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Sample records for time-resolved x-ray crystallography

  1. Time-resolved protein nano-crystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Fromme, Petra; Fromme, Raimund; Grotjohann, Ingo; Doak, R. Bruce; Kirian, Richard A.; Schmidt, Kevin E.; Wang, Xiaoyu; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John C.H.; White, Thomas A.; Caleman, Carl; DePonte, Daniel P.; Fleckenstein, Holger; Gumprecht, Lars; Liang, Mengning; Martin, Andrew V.; Schulz, Joachim; Stellato, Francesco; Stern, Stephan; Barty, Anton; Andreasson, Jakob; Davidsson, Jan; Hajdu, Janos; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Timneanu, Nicusor; Arnlund, David; Johansson, Linda; Malmerberg, Erik; Neutze, Richard; Bajt, Sasa; Barthelmess, Miriam; Graafsma, Heinz; Hirsemann, Helmut; Wunderer, Cornelia; Barends, Thomas R.M.; Foucar, Lutz; Krasniqi, Faton; Lomb, Lukas; Rolles, Daniel; Schlichting, Ilme; Schmidt, Carlo; Bogan, Michael J.; Hampton, Christina Y.; Sierra, Raymond; Starodub, Dmitri; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Bottin, Herve

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of an X-ray free electron laser synchronized with an optical pump laser to obtain X-ray diffraction snapshots from the photo-activated states of large membrane protein complexes in the form of nano-crystals flowing in a liquid jet. Light-induced changes of Photosystem I-Ferredoxin co-crystals were observed at time delays of 5 to 10 μs after excitation. The result correlates with the microsecond kinetics of electron transfer from Photosystem I to ferredoxin. The undocking process that follows the electron transfer leads to large rearrangements in the crystals that will terminally lead to the disintegration of the crystals. We describe the experimental setup and obtain the first time resolved femtosecond serial X-ray crystallography results from an irreversible photo-chemical reaction at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This technique opens the door to time-resolved structural studies of reaction dynamics in biological systems. (authors)

  2. Watching proteins function with time-resolved x-ray crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Šrajer, Vukica; Schmidt, Marius

    2017-08-22

    Macromolecular crystallography was immensely successful in the last two decades. To a large degree this success resulted from use of powerful third generation synchrotron x-ray sources. An expansive database of more than 100 000 protein structures, of which many were determined at resolution better than 2 Å, is available today. With this achievement, the spotlight in structural biology is shifting from determination of static structures to elucidating dynamic aspects of protein function. A powerful tool for addressing these aspects is time-resolved crystallography, where a genuine biological function is triggered in the crystal with a goal of capturing molecules in action and determining protein kinetics and structures of intermediates (Schmidt et al 2005a Methods Mol. Biol. 305 115–54, Schmidt 2008 Ultrashort Laser Pulses in Biology and Medicine (Berlin: Springer) pp 201–41, Neutze and Moffat 2012 Curr. Opin. Struct. Biol. 22 651–9, Šrajer 2014 The Future of Dynamic Structural Science (Berlin: Springer) pp 237–51). In this approach, short and intense x-ray pulses are used to probe intermediates in real time and at room temperature, in an ongoing reaction that is initiated synchronously and rapidly in the crystal. Time-resolved macromolecular crystallography with 100 ps time resolution at synchrotron x-ray sources is in its mature phase today, particularly for studies of reversible, light-initiated reactions. The advent of the new free electron lasers for hard x-rays (XFELs; 5–20 keV), which provide exceptionally intense, femtosecond x-ray pulses, marks a new frontier for time-resolved crystallography. The exploration of ultra-fast events becomes possible in high-resolution structural detail, on sub-picosecond time scales (Tenboer et al 2014 Science 346 1242–6, Barends et al 2015 Science 350 445–50, Pande et al 2016 Science 352 725–9). We review here state-of-the-art time-resolved crystallographic experiments both at synchrotrons and XFELs. We

  3. Watching proteins function with time-resolved x-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šrajer, Vukica; Schmidt, Marius

    2017-09-01

    Macromolecular crystallography was immensely successful in the last two decades. To a large degree this success resulted from use of powerful third generation synchrotron x-ray sources. An expansive database of more than 100 000 protein structures, of which many were determined at resolution better than 2 Å, is available today. With this achievement, the spotlight in structural biology is shifting from determination of static structures to elucidating dynamic aspects of protein function. A powerful tool for addressing these aspects is time-resolved crystallography, where a genuine biological function is triggered in the crystal with a goal of capturing molecules in action and determining protein kinetics and structures of intermediates (Schmidt et al 2005a Methods Mol. Biol. 305 115-54, Schmidt 2008 Ultrashort Laser Pulses in Biology and Medicine (Berlin: Springer) pp 201-41, Neutze and Moffat 2012 Curr. Opin. Struct. Biol. 22 651-9, Šrajer 2014 The Future of Dynamic Structural Science (Berlin: Springer) pp 237-51). In this approach, short and intense x-ray pulses are used to probe intermediates in real time and at room temperature, in an ongoing reaction that is initiated synchronously and rapidly in the crystal. Time-resolved macromolecular crystallography with 100 ps time resolution at synchrotron x-ray sources is in its mature phase today, particularly for studies of reversible, light-initiated reactions. The advent of the new free electron lasers for hard x-rays (XFELs; 5-20 keV), which provide exceptionally intense, femtosecond x-ray pulses, marks a new frontier for time-resolved crystallography. The exploration of ultra-fast events becomes possible in high-resolution structural detail, on sub-picosecond time scales (Tenboer et al 2014 Science 346 1242-6, Barends et al 2015 Science 350 445-50, Pande et al 2016 Science 352 725-9). We review here state-of-the-art time-resolved crystallographic experiments both at synchrotrons and XFELs. We also outline

  4. Time-Resolved Macromolecular Crystallography at Modern X-Ray Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Marius

    2017-01-01

    Time-resolved macromolecular crystallography unifies protein structure determination with chemical kinetics. With the advent of fourth generation X-ray sources the time-resolution can be on the order of 10-40 fs, which opens the ultrafast time scale to structure determination. Fundamental motions and transitions associated with chemical reactions in proteins can now be observed. Moreover, new experimental approaches at synchrotrons allow for the straightforward investigation of all kind of reactions in biological macromolecules. Here, recent developments in the field are reviewed.

  5. Watching proteins function with 150-ps time-resolved X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anfinrud, Philip

    2007-03-01

    We have used time-resolved Laue crystallography to characterize ligand migration pathways and dynamics in wild-type and several mutant forms of myoglobin (Mb), a ligand-binding heme protein found in muscle tissue. In these pump-probe experiments, which were conducted on the ID09B time-resolved beamline at the European Synchrotron and Radiation Facility, a laser pulse photodissociates CO from an MbCO crystal and a suitably delayed X-ray pulse probes its structure via Laue diffraction. Single-site mutations in the vicinity of the heme pocket docking site were found to have a dramatic effect on ligand migration. To visualize this process, time-resolved electron density maps were stitched together into movies that unveil with <2-å spatial resolution and 150-ps time-resolution the correlated protein motions that accompany and/or mediate ligand migration. These studies help to illustrate at an atomic level relationships between protein structure, dynamics, and function.

  6. Time-resolved x-ray diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    Techniques for time-resolved x-ray diagnostics will be reviewed with emphasis on systems utilizing x-ray diodes or scintillators. System design concerns for high-bandwidth (> 1 GHz) diagnostics will be emphasized. The limitations of a coaxial cable system and a technique for equalizing to improve bandwidth of such a system will be reviewed. Characteristics of new multi-GHz amplifiers will be presented. An example of a complete operational system on the Los Alamos Helios laser will be presented which has a bandwidth near 3 GHz over 38 m of coax. The system includes the cable, an amplifier, an oscilloscope, and a digital camera readout

  7. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Edward Snell, a National Research Council research fellow at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), prepares a protein crystal for analysis by x-ray crystallography as part of NASA's structural biology program. The small, individual crystals are bombarded with x-rays to produce diffraction patterns, a map of the intensity of the x-rays as they reflect through the crystal.

  8. X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  9. Optimizing a time-resolved X-ray absorption experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bressler, C; Chergui, M; Abela, R; Pattison, P

    2001-01-01

    Calculations are presented of the optimum conditions for performing a laser-pump X-ray probe time-resolved X-ray absorption experiment. The results concerning sensitivity and feasibility for implementing the method are illustrated for the case of the nascent I radical environment following I sup - photolysis in H sub 2 O.

  10. Theory of time-resolved inelastic x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Ulf; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2010-01-01

    Starting from a general theory of time-resolved x-ray scattering, we derive a convenient expression for the diffraction signal based on a careful analysis of the relevant inelastic scattering processes. We demonstrate that the resulting inelastic limit applies to a wider variety of experimental...... conditions than similar, previously derived formulas, and it directly allows the application of selection rules when interpreting diffraction signals. Furthermore, we present a simple extension to systems simultaneously illuminated by x rays and a laser beam....

  11. The Beginnings of X-ray Crystallography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    The Beginnings of X-ray Crystallography. A Profile on the Two Braggs. Those were the days when Science was hovering around the wave–particle duality. William. Henry Bragg was toying with the idea that X-rays are particles and the observation made by Max von Laue that X-rays are diffracted by crystals could indeed ...

  12. Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenneth Moya; Ian McKennaa; Thomas Keenana; Michael Cuneob

    2007-01-01

    Wired array studies are being conducted at the SNL Z accelerator to maximize the x-ray generation for inertial confinement fusion targets and high energy density physics experiments. An integral component of these studies is the characterization of the time-resolved spectral content of the x-rays. Due to potential spatial anisotropy in the emitted radiation, it is also critical to diagnose the time-evolved spectral content in a space-resolved manner. To accomplish these two measurement goals, we developed an x-ray spectrometer using a set of high-speed detectors (silicon PIN diodes) with a collimated field-of-view that converged on a 1-cm-diameter spot at the pinch axis. Spectral discrimination is achieved by placing high Z absorbers in front of these detectors. We built two spectrometers to permit simultaneous different angular views of the emitted radiation. Spectral data have been acquired from recent Z shots for the radial and polar views. UNSPEC1 has been adapted to analyze and unfold the measured data to reconstruct the x-ray spectrum. The unfold operator code, UFO2, is being adapted for a more comprehensive spectral unfolding treatment

  13. Time Resolved X-Ray Scattering of molecules in Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt van Driel, Tim

    The dissertation describes the use of Time-Resolved X-ray Diffuse Scattering (TR-XDS) to study photo-induced structural changes in molecules in solution. The application of the technique is exemplified with experiments on two bimetallic molecules. The main focus is on the data-flow and process of...... in the purpose built CSPAD detector is presented and applied to the data to highlight the relevance of this work. Thereby showing the ability to capture a molecular movie on the sub-ps time-scale....

  14. X-Ray Crystallography Reagent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Microcapsules prepared by encapsulating an aqueous solution of a protein, drug or other bioactive substance inside a semi-permeable membrane by are disclosed. The microcapsules are formed by interfacial coacervation under conditions where the shear forces are limited to 0-100 dynes per square centimeter at the interface. By placing the microcapsules in a high osmotic dewatering solution. the protein solution is gradually made saturated and then supersaturated. and the controlled nucleation and crystallization of the protein is achieved. The crystal-filled microcapsules prepared by this method can be conveniently harvested and stored while keeping the encapsulated crystals in essentially pristine condition due to the rugged. protective membrane. Because the membrane components themselves are x-ray transparent, large crystal-containing microcapsules can be individually selected, mounted in x-ray capillary tubes and subjected to high energy x-ray diffraction studies to determine the 3-D smucture of the protein molecules. Certain embodiments of the microcapsules of the invention have composite polymeric outer membranes which are somewhat elastic, water insoluble, permeable only to water, salts, and low molecular weight molecules and are structurally stable in fluid shear forces typically encountered in the human vascular system.

  15. X-ray Crystallography of Biological Macromolecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 6. X-ray Crystallography of Biological Macromolecules. K Suguna. General Article Volume 10 Issue 6 June 2005 pp 35-42. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/010/06/0035-0042 ...

  16. Structure determination by X-ray crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Ladd, M F C

    1977-01-01

    Crystallography may be described as the science of the structure of materi­ als, using this word in its widest sense, and its ramifications are apparent over a broad front of current scientific endeavor. It is not surprising, therefore, to find that most universities offer some aspects of crystallography in their undergraduate courses in the physical sciences. It is the principal aim of this book to present an introduction to structure determination by X-ray crystal­ lography that is appropriate mainly to both final-year undergraduate studies in crystallography, chemistry, and chemical physics, and introductory post­ graduate work in this area of crystallography. We believe that the book will be of interest in other disciplines, such as physics, metallurgy, biochemistry, and geology, where crystallography has an important part to play. In the space of one book, it is not possible either to cover all aspects of crystallography or to treat all the subject matter completely rigorously. In particular, certain ...

  17. Opportunities and challenges for time-resolved studies of protein structural dynamics at X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutze, Richard

    2014-07-17

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are revolutionary X-ray sources. Their time structure, providing X-ray pulses of a few tens of femtoseconds in duration; and their extreme peak brilliance, delivering approximately 10(12) X-ray photons per pulse and facilitating sub-micrometre focusing, distinguish XFEL sources from synchrotron radiation. In this opinion piece, I argue that these properties of XFEL radiation will facilitate new discoveries in life science. I reason that time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography and time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering are promising areas of scientific investigation that will be advanced by XFEL capabilities, allowing new scientific questions to be addressed that are not accessible using established methods at storage ring facilities. These questions include visualizing ultrafast protein structural dynamics on the femtosecond to picosecond time-scale, as well as time-resolved diffraction studies of non-cyclic reactions. I argue that these emerging opportunities will stimulate a renaissance of interest in time-resolved structural biochemistry.

  18. BioCARS: a synchrotron resource for time-resolved X-ray science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, T; Anderson, S; Brewer, H; Chen, Y S; Cho, H S; Dashdorj, N; Henning, R W; Kosheleva, I; Macha, G; Meron, M; Pahl, R; Ren, Z; Ruan, S; Schotte, F; Srajer, V; Viccaro, P J; Westferro, F; Anfinrud, P; Moffat, K

    2011-07-01

    BioCARS, a NIH-supported national user facility for macromolecular time-resolved X-ray crystallography at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), has recently completed commissioning of an upgraded undulator-based beamline optimized for single-shot laser-pump X-ray-probe measurements with time resolution as short as 100 ps. The source consists of two in-line undulators with periods of 23 and 27 mm that together provide high-flux pink-beam capability at 12 keV as well as first-harmonic coverage from 6.8 to 19 keV. A high-heat-load chopper reduces the average power load on downstream components, thereby preserving the surface figure of a Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror system capable of focusing the X-ray beam to a spot size of 90 µm horizontal by 20 µm vertical. A high-speed chopper isolates single X-ray pulses at 1 kHz in both hybrid and 24-bunch modes of the APS storage ring. In hybrid mode each isolated X-ray pulse delivers up to ~4 × 10(10) photons to the sample, thereby achieving a time-averaged flux approaching that of fourth-generation X-FEL sources. A new high-power picosecond laser system delivers pulses tunable over the wavelength range 450-2000 nm. These pulses are synchronized to the storage-ring RF clock with long-term stability better than 10 ps RMS. Monochromatic experimental capability with Biosafety Level 3 certification has been retained.

  19. Time-resolved pump-probe X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy of Gaq3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicke, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    of Gaq 3 was analyzed and presents one of the first time-resolved measurements at PETRA III. In addition to pump-probe XAFS spectroscopy, different phases of Gaq 3 and Alq 3 in form of powder, crystal, film and solution were analyzed by means of UV-VIS and fluorescence spectroscopy. Electronic and optical differences of the molecules related to the particular form could be revealed. Gaq 3 in benzyl alcohol solution and Gaq 3 in crystalline form exhibit very similar optical features, indicating similar structural properties. The various preparation techniques used to obtain the sample forms are presented in this thesis. Analyzing the differences among the diverse sample forms helps to answer the question on how the conclusions extracted from sample systems in liquid form can be transferred to the ones in crystal form or film form, the latter appearing in organic light emitting diodes. The future goal of this research project is the direct measurement of the excited state structure of Alq 3 as well as Gaq 3 , and similar sample systems by time-resolved X-ray crystallography. The sample crystals have to fulfill specific requirements especially for the laser induced photoexcitation process. In this thesis a newly developed preparation method for low roughness singe crystal slices is presented. These crystal slices can be used for future perspective time-resolved X-ray crystallography experiments.

  20. Why do We Trust X-ray Crystallography?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    All chemists know that X-ray crystallography is the 'gold standard' characterisation technique: an X-ray crystal struc- ture provides definitive proof of structure for chemical com- pounds. But, why do we trust X-ray crystallography in this way? This article highlights the underlying reasons: there is simply so much information in ...

  1. Time Resolved X-Ray Spot Size Diagnostic

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Roger; Falabella, Steven; Guethlein, Gary; Raymond, Brett; Weir, John

    2005-01-01

    A diagnostic was developed for the determination of temporal history of an X-ray spot. A pair of thin (0.5 mm) slits image the x-ray spot to a fast scintillator which is coupled to a fast detector, thus sampling a slice of the X-Ray spot. Two other scintillator/detectors are used to determine the position of the spot and total forward dose. The slit signal is normalized to the dose and the resulting signal is analyzed to get the spot size. The position information is used to compensate for small changes due to spot motion and misalignment. The time resolution of the diagnostic is about 1 ns and measures spots from 0.5 mm to over 3 mm. The theory and equations used to calculate spot size and position are presented, as well as data. The calculations assume a symmetric, Gaussian spot. The spot data is generated by the ETA II accelerator, a 2kA, 5.5 MeV, 60ns electron beam focused on a Tantalum target. The spot generated is typically about 1 mm FWHM. Comparisons are made to an X-ray pinhole camera which images th...

  2. Time-Resolved Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Elshof, Johan E.; Besselink, R.; Stawski, Tomasz; Castricum, H.L.; Levy, D.; Zayat, M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter focuses on time-resolved studies of nanostructure development in sol-gel liquids, that is, diluted sols, wet gels, and drying thin fffilms. The most commonly investigated classes of sol-gel materials are silica, organically modified silica, template-directed mesostructured silica,

  3. A glimpse of structural biology through X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yigong

    2014-11-20

    Since determination of the myoglobin structure in 1957, X-ray crystallography, as the anchoring tool of structural biology, has played an instrumental role in deciphering the secrets of life. Knowledge gained through X-ray crystallography has fundamentally advanced our views on cellular processes and greatly facilitated development of modern medicine. In this brief narrative, I describe my personal understanding of the evolution of structural biology through X-ray crystallography-using as examples mechanistic understanding of protein kinases and integral membrane proteins-and comment on the impact of technological development and outlook of X-ray crystallography.

  4. Structure determination by X-ray crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Ladd, M F C

    1995-01-01

    X-ray crystallography provides us with the most accurate picture we can get of atomic and molecular structures in crystals. It provides a hard bedrock of structural results in chemistry and in mineralogy. In biology, where the structures are not fully crystalline, it can still provide valuable results and, indeed, the impact here has been revolutionary. It is still an immense field for young workers, and no doubt will provide yet more striking develop­ ments of a major character. It does, however, require a wide range of intellectual application, and a considerable ability in many fields. This book will provide much help. It is a very straightforward and thorough guide to every aspect of the subject. The authors are experienced both as research workers themselves and as teachers of standing, and this is shown in their clarity of exposition. There are plenty of iliustrations and worked examples to aid the student to obtain a real grasp of the subject.

  5. Capturing molecular structural dynamics by 100 ps time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tokushi; Nozawa, Shunsuke; Ichiyanagi, Kohei; Tomita, Ayana; Chollet, Matthieu; Ichikawa, Hirohiko; Fujii, Hiroshi; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Koshihara, Shin-ya

    2009-01-01

    An experimental set-up for time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 100 ps time resolution at beamline NW14A at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring is presented. An experimental set-up for time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 100 ps time resolution at beamline NW14A at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring is presented. The X-ray positional active feedback to crystals in a monochromator combined with a figure-of-merit scan of the laser beam position has been utilized as an essential tool to stabilize the spatial overlap of the X-ray and laser beams at the sample position. As a typical example, a time-resolved XAFS measurement of a photo-induced spin crossover reaction of the tris(1,10-phenanthrorine)iron(II) complex in water is presented

  6. Time-resolved materials science opportunities using synchrotron x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, B.C.; Tischler, J.Z.

    1995-06-01

    The high brightness, high intensity, and pulsed time-structure of synchrotron sources provide new opportunities for time-resolved x-ray diffraction investigations. With third generation synchrotron sources coming on line, high brilliance and high brightness are now available in x-ray beams with the highest flux. In addition to the high average flux, the instantaneous flux available in synchrotron beams is greatly enhanced by the pulsed time structure, which consists of short bursts of x-rays that are separated by ∼tens to hundreds of nanoseconds. Time-resolved one- and two-dimensional position sensitive detection techniques that take advantage of synchrotron radiation for materials science x-ray diffraction investigations are presented, and time resolved materials science applications are discussed in terms of recent diffraction and spectroscopy results and materials research opportunities

  7. Ultrafast time-resolved X-ray diffraction using an optimized laser-plasma based X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Femtosecond X-ray pulses are invaluable tools to investigate the structural dynamics triggered by a femtosecond laser pulse. These ultrashort X-ray pulses can be provided by lab-sized laser-produced plasma X-ray sources. This thesis is dedicated to optimizing the X-ray emission from the X-ray source at the University of Duisburg-Essen and using this source to investigate ultrafast structural dynamics in laser excited materials. For these purposes, detailed investigations on how the laser intensities, target thicknesses, angles of incidence and different pre-pulse/pre-plasma conditions affecting the emission of Kα-photons from Cu and Ti targets were performed. The outcomes from these studies are applied to optimize the X-ray production of the existing X-ray source for time resolved X-ray diffraction (TRXD) experiments. In the mean time, in order to improve the measurement sensitivity/accuracy, and automatize and speed up the experimental procedures, several other improvements have been implemented in the experimental setup for TRXD experiments. These improvements of the setup are essential to achieve the results of the three TRXD experiments discussed in this thesis. In the first experiment, Debye-Waller effect in a thin laser-excited Au film was observed. The drop of measured diffraction signal with a decay time constant of 4.3±1 ps was measured for high excitation fluences. This result is in good agreement with previous experimental results as well as the Two-Temperature Model (TTM) calculations at high fluences. The second experiment extends the studies of coherent optical phonons in laser-excited Bi to a higher excitation fluence range that has not been investigated previously. Large amplitude coherent atomic motion and a complete softening of the A1g phonon mode were observed. These observations represents conclusive experimental evidence that the Peierls distortion, which defines the equilibrium structure of Bi, vanishes and the material is transformed into

  8. Fixed target matrix for femtosecond time-resolved and in situ serial micro-crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mueller

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a crystallography chip enabling in situ room temperature crystallography at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron laser (X-FEL sources. Compared to other in situ approaches, we observe extremely low background and high diffraction data quality. The chip design is robust and allows fast and efficient loading of thousands of small crystals. The ability to load a large number of protein crystals, at room temperature and with high efficiency, into prescribed positions enables high throughput automated serial crystallography with microfocus synchrotron beamlines. In addition, we demonstrate the application of this chip for femtosecond time-resolved serial crystallography at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS, Menlo Park, California, USA. The chip concept enables multiple images to be acquired from each crystal, allowing differential detection of changes in diffraction intensities in order to obtain high signal-to-noise and fully exploit the time resolution capabilities of XFELs.

  9. Fixed target matrix for femtosecond time-resolved and in situ serial micro-crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, C.; Marx, A.; Epp, S. W.; Zhong, Y.; Kuo, A.; Balo, A. R.; Soman, J.; Schotte, F.; Lemke, H. T.; Owen, R. L.; Pai, E. F.; Pearson, A. R.; Olson, J. S.; Anfinrud, P. A.; Ernst, O. P.; Dwayne Miller, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a crystallography chip enabling in situ room temperature crystallography at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron laser (X-FEL) sources. Compared to other in situ approaches, we observe extremely low background and high diffraction data quality. The chip design is robust and allows fast and efficient loading of thousands of small crystals. The ability to load a large number of protein crystals, at room temperature and with high efficiency, into prescribed positions enables high throughput automated serial crystallography with microfocus synchrotron beamlines. In addition, we demonstrate the application of this chip for femtosecond time-resolved serial crystallography at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS, Menlo Park, California, USA). The chip concept enables multiple images to be acquired from each crystal, allowing differential detection of changes in diffraction intensities in order to obtain high signal-to-noise and fully exploit the time resolution capabilities of XFELs. PMID:26798825

  10. Time-resolved crystallography using the Hadamard Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Briony A.; Beddard, Godfrey S.; Owen, Robin L.; Pearson, Arwen R.

    2014-01-01

    A new method for performing time-resolved X-ray crystallographic experiments based on the Hadamard Transform is proposed and demonstrated. The time-resolution is defined by the underlying periodicity of the probe pulse sequence and the signal to noise is greatly improved compared to the fastest experiments depending on a single pulse. This approach is general and equally applicable to any spectroscopic or imaging measurement where the probe can be encoded. PMID:25282611

  11. On the theory of time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    2008-01-01

    We derive the basic theoretical formulation for X-ray diffraction with pulsed fields, using a fully quantized description of light and matter. Relevant time scales are discussed for coherent as well as incoherent X-ray pulses, and we provide expressions to be used for calculation of the experimen......We derive the basic theoretical formulation for X-ray diffraction with pulsed fields, using a fully quantized description of light and matter. Relevant time scales are discussed for coherent as well as incoherent X-ray pulses, and we provide expressions to be used for calculation...... of the experimental diffraction signal for both types of X-ray sources. We present a simple analysis of time-resolved X-ray scattering for direct bond breaking in diatomic molecules. This essentially analytical approach highlights the relation between the signal and the time-dependent quantum distribution...

  12. Few-femtosecond time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, C; Decker, F-J; Ding, Y; Dolgashev, V A; Frisch, J; Huang, Z; Krejcik, P; Loos, H; Lutman, A; Maxwell, T J; Turner, J; Wang, J; Wang, M-H; Welch, J; Wu, J

    2014-04-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers, with pulse durations ranging from a few to several hundred femtoseconds, are uniquely suited for studying atomic, molecular, chemical and biological systems. Characterizing the temporal profiles of these femtosecond X-ray pulses that vary from shot to shot is not only challenging but also important for data interpretation. Here we report the time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers by using an X-band radiofrequency transverse deflector at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We demonstrate this method to be a simple, non-invasive technique with a large dynamic range for single-shot electron and X-ray temporal characterization. A resolution of less than 1 fs root mean square has been achieved for soft X-ray pulses. The lasing evolution along the undulator has been studied with the electron trapping being observed as the X-ray peak power approaches 100 GW.

  13. X-ray induced dimerization of cinnamic acid: Time-resolved inelastic X-ray scattering study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkinen, Juho; Niskanen, Johannes; Talka, Tuomas; Sahle, Christoph J; Müller, Harald; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Hashemi, Javad; Akbari, Ali; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2015-11-16

    A classic example of solid-state topochemical reactions is the ultraviolet-light induced photodimerization of α-trans-cinnamic acid (CA). Here, we report the first observation of an X-ray-induced dimerization of CA and monitor it in situ using nonresonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy (NRIXS). The time-evolution of the carbon core-electron excitation spectra shows the effects of two X-ray induced reactions: dimerization on a short time-scale and disintegration on a long time-scale. We used spectrum simulations of CA and its dimerization product, α-truxillic acid (TA), to gain insight into the dimerization effects. From the time-resolved spectra, we extracted component spectra and time-dependent weights corresponding to CA and TA. The results suggest that the X-ray induced dimerization proceeds homogeneously in contrast to the dimerization induced by ultraviolet light. We also utilized the ability of NRIXS for direct tomography with chemical-bond contrast to image the spatial progress of the reactions in the sample crystal. Our work paves the way for other time-resolved studies on chemical reactions using inelastic X-ray scattering.

  14. Mix and Inject: Reaction Initiation by Diffusion for Time-Resolved Macromolecular Crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Schmidt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved macromolecular crystallography unifies structure determination with chemical kinetics, since the structures of transient states and chemical and kinetic mechanisms can be determined simultaneously from the same data. To start a reaction in an enzyme, typically, an initially inactive substrate present in the crystal is activated. This has particular disadvantages that are circumvented when active substrate is directly provided by diffusion. However, then it is prohibitive to use macroscopic crystals because diffusion times become too long. With small micro- and nanocrystals diffusion times are adequately short for most enzymes and the reaction can be swiftly initiated. We demonstrate here that a time-resolved crystallographic experiment becomes feasible by mixing substrate with enzyme nanocrystals which are subsequently injected into the X-ray beam of a pulsed X-ray source.

  15. Ultrafast Structural Dynamics in InSb Probed by Time-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, A.H.; Shank, C.V.; Chin, A.H.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Shank, C.V.; Glover, T.E.; Leemans, W.P.; Balling, P.

    1999-01-01

    Ultrafast structural dynamics in laser-perturbed InSb are studied using time-resolved x-ray diffraction with a novel femtosecond x-ray source. We report the first observation of a delay in the onset of lattice expansion, which we attribute to energy relaxation processes and lattice strain propagation. In addition, we observe direct indications of ultrafast disordering on a subpicosecond time scale. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  16. Time-resolved X-ray PIV technique for diagnosing opaque biofluid flow with insufficient X-ray fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung Yong; Park, Han Wook; Kim, Bo Heum; Lee, Sang Joon

    2013-05-01

    X-ray imaging is used to visualize the biofluid flow phenomena in a nondestructive manner. A technique currently used for quantitative visualization is X-ray particle image velocimetry (PIV). Although this technique provides a high spatial resolution (less than 10 µm), significant hemodynamic parameters are difficult to obtain under actual physiological conditions because of the limited temporal resolution of the technique, which in turn is due to the relatively long exposure time (~10 ms) involved in X-ray imaging. This study combines an image intensifier with a high-speed camera to reduce exposure time, thereby improving temporal resolution. The image intensifier amplifies light flux by emitting secondary electrons in the micro-channel plate. The increased incident light flux greatly reduces the exposure time (below 200 µs). The proposed X-ray PIV system was applied to high-speed blood flows in a tube, and the velocity field information was successfully obtained. The time-resolved X-ray PIV system can be employed to investigate blood flows at beamlines with insufficient X-ray fluxes under specific physiological conditions. This method facilitates understanding of the basic hemodynamic characteristics and pathological mechanism of cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Time resolved x-ray photography of a dense plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, J.C.; Meyer, J.; Rankin, G.

    1977-01-01

    The temporal development of the hot plasma in a dense plasma focus is studied by x-ray streak photography of approximately 2 ns resolution time. It is shown that initially a uniform x-ray emitting pinch plasma is formed which subsequently cools down until x-ray emission stops after approximately 50 ns. At a time of around 100 ns after initial x-ray emission coinciding with the break-up time of the pinch a second burst of x-rays is observed coming from small localized regions. The observations are compared with results obtained from time-resolved shadow and schlieren photography of a similar dense focus discharge. (author)

  18. Combined time-resolved SAXS and X-ray Spectroscopy methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bras, W.; Nikitenko, S.; Portale, G.; Beale, A.M.; van der Eerden, A.M.J.; Detollenaere, D.

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed equipment suitable for quasi simultaneous data collection of SAXS/WAXS and X-ray spectroscopy is discussed. The main applications for this technique are foreseen to be time-resolved studies in inorganic materials relevant for catalysis research and ceramics. The equipment is

  19. The Beginnings of X-ray Crystallography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    broke his arm when he was 5 years old and his father used the newly discovered Rontgen-rays. (X-rays) and his experimental equipment to examine the broken arm, which is the first recorded surgical use of X-rays in Australia. William Lawrence Bragg married Alice Hopkinson (1899–. 1989) in 1921, with whom he had four ...

  20. Direct observation of ultrafast atomic motion using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shymanovich, U.

    2007-11-13

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the atomic motion in laser irradiated solids on a picosecond to subpicosecond time-scale using the time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique. In the second chapter, the laser system, the laser-plasma based X-ray source and the experimental setup for optical pump / X-ray probe measurements were presented. Chapter 3 is devoted to the characterization and comparison of different types of X-ray optics. Chapter 4 presented the time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments performed for this thesis. The first two sections of this chapter discuss the measurements of initially unexpected strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity of the X-ray probe beam. The elimination of the strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity represented an important prerequisite to perform the study of lattice heating in Germanium after femtosecond optical excitation by measuring the transient Debye-Waller effect. The third section describes the investigations of acoustic waves upon ultrafast optical excitation and discusses the two different pressure contributions driving them: the thermal and the electronic ones. (orig.)

  1. Time-resolved x-ray line diagnostics of laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffman, R.L.; Matthews, D.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Lee, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    We have examined the underdense plasma conditions of laser irradiated disks using K x-rays from highly ionized ions. A 900 ps laser pulse of 0.532 μm light is used to irradiate various Z disks which have been doped with low concentrations of tracer materials. The tracers whose Z's range from 13 to 22 are chosen so that their K x-ray spectrum is sensitive to typical underdense plasma temperatures and densities. Spectra are measured using a time-resolved crystal spectrograph recording the time history of the x-ray spectrum. A spatially-resolved, time-integrated crystal spectrograph also monitors the x-ray lines. Large differences in Al spectra are observed when the host plasma is changed from SiO 2 to PbO or In. Spectra will be presented along with preliminary analysis of the data

  2. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Scintillator performance in time-resolved, hard, indirect detection X-ray studies on the sub-microsecond timescale at synchrotron light sources is reviewed, modelled and examined experimentally. LYSO:Ce is found to be the only commercially available crystal suitable for these experiments. The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits)

  3. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Drakopoulos, Michael [Diamond Light Source, I12 Joint Engineering, Environmental, Processing (JEEP) Beamline, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Rack, Alexander [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Eakins, Daniel E., E-mail: d.eakins@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-24

    Scintillator performance in time-resolved, hard, indirect detection X-ray studies on the sub-microsecond timescale at synchrotron light sources is reviewed, modelled and examined experimentally. LYSO:Ce is found to be the only commercially available crystal suitable for these experiments. The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits)

  4. Picosecond time-resolved laser pump/X-ray probe experiments using a gated single-photon-counting area detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejdrup, T.; Lemke, H.T.; Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer

    2009-01-01

    The recent developments in X-ray detectors have opened new possibilities in the area of time-resolved pump/probe X-ray experiments; this article presents the novel use of a PILATUS detector to achieve X-ray pulse duration limited time-resolution at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), USA. The capab......The recent developments in X-ray detectors have opened new possibilities in the area of time-resolved pump/probe X-ray experiments; this article presents the novel use of a PILATUS detector to achieve X-ray pulse duration limited time-resolution at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), USA...

  5. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy on a Tabletop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miaja-Avila

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental tools capable of monitoring both atomic and electronic structure on ultrafast (femtosecond to picosecond time scales are needed for investigating photophysical processes fundamental to light harvesting, photocatalysis, energy and data storage, and optical display technologies. Time-resolved hard x-ray (>3  keV spectroscopies have proven valuable for these measurements due to their elemental specificity and sensitivity to geometric and electronic structures. Here, we present the first tabletop apparatus capable of performing time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy. The time resolution of the apparatus is better than 6 ps. By combining a compact laser-driven plasma source with a highly efficient array of microcalorimeter x-ray detectors, we are able to observe photoinduced spin changes in an archetypal polypyridyl iron complex [Fe(2,2^{′}-bipyridine_{3}]^{2+} and accurately measure the lifetime of the quintet spin state. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast hard x-ray emission spectroscopy is no longer confined to large facilities and now can be performed in conventional laboratories with 10 times better time resolution than at synchrotrons. Our results are enabled, in part, by a 100- to 1000-fold increase in x-ray collection efficiency compared to current techniques.

  6. Time-resolved imaging using x-ray free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barty, Anton

    2010-01-01

    The ultra-intense, ultra-short x-ray pulses provided by x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) sources are ideally suited to time-resolved studies of structural dynamics with spatial resolution from nanometre to atomic length scales and a temporal resolution of 10 fs or less. With enough photons in a single pulse to enable single-shot measurements and short enough pulses to freeze atomic motion, researchers now have a new window into the time evolution ultrafast phenomena that are intrinsically not cyclic in nature. In this paper we recap some of the key time-resolved imaging experiments performed at FLASH and look ahead to a new generation of experiments at higher resolution using a new generation of new XFEL sources that are only just becoming available.

  7. X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography of metalloenzymes at XFELs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Junko

    2016-01-01

    The ultra-bright femtosecond X-ray pulses provided by X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) open capabilities for studying the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of biological and inorganic systems beyond what is possible at synchrotron sources. Although the structure and chemistry at the catalytic sites have been studied intensively in both biological and inorganic systems, a full understanding of the atomic-scale chemistry requires new approaches beyond the steady state X-ray crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures. Following the dynamic changes in the geometric and electronic structure at ambient conditions, while overcoming X-ray damage to the redox active catalytic center, is key for deriving reaction mechanisms. Such studies become possible by using the intense and ultra-short femtosecond X-ray pulses from an XFEL, where sample is probed before it is damaged. We have developed methodology for simultaneously collecting crystallography data and X-ray emission spectra, using an energy dispersive spectrometer at ambient conditions. In addition, we have developed a way to collect metal L-edge data of dilute samples using soft X-rays at XFELs. The advantages and challenges of these methods will be described in this review. (author)

  8. X-ray pixel detector for crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Delpierre, P A; Blanquart, L; Caillot, B; Clemens, J C; Mouget, C

    2001-01-01

    For X-ray diffraction experiments, the required dynamic range is a challenge. The signal ranges usually over more than six orders of magnitude. To meet this requirement and to reduce the readout time with respect to the commonly used charge-coupled device camera, a dedicated hybrid pixel detector is under development. We have designed a new counting chip with pixel size of 330 mu m. The expected counting rate per pixel is 10/sup 7/ ph/s, and a continuous readout with time stamping will allow a dynamic range for up to 4*10 /sup 9/ (16-bit counter in each pixel and 16-bit counter per pixel in the readout boards). This chip has been submitted for fabrication and is under test. First results of this chip will be presented. As a first step, a small detector (4*1.6 cm/sup 2/) is being built, using a DELPHI(LEP/CERN) silicon array of diodes, which have good efficiency for collecting X-rays between 5 and 25 keV. After the electrical tests, the performance of this X-ray detector will be measured in the ESRF-D2AM beam ...

  9. X-ray pixel detector for crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Delpierre, P A; Blanquart, L; Caillot, B; Clemens, J C; Mouget, C

    2000-01-01

    For X-rays diffraction experiments, the required dynamic is a challenge. The signal ranges usually over more than six orders of magnitude. To meet this requirement and to reduce the readout time with respect to the commonly used CCD camera a dedicated hybrid pixel detector is under fabrication. We have designed a new counting chip with pixel sizes of 330 mu m. The expected counting rate per pixel is 10/sup 7/ ph/s and a continuous readout with time stamping-will allow for up to 4*10/sup 9/ dynamics range (16-bit counter in each pixel and 16-bit counter per pixel in the readout boards). This chip has been submitted for fabrication and it is under test. We will show first results. As a first step a small detector (4* 1.6 cm/sup 2/) is being built, using a DELPHI (LEP/CERN) Si array of diodes which have good efficiency for collecting X-rays between 5 and 25 keV. After the electrical tests, the performances of this X-ray detector will be measured in the ESRF-D2AM beam line (Grenoble, France), scheduled in next De...

  10. Versatile, reprogrammable area pixel array detector for time-resolved synchrotron x-ray applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruner, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The final technical report for DOE grant DE-SC0004079 is presented. The goal of the grant was to perform research, development and application of novel imaging x-ray detectors so as to effectively utilize the high intensity and brightness of the national synchrotron radiation facilities to enable previously unfeasible time-resolved x-ray research. The report summarizes the development of the resultant imaging x-ray detectors. Two types of detector platforms were developed: The first is a detector platform (called a Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD) that can image continuously at over a thousand images per second while maintaining high efficiency for wide dynamic range signals ranging from 1 to hundreds of millions of x-rays per pixel per image. Research on an even higher dynamic range variant is also described. The second detector platform (called the Keck Pixel Array Detector) is capable of acquiring a burst of x-ray images at a rate of millions of images per second.

  11. Time-resolved measurements of x-ray damage to optical coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elton, R. C.; Grun, J.; Burkhalter, P. G.; Burris, H. R.; Ripin, B. H.; Newman, D. A.; Millard, J. R.; Bey, D.-M.; Manka, C. K.; Konnert, J.

    1997-02-01

    Thin film optical coatings are susceptible to damage by high intensity x rays. Time-resolved measurements of this damage are required to better understand the mechanism, so that more rugged coatings can be developed. In the present experiment, dark-field shadowgraphy was used to temporally map the x-ray damage across the surface of certain anti-reflecting (AR) coatings. Two beams from the NRL PHAROS III high power Nd:glass laser system were utilized to generate a point source of plasma x rays, which in turn was used to irradiate and damage the optical coatings. Thin, opaque filters, coupled with permanent magnets and pinholes, were used to shield the optical samples from ultraviolet and charged-particle damage, respectively. The absolute, time-integrated x-ray fluence was measured with a crystal spectrograph, and also was temporally resolved with an x-ray diode. The surface morphology of the damaged optical samples was examined after each shot visually, and later with a profilometer as well as with both scanning electron- and atomic-force microscopes. A measured threshold fluence for damage of 0.049±30% cal/cm2 agrees very well with a radiation-damage code prediction of 0.046 cal/cm2.

  12. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E; Chapman, David J; White, Thomas G; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits).

  13. The founding and development of X-ray crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Zhenhong

    2014-01-01

    2014 is the centennial of X-ray crystallography. Crystals have played an important role in our lives and in the development of society throughout these 100 years. In July 2012 the 66th General Assembly of the United Nations declared 2014 to be the official International Year of Crystallography (IYCr2014). The discovery of X-ray diffraction by crystals has had a profound impact on science and technology worldwide. It provides for us a distinct image of the arrangement of atoms or/and molecules in crystals. The development of X-ray spectroscopy has made it possible for us to understand the laws of atomic structure, and thus to identify the elements in all kinds of matter. In this article the greatest events in the history of X-ray crystallography, including the development of X-ray sources, detectors, experimental data analysis, and experimental methods are reviewed to commemorate the pioneers who made such important contributions to science and technology. (author)

  14. Professor G N Ramachandran's Contributions to X-ray Crystallography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    crystallography with particular reference to structure-reactivity correlations in the crystalline state. K Venkatesan. This article presents briefly the original contributions of. Professor G N Ramachandran to the methods of the struc- ture determination by X-ray diffraction of crystals. Introduction. Crystals are composed of groups ...

  15. Professor GN Ramachandran's Contributions to X-ray Crystallography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 10. Professor G. N. Ramachandran's Contributions to X-ray Crystallography. K Venkatesan. General Article Volume 6 Issue 10 October 2001 pp 8-15. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Atomic motion of resonantly vibrating quartz crystal visualized by time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyagi, Shinobu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Takeda, Shoichi; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Transient atomic displacements during a resonant thickness-shear vibration of AT-cut α-quartz are revealed by time-resolved X-ray diffraction under an alternating electric field. The lattice strain resonantly amplified by the alternating electric field is ∼10 4 times larger than that induced by a static electric field. The resonantly amplified lattice strain is achieved by fast displacements of oxygen anions and collateral resilient deformation of Si−O−Si angles bridging rigid SiO 4 tetrahedra, which efficiently transduce electric energy into elastic energy

  17. 100 ps time-resolved solution scattering utilizing a wide-bandwidth X-ray beam from multilayer optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiyanagi, K.; Sato, T.; Nozawa, S.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, J. H.; Choi, J.; Tomita, A.; Ichikawa, H.; Adachi, S.; Ihee, H.; Koshihara, S.

    2009-01-01

    A new method of time-resolved solution scattering utilizing X-ray multilayer optics is presented. 100 ps time-resolved X-ray solution-scattering capabilities have been developed using multilayer optics at the beamline NW14A, Photon Factory Advanced Ring, KEK. X-ray pulses with an energy bandwidth of ΔE/E = 1–5% are generated by reflecting X-ray pulses (ΔE/E = 15%) through multilayer optics, made of W/B 4 C or depth-graded Ru/C on silicon substrate. This tailor-made wide-bandwidth X-ray pulse provides high-quality solution-scattering data for obtaining photo-induced molecular reaction dynamics. The time-resolved solution scattering of CH 2 I 2 in methanol is demonstrated as a typical example

  18. Combining X-ray and neutron crystallography with spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hanna; Smith, Oliver; Raven, Emma Lloyd; Moody, Peter C E

    2017-02-01

    X-ray protein crystallography has, through the determination of the three-dimensional structures of enzymes and their complexes, been essential to the understanding of biological chemistry. However, as X-rays are scattered by electrons, the technique has difficulty locating the presence and position of H atoms (and cannot locate H + ions), knowledge of which is often crucially important for the understanding of enzyme mechanism. Furthermore, X-ray irradiation, through photoelectronic effects, will perturb the redox state in the crystal. By using single-crystal spectrophotometry, reactions taking place in the crystal can be monitored, either to trap intermediates or follow photoreduction during X-ray data collection. By using neutron crystallography, the positions of H atoms can be located, as it is the nuclei rather than the electrons that scatter neutrons, and the scattering length is not determined by the atomic number. Combining the two techniques allows much greater insight into both reaction mechanism and X-ray-induced photoreduction.

  19. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction on laser-excited metal nano-particles

    CERN Document Server

    Plech, A; Kurbitz, S; Berg, K J; Graener, H; Berg, G; Gresillon, S; Kaempfe, M; Feldmann, J; Von Plessen, G

    2003-01-01

    The lattice expansion and relaxation of noble-metal nano-particles heated by intense femtosecond laser pulses are measured by pump-probe time-resolved X-ray scattering. Following the laser pulse, shape and angular shift of the (111) Bragg reflection from crystalline silver and gold particles with diameters from 20 to 100 nm are resolved stroboscopically using 100 ps X-ray- pulses from a synchrotron. We observe a transient lattice expansion that corresponds to a laser-induced temperature rise of up to 200 K, and a subsequent lattice relaxation. The relaxation occurs within several hundred picoseconds for embedded silver particles, and several nanoseconds for supported free gold particles. The relaxation time shows a strong dependence on particle size. The relaxation rate appears to be limited by the thermal coupling of the particles to the matrix and substrate; respectively, rather than by bulk thermal diffusion. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction can resolve the internal strain state of the nano-particles to sepa...

  20. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C.; Vecchio, K. S.; Huskins, E. L.; Casem, D. T.; Gruner, S. M.; Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T.; Woll, A. R.; Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T.; Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ∼10 3 –10 4 s −1 in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (∼40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation

  1. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Vecchio, K. S. [Department of NanoEngineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Huskins, E. L. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Casem, D. T. [US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Gruner, S. M. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Woll, A. R. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ∼10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} s{sup −1} in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (∼40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  2. Time-resolved X-ray transmission microscopy on magnetic microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puzic, Aleksandar

    2007-01-01

    Three excitation schemes were designed for stroboscopic imaging of magnetization dynamics with time-resolved magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (TR-MTXM). These techniques were implemented into two types of X-ray microscopes, namely the imaging transmission X-ray microscope (ITXM) and the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM), both installed at the electron storage ring of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, USA. Circular diffraction gratings (Fresnel zone plates) used in both microscopes as focusing and imaging elements presently allow for lateral resolution down to 30 nm. Magnetic imaging is performed by using the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) as element specific contrast mechanism. The developed methods have been successfully applied to the experimental investigation of magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic microstructures. A temporal resolution well below 100 ps was achieved. A conventional pump-probe technique was implemented first. The dynamic response of the magnetization excited by a broadband pulsed magnetic field was imaged spatially resolved using focused X-ray flashes. As a complementary method, the spatially resolved ferromagnetic resonance (SR-FMR) technique was developed for experimental study of magnetization dynamics in the frequency domain. As a third excitation mode, the burst excitation was implemented. The performance and efficiency of the developed methods have been demonstrated by imaging the local magnetization dynamics in laterally patterned ferromagnetic thin-film elements and three-layer stacks. The existence of multiple eigenmodes in the excitation spectra of ferromagnetic microstructures has been verified by using the pump-probe technique. Magnetostatic spin waves were selectively excited and detected with a time resolution of 50 ps using the SR-FMR technique. Thorough analysis of 20 in most cases independently prepared samples has verified that vortices which exhibit a low-amplitude switching of their core

  3. Time-resolved X-ray transmission microscopy on magnetic microstructures; Zeitaufloesende Roentgentransmissionsmikroskopie an magnetischen Mikrostrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puzic, Aleksandar

    2007-10-23

    Three excitation schemes were designed for stroboscopic imaging of magnetization dynamics with time-resolved magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (TR-MTXM). These techniques were implemented into two types of X-ray microscopes, namely the imaging transmission X-ray microscope (ITXM) and the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM), both installed at the electron storage ring of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, USA. Circular diffraction gratings (Fresnel zone plates) used in both microscopes as focusing and imaging elements presently allow for lateral resolution down to 30 nm. Magnetic imaging is performed by using the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) as element specific contrast mechanism. The developed methods have been successfully applied to the experimental investigation of magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic microstructures. A temporal resolution well below 100 ps was achieved. A conventional pump-probe technique was implemented first. The dynamic response of the magnetization excited by a broadband pulsed magnetic field was imaged spatially resolved using focused X-ray flashes. As a complementary method, the spatially resolved ferromagnetic resonance (SR-FMR) technique was developed for experimental study of magnetization dynamics in the frequency domain. As a third excitation mode, the burst excitation was implemented. The performance and efficiency of the developed methods have been demonstrated by imaging the local magnetization dynamics in laterally patterned ferromagnetic thin-film elements and three-layer stacks. The existence of multiple eigenmodes in the excitation spectra of ferromagnetic microstructures has been verified by using the pump-probe technique. Magnetostatic spin waves were selectively excited and detected with a time resolution of 50 ps using the SR-FMR technique. Thorough analysis of 20 in most cases independently prepared samples has verified that vortices which exhibit a low-amplitude switching of their core

  4. Novel organophosphorus compounds; synthesis, spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shariatinia, Z.; Sohrabi, M.; Yousefi, M.; Kovaľ, Tomáš; Dušek, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2012), s. 125-133 ISSN 1024-1221 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP0701 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : organophosphorus compounds * NMR * X-ray crystallography * hydrogen bond Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.686, year: 2012

  5. Direct Observation of Insulin Association Dynamics with Time-Resolved X-ray Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmerman, Dolev; Leshchev, Denis; Hsu, Darren J; Hong, Jiyun; Kosheleva, Irina; Chen, Lin X

    2017-09-21

    Biological functions frequently require protein-protein interactions that involve secondary and tertiary structural perturbation. Here we study protein-protein dissociation and reassociation dynamics in insulin, a model system for protein oligomerization. Insulin dimer dissociation into monomers was induced by a nanosecond temperature-jump (T-jump) of ∼8 °C in aqueous solution, and the resulting protein and solvent dynamics were tracked by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering (TRXSS) on time scales of 10 ns to 100 ms. The protein scattering signals revealed the formation of five distinguishable transient species during the association process that deviate from simple two-state kinetics. Our results show that the combination of T-jump pump coupled to TRXSS probe allows for direct tracking of structural dynamics in nonphotoactive proteins.

  6. Direct Observation of Insulin Association Dynamics with Time-Resolved X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimmerman, Dolev [Department; Leshchev, Denis [Department; Hsu, Darren J. [Department; Hong, Jiyun [Department; Kosheleva, Irina [Center; Chen, Lin X. [Department; Chemical

    2017-09-05

    Biological functions frequently require protein-protein interactions that involve secondary and tertiary structural perturbation. Here we study protein-protein dissociation and reassociation dynamics in insulin, a model system for protein oligomerization. Insulin dimer dissociation into monomers was induced by a nanosecond temperature-jump (T-jump) of ~8 °C in aqueous solution, and the resulting protein and solvent dynamics were tracked by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering (TRXSS) on time scales of 10 ns to 100 ms. The protein scattering signals revealed the formation of five distinguishable transient species during the association process that deviate from simple two state kinetics. Our results show that the combination of T-jump pump coupled to TRXSS probe allows for direct tracking of structural dynamics in nonphotoactive proteins.

  7. Computational time-resolved and resonant x-ray scattering of strongly correlated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansil, Arun [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-11-09

    predominantly decays via Auger processes, thereby providing an internal time-scale, which limits intermediate-state processes to timescales of a few femtoseconds. Accordingly, a number of activities directed at modeling K-, L- and M-edge RIXS in correlated materials were also pursused by our CRT. Our research effort supported by this CMCSN grant substantially advanced the understanding of x-ray scattering processes in the time-domain as well as in the more conventional scattering channels, including time-resolved photoemission, and how such processes can be modeled realistically in complex correlated materials more generally. The modeling of relaxation processes involved in time-domain spectroscopies is important also for understanding photoinduced effects such as energy conversion in photosynthesis and solar cell applications, and thus impacts the basic science for energy needs.

  8. The 100th Anniversary of X-Ray Crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kojić-Prodić, B.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The important thing in science is not so much to obtain new facts as to discover new ways of thinking about them.W. L. BraggThe 100th anniversary of X-ray crystallography dates back to the first X-ray diffraction experiment on a crystal of copper sulphate pentahydrate. Max von Laue designed the theoretical background of the experiment, which was performed by German physicists W. Friedrich and P. Knipping in 1912. At that time, the mathematical formulation of the phenomenon and the fundamental concepts of crystallography were subjects of mineralogy. Altogether, they facilitated the development of methods for determination of the structure of matter at the atomic level. In 1913, father and son Bragg started to develop X-ray structure analysis for determination of crystal structures of simple molecules. Historic examples of structure determination starting from rock salt to complex, biologically important (macromolecules, such as globular proteins haemoglobin and myoglobin, DNA, vitamin B12 and the recent discovery of ribozyme, illustrate the development of X-ray structural analysis. The determination of 3D structures of these molecules by X-ray diffraction had opened new areas of scientific research, such as molecular biophysics, molecular genetics, structural molecular biology, bioinorganic chemistry, organometallic chemistry, and many others. The discovery and development of X-ray crystallography revolutionised our understanding of natural sciences – physics, chemistry, biology, and also science of materials. The scientific community recognised these fundamental achievements (including the discovery of X-rays by awarding twenty-eight Nobel prizes to thirty-nine men and two women. The explosive growth of science and technology in the 20th and 21st centuries had been founded on the detailed knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of molecules, which was the basis for explaining and predicting the physical, chemical, biological and

  9. Time-Resolved Soft X-ray Diffraction Reveals Transient Structural Distortions of Ternary Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Mann

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Home-based soft X-ray time-resolved scattering experiments with nanosecond time resolution (10 ns and nanometer spatial resolution were carried out at a table top soft X-ray plasma source (2.2–5.2 nm. The investigated system was the lyotropic liquid crystal C16E7/paraffin/glycerol/formamide/IR 5. Usually, major changes in physical, chemical, and/or optical properties of the sample occur as a result of structural changes and shrinking morphology. Here, these effects occur as a consequence of the energy absorption in the sample upon optical laser excitation in the IR regime. The liquid crystal shows changes in the structural response within few hundred nanoseconds showing a time decay of 182 ns. A decrease of the Bragg peak diffracted intensity of 30% and a coherent macroscopic movement of the Bragg reflection are found as a response to the optical pump. The Bragg reflection movement is established to be isotropic and diffusion controlled (1 μs. Structural processes are analyzed in the Patterson analysis framework of the time-varying diffraction peaks revealing that the inter-lamellar distance increases by 2.7 Å resulting in an elongation of the coherently expanding lamella crystallite. The present studies emphasize the possibility of applying TR-SXRD techniques for studying the mechanical dynamics of nanosystems.

  10. A Compact X-Ray System for Macromolecular Crystallography. 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Ciszak, Ewa; Ponomarev, Igor; Joy, Marshall

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of a high flux x-ray system for macromolecular crystallography that combines a microfocus x-ray generator (40 gm FWHM spot size at a power level of 46.5Watts) and a 5.5 mm focal distance polycapillary optic. The Cu K(sub alpha) X-ray flux produced by this optimized system is 7.0 times above the X-ray flux previously reported. The X-ray flux from the microfocus system is also 3.2 times higher than that produced by the rotating anode generator equipped with a long focal distance graded multilayer monochromator (Green optic; CMF24-48-Cu6) and 30% less than that produced by the rotating anode generator with the newest design of graded multilayer monochromator (Blue optic; CMF12-38-Cu6). Both rotating anode generators operate at a power level of 5000 Watts, dissipating more than 100 times the power of our microfocus x-ray system. Diffraction data collected from small test crystals are of high quality. For example, 42,540 reflections collected at ambient temperature from a lysozyme crystal yielded R(sub sym) 5.0% for the data extending to 1.7A, and 4.8% for the complete set of data to 1.85A. The amplitudes of the reflections were used to calculate difference electron density maps that revealed positions of structurally important ions and water molecules in the crystal of lysozyme using the phases calculated from the protein model.

  11. A Compact X-Ray System for Macromolecular Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Ciszak, Ewa; Ponomarev, Igor; Gibson, Walter; Joy, Marshall

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of a high flux x-ray system for a macromolecular crystallography that combines a microfocus x-ray generator (40 micrometer full width at half maximum spot size at a power level of 46.5 W) and a collimating polycapillary optic. The Cu Ka lpha x-ray flux produced by this optimized system through a 500,um diam orifice is 7.0 times greater than the x-ray flux previously reported by Gubarev et al. [M. Gubarev et al., J. Appl. Crystallogr. 33, 882 (2000)]. The x-ray flux from the microfocus system is also 2.6 times higher than that produced by a rotating anode generator equipped with a graded multilayer monochromator (green optic, Osmic Inc. CMF24-48-Cu6) and 40% less than that produced by a rotating anode generator with the newest design of graded multilayer monochromator (blue optic, Osmic, Inc. CMF12-38-Cu6). Both rotating anode generators operate at a power level of 5000 W, dissipating more than 100 times the power of our microfocus x-ray system. Diffraction data collected from small test crystals are of high quality. For example, 42 540 reflections collected at ambient temperature from a lysozyme crystal yielded R(sub sym)=5.0% for data extending to 1.70 A, and 4.8% for the complete set of data to 1.85 A. The amplitudes of the observed reflections were used to calculate difference electron density maps that revealed positions of structurally important ions and water molecules in the crystal of lysozyme using the phases calculated from the protein model.

  12. The development of structural x-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfson, M. M.

    2018-03-01

    From its birth in 1912, when only the simplest structures could be solved, x-ray structural crystallography is now able to solve macromolecular structures containing many thousands of independent non-hydrogen atoms. This progress has depended on, and been driven by, great technical advances in the development of powerful synchrotron x-ray sources, advanced automated equipment for the collection and storage of large data sets and powerful computers to deal with everything from data processing to running programmes employing complex algorithms for the automatic solution of structures. The sheer number of developments in the subject over the past century makes it impossible for this review to be exhaustive, but it will describe some major developments that will enable the reader to understand how the subject has grown from its humble beginnings to what it is today.

  13. Time-resolved structural studies at synchrotrons and X-ray free electron lasers: opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutze, Richard; Moffat, Keith

    2012-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are potentially revolutionary X-ray sources because of their very short pulse duration, extreme peak brilliance and high spatial coherence, features that distinguish them from today’s synchrotron sources. We review recent time-resolved Laue diffraction and time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) studies at synchrotron sources, and initial static studies at XFELs. XFELs have the potential to transform the field of time-resolved structural biology, yet many challenges arise in devising and adapting hardware, experimental design and data analysis strategies to exploit their unusual properties. Despite these challenges, we are confident that XFEL sources are poised to shed new light on ultrafast protein reaction dynamics. PMID:23021004

  14. Cavitation dynamics on a NACA0015 hydrofoil using time resolved X-ray densitometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Harish; Wu, Juliana; Ceccio, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Recent investigations of partial cavitation have shown that the transition from stable to shedding cavities can be related to the presence of both propagating bubbly shocks and re-entrant liquid jets originating in the cavity closure region. In the present study, formation of sheet cavitation and its transition to periodically shedding cavities is studied on a NACA0015 hydrofoil in a recirculating water tunnel at different attack angles. Using high-speed videos and time resolved X-ray densitometry, the instantaneous void fraction flow fields are obtained to identify the principal mechanism responsible for transition from stable to shedding cavities over a range of attack angles and cavitation numbers. The role of attack angle is of particular interest, since is it related to the pressure gradient at cavity enclosure, and can lead to the formation of stronger reentrant flows. The relative importance of reentrant liquid flow and bubbly shock wave propagation will be discussed This work is supported by Office of Naval Research.

  15. Photolysis of Br2 in CCl4 studied by time-resolved X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qingyu; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Lo Russo, Manuela; Kim, Tae Kyu; Lorenc, Maciej; Cammarata, Marco; Bratos, Savo; Buslaps, Thomas; Honkimaki, Veijo; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Wulff, Michael

    2010-03-01

    A time-resolved X-ray solution scattering study of bromine molecules in CCl(4) is presented as an example of how to track atomic motions in a simple chemical reaction. The structures of the photoproducts are tracked during the recombination process, geminate and non-geminate, from 100 ps to 10 micros after dissociation. The relaxation of hot Br(2)(*) molecules heats the solvent. At early times, from 0.1 to 10 ns, an adiabatic temperature rise is observed, which leads to a pressure gradient that forces the sample to expand. The expansion starts after about 10 ns with the laser beam sizes used here. When thermal artefacts are removed by suitable scaling of the transient solvent response, the excited-state solute structures can be obtained with high fidelity. The analysis shows that 30% of Br(2)(*) molecules recombine directly along the X potential, 60% are trapped in the A/A' state with a lifetime of 5.5 ns, and 10% recombine non-geminately via diffusive motion in about 25 ns. The Br-Br distance distribution in the A/A' state peaks at 3.0 A.

  16. Guest–Host Interactions Investigated by Time-Resolved X-ray Spectroscopies and Scattering at MHz Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer; Vanko, G.; Gawelda, W.

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the photoinduced low spin (LS) to high spin (HS) conversion of [Fe(bipy)3]2+ in aqueous solution. In a laser pump/X-ray probe synchrotron setup permitting simultaneous, time-resolved X-ray diffuse scattering (XDS) and X-ray spectroscopic measurements at a 3.26 MHz repetition rate......, we observed the interplay between intramolecular dynamics and the intermolecular caging solvent response with better than 100 ps time resolution. On this time scale, the initial ultrafast spin transition and the associated intramolecular geometric structure changes are long completed...

  17. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction with accelerator- and laser-plasma-based X-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicoul, Matthieu

    2010-09-01

    Femtosecond X-ray pulses are a powerful tool to investigate atomic motions triggered by femtosecond pump pulses. This thesis is dedicated to the production of such pulses and their use in optical pump - X-ray probe measurement. This thesis describes the laser-plasma-based sources available at the University of Duisburg-Essen. Part of it consists of the description of the design, built-up and characterization of a new ''modular'' X-ray source dedicated to optimize the X-ray flux onto the sample under investigation. The acoustic wave generation in femtosecond optically excited semiconductor (gallium arsenide) and metal (gold) was performed using the sources of the University of Duisburg-Essen. The physical answer of the material was modeled by a simple strain model for the semiconductor, pressure model for the metal, in order to gain information on the interplay of the electronic and thermal pressures rising after excitation. Whereas no reliable information could be obtain in gallium arsenide (principally due to the use of a bulk), the model for gold achieved very good agreement, providing useful information. The relaxation time of the electron to lattice energy was found to be (5.0{+-}0.3) ps, and the ratio of the Grueneisen parameters was found to be {gamma}{sub e} / {gamma}{sub i} = (0.5{+-}0.1). This thesis also describes the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) which existed at the (formally) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, an accelerator-based X-ray source, and two measurements performed with it. The first one is the detailed investigation of the phonon softening of the A{sub 1g} mode launch in bismuth upon fluence excitation. Detailed information concerning the new equilibrium position and phonon frequency were obtained over extended laser pump fluences. The second measurement concerned the study of the liquid phase dynamics in a newly formed liquid phase following ultrafast melting in indium antimonide. The formation of the liquid phase

  18. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction with accelerator- and laser-plasma-based X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicoul, Matthieu

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond X-ray pulses are a powerful tool to investigate atomic motions triggered by femtosecond pump pulses. This thesis is dedicated to the production of such pulses and their use in optical pump - X-ray probe measurement. This thesis describes the laser-plasma-based sources available at the University of Duisburg-Essen. Part of it consists of the description of the design, built-up and characterization of a new ''modular'' X-ray source dedicated to optimize the X-ray flux onto the sample under investigation. The acoustic wave generation in femtosecond optically excited semiconductor (gallium arsenide) and metal (gold) was performed using the sources of the University of Duisburg-Essen. The physical answer of the material was modeled by a simple strain model for the semiconductor, pressure model for the metal, in order to gain information on the interplay of the electronic and thermal pressures rising after excitation. Whereas no reliable information could be obtain in gallium arsenide (principally due to the use of a bulk), the model for gold achieved very good agreement, providing useful information. The relaxation time of the electron to lattice energy was found to be (5.0±0.3) ps, and the ratio of the Grueneisen parameters was found to be γ e / γ i = (0.5±0.1). This thesis also describes the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) which existed at the (formally) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, an accelerator-based X-ray source, and two measurements performed with it. The first one is the detailed investigation of the phonon softening of the A 1g mode launch in bismuth upon fluence excitation. Detailed information concerning the new equilibrium position and phonon frequency were obtained over extended laser pump fluences. The second measurement concerned the study of the liquid phase dynamics in a newly formed liquid phase following ultrafast melting in indium antimonide. The formation of the liquid phase and its development for excitations close to the

  19. Time-resolved and position-resolved X-ray spectrometry with a pixelated detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, Peter

    2012-12-07

    stability of the applied Bayesian deconvolution method enabled the possibility of performing time-resolved spectrometric measurements. By measuring in ToA mode and in parallel performing a THL scan, it is possible to gain information on both energy and time. This method was then tested for a conventional X-ray tube for measuring the time dependence of the spectrum emitted during the switching-on process of the radiation. As expected, the results showed a relatively long time-dependent change of the spectrum. This method was then applied for proving that a newly developed X-ray source shows a spectral change of the spectrum emitted on a very low time scale only. As this time dependence is much shorter compared to the total pulse duration of the radiation, it is negligible. This result guarantees that both pulse duration and energy can be adjusted independently. This enables further investigations with this new X-ray tube in the field of pulsed radiation and its use for e.g. type tests.

  20. Time-resolved and position-resolved X-ray spectrometry with a pixelated detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievers, Peter

    2012-01-01

    stability of the applied Bayesian deconvolution method enabled the possibility of performing time-resolved spectrometric measurements. By measuring in ToA mode and in parallel performing a THL scan, it is possible to gain information on both energy and time. This method was then tested for a conventional X-ray tube for measuring the time dependence of the spectrum emitted during the switching-on process of the radiation. As expected, the results showed a relatively long time-dependent change of the spectrum. This method was then applied for proving that a newly developed X-ray source shows a spectral change of the spectrum emitted on a very low time scale only. As this time dependence is much shorter compared to the total pulse duration of the radiation, it is negligible. This result guarantees that both pulse duration and energy can be adjusted independently. This enables further investigations with this new X-ray tube in the field of pulsed radiation and its use for e.g. type tests.

  1. X-ray powder crystallography with vertex instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatzisotiriou, V.; Christofis, I.; Dimitriou, N.; Karvelas, S.; Karydas, A.G.; Loukas, D.; Pavlidis, A.; Spirou, S.; Dre, C.; Haralabidis, N.; Misiakos, K.; Tsoi, E.; Perdikatsis, V.; Psycharis, V.; Terzis, A.; Turchetta, R.

    1998-01-01

    An X-ray Diffractometer for Powder Crystallography is described along with experimental results and future plans. This is an intermediate instrument toward a long linear array system. Three channels of a silicon microstrip detector, are the detecting elements in the present instrument. Each detector channel is followed by a VLSI readout chain, which consists of a charge preamplifier with pulse shaping circuitry, a discriminator, and a 16-bit counter. Control and data acquisition is performed with a custom made PC readout card. A motorized goniometer scans the angle range of interest. Calibration of the system is done with reference samples and data which are captured with a one-channel conventional NaI detector. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  2. Sub-atomic resolution X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography: promise, challenges and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeley, Matthew P; Hasnain, Samar S; Antonyuk, Svetlana V

    2015-07-01

    The International Year of Crystallography saw the number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank cross the 100000 mark, with more than 90000 of these provided by X-ray crystallography. The number of X-ray structures determined to sub-atomic resolution (i.e. ≤1 Å) has passed 600 and this is likely to continue to grow rapidly with diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation sources such as MAX-IV (Sweden) and Sirius (Brazil) under construction. A dozen X-ray structures have been deposited to ultra-high resolution (i.e. ≤0.7 Å), for which precise electron density can be exploited to obtain charge density and provide information on the bonding character of catalytic or electron transfer sites. Although the development of neutron macromolecular crystallography over the years has been far less pronounced, and its application much less widespread, the availability of new and improved instrumentation, combined with dedicated deuteration facilities, are beginning to transform the field. Of the 83 macromolecular structures deposited with neutron diffraction data, more than half (49/83, 59%) were released since 2010. Sub-mm(3) crystals are now regularly being used for data collection, structures have been determined to atomic resolution for a few small proteins, and much larger unit-cell systems (cell edges >100 Å) are being successfully studied. While some details relating to H-atom positions are tractable with X-ray crystallography at sub-atomic resolution, the mobility of certain H atoms precludes them from being located. In addition, highly polarized H atoms and protons (H(+)) remain invisible with X-rays. Moreover, the majority of X-ray structures are determined from cryo-cooled crystals at 100 K, and, although radiation damage can be strongly controlled, especially since the advent of shutterless fast detectors, and by using limited doses and crystal translation at micro-focus beams, radiation damage can still take place. Neutron

  3. Sub-atomic resolution X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography: promise, challenges and potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Blakeley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The International Year of Crystallography saw the number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank cross the 100000 mark, with more than 90000 of these provided by X-ray crystallography. The number of X-ray structures determined to sub-atomic resolution (i.e. ≤1 Å has passed 600 and this is likely to continue to grow rapidly with diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation sources such as MAX-IV (Sweden and Sirius (Brazil under construction. A dozen X-ray structures have been deposited to ultra-high resolution (i.e. ≤0.7 Å, for which precise electron density can be exploited to obtain charge density and provide information on the bonding character of catalytic or electron transfer sites. Although the development of neutron macromolecular crystallography over the years has been far less pronounced, and its application much less widespread, the availability of new and improved instrumentation, combined with dedicated deuteration facilities, are beginning to transform the field. Of the 83 macromolecular structures deposited with neutron diffraction data, more than half (49/83, 59% were released since 2010. Sub-mm3 crystals are now regularly being used for data collection, structures have been determined to atomic resolution for a few small proteins, and much larger unit-cell systems (cell edges >100 Å are being successfully studied. While some details relating to H-atom positions are tractable with X-ray crystallography at sub-atomic resolution, the mobility of certain H atoms precludes them from being located. In addition, highly polarized H atoms and protons (H+ remain invisible with X-rays. Moreover, the majority of X-ray structures are determined from cryo-cooled crystals at 100 K, and, although radiation damage can be strongly controlled, especially since the advent of shutterless fast detectors, and by using limited doses and crystal translation at micro-focus beams, radiation damage can still take place

  4. Time-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction: The Dynamics of the Chemical Bond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2012-01-01

    We review the basic theoretical formulation for pulsed X-ray scattering on nonstationary molecular states. Relevant time scales are discussed for coherent as well as incpherent X-ray pulses. The general formalism is applied to a nonstationary diatomic molecule in order to highlight the relation b...

  5. Novel opportunities for time-resolved absorption spectroscopy at the X-ray free electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, B D; Abela, R

    2010-06-07

    Time-dependent X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements of chemical reaction dynamics have a time resolution which is limited by: (a) the speed and efficiency of the reaction initiation; (b) the duration of the X-ray pulses used for the measurement; and (c) the brightness of the X-ray source. X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL), which will deliver 20-100 fs pulses of X-rays, with a peak brightness which is 10(10) times that of a synchrotron, will alleviate limitations (b) and (c). Furthermore, by including a synchronized source of UV, visible, IR or THz pump radiation, the XFEL will contribute to the solution of limitation (a). The present article describes the XFEL operating principle and the generic design of an XFEL facility, emphasizing the features of particular interest to the XAS investigator.

  6. Contribution of X-ray crystallography in energy related problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majid, C.A.; Hussain, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    Crystallography is concerned with the study of the structure of matter at the atomic level in condensed state. The great practical importance of scientific knowledge of the structure of solid is self evident when consideration is given to the definition of desired physical and chemical properties. The strength of steel girders, the corrosion of alloys, the plasticity of lime, the wearing properties of case hardness steel, the dielectric capacity of materials, the lubricating properties of long chain paraffin's or of graphite, the stretching of rubber and innumerable other practical phenomena of every day life depend upon ultimate structure of these materials. To understand function to control, manipulate and best utilize their properties, and to produce materials with properties meeting a desired set of specification it is essential to understand thoroughly both the characteristics and origin of each property. Origins of materials properties lie in a combination of natural laws with the detailed structure and composition of materials, i.e. the choice, location, bonding, etc. of every atom in the material object. Therefore, to understand their various properties, it is important to explore the structure property relationship in materials. X-ray crystallography is not only helping to develop new materials having desired properties, but also in improving existing materials. Radiation effects, electrolytes, superconductors and catalysts etc. are just a few examples of many areas where crystallography is helping. With the invent of new radiation sources like synchrotron and new detectors materials and techniques, this almost 80 years old discipline continues to capture the interest of solid state physicists and chemists alike. (author)

  7. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction at monocrystalline indium antimonide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefer, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    The present work deals with the experimental study of the structural change of the semiconductor indium antimonide (InSb) after excitation by an ultrashort laser pulse (60 fs). The investigation is carried out by ultra-short X-ray pulses (around 100 fs). As a source for ultrashort X-ray pulses serves a laser plasma X-ray source. With this source, a more intense ultrashort optical laser pulse is focused onto a metal foil (intensity to 8.10 16 W/cm 2 ), and by the resulting plasma, there is an emission of X-rays. To characterize the X-ray source a novel Timepix detector was used, which made it possible to detect Bremsstrahlung up to photon energies of 700 keV. The penetration depth of X-rays is usually several micrometers and is thus much greater than the penetration depth of 100 nm of the laser pulse used for excitation. By the use of a highly asymmetric Bragg reflex the penetration depth of X-rays could be adapted to the penetration depth of the excitation pulse. Due to the low penetration depth of 2 ps after excitation an expansion of 4% of a 4 nm thin layer at the surface can already be measured. The excitation of the semiconductor will be described with different models theoretically, the temporal evolution of the deformation obtained therefrom is compared with the performed measurements. [de

  8. Photoinduced Structural Dynamics of Molecular Systems Mapped by Time-Resolved X-ray Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chergui, Majed; Collet, Eric

    2017-08-23

    We review the tremendous advances in ultrafast X-ray science, over the past 15 years, making the best use of new ultrashort X-ray sources including table-top or large-scale facilities. Different complementary X-ray-based techniques, including spectroscopy, scattering, and diffraction, are presented. The broad and expanding spectrum of these techniques in the ultrafast time domain is delivering new insight into the dynamics of molecular systems, of solutions, of solids, and of biosystems. Probing the time evolution of the electronic and structural degrees of freedom of these systems on the time scales of femtosecond to picoseconds delivers new insight into our understanding of dynamical matter.

  9. Time-resolved soft-x-ray studies of energy transport in layered and planar laser-driven targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stradling, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    New low-energy x-ray diagnostic techniques are used to explore energy-transport processes in laser heated plasmas. Streak cameras are used to provide 15-psec time-resolution measurements of subkeV x-ray emission. A very thin (50 μg/cm 2 ) carbon substrate provides a low-energy x-ray transparent window to the transmission photocathode of this soft x-ray streak camera. Active differential vacuum pumping of the instrument is required. The use of high-sensitivity, low secondary-electron energy-spread CsI photocathodes in x-ray streak cameras is also described. Significant increases in sensitivity with only a small and intermittant decrease in dynamic range were observed. These coherent, complementary advances in subkeV, time-resolved x-ray diagnostic capability are applied to energy-transport investigations of 1.06-μm laser plasmas. Both solid disk targets of a variety of Z's as well as Be-on-Al layered-disk targets were irradiated with 700-psec laser pulses of selected intensity between 3 x 10 14 W/cm 2 and 1 x 10 15 W/cm 2

  10. Applications of a table-top time-resolved luminescence spectrometer with nanosecond soft X-ray pulse excitation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brůža, P.; Pánek, D.; Fidler, V.; Benedikt, P.; Čuba, V.; Gbur, T.; Boháček, Pavel; Nikl, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 1 (2014), s. 448-451 ISSN 0018-9499 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-09876S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : LiCaAlF 6 * luminescence * scintillators * soft x-ray * SrHfO 3 * time-resolved spectroscopy * ZnO:Ga Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.283, year: 2014

  11. Time-resolved pump and probe x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 at PETRA III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Göries, D., E-mail: dennis.goeries@desy.de; Roedig, P.; Stübe, N.; Meyer, J.; Warmer, M.; Weckert, E.; Meents, A., E-mail: alke.meents@desy.de [DESY Photon Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Dicke, B.; Naumova, M.; Rübhausen, M. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL), Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Galler, A.; Gawelda, W.; Geßler, P.; Sotoudi Namin, H.; Beckmann, A. [European XFEL, Albert-Einstein Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Britz, A.; Bressler, C. [European XFEL, Albert-Einstein Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Schlie, M. [Institut für Experimentalphysik, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    We report about the development and implementation of a new setup for time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 utilizing the outstanding source properties of the low-emittance PETRA III synchrotron storage ring in Hamburg. Using a high intensity micrometer-sized X-ray beam in combination with two positional feedback systems, measurements were performed on the transition metal complex fac-Tris[2-phenylpyridinato-C2,N]iridium(III) also referred to as fac-Ir(ppy){sub 3}. This compound is a representative of the phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes, which play an important role in organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology. The experiment could directly prove the anticipated photoinduced charge transfer reaction. Our results further reveal that the temporal resolution of the experiment is limited by the PETRA III X-ray bunch length of ∼103 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM).

  12. Development of a fast pixel array detector for use in microsecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barna, S.L.; Gruner, S.M.; Shepherd, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    A large-area pixel x-ray detector is being developed to collect eight successive frames of wide dynamic range two-dimensional images at 200kHz rates. Such a detector, in conjunction with a synchrotron radiation x-ray source, will enable time-resolved x-ray studies of proteins and other materials on time scales which have previously been inaccessible. The detector will consist of an array of fully-depleted 150 micron square diodes connected to a CMOS integrated electronics layer with solder bump-bonding. During each framing period, the current resulting from the x-rays stopped in the diodes is integrated in the electronics layer, and then stored in one of eight storage capacitors underneath the pixel. After the last frame, the capacitors are read out at standard data transmission rates. The detector has been designed for a well-depth of at least 10,000 x-rays (at 20keV), and a noise level of one x-ray. Ultimately, the authors intend to construct a detector with over one million pixels (1024 by 1024). They present the results of their development effort and various features of the design. The electronics design is discussed, with special attention to the performance requirements. The choice and design of the detective diodes, as they relate to x-ray stopping power and charge collection, are presented. An analysis of various methods of bump bonding is also presented. Finally, the authors discuss the possible need for a radiation-blocking layer, to be placed between the electronics and the detective layer, and various methods they have pursued in the construction of such a layer

  13. Design of Time-Resolved Shifted Dual Transmission Grating Spectrometer for the X-Ray Spectrum Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baoqing; Yi, Tao; Wang, Chuanke; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Tingshuai; Li, Jin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-07-01

    A new time-resolved shifted dual transmission grating spectrometer (SDTGS) is designed and fabricated in this work. This SDTGS uses a new shifted dual transmission grating (SDTG) as its dispersive component, which has two sub transmission gratings with different line densities, of 2000 lines/mm and 5000 lines/mm. The axes of the two sub transmission gratings in SDTG are horizontally and vertically shifted a certain distance to measure a broad range of 0.1-5 keV time-resolved X-ray spectra. The SDTG has been calibrated with a soft X-ray beam of the synchrotron radiation facility and its diffraction efficiency is also measured. The designed SDTGS can take full use of the space on a record panel and improve the precision for measuring spatial and temporal spectrum simultaneously. It will be a promising application for accurate diagnosis of the soft X-ray spectrum in inertial confinement fusion. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11405158 and 11435011) and Development Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (Nos. 2014B0102011 and 2014B0102012)

  14. Ultrafast time-resolved transient structures of solids and liquids by means of extended X-ray absorption fine structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Ivan V; Rentzepis, Peter M

    2004-01-23

    Detection of ultrafast transient structures and the evolution of ultrafast structural intermediates during the course of reactions has been a long standing goal of chemists and biologists. This article will be restricted to nanosecond, picosecond and shorter time-resolved extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies, its aim being to present the progress and problems encounter in measurements and understanding the structure of transients. The recent advances in source technology has stimulated a wide variety of novel experiments using both synchrotrons and smaller laboratory size systems. With more efficient X-ray lenses and detectors many of the previously difficult experiments to perform, because of the exposure time required and weak signals, will now be easily performed. The experimental system for the detection of ultrafast, time-resolved EXAFS spectra of molecules in liquids is described and the method for the analysis of EXAFS spectra to yield transient structures is given. We believe that utilizing our table-top ultrafast X-ray source and the polycapillary optics in conjunction with dispersive spectrometer and charge coupled devices (CCD) we will be able to determine the structure of many reaction intermediates and excited states of chemical and biological molecules in solid and liquid state.

  15. Carbon Condensation during High Explosive Detonation with Time Resolved Small Angle X-ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammons, Joshua; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Nielsen, Michael; Lauderbach, Lisa; Hodgin, Ralph; Bastea, Sorin; Fried, Larry; May, Chadd; Sinclair, Nicholas; Jensen, Brian; Gustavsen, Rick; Dattelbaum, Dana; Watkins, Erik; Firestone, Millicent; Ilavsky, Jan; van Buuren, Tony; Willey, Trevor; Lawrence Livermore National Lab Collaboration; Los Alamos National Laboratory Collaboration; Washington State University/Advanced Photon Source Team

    Carbon condensation during high-energy detonations occurs under extreme conditions and on very short time scales. Understanding and manipulating soot formation, particularly detonation nanodiamond, has attracted the attention of military, academic and industrial research. An in-situ characterization of these nanoscale phases, during detonation, is highly sought after and presents a formidable challenge even with today's instruments. Using the high flux available with synchrotron X-rays, pink beam small angle X-ray scattering is able to observe the carbon phases during detonation. This experimental approach, though powerful, requires careful consideration and support from other techniques, such as post-mortem TEM, EELS and USAXS. We present a comparative survey of carbon condensation from different CHNO high explosives. This work was performed under the auspices of the US DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Strain analysis of trabecular bone using time-resolved X-ray microtomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiroušek, Ondřej; Zlámal, Petr; Kytýř, Daniel; Kroupa, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 633, Suppl. 1 (2011), s. 148-151 ISSN 0168-9002. [International Workshop on Radiation Imaging Detectors /11./. Praha, 28.06.2009-02.07.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP103/07/P483 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : trabecular bone * X-ray microtomography * strain analysis * intrinsic material properties Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.207, year: 2011

  17. FY05 LDRD Final ReportTime-Resolved Dynamic Studies using Short Pulse X-Ray Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A; Dunn, J; van Buuren, T; Budil, K; Sadigh, B; Gilmer, G; Falcone, R; Lee, R; Ng, A

    2006-02-10

    Established techniques must be extended down to the ps and sub-ps time domain to directly probe product states of materials under extreme conditions. We used short pulse ({le} 1 ps) x-ray radiation to track changes in the physical properties in tandem with measurements of the atomic and electronic structure of materials undergoing fast laser excitation and shock-related phenomena. The sources included those already available at LLNL, including the picosecond X-ray laser as well as the ALS Femtosecond Phenomena beamline and the SSRL based sub-picosecond photon source (SPPS). These allow the temporal resolution to be improved by 2 orders of magnitude over the current state-of-the-art, which is {approx} 100 ps. Thus, we observed the manifestations of dynamical processes with unprecedented time resolution. Time-resolved x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and x-ray scattering were used to study phase changes in materials with sub-picosecond time resolution. These experiments coupled to multiscale modeling allow us to explore the physics of materials in high laser fields and extreme non-equilibrium states of matter. The ability to characterize the physical and electronic structure of materials under extreme conditions together with state-of-the-art models and computational facilities will catapult LLNL's core competencies into the scientific world arena as well as support its missions of national security and stockpile stewardship.

  18. Time-resolved soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy in transmission mode on liquids at MHz repetition rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattis Fondell

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a setup combining a liquid flatjet sample delivery and a MHz laser system for time-resolved soft X-ray absorption measurements of liquid samples at the high brilliance undulator beamline UE52-SGM at Bessy II yielding unprecedented statistics in this spectral range. We demonstrate that the efficient detection of transient absorption changes in transmission mode enables the identification of photoexcited species in dilute samples. With iron(II-trisbipyridine in aqueous solution as a benchmark system, we present absorption measurements at various edges in the soft X-ray regime. In combination with the wavelength tunability of the laser system, the set-up opens up opportunities to study the photochemistry of many systems at low concentrations, relevant to materials sciences, chemistry, and biology.

  19. Time-resolved X-ray scattering program at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodricks, B.

    1994-01-01

    The Time-Resolved Scattering Program's goal is the development of instruments and techniques for time-resolved studies. This entails the development of wide bandpass and focusing optics, high-speed detectors, mechanical choppers, and components for the measurement and creation of changes in samples. Techniques being developed are pump-probe experiments, single-bunch scattering experiments, high-speed white and pink beam Laue scattering, and nanosecond to microsecond synchronization of instruments. This program will be carried out primarily from a white-beam, bend-magnet source, experimental station, 1-BM-B, that immediately follows the first optics enclosure (1-BM-A). This paper will describe the experimental station and instruments under development to carry out the program

  20. Timepix3 as X-ray detector for time resolved synchrotron experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousef, Hazem, E-mail: hazem.yousef@diamond.ac.uk; Crevatin, Giulio; Gimenez, Eva N.; Horswell, Ian; Omar, David; Tartoni, Nicola

    2017-02-11

    The Timepix3 ASIC can be used very effectively for time resolved experiments at synchrotron facilities. We have carried out characterizations with the synchrotron beam in order to determine the time resolution and other characteristics such as the energy resolution, charge sharing and signals overlapping. The best time resolution achieved is 19 ns FWHM for 12 keV photons and 350 V bias voltage. The time resolution shows dependency on the photon energy as well as on the chip and acquisition parameters. - Highlights: • An estimate time resolution of the Timepix3 is produced based on the arrival time. • At high resolution, the time structure of the DLS synchrotron beam is resolved. • The arrival time information improves combining the charge split events. • The results enable performing a wide range of time resolved experiments.

  1. The Oxford-Diamond In Situ Cell for studying chemical reactions using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhouse, Saul J.; Vranješ, Nenad; Jupe, Andrew; Drakopoulos, Michael; O'Hare, Dermot

    2012-08-01

    A versatile, infrared-heated, chemical reaction cell has been assembled and commissioned for the in situ study of a range of chemical syntheses using time-resolved energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) on Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source. Specialized reactor configurations have been constructed to enable in situ EDXRD investigation of samples under non-ambient conditions. Chemical reactions can be studied using a range of sample vessels such as alumina crucibles, steel hydrothermal autoclaves, and glassy carbon tubes, at temperatures up to 1200 °C.

  2. Nonequilibrium lattice-driven dynamics of stripes in nickelates using time-resolved x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.S.; Kung, Y.F.; Moritz, B.; Coslovich, G.; Kaindl, R.A.; Chuang, Y.D.; Moore, R.G.; Lu, D.H.; Kirchmann, P.S.; Robinson, J.S.; Minitti, M.P.; Dakovski, G.; Schlotter, W.F.; Turner, J.J.; Gerber, S.; Sasagawa, T.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z.X.; Devereaux, T.P.

    2017-03-13

    We investigate the lattice coupling to the spin and charge orders in the striped nickelate, La 1.75 Sr 0.25 NiO 4 , using time-resolved resonant x-ray scattering. Lattice-driven dynamics of both spin and charge orders are observed when the pump photon energy is tuned to that of an E u bond- stretching phonon. We present a likely scenario for the behavior of the spin and charge order parameters and its implications using a Ginzburg-Landau theory.

  3. Introducing a standard method for experimental determination of the solvent response in laser pump, x-ray probe time-resolved wide-angle x-ray scattering experiments on systems in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Kasper Skov; Brandt van Driel, Tim; Kehres, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In time-resolved laser pump, X-ray probe wide-angle X-ray scattering experiments on systems in solution the structural response of the system is accompanied by a solvent response. The solvent response is caused by reorganization of the bulk solvent following the laser pump event, and in order...... response-the solvent term-experimentally when applying laser pump, X-ray probe time-resolved wide-angle X-ray scattering. The solvent term describes difference scattering arising from the structural response of the solvent to changes in the hydrodynamic parameters: pressure, temperature and density. We...... is demonstrated to exhibit first order behaviour with respect to the amount of energy deposited in the solution. We introduce a standardized method for recording solvent responses in laser pump, X-ray probe time-resolved X-ray wide-angle scattering experiments by using dye mediated solvent heating. Furthermore...

  4. A beamline for time-resolved extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Grilj, Jakob; Sistrunk, Emily; Koch, Markus; Gühr, Markus

    2013-01-01

    High harmonic generation is a convenient way to obtain extreme ultraviolet light from table-top laser systems and the experimental tools to exploit this simple and powerful light source for time-resolved spectroscopy are being developed by several groups. For these applications, brightness and stability of the high harmonic generation is a key feature. This article focuses on practical aspects in the generation of extreme ultraviolet pulses with ultrafast commercial lasers, namely generation ...

  5. Diagnosis of laser ablated carbon particles measured by time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Atsumi; Yoda, Osamu; Ohyanagi, T.; Murakami, K.

    1995-01-01

    The time and space resolved properties of laser ablated carbon particles were measured by X-ray absorption spectroscopy using LPX as an X-ray source. The energy density of the irradiation laser on the sample was in the range of 0.5-20J/cm 2 and the time delay was varied between 0 and 120ns. The absorption spectra exhibited several peaks originated from level to level transitions and an intense broad absorption in the energy range of C-K edge. At a delay time of 120ns, the absorption peak from 1s→2p transition of neutral carbon atom (C 0 ), C - , C + and C 2+ ions were observed. The absorption peak from C 0 was stronger as the probing position was closer to the sample surface and decreased rapidly with distance from the sample surface. The absorption peak C 2+ ion was observed only at comparatively distant positions from surface. The maximum speeds of highly charged ions were faster than that of neutral atoms and negative charged ions. The neutral atom and lower charged ions were emitted from the sample even after laser irradiation. The spatial distributions of the laser ablated carbon particles in the localized helium gas environment were measured. In the helium gas environment, the ablation plume was depressed by the helium cloud generated on the top of ablation plume. (author)

  6. Strategies for Time-resolved X-ray Diffraction of Phase Transitions with Laser Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Laura Robin; Eggert, J. H.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P. M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Palmer, N.; Petre, R. B.; Rygg, J. R.; Sorce, C.; Collins, G. W.; Boehly, T. R.

    2017-10-01

    As part of a program to document kinetics of phase transitions under laser-driven dynamic compression, we are designing a platform to make multiple x-ray diffraction measurements during a single laser experiment. Our plans include experimental development at Omega-EP and eventual implementation at NIF. We will present our strategy for designing a robust platform that can effectively document a wide variety of phase transformations by utilizing both streaked and multiple-frame imaging detectors. Preliminary designs utilize a novel CMOS detector designed by Sandia National Lab. Our initial experiments include scoping studies that will focus on photometrics and shielding requirements in the high EMP environment close to the target. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, LLNL-ABS-734470.

  7. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction analysis of the experimental dehydration of serpentine at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Toru; Yoshimi, Isamu; Yamada, Akihiro; Kikegawa, Takumi

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved, in situ X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine the dehydration rate and kinetics of serpentine during experimental dehydration at high pressures. The capsule used comprises a diamond sleeve fitted with Au or Pt lids in order to provide high-quality, time-resolved X-ray diffraction data. Antigorite quickly dehydrated to enstatite + forsterite + fluid within 2 h at 650degC below ∼6 GPa. Avrami modeling of the results and SEM observations of the partially dehydrated sample revealed that the nucleation rate was quite high for enstatite but low for forsterite, showing incubation periods of ∼10 min before appearing. The crystallization of these minerals is controlled largely by the composition of the fluid generated from serpentine dehydration. The dehydration boundary determined below 6 GPa in the present study is consistent with the results of previous phase equilibrium studies. This study indicates that serpentine in a subducting slab dehydrates rapidly below 6 GPa when the slab intersects the dehydration boundary conditions. (author)

  8. Crystals x-rays and proteins comprehensive protein crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Sherwood, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Information derived from X-ray crystal structures of biological molecules allows us to explain their functions in living organisms and to develop drugs to treat disease. This book describes the principles and practice of X-ray diffraction as a key technique at the forefront of new discoveries in biology and medicine.

  9. X-Ray Crystallography: One Century of Nobel Prizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Simona

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the United Nations General Assembly declared 2014 the International Year of Crystallography. Throughout the year 2014 and beyond, all the crystallographic associations and societies active all over the world are organizing events to attract the wider public toward crystallography and the numerous topics to which it is deeply interlinked.…

  10. A Compact X-Ray System for Support of High Throughput Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Gubarev, Mikhail; Gibson, Walter M.; Joy, Marshall K.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Standard x-ray systems for crystallography rely on massive generators coupled with optics that guide X-ray beams onto the crystal sample. Optics for single-crystal diffractometry include total reflection mirrors, polycapillary optics or graded multilayer monochromators. The benefit of using polycapillary optic is that it can collect x-rays over tile greatest solid angle, and thus most efficiently, utilize the greatest portion of X-rays emitted from the Source, The x-ray generator has to have a small anode spot, and thus its size and power requirements can be substantially reduced We present the design and results from the first high flux x-ray system for crystallography that combine's a microfocus X-ray generator (40microns FWHM Spot size at a power of 45 W) and a collimating, polycapillary optic. Diffraction data collected from small test crystals with cell dimensions up to 160A (lysozyme and thaumatin) are of high quality. For example, diffraction data collected from a lysozyme crystal at RT yielded R=5.0% for data extending to 1.70A. We compare these results with measurements taken from standard crystallographic systems. Our current microfocus X-ray diffraction system is attractive for supporting crystal growth research in the standard crystallography laboratory as well as in remote, automated crystal growth laboratory. Its small volume, light-weight, and low power requirements are sufficient to have it installed in unique environments, i.e.. on-board International Space Station.

  11. Charge Carriers Modulate the Bonding of Semiconductor Nanoparticle Dopants As Revealed by Time-Resolved X-ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Asra; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Liu, Xiaohan; Rowland, Clare E. [Department; Jawaid, Ali M.; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Gulec, Ahmet; Shamirian, Armen; Zuo, Xiaobing; Klie, Robert F.; Schaller, Richard D. [Department; Snee, Preston T.

    2017-08-31

    Understanding the electronic structure of doped semiconductors is essential to realize advancements in electronics and in the rational design of nanoscale devices. Reported here are the results of time-resolved X-ray absorption studies on copper-doped cadmium sulfide nanoparticles that provide an explicit description of the electronic dynamics of the dopants. The interaction of a dopant ion and an excess charge carrier is unambiguously observed via monitoring the oxidation state. The experimental data combined with DFT calculations demonstrate that dopant bonding to the host matrix is modulated by its interaction with charge carriers. Furthermore, the transient photoluminescence and the kinetics of dopant oxidation reveal the presence of two types of surface-bound ions that create mid-gap states.

  12. Tubulin oligomers and microtubule assembly studied by time-resolved X-ray scattering: separation of prenucleation and nucleation events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spann, U.; Renner, W.; Mandelkow, E.M.; Bordas, J.; Mandelkow, E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a time-resolved X-ray scattering study of microtubule assembly by synchrotron radiation. The method is complementary to light scattering but allows a better distinction between oligomeric and polymeric assembly states. With an improved rapid temperature jump device, it is shown that temperature-induced microtubule assembly is preceded by prenucleation and nucleation events involving oligomers of tubulin, in analogy with earlier results from near-equilibrium temperature scans. In general, the two phases closely overlap, but in certain conditions they can be observed separately. The prenucleation events seen by X-rays can be described as a rapid temperature-dependent equilibrium, with ring oligomers dissociating into smaller oligomers and subunits at elevated temperature. Different solution conditions affect mainly the time lag between the prenucleation and nucleation phases; this in turn determines the apparent magnitude of the prenucleation steps. By contrast, the temperature dependence of the equilibrium between the prenucleation oligomers shows little influence on solution conditions. The results suggest that the ring-forming and tubule-forming assembly modes of tubulin are governed by different interactions between subunits, although they may be based on a pool of similar intermediates

  13. Probing the hydrogen-bond network of water via time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huse, Nils; Wen, Haidan; Nordlund, Dennis; Szilagyi, Erzsi; Daranciang, Dan; Miller, Timothy A.; Nilsson, Anders; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2009-04-24

    We report time-resolved studies of hydrogen bonding in liquid H2O, in response to direct excitation of the O-H stretch mode at 3 mu m, probed via soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the oxygen K-edge. This approach employs a newly developed nanofluidic cell for transient soft x-ray spectroscopy in liquid phase. Distinct changes in the near-edge spectral region (XANES) are observed, and are indicative of a transient temperature rise of 10K following transient laser excitation and rapid thermalization of vibrational energy. The rapid heating occurs at constant volume and the associated increase in internal pressure, estimated to be 8MPa, is manifest by distinct spectral changes that differ from those induced by temperature alone. We conclude that the near-edge spectral shape of the oxygen K-edge is a sensitive probe of internal pressure, opening new possibilities for testing the validity of water models and providing new insight into the nature of hydrogen bonding in water.

  14. Sub-millisecond time-resolved SAXS using a continuous-flow mixer and X-ray microbeam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graceffa, Rita; Nobrega, R Paul; Barrea, Raul A; Kathuria, Sagar V; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Bilsel, Osman; Irving, Thomas C

    2013-11-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is a well established technique to probe the nanoscale structure and interactions in soft matter. It allows one to study the structure of native particles in near physiological environments and to analyze structural changes in response to variations in external conditions. The combination of microfluidics and SAXS provides a powerful tool to investigate dynamic processes on a molecular level with sub-millisecond time resolution. Reaction kinetics in the sub-millisecond time range has been achieved using continuous-flow mixers manufactured using micromachining techniques. The time resolution of these devices has previously been limited, in part, by the X-ray beam sizes delivered by typical SAXS beamlines. These limitations can be overcome using optics to focus X-rays to the micrometer size range providing that beam divergence and photon flux suitable for performing SAXS experiments can be maintained. Such micro-SAXS in combination with microfluidic devices would be an attractive probe for time-resolved studies. Here, the development of a high-duty-cycle scanning microsecond-time-resolution SAXS capability, built around the Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror-based microbeam system at the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team (BioCAT) beamline 18ID at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, is reported. A detailed description of the microbeam small-angle-scattering instrument, the turbulent flow mixer, as well as the data acquisition and control and analysis software is provided. Results are presented where this apparatus was used to study the folding of cytochrome c. Future prospects for this technique are discussed.

  15. Sub-millisecond time-resolved SAXS using a continuous-flow mixer and X-ray microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graceffa, Rita; Nobrega, R. Paul; Barrea, Raul A.; Kathuria, Sagar V.; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Bilsel, Osman; Irving, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    The development of a high-duty-cycle microsecond time-resolution SAXS capability at the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team beamline (BioCAT) 18ID at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, USA, is reported. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is a well established technique to probe the nanoscale structure and interactions in soft matter. It allows one to study the structure of native particles in near physiological environments and to analyze structural changes in response to variations in external conditions. The combination of microfluidics and SAXS provides a powerful tool to investigate dynamic processes on a molecular level with sub-millisecond time resolution. Reaction kinetics in the sub-millisecond time range has been achieved using continuous-flow mixers manufactured using micromachining techniques. The time resolution of these devices has previously been limited, in part, by the X-ray beam sizes delivered by typical SAXS beamlines. These limitations can be overcome using optics to focus X-rays to the micrometer size range providing that beam divergence and photon flux suitable for performing SAXS experiments can be maintained. Such micro-SAXS in combination with microfluidic devices would be an attractive probe for time-resolved studies. Here, the development of a high-duty-cycle scanning microsecond-time-resolution SAXS capability, built around the Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror-based microbeam system at the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team (BioCAT) beamline 18ID at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, is reported. A detailed description of the microbeam small-angle-scattering instrument, the turbulent flow mixer, as well as the data acquisition and control and analysis software is provided. Results are presented where this apparatus was used to study the folding of cytochrome c. Future prospects for this technique are discussed

  16. Sub-millisecond time-resolved SAXS using a continuous-flow mixer and X-ray microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graceffa, Rita, E-mail: rita.graceffa@gmail.com [Illinois Institute of Technology, 3101 South Dearborn, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Nobrega, R. Paul [University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, LRB 919, Worcester, MA 01605 (United States); Barrea, Raul A. [Illinois Institute of Technology, 3101 South Dearborn, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Kathuria, Sagar V. [University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, LRB 919, Worcester, MA 01605 (United States); Chakravarthy, Srinivas [Illinois Institute of Technology, 3101 South Dearborn, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Bilsel, Osman [University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, LRB 919, Worcester, MA 01605 (United States); Irving, Thomas C. [Illinois Institute of Technology, 3101 South Dearborn, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The development of a high-duty-cycle microsecond time-resolution SAXS capability at the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team beamline (BioCAT) 18ID at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, USA, is reported. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is a well established technique to probe the nanoscale structure and interactions in soft matter. It allows one to study the structure of native particles in near physiological environments and to analyze structural changes in response to variations in external conditions. The combination of microfluidics and SAXS provides a powerful tool to investigate dynamic processes on a molecular level with sub-millisecond time resolution. Reaction kinetics in the sub-millisecond time range has been achieved using continuous-flow mixers manufactured using micromachining techniques. The time resolution of these devices has previously been limited, in part, by the X-ray beam sizes delivered by typical SAXS beamlines. These limitations can be overcome using optics to focus X-rays to the micrometer size range providing that beam divergence and photon flux suitable for performing SAXS experiments can be maintained. Such micro-SAXS in combination with microfluidic devices would be an attractive probe for time-resolved studies. Here, the development of a high-duty-cycle scanning microsecond-time-resolution SAXS capability, built around the Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror-based microbeam system at the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team (BioCAT) beamline 18ID at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, is reported. A detailed description of the microbeam small-angle-scattering instrument, the turbulent flow mixer, as well as the data acquisition and control and analysis software is provided. Results are presented where this apparatus was used to study the folding of cytochrome c. Future prospects for this technique are discussed.

  17. Molecular form factors in X-ray crystallography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.P.M.; Feil, D.

    1969-01-01

    The calculation of molecular form factors from ab initio molecular electronic wavefunctions is discussed, and a scheme for application to X-ray diffraction structure analysis is given. The method is used to calculate the form factor of the NH+4 molecular ion from three accurate molecular

  18. X-ray Crystallography of Biological Macromolecules -RE ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The three-dimensional structures of thousands ofbiologi- cal macromolecules have been determined by X-ray dif- fraction, since the first structures were reported about half a century ago. The structures revealed how critical the shapes and sizes of the molecules are to perform various biological processes in living creatures.

  19. X-ray Crystallography of Biological Macromolecules -RE ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bangalore. Her research involves the determination of the crystal structures of macromolecules by the X- ray diffraction method. She is interested in the structures and functions of biological macromolecules. Keywords .... structures of proteins from , HIV, the virus causing AIDS are being used in the treatment of AIDS now.

  20. UV-Visible Absorption Spectroscopy Enhanced X-ray Crystallography at Synchrotron and X-ray Free Electron Laser Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Aina E; Doukov, Tzanko; Soltis, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    This review describes the use of single crystal UV-Visible Absorption micro-Spectrophotometry (UV-Vis AS) to enhance the design and execution of X-ray crystallography experiments for structural investigations of reaction intermediates of redox active and photosensitive proteins. Considerations for UV-Vis AS measurements at the synchrotron and associated instrumentation are described. UV-Vis AS is useful to verify the intermediate state of an enzyme and to monitor the progression of reactions within crystals. Radiation induced redox changes within protein crystals may be monitored to devise effective diffraction data collection strategies. An overview of the specific effects of radiation damage on macromolecular crystals is presented along with data collection strategies that minimize these effects by combining data from multiple crystals used at the synchrotron and with the X-ray free electron laser.

  1. Complementary uses of small angle X-ray scattering and X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, Monica C; Guarné, Alba

    2017-11-01

    Most proteins function within networks and, therefore, protein interactions are central to protein function. Although stable macromolecular machines have been extensively studied, dynamic protein interactions remain poorly understood. Small-angle X-ray scattering probes the size, shape and dynamics of proteins in solution at low resolution and can be used to study samples in a large range of molecular weights. Therefore, it has emerged as a powerful technique to study the structure and dynamics of biomolecular systems and bridge fragmented information obtained using high-resolution techniques. Here we review how small-angle X-ray scattering can be combined with other structural biology techniques to study protein dynamics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biophysics in Canada, edited by Lewis Kay, John Baenziger, Albert Berghuis and Peter Tieleman. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemical crystallography with pulsed neutrons and synchrotron x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrondo, M.A.; Jeffrey, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    Solid-state chemists and physicists, crystallographers and molecular biologists who are using or who plan to use the special properties of pulsed neutron spallation and synchrotron X-ray sources will find this book invaluable. Those scientists who have not yet gained experience in working with such sources will find the basic physics of the radiations, their production and their scattering properties explained, together with descriptions of the different types of diffraction experiments which use them

  3. Chromophore twisting in the excited state of a photoswitchable fluorescent protein captured by time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquelle, Nicolas; Sliwa, Michel; Woodhouse, Joyce; Schirò, Giorgio; Adam, Virgile; Aquila, Andrew; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Boutet, Sébastien; Byrdin, Martin; Carbajo, Sergio; de La Mora, Eugenio; Doak, R. Bruce; Feliks, Mikolaj; Fieschi, Franck; Foucar, Lutz; Guillon, Virginia; Hilpert, Mario; Hunter, Mark S.; Jakobs, Stefan; Koglin, Jason E.; Kovacsova, Gabriela; Lane, Thomas J.; Lévy, Bernard; Liang, Mengning; Nass, Karol; Ridard, Jacqueline; Robinson, Joseph S.; Roome, Christopher M.; Ruckebusch, Cyril; Seaberg, Matthew; Thepaut, Michel; Cammarata, Marco; Demachy, Isabelle; Field, Martin; Shoeman, Robert L.; Bourgeois, Dominique; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Schlichting, Ilme; Weik, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Chromophores absorb light in photosensitive proteins and thereby initiate fundamental biological processes such as photosynthesis, vision and biofluorescence. An important goal in their understanding is the provision of detailed structural descriptions of the ultrafast photochemical events that they undergo, in particular of the excited states that connect chemistry to biological function. Here we report on the structures of two excited states in the reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein rsEGFP2. We populated the states through femtosecond illumination of rsEGFP2 in its non-fluorescent off state and observed their build-up (within less than one picosecond) and decay (on the several picosecond timescale). Using an X-ray free-electron laser, we performed picosecond time-resolved crystallography and show that the hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone chromophore in one of the excited states assumes a near-canonical twisted configuration halfway between the trans and cis isomers. This is in line with excited-state quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics and classical molecular dynamics simulations. Our new understanding of the structure around the twisted chromophore enabled the design of a mutant that displays a twofold increase in its off-to-on photoswitching quantum yield.

  4. An ultrafast front-end ASIC for APD array detectors in X-ray time-resolved experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yang-Fan; Li, Qiu-Ju; Liu, Peng; Fan, Lei; Xu, Wei; Tao, Ye; Li, Zhen-Jie

    2017-06-01

    An ultrafast front-end ASIC chip has been developed for APD array detectors in X-ray time-resolved experiments. The chip has five channels: four complete channels and one test channel with an analog output. Each complete channel consists of a preamplifier, a voltage discriminator and an open-drain output driver. A prototype chip has been designed and fabricated using 0.13 μm CMOS technology with a chip size of 1.3 mm × 1.9 mm. The electrical characterizations of the circuit demonstrate a very good intrinsic time resolution (rms) on the output pulse leading edge, with the test result better than 30 ps for high input signal charges (> 75 fC) and better than 100 ps for low input signal charges (30-75 fC), while keeping a low power consumption of 5 mW per complete channel. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11605227), High Energy Photon Source-Test Facility Project, and the State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics. This research used resources of the BSRF.

  5. Concentration effects on the dynamics of liquid crystalline self-assembly: time-resolved X-ray scattering studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Marcel; Menzel, Andreas; Bunk, Oliver; Busse, Gerhard; Techert, Simone

    2011-03-24

    A manifold of ordering transitions relevant to chemical and biological systems occur at interfaces from liquids to self-assembled soft solids like membranes or liquid crystals. In the present case, we were interested in understanding the phase transition from the microemulsion phase to the liquid crystal phase in terms of their driving forces, i.e., activation energy and entropy. The purpose of this work was to clarify the influence of concentration effects of the amphiphilic molecules on the nature of these self-assembly processes. By photosensitization of the model system (polyalkylglycolether (C(10)E(4)), water, decane, and cyclohexane) with laser dyes, we could effectively induce and control the phase transition through the absorption of optical photons. The photo transformation conditions were chosen in such a way that the system was in thermal equilibrium. By application of time-resolved photo small-angle X-ray scattering we could monitor the conversion process and demonstrate that the surfactant concentration has a direct impact on the activation energy, which is observable through the length of the induction time.

  6. Particle evolution of Composition B-3 studied by time-resolved small angle x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, R.; Podlesak, D.; Dattelbaum, D.; Firestone, M.; Gustavsen, R.; Jensen, B.; Ringstrand, B.; Watkins, E.; Bagge-Hansen, M.; Hodgin, R.; Lauderbach, L.; Willey, T.; van Buuren, T.; Graber, T.; Rigg, P.; Sinclair, N.; Seifert, S.

    Accessing various pressures and temperatures of the carbon phase diagram through high explosive (HE) detonations, as a means of synthesis, provides an exciting opportunity to study new carbon allotropes. Carbon allotropes in HE detonations are thought to form through collision of free carbon within the detonation cloud; however direct confirmation of real-time product formation is limited due to experimental restraints. Time-resolved small angle x-ray scattering (TRSAXS) of in-line detonations provides information about particle formation behind the detonation front on the 100's of nanoseconds timescale. The only set-up of its kind in the United States is at Argonne National Laboratory at the Advanced Photon Source in the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS). Through empirical and analytical analysis of the TRSAXS data, parameters such as particle size and morphology can be deduced with respect to time. In the case of Composition B-3 (40% TNT/60% RDX) particle formation morphs from spherical core-shell structure to an elongated structure at long times ( 2 us) under vacuum. To complete the timeline of carbon formation, the post detonation soot is also analyzed to confirm this elongated structure as the majority carbon product. LA-UR-16-28691

  7. Time-Resolved Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Reveals Millisecond Transitions of a DNA Origami Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruetzel, Linda K; Walker, Philipp U; Gerling, Thomas; Dietz, Hendrik; Lipfert, Jan

    2018-04-11

    Self-assembled DNA structures enable creation of specific shapes at the nanometer-micrometer scale with molecular resolution. The construction of functional DNA assemblies will likely require dynamic structures that can undergo controllable conformational changes. DNA devices based on shape complementary stacking interactions have been demonstrated to undergo reversible conformational changes triggered by changes in ionic environment or temperature. An experimentally unexplored aspect is how quickly conformational transitions of large synthetic DNA origami structures can actually occur. Here, we use time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering to monitor large-scale conformational transitions of a two-state DNA origami switch in free solution. We show that the DNA device switches from its open to its closed conformation upon addition of MgCl 2 in milliseconds, which is close to the theoretical diffusive speed limit. In contrast, measurements of the dimerization of DNA origami bricks reveal much slower and concentration-dependent assembly kinetics. DNA brick dimerization occurs on a time scale of minutes to hours suggesting that the kinetics depend on local concentration and molecular alignment.

  8. Structural investigation of bistrifluron using x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, J K; Rhee, S K; Kim, G B; Yun, H S; Chung, B J; Lee, S S; Lim, Y H

    2002-01-01

    A new insecticide, bistrifluron acts as an inhibitor of insect development and interferes with the cuticle formation of insects. Since it shows low acute oral and dermal toxicities, it can be one of potent insecticides. Based on X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling, the structural studies of bistrifluron have been carried out.

  9. Synthesis, spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and DFT computations of nanosized phosphazenes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shariatinia, Z.; Moghadam, E.J.; Maghsoudi, N.; Mousavi, H.S.M.; Dušek, Michal; Eigner, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 641, č. 5 (2015), s. 967-978 ISSN 0044-2313 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : phosphazene * ultrasonic * nanoparticle * x-ray crystallography * DFT calculation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.261, year: 2015

  10. Apparatus and method for nanoflow liquid jet and serial femtosecond x-ray protein crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogan, Michael J.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.

    2016-03-01

    Techniques for nanoflow serial femtosecond x-ray protein crystallography include providing a sample fluid by mixing a plurality of a first target of interest with a carrier fluid and injecting the sample fluid into a vacuum chamber at a rate less than about 4 microliters per minute. In some embodiments, the carrier fluid has a viscosity greater than about 3 centipoise.

  11. The Beginnings of X-ray Crystallography: A Profile on the Two Braggs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 12. The Beginnings of X-ray Crystallography: A Profile on the Two Braggs. T N Guru Row. Article-in-a-Box Volume 19 Issue 12 December 2014 pp 1071-1073. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  12. Synthesis of new nano Schiff base complexes: X-ray crystallography ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study presents synthesis and characterization of new nano uranyl Schiff base complexes. Electrochemistry of these complexes showed a quasireversible redox reaction without any successive reactions. Furthermore, X-ray crystallography exhibited that beside the coordination of tetradentate Schiff base, one solvent ...

  13. Long-Wavelength X-Ray Diffraction and Its Applications in Macromolecular Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Manfred S

    2017-01-01

    For many years, diffraction experiments in macromolecular crystallography at X-ray wavelengths longer than that of Cu-K α (1.54 Å) have been largely underappreciated. Effects caused by increased X-ray absorption result in the fact that these experiments are more difficult than the standard diffraction experiments at short wavelengths. However, due to the also increased anomalous scattering of many biologically relevant atoms, important additional structural information can be obtained. This information, in turn, can be used for phase determination, for substructure identification, in molecular replacement approaches, as well as in structure refinement. This chapter reviews the possibilities and the difficulties associated with such experiments, and it provides a short description of two macromolecular crystallography synchrotron beam lines dedicated to long-wavelength X-ray diffraction experiments.

  14. Ammonia-rich high-temperature superconducting intercalates of iron selenide revealed through time-resolved in situ X-ray and neutron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmaier, Stefan J; Cassidy, Simon J; Morris, Richard G; Drakopoulos, Michael; Reinhard, Christina; Moorhouse, Saul J; O'Hare, Dermot; Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry; Clarke, Simon J

    2014-01-15

    The development of a technique for following in situ the reactions of solids with alkali metal/ammonia solutions, using time-resolved X-ray diffraction methods, reveals high-temperature superconducting ammonia-rich intercalates of iron selenide which reversibly absorb and desorb ammonia around ambient temperatures.

  15. Automatic Weissenberg data collection system for time-resolved protein crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Sakabe, N; Higashi, T; Igarashi, N; Suzuki, M; Watanabe, N; Sasaki, K

    2001-01-01

    A totally new type of fully automatic Weissenberg data-collection system called 'Galaxy' was developed and was installed at the Photon Factory. This automatic data collection system consists of a rotated-inclined focusing monochromator, a screenless Weissenberg type camera, an image reader, an eraser, a cassette transportation mechanism, a control console and a safety and high-speed computer network system linking a control console, data processing computers and data servers. The special characteristics of this system are a Weissenberg camera with a fully cylindrical cassette which can be rotated to exchange a frame, a maximum number of 36 images to be recorded in an IP cassette, and a very high speed IP reader with five reading heads. Since the frame exchange time is only a few seconds, this system is applicable for time-resolved protein crystallography at seconds or minutes of time-scale.

  16. Contribution to time resolved X-ray fluence and differential spectra measurement method improvement in 5-200 KeV range. Application to pulsed emission sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vie, M.

    1983-09-01

    Two types of sensors have been developed to measure locally the time-resolved fluence and differential energetic spectrum of pulsed X-ray in the energy range 5 to 200 keV. Rise time of these sensors is very short (10 ns) in order to permit time-resolved measurements. Fluence sensors have been developed by putting filters in front of detector in order to make sensor response independent of X-ray energy and proportional to X-ray fluence. The energetic differential spectrum was calculated by way of a method similar to the ROSS method but using filters separated within a pair defining adjacent spectral width. A detailed analysis of uncertainties affecting calculated fluence and spectrum has been done [fr

  17. a Time-Resolved X-Ray Scattering Study of the Ordering Kinetics in COPPER(3)-GOLD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Robert Francis, Jr.

    Time-resolved x-ray scattering has been used to study ordering kinetics in single crystal bulk Cu _3Au, as well as in sputtered and molecular beam epitaxy grown films. After annealing at high temperatures the sample is rapidly quenched to fixed temperatures below the order-disorder transition temperature. The development of order is monitored in real time using scattering techniques. The bulk sample clearly showed three regimes: nucleation, ordering, and coarsening. The anisotropic superlattice peaks that reflect the domains structure are investigated in connection with the ordering kinetics. The line shape of the scattering function exhibits a crossover from gaussian to lorentzian-squared as the system goes from the ordering regime to the coarsening regime. Coarsening in Cu_3Au is consistent with curvature driven growth. Domain coarsening in stoichiometric sputtered films is also consistent with curvature driven growth. However, coarsening in copper rich films proceeds much more slowly. The results suggest the extra copper affects the ordering kinetics in the same way diffusive impurities would, resulting in a logarithmic like time dependence. The M.B.E. films show a slowing of the growth at late times. The 4500A film starts out with curvature driven growth but then continuously slows down as the domains grow. The 710A film shows an interesting temperature dependence for the growth, in such a way that at temperatures close to the transition, the domain growth almost freezes at late times. The dominate factor is probably strain, all of the trends for slower growth are consistent with greater strain. The dimensionality in the M.B.E. film systems is considered. The scaling in the 4500A and 710A films is clearly three dimensional. However, the dimension of the scaling in the 260A film is unclear.

  18. Structural changes during contraction in vertebrate skeletal muscle as studied by time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugi, H.; Tanaka, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Iwamoto, H.; Wakabayashi, K.; Hamanaka, T.; Mitsui, T.; Amemiya, Y.

    1986-01-01

    To obtain information about the structural changes in vertebrate skeletal muscle during contraction, time-resolved X-ray diffraction studies were performed on the intensity changes of the 59 A and 51 A actin layer lines from bullfrog sartorius muscle during the isometric force development, and the intensity changes of the 143 A and 215 A myosin meridional reflections and of the 1,0 and 1,1 equatorial reflections when isometrically contracting muscle was subjected to sinusoidal length changes (1%, 5-10Hz) with the following results. The integrated intensities of the 59 A and 51 A actin layer lines increased during the force development by 30-50% for the 59 A reflection, and by about 70% for the 51 A reflection compard to their respective resting values. These intensity changes were greater than those taking place during the transition from rest to rigor state, and observed to precede the intensity changes of the 429 A myosin off-meridional reflection and of equatorial reflections. When sinusoidal length changes were applied to the muscle generating steady isometric force, the resulting periodic intensity changes in the 1,0 and 1,1 equatorial reflections were in phase and in antiphase with the length changes, respectively. On the other hand, the 143 A myosin reflection exhibited a characteristic periodic change; its intensity reached a maximum at each boundary between the stretch and release phases of the length changes. These results are discussed in connection with the behavior of the cross-bridges during contraction. (author)

  19. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction from frog skeletal muscle during an isotonic twitch under a small load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugi, Haruo; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Hashizume, Hiroo.

    1978-01-01

    A time-resolved x-ray diffraction technique was used to study the time course of change in the intensity ratio Isub(1,0)/Isub(1,1) during isotonic twitch (initial sarcomere, 2.4 μm) under a small load and to determine the kinetic properties of the crossbridges responsible for muscle contraction. Isotonic twitches in four other preparations with an initial sarcomere of 2.4 μm and in two with an initial sarcomere of 2.3 μm and 2.2 μm, respectively, were examined. In each case, the intensity ratio started to decrease at stimulation, reached a minimum value of 0.8 - 1.0 within the first 20 - 30% of the shortening phase, and maintained this value until the beginning of the relaxation phase. Gradual recovery of the intensity ratio to the resting value was seen during the relaxation phase. During the recovery phase, the intensity ratio appeared to exhibit oscillatory changes. Though the extent of shortening was reduced by about 30% at the end of each experiment, the duration of the shortening phase remained almost unchanged in all the preparations examined. The time course of change in the intensity ratio was also examined during an isometric twitch in four preparations (sarcomere, 2.4 μm) with the tibial end connected to a strain gauge. The extent of internal shortening of muscle fibres against the tendons and the recording system during an isometric twitch or a tetanus at low temperatures was estimated. The intensity ratio decreased to a minimum value of 0.5 - 0.6 during the rising phase of isometric tension and started to return to the resting value after the beginning of relaxation. In both isotonic and isometric twitches, a decrease in the intensity ratio resulted from both a decrease in the 1,0 intensity and an increase in the 1,1 intensity. (J.P.N.)

  20. Kinetic Analyses of Cation Exchange Rates in Synthetic Birnessite Measured by Time- Resolved Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopano, C. L.; Heaney, P. J.; Post, J. E.; Bandstra, J.; Brantley, S. L.

    2006-05-01

    Birnessite is the most abundant and chemically important layer-structure Mn-oxide phase found in soils, desert varnishes, and ocean nodules. It also is industrially important for use in battery technology and octahedral sieves. Due to the poorly crystalline nature of natural birnessite, synthetic analogues typically have been employed in studies that explore the structural response of birnessite to variations in interlayer composition. For this work, we measured changes in unit-cell parameters over time to quantify the degree of cation exchange as a function of concentration. Aqueous K+, Cs+, and Ba2+ cations at varying concentrations at pH 7 were exchanged for interlayer Na+ in synthetic birnessite (Na0.58(Mn4+1.42,Mn3+0.58)O4·1.5H2O) using a simple flow- through cell, and the exchange products were monitored via time-resolved X-ray powder diffraction at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns were collected every 2-3 minutes. Rietveld analyses of X-ray diffraction patterns for K- and Ba-exchanged birnessite revealed a decrease in unit- cell volume over time. In contrast, Cs+ substitution increased cell volume. For all three cations, the crystallographic data indicate that exchange occurred in two stages. A rapid and dramatic change in unit-cell volume was followed by a modest adjustment over longer timescales. Fourier electron difference syntheses revealed that the rapid, initial stage of exchange was marked by re-configuration of the interlayer species, whereas the second, protracted phase of substitution represented ordering into the newly established interlayer positions. For the first time, we have modeled the kinetics of interlayer substitution in Na-birnessite. For purposes of comparison, we have employed a simple one-stage reaction (i.e., Na-birnessite → K-birnessite) and a two stage reaction (i.e,. Na-birnessite → K-birnessitedisordered → K- birnessiteordered). For exchange with 0.01 M KCl solutions, the single

  1. Visualization of X-ray Beam Using CdWO4 Crystal for Macromolecular Crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz J. Gofron

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In synchrotron diffraction experiments, it is typically assumed that the X-ray beam at the sample position is uniform, stable and has dimensions that are controlled by the focus and slits settings. As might be expected, this process is much more complex. We present here an investigation of the properties of a synchrotron X-ray beam at the sample position. The X-ray beam is visualized with a single crystal scintillator that converts X-ray photons into visible light photons, which can be imaged using Structure Biology Center (SBC on-axis and off-axis microscope optics. The X-ray penetration is dependent on the composition of the scintillator (especially the effective Z, and X-ray energy. Several scintillators have been used to visualize X-ray beams. Here we compare CdWO4, PbWO4, Bi4Ge3O12, Y3Al5O12:Ce (YAG:Ce, and Gd2O2S:Tb (phosphor. We determined that scintillator crystals made of CdWO4 and similar high-Z materials are best suited for the energy range (7–20 keV and are most suitable for beam visualization for macromolecular crystallography applications. These scintillators show excellent absorption, optical, and mechanical properties.

  2. Probing the influence of X-rays on aqueous copper solutions using time-resolved in situ combined video/X-ray absorption near-edge/ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesu, J. Gerbrand; Beale, Andrew M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325802068; de Groot, Frank M. F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08747610X; Weckhuysen, Bert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved in situ video monitoring and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy in combination with X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) have been used for the first time in a combined manner to study the effect of synchrotron radiation on a series of homogeneous aqueous copper solutions in a

  3. 100 Years later: Celebrating the contributions of x-ray crystallography to allergy and clinical immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomés, Anna; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Gustchina, Alla; Minor, Wladek; Mueller, Geoffrey A; Pedersen, Lars C; Wlodawer, Alexander; Chapman, Martin D

    2015-07-01

    Current knowledge of molecules involved in immunology and allergic disease results from the significant contributions of x-ray crystallography, a discipline that just celebrated its 100th anniversary. The histories of allergens and x-ray crystallography are intimately intertwined. The first enzyme structure to be determined was lysozyme, also known as the chicken food allergen Gal d 4. Crystallography determines the exact 3-dimensional positions of atoms in molecules. Structures of molecular complexes in the disciplines of immunology and allergy have revealed the atoms involved in molecular interactions and mechanisms of disease. These complexes include peptides presented by MHC class II molecules, cytokines bound to their receptors, allergen-antibody complexes, and innate immune receptors with their ligands. The information derived from crystallographic studies provides insights into the function of molecules. Allergen function is one of the determinants of environmental exposure, which is essential for IgE sensitization. Proteolytic activity of allergens or their capacity to bind LPSs can also contribute to allergenicity. The atomic positions define the molecular surface that is accessible to antibodies. In turn, this surface determines antibody specificity and cross-reactivity, which are important factors for the selection of allergen panels used for molecular diagnosis and the interpretation of clinical symptoms. This review celebrates the contributions of x-ray crystallography to clinical immunology and allergy, focusing on new molecular perspectives that influence the diagnosis and treatment of allergic diseases. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  4. Time Resolved Operando X-ray Techniques in Catalysis, a Case Study: CO Oxidation by O2 over Pt Surfaces and Alumina Supported Pt Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Newton

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic oxidation of CO by O2 to form CO2 over Pt surfaces and supported catalysts is one of the most studied catalytic reactions from both fundamental and applied points of view. This review aims to show how the application of a range of time resolved, X-ray based techniques, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD, Surface X-ray diffraction (SXRD, total X-ray scattering/pair distribution function (PDF, X-ray absorption (XAFS, X-ray emission (XES, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies (XPS, applied under operando conditions and often coupled to adjunct techniques (for instance mass spectrometry (MS and infrared spectroscopy (IR have shed new light on the structures and mechanisms at work in this most studied of systems. The aim of this review is therefore to demonstrate how a fusion of the operando philosophy with the ever augmenting capacities of modern synchrotron sources can lead to new insight and catalytic possibilities, even in the case of a process that has been intensely studied for almost 100 years.

  5. How cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography complement each other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Jia-Wei

    2017-01-01

    With the ability to resolve structures of macromolecules at atomic resolution, X-ray crystallography has been the most powerful tool in modern structural biology. At the same time, recent technical improvements have triggered a resolution revolution in the single particle cryo-EM method. While the two methods are different in many respects, from sample preparation to structure determination, they both have the power to solve macromolecular structures at atomic resolution. It is important to understand the unique advantages and caveats of the two methods in solving structures and to appreciate the complementary nature of the two methods in structural biology. In this review we provide some examples, and discuss how X-ray crystallography and cryo-EM can be combined in deciphering structures of macromolecules for our full understanding of their biological mechanisms. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  6. Towards an integrative structural biology approach: combining Cryo-TEM, X-ray crystallography, and NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Jeffrey; Hnath, Eric; Storms, Marc; Wohlfarth, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and particularly single particle analysis is rapidly becoming the premier method for determining the three-dimensional structure of protein complexes, and viruses. In the last several years there have been dramatic technological improvements in Cryo-TEM, such as advancements in automation and use of improved detectors, as well as improved image processing techniques. While Cryo-TEM was once thought of as a low resolution structural technique, the method is currently capable of generating nearly atomic resolution structures on a routine basis. Moreover, the combination of Cryo-TEM and other methods such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics modeling are allowing researchers to address scientific questions previously thought intractable. Future technological developments are widely believed to further enhance the method and it is not inconceivable that Cryo-TEM could become as routine as X-ray crystallography for protein structure determination.

  7. X-ray crystallography and its impact on understanding bacterial cell wall remodeling processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Felix Michael; Renner-Schneck, Michaela; Stehle, Thilo

    2015-02-01

    The molecular structure of matter defines its properties and function. This is especially true for biological macromolecules such as proteins, which participate in virtually all biochemical processes. A three dimensional structural model of a protein is thus essential for the detailed understanding of its physiological function and the characterization of essential properties such as ligand binding and reaction mechanism. X-ray crystallography is a well-established technique that has been used for many years, but it is still by far the most widely used method for structure determination. A particular strength of this technique is the elucidation of atomic details of molecular interactions, thus providing an invaluable tool for a multitude of scientific projects ranging from the structural classification of macromolecules over the validation of enzymatic mechanisms or the understanding of host-pathogen interactions to structure-guided drug design. In the first part of this review, we describe essential methodological and practical aspects of X-ray crystallography. We provide some pointers that should allow researchers without a background in structural biology to assess the overall quality and reliability of a crystal structure. To highlight its potential, we then survey the impact X-ray crystallography has had on advancing an understanding of a class of enzymes that modify the bacterial cell wall. A substantial number of different bacterial amidase structures have been solved, mostly by X-ray crystallography. Comparison of these structures highlights conserved as well as divergent features. In combination with functional analyses, structural information on these enzymes has therefore proven to be a valuable template not only for understanding their mechanism of catalysis, but also for targeted interference with substrate binding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Synthesis, X-ray crystallography, spectroscopy, electrochemistry, thermal and kinetic study of uranyl Schiff base complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Asadi, Z.; Golzard, F.; Eigner, Václav; Dušek, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 20 (2013), s. 3629-3646 ISSN 0095-8972 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/0809 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : X-ray crystallography * uranyl Schiff base complex * kinetics of thermal decomposition * cyclic voltammetry * kinetics and mechanism Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.224, year: 2013

  9. Semi-empirical atom-atom interaction models and X-ray crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braam, A.W.M.

    1981-01-01

    Several aspects of semi-empirical energy calculations in crystallography are considered. Solid modifications of ethane have been studied using energy calculations and a fast summation technique has been evaluated. The structure of tetramethylpyrazine has been determined at room temperature and at 100K and accurate structure factors have been derived from measured Bragg intensities. Finally electrostatic properties have been deduced from X-ray structure factors. (C.F.)

  10. PILATUS: a two-dimensional X-ray detector for macromolecular crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Eikenberry, E F; Huelsen, G; Toyokawa, H; Horisberger, R P; Schmitt, B; Schulze-Briese, C; Tomizaki, T

    2003-01-01

    A large quantum-limited area X-ray detector for protein crystallography is under development at the Swiss Light Source. The final detector will be 2kx2k pixels covering 40x40 cm sup 2. A three-module prototype with 1120x157 pixels covering an active area of 24.3x3.4 cm sup 2 has been tested. X-rays above 6 keV with peak count rates exceeding 5x10 sup 5 X-ray/pixel/s could be detected in single photon counting mode. Statistics of module production and results of threshold trimming are presented. To demonstrate the potential of this new detector, protein crystal data were collected at beamline 6S of the SLS.

  11. 3D Manipulation of Protein Microcrystals with Optical Tweezers for X-ray Crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikima, T; Hashimoto, K; Murakami, H; Ueno, G; Kawano, Y; Hirata, K; Hasegawa, K; Kumasaka, T; Yamamoto, M

    2013-01-01

    In some synchrotron facilities such as SPring-8, X-ray microbeams have been utilized for protein crystallography, allowing users to collect diffraction data from a protein microcrystal. Usually, a protein crystal is picked up manually from a crystallization droplet. However it is very difficult to manipulate the protein microcrystals which are very small and fragile against a shock and changes of temperature and solvent condition. We have been developing an automatic system applying the optical tweezers with two lensed fiber probes to manipulate the fragile protein microcrystal. The system succeeded in trapping a crystal and levitating it onto the cryoloop in the solvent. X-ray diffraction measurement for the manipulated protein microcrystals indicated that laser irradiation and trap with 1064nm wavelength hardly affected the result of X-ray structural analysis.

  12. Time resolved X-ray micro-diffraction measurements of the dynamic local layer response to electric field in antiferroelectric liquid crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Y; Takanishi, Y; Ogasawara, T; Takezoe, H

    2001-01-01

    The time-resolved synchrotron X-ray microbeam diffraction experiment has been carried out to reveal the local layer response to the electric field in the antiferroelectric liquid crystal. The X-ray microbeam of a few mu m spatial resolution was obtained with Kirkpatrick-Baez optics. The time-resolved small angle diffraction experiment was performed with a time resolution ranging from 10 mu s to a few ms. The reversible local layer change between the horizontal chevron and the quasi-bookshelf structure was confirmed by the triangular wave form. The transient layer response for the step form electric field was observed. The layer response closely related with an electric field induced antiferroelectric to ferroelectric phase transition.

  13. Coded diffraction system in X-ray crystallography using a boolean phase coded aperture approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinilla, Samuel; Poveda, Juan; Arguello, Henry

    2018-03-01

    Phase retrieval is a problem present in many applications such as optics, astronomical imaging, computational biology and X-ray crystallography. Recent work has shown that the phase can be better recovered when the acquisition architecture includes a coded aperture, which modulates the signal before diffraction, such that the underlying signal is recovered from coded diffraction patterns. Moreover, this type of modulation effect, before the diffraction operation, can be obtained using a phase coded aperture, just after the sample under study. However, a practical implementation of a phase coded aperture in an X-ray application is not feasible, because it is computationally modeled as a matrix with complex entries which requires changing the phase of the diffracted beams. In fact, changing the phase implies finding a material that allows to deviate the direction of an X-ray beam, which can considerably increase the implementation costs. Hence, this paper describes a low cost coded X-ray diffraction system based on block-unblock coded apertures that enables phase reconstruction. The proposed system approximates the phase coded aperture with a block-unblock coded aperture by using the detour-phase method. Moreover, the SAXS/WAXS X-ray crystallography software was used to simulate the diffraction patterns of a real crystal structure called Rhombic Dodecahedron. Additionally, several simulations were carried out to analyze the performance of block-unblock approximations in recovering the phase, using the simulated diffraction patterns. Furthermore, the quality of the reconstructions was measured in terms of the Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR). Results show that the performance of the block-unblock phase coded apertures approximation decreases at most 12.5% compared with the phase coded apertures. Moreover, the quality of the reconstructions using the boolean approximations is up to 2.5 dB of PSNR less with respect to the phase coded aperture reconstructions.

  14. X-ray crystallography over the past decade for novel drug discovery - where are we heading next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Heping; Handing, Katarzyna B; Zimmerman, Matthew D; Shabalin, Ivan G; Almo, Steven C; Minor, Wladek

    2015-01-01

    Macromolecular X-ray crystallography has been the primary methodology for determining the three-dimensional structures of proteins, nucleic acids and viruses. Structural information has paved the way for structure-guided drug discovery and laid the foundations for structural bioinformatics. However, X-ray crystallography still has a few fundamental limitations, some of which may be overcome and complemented using emerging methods and technologies in other areas of structural biology. This review describes how structural knowledge gained from X-ray crystallography has been used to advance other biophysical methods for structure determination (and vice versa). This article also covers current practices for integrating data generated by other biochemical and biophysical methods with those obtained from X-ray crystallography. Finally, the authors articulate their vision about how a combination of structural and biochemical/biophysical methods may improve our understanding of biological processes and interactions. X-ray crystallography has been, and will continue to serve as, the central source of experimental structural biology data used in the discovery of new drugs. However, other structural biology techniques are useful not only to overcome the major limitation of X-ray crystallography, but also to provide complementary structural data that is useful in drug discovery. The use of recent advancements in biochemical, spectroscopy and bioinformatics methods may revolutionize drug discovery, albeit only when these data are combined and analyzed with effective data management systems. Accurate and complete data management is crucial for developing experimental procedures that are robust and reproducible.

  15. Time-resolved methods in biophysics. 6. Time-resolved Laue crystallography as a tool to investigate photo-activated protein dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Dominique; Schotte, Friedrich; Brunori, Maurizio; Vallone, Beatrice

    2007-10-01

    When polychromatic X-rays are shined onto crystalline material, they generate a Laue diffraction pattern. At third generation synchrotron radiation sources, a single X-ray pulse of approximately 100 ps duration is enough to produce interpretable Laue data from biomolecular crystals. Thus, by initiating biological turnover in a crystalline protein, structural changes along the reaction pathway may be filmed by ultra-fast Laue diffraction. Using laser-light as a trigger, transient species in photosensitive macromolecules can be captured at near atomic resolution with sub-nanosecond time-resolution. Such pump-probe Laue experiments have now reached an outstanding level of sophistication and have found a domain of excellence in the investigation of light-sensitive proteins undergoing cyclic photo-reactions and producing stiff crystals. The main theoretical concepts of Laue diffraction and the challenges associated with time-resolved experiments on biological crystals are recalled. The recent advances in the design of experiments are presented in terms of instrumental choices, data collection strategy and data processing, and some of the inherent difficulties of the method are highlighted. The discussion is based on the example of myoglobin, a protein that has traversed the whole history of pump-probe Laue diffraction, and for which a massive amount of data have provided considerable insight into the understanding of protein dynamics.

  16. Ultrasonic acoustic levitation for fast frame rate X-ray protein crystallography at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Tomizaki, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    Increasing the data acquisition rate of X-ray diffraction images for macromolecular crystals at room temperature at synchrotrons has the potential to significantly accelerate both structural analysis of biomolecules and structure-based drug developments. Using lysozyme model crystals, we demonstrated the rapid acquisition of X-ray diffraction datasets by combining a high frame rate pixel array detector with ultrasonic acoustic levitation of protein crystals in liquid droplets. The rapid spinning of the crystal within a levitating droplet ensured an efficient sampling of the reciprocal space. The datasets were processed with a program suite developed for serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX). The structure, which was solved by molecular replacement, was found to be identical to the structure obtained by the conventional oscillation method for up to a 1.8-Å resolution limit. In particular, the absence of protein crystal damage resulting from the acoustic levitation was carefully established. These results represent a key step towards a fully automated sample handling and measurement pipeline, which has promising prospects for a high acquisition rate and high sample efficiency for room temperature X-ray crystallography.

  17. Time-resolved X-ray scattering by electronic wave packets: analytic solutions to the hydrogen atom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmermacher, Mats; Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    2017-01-01

    Modern pulsed X-ray sources permit time-dependent measurements of dynamical changes in atoms and molecules via non-resonant scattering. The planning, analysis, and interpretation of such experiments, however, require a firm and elaborated theoretical framework. This paper provides a detailed...

  18. Multichord time-resolved electron temperature measurements by the x-ray absorber-foil method on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiraly, J.; Bitter, M.; Efthimion, P.

    1985-09-01

    Absorber foils have been installed in the TFTR X-Ray Imaging System to permit measurement of the electron temperature along 10 to 30 chords spaced at 5-12.5 cm with a time resolution of less than 100 μs. The technique uses the ratio of x-ray fluxes transmitted through two different foils. The ratio depends mainly on electron temperature. Simulations show that strong impurity line radiation can distort this ratio. To correct for these effects, special beryllium-scandium filters are employed to select the line-free region between 2 and 4.5 keV. Other filter pairs allow corrections for Fe L and Ni L line radiation as well as Ti K and Ni K emission. Good accuracy is also obtained with simple beryllium filters, provided that impurity corrections are incorporated in the analysis, taking line intensities from the x-ray pulse-height analysis diagnostic. A description of modeling calculations and a comparison of temperature values from this diagnostic with data from the x-ray pulse height analysis, the electron cyclotron emission, and the Thomson scattering diagnostics are presented. Several applications of the absorber foil electron temperature diagnostic on TFTR are discussed

  19. Large area high-resolution CCD-based X-ray detector for macromolecular crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Pokric, M; Jorden, A R; Cox, M P; Marshall, A; Long, P G; Moon, K; Jerram, P A; Pool, P; Nave, C; Derbyshire, G E; Helliwell, J R

    2002-01-01

    An X-ray detector system for macromolecular crystallography based on a large area charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor has been developed as part of a large research and development programme for advanced X-ray sensor technology, funded by industry and the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC) in the UK. The prototype detector consists of two large area three-sides buttable charge-coupled devices (CCD 46-62 EEV), where the single CCD area is 55.3 mmx41.5 mm. Overall detector imaging area is easily extendable to 85 mmx110 mm. The detector consists of an optically coupled X-ray sensitive phosphor, skewed fibre-optic studs and CCDs. The crystallographic measurement requirements at synchrotron sources are met through a high spatial resolution (2048x1536 pixel array), high dynamic range (approx 10 sup 5), a fast readout (approx 1 s), low noise (<10e sup -) and much reduced parallax error. Additionally, the prototype detector system has been optimised by increasing its efficiency at low X-ray ene...

  20. Application of combined multivariate techniques for the description of time-resolved powder X-ray diffraction data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taris, A.; Grosso, M.; Brundu, M.; Guida, V.; Viani, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2017), s. 451-461 ISSN 1600-5767 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : in situ X-ray powder diffraction * amorphous content * chemically bonded ceramics * statistical total correlation spectroscopy * multivariate curve resolution Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 2.495, year: 2016 http://journals.iucr.org/j/issues/2017/02/00/ap5006/index.html

  1. Reaction monitoring of cementing materials through multivariate techniques applied to time-resolved synchrotron X-Ray diffraction data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taris, A.; Grosso, M.; Viani, Alberto; Brundu, M.; Guida, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 43, May (2015), s. 895-900. ISBN 978-88-95608-34-1. ISSN 2283-9216 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : engineering controlled terms * least squares approximations * magnesium powder * multivariant analysis * potassium * reaction intermediates * X ray powder diffraction Subject RIV: AN - Psychology http://www.aidic.it/cet/15/43/150.pdf

  2. Using X-Ray Crystallography to Simplify and Accelerate Biologics Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brader, Mark L; Baker, Edward N; Dunn, Michael F; Laue, Thomas M; Carpenter, John F

    2017-02-01

    Every major biopharmaceutical company incorporates a protein crystallography unit that is central to its structure-based drug discovery efforts. Yet these capabilities are rarely leveraged toward the formal higher order structural characterization that is so challenging but integral to large-scale biologics manufacturing. Although the biotech industry laments the shortcomings of its favored biophysical techniques, x-ray crystallography is not even considered for drug development. Why not? We suggest that this is due, at least in part, to outdated thinking (for a recent industry-wide survey, see Gabrielson JP, Weiss IV WF. Technical decision-making with higher order structure data: starting a new dialogue. J Pharm Sci. 2015;104(4):1240-1245). We examine some myths surrounding protein crystallography and highlight the inherent properties of protein crystals (molecular identity, biochemical purity, conformational uniformity, and macromolecular crowding) as having practicable commonalities with today's patient-focused liquid drug products. In the new millennium, protein crystallography has become essentially a routine analytical test. Its application may aid the identification of better candidate molecules that are more amenable to high-concentration processing, formulation, and analysis thereby helping to make biologics drug development quicker, simpler, and cheaper. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Deflection gating for time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism-photoemission electron microscopy using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemann, C.; Kaiser, A. M.; Cramm, S.; Schneider, C. M.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we present a newly developed gating technique for a time-resolving photoemission microscope. The technique makes use of an electrostatic deflector within the microscope's electron optical system for fast switching between two electron-optical paths, one of which is used for imaging, while the other is blocked by an aperture stop. The system can be operated with a switching time of 20 ns and shows superior dark current rejection. We report on the application of this new gating technique to exploit the time structure in the injection bunch pattern of the synchrotron radiation source BESSY II at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for time-resolved measurements in the picosecond regime.

  4. A high-temperature furnace and a heating/drawing device designed for time-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements of polymer solids using imaging plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Syozo; Tanno, Kiyomitsu; Tsuji, Masaki; Kohjiya, Shinzo

    1995-01-01

    For time-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements using the imaging plate system in the drawing and/or heating process of polymer solids, a high-temperature furnace for heat treatment and a heating/drawing device were newly designed and constructed. Then, to demonstrate their performance, some experimental results obtained in the drawing process of an extruded/blown film of high-density polyethylene at room temperature and in the crystallization process of an oriented amorphous film of poly(ethylene naphthalene-2,6-dicarboxylate) by heating were presented. Other experimental results obtained using them were also briefly cited. (author)

  5. Analysis of urinary stone composition in Eastern India by X-ray diffraction crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Jindal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stones in the urinary system are common in our country. This study was done to assess the composition of the urinary stones in eastern part of India. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was done over a period of thirty months. A total of 90 stones were analyzed in this time period by using X-ray diffraction crystallography. Results: Of the 90 stones analyzed, 77 were renal stones, 12 were ureteric stones and one was a bladder stone. Six stones (all renal did not have properties to be represented by X-ray diffraction crystallography. The overall prevalence of the oxalate containing stones was 85.7% with calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM being the major constituent. Calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD was the next most common constituent. Struvite stones constituted 9.5% of the stones analyzed. Pure calcium phosphate stones were found in 4.7% of the cases. Conclusion: Our study reveals that the stone composition in the eastern part of India is different from that in other parts of the country. We have a comparatively lower prevalence of oxalate stones while a higher prevalence of phosphate and struvite stones.

  6. Revealing the micromechanisms behind semi-solid metal deformation with time-resolved X-ray tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Kareh, K. M.; Lee, P. D.; Atwood, R. C.; Connolley, T.; Gourlay, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    The behaviour of granular solid–liquid mixtures is key when deforming a wide range of materials from cornstarch slurries to soils, rock and magma flows. Here we demonstrate that treating semi-solid alloys as a granular fluid is critical to understanding flow behaviour and defect formation during casting. Using synchrotron X-ray tomography, we directly measure the discrete grain response during uniaxial compression. We show that the stress–strain response at 64–93% solid is due to the shear-in...

  7. Tracking the picosecond deactivation dynamics of a photoexcited iron carbene complex by time-resolved X-ray scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leshchev, Denis; Harlang, Tobias C. B.; Fredin, Lisa A.

    2018-01-01

    Recent years have seen the development of new iron-centered N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes for solar energy applications. Compared to typical ligand systems, the NHC ligands provide Fe complexes with longer-lived metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) states. This increased lifetime......)pyridine) is a unique complex as it exhibits a short-lived MC state with a lifetime on the scale of a few hundreds of picoseconds. Hence, this complex allows for a detailed investigation, using 100 ps X-ray pulses from a synchrotron, of strong ligand field effects on the intermediate MC state in an NHC complex. Here...

  8. X-ray tests of microfocusing mono-capillary optic for protein crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Bilderback, D H

    2001-01-01

    A single, borosilicate-glass capillary was drawn into a 30.5 cm long elliptical shape. The inside diameter was 0.40 mm at the large base end and 0.13 mm at the tip. With 12 keV X-rays from the CHESS D1 bending magnet, the single-bounce capillary produced a focus of better than 18 mu m in diameter (FHWM) at a 3 cm distance from the capillary tip. A flux gain of 110 in the focus position was observed along with a total flux in the spot of 4x10 sup 1 sup 0 X-rays/s (conditions: 5.3 GeV, 182 mA, 1.5% bandwidth multilayer, 12 keV X-rays). A measurement of the far field focus ring diameter yielded a divergence of 3.8 mrad, in good agreement with the 4 mrad design of the optic for protein crystallography. Using a small 25 mu m square beam, we measured the local reflectivity to be greater than 95% and the inner slope errors of the capillary to average about +-150 mu rad, both from raw and elliptically shaped tubing. Our conclusion is that more perfect starting tubing (i.e. one with lower slope errors) is needed to ma...

  9. X-ray tests of microfocusing mono-capillary optic for protein crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilderback, D.H.; Huang, R.

    2001-01-01

    A single, borosilicate-glass capillary was drawn into a 30.5 cm long elliptical shape. The inside diameter was 0.40 mm at the large base end and 0.13 mm at the tip. With 12 keV X-rays from the CHESS D1 bending magnet, the single-bounce capillary produced a focus of better than 18 μm in diameter (FHWM) at a 3 cm distance from the capillary tip. A flux gain of 110 in the focus position was observed along with a total flux in the spot of 4x10 10 X-rays/s (conditions: 5.3 GeV, 182 mA, 1.5% bandwidth multilayer, 12 keV X-rays). A measurement of the far field focus ring diameter yielded a divergence of 3.8 mrad, in good agreement with the 4 mrad design of the optic for protein crystallography. Using a small 25 μm square beam, we measured the local reflectivity to be greater than 95% and the inner slope errors of the capillary to average about ±150 μrad, both from raw and elliptically shaped tubing. Our conclusion is that more perfect starting tubing (i.e. one with lower slope errors) is needed to make even more perfect elliptically figured optics in the future

  10. Photoinduced charge transfer in a transition metal complex investigated by time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Setup and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeries, Dennis

    2015-02-01

    In the framework of this thesis the development of a time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiment and its application to fac-Ir(ppy) 3 is described. Such experiments require a very stable setup in terms of spatial and temporal accuracy. Therefore, the stability properties of the present installation were investigated in detail and continuously improved, in particular the synchronization of the ultrashort pulse laser system to the storage ring as well as the spatial stability of both X-ray and laser beam. Experiments utilizing the laser pump and X-ray probe configuration were applied on the green phosphorescence emitter complex fac-Ir(ppy) 3 dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide. Structural and electronic changes were triggered by photoexcitation of the metal-to-ligand charge transfer band with ultrashort laser pulses at a wavelength of 343 nm. The excited triplet state spectrum was extracted from the measured pump-probe X-ray absorption spectrum using an ionic approximation. The results con rm the anticipated metal-to-ligand charge transfer as shown by an ionization potential shift of the iridium atom. The symmetry of the complex was found to be pseudo-octahedral. This allowed the first experimental determination of the bond length of fac-Ir(ppy) 3 in an octahedral approximation and revealed a decrease of bond length of the first coordination shell in the triplet state. The first and second-order decay kinetics of the triplet state were investigated in a combination of X-ray and laser based experiments and revealed self-quenching as well as triplet-triplet annihilation rate constants.

  11. Diverse application platform for hard X-ray diffraction in SACLA (DAPHNIS): application to serial protein crystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tono, Kensuke, E-mail: tono@spring8.or.jp [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun 679-5198 (Japan); Nango, Eriko; Sugahara, Michihiro; Song, Changyong; Park, Jaehyun; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Rie [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun 679-5148 (Japan); Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun 679-5198 (Japan); Ono, Shun; Hatsui, Takaki [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun 679-5148 (Japan); Mizohata, Eiichi [Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Suzuki, Mamoru [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun 679-5148 (Japan); Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Shimamura, Tatsuro; Tanaka, Yoshiki [Kyoto University, Yoshidakonoe-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Iwata, So [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun 679-5148 (Japan); Kyoto University, Yoshidakonoe-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Yabashi, Makina [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun 679-5148 (Japan)

    2015-04-16

    An experimental platform for serial femtosecond crystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser and its applications at SACLA are described. An experimental system for serial femtosecond crystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) has been developed. It basically consists of a sample chamber, fluid injectors and a two-dimensional detector. The chamber and the injectors are operated under helium atmosphere at 1 atm. The ambient pressure operation facilitates applications to fluid samples. Three kinds of injectors are employed to feed randomly oriented crystals in aqueous solution or highly viscous fluid. Experiments on lysozyme crystals were performed by using the 10 keV XFEL of the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA). The structure of model protein lysozyme from 1 µm crystals at a resolution of 2.4 Å was obtained.

  12. CCD-based detector for protein crystallography with synchrotron X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, M.G.; Westbrook, E.M.; Naday, I.; Coleman, T.A.; Westbrook, M.L.; Travis, D.J.; Sweet, R.M.; Pflugrath, J.W.; Stanton, M.

    1990-01-01

    A detector with a 114 mm aperture, based on a charge-coupled device (CCD), has been designed for X-ray diffraction studies in protein crystallography. The detector was tested at the National Synchrotron Light Source with a beam intensity, through a 0.3 mm collimator, of greater than 10 9 X-ray photons/s. A fiberoptic taper, an image intensifier, and a lens demagnify, intensity, and focus the image onto a CCD having 512x512 pixels. The statistical uncertainty in the detector output was evaluated as a function of conversion gain. From this, a detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of 0.36 was derived. The dynamic range of 4x4 pixel resolution element, comparable in size to a diffraction peak, was 10 4 . The point-spread function shows FWHM resolution of approximately 1 pixel, where a pixel is 160 μm on the detector face. A data set collected from a chicken egg-white lysozyme crystal, consisting of 495 0.1deg frames, was processed by the MADNES data reduction program. The symmetry R-factors for the data were 3.2-3.5%. In a separate experiment a complete lysozyme data set consisting of 45 1deg frames was obtained in just 36 s of X-ray exposure. Diffraction images from crystals of the myosin S1 head (a=275 A) were also recorded; the Bragg spots, only 5 pixels apart, were separated but not fully resolved. Changes in the detector design that will improve the DQE and spatial resolution are outlined. The overall performance showed that this type of detector is well suited for X-ray scattering investigations with synchrotron sources. (orig.)

  13. CCD-based detector for protein crystallography with synchrotron X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, M.G.; Westbrook, E.M.; Naday, I.; Coleman, T.A.; Westbrook, M.L.; Travis, D.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Sweet, R.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Pflugrath, J.W. (Cold Spring Harbor Lab., NY (USA)); Stanton, M. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (USA))

    1990-11-15

    A detector with a 114 mm aperture, based on a charge-coupled device (CCD), has been designed for X-ray diffraction studies in protein crystallography. The detector was tested at the National Synchrotron Light Source with a beam intensity, through a 0.3 mm collimator, of greater than 10{sup 9} X-ray photons/s. A fiberoptic taper, an image intensifier, and a lens demagnify, intensity, and focus the image onto a CCD having 512x512 pixels. The statistical uncertainty in the detector output was evaluated as a function of conversion gain. From this, a detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of 0.36 was derived. The dynamic range of 4x4 pixel resolution element, comparable in size to a diffraction peak, was 10{sup 4}. The point-spread function shows FWHM resolution of approximately 1 pixel, where a pixel is 160 {mu}m on the detector face. A data set collected from a chicken egg-white lysozyme crystal, consisting of 495 0.1deg frames, was processed by the MADNES data reduction program. The symmetry R-factors for the data were 3.2-3.5%. In a separate experiment a complete lysozyme data set consisting of 45 1deg frames was obtained in just 36 s of X-ray exposure. Diffraction images from crystals of the myosin S1 head (a=275 A) were also recorded; the Bragg spots, only 5 pixels apart, were separated but not fully resolved. Changes in the detector design that will improve the DQE and spatial resolution are outlined. The overall performance showed that this type of detector is well suited for X-ray scattering investigations with synchrotron sources. (orig.).

  14. Large aperture CCD x-ray detector for protein crystallography using a fiberoptic taper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, M.G.; Westbrook, E.M.; Naday, I.; Coleman, T.A.; Westbrook, M.L.; Travis, D.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Sweet, R.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Pflugrath, J.W. (Cold Spring Harbor Lab., NY (USA)); Stanton, M. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (USA))

    1991-01-01

    A detector with a 114 mm aperture, based on a charge-coupled device (CCD), has been designed for x-ray diffraction studies in protein crystallography. The detector was tested on a beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory with a beam intensity greater than 10{sup 9} x-ray photons/s. A fiberoptic taper, an image intensifier and a lens demagnify, intensify, and focus the image onto a CCD having 512 {times} 512 pixels. A detective quantum efficiency (DOE) of 0.36 was obtained by evaluating the statistical uncertainty in the detector output. The dynamic range of a 4 {times} 4 pixel resolution element, comparable in size to a diffraction peak, was 10{sup 4}. The point-spread function shows FWHM resolution of approximately 1 pixel, where a pixel on the detector face is 160 {mu}m. A complete data set, consisting of forty-five 1{degree} rotation frames, was obtained in just 36 s of x-ray exposure to a crystal of chicken egg-white lysozyme. In a separate experiment, a lysozyme data set consisting of 495 0.1{degree} frames, was processed by the MADNES data reduction program, yielding symmetry R-factors for the data of 3.2--3.5%. Diffraction images from crystals of the myosin S1 head (a = 275 {Angstrom}) were also recorded. The Bragg spots, only 5 pixels apart, were resolved but were not sufficiently separated to process these data. Changes in the detector design which will improve the DQE and spatial resolution are outlined. The overall performance showed that this type of detector is well suited for x-ray scattering investigations with synchrotron sources. 23 refs., 11 figs.

  15. Large aperture CCD x ray detector for protein crystallography using a fiberoptic taper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, M. G.; Westbrook, E. M.; Naday, I.; Coleman, T. A.; Westbrook, M. L.; Travis, D. J.; Sweet, R. M.; Pflugrath, J. W.

    A detector with a 114 mm aperture, based on a charge-coupled device (CCD), has been designed for x-ray diffraction studies in protein crystallography. The detector was tested on a beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory with a beam intensity greater than 10(exp 9) x-ray photons/s. A fiberoptic taper, an image intensifier and a lens demagnify, intensify, and focus the image onto a CCD having 512 x 512 pixels. A detective quantum efficiency (DOE) of 0.36 was obtained by evaluating the statistical uncertainty in the detector output. The dynamic range of a 4 x 4 pixel resolution element, comparable in size to a diffraction peak, was 10(exp 4). The point-spread function shows FWHM resolution of approximately 1 pixel, where a pixel on the detector face is 160 microns. A complete data set, consisting of forty-five 1 deg rotation frames, was obtained in just 36 s of x-ray exposure to a crystal of chicken egg-white lysozyme. In a separate experiment, a lysozyme data set consisting of 495 0.1 deg frames, was processed by the MADNES data reduction program, yielding symmetry R-factors for the data of 3.2 to 3.5 percent. Diffraction images from crystals of the myosin S1 head (a = 275 A) were also recorded. The Bragg spots, only 5 pixels apart, were resolved but were not sufficiently separated to process these data. Changes in the detector design which will improve the DOE and spatial resolution are outlined. The overall performance showed that this type of detector is well suited for x-ray scattering investigations with synchrotron sources.

  16. CCD-based detector for protein crystallography with synchrotron X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, M. G.; Westbrook, E. M.; Naday, I.; Coleman, T. A.; Westbrook, M. L.; Travis, D. J.; Sweet, R. M.; Pflugrath, J. W.; Stanton, M.

    1990-11-01

    A detector with a 114 mm aperture, based on a charge-coupled device (CCD), has been designed for X-ray diffraction studies in protein crystallography. The detector was tested at the National Synchrotron Light Source with a beam intensity, through a 0.3 mm collimator, of greater than 109 X-ray photons/s. A fiberoptic taper, an image intensifier, and a lens demagnify, intensify, and focus the image onto a CCD having 512×512 pixels. The statistical uncertainty in the detector output was evaluated as a function of conversion gain. From this, a detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of 0.36 was derived. The dynamic range of a 4×4 pixel resolution element, comparable in size to a diffraction peak, was 104. The point-spread function shows FWHM resolution of approximately 1 pixel, where a pixel is 160 μm on the detector face. A data set collected from a chicken egg-white lysozyme crystal, consisting of 495 0.1° frames, was processed by the MADNES data reduction program. The symmetry R-factors for the data were 3.2-3.5%. In a separate experiment a complete lysozyme data set consisting of 45 1° frames was obtained in just 36 s of X-ray exposure. Diffraction images from crystals of the myosin S1 head (a = 275 Å) were also recorded; the Bragg spots, only 5 pixels apart, were separated but not fully resolved. Changes in the detector design that will improve the DQE and spatial resolution are outlined. The overall performance showed that this type of detector is well suited for X-ray scattering investigations with synchrotron sources.

  17. Time-Resolving Study of Stress-Induced Transformations of Isotactic Polypropylene through Wide Angle X-ray Scattering Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finizia Auriemma

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of a highly oriented fiber morphology by effect of tensile deformation of stereodefective isotactic polypropylene (iPP samples, starting from the unoriented γ form, is studied by following the transformation in real time during stretching through wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS measurements. In the stretching process, after yielding, the initial γ form transforms into the mesomorphic form of iPP through mechanical melting and re-crystallization. The analysis of the scattering invariant measured in the WAXS region highlights that the size of the mesomorphic domains included in the well oriented fiber morphology obtained at high deformations increases through a process which involves the coalescence of the small fragments formed by effect of tensile stress during lamellar destruction with the domain of higher dimensions.

  18. Upgraded high time-resolved x-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy system for J-TEXT ohmic plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, W.; Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, D. W.; Li, Q. L.; Yan, W.; Luo, Y. H.; Huang, Y. H.; Tong, R. H.; Yang, Z. J.; Rao, B.; Ding, Y. H.; Zhuang, G.; Lee, S. G.; Shi, Y. J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the upgraded x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) system on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) tokamak and the latest experimental results obtained in last campaign. With 500 Hz frame rate of the new Pilatus detector and 5 cm × 10 cm spherically bent crystal, the XICS system can provide core electron temperature (T e ), core ion temperature (T i ), and plasma toroidal rotation (V Φ ) with a maximum temporal resolution of 2 ms for J-TEXT pure ohmic plasmas. These parameters with high temporal resolution are very useful in tokamak plasma research, especially for rapidly changed physical processes. The experimental results from the upgraded XICS system are presented

  19. Time-resolved electron beam phase space tomography at a soft x-ray free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Röhrs

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs in the ultraviolet and x-ray regime put stringent demands on the peak current, transverse emittance, and energy spread of the driving electron beam. At the soft x-ray FEL FLASH, a transverse deflecting microwave structure (TDS has been installed to determine these parameters for the longitudinally compressed bunches, which are characterized by a narrow leading peak of high charge density and a long tail. The rapidly varying electromagnetic field in the TDS deflects the electrons vertically and transforms the time profile into a streak on an observation screen. The bunch current profile was measured single shot with an unprecedented resolution of 27 fs under FEL operating conditions. A precise single-shot measurement of the energy distribution along a bunch was accomplished by using the TDS in combination with an energy spectrometer. Variation of quadrupole strengths allowed for a determination of the horizontal emittance as a function of the longitudinal position within a bunch, the so-called slice emittance. In the bunch tail, a normalized slice emittance of about 2  μm was found, in agreement with expectations. In the leading spike, however, surprisingly large emittance values were observed, in apparent contradiction with the low emittance deduced from the measured FEL gain. By applying three-dimensional phase space tomography, we were able to show that the bunch head contains a central core of low emittance and high local current density, which is presumably the lasing part of the bunch.

  20. X-ray crystallography over the past decade for novel drug discovery – where are we heading next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Heping; Handing, Katarzyna B; Zimmerman, Matthew D; Shabalin, Ivan G; Almo, Steven C; Minor, Wladek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Macromolecular X-ray crystallography has been the primary methodology for determining the three-dimensional structures of proteins, nucleic acids and viruses. Structural information has paved the way for structure-guided drug discovery and laid the foundations for structural bioinformatics. However, X-ray crystallography still has a few fundamental limitations, some of which may be overcome and complemented using emerging methods and technologies in other areas of structural biology. Areas covered This review describes how structural knowledge gained from X-ray crystallography has been used to advance other biophysical methods for structure determination (and vice versa). This article also covers current practices for integrating data generated by other biochemical and biophysical methods with those obtained from X-ray crystallography. Finally, the authors articulate their vision about how a combination of structural and biochemical/biophysical methods may improve our understanding of biological processes and interactions. Expert opinion X-ray crystallography has been, and will continue to serve as, the central source of experimental structural biology data used in the discovery of new drugs. However, other structural biology techniques are useful not only to overcome the major limitation of X-ray crystallography, but also to provide complementary structural data that is useful in drug discovery. The use of recent advancements in biochemical, spectroscopy and bioinformatics methods may revolutionize drug discovery, albeit only when these data are combined and analyzed with effective data management systems. Accurate and complete data management is crucial for developing experimental procedures that are robust and reproducible. PMID:26177814

  1. A furnace for the in situ study of the formation of inorganic solids at high temperature using time-resolved energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geselbracht, Margret J.; Walton, Richard I.; Cowell, E. Sarah; Millange, Franck; O'Hare, Dermot

    2000-11-01

    The design, construction, and use of a furnace from which time-resolved x-ray diffraction data may be measured from reacting mixtures of solids or of solids and liquids is described. The furnace is a vertical tube design, constructed from commercially available components, and can operate at temperatures of up to 1000 °C. The apparatus is designed to heat sample tubes of up to 3 cm diameter. The use of high-intensity synchrotron-generated white-beam x rays allows the tube and its contents to be penetrated; thus x-ray diffraction data can be measured from reactions taking place in laboratory-sized reaction vessels. The energy-dispersive diffraction geometry allows rapid data collection (of the order of seconds); hence reactions can be followed continuously in real time. The use of the furnace is demonstrated by results from experiments performed on Station 16.4 of the Daresbury Synchrotron Radiation Source, UK. Two distinct reaction types are studied, both used to prepare the layered perovskite RbCa2Nb3O10: first, a solid state route at 800 °C and second a flux route, performed in molten RbCl, also at 800 °C.

  2. In meso in situ serial X-ray crystallography of soluble and membrane proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chia-Ying [Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland); Olieric, Vincent [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ma, Pikyee [Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland); Panepucci, Ezequiel [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Diederichs, Kay [Universität Konstanz, M647, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Wang, Meitian, E-mail: meitian.wang@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Caffrey, Martin, E-mail: meitian.wang@psi.ch [Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland)

    2015-05-14

    A method for performing high-throughput in situ serial X-ray crystallography with soluble and membrane proteins in the lipid cubic phase is described. It works with microgram quantities of protein and lipid (and ligand when present) and is compatible with the most demanding sulfur SAD phasing. The lipid cubic phase (LCP) continues to grow in popularity as a medium in which to generate crystals of membrane (and soluble) proteins for high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structure determination. To date, the PDB includes 227 records attributed to the LCP or in meso method. Among the listings are some of the highest profile membrane proteins, including the β{sub 2}-adrenoreceptor–G{sub s} protein complex that figured in the award of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Lefkowitz and Kobilka. The most successful in meso protocol to date uses glass sandwich crystallization plates. Despite their many advantages, glass plates are challenging to harvest crystals from. However, performing in situ X-ray diffraction measurements with these plates is not practical. Here, an alternative approach is described that provides many of the advantages of glass plates and is compatible with high-throughput in situ measurements. The novel in meso in situ serial crystallography (IMISX) method introduced here has been demonstrated with AlgE and PepT (alginate and peptide transporters, respectively) as model integral membrane proteins and with lysozyme as a test soluble protein. Structures were solved by molecular replacement and by experimental phasing using bromine SAD and native sulfur SAD methods to resolutions ranging from 1.8 to 2.8 Å using single-digit microgram quantities of protein. That sulfur SAD phasing worked is testament to the exceptional quality of the IMISX diffraction data. The IMISX method is compatible with readily available, inexpensive materials and equipment, is simple to implement and is compatible with high-throughput in situ serial data collection at

  3. Recent results from the in situ study of hydrothermal crystallisations using time-resolved X-ray and neutron diffraction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Richard I; Norquist, Alexander; Smith, Ronald I; O'Hare, Dermot

    2003-01-01

    We present new time-resolved powder diffraction data measured in situ during the hydrothermal crystallisation of two families of crystalline inorganic materials. In the first study, we have used time-resolved energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) to follow the formation of zeolitic zinc phosphates from amine phosphates and zinc oxide in acidic solutions at 60-150 degrees C. The advantage of this method is the ability to penetrate a laboratory-sized reaction vessel and to measure data in short (diffraction data to be measured during the experiment. We are thus able to show that three-dimensional zinc phosphate architectures often form via low-dimensional chain and layered phases, which is consistent with a recent aufbau model proposed for their formation. In the second study, we focus on the hydrothermal formation of ferroelectric barium titanate from TiO2 and barium salts in alkaline solution using time-resolved neutron diffraction. Although the time resolution of the neutron diffraction experiment is lower than the EDXRD experiment (data are measured in intervals of 5 min), we are able to penetrate reaction mixtures that are highly absorbing towards X-rays, and thus can measure data in a large volume reaction cell. Neutron diffraction data were collected on one of the highest-flux/highest detector-coverage diffractometers currently available; the GEM diffractometer at ISIS, UK. These experiments reveal that BaTiO3 crystallises after a large amount of TiO2 has been consumed; this implies that a dissolution crystallisation mechanism predominates. Additional mechanistic information is inferred by the observation of transient crystalline phases under certain reaction conditions.

  4. Compaction bands in shale revealed through digital volume correlation of time-resolved X-ray tomography scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeck, J.; Kobchenko, M.; Hall, S.; Tudisco, E.; Cordonnier, B.; Renard, F.

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies have identified compaction bands primarily within sandstones, and in fewer instances, within other porous rocks and sediments. Using Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) of X-ray microtomography scans, we find evidence of localized zones of high axial contraction that form tabular structures sub-perpendicular to maximum compression, σ1, in Green River shale. To capture in situ strain localization throughout loading, two shale cores were deformed in the HADES triaxial deformation apparatus installed on the X-ray microtomography beamline ID19 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. In these experiments, we increase σ1 in increments of two MPa, with constant confining pressure (20 MPa), until the sample fails in macroscopic shear. After each stress step, a 3D image of the sample inside the rig is acquired at a voxel resolution of 6.5 μm. The evolution of lower density regions within 3D reconstructions of linear attenuation coefficients reveal the development of fractures that fail with some opening. If a fracture produces negligible dilation, it may remain undetected in image segmentation of the reconstructions. We use the DVC software TomoWarp2 to identify undetected fractures and capture the 3D incremental displacement field between each successive pair of microtomography scans acquired in each experiment. The corresponding strain fields reveal localized bands of high axial contraction that host minimal shear strain, and thus match the kinematic definition of compaction bands. The bands develop sub-perpendicular to σ1 in the two samples in which pre-existing bedding laminations were oriented parallel and perpendicular to σ1. As the shales deform plastically toward macroscopic shear failure, the number of bands and axial contraction within the bands increase, while the spacing between the bands decreases. Compaction band development accelerates the rate of overall axial contraction, increasing the mean axial contraction throughout the sample

  5. Online diagnostics of time-resolved electron beam properties with femtosecond resolution for X-ray FELs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Minjie

    2016-07-01

    The European X-ray Free-electron Laser (XFEL) puts high demands on the quality of the highbrightness driving electron beam with bunch lengths in the femtosecond regime. Longitudinal diagnostics is requested to optimize and control the longitudinal profile, the longitudinal phase space, the slice energy spread and the slice emittance of the electron bunch, all of which are crucial to the generation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). The high bunch repetition rate of the super-conducting accelerator renders diagnostic method that is (quasi) non-destructive to the generation of SASE possible. In this thesis, three online diagnostic sections utilizing transverse deflecting structures (TDS) have been designed for the European XFEL, providing access to all parameters of interest with a longitudinal resolution down to below 10 fs.The requirement on the non-destructive capability has been realized by the implementation of fast kickermagnets and off-axis screens, which has been validated experimentally using an installation of the same concept at the Free-electron Laser in Hamburg. A special slicing procedure has been developed to significantly enhance the accuracy of slice energy spread measurements. Suppression of coherence effects, which impede the beam imaging in the TDS diagnostics, has been first demonstrated experimentally using the spatial separation method with scintillator screens. Comparison of the results of emittance measurements using the quadrupole scan method with those using the multi-screen method has proved the reliability of the latter method, which has been modelled intensively for the European XFEL.

  6. Production of RXLR effector proteins for structural analysis by X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Richard K; Banfield, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Structural analysis of RXLR effector proteins from oomycete plant pathogens is an emerging area of research. These studies are aimed at understanding the molecular basis of how these proteins manipulate plant cells to promote infection and also to help define how they can lead to activation of the plant innate immune system. Here, we describe a medium-throughput procedure for cloning and expression testing oomycete RXLR proteins in Escherichia coli. We also describe methods for purification of soluble protein and crystallization, with the aim of determining three-dimensional structures by X-ray crystallography. The procedures are generally applicable to any research program where the production of soluble recombinant protein in E. coli has proven difficult, or where there is a desire to evaluate E. coli thoroughly as a host before considering alternative hosts for heterologous expression.

  7. Synthesis, x-ray crystallography and leishmanicidal activity of benzimidazolinyl piperidine derivative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saify, Z.S.; Begum, N.; Yousuf, S.; Ashraf, S.

    2014-01-01

    Protozoan parasites of the Leishmania genus are the main cause of vector-borne disease leishmaniasis throughout the world. It is caused by at least 17 different species of protozoan Leishmania and transmitted by the bite of infected sand flies. Leishmaniasis could be fatal. Present drugs have limitations to cure it due to the development of drug resistance. Hence, to design an effective leishmanicidal agent would be of great interest. Benzimidazolinyl piperidine has served as potential target due to a vast range of biological activities. In the present study a new 4-(2-keto-1-benzimidazolinyl)piperidine derivative, 1-(2-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-oxoethyl)-4-(2-oxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-benzo(d)imidazol) piperidinium bromide has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. Evaluation by in vitro leishmanicidal assay showed good activity. (author)

  8. Time-resolved solution X-ray scattering of tobacco mosaic virus coat protein: kinetics and structure of intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potschka, M.; Kock, M.H.J.; Adams, M.L.; Schuster, T.M.

    1988-11-01

    The kinetics of assembly and disassembly of tobacco mosaic virus coat protein (TMVP) following temperature jumps have been studied by small-angle X-ray scattering and turbidimetry. The structures of the principal aggregates of TMVP oligomers (A protein), intermediate size (helix I) and large size helical rods (helix II), have been characterized by their average radii of gyration of thickness, cross section, and shape obtained from the corresponding regimes of the small-angle scattering pattern. This structural information was obtained within seconds after the temperature-induced initiation of either polymerization or depolymerization and allowed the authors to detect transient intermediates. This methodology made it possible to observe and characterize the structure of a principal intermediate. Taken together with other kinetic information, these data suggest that polymerization of TMVP under virus self-assembly conditions may proceed via a single-layered helical nucleus that contains about 20 subunits. Previous studies have shown that overshoot polymerization of TMVP can occur and result in metastable long helical viruslike rods which subsequently depolymerize and then form short helical rods, depending on the conditions of the final equilibrium state. The longer rods (helix II) are overshoot polymers which form within seconds and contain 17 1/3 subunits per turn (helix IIB), in contrast to the subunit packing arrangement of 16 1/3 subunits per turn found in the shorter helical rods (helix IA). The latter packing arrangement is the one found in TMV. An overall polymerization scheme is proposed for the formation of these two helical forms of TMVP.

  9. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Chemical Crystallography with Pulsed Neutrons and Synchrotron X-Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, George

    1988-01-01

    X-ray and neutron crystallography have played an increasingly impor­ tant role in the chemical and biochemical sciences over the past fifty years. The principal obstacles in this methodology, the phase problem and com­ puting, have been overcome. The former by the methods developed in the 1960's and just recognised by the 1985 Chemistry Nobel Prize award to Karle and Hauptman, the latter by the dramatic advances that have taken place in computer technology in the past twenty years. Within the last decade, two new radiation sources have been added to the crystallographer's tools. One is synchrotron X-rays and the other is spallation neutrons. Both have much more powerful fluxes than the pre­ vious sources and they are pulsed rather than continuos. New techniques are necessary to fully exploit the intense continuos radiation spectrum and its pulsed property. Both radiations are only available from particular National Laboratories on a guest-user basis for scientists outside these Na­ tional Laboratories. Hi...

  10. Ultraviolet photochemical reaction of [Fe(III(C2O43]3− in aqueous solutions studied by femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ogi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy was performed for aqueous ammonium iron(III oxalate trihydrate solutions using an X-ray free electron laser and a synchronized ultraviolet laser. The spectral and time resolutions of the experiment were 1.3 eV and 200 fs, respectively. A femtosecond 268 nm pulse was employed to excite [Fe(III(C2O43]3− in solution from the high-spin ground electronic state to ligand-to-metal charge transfer state(s, and the subsequent dynamics were studied by observing the time-evolution of the X-ray absorption spectrum near the Fe K-edge. Upon 268 nm photoexcitation, the Fe K-edge underwent a red-shift by more than 4 eV within 140 fs; however, the magnitude of the redshift subsequently diminished within 3 ps. The Fe K-edge of the photoproduct remained lower in energy than that of [Fe(III(C2O43]3−. The observed red-shift of the Fe K-edge and the spectral feature of the product indicate that Fe(III is upon excitation immediately photoreduced to Fe(II, followed by ligand dissociation from Fe(II. Based on a comparison of the X-ray absorption spectra with density functional theory calculations, we propose that the dissociation proceeds in two steps, forming first [(CO2•Fe(II(C2O42]3− and subsequently [Fe(II(C2O42]2−.

  11. Some Aspects of Crystal Centering During X-ray High-throughput Protein Crystallography Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaponov, Yu. A.; Matsugaki, N.; Sasajima, K.; Igarashi, N.; Wakatsuki, S.

    A set of algorithms and procedures of a crystal loop centering during X-ray high-throughput protein crystallography experiment has been designed and developed. A simple algorithm of the crystal loop detection and preliminary recognition has been designed and developed. The crystal loop detection algorithm is based on finding out the crystal loop ending point (opposite to the crystal loop pin) using image cross section (digital image column) profile analysis. The crystal loop preliminary recognition procedure is based on finding out the crystal loop sizes and position using image cross section profile analysis. The crystal loop fine recognition procedure based on Hooke-Jeeves pattern search method with an ellipse as a fitting pattern has been designed and developed. The procedure of restoring missing coordinate of the crystal loop is described. Based on developed algorithms and procedures the optimal auto-centering procedure has been designed and developed. A procedure of optimal manual crystal centering (Two Clicks Procedure) has been designed and developed. Developed procedures have been integrated into control software system PCCS installed at crystallography beamlines Photon Factory BL5A and PF-AR NW12, KEK.

  12. NATURAL CYCLOPENTANOID CYANOHYDRIN GLYCOSIDES .13. STRUCTURE DETERMINATION OF NATURAL EPOXYCYCLOPENTANES BY X-RAY CRYSTALLOGRAPHY AND NMR-SPECTROSCOPY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olafsdottir, E. S.; Sorensen, A. M.; Cornett, Claus

    1991-01-01

    nonannellated cyclopentane derivatives. The new glucosides were shown, by NMR spectroscopy (including NOE measurements), X-ray crystallography, and enzymatic hydrolysis to the corresponding cyanohydrins, to be (1R,2R,3R,4R)- and (1S,2S,3S,4S)-1-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-2,3-epoxy-4-hydroxycyclopenta ne-1...

  13. Relative stability of protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy : A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, H; Mark, AE

    2003-01-01

    The relative stability of protein structures determined by either X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation techniques. Published structures of 34 proteins containing between 50 and 100 residues have been

  14. Dehydrogenation kinetics of pure and nickel-doped magnesium hydride investigated by in situ time-resolved powder X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.R.; Andreasen, A.; Vegge, Tejs

    2006-01-01

    The dehydrogenation kinetics of pure and nickel (Ni)-doped (2w/w%) magnesium hydride (MgH2) have been investigated by in situ time-resolved powder X-ray diffraction (PXD). Deactivated samples, i.e. air exposed, are investigated in order to focus on the effect of magnesium oxide (MgO) surface layers......, which might be unavoidable for magnesium (Mg)-based storage media for mobile applications. A curved position-sensitive detector covering 120 degrees in 20 and a rotating anode X-ray source provide a time resolution of 45 s and up to 90 powder pattems collected during an experiment under isothermal...... by the Johnson-Mehi-Avrami formalism in order to derive rate constants at different temperatures. The apparent activation energies for dehydrogenation of pure and Ni-doped magnesium hydride were E-A approximate to 300 and 250 kJ/mol, respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry gave, E-A = 270 k...

  15. Experimental set-up for time resolved small angle X-ray scattering studies of nanoparticles formation using a free-jet micromixer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmiroli, Benedetta [Institute for Biophysics and Nanosystem Research, Austrian Academy of Science, Schmiedlstrasse 6, Graz (Austria); Grenci, Gianluca [TASC INFM/CNR, SS 14 km 163.5, Basovizza, TS (Italy); Cacho-Nerin, Fernando; Sartori, Barbara; Laggner, Peter [Institute for Biophysics and Nanosystem Research, Austrian Academy of Science, Schmiedlstrasse 6, Graz (Austria); Businaro, Luca [TASC INFM/CNR, SS 14 km 163.5, Basovizza, TS (Italy); Amenitsch, Heinz, E-mail: heinz.amenitsch@elettra.trieste.i [Institute for Biophysics and Nanosystem Research, Austrian Academy of Science, Schmiedlstrasse 6, Graz (Austria)

    2010-02-15

    Recently, we have designed, fabricated and tested a free-jet micromixer for time resolved small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of nanoparticles formation in the <100 mus time range. The microjet has a diameter of 25 mum and a time of first accessible measurement of 75 mus has been obtained. This result can still be improved. In this communication, we present a method to estimate whether a given chemical or biological reaction can be investigated with the micromixer, and to optimize the beam size for the measurement at the chosen SAXS beamline. Moreover, we describe a system based on stereoscopic imaging which allows the alignment of the jet with the X-ray beam with a precision of 20 mum. The proposed experimental procedures have been successfully employed to observe the formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) nanoparticles from the reaction of sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) and calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}). The induction time has been estimated in the order of 200 mus and the determined radius of the particles is about 14 nm.

  16. In vivo crystallography at X-ray free-electron lasers: the next generation of structural biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallat, François-Xavier; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Coussens, Nathan P; Yagi, Koichiro J; Boudes, Marion; Higashi, Tetsuya; Tsuji, Daisuke; Tatano, Yutaka; Suzuki, Mamoru; Mizohata, Eiichi; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Park, Jaehyun; Song, Changyong; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Nango, Eriko; Itoh, Kohji; Coulibaly, Fasséli; Tobe, Stephen; Ramaswamy, S; Stay, Barbara; Iwata, So; Chavas, Leonard M G

    2014-07-17

    The serendipitous discovery of the spontaneous growth of protein crystals inside cells has opened the field of crystallography to chemically unmodified samples directly available from their natural environment. On the one hand, through in vivo crystallography, protocols for protein crystal preparation can be highly simplified, although the technique suffers from difficulties in sampling, particularly in the extraction of the crystals from the cells partly due to their small sizes. On the other hand, the extremely intense X-ray pulses emerging from X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources, along with the appearance of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) is a milestone for radiation damage-free protein structural studies but requires micrometre-size crystals. The combination of SFX with in vivo crystallography has the potential to boost the applicability of these techniques, eventually bringing the field to the point where in vitro sample manipulations will no longer be required, and direct imaging of the crystals from within the cells will be achievable. To fully appreciate the diverse aspects of sample characterization, handling and analysis, SFX experiments at the Japanese SPring-8 angstrom compact free-electron laser were scheduled on various types of in vivo grown crystals. The first experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of the approach and suggest that future in vivo crystallography applications at XFELs will be another alternative to nano-crystallography. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Life in the fast lane for protein crystallization and X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tempel, Wolfram; Praissman, Jeremy; Lin, Dawei; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Gavira, Jose A.; Ng, Joseph D.

    2005-01-01

    The common goal for structural genomic centers and consortiums is to decipher as quickly as possible the three-dimensional structures for a multitude of recombinant proteins derived from known genomic sequences. Since X-ray crystallography is the foremost method to acquire atomic resolution for macromolecules, the limiting step is obtaining protein crystals that can be useful of structure determination. High-throughput methods have been developed in recent years to clone, express, purify, crystallize and determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein gene product rapidly using automated devices, commercialized kits and consolidated protocols. However, the average number of protein structures obtained for most structural genomic groups has been very low compared to the total number of proteins purified. As more entire genomic sequences are obtained for different organisms from the three kingdoms of life, only the proteins that can be crystallized and whose structures can be obtained easily are studied. Consequently, an astonishing number of genomic proteins remain unexamined. In the era of high-throughput processes, traditional methods in molecular biology, protein chemistry and crystallization are eclipsed by automation and pipeline practices. The necessity for high-rate production of protein crystals and structures has prevented the usage of more intellectual strategies and creative approaches in experimental executions. Fundamental principles and personal experiences in protein chemistry and crystallization are minimally exploited only to obtain "low-hanging fruit" protein structures. We review the practical aspects of today's high-throughput manipulations and discuss the challenges in fast pace protein crystallization and tools for crystallography. Structural genomic pipelines can be improved with information gained from low-throughput tactics that may help us reach the higher-bearing fruits. Examples of recent developments in this area are reported from

  18. Developing advanced X-ray scattering methods combined with crystallography and computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J Jefferson P; Tainer, John A

    2013-03-01

    The extensive use of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) over the last few years is rapidly providing new insights into protein interactions, complex formation and conformational states in solution. This SAXS methodology allows for detailed biophysical quantification of samples of interest. Initial analyses provide a judgment of sample quality, revealing the potential presence of aggregation, the overall extent of folding or disorder, the radius of gyration, maximum particle dimensions and oligomerization state. Structural characterizations include ab initio approaches from SAXS data alone, and when combined with previously determined crystal/NMR, atomistic modeling can further enhance structural solutions and assess validity. This combination can provide definitions of architectures, spatial organizations of protein domains within a complex, including those not determined by crystallography or NMR, as well as defining key conformational states of a protein interaction. SAXS is not generally constrained by macromolecule size, and the rapid collection of data in a 96-well plate format provides methods to screen sample conditions. This includes screening for co-factors, substrates, differing protein or nucleotide partners or small molecule inhibitors, to more fully characterize the variations within assembly states and key conformational changes. Such analyses may be useful for screening constructs and conditions to determine those most likely to promote crystal growth of a complex under study. Moreover, these high throughput structural determinations can be leveraged to define how polymorphisms affect assembly formations and activities. This is in addition to potentially providing architectural characterizations of complexes and interactions for systems biology-based research, and distinctions in assemblies and interactions in comparative genomics. Thus, SAXS combined with crystallography/NMR and computation provides a unique set of tools that should be considered

  19. Life in the fast lane for protein crystallization and X-ray crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tempel, Wolfram; Praissman, Jeremy; Lin, Dawei; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Gavira, Jose A.; Ng, Joseph D. (UAH); (NASA); (Georgia)

    2010-07-20

    The common goal for structural genomic centers and consortiums is to decipher as quickly as possible the three-dimensional structures for a multitude of recombinant proteins derived from known genomic sequences. Since X-ray crystallography is the foremost method to acquire atomic resolution for macromolecules, the limiting step is obtaining protein crystals that can be useful of structure determination. High-throughput methods have been developed in recent years to clone, express, purify, crystallize and determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein gene product rapidly using automated devices, commercialized kits and consolidated protocols. However, the average number of protein structures obtained for most structural genomic groups has been very low compared to the total number of proteins purified. As more entire genomic sequences are obtained for different organisms from the three kingdoms of life, only the proteins that can be crystallized and whose structures can be obtained easily are studied. Consequently, an astonishing number of genomic proteins remain unexamined. In the era of high-throughput processes, traditional methods in molecular biology, protein chemistry and crystallization are eclipsed by automation and pipeline practices. The necessity for high-rate production of protein crystals and structures has prevented the usage of more intellectual strategies and creative approaches in experimental executions. Fundamental principles and personal experiences in protein chemistry and crystallization are minimally exploited only to obtain 'low-hanging fruit' protein structures. We review the practical aspects of today's high-throughput manipulations and discuss the challenges in fast pace protein crystallization and tools for crystallography. Structural genomic pipelines can be improved with information gained from low-throughput tactics that may help us reach the higher-bearing fruits. Examples of recent developments in this area

  20. Effects of quartz particle size and water-to-solid ratio on hydrothermal synthesis of tobermorite studied by in-situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuma, J.; Tsunashima, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Matsuno, S.; Ogawa, A.; Matsui, K.; Sato, M.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrothermal synthesis process of tobermorite (5CaO.6SiO 2 .5H 2 O) has been investigated by in-situ X-ray diffraction using high-energy X-rays from a synchrotron radiation source in combination with a purpose-build autoclave cell. Dissolution rates of quartz were largely affected by its particle size distribution in the starting mixtures. However, the composition (Ca/Si) of non-crystalline C-S-H at the start of tobermorite formation was identical regardless of the quartz dissolution rate. An effect of water-to-solid ratio (w/s) was investigated for samples using fine particle quartz. Tobermorite did not occur with w/s of 1.7 but occurred with w/s higher than 3.0. Surprisingly, however, the dissolution curves of quartz were nearly identical for all samples with w/s from 1.7 to 9, indicating that the dissolution rate is predominated by surface area. Possible reaction mechanism for tobermorite formation will be discussed in terms of Ca and/or silicate ion concentration in the liquid phase and distribution of Ca/Si in non-crystalline C-S-H. - Graphical abstract: Time-resolved XRD data set was obtained at up to 190 deg. C under a saturated steam pressure. Tobermorite (5CaO.6SiO 2 .5H 2 O) formation reaction was investigated in detail for several different starting materials. Highlights: → Hydrothermal formation of tobermorite was monitored by in-situ XRD. → Ca/Si of C-S-H at the start time of tobermorite formation was determined. → The Ca/Si value was identical regardless of the quartz particle size in the starting mixture.

  1. SAXSANA: an interactive program for the analysis and monitoring of static and time-resolved small-angle X-ray solution scattering measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiragi, Yuzuru; Sano, Yoh; Matsumoto, Tomoharu

    2003-03-01

    An interactive analytical program, SAXSANA, for small-angle X-ray scattering measurements of solutions is described. The program processes scattered data without disciplined knowledge of small-angle scattering. SAXSANA also assists in finding the best experimental conditions, thus avoiding blind runs of experiments. SAXSANA consists of the following procedures: (i) determination of the centre of scattered X-rays and moment transfer Q (Q = 4pisintheta/lambda, where 2theta is the scattering angle and lambda is the wavelength) for each measured channel; (ii) conversion of the data format to the format of Q versus scattered intensities J(Q); (iii) truncation of unnecessary data and smoothing of scattering curves by cubic-spline function; (iv) correction of the absorption effect and subtraction of the scattered intensity of the buffer (solvent) solution from that of the sample solution; (v) creation of a data file for a three-dimensional representation of time-resolved scattering curves; (vi) determination of radii of gyration by Guinier plots; (vii) determination of persistent lengths by Kratky plots; (viii) extrapolation of the small-angle part by Guinier plots; (ix) extrapolation of the wide-angle part by Porod's & Luzzati's laws for the Hankel transformation in order to obtain the distance distribution function p(r); (x) calculation of p(r) and computation of the invariant, the chord length, the Volume, the spherical radius, the maximum dimension D(max) and the radius of gyration (Rg). SAXSANA also serves as an on-site monitor for the validity of an experimental result during the measurements.

  2. X-ray crystallography, electrochemistry, spectral and thermal analysis of some tetradentate schiff base complexes and formation constant measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Asadi, Z.; Savarypour, N.; Dušek, Michal; Eigner, Václav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 11 (2017), s. 1501-1508 ISSN 2470-1556 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-12653S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : X-ray crystallography * transition metal Schiff base complexes * thermogravimetry * electrochemistry * formation constant measurements Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.)

  3. Direct Evidence of Conformational Changes Associated with Voltage Gating in a Voltage Sensor Protein by Time-Resolved X-ray/Neutron Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The voltage sensor domain (VSD) of voltage-gated cation (e.g., Na+, K+) channels central to neurological signal transmission can function as a distinct module. When linked to an otherwise voltage-insensitive, ion-selective membrane pore, the VSD imparts voltage sensitivity to the channel. Proteins homologous with the VSD have recently been found to function themselves as voltage-gated proton channels or to impart voltage sensitivity to enzymes. Determining the conformational changes associated with voltage gating in the VSD itself in the absence of a pore domain thereby gains importance. We report the direct measurement of changes in the scattering-length density (SLD) profile of the VSD protein, vectorially oriented within a reconstituted phospholipid bilayer membrane, as a function of the transmembrane electric potential by time-resolved X-ray and neutron interferometry. The changes in the experimental SLD profiles for both polarizing and depolarizing potentials with respect to zero potential were found to extend over the entire length of the isolated VSD’s profile structure. The characteristics of the changes observed were in qualitative agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of a related membrane system, suggesting an initial interpretation of these changes in terms of the VSD’s atomic-level 3-D structure. PMID:24697545

  4. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction from frog skeletal muscle during shortening against an inertial load and a quick release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Hashizume, Hiroo; Tameyasu, Tsukasa; Tanaka, Hidehiro; Sugi, Haruo.

    1980-01-01

    A group of Japanese researchers conducted, for the first time in this field, experiments on time-resolved x-ray diffraction of frog (bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana) skeletal muscle in conditions where both the force and the muscle length change with time. During an isotonic twitch under a load of about 0.3 P 0 , the intensity ratio started falling on stimulation and reached a minimum value of 0.5 - 0.6 at the early shortening phase, which was maintained until the beginning of relaxation. Except that the minimum value was not retained until the start of relaxation, the same was observed during a twitch against an inertial load whereby the peak force exerted by the muscle was about 0.4 P 0 . The results may be taken to indicate that the change in the intensity ratio reflects not the time course of shortening but that of force generation. When a quick release (3 - 4% of muscle length) was applied during the rising phase of an isometric twitch, the intensity ratio showed no distinct change. Judging from tentative calculation results, however, the foregoing result is subject to further experiments with a much improved time resolution of the measurements. (Kitajima, A.)

  5. Molecular structure in the solid state by X-ray crystallography and SSNMR and in solution by NMR of two 1,4-diazepines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Carla I.; Sanz, Dionisia; Claramunt, Rosa M.; Torralba, M. Carmen; Torres, M. Rosario; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2018-03-01

    The crystals of two 1,4-diazepines prepared from curcuminoid β-diketones and ethylenediamine were studied by X-ray crystallography and NMR. Their tautomerism, intramolecular hydrogen bonds and conformation were determined.

  6. Bond Shortening (1.4 Å) in the Singlet and Triplet Excited States of [Ir2(dimen)4]2+ in Solution Determined by Time-Resolved X-ray Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer; Harlang, Tobias; Christensen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Ground- and excited-state structures of the bimetallic, ligand-bridged compound Ir2(dimen)42+ are investigated in acetonitrile by means of time-resolved X-ray scattering. Following excitation by 2 ps laser pulses at 390 nm, analysis of difference scattering patterns obtained at eight different ti...

  7. A new fixed-target approach for serial crystallography at synchrotron light sources and X-ray free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedig, Philip

    2017-07-15

    In the framework of this thesis, a new method for high-speed fixed-target serial crystallography experiments and its applicability to biomacromolecular crystallography at both synchrotron light sources and X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) is presented. The method is based on a sample holder, which can carry up to 20,000 microcrystals and which is made of single-crystalline silicon. Using synchrotron radiation, the structure of Operophtera brumata cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus type 18 polyhedrin, lysozyme and cubic insulin was determined by collecting X-ray diffraction data from multiple microcrystals. Data collection was shown to be possible at both cryogenic and ambient conditions. For room-temperature measurements, both global and specific indications of radiation damage were investigated and characterized. Due to the sieve-like structure of the chip, the microcrystals tend to arrange themselves according to the micropore pattern, which allows for efficient sampling of the sample material. In combination with a high-speed scanning stage, the sample holder was furthermore shown to be highly suitable for serial femtosecond crystallography experiments. By fast raster scanning of the chip through the pulsed X-ray beam of an XFEL, structure determination of a virus, using the example of bovine enterovirus type 2, has been demonstrated at an XFEL for the first time. Hit rates of up to 100% were obtained by the presented method, which refers to a reduction in sample consumption by at least three orders of magnitude with respect to common liquid-jet injection methods used for sample delivery. In this way, the typical time needed for data collection in serial femtosecond crystallography is significantly decreased. The presented technique for sample loading of the chip is easy to learn and results in efficient removal of the surrounding mother liquor, thereby reducing the generated background signal. Since the chip is made of single-crystalline silicon, in principle no

  8. A new fixed-target approach for serial crystallography at synchrotron light sources and X-ray free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedig, Philip

    2017-07-01

    In the framework of this thesis, a new method for high-speed fixed-target serial crystallography experiments and its applicability to biomacromolecular crystallography at both synchrotron light sources and X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) is presented. The method is based on a sample holder, which can carry up to 20,000 microcrystals and which is made of single-crystalline silicon. Using synchrotron radiation, the structure of Operophtera brumata cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus type 18 polyhedrin, lysozyme and cubic insulin was determined by collecting X-ray diffraction data from multiple microcrystals. Data collection was shown to be possible at both cryogenic and ambient conditions. For room-temperature measurements, both global and specific indications of radiation damage were investigated and characterized. Due to the sieve-like structure of the chip, the microcrystals tend to arrange themselves according to the micropore pattern, which allows for efficient sampling of the sample material. In combination with a high-speed scanning stage, the sample holder was furthermore shown to be highly suitable for serial femtosecond crystallography experiments. By fast raster scanning of the chip through the pulsed X-ray beam of an XFEL, structure determination of a virus, using the example of bovine enterovirus type 2, has been demonstrated at an XFEL for the first time. Hit rates of up to 100% were obtained by the presented method, which refers to a reduction in sample consumption by at least three orders of magnitude with respect to common liquid-jet injection methods used for sample delivery. In this way, the typical time needed for data collection in serial femtosecond crystallography is significantly decreased. The presented technique for sample loading of the chip is easy to learn and results in efficient removal of the surrounding mother liquor, thereby reducing the generated background signal. Since the chip is made of single-crystalline silicon, in principle no

  9. Cation Movements during Dehydration and NO2 Desorption in a Ba-Y,FAU zeolite: an in situ Time-resolved X-ray Diffraction Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xianqin; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-02-28

    Synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction and Rietveld analysis were used to probe the interactions between BaY, FAU zeolite frameworks and H2O or NO2 molecules. These results provided information about the migration of the Ba2+ cations in the zeolite framework during dehydration and during NO2 adsorption/desorption processes in a water free zeolite. In the hydrated structure water molecules form four double rings of hexagonal ice-like clusters [(H2O)6] in the 12-ring openings of the super-cage. These water rings interacted with the cations and the zeolite framework through four cation/water clusters centered over the four 6-membered rings of the super-cage (site II). Interpenetrating tetrahedral water clusters [(H2O)4] and tetrahedral Ba+2 cation clusters were observed in the sodalite cage. Consistent with the reported FT-IR results, three different ionic NOx species (NO+, NO+-NO2, and NO3-) were observed following NO2 adsorption by the dehydrated Ba-Y,FAU zeolite. The structure of the water and the NOx species were correlated with the interactions between the adsorbates, the cations, and the framework. The population of Ba2+ ions at different cationic positions strongly depended on the amount of bound water or NOx species. Both dehydration and NO2 adsorption/desorption resulted in facile migration of Ba2+ ions among the different cationic positions. Data obtained in this work have provided direct evidence for the Ba2+ cation migration to accommodate the binding of gas molecules. This important feature may play a pivotal role in the strong binding of NO2 to Ba-Y,FAU zeolite, a prerequisite for high catalytic activity in lean NOx reduction catalysis.

  10. Time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering study of the early stage of amyloid formation of an apomyoglobin mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortore, Maria Grazia; Spinozzi, Francesco; Vilasi, Silvia; Sirangelo, Ivana; Irace, Gaetano; Shukla, Anuj; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Sinibaldi, Raffaele; Mariani, Paolo

    2011-12-01

    The description of the fibrillogenesis pathway and the identification of “on-pathway” or “off-pathway” intermediates are key issues in amyloid research as they are concerned with the mechanism for onset of certain diseases and with therapeutic treatments. Recent results on the fibril formation process revealed an unexpected complexity both in the number and in the types of species involved, but the early aggregation events are still largely unknown, mainly because of their experimental inaccessibility. To provide information on the early stage events of self-assembly of an amyloidogenic protein, during the so-called lag phase, stopped-flow time-resolved small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments were performed. Using a global fitting analysis, the structural and aggregation properties of the apomyoglobin W7FW14F mutant, which is monomeric and partly folded at acidic pH but forms amyloid fibrils after neutralization, were derived from the first few milliseconds onward. SAXS data indicated that the first aggregates appear in less than 20 ms after the pH jump to neutrality and further revealed the simultaneous presence of diverse species. In particular, worm-like unstructured monomers, very large assemblies, and elongated particles were detected, and their structural features and relative concentrations were derived as a function of time on the basis of our model. The final results show that, during the lag phase, early assembling occurs due to the presence of transient monomeric species very prone to association and through successive competing aggregation and rearrangement processes leading to coexisting on-pathway and off-pathway transient species.

  11. Combined analysis of 1,3-benzodioxoles by crystalline sponge X-ray crystallography and laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yukako; Ohara, Kazuaki; Taki, Rika; Saeki, Tomomi; Yamaguchi, Kentaro

    2018-03-12

    The crystalline sponge (CS) method, which employs single-crystal X-ray diffraction to determine the structure of an analyte present as a liquid or an oil and having a low melting point, was used in combination with laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). 1,3-Benzodioxole derivatives were encapsulated in CS and their structures were determined by combining X-ray crystallography and MS. After the X-ray analysis, the CS was subjected to imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) with an LDI spiral-time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). The ion detection area matched the microscopic image of the encapsulated CS. In addition, the accumulated 1D mass spectra showed that fragmentation of the guest molecule (hereafter, guest) can be easily visualized without any interference from the fragment ions of CS except for two strong ion peaks derived from the tridentate ligand TPT (2,4,6-tris(4-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine) of the CS and its fragment. X-ray analysis clearly showed the presence of the guest as well as the π-π, CH-halogen, and CH-O interactions between the guest and the CS framework. However, some guests remained randomly diffused in the nanopores of CS. In addition, the detection limit was less than sub-pmol order based on the weight and density of CS determined by X-ray analysis. Spectroscopic data, such as UV-vis and NMR, also supported the encapsulation of the guest through the interaction between the guest and CS components. The results denote that the CS-LDI-MS method, which combines CS, X-ray analysis and LDI-MS, is effective for structure determination.

  12. Cooperative protein structural dynamics of homodimeric hemoglobin linked to water cluster at subunit interface revealed by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Goo Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Homodimeric hemoglobin (HbI consisting of two subunits is a good model system for investigating the allosteric structural transition as it exhibits cooperativity in ligand binding. In this work, as an effort to extend our previous study on wild-type and F97Y mutant HbI, we investigate structural dynamics of a mutant HbI in solution to examine the role of well-organized interfacial water cluster, which has been known to mediate intersubunit communication in HbI. In the T72V mutant of HbI, the interfacial water cluster in the T state is perturbed due to the lack of Thr72, resulting in two less interfacial water molecules than in wild-type HbI. By performing picosecond time-resolved X-ray solution scattering experiment and kinetic analysis on the T72V mutant, we identify three structurally distinct intermediates (I1, I2, and I3 and show that the kinetics of the T72V mutant are well described by the same kinetic model used for wild-type and F97Y HbI, which involves biphasic kinetics, geminate recombination, and bimolecular CO recombination. The optimized kinetic model shows that the R-T transition and bimolecular CO recombination are faster in the T72V mutant than in the wild type. From structural analysis using species-associated difference scattering curves for the intermediates, we find that the T-like deoxy I3 intermediate in solution has a different structure from deoxy HbI in crystal. In addition, we extract detailed structural parameters of the intermediates such as E-F distance, intersubunit rotation angle, and heme-heme distance. By comparing the structures of protein intermediates in wild-type HbI and the T72V mutant, we reveal how the perturbation in the interfacial water cluster affects the kinetics and structures of reaction intermediates of HbI.

  13. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction study on superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} epitaxially grown on SrTiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luebcke, A.

    2007-07-01

    In this PhD thesis time-resolved X-ray diffraction in optical pump - X-ray probe scheme was applied for the first time to a High-Temperature Superconductor in the superconducting state. The aim was to study the possible lattice response to optical Cooper pair breaking. As sample a thin YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} film with a superconducting transition temperature of T{sub c}=90 K, epitaxially grown on a SrTiO{sub 3} single crystal was used. (orig.)

  14. Ultrasonic acoustic levitation for fast frame rate X-ray protein crystallography at room temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Tomizaki, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the data acquisition rate of X-ray diffraction images for macromolecular crystals at room temperature at synchrotrons has the potential to significantly accelerate both structural analysis of biomolecules and structure-based drug developments. Using lysozyme model crystals, we demonstrated the rapid acquisition of X-ray diffraction datasets by combining a high frame rate pixel array detector with ultrasonic acoustic levitation of protein crystals in liquid droplets. The rapid spinn...

  15. Room-temperature serial crystallography at synchrotron X-ray sources using slowly flowing free-standing high-viscosity microstreams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botha, Sabine; Nass, Karol; Barends, Thomas R M; Kabsch, Wolfgang; Latz, Beatrice; Dworkowski, Florian; Foucar, Lutz; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Wang, Meitian; Shoeman, Robert L; Schlichting, Ilme; Doak, R Bruce

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances in synchrotron sources, beamline optics and detectors are driving a renaissance in room-temperature data collection. The underlying impetus is the recognition that conformational differences are observed in functionally important regions of structures determined using crystals kept at ambient as opposed to cryogenic temperature during data collection. In addition, room-temperature measurements enable time-resolved studies and eliminate the need to find suitable cryoprotectants. Since radiation damage limits the high-resolution data that can be obtained from a single crystal, especially at room temperature, data are typically collected in a serial fashion using a number of crystals to spread the total dose over the entire ensemble. Several approaches have been developed over the years to efficiently exchange crystals for room-temperature data collection. These include in situ collection in trays, chips and capillary mounts. Here, the use of a slowly flowing microscopic stream for crystal delivery is demonstrated, resulting in extremely high-throughput delivery of crystals into the X-ray beam. This free-stream technology, which was originally developed for serial femtosecond crystallography at X-ray free-electron lasers, is here adapted to serial crystallography at synchrotrons. By embedding the crystals in a high-viscosity carrier stream, high-resolution room-temperature studies can be conducted at atmospheric pressure using the unattenuated X-ray beam, thus permitting the analysis of small or weakly scattering crystals. The high-viscosity extrusion injector is described, as is its use to collect high-resolution serial data from native and heavy-atom-derivatized lysozyme crystals at the Swiss Light Source using less than half a milligram of protein crystals. The room-temperature serial data allow de novo structure determination. The crystal size used in this proof-of-principle experiment was dictated by the available flux density. However, upcoming

  16. A CCD-based area detector for X-ray crystallography using synchrotron and laboratory sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.C.; Li Youli; Stanton, M.; Xie Yuanhui; O'Mara, D.; Kalata, K.

    1993-01-01

    The design and characteristics of a CCD-based area detector suitable for X-ray crystallographic studies using both synchrotron and laboratory sources are described. The active area is 75 mm in diameter, the FWHM of the point response function is 0.20 mm, and for Bragg peaks the dynamic range is 900 and the DQE ∼0.3. The 1320x1035-pixel Kodak CCD is read out into an 8 Mbyte memory system in 0.14 s and digitized to 12 bits. X-ray crystallographic data collected at the NSLS synchrotron from cubic insulin crystals are presented. (orig.)

  17. New insight into the dynamic properties and the active site architecture of H-Ras p21 revealed by X-ray crystallography at very high resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klink Björn U

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In kinetic crystallography, the usually static method of X-ray diffraction is expanded to allow time-resolved analysis of conformational rearrangements in protein structures. To achieve this, reactions have to be triggered within the protein crystals of interest, and optical spectroscopy can be used to monitor the reaction state. For this approach, a modified form of H-Ras p21 was designed which allows reaction initiation and fluorescence readout of the initiated GTPase reaction within the crystalline state. Rearrangements within the crystallized protein due to the progressing reaction and associated heterogeneity in the protein conformations have to be considered in the subsequent refinement processes. Results X-ray diffraction experiments on H-Ras p21 in different states along the reaction pathway provide detailed information about the kinetics and mechanism of the GTPase reaction. In addition, a very high data quality of up to 1.0 Å resolution allowed distinguishing two discrete subconformations of H-Ras p21, expanding the knowledge about the intrinsic flexibility of Ras-like proteins, which is important for their function. In a complex of H-Ras•GppNHp (guanosine-5'-(β,γ-imido-triphosphate, a second Mg2+ ion was found to be coordinated to the γ-phosphate group of GppNHp, which positions the hydrolytically active water molecule very close to the attacked γ-phosphorous atom. Conclusion For the structural analysis of very high-resolution data we have used a new 'two-chain-isotropic-refinement' strategy. This refinement provides an alternative and easy to interpret strategy to reflect the conformational variability within crystal structures of biological macromolecules. The presented fluorescent form of H-Ras p21 will be advantageous for fluorescence studies on H-Ras p21 in which the use of fluorescent nucleotides is not feasible.

  18. Modern neutron diffraction methods as a complementary tool to X-ray crystallography for structure research in materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heger, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is a well established method in structure research of crystal structures and magnetic ordering. Whereas X-ray diffraction is the standard method for crystal structure determination yielding the total electron density distribution of crystalline materials, neutron diffraction by their nuclear interaction provides the nuclear density distribution and by magnetic dipole interaction the partial electron density distribution of unpaired electrons. Hence neutron crystallography is of special importance for detailed investigations of light elements with few electrons (most prominent example is the hydrogen distribution), to discriminate between different isotopes (e.g. between H and D), and for the determination of magnetic structures and spin density distributions. But neutrons are rare and expensive. There are only a few reactor and spallation sources around the world and the flux of neutron beams is almost 10 -3 smaller than that of a conventional X-ray tube. Therefore, neutron diffractometers and the strategy of data acquisition have to be optimized. Suitable samples, e.g. mm 3 large single crystals are needed, have to be prepared. Examples of modern instrumentation and methods are presented together with results from investigations on structural phase transitions induced by hydrogen-bond ordering (ferroelectric and proton conductor materials) and on complex magnetic systems. It is shown that the combination of X-ray/synchrotron and neutron diffraction is an important tool for a microscopic understanding of physical properties of crystalline materials. (author)

  19. CCD[charge-coupled device]-based synchrotron x-ray detector for protein crystallography: Performance projected from an experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, M.G.; Naday, I.; Sherman, I.S.; Kraimer, M.R.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    The intense x radiation from a synchrotron source could, with a suitable detector, provide a complete set of diffraction images from a protein crystal before the crystal is damaged by radiation (2 to 3 min). An area detector consisting of a 40 mm dia. x-ray fluorescing phosphor, coupled with an image intensifier and lens to a CCD image sensor, was developed to determine the effectiveness of such a detector in protein crystallography. The detector was used in an experiment with a rotating anode x-ray generator. Diffraction patterns from a lysozyme crystal obtained with this detector are compared to those obtained with film. The two images appear to be virtually identical. The flux of 10 4 x-ray photons/s was observed on the detector at the rotating anode generator. At the 6-GeV synchrotron being designed at Argonne, the flux on an 80 x 80 mm 2 detector is expected to be >10 9 photons/s. The projected design of such a synchrotron detector shows that a diffraction-peak count >10 6 could be obtained in ∼0.5 s. With an additional ∼0.5 s readout time of a 512 x 512 pixel CCD, the data acquisition time per frame would be ∼1 s so that ninety 1 0 diffraction images could be obtained, with approximately 1% precision, in less than 3 min

  20. Synthesis, X-ray crystallography, and DFT calculations of a novel phosphoramide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shariatinia, Z.; Dušek, Michal; Eigner, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 640, č. 14 (2014), 2945-2955 ISSN 0044-2313 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03276S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : phosphoramide * x-ray structure * DFT Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.160, year: 2014

  1. Large-aperture CCD x-ray detector for protein crystallography using a fiber-optic taper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Michael G.; Westbrook, Edwin M.; Naday, Istvan; Coleman, T. A.; Westbrook, Mary L.; Travis, D. J.; Sweet, Robert M.; Pflugrath, J. W.; Stanton, Martin J.

    1991-07-01

    A detector with a 114 mm aperture, based on a charge-coupled device (CCD), has been designed for x-ray diffraction studies in protein crystallography. The detector was tested on a beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory with a beam intensity greater than 10(superscript 9) x-ray photons/s. A fiber-optic taper, an image intensifier, and a lens demagnify, intensify, and focus the image onto a CCD having 512 X 512 pixels. A detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of 0.36 was obtained by evaluating the statistical uncertainty in the detector output. The dynamic range of a 4 X 4 pixel resolution element, comparable in size to a diffraction peak, was 10 (superscript 4). The point-spread function shows FWHM resolution of approximately 1 pixel, where a pixel on the detector face is 160 micrometers . A complete data set, consisting of forty-five 1 degree(s) rotation frames, was obtained in just 36 s of x-ray exposure to a crystal of chicken egg-white lysozyme. In a separate experiment, a lysozyme data set consisting of 495 0.1 degree(s) frames, was processed by the MADNES data reduction program, yielding symmetry R-factors for the data of 3.2- 3.5%. Diffraction images from crystals of the myosin S1 head (a equals 275 angstroms) were also recorded. The Bragg spots, only 5 pixels apart, were resolved but were not sufficiently separated to process these data. Changes in the detector design which will improve the DQE and spatial resolution are outlined. The overall performance showed that this type of detector is well suited for x-ray scattering investigations with synchrotron sources.

  2. High-speed x-ray imaging with the Keck pixel array detector (Keck PAD) for time-resolved experiments at synchrotron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, Hugh T., E-mail: htp2@cornell.edu; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S.; Weiss, Joel T. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Chamberlain, Darol; Gruner, Sol M. [Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Modern storage rings are readily capable of providing intense x-ray pulses, tens of picoseconds in duration, millions of times per second. Exploiting the temporal structure of these x-ray sources opens avenues for studying rapid structural changes in materials. Many processes (e.g. crack propagation, deformation on impact, turbulence, etc.) differ in detail from one sample trial to the next and would benefit from the ability to record successive x-ray images with single x-ray sensitivity while framing at 5 to 10 MHz rates. To this end, we have pursued the development of fast x-ray imaging detectors capable of collecting bursts of images that enable the isolation of single synchrotron bunches and/or bunch trains. The detector technology used is the hybrid pixel array detector (PAD) with a charge integrating front-end, and high-speed, in-pixel signal storage elements. A 384×256 pixel version, the Keck-PAD, with 150 µm × 150 µm pixels and 8 dedicated in-pixel storage elements is operational, has been tested at CHESS, and has collected data for compression wave studies. An updated version with 27 dedicated storage capacitors and identical pixel size has been fabricated.

  3. High-speed x-ray imaging with the Keck pixel array detector (Keck PAD) for time-resolved experiments at synchrotron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S.; Weiss, Joel T.; Chamberlain, Darol; Gruner, Sol M.

    2016-01-01

    Modern storage rings are readily capable of providing intense x-ray pulses, tens of picoseconds in duration, millions of times per second. Exploiting the temporal structure of these x-ray sources opens avenues for studying rapid structural changes in materials. Many processes (e.g. crack propagation, deformation on impact, turbulence, etc.) differ in detail from one sample trial to the next and would benefit from the ability to record successive x-ray images with single x-ray sensitivity while framing at 5 to 10 MHz rates. To this end, we have pursued the development of fast x-ray imaging detectors capable of collecting bursts of images that enable the isolation of single synchrotron bunches and/or bunch trains. The detector technology used is the hybrid pixel array detector (PAD) with a charge integrating front-end, and high-speed, in-pixel signal storage elements. A 384×256 pixel version, the Keck-PAD, with 150 µm × 150 µm pixels and 8 dedicated in-pixel storage elements is operational, has been tested at CHESS, and has collected data for compression wave studies. An updated version with 27 dedicated storage capacitors and identical pixel size has been fabricated.

  4. A high count rate one-dimensional position sensitive detector and a data acquisition system for time resolved X-ray scattering studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernot, P.

    1982-01-01

    A curved multiwire proportional drift chamber has been built as a general purpose instrument for X-ray scattering and X-ray diffraction experiments with synchrotron radiation. This parallaxe-free one-dimensional linear position sensitive detector has a parallel readout with a double hit logic. The data acquisition system, installed as a part of the D11 camera at LURE-DCI, is designed to perform time slicing and cyclic experiments; it has been used with either the fast multiwire chamber or a standard position sensitive detector with delay line readout [fr

  5. Hydrogen atoms can be located accurately and precisely by x-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woińska, Magdalena; Grabowsky, Simon; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    Precise and accurate structural information on hydrogen atoms is crucial to the study of energies of interactions important for crystal engineering, materials science, medicine, and pharmacy, and to the estimation of physical and chemical properties in solids. However, hydrogen atoms only scatter x-radiation weakly, so x-rays have not been used routinely to locate them accurately. Textbooks and teaching classes still emphasize that hydrogen atoms cannot be located with x-rays close to heavy elements; instead, neutron diffraction is needed. We show that, contrary to widespread expectation, hydrogen atoms can be located very accurately using x-ray diffraction, yielding bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms (A–H) that are in agreement with results from neutron diffraction mostly within a single standard deviation. The precision of the determination is also comparable between x-ray and neutron diffraction results. This has been achieved at resolutions as low as 0.8 Å using Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR). We have applied HAR to 81 crystal structures of organic molecules and compared the A–H bond lengths with those from neutron measurements for A–H bonds sorted into bonds of the same class. We further show in a selection of inorganic compounds that hydrogen atoms can be located in bridging positions and close to heavy transition metals accurately and precisely. We anticipate that, in the future, conventional x-radiation sources at in-house diffractometers can be used routinely for locating hydrogen atoms in small molecules accurately instead of large-scale facilities such as spallation sources or nuclear reactors. PMID:27386545

  6. Hydrogen atoms can be located accurately and precisely by x-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woińska, Magdalena; Grabowsky, Simon; Dominiak, Paulina M; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-05-01

    Precise and accurate structural information on hydrogen atoms is crucial to the study of energies of interactions important for crystal engineering, materials science, medicine, and pharmacy, and to the estimation of physical and chemical properties in solids. However, hydrogen atoms only scatter x-radiation weakly, so x-rays have not been used routinely to locate them accurately. Textbooks and teaching classes still emphasize that hydrogen atoms cannot be located with x-rays close to heavy elements; instead, neutron diffraction is needed. We show that, contrary to widespread expectation, hydrogen atoms can be located very accurately using x-ray diffraction, yielding bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms (A-H) that are in agreement with results from neutron diffraction mostly within a single standard deviation. The precision of the determination is also comparable between x-ray and neutron diffraction results. This has been achieved at resolutions as low as 0.8 Å using Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR). We have applied HAR to 81 crystal structures of organic molecules and compared the A-H bond lengths with those from neutron measurements for A-H bonds sorted into bonds of the same class. We further show in a selection of inorganic compounds that hydrogen atoms can be located in bridging positions and close to heavy transition metals accurately and precisely. We anticipate that, in the future, conventional x-radiation sources at in-house diffractometers can be used routinely for locating hydrogen atoms in small molecules accurately instead of large-scale facilities such as spallation sources or nuclear reactors.

  7. Measurement and Interpretation of Diffuse Scattering in X-Ray Diffraction for Macromolecular Crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-16

    X-ray diffraction from macromolecular crystals includes both sharply peaked Bragg reflections and diffuse intensity between the peaks. The information in Bragg scattering reflects the mean electron density in the unit cells of the crystal. The diffuse scattering arises from correlations in the variations of electron density that may occur from one unit cell to another, and therefore contains information about collective motions in proteins.

  8. Time-resolved observation of band-gap shrinking and electron-lattice thermalization within X-ray excited gallium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaja, Beata; Medvedev, Nikita; Tkachenko, Victor; Maltezopoulos, Theophilos; Wurth, Wilfried

    2015-12-11

    Femtosecond X-ray irradiation of solids excites energetic photoelectrons that thermalize on a timescale of a few hundred femtoseconds. The thermalized electrons exchange energy with the lattice and heat it up. Experiments with X-ray free-electron lasers have unveiled so far the details of the electronic thermalization. In this work we show that the data on transient optical reflectivity measured in GaAs irradiated with femtosecond X-ray pulses can be used to follow electron-lattice relaxation up to a few tens of picoseconds. With a dedicated theoretical framework, we explain the so far unexplained reflectivity overshooting as a result of band-gap shrinking. We also obtain predictions for a timescale of electron-lattice thermalization, initiated by conduction band electrons in the temperature regime of a few eVs. The conduction and valence band carriers were then strongly non-isothermal. The presented scheme is of general applicability and can stimulate further studies of relaxation within X-ray excited narrow band-gap semiconductors.

  9. Metal ions-binding T4 lysozyme as an intramolecular protein purification tag compatible with X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boura, Evzen; Baumlova, Adriana; Chalupska, Dominika; Dubankova, Anna; Klima, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Phage T4 lysozyme is a well folded and highly soluble protein that is widely used as an insertion tag to improve solubility and crystallization properties of poorly behaved recombinant proteins. It has been used in the fusion protein strategy to facilitate crystallization of various proteins including multiple G protein-coupled receptors, lipid kinases, or sterol binding proteins. Here, we present a structural and biochemical characterization of its novel, metal ions-binding mutant (mbT4L). We demonstrate that mbT4L can be used as a purification tag in the immobilized-metal affinity chromatography and that, in many respects, it is superior to the conventional hexahistidine tag. In addition, structural characterization of mbT4L suggests that mbT4L can be used as a purification tag compatible with X-ray crystallography. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  10. Operational experience of a large area x-ray camera for protein crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joachimiak, A.; Jorden, A. R.; Loeffen, P. W.; Naday, I.; Sanishvili, R.; Westbrook, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    After 3 years experience of operating very large area (210mm x 210mm) CCD-based detectors at the Advanced Photon Source, operational experience is reported. Four such detectors have been built, two for Structural Biology Center (APS-1 and SBC-2), one for Basic Energy Sciences Synchrotrons Radiation Center (Gold-2) at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source and one for Osaka University by Oxford Instruments, for use at Spring 8 (PX-21O). The detector is specifically designed as a high resolution and fast readout camera for macromolecular crystallography. Design trade-offs for speed and size are reviewed in light of operational experience and future requirements are considered. Operational data and examples of crystallography data are presented, together with plans for more development

  11. Racemic crystallography of synthetic protein enantiomers used to determine the X-ray structure of plectasin by direct methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Pentelute, Brad L.; Tereshko, Valentina; Thammavongsa, Vilasak; Schneewind, Olaf; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.; Kent, Stephen B.H.; (UC)

    2009-06-30

    We describe the use of racemic crystallography to determine the X-ray structure of the natural product plectasin, a potent antimicrobial protein recently isolated from fungus. The protein enantiomers L-plectasin and D-plectasin were prepared by total chemical synthesis; interestingly, L-plectasin showed the expected antimicrobial activity, while D-plectasin was devoid of such activity. The mirror image proteins were then used for racemic crystallization. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data were collected to atomic resolution from a racemic plectasin crystal; the racemate crystallized in the achiral centrosymmetric space group P1 with one L-plectasin molecule and one D-plectasin molecule forming the unit cell. Dimer-like intermolecular interactions between the protein enantiomers were observed, which may account for the observed extremely low solvent content (13%-15%) and more highly ordered nature of the racemic crystals. The structure of the plectasin molecule was well defined for all 40 amino acids and was generally similar to the previously determined NMR structure, suggesting minimal impact of the crystal packing on the plectasin conformation.

  12. The Barium Site in a Potassium Channel by X-Ray Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Youxing; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2000-01-01

    X-ray diffraction data were collected from frozen crystals (100°K) of the KcsA K+ channel equilibrated with solutions containing barium chloride. Difference electron density maps (Fbarium − Fnative, 5.0 Å resolution) show that Ba2+ resides at a single location within the selectivity filter. The Ba2+ blocking site corresponds to the internal aspect (adjacent to the central cavity) of the “inner ion” position where an alkali metal cation is found in the absence of the blocking Ba2+ ion. The location of Ba2+ with respect to Rb+ ions in the pore is in good agreement with the findings on the functional interaction of Ba2+ with K+ (and Rb+) in Ca2+-activated K+ channels (Neyton, J., and C. Miller. 1988. J. Gen. Physiol. 92:549–567). Taken together, these structural and functional data imply that at physiological ion concentrations a third ion may interact with two ions in the selectivity filter, perhaps by entering from one side and displacing an ion on the opposite side. PMID:10694255

  13. Time-resolved in situ studies of oxygen intercalation into SrCoO2.5, performed by neutron diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Toquin, Ronan; Paulus, Werner; Cousson, Alain; Prestipino, Carmelo; Lamberti, Carlo

    2006-10-11

    Electrochemical oxidation of the antiferromagnetically ordered SrCoO(2.5), with brownmillerite-type structure, to the cubic ferromagnet SrCoO(3), with perovskite structure, has been investigated in situ by neutron diffraction as well as by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy in specially designed electrochemical cells. The neutron diffraction experiments were performed twice, using two different wavelengths (lambda = 1.2921(2) and 4.74 A) in order to better discriminate structural and magnetic changes as functions of the charge transfer. From the neutron diffraction experiments, two intermediate phases, SrCoO(2.75) and SrCoO(2.82)(+/-)(0.07), were characterized. No superstructure reflections were observed for the corresponding SrCoO(2.75) phase. Instead we observed here, for the first time, 3D oxygen ordering during an oxygen intercalation reaction, as established for SrCoO(2.82)(+/-)(0.07), which can be described as a tetragonal unit cell, related to the perovskite cell by a approximately 2(a radical2) and c approximately 2a. The structure of this intermediate phase confirms the strongly topotactic character of the oxygen intercalation reaction. We were also able to prove, from in situ XAFS spectroscopy at the Co absorption edge, that the evolution of the Co valence state from formally +3 for SrCoO(2.5) to +4 for the final reaction product (SrCoO(3.0)) does not proceed continuously but gives evidence for the formation of O(-) species for stoichiometries corresponding to SrCoO(2.82)(+/-)(0.07). The use of neutrons (vs X-rays) in the diffraction experiments and the choice of the transmission (vs fluorescence) mode in the XAFS experiment guarantee that the obtained data well represent bulk and not just surface properties.

  14. Kissing G domains of MnmE monitored by X-ray crystallography and pulse electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Meyer

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available MnmE, which is involved in the modification of the wobble position of certain tRNAs, belongs to the expanding class of G proteins activated by nucleotide-dependent dimerization (GADs. Previous models suggested the protein to be a multidomain protein whose G domains contact each other in a nucleotide dependent manner. Here we employ a combined approach of X-ray crystallography and pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy to show that large domain movements are coupled to the G protein cycle of MnmE. The X-ray structures show MnmE to be a constitutive homodimer where the highly mobile G domains face each other in various orientations but are not in close contact as suggested by the GDP-AlF(x structure of the isolated domains. Distance measurements by pulse double electron-electron resonance (DEER spectroscopy show that the G domains adopt an open conformation in the nucleotide free/GDP-bound and an open/closed two-state equilibrium in the GTP-bound state, with maximal distance variations of 18 A. With GDP and AlF(x, which mimic the transition state of the phosphoryl transfer reaction, only the closed conformation is observed. Dimerization of the active sites with GDP-AlF(x requires the presence of specific monovalent cations, thus reflecting the requirements for the GTPase reaction of MnmE. Our results directly demonstrate the nature of the conformational changes MnmE was previously suggested to undergo during its GTPase cycle. They show the nucleotide-dependent dynamic movements of the G domains around two swivel positions relative to the rest of the protein, and they are of crucial importance for understanding the mechanistic principles of this GAD.

  15. Goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography with X-ray free electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Aina E; Soltis, S Michael; González, Ana; Aguila, Laura; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Barnes, Christopher O; Baxter, Elizabeth L; Brehmer, Winnie; Brewster, Aaron S; Brunger, Axel T; Calero, Guillermo; Chang, Joseph F; Chollet, Matthieu; Ehrensberger, Paul; Eriksson, Thomas L; Feng, Yiping; Hattne, Johan; Hedman, Britt; Hollenbeck, Michael; Holton, James M; Keable, Stephen; Kobilka, Brian K; Kovaleva, Elena G; Kruse, Andrew C; Lemke, Henrik T; Lin, Guowu; Lyubimov, Artem Y; Manglik, Aashish; Mathews, Irimpan I; McPhillips, Scott E; Nelson, Silke; Peters, John W; Sauter, Nicholas K; Smith, Clyde A; Song, Jinhu; Stevenson, Hilary P; Tsai, Yingssu; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Vinetsky, Vladimir; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Weis, William I; Zadvornyy, Oleg A; Zeldin, Oliver B; Zhu, Diling; Hodgson, Keith O

    2014-12-02

    The emerging method of femtosecond crystallography (FX) may extend the diffraction resolution accessible from small radiation-sensitive crystals and provides a means to determine catalytically accurate structures of acutely radiation-sensitive metalloenzymes. Automated goniometer-based instrumentation developed for use at the Linac Coherent Light Source enabled efficient and flexible FX experiments to be performed on a variety of sample types. In the case of rod-shaped Cpl hydrogenase crystals, only five crystals and about 30 min of beam time were used to obtain the 125 still diffraction patterns used to produce a 1.6-Å resolution electron density map. For smaller crystals, high-density grids were used to increase sample throughput; 930 myoglobin crystals mounted at random orientation inside 32 grids were exposed, demonstrating the utility of this approach. Screening results from cryocooled crystals of β2-adrenoreceptor and an RNA polymerase II complex indicate the potential to extend the diffraction resolution obtainable from very radiation-sensitive samples beyond that possible with undulator-based synchrotron sources.

  16. Pico-litre Sample Introduction and Acoustic Levitation Systems for Time Resolved Protein Crystallography Experiments at XFELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Docker

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The system described in this work is a variant from traditional acoustic levitation first described by, Marzo et al. It uses multiple transducers eliminating the requirement for a mirror surface, allowing for an open geometry as the sound from multiple transducers combines to generate the acoustic trap which is configured to catch pico litres of crystal slurries. These acoustic traps also have the significant benefit of eliminating potential beam attenuation due to support structures or microfluidic devices. Additionally they meet the need to eliminate sample environments when experiments are carried out using an X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS as any sample environment would not survive the exposure to the X-Ray beam. XFELs generate Light a billion times brighter than the sun. The application for this system will be to examine turn over in Beta lactamase proteins which is responsible for bacteria developing antibiotic resistance and therefore of significant importance to future world health. The system will allow for diffraction data to be collected before and after turnover allowing for a better understanding of the underling processes. The authors first described this work at Nanotech 2017.

  17. Selenium Derivatization of Nucleic Acids for Phase and Structure Determination in Nucleic Acid X-ray Crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Huang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Selenium derivatization (via selenomethionine of proteins for crystal structure determination via MAD phasing has revolutionized protein X-ray crystallography. It is estimated that over two thirds of all new crystal structures of proteins have been determined via Se-Met derivatization. Similarly, selenium functionalities have also been successfully incorporated into nucleic acids to facilitate their structure studies and it has been proved that this Se-derivatization has advantages over halogen strategy, which was usually used as a traditional method in this field. This review reports the development of site-specific selenium derivatization of nucleic acids for phase determination since the year of 2001 (mainly focus on the 2’-position of the ribose. All the synthesis of 2’-SeMe modified phosphoramidite building blocks (U, C, T, A, G and the according oligonucleotides are included. In addition, several structures of selenium contained nucleic acid are also described in this paper.

  18. Comparison of the decameric structure of peroxiredoxin-II by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, J. Robin; Schröder, Ewald; Isupov, Michail N.

    2001-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin; Transmission electron microscopy; X-ray structure; Negative staining; angular reconstitution; Molecular fitting......Peroxiredoxin; Transmission electron microscopy; X-ray structure; Negative staining; angular reconstitution; Molecular fitting...

  19. Shoot-and-Trap: Use of specific X-ray damage to study structural protein dynamics by temperature-control led cryo-crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colletier, J.P.; Sanson, B.; Weik, M.; Bourgeois, D.; Fournier, D.; Bourgeois, D.; Silman, I.; Sussman, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Although X-ray crystallography is the most widely used method for macromolecular structure determination, it does not provide dynamical information, and either experimental tricks or complementary experiments must be used to overcome the inherently static nature of crystallographic structures. Here we used specific X-ray damage during temperature-controlled crystallographic experiments at a third-generation synchrotron source to trigger and monitor (Shoot-and-Trap) structural changes putatively involved in an enzymatic reaction. In particular, a non-hydrolyzable substrate analogue of acetylcholinesterase, the 'off-switch' at cholinergic synapses, was radio-cleaved within the buried enzymatic active site. Subsequent product clearance, observed at 150 K but not at 100 K, indicated exit from the active site possibly via a 'backdoor'. The simple strategy described here is, in principle, applicable to any enzyme whose structure in complex with a substrate analogue is available and, therefore, could serve as a standard procedure in kinetic crystallography studies. (authors)

  20. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies on the intensity changes of the 5.9 and 5.1 nm actin layer lines from frog skeletal muscle during an isometric tetanus using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, K.; Tanaka, H.; Amemiya, Y.; Fujishima, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Hamanaka, T.; Sugi, H.; Mitsui, T.

    1985-01-01

    Time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies have been made on the 5.9- and 5.1-nm actin layer lines from frog skeletal muscles during an isometric tetanus at 6 degrees C, using synchrotron radiation. The integrated intensities of these actin layer lines were found to increase during a tetanus by 30-50% for the 5.9-nm reflection and approximately 70% for the 5.1-nm reflection of the resting values. The intensity increase of both reflections was greater than that taking place in the transition from rest to rigor state. The intensity change of the 5.9-nm reflection preceded those of the myosin 42.9-nm off-meridional reflection and of the equatorial reflections, as well as the isometric tension development. The intensity profile of the 5.9-nm layer line during contraction was found to be different from that observed in the rigor state

  1. Cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography: complementary approaches to structural biology and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vénien-Bryan, Catherine; Li, Zhuolun; Vuillard, Laurent; Boutin, Jean Albert

    2017-04-01

    The invention of the electron microscope has greatly enhanced the view scientists have of small structural details. Since its implementation, this technology has undergone considerable evolution and the resolution that can be obtained for biological objects has been extended. In addition, the latest generation of cryo-electron microscopes equipped with direct electron detectors and software for the automated collection of images, in combination with the use of advanced image-analysis methods, has dramatically improved the performance of this technique in terms of resolution. While calculating a sub-10 Å resolution structure was an accomplishment less than a decade ago, it is now common to generate structures at sub-5 Å resolution and even better. It is becoming possible to relatively quickly obtain high-resolution structures of biological molecules, in particular large ones (>500 kDa) which, in some cases, have resisted more conventional methods such as X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Such newly resolved structures may, for the first time, shed light on the precise mechanisms that are essential for cellular physiological processes. The ability to attain atomic resolution may support the development of new drugs that target these proteins, allowing medicinal chemists to understand the intimacy of the relationship between their molecules and targets. In addition, recent developments in cryo-electron microscopy combined with image analysis can provide unique information on the conformational variability of macromolecular complexes. Conformational flexibility of macromolecular complexes can be investigated using cryo-electron microscopy and multiconformation reconstruction methods. However, the biochemical quality of the sample remains the major bottleneck to routine cryo-electron microscopy-based determination of structures at very high resolution.

  2. Time resolved techniques: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, B.C.; Tischler, J.Z.

    1990-06-01

    Synchrotron sources provide exceptional opportunities for carrying out time-resolved x-ray diffraction investigations. The high intensity, high angular resolution, and continuously tunable energy spectrum of synchrotron x-ray beams lend themselves directly to carrying out sophisticated time-resolved x-ray scattering measurements on a wide range of materials and phenomena. When these attributes are coupled with the pulsed time-structure of synchrotron sources, entirely new time-resolved scattering possibilities are opened. Synchrotron beams typically consist of sub-nanosecond pulses of x-rays separated in time by a few tens of nanoseconds to a few hundred nanoseconds so that these beams appear as continuous x-ray sources for investigations of phenomena on time scales ranging from hours down to microseconds. Studies requiring time-resolution ranging from microseconds to fractions of a nanosecond can be carried out in a triggering mode by stimulating the phenomena under investigation in coincidence with the x-ray pulses. Time resolution on the picosecond scale can, in principle, be achieved through the use of streak camera techniques in which the time structure of the individual x-ray pulses are viewed as quasi-continuous sources with ∼100--200 picoseconds duration. Techniques for carrying out time-resolved scattering measurements on time scales varying from picoseconds to kiloseconds at present and proposed synchrotron sources are discussed and examples of time-resolved studies are cited. 17 refs., 8 figs

  3. The O2-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II: Recent Insights from Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM), Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS), and Femtosecond X-ray Crystallography Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askerka, Mikhail; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S

    2017-01-17

    Efficient photoelectrochemical water oxidation may open a way to produce energy from renewable solar power. In biology, generation of fuel due to water oxidation happens efficiently on an immense scale during the light reactions of photosynthesis. To oxidize water, photosynthetic organisms have evolved a highly conserved protein complex, Photosystem II. Within that complex, water oxidation happens at the CaMn 4 O 5 inorganic catalytic cluster, the so-called oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), which cycles through storage "S" states as it accumulates oxidizing equivalents and produces molecular oxygen. In recent years, there has been significant progress in understanding the OEC as it evolves through the catalytic cycle. Studies have combined conventional and femtosecond X-ray crystallography with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods and have addressed changes in protonation states of μ-oxo bridges and the coordination of substrate water through the analysis of ammonia binding as a chemical analog of water. These advances are thought to be critical to understanding the catalytic cycle since protonation states regulate the relative stability of different redox states and the geometry of the OEC. Therefore, establishing the mechanism for substrate water binding and the nature of protonation/redox state transitions in the OEC is essential for understanding the catalytic cycle of O 2 evolution. The structure of the dark-stable S 1 state has been a target for X-ray crystallography for the past 15 years. However, traditional X-ray crystallography has been hampered by radiation-induced reduction of the OEC. Very recently, a revolutionary X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) technique was applied to PSII to reveal atomic positions at 1.95 Å without radiation damage, which brought us closer than ever to establishing the ultimate structure of the OEC in the S 1 state. However, the atom positions in this crystal

  4. Time Resolved X-Ray Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-20

    Wark and D. Riley, J. Appl. Cryst. 23,441 (1990). 8. B. Van Wonterghem and P. M. Rentzepis, SPIE 1204, 784 (1990). 9. T. Anderson, I. V. Tomov and P...C. Girardeau-Montaut, J.Appl. Phys. 65, 2889 (1989). 14. T. Anderson, I.V. Tomov and P. M. Rentzepis, J. Appl. Phys. 71, 5161 (1992). 15. C. Girardeau...Proc. Phys. Soc. Lond. 78,1206 (1961). 19. I. V. Tomov , T. Anderson, and P. M. Rentzepis, Appl. Phys. Lett. 61,1157 (1992); 61, 3193E (1992). 20. M

  5. Complementarity of neutron and ultrahigh resolution synchrotron X-ray protein crystallography studies: Results with concanavalin A at cryo and room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helliwell, J.R.; Price, H.J.; Deacon, A.; Raftery, J.; Habash, J.

    2002-01-01

    The complementarity of synchrotron derived ultrahigh resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography is explored via an ensemble of part lectin concanavalin A crystal structures. Thus a resume of the study of a cryo 0.94 A and a neutron (+X-ray) protein crystal 2.4 A structure in room temperature is made and these are then compared in their efficiency to determine the positions of the bound solvent atoms i.e. as hydrogens and deuteriums. First results are also presented of comparisons of two ultrahigh resolution protein crystal structures, the 0.94 A and the new 0.92 A structure. Thus the variability is in the multiple occupancies of side chains. Overall, one can see that a 'complete' structure definition, with today's experimental capabilities, is possible and can include structure ensemble variations. (author)

  6. Room-temperature serial crystallography using a kinetically optimized microfluidic device for protein crystallization and on-chip X-ray diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Heymann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An emulsion-based serial crystallographic technology has been developed, in which nanolitre-sized droplets of protein solution are encapsulated in oil and stabilized by surfactant. Once the first crystal in a drop is nucleated, the small volume generates a negative feedback mechanism that lowers the supersaturation. This mechanism is exploited to produce one crystal per drop. Diffraction data are measured, one crystal at a time, from a series of room-temperature crystals stored on an X-ray semi-transparent microfluidic chip, and a 93% complete data set is obtained by merging single diffraction frames taken from different unoriented crystals. As proof of concept, the structure of glucose isomerase was solved to 2.1 Å, demonstrating the feasibility of high-throughput serial X-ray crystallography using synchrotron radiation.

  7. Correlated single-crystal electronic absorption spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography at NSLS beamline X26-C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orville, A.M.; Buono, R.; Cowan, M.; Heroux, A.; Shea-McCarthy, G.; Schneider, D.K.; Skinner, J.M.; Skinner, M.J.; Stoner-Ma, D.; Sweet, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population.

  8. X-Ray Crystallography as a Tool to Determine Three-Dimensional Structures of Commercial Enzymes Subjected to Treatment in Pressurized Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiten, Mirian Cristina; Di Luccio, Marco; Santos, Karine F; de Oliveira, Débora; Oliveira, J Vladimir

    2017-06-01

    The study of enzyme function often involves a multi-disciplinary approach. Several techniques are documented in the literature towards determining secondary and tertiary structures of enzymes, and X-ray crystallography is the most explored technique for obtaining three-dimensional structures of proteins. Knowledge of three-dimensional structures is essential to understand reaction mechanisms at the atomic level. Additionally, structures can be used to modulate or improve functional activity of enzymes by the production of small molecules that act as substrates/cofactors or by engineering selected mutants with enhanced biological activity. This paper presentes a short overview on how to streamline sample preparation for crystallographic studies of treated enzymes. We additionally revise recent developments on the effects of pressurized fluid treatment on activity and stability of commercial enzymes. Future directions and perspectives on the the role of crystallography as a tool to access the molecular mechanisms underlying enzymatic activity modulation upon treatment in pressurized fluids are also addressed.

  9. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction measurements of high-density InAs quantum dots on Sb/GaAs layers and the suppression of coalescence by Sb-irradiated growth interruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakuda, Naoki; Yamaguchi, Koichi; Kaizu, Toshiyuki; Takahasi, Masamitu; Fujikawa, Seiji

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembly of high-density InAs quantum dots (QDs) on Sb-irradiated GaAs buffer layers was observed in-situ by a time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique using a combination of XRD and molecular beam epitaxy. Evolution of dot height and lattice constant was analyzed during InAs QD growth and subsequent growth interruption (GI), and as a result, dislocated giant dots due to coalescence and coherent dots were separately evaluated. An Sb-irradiated GI (Sb-GI) method to be applied after InAs growth was attempted for the suppression of coalescence. Using this method, the XRD intensity of giant dots decreased, and the photoluminescence intensity of InAs QDs was enhanced. High-density InAs QDs without giant dots were produced by using the combination of the QD growth on the Sb-irradiated GaAs buffer layers and the Sb-GI. (author)

  10. Assessing the Influence of Mutation on GTPase Transition States by Using X-ray Crystallography,19F NMR, and DFT Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yi; Molt, Robert W; Pellegrini, Erika; Cliff, Matthew J; Bowler, Matthew W; Richards, Nigel G J; Blackburn, G Michael; Waltho, Jonathan P

    2017-08-07

    We report X-ray crystallographic and 19 F NMR studies of the G-protein RhoA complexed with MgF 3 - , GDP, and RhoGAP, which has the mutation Arg85'Ala. When combined with DFT calculations, these data permit the identification of changes in transition state (TS) properties. The X-ray data show how Tyr34 maintains solvent exclusion and the core H-bond network in the active site by relocating to replace the missing Arg85' sidechain. The 19 F NMR data show deshielding effects that indicate the main function of Arg85' is electronic polarization of the transferring phosphoryl group, primarily mediated by H-bonding to O 3G and thence to P G . DFT calculations identify electron-density redistribution and pinpoint why the TS for guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis is higher in energy when RhoA is complexed with RhoGAP Arg85'Ala relative to wild-type (WT) RhoGAP. This study demonstrates that 19 F NMR measurements, in combination with X-ray crystallography and DFT calculations, can reliably dissect the response of small GTPases to site-specific modifications. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  11. Clear as Crystal: The Story of the Braggs--How X-Ray Crystallography Has Contributed to Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Robert; Patterson, John

    2014-01-01

    Here is a brief history of the work of two of Australia's most famous scientists, Sir William Bragg and his son Sir Lawrence Bragg. Jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in 1915 for their groundbreaking research into the use of X-rays to study the chemical structure and function of molecules, they have contributed to our heritage and to science at an…

  12. Catalysis of GTP hydrolysis by small GTPases at atomic detail by integration of X-ray crystallography, experimental, and theoretical IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudack, Till; Jenrich, Sarah; Brucker, Sven; Vetter, Ingrid R; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2015-10-02

    Small GTPases regulate key processes in cells. Malfunction of their GTPase reaction by mutations is involved in severe diseases. Here, we compare the GTPase reaction of the slower hydrolyzing GTPase Ran with Ras. By combination of time-resolved FTIR difference spectroscopy and QM/MM simulations we elucidate that the Mg(2+) coordination by the phosphate groups, which varies largely among the x-ray structures, is the same for Ran and Ras. A new x-ray structure of a Ran·RanBD1 complex with improved resolution confirmed this finding and revealed a general problem with the refinement of Mg(2+) in GTPases. The Mg(2+) coordination is not responsible for the much slower GTPase reaction of Ran. Instead, the location of the Tyr-39 side chain of Ran between the γ-phosphate and Gln-69 prevents the optimal positioning of the attacking water molecule by the Gln-69 relative to the γ-phosphate. This is confirmed in the RanY39A·RanBD1 crystal structure. The QM/MM simulations provide IR spectra of the catalytic center, which agree very nicely with the experimental ones. The combination of both methods can correlate spectra with structure at atomic detail. For example the FTIR difference spectra of RasA18T and RanT25A mutants show that spectral differences are mainly due to the hydrogen bond of Thr-25 to the α-phosphate in Ran. By integration of x-ray structure analysis, experimental, and theoretical IR spectroscopy the catalytic center of the x-ray structural models are further refined to sub-Å resolution, allowing an improved understanding of catalysis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Conformational variability of the stationary phase survival protein E from Xylella fastidiosa revealed by X-ray crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering studies, and normal mode analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Agnes Thiane Pereira; Fonseca, Emanuella Maria Barreto; Reis, Marcelo Augusto Dos; Saraiva, Antonio Marcos; Santos, Clelton Aparecido Dos; de Toledo, Marcelo Augusto Szymanski; Polikarpov, Igor; de Souza, Anete Pereira; Aparicio, Ricardo; Iulek, Jorge

    2017-10-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium that infects a wide variety of plants. Stationary phase survival protein E is classified as a nucleotidase, which is expressed when bacterial cells are in the stationary growth phase and subjected to environmental stresses. Here, we report four refined X-ray structures of this protein from X. fastidiosa in four different crystal forms in the presence and/or absence of the substrate 3'-AMP. In all chains, the conserved loop verified in family members assumes a closed conformation in either condition. Therefore, the enzymatic mechanism for the target protein might be different of its homologs. Two crystal forms exhibit two monomers whereas the other two show four monomers in the asymmetric unit. While the biological unit has been characterized as a tetramer, differences of their sizes and symmetry are remarkable. Four conformers identified by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) in a ligand-free solution are related to the low frequency normal modes of the crystallographic structures associated with rigid body-like protomer arrangements responsible for the longitudinal and symmetric adjustments between tetramers. When the substrate is present in solution, only two conformers are selected. The most prominent conformer for each case is associated to a normal mode able to elongate the protein by moving apart two dimers. To our knowledge, this work was the first investigation based on the normal modes that analyzed the quaternary structure variability for an enzyme of the SurE family followed by crystallography and SAXS validation. The combined results raise new directions to study allosteric features of XfSurE protein. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Weak activity of haloalkane dehalogenase LinB with 1,2,3-trichloropropane revealed by X-Ray crystallography and microcalorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monincová, Marta; Prokop, Zbynek; Vévodová, Jitka; Nagata, Yuji; Damborsky, Jirí

    2007-03-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a highly toxic and recalcitrant compound. Haloalkane dehalogenases are bacterial enzymes that catalyze the cleavage of a carbon-halogen bond in a wide range of organic halogenated compounds. Haloalkane dehalogenase LinB from Sphingobium japonicum UT26 has, for a long time, been considered inactive with TCP, since the reaction cannot be easily detected by conventional analytical methods. Here we demonstrate detection of the weak activity (k(cat) = 0.005 s(-1)) of LinB with TCP using X-ray crystallography and microcalorimetry. This observation makes LinB a useful starting material for the development of a new biocatalyst toward TCP by protein engineering. Microcalorimetry is proposed to be a universal method for the detection of weak enzymatic activities. Detection of these activities is becoming increasingly important for engineering novel biocatalysts using the scaffolds of proteins with promiscuous activities.

  15. Weak Activity of Haloalkane Dehalogenase LinB with 1,2,3-Trichloropropane Revealed by X-Ray Crystallography and Microcalorimetry▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monincová, Marta; Prokop, Zbyněk; Vévodová, Jitka; Nagata, Yuji; Damborský, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a highly toxic and recalcitrant compound. Haloalkane dehalogenases are bacterial enzymes that catalyze the cleavage of a carbon-halogen bond in a wide range of organic halogenated compounds. Haloalkane dehalogenase LinB from Sphingobium japonicum UT26 has, for a long time, been considered inactive with TCP, since the reaction cannot be easily detected by conventional analytical methods. Here we demonstrate detection of the weak activity (kcat = 0.005 s−1) of LinB with TCP using X-ray crystallography and microcalorimetry. This observation makes LinB a useful starting material for the development of a new biocatalyst toward TCP by protein engineering. Microcalorimetry is proposed to be a universal method for the detection of weak enzymatic activities. Detection of these activities is becoming increasingly important for engineering novel biocatalysts using the scaffolds of proteins with promiscuous activities. PMID:17259360

  16. O-Alkylated heavy atom carbohydrate probes for protein X-ray crystallography: Studies towards the synthesis of methyl 2-O-methyl-L-selenofucopyranoside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Sommer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Selenoglycosides are used as reactive glycosyl donors in the syntheses of oligosaccharides. In addition, such heavy atom analogs of natural glycosides are useful tools for structure determination of their lectin receptors using X-ray crystallography. Some lectins, e.g., members of the tectonin family, only bind to carbohydrate epitopes with O-alkylated ring hydroxy groups. In this context, we report the first synthesis of an O-methylated selenoglycoside, specifically methyl 2-O-methyl-L-selenofucopyranoside, a ligand of the lectin tectonin-2 from the mushroom Laccaria bicolor. The synthetic route required a strategic revision and further optimization due to the intrinsic lability of alkyl selenoglycosides, in particular for the labile fucose. Here, we describe a successful synthetic access to methyl 2-O-methyl-L-selenofucopyranoside in 9 linear steps and 26% overall yield starting from allyl L-fucopyranoside.

  17. Atomic structure of the 75 MDa extremophile Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus determined by CryoEM and X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veesler, David; Ng, Thiam-Seng; Sendamarai, Anoop K; Eilers, Brian J; Lawrence, C Martin; Lok, Shee-Mei; Young, Mark J; Johnson, John E; Fu, Chi-yu

    2013-04-02

    Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) was isolated in acidic hot springs where it infects the archeon Sulfolobus solfataricus. We determined the STIV structure using near-atomic resolution electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography allowing tracing of structural polypeptide chains and visualization of transmembrane proteins embedded in the viral membrane. We propose that the vertex complexes orchestrate virion assembly by coordinating interactions of the membrane and various protein components involved. STIV shares the same coat subunit and penton base protein folds as some eukaryotic and bacterial viruses, suggesting that they derive from a common ancestor predating the divergence of the three kingdoms of life. One architectural motif (β-jelly roll fold) forms virtually the entire capsid (distributed in three different gene products), indicating that a single ancestral protein module may have been at the origin of its evolution.

  18. Difference in diaphragmatic motion during tidal breathing in a standing position between COPD patients and normal subjects: Time-resolved quantitative evaluation using dynamic chest radiography with flat panel detector system (“dynamic X-ray phrenicography”)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yoshitake, E-mail: yamada@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis St., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Ueyama, Masako, E-mail: ueyamam@fukujuji.org [Department of Health Care, Fukujuji Hospital, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association, 3-1-24 Matsuyama, Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8522 (Japan); Abe, Takehiko, E-mail: takehikoabe@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Fukujuji Hospital, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association, 3-1-24 Matsuyama, Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8522 (Japan); Araki, Tetsuro, E-mail: TARAKI@partners.org [Department of Radiology, Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis St., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Abe, Takayuki, E-mail: abe.t@keio.jp [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Biostatistics Unit at Clinical and Translational Research Center, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Nishino, Mizuki, E-mail: Mizuki_Nishino11@dfci.harvard.edu [Department of Radiology, Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis St., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Jinzaki, Masahiro, E-mail: jinzaki@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hatabu, Hiroto, E-mail: hhatabu@partners.org [Department of Radiology, Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis St., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); and others

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Dynamic X-ray phrenicography is a useful method for the evaluation of the diaphragms. • Its radiation dose is comparable to conventional two projection chest radiography. • Diaphragm motion during tidal breathing is larger in COPD than in normal subjects. • Higher BMI is also associated with increased excursions of the bilateral diaphragm. - Abstract: Objectives: To quantitatively compare diaphragmatic motion during tidal breathing in a standing position between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and normal subjects using dynamic chest radiography. Materials and methods: Thirty-nine COPD patients (35 males; age, 71.3 ± 8.4 years) and 47 normal subjects (non-smoker healthy volunteers) (20 males; age, 54.8 ± 9.8 years) underwent sequential chest radiographs during tidal breathing using dynamic chest radiography with a flat panel detector system. We evaluated the excursions and peak motion speeds of the diaphragms. The results were analyzed using an unpaired t-test and a multiple linear regression model. Results: The excursions of the diaphragms in COPD patients were significantly larger than those in normal subjects (right, 14.7 ± 5.5 mm vs. 10.2 ± 3.7 mm, respectively, P < 0.001; left, 17.2 ± 4.9 mm vs. 14.9 ± 4.2 mm, respectively, P = 0.022). Peak motion speeds in inspiratory phase were significantly faster in COPD patients compared to normal subjects (right, 16.3 ± 5.0 mm/s vs. 11.8 ± 4.2 mm/s, respectively, P < 0.001; left, 18.9 ± 4.9 mm/s vs. 16.7 ± 4.0 mm/s, respectively, P = 0.022). The multivariate analysis demonstrated that having COPD and higher body mass index were independently associated with increased excursions of the bilateral diaphragm (all P < 0.05), after adjusting for other clinical variables. Conclusions: Time-resolved quantitative evaluation of the diaphragm using dynamic chest radiography demonstrated that the diaphragmatic motion during tidal breathing in a standing position is larger and

  19. Inhibition of d-xylose isomerase by polyols: atomic details by joint X-ray/neutron crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalevsky, Andrey, E-mail: ayk@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, MS M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hanson, B. Leif [University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Mason, Sax A. [Institut Laue–Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Forsyth, V. Trevor [Institut Laue–Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Keele University, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); Fisher, Zoe [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, MS M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mustyakimov, Marat [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, MS M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, MS 6475, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Blakeley, Matthew P. [Institut Laue–Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Keen, David A. [Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Langan, Paul [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, MS 6475, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, MS M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    A joint X-ray/neutron structure of d-xylose isomerase in complex with the inhibitor sorbitol was determined at room temperature at an acidic pH of 5.9. Protonation of the O5 O atom of the sugar was directly observed in the nuclear density maps. Under acidic conditions sorbitol gains a water-mediated interaction with the enzyme active site, which may explain the increased potency of the inhibitor at low pH. d-Xylose isomerase (XI) converts the aldo-sugars xylose and glucose to their keto analogs xylulose and fructose, but is strongly inhibited by the polyols xylitol and sorbitol, especially at acidic pH. In order to understand the atomic details of polyol binding to the XI active site, a 2.0 Å resolution room-temperature joint X-ray/neutron structure of XI in complex with Ni{sup 2+} cofactors and sorbitol inhibitor at pH 5.9 and a room-temperature X-ray structure of XI containing Mg{sup 2+} ions and xylitol at the physiological pH of 7.7 were obtained. The protonation of oxygen O5 of the inhibitor, which was found to be deprotonated and negatively charged in previous structures of XI complexed with linear glucose and xylulose, was directly observed. The Ni{sup 2+} ions occupying the catalytic metal site (M2) were found at two locations, while Mg{sup 2+} in M2 is very mobile and has a high B factor. Under acidic conditions sorbitol gains a water-mediated interaction that connects its O1 hydroxyl to Asp257. This contact is not found in structures at basic pH. The new interaction that is formed may improve the binding of the inhibitor, providing an explanation for the increased affinity of the polyols for XI at low pH.

  20. An Investigation of Atomic Structures Derived from X-ray Crystallography and Cryo-Electron Microscopy Using Distal Blocks of Side-Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; He, Jing; Sazzed, Salim; Walker, Rayshawn

    2018-03-08

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a structure determination method for large molecular complexes. As more and more atomic structures are determined using this technique, it is becoming possible to perform statistical characterization of side-chain conformations. Two data sets were involved to characterize block lengths for each of the 18 types of amino acids. One set contains 9131 structures resolved using X-ray crystallography from density maps with better than or equal to 1.5 Å resolutions, and the other contains 237 protein structures derived from cryo-EM density maps with 2-4 Å resolutions. The results show that the normalized probability density function of block lengths is similar between the X-ray data set and the cryo-EM data set for most of the residue types, but differences were observed for ARG, GLU, ILE, LYS, PHE, TRP, and TYR for which conformations with certain shorter block lengths are more likely to be observed in the cryo-EM set with 2-4 Å resolutions.

  1. Time-resolved studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    When new or more powerful probes become available that offer both shorter data-collection times and the opportunity to apply innovative approaches to established techniques, it is natural that investigators consider the feasibility of exploring the kinetics of time-evolving systems. This stimulating area of research not only can lead to insights into the metastable or excited states that a system may populate on its way to a ground state, but can also lead to a better understanding of that final state. Synchrotron radiation, with its unique properties, offers just such a tool to extend X-ray measurements from the static to the time-resolved regime. The most straight-forward application of synchrotron radiation to the study of transient phenomena is directly through the possibility of decreased data-collection times via the enormous increase in flux over that of a laboratory X-ray system. Even further increases in intensity can be obtained through the use of novel X-ray optical devices. Widebandpass monochromators, e.g., that utilize the continuous spectral distribution of synchrotron radiation, can increase flux on the sample several orders of magnitude over conventional X-ray optical systems thereby allowing a further shortening of the data-collection time. Another approach that uses the continuous spectral nature of synchrotron radiation to decrease data-collection times is the open-quote parallel data collectionclose quotes method. Using this technique, intensities as a function of X-ray energy are recorded simultaneously for all energies rather than sequentially recording data at each energy, allowing for a dramatic decrease in the data-collection time

  2. Low-Z polymer sample supports for fixed-target serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feld, Geoffrey K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); National Institute of Environmental Health Science, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Heymann, Michael [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States); Univ. of Hamburg and DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Benner, W. Henry [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pardini, Tommaso [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tsai, Ching -Ju [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Boutet, Sebastien [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Coleman, Matthew A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hunter, Mark S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Li, Xiaodan [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Messerschmidt, Marc [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); BioXFEL Science and Technology Center, Buffalo, NY (United States); Opathalage, Achini [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States); Pedrini, Bill [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Williams, Garth J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Krantz, Bryan A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fraden, Seth [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States); Hau-Riege, Stefan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Evans, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Segelke, Brent W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frank, Matthias [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-27

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) offer a new avenue to the structural probing of complex materials, including biomolecules. Delivery of precious sample to the XFEL beam is a key consideration, as the sample of interest must be serially replaced after each destructive pulse. The fixed-target approach to sample delivery involves depositing samples on a thin-film support and subsequent serial introduction via a translating stage. Some classes of biological materials, including two-dimensional protein crystals, must be introduced on fixed-target supports, as they require a flat surface to prevent sample wrinkling. A series of wafer and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-style grid supports constructed of low-Z plastic have been custom-designed and produced. Aluminium TEM grid holders were engineered, capable of delivering up to 20 different conventional or plastic TEM grids using fixed-target stages available at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). As proof-of-principle, X-ray diffraction has been demonstrated from two-dimensional crystals of bacteriorhodopsin and three-dimensional crystals of anthrax toxin protective antigen mounted on these supports at the LCLS. In conclusion, the benefits and limitations of these low-Z fixed-target supports are discussed; it is the authors' belief that they represent a viable and efficient alternative to previously reported fixed-target supports for conducting diffraction studies with XFELs.

  3. Analysis of cytochrome P450 CYP119 ligand-dependent conformational dynamics by two-dimensional NMR and X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basudhar, Debashree; Madrona, Yarrow; Kandel, Sylvie; Lampe, Jed N; Nishida, Clinton R; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2015-04-17

    Defining the conformational states of cytochrome P450 active sites is critical for the design of agents that minimize drug-drug interactions, the development of isoform-specific P450 inhibitors, and the engineering of novel oxidative catalysts. We used two-dimensional (1)H,(15)N HSQC chemical shift perturbation mapping of (15)N-labeled Phe residues and x-ray crystallography to examine the ligand-dependent conformational dynamics of CYP119. Active site Phe residues were most affected by the binding of azole inhibitors and fatty acid substrates, in agreement with active site localization of the conformational changes. This was supported by crystallography, which revealed movement of the F-G loop with various azoles. Nevertheless, the NMR chemical shift perturbations caused by azoles and substrates were distinguishable. The absence of significant chemical shift perturbations with several azoles revealed binding of ligands to an open conformation similar to that of the ligand-free state. In contrast, 4-phenylimidazole caused pronounced NMR changes involving Phe-87, Phe-144, and Phe-153 that support the closed conformation found in the crystal structure. The same closed conformation is observed by NMR and crystallography with a para-fluoro substituent on the 4-phenylimidazole, but a para-chloro or bromo substituent engendered a second closed conformation. An open conformation is thus favored in solution with many azole ligands, but para-substituted phenylimidazoles give rise to two closed conformations that depend on the size of the para-substituent. The results suggest that ligands selectively stabilize discrete cytochrome P450 conformational states. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Comparison of the structure of human recombinant short form stromelysin by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR and X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooley, P R; O'Connell, J F; Marcy, A I; Cuca, G C; Axel, M G; Caldwell, C G; Hagmann, W K; Becker, J W

    1996-01-01

    Stromelysin-1 is a matrix metalloprotease that has been implicated in a number of degenerative diseases. Here we present the refined NMR solution structure of the catalytic domain of stromelysin-1 complexed with a small inhibitor and compare it to the X-ray crystal structure of the same complex. The structures are similar in global fold and show an unusual bottomless S1' subsite. There are differences, however, in the least well defined regions, Phe83-Ile89, His224-Phe232 and Pro249- Pro250, reflecting the lack of NOE data and large B-factors. The region His224-Phe232 contains residues of the S1' subsite and, consequently, small differences are observed in this subsite. Hydrogen-bond data show that, in contrast to the crystal structure, the solution structure lacks a hydrogen bond between the amide of Tyr223 and the carbonyl of the P3' residue. Analysis of bound water shows two tightly bound water molecules both in the solution and the crystal structure; neither of these waters are in the inhibitor binding site.

  5. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of enveloped virus microcrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX using X-ray free-electron lasers has produced high-resolution, room temperature, time-resolved protein structures. We report preliminary SFX of Sindbis virus, an enveloped icosahedral RNA virus with ∼700 Å diameter. Microcrystals delivered in viscous agarose medium diffracted to ∼40 Å resolution. Small-angle diffuse X-ray scattering overlaid Bragg peaks and analysis suggests this results from molecular transforms of individual particles. Viral proteins undergo structural changes during entry and infection, which could, in principle, be studied with SFX. This is an important step toward determining room temperature structures from virus microcrystals that may enable time-resolved studies of enveloped viruses.

  6. Characteristic Ligand-Induced Crystal Forms of HIV-1 Protease Complexes: A Novel Discovery of X-Ray Crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olajuyigbe, Folasade M.; Geremia, Silvano

    2009-10-01

    Mixtures of saquinavir (SQV) and ritonavir (RTV) were cocrystallized with HIV-1 protease (PR) in an attempt to compare their relative potencies using a crystallographic approach and factors responsible for the respective crystal forms obtained were examined. The mixture ratio of the SQV/RTV was in the range of 1:1 to 1:50 with increasing concentration of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) used. Two crystal forms of PR complexes were obtained. At concentrations of 0.8 and 1.2 % DMSO using 1:1 and 1:15 ratios of SQV/RTV, the crystal form was monoclinic while increasing the concentration of DMSO to 3.2 and 5.0% using 1:15 and 1:50 ratios of SQV/RTV, the orthorhombic crystal form was obtained. The high resolution X-ray crystal structures of the PR/ inhibitor complexes reveal that crystal forms with respective space groups are dependent on the occupancy of either SQV or RTV in the active site of the PR. The occupancy of either of the PR inhibitors in the active site of PR has interestingly demonstrated unique cooperativity effects in crystallization of protein-ligand complexes. The crystal forms obtained were also related to the concentration of DMSO and ammonium sulphate in crystallization, and storage conditions of purified PR. Surprisingly, the relative occupancies of these inhibitors in the active site suggested a competition between the two inhibitors which were not inhibition constants related. Analysis of the structures in both crystal forms show no difference in DMSO content but at higher concentration of DMSO (3.2 - 5.0%) in the orthorhombic crystal forms, there were protein-sulphate interactions which were absent in the monoclinic forms with lower concentration (0.8 - 1.2%) of DMSO. This work has clearly demonstrated that there is cooperativity in crystallization and the conditions of crystallization influence specific intermolecular contacts in crystal packing (crystal form). (author)

  7. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M.; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jörg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.panneels@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, OFLC/103, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-06-27

    A new batch preparation method is presented for high-density micrometre-sized crystals of the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin for use in time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free-electron laser using a liquid jet. Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.

  8. Native Chemical Ligation at Asx-Cys, Glx-Cys: Chemical Synthesis and High Resolution X-ray Structure of ShK Toxin by Racemic Protein Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Bobo; Kubota, Tomoya; Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Bezanilla, Francisco; Kent, Stephen B. H.

    2013-01-01

    We have re-examined the utility of native chemical ligation at −Gln/Glu-Cys− [Glx-Cys] and −Asn/Asp-Cys− [Asx-Cys] sites. Using the improved thioaryl catalyst 4-mercaptophenylacetic acid (MPAA), native chemical ligation could be performed at −Gln-Cys− and Asn-Cys− sites without side reactions. After optimization, ligation at a −Glu-Cys− could also be used as a ligation site, with minimal levels of byproduct formation. However, −Asp-Cys− is not appropriate for use as a site for native chemical ligation because of formation of significant amounts of β-linked byproduct. The feasibility of native chemical ligation at −Gln-Cys− enabled a convergent total chemical synthesis of the enantiomeric forms of the ShK toxin protein molecule. The D-ShK protein molecule was ~50,000-fold less active in blocking the Kv1.3 channel than the L-ShK protein molecule. Racemic protein crystallography was used to obtain high resolution X-ray diffraction data for ShK toxin. The structure was solved by direct methods and showed significant differences from the previously reported NMR structures in some regions of the ShK protein molecule. PMID:23919482

  9. Combined x-ray crystallography and computational modeling approach to investigate the Hsp90 C-terminal peptide binding to FKBP51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajnish; Moche, Martin; Winblad, Bengt; Pavlov, Pavel F

    2017-10-27

    FK506 binding protein of 51 kDa (FKBP51) is a heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) co-chaperone involved in the regulation of steroid hormone receptors activity. It is known for its role in various regulatory pathways implicated in mood and stress-related disorders, cancer, obesity, Alzheimer's disease and corticosteroid resistant asthma. It consists of two FKBP12 like active peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PPIase) domains (an active FK1 and inactive FK2 domain) and one tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain that mediates interaction with Hsp90 via its C-terminal MEEVD peptide. Here, we report a combined x-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics study to reveal the binding mechanism of Hsp90 MEEVD peptide to the TPR domain of FKBP51. The results demonstrated that the Hsp90 C-terminal peptide binds to the TPR domain of FKBP51 with the help of di-carboxylate clamp involving Lys272, Glu273, Lys352, Asn322, and Lys329 which are conserved throughout several di-carboxylate clamp TPR proteins. Interestingly, the results from molecular dynamics study are also in agreement to the complex structure where all the contacts between these two partners were consistent throughout the simulation period. In a nutshell, our findings provide new opportunity to engage this important protein-protein interaction target by small molecules designed by structure based drug design strategy.

  10. Synthesis, Characterization, X-ray Crystallography, Acetyl Cholinesterase Inhibition and Antioxidant Activities of Some Novel Ketone Derivatives of Gallic Hydrazide-Derived Schiff Bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Khaledi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common form of dementia among older people and the pathogenesis of this disease is associated with oxidative stress. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors with antioxidant activities are considered potential treatments for AD. Some novel ketone derivatives of gallic hydrazide-derived Schiff bases were synthesized and examined for their antioxidant activities and in vitro and in silico acetyl cholinesterase inhibition. The compounds were characterized using spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assays revealed that all the compounds have strong antioxidant activities. N-(1-(5-bromo-2-hydroxyphenyl-ethylidene-3,4,5-trihydroxybenzohydrazide (2 was the most potent inhibitor of human acetyl cholinesterase, giving an inhibition rate of 77% at 100 μM. Molecular docking simulation of the ligand-enzyme complex suggested that the ligand may be positioned in the enzyme’s active-site gorge, interacting with residues in the peripheral anionic subsite (PAS and acyl binding pocket (ABP. The current work warrants further preclinical studies to assess the potential for these novel compounds for the treatment of AD.

  11. Binding of N-carboxymethyl dipeptide inhibitors to thermolysin determined by X-ray crystallography: a novel class of transition-state analogues for zinc peptidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzingo, A F; Matthews, B W

    1984-11-20

    The mode of binding of the specific thermolysin inhibitor N-(1-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl)-L-leucyl-L-tryptophan (KI approximately 5 X 10(-8) M) [Maycock, A. L., DeSousa, D. M., Payne, L. G., ten Broeke, J., Wu, M. T., & Patchett, A. A. (1981) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 102, 963-969] has been determined by X-ray crystallography and refined to an R value of 17.1% at 1.9-A resolution. The inhibitor binds to thermolysin with both oxygens of the N-carboxymethyl group liganded to the zinc to give overall pentacoordination of the metal. The bidentate ligation of the inhibitor differs from the monodentate binding seen previously for carboxylate-zinc interactions in thermolysin and is closer to the bidentate geometry observed for the binding of hydroxamates [Holmes, M. A., & Matthews, B. W. (1981) Biochemistry 20, 6912-6920]. The geometry of the inhibitor and its interactions with the protein have a number of elements in common with the presumed transition state formed during peptide hydrolysis. The observed zinc ligation supports the previous suggestion that a pentacoordinate intermediate participates in the mechanism of catalysis. However, the alpha-amino nitrogen of the inhibitor is close to Glu-143, suggesting that this residue might accept a proton from an attacking water molecule (as proposed before) and subsequently donate this proton to the leaving nitrogen. By analogy with thermolysin, it is proposed that a related mechanism should be considered for peptide cleavage by carboxypeptidase A.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Elucidating an Amorphous Form Stabilization Mechanism for Tenapanor Hydrochloride: Crystal Structure Analysis Using X-ray Diffraction, NMR Crystallography, and Molecular Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson Lill, Sten O; Widdifield, Cory M; Pettersen, Anna; Svensk Ankarberg, Anna; Lindkvist, Maria; Aldred, Peter; Gracin, Sandra; Shankland, Norman; Shankland, Kenneth; Schantz, Staffan; Emsley, Lyndon

    2018-03-12

    By the combined use of powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR, and molecular modeling, the crystal structures of two systems containing the unusually large tenapanor drug molecule have been determined: the free form, ANHY, and a dihydrochloride salt form, 2HCl. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) assisted solid-state NMR (SSNMR) crystallography investigations were found essential for the final assignment and were used to validate the crystal structure of ANHY. From a structural informatics analysis of ANHY and 2HCl, conformational ring differences in one part of the molecule were observed which influence the relative orientation of a methyl group on a ring nitrogen and thereby impact the crystallizability of the dihydrochloride salt. From quantum chemistry calculations, the dynamics between different ring conformations in tenapanor is predicted to be fast. Addition of HCl to tenapanor results in general in a mixture of protonated ring conformers and hence a statistical mix of diastereoisomers which builds up the amorphous form, a-2HCl. This was qualitatively verified by 13 C CP/MAS NMR investigations of the amorphous form. Thus, to form any significant amount of the crystalline material 2HCl, which originates from the minor (i.e., energetically less stable) ring conformations, one needs to involve nitrogen deprotonation to allow exchange between the minor and major conformations of ANHY in solution. Thus, by controlling the solution pH value to well below the p K a of ANHY, the equilibrium between ANHY and 2HCl can be controlled and by this mechanism the crystallization of 2HCl can be avoided and the amorphous form of the dichloride salt can therefore be stabilized.

  13. Chemical synthesis and X-ray structure of a heterochiral {D-protein antagonist plus vascular endothelial growth factor} protein complex by racemic crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Uppalapati, Maruti; Ault-Riché, Dana; Kenney, John; Lowitz, Joshua; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Kent, Stephen B.H. (Antibody Solutions); (Toronto); (Reflexion); (UC)

    2012-10-23

    Total chemical synthesis was used to prepare the mirror image (D-protein) form of the angiogenic protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A). Phage display against D-VEGF-A was used to screen designed libraries based on a unique small protein scaffold in order to identify a high affinity ligand. Chemically synthesized D- and L- forms of the protein ligand showed reciprocal chiral specificity in surface plasmon resonance binding experiments: The L-protein ligand bound only to D-VEGF-A, whereas the D-protein ligand bound only to L-VEGF-A. The D-protein ligand, but not the L-protein ligand, inhibited the binding of natural VEGF{sub 165} to the VEGFR1 receptor. Racemic protein crystallography was used to determine the high resolution X-ray structure of the heterochiral complex consisting of {l_brace}D-protein antagonist + L-protein form of VEGF-A{r_brace}. Crystallization of a racemic mixture of these synthetic proteins in appropriate stoichiometry gave a racemic protein complex of more than 73 kDa containing six synthetic protein molecules. The structure of the complex was determined to a resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}. Detailed analysis of the interaction between the D-protein antagonist and the VEGF-A protein molecule showed that the binding interface comprised a contact surface area of approximately 800 {angstrom}{sup 2} in accord with our design objectives, and that the D-protein antagonist binds to the same region of VEGF-A that interacts with VEGFR1-domain 2.

  14. X-ray Excited Optical Fluorescence and Diffraction Imaging of Reactivity and Crystallinity in a Zeolite Crystal : Crystallography and Molecular Spectroscopy in One

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ristanovic, Zoran; Hofmann, Jan P; Richard, Marie-Ingrid; Jiang, Tao; Chahine, Gilbert A; Schülli, Tobias U; Meirer, Florian; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-01-01

    Structure-activity relationships in heterogeneous catalysis are challenging to be measured on a single-particle level. For the first time, one X-ray beam is used to determine the crystallographic structure and reactivity of a single zeolite crystal. The method generates μm-resolved X-ray diffraction

  15. Space and time resolved spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas: A study of density-sensitive x-ray transitions in helium-like and neon-like ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Bruce Kai Fong

    1988-09-01

    The determination of level populations and detailed population mechanisms in dense plasmas has become an increasingly important problem in atomic physics. In this work, the density variation of line intensities and level populations in aluminum K-shell and molybdenum and silver L-shell emission spectra have been measured from high-powered, laser-produced plasmas. For each case, the density dependence of the observed line emission is due to the effect of high frequency electron-ion collisions on metastable levels. The density dependent line intensities vary greatly in laser-produced plasmas and can be used to extract detailed information concerning the population kinetics and level populations of the ions. The laser-plasmas had to be fully characterized in order to clearly compare the observed density dependence with atomic theory predictions. This has been achieved through the combined use of new diagnostic instruments and microdot targets which provided simultaneously space, time, and spectrally resolved data. The plasma temperatures were determined from the slope of the hydrogen-like recombination continuum. The time resolved electron density profiles were measured using multiple frame holographic interferometry. Thus, the density dependence of K-shell spectral lines could be clearly examined, independent of assumptions concerning the dynamics of the plasma. In aluminum, the electron density dependence of various helium-like line intensity ratios were measured. Standard collisional radiative equilibrium models fail to account for the observed density dependence measured for the ''He/sub ..cap alpha..//IC'' ratio. Instead, a quasi-steady state atomic model based on a purely recombining plasma is shown to accurately predict the measured density dependence. This same recombining plasma calculation successfully models the density dependence of the high-n ''He/sub ..gamma..//He/sub ..beta../'' and ''He/sub delta

  16. Space and time resolved spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas: A study of density-sensitive x-ray transitions in helium-like and neon-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Bruce Kai Fong.

    1988-09-01

    The determination of level populations and detailed population mechanisms in dense plasmas has become an increasingly important problem in atomic physics. In this work, the density variation of line intensities and level populations in aluminum K-shell and molybdenum and silver L-shell emission spectra have been measured from high-powered, laser-produced plasmas. For each case, the density dependence of the observed line emission is due to the effect of high frequency electron-ion collisions on metastable levels. The density dependent line intensities vary greatly in laser-produced plasmas and can be used to extract detailed information concerning the population kinetics and level populations of the ions. The laser-plasmas had to be fully characterized in order to clearly compare the observed density dependence with atomic theory predictions. This has been achieved through the combined use of new diagnostic instruments and microdot targets which provided simultaneously space, time, and spectrally resolved data. The plasma temperatures were determined from the slope of the hydrogen-like recombination continuum. The time resolved electron density profiles were measured using multiple frame holographic interferometry. Thus, the density dependence of K-shell spectral lines could be clearly examined, independent of assumptions concerning the dynamics of the plasma. In aluminum, the electron density dependence of various helium-like line intensity ratios were measured. Standard collisional radiative equilibrium models fail to account for the observed density dependence measured for the ''He/sub α//IC'' ratio. Instead, a quasi-steady state atomic model based on a purely recombining plasma is shown to accurately predict the measured density dependence. This same recombining plasma calculation successfully models the density dependence of the high-n ''He/sub γ//He/sub β/'' and ''He/sub δ//He/sub β/'' helium-like resonance line intensity ratios

  17. X-ray data processing

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Harold R.

    2017-01-01

    The method of molecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography is a little over a century old. The history is described briefly, along with developments in X-ray sources and detectors. The fundamental processes involved in measuring diffraction patterns on area detectors, i.e. autoindexing, refining crystal and detector parameters, integrating the reflections themselves and putting the resultant measurements on to a common scale are discussed, with particular reference to the most c...

  18. A new small-angle X-ray scattering set-up on the crystallography beamline I711 at MAX-lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knaapila, M.; Svensson, C.; Barauskas, J.

    2009-01-01

    A small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) set-up has recently been developed at beamline I711 at the MAX II storage ring in Lund (Sweden). An overview of the required modifications is presented here together with a number of application examples. The accessible q range in a SAXS experiment is 0.009-0...

  19. The Controlled-Drift Detector: a new detector for fast frame readout X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castoldi, A.; Gatti, E.; Guazzoni, C. E-mail: chiara.guazzoni@mi.infn.it; Longoni, A.; Rehak, P.; Strueder, L

    2001-04-01

    The Controlled-Drift Detector (CDD) is a new X-ray imaging detector operated in integrate-readout mode. Its basic feature is the fast transport of the integrated charge to the output electrode by means of a uniform drift field. The energy-resolved X-ray imaging capability of the CDD has been tested at room temperature. The images of a {sup 55}Fe source taken with the CDD at different frame rates (up to 10 kHz) are presented and the achieved energy resolution is analyzed. A detector with such features can be of interest in several fields of application like time-resolved X-ray crystallography and astronomy.

  20. Ultra fast x-ray streak camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, L.W.; McConaghy, C.F.

    1975-01-01

    A unique ultrafast x-ray sensitive streak camera, with a time resolution of 50psec, has been built and operated. A 100A thick gold photocathode on a beryllium vacuum window is used in a modified commerical image converter tube. The X-ray streak camera has been used in experiments to observe time resolved emission from laser-produced plasmas. (author)

  1. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy of semiconductor nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porte, Henrik

    This thesis describes time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy measurements on various semiconductor nanostructures. The aim is to study the carrier dynamics in these nanostructures on a picosecond timescale. In a typical experiment carriers are excited with a visible or near-infrared pulse...... be signicantly reduced. Besides time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy measurement, optical transmission, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray, and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy experiments on black silicon are presented....

  2. Study of the earth's deep interior and crystallography. X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments under high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Takehiko

    2014-01-01

    History of the study of the Earth's deep interior was reviewed. In order to understand Earth's deep interior from the view point of materials science, X-ray diffraction under high pressure and high temperature played very important role. Use of synchrotron radiation dramatically advanced this experimental technique and it is now possible to make precise X-ray study under the P-T conditions corresponding even to the center of the Earth. In order to clarify the behavior of light elements such as hydrogen, however, studies using neutron diffraction are also required. A new neutron beam line dedicated for high-pressure science is constructed at J-PARC and is now ready for use. (author)

  3. Time-resolved studies. Ch. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Dennis M.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1991-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation, with its unique properties, offers a tool to extend X-ray measurements from the static to the time-resolved regime. The most straight-forward application of synchrotron radiation to the study of transient phenomena is directly through the possibility of decreased data-collection times via the enormous increase in flux over that of a laboratory X-ray system. Even further increases in intensity can be obtained through the use of novel X-ray optical devices. Wide-bandpass monochromators, e.g., that utilize the continuous spectral distribution of synchrotron radiation, can increase flux on the sample several orders of magnitude over conventional X-ray optical systems thereby allowing a further shortening of the data-collection time. Another approach that uses the continuous spectral nature of synchrotron radiation to decrease data-collection times is the 'parallel data collection' method. Using this technique, intensities as a function of X-ray energy are recorded simultaneously for all energies rather than sequentially recording data at each energy, allowing for a dramatic decrease in data-collection time. Perhaps the most exciting advances in time-resolved X-ray studies will be made by those methods that exploit the pulsed nature of the radiation emitted from storage rings. Pulsed techniques have had an enormous impact in the study of the temporal evolution of transient phenomena. The extension from continuous to modulated sources for use in time-resolved work has been carried over in a host of fields that use both pulsed particle and pulsed electro-magnetic beams. In this chapter the new experimental techniques are reviewed and illustrated with some experiments. (author). 98 refs.; 20 figs.; 5 tabs

  4. Azo coupling of 4-nitrophenyldiazonium chloride with aliphatic nucleophiles: an integrated organic synthesis and X-ray crystallography experiment; Acoplamento de cloreto de 4-nitrofenildiazonio com nucleofilos alifaticos: experimento integrado de sintese organica e cristalografia de raios X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Silvio; Marques, Monique F.; Rocha, Valeria, E-mail: silviodc@ufba.br [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Lariucci, Carlito; Vencato, Ivo [Universidade Federal de Goiania (UFG), GO (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2013-11-01

    This article describes an undergraduate experiment for the synthesis of p-nitrophenyldiazonium chloride and its coupling with acetylacetone and two enaminones, 4-phenylamino-pent-3-en-2-one and 4-amino-pent-3-en-2-one, in an adaptation of a previously reported synthetic protocol. The azo dyes 4-(E)-phenylamino-3-[(E)-2-(4-nitrophenylazo)]-3-penten-2-one and 4-(E)-amino-3-[(E)-2-(4-nitrophenylazo)]-3-penten-2-one were obtained, and the solid state structure of this latter azo compound was characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. This two-week integrated laboratory approach involves simple synthetic experiments and microwave chemistry in the organic laboratory plus crystallography analysis, suitable for novice students on undergraduate experimental chemistry courses. (author)

  5. Solid state structural investigations of the bis(chalcone) compound with single crystal X-ray crystallography, DFT, gamma-ray spectroscopy and chemical spectroscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakalı, Gül; Biçer, Abdullah; Eke, Canel; Cin, Günseli Turgut

    2018-04-01

    A bis(chalcone), (2E,6E)-2,6-bis((E)-3phenylallidene)cyclohexanone, was characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, FTIR, UV-Vis spectroscopy, gamma-ray spectroscopy and single crystal X- ray structural analysis. The optimized molecular structure of the compound is calculated using DFT/B3LYP with 6-31G (d,p) level. The calculated geometrical parameters are in good agreement with the experimental data obtained from our reported X-ray structure. The powder and single crystal compounds were gama-irradiated using clinical electron linear accelerator and 60Co gamma-ray source, respectively. Spectral studies (1H NMR, 13C NMR, FTIR and UV-Vis) of powder chalcone compound were also investigated before and after irradiation. Depending on the irradiation notable changes were observed in spectral features powder sample. Single crystal X-ray diffraction investigation shows that both unirradiated and irradiated single crystal samples crystallizes in a orthorhombic crystal system in the centrosymmetric space group Pbcn and exhibits an C-H..O intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The crystal packing is stabilised by strong intermolecular bifurcate C-H..O hydrogen bonds and π…π stacking interactions. The asymmetric unit of the title compound contains one-half of a molecule. The other half of the molecule is generated with (1-x,y,-3/2-z) symmetry operator. The molecule is almost planar due to having π conjugated system of chalcones. However, irradiated single crystal compound showed significant changes lattice parameters, crystal volume and density. According to results of gamma-ray spectroscopy, radioactive elements of powder compound which are 123Sb(n,g),124Sb,57Fe(g,p),56Mn, 55Mn(g,n), and 54Mn were determined using photoactivation analysis. However, the most intensive gamma-ray energy signals are 124Sb.

  6. Design and performance of U7B beamline and X-ray diffraction and scattering station at NSRL and its preliminary experiments in protein crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Guoqiang; Xu, Chaoyin; Fan Rong; Gao Chen; Lou Xiaohua; Teng Maikun; Huang Qingqiu; Niu Liwen

    2005-01-01

    This publication describes the design and performance of the U7B beamline and X-ray diffraction and diffuse scattering station at National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The beamline optics comprise a Pt-coated toroidal focusing mirror and a double-crystal Si(1 1 1) monochromator. A preliminary experiment of diffraction data collection and processing was carried out using a commercial imaging plate detector system (Mar345). The data collected from one single crystal of acutohaemolysin, a Lys49-type PLA2 from Agkistrodon acutus venom, are of high quality

  7. The interplay between X-ray crystallography, neutron diffraction, image reconstruction, organo-metallic chemistry and biochemistry in structural studies of ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, M; Sharon, R; Berkovitch-Yellin, Z; Gewitz, H S; Weinstein, S; Pebay-Peyroula, E; Roth, M; Yonath, A

    1991-01-01

    Crystals of ribosomes, their complexes with components of protein biosynthesis, their natural, mutated and modified subunits, have been subjected to X-ray and neutron crystallographic analyses. Electron microscopy and 3-dimensional image reconstruction, supported by biochemistry, genetic, functional and organo-metallic studies were employed for facilitating phasing of the crystallographic data. For example, a monofunctional multi heavy-atom cluster (undecagold) was designed for covalent and quantitative binding to ribosomes. The modified particles were crystallized isomorphously with the native ones. Their difference-Patterson maps contain indications for the usefulness of these derivatives for subsequent phasing. Models of the ribosome and its large subunit were reconstructed from tilt series of 2-dimensional sheets. The comparison of the various reconstructed images enabled an initial assessment of the reliability of these models and led to tentative assignments of several functional features. These include the presumed sites for binding mRNA and for codon-anticodon interactions, the path taken by the nascent protein chain and the mode for tRNA binding to ribosomes. These assignments assisted in the design of biologically meaningful crystal systems. The reconstructed models are being used to identify structural features in initial density maps derived from X-ray and neutron diffraction data.

  8. Skull x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - head; X-ray - skull; Skull radiography; Head x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  9. Neck x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - neck; Cervical spine x-ray; Lateral neck x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored so that the lowest amount of radiation is used to produce the image. Pregnant women and ...

  10. X-ray data processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Harold R

    2017-10-31

    The method of molecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography is a little over a century old. The history is described briefly, along with developments in X-ray sources and detectors. The fundamental processes involved in measuring diffraction patterns on area detectors, i.e. autoindexing, refining crystal and detector parameters, integrating the reflections themselves and putting the resultant measurements on to a common scale are discussed, with particular reference to the most commonly used software in the field. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. Serial Femtosecond Crystallography

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Henry N.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers produce brief flashes of X-rays that are of about a billion times higher peak brightness than achievable from storage ring sources. Such a tremendous jump in X-ray source capabilities, which came in 2009 when the Linac Coherent Light Source began operations, was unprecedented in the history of X-ray science. Protein structure determination through the method of macromolecular crystallography has consistently benefited from the many increases in source performance fr...

  12. Intergrown new zeolite beta polymorphs with interconnected 12-ring channels solved by combining electron crystallography and single-crystal X-ray diffraction

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Zhengbao

    2012-10-09

    Two new polymorphs of zeolite beta, denoted as SU-78A and SU-78B, were synthesized by employing dicyclohexylammonium hydroxides as organic structure-directing agents. The structure was solved by combining transmission electron microscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. SU-78 is an intergrowth of SU-78A and SU-78B and contains interconnected 12-ring channels in three directions. The two polymorphs are built from the same building layer, similar to that for the zeolite beta family. The layer stacking in SU-78, however, is different from those in zeolite beta polymorph A, B, and C, showing new zeolite framework topologies. SU-78 is thermally stable up to 600 °C. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  13. Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at a Hard X-ray Free Electron Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Bressler, Christian; Chen, Lin X.

    2013-01-01

    -quality X-ray absorption data and we report femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements of a spin-crossover system, iron(II) tris(2,2'-bipyridine) in water. The data indicate that the low-spin to high-spin transition can be modeled by single-exponential kinetics...

  14. Phosphor Scanner For Imaging X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Hecht, Diana L.; Witherow, William K.

    1992-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic scanning apparatus generates digitized image of x-ray image recorded in phosphor. Scanning fiber-optic probe supplies laser light stimulating luminescence in areas of phosphor exposed to x rays. Luminescence passes through probe and fiber to integrating sphere and photomultiplier. Sensitivity and resolution exceed previously available scanners. Intended for use in x-ray crystallography, medical radiography, and molecular biology.

  15. Synthesis, spectra and X-ray crystallography of dipyridin-2-ylmethanone oxime and its CuX2(oxime)2 complexes: Thermal, Hirshfeld surface and DFT analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warad, Ismail; Abdoh, Muneer; Al Ali, Anas; Shivalingegowda, Naveen; Kumara, Karthik; Zarrouk, Abdelkader; Lokanath, Neartur Krishnappagowda

    2018-02-01

    Dipyridin-2-ylmethanone oxime (C11H9N3O), was prepared using di-2-pyridyl ketone. The oxime ligand and its neutral CuX2 (oxime)2 (X = Cl or Br) complexes have been identified with the aid of several spectroscopic techniques such as: IR, EI-MS, EA, UV-visible, TG, 1H-NMR and finally the structure of the free oxime ligand was confirmed by X-ray diffraction studies. The oxime crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c, with cell parameters a = 8.8811 (8) Å, b = 10.6362 (8) Å, c = 11.2050 (8) Å, β = 109.085 (4) º, V = 1000.26 (14) Å3 and Z = 4. The molecular conformation is stabilized by a strong intramolecular Osbnd H⋯N hydrogen bonding between the hydroxyl group of the oxime moiety and the nitrogen of the pyridine ring. Since the oxime structure was solved by XRD, the ligand structure parameters like bond length and angles were compared to the DFT computed one, the UV-visible to TD-SCF and Hirshfeld surface to MEP analysis.

  16. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability (R work = 16.2, R free = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh

  17. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A., E-mail: alashkov83@gmail.com; Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability (R{sub work} = 16.2, R{sub free} = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh.

  18. Effect of detergent binding on cytochrome P450 2B4 structure as analyzed by X-ray crystallography and deuterium-exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish B; Jang, Hyun-Hee; Wilderman, P Ross; Lee, David; Li, Sheng; Zhang, Qinghai; Stout, C David; Halpert, James R

    2016-09-01

    Multiple crystal structures of CYP2B4 have demonstrated the binding of the detergent 5-cyclohexyl-1-pentyl-β-D-maltoside (CYMAL-5) in a peripheral pocket located adjacent to the active site. To explore the consequences of detergent binding, X-ray crystal structures of the peripheral pocket mutant CYP2B4 F202W were solved in the presence of hexaethylene glycol monooctyl ether (C8E6) and CYMAL-5. The structure in the presence of CYMAL-5 illustrated a closed conformation indistinguishable from the previously solved wild-type. In contrast, the F202W structure in the presence of C8E6 revealed a detergent molecule that coordinated the heme-iron and extended to the protein surface through the substrate access channel 2f. Despite the overall structural similarity of these detergent complexes, remarkable differences were observed in the A, A', and H helices, the F-G cassette, the C-D and β4 loop region. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS) was employed to probe these differences and to test the effect of detergents in solution. The presence of either detergent increased the H/D exchange rate across the plastic regions, and the results obtained by DXMS in solution were consistent in general with the relevant structural snapshots. The study provides insight into effect of detergent binding and the interpretation of associated conformational dynamics of CYP2B4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Exploring the Mechanism of β-Lactam Ring Protonation in the Class A β-lactamase Acylation Mechanism Using Neutron and X-ray Crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Weiss, Kevin L.; Cooper, Jonathan B.; Erskine, Peter T.; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Ostermann, Andreas; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ginell, Stephan L.; Coates, Leighton

    2016-01-14

    The catalytic mechanism of class A beta-lactamases is often debated due in part to the large number of amino acids that interact with bound beta-lactam substrates. The role and function of the conserved residue Lys 73 in the catalytic mechanism of class A type beta-lactamase enzymes is still not well understood after decades of scientific research. To better elucidate the functions of this vital residue, we used both neutron and high-resolution X-ray diffraction to examine both the structures of the ligand free protein and the acyl-enzyme complex of perdeuterated E166A Toho-1 beta-lactamase with the antibiotic cefotaxime. The E166A mutant lacks a critical glutamate residue that has a key role in the deacylation step of the catalytic mechanism, allowing the acyl-enzyme adduct to be captured for study. In our ligand free structures, Lys 73 is present in a single conformation, however in all of our acyl-enzyme structures, Lys 73 is present in two different conformations, in which one conformer is closer to Ser 70 while the other conformer is positioned closer to Ser 130, which supports the existence of a possible pathway by which proton transfer from Lys 73 to Ser 130 can occur. This and further clarifications of the role of Lys 73 in the acylation mechanism may facilitate the design of inhibitors that capitalize on the enzymes native machinery.

  20. Synthesis, characterization, X-ray crystallography, and cytotoxicity of a cymantrene keto carboxylic acid for IR labelling of bioactive peptides on a solid support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peindy N'Dongo, Harmel W; Neundorf, Ines; Merz, Klaus; Schatzschneider, Ulrich

    2008-12-01

    Cym-CO-CH2-CH2-COOH was prepared in good yield by Friedel-Crafts reaction of cymantrene (Cym, CpMn(CO)3) with succinic anhydride for the IR labelling of peptides and fully characterized, including an X-ray structure analysis (monoclinic space group P2(1)/n, a=5.727(3)A, b=19.865(9)A, c=10.518(5)A, beta=91.211(9) degrees). The compound was isolated in pure form without the need for chromatographic work-up and subsequently used for solution-phase synthesis of a bioconjugate with phenylalanine methyl ester to allow a complete spectroscopic characterization of this model system. The cymantrene keto carboxylic acid also turned out to be a very robust marker in automated microwave-assisted solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). [Leu5]-enkephalin (Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu) was prepared on a Wang resin and labelled with the cymantrene derivative on the solid support under microwave irradiation in all steps. The metal-carbonyl marker stayed intact during cleavage from the resin with concentrated trifluoroacetic acid. After simple precipitation and lyophilization, the cymantrene-enkephalin bioconjugate could be obtained in analytically pure form without the need of HPLC purification. As required, the compound is non-cytotoxic against MCF-7 cells at up to 100 microM. This protocol thus allows one to introduce organometallic IR spectroscopic labels to peptides in a very straightforward way.

  1. Time-resolved absorption measurements on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaanimagi, P.A.; DaSilva, L.; Delettrez, J.; Gregory, G.G.; Richardson, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    Time-resolved measurements of the incident laser light that is scattered and/or refracted from targets irradiated by the 24 uv-beam OMEGA laser at LLE, have provided some interesting features related to time-resolved absorption. The decrease in laser absorption characteristic of irradiating a target that implodes during the laser pulse has been observed. The increase in absorption expected as the critical density surface moves from a low to a high Z material in the target has also been noted. The detailed interpretation of these results is made through comparisons with simulation using the code LILAC, as well as with streak data from time-resolved x-ray imaging and spectroscopy. In addition, time and space-resolved imaging of the scattered light yields information on laser irradiation uniformity conditions on the target. The report consists of viewgraphs

  2. Osmium(III) analogues of KP1019: Electrochemical and chemical synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, x-ray crystallography, hydrolytic stability, and antiproliferative activity

    KAUST Repository

    Kuhn, Paul-Steffen

    2014-10-20

    A one-electron reduction of osmium(IV) complexes trans-[OsIVCl4(Hazole)2], where Hazole = 1H-pyrazole ([1]0), 2H-indazole ([2]0), 1H-imidazole ([3]0), and 1H-benzimidazole ([4]0), afforded a series of eight new complexes as osmium analogues of KP1019, a lead anticancer drug in clinical trials, with the general formula (cation)[trans-OsIIICl4(Hazole)2], where cation = H2pz+ (H2pz[1]), H2ind+ (H2ind[2]), H2im+ (H2im[3]), Ph4P+ (Ph4P[3]), nBu4N+ (nBu4N[3]), H2bzim+ (H2bzim[4]), Ph4P+ (Ph4P[4]), and nBu4N+ (nBu4N[4]). All complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, 1H NMR spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, UV-vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, while H2pz[1], H2ind[2], and nBu4[3], in addition, by X-ray diffraction. The reduced species [1]- and [4]- are stable in aqueous media in the absence of air oxygen and do not react with small biomolecules such as amino acids and the nucleotide 5′-dGMP. Cell culture experiments in five different human cancer cell lines (HeLa, A549, FemX, MDA-MB-453, and LS-174) and one noncancerous cell line (MRC-5) were performed, and the results were discussed and compared to those for KP1019 and cisplatin. Benzannulation in complexes with similar structure enhances antitumor activity by several orders of magnitude, implicating different mechanisms of action of the tested compounds. In particular, complexes H2ind[2] and H2bzim[4] exhibited significant antiproliferative activity in vitro when compared to H2pz[1] and H2im[3]. (Chemical Equation Presented).

  3. Unusual saccharin-N,O (carbonyl) coordination in mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes: Synthesis, X-ray crystallography and biological activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtaruddin, Nur Shuhada Mohd; Yusof, Enis Nadia Md; Ravoof, Thahira B. S. A.; Tiekink, Edward R. T.; Veerakumarasivam, Abhi; Tahir, Mohamed Ibrahim Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    Three tridentate Schiff bases containing N and S donor atoms were synthesized via the condensation reaction between S-2-methylbenzyldithiocarbazate with 2-acetyl-4-methylpyridine (S2APH); 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazide with 2-acetylpyridine (MT2APH) and 4-ethyl-3-thiosemicarbazide with 2-acetylpyridine (ET2APH). Three new, binuclear and mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes with the general formula, [Cu(sac)(L)]2 (sac = saccharinate anion; L = anion of the Schiff base) were then synthesized, and subsequently characterized by IR and UV/Vis spectroscopy as well as by molar conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The Schiff bases were also spectroscopically characterized using NMR and MS to further confirm their structures. The spectroscopic data indicated that the Schiff bases behaved as a tridentate NNS donor ligands coordinating via the pyridyl-nitrogen, azomethine-nitrogen and thiolate-sulphur atoms. Magnetic data indicated a square pyramidal environment for the complexes and the conductivity values showed that the complexes were essentially non-electrolytes in DMSO. The X-ray crystallographic analysis of one complex, [Cu(sac)(S2AP)]2 showed that the Cu(II) atom was coordinated to the thiolate-S, azomethine-N and pyridyl-N donors of the S2AP Schiff base and to the saccharinate-N from one anion, as well as to the carbonyl-O atom from a symmetry related saccharinate anion yielding a centrosymmetric binuclear complex with a penta-coordinate, square pyramidal geometry. All the copper(II) saccharinate complexes were found to display strong cytotoxic activity against the MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines.

  4. A Bright Future for Serial Femtosecond Crystallography with XFELs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Linda C; Stauch, Benjamin; Ishchenko, Andrii; Cherezov, Vadim

    2017-09-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) have the potential to revolutionize macromolecular structural biology due to the unique combination of spatial coherence, extreme peak brilliance, and short duration of X-ray pulses. A recently emerged serial femtosecond (fs) crystallography (SFX) approach using XFEL radiation overcomes some of the biggest hurdles of traditional crystallography related to radiation damage through the diffraction-before-destruction principle. Intense fs XFEL pulses enable high-resolution room-temperature structure determination of difficult-to-crystallize biological macromolecules, while simultaneously opening a new era of time-resolved structural studies. Here, we review the latest developments in instrumentation, sample delivery, data analysis, crystallization methods, and applications of SFX to important biological questions, and conclude with brief insights into the bright future of structural biology using XFELs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Structure of HI-6*sarin-acetylcholinesterase determined by X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulation: reactivator mechanism and design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Ekström

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphonates such as isopropyl metylphosphonofluoridate (sarin are extremely toxic as they phosphonylate the catalytic serine residue of acetylcholinesterase (AChE, an enzyme essential to humans and other species. Design of effective AChE reactivators as antidotes to various organophosphonates requires information on how the reactivators interact with the phosphonylated AChEs. However, such information has not been available hitherto because of three main challenges. First, reactivators are generally flexible in order to change from the ground state to the transition state for reactivation; this flexibility discourages determination of crystal structures of AChE in complex with effective reactivators that are intrinsically disordered. Second, reactivation occurs upon binding of a reactivator to the phosphonylated AChE. Third, the phosphorous conjugate can develop resistance to reactivation. We have identified crystallographic conditions that led to the determination of a crystal structure of the sarin(nonaged-conjugated mouse AChE in complex with [(E-[1-[(4-carbamoylpyridin-1-ium-1-ylmethoxymethyl]pyridin-2-ylidene]methyl]-oxoazanium dichloride (HI-6 at a resolution of 2.2 A. In this structure, the carboxyamino-pyridinium ring of HI-6 is sandwiched by Tyr124 and Trp286, however, the oxime-pyridinium ring is disordered. By combining crystallography with microsecond molecular dynamics simulation, we determined the oxime-pyridinium ring structure, which shows that the oxime group of HI-6 can form a hydrogen-bond network to the sarin isopropyl ether oxygen, and a water molecule is able to form a hydrogen bond to the catalytic histidine residue and subsequently deprotonates the oxime for reactivation. These results offer insights into the reactivation mechanism of HI-6 and design of better reactivators.

  6. Unique structure and dynamics of the EphA5 ligand binding domain mediate its binding specificity as revealed by X-ray crystallography, NMR and MD simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelu Huan

    Full Text Available The 16 EphA and EphB receptors represent the largest family of receptor tyrosine kinases, and their interactions with 9 ephrin-A and ephrin-B ligands initiate bidirectional signals controlling many physiological and pathological processes. Most interactions occur between receptor and ephrins of the same class, and only EphA4 can bind all A and B ephrins. To understand the structural and dynamic principles that enable Eph receptors to utilize the same jellyroll β-sandwich fold to bind ephrins, the VAPB-MSP domain, peptides and small molecules, we have used crystallography, NMR and molecular dynamics (MD simulations to determine the first structure and dynamics of the EphA5 ligand-binding domain (LBD, which only binds ephrin-A ligands. Unexpectedly, despite being unbound, the high affinity ephrin-binding pocket of EphA5 resembles that of other Eph receptors bound to ephrins, with a helical conformation over the J-K loop and an open pocket. The openness of the pocket is further supported by NMR hydrogen/deuterium exchange data and MD simulations. Additionally, the EphA5 LBD undergoes significant picosecond-nanosecond conformational exchanges over the loops, as revealed by NMR and MD simulations, but lacks global conformational exchanges on the microsecond-millisecond time scale. This is markedly different from the EphA4 LBD, which shares 74% sequence identity and 87% homology. Consequently, the unbound EphA5 LBD appears to comprise an ensemble of open conformations that have only small variations over the loops and appear ready to bind ephrin-A ligands. These findings show how two proteins with high sequence homology and structural similarity are still able to achieve distinctive binding specificities through different dynamics, which may represent a general mechanism whereby the same protein fold can serve for different functions. Our findings also suggest that a promising strategy to design agonists/antagonists with high affinity and selectivity

  7. Cosmic x ray physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  8. X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enema. What you can expect During the X-ray X-rays are performed at doctors' offices, dentists' offices, ... as those using a contrast medium. Your child's X-ray Restraints or other techniques may be used to ...

  9. Chest x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  10. Abdominal x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdominal film; X-ray - abdomen; Flat plate; KUB x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  11. Native chemical ligation at Asx-Cys, Glx-Cys: chemical synthesis and high-resolution X-ray structure of ShK toxin by racemic protein crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Bobo; Kubota, Tomoya; Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Bezanilla, Francisco; Kent, Stephen B H

    2013-08-14

    We have re-examined the utility of native chemical ligation at -Gln/Glu-Cys- [Glx-Cys] and -Asn/Asp-Cys- [Asx-Cys] sites. Using the improved thioaryl catalyst 4-mercaptophenylacetic acid (MPAA), native chemical ligation could be performed at -Gln-Cys- and Asn-Cys- sites without side reactions. After optimization, ligation at a -Glu-Cys- site could also be used as a ligation site, with minimal levels of byproduct formation. However, -Asp-Cys- is not appropriate for use as a site for native chemical ligation because of formation of significant amounts of β-linked byproduct. The feasibility of native chemical ligation at -Gln-Cys- enabled a convergent total chemical synthesis of the enantiomeric forms of the ShK toxin protein molecule. The D-ShK protein molecule was ~50,000-fold less active in blocking the Kv1.3 channel than the L-ShK protein molecule. Racemic protein crystallography was used to obtain high-resolution X-ray diffraction data for ShK toxin. The structure was solved by direct methods and showed significant differences from the previously reported NMR structures in some regions of the ShK protein molecule.

  12. Direct imaging electron microscopy (EM) methods in modern structural biology: overview and comparison with X-ray crystallography and single-particle cryo-EM reconstruction in the studies of large macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaguchi, Katsuyuki

    2014-10-01

    Determining the structure of macromolecules is important for understanding their function. The fine structure of large macromolecules is currently studied primarily by X-ray crystallography and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (EM) reconstruction. Before the development of these techniques, macromolecular structure was often examined by negative-staining, rotary-shadowing and freeze-etching EM, which are categorised here as 'direct imaging EM methods'. In this review, the results are summarised by each of the above techniques and compared with respect to four macromolecules: the ryanodine receptor, cadherin, rhodopsin and the ribosome-translocon complex (RTC). The results of structural analysis of the ryanodine receptor and cadherin are consistent between each technique. The results obtained for rhodopsin vary to some extent within each technique and between the different techniques. Finally, the results for RTC are inconsistent between direct imaging EM and other analytical techniques, especially with respect to the space within RTC, the reasons for which are discussed. Then, the role of direct imaging EM methods in modern structural biology is discussed. Direct imaging methods should support and verify the results obtained by other analytical methods capable of solving three-dimensional molecular architecture, and they should still be used as a primary tool for studying macromolecule structure in vivo. © 2014 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacconi, R.; Gursky, H.

    1974-01-01

    This text contains ten chapters and three appendices. Following an introduction, chapters two through five deal with observational techniques, mechanisms for the production of x rays in a cosmic setting, the x-ray sky and solar x-ray emission. Chapters six through ten include compact x-ray sources, supernova remnants, the interstellar medium, extragalactic x-ray sources and the cosmic x-ray background. Interactions of x rays with matter, units and conversion factors and a catalog of x-ray sources comprise the three appendices. (U.S.)

  14. Serial Millisecond Crystallography of Membrane Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Kathrin; Dworkowski, Florian; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Milne, Christopher; Wang, Meitian; Standfuss, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) is a powerful method to determine high-resolution structures of pharmaceutically relevant membrane proteins. Recently, the technology has been adapted to carry out serial millisecond crystallography (SMX) at synchrotron sources, where beamtime is more abundant. In an injector-based approach, crystals grown in lipidic cubic phase (LCP) or embedded in viscous medium are delivered directly into the unattenuated beam of a microfocus beamline. Pilot experiments show the application of microjet-based SMX for solving the structure of a membrane protein and compatibility of the method with de novo phasing. Planned synchrotron upgrades, faster detectors and software developments will go hand-in-hand with developments at free-electron lasers to provide a powerful methodology for solving structures from microcrystals at room temperature, ligand screening or crystal optimization for time-resolved studies with minimal or no radiation damage.

  15. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Alan Hap [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90° Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated ~ 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 Å) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has been demonstrated as a

  16. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, A.H.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA

    1998-01-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90 o Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated ∼ 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 (angstrom)) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has been

  17. Three-dimensional imaging of nanoscale materials by using coherent x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Jianwei

    2011-04-18

    sufficiently fine scale on the Ewald sphere, the 3D structure of the object is determined by the 2D spherical pattern. We confirmed the theoretical analysis by performing 3D numerical reconstructions of a sodium silicate glass structure at 2 A resolution from a 2D spherical diffraction pattern alone. As X-ray free electron lasers are under rapid development worldwide, ankylography may open up a new horizon to obtain the 3D structure of a non-crystalline specimen from a single pulse and allow time-resolved 3D structure determination of disordered materials.

  18. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed x-ray exams and use a very small dose of ... of the inside of the chest. A chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and ...

  19. X-ray sky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, M.; Koubsky, P.

    1977-01-01

    The history is described of the discoveries of X-ray sources in the sky. The individual X-ray detectors are described in more detail, i.e., gas counters, scintillation detectors, semiconductor detectors, and the principles of X-ray spectrometry and of radiation collimation aimed at increased resolution are discussed. Currently, over 200 celestial X-ray sources are known. Some were identified as nebulae, in some pulsations were found or the source was identified as a binary star. X-ray bursts of novae were also observed. The X-ray radiation is briefly mentioned of spherical star clusters and of extragalactic X-ray sources. (Oy)

  20. Deflection evaluation using time-resolved radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, D.A.; Lucero, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Time-resolved radiography is the creation of an x-ray image for which both the start-exposure and stop-exposure times are known with respect to the event under study. The combination of image and timing are used to derive information about the event. The authors have applied time-resolved radiography to evaluate motions of explosive-driven events. In the particular application discussed in this paper, the author's intent is to measure maximum deflections of the components involved. Exposures are made during the time just before to just after the event of interest occurs. A smear or blur of motion out to its furthest extent is recorded on the image. Comparison of the dynamic images with static images allows deflection measurements to be made

  1. The structure of denisovite, a fibrous nanocrystalline polytypic disordered `very complex' silicate, studied by a synergistic multi-disciplinary approach employing methods of electron crystallography and X-ray powder diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira V. Rozhdestvenskaya

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Denisovite is a rare mineral occurring as aggregates of fibres typically 200–500 nm diameter. It was confirmed as a new mineral in 1984, but important facts about its chemical formula, lattice parameters, symmetry and structure have remained incompletely known since then. Recently obtained results from studies using microprobe analysis, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD, electron crystallography, modelling and Rietveld refinement will be reported. The electron crystallography methods include transmission electron microscopy (TEM, selected-area electron diffraction (SAED, high-angle annular dark-field imaging (HAADF, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, precession electron diffraction (PED and electron diffraction tomography (EDT. A structural model of denisovite was developed from HAADF images and later completed on the basis of quasi-kinematic EDT data by ab initio structure solution using direct methods and least-squares refinement. The model was confirmed by Rietveld refinement. The lattice parameters are a = 31.024 (1, b = 19.554 (1 and c = 7.1441 (5 Å, β = 95.99 (3°, V = 4310.1 (5 Å3 and space group P12/a1. The structure consists of three topologically distinct dreier silicate chains, viz. two xonotlite-like dreier double chains, [Si6O17]10−, and a tubular loop-branched dreier triple chain, [Si12O30]12−. The silicate chains occur between three walls of edge-sharing (Ca,Na octahedra. The chains of silicate tetrahedra and the octahedra walls extend parallel to the z axis and form a layer parallel to (100. Water molecules and K+ cations are located at the centre of the tubular silicate chain. The latter also occupy positions close to the centres of eight-membered rings in the silicate chains. The silicate chains are geometrically constrained by neighbouring octahedra walls and present an ambiguity with respect to their z position along these walls, with displacements between neighbouring layers being

  2. Intact Protein Analysis at 21 Tesla and X-Ray Crystallography Define Structural Differences in Single Amino Acid Variants of Human Mitochondrial Branched-Chain Amino Acid Aminotransferase 2 (BCAT2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lissa C.; Håkansson, Maria; Walse, Björn; Nilsson, Carol L.

    2017-09-01

    Structural technologies are an essential component in the design of precision therapeutics. Precision medicine entails the development of therapeutics directed toward a designated target protein, with the goal to deliver the right drug to the right patient at the right time. In the field of oncology, protein structural variants are often associated with oncogenic potential. In a previous proteogenomic screen of patient-derived glioblastoma (GBM) tumor materials, we identified a sequence variant of human mitochondrial branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase 2 as a putative factor of resistance of GBM to standard-of-care-treatments. The enzyme generates glutamate, which is neurotoxic. To elucidate structural coordinates that may confer altered substrate binding or activity of the variant BCAT2 T186R, a 45 kDa protein, we applied combined ETD and CID top-down mass spectrometry in a LC-FT-ICR MS at 21 T, and X-Ray crystallography in the study of both the variant and non-variant intact proteins. The combined ETD/CID fragmentation pattern allowed for not only extensive sequence coverage but also confident localization of the amino acid variant to its position in the sequence. The crystallographic experiments confirmed the hypothesis generated by in silico structural homology modeling, that the Lys59 side-chain of BCAT2 may repulse the Arg186 in the variant protein (PDB code: 5MPR), leading to destabilization of the protein dimer and altered enzyme kinetics. Taken together, the MS and novel 3D structural data give us reason to further pursue BCAT2 T186R as a precision drug target in GBM. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Rigid body essential X-ray crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Esben Jannik; Biggin, Philip C

    2008-01-01

    The ligand-binding domain (LBD) from the ionotropic glutamate receptor subtype 2 (GluR2) has been shown to adopt a range of ligand-dependent conformational states. These states have been described in terms of the rotation required to fit subdomain (lobe) 2 following superposition of subdomain (lo...

  4. Measuring and understanding ultrafast phenomena using X-rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Kristoffer; Nielsen, Martin Meedom

    2014-01-01

    Within the last decade, significant advances in X-ray sources and instrumentation as well as simultaneous developments in analysis methodology has allowed the field of fast- and ultrafast time-resolved X-ray studies of solution-state systems to truly come of age. We here describe some aspects of ...

  5. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sell, L.J.

    1981-01-01

    A diagnostic x-ray device, readily convertible between conventional radiographic and tomographic operating modes, is described. An improved drive system interconnects and drives the x-ray source and the imaging device through coordinated movements for tomography

  6. X-ray - skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003381.htm X-ray - skeleton To use the sharing features on this ... Degenerative bone conditions Osteomyelitis Risks There is low radiation exposure. X-rays machines are set to provide the smallest ...

  7. Dental x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film; Digital image ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some of them are: Bitewing. Shows the crown ...

  8. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a ... posted: How to Obtain and Share ...

  9. X-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  10. High-Resolution Detector For X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Withrow, William K.; Pusey, Marc L.; Yost, Vaughn H.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed x-ray-sensitive imaging detector offers superior spatial resolution, counting-rate capacity, and dynamic range. Instrument based on laser-stimulated luminescence and reusable x-ray-sensitive film. Detector scans x-ray film line by line. Extracts latent image in film and simultaneously erases film for reuse. Used primarily for protein crystallography. Principle adapted to imaging detectors for electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy and general use in astronomy, engineering, and medicine.

  11. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  12. A multiple CCD X-ray detector and its first operation with synchrotron radiation X-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masayo; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kumasaka, Takashi; Sato, Kazumichi; Toyokawa, Hidenori; Aries, Ian F.; Jerram, Paul A.; Ueki, Tatzuo

    1999-01-01

    A 4x4 array structure of 16 identical CCD X-ray detector modules, called the multiple CCD X-ray detector system (MCCDX), was submitted to its first synchrotron radiation experiment at the protein crystallography station of the RIKEN beamline (BL45XU) at the SPring-8 facility. An X-ray diffraction pattern of cholesterol powder was specifically taken in order to investigate the overall system performance

  13. A multiple CCD X-ray detector and its first operation with synchrotron radiation X-ray beam

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, M; Kumasaka, T; Sato, K; Toyokawa, H; Aries, I F; Jerram, P A; Ueki, T

    1999-01-01

    A 4x4 array structure of 16 identical CCD X-ray detector modules, called the multiple CCD X-ray detector system (MCCDX), was submitted to its first synchrotron radiation experiment at the protein crystallography station of the RIKEN beamline (BL45XU) at the SPring-8 facility. An X-ray diffraction pattern of cholesterol powder was specifically taken in order to investigate the overall system performance.

  14. Characterization of Metalloproteins and Biomaterials by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl

    by estimation of the water content by thermogravimetric analysis. Bone tissue from dogs treated with strontiummalonate was studied using XAS. A new approach for analysing the X-ray absorption spectra resulted in a compositional model, from which the relative distribution of strontium in the different bone......-ray crystallography and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) applied to studying different hexameric insulin conformations. (iii) The structures of polymorphs of strontium ranelate and the distribution of strontium in bone tissue. A procedure for fast identification and verification of protein powders using XRPD...... and R6) were solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) to 1.40 Å, 1.30 Å and 1.80 Å resolution, respectively. The zinc coordination in each conformation was studied by XAS including both extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES...

  15. Editorial: Focus on X-ray Beams with High Coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ian; Gruebel, Gerhard; Mochrie, Simon

    2010-03-01

    Williams, H M Quiney, A G Peele and K A Nugent Imaging of complex density in silver nanocubes by coherent x-ray diffraction R Harder, M Liang, Y Sun, Y Xia and I K Robinson Methodology for studying strain inhomogeneities in polycrystalline thin films during in situ thermal loading using coherent x-ray diffraction N Vaxelaire, H Proudhon, S Labat, C Kirchlechner, J Keckes, V Jacques, S Ravy, S Forest and O Thomas Ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging of weakly scattering specimens Martin Dierolf, Pierre Thibault, Andreas Menzel, Cameron M Kewish, Konstantins Jefimovs, Ilme Schlichting, Konstanze von König, Oliver Bunk and Franz Pfeiffer Dose requirements for resolving a given feature in an object by coherent x-ray diffraction imaging Andreas Schropp and Christian G Schroer FLASH: new opportunities for (time-resolved) coherent imaging of nanostructures R Treusch and J Feldhaus Structure of a single particle from scattering by many particles randomly oriented about an axis: toward structure solution without crystallization? D K Saldin, V L Shneerson, M R Howells, S Marchesini, H N Chapman, M Bogan, D Shapiro, R A Kirian, U Weierstall, K E Schmidt and J C H Spence Analysis of strain and stacking faults in single nanowires using Bragg coherent diffraction imaging V Favre-Nicolin, F Mastropietro, J Eymery, D Camacho, Y M Niquet, B M Borg, M E Messing, L-E Wernersson, R E Algra, E P A M Bakkers, T H Metzger, R Harder and I K Robinson Coherent science at the SwissFEL x-ray laser B D Patterson, R Abela, H-H Braun, U Flechsig, R Ganter, Y Kim, E Kirk, A Oppelt, M Pedrozzi, S Reiche, L Rivkin, Th Schmidt, B Schmitt, V N Strocov, S Tsujino and A F Wrulich Energy recovery linac (ERL) coherent hard x-ray sources Donald H Bilderback, Joel D Brock, Darren S Dale, Kenneth D Finkelstein, Mark A Pfeifer and Sol M Gruner Statistical and coherence properties of radiation from x-ray free-electron lasers E L Saldin, E A Schneidmiller and M V Yurkov Microscopic return point memory in Co

  16. Structure and function of proteins investigated by crystallographic and spectroscopic time-resolved methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwar, Namrta

    Biomolecules play an essential role in performing the necessary functions for life. The goal of this thesis is to contribute to an understanding of how biological systems work on the molecular level. We used two biological systems, beef liver catalase (BLC) and photoactive yellow protein (PYP). BLC is a metalloprotein that protects living cells from the harmful effects of reactive oxygen species by converting H2O2 into water and oxygen. By binding nitric oxide (NO) to the catalase, a complex was generated that mimics the Cat-H2O2 adduct, a crucial intermediate in the reaction promoted by the catalase. The Cat-NO complex is obtained by using a convenient NO generator (1-(N,N-diethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate). Concentrations up to 100˜200 mM are reached by using a specially designed glass cavity. With this glass apparatus and DEANO, sufficient NO occupation is achieved and structure determination of the catalase with NO bound to the heme iron becomes possible. Structural changes upon NO binding are minute. NO has a slightly bent geometry with respect to the heme normal, which results in a substantial overlap of the NO orbitals with the iron-porphyrin molecular orbitals. From the structure of the iron-NO complex, conclusions on the electronic properties of the heme iron can be drawn that ultimately lead to an insight into the catalytic properties of this enzyme. Enzyme kinetics is affected by additional parameters such as temperature and pH. Additionally, in crystallography, the absorbed X-ray dose may impair protein function. To address the effect of these parameters, we performed time-resolved crystallographic experiments on a model system, PYP. By collecting multiple time-series on PYP at increasing X-ray dose levels, we determined a kinetic dose limit up to which kinetically meaningful X-ray data sets can be collected. From this, we conclude that comprehensive time-series spanning up to 12 orders of magnitude in time can be collected from a single PYP

  17. Novel spectroscopic techniques with using soft x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gejo, Tatsuo

    2010-01-01

    Recent progress of experimental techniques related to synchrotron radiation makes possible of detail investigation of molecular dynamics after irradiation of soft X-ray. We introduce several novel spectroscopic techniques with using soft X-ray: Symmetry-resolved zero kinetic energy electron spectroscopy, symmetry-resolved metastable photofragment spectroscopy, soft X-ray emission spectroscopy, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, and time-resolved-fluorescence mass-selected-ion coincidence spectroscopy. We also show new techniques performed by other groups at BL27SU in SPring-8. (author)

  18. Flash X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Eiichi

    2003-01-01

    Generation of quasi-monochromatic X-ray by production of weakly ionized line plasma (flash X-ray), high-speed imaging by the X-ray and high-contrast imaging by the characteristic X-ray absorption are described. The equipment for the X-ray is consisted from the high-voltage power supply and condenser, turbo molecular pump, and plasma X-ray tube. The tube has a long linear anticathode to produce the line plasma and flash X-ray at 20 kA current at maximum. X-ray spectrum is measured by the imaging plate equipped in the computed radiography system after diffracted by a LiF single crystal bender. Cu anticathode generates sharp peaks of K X-ray series. The tissue images are presented for vertebra, rabbit ear and heart, and dog heart by X-ray fluoroscopy with Ce anticathode. Generation of K-orbit characteristic X-ray with extremely low bremsstrahung is to be attempted for medical use. (N.I.)

  19. X-ray holography

    CERN Document Server

    Faigel, G; Belakhovsky, M; Marchesini, S; Bortel, G

    2003-01-01

    In the last decade holographic methods using hard X-rays were developed. They are able to resolve atomic distances, and can give the 3D arrangement of atoms around a selected element. Therefore, hard X-ray holography has potential applications in chemistry, biology and physics. In this article we give a general description of these methods and discuss the developments in the experimental technique. The capabilities of hard X-ray holography are demonstrated by examples.

  20. X-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faigel, G.; Tegze, M.; Belakhovsky, M.; Marchesini, S.; Bortel, G.

    2003-01-01

    In the last decade holographic methods using hard X-rays were developed. They are able to resolve atomic distances, and can give the 3D arrangement of atoms around a selected element. Therefore, hard X-ray holography has potential applications in chemistry, biology and physics. In this article we give a general description of these methods and discuss the developments in the experimental technique. The capabilities of hard X-ray holography are demonstrated by examples

  1. Providing x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallozzi, P.J.; Epstein, H.M.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides an apparatus for providing x-rays to an object that may be in an ordinary environment such as air at approximately atmospheric pressure. The apparatus comprises: means (typically a laser beam) for directing energy onto a target to produce x-rays of a selected spectrum and intensity at the target; a fluid-tight enclosure around the target; means for maintaining the pressure in the first enclosure substantially below atmospheric pressure; a fluid-tight second enclosure adjoining the first enclosure, the common wall portion having an opening large enough to permit x-rays to pass through but small enough to allow the pressure reducing means to evacuate gas from the first enclosure at least as fast as it enters through the opening; the second enclosure filled with a gas that is highly transparent to x-rays; the wall of the second enclosure to which the x-rays travel having a portion that is highly transparent to x-rays (usually a beryllium or plastic foil), so that the object to which the x-rays are to be provided may be located outside the second enclosure and adjacent thereto and thus receive the x-rays substantially unimpeded by air or other intervening matter. The apparatus is particularly suited to obtaining EXAFS (extended x-ray fine structure spectroscopy) data on a material

  2. Gas Jets in Granular Matter : Observed by a High Speed X-ray Tomography System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, X.

    2015-01-01

    High speed X-ray tomography is a promising tool to visualize the time-resolved gas distribution for fluidized beds. The tomography unit at Delft University of Technology is composed of three X-ray tubes and three double-layer detector arrays. The X-ray tubes are places at 120? around the fluidized

  3. CONTINUING THE DEVELOPMENT OF A 100 FEMTOSECOND X-RAY DETECTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenghu Chang

    2005-01-01

    The detector is an x-ray streak camera running in accumulation mode for time resolved x-ray studies at the existing third generation synchrotron facilities and will also be used for the development and applications of the fourth generation x-ray sources. We have made significant progress on both the detector development and its applications at Synchrotron facilities

  4. Extremity x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003461.htm Extremity x-ray To use the sharing features on this page, ... in the body Risks There is low-level radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the ...

  5. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to change into a gown. You may have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny ...

  6. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x- ...

  7. Time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy for the study of solid state reactions: synthesis of nanocrystalline barium titanate and thermal decomposition of ammonium hexachlorometallate compounds; Zeitaufgeloeste Roentgenabsorptionspektroskopie zur Untersuchung von Festkoerperreaktionen: Synthese von nanokristallinem Bariumtitanat und thermische Zersetzung von Ammoniumhexachlorometallat-Verbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumpf, H.

    2001-07-01

    This report presents investigations on the mechanism of two different types of solid-state reactions: At first, barium titanate nanopowders were prepared through a combined polymerization and pyrolysis of a metallo-organic precursor. The mean particle size d{sub m} could be adjusted by choosing appropriate reaction temperatures and tempering atmospheres. In the present in situ study of this particular solid-phase reaction, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the Ti K and Ba L{sub 3}-edges was applied in the preparation route of BaTiO{sub 3} nanopowders. A pronounced distortion of the lattice symmetry was found to occur in very fine BaTiO{sub 3} nanopowders (d{sub m} < 20 nm). Secondly, in situ XANES investigations were carried out at the Cl K, Pd L{sub 3}, Rh L{sub 3}, and Pt L{sub 3}-edges to study the mechanism of the thermal decomposition of ammonium hexachlorometallates. The results exceed structural information obtained by in situ X-ray diffraction methods and thermal analysis. Feff8 multiple scattering simulations have been carried out to disclose new intermediate phases of unknown reference compounds. (orig.)

  8. Synchrotron and neutron techniques in biological crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeley, M P; Cianci, M; Helliwell, J R; Rizkallah, P J

    2004-10-20

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) techniques are continuously pushing the frontiers of wavelength range usage, smaller crystal sample size, larger protein molecular weight and complexity, as well as better diffraction resolution. The new research specialism of probing functional states directly in crystals, via time-resolved Laue and freeze trapping structural studies, has been developed, with a range of examples, based on research stretching over some 20 years. Overall, SR X-ray biological crystallography is complemented by neutron protein crystallographic studies aimed at cases where much more complete hydrogen details are needed involving synergistic developments between SR and neutron Laue methods. A big new potential exists in harnessing genome databases for targeting of new proteins for structural study. Structural examples in this tutorial review illustrate new chemistry learnt from biological macromolecules.

  9. Multigrain crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henning Osholm; Schmidt, Søren; Wright, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    , integration and filtering with emphasis on handling the complications of spot overlap and the need for on-line analysis. The structure solution and refinement steps are performed by conventional single crystal programs. Simulations are used to verify the algorithms and to probe the overall limitations...... of the methodology in terms of number of grains, size of unit cell and direct space resolution. First experimental results in the fields of chemistry, structural biology and time-resolved studies in photochemistry are presented. As an outlook, the concept of TotalCrystallography is introduced, defined...

  10. A prototype chopper for synchrotron time-resolved crystallographic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husheer, S. L. G.; Cole, J. M.; D'Almeida, T.; Teat, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    A mechanical x-ray chopper has been designed to perform microsecond time-resolved crystallographic studies at the DIAMOND synchrotron I19 beamline. It consists of two asymmetric absorbers rotating synchronously at frequencies from 0 to 50 Hz in the same direction around a rotation axis that is parallel to the x-ray beam. The duration of the x-ray pulses produced by the chopper is determined by the relative phase between the two blades, which can be adjusted. The chopper system presented in this paper offers a time resolution suitable for conducting in situ experiments that afford the crystal structure of materials while in their transient (>10 μs) photoactivated excited states.

  11. X-ray generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are described for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly stripped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays

  12. High Brightness, Laser-Driven X-ray Source for Nanoscale Metrology and Femtosecond Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siders, C W; Crane, J K; Semenov, V; Betts, S; Kozioziemski, B; Wharton, K; Wilks, S; Barbee, T; Stuart, B; Kim, D E; An, J; Barty, C

    2007-02-26

    This project developed and demonstrated a new, bright, ultrafast x-ray source based upon laser-driven K-alpha generation, which can produce an x-ray flux 10 to 100 times greater than current microfocus x-ray tubes. The short-pulse (sub-picosecond) duration of this x-ray source also makes it ideal for observing time-resolved dynamics of atomic motion in solids and thin films.

  13. STROBE-X: X-ray timing and spectroscopy on dynamical timescales from microseconds to years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen A. Wilson-Hodge

    Full Text Available The Spectroscopic Time-Resolving Observatory for Broadband Energy X-rays (STROBE-X probes strong gravity for stellar mass to supermassive black holes and ultradense matter with unprecedented effective area, high time-resolution, and good spectral resolution, while providing a powerful time-domain X-ray observatory. Keywords: Missions, X-ray timing, X-ray spectroscopy, Compact objects

  14. Conceptual design of novel IP-conveyor-belt Weissenberg-mode data-collection system with multi-readers for macromolecular crystallography. A comparison between Galaxy and Super Galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakabe, N; Sakabe, K; Sasaki, K

    2004-01-01

    Galaxy is a Weissenberg-type high-speed high-resolution and highly accurate fully automatic data-collection system using two cylindrical IP-cassettes each with a radius of 400 mm and a width of 450 mm. It was originally developed for static three-dimensional analysis using X-ray diffraction and was installed on bending-magnet beamline BL6C at the Photon Factory. It was found, however, that Galaxy was also very useful for time-resolved protein crystallography on a time scale of minutes. This has prompted us to design a new IP-conveyor-belt Weissenberg-mode data-collection system called Super Galaxy for time-resolved crystallography with improved time and crystallographic resolution over that achievable with Galaxy. Super Galaxy was designed with a half-cylinder-shaped cassette with a radius of 420 mm and a width of 690 mm. Using 1.0 A incident X-rays, these dimensions correspond to a maximum resolutions of 0.71 A in the vertical direction and 1.58 A in the horizontal. Upper and lower screens can be used to set the frame size of the recorded image. This function is useful not only to reduce the frame exchange time but also to save disk space on the data server. The use of an IP-conveyor-belt and many IP-readers make Super Galaxy well suited for time-resolved, monochromatic X-ray crystallography at a very intense third-generation SR beamline. Here, Galaxy and a conceptual design for Super Galaxy are described, and their suitability for use as data-collection systems for macromolecular time-resolved monochromatic X-ray crystallography are compared.

  15. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, S.; Stagg, L.; Lambert, T.W.; Griswa, P.J.

    1976-01-01

    A patient support system for X-ray equipment in arteriographic studies of the heart is described in detail. The support system has been designed to overcome many of the practical problems encountered in using previous types of arteriographic X-ray equipment. The support system is capable of horizontal movement and, by a series of shafts attached to the main support system, the X-ray source and image intensifier or detector may be rotated through the same angle. The system is highly flexible and details are given of several possible operational modes. (U.K.)

  16. X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetten, N.R.; Houston, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    An ionization chamber for use in determining the spatial distribution of x-ray photons in tomography systems comprises a plurality of substantially parallel, planar anodes separated by parallel, planar cathodes and enclosed in a gas of high atomic weight at a pressure from approximately 10 atmospheres to approximately 50 atmospheres. The cathode and anode structures comprise metals which are substantially opaque to x-ray radiation and thereby tend to reduce the resolution limiting effects of x-ray fluoresence in the gas. In another embodiment of the invention the anodes comprise parallel conductive bars disposed between two planar cathodes. Guard rings eliminate surface leakage currents between adjacent electrodes. 8 figures

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  18. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a very small ... limitations of Panoramic X-ray? What is Panoramic X-ray? Panoramic radiography , also called panoramic x-ray , is ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  1. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very ... of an abdominal x-ray? What is abdominal x-ray? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  2. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... darker. An X-ray technician takes the X-rays. An X-ray technician in the radiology department of a ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small dose ... limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is ...

  4. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  6. Viscous hydrophilic injection matrices for serial crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Kovácsová

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Serial (femtosecond crystallography at synchrotron and X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL sources distributes the absorbed radiation dose over all crystals used for data collection and therefore allows measurement of radiation damage prone systems, including the use of microcrystals for room-temperature measurements. Serial crystallography relies on fast and efficient exchange of crystals upon X-ray exposure, which can be achieved using a variety of methods, including various injection techniques. The latter vary significantly in their flow rates – gas dynamic virtual nozzle based injectors provide very thin fast-flowing jets, whereas high-viscosity extrusion injectors produce much thicker streams with flow rates two to three orders of magnitude lower. High-viscosity extrusion results in much lower sample consumption, as its sample delivery speed is commensurate both with typical XFEL repetition rates and with data acquisition rates at synchrotron sources. An obvious viscous injection medium is lipidic cubic phase (LCP as it is used for in meso membrane protein crystallization. However, LCP has limited compatibility with many crystallization conditions. While a few other viscous media have been described in the literature, there is an ongoing need to identify additional injection media for crystal embedding. Critical attributes are reliable injection properties and a broad chemical compatibility to accommodate samples as heterogeneous and sensitive as protein crystals. Here, the use of two novel hydrogels as viscous injection matrices is described, namely sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and the thermo-reversible block polymer Pluronic F-127. Both are compatible with various crystallization conditions and yield acceptable X-ray background. The stability and velocity of the extruded stream were also analysed and the dependence of the stream velocity on the flow rate was measured. In contrast with previously characterized injection media, both new

  7. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiology and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray ... posted: How to Obtain and Share Your Medical Images Movement Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI ...

  8. X-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    A form of x-ray tube is described which provides satisfactory focussing of the electron beam when the beam extends for several feet from gun to target. Such a tube can be used for computerised tomographic scanning. (UK)

  9. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight February is American Heart Month Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test ... x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used to ...

  10. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Medical Imaging Costs Radiology and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/ ... Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  11. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exams and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the ... chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs ...

  12. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  13. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You ...

  14. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. ...

  15. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used ... diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A ...

  16. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the ... x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs ...

  17. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Spotlight March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  18. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Spotlight March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: How to Obtain and ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  19. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Spotlight March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: Video: The Basketball Game: ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  20. X-Ray Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, David C.

    1998-05-01

    We provide an overview of the status of x-ray laser development worldwide with particular attention given to activities at LLNL. Since the demonstration of x-ray lasing 14 years ago there has been major progress in achieving shorter wavelengths, higher energies per pulse, higher efficiency, shorter pulse durations, etc. Original x-ray lasers used large kJ class lasers to achieve lasing in mid-Z materials with electron collisional pumping in the highly stripped ion being the most successful process for populating the upper-laser state. The two most common electron configurations for these collisional x-ray lasers are Ne-like and Ni-like ions. Through the use of prepulses and short picosecond driving pulses, transient collisional x-ray lasing schemes have been demonstrated using lasers with only a few Joules per pulse. An interesting aspect of these lasers is the time lag in reaching ionization equilibrium helps in obtaining high gain coefficients. A different approach to x-ray lasing is also being studied where lasing occurs in a singly ionized ion following innershell photoionization. The major requirement of the driving laser in this case is an ultrashort pulse duration (rise time to achieve lasing prior to collisional ionization of outershell electrons. In the area of applications, most of the work has been for single pulse experiments such as plasma and biological imaging. However, many of the new x-ray lasers achieve high average power by having a reasonable repetition rate of order 10 Hz and we briefly discuss relevant applications for these x-ray lasers. This work performed under the auspices of US DOE by LLNL under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  1. X-Ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    samples. Another exciting application of microbeam of x-rays is in that of high pressure x-ray diffraction from small samples. Along this line, Yan...will be presented by Jonathan in February at the Physics and Chemistry of Semiconductor Interfaces conference and in March at the American Physical...VUV9 conference this summer. Jeff has also worked on developing software that makes use of the scattering factor tables for both microvax and IBM PC

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray ... extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of knee x-rays. A portable x-ray machine is a compact apparatus that can be taken ... of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes ...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray ( ... leg (shin), ankle or foot. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray is taken with the ... an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath the patient. top of page ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ... Medicine Radiation Safety How to Read Your Radiology Report Images related to X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Sponsored ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  8. High-pressure crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrusiak, A.

    2008-01-01

    The history and development of high-pressure crystallography are briefly described and examples of structural transformations in compressed compounds are given. The review is focused on the diamond-anvil cell, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, the principles of its operation and the impact it has had on high-pressure X-ray diffraction.

  9. A MEMS-based high frequency x-ray chopper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siria, A; Schwartz, W; Chevrier, J [Institut Neel, CNRS-Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Dhez, O; Comin, F [ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Torricelli, G [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-29

    Time-resolved x-ray experiments require intensity modulation at high frequencies (advanced rotating choppers have nowadays reached the kHz range). We here demonstrate that a silicon microlever oscillating at 13 kHz with nanometric amplitude can be used as a high frequency x-ray chopper. We claim that using micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), it will be possible to achieve higher frequencies in excess of hundreds of megahertz. Working at such a frequency can open a wealth of possibilities in chemistry, biology and physics time-resolved experiments.

  10. A MEMS-based high frequency x-ray chopper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siria, A; Dhez, O; Schwartz, W; Torricelli, G; Comin, F; Chevrier, J

    2009-04-29

    Time-resolved x-ray experiments require intensity modulation at high frequencies (advanced rotating choppers have nowadays reached the kHz range). We here demonstrate that a silicon microlever oscillating at 13 kHz with nanometric amplitude can be used as a high frequency x-ray chopper. We claim that using micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), it will be possible to achieve higher frequencies in excess of hundreds of megahertz. Working at such a frequency can open a wealth of possibilities in chemistry, biology and physics time-resolved experiments.

  11. A MEMS-based high frequency x-ray chopper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siria, A; Schwartz, W; Chevrier, J; Dhez, O; Comin, F; Torricelli, G

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved x-ray experiments require intensity modulation at high frequencies (advanced rotating choppers have nowadays reached the kHz range). We here demonstrate that a silicon microlever oscillating at 13 kHz with nanometric amplitude can be used as a high frequency x-ray chopper. We claim that using micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), it will be possible to achieve higher frequencies in excess of hundreds of megahertz. Working at such a frequency can open a wealth of possibilities in chemistry, biology and physics time-resolved experiments.

  12. Time-resolved quantitative phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verano-Braga, Thiago; Schwämmle, Veit; Sylvester, Marc

    2012-01-01

    proteins involved in the Ang-(1-7) signaling, we performed a mass spectrometry-based time-resolved quantitative phosphoproteome study of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) treated with Ang-(1-7). We identified 1288 unique phosphosites on 699 different proteins with 99% certainty of correct peptide...

  13. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Champion, Paul [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Heilweil, Edwin J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Nelson, Keith A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ziegler, Larry [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE's Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all fiveof DOE's grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  14. Structural study of polymers under stretch using a new X-ray TV detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohishi, Yasuo; Uemura, Akio; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki.

    1994-01-01

    Time-resolved synchrotron radiation small angle X-ray scattering experiment to investigate the structural change of polyethylene during stretching have been made by utilizing a new X-ray TV detector installed at the Photon Factory. This X-ray TV detector specially developed for real-time measurements of diffraction patterns employs an X-ray image intensifier with a Be-window of a 150 mm diameter. The TV detector has a sensitivity and a time resolution of 30 frames per second. This capability allows us to observe weak SAXS patterns in a time-resolved mode. (author)

  15. X-Ray Absorption with Transmission X-Ray Microscopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, F.M.F.

    2016-01-01

    In this section we focus on the use of transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) to measure the XAS spectra. In the last decade a range of soft X-ray and hard X-ray TXM microscopes have been developed, allowing the measurement of XAS spectra with 10–100 nm resolution. In the hard X-ray range the TXM

  16. New progress on monolithic X-ray lens in diffraction application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yude; He Yejun; Chen Jun; Luo Ping; Wang Dachun; Yan Yiming

    1999-12-01

    The basic physical properties for monolithic X-ray lens are introduced. The X-ray diffraction for macromolecular crystallography using monolithic X-ray lens were investigated. The experimental results show that in the same X-ray source power the diffracted intensity in the condition with X-ray lens was increased about 7 times, and the resolution was improved by 0.2 x 10 -10 -0.6 x 10 -10 m. The signal to noise ratio was also improved, and the time of measurement was reduced. The X-ray diffraction of Au thin films on the Si(100) single crystal substrates were investigated in a X-ray powder diffractometer. The experimental results show that in the same X-ray source power the diffracted intensity in the condition with X-ray lens was increased about 2 times, and the angular resolution of the diffractometer was enhanced

  17. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacconi, R.; Setti, G.

    1980-01-01

    This book contains the lectures, and the most important seminars held at the NATO meeting on X-Ray astronomy in Erice, July 1979. The meeting was an opportune forum to discuss the results of the first 8-months of operation of the X-ray satellite, HEAO-2 (Einstein Observatory) which was launched at the end of 1978. Besides surveying these results, the meeting covered extragalactic astronomy, including the relevant observations obtained in other portions of the electromagnetic spectrum (ultra-violet, optical, infrared and radio). The discussion on galactic X-ray sources essentially covered classical binaries, globular clusters and bursters and its significance to extragalactic sources and to high energy astrophysics was borne in mind. (orig.)

  18. X-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webley, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    The object of the invention described is to provide an X-ray tube providing a scanned X-ray output which does not require a scanned electron beam. This is obtained by an X-ray tube including an anode which is rotatable about an axis, and a source of a beam of energy, for example an electron beam, arranged to impinge on a surface of the anode to generate X-radiation substantially at the region of incidence on the anode surface. The anode is rotatable about the axis to move the region of incidence over the surface. The anode is so shaped that the rotation causes the region of incidence to move in a predetermined manner relative to fixed parts of the tube so that the generated X-radiation is scanned in a predetermined manner relative to the tube. (UK)

  19. Imaging plate, a new type of x-ray area detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Nobuo; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Miyahara, Junji.

    1986-01-01

    In respective fields of X-ray crystallography, for the purpose of the efficient collection of reciprocal space information, two-dimensional X-ray detectors such as multiwire proportional chambers and X-ray television sets have been used together with conventional X-ray films. X-ray films are characterized by uniform sensitivity and high positional resolution over a wide area, but the sensitivity is low, and the range of action and the linearity of the sensitivity is problematic. They require the development process, accordingly lack promptitude. The MWPCs and X-ray television sets are superior in the sensitivity, its linearity, the range of action and promptitude, but interior in the uniformity and resolution to the films. Imaging plate is a new X-ray area detector developed by Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd., for digital X-ray medical image diagnosis. This detector is superior in all the above mentioned performances, and it seems very useful also for X-ray crystallography. In this paper, the system composed of an imaging plate and its reader is described, and the basic performance as an X-ray area detector and the results of having recorded the diffraction images of protein crystals as the example of applying it to X-ray crystallography are reported. The imaging plate is that the crystalline fluorescent powder of BaFBr doped with Eu 2+ ions is applied on plastic films. (Kako, I.)

  20. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Pelvis KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Ray Exam: Hip Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  1. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Forearm KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  2. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  3. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  4. Thoracic spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  5. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  6. Subluminous X-ray binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armas Padilla, M.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of the first X-ray binary, Scorpius X-1, by Giacconi et al. (1962), marked the birth of X-ray astronomy. Following that discovery, many additional X-ray sources where found with the first generation of X-ray rockets and observatories (e.g., UHURU and Einstein). The short-timescale

  7. X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.; Whetten, N.R.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber for use in determining the spatial distribution of x-ray photons in tomography systems comprises a plurality of substantially parallel, planar anodes separated by parallel, planar cathodes and enclosed in a gas of high atomic weight at a pressure from approximately 10 atmospheres to approximately 50 atmospheres. The cathode and anode structures comprise metals which are substantially opaque to x-ray radiation and thereby tend to reduce the resolution limiting effects of xray fluoresence in the gas. In another embodiment of the invention the anodes comprise parallel conductive bars disposed between two planar cathodes. Guard rings eliminate surface leakage currents between adjacent electrodes

  8. X-ray masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, J.C.; Satchell, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    In semiconductor manufacture, where X-ray irradiation is used, a thin silicon membrane can be used as an X-ray mask. This membrane has areas on which are patterns to define the regions to be irradiated. These regions are of antireflection material. With the thin, in the order of 3 microns, membranes used, fragility is a problem. Hence a number of ribs of silicon are formed integral with the membrane, and which are relatively thick, 5 to 10 microns. The ribs may be formed by localised deeper boron deposition followed by a selective etch. (author)

  9. Flash x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Q.; Pellinen, D.

    1976-01-01

    The complementary techniques of flash x-ray radiography (FXR) and flash x-ray diffraction (FXD) provide access to a unique domain in nondestructive materials testing. FXR is useful in studies of macroscopic properties during extremely short time intervals, and FXD, the newer technique, is used in studies of microscopic properties. Although these techniques are similar in many respects, there are some substantial differences. FXD generally requires low-voltage, line-radiation sources and extremely accurate timing; FXR is usually less demanding. Phenomena which can be profitably studied by FXR often can also be studied by FXD to permit a complete materials characterization

  10. CRL X-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolchevsky, N.N.; Petrov, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    A novel types of X-ray tubes with refractive lenses are proposed. CRL-R X-ray tube consists of Compound Refractive Lens- CRL and Reflection X-ray tube. CRL acts as X-ray window. CRL-T X-ray consists of CRL and Transmission X-ray tube. CRL acts as target for electron beam. CRL refractive lens acts as filter, collimator, waveguide and focusing lens. Properties and construction of the CRL X-ray tube are discussed. (authors)

  11. CRL X-RAY TUBE

    OpenAIRE

    Kolchevsky, N. N.; Petrov, P. V.

    2015-01-01

    A novel types of X-ray tubes with refractive lenses are proposed. CRL-R X-ray tube consists of Compound Refractive Lens- CRL and Reflection X-ray tube. CRL acts as X-ray window. CRL-T X-ray consists of CRL and Transmission X-ray tube. CRL acts as target for electron beam. CRL refractive lens acts as filter, collimator, waveguide and focusing lens. Properties and construction of the CRL X-ray tube are discussed.

  12. X rays and condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daillant, J.

    1997-01-01

    After a historical review of the discovery and study of X rays, the various interaction processes between X rays and matter are described: Thomson scattering, Compton scattering, X-photon absorption through photoelectric effect, and magnetic scattering. X ray sources such as the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are described. The various X-ray applications are presented: imagery such as X tomography, X microscopy, phase contrast; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy; X-ray scattering and diffraction techniques

  13. X-ray beam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koller, T.J.; Randmer, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A method of minimizing the preferential angular absorption of the divergent beam from an X-ray generator is described. The generator consists of an X-ray shielded housing with an X-ray transmissive window symmetrically placed in radial alignment with a focal spot area on a sloped target surface of an X-ray tube in the housing. The X-ray tube may be of the stationary anode type or of the rotating anode type. (U.K.)

  14. Sixa-silicon x-ray array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, I.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: The Spectrum-X-Gamma (SRG) satellite is scheduled for launch in 1995-96. Mission objectives include broad and narrow band imaging spectroscopy over a wide range of energies from the EUV through hard X-rays with an emphasis on studying galactic and extragalactic X-ray sources. Timing and moderate resolution spectroscopy can be performed with the solid state spectrometer SIXA (Silicon X-Ray Array), placed on the focal plane of the SODART telescope with total effective area of 1150 cm 2 at 6 keV (for f = 8 in telescope). The detector consists of 19 circular Si(Li) pixels, each with an active diameter of 9.2 min and thickness of 3 min. A radiative cooler will be used to bring the detector to the proper operating temperature (120-130 K). The energy range 0.5-20 keV is divided into 1024 channels of 20 eV size. Photons can be recorded with 30 μs time resolution and 160-200 eV (1-7 keV) energy resolution. Potential observing programmes (for e.g. time-resolved Iron Kα line spectroscopy) include stellar coronae, cataclysmic variables and X-ray binaries; accretion discs and coronae of neutron stars and black hole candidates; supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei and clusters of galaxies. (author)

  15. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny ...

  16. Singular value decomposition as a tool for background corrections in time-resolved XFEL scattering data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    The development of new X-ray light sources, XFELs, with unprecedented time and brilliance characteristics has led to the availability of very large datasets with high time resolution and superior signal strength. The chaotic nature of the emission processes in such sources as well as entirely nov...... on singular-value decomposition of no-signal subsets of acquired datasets in combination with model inputs and appears generally applicable to time-resolved X-ray diffuse scattering experiments....

  17. Neutron Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatake, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The hydration shells surrounding nucleic acids and hydrogen-bonding networks involving water molecules and nucleic acids are essential interactions for the structural stability and function of nucleic acids. Water molecules in the hydration shells influence various conformations of DNA and RNA by specific hydrogen-bonding networks, which often contribute to the chemical reactivity and molecular recognition of nucleic acids. However, X-ray crystallography could not provide a complete description of structural information with respect to hydrogen bonds. Indeed, X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for determining the locations of water molecules, i.e., the location of the oxygen atom of H2O; however, it is very difficult to determine the orientation of the water molecules, i.e., the orientation of the two hydrogen atoms of H2O, because X-ray scattering from the hydrogen atom is very small.Neutron crystallography is a specialized tool for determining the positions of hydrogen atoms. Neutrons are not diffracted by electrons, but are diffracted by atomic nuclei; accordingly, neutron scattering lengths of hydrogen and its isotopes are comparable to those of non-hydrogen atoms. Therefore, neutron crystallography can determine both of the locations and orientations of water molecules. This chapter describes the current status of neutron nucleic acid crystallographic research as well as the basic principles of neutron diffraction experiments performed on nucleic acid crystals: materials, crystallization, diffraction experiments, and structure determination.

  18. Enzyme reactions and their time resolved measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajdu, Janos

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses experimental strategies in data collection with the Laue method and summarises recent results using synchrotron radiation. Then, an assessment is made of the progress towards time resolved studies with protein crystals and the problems that remain. The paper consists of three parts which respectively describe some aspects of Laue diffraction, recent examples of structural results from Laue diffraction, and kinetic Laue crystallography. In the first part, characteristics of Laue diffraction is discussed first, focusing on the harmonics problems, spatials problem, wavelength normalization, low resolution hole, data completeness, and uneven coverage of reciprocal space. Then, capture of the symmetry unique reflection set is discussed focusing on the effect of wavelength range on the number of reciprocal lattice points occupying diffracting positions, effect of crystal to film distance and the film area and shape on the number of reflections captured, and effect of crystal symmetry on the number of unique reflections within the number of reflections captured. The second part addresses the determination of the structure of turkey egg white lysozyme, and calcium binding in tomato bushy stunt virus. The third part describes the initiation of reactions in enzyme crystals, picosecond Laue diffraction at high energy storage rings, and detectors. (N.K.)

  19. X-ray excited optical luminescence of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestreich, G.J.

    1979-05-01

    X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) coupled with time resolved spectroscopy was employed to analyze polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in n-alkane solvents at 10 K. A pulsed XEOL system which was designed around minicomputer control of a medical x-ray unit was developed. Computer software which generated variable width x-ray pulses, monitored timing reference pulses, controlled data acquisition, and analyzed data was written. Phosphorescence decay constants of several PAHs were determined. Synthetic mixtures of zone refined PAHs were prepared and time resolved with the pulsed XEOL technique. Analytical results obtained from the five component mixtures of PAHs at the part per million level were tabulated. Systematic improvements and further development of the pulsed XEOL method were considered.

  20. Clusters in intense x-ray pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostedt, Christoph

    2012-06-01

    Free-electron lasers can deliver extremely intense, coherent x-ray flashes with femtosecond pulse length, opening the door for imaging single nanoscale objects in a single shot. All matter irradiated by these intense x-ray pulses, however, will be transformed into a highly-excited non-equilibrium plasma within femtoseconds. During the x-ray pulse complex electron dynamics and the onset of atomic disorder will be induced, leading to a time-varying sample. We have performed first experiments about x-ray laser pulse -- cluster interaction with a combined spectroscopy and imaging approach at both, the FLASH free electron laser in Hamburg (Germany) and the LCLS x-ray free-electron laser in Stanford (California). Atomic clusters are ideal for investigating the light - matter interaction because their size can be tuned from the molecular to the bulk regime, thus allowing to distinguish between intra and inter atomic processes. Imaging experiments with xenon clusters show power-density dependent changes in the scattering patterns. Modeling the scattering data indicates that the optical constants of the clusters change during the femtosecond pulse due to the transient creation of high charge states. The results show that ultra fast scattering is a promising approach to study transient states of matter on a femtosecond time scale. Coincident recording of time-of-flight spectra and scattering patterns allows the deconvolution of focal volume and particle size distribution effects. Single-shot single-particle experiments with keV x-rays reveal that for the highest power densities an highly excited and hot cluster plasma is formed for which recombination is suppressed. Time resolved infrared pump -- x-ray probe experiments have started. Here, the clusters are pumped into a nanoplasma state and their time evolution is probed with femtosecond x-ray scattering. The data show strong variations in the scattering patterns stemming from electronic reconfigurations in the cluster

  1. Synthesis, X-ray crystallography, spectroscopic characterization and spectroscopic/electrochemical evidence of formation of phenoxy free radical in active center analogs of galactose oxidase - [Cu(Salgly)H2O] and [Cu(Salphenylalanine)H2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Biva; Medhi, Okhil K.

    2013-03-01

    The formation of phenolate free radical is the factor of high turnover for catalytic activity of galactose oxidase (GO) compared to that by inorganic complexes. A new active center analog of GO, [Cu(II)(Salphenylalanine)H2O] have been synthesized and its single crystal X-ray analysis was done. In aqueous surfactant micellar solution chemical oxidation as well as electrochemical oxidation of structural models of galactose oxidase - [Cu(II)Salgly·H2O] and [Cu(II)(Salphenylalanine)·H2O], have been found to generate free radical originating at the phenolate group. Formation of the free radical have been proved by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, electronic spectroscopy and electrochemistry.

  2. Optoelectronic Picosecond Detection of Synchrotron X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, Stephen M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2017-08-04

    The goal of this research program was to develop a detector that would measure x-ray time profiles with picosecond resolution. This was specifically aimed for use at x-ray synchrotrons, where x-ray pulse profiles have Gaussian time spreads of 50-100 ps (FWHM), so the successful development of such a detector with picosecond resolution would permit x-ray synchrotron studies to break through the pulse width barrier. That is, synchrotron time-resolved studies are currently limited to pump-probe studies that cannot reveal dynamics faster than ~50 ps, whereas the proposed detector would push this into the physically important 1 ps domain. The results of this research effort, described in detail below, are twofold: 1) the original plan to rely on converting electronic signals from a semiconductor sensor into an optical signal proved to be insufficient for generating signals with the necessary time resolution and sensitivity to be widely applicable; and 2) an all-optical method was discovered whereby the x-rays are directly absorbed in an optoelectronic material, lithium tantalate, which can then be probed by laser pulses with the desired picosecond sensitivity for detection of synchrotron x-rays. This research program has also produced new fundamental understanding of the interaction of x-rays and optical lasers in materials that has now created a viable path for true picosecond detection of synchrotron x-rays.

  3. X-ray filter for x-ray powder diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsheimer, John Jay; Conley, Raymond P.; Bouet, Nathalie C. D.; Dooryhee, Eric; Ghose, Sanjit

    2018-01-23

    Technologies are described for apparatus, methods and systems effective for filtering. The filters may comprise a first plate. The first plate may include an x-ray absorbing material and walls defining first slits. The first slits may include arc shaped openings through the first plate. The walls of the first plate may be configured to absorb at least some of first x-rays when the first x-rays are incident on the x-ray absorbing material, and to output second x-rays. The filters may comprise a second plate spaced from the first plate. The second plate may include the x-ray absorbing material and walls defining second slits. The second slits may include arc shaped openings through the second plate. The walls of the second plate may be configured to absorb at least some of second x-rays and to output third x-rays.

  4. X-ray refractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tur'yanskij, A.G.; Pirshin, I.V.

    2001-01-01

    Paper introduces a new circuit of X-ray refractometer to study angular and spectral features of refracted radiation within hard X-ray range. Refractometer incorporates two goniometers, two crystal-analyzers and three radiation detectors. The maximum distance between radiation source focal point and a receiving slit of the second goniometer is equal to 1.4 m. For the first time one obtained refraction patterns of fine-film specimens including C/Si stressed structure. Paper describes a new technique of refractometry via specimen oscillation at fixed position of a detecting device. Paper presents the measurement results of oscillation refraction patterns for specimens of melted quartz and ZnSe single crystal [ru

  5. X-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunsmuir, J.H.; Ferguson, S.R.; D'Amico, K.L.; Stokes, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe the application of a new high-resolution X-ray tomographic microscope to the study of porous media. The microscope was designed to exploit the properties of a synchrotron X-ray source to perform three dimensional tomography on millimeter sized objects with micron resolution and has been used in materials science studies with both synchrotron and conventional and synchrotron sources will be compared. In this work the authors have applied the microscope to measure the three dimensional structure of fused bead packs and berea sandstones with micron resolution and have performed preliminary studies of flow in these media with the microscope operated in a digital subtraction radiography mode. Computer graphics techniques have been applied to the data to visually display the structure of the pore body system. Tomographic imaging after flow experiments should detect the structure of the oil-water interface in the pore network and this work is ongoing

  6. Pink-beam serial crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meents, A; Wiedorn, M O; Srajer, V; Henning, R; Sarrou, I; Bergtholdt, J; Barthelmess, M; Reinke, P Y A; Dierksmeyer, D; Tolstikova, A; Schaible, S; Messerschmidt, M; Ogata, C M; Kissick, D J; Taft, M H; Manstein, D J; Lieske, J; Oberthuer, D; Fischetti, R F; Chapman, H N

    2017-11-03

    Serial X-ray crystallography allows macromolecular structure determination at both X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) and, more recently, synchrotron sources. The time resolution for serial synchrotron crystallography experiments has been limited to millisecond timescales with monochromatic beams. The polychromatic, "pink", beam provides a more than two orders of magnitude increased photon flux and hence allows accessing much shorter timescales in diffraction experiments at synchrotron sources. Here we report the structure determination of two different protein samples by merging pink-beam diffraction patterns from many crystals, each collected with a single 100 ps X-ray pulse exposure per crystal using a setup optimized for very low scattering background. In contrast to experiments with monochromatic radiation, data from only 50 crystals were required to obtain complete datasets. The high quality of the diffraction data highlights the potential of this method for studying irreversible reactions at sub-microsecond timescales using high-brightness X-ray facilities.

  7. X-ray Ordinance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, R.; Zerlett, G.

    1983-01-01

    This commentary, presented as volume 2 of the Deutsches Strahlenschutzrecht (German legislation on radiation protection) deals with the legal provisions of the ordinance on the protection against harmful effects of X-radiation (X-ray Ordinance - RoeV), of March 1, 1973 (announced in BGBl.I, page 173), as amended by the ordinance on the protection against harmful effects of ionizing radiation, of October 13, 1976 (announced in BGBl. I, page 2905). Thus volume 2 completes the task started with volume 1, namely to present a comprehensive view and account of the body of laws governing radiation protection, a task which was thought useful as developments in the FRG led to regulations being split up into the X-ray Ordinance, and the Radiation Protection Ordinance. In order to present a well-balanced commentary on the X-ray Ordinance, it was necessary to discuss the provisions both from the legal and the medical point of view. This edition takes into account the Fourth Public Notice of the BMA (Fed. Min. of Labour and Social Affairs) concerning the implementation of the X-ray Ordinance of January 4, 1982, as well as court decisions and literature published in this field, until September 1982. In addition, the judgment of the Federal Constitutional Court, dated October 19, 1982, concerning the voidness of the law on government liability, and two decisions by the Federal High Court, dated November 23, 1982, concerning the right to have insight into medical reports - of great significance in practice - have been considered. This commentary therefore is up to date with current developments. (orig.) [de

  8. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einstein, J.R.; Wei, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    We have been interested in structural elucidation by x-ray diffraction of compounds of biological interest. Understanding exactly how atoms are arranged in three-dimensional arrays as molecules can help explain the relationship between structure and functions. The species investigated may vary in size and shape; our recent studies included such diverse substances as antischistosomal drugs, a complex of cadmium with nucleic acid base, nitrate salts of adenine, and proteins

  9. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Chuji.

    1980-01-01

    A principal object of the present invention is to provide an X-ray apparatus which is such that the distance between the surface of the patient's table and the floor on which the apparatus is installed is sufficiently small in the horizontal position of the patient's table of the roentgenographical pedestal and that the rotation of the pedestal from the horizontal position to a tilted position and further to the vertical position of the table can be carried out smoothly. (auth)

  10. Producing x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallozzi, P.J.; Epstein, H.M.; Jung, R.G.; Applebaum, D.C.; Fairand, B.P.; Gallagher, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    A method of producing x-rays by directing radiant energy from a laser onto a target is described. Conversion efficiency of at least about 3 percent is obtained by providing the radiant energy in a low-power precursor pulse of approximately uniform effective intensity focused onto the surface of the target for about 1 to 30 nanoseconds so as to generate an expanding unconfined coronal plasma having less than normal solid density throughout and comprising a low-density (underdense) region wherein the plasma frequency is less than the laser radiation frequency and a higher-density (overdense) region wherein the plasma frequency is greater than the laser radiation frequency and, about 1 to 30 nanoseconds after the precursor pulse strikes the target, a higher-power main pulse focused onto the plasma for about 10 -3 to 30 nanoseconds and having such power density and total energy that the radiant energy is absorbed in the underdense region and conducted into the overdense region to heat it and thus to produce x-rays therefrom with the plasma remaining substantially below normal solid density and thus facilitating the substantial emission of x-rays in the form of spectral lines arising from nonequilibrium ionization states

  11. STROBE-X: X-ray timing and spectroscopy on dynamical timescales from microseconds to years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Ray, Paul S.; Gendreau, Keith; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Feroci, Marco; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Brandt, Soren; Hernanz, Margarita; Hui, C. Michelle; Jenke, Peter A.; Maccarone, Thomas; Remillard, Ron; Wood, Kent; Zane, Silvia; Strobe-X Collaboration

    The Spectroscopic Time-Resolving Observatory for Broadband Energy X-rays (STROBE-X) probes strong gravity for stellar mass to supermassive black holes and ultradense matter with unprecedented effective area, high time-resolution, and good spectral resolution, while providing a powerful time-domain X-ray observatory.

  12. Anisotropy enhanced X-ray scattering from solvated transition metal complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biasin, Elisa; van Driel, Tim B.; Levi, Gianluca

    2018-01-01

    Time-resolved X-ray scattering patterns from photoexcited molecules in solution are in many cases anisotropic at the ultrafast time scales accessible at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). This anisotropy arises from the interaction of a linearly polarized UV-Vis pump laser pulse with the sample...

  13. Serial Femtosecond Crystallography Opens New Avenues for Structural Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Jesse; Fromme, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Free electron lasers (FELs) provide X-ray pulses in the femtosecond time domain with up to 1012 higher photon flux than synchrotrons and open new avenues for the determination of difficult to crystallize proteins, like large complexes and human membrane proteins. While the X-ray pulses are so strong that they destroy any solid material, the crystals diffract before they are destroyed. The most successful application of FELs for biology has been the method of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) where nano or microcrystals are delivered to the FEL beam in a stream of their mother liquid at room temperature, which ensures the replenishment of the sample before the next X-ray pulse arrives. New injector technology allows also for the delivery of crystal in lipidic cubic phases or agarose, which reduces the sample amounts for an SFX data set by two orders of magnitude. Time-resolved SFX also allows for analysis of the dynamics of biomolecules, the proof of principle being recently shown for light-induced reactions in photosystem II and photoactive yellow protein. An SFX data sets consist of thousands of single crystal snapshots in random orientations, which can be analyzed now “on the fly” by data analysis programs specifically developed for SFX, but de-novo phasing is still a challenge, that might be overcome by two-color experiments or phasing by shape transforms. PMID:26786767

  14. Resource Letter on Stimulated Inelastic X-ray Scattering at an XFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Bruce D.; /SLAC

    2010-09-02

    At sufficient X-ray intensity, stimulated effects in inelastic scattering will become important. These coherent, non-linear optical phenomena may be used to impulsively produce a high degree of collective excitation in, for example, correlated electron materials, suitable for performing ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy. This Resource Letter collects information on fundamental aspects of stimulated X-ray scattering and evaluates the prospect for successful experiments at a present or future X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facility.

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissue shows up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x- ... x-ray machine is a compact apparatus that can be taken to the patient in a hospital ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were maintained on large film ... assist you in finding the most comfortable position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ... ray examination. X-rays usually have no side effects in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. A bone ... bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no special preparation. You ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can be taken to the patient in a hospital bed or the emergency room. The x-ray ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wrist, arm, elbow, shoulder, spine, pelvis, hip, thigh, knee, leg (shin), ankle or foot. top of page ... the patient standing upright, as in cases of knee x-rays. A portable x-ray machine is ...

  3. X-ray detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The object of the invention (an ionization chamber X-ray detector array for use with high speed computerised tomographic imaging apparatus) is to reduce the time required to produce a tomographic image. The detector array described determines the distribution of X-ray intensities in one or more flat, coplanar X-ray beams. It comprises three flat anode sheets parallel to the X-ray beam, a plurality of rod-like cathodes between the anodes, a detector gas between the electrodes and a means for applying a potential between the electrodes. Each of the X-ray sources is collimated to give a narrow, planar section of X-ray photons. Sets of X-ray sources in the array are pulsed simultaneously to obtain X-ray transmission data for tomographic image reconstruction. (U.K.)

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... image on photographic film or a special detector. Different parts of the body absorb the x-rays ... process is repeated. Two or three images (from different angles) will typically be taken. An x-ray ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were maintained on ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissues around or in bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require ... is placed beneath the patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and ...

  11. Soft X-ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seely, John

    1999-05-20

    The contents of this report cover the following: (1) design of the soft x-ray telescope; (2) fabrication and characterization of the soft x-ray telescope; and (3) experimental implementation at the OMEGA laser facility.

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray technologist if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A bone x-ray is used to: ... and x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for ...

  14. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Mialocq, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the evolution in time of light emitted by a molecular system after a brief photo-excitation. The authors first describe fluorescence from a photo-physical point of view and discuss the characterization of the excited state. Then, they explain some basic notions related to fluorescence characterization (lifetime and decays, quantum efficiency, so on). They present the different experimental methods and techniques currently used to study time-resolved fluorescence. They discuss basic notions of time resolution and spectral reconstruction. They briefly present some conventional methods: intensified Ccd cameras, photo-multipliers and photodiodes associated with a fast oscilloscope, and phase modulation. Other methods and techniques are more precisely presented: time-correlated single photon counting (principle, examples, and fluorescence lifetime imagery), streak camera (principle, examples), and optical methods like the Kerr optical effect (principle and examples) and fluorescence up-conversion (principle and theoretical considerations, examples of application)

  15. Filming Femtosecond Molecular Movies with X-ray Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Kasper Skov

    This thesis describes the investigation of time-resolved phenomena using X-ray techniques, and in particular the new possibilities and challenges arising from the application of these techniques on the femtosecond time-scale. The thesis will review the processes following laser excitation...... of molecular species in solution, describing the interplay between electronic and structural dynamics, as well as the role of the solvent. This will be followed by an introduction of the three X-ray techniques used in this work, and it will be shown how the application of these techniques in a laser pump / X-ray...... probe framework can help elucidate the excited state dynamics. The theoretical information content of the X-ray techniques will be discussed, as well as the practical experimental considerations for their implementation. This is done in order to demonstrate the potential increase in information content...

  16. X-ray vision of fuel sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.

    2005-01-01

    With brilliant synchrotron X-ray sources, microsecond time-resolved synchrotron X-ray radiography and tomography have been used to elucidate the detailed three-dimensional structure and dynamics of high-pressure high-speed fuel sprays in the near-nozzle region. The measurement allows quantitative determination of the fuel distribution in the optically impenetrable region owing to the multiple scattering of visible light by small atomized fuel droplets surrounding the jet. X-radiographs of the jet-induced shock waves prove that the fuel jets become supersonic under appropriate injection conditions and that the quantitative analysis of the thermodynamic properties of the shock waves can also be derived from the most direct measurement. In other situations where extremely axial-asymmetric sprays are encountered, mass deconvolution and cross-sectional fuel distribution models can be computed based on the monochromatic and time-resolved X-radiographic images collected from various rotational orientations of the sprays. Such quantitative analysis reveals the never-before-reported characteristics and most detailed near-nozzle mass distribution of highly transient fuel sprays

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... used for bone x-rays consists of an x-ray tube suspended over a table on which the patient ... a hospital bed or the emergency room. The x-ray tube is connected to a flexible arm that is ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for bone x-rays consists of ... and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely available in emergency ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... X-rays are a form of radiation like light or radio waves. X-rays pass through most objects, including the body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small ...

  20. Tunable X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, James R [Williamsburg, VA

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  1. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Ankle What's in this article? What It Is Why ... You Have Questions Print What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  2. Special issue on Chemical Crystallography Editorial

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laue was awarded Nobel prize in. 1914. The very next year's Nobel prize in physics was shared by the father-son duo, namely William Henry Bragg and William Lawrence Bragg, for analysis of crystal structures using X-rays. X-ray crystallography has since become a subject that is deeply distributed in several disciplines.

  3. Improved selectivity for Pb(II) by sulfur, selenium and tellurium analogues of 1,8-anthraquinone-18-crown-5: synthesis, spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and computational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, Kadarkaraisamy; Alaparthi, Madhubabu; Hoffman, Mariah; Rama, Myriam Alcantar; Balasubramanian, Vinothini; John, Danielle M; Sykes, Andrew G

    2015-07-14

    We report here a series of heteroatom-substituted macrocycles containing an anthraquinone moiety as a fluorescent signaling unit and a cyclic polyheteroether chain as the receptor. Sulfur, selenium, and tellurium derivatives of 1,8-anthraquinone-18-crown-5 (1) were synthesized by reacting sodium sulfide (Na2S), sodium selenide (Na2Se) and sodium telluride (Na2Te) with 1,8-bis(2-bromoethylethyleneoxy)anthracene-9,10-dione in a 1 : 1 ratio. The optical properties of the new compounds are examined and the sulfur and selenium analogues produce an intense green emission enhancement upon association with Pb(II) in acetonitrile. Selectivity for Pb(II) is markedly improved as compared to the oxygen analogue 1 which was also competitive for Ca(II) ion. UV-Visible and luminescence titrations reveal that 2 and 3 form 1 : 1 complexes with Pb(II), confirmed by single-crystal X-ray studies where Pb(II) is complexed within the macrocycle through coordinate covalent bonds to neighboring carbonyl, ether and heteroether donor atoms. Cyclic voltammetry of 2-8 showed classical, irreversible oxidation potentials for sulfur, selenium and tellurium heteroethers in addition to two one-electron reductions for the anthraquinone carbonyl groups. DFT calculations were also conducted on 1, 2, 3, 6, 6 + Pb(II) and 6 + Mg(II) to determine the trend in energies of the HOMO and the LUMO levels along the series.

  4. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, J.L. de.

    1976-01-01

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of literature on X-ray diffraction begins with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips' organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. This is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is divided according to the equipment (cameras, diffractometers, monochromators) and its applications. The applications are subdivided into sections for high/low temperature and pressure, effects due to the equipment, small angle scattering and a part for stress, texture and phase analyses of metals and quantitative analysis of minerals

  5. Obstetric X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mwachi, M.K.

    2006-01-01

    Radiography of the pelvis should never be taken to diagnose early pregnancy, because of potential hazards of radiation damage to the growing foetus. the only indication occurs in the last week of pregnancy (37 weeks). Obstetric X-ray will help you answer like confirmation of malposition,multiple pregnancies; fetal abnormalities e.g. hydrocephalus, foetal disposition. The choice of radiographic projection will help give foetal presentation, disposition as well as foetal maturity. The search pattern helps you determine maternal and spine deformity, foetal spine and head , foetal presentation and any other anomalies

  6. Miniature X-Ray Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearman, Gregory H.

    1995-01-01

    Miniature x-ray tubes proposed for use in portable instruments used to analyze minerals. Electrons from field emitter (instead of thermionic emitter) accelerated to target to generate x-rays. Fabricated from silicon wafers, micromachined field emitters (MFEs) not subject to breakage or restrictions on lifetimes, and tolerate vacuums that filaments cannot. Miniature x-ray tubes very robust, immune to shock and vibration, and permanently sealed with getter for continued pumping. Combined with solid-state x-ray detectors for analysis of x-ray fluorescence.

  7. Ultrafast, laser-based, x-ray science: the dawn of atomic-scale cinematography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, C.P.J. [University of California, Department of Applied Mechanics and Engineering Science, Urey Hall, Mali Code 0339, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    The characteristics of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification systems are reviewed. Application of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification to the generation of femtosecond, incoherent, 8-keV line radiation is outlined and the use of femtosecond laser-based, x-rays for novel time-resolved diffraction studies of crystalline dynamics with sub-picosecond temporal resolution and sub-picometer spatial resolution is reviewed in detail. Possible extensions of laser-based, x-ray technology and evaluation of alternative x-ray approaches for time-resolved studies of the atomic scale dynamics are given. (author)

  8. Soft x-ray lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, D.L.; Rosen, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    One of the elusive dreams of laser physicists has been the development of an x-ray laser. After 25 years of waiting, the x-ray laser has at last entered the scientific scene, although those now in operation are still laboratory prototypes. They produce soft x rays down to about five nanometers. X-ray lasers retain the usual characteristics of their optical counterparts: a very tight beam, spatial and temporal coherence, and extreme brightness. Present x-ray lasers are nearly 100 times brighter that the next most powerful x-ray source in the world: the electron synchrotron. Although Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is widely known for its hard-x-ray laser program which has potential applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative, the soft x-ray lasers have no direct military applications. These lasers, and the scientific tools that result from their development, may one day have a place in the design and diagnosis of both laser fusion and hard x-ray lasers. The soft x-ray lasers now in operation at the LLNL have shown great promise but are still in the primitive state. Once x-ray lasers become reliable, efficient, and economical, they will have several important applications. Chief among them might be the creation of holograms of microscopic biological structures too small to be investigated with visible light. 5 figs

  9. X-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayo, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    An x-ray tube in which the x-ray origin is scanned on a circle around the patient, comprises a ring-shaped anode, an electron beam travelling along a circular path being deflected onto the anode at the desired positions. The electron beam path may be in a plane parallel to the anode and perhaps at the same radius. It may be in the same plane as a transmission target/anode and at a greater radius. The anode should extend over at least 180 0 although it may extend to 360 0 . Electrostatic means may be provided to constrain the beam to the circular path and further electrostatic means deflect it to the anode of the beam and ensure it is focused at the point of incidence. Collimators provide a planar fan-shaped beam and the anode may be shaped to attenuate side lobes of the radiation. Electrode collects electrons not deflected. The focal regions may be adjacent or otherwise. Coils may provide periodic focusing to overcome space charge dispersion and dynamic adjustment of the focusing before deflection ensures focusing at target incidence. Focusing may be absent near the deflection region, and current in the coil section near the focal region should be zero. (author)

  10. Locating and Visualizing Crystals for X-Ray Diffraction Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Michael; Kissick, David J; Ogata, Craig M

    2017-01-01

    Macromolecular crystallography has advanced from using macroscopic crystals, which might be >1 mm on a side, to crystals that are essentially invisible to the naked eye, or even under a standard laboratory microscope. As crystallography requires recognizing crystals when they are produced, and then placing them in an X-ray, electron, or neutron beam, this provides challenges, particularly in the case of advanced X-ray sources, where beams have very small cross sections and crystals may be vanishingly small. Methods for visualizing crystals are reviewed here, and examples of different types of cases are presented, including: standard crystals, crystals grown in mesophase, in situ crystallography, and crystals grown for X-ray Free Electron Laser or Micro Electron Diffraction experiments. As most techniques have limitations, it is desirable to have a range of complementary techniques available to identify and locate crystals. Ideally, a given technique should not cause sample damage, but sometimes it is necessary to use techniques where damage can only be minimized. For extreme circumstances, the act of probing location may be coincident with collecting X-ray diffraction data. Future challenges and directions are also discussed.

  11. X-ray Crystal Structure and Time-resolved Spectroscopy of the Blue Carotenoid Violerythrin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polívka, Tomáš; Frank, H.A.; Enriquez, M.M.; Niedzwiedzki, D.M.; Liaaen-Jensen, S.; Hemming, J.; Helliwell, J.R.; Helliwell, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 26 (2010), s. 8760-8769 ISSN 1520-6106 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : carotenoids * excited states * spectroscopy Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.603, year: 2010

  12. X-Pinch And Its Applications In X-ray Radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Xiaobing; Wang Xinxin; Liu Rui; Zhao Tong; Zeng Naigong; Zhao Yongchao; Du Yanqiang

    2009-01-01

    An X-pinch device and the related diagnostics of x-ray emission from X-pinch were briefly described. The time-resolved x-ray measurements with photoconducting diodes show that the x-ray pulse usually consists of two subnanosecond peaks with a time interval of about 0.5 ns. Being consistent with these two peaks of the x-ray pulse, two point x-ray sources of size ranging from 100 μm to 5 μm and depending on cut-off x-ray photon energy were usually observed on the pinhole pictures. The x-pinch was used as x-ray source for backlighting of the electrical explosion of single wire and the evolution of X-pinch, and for phase-contrast imaging of soft biological objects such as a small shrimp and a mosquito.

  13. Serial Femtosecond Crystallography and Ultrafast Absorption Spectroscopy of the Photoswitchable Fluorescent Protein IrisFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Sliwa, Michel; Gallat, François-Xavier; Sugahara, Michihiro; Guillon, Virginia; Schirò, Giorgio; Coquelle, Nicolas; Woodhouse, Joyce; Roux, Laure; Gotthard, Guillaume; Royant, Antoine; Uriarte, Lucas Martinez; Ruckebusch, Cyril; Joti, Yasumasa; Byrdin, Martin; Mizohata, Eiichi; Nango, Eriko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Adam, Virgile; Cammarata, Marco; Schlichting, Ilme; Bourgeois, Dominique; Weik, Martin

    2016-03-03

    Reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins find growing applications in cell biology, yet mechanistic details, in particular on the ultrafast photochemical time scale, remain unknown. We employed time-resolved pump-probe absorption spectroscopy on the reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein IrisFP in solution to study photoswitching from the nonfluorescent (off) to the fluorescent (on) state. Evidence is provided for the existence of several intermediate states on the pico- and microsecond time scales that are attributed to chromophore isomerization and proton transfer, respectively. Kinetic modeling favors a sequential mechanism with the existence of two excited state intermediates with lifetimes of 2 and 15 ps, the second of which controls the photoswitching quantum yield. In order to support that IrisFP is suited for time-resolved experiments aiming at a structural characterization of these ps intermediates, we used serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free electron laser and solved the structure of IrisFP in its on state. Sample consumption was minimized by embedding crystals in mineral grease, in which they remain photoswitchable. Our spectroscopic and structural results pave the way for time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography aiming at characterizing the structure of ultrafast intermediates in reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins.

  14. Time-resolved PHERMEX image restorations constrained with an additional multiply-exposed image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, R.P.; Breedlove, J.R. Jr.; Trussell, H.J.

    1978-06-01

    There are a number of possible industrial and scientific applications of nanosecond cineradiographs. Although the technology exists to produce closely spaced pulses of x rays for this application, the quality of the time-resolved radiographs is severely limited. The limitations arise from the necessity of using a fluorescent screen to convert the transmitted x rays to light and then using electro-optical imaging systems to gate and to record the images with conventional high-speed cameras. It has been proposed that, in addition to the time-resolved images, a conventional multiply exposed radiograph be obtained. This report uses both PHERMEX and conventional photographic simulations to demonstrate that the additional information supplied by the multiply exposed radiograph can be used to improve the quality of digital image restorations of the time-resolved pictures over what could be achieved with the degraded images alone

  15. X-ray table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, J.R.; Otto, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    An X-ray radiographic or fluoroscopic table is described which includes a film holder with a frame attached to a cable running over end pulleys for positioning the holder longitudinally as desired under the table top. The holder has a front opening to receive a cassette-supporting tray which can be slid out on tracks to change the cassette. A reed switch on the frame is opened by a permanent magnet on the tray only when the tray is half-way out. When the switch is closed, an electromagnet locks the pulley and the holder in place. The holder is thus automatically locked in place not only during exposure (tray in) but when the tray is out for changing the cassette. To re-position the holder, the operator pulls the tray half-out and, using the tray itself, pushes the holder along the table, the holder being counterbalanced by a weight. (author)

  16. X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmayne, I.G.B.

    1988-01-01

    The patent concerns a warning and protection system for mobile x-ray equipment used for 'on site' radiography, so that workers in the vicinity of such a working unit can be alerted to its presence. The invention is a local repeater warning system which gives a preliminary warning that energisation of the tubehead is imminent, as well as a switch near the tubehead to abort or inhibit energisation. The latter switch allows personnel caught in the vicinity of the tubehead to prevent energisation. The preliminary warning may be flashing lamps or by a klaxon. The control unit for the equipment may include a monitoring circuit to detect failure of the warning light or klaxon. (U.K.)

  17. X-ray equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmayne, I.G.B.

    1988-01-06

    The patent concerns a warning and protection system for mobile x-ray equipment used for 'on site' radiography, so that workers in the vicinity of such a working unit can be alerted to its presence. The invention is a local repeater warning system which gives a preliminary warning that energisation of the tubehead is imminent, as well as a switch near the tubehead to abort or inhibit energisation. The latter switch allows personnel caught in the vicinity of the tubehead to prevent energisation. The preliminary warning may be flashing lamps or by a klaxon. The control unit for the equipment may include a monitoring circuit to detect failure of the warning light or klaxon. (U.K.).

  18. X-ray instrumentation in astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuhlane, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of a conference devoted to x-ray instrumentation in astronomy. Special sections are: AXAF X-Ray Optical Systems; Specialized X-Ray Systems; X-Ray Optical Systems I; X-Ray Optical Systems II; Gas Filled X-Ray Detectors II; The NASA Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility; X-Ray and EUV Spectrometers; Microchannel Plates; and Solid State Detectors

  19. X-Ray Lasers 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, Sergei; Daido, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yoshiaki

    2018-01-01

    These proceedings comprise a selection of invited and contributed papers presented at the 15th International Conference on X-Ray Lasers (ICXRL 2016), held at the Nara Kasugano International Forum, Japan, from May 22 to 27, 2016. This conference was part of an ongoing series dedicated to recent developments in the science and technology of x-ray lasers and other coherent x-ray sources with additional focus on supporting technologies, instrumentation and applications.   The book showcases recent advances in the generation of intense, coherent x-rays, the development of practical devices and their applications across a wide variety of fields. It also discusses emerging topics such as plasma-based x-ray lasers, 4th generation accelerator-based sources and higher harmonic generations, as well as other x-ray generation schemes.

  20. Neutron and X-ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carini, Gabriella [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Denes, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gruener, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Lessner, Elianne [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science Office of Basic Energy Sciences

    2012-08-01

    (and two computing hurdles that result from the corresponding increase in data volume) for the detector community to overcome in order to realize the full potential of BES neutron and X-ray facilities. Resolving these detector impediments will improve scientific productivity both by enabling new types of experiments, which will expand the scientific breadth at the X-ray and neutron facilities, and by potentially reducing the beam time required for a given experiment. These research priorities are summarized in the table below. Note that multiple, simultaneous detector improvements are often required to take full advantage of brighter sources. High-efficiency hard X-ray sensors: The fraction of incident particles that are actually detected defines detector efficiency. Silicon, the most common direct-detection X-ray sensor material, is (for typical sensor thicknesses) 100% efficient at 8 keV, 25%efficient at 20 keV, and only 3% efficient at 50 keV. Other materials are needed for hard X-rays. Replacement for 3He for neutron detectors: 3He has long been the neutron detection medium of choice because of its high cross section over a wide neutron energy range for the reaction 3He + n —> 3H + 1H + 0.764 MeV. 3He stockpiles are rapidly dwindling, and what is available can be had only at prohibitively high prices. Doped scintillators hold promise as ways to capture neutrons and convert them into light, although work is needed on brighter, more efficient scintillator solutions. Neutron detectors also require advances in speed and resolution. Fast-framing X-ray detectors: Today’s brighter X-ray sources make time-resolved studies possible. For example, hybrid X-ray pixel detectors, initially developed for particle physics, are becoming fairly mature X-ray detectors, with considerable development in Europe. To truly enable time-resolved studies, higher frame rates and dynamic range are required, and smaller pixel sizes are desirable. High-speed spectroscopic X-ray detectors

  1. Structure and dynamics in liquid water from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernet, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen K-edge x-ray absorption spectra of water are discussed. The spectra of gas-phase water, liquid water and ice illustrate the sensitivity of oxygen K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy to hydrogen bonding in water. Transmission mode spectra of amorphous and crystalline ice are compared to x-ray Raman spectra of ice. The good agreement consolidates the experimental spectrum of crystalline ice and represents an incentive for theoretical calculations of the oxygen K-edge absorption spectrum of crystalline ice. Time-resolved infrared-pump and x-ray absorption probe results are finally discussed in the light of this structural interpretation.

  2. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  3. X-ray filtration apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to an X-ray shielding support device. In spite of considerable development in X-ray taking techniques, a need still exists for effective shielding, inter alia, to compensate for variations in the thickness, density and the absorption properties of the object being studied. By appropriate shielding, the X-ray image produced is of sufficient detail, contrast and intensity over its entire area to constitute a useful diagnostic aid. It is also desirable to subject the patient to the smallest possible X-ray dosage. 4 figs

  4. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  5. X-ray emission spectroscopy. X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despujols, J.

    1992-01-01

    Principles of X-ray emission spectrometry are first recalled, then wave-length dispersive and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer are described. They are essentially designed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of elements (Z>10). Sample preparation, calibration, corrections, interferences, accuracy are reviewed. Examples of use in different industries are given. (71 refs.)

  6. Femtosecond profiling of shaped x-ray pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, M. C.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J.; Bromberger, H.; Coffee, R.; Costello, J. T.; DiMauro, L. F.; Ding, Y.; Doumy, G.; Helml, W.; Ilchen, M.; Kienberger, R.; Lee, S.; Maier, A. R.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Messerschmidt, M.; Schorb, S.; Schweinberger, W.; Zhang, K.; Cavalieri, A. L.

    2018-03-01

    Arbitrary manipulation of the temporal and spectral properties of x-ray pulses at free-electron lasers would revolutionize many experimental applications. At the Linac Coherent Light Source at Stanford National Accelerator Laboratory, the momentum phase-space of the free-electron laser driving electron bunch can be tuned to emit a pair of x-ray pulses with independently variable photon energy and femtosecond delay. However, while accelerator parameters can easily be adjusted to tune the electron bunch phase-space, the final impact of these actuators on the x-ray pulse cannot be predicted with sufficient precision. Furthermore, shot-to-shot instabilities that distort the pulse shape unpredictably cannot be fully suppressed. Therefore, the ability to directly characterize the x-rays is essential to ensure precise and consistent control. In this work, we have generated x-ray pulse pairs via electron bunch shaping and characterized them on a single-shot basis with femtosecond resolution through time-resolved photoelectron streaking spectroscopy. This achievement completes an important step toward future x-ray pulse shaping techniques.

  7. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature using an X-ray free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirci, Hasan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Shoeman, Robert L.; Botha, Sabine; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Doak, R. Bruce; Gati, Cornelius; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Jogl, Gerwald; Dahlberg, Albert E.; Gregory, Steven T.; Bogan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Serial femtosecond X-ray (SFX) diffraction extending beyond 6 Å resolution using T. thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit crystals is reported. High-resolution ribosome structures determined by X-ray crystallography have provided important insights into the mechanism of translation. Such studies have thus far relied on large ribosome crystals kept at cryogenic temperatures to reduce radiation damage. Here, the application of serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain diffraction data from ribosome microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature is described. 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals diffracted to beyond 6 Å resolution, demonstrating the feasibility of using SFX for ribosome structural studies. The ability to collect diffraction data at near-physiological temperatures promises to provide fundamental insights into the structural dynamics of the ribosome and its functional complexes

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a large photographic negative). Today, most images are digital files that are stored electronically. These stored images are easily accessible and are frequently compared to current x-ray images for diagnosis and ... the x-ray film holder or digital recording plate under the table in the area ...

  9. Chandra's X-ray Vision

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1999-07-23

    Jul 23, 1999 ... GENERAL I ARTICLE. Chandra's X-ray Vision. K P Singh. Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) is a scientific satellite (moon/ chandra), named after the Indian-born Nobel laureate. Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar - one of the foremost astro- physicists of the twentieth century and popularly known as. Chandra.

  10. Traditional x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Methods of imaging x-rays, with particular reference to medicine, are reviewed. The history and nature of x-rays, their production and spectra, contrast, shapes and fine structure, image transducers, including fluorescent screens, radiography, fluoroscopy, and image intensifiers, image detection, perception and enhancement and clinical applications are considered. (U.K.)

  11. X-ray based extensometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, E. H.; Pease, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    A totally new method of extensometry using an X-ray beam was proposed. The intent of the method is to provide a non-contacting technique that is immune to problems associated with density variations in gaseous environments that plague optical methods. X-rays are virtually unrefractable even by solids. The new method utilizes X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence or X-ray induced optical fluorescence of targets that have melting temperatures of over 3000 F. Many different variations of the basic approaches are possible. In the year completed, preliminary experiments were completed which strongly suggest that the method is feasible. The X-ray induced optical fluorescence method appears to be limited to temperatures below roughly 1600 F because of the overwhelming thermal optical radiation. The X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence scheme appears feasible up to very high temperatures. In this system there will be an unknown tradeoff between frequency response, cost, and accuracy. The exact tradeoff can only be estimated. It appears that for thermomechanical tests with cycle times on the order of minutes a very reasonable system may be feasible. The intended applications involve very high temperatures in both materials testing and monitoring component testing. Gas turbine engines, rocket engines, and hypersonic vehicles (NASP) all involve measurement needs that could partially be met by the proposed technology.

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different parts of the body absorb the x-rays in ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. ...

  14. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attekum, P.M.T.M. van.

    1979-01-01

    The methods and results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in the study of plasmons, alloys and gold compounds are discussed. After a comprehensive introduction, seven papers by the author, previously published elsewhere, are reprinted and these cover a wide range of the uses of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. (W.D.L.)

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very ... they provide little information about muscles, tendons or joints. An MRI may ...

  16. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    Intra-oral dental X-ray apparatus for panoramic radiography is described in detail. It comprises a tubular target carrier supporting at its distal end a target with an inclined forward face. Image definition is improved by positioning in the path of the X-rays a window of X-ray transmitting ceramic material, e.g. 90% oxide of Be, or Al, 7% Si0 2 . The target carrier forms a probe which can be positioned in the patient's mouth. X-rays are directed forwardly and laterally of the target to an X-ray film positioned externally. The probe is provided with a detachable sleeve having V-form arms of X-ray opaque material which serve to depress the tongue out of the radiation path and also shield the roof of the mouth and other regions of the head from the X-ray pattern. A cylindrical lead shield defines the X-ray beam angle. (author)

  17. X-ray imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    A novel, high-speed apparatus for use in X-ray computerised tomography is described in detail. It consists of a semi-circular array of X-ray sources, collimators and an ion chamber array for detection of the X-rays. The X-ray sources may be pulsed in salvos such that the corresponding detectors in the array are only illuminated by one source. The use of computer controlled salvos speeds up the image processing by at least a factor of two. The ion chamber array is designed to have a constant detection efficiency for varying angles of X-ray incidence. A detailed description of the detector construction and suggested gaseous fillings are given. It is claimed that the present tomographic system allows fast and accurate imaging of internal body organs and is insensitive to the blurring effects which motion of these organs tends to produce. (UK)

  18. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  19. Accurate determination of segmented X-ray detector geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yefanov, Oleksandr; Mariani, Valerio; Gati, Cornelius; White, Thomas A.; Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in X-ray detector technology have resulted in the introduction of segmented detectors composed of many small detector modules tiled together to cover a large detection area. Due to mechanical tolerances and the desire to be able to change the module layout to suit the needs of different experiments, the pixels on each module might not align perfectly on a regular grid. Several detectors are designed to permit detector sub-regions (or modules) to be moved relative to each other for different experiments. Accurate determination of the location of detector elements relative to the beam-sample interaction point is critical for many types of experiment, including X-ray crystallography, coherent diffractive imaging (CDI), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and spectroscopy. For detectors with moveable modules, the relative positions of pixels are no longer fixed, necessitating the development of a simple procedure to calibrate detector geometry after reconfiguration. We describe a simple and robust method for determining the geometry of segmented X-ray detectors using measurements obtained by serial crystallography. By comparing the location of observed Bragg peaks to the spot locations predicted from the crystal indexing procedure, the position, rotation and distance of each module relative to the interaction region can be refined. We show that the refined detector geometry greatly improves the results of experiments. PMID:26561117

  20. Time resolved spectroscopic studies on some nanophosphors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. Time resolved spectroscopy is an important tool for studying photophysical processes in phosphors. Present work investigates the steady state and time resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopic characteristics of ZnS, ZnO and (Zn, Mg)O nanophosphors both in powder as well as thin film form.