pitch across the enlarged pixel array is preserved by forming die stacks with each pixel array circuitry die stacked on a separate die that contains the corresponding signal processing circuitry. Techniques for die stack interconnections and die stack placement are implemented to ensure that the desired pixel pitch is preserved across the enlarged pixel array.

  11. Icon arrays help younger children's proportional reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Azzurra; Vagharchakian, Laurianne; Xu, Fei

    2018-06-01

    We investigated the effects of two context variables, presentation format (icon arrays or numerical frequencies) and time limitation (limited or unlimited time), on the proportional reasoning abilities of children aged 7 and 10 years, as well as adults. Participants had to select, between two sets of tokens, the one that offered the highest likelihood of drawing a gold token, that is, the set of elements with the greater proportion of gold tokens. Results show that participants performed better in the unlimited time condition. Moreover, besides a general developmental improvement in accuracy, our results show that younger children performed better when proportions were presented as icon arrays, whereas older children and adults were similarly accurate in the two presentation format conditions. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? There is a developmental improvement in proportional reasoning accuracy. Icon arrays facilitate reasoning in adults with low numeracy. What does this study add? Participants were more accurate when they were given more time to make the proportional judgement. Younger children's proportional reasoning was more accurate when they were presented with icon arrays. Proportional reasoning abilities correlate with working memory, approximate number system, and subitizing skills. © 2018 The British Psychological Society.

  12. Formic Acid Electrooxidation by a Platinum Nanotubule Array Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Broaddus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional metallic nanostructures such as nanowires, rods, and tubes have drawn much attention for electrocatalytic applications due to potential advantages that include fewer diffusion impeding interfaces with polymeric binders, more facile pathways for electron transfer, and more effective exposure of active surface sites. 1D nanostructured electrodes have been fabricated using a variety of methods, typically showing improved current response which has been attributed to improved CO tolerance, enhanced surface activity, and/or improved transport characteristics. A template wetting approach was used to fabricate an array of platinum nanotubules which were examined electrochemically with regard to the electrooxidation of formic acid. Arrays of 100 and 200 nm nanotubules were compared to a traditional platinum black catalyst, all of which were found to have similar surface areas. Peak formic acid oxidation current was observed to be highest for the 100 nm nanotubule array, followed by the 200 nm array and the Pt black; however, CO tolerance of all electrodes was similar, as were the onset potentials of the oxidation and reduction peaks. The higher current response was attributed to enhanced mass transfer in the nanotubule electrodes, likely due to a combination of both the more open nanostructure as well as the lack of a polymeric binder in the catalyst layer.

  13. Cryogen-free cryostat for large-scale arrays of superconducting tunnel junction ion detectors in time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushino, A.; Ohkubo, M.; Chen, Y. E.; Ukibe, M.; Kasai, S.; Fujioka, K.

    2006-04-01

    Nb-based superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors have a fast time resolution of a few 100 ns and high operating temperature of 0.3 K. These advantages expand their applicable fields to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). In order to enlarge effective detection area, we have built arrays based on hundreds of large STJ elements. To realize the fast readout and no-cross talk, coaxial cables made of low-thermal conductivity materials were investigated. From results of thermal conduction measurements, we chose thin coaxial cables with a diameter of 0.33 mm, consisting of CuNi center/outer conductors and Teflon insulator for the wiring between 0.3 K- 3He pot of the sorption pump and 3 K-2nd stage of GM cooler. Even after the installation of coaxial cables and a cold snout to the cryogen-free cryostat, we could keep arrays at 0.3 K for about a week, and reduction of the holding time at 0.3 K and temperature rise at 3He pot due to the installation were small, ˜0.5 day and 10 mK, respectively.

  14. Automated Non-Destructive Testing Array Evaluation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, T.; Zavaljevski, N.; Bakhtiari, S.; Miron, A.; Jupperman, D.

    2004-12-31

    Utilities perform eddy current tests on nuclear power plant steam generator (SG) tubes to detect degradation. This report summarizes the status of ongoing research to develop signal processing algorithms that automate analysis of eddy current test data. The research focuses on analyzing array probe data for detecting, classifying, and characterizing degradation in SG tubes.

  15. Automated Non-Destructive Testing Array Evaluation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, T.; Zavaljevski, N.; Bakhtiari, S.; Miron, A.; Kupperman, D.

    2004-01-01

    Utilities perform eddy current tests on nuclear power plant steam generator (SG) tubes to detect degradation. This report summarizes the status of ongoing research to develop signal processing algorithms that automate analysis of eddy current test data. The research focuses on analyzing array probe data for detecting, classifying, and characterizing degradation in SG tubes

  16. Self-Positioned Nanosized Mask for Transparent and Flexible Ferroelectric Polymer Nanodiodes Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Seung; Kwon, Owoong; Choi, Chungryong; Vincent Joseph, Kanniyambatti L; Kim, Yunseok; Kim, Jin Kon

    2016-10-12

    High density arrays of ferroelectric polymer nanodiodes have gained strong attention for next-generation transparent and flexible nonvolatile resistive memory. Here, we introduce a facile and innovative method to fabricate ferroelectric polymer nanodiode array on an ITO-coated poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrate by using block copolymer self-assembly and oxygen plasma etching. First, polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) copolymer (PS-b-P2VP) micelles were spin-coated on poly(vinylidene fluoride-ran-trifluoroethylene) copolymer (P(VDF-TrFE)) film/ITO-coated PET substrate. After the sample was immersed in a gold precursor (HAuCl 4 ) containing solution, which strongly coordinates with nitrogen group in P2VP, oxygen plasma etching was performed. During the plasma etching, coordinated gold precursors became gold nanoparticles (GNPs), which successfully acted as self-positioned etching mask to fabricate a high density array of P(VDF-TrFE)) nanoislands with GNP at the top. Each nanoisland shows clearly individual diode property, as confirmed by current-voltage (I-V) curve. Furthermore, due to the transparent and flexible nature of P(VDF-TrFE)) nanoisland as well as the substrate, the P(VDF-TrFE) nanodiode array was highly tranparent, and the diode property was maintained even after a large number of bendings (for instance, 1000 times). The array could be used as the next-generation tranparent and flexible nonvolatile memory device.

  17. Primary experimental results of wire-array Z-pinches on PTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, X. B., E-mail: caephxb2003@aliyun.com; Zhou, S. T., E-mail: caephxb2003@aliyun.com; Ren, X. D., E-mail: caephxb2003@aliyun.com; Dan, J. K., E-mail: caephxb2003@aliyun.com; Wang, K. L., E-mail: caephxb2003@aliyun.com; Zhang, S. Q., E-mail: caephxb2003@aliyun.com; Li, J., E-mail: caephxb2003@aliyun.com; Xu, Q., E-mail: caephxb2003@aliyun.com; Cai, H. C., E-mail: caephxb2003@aliyun.com; Duan, S. C., E-mail: caephxb2003@aliyun.com; Ouyang, K., E-mail: caephxb2003@aliyun.com; Chen, G. H., E-mail: caephxb2003@aliyun.com; Ji, C., E-mail: caephxb2003@aliyun.com; Wang, M., E-mail: caephxb2003@aliyun.com; Feng, S. P., E-mail: caephxb2003@aliyun.com; Yang, L. B., E-mail: caephxb2003@aliyun.com; Xie, W. P., E-mail: caephxb2003@aliyun.com; Deng, J. J., E-mail: caephxb2003@aliyun.com [Key Lab of Pulsed Power, Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, P.O. Box 919-108, Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China)

    2014-12-15

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a multiterawatt pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ∼10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%-90%) current to a short circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. In this paper, primary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 14.4-26.4 mm, and consisting of 132∼276 tungsten wires with 5∼10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to determine the characteristics of x-ray radiations and to obtain self-emitting images of imploding plasmas. X-ray power up to 80 TW with ∼3 ns FWMH is achieved by using nested wire arrays. The total x-ray energy exceeds 500 kJ and the peak radiation temperature is about 150 eV. Typical velocity of imploding plasmas goes around 3∼5×10{sup 7} cm/s and the radial convergence ratio is between 10 and 20.

  18. CRISPR-Cas9 directed knock-out of a constitutively expressed gene using lance array nanoinjection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, John W; Skousen, Craig S; Price, Kevin D; Hanks, Brad W; Hope, Sandra; Alder, Jonathan K; Jensen, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing and labeling has emerged as an important tool in biologic research, particularly in regards to potential transgenic and gene therapy applications. Delivery of CRISPR-Cas9 plasmids to target cells is typically done by non-viral methods (chemical, physical, and/or electrical), which are limited by low transfection efficiencies or with viral vectors, which are limited by safety and restricted volume size. In this work, a non-viral transfection technology, named lance array nanoinjection (LAN), utilizes a microfabricated silicon chip to physically and electrically deliver genetic material to large numbers of target cells. To demonstrate its utility, we used the CRISPR-Cas9 system to edit the genome of isogenic cells. Two variables related to the LAN process were tested which include the magnitude of current used during plasmid attraction to the silicon lance array (1.5, 4.5, or 6.0 mA) and the number of times cells were injected (one or three times). Results indicate that most successful genome editing occurred after injecting three times at a current control setting of 4.5 mA, reaching a median level of 93.77 % modification. Furthermore, we found that genome editing using LAN follows a non-linear injection-dose response, meaning samples injected three times had modification rates as high as nearly 12 times analogously treated single injected samples. These findings demonstrate the LAN's ability to deliver genetic material to cells and indicate that successful alteration of the genome is influenced by a serial injection method as well as the electrical current settings.

  19. Characteristic time for halo current growth and rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boozer, Allen H., E-mail: ahb17@columbia.edu [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    A halo current flows for part of its path through the plasma edge and for part through the chamber walls and during tokamak disruptions can be as large as tenths of the plasma current. The primary interest in halo currents is the large force that they can exert on machine components particularly if the toriodal rotation of the halo current resonates with a natural oscillation frequency of the tokamak device. Halo currents arise when required to slow down the growth of a kink that is too unstable to be stabilized by the chamber walls. The width of the current channel in the halo plasma is comparable to the amplitude of the kink, and the halo current grows linearly, not exponentially, in time. The current density in the halo is comparable to that of the main plasma body. The rocket force due to plasma flowing out of the halo and recombining on the chamber walls can cause the non-axisymmetric magnetic structure produced by the kink to rotate toroidally at a speed comparable to the halo speed of sound. Gerhardt's observations of the halo current in NSTX shot 141 687 [Nucl. Fusion 53, 023005 (2013)] illustrate many features of the theory of halo currents and are discussed as a summary of the theory.

  20. Frequency Diverse Array Radar Signal Processing via Space-Range-Doppler Focus (SRDF Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiaolong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available To meet the urgent demand of low-observable moving target detection in complex environments, a novel method of Frequency Diverse Array (FDA radar signal processing method based on Space-Rang-Doppler Focusing (SRDF is proposed in this paper. The current development status of the FDA radar, the design of the array structure, beamforming, and joint estimation of distance and angle are systematically reviewed. The extra degrees of freedom provided by FDA radar are fully utilizsed, which include the Degrees Of Freedom (DOFs of the transmitted waveform, the location of array elements, correlation of beam azimuth and distance, and the long dwell time, which are also the DOFs in joint spatial (angle, distance, and frequency (Doppler dimensions. Simulation results show that the proposed method has the potential of improving target detection and parameter estimation for weak moving targets in complex environments and has broad application prospects in clutter and interference suppression, moving target refinement, etc..

  1. Trimodal nanoelectrode array for precise deep brain stimulation: prospects of a new technology based on carbon nanofiber arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Andrews, R J

    2007-01-01

    Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) has recently been shown to be effective for neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, there are many limitations of the current technology: the large size of current microelectrodes (approximately 1 mm diameter); the lack of monitoring of local brain electrical activity and neurotransmitters (e.g. dopamine in Parkinson's disease); the open-loop nature of the stimulation (i.e. not guided by brain electrochemical activity). Reducing the size of the monitoring and stimulating electrodes by orders of magnitude (to the size of neural elements) allows remarkable improvements in both monitoring (spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and sensitivity) and stimulation. Carbon nanofiber nanoelectrode technology offers the possibility of trimodal arrays (monitoring electrical activity, monitoring neurotransmitter levels, precise stimulation). DBS can then be guided by changes in brain electrical activity and/or neurotransmitter levels (i.e. closed-loop DBS). Here, we describe the basic manufacture and electrical characteristics of a prototype nanoelectrode array for DBS, as well as preliminary studies with electroconductive polymers necessary to optimize DBS in vivo. An approach such as the nanoelectrode array described here may offer a generic electrical-neural interface for use in various neural prostheses.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of ZnO nanowires array electrodes with high photocurrent densities: Effects of the seed layer calcination time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yi-Jing; Liu, Ching-Fang; Hu, Chi-Chang, E-mail: cchu@che.nthu.edu.tw; Kuo, Jen-Hou; Boddula, Rajender

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that vertically grown ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays of the wurzite phase were successfully fabricated on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates via a hydrothermal method. The coating of a seed layer onto the FTO substrates was found to favor the growth of a uniform ZnO NWs array which shows saturation in the photocurrent density with a relatively low potential bias. Furthermore, prolonging the calcination time of the seed layer makes the ZnO NWs behave the better charge separation and improve the photo-electrochemical performance. Under the irradiation at a 75 mW cm{sup −2} from a simulated sunlight source, the ZnO NWs array electrode prepared from the seed layer with calcination at 350 °C for 5 h shows a saturated photocurrent density of 514 μA cm{sup −2} and a maximum half-cell solar-to-hydrogen (HC-STH) efficiency of 0.26% was obtained at 0.6 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) in neutral electrolyte. - Highlights: • The seed layer annealing time strongly influences the textural and photo-activity of ZnO NWs. • The average diameter and density of ZnO NWs were controlled to 47–70 nm and 46–70 NWs μm{sup −2}, respectively. • ZnO NWs show promising application potential in solar-electrocatalytic water splitting under potential bias. • The ZnO NWs with SL annealing time = 5 h achieve the highest HC-STH efficiency of 0.26% at 0.6 V.

  3. COHERENT NETWORK ANALYSIS FOR CONTINUOUS GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNALS IN A PULSAR TIMING ARRAY: PULSAR PHASES AS EXTRINSIC PARAMETERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yan [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurements, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430074 (China); Mohanty, Soumya D.; Jenet, Fredrick A., E-mail: ywang12@hust.edu.cn [Department of Physics, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, 1 West University Boulevard, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States)

    2015-12-20

    Supermassive black hole binaries are one of the primary targets of gravitational wave (GW) searches using pulsar timing arrays (PTAs). GW signals from such systems are well represented by parameterized models, allowing the standard Generalized Likelihood Ratio Test (GLRT) to be used for their detection and estimation. However, there is a dichotomy in how the GLRT can be implemented for PTAs: there are two possible ways in which one can split the set of signal parameters for semi-analytical and numerical extremization. The straightforward extension of the method used for continuous signals in ground-based GW searches, where the so-called pulsar phase parameters are maximized numerically, was addressed in an earlier paper. In this paper, we report the first study of the performance of the second approach where the pulsar phases are maximized semi-analytically. This approach is scalable since the number of parameters left over for numerical optimization does not depend on the size of the PTA. Our results show that for the same array size (9 pulsars), the new method performs somewhat worse in parameter estimation, but not in detection, than the previous method where the pulsar phases were maximized numerically. The origin of the performance discrepancy is likely to be in the ill-posedness that is intrinsic to any network analysis method. However, the scalability of the new method allows the ill-posedness to be mitigated by simply adding more pulsars to the array. This is shown explicitly by taking a larger array of pulsars.

  4. Measurement of blockage in deformed LWR multi-rod arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.; Jones, C.; Whitty, S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper critically reviews the current methods used for measuring blockage in multi-rod arrays and discusses their application. A new definition which overcomes the deficiencies of the previous methods is proposed. Also examples of the application of automatic computerised techniques to directly measure rod strain, blockage, sub-channel blockage and perimeter changes from photographs of sections through deformed arrays are presented. (author)

  5. Current noise in a vibrating quantum dot array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flindt, Christian; Novotny, Tomas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2004-01-01

    of extensive numerical calculations for current and current noise (Fano factor), based on a solution of a Markovian generalized master equation. The results for the current and noise are further analyzed in terms of Wigner functions, which help to distinguish different transport regimes (in particular......, shuttling versus cotunneling). In the case of weak interdot coupling, the electron transport proceeds via sequential tunneling between neighboring dots. A simple rate equation with the rates calculated analytically from the P(E) theory is developed and shown to agree with the full numerics....

  6. Study and operating conditions of HTS Josephson arrays for metrological application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosso, A.; Lacquaniti, V.; Andreone, D.; Cerri, R.; Klushin, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    We report an experimental study of metrological properties of high-temperature superconductor arrays, made of shunted bicrystal YBCO Josephson junctions. The work is mainly based on a direct comparison against a low temperature array. Owing to the high sensitivity of the measurements, we observed at nanovolt level the changes in the HTS array voltage on a step. A precise estimate of the dependence of the HTS array step width on operating conditions was obtained. Differences were observed with respect to the results of low sensitivity techniques, confirming that our method is necessary in the study of HTS arrays for metrology. The high sensitivity analysis was also applied in the derivation of the temperature dependence of the critical current, providing insights on the behavior of the HTS array

  7. Maximum power point tracking for PV systems under partial shading conditions using current sweeping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, K.M.; Chan, W.L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel approach for tracking the maximum power point of photovoltaic systems. • Able to handle both the uniform insolation and partial shading conditions. • Maximum power point tracking based on current sweeping. - Abstract: Partial shading on photovoltaic (PV) arrays causes multiple peaks on the output power–voltage characteristic curve and local searching technique such as perturb and observe (P&O) method could easily fail in searching for the global maximum. Moreover, existing global searching techniques are still not very satisfactory in terms of speed and implementation complexity. In this paper, a fast global maximum power point (MPPT) tracking method which is using current sweeping for photovoltaic arrays under partial shading conditions is proposed. Unlike conventional approach, the proposed method is current based rather than voltage based. The initial maximum power point will be derived based on a current sweeping test and the maximum power point can be enhanced by a finer local search. The speed of the global search is mainly governed by the apparent time constant of the PV array and the generation of a fast current sweeping test. The fast current sweeping test can easily be realized by a DC/DC boost converter with a very fast current control loop. Experimental results are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed global searching scheme

  8. Piezo-Phototronic Enhanced UV Sensing Based on a Nanowire Photodetector Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xun; Du, Weiming; Yu, Ruomeng; Pan, Caofeng; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-12-22

    A large array of Schottky UV photodetectors (PDs) based on vertical aligned ZnO nanowires is achieved. By introducing the piezo-phototronic effect, the performance of the PD array is enhanced up to seven times in photoreponsivity, six times in sensitivity, and 2.8 times in detection limit. The UV PD array may have applications in optoelectronic systems, adaptive optical computing, and communication. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Experiments on pumping of liquids using arrays of microelectrodes subjected to travelling wave potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Sanchez, P; Ramos, A [Dpto. de Electronica y Electromagnetismo, Universidad de Sevilla, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Green, Nicolas G; Morgan, H [School of Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ Southampton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: pablogarcia@us.es

    2008-12-01

    Net fluid flow of electrolytes driven on an array of microelectrodes subjected to a travelling-wave potential is presented. Two sizes of platinum microelectrodes have been studied. In both arrays, at low voltages the liquid flows according to the prediction given by ac electroosmotic theory. At voltages above a threshold the fluid flow is reversed. Measurements of the electrical current when the microelectrode array is pumping the liquid are also reported. Transient behaviours in both electrical current and fluid velocity have been observed.

  10. Experiments on pumping of liquids using arrays of microelectrodes subjected to travelling wave potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Sanchez, P; Ramos, A; Green, Nicolas G; Morgan, H

    2008-01-01

    Net fluid flow of electrolytes driven on an array of microelectrodes subjected to a travelling-wave potential is presented. Two sizes of platinum microelectrodes have been studied. In both arrays, at low voltages the liquid flows according to the prediction given by ac electroosmotic theory. At voltages above a threshold the fluid flow is reversed. Measurements of the electrical current when the microelectrode array is pumping the liquid are also reported. Transient behaviours in both electrical current and fluid velocity have been observed.

  11. The GPS Laser Retroreflector Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkowitz, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Systematic co-location in space through the precision orbit determination of GPS satellites via satellite laser ranging will contribute significantly towards improving the accuracy and stability of the international terrestrial reference frame. NASA recently formed the GPS Laser Retroreflector Array Project to develop and deliver retroreflectors for integration on the next generation of GPS satellites. These retroreflectors will be an important contributor to achieving a global accuracy of 1.0 mm and 0.1 mm/year stability in the international terrestrial reference frame. We report here the current status of the GPS Laser Retroreflector Array Project.

  12. CRISPRDetect: A flexible algorithm to define CRISPR arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Ambarish; Staals, Raymond H J; Morales, Sergio E; Fineran, Peter C; Brown, Chris M

    2016-05-17

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) RNAs provide the specificity for noncoding RNA-guided adaptive immune defence systems in prokaryotes. CRISPR arrays consist of repeat sequences separated by specific spacer sequences. CRISPR arrays have previously been identified in a large proportion of prokaryotic genomes. However, currently available detection algorithms do not utilise recently discovered features regarding CRISPR loci. We have developed a new approach to automatically detect, predict and interactively refine CRISPR arrays. It is available as a web program and command line from bioanalysis.otago.ac.nz/CRISPRDetect. CRISPRDetect discovers putative arrays, extends the array by detecting additional variant repeats, corrects the direction of arrays, refines the repeat/spacer boundaries, and annotates different types of sequence variations (e.g. insertion/deletion) in near identical repeats. Due to these features, CRISPRDetect has significant advantages when compared to existing identification tools. As well as further support for small medium and large repeats, CRISPRDetect identified a class of arrays with 'extra-large' repeats in bacteria (repeats 44-50 nt). The CRISPRDetect output is integrated with other analysis tools. Notably, the predicted spacers can be directly utilised by CRISPRTarget to predict targets. CRISPRDetect enables more accurate detection of arrays and spacers and its gff output is suitable for inclusion in genome annotation pipelines and visualisation. It has been used to analyse all complete bacterial and archaeal reference genomes.

  13. Investigation of the effects of metal-wire resonators in sub-wavelength array based on time-reversal technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, Hui-Lin; Xiao, Shao-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    The resonant metalens consisting of metal-wire resonators with equally finite length can break the diffraction barrier well suited for super-resolution imaging. In this study, a basic combination constructed by two metal-wire resonators with different lengths is proposed, and its resonant characteristics is analyzed using the method of moments (MoM). Based on the time reversal (TR) technique, this kind of combination can be applied to a sub-wavelength two-element antenna array with a 1/40-wavelength interval to make the elements work simultaneously with little interference in the frequency band of 1.0-1.5 GHz and 1.5-2.0 GHz, respectively. The simulations and experiments show that analysis of MoM and the application of the resonators can be used to design multi-frequency sub-wavelength antenna arrays efficiently. This general design method is convenient and can be used for many applications, such as weakening jamming effectiveness in communication systems, and sub-wavelength imaging in a broad frequency band.

  14. Calculating electronic tunnel currents in networks of disordered irregularly shaped nanoparticles by mapping networks to arrays of parallel nonlinear resistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghili Yajadda, Mir Massoud [CSIRO Manufacturing Flagship, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield NSW 2070 (Australia)

    2014-10-21

    We have shown both theoretically and experimentally that tunnel currents in networks of disordered irregularly shaped nanoparticles (NPs) can be calculated by considering the networks as arrays of parallel nonlinear resistors. Each resistor is described by a one-dimensional or a two-dimensional array of equal size nanoparticles that the tunnel junction gaps between nanoparticles in each resistor is assumed to be equal. The number of tunnel junctions between two contact electrodes and the tunnel junction gaps between nanoparticles are found to be functions of Coulomb blockade energies. In addition, the tunnel barriers between nanoparticles were considered to be tilted at high voltages. Furthermore, the role of thermal expansion coefficient of the tunnel junction gaps on the tunnel current is taken into account. The model calculations fit very well to the experimental data of a network of disordered gold nanoparticles, a forest of multi-wall carbon nanotubes, and a network of few-layer graphene nanoplates over a wide temperature range (5-300 K) at low and high DC bias voltages (0.001 mV–50 V). Our investigations indicate, although electron cotunneling in networks of disordered irregularly shaped NPs may occur, non-Arrhenius behavior at low temperatures cannot be described by the cotunneling model due to size distribution in the networks and irregular shape of nanoparticles. Non-Arrhenius behavior of the samples at zero bias voltage limit was attributed to the disorder in the samples. Unlike the electron cotunneling model, we found that the crossover from Arrhenius to non-Arrhenius behavior occurs at two temperatures, one at a high temperature and the other at a low temperature.

  15. Storm-time ring current: model-dependent results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Ganushkina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main point of the paper is to investigate how much the modeled ring current depends on the representations of magnetic and electric fields and boundary conditions used in simulations. Two storm events, one moderate (SymH minimum of −120 nT on 6–7 November 1997 and one intense (SymH minimum of −230 nT on 21–22 October 1999, are modeled. A rather simple ring current model is employed, namely, the Inner Magnetosphere Particle Transport and Acceleration model (IMPTAM, in order to make the results most evident. Four different magnetic field and two electric field representations and four boundary conditions are used. We find that different combinations of the magnetic and electric field configurations and boundary conditions result in very different modeled ring current, and, therefore, the physical conclusions based on simulation results can differ significantly. A time-dependent boundary outside of 6.6 RE gives a possibility to take into account the particles in the transition region (between dipole and stretched field lines forming partial ring current and near-Earth tail current in that region. Calculating the model SymH* by Biot-Savart's law instead of the widely used Dessler-Parker-Sckopke (DPS relation gives larger and more realistic values, since the currents are calculated in the regions with nondipolar magnetic field. Therefore, the boundary location and the method of SymH* calculation are of key importance for ring current data-model comparisons to be correctly interpreted.

  16. Biasing, Acquisition and Interpretation of a Dense Langmuir Probe Array in NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworski, M.A.; Kallman, J.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Marsala, R.; Ruzic, D.

    2010-01-01

    A dense array of 99 Langmuir probes has been installed in the lower divertor region of the National Spherical Torus Experiments (NSTX). This array is instrumented with a system of elec- tronics that allows flexibility in the choice of probes to bias as well as the type of measurement (including standard swept, single probe, triple probe and operation as passive floating potential and scrape-off-layer (SOL) current monitors). The use of flush-mounted probes requires careful inter- pretation. The time dependent nature of the SOL makes swept-probe traces difficult to interpret. To overcome these challenges, the single- and triple-Langmuir probe signals are used in comple- mentary fashion to determine the temperature and density at the probe location. A comparison to mid-plane measurements is made.

  17. A Sparsity-Based Approach to 3D Binaural Sound Synthesis Using Time-Frequency Array Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos, Maximo; Lopez, JoseJ; Spors, Sascha

    2010-12-01

    Localization of sounds in physical space plays a very important role in multiple audio-related disciplines, such as music, telecommunications, and audiovisual productions. Binaural recording is the most commonly used method to provide an immersive sound experience by means of headphone reproduction. However, it requires a very specific recording setup using high-fidelity microphones mounted in a dummy head. In this paper, we present a novel processing framework for binaural sound recording and reproduction that avoids the use of dummy heads, which is specially suitable for immersive teleconferencing applications. The method is based on a time-frequency analysis of the spatial properties of the sound picked up by a simple tetrahedral microphone array, assuming source sparseness. The experiments carried out using simulations and a real-time prototype confirm the validity of the proposed approach.

  18. Compressive Sensing for Millimeter Wave Antenna Array Diagnosis

    KAUST Repository

    Eltayeb, Mohammed E.

    2018-01-08

    The radiation pattern of an antenna array depends on the excitation weights and the geometry of the array. Due to wind and atmospheric conditions, outdoor millimeter wave antenna elements are subject to full or partial blockages from a plethora of particles like dirt, salt, ice, and water droplets. Handheld devices are also subject to blockages from random finger placement and/or finger prints. These blockages cause absorption and scattering to the signal incident on the array, modify the array geometry, and distort the far-field radiation pattern of the array. This paper studies the effects of blockages on the far-field radiation pattern of linear arrays and proposes several array diagnosis techniques for millimeter wave antenna arrays. The proposed techniques jointly estimate the locations of the blocked antennas and the induced attenuation and phase-shifts given knowledge of the angles of arrival/departure. Numerical results show that the proposed techniques provide satisfactory results in terms of fault detection with reduced number of measurements (diagnosis time) provided that the number of blockages is small compared to the array size.

  19. Fabrication of Faraday Cup Array for the Measurement of 2-Dimensional Proton Beam Profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Myunghwan; Kim, Bom Sok; Kim, Kyeryung

    2014-01-01

    It has an advantage of easy-to-use and possible to visually check, immediately; on the other hand, the measurement range is very limited. Another method is using the CCD camera-scintillator device such as p43 phosphor screen or chromox. A variety of faraday cup detectors have been recently introduced. The faraday cup is one of the powerful and popular tools for the measurement of beam current. By using several faraday cups in array geometry, it is possible to observe current distribution. In this study, we developed an external faraday cup array for the measure the beam current and profile at a KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) beam utilization facility. To measure the beam profile, before fabrication of faraday cup array, we use gafchromic film. By making the faraday cup array we were able to reduce the consumption of Gafchromic film and a more accurate diagnosis of the proton beam is possible. The use of faraday cup array, experiment using the proton beam is more reliable and confident

  20. The current duration design for estimating the time to pregnancy distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasbarra, Dario; Arjas, Elja; Vehtari, Aki

    2015-01-01

    This paper was inspired by the studies of Niels Keiding and co-authors on estimating the waiting time-to-pregnancy (TTP) distribution, and in particular on using the current duration design in that context. In this design, a cross-sectional sample of women is collected from those who are currently...... attempting to become pregnant, and then by recording from each the time she has been attempting. Our aim here is to study the identifiability and the estimation of the waiting time distribution on the basis of current duration data. The main difficulty in this stems from the fact that very short waiting...... times are only rarely selected into the sample of current durations, and this renders their estimation unstable. We introduce here a Bayesian method for this estimation problem, prove its asymptotic consistency, and compare the method to some variants of the non-parametric maximum likelihood estimators...

  1. Single sources in the low-frequency gravitational wave sky: properties and time to detection by pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Blecha, Laura; Hernquist, Lars; Sesana, Alberto; Taylor, Stephen R.

    2018-06-01

    We calculate the properties, occurrence rates and detection prospects of individually resolvable `single sources' in the low-frequency gravitational wave (GW) spectrum. Our simulations use the population of galaxies and massive black hole binaries from the Illustris cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, coupled to comprehensive semi-analytic models of the binary merger process. Using mock pulsar timing arrays (PTA) with, for the first time, varying red-noise models, we calculate plausible detection prospects for GW single sources and the stochastic GW background (GWB). Contrary to previous results, we find that single sources are at least as detectable as the GW background. Using mock PTA, we find that these `foreground' sources (also `deterministic'/`continuous') are likely to be detected with ˜20 yr total observing baselines. Detection prospects, and indeed the overall properties of single sources, are only moderately sensitive to binary evolution parameters - namely eccentricity and environmental coupling, which can lead to differences of ˜5 yr in times to detection. Red noise has a stronger effect, roughly doubling the time to detection of the foreground between a white-noise only model (˜10-15 yr) and severe red noise (˜20-30 yr). The effect of red noise on the GWB is even stronger, suggesting that single source detections may be more robust. We find that typical signal-to-noise ratios for the foreground peak near f = 0.1 yr-1, and are much less sensitive to the continued addition of new pulsars to PTA.

  2. The Argonne silicon strip-detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuosmaa, A H; Back, B B; Betts, R R; Freer, M; Gehring, J; Glagola, B G; Happ, Th; Henderson, D J; Wilt, P [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bearden, I G [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-08-01

    Many nuclear physics experiments require the ability to analyze events in which large numbers of charged particles are detected and identified simultaneously, with good resolution and high efficiency, either alone, or in coincidence with gamma rays. The authors have constructed a compact large-area detector array to measure these processes efficiently and with excellent energy resolution. The array consists of four double-sided silicon strip detectors, each 5x5 cm{sup 2} in area, with front and back sides divided into 16 strips. To exploit the capability of the device fully, a system to read each strip-detector segment has been designed and constructed, based around a custom-built multi-channel preamplifier. The remainder of the system consists of high-density CAMAC modules, including multi-channel discriminators, charge-sensing analog-to-digital converters, and time-to-digital converters. The array`s performance has been evaluated using alpha-particle sources, and in a number of experiments conducted at Argonne and elsewhere. Energy resolutions of {Delta}E {approx} 20-30 keV have been observed for 5 to 8 MeV alpha particles, as well as time resolutions {Delta}T {<=} 500 ps. 4 figs.

  3. Compressive Sensing for Blockage Detection in Vehicular Millimeter Wave Antenna Arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Eltayeb, Mohammed E.; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.; Heath, Robert W.

    2017-01-01

    The radiation pattern of an antenna array depends on the excitation weights and the geometry of the array. Due to mobility, some vehicular antenna elements might be subjected to full or partial blockages from a plethora of particles like dirt, salt, ice, and water droplets. These particles cause absorption and scattering to the signal incident on the array, and as a result, change the array geometry. This distorts the radiation pattern of the array mostly with an increase in the sidelobe level and decrease in gain. In this paper, we propose a blockage detection technique for millimeter wave vehicular antenna arrays that jointly estimates the locations of the blocked antennas and the attenuation and phase-shifts that result from the suspended particles. The proposed technique does not require the antenna array to be physically removed from the vehicle and permits real-time array diagnosis. Numerical results show that the proposed technique provides satisfactory results in terms of block detection with low detection time provided that the number of blockages is small compared to the array size.

  4. Compressive Sensing for Blockage Detection in Vehicular Millimeter Wave Antenna Arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Eltayeb, Mohammed E.

    2017-02-07

    The radiation pattern of an antenna array depends on the excitation weights and the geometry of the array. Due to mobility, some vehicular antenna elements might be subjected to full or partial blockages from a plethora of particles like dirt, salt, ice, and water droplets. These particles cause absorption and scattering to the signal incident on the array, and as a result, change the array geometry. This distorts the radiation pattern of the array mostly with an increase in the sidelobe level and decrease in gain. In this paper, we propose a blockage detection technique for millimeter wave vehicular antenna arrays that jointly estimates the locations of the blocked antennas and the attenuation and phase-shifts that result from the suspended particles. The proposed technique does not require the antenna array to be physically removed from the vehicle and permits real-time array diagnosis. Numerical results show that the proposed technique provides satisfactory results in terms of block detection with low detection time provided that the number of blockages is small compared to the array size.

  5. Mutual-Coupling Based Phased-Array Calibration: A Robust and Versatile Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekers, D.J.; Dijk, R. van; Vliet, F.E. van

    2013-01-01

    The transmit and receive modules of a large phased array are often calibrated for amplitude and phase variations by an internal calibration network and an offline characterization of the complete array in an anechoic chamber. Such a solution is less obvious in view of current trends towards

  6. Monolithic millimeter-wave diode array beam controllers: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, L. B.; Liu, H.-X. L.; Wang, F.; Liu, T.; Wu, W.; Qin, X.-H.; Chung, E.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Maserjian, J.

    1992-01-01

    In the current work, multi-function beam control arrays have been fabricated and have successfully demonstrated amplitude control of transmitted beams in the W and D bands (75-170 GHz). While these arrays are designed to provide beam control under DC bias operation, new designs for high-speed electronic and optical control are under development. These arrays will fill a need for high-speed watt-level beam switches in pulsed reflectometer systems under development for magnetic fusion plasma diagnostics. A second experimental accomplishment of the current work is the demonstration in the 100-170 GHz (D band) frequency range of a new technique for the measurement of the transmission phase as well as amplitude. Transmission data can serve as a means to extract ('de-embed') the grid parameters; phase information provides more complete data to assist in this process. Additional functions of the array beam controller yet to be tested include electronically controlled steering and focusing of a reflected beam. These have application in the areas of millimeter-wave electronic scanning radar and reflectometry, respectively.

  7. Science with the ASTRI mini-array for the Cherenkov Telescope Array: blazars and fundamental physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnoli, Giacomo; Tavecchio, Fabrizio; Giuliani, Andrea; Bigongiari, Ciro; Di Pierro, Federico; Stamerra, Antonio; Pareschi, Giovanni; Vercellone, Stefano; ASTRI Collaboration; CTA Consortium

    2016-05-01

    ASTRI (“Astronomia a Specchi con Tecnologia Replicante Italiana”) is a flagship project of the Italian Ministry of Research (MIUR), devoted to the realization, operation and scientific validation of an end-to-end prototype for the Small Size Telescope (SST) envisaged to become part of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype is characterized by a dual mirror, Schwarzschild-Couder optical design and a compact camera based on silicon photo-multipliers. It will be sensitive to multi-TeV very high energy (VHE) gamma rays up to 100 TeV, with a PSF ~ 6’ and a wide (9.6°) unaberrated optical field of view. Right after validation of the design in single-dish observations at the Serra La Nave site (Sicily, Italy) during 2015, the ASTRI collaboration will be able to start deployment, at the final CTA southern site, of the ASTRI mini-array, proposed to constitute the very first CTA precursor. Counting 9 ASTRI SST-2M telescopes, the ASTRI mini-array will overtake current IACT systems in differential sensitivity above 5 TeV, thus allowing unprecedented observations of known and predicted bright TeV emitters in this band, including some extragalactic sources such as extreme high-peaked BL Lacs with hard spectra. We exploited the ASTRI scientific simulator ASTRIsim in order to understand the feasibility of observations tackling blazar and cosmic ray physics, including discrimination of hadronic and leptonic scenarios for the VHE emission from BL Lac relativistic jets and indirect measurements of the intergalactic magnetic field and of the extragalactic background light. We selected favorable targets, outlining observation modes, exposure times, multi-wavelength coverage needed and the results expected. Moreover, the perspectives for observation of effects due to the existence of axion-like particles or to Lorentz invariance violations have been investigated.

  8. Real-time control for long ohmic alternate current discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Ivo S.; Duarte, Paulo; Fernandes, Horácio; Valcárcel, Daniel F.; Carvalho, Pedro J.; Silva, Carlos; Duarte, André S.; Neto, André; Sousa, Jorge; Batista, António J.N.; Hekkert, Tiago; Carvalho, Bernardo B.; Gomes, Rui B.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 40 Alternate plasma current (AC) semi-cycles without loss of ionization, more than 1 s of operation. • AC discharges automatic control: feedback loops, time-windows control strategy, goal oriented time-windows and exception handling. • Energy deposition and Carbon radiation evolution during the AC discharges. - Abstract: The ISTTOK tokamak has a long tradition on alternate plasma current (AC) discharges, but the old control system was limiting and lacked full system integration. In order to improve the AC discharges performance the ISTTOK fast control system was updated. This control system developed on site based on the Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture (ATCA) standard now integrates the information gathered by all the tokamak real-time diagnostics to produce an accurate observation of the plasma parameters. The real-time actuators were also integrated, allowing a Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) control environment with several synchronization strategies available. The control system software was developed in C++ on top of a Linux system with the Multi-threaded Application Real-Time executor (MARTe) Framework to synchronize the real-time code execution under a 100μs control cycle. In addition, to simplify the discharge programming, a visual Human–Machine Interface (HMI) was also developed using the BaseLib2 libraries included in the MARTe Framework. This paper presents the ISTTOK control system and the optimizations that extended the AC current discharges duration to more than 1 s, corresponding to 40 semi-cycles without apparent degradation of the plasma parameters. This upgrade allows ISTTOK to be used as a low-cost material testing facility with long time exposures to nuclear fusion relevant plasmas, comparable (in duration) with medium size tokamaks

  9. Real-time control for long ohmic alternate current discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Ivo S., E-mail: ivoc@ipfn.ist.utl.pt; Duarte, Paulo; Fernandes, Horácio; Valcárcel, Daniel F.; Carvalho, Pedro J.; Silva, Carlos; Duarte, André S.; Neto, André; Sousa, Jorge; Batista, António J.N.; Hekkert, Tiago; Carvalho, Bernardo B.; Gomes, Rui B.

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • 40 Alternate plasma current (AC) semi-cycles without loss of ionization, more than 1 s of operation. • AC discharges automatic control: feedback loops, time-windows control strategy, goal oriented time-windows and exception handling. • Energy deposition and Carbon radiation evolution during the AC discharges. - Abstract: The ISTTOK tokamak has a long tradition on alternate plasma current (AC) discharges, but the old control system was limiting and lacked full system integration. In order to improve the AC discharges performance the ISTTOK fast control system was updated. This control system developed on site based on the Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture (ATCA) standard now integrates the information gathered by all the tokamak real-time diagnostics to produce an accurate observation of the plasma parameters. The real-time actuators were also integrated, allowing a Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) control environment with several synchronization strategies available. The control system software was developed in C++ on top of a Linux system with the Multi-threaded Application Real-Time executor (MARTe) Framework to synchronize the real-time code execution under a 100μs control cycle. In addition, to simplify the discharge programming, a visual Human–Machine Interface (HMI) was also developed using the BaseLib2 libraries included in the MARTe Framework. This paper presents the ISTTOK control system and the optimizations that extended the AC current discharges duration to more than 1 s, corresponding to 40 semi-cycles without apparent degradation of the plasma parameters. This upgrade allows ISTTOK to be used as a low-cost material testing facility with long time exposures to nuclear fusion relevant plasmas, comparable (in duration) with medium size tokamaks.

  10. Numerical simulation of wire array load implosion on Yang accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hailong; Deng Jianjun; Wang Qiang; Zou Wenkang; Wang Ganghua

    2012-01-01

    Based on the ZORK model describing the Saturn facility, a zero dimensional load model of the wire array Z-pinch on Yang accelerator is designed using Pspice to simulate the implosion process. Comparisons between the calculated results and experimental data prove the load model to be correct. The applicability and shortcomings of the load model are presented. One-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic calculations are performed by using the current curve obtained from calculated results of experiment Yang 1050#. and the parameters such as implosion time and radiation X-ray power are obtained. (authors)

  11. Silicon-CsI detector array for heavy-ion reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Norbeck, E; Pogodin, P I; Cheng, Y W; Ingram, F D; Bjarki, O; Grévy, S; Magestro, D J; Molen, A M V; Westfall, G D

    2000-01-01

    An array of 60 silicon-CsI(Tl) detector telescopes has been developed along with associated electronics. The close packing of the telescopes required novel designs for the photodiodes and the silicon DELTA E detectors. Newly developed electronics include preamplifiers, shaping amplifiers, test pulse circuitry, and a module to monitor leakage currents in the silicon diodes. The array covers angles from 5 deg. to 18 deg. in the 4 pi Array at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. It measures protons to 150 MeV and has isotopic resolution for intermediate mass nuclei.

  12. Comparing Sources of Storm-Time Ring Current O+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    The first observations of the storm-time ring current composition using AMPTE/CCE data showed that the O+ contribution to the ring current increases significantly during storms. The ring current is predominantly formed from inward transport of the near-earth plasma sheet. Thus the increase of O+ in the ring current implies that the ionospheric contribution to the plasma sheet has increased. The ionospheric plasma that reaches the plasma sheet can come from both the cusp and the nightside aurora. The cusp outflow moves through the lobe and enters the plasma sheet through reconnection at the near-earth neutral line. The nightside auroral outflow has direct access to nightside plasma sheet. Using data from Cluster and the Van Allen Probes spacecraft, we compare the development of storms in cases where there is a clear input of nightside auroral outflow, and in cases where there is a significant cusp input. We find that the cusp input, which enters the tail at ~15-20 Re becomes isotropized when it crosses the neutral sheet, and becomes part of the hot (>1 keV) plasma sheet population as it convects inward. The auroral outflow, which enters the plasma sheet closer to the earth, where the radius of curvature of the field line is larger, does not isotropize or become significantly energized, but remains a predominantly field aligned low energy population in the inner magnetosphere. It is the hot plasma sheet population that gets accelerated to high enough energies in the inner magnetosphere to contribute strongly to the ring current pressure. Thus it appears that O+ that enters the plasma sheet further down the tail has a greater impact on the storm-time ring current than ions that enter closer to the earth.

  13. Continuous-Time Random Walk Models of DNA Electrophoresis in a Post Array: II. Mobility and Sources of Band Broadening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Daniel W.; Dutta, Sarit; Laachi, Nabil; Tian, Mingwei; Dorfman, Kevin D.

    2011-01-01

    Using the two-state, continuous-time random walk model, we develop expressions for the mobility and the plate height during DNA electrophoresis in an ordered post array that delineate the contributions due to (i) the random distance between collisions and (ii) the random duration of a collision. These contributions are expressed in terms of the means and variances of the underlying stochastic processes, which we evaluate from a large ensemble of Brownian dynamics simulations performed using different electric fields and molecular weights in a hexagonal array of 1 μm posts with a 3 μm center-to-center distance. If we fix the molecular weight, we find that the collision frequency governs the mobility. In contrast, the average collision duration is the most important factor for predicting the mobility as a function of DNA size at constant Péclet number. The plate height is reasonably well-described by a single post rope-over-pulley model, provided that the extension of the molecule is small. Our results only account for dispersion inside the post array and thus represent a theoretical lower bound on the plate height in an actual device. PMID:21290387

  14. Characteristics of zinc oxide nanorod array/titanium oxide film heterojunction prepared by aqueous solution deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Kwei; Hong, Min-Hsuan; Li, Bo-Wei

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of a ZnO nanorod array/TiO2 film heterojunction were investigated. A TiO2 film was prepared on glass by aqueous solution deposition with precursors of ammonium hexafluorotitanate and boric acid at 40 °C. Then, a ZnO seed layer was prepared on a TiO2 film/glass substrate by RF sputtering. A vertically oriented ZnO nanorod array was grown on a ZnO seed layer/TiO2 film/glass substrate by aqueous solution deposition with precursors of zinc nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) at 70 °C. After thermal annealing in N2O ambient at 300 °C, this heterojunction used as an oxygen gas sensor shows much better rise time, decay time, and on/off current ratio than as-grown and annealed ZnO nanorods.

  15. A Versatile Multichannel Digital Signal Processing Module for Microcalorimeter Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, H.; Collins, J. W.; Walby, M.; Hennig, W.; Warburton, W. K.; Grudberg, P.

    2012-06-01

    Different techniques have been developed for reading out microcalorimeter sensor arrays: individual outputs for small arrays, and time-division or frequency-division or code-division multiplexing for large arrays. Typically, raw waveform data are first read out from the arrays using one of these techniques and then stored on computer hard drives for offline optimum filtering, leading not only to requirements for large storage space but also limitations on achievable count rate. Thus, a read-out module that is capable of processing microcalorimeter signals in real time will be highly desirable. We have developed multichannel digital signal processing electronics that are capable of on-board, real time processing of microcalorimeter sensor signals from multiplexed or individual pixel arrays. It is a 3U PXI module consisting of a standardized core processor board and a set of daughter boards. Each daughter board is designed to interface a specific type of microcalorimeter array to the core processor. The combination of the standardized core plus this set of easily designed and modified daughter boards results in a versatile data acquisition module that not only can easily expand to future detector systems, but is also low cost. In this paper, we first present the core processor/daughter board architecture, and then report the performance of an 8-channel daughter board, which digitizes individual pixel outputs at 1 MSPS with 16-bit precision. We will also introduce a time-division multiplexing type daughter board, which takes in time-division multiplexing signals through fiber-optic cables and then processes the digital signals to generate energy spectra in real time.

  16. Specific features of implosion of metallized fiber arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrofanov, K. N., E-mail: mitrofan@triniti.ru; Aleksandrov, V. V.; Gritsuk, A. N.; Grabovski, E. V.; Frolov, I. N.; Laukhin, Ya. N.; Breshkov, S. S. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    Implosion of metallized fiber arrays was studied experimentally at the Angara-5-1 facility. The use of such arrays makes it possible to investigate the production and implosion dynamics of plasmas of various metals (such as tin, indium, and bismuth) that were previously unavailable for such studies. The plasma production rates m-dot (in μg/(cm{sup 2} ns)) for different metals were determined and quantitatively compared. Varying the thickness of the metal layer deposited on kapron fibers (the total linear mass of the metal coating being maintained at the level of 220 μg/cm), the current and velocity of the plasma precursor were studied as functions of the thickness of the metal coating. The strong difference in the rates of plasma production from the metal coating and kapron fibers results in the redistribution of the discharge current between the Z-pinch and the trailing fiber plasma. The outer boundary of the plasma produced from the metal coating is found to be stable against instabilities typical of the final stage of implosion of conventional wire arrays.

  17. Development of a fast pixel array detector for use in microsecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barna, S.L.; Gruner, S.M.; Shepherd, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    A large-area pixel x-ray detector is being developed to collect eight successive frames of wide dynamic range two-dimensional images at 200kHz rates. Such a detector, in conjunction with a synchrotron radiation x-ray source, will enable time-resolved x-ray studies of proteins and other materials on time scales which have previously been inaccessible. The detector will consist of an array of fully-depleted 150 micron square diodes connected to a CMOS integrated electronics layer with solder bump-bonding. During each framing period, the current resulting from the x-rays stopped in the diodes is integrated in the electronics layer, and then stored in one of eight storage capacitors underneath the pixel. After the last frame, the capacitors are read out at standard data transmission rates. The detector has been designed for a well-depth of at least 10,000 x-rays (at 20keV), and a noise level of one x-ray. Ultimately, the authors intend to construct a detector with over one million pixels (1024 by 1024). They present the results of their development effort and various features of the design. The electronics design is discussed, with special attention to the performance requirements. The choice and design of the detective diodes, as they relate to x-ray stopping power and charge collection, are presented. An analysis of various methods of bump bonding is also presented. Finally, the authors discuss the possible need for a radiation-blocking layer, to be placed between the electronics and the detective layer, and various methods they have pursued in the construction of such a layer

  18. Transition-edge sensor imaging arrays for astrophysics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burney, Jennifer Anne

    Many interesting objects in our universe currently elude observation in the optical band: they are too faint or they vary rapidly and thus any structure in their radiation is lost over the period of an exposure. Conventional photon detectors cannot simultaneously provide energy resolution and time-stamping of individual photons at fast rates. Superconducting detectors have recently made the possibility of simultaneous photon counting, imaging, and energy resolution a reality. Our research group has pioneered the use of one such detector, the Transition-Edge Sensor (TES). TES physics is simple and elegant. A thin superconducting film, biased at its critical temperature, can act as a particle detector: an incident particle deposits energy and drives the film into its superconducting-normal transition. By inductively coupling the detector to a SQUID amplifier circuit, this resistance change can be read out as a current pulse, and its energy deduced by integrating over the pulse. TESs can be used to accurately time-stamp (to 0.1 [mu]s) and energy-resolve (0.15 eV at 1.6 eV) near-IR/visible/near-UV photons at rates of 30~kHz. The first astronomical observations using fiber-coupled detectors were made at the Stanford Student Observatory 0.6~m telescope in 1999. Further observations of the Crab Pulsar from the 107" telescope at the University of Texas McDonald Observatory showed rapid phase variations over the near-IR/visible/near-UV band. These preliminary observations provided a glimpse into a new realm of observations of pulsars, binary systems, and accreting black holes promised by TES arrays. This thesis describes the development, characterization, and preliminary use of the first camera system based on Transition-Edge Sensors. While single-device operation is relatively well-understood, the operation of a full imaging array poses significant challenges. This thesis addresses all aspects related to the creation and characterization of this cryogenic imaging

  19. Integrated power conditioning for laser diode arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, R.L.; Kirbie, H.C.; Newton, M.A.; Farhoud, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    This compact modulator has demonstated its ability to efficiently and accurately drive a laser diode array. The addition of the crowbar protection circuit is an invaluable addition to the integrated system and is capable of protecting the laser diode array against severe damage. We showed that the correlation between measured data and simulation indicates that our modulator model is valid and can be used as a tool in the design of future systems. The spectrometer measurements that we conducted underline the imprtance of current regulation to stable laser operation

  20. Field emission properties of an array of pyramidal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Assis, Thiago A [Departamento de QuImica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Borondo, F [Departamento de QuImica, Instituto Mixto de Ciencias Matematicas CSIC-UAM-UC3M-UCM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); De Castilho, C M C; Brito Mota, F [Grupo de Fisica de SuperfIcies e Materiais, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitario da Federacao, 40210-340, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Benito, R M, E-mail: t.albuquerque@uam.e, E-mail: f.borondo@uam.e, E-mail: caio@ufba.b, E-mail: fbmota@ufba.b, E-mail: rosamaria.benito@upm.e [Grupo de Sistemas Complejos, Departamento de Fisica y Mecanica, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Agronomos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-10-07

    The properties and efficiency of the emission current density produced by a metallic array of pyramidal structures are investigated. The theoretical results obtained by numerical integration of the corresponding Laplace equation using a finite differences scheme offer useful information for the optimization of field emission devices based on cathodes with this geometry. Our study shows that the inter-pyramidal distance strongly affects the current density, and even more important for this issue is the protrusion characteristics of these structures. Another relevant, although less important, parameter determining this density is the anode-cathode distance. The effect of the array characteristics on the maximum local electric field intensity is also discussed.

  1. Tests of operating conditions for metrological application of HTS Josephson arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosso, A; Lacquaniti, V; Andreone, D; Cerri, R; Klushin, A M

    2006-01-01

    We report on an experimental study of metrological properties of High Temperature Superconductor arrays, made of shunted bicrystal YBCO Josephson junctions, to assess their accuracy. A detailed analysis of measurement errors is presented, mainly based on a direct comparison of an HTS array against a low temperature array. Owing to the high sensitivity of the comparison, we were able to measure the changes in the HTS array voltage on a step at nanovolt level. A precise estimate of the dependence of the HTS array step width on operating conditions was obtained. Differences were observed with respect to the results provided by the usual, low sensitivity, techniques, confirming that the method we adopted is necessary in the study of HTS arrays for metrology. The high sensitivity analysis was applied in the derivation of the temperature dependence of the critical current as well, providing some insights on the behaviour of the HTS array

  2. 3D Self-Supported Nanoarchitectured Arrays Electrodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional self-supported nanoarchitectured arrays electrodes (3DSNAEs consisting of a direct growth of nanoarchitectured arrays on the conductive current collector, including homogeneous and heterogeneous nanoarchitectured arrays structures, have been currently studied as the most promising electrodes owing to their synergies resulting from the multistructure hybrid and integrating heterocomponents to address the requirements (high energy and power density of superperformance lithium ion batteries (LIBs applied in portable electronic consumer devices, electric vehicles, large-scale electricity storage, and so on. In the paper, recent advances in the strategies for the fabrication, selection of the different current collector substrates, and structural configuration of 3DSNAEs with different cathode and anode materials are investigated in detail. The intrinsic relationship of the unique structural characters, the conductive substrates, and electrochemical kinetic properties of 3DSNAEs is minutely analyzed. Finally, the future design trends and directions of 3DSNAEs are highlighted, which may open a new avenue of developing ideal multifunctional 3DSNAEs for further advanced LIBs.

  3. Development and evaluation of an ultra-fast ASIC for future PET scanners using TOF-capable MPPC array detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambe, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kataoka, J.; Matsuda, H.; Kato, T.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a front-end ASIC for future PET scanners with Time-Of-Flight (TOF) capability to be coupled with 4×4 Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) arrays. The ASIC is designed based on the open-IP project proposed by JAXA and realized in TSMC 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The circuit comprises 16-channel, low impedance current conveyors for effectively acquiring fast MPPC signals. For precise measurement of the coincidence timing of 511-keV gamma rays, the leading-edge method was used to discriminate the signals. We first tested the time response of the ASIC by illuminating each channel of a MPPC array device 3×3 mm 2 in size with a Pico-second Light Pulsar with a light emission peak of 655 nm and pulse duration of 54 ps (FWHM). We obtained 105 ps (FWHM) on average for each channel in time jitter measurements. Moreover, we compensated for the time lag of each channel with inner delay circuits and succeeded in suppressing about a 700-ps lag to only 15 ps. This paper reports TOF measurements using back-to-back 511-keV signals, and suggests that the ASIC can be a promising device for future TOF-PET scanners based on the MPPC array. - Highlights: • We developed a newly designed large-area monolithic MPPC array. • We obtained fine gain uniformity, and good energy and time resolutions when coupled to the LYSO scintillator. • We fabricated gamma-ray camera consisting of the MPPC array and the submillimeter pixelized LYSO and GGAG scintillators. • In the flood images, each crystal of scintillator matrices was clearly resolved. • Good energy resolutions for 662 keV gamma-rays for each LYSO and GGAG scintillator matrices were obtained

  4. The Earthscope USArray Array Network Facility (ANF): Metadata, Network and Data Monitoring, Quality Assurance During the Second Year of Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakins, J. A.; Vernon, F. L.; Martynov, V.; Newman, R. L.; Cox, T. A.; Lindquist, K. L.; Hindley, A.; Foley, S.

    2005-12-01

    The Array Network Facility (ANF) for the Earthscope USArray Transportable Array seismic network is responsible for: the delivery of all Transportable Array stations (400 at full deployment) and telemetered Flexible Array stations (up to 200) to the IRIS Data Management Center; station command and control; verification and distribution of metadata; providing useful remotely accessible world wide web interfaces for personnel at the Array Operations Facility (AOF) to access state of health information; and quality control for all data. To meet these goals, we use the Antelope software package to facilitate data collection and transfer, generation and merging of the metadata, real-time monitoring of dataloggers, generation of station noise spectra, and analyst review of individual events. Recently, an Antelope extension to the PHP scripting language has been implemented which facilitates the dynamic presentation of the real-time data to local web pages. Metadata transfers have been simplified by the use of orb transfer technologies at the ANF and receiver end points. Web services are being investigated as a means to make a potentially complicated set of operations easy to follow and reproduce for each newly installed or decommissioned station. As part of the quality control process, daily analyst review has highlighted areas where neither the regional network bulletins nor the USGS global bulletin have published solutions. Currently four regional networks (Anza, BDSN, SCSN, and UNR) contribute data to the Transportable Array with additional contributors expected. The first 100 stations (42 new Earthscope stations) were operational by September 2005 with all but one of the California stations installed. By year's end, weather permitting, the total number of stations deployed is expected to be around 145. Visit http://anf.ucsd.edu for more information on the project and current status.

  5. Virtual electrodes for high-density electrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cela, Carlos J.; Lazzi, Gianluca

    2015-10-13

    The present embodiments are directed to implantable electrode arrays having virtual electrodes. The virtual electrodes may improve the resolution of the implantable electrode array without the burden of corresponding complexity of electronic circuitry and wiring. In a particular embodiment, a virtual electrode may include one or more passive elements to help steer current to a specific location between the active electrodes. For example, a passive element may be a metalized layer on a substrate that is adjacent to, but not directly connected to an active electrode. In certain embodiments, an active electrode may be directly coupled to a power source via a conductive connection. Beneficially, the passive elements may help to increase the overall resolution of the implantable array by providing additional stimulation points without requiring additional wiring or driver circuitry for the passive elements.

  6. Ordered Au Nanodisk and Nanohole Arrays: Fabrication and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Yue Bing; Juluri, Bala Krishna; Kiraly, Brian; Huang, Tony Jun

    2010-01-01

    We have utilized nanosphere lithography (NSL) to fabricate ordered Au nanodisk and nanohole arrays on substrates and have studied the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the arrays. Through these investigations, we demonstrate that the angle- dependent behavior of the LSPR in the Au nanodisk arrays enables real-time observation of exciton-plasmon couplings. In addition, we show that the NSL-fabricated Au nanohole arrays can be applied as templates for patterning micro-/nanoparticles under capillary force. The unique structural and plasmonic characteristics of the Au nanodisk and nano- hole arrays, as well as the low-cost and high-throughput NSL-based nanofabrication technique, render these arrays excellent platforms for numerous engineering applications. © 2010 by ASME.

  7. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Yunes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein’s theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime. Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  8. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunes, Nicolás; Siemens, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein's theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime . Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  9. Solar array qualification through qualified analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijdemans, J.; Cruijssen, H. J.; Wijker, J. J.

    1991-04-01

    To achieve qualification is in general a very expensive exercise. For solar arrays this is done by a dedicated test program through which final qualification is achieved. Due to severe competition on the solar array market, cheaper means are looked for to achieve a qualified product for the customers. One of the methods is to drastically limit the environmental test program and to qualify the solar-array structure against its environmental loads by analysis. Qualification by analysis is possible. The benefits are that a significant amount of development effort can be saved in case such a powerful tool is available. Extensive testing can be avoided thus saving time and money.

  10. Spin current relaxation time in thermally evaporated pentacene films

    OpenAIRE

    Tani, Yasuo; Kondo, Takuya; Teki, Yoshio; Shikoh, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    The spin current relaxation time [tau] in thermally evaporated pentacene films was evaluated with the spin-pump-induced spin transport properties and the charge current transport properties in pentacene films. Under an assumption of a diffusive transport of the spin current in pentacene films, the zero-field mobility and the diffusion constant of holes in pentacene films were experimentally obtained to be ~8.0x10^-7 m^2/Vs and ~2.0x10^-8 m^2/s, respectively. Using those values and the previou...

  11. High-resolution disruption halo current measurements using Langmuir probes in Alcator C-Mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinguely, R. A.; Granetz, R. S.; Berg, A.; Kuang, A. Q.; Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.

    2018-01-01

    Halo currents generated during disruptions on Alcator C-Mod have been measured with Langmuir ‘rail’ probes. These rail probes are embedded in a lower outboard divertor module in a closely-spaced vertical (poloidal) array. The dense array provides detailed resolution of the spatial dependence (~1 cm spacing) of the halo current distribution in the plasma scrape-off region with high time resolution (400 kHz digitization rate). As the plasma limits on the outboard divertor plate, the contact point is clearly discernible in the halo current data (as an inversion of current) and moves vertically down the divertor plate on many disruptions. These data are consistent with filament reconstructions of the plasma boundary, from which the edge safety factor of the disrupting plasma can be calculated. Additionally, the halo current ‘footprint’ on the divertor plate is obtained and related to the halo flux width. The voltage driving halo current and the effective resistance of the plasma region through which the halo current flows to reach the probes are also investigated. Estimations of the sheath resistance and halo region resistivity and temperature are given. This information could prove useful for modeling halo current dynamics.

  12. The Status of the Telescope Array experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuno, H; Azuma, R [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Blake, S A; Brusova, O; Cady, R [University of Utah, High Energy Astrophysics Institute, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Aida, R [University of Yamanashi, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, Kofu, Yamanashi (Japan); Benno, T; Chikawa, M; Doura, K [Kinki University, Higashi Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Bergman, D R [Rutgers University, Piscataway (United States); Cheon, B G; Cho, E J [Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chiba, J [Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba (Japan); Cho, L S; Cho, W R [Yonsei University, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republ