WorldWideScience

Sample records for time-lapse video recording

  1. Time-lapse videos for physics education: specific examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Michael; Möllmann, Klaus-Peter

    2018-05-01

    There are many physics experiments with long time scales such that they are usually neither shown in the physics class room nor in student labs. However, they can be easily recorded with time-lapse cameras and the respective time-lapse videos allow qualitative and/or quantitative analysis of the underlying physics. Here, we present some examples from thermal physics (melting, evaporation, cooling) as well as diffusion processes

  2. Network Analysis of Time-Lapse Microscopy Recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik eSmedler

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multicellular organisms rely on intercellular communication to regulate important cellular processes critical to life. To further our understanding of those processes there is a need to scrutinize dynamical signaling events and their functions in both cells and organisms. Here, we report a method and provide MATLAB code that analyzes time-lapse microscopy recordings to identify and characterize network structures within large cell populations, such as interconnected neurons. The approach is demonstrated using intracellular calcium (Ca2+ recordings in neural progenitors and cardiac myocytes, but could be applied to a wide variety of biosensors employed in diverse cell types and organisms. In this method, network structures are analyzed by applying cross-correlation signal processing and graph theory to single-cell recordings. The goal of the analysis is to determine if the single cell activity constitutes a network of interconnected cells and to decipher the properties of this network. The method can be applied in many fields of biology in which biosensors are used to monitor signaling events in living cells. Analyzing intercellular communication in cell ensembles can reveal essential network structures that provide important biological insights.

  3. Slow speed—fast motion: time-lapse recordings in physics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Michael; Möllmann, Klaus-Peter

    2018-05-01

    Video analysis with a 30 Hz frame rate is the standard tool in physics education. The development of affordable high-speed-cameras has extended the capabilities of the tool for much smaller time scales to the 1 ms range, using frame rates of typically up to 1000 frames s-1, allowing us to study transient physics phenomena happening too fast for the naked eye. Here we want to extend the range of phenomena which may be studied by video analysis in the opposite direction by focusing on much longer time scales ranging from minutes, hours to many days or even months. We discuss this time-lapse method, needed equipment and give a few hints of how to produce respective recordings for two specific experiments.

  4. Gliding motility of Babesia bovis merozoites visualized by time-lapse video microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahito Asada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Babesia bovis is an apicomplexan intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite that induces babesiosis in cattle after transmission by ticks. During specific stages of the apicomplexan parasite lifecycle, such as the sporozoites of Plasmodium falciparum and tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii, host cells are targeted for invasion using a unique, active process termed "gliding motility". However, it is not thoroughly understood how the merozoites of B. bovis target and invade host red blood cells (RBCs, and gliding motility has so far not been observed in the parasite. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gliding motility of B. bovis merozoites was revealed by time-lapse video microscopy. The recorded images revealed that the process included egress of the merozoites from the infected RBC, gliding motility, and subsequent invasion into new RBCs. The gliding motility of B. bovis merozoites was similar to the helical gliding of Toxoplasma tachyzoites. The trails left by the merozoites were detected by indirect immunofluorescence assay using antiserum against B. bovis merozoite surface antigen 1. Inhibition of gliding motility by actin filament polymerization or depolymerization indicated that the gliding motility was driven by actomyosin dependent process. In addition, we revealed the timing of breakdown of the parasitophorous vacuole. Time-lapse image analysis of membrane-stained bovine RBCs showed formation and breakdown of the parasitophorous vacuole within ten minutes of invasion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of the gliding motility of B. bovis. Since merozoites of Plasmodium parasites do not glide on a substrate, the gliding motility of B. bovis merozoites is a notable finding.

  5. Visualizing and quantifying movement from pre-recorded videos: The spectral time-lapse (STL algorithm [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2qo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R Madan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When studying animal behaviour within an open environment, movement-related data are often important for behavioural analyses. Therefore, simple and efficient techniques are needed to present and analyze the data of such movements. However, it is challenging to present both spatial and temporal information of movements within a two-dimensional image representation. To address this challenge, we developed the spectral time-lapse (STL algorithm that re-codes an animal’s position at every time point with a time-specific color, and overlays it with a reference frame of the video, to produce a summary image. We additionally incorporated automated motion tracking, such that the animal’s position can be extracted and summary statistics such as path length and duration can be calculated, as well as instantaneous velocity and acceleration. Here we describe the STL algorithm and offer a freely available MATLAB toolbox that implements the algorithm and allows for a large degree of end-user control and flexibility.

  6. Time-Lapse Video Microscopy for Assessment of EYFP-Parkin Aggregation as a Marker for Cellular Mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sante, Gabriele; Casimiro, Mathew C; Pestell, Timothy G; Pestell, Richard G

    2016-05-04

    Time-lapse video microscopy can be defined as the real time imaging of living cells. This technique relies on the collection of images at different time points. Time intervals can be set through a computer interface that controls the microscope-integrated camera. This kind of microscopy requires both the ability to acquire very rapid events and the signal generated by the observed cellular structure during these events. After the images have been collected, a movie of the entire experiment is assembled to show the dynamic of the molecular events of interest. Time-lapse video microscopy has a broad range of applications in the biomedical research field and is a powerful and unique tool for following the dynamics of the cellular events in real time. Through this technique, we can assess cellular events such as migration, division, signal transduction, growth, and death. Moreover, using fluorescent molecular probes we are able to mark specific molecules, such as DNA, RNA or proteins and follow them through their molecular pathways and functions. Time-lapse video microscopy has multiple advantages, the major one being the ability to collect data at the single-cell level, that make it a unique technology for investigation in the field of cell biology. However, time-lapse video microscopy has limitations that can interfere with the acquisition of high quality images. Images can be compromised by both external factors; temperature fluctuations, vibrations, humidity and internal factors; pH, cell motility. Herein, we describe a protocol for the dynamic acquisition of a specific protein, Parkin, fused with the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) in order to track the selective removal of damaged mitochondria, using a time-lapse video microscopy approach.

  7. A software solution for recording circadian oscillator features in time-lapse live cell microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmon Patrick

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescent and bioluminescent time-lapse microscopy approaches have been successfully used to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying the mammalian circadian oscillator at the single cell level. However, most of the available software and common methods based on intensity-threshold segmentation and frame-to-frame tracking are not applicable in these experiments. This is due to cell movement and dramatic changes in the fluorescent/bioluminescent reporter protein during the circadian cycle, with the lowest expression level very close to the background intensity. At present, the standard approach to analyze data sets obtained from time lapse microscopy is either manual tracking or application of generic image-processing software/dedicated tracking software. To our knowledge, these existing software solutions for manual and automatic tracking have strong limitations in tracking individual cells if their plane shifts. Results In an attempt to improve existing methodology of time-lapse tracking of a large number of moving cells, we have developed a semi-automatic software package. It extracts the trajectory of the cells by tracking theirs displacements, makes the delineation of cell nucleus or whole cell, and finally yields measurements of various features, like reporter protein expression level or cell displacement. As an example, we present here single cell circadian pattern and motility analysis of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts expressing a fluorescent circadian reporter protein. Using Circadian Gene Express plugin, we performed fast and nonbiased analysis of large fluorescent time lapse microscopy datasets. Conclusions Our software solution, Circadian Gene Express (CGE, is easy to use and allows precise and semi-automatic tracking of moving cells over longer period of time. In spite of significant circadian variations in protein expression with extremely low expression levels at the valley phase, CGE allows accurate and

  8. Preliminary observations on polar body extrusion and pronuclear formation in human oocytes using time-lapse video cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, D; Flaherty, S P; Barry, M F; Matthews, C D

    1997-03-01

    In this study, we have used time-lapse video cinematography to study fertilization in 50 human oocytes that had undergone intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Time-lapse recording commenced shortly after ICSI and proceeded for 17-20 h. Oocytes were cultured in an environmental chamber which was maintained under standard culture conditions. Overall, 38 oocytes (76%) were fertilized normally, and the fertilization rate and embryo quality were not significantly different from 487 sibling oocytes cultured in a conventional incubator. Normal fertilization followed a defined course of events, although the timing of these events varied markedly between oocytes. In 35 of the 38 fertilized oocytes (92%), there were circular waves of granulation within the ooplasm which had a periodicity of 20-53 min. The sperm head decondensed during this granulation phase. The second polar body was then extruded, and this was followed by the central formation of the male pronucleus. The female pronucleus formed in the cytoplasm adjacent to the second polar body at the same time as, or slightly after, the male pronucleus, and was subsequently drawn towards the male pronucleus until the two abutted. Both pronuclei then increased in size, the nucleoli moved around within the pronuclei and some nucleoli coalesced. During pronuclear growth, the organelles contracted from the cortex towards the centre of the oocyte, leaving a clear cortical zone. The oocyte decreased in diameter from 112 to 106 microm (P cinematography is an excellent tool for studying fertilization and early embryo development, and have demonstrated that human fertilization comprises numerous complex dynamic events.

  9. Penicillin induced persistence in Chlamydia trachomatis: high quality time lapse video analysis of the developmental cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel J Skilton

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis is a major human pathogen with a unique obligate intracellular developmental cycle that takes place inside a modified cytoplasmic structure known as an inclusion. Following entry into a cell, the infectious elementary body (EB differentiates into a non-infectious replicative form known as a reticulate body (RB. RBs divide by binary fission and at the end of the cycle they redifferentiate into EBs. Treatment of C.trachomatis with penicillin prevents maturation of RBs which survive and enlarge to become aberrant RBs within the inclusion in a non-infective persistent state. Persistently infected individuals may be a reservoir for chlamydial infection. The C.trachomatis genome encodes the enzymes for peptidoglycan (PG biosynthesis but a PG sacculus has never been detected. This coupled to the action of penicillin is known as the chlamydial anomaly. We have applied video microscopy and quantitative DNA assays to the chlamydial developmental cycle to assess the effects of penicillin treatment and establish a framework for investigating penicillin induced chlamydial persistence.Addition of penicillin at the time of cell infection does not prevent uptake and the establishment of an inclusion. EB to RB transition occurs but bacterial cytokinesis is arrested by the second binary fission. RBs continue to enlarge but not divide in the presence of penicillin. The normal developmental cycle can be recovered by the removal of penicillin although the large, aberrant RBs do not revert to the normal smaller size but remain present to the completion of the developmental cycle. Chromosomal and plasmid DNA replication is unaffected by the addition of penicillin but the arrest of bacterial cytokinesis under these conditions results in RBs accumulating multiple copies of the genome.We have applied video time lapse microscopy to the study of the chlamydial developmental cycle. Linked with accurate measures of genome replication this provides a

  10. Optimal Estimation of Diffusion Coefficients from Noisy Time-Lapse-Recorded Single-Particle Trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian Lyngby

    2012-01-01

    Optimal Estimation of Diusion Coecients from Noisy Time-Lapse- Measurements of Single-Particle Trajectories Single-particle tracking techniques allow quantitative measurements of diusion at the single-molecule level. Recorded time-series are mostly short and contain considerable measurement noise....... The standard method for estimating diusion coecients from single-particle trajectories is based on leastsquares tting to the experimentally measured mean square displacements. This method is highly inecient, since it ignores the high correlations inherent in these. We derive the exact maximum likelihood...... parameter values. We extend the methods to particles diusing on a uctuating substrate, e.g., exible or semi exible polymers such as DNA, and show that uctuations induce an important bias in the estimates of diusion coecients if they are not accounted for. We apply the methods to obtain precise estimates...

  11. How to connect time-lapse recorded trajectories of motile microorganisms with dynamical models in continuous time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Li, Liang; Gradinaru, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    We provide a tool for data-driven modeling of motility, data being time-lapse recorded trajectories. Several mathematical properties of a model to be found can be gleaned from appropriate model-independent experimental statistics, if one understands how such statistics are distorted by the finite...... of these effects that are valid for any reasonable model for persistent random motion. Our findings are illustrated with experimental data and Monte Carlo simulations....

  12. Diferentes modelos de video Time-Lapse y su aplicación en las clínicas de reproducción asistida

    OpenAIRE

    Fanjul González, Paula

    2013-01-01

    TFM del Máster de Biología y Tecnología de la Reproducción sobre los distintos modelos de video Time-Lapse que se pueden utilizar para la valoración embrionaria en una clínica de reproducción asistida

  13. Time-lapse video microscopy and image analysis of adherence and growth patterns of Candida albicans strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Gabor; Hennig, Grant W; Petrenyi, Katalin; Kovacs, Laszlo; Pocsi, Istvan; Dombradi, Viktor; Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2014-06-01

    Digital image analysis of high time resolution video microscopy was used to investigate hyphal growth dynamics in different Candida albicans strains. The effects of the quorum sensing molecules tyrosol and farnesol, the deletion of the fungus specific protein phosphatase Z1 CaPPZ1), and the hypha-specific cyclin (HGC1) genes were analyzed by this method. Our system monitored cell growth in a CO2 incubator under near-physiological conditions and measured three major parameters under the following stringent conditions: (a) the time of yeast cell adherence, (b) the time of hyphal outgrowth, and (c) the rate of hyphal growth. This method showed that hyphal extension of wild-type SC5314 cells was accelerated by tyrosol and inhibited by farnesol. Hyphal growth rate was moderately lower in cappz1 and strongly reduced in hgc1 mutants. In addition, tyrosol treatment caused a firm adherence, while farnesol treatment and hgc1 mutation prevented the adherence of yeast cells to the surface of the culture flask. Transition from yeast-to-hyphal state was faster after tyrosol treatment, while it was reduced in farnesol-treated cells as well as in the cappz1 and hgc1 mutants. Our data confirm the notion that the attachment of yeast cells, the yeast-to-hyphal transition, and hyphal growth rate are closely related processes. Time-lapse video microscopy combined with image analysis offers a convenient and reliable method of testing chemicals, including potential drug candidates, and genetic manipulations on the dynamic morphological changes in C. albicans strains.

  14. Macular hole formation, progression, and surgical repair: case series of serial optical coherence tomography and time lapse morphing video study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background To use a new medium to dynamically visualize serial optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans in order to illustrate and elucidate the pathogenesis of idiopathic macular hole formation, progression, and surgical closure. Case Presentations Two patients at the onset of symptoms with early stage macular holes and one patient following repair were followed with serial OCTs. Images centered at the fovea and at the same orientation were digitally exported and morphed into an Audiovisual Interleaving (avi) movie format. Morphing videos from serial OCTs allowed the OCTs to be viewed dynamically. The videos supported anterior-posterior vitreofoveal traction as the initial event in macular hole formation. Progression of the macular hole occurred with increased cystic thickening of the fovea without evidence of further vitreofoveal traction. During cyst formation, the macular hole enlarged as the edges of the hole became elevated from the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with an increase in subretinal fluid. Surgical repair of a macular hole revealed initial closure of the macular hole with subsequent reabsorption of the sub-retinal fluid and restoration of the foveal contour. Conclusions Morphing videos from serial OCTs are a useful tool and helped illustrate and support anterior-posterior vitreofoveal traction with subsequent retinal hydration as the pathogenesis of idiopathic macular holes. PMID:20849638

  15. Significantly improved precision of cell migration analysis in time-lapse video microscopy through use of a fully automated tracking system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seufferlein Thomas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell motility is a critical parameter in many physiological as well as pathophysiological processes. In time-lapse video microscopy, manual cell tracking remains the most common method of analyzing migratory behavior of cell populations. In addition to being labor-intensive, this method is susceptible to user-dependent errors regarding the selection of "representative" subsets of cells and manual determination of precise cell positions. Results We have quantitatively analyzed these error sources, demonstrating that manual cell tracking of pancreatic cancer cells lead to mis-calculation of migration rates of up to 410%. In order to provide for objective measurements of cell migration rates, we have employed multi-target tracking technologies commonly used in radar applications to develop fully automated cell identification and tracking system suitable for high throughput screening of video sequences of unstained living cells. Conclusion We demonstrate that our automatic multi target tracking system identifies cell objects, follows individual cells and computes migration rates with high precision, clearly outperforming manual procedures.

  16. The use of computerized video time lapse to study cell death in rat embryo cells transfected with c-ha-ras or c-myc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrester, H.B.; Vidair, C.A.; Dewey, W.C.; Ling, C.C.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Individual rat embryo fibroblasts that had been transfected with the c-myc (REC:myc) or c-Ha ras (REC:ras) oncogene were followed after irradiation using a computer video time lapse (CVTL) system in order to quantify the lethal events that resulted in loss of clonogenic survival after irradiation. By followed the cells for 2 to 3 generations before irradiation we were able to determine where they were in the cell cycle at the time of irradiation for cell cycle analysis. After irradiation, the individual cells and their progeny were followed in multiple fields for 5-6 days Then, pedigrees for individual irradiated cells were determined by noting the times of divisions fusions, and cell death. After X-irradiation, the clonogenic survival values for these two cell lines are similar. However, by using computerized video time lapse (CVTL) to follow individual cells we found that the loss of clonogenic survival was due to two different processes, cell death and a senescent-like process. The loss of clonogenic survival of x-irradiated (9.5 and 4 Gy) REC:myc cells was attributed almost entirely to the cells dying by apoptosis (∼99 and 90%). In contrast, approximately 60% of the x-irradiated (9.5 Gy) non-clonogenic REC:ras cells died by apoptosis (with a very small amount of necrosis), and the other 40% underwent a senescent-type process in which some of the cells and their progeny stopped dividing but remained as viable cells throughout 140 hours of observation. Both processes usually occurred after the cells had divided and continued to occur in the cells' progeny for up to five divisions after irradiation. The mode of cell death in the progeny of a non-clonogenic cell can be determined only by using CVTL and can not be determined by conventional clonogenic survival experiments. Also, only by following the individual cells and their progeny can the true amount of apoptosis be determined. The cumulative percentage of apoptosis scored in whole populations

  17. Individual cell motility studied by time-lapse video recording: influence of experimental conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, R; Walmod, P S; Berezin, A

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Eukaryotic cell motility plays a key role during development, wound healing, and tumour invasion. Computer-assisted image analysis now makes it a realistic task to quantify individual cell motility of a large number of cells. However, the influence of culture conditions before...... and during measurements has not been investigated systematically. METHODS: We have evaluated intraassay and interassay variations in determinations of cellular speed of fibroblastoid L929 cells and investigated the effects of a series of physical and biological parameters on the motile behavior of this cell...... shown to affect cellular speed significantly. pH and temperature of the medium most profoundly influenced cell motility and morphology. Thus, the mean cell speed was 40% lower at pH 7.25 than at pH 7.6; at 29 degrees C, it was approximately four times lower than at 39 degrees C. CONCLUSION...

  18. A-3 Construction Time Lapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    A time lapse from start to finish of steel erection for the 235-foot tall A-3 Test Stand. Ground work for the stand was broken in August 2008 and the final structural steel beam was placed April 9, 2009.

  19. Chloroplast to chromoplast transition in tomato fruit: spectral confocal microscopy analyses of carotenoids and chlorophylls in isolated plastids and time-lapse recording on intact live tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Isabel; Bian, Wanping; Barsan, Cristina; Jauneau, Alain; Pech, Jean-Claude; Latché, Alain; Li, Zhengguo; Chervin, Christian

    2011-08-01

    There are several studies suggesting that tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) chromoplasts arise from chloroplasts, but there is still no report showing the fluorescence of both chlorophylls and carotenoids in an intermediate plastid, and no video showing this transition phase. Pigment fluorescence within individual plastids, isolated from tomato fruit using sucrose gradients, was observed at different ripening stages, and an in situ real-time recording of pigment fluorescence was performed on live tomato fruit slices. At the mature green and red stages, homogenous fractions of chloroplasts and chromoplasts were obtained, respectively. At the breaker stage, spectral confocal microscopy showed that intermediate plastids contained both chlorophylls and carotenoids. Furthermore, an in situ real-time recording (a) showed that the chloroplast to chromoplast transition was synchronous for all plastids of a single cell; and (b) confirmed that all chromoplasts derived from pre-existing chloroplasts. These results give details of the early steps of tomato chromoplast biogenesis from chloroplasts, with the formation of intermediate plastids containing both carotenoids and chlorophylls. They provide information at the sub-cellular level on the synchronism of plastid transition and pigment changes.

  20. Time-lapse seismic within reservoir engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenziel, T.

    2003-01-01

    Time-lapse 3D seismic is a fairly new technology allowing dynamic reservoir characterisation in a true volumetric sense. By investigating the differences between multiple seismic surveys, valuable information about changes in the oil/gas reservoir state can be captured. Its interpretation involves

  1. Time-Lapse Measurement of Wellbore Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguid, A.

    2017-12-01

    Well integrity is becoming more important as wells are used longer or repurposed. For CO2, shale gas, and other projects it has become apparent that wells represent the most likely unintended migration pathway for fluids out of the reservoir. Comprehensive logging programs have been employed to determine the condition of legacy wells in North America. These studies provide examples of assessment technologies. Logging programs have included pulsed neutron logging, ultrasonic well mapping, and cement bond logging. While these studies provide examples of what can be measured, they have only conducted a single round of logging and cannot show if the well has changed over time. Recent experience with time-lapse logging of three monitoring wells at a US Department of Energy sponsored CO2 project has shown the full value of similar tools. Time-lapse logging has shown that well integrity changes over time can be identified. It has also shown that the inclusion of and location of monitoring technologies in the well and the choice of construction materials must be carefully considered. Two of the wells were approximately eight years old at the time of study; they were constructed with steel and fiberglass casing sections and had lines on the outside of the casing running to the surface. The third well was 68 years old when it was studied and was originally constructed as a production well. Repeat logs were collected six or eight years after initial logging. Time-lapse logging showed the evolution of the wells. The results identified locations where cement degraded over time and locations that showed little change. The ultrasonic well maps show clearly that the lines used to connect the monitoring technology to the surface are visible and have a local effect on cement isolation. Testing and sampling was conducted along with logging. It provided insight into changes identified in the time-lapse log results. Point permeability testing was used to provide an in-situ point

  2. The Extreme Ice Survey: Capturing and Conveying Glacial Processes Through Time-Lapse Imagery and Narration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, J. D.; Box, J. E.; Pfeffer, W. T.; Hood, E. W.; Fagre, D. B.; Anker, C.; O'Neel, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Extreme Ice Survey (EIS) uses time-lapse photography, conventional photography, and video to document rapid change in the Earth's glacial ice. The EIS team currently has 38 time-lapse cameras at sites in Greenland, Iceland, Alaska, the Rocky Mountains and Nepal. EIS supplements this ongoing record with annual repeat photography in British Columbia, Iceland, the Alps, and Bolivia. EIS imagery supplies basic knowledge in glacier dynamics to the science community, as well as compelling, engaging narratives to the general public about the immediacy of the Anthropocene and climate change. Visual materials from EIS have impacted more than 150 million people, ranging from White House staff, the U. S. Congress and government agency officials to globally influential corporate officers and all age strata of the general public. Media products include a National Geographic/NOVA special, two National Geographic magazine articles, a feature in Parade magazine (circulation 71 million), and numerous presentations on CNN, NBC, BBC and National Public Radio. Columbia Glacier, Alaska, June 2006, May 2007, June 2008 terminus indicated.

  3. Time-lapse photogrammetry in geomorphic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltner, Anette; Kaiser, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Image based approaches to reconstruct the earth surface (Structure from Motion - SfM) are establishing as a standard technology for high resolution topographic data. This is amongst other advantages due to the comparatively ease of use and flexibility of data generation. Furthermore, the increased spatial resolution led to its implementation at a vast range of applications from sub-mm to tens-of-km scale. Almost fully automatic calculation of referenced digital elevation models allows for a significant increase of temporal resolution, as well, potentially up to sub-second scales. Thereby, the setup of a time-lapse multi-camera system is necessary and different aspects need to be considered: The camera array has to be temporary stable or potential movements need to be compensated by temporary stable reference targets/areas. The stability of the internal camera geometry has to be considered due to a usually significantly lower amount of images of the scene, and thus redundancy for parameter estimation, compared to more common SfM applications. Depending on the speed of surface change, synchronisation has to be very accurate. Due to the usual application in the field, changing environmental conditions important for lighting and visual range are also crucial factors to keep in mind. Besides these important considerations much potential is comprised by time-lapse photogrammetry. The integration of multi-sensor systems, e.g. using thermal cameras, enables the potential detection of other processes not visible with RGB-images solely. Furthermore, the implementation of low-cost sensors allows for a significant increase of areal coverage and their setup at locations, where a loss of the system cannot be ruled out. The usage of micro-computers offers smart camera triggering, e.g. acquiring images with increased frequency controlled by a rainfall-triggered sensor. In addition these micro-computers can enable on-site data processing, e.g. recognition of increased surface

  4. Interferometric full-waveform inversion of time-lapse data

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Mrinal

    2017-08-17

    One of the key challenges associated with time-lapse surveys is ensuring the repeatability between the baseline and monitor surveys. Non-repeatability between the surveys is caused by varying environmental conditions over the course of different surveys. To overcome this challenge, we propose the use of interferometric full waveform inversion (IFWI) for inverting the velocity model from data recorded by baseline and monitor surveys. A known reflector is used as the reference reflector for IFWI, and the data are naturally redatumed to this reference reflector using natural reflections as the redatuming operator. This natural redatuming mitigates the artifacts introduced by the repeatability errors that originate above the reference reflector.

  5. Application of a linear finite-frequency theory to time-lapse crosswell tomography in ultrasonic and numerical experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spetzler, J.; Sijacic, D.; Wolf, K.H.A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Time-lapse seismic monitoring is the geophysical discipline whereby multiple data sets recorded at the same location but at different times are used to locate and quantify temporal changes in the elastic parameters of the subsurface. We validate a time-lapse monitoring method by crosswell tomography

  6. Combined time-lapse cinematography and immuno-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, B M; Goscicka, T; MacKenzie, J L; Gautam, A; Tate, M; Clark, J

    1990-04-01

    A method was developed to record interactions between mobile non-adherent immunocytes by time-lapse cinematography and then to study the same cells by immuno-electron microscopy, using monoclonal antibodies against surface components. For this purpose a modified stage was designed to fit an inverted microscope. The attachment included a device to cool the culture chamber with N2 gas, a micro-injector for monoclonal antibody and immuno-gold treatment, and two pairs of washing needles to change the medium without disturbance. The technique was first employed to study the formation of aggregates around the antigen-presenting cells in cultures containing cells from hyper-immunized animals. Recently peripheral blood cells from normal subjects and patients with immune deficiency syndromes were stimulated with pokeweed mitogen, cluster formation was recorded, and the cells were processed for immuno-electron microscopy.

  7. Dust Storm Time Lapse Shows Opportunity's Skies Darken

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Dust Storm Time Lapse Shows Opportunity's Skies Darken NASA's Opportunity rover is literally seeing some of its darkest days. Both Mars Exploration Rovers have been riding out a regional dust storm for several weeks. Conditions became particularly dreary in the Meridiani Planum region where Opportunity sits, perched on the edge of 'Victoria Crater.' This image is a time-lapse composite where each horizon-survey image has been compressed horizontally (but not vertically) to emphasize the sky. The relative brightness and darkness of the sky from sol to sol (over a 30-sol period beginning June 14, 2007) is depicted accurately in these images, which view roughly the same part of the plains southwest of the rover. The images are approximately true color composites, generated from calibrated radiance data files using the panoramic camera's 601-nanometer, 535-nanometer and 482-nanometer filters. The rovers' atmospheric science team is concerned that smaller, regional dust storms could expand into a larger, globe-encircling storm. That could extend the time the sun stays obscured, challenging the capability of Opportunity's solar panels to produce enough electricity for the rover to function. Fortunately, as of July 19, 2007, the Opportunity site is clearing slightly. When the storm ends, atmospheric scientists hope to review data from the rovers that will help them determine what sort of dust was being lifted and distributed. The numbers across the top of the image report a measurement of atmospheric opacity, called by the Greek letter tau. The lower the number, the clearer the sky. Both Opportunity and Spirit have been recording higher tau measurements in July 2007 than they had seen any time previously in their three and a half years on Mars. The five sol numbers across the bottom correspond (left to right) to June 14, June 30, July 5, July 13 and July 15, 2007.

  8. Exploiting the airwave for time-lapse reservoir monitoring with CSEM on land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirianto, M.; Mulder, W.A.; Slob, E.C.

    2011-01-01

    In the application of controlled source electromagnetics for reservoir monitoring on land, repeatability errors in the source will mask the time-lapse signal due to hydrocarbon production when recording surface data close to the source. We demonstrate that at larger distances, the airwave will still

  9. Full waveform inversion of repeating seismic events to estimate time-lapse velocity changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, R.; Lumley, D.

    2017-05-01

    obtain a reasonably accurate baseline velocity model. Extensive synthetic tests using a realistic velocity model developed from a real project area demonstrate the potential of full waveform inversion to estimate velocity changes from dense surface arrays of seismic stations recording a small number of repeating events. Analysis of sensitivity kernels suggests that positioning sensors at large distances allows for a stable recovery of velocity changes near the event locations by illuminating the inversion area with a wide aperture of angles. We show how full waveform inversion maps the errors in the baseline velocity model and the non-repeatable noise into the estimates of time-lapse velocity changes. Among the three time-lapse inversion methods, parallel inversion is most affected by non-repeatability factors, and is thus the least robust and most contaminated by artefacts. In contrast, the double-difference and bootstrapping methods result in more accurate time-lapse inversions. As the non-repeatability of both sources and noise increases, the bootstrapping method provides more robust and accurate results than the double-difference method.

  10. Capturing tissue repair in zebrafish larvae with time-lapse brightfield stereomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Thomas S; Brochu, Elizabeth A; Rieger, Sandra

    2015-01-31

    The zebrafish larval tail fin is ideal for studying tissue regeneration due to the simple architecture of the larval fin-fold, which comprises of two layers of skin that enclose undifferentiated mesenchyme, and because the larval tail fin regenerates rapidly within 2-3 days. Using this system, we demonstrate a method for capturing the repair dynamics of the amputated tail fin with time-lapse video brightfield stereomicroscopy. We demonstrate that fin amputation triggers a contraction of the amputation wound and extrusion of cells around the wound margin, leading to their subsequent clearance. Fin regeneration proceeds from proximal to distal direction after a short delay. In addition, developmental growth of the larva can be observed during all stages. The presented method provides an opportunity for observing and analyzing whole tissue-scale behaviors such as fin development and growth in a simple microscope setting, which is easily adaptable to any stereomicroscope with time-lapse capabilities.

  11. Time-Lapse Monitoring of Subsurface Fluid Flow using Parsimonious Seismic Interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif

    2017-04-21

    A typical small-scale seismic survey (such as 240 shot gathers) takes at least 16 working hours to be completed, which is a major obstacle in case of time-lapse monitoring experiments. This is especially true if the subject that needs to be monitored is rapidly changing. In this work, we will discuss how to decrease the recording time from 16 working hours to less than one hour of recording. Here, the virtual data has the same accuracy as the conventional data. We validate the efficacy of parsimonious seismic interferometry with the time-lapse mentoring idea with field examples, where we were able to record 30 different data sets within a 2-hour period. The recorded data are then processed to generate 30 snapshots that shows the spread of water from the ground surface down to a few meters.

  12. Calibrating vadose zone models with time-lapse gravity data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lars; Binning, Philip John; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The vadose zone plays an important role in the hydrologic cycle. Various geophysical methods can determine soil water content variations in time and space in volumes ranging from a few cubic centimeters to several cubic meters. In contrast to the established methods, time-lapse gravity measurements...... hydrologic information. In this study, changes in the soil water content gave rise to a measurable signal in a forced infiltration experiment on a 107-m2 grassland area. Time-lapse gravity data were able to constrain the van Genuchten soil hydraulic parameters in both a synthetic example and a field...

  13. Automated Tracking of Root for Confocal Time-lapse Imaging of Cellular Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Doumane, Mehdi; Lionnet, Claire; Bayle, Vincent; Jaillais, Yvon; Caillaud, Marie-C?cile

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe a protocol that enables to automatically perform time-lapse imaging of growing root tips for several hours. Plants roots expressing fluorescent proteins or stained with dyes are imaged while they grow using automatic movement of the microscope stage that compensates for root growth and allows to follow a given region of the root over time. The protocol makes possible the image acquisition of multiple growing root tips, therefore increasing the number of recorded mitotic event...

  14. Time-lapse controlled-source electromagnetics using interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunziker, J.W.; Slob, E.C.; Wapenaar, C.P.A.

    In time-lapse controlled-source electromagnetics, it is crucial that the source and the receivers are positioned at exactly the same location at all times of measurement. We use interferometry by multidimensional deconvolution (MDD) to overcome problems in repeatability of the source location.

  15. TimeLapseAnalyzer: Multi-target analysis for live-cell imaging and time-lapse microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huth, Johannes; Buchholz, Malte; Kraus, Johann M.

    2011-01-01

    The direct observation of cells over time using time-lapse microscopy can provide deep insights into many important biological processes. Reliable analyses of motility, proliferation, invasive potential or mortality of cells are essential to many studies involving live cell imaging and can aid...

  16. Time-lapse joint AVO inversion using generalized linear method based on exact Zoeppritz equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Longxiao; Gu, Hanming

    2018-03-01

    The conventional method of time-lapse AVO (Amplitude Versus Offset) inversion is mainly based on the approximate expression of Zoeppritz equations. Though the approximate expression is concise and convenient to use, it has certain limitations. For example, its application condition is that the difference of elastic parameters between the upper medium and lower medium is little and the incident angle is small. In addition, the inversion of density is not stable. Therefore, we develop the method of time-lapse joint AVO inversion based on exact Zoeppritz equations. In this method, we apply exact Zoeppritz equations to calculate the reflection coefficient of PP wave. And in the construction of objective function for inversion, we use Taylor series expansion to linearize the inversion problem. Through the joint AVO inversion of seismic data in baseline survey and monitor survey, we can obtain the P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density in baseline survey and their time-lapse changes simultaneously. We can also estimate the oil saturation change according to inversion results. Compared with the time-lapse difference inversion, the joint inversion doesn't need certain assumptions and can estimate more parameters simultaneously. It has a better applicability. Meanwhile, by using the generalized linear method, the inversion is easily implemented and its calculation cost is small. We use the theoretical model to generate synthetic seismic records to test and analyze the influence of random noise. The results can prove the availability and anti-noise-interference ability of our method. We also apply the inversion to actual field data and prove the feasibility of our method in actual situation.

  17. Definition of "banner clouds" based on time lapse movies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Schween

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Banner clouds appear on the leeward side of a mountain and resemble a banner or a flag. This article provides a comprehensive definition of "banner clouds". It is based primarily on an extensive collection of time lapse movies, but previous attempts at an explanation of this phenomenon are also taken into account. The following ingredients are considered essential: the cloud must be attached to the mountain but not appear on the windward side; the cloud must originate from condensation of water vapour contained in the air (rather than consist of blowing snow; the cloud must be persistent; and the cloud must not be of convective nature. The definition is illustrated and discussed with the help of still images and time lapse movies taken at Mount Zugspitze in the Bavarian Alps.

  18. Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Time-lapse pressurechanges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, Don W.

    2003-04-08

    Time-lapse fluid pressure and saturation estimates are sensitive to reservoir flow properties such as permeability. In fact, given time-lapse estimates of pressure and saturation changes, one may define a linear partial differential equation for permeability variations within the reservoir. The resulting linear inverse problem can be solved quite efficiently using sparse matrix techniques. An application to a set of crosswell saturation and pressure estimates from a CO{sub 2} flood at the Lost Hills field in California demonstrates the utility of this approach. From the crosswell estimates detailed estimates of reservoir permeability are produced. The resulting permeability estimates agree with a permeability log in an adjacent well and are in accordance with water and CO{sub 2} saturation changes in the interwell region.

  19. Definition of "banner clouds" based on time lapse movies

    OpenAIRE

    Schween , J. H.; Kuettner , J.; Reinert , D.; Reuder , J.; Wirth , V.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Banner clouds appear on the leeward side of a mountain and resemble a banner or a flag. This article provides a comprehensive definition of "banner clouds". It is based primarily on an extensive collection of time lapse movies, but previous attempts at an explanation of this phenomenon are also taken into account. The following ingredients are considered essential: the cloud must be attached to the mountain but not appear on the windward side; the cloud must originate ...

  20. Multiple Generations on Video Tape Recorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Jacob H.

    Helical scan video tape recorders were tested for their dubbing characteristics in order to make selection data available to media personnel. The equipment, two recorders of each type tested, was submitted by the manufacturers. The test was designed to produce quality evaluations for three generations of a single tape, thereby encompassing all…

  1. Digital video recording and archiving in ophthalmic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju Biju

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently most ophthalmic operating rooms are equipped with an analog video recording system [analog Charge Couple Device camera for video grabbing and a Video Cassette Recorder for recording]. We discuss the various advantages of a digital video capture device, its archiving capabilities and our experience during the transition from analog to digital video recording and archiving. The basic terminology and concepts related to analog and digital video, along with the choice of hardware, software and formats for archiving are discussed.

  2. Inter-laboratory agreement on embryo classification and clinical decision: Conventional morphological assessment vs. time lapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Granados, Luis; Serrano, María; González-Utor, Antonio; Ortíz, Nereyda; Badajoz, Vicente; Olaya, Enrique; Prados, Nicolás; Boada, Montse; Castilla, Jose A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine inter-laboratory variability on embryo assessment using time-lapse platform and conventional morphological assessment. This study compares the data obtained from a pilot study of external quality control (EQC) of time lapse, performed in 2014, with the classical EQC of the Spanish Society for the Study of Reproductive Biology (ASEBIR) performed in 2013 and 2014. In total, 24 laboratories (8 using EmbryoScope™, 15 using Primo Vision™ and one with both platforms) took part in the pilot study. The clinics that used EmbryoScope™ analysed 31 embryos and those using Primo Vision™ analysed 35. The classical EQC was implemented by 39 clinics, based on an analysis of 25 embryos per year. Both groups were required to evaluate various qualitative morphological variables (cell fragmentation, the presence of vacuoles, blastomere asymmetry and multinucleation), to classify the embryos in accordance with ASEBIR criteria and to stipulate the clinical decision taken. In the EQC time-lapse pilot study, the groups were asked to determine, as well as the above characteristics, the embryo development times, the number, opposition and size of pronuclei, the direct division of 1 into 3 cells and/or of 3 into 5 cells and false divisions. The degree of agreement was determined by calculating the intra-class correlation coefficients and the coefficient of variation for the quantitative variables and the Gwet index for the qualitative variables. For both EmbryoScope™ and Primo Vision™, two periods of greater inter-laboratory variability were observed in the times of embryo development events. One peak of variability was recorded among the laboratories addressing the first embryo events (extrusion of the second polar body and the appearance of pronuclei); the second peak took place between the times corresponding to the 8-cell and morula stages. In most of the qualitative variables analysed regarding embryo development, there was almost

  3. Mycoplasma infection followed by time-lapse microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talas, Laszlo; Banfalvi, Gaspar; Fidrus, Eszter; Szigeti, Zsuzsa M; Nagy, Gabor

    2017-10-01

    Early detection of mycoplasma infection is crucial for saving precious often irreplaceable data from the tissues of patients. Mycoplasma infections cause diseases in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, urethritis in men resulting in painful dysuria, urgency and urethral discharge. Cough, fever, headache, urethritis may persist for several weeks and convalescence is slow. The symptoms of these diseases are aggravated by the detection of mycoplasma infections, that takes either a long time, besides being expensive or is specific and restricted to only a limited number of contaminant strains. Mycoplasmas are hard to detect visually but could be seen and followed by time-lapse microscopy. Our hypothesis is that one can detect mycoplasma infection irrespective of its origin and type of mycoplasma. Main lines of supporting evidence are provided by the time-lapse microscopy showing dynamic morphological alterations caused by mycoplasmas before changes in human cell cultures become visible. Morphometric measurements of mycoplasma infections revealed four subphases: i) detachment of infected cells, ii) aggregation, iii) biofilm formation and iv) shrinkage of infected cells. The applicability of time-lapse microscopy for the detection of mycoplasma infection was validated by a mycoplasma test Kit. Most important implications related to morphometric parameters include the observation of mycoplasma infected cultures for an extended period of time instead of applying static snap-shot microscopy. A reliable method is offered to estimate the time of mycoplasma exposure that elapsed during the cell growth. This microphotometric approach served a more economical detection of mycoplasma contamination at its early stage of cell growth and spread, irrespective of the origin of contaminated serum, without defining the type of mycoplasma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Time-lapse microscopy of lung endothelial cells under hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrvar, Shima; Ghanian, Zahra; Kondouri, Ganesh; Camara, Amadou S.; Ranji, Mahsa

    2017-02-01

    Objective: This study utilizes fluorescence microscopy to assess the effect of the oxygen tension on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria of fetal pulmonary artery endothelial cells (FPAECs). Introduction: Hypoxia is a severe oxygen stress, which mostly causes irreversible injury in lung cells. However, in some studies, it is reported that hypoxia decreases the severity of injuries. In this study, ROS production level was examined in hypoxic FPAECs treated with pentachlorophenol (PCP, uncoupler). This work was accomplished by monitoring and quantifying the changes in the level of the produced ROS in hypoxic cells before and after PCP treatment. Materials and methods: The dynamic of the mitochondrial ROS production in two groups of FPAECs was measured over time using time-lapse microscopy. For the first group, cells were incubated in 3% hypoxic condition for 2 hours and then continuously were exposed to hypoxic condition for imaging as well. For the second group, cells were incubated in normal oxygen condition. Time lapse images of the cells loaded with Mito-SOX (ROS indicator) were acquired, and the red fluorescence intensity profile of the cells was calculated. Changes in the level of the fluorescence intensity profile while they are treated with PCP indicates the dynamics of the ROS level. Results: The intensity profiles of the PCP-treated cells in the first group showed 47% lower ROS production rate than the PCP-treated cells in the second group. Conclusion: Time lapse microscopy revealed that hypoxic cells have lower ROS generation while treated with PCP. Therefore, this result suggests that hypoxia decreased electron transport chain activity in uncoupled chain.

  5. Use of video cassette recorders for combined video and PCM data recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, R. J.; Gallo, L.

    Analog tape recorders are commonly used in aircraft flight testing to record PCM digital data. These recorders require considerable space and add significantly to the cost of test instrumentation. For limited test programs in densely packed aircraft, such as the modern fighter, the burden of a conventional reel to reel analog recorder is oppressive. With this condition in mind, the desirability of recording PCM data on a video cassette recorder surfaced. The video cassette recorder (VCR) offers greatly improved size and cost efficiency over conventional reel to reel recorders for many data acquisition requirements. Not only are cost and size improved, but several other benefits are realized. For instance, video cassettes are easily stored and transported. Automatic synchronization of the digital data and video images is inherent in the combined recording system. The system described in this paper makes use of a small electronic interface unit to combine and synchronize the video and PCM data signals. This composite signal is then recorded on a standard VHS video recorder. PCM data rates of up to thirty kilobits per second can be accomodated with only a minor reduction of picture area.

  6. Feeling the Heat: Supraglacial Lake Changes as Observed via Time-Lapse Photography, Ngozumpa Glacier, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horodyskyj, U. N.; Breashears, D.; Bilham, R. G.

    2011-12-01

    Supraglacial lakes are suspected of playing a catalytic role in the current rapid melting rate of temperate glaciers. Our field work on the Ngozumpa glacier, in the Nepalese Himalaya, was targeted to quantify the physics of this process. A field season was conducted in June 2011 to investigate the formation and evolution of these lakes via time-lapse photography. One supraglacial lake in particular was chosen for more intensive study. A pressure transducer recorded lake level changes throughout the field season; probes measured surface water temperature, water temperature at depth, and air temperature; and solar irradiation (incoming and outgoing) was measured with a pair of silicon pyranometers. Depth surveys were conducted, water samples were collected, and melt rates on north and south facing ice walls also were measured with a laser rangefinder during hours of peak insolation. During the course of the field season, 28 cm of overall water rise was measured in the lake. Two major icefall events a week apart contributed to 8 and 6 cm, respectively, rise alone. Surface water and air temperatures increased during this time, along with the amount of solar irradiation reaching the surface of the lake. South-facing ice walls were found to melt faster, but no walls were found to be immune to melt and collapse. Hourly time-lapse photography captured a major icefall in this lake, while another camera captured a larger lake farther upglacier draining more than 3 meters overnight. A third camera, aimed near the terminus, captured a lake changing in color (from milky blue to brown) and doubling in size during the field season. These initial results show substantial change in a short amount of time. Continued time-lapse photography should provide us with an even better record of surface evolution on this climatically sensitive glacier in the Himalaya.

  7. Super-resolution Time-Lapse Seismic Waveform Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovcharenko, O.; Kazei, V.; Peter, D. B.; Alkhalifah, T.

    2017-12-01

    Time-lapse seismic waveform inversion is a technique, which allows tracking changes in the reservoirs over time. Such monitoring is relatively computationally extensive and therefore it is barely feasible to perform it on-the-fly. Most of the expenses are related to numerous FWI iterations at high temporal frequencies, which is inevitable since the low-frequency components can not resolve fine scale features of a velocity model. Inverted velocity changes are also blurred when there is noise in the data, so the problem of low-resolution images is widely known. One of the problems intensively tackled by computer vision research community is the recovering of high-resolution images having their low-resolution versions. Usage of artificial neural networks to reach super-resolution from a single downsampled image is one of the leading solutions for this problem. Each pixel of the upscaled image is affected by all the pixels of its low-resolution version, which enables the workflow to recover features that are likely to occur in the corresponding environment. In the present work, we adopt machine learning image enhancement technique to improve the resolution of time-lapse full-waveform inversion. We first invert the baseline model with conventional FWI. Then we run a few iterations of FWI on a set of the monitoring data to find desired model changes. These changes are blurred and we enhance their resolution by using a deep neural network. The network is trained to map low-resolution model updates predicted by FWI into the real perturbations of the baseline model. For supervised training of the network we generate a set of random perturbations in the baseline model and perform FWI on the noisy data from the perturbed models. We test the approach on a realistic perturbation of Marmousi II model and demonstrate that it outperforms conventional convolution-based deblurring techniques.

  8. Possible mechanism of polyspermy block in human oocytes observed by time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mio, Yasuyuki; Iwata, Kyoko; Yumoto, Keitaro; Kai, Yoshiteru; Sargant, Haruka C; Mizoguchi, Chizuru; Ueda, Minako; Tsuchie, Yuka; Imajo, Akifumi; Iba, Yumiko; Nishikori, Kyoko

    2012-09-01

    To analyze the fertilization process related to polyspermy block in human oocytes using an in vitro culturing system for time-lapse cinematography. We had 122 oocytes donated for this study from couples that provided informed consent. We recorded human oocytes at 2,000 to 2,800 frames every 10 s during the fertilization process and thereafter every 2 min using a new in vitro culture system originally developed by the authors for time-lapse cinematography. We displayed 30 frames per second for analysis of the polyspermy block during fertilization. Three oocytes showed the leading and following sperm within the zona pellucida in the same microscopic field. The dynamic images obtained during the fertilization process using this new system revealed that once a leading sperm penetrated the zona pellucida and attached to the oocyte membrane, a following sperm was arrested from further penetration into the zona pellucida within 10 s. The present results strongly suggest the existence of a novel mechanism of polyspermy block that takes place at the zona pellucida immediately after fertilization. These findings are clearly different from previous mechanisms describing polyspermy block as the oocyte membrane block to sperm penetration and the zona reaction. The finding presented herein thus represents a novel discovery about the highly complicated polyspermy block mechanism occurring in human oocytes.

  9. Combined time-lapse magnetic resonance imaging and modeling to investigate colloid deposition and transport in porous media

    OpenAIRE

    LEHOUX, Alizée; FAURE, Paméla; LAFOLIE, Francois; RODTS, Stéphane; COURTIER-MURIAS, Denis; COUSSOT, Philippe; MICHEL, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Colloidal particles can act as vectors of adsorbed pollutants in the subsurface, or be themselves pollutants. They can reach the aquifer and impair groundwater quality. The mechanisms of colloid transport and deposition are often studied in columns filled with saturated porous media. Time-lapse profiles of colloid concentration inside the columns have occasionally been derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data recorded in transport experiments. These profiles are valuable, in additio...

  10. Time lapse gravity monitoring at Coso geothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Rachel Vest

    An extensive time lapse gravity data set was acquired over the Coso geothermal field near Ridgecrest, California starting in 1987, with the latest data set acquired in 2013. In this thesis I use these gravity data to obtain a better understanding of mass changes occurring within the geothermal field. Geothermal energy is produced by flashing naturally heated ground water into steam which is used to turn turbines. Brine and re-condensed steam are then re-injected into the reservoir. A percentage of the water removed from the system is lost to the process. The time lapse gravity method consists of gravity measurements taken at the same locations over time, capturing snap shots of the changing field. After careful processing, the final data are differenced to extract the change in gravity over time. This change in gravity can then be inverted to recover the change in density and therefore mass over time. The inversion process also produces information on the three dimensional locations of these mass changes. Thirty five gravity data sets were processed and a subsection were inverted with two different starting times, a sixteen point data set collected continuously between 1991 and 2005, and a thirty-eight point data set collected between 1996 and 2005. The maximum change in gravity in the 1991 data group was -350 microGal observed near station CSE2. For the 1996 data group the maximum gravity change observed over the nine year period was -248 microGal. The gravity data were then inverted using the surface inversion method. Three values of density contrast were used, -0.05 g/cm3, -0.10 g/cm3, and -0.20 g/cm3. The starting surface in 1991 was set to 2,500 ft above sea level. The changes in surfaces were then converted to mass changes. The largest total mass change recovered was -1.39x1011 kg. This mass value is of the same order of magnitude as published well production data for the field. Additionally, the gravity data produces a better understanding of the spatial

  11. Soundscape and Noise Exposure Monitoring in a Marine Protected Area Using Shipping Data and Time-Lapse Footage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Nathan D; Pirotta, Enrico; Barton, Tim R; Thompson, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    We review recent work that developed new techniques for underwater noise assessment that integrate acoustic monitoring with automatic identification system (AIS) shipping data and time-lapse video, meteorological, and tidal data. Two sites were studied within the Moray Firth Special Area of Conservation (SAC) for bottlenose dolphins, where increased shipping traffic is expected from construction of offshore wind farms outside the SAC. Noise exposure varied markedly between the sites, and natural and anthropogenic contributions were characterized using multiple data sources. At one site, AIS-operating vessels accounted for total cumulative sound exposure (0.1-10 kHz), suggesting that noise modeling using the AIS would be feasible.

  12. Implications of the law on video recording in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henken, Kirsten R; Jansen, Frank Willem; Klein, Jan; Stassen, Laurents P S; Dankelman, Jenny; van den Dobbelsteen, John J

    2012-10-01

    Technological developments allow for a variety of applications of video recording in health care, including endoscopic procedures. Although the value of video registration is recognized, medicolegal concerns regarding the privacy of patients and professionals are growing. A clear understanding of the legal framework is lacking. Therefore, this research aims to provide insight into the juridical position of patients and professionals regarding video recording in health care practice. Jurisprudence was searched to exemplify legislation on video recording in health care. In addition, legislation was translated for different applications of video in health care found in the literature. Three principles in Western law are relevant for video recording in health care practice: (1) regulations on privacy regarding personal data, which apply to the gathering and processing of video data in health care settings; (2) the patient record, in which video data can be stored; and (3) professional secrecy, which protects the privacy of patients including video data. Practical implementation of these principles in video recording in health care does not exist. Practical regulations on video recording in health care for different specifically defined purposes are needed. Innovations in video capture technology that enable video data to be made anonymous automatically can contribute to protection for the privacy of all the people involved.

  13. Automated Tracking of Root for Confocal Time-lapse Imaging of Cellular Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumane, Mehdi; Lionnet, Claire; Bayle, Vincent; Jaillais, Yvon; Caillaud, Marie-Cécile

    2017-04-20

    Here we describe a protocol that enables to automatically perform time-lapse imaging of growing root tips for several hours. Plants roots expressing fluorescent proteins or stained with dyes are imaged while they grow using automatic movement of the microscope stage that compensates for root growth and allows to follow a given region of the root over time. The protocol makes possible the image acquisition of multiple growing root tips, therefore increasing the number of recorded mitotic events in a given experiment. The protocol also allows the visualization of more than one fluorescent protein or dye simultaneously, using multiple channel acquisition. We particularly focus on imaging of cytokinesis in Arabidopsis root tip meristem, but this protocol is also suitable to follow root hair growth, pollen tube growth, and other regions of root over time, in various plant species. It may as well be amendable to automatically track non-plant structures with an apical growth.

  14. Exploring Time-Lapse Photography as a Means for Qualitative Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persohn, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    Collecting information via time-lapse photography is nothing new. Scientists and artists have been using this kind of data since the late 1800s. However, my research and experiments with time-lapse have shown that great potential may lie in its application to educational and social scientific research methods. This article is part history, part…

  15. Capturing change: the duality of time-lapse imagery to acquire data and depict ecological dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinley Buckley, Emma M.; Allen, Craig R.; Forsberg, Michael; Farrell, Michael; Caven, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the scientific and communicative value of time-lapse imagery by exploring applications for data collection and visualization. Time-lapse imagery has a myriad of possible applications to study and depict ecosystems and can operate at unique temporal and spatial scales to bridge the gap between large-scale satellite imagery projects and observational field research. Time-lapse data sequences, linking time-lapse imagery with data visualization, have the ability to make data come alive for a wider audience by connecting abstract numbers to images that root data in time and place. Utilizing imagery from the Platte Basin Timelapse Project, water inundation and vegetation phenology metrics are quantified via image analysis and then paired with passive monitoring data, including streamflow and water chemistry. Dynamic and interactive time-lapse data sequences elucidate the visible and invisible ecological dynamics of a significantly altered yet internationally important river system in central Nebraska.

  16. Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Time-lapse amplitude changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, D.W.; Datta-Gupta, Akhil; Behrens, Ron; Condon, Pat; Rickett, Jame s

    2003-03-13

    Asymptotic methods provide an efficient means by which to infer reservoir flow properties, such as permeability, from time-lapse seismic data. A trajectory-based methodology, much like ray-based methods for medical and seismic imaging, is the basis for an iterative inversion of time-lapse amplitude changes. In this approach a single reservoir simulation is required for each iteration of the algorithm. A comparison between purely numerical and the trajectory-based sensitivities demonstrates their accuracy. An application to a set of synthetic amplitude changes indicates that they can recover large-scale reservoir permeability variations from time-lapse data. In an application of actual time-lapse amplitude changes from the Bay Marchand field in the Gulf of Mexico we are able to reduce the misfit by 81% in twelve iterations. The time-lapse observations indicate lower permeabilities are required in the central portion of the reservoir.

  17. Capturing change: the duality of time-lapse imagery to acquire data and depict ecological dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma M. Brinley Buckley

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the scientific and communicative value of time-lapse imagery by exploring applications for data collection and visualization. Time-lapse imagery has a myriad of possible applications to study and depict ecosystems and can operate at unique temporal and spatial scales to bridge the gap between large-scale satellite imagery projects and observational field research. Time-lapse data sequences, linking time-lapse imagery with data visualization, have the ability to make data come alive for a wider audience by connecting abstract numbers to images that root data in time and place. Utilizing imagery from the Platte Basin Timelapse Project, water inundation and vegetation phenology metrics are quantified via image analysis and then paired with passive monitoring data, including streamflow and water chemistry. Dynamic and interactive time-lapse data sequences elucidate the visible and invisible ecological dynamics of a significantly altered yet internationally important river system in central Nebraska.

  18. Implications of the law on video recording in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.R. Henken (Kirsten R.); F-W. Jansen (Frank-Willem); J. Klein (Jan); L.P. Stassen (Laurents); J. Dankelman (Jenny); J.J. van den Dobbelsteen (John)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Technological developments allow for a variety of applications of video recording in health care, including endoscopic procedures. Although the value of video registration is recognized, medicolegal concerns regarding the privacy of patients and professionals are growing. A

  19. Implications of the law on video recording in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henken, K.R.; Jansen, F.W.; Klein, J.; Stassen, L.P.S.; Dankelman, J.; Van den Dobbelsteen, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Technological developments allow for a variety of applications of video recording in health care, including endoscopic procedures. Although the value of video registration is recognized, medicolegal concerns regarding the privacy of patients and professionals are growing. A clear

  20. Prediction of in-vitro developmental competence of early cleavage-stage mouse embryos with compact time-lapse equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribenszky, Csaba; Losonczi, Eszter; Molnár, Miklós; Lang, Zsolt; Mátyás, Szabolcs; Rajczy, Klára; Molnár, Katalin; Kovács, Péter; Nagy, Péter; Conceicao, Jason; Vajta, Gábor

    2010-03-01

    Single blastocyst transfer is regarded as an efficient way to achieve high pregnancy rates and to avoid multiple pregnancies. Risk of cancellation of transfer due to a lack of available embryos may be reduced by early prediction of blastocyst development. Time-lapse investigation of mouse embryos shows that the time of the first and second cleavage (to the 2- and 3-cell stages, respectively) has a strong predictive value for further development in vitro, while cleavage from the 3-cell to the 4-cell stage has no predictive value. In humans, embryo fragmentation during preimplantation development has been associated with lower pregnancy rates and a higher incidence of developmental abnormalities. Analysis of time-lapse records shows that most fragmentation is reversible in the mouse and is resorbed in an average of 9 h. Daily or bi-daily microscopic checks of embryo development, applied routinely in human IVF laboratories, would fail to detect 36 or 72% of these fragmentations, respectively. Fragmentation occurring in a defined time frame has a strong predictive value for in-vitro embryo development. The practical compact system used in the present trial, based on the 'one camera per patient' principle, has eliminated the usual disadvantages of time-lapse investigations and is applicable for the routine follow-up of in-vitro embryo development. Copyright 2009 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Time-lapse camera trapping as an alternative to pitfall trapping for estimating activity of leaf litter arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Rachael A; Fisher, Diana O

    2017-09-01

    Pitfall trapping is the standard technique to estimate activity and relative abundance of leaf litter arthropods. Pitfall trapping is not ideal for long-term sampling because it is lethal, labor-intensive, and may have taxonomic sampling biases. We test an alternative sampling method that can be left in place for several months at a time: verticallyplaced time-lapse camera traps that have a short focal distance, enabling identification of small arthropods. We tested the effectiveness of these time-lapse cameras, and quantified escape and avoidance behavior of arthropod orders encountering pitfall traps by placing cameras programed with a range of sampling intervals above pitfalls, to assess numerical, taxonomic, and body size differences in samples collected by the two methods. Cameras programed with 1- or 15-min intervals recorded around twice as many arthropod taxa per day and a third more individuals per day than pitfall traps. Hymenoptera (ants), Embioptera (webspinners), and Blattodea (cockroaches) frequently escaped from pitfalls so were particularly under-sampled by them. The time-lapse camera method effectively samples litter arthropods to collect long-term data. It is standardized, non-lethal, and does not alter the substrate or require frequent visits.

  2. Low-cost motility tracking system (LOCOMOTIS) for time-lapse microscopy applications and cell visualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Adam E; Triajianto, Junian; Routledge, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Direct visualisation of cells for the purpose of studying their motility has typically required expensive microscopy equipment. However, recent advances in digital sensors mean that it is now possible to image cells for a fraction of the price of a standard microscope. Along with low-cost imaging there has also been a large increase in the availability of high quality, open-source analysis programs. In this study we describe the development and performance of an expandable cell motility system employing inexpensive, commercially available digital USB microscopes to image various cell types using time-lapse and perform tracking assays in proof-of-concept experiments. With this system we were able to measure and record three separate assays simultaneously on one personal computer using identical microscopes, and obtained tracking results comparable in quality to those from other studies that used standard, more expensive, equipment. The microscopes used in our system were capable of a maximum magnification of 413.6×. Although resolution was lower than that of a standard inverted microscope we found this difference to be indistinguishable at the magnification chosen for cell tracking experiments (206.8×). In preliminary cell culture experiments using our system, velocities (mean µm/min ± SE) of 0.81 ± 0.01 (Biomphalaria glabrata hemocytes on uncoated plates), 1.17 ± 0.004 (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells), 1.24 ± 0.006 (SC5 mouse Sertoli cells) and 2.21 ± 0.01 (B. glabrata hemocytes on Poly-L-Lysine coated plates), were measured and are consistent with previous reports. We believe that this system, coupled with open-source analysis software, demonstrates that higher throughput time-lapse imaging of cells for the purpose of studying motility can be an affordable option for all researchers.

  3. Low-cost motility tracking system (LOCOMOTIS for time-lapse microscopy applications and cell visualisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam E Lynch

    Full Text Available Direct visualisation of cells for the purpose of studying their motility has typically required expensive microscopy equipment. However, recent advances in digital sensors mean that it is now possible to image cells for a fraction of the price of a standard microscope. Along with low-cost imaging there has also been a large increase in the availability of high quality, open-source analysis programs. In this study we describe the development and performance of an expandable cell motility system employing inexpensive, commercially available digital USB microscopes to image various cell types using time-lapse and perform tracking assays in proof-of-concept experiments. With this system we were able to measure and record three separate assays simultaneously on one personal computer using identical microscopes, and obtained tracking results comparable in quality to those from other studies that used standard, more expensive, equipment. The microscopes used in our system were capable of a maximum magnification of 413.6×. Although resolution was lower than that of a standard inverted microscope we found this difference to be indistinguishable at the magnification chosen for cell tracking experiments (206.8×. In preliminary cell culture experiments using our system, velocities (mean µm/min ± SE of 0.81 ± 0.01 (Biomphalaria glabrata hemocytes on uncoated plates, 1.17 ± 0.004 (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, 1.24 ± 0.006 (SC5 mouse Sertoli cells and 2.21 ± 0.01 (B. glabrata hemocytes on Poly-L-Lysine coated plates, were measured and are consistent with previous reports. We believe that this system, coupled with open-source analysis software, demonstrates that higher throughput time-lapse imaging of cells for the purpose of studying motility can be an affordable option for all researchers.

  4. Real-Time Digital Video Recording System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lysel, M. S.; Zarnstorff, W. C.; Lancaster, J. C.; Mistretta, C. A.; Dobbins, J. T.

    1981-11-01

    Image storage is a necessary consideration in a medical imaging system. Data generated by recently developed digital radiographic techniques may be stored on magnetic tape or disc in either analog or digital form. Video discs have desirable freeze frame and image sequencing properties allowing for flexible image manipulation and display. Whereas digital pre-processing has enabled excellent results to be obtained using analog storage, digital storage is ideal as far as bandwidth and noise properties are concerned. However, serial data rates of digital disc drives are limited to about 10 megabits per second, too slow for recording video information in real-time. Using a standard multi-platter magnetic disc drive we have constructed parallel read/write channels servicing sets of 9 or 10 surfaces simultaneously in order to achieve a data rate of 100 megabits per second. This permits storage of 815 512x512x9 bit images at 30 frames per second. Hardware configurations and applications of the real-time digital disc to subtraction angiography will be discussed.

  5. Development of the HDTV optical video disk recorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoi, Satoshi; Sato, D.; Yamamoto, N.; Oshima, K.

    1995-09-01

    We developed the HDTV optical video disk recorder, which combines the HD-CODEC, compresses HD-TV signal to 94Mbps, and the VF-200 optical disk recorder, which can record noncompressed NTSC video data, 4-channel audio data, and user data to both sides of a 30cm(phi) magneto-optical disk in 32 minutes.

  6. Video-supported analysis of Beggiatoa filament growth, breakage, and movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Røy, Hans; Schulz-Vogt, Heide N.

    2008-01-01

    A marine Beggiatoa sp. was cultured in semi-solid agar with opposing oxygen-sulfide gradients. Growth pattern, breakage of filaments for multiplication, and movement directions of Beggiatoa filaments in the transparent agar were investigated by time-lapse video recording. The initial doubling time...

  7. STUDY OF TIME LAPSE IN FOREIGN BODY ASPIRATION IN RELATION TO CHEST X - RAY AND TYPE OF FOREIGN BODY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTI ON: Foreign body aspiration in pediatrics is a potentially fatal accident which will continue until children explore their surroundings with their hand and mouth. Pediatric aspirations will persist until mankind exists. Not all foreign body aspirations are witnessed hence chances of delay in diagnosing an aspiration are high. Delay in diagnosis depends on site and character of foreign body aspirated. The chest x - ray findings and type of foreign body extracted vary depending on the duration the foreign body remains in airway . OBJECTIVE: To study the X - ray finding in pediatric airway aspiration and its relation to time lapse, the type and site of lodgment of foreign body extracted via bronchoscopy. The type of foreign body in relation to time lapse in aspiration. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a prospective study done in Bapuji child health institute and research center, JJM Medical College, Davangere . History and pre bronchoscopy x - Ray finding were noted for 65 children who were posted for suspicious bronchoscopy from August 2011 to September 2013. 11 children were excluded from study as they showed no foreign body on bronchoscopy. Time lapse in aspir ation and seeking medical care was noted. The bronchoscopic findings regarding site of foreign body lodgment and type of foreign body were recorded. The type of foreign body and variation of x - ray picture in relation to time lapse in aspiration were noted. Data collected was analyzed using descriptive statistics. RESULT: It was observed that mean age was 28 months. About 80% of the cases were between 1 to 3 years age. 82% (n=53/54 were radio lucent foreign body, only 1.5% (n=1/54 were radio o paque. Site of lodgment of foreign body was right main bronchus in 48% (n=26/54, left main bronchus 46% (n=25/54 , tracheal 1.85% (n=1/54, subglottic 1.85% (n=1/54, carinal 1.85% (n=1/54, multiple site i.e. left bronchus +right bronchus+ carinal 1.85% (n=1/54. Groundnut was most common

  8. Discrimination between phase and amplitude attributes in time-lapse seismic streamer data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spetzler, J.; Kvam, O.

    2006-01-01

    Time-lapse seismic experiments aim to obtain information about production-related effects in hydrocarbon reservoirs to increase the recovery percentage. However, nonrepeatability problems such as acquisition differences, overburden effects, and noise are often significantly stronger than the imprint

  9. The state of the art in time-lapse seismic monitoring of heavy oil fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lines, Larry; Embleton, Joan [Chorus (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Reservoir characterization is an essential tool for the maximization of heavy oil production. Characterization allows the changes occurring in the reservoir during production to be monitored. The current study demonstrates that time-lapse 3D seismology may be used to monitor these changes over time. When a reservoir change influences seismic velocity, changes in the subsurface may be assessed by time-lapse 3D seismology. Multiple factors (such as seismic noise, near-surface seasonal variations, or consistent acquisition and processing) affect the data acquired when using time-lapse 3D seismology to monitor heavy oil fields. The study shows how to circumvent these factors to obtain consistent and usable data. Using information such as well logs, Vp/Vs ratios from core samples and seismic data, it was demonstrated that time-lapse 3D seismology is a suitable characterization method for reservoir changes in heavy oil production.

  10. A randomized clinical trial comparing embryo culture in a conventional incubator with a time-lapse incubator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Kirstine; Hindkjaer, Johnny Juhl; Grøndahl, Marie Louise

    2012-01-01

    Time-lapse monitoring allows for a flexible embryo evaluation and potentially provides new dynamic markers of embryo competence. Before introducing time-lapse monitoring in a clinical setting, the safety of the instrument must be properly documented. Accordingly, the aim of this study...... was to evaluate the safety of a commercially available time-lapse incubator....

  11. Analysis of Zebrafish Kidney Development with Time-lapse Imaging Using a Dissecting Microscope Equipped for Optical Sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perner, Birgit; Schnerwitzki, Danny; Graf, Michael; Englert, Christoph

    2016-04-07

    In order to understand organogenesis, the spatial and temporal alterations that occur during development of tissues need to be recorded. The method described here allows time-lapse analysis of normal and impaired kidney development in zebrafish embryos by using a fluorescence dissecting microscope equipped for structured illumination and z-stack acquisition. To visualize nephrogenesis, transgenic zebrafish (Tg(wt1b:GFP)) with fluorescently labeled kidney structures were used. Renal defects were triggered by injection of an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide against the Wilms tumor gene wt1a, a factor known to be crucial for kidney development. The advantage of the experimental setup is the combination of a zoom microscope with simple strategies for re-adjusting movements in x, y or z direction without additional equipment. To circumvent focal drift that is induced by temperature variations and mechanical vibrations, an autofocus strategy was applied instead of utilizing a usually required environmental chamber. In order to re-adjust the positional changes due to a xy-drift, imaging chambers with imprinted relocation grids were employed. In comparison to more complex setups for time-lapse recording with optical sectioning such as confocal laser scanning or light sheet microscopes, a zoom microscope is easy to handle. Besides, it offers dissecting microscope-specific benefits such as high depth of field and an extended working distance. The method to study organogenesis presented here can also be used with fluorescence stereo microscopes not capable of optical sectioning. Although limited for high-throughput, this technique offers an alternative to more complex equipment that is normally used for time-lapse recording of developing tissues and organ dynamics.

  12. Implications of the law on video recording in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Henken, Kirsten R.; Jansen, Frank-Willem; Klein, Jan; Stassen, Laurents; Dankelman, Jenny; Dobbelsteen, John

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Technological developments allow for a variety of applications of video recording in health care, including endoscopic procedures. Although the value of video registration is recognized, medicolegal concerns regarding the privacy of patients and professionals are growing. A clear understanding of the legal framework is lacking. Therefore, this research aims to provide insight into the juridical position of patients and professionals regarding video recording in health ...

  13. History matching of time-lapse crosswell data using ensemble kalman filtering

    KAUST Repository

    de Matos Ravanelli, Fabio Miguel

    2015-09-03

    Data from crosswell seismic surveys is processed to provide crosswell time-lapse data to map fluid changes in a reservoir where time-lapse or 4D seismic data is unavailable or unreliable, such as in onshore reservoirs. The resultant processing results provide quantitative information for history matching purposes using a probabilistic approach to take in account uncertainties in the geological model and reduce uncertainties in reservoir production forecasts.

  14. Time-lapse seismic attribute analysis for a water-flooded reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Long; Sen, M K; Stoffa, P L; Seif, R K

    2008-01-01

    One of the goals of time-lapse seismic monitoring is the direct detection of the fluid front and two-phase contact area. However, several factors affect the quality of time-lapse seismic difference data and decrease detectability. One of these factors is random noise. In this paper, we propose five different methods aimed at improving the quality and detectability of noisy time-lapse seismic difference data. Common to these methods is the transform of the differences to a domain where the time-lapse signal and random noise are well separated. Our proposed methods include direct Fourier transform based spectral decomposition, bispectra, wavelet transform, singular value decomposition and hybrid methods. We also propose a method that combines multiple time-lapse difference data and gives a final difference which enhances the common part and attenuates the differences of the multiple difference images resulting in a better detectability than the original images. A synthetic time-lapse model is used to demonstrate the feasibility of our proposed methods

  15. Time-lapse high-resolution seismic surveys in the Mississippi Delta mudflow area, offshore Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son-Hindmarsh, R.; Hughson, R.A.; Ploessel, M.R.

    1984-05-01

    Time-lapse high-resolution surveys are useful for studying rapidly changing geologic features such as the mudflows of the Mississippi Delta, and for assessing how these potentially hazardous features might affect offshore structures. For time-lapse surveys, an initial high-resolution seismic survey is repeated at specified time intervals, following the same grid of tracklines, using the same seismic systems and a precise navigation system. Time-lapse surveys have been used successfully to monitor the active mudflow about 6 miles upslope from Shell Offshore Inc.'s Cognac Platform. The surveys show that mudflow activity has had no effect on the Platform. Time-lapse surveys obtain the most accurate determination of seafloor changes available at the present time. If one compares two or more random surveys in an area, instead of carefully performed time-lapse surveys, the accuracy of the results may be less than the actural amount of change; so results may be meaningless or misleading. Time-lapse surveys can produce results with vertical accuracy of about + or 5 feet along survey tracklines.

  16. Time-Lapse Dynamics of the Mouse Oocyte Chromatin Organisation during Meiotic Resumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Belli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the mammalian oocyte, distinct patterns of centromeres and pericentromeric heterochromatin localisation correlate with the gamete’s developmental competence. Mouse antral oocytes display two main types of chromatin organisation: SN oocytes, with a ring of Hoechst-positive chromatin surrounding the nucleolus, and NSN oocytes lacking this ring. When matured to MII and fertilised, only SN oocytes develop beyond the 2-cell, and reach full term. To give detailed information on the dynamics of the SN or NSN chromatin during meiosis resumption, we performed a 9 hr time-lapse observation. The main significant differences recorded are: (1 reduction of the nuclear area only in SN oocytes; (2 ~17 min delay of GVBD in NSN oocytes; (3 chromatin condensation, after GVBD, in SN oocytes; (4 formation of 4-5 CHCs in SN oocytes; (5 increase of the perivitelline space, ~57 min later in NSN oocytes; (6 formation of a rosette-like disposition of CHCs, ~84 min later in SN oocytes; (7 appearance of the MI plate ~40 min later in NSN oocytes. Overall, we described a pathway of transition from the GV to the MII stage that is punctuated of discrete recordable events showing their specificity and occurring with different time kinetics in the two types of oocytes.

  17. Near real-time imaging of molasses injections using time-lapse electrical geophysics at the Brandywine DRMO, Brandywine, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteeg, R. J.; Johnson, T.; Major, B.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Lane, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Enhanced bioremediation, which involves introduction of amendments to promote biodegradation, increasingly is used to accelerate cleanup of recalcitrant compounds and has been identified as the preferred remedial treatment at many contaminated sites. Although blind introduction of amendments can lead to sub-optimal or ineffective remediation, the distribution of amendment throughout the treatment zone is difficult to measure using conventional sampling. Because amendments and their degradation products commonly have electrical properties that differ from those of ambient soil, time-lapse electrical geophysical monitoring has the potential to verify amendment emplacement and distribution. In order for geophysical monitoring to be useful, however, results of the injection ideally should be accessible in near real time. In August 2010, we demonstrated the feasibility of near real-time, autonomous electrical geophysical monitoring of amendment injections at the former Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) in Brandywine, Maryland. Two injections of about 1000 gallons each of molasses, a widely used amendment for enhanced bioremediation, were monitored using measurements taken with borehole and surface electrodes. During the injections, multi-channel resistance data were recorded; data were transmitted to a server and processed using a parallel resistivity inversion code; and results in the form of time-lapse imagery subsequently were posted to a website. This process occurred automatically without human intervention. The resulting time-lapse imagery clearly showed the evolution of the molasses plume. The delay between measurements and online delivery of images was between 45 and 60 minutes, thus providing actionable information that could support decisions about field procedures and a check on whether amendment reached target zones. This experiment demonstrates the feasibility of using electrical imaging as a monitoring tool both during amendment emplacement

  18. Estimation of soil hydraulic properties based on time-lapse Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumann, Stefan; Klenk, Patrick; Roth, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    Recent developments brought surface-based GPR measurements to a precision that make them useful for estimating soil hydraulic properties. For this study, we estimate Mualem-Brooks-Corey parameters for a layered subsurface material distribution employing the Levenberg-Marquardt inversion algorithm. The required measurement data were recorded at our artificial test site ASSESS, where we forced the hydraulic system with a fluctuating water table and observed the dynamic deformation of the capillary fringe with time-lapse GPR. Subsequently, these measurements were simulated based on a model comprising (i) the Richards equation describing the temporal evolution of the soil hydraulic system which was solved with MUPHI, (ii) the Complex Refractive Index Model (CRIM) serving as petrophysical relationship which links the soil hydraulic model to (iii) the electrodynamic model consisting of Maxwell's equations which are solved with MEEP. For the objective function of the optimization algorithm, both measured and simulated GPR data were evaluated with a semi-automated wavelet feature detection algorithm allowing to directly compare the travel time and amplitude of the GPR signal. In this presentation, we discuss the results of the inversion based on the inversion of GPR data and we also discuss how including Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) measurement data influences the estimated parameters.

  19. Mathematical analysis of endothelial sibling pair cell-cell interactions using time-lapse cinematography data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L M; Ryan, U S; Absher, M; Olazabal, B M

    1982-01-01

    The sibling pairs from two different endothelial cell cultures were analysed by time-lapse cinematography. It was shown that wounded and regular (low density seeded) cultures differed in the behaviour patterns of their siblings. The cultures differed most significantly in the minimum interdivision time (IDT) which was 27% lower for the wounded culture. In the wounded culture there was a greater correlation of IDT values between sibling pairs. IDT values recorded both for paired and for unpaired cells were shorter for the wounded than for the regular culture. The mean IDT for unpaired cells was longer than the mean IDT for paired cells in the regular culture. Thus paired cells in the regular culture, had shorter IDTs, but not as short as in the wounded culture. It was significant that in the wounded culture the first generation of siblings were very close (less than 150 microns apart) at division. Overall the behaviour differences between the two cultures resulted in a higher rate of increase in cell numbers, and thus faster repair, of the wounded monolayer.

  20. Time-lapse imaging of human heart motion with switched array UWB radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovoll, Sverre; Berger, Tor; Paichard, Yoann; Aardal, Øyvind; Lande, Tor Sverre; Hamran, Svein-Erik

    2014-10-01

    Radar systems for detection of human heartbeats have mostly been single-channel systems with limited spatial resolution. In this paper, a radar system for ultra-wideband (UWB) imaging of the human heart is presented. To make the radar waves penetrate the human tissue the antenna is placed very close to the body. The antenna is an array with eight elements, and an antenna switch system connects the radar to the individual elements in sequence to form an image. Successive images are used to build up time-lapse movies of the beating heart. Measurements on a human test subject are presented and the heart motion is estimated at different locations inside the body. The movies show rhythmic motion consistent with the beating heart, and the location and shape of the reflections correspond well with the expected response form the heart wall. The spatial dependent heart motion is compared to ECG recordings, and it is confirmed that heartbeat modulations are seen in the radar data. This work shows that radar imaging of the human heart may provide valuable information on the mechanical movement of the heart.

  1. Clients experience of video recordings of their psychotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Jensen, Karen Boelt; Madsen, Ninna Skov

    Background: Due to the development of technologies and the low costs video recording of psychotherapy sessions have gained ground in training and supervision. While some praise the advantages others decline to use this technological aid for ethical, theoretical or clinical reasons. Despite...... of having their psychotherapy sessions video recorded and presented in supervision. Methods: In all 25 clients receiving brief psychodynamic outpatient treatment in a university clinic setting filled out a questionnaire containing eight open ended questions concerning the influence of the video recordings...

  2. Time-lapse seismic imaging of the Reykjanes geothermal reservoir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weemstra, C.; Obermann, Anne; Blanck, Hanna; Verdel, Arie; Paap, B; Guðnason, Egill Árni; Hersir, Gylfi Páll; Jousset, Philippe; Sigurðsson, Ömar

    2016-01-01

    We report on the results obtained from a dense seismic deployment over a geothermal reservoir. The reservoir has been producing continuously for almost a decade and is located on the tip of the Reykjanes peninsula, SW Iceland. The seismic stations on top of the reservoir have continuously recorded

  3. Time-Lapse Monitoring with 4D Seismic Coda Waves in Active, Passive and Ambient Noise Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, D. E.; Kamei, R.; Saygin, E.; Shragge, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth's subsurface is continuously changing, due to temporal variations in fluid flow, stress, temperature, geomechanics and geochemistry, for example. These physical changes occur at broad tectonic and earthquake scales, and also at very detailed near-surface and reservoir scales. Changes in the physical states of the earth cause time-varying changes in the physical properties of rocks and fluids, which can be monitored with natural or manmade seismic waves. Time-lapse (4D) seismic monitoring is important for applications related to natural and induced seismicity, hydrocarbon and groundwater reservoir depletion, CO2 sequestration etc. An exciting new research area involves moving beyond traditional methods in order to use the full complex time-lapse scattered wavefield (4D coda waves) for both manmade active-source 3D/4D seismic data, and also to use continuous recordings of natural-source passive seismic data, especially (micro) earthquakes and ocean ambient noise. This research involves full wave-equation approaches including waveform inversion (FWI), interferometry, Large N sensor arrays, "big data" information theory, and high performance supercomputing (HPC). I will present high-level concepts and recent data results that are quite spectacular and highly encouraging.

  4. Advances in interpretation of subsurface processes with time-lapse electrical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Kaminit; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Johnson, Tim B.; Slater, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    Electrical geophysical methods, including electrical resistivity, time-domain induced polarization, and complex resistivity, have become commonly used to image the near subsurface. Here, we outline their utility for time-lapse imaging of hydrological, geochemical, and biogeochemical processes, focusing on new instrumentation, processing, and analysis techniques specific to monitoring. We review data collection procedures, parameters measured, and petrophysical relationships and then outline the state of the science with respect to inversion methodologies, including coupled inversion. We conclude by highlighting recent research focused on innovative applications of time-lapse imaging in hydrology, biology, ecology, and geochemistry, among other areas of interest.

  5. Calibrating vadose zone models with time-lapse gravity data: a forced infiltration experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lars; Hansen, Allan Bo; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms

    A change in soil water content is a change in mass stored in the subsurface, and when large enough, can be measured with a gravity meter. Over the last few decades there has been increased use of ground-based time-lapse gravity measurements to infer hydrogeological parameters. These studies have...

  6. 2D Time-lapse Seismic Tomography Using An Active Time Constraint (ATC) Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    We propose a 2D seismic time-lapse inversion approach to image the evolution of seismic velocities over time and space. The forward modeling is based on solving the eikonal equation using a second-order fast marching method. The wave-paths are represented by Fresnel volumes rathe...

  7. Inter and intra-observer variability of time-lapse annotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundvall Germeys, Linda Karin M; Ingerslev, Hans Jakob; Knudsen, Ulla Breth

    . This provides the basis for further investigation of embryo assessment and selection by time-lapse imaging in prospective trials. Study funding/competing interest(s): Research at the Fertility Clinic was funded by an unrestricted grant from Ferring and MSD. The authors have no competing interests to declare....

  8. Latest time-lapse seismic data from Sleipner yield new insights into CO2 plume development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chadwick, R.A.; Noy, D.; Arts, R.; Eiken, O.

    2009-01-01

    Since its inception in 1996, the CO2 injection operation at Sleipner has been monitored by 3D time-lapse seismic surveys. Striking images of the CO2 plume have been obtained, showing a multi-tier feature of high reflectivity, interpreted as arising from a number of thin layers of CO2 trapped beneath

  9. Oil Sands Characteristics and Time-Lapse and P-SV Seismic Steam Monitoring, Athabasca, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, A.; Nakayama, T.; Kashihara, K.; Skinner, L.; Kato, A.

    2008-12-01

    -injection. The differences of the seismic responses between the time-lapse seismic volumes can be quantitatively explained by P-wave velocity decrease of the oil sands layers due to steam-injection. In addition, the data suggests that a larger area would be influenced by pressure than temperature. We calculate several seismic attributes such as RMS values of amplitude difference, maximum cross correlations, and interval velocity differences. These attributes are integrated by using self-organization maps (SOM) and K-means methods. By this analysis, we are able to distinguish areas of steam chamber growth from transitional and non-affected areas. In addition, 3D P-SV converted-wave processing and analysis are applied on the second 3D data set (recorded with three-component digital sensor). Low Vp/Vs values in the P-SV volume show areas of steam chamber development, and high Vp/Vs values indicate transitional zones. Our analysis of both time-lapse 3D seismic and 3D P-SV data along with the rock physics model can be used to monitor qualitatively and quantitatively the rock property changes of the inter-well reservoir sands in the field.

  10. Advancement of thyroid surgery video recording: A comparison between two full HD head mounted video cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortensi, Andrea; Panunzi, Andrea; Trombetta, Silvia; Cattaneo, Alberto; Sorrenti, Salvatore; D'Orazi, Valerio

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to test two different video cameras and recording systems used in thyroid surgery in our Department. This is meant to be an attempt to record the real point of view of the magnified vision of surgeon, so as to make the viewer aware of the difference with the naked eye vision. In this retrospective study, we recorded and compared twenty thyroidectomies performed using loupes magnification and microsurgical technique: ten were recorded with GoPro ® 4 Session action cam (commercially available) and ten with our new prototype of head mounted video camera. Settings were selected before surgery for both cameras. The recording time is about from 1 to 2 h for GoPro ® and from 3 to 5 h for our prototype. The average time of preparation to fit the camera on the surgeon's head and set the functionality is about 5 min for GoPro ® and 7-8 min for the prototype, mostly due to HDMI wiring cable. Videos recorded with the prototype require no further editing, which is mandatory for videos recorded with GoPro ® to highlight the surgical details. the present study showed that our prototype of video camera, compared with GoPro ® 4 Session, guarantees best results in terms of surgical video recording quality, provides to the viewer the exact perspective of the microsurgeon and shows accurately his magnified view through the loupes in thyroid surgery. These recordings are surgical aids for teaching and education and might be a method of self-analysis of surgical technique. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Coupled hydrogeophysical inversion using time-lapse magnetic resonance sounding and time-lapse gravity data for hydraulic aquifer testing: Will it work in practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herckenrath, Daan; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Temporal changes in water content can be directly related to the time-lapse signals retrieved using magnetic resonance sounding (TL-MRS) and relative gravimetry (TL-RG). Previous studies suggest that TL-RG measurements can potentially provide accurate estimates of aquifer characteristics in an aq......Temporal changes in water content can be directly related to the time-lapse signals retrieved using magnetic resonance sounding (TL-MRS) and relative gravimetry (TL-RG). Previous studies suggest that TL-RG measurements can potentially provide accurate estimates of aquifer characteristics...... in an aquifer pumping test experiment when used in a coupled hydrogeophysical inversion approach. However, these studies considered highly idealized conditions. The aim of this paper is twofold: first, we investigate three major issues which likely limit the practical utility of TL-RG for pumping test...... monitoring: partially penetrating pumping wells in anisotropic aquifers, delayed drainage effects, and typical data errors for TL-RG. Second, we introduce TL-MRS in a similar coupled hydrogeophysical inversion framework and compare the performance of TL-MRS and TL-RG for pumping test monitoring...

  12. A randomized clinical trial comparing embryo culture in a conventional incubator with a time-lapse incubator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Kirstine; Hindkjaer, Johnny Juhl; Grøndahl, Marie Louise

    2012-01-01

    Time-lapse monitoring allows for a flexible embryo evaluation and potentially provides new dynamic markers of embryo competence. Before introducing time-lapse monitoring in a clinical setting, the safety of the instrument must be properly documented. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to eval...

  13. Effect of oxygen concentration on human embryo development evaluated by time-lapse monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Hans Jakob; Hindkjær, Johnny Juhl; Kirkegaard, Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    -points for each cell division and blastocyst stages were registered until 120 hours after oocyte retrieval. Only 2PN embryos completing the first cleavage were evaluated. The groups were compared using one-way ANOVA or Kruskall-Wallis test. Estimates are reported as medians with 95% confidence intervals. Time......Introduction: Data from a number of studies indicate -but not unequivocally- that culture of embryos in 5% O2 compared to 20% O2 improves blastocyst formation in humans and various animal species and may yield better pregnancy rates in IVF. The detrimental effects of atmospheric oxygen were...... was to evaluate the influence of oxygen tension on human pre-implantation development using time-lapse monitoring. Materials and methods: Human embryos were cultured to the blastocyst stage in a time-lapse incubator (EmbryoScope™) in 20% O2 (group 1), 20% O2 for 24 hours followed by culture in 5% O2 (group 2...

  14. Freeze core sampling to validate time-lapse resistivity monitoring of the hyporheic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toran, Laura; Hughes, Brian; Nyquist, Jonathan; Ryan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A freeze core sampler was used to characterize hyporheic zone storage during a stream tracer test. The pore water from the frozen core showed tracer lingered in the hyporheic zone after the tracer had returned to background concentration in collocated well samples. These results confirmed evidence of lingering subsurface tracer seen in time-lapse electrical resistivity tomographs. The pore water exhibited brine exclusion (ion concentrations in ice lower than source water) in a sediment matrix, despite the fast freezing time. Although freeze core sampling provided qualitative evidence of lingering tracer, it proved difficult to quantify tracer concentration because the amount of brine exclusion during freezing could not be accurately determined. Nonetheless, the additional evidence for lingering tracer supports using time-lapse resistivity to detect regions of low fluid mobility within the hyporheic zone that can act as chemically reactive zones of importance in stream health. © 2012, The Author(s). GroundWater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  15. Time-lapse electrical surveys to locate infiltration zones in weathered hard rock tropical areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wubda, M.; Descloitres, M.; Yalo, N.; Ribolzi, O.; Vouillamoz, J. M.; Boukari, M.; Hector, B.; Séguis, L.

    2017-07-01

    In West Africa, infiltration and groundwater recharge processes in hard rock areas are depending on climatic, surface and subsurface conditions, and are poorly documented. Part of the reason is that identification, location and monitoring of these processes is still a challenge. Here, we explore the potential for time-lapse electrical surveys to bring additional information on these processes for two different climate situations: a semi-arid Sahelian site (north of Burkina and a humid Sudanian site (north of Benin), respectively focusing on indirect (localized) and direct (diffuse) recharge processes. The methodology is based on surveys in dry season and rainy season on typical pond or gully using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and frequency electromagnetic (FEM) apparent conductivity mapping. The results show that in the Sahelian zone an indirect recharge occurs as expected, but infiltration doesn't takes place at the center of the pond to the aquifer, but occurs laterally in the banks. In Sudanian zone, the ERT survey shows a direct recharge process as expected, but also a complicated behavior of groundwater dilution, as well as the role of hardpans for fast infiltration. These processes are ascertained by groundwater monitoring in adjacent observing wells. At last, FEM time lapse mapping is found to be difficult to quantitatively interpreted due to the non-uniqueness of the model, clearly evidenced comparing FEM result to auger holes monitoring. Finally, we found that time-lapse ERT can be an efficient way to track infiltration processes across ponds and gullies in both climatic conditions, the Sahelian setting providing results easier to interpret, due to significant resistivity contrasts between dry and rain seasons. Both methods can be used for efficient implementation of punctual sensors for complementary studies. However, FEM time-lapse mapping remains difficult to practice without external information that renders this method less attractive for

  16. Calixarenes and cations: a time-lapse photography of the big-bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casnati, Alessandro

    2013-08-07

    The outstanding cation complexation properties emerging from the pioneering studies on calixarene ligands during a five-year period in the early 1980s triggered a big-bang burst of publications on such macrocycles that is still lasting at a distance of more than 30 years. A time-lapse photography of this timeframe is proposed which allows the readers to pinpoint the contributions of the different research groups.

  17. 3D Time-lapse Imaging and Quantification of Mitochondrial Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Sison, Miguel; Chakrabortty, Sabyasachi; Extermann, J?r?me; Nahas, Amir; James Marchand, Paul; Lopez, Antonio; Weil, Tanja; Lasser, Theo

    2017-01-01

    We present a 3D time-lapse imaging method for monitoring mitochondrial dynamics in living HeLa cells based on photothermal optical coherence microscopy and using novel surface functionalization of gold nanoparticles. The biocompatible protein-based biopolymer coating contains multiple functional groups which impart better cellular uptake and mitochondria targeting efficiency. The high stability of the gold nanoparticles allows continuous imaging over an extended time up to 3000 seconds withou...

  18. Probabilistic 3-D time-lapse inversion of magnetotelluric data: Application to an enhanced geothermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Carbajal, Marina; Linde, Nicolas; Peacock, Jared R.; Zyserman, F. I.; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Thiel, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Surface-based monitoring of mass transfer caused by injections and extractions in deep boreholes is crucial to maximize oil, gas and geothermal production. Inductive electromagnetic methods, such as magnetotellurics, are appealing for these applications due to their large penetration depths and sensitivity to changes in fluid conductivity and fracture connectivity. In this work, we propose a 3-D Markov chain Monte Carlo inversion of time-lapse magnetotelluric data to image mass transfer following a saline fluid injection. The inversion estimates the posterior probability density function of the resulting plume, and thereby quantifies model uncertainty. To decrease computation times, we base the parametrization on a reduced Legendre moment decomposition of the plume. A synthetic test shows that our methodology is effective when the electrical resistivity structure prior to the injection is well known. The centre of mass and spread of the plume are well retrieved.We then apply our inversion strategy to an injection experiment in an enhanced geothermal system at Paralana, South Australia, and compare it to a 3-D deterministic time-lapse inversion. The latter retrieves resistivity changes that are more shallow than the actual injection interval, whereas the probabilistic inversion retrieves plumes that are located at the correct depths and oriented in a preferential north-south direction. To explain the time-lapse data, the inversion requires unrealistically large resistivity changes with respect to the base model. We suggest that this is partly explained by unaccounted subsurface heterogeneities in the base model from which time-lapse changes are inferred.

  19. Time-lapse seismic - repeatability versus usefulness and 2D versus 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landro, M.

    2017-12-01

    Time-lapse seismic has developed rapidly over the past decades, especially for monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs and subsurface storage of CO2. I will review and discuss some of the critical enabling factors for the commercial success of this technology. It was early realized that how well we are able to repeat our seismic experiment is crucial. However, it is always a question of detectability versus repeatability. For marine seismic, there are several factors limiting the repeatability: Weather conditions, positioning of sources and receivers and so on. I will discuss recent improvements in both acquisition and processing methods over the last decade. It is well known that repeated 3D seismic data is the most accurate tool for reservoir monitoring purposes. However, several examples show that 2D seismic data may be used for monitoring purposes despite lower repeatability. I will use examples from an underground blow out in the North Sea, and repeated 2D seismic lines acquired before and after the Tohoku earthquake in 2011 to illustrate this. A major challenge when using repeated 2D seismic for subsurface monitoring purposes is the lack of 3D calibration points and significantly less amount of data. For marine seismic acquisition, feathering issues and crossline dip effects become more critical compared to 3D seismic acquisition. Furthermore, the uncertainties arising from a non-ideal 2D seismic acquisition are hard to assess, since the 3D subsurface geometry has not been mapped. One way to shed more light on this challenge is to use 3D time lapse seismic modeling testing various crossline dips or geometries. Other ways are to use alternative data sources, such as bathymetry, time lapse gravity or electromagnetic data. The end result for all time-lapse monitoring projects is an interpretation associated with uncertainties, and for the 2D case these uncertainties are often large. The purpose of this talk is to discuss how to reduces and control these

  20. Assessment of Time-Lapse in Visible and Thermal Face Recognition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Farokhi, Sajad; Shamsuddin, Siti Mariyam; Flusser, Jan; Sheikh, Usman Ullah

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2012), s. 181-186 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/1552 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : face recognition * moment invariants * Zernike moments Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/ZOI/flusser-assessment of time-lapse in visible and thermal face recognition -j.pdf

  1. Seismic time-lapse imaging using Interferometric least-squares migration

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Mrinal

    2016-09-06

    One of the problems with 4D surveys is that the environmental conditions change over time so that the experiment is insufficiently repeatable. To mitigate this problem, we propose the use of interferometric least-squares migration (ILSM) to estimate the migration image for the baseline and monitor surveys. Here, a known reflector is used as the reference reflector for ILSM. Results with synthetic and field data show that ILSM can eliminate artifacts caused by non-repeatability in time-lapse surveys.

  2. Using time-lapse gravity for groundwater model calibration: An application to alluvial aquifer storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lars; Binning, Philip John; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The estimation of hydrological model parameters by calibration to field data is a critical step in the modeling process. However, calibration often fails because of parameter correlation. Here it is shown that time-lapse gravity data can be combined with hydraulic head data in a coupled hydrogeop......The estimation of hydrological model parameters by calibration to field data is a critical step in the modeling process. However, calibration often fails because of parameter correlation. Here it is shown that time-lapse gravity data can be combined with hydraulic head data in a coupled...... shows that time-lapse gravity data are especially useful to constrain specific yield. Furthermore, we demonstrate that evapotranspiration, and riverbed conductance are better constrained by coupled inversion to gravity and head data than to head data alone. When estimating the four parameters...... simultaneously, the six correlation coefficients were reduced from unity when only head data were employed to significantly lower values when gravity and head data were combined. Our analysis reveals that the estimated parameter values are not very sensitive to the choice of weighting between head and gravity...

  3. Efficiency of time-lapse intervals and simple baits for camera surveys of wild pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B.L.; Holtfreter, R.W.; Ditchkoff, S.S.; Grand, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Growing concerns surrounding established and expanding populations of wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have created the need for rapid and accurate surveys of these populations. We conducted surveys of a portion of the wild pig population on Fort Benning, Georgia, to determine if a longer time-lapse interval than had been previously used in surveys of wild pigs would generate similar detection results. We concurrently examined whether use of soured corn at camera sites affected the time necessary for pigs to locate a new camera site or the time pigs remained at a site. Our results suggest that a 9-min time-lapse interval generated dependable detection results for pigs and that soured corn neither attracted pigs to a site any quicker than plain, dry, whole-kernel corn, nor held them at a site longer. Maximization of time-lapse interval should decrease data and processing loads, and use of a simple, available bait should decrease cost and effort associated with more complicated baits; combination of these concepts should increase efficiency of wild pig surveys. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  4. THE DETERMINATION OF THE SHARPNESS DEPTH BORDERS AND CORRESPONDING PHOTOGRAPHY AND VIDEO RECORDING PARAMETERS FOR CONTEMPORARY VIDEO TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Zaytseva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of determination of the sharpness depth borders was improved for contemporary video technology. The computer programme for determination of corresponding video recording parameters was created.

  5. A state-space Bayesian framework for estimating biogeochemical transformations using time-lapse geophysical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; Hubbard, S.; Williams, K.; Pride, S.; Li, L.; Steefel, C.; Slater, L.

    2009-04-15

    We develop a state-space Bayesian framework to combine time-lapse geophysical data with other types of information for quantitative estimation of biogeochemical parameters during bioremediation. We consider characteristics of end-products of biogeochemical transformations as state vectors, which evolve under constraints of local environments through evolution equations, and consider time-lapse geophysical data as available observations, which could be linked to the state vectors through petrophysical models. We estimate the state vectors and their associated unknown parameters over time using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling methods. To demonstrate the use of the state-space approach, we apply it to complex resistivity data collected during laboratory column biostimulation experiments that were poised to precipitate iron and zinc sulfides during sulfate reduction. We develop a petrophysical model based on sphere-shaped cells to link the sulfide precipitate properties to the time-lapse geophysical attributes and estimate volume fraction of the sulfide precipitates, fraction of the dispersed, sulfide-encrusted cells, mean radius of the aggregated clusters, and permeability over the course of the experiments. Results of the case study suggest that the developed state-space approach permits the use of geophysical datasets for providing quantitative estimates of end-product characteristics and hydrological feedbacks associated with biogeochemical transformations. Although tested here on laboratory column experiment datasets, the developed framework provides the foundation needed for quantitative field-scale estimation of biogeochemical parameters over space and time using direct, but often sparse wellbore data with indirect, but more spatially extensive geophysical datasets.

  6. Time-lapse electrical geophysical monitoring of amendment-based biostimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Major, William; Lane, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Biostimulation is increasingly used to accelerate microbial remediation of recalcitrant groundwater contaminants. Effective application of biostimulation requires successful emplacement of amendment in the contaminant target zone. Verification of remediation performance requires postemplacement assessment and contaminant monitoring. Sampling-based approaches are expensive and provide low-density spatial and temporal information. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is an effective geophysical method for determining temporal changes in subsurface electrical conductivity. Because remedial amendments and biostimulation-related biogeochemical processes often change subsurface electrical conductivity, ERT can complement and enhance sampling-based approaches for assessing emplacement and monitoring biostimulation-based remediation.Field studies demonstrating the ability of time-lapse ERT to monitor amendment emplacement and behavior were performed during a biostimulation remediation effort conducted at the Department of Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) Yard, in Brandywine, Maryland, United States. Geochemical fluid sampling was used to calibrate a petrophysical relation in order to predict groundwater indicators of amendment distribution. The petrophysical relations were field validated by comparing predictions to sequestered fluid sample results, thus demonstrating the potential of electrical geophysics for quantitative assessment of amendment-related geochemical properties. Crosshole radar zero-offset profile and borehole geophysical logging were also performed to augment the data set and validate interpretation.In addition to delineating amendment transport in the first 10 months after emplacement, the time-lapse ERT results show later changes in bulk electrical properties interpreted as mineral precipitation. Results support the use of more cost-effective surface-based ERT in conjunction with limited field sampling to improve spatial

  7. Time-Lapse Electrical Geophysical Monitoring of Amendment-Based Biostimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Versteeg, Roelof; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Major, William; Lane, John W.

    2015-12-02

    Biostimulation is increasingly used to accelerate microbial remediation of recalcitrant groundwater contaminants. Effective application of biostimulation requires successful emplacement of amendment in the contaminant target zone. Verification of remediation performance requires postemplacement assessment and contaminant monitoring. Sampling based approaches are expensive and provide low-density spatial and temporal information. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is an effective geophysical method for determining temporal changes in subsurface electrical conductivity. Because remedial amendments and biostimulation-related biogeochemical processes often change subsurface electrical conductivity, ERT can complement and enhance sampling-based approaches for assessing emplacement and monitoring biostimulation-based remediation. Field studies demonstrating the ability of time-lapse ERT to monitor amendment emplacement and behavior were performed during a biostimulation remediation effort conducted at the Department of Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) Yard, in Brandywine, Maryland, United States. Geochemical fluid sampling was used to calibrate a petrophysical relation in order to predict groundwater indicators of amendment distribution. The petrophysical relations were field validated by comparing predictions to sequestered fluid sample results, thus demonstrating the potential of electrical geophysics for quantitative assessment of amendment-related geochemical properties. Crosshole radar zero-offset profile and borehole geophysical logging were also performed to augment the data set and validate interpretation. In addition to delineating amendment transport in the first 10 months after emplacement, the time-lapse ERT results show later changes in bulk electrical properties interpreted as mineral precipitation. Results support the use of more cost-effective surfacebased ERT in conjunction with limited field sampling to improve spatial

  8. Time-lapse 3D imaging of calcite precipitation in a microporous column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, Jose R. A.; Withers, Philip J.

    2018-02-01

    Time-lapse X-ray computed tomography is used to image the evolution of calcite precipitation during flow through microporous quartz over the course of 400 h. The growth rate decreases by more than seven times, which is linked to the clogging of flow paths that restricts flow to some regions of the column. Fewer precipitates are observed as a function of column depth, which is found to be related to a differential nucleation density along the sample. A higher nucleation density closer to the inlet implies more crystal volume increase per unit of time without affecting the rate if normalized to the surface area of crystals. Our overall growth rates measured in porous media are orders of magnitude slower than growth rates derived from traditional precipitation experiments on free surfaces. Based on our time-lapse results we hypothesize a scenario where the evolving distribution of precipitates within a pore structure during precipitation progressively modifies the local transport through the pores. Within less permeable regions the saturation index may be lower than along the main flow paths. Therefore, the reactive crystal surfaces within those regions grow at a slower rate than that expected from the bulk fluid composition. Since the amount of reactive surface area within these less permeable regions increases over time, the overall growth rate decreases without a necessary significant change of the bulk fluid composition along more permeable flow paths. In conclusion, the overall growth rates in an evolving porous media expected from bulk fluid compositions alone can be overestimated due to the development of stagnant sub-regions where the reactive surface area is bath by a solution with lower saturation index. In this context we highlight the value of time-lapse 3D studies for understanding the dynamics of mineral precipitation in porous media.

  9. Segmentation Method of Time-Lapse Microscopy Images with the Focus on Biocompatibility Assessment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, Jindřich; Císař, P.; Šroubek, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2016), s. 497-506 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-29225S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LO1205; GA UK(CZ) 914813/2013; GA UK(CZ) SVV-2016-260332; CENAKVA(CZ) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0024 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : phase contrast microscopy * segmentation * biocompatibility assessment * time-lapse * cytotoxicity testing Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/ZOI/soukupj-0460642.pdf

  10. Recording electrophysiological data on video tape: a superior and less costly alternative to conventional tape recorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, R G; Knobloch, C A; Singleton, D M; Steel, C G; Davey, K G

    1985-10-01

    Electrical potentials recorded extracellularly from the sinus gland of the isopod, Oniscus asellus, were stored on video tape with the aid of a digital-audio (DA) processor and a video cassette recorder (VCR). The DA processor transforms the analog signal to digital pulses of equal amplitude and converts these pulses into a television signal for recording on video tape. In playback, the DA processor reconverts the pulses to an analog signal with negligible distortion. When viewed on the oscilloscope screen, electrical potentials reproduced by this method were indistinguishable from electrical potentials recorded 'live' from the sinus gland. However, electrical potentials recorded from the same sinus gland and reproduced by a conventional FM tape recorder were easily differentiated from the 'live' recording. The special effects inherent in the VCR (e.g. stop action, frame advance) also permitted detailed analysis of spontaneously occurring electrical potentials. Special effects were not possible with the FM tape recorder. The price, ease of operation and ability to produce extremely high quality recordings, makes the DA processor and VCR an exceptional system for storing electrophysiological data.

  11. Understanding infiltration and groundwater flow at an artificial recharge facility using time-lapse gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jeffrey

    Groundwater provides a fundamental resource for modern life. Throughout the world, groundwater is managed by storing (recharging) it underground in natural aquifers for future withdrawal and consumptive use. In Arizona, over 4 million people benefit from managed aquifer storage, but little effort is made to track the movement of recharged water through the subsurface. Motivated by current limitations in our ability to monitor percolation and groundwater movement at the scale of a recharge facility, an effort to collect time-lapse gravity data was carried out at the Southern Avra Valley Storage and Recovery Project (SAVSARP) operated by the City of Tucson, Arizona. In addition to collecting water-level data 12 wells, there were three primary gravity experiments: (1) five continuously-recording gravity meters (2 iGrav superconducting gravity meters and 3 gPhone gravity meters) were installed semi-permanently in control buildings adjacent to the recharge basins, (2) absolute gravity measurements were made at nine locations over a 17 month period, and (3) three relative-gravity campaigns were carried out on a network of 70 stations. This large-scale controlled experiment, with known infiltration and pumping rates, resulted in one of the most comprehensive datasets of its kind. Gravity data led to several hydrologic insights, both through direct measurement and modeling. First, the infiltration rate could be estimated accurately based on the initial rate of gravity change during infiltration, regardless of the specific yield. Using two gravity meters, the depth, and therefore speed, of the wetting front beneath a recharge basin was observed, including the time at which the water table was reached. Spatial maps of gravity change from relative gravity surveys show areas where infiltration efficiency is highest, and where groundwater accumulates; storage accumulated preferentially to the west of the recharge basins, away from pumping wells. Such information would be

  12. Marine time-Lapse (4D) Seismic Operations and Improved Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, N.

    2002-01-01

    Time-lapse (4D) seismic monitoring of producing reservoirs presents strong potential for improving reservoir management. Case studies show the capacity of 4D seismic to monitor injected fluid fronts, locate bypassed oil, map pressure compartmentalization, and delineate the sealing or leaking flow properties of faults. The advent of 4D seismic is expected to have as significant effect on increased recovery as the earlier introduction of 3D seismic in the late 80's 4D seismic has now become an established part of operators long-term plans for subsurface assets and in recent years much of the seismic activity in the North Sea has been the acquisition of 4D seismic surveys.The producing reservoir will usually feature a floating or fixed surface installation. As these installations obstruct towed streamer operations a second vessel is often required to undershoot the obstruction, Fugro-Geoteam's fleet of 2D and 3D seismic vessels is ideally suited to this type of operation and the company has gained valuable operational experience in the North Sea, Mediterranean and the Middle East.Errors in the positioning of in-sea equipment impact seismic imaging. These errors are compounded with each successive time-lapse survey. Fugro continually strives for ways to meet customers' expectations for improved performance. Therefore, in 2001 Fugro introduced a new high accuracy positioning service. This paper focuses on Fugro-Geoteam's 4D/undershoot operational experience and the new positioning 'High Performance' service

  13. Analysis of compaction initiation in human embryos by using time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Kyoko; Yumoto, Keitaro; Sugishima, Minako; Mizoguchi, Chizuru; Kai, Yoshiteru; Iba, Yumiko; Mio, Yasuyuki

    2014-04-01

    To analyze the initiation of compaction in human embryos in vitro by using time-lapse cinematography (TLC), with the goal of determining the precise timing of compaction and clarifying the morphological changes underlying the compaction process. One hundred and fifteen embryos donated by couples with no further need for embryo-transfer were used in this study. Donated embryos were thawed and processed, and then their morphological behavior during the initiation of compaction was dynamically observed via time-lapse cinematography (TLC) for 5 days. Although the initiation of compaction occurred throughout the period from the 4-cell to 16-cell stage, 99 (86.1 %) embryos initiated compaction at the 8-cell stage or later, with initiation at the 8-cell stage being most frequent (22.6 %). Of these 99 embryos, 49.5 % developed into good-quality blastocysts. In contrast, of the 16 (13.9 %) embryos that initiated compaction prior to the 8-cell stage, only 18.8 % developed into good-quality blastocysts. Embryos that initiated compaction before the 8-cell stage showed significantly higher numbers of multinucleated blastomeres, due to asynchronism in nuclear division at the third mitotic division resulting from cytokinetic failure. The initiation of compaction primarily occurs at the third mitotic division or later in human embryos. Embryos that initiate compaction before the 8-cell stage are usually associated with aberrant embryonic development (i.e., cytokinetic failure accompanied by karyokinesis).

  14. Time-lapse crystallography snapshots of a double-strand break repair polymerase in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamsen, Joonas A; Beard, William A; Pedersen, Lars C; Shock, David D; Moon, Andrea F; Krahn, Juno M; Bebenek, Katarzyna; Kunkel, Thomas A; Wilson, Samuel H

    2017-08-15

    DNA polymerase (pol) μ is a DNA-dependent polymerase that incorporates nucleotides during gap-filling synthesis in the non-homologous end-joining pathway of double-strand break repair. Here we report time-lapse X-ray crystallography snapshots of catalytic events during gap-filling DNA synthesis by pol μ. Unique catalytic intermediates and active site conformational changes that underlie catalysis are uncovered, and a transient third (product) metal ion is observed in the product state. The product manganese coordinates phosphate oxygens of the inserted nucleotide and PP i . The product metal is not observed during DNA synthesis in the presence of magnesium. Kinetic analyses indicate that manganese increases the rate constant for deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphate insertion compared to magnesium. The likely product stabilization role of the manganese product metal in pol μ is discussed. These observations provide insight on structural attributes of this X-family double-strand break repair polymerase that impact its biological function in genome maintenance.DNA polymerase (pol) μ functions in DNA double-strand break repair. Here the authors use time-lapse X-ray crystallography to capture the states of pol µ during the conversion from pre-catalytic to product complex and observe a third transiently bound metal ion in the product state.

  15. Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Investigations for Imaging the Grouting Injection in Shallow Subsurface Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farooq

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The highway of Yongweol-ri, Muan-gun, south-western part of the South Korean Peninsula, is underlain by the abandoned of subsurface cavities, which were discovered in 2005. These cavities lie at shallow depths with the range of 5∼15 meters below the ground surface. Numerous subsidence events have repeatedly occurred in the past few years, damaging infrastructure and highway. As a result of continuing subsidence issues, the Korean Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources (KIGAM was requested by local administration to resolve the issue. The KIGAM used geophysical methods to delineate subsurface cavities and improve more refined understanding of the cavities network in the study area. Cement based grouting has been widely employed in the construction industry to reinforce subsurface ground. In this research work, time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys were accomplished to monitor the grouting injection in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway, which have provided a quasi-real-time monitoring for modifying the subsurface cavities related to ground reinforcement, which would be difficult with direct methods. The results obtained from time-lapse electrical resistivity technique have satisfactory imaged the grouting injection experiment in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway. Furthermore, the borehole camera confirmed the presence of grouting material in the subsurface cavities, and hence this procedure increases the mechanical resistance of subsurface cavities below the highway.

  16. A study on quality-adjusted impact of time lapse on iris recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Nadezhda; Hua, Fang; Liu, Xuan; Remus, Jeremiah; Ross, Arun; Hornak, Lawrence; Schuckers, Stephanie

    2012-06-01

    Although human iris pattern is widely accepted as a stable biometric feature, recent research has found some evidences on the aging effect of iris system. In order to investigate changes in iris recognition performance due to the elapsed time between probe and gallery iris images, we examine the effect of elapsed time on iris recognition utilizing 7,628 iris images from 46 subjects with an average of ten visits acquired over two years from a legacy database at Clarkson University. Taken into consideration the impact of quality factors such as local contrast, illumination, blur and noise on iris recognition performance, regression models are built with and without quality metrics to evaluate the degradation of iris recognition performance based on time lapse factors. Our experimental results demonstrate the decrease of iris recognition performance along with increased elapsed time based on two iris recognition system (the modified Masek algorithm and a commercial software VeriEye SDK). These results also reveal the significance of quality factors in iris recognition regression indicating the variability in match scores. According to the regression analysis, our study in this paper helps provide the quantified decrease on match scores with increased elapsed time, which indicates the possibility to implement the prediction scheme for iris recognition performance based on learning of impact on time lapse factors.

  17. Very-High-Resolution Time-Lapse Photography for Plant and Ecosystems Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary H. Nichols

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Traditional photography is a compromise between image detail and area covered. We report a new method for creating time-lapse sequences of very-high-resolution photographs to produce zoomable images that facilitate observation across a range of spatial and temporal scales. Methods and Results: A robotic camera mount and software were used to capture images of the growth and movement in Brassica rapa every 15 s in the laboratory. The resultant time-lapse sequence (http://timemachine.gigapan.org/wiki/Plant_Growth captures growth detail such as circumnutation. A modified, solar-powered system was deployed at a remote field site in southern Arizona. Images were collected every 2 h over a 3-mo period to capture the response of vegetation to monsoon season rainfall (http://timemachine.gigapan.org/wiki/Arizona_Grasslands. Conclusions: A technique for observing time sequences of both individual plant and ecosystem response at a range of spatial scales is available for use in the laboratory and in the field.

  18. Informing hydrological models with ground-based time-lapse relative gravimetry: potential and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Christiansen, Lars; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Coupled hydrogeophysical inversion emerges as an attractive option to improve the calibration and predictive capability of hydrological models. Recently, ground-based time-lapse relative gravity (TLRG) measurements have attracted increasing interest because there is a direct relationship between ...... in gravity due to unmonitored non-hydrological effects, and the requirement of a gravitationally stable reference station. Application of TLRG in hydrology should be combined with other geophysical and/or traditional monitoring methods.......Coupled hydrogeophysical inversion emerges as an attractive option to improve the calibration and predictive capability of hydrological models. Recently, ground-based time-lapse relative gravity (TLRG) measurements have attracted increasing interest because there is a direct relationship between...... the signal and the change in water mass stored in the subsurface. Thus, no petrophysical relationship is required for coupled hydrogeophysical inversion. Two hydrological events were monitored with TLRG. One was a natural flooding event in the periphery of the Okavango Delta, Botswana, and one was a forced...

  19. Time-lapse nanoscopy of friction in the non-Amontons and non-Coulomb regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Tadashi; Sato, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Oguma, Masatsugu; Itamura, Noriaki; Goda, Keisuke; Sasaki, Naruo; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-11

    Originally discovered by Leonard da Vinci in the 15th century, the force of friction is directly proportional to the applied load (known as Amontons' first law of friction). Furthermore, kinetic friction is independent of the sliding speed (known as Coulomb's law of friction). These empirical laws break down at high normal pressure (due to plastic deformation) and low sliding speed (in the transition regime between static friction and kinetic friction). An important example of this phenomenon is friction between the asperities of tectonic plates on the Earth. Despite its significance, little is known about the detailed mechanism of friction in this regime due to the lack of experimental methods. Here we demonstrate in situ time-lapse nanoscopy of friction between asperities sliding at ultralow speed (∼0.01 nm/s) under high normal pressure (∼GPa). This is made possible by compressing and rubbing a pair of nanometer-scale crystalline silicon anvils with electrostatic microactuators and monitoring its dynamical evolution with a transmission electron microscope. Our analysis of the time-lapse movie indicates that superplastic behavior is induced by decrystallization, plastic deformation, and atomic diffusion at the asperity-asperity interface. The results hold great promise for a better understanding of quasi-static friction under high pressure for geoscience, materials science, and nanotechnology.

  20. Time Lapse Electrical Resistivity to Connect Evapotranspiration and Groundwater Fluxes in the Critical Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, S. K.; Harmon, R. E.; Barnard, H. R.; Randall, J.; Singha, K.

    2017-12-01

    The critical zone (CZ)—an open system extending from canopy top to the base of groundwater—is a highly dynamic and heterogeneous environment. In forested terrain, trees make up a large component of the CZ. This work aims to quantify the connection between vegetation and subsurface water storage at a hillslope scale within a forested watershed in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Oregon. To identify the mechanism(s) controlling the connection at the hillslope scale, we observe patterns in electrical conductivity using 2D-time lapse-DC resistivity. To compare inversions through time a representative error model was determined using L-curve criterion. Inverted data show high spatial variability in ground electrical conductivity and variation at both diel and seasonal timescales. These changes are most pronounced in areas corresponding to dense vegetation. The diel pattern in electrical conductivity is also observed in monitored sap flow sensors, water-level gauges, tensiometers, and sediment thermal probes. To quantify the temporal connection between these data over the course of the growing season a cross correlation analysis was conducted. Preliminary data show that over the course of the growing season transpiration becomes decoupled from both groundwater and soil moisture. Further decomposition of the inverted time lapse data will highlight spatial variability in electrical conductivity providing insight into the where, when, and how(s) of tree-modified subsurface storage.

  1. Using a time lapse microgravity model for mapping seawater intrusion around Semarang

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supriyadi,, E-mail: supriyadi@mail.unnes.ac.id; Khumaedi [Physics Department, Semarang State University (UNNES), D7 Building 2nd Floor FMIPA Sekaran Gunungpati (Indonesia); Yusuf, M. [Badan Meteologi Klimatologi Goefisika (BMKG), Jl.Angkasa I No.2 Kemayoran Jakarta Pusat (Indonesia); Agung, W. [Physics Department, Diponegoro University (UNDIP), Jl. Prof. Soedharto, Tembalang, Semarang (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    A modeling of time-lapse microgravity anomaly due to sea water intrusion has been conducted. It used field data of aquifer cross section, aquifer thickness and lithology of research area. Those data were then processed using Grav3D and Surfer. Modeling results indicated that the intrusion of sea water resulting in a time-lapse microgravity anomalies of 0.12 to 0.18 mGal, at soil layer density of 0.15 g/cm{sup 3} to 0.3 g/cm{sup 3} and at depth of 30 to 100 m. These imply that the areas experiencing seawater intrusion were Tanjung Mas, SPBE Bandarharjo, Brass, Old Market Boom and Johar as the microgravity measured there were in the range of 0.12 to 0.18 mGal and the density contrast were at 0.15 g/cm{sup 3} to 0.28 g/cm{sup 3}. Areas that experienced fluid reduction were Puri Anjasmoro, Kenconowungu and Puspowarno with microgravity changes from -0.06 mGal to -0.18 mGal.

  2. A Review of Published Guidance for Video Recording in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Dennis J

    2018-01-25

    Medical educators have used resident-patient video recording to verify trainee competence in interpersonal and technical skills for 50 years. Although numerous authors acknowledge that video recording can compromise patient privacy and confidentiality, no summary of potential risks is available. A scoping review of the literature on resident-patient video recording in medical education from the 1960s to the present was conducted. The review examined publications that addressed ethical, policy, procedural, or legal issues affecting patients' rights when video recording. Potential risks to the rights of video recorded patients were organized into 6 categories: informed consent policies, informed consent procedures, recorded medical errors, secondary use of recordings, collateral patient information, and public trust issues. The review revealed contradictory opinions on informed consent policies, inadequate guidance for responding when medical errors are recorded, and conflicting opinions about when recordings become part of the medical record. Many reviewed publications are opinion-based, precede current confidentiality guidelines, or rely on survey results. This review organizes potential threats to patients' rights for those medical educators who use video recording technology. The review reveals a need for broader consensus about video recording guidelines and for research on video recording practices, especially given technological advances in video equipment and the expansion of video technology in health care settings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Cell Phone Video Recording Feature as a Language Learning Tool: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromik, Nicolas A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a case study conducted at a Japanese national university. Nine participants used the video recording feature on their cell phones to produce weekly video productions. The task required that participants produce one 30-second video on a teacher-selected topic. Observations revealed the process of video creation with a cell…

  4. 3D reconstruction of cystoscopy videos for comprehensive bladder records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Kristen L; Angst, Roland; Zlatev, Dimitar V; Liao, Joseph C; Ellerbee Bowden, Audrey K

    2017-04-01

    White light endoscopy is widely used for diagnostic imaging of the interior of organs and body cavities, but the inability to correlate individual 2D images with 3D organ morphology limits its utility for quantitative or longitudinal studies of disease physiology or cancer surveillance. As a result, most endoscopy videos, which carry enormous data potential, are used only for real-time guidance and are discarded after collection. We present a computational method to reconstruct and visualize a 3D model of organs from an endoscopic video that captures the shape and surface appearance of the organ. A key aspect of our strategy is the use of advanced computer vision techniques and unmodified, clinical-grade endoscopy hardware with few constraints on the image acquisition protocol, which presents a low barrier to clinical translation. We validate the accuracy and robustness of our reconstruction and co-registration method using cystoscopy videos from tissue-mimicking bladder phantoms and show clinical utility during cystoscopy in the operating room for bladder cancer evaluation. As our method can powerfully augment the visual medical record of the appearance of internal organs, it is broadly applicable to endoscopy and represents a significant advance in cancer surveillance opportunities for big-data cancer research.

  5. Technical note: Stage and water width measurement of a mountain stream using a simple time-lapse camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Leduc

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing applied to river monitoring adds complementary information useful for understanding the system behaviour. In this paper, we present a method for visual stage gauging and water surface width measurement using a ground-based time-lapse camera and a fully automatic image analysis algorithm for flow monitoring at a river cross section of a steep, bouldery channel. The remote stage measurement was coupled with a water level logger (pressure transducer on site and shows that the image-based method gives a reliable estimate of the water height variation and daily flow record when validated against the pressure transducer (R = 0.91. From the remotely sensed pictures, we also extracted the water width and show that it is possible to correlate water surface width and stage. The images also provide valuable ancillary information for interpreting and understanding flow hydraulics and site weather conditions. This image-based gauging method is a reliable, informative and inexpensive alternative or adjunct to conventional stage measurement especially for remote sites.

  6. Technical note: Stage and water width measurement of a mountain stream using a simple time-lapse camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Pauline; Ashmore, Peter; Sjogren, Darren

    2018-01-01

    Remote sensing applied to river monitoring adds complementary information useful for understanding the system behaviour. In this paper, we present a method for visual stage gauging and water surface width measurement using a ground-based time-lapse camera and a fully automatic image analysis algorithm for flow monitoring at a river cross section of a steep, bouldery channel. The remote stage measurement was coupled with a water level logger (pressure transducer) on site and shows that the image-based method gives a reliable estimate of the water height variation and daily flow record when validated against the pressure transducer (R = 0.91). From the remotely sensed pictures, we also extracted the water width and show that it is possible to correlate water surface width and stage. The images also provide valuable ancillary information for interpreting and understanding flow hydraulics and site weather conditions. This image-based gauging method is a reliable, informative and inexpensive alternative or adjunct to conventional stage measurement especially for remote sites.

  7. Active and passive electrical and seismic time-lapse monitoring of earthen embankments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittgers, Justin Bradley

    In this dissertation, I present research involving the application of active and passive geophysical data collection, data assimilation, and inverse modeling for the purpose of earthen embankment infrastructure assessment. Throughout the dissertation, I identify several data characteristics, and several challenges intrinsic to characterization and imaging of earthen embankments and anomalous seepage phenomena, from both a static and time-lapse geophysical monitoring perspective. I begin with the presentation of a field study conducted on a seeping earthen dam, involving static and independent inversions of active tomography data sets, and self-potential modeling of fluid flow within a confined aquifer. Additionally, I present results of active and passive time-lapse geophysical monitoring conducted during two meso-scale laboratory experiments involving the failure and self-healing of embankment filter materials via induced vertical cracking. Identified data signatures and trends, as well as 4D inversion results, are discussed as an underlying motivation for conducting subsequent research. Next, I present a new 4D acoustic emissions source localization algorithm that is applied to passive seismic monitoring data collected during a full-scale embankment failure test. Acoustic emissions localization results are then used to help spatially constrain 4D inversion of collocated self-potential monitoring data. I then turn to time-lapse joint inversion of active tomographic data sets applied to the characterization and monitoring of earthen embankments. Here, I develop a new technique for applying spatiotemporally varying structural joint inversion constraints. The new technique, referred to as Automatic Joint Constraints (AJC), is first demonstrated on a synthetic 2D joint model space, and is then applied to real geophysical monitoring data sets collected during a full-scale earthen embankment piping-failure test. Finally, I discuss some non-technical issues related to

  8. The type of GnRH analogue used during controlled ovarian stimulation influences early embryo developmental kinetics: a time-lapse study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Manuel; Cruz, María; Humaidan, Peter; Garrido, Nicolás; Pérez-Cano, Inmaculada; Meseguer, Marcos

    2013-06-01

    To explore if the GnRH analogue used for controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) and the ovulation triggering factor (GnRH agonist + hCG triggering versus GnRH antagonist + GnRH agonist triggering) affect embryo development and kinetics. In a retrospective cohort study in the Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad (IVI) Alicante and the Instituto Universitario-IVI Valencia, Spain, 2817 embryos deriving from 400 couples undergoing oocyte donation were analysed. After controlled ovarian stimulation and IVF/intracytoplamic sperm injection, the timing of embryonic cleavages was assessed by a video time-lapse system. The results were analysed using Student's t test for comparison of timings (hours) and Chi-squared test for comparison of proportions. A p-value we can suggest that the type of protocol used for controlled ovarian stimulation influences embryo kinetics of development but these variations are not reflected in embryo quality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. OBSERVATION AND DEMONSTRATION IN TEACHER EDUCATION BY CLOSED CIRCUIT TELEVISION AND VIDEO TAPE RECORDINGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SANDEFUR, J.T.; AND OTHERS

    THIS PROJECT WAS DESIGNED TO (1) ASSESS THE FEASIBILITY OF A COOPERATIVE EFFORT IN THE USE OF VIDEO TAPE RECORDINGS BETWEEN A STATE INSTITUTION AND PRIVATE LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGES, (2) TO EVALUATE VIDEO TAPE RECORDINGS AS A TOOL IN TEACHER EDUCATION, AND (3) TO EVALUATE INTERACTION ANALYSIS AS AN OBSERVATIONAL TOOL IN VIEWING VIDEO TAPE RECORDINGS…

  10. Time-lapse cinematography in living Drosophila tissues: preparation of material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ilan; Parton, Richard M

    2006-11-01

    The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been an extraordinarily successful model organism for studying the genetic basis of development and evolution. It is arguably the best-understood complex multicellular model system, owing its success to many factors. Recent developments in imaging techniques, in particular sophisticated fluorescence microscopy methods and equipment, now allow cellular events to be studied at high resolution in living material. This ability has enabled the study of features that tend to be lost or damaged by fixation, such as transient or dynamic events. Although many of the techniques of live cell imaging in Drosophila are shared with the greater community of cell biologists working on other model systems, studying living fly tissues presents unique difficulties in keeping the cells alive, introducing fluorescent probes, and imaging through thick hazy cytoplasm. This protocol outlines the preparation of major tissue types amenable to study by time-lapse cinematography and different methods for keeping them alive.

  11. Time-lapse cinematography of dynamic changes occurring during in vitro development of human embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mio, Yasuyuki; Maeda, Kazuo

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify developmental changes of early human embryos by using time-lapse cinematography (TLC). For human ova, fertilization and cleavage, development of the blastocyst, and hatching, as well as consequent changes were repeatedly photographed at intervals of 5-6 days by using an inverse microscope under stabilized temperature and pH. Photographs were taken at 30 frames per second and the movies were studied. Cinematography has increased our understanding of the morphologic mechanisms of fertilization, development, and behavior of early human embryos, and has identified the increased risk of monozygotic twin pregnancy based on prolonged incubation in vitro to the blastocyst stage. Using TLC, we observed the fertilization of an ovum by a single spermatozoon, followed by early cleavages, formation of the morula, blastocyst hatching, changes in the embryonic plates, and the development of monozygotic twins from the incubated blastocysts.

  12. Time-lapse cinematography of the capillary tube cell migration inhibition test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, M A

    1980-01-01

    The kinetics of human and guinea pig cell migration inhibition have been studied using time-lapse cinematography of cells migrating from capillary tubes. Guinea pig and human cells exhibit markedly different kinetics in the absence of inhibitors. Specific antigen causes a dose-related inhibition of migration for up to 60 h using guinea pig cells and a peak of inhibition after 18 h using the human leucocyte system. The timing of measurement of maximum activity more critical for the latter test. The kinetics of lymphokine generation have been examined and the migration inhibitory activity of the plant mitogen (PHA), a Kurloff cell product and a continuous cell line supernatant have been compared with the inhibitory profiles of lymphokine preparations and specific antigen.

  13. 3-D time-lapse electrical resistivity monitoring of injected CO2 in a shallow aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, Joseph A. J.A.; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest C A.V.C.

    2013-01-01

    Contamination of potable groundwater by leaking CO2 is a potential risk of carbon sequestration. With the help of a field experiment, we investigate if surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can detect dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer. For this purpose, we injected CO2 at a depth of 5...... inversion reveals the geology at the site consisting of aeolian sands near the surface and glacial sands below 5 m depth. Time-lapse inversions clearly image the dissolved CO2 plume with decreased electrical resistivity values. We can follow the CO2 plume as it spreads and moves with the groundwater...... and 10 m and monitored its migration using 320 surface electrodes on a 126 m × 20 m grid. A fully automated acquisition system continuously collected data and uploaded it into an online database. The large amount of data allows for time-series analysis for data quality and noise estimation. A baseline...

  14. How does blastomere removal affect embryonic development? : A time-lapse analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Kirstine; Hindkjær, Johnny Juhl; Ingerslev, Hans Jakob

    Introduction: Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is offered to couples whose potential offspring are at risk of an inherited single gene disease or structural chromosomal disorder. PGD requires embryonic DNA for establishing the diagnosis, which can be obtained by performing blastomere biopsy...... of the 6-10 cell embryo. It has been argued that blastomere removal does not affect embryonic development, but few studies have focussed on safety of the procedure. Recently, time-lapse studies on mice have suggested that blastomere removal affects embryonic development. The present study was conducted...... at the same time-point as the control group, but had a significantly smaller size (p=0,000) and a thicker zona pellucida (p=0,000) when hatching. In the control group expansion of the blastocyst caused continous thinning of zona pellucida until the blastocyst hatched. In the biopsed group no expansion or zona...

  15. Time-lapse reveals that osteoclasts can move across the bone surface while resorbing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Kent; Delaissé, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    resulting in the formation of clusters of round pits. However, very importantly, we also demonstrate that more than half of the osteoclasts moved laterally, displacing their extracellular bone-resorbing compartment over the bone surface without disassembling and reconstructing it, thereby generating long......Bone erosion both demands that the osteoclast resorbs bone matrix and moves over the bone surface. It is widely accepted that these two activities alternate, because they are considered mutually exclusive since resorption is believed to involve an immobilizing seal to the bone surface. However......, clear real-time observations are still lacking. Herein, we used specific markers and time-lapse to monitor live the spatiotemporal generation of resorption events by osteoclasts cultured on bone slices. In accordance with the current view, we found alternating episodes of resorption and migration...

  16. Time-lapse seismic analysis of the North Sea Fulmar Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, David H.; McKenny, Robert S.; Burkhart, Tucker D.

    1998-12-31

    Time-lapse seismic analysis has been applied to two 3-D seismic surveys acquired over the central North Sea Fulmar field in a pre-production survey shot in 1977, reprocessed in 1987, and a survey in 1992. The Upper Jurassic reservoirs in the field have been under production since 1982. Differences in averaged impedance between the 1977 and 1992 surveys clearly show the effects of water influx and pressure decline. The changes observed in the seismic data are overall consistent with predictions obtained from a full-field, history-matched simulation. Differences in details may suggest areas of bypassed oil. Dta quality is not sufficient to serve as the sole basis for drilling decisions. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  17. A poly(dimethylsiloxane)-based device enabling time-lapse imaging with high spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Masahiko; Hoshida, Tetsushi; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a regulator-free device that enables long-term incubation of mammalian cells for epi-fluorescence imaging, based on a concept that the size of sample to be gassed and heated is reduced to observation scale. A poly(dimethylsiloxane) block stamped on a coverslip works as a long-lasting supplier of CO 2 -rich gas to adjust bicarbonate-containing medium in a tiny chamber at physiological pH, and an oil-immersion objective warms cells across the coverslip. A time-lapse imaging experiment using HeLa cells stably expressing fluorescent cell-cycle indicators showed that the cells in the chamber proliferated with normal cell-cycle period over 2 days.

  18. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinical isolates by digital time-lapse microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, M; Rosenvinge, F S; Spillum, E

    2015-01-01

    (168 antimicrobial agent-organism combinations) demonstrated 3.6 % minor, no major and 1.2 % very major errors of the oCelloScope system compared to conventional susceptibility testing, as well as a rapid and correct phenotypic detection of strains with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA......Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is essential for early and appropriate therapy. Methods with short detection time enabling same-day treatment optimisation are highly favourable. In this study, we evaluated the potential of a digital time-lapse microscope system, the o......CelloScope system, to perform rapid AST. The oCelloScope system demonstrated a very high accuracy (96 % overall agreement) when determining the resistance profiles of four reference strains, nine clinical isolates, including multi-drug-resistant isolates, and three positive blood cultures. AST of clinical isolates...

  19. Network Flow Integer Programming to Track Elliptical Cells in Time-Lapse Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turetken, Engin; Wang, Xinchao; Becker, Carlos J; Haubold, Carsten; Fua, Pascal

    2017-04-01

    We propose a novel approach to automatically tracking elliptical cell populations in time-lapse image sequences. Given an initial segmentation, we account for partial occlusions and overlaps by generating an over-complete set of competing detection hypotheses. To this end, we fit ellipses to portions of the initial regions and build a hierarchy of ellipses, which are then treated as cell candidates. We then select temporally consistent ones by solving to optimality an integer program with only one type of flow variables. This eliminates the need for heuristics to handle missed detections due to partial occlusions and complex morphology. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach on a range of challenging sequences consisting of clumped cells and show that it outperforms state-of-the-art techniques.

  20. Time-lapse Ground-Penetrating Radar for Deriving Soil Hydraulic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, Patrick; Jaumann, Stefan; Roth, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    A profound understanding of subsurface hydrological processes demands a detailed description of hydraulic parameter distributions at the pertinent scale of interest. However, characterizing soil hydraulic properties remains a challenge, especially for field scale studies. Accurate high-resolution GPR measurements of soil water dynamics have shown promise to alleviate this challenge. In recent years, ASSESS-GPR, a field scale test site for advancing Ground-Penetrating Radar methods has been successfully established in Heidelberg (e.g., Buchner et al, 2012 or Klenk, 2012). Permanently installed TDR sensor profiles allow for an independent, corroborating dataset which can serve as basis for hydrologic modeling. In such a well-controlled experimental setup, we can achieve a very high relative precision for non-invasively monitoring soil water dynamics with GPR (Klenk, 2012). We can furthermore study the dynamics of the capillary fringe in different materials through time-lapse GPR measurements during pumping experiments. For example, as Dagenbach et al (2013) have shown, information can be gained about the appropriate form of a hydraulic parameterization. We here expand on these previous works by presenting a set of experiments, where the water table has been raised and subsequently lowered in a multi-step fashion over the course of several days. We discuss the non-invasive, high-resolution monitoring of the corresponding subsurface water dynamics by time-lapse GPR and thoroughly assess potentials for deriving hydraulic parameters for the different materials through electromagnetic modeling of the GPR response for said materials under the measured forcing.

  1. On the Resolvability of Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage Reservoirs Using Time-Lapse Gravity Gradiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, E. Judith; Braun, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    Unconventional heavy oil resource plays are important contributors to oil and gas production, as well as controversial for posing environmental hazards. Monitoring those reservoirs before, during, and after operations would assist both the optimization of economic benefits and the mitigation of potential environmental hazards. This study investigates how gravity gradiometry using superconducting gravimeters could resolve depletion areas in steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) reservoirs. This is achieved through modelling of a SAGD reservoir at 1.25 and 5 years of operation. Specifically, the density change structure identified from geological, petrological, and seismic observations is forward modelled for gravity and gradients. Three main parameters have an impact on the resolvability of bitumen depletion volumes and are varied through a suitable parameter space: well pair separation, depth to the well pairs, and survey grid sampling. The results include a resolvability matrix, which identifies reservoirs that could benefit from time-lapse gravity gradiometry monitoring. After 1.25 years of operation, during the rising phase, the resolvable maximum reservoir depth ranges between the surface and 230 m, considering a well pair separation between 80 and 200 m. After 5 years of production, during the spreading phase, the resolvability of depletion volumes around single well pairs is greatly compromised as the depletion volume is closer to the surface, which translates to a larger portion of the gravity signal. The modelled resolvability matrices were derived from visual inspection and spectral analysis of the gravity gradient signatures and can be used to assess the applicability of time-lapse gradiometry to monitor reservoir density changes.

  2. Relative Morphokinetics Assessed by Time-Lapse Imaging Are Altered in Embryos From Patients With Endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freis, Alexander; Dietrich, Jens Erik; Binder, Moritz; Holschbach, Verena; Strowitzki, Thomas; Germeyer, Ariane

    2017-01-01

    Time-lapse technology allows almost continuous noninvasive assessment of embryonic development. It was shown previously that relative kinetics defining cleavage synchronicity are better predictors of blastocyst quality than absolute time points. This study aims to compare relative kinetics in embryos from patients with and without endometriosis. Time-lapse data were collected retrospectively from 596 patients undergoing infertility treatment for in vitro fertilization from January 2011 to July 2016. Four hundred twenty-eight patients with confounding comorbidities (ie, polycystic ovary syndrome, pathological spermiogram in the included cycle, numerical/structural genetic abnormalities, preimplantation genetic screening performed) or incomplete data sets were excluded. Of the 168 included patients, 72 (42.9%) had endometriosis. Indications for in vitro fertilization of controls were tubal factor, unexplained infertility, or prolonged infertility. Relative kinetics were calculated as defined previously: cleavage synchronicity (CS)2-8=((t3-t2) + (t5-t4))/(t8-t2), CS4-8=(t8-t5)/(t8-t4), CS2-4=(t4-t3)/(t4-t2), DNA replication time ratio (DR)=(t3-t2)/(t5-t3). In women with more than one embryo, the median time was analyzed. Median age, body mass index, smoking status, and AMH levels were similar in both groups. Embryos from patients with endometriosis showed poorer relative kinetics. The relative time CS2-8 was decreased in embryos from patients with endometriosis (0.7 [0.0-0.93] vs 0.8 [0.0-0.94], P relative kinetic parameters (CS2-4 and DR) were not significantly different. Embryos from patients with endometriosis presented with altered relative kinetics suggesting poorer embryo quality. These findings support recently published data demonstrating reduced oocyte quality in patients with endometriosis which is one possible explanation for their poor response to fertility treatment.

  3. Quantifying Effusion Rates at Active Volcanoes through Integrated Time-Lapse Laser Scanning and Photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Slatcher

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During volcanic eruptions, measurements of the rate at which magma is erupted underpin hazard assessments. For eruptions dominated by the effusion of lava, estimates are often made using satellite data; here, in a case study at Mount Etna (Sicily, we make the first measurements based on terrestrial laser scanning (TLS, and we also include explosive products. During the study period (17–21 July 2012, regular Strombolian explosions were occurring within the Bocca Nuova crater, producing a ~50 m-high scoria cone and a small lava flow field. TLS surveys over multi-day intervals determined a mean cone growth rate (effusive and explosive products of ~0.24 m3·s−1. Differences between 0.3-m resolution DEMs acquired at 10-minute intervals captured the evolution of a breakout lava flow lobe advancing at 0.01–0.03 m3·s−1. Partial occlusion within the crater prevented similar measurement of the main flow, but integrating TLS data with time-lapse imagery enabled lava viscosity (7.4 × 105 Pa·s to be derived from surface velocities and, hence, a flux of 0.11 m3·s−1 to be calculated. Total dense rock equivalent magma discharge estimates are ~0.1–0.2 m3·s−1 over the measurement period and suggest that simultaneous estimates from satellite data are somewhat overestimated. Our results support the use of integrated TLS and time-lapse photography for ground-truthing space-based measurements and highlight the value of interactive image analysis when automated approaches, such as particle image velocimetry (PIV, fail.

  4. Time-lapse seismic waveform modelling and attribute analysis using hydromechanical models for a deep reservoir undergoing depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Y.-X.; Angus, D. A.; Blanchard, T. D.; Wang, G.-L.; Yuan, S.-Y.; Garcia, A.

    2016-04-01

    Extraction of fluids from subsurface reservoirs induces changes in pore pressure, leading not only to geomechanical changes, but also perturbations in seismic velocities and hence observable seismic attributes. Time-lapse seismic analysis can be used to estimate changes in subsurface hydromechanical properties and thus act as a monitoring tool for geological reservoirs. The ability to observe and quantify changes in fluid, stress and strain using seismic techniques has important implications for monitoring risk not only for petroleum applications but also for geological storage of CO2 and nuclear waste scenarios. In this paper, we integrate hydromechanical simulation results with rock physics models and full-waveform seismic modelling to assess time-lapse seismic attribute resolution for dynamic reservoir characterization and hydromechanical model calibration. The time-lapse seismic simulations use a dynamic elastic reservoir model based on a North Sea deep reservoir undergoing large pressure changes. The time-lapse seismic traveltime shifts and time strains calculated from the modelled and processed synthetic data sets (i.e. pre-stack and post-stack data) are in a reasonable agreement with the true earth models, indicating the feasibility of using 1-D strain rock physics transform and time-lapse seismic processing methodology. Estimated vertical traveltime shifts for the overburden and the majority of the reservoir are within ±1 ms of the true earth model values, indicating that the time-lapse technique is sufficiently accurate for predicting overburden velocity changes and hence geomechanical effects. Characterization of deeper structure below the overburden becomes less accurate, where more advanced time-lapse seismic processing and migration is needed to handle the complex geometry and strong lateral induced velocity changes. Nevertheless, both migrated full-offset pre-stack and near-offset post-stack data image the general features of both the overburden and

  5. Combined time-lapse magnetic resonance imaging and modeling to investigate colloid deposition and transport in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoux, Alizée P; Faure, Pamela; Lafolie, François; Rodts, Stéphane; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Coussot, Philippe; Michel, Eric

    2017-10-15

    Colloidal particles can act as vectors of adsorbed pollutants in the subsurface, or be themselves pollutants. They can reach the aquifer and impair groundwater quality. The mechanisms of colloid transport and deposition are often studied in columns filled with saturated porous media. Time-lapse profiles of colloid concentration inside the columns have occasionally been derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data recorded in transport experiments. These profiles are valuable, in addition to particle breakthrough curves (BTCs), for testing and improving colloid transport models. We show that concentrations could not be simply computed from MRI data when both deposited and suspended colloids contributed to the signal. We propose a generic method whereby these data can still be used to quantitatively appraise colloid transport models. It uses the modeled suspended and deposited particle concentrations to compute modeled MRI data that are compared to the experimental data. We tested this method by performing transport experiments with sorbing colloids in sand, and assessed for the first time the capacity of the model calibrated from BTCs to reproduce the MRI data. Interestingly, the dispersion coefficient and deposition rate calibrated from the BTC were respectively overestimated and underestimated compared with those calibrated from the MRI data, suggesting that these quantities, when determined from BTCs, need to be interpreted with care. In a broader perspective, we consider that combining MRI and modeling offers great potential for the quantitative analysis of complex MRI data recorded during transport experiments in complex environmentally relevant porous media, and can help improve our understanding of the fate of colloids and solutes, first in these media, and later in soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Video-EEG recording: a four-year clinical audit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Rourke, K

    2012-02-03

    In the setting of a regional neurological unit without an epilepsy surgery service as in our case, video-EEG telemetry is undertaken for three main reasons; to investigate whether frequent paroxysmal events represent seizures when there is clinical doubt, to attempt anatomical localization of partial seizures when standard EEG is unhelpful, and to attempt to confirm that seizures are non-epileptic when this is suspected. A clinical audit of all telemetry performed over a four-year period was carried out, in order to determine the clinical utility of this aspect of the service and to determine means of improving effectiveness in the unit. Analysis of the data showed a high rate of negative studies with no attacks recorded. Of the positive studies approximately 50% showed non-epileptic attacks. Strategies for improving the rate of positive investigations are discussed.

  7. In-situ, time-lapse study of extracellular polymeric substance discharge in Streptococcus mutans biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bernard Haochih; Yu, Li-Chieh

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus mutans is one of the main pathogens that cause tooth decay. By metabolizing carbohydrates, S. mutans emits extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) that adheres to the tooth surface and forms layers of biofilm. Periodontal disease occurs due to the low pH environment created by S. mutans biofilm, and such an acidic environment gradually erodes tooth enamel. Since the existence of EPS is essential in the formation of biofilm, the in-situ investigation of its generation and distribution in real time is the key to the control and suppression of S. mutans biofilm. Prior studies of the biofilm formation process by fluorescence microscope, scanning electron microscope, or spectroscope have roughly divided the mechanism into three stages: (1) initial attachment; (2) microcolonies; and (3) maturation. However, these analytical methods are incapable to observe real-time changes in different locations of the extracellular matrix, and to analyze mechanical properties for single bacteria in micro and nanoscale. Since atomic force microscopy (AFM) operates by precise control of tip-sample interaction forces in liquid and in air, living microorganisms can be analyzed under near-physiological conditions. Thus, analytical techniques based on AFM constitute powerful tools for the study of biological samples, both qualitatively and quantitatively. In this study, we used AFM to quantitatively track the changes of multiple nanomechanical properties of S. mutans, including dissipation energy, adhesion force, deformation, and elastic modulus at different metabolic stages. The data revealed that the bacterial extracellular matrix has a gradient distribution in stickiness, in which different stickiness indicates the variation of EPS compositions, freshness, and metabolic stages. In-situ, time-lapse AFM images showed the local generation and distribution of EPS at different times, in which the highest adhesion distributed along sides of the S. mutans cells. Through time-lapse

  8. Land time-lapse CSEM : Collecting, modeling and inversion of CSEM data for a steam-injected oil field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaller, A.M.

    2018-01-01

    Geophysical methods are widely used for hydrocarbon exploration and time-lapse measurements. One method that can be applied in place of or in addition to the routinely used seismic method, is the Controlled-Source ElectroMagnetic (CSEM) method. The work described in this thesis explores various

  9. Growth Rate and Morphology of a Single Calcium Carbonate Crystal on Polysulfone Film Measured with Time Lapse Raman Micro Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liszka, B.; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; Otto, Cornelis

    2016-01-01

    The growth of single, self- nucleated calcium carbonate crystals on a polysulfone (PSU) film was investigated with high resolution, time lapse Raman imaging. The Raman images were acquired on the interface of the polymer with the crystal. The growth of crystals could thus be followed in time. PSU is

  10. Mass conservative three-dimensional water tracer distribution from MCMC inversion of time-lapse GPR data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalov, E.; Linde, N.; Vrugt, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Time-lapse geophysical measurements are widely used to monitor the movement of water and solutes through the subsurface. Yet commonly used deterministic least squares inversions typically suffer from relatively poor mass recovery, spread overestimation, and limited ability to appropriately estimate

  11. Time-lapse micro-tomography analysis of the deformation response of a gellan-gum-based scaffold

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kytýř, Daniel; Fenclová, Nela; Zlámal, Petr; Kumpová, Ivana; Fíla, Tomáš; Koudelka_ml., Petr; Gantar, A.; Novak, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2017), s. 397-402 ISSN 1580-2949 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : bone scaffold * gellan gum * time-lapse micro CT * digital volume correlation Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 0.436, year: 2016 http://mit.imt.si/Revija/izvodi/mit173/kytyr.pdf

  12. Could monopronucleated ICSI zygotes be considered for transfer? Analysis through time-lapse monitoring and PGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, S; Vidal, F; Parriego, M; Rodríguez, I; Montalvo, V; Veiga, A; Boada, M

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the chromosomal constitution and the developmental potential of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) deriving embryos displaying a single pronucleus at the zygote stage. Eighty-eight embryos from single pronucleus (1PN) two polar bodies (2PB) ICSI zygotes from 64 preimplantational genetic screening (PGS) cycles (October 2012-December 2014), were retrospectively analyzed. Zygotes were cultured in a time-lapse incubator. Embryo biopsy was performed on day 3 and genetic analysis approached by array comparative genomic hybridization. Chromosomal analysis revealed that 17% (15/88) of embryos derived from 1PN 2PB zygotes were diagnosed as euploid. After blastomere biopsy at day 3, the blastocyst rate at day 5 was 3.4% (3/88). Only 2.3% (2/88) euploid blastocysts were obtained. In two couples and after counseling and patient agreement, the transfer of a euploid blastocyst from a 1PN 2PB ICSI zygote was performed resulting in the birth of a healthy child. These results open the possibility to consider embryos coming from 1PN 2PB ICSI zygotes for transfer when no other embryos from 2PN 2PB ICSI zygotes are available and if a PGS diagnosis of euploidy is obtained. Confirmation of biparental inheritance is strongly recommended.

  13. Time-lapse imaging of neuroblastoma cells to determine cell fate upon gene knockdown.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Batra

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor of early childhood. Standard therapies are not effective in case of poor prognosis and chemotherapy resistance. To improve drug therapy, it is imperative to discover new targets that play a substantial role in tumorigenesis of neuroblastoma. The mitotic machinery is an attractive target for therapeutic interventions and inhibitors can be developed to target mitotic entry, spindle apparatus, spindle activation checkpoint, and mitotic exit. We present an elaborate analysis pipeline to determine cancer specific therapeutic targets by first performing a focused gene expression analysis to select genes followed by a gene knockdown screening assay of live cells. We interrogated gene expression studies of neuroblastoma tumors and selected 240 genes relevant for tumorigenesis and cell cycle. With these genes we performed time-lapse screening of gene knockdowns in neuroblastoma cells. We classified cellular phenotypes and used the temporal context of the perturbation effect to determine the sequence of events, particularly the mitotic entry preceding cell death. Based upon this phenotype kinetics from the gene knockdown screening, we inferred dynamic gene functions in mitosis and cell proliferation. We identified six genes (DLGAP5, DSCC1, SMO, SNRPD1, SSBP1, and UBE2C with a vital role in mitosis and these are promising therapeutic targets for neuroblastoma. Images and movies of every time point of all screened genes are available at https://ichip.bioquant.uni-heidelberg.de.

  14. Monitoring of In-Situ Remediation By Time Lapse 3D Geo-Electric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanli, A. I.; Tildy, P.; Neducza, B.; Nagy, P.; Hegymegi, C.

    2017-12-01

    Injection of chemical oxidant solution to degrade the subsurface contaminants can be used for hydrocarbon contamination remediation. In this study, we developed a non-destructive measurement strategy to monitor oxidative in-situ remediation processes. The difficulties of the presented study originate from the small volume of conductive solution that can be used due to environmental considerations. Due to the effect of conductive groundwater and the high clay content of the targeted layer and the small volume of conductive solution that can be used due to environmental considerations, a site specific synthetic modelling is necessary for measurement design involving the results of preliminary 2D ERT measurements, electrical conductivity measurements of different active agents and expected resistivity changes calculated by soil resistivity modelling. Because of chemical biodegradation, the results of soil resistivity modelling have suggested that the reagent have complex effects on contaminated soils. As a result the plume of resistivity changes caused by the injected agent was determined showing strong fracturing effect because of the high pressure of injection. 3D time-lapse geo-electric measurements were proven to provide a usable monitoring tool for in-situ remediation as a result of our sophisticated tests and synthetic modelling.

  15. Direct prediction of spatially and temporally varying physical properties from time-lapse electrical resistance data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Thomas; Oware, Erasmus; Caers, Jef

    2016-09-01

    Time-lapse applications of electrical methods have grown significantly over the last decade. However, the quantitative interpretation of tomograms in terms of physical properties, such as salinity, temperature or saturation, remains difficult. In many applications, geophysical models are transformed into hydrological models, but this transformation suffers from spatially and temporally varying resolution resulting from the regularization used by the deterministic inversion. In this study, we investigate a prediction-focused approach (PFA) to directly estimate subsurface physical properties with electrical resistance data, circumventing the need for classic tomographic inversions. First, we generate a prior set of resistance data and physical property forecast through hydrogeological and geophysical simulations mimicking the field experiment. We reduce the dimension of both the data and the forecast through principal component analysis in order to keep the most informative part of both sets in a reduced dimension space. Then, we apply canonical correlation analysis to explore the relationship between the data and the forecast in their reduced dimension space. If a linear relationship can be established, the posterior distribution of the forecast can be directly sampled using a Gaussian process regression where the field data scores are the conditioning data. In this paper, we demonstrate PFA for various physical property distributions. We also develop a framework to propagate the estimated noise level in the reduced dimension space. We validate the results by a Monte Carlo study on the posterior distribution and demonstrate that PFA yields accurate uncertainty for the cases studied.

  16. Observation of human embryonic behavior in vitro by high-resolution time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Kyoko; Mio, Yasuyuki

    2016-07-01

    Assisted reproductive technology (ART) has yielded vast amounts of information and knowledge on human embryonic development in vitro; however, still images provide limited data on dynamic changes in the developing embryos. Using our high-resolution time-lapse cinematography (hR-TLC) system, we were able to describe normal human embryonic development continuously from the fertilization process to the hatched blastocyst stage in detail. Our hR-TLC observation also showed the embryonic abnormality of a third polar body (PB)-like substance likely containing a small pronucleus being extruded and resulting in single-pronucleus (1PN) formation, while our molecular biological investigations suggested the possibility that some 1PN embryos could be diploid, carrying both maternal and paternal genomes. Furthermore, in some embryos the extruded third PB-like substance was eventually re-absorbed into the ooplasm resulting in the formation of an uneven-sized, two-PN zygote. In addition, other hR-TLC observations showed that cytokinetic failure was correlated with equal-sized, multi-nucleated blastomeres that were also observed in the embryo showing early initiation of compaction. Assessment combining our hR-TLC with molecular biological techniques enables a better understanding of embryonic development and potential improvements in ART outcomes.

  17. Aberrant behavior of mouse embryo development after blastomere biopsy as observed through time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugajin, Tomohisa; Terada, Yukihiro; Hasegawa, Hisataka; Velayo, Clarissa L; Nabeshima, Hiroshi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2010-05-15

    To analyze whether blastomere biopsy affects early embryonal growth as observed through time-lapse cinematography. Comparative prospective study between embryos in which a blastomere was removed and embryos in which a blastomere was not removed. An experimental laboratory of the university. We calculated the time between blastocele formation and the end of hatching, the time between the start and end of hatching, the number of contractions and expansions between blastocyst formation and the end of hatching, and the maximum diameter of the expanded blastocyst. In blastomere removal embryos, compaction began at the six-cell stage instead of at the eight-cell stage. We also found that hatching was delayed in these embryos as compared with matched controls. Moreover, the frequency of contraction and expansion movements after blastocyst formation was significantly higher in the blastomere removal group as compared with the control group. Finally, the maximum diameter of the expanded blastocyst just before hatching was not significantly different between both groups. These findings suggested that blastomere removal has an adverse effect on embryonic development around the time of hatching. Thus, future developments in preimplantation genetic diagnosis and screening should involve further consideration and caution in light of the influence of blastomere biopsy on embryonal growth. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Time-lapse analysis of potential cellular responsiveness to Johrei, a Japanese healing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Ryan; Moore, Dan; Yount, Garret

    2005-01-24

    Johrei is an alternative healing practice which involves the channeling of a purported universal healing energy to influence the health of another person. Despite little evidence to support the efficacy of such practices the use of such treatments is on the rise. We assessed cultured human cancer cells for potential responsiveness to Johrei treatment from a short distance. Johrei treatment was delivered by practitioners who participated in teams of two, alternating every half hour for a total of four hours of treatment. The practitioners followed a defined set of mental procedures to minimize variability in mental states between experiments. An environmental chamber maintained optimal growth conditions for cells throughout the experiments. Computerized time-lapse microscopy allowed documentation of cancer cell proliferation and cell death before, during and after Johrei treatments. Comparing eight control experiments with eight Johrei intervention experiments, we found no evidence of a reproducible cellular response to Johrei treatment. Cell death and proliferation rates of cultured human cancer cells do not appear responsive to Johrei treatment from a short distance.

  19. Segmentation Method of Time-Lapse Microscopy Images with the Focus on Biocompatibility Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Jindřich; Císař, Petr; Šroubek, Filip

    2016-06-01

    Biocompatibility testing of new materials is often performed in vitro by measuring the growth rate of mammalian cancer cells in time-lapse images acquired by phase contrast microscopes. The growth rate is measured by tracking cell coverage, which requires an accurate automatic segmentation method. However, cancer cells have irregular shapes that change over time, the mottled background pattern is partially visible through the cells and the images contain artifacts such as halos. We developed a novel algorithm for cell segmentation that copes with the mentioned challenges. It is based on temporal differences of consecutive images and a combination of thresholding, blurring, and morphological operations. We tested the algorithm on images of four cell types acquired by two different microscopes, evaluated the precision of segmentation against manual segmentation performed by a human operator, and finally provided comparison with other freely available methods. We propose a new, fully automated method for measuring the cell growth rate based on fitting a coverage curve with the Verhulst population model. The algorithm is fast and shows accuracy comparable with manual segmentation. Most notably it can correctly separate live from dead cells.

  20. Environmental Monitoring Of Leaks Using Time Lapsed Long Electrode Electrical Resistivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucker, D.F.; Fink, J.B.; Loke, M.H.; Myers, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    Highly industrialized areas pose significant challenges for surface based electrical resistivity characterization and monitoring due to the high degree of metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically several orders of magnitude more conductive than the desired targets, preventing the geophysicist from obtaining a clear picture of the subsurface. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes in a complex nuclear waste facility to monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank. The leak was simulated by injecting high conductivity fluid in a perforated well and the resistivity measurements were made before and after the leak test. The data were processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure was applied in both the time and space domains. The results showed a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site. The time lapsed regularization parameter had a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post datasets, potentially making calibration of the results to specific hydrogeologic parameters difficult.

  1. Time-lapse analysis of potential cellular responsiveness to Johrei, a Japanese healing technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Dan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Johrei is an alternative healing practice which involves the channeling of a purported universal healing energy to influence the health of another person. Despite little evidence to support the efficacy of such practices the use of such treatments is on the rise. Methods We assessed cultured human cancer cells for potential responsiveness to Johrei treatment from a short distance. Johrei treatment was delivered by practitioners who participated in teams of two, alternating every half hour for a total of four hours of treatment. The practitioners followed a defined set of mental procedures to minimize variability in mental states between experiments. An environmental chamber maintained optimal growth conditions for cells throughout the experiments. Computerized time-lapse microscopy allowed documentation of cancer cell proliferation and cell death before, during and after Johrei treatments. Results Comparing eight control experiments with eight Johrei intervention experiments, we found no evidence of a reproducible cellular response to Johrei treatment. Conclusion Cell death and proliferation rates of cultured human cancer cells do not appear responsive to Johrei treatment from a short distance.

  2. Monitoring water flows with time-lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomography on the Super-Sauze landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gance, J.; Sailhac, P.; Malet, J.-P.; Grandjean, G.; Supper, R.; Jochum, B.; Ottowitz, D.

    2012-04-01

    This work presents results of a permanent hydro-geophysical monitoring of an active landslide developed in clay-shales. Hydrology has been proved to be a major factor controlling the Super-Sauze earthflow behavior, but it knowledge still limited mainly because of the importance of spatial heterogeneities. The geometry of the bedrock creates internal crests and gullies that can guide waterflows or create a lock and engender an excess of pore water pressure; the soil surface characteristics plays also a large role in the surface hydraulic conductivity, and therefore, on the infiltration pattern. To understand in detail these processes, it is therefore important to monitor spatially at large scale (with high resolution) those phenomena and to overcome the monitoring difficulties inherent to a fast-moving clayey earthflow. The objectives of the survey are to identify and characterize spatially and temporarily the water flow circulation within the landslide body over a period of one year. The studied profile measures 114 m long and is surveyed with 93 electrodes spaced from 0.5, 1 or 2 meter according the soil surface cracking. Four resistivity datasets of 4300 measurements are acquired each day using a gradient array since May 2011. The monitoring is performed with the GEOMON4D system, developed by the Geological Survey of Austria. To facilitate the interpretation, humidity, conductivity, temperature, and piezometer sensors are placed along the profile. Two dGPS antenna placed upstream and downstream the profile allow to correlate the results with soil displacement. Lefranc tests and granulometry results realized on several samples have shown the important heterogeneities of the near surface. The objective of this work is to present the data processing strategy for the analysis of long periods time-lapse ERT survey of natural rain events taking into account changes through time of the position of the electrodes, changes in the soil surface state and important changes

  3. Untangling cell tracks: Quantifying cell migration by time lapse image data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Carl-Magnus; Medyukhina, Anna; Belyaev, Ivan; Al-Zaben, Naim; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2018-03-01

    Automated microscopy has given researchers access to great amounts of live cell imaging data from in vitro and in vivo experiments. Much focus has been put on extracting cell tracks from such data using a plethora of segmentation and tracking algorithms, but further analysis is normally required to draw biologically relevant conclusions. Such relevant conclusions may be whether the migration is directed or not, whether the population has homogeneous or heterogeneous migration patterns. This review focuses on the analysis of cell migration data that are extracted from time lapse images. We discuss a range of measures and models used to analyze cell tracks independent of the biological system or the way the tracks were obtained. For single-cell migration, we focus on measures and models giving examples of biological systems where they have been applied, for example, migration of bacteria, fibroblasts, and immune cells. For collective migration, we describe the model systems wound healing, neural crest migration, and Drosophila gastrulation and discuss methods for cell migration within these systems. We also discuss the role of the extracellular matrix and subsequent differences between track analysis in vitro and in vivo. Besides methods and measures, we are putting special focus on the need for openly available data and code, as well as a lack of common vocabulary in cell track analysis. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  4. BactImAS: a platform for processing and analysis of bacterial time-lapse microscopy movies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekterović, Igor; Mekterović, Darko; Maglica, Zeljka

    2014-07-25

    The software available to date for analyzing image sequences from time-lapse microscopy works only for certain bacteria and under limited conditions. These programs, mostly MATLAB-based, fail for microbes with irregular shape, indistinct cell division sites, or that grow in closely packed microcolonies. Unfortunately, many organisms of interest have these characteristics, and analyzing their image sequences has been limited to time consuming manual processing. Here we describe BactImAS - a modular, multi-platform, open-source, Java-based software delivered both as a standalone program and as a plugin for Icy. The software is designed for extracting and visualizing quantitative data from bacterial time-lapse movies. BactImAS uses a semi-automated approach where the user defines initial cells, identifies cell division events, and, if necessary, manually corrects cell segmentation with the help of user-friendly GUI and incorporated ImageJ application. The program segments and tracks cells using a newly-developed algorithm designed for movies with difficult-to-segment cells that exhibit small frame-to-frame differences. Measurements are extracted from images in a configurable, automated fashion and an SQLite database is used to store, retrieve, and exchange all acquired data. Finally, the BactImAS can generate configurable lineage tree visualizations and export data as CSV files. We tested BactImAS on time-lapse movies of Mycobacterium smegmatis and achieved at least 10-fold reduction of processing time compared to manual analysis. We illustrate the power of the visualization tool by showing heterogeneity of both icl expression and cell growth atop of a lineage tree. The presented software simplifies quantitative analysis of time-lapse movies overall and is currently the only available software for the analysis of mycobacteria-like cells. It will be of interest to the community of both end-users and developers of time-lapse microscopy software.

  5. LOW-COMPLEXITY BIG VIDEO DATA RECORDING ALGORITHMS FOR URBAN SURVEILLANCE SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Ling Hu and Qiang Ni

    2016-01-01

    Big Video data analytics and processing are becoming increasingly important research areas because ofinfinite generation of massive video data volumes all over the world. In this paper, by utilizing Bayesianbased importance analysis, we propose a set of novel, simple but effective video recording methodologies and intelligent algorithms to solve the so-called big video data volume problem in urban surveillance systems. The complexity of our proposed algorithms are only O(n), hence they can be...

  6. Video Recorded Feedback for Self Regulation of Prospective Music Teachers in Piano Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Jale

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of the study is enabling the prospective teachers to make self-regulations by video recording their piano performances with their instructors and feedbacks of their instructors and detect the views of specific students concerning these video records. The research was carried out during 2008-2009 academic year in Marmara…

  7. A method for quantifying cloud immersion in a tropical mountain forest using time-lapse photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiouni, Maoya; Scholl, Martha A.; Torres-Sanchez, Angel J.; Murphy, Sheila F.

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying the frequency, duration, and elevation range of fog or cloud immersion is essential to estimate cloud water deposition in water budgets and to understand the ecohydrology of cloud forests. The goal of this study was to develop a low-cost and high spatial-coverage method to detect occurrence of cloud immersion within a mountain cloud forest by using time-lapse photography. Trail cameras and temperature/relative humidity sensors were deployed at five sites covering the elevation range from the assumed lifting condensation level to the mountain peaks in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. Cloud-sensitive image characteristics (contrast, the coefficient of variation and the entropy of pixel luminance, and image colorfulness) were used with a k-means clustering approach to accurately detect cloud-immersed conditions in a time series of images from March 2014 to May 2016. Images provided hydrologically meaningful cloud-immersion information while temperature-relative humidity data were used to refine the image analysis using dew point information and provided temperature gradients along the elevation transect. Validation of the image processing method with human-judgment based classification generally indicated greater than 90% accuracy. Cloud-immersion frequency averaged 80% at sites above 900 m during nighttime hours and 49% during daytime hours, and was consistent with diurnal patterns of cloud immersion measured in a previous study. Results for the 617 m site demonstrated that cloud immersion in the Luquillo Mountains rarely occurs at the previously-reported cloud base elevation of about 600 m (11% during nighttime hours and 5% during daytime hours). The framework presented in this paper will be used to monitor at a low cost and high spatial resolution the long-term variability of cloud-immersion patterns in the Luquillo Mountains, and can be applied to ecohydrology research at other cloud-forest sites or in coastal ecosystems with advective sea

  8. Using electromagnetic conductivity imaging to generate time-lapse soil moisture estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingyi; Scuderio, Elia; Corwin, Dennis; Triantafilis, John

    2015-04-01

    Irrigated agriculture is crucial to the agricultural productivity of the Moreno valley. To maintain profitability, more will need to be done by irrigators with less water, owing to competing demands from rapidly expanding urbanisation in southern California. In this regard, irrigators need to understand the spatial and temporal variation of soil moisture to discern inefficiencies. However, soil moisture is difficult to measure and monitor, unless a large bank of soil sensors are installed and at various depths in the profile. In order to value add to the limited amount of information, geophysical techniques, such as direct current resisivity (DCR) arrays are used to develop electrical resistivity images (ERI). Whilst successful the approach is time consuming and labour intensive. In this research we describe how equivalent data can be collected using a proximal sensing electromagnetic (EM) induction instrument (i.e. DUALEM-421) and inversion software (EM4Soil) to generate EM conductivity images (EMCI). Figure 1 shows the EMCI generated from DUALEM-421 data acquired at various days of a time-lapse experiment and including; day a) 0, b) 1, c) 2, d) 3, e) 5, f) 7 and g) 11. We calibrate the estimates of true electrical conductivity (sigma - mS/m) with volumetric moisture content and show with good accuracy the spatial and temporal variation of soil moisture status and over 12 day period. The results show clearly that the pivot sprinkler irrigation system is effective at providing sufficient amounts of water to the top 0.5 m of a Lucerne crop (i.e. red shaded areas of high sigma). However, in some places faulty sprinklers are evident owing to the lack of wetting (i.e. blue shaded areas of low sigma). In addition, and over time, our approach shows clearly the effect the Lucerne crop has in drying the soil profile and using the soil moisture.

  9. Tracking snowmelt in the subsurface: time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging on an alpine hill slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, D.; Parsekian, A.; Hyde, K.; Beverly, D.; Speckman, H. N.; Ewers, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    In the mountain West region the winter snowpack provides more than 70% of our annual water supply. Modeling and predicting the timing and magnitude of snowmelt-driven water yield is difficult due to the complexities of hydrologic systems that move meltwater from snow to rivers. Particular challenges are understanding the temporal and spatial domain of subsurface hydraulic processes at relevant scales, which range from points to catchments. Subsurface characterization often requires borehole instrumentation, which is expensive and extremely difficult to install in remote, rugged terrain. Advancements in non-invasive geophysical methods allow us to monitor changes in geophysical parameters over time and infer changes in hydraulic processes. In the No-Name experimental catchment in the Medicine Bow National Forest in Wyoming, we are conducting a multi-season, time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging survey on a sub-alpine hill slope. This south-facing, partially forested slope ranges from 5 degrees to 35 degrees in steepness and consists of a soil mantle covering buried glacial talus deposits of unknown depth. A permanent grid of down-slope and cross-slope electrode arrays is monitored up to four times a day. The arrays span the entire vertical distance of the slope, from an exposed bedrock ridge to a seasonal drainage below, and cover treed and non-treed areas. Geophysical measurements are augmented by temperature and moisture time-series instrumented below the surface in a contiguous 3 meter borehole. A time-series of multiple resistivity models each day from May to July shows the changing distribution of subsurface moisture during a seasonal drying sequence punctuated by isolated rain events. Spatial patterns of changing moisture indicate that soil and gravel in the top two meters drain into a saturated layer parallel to the slope which overlies less saturated material. These results suggest that water from snowmelt and rain events tends to move down-slope beneath

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF LEAKS USING TIME LAPSED LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.A.; Rucker, D.F.; Fink, J.B.; Loke, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Highly industrialized areas pose challenges for surface electrical resistivity characterization due to metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically more conductive than the desired targets and will mask the deeper subsurface information. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes in the area near the target. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes to electrically monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank with both synthetic examples and a field demonstration. The synthetic examples place a simple target of varying electrical properties beneath a very low resistivity layer. The layer is meant to replicate the effects of infrastructure. Both surface and long electrodes are tested on the synthetic domain. The leak demonstration for the field experiment is simulated by injecting a high conductivity fluid in a perforated well within the S tank farm at Hanford, and the resistivity measurements are made before and after the leak test. All data are processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure is applied in both the time and space domains. The synthetic test case shows that the long electrode ERM could detect relative changes in resistivity that are commensurate with the differing target properties. The surface electrodes, on the other hand, had a more difficult time matching the original target's footprint. The field results shows a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site after cessation of the injections. The time lapsed regularization parameter has a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post injection datasets, but the interpretation of the target is consistent across all values of the parameter. The long electrode ERM method may provide a tool for near real-time monitoring of leaking underground storage tanks.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF LEAKS USING TIME LAPSED LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MYERS DA; RUCKER DF; FINK JB; LOKE MH

    2009-12-16

    Highly industrialized areas pose challenges for surface electrical resistivity characterization due to metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically more conductive than the desired targets and will mask the deeper subsurface information. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes in the area near the target. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes to electrically monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank with both synthetic examples and a field demonstration. The synthetic examples place a simple target of varying electrical properties beneath a very low resistivity layer. The layer is meant to replicate the effects of infrastructure. Both surface and long electrodes are tested on the synthetic domain. The leak demonstration for the field experiment is simulated by injecting a high conductivity fluid in a perforated well within the S tank farm at Hanford, and the resistivity measurements are made before and after the leak test. All data are processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure is applied in both the time and space domains. The synthetic test case shows that the long electrode ERM could detect relative changes in resistivity that are commensurate with the differing target properties. The surface electrodes, on the other hand, had a more difficult time matching the original target's footprint. The field results shows a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site after cessation of the injections. The time lapsed regularization parameter has a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post injection datasets, but the interpretation of the target is consistent across all values of the parameter. The long electrode ERM method may provide a tool for near real-time monitoring of leaking underground storage tanks.

  12. Minding the Music: Neuroscience, Video Recording, and the Pianist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Milton

    2011-01-01

    Research in music education asserts that video review by performers facilitates self-directed learning and transforms performing. Yet, certain videos may be traumatic for musicians to view; those who perceive themselves as failing or experience performance-related failures are prone to feelings of distress and sadness that can negatively affect…

  13. On the possibility of time-lapse ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography for bladder cancer grading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhijia; Chen, Bai; Ren, Hugang; Pan, Yingtian

    2009-09-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that the cellular details of bladder epithelium embedded in speckle noise can be uncovered with time-lapse ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (TL-uOCT) by proper time-lapse frame averaging that takes advantage of cellular micromotion in fresh biological tissue ex vivo. Here, spectral-domain 3-D TL-uOCT is reported to further improve the image fidelity, and new experimental evidence is presented to differentiate normal and cancerous nuclei of rodent bladder epithelia. Results of animal cancer study reveal that despite a slight overestimation (e.g., cancerous (e.g., high-grade DN''~13 μm) urothelia, which may potentially be very useful for enhancing the diagnosis of nonpapillary bladder cancer. More animal study is being conducted to examine the utility to differentiate hyperplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ.

  14. The influence of video recordings on beginning therapists’ learning in psychotherapy training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Olesen, Mette Kirk; Kløve, Astrid

    a qualitative, explorative study of the influence video recordings have on the beginning therapist and his/her evolving learning process in becoming a psychotherapist. Methods: 24 beginning therapists in training at an outpatient university clinic setting filled out a questionnaire containing ten open...... the current relatively widespread use of video, one finds only a very limited number of empirical studies on how these recordings specifically influence the learning process of the beginning therapist. Aim: After a brief discussion of the pro and cons of the use of video recordings this paper presents...... is that video recordings facilitate the learning experience of the beginning therapist. They report how video helped them gaining an overall deeper understanding of psychotherapy and themselves as therapists. At the beginning they felt anxious and exposed but it decreased over time and became a learning...

  15. The influence of video recordings on beginning therapist’s learning in psychotherapy training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Olesen, Mette Kirk; Kløve, Astrid

    2010-01-01

    a qualitative, explorative study of the influence video recordings have on the beginning therapist and his/her evolving learning process in becoming a psychotherapist. Methods: 24 beginning therapists in training at an outpatient university clinic setting filled out a questionnaire containing ten open...... the current relatively widespread use of video, one finds only a very limited number of empirical studies on how these recordings specifically influence the learning process of the beginning therapist. Aim: After a brief discussion of the pro and cons of the use of video recordings this paper presents...... is that video recordings facilitate the learning experience of the beginning therapist. They report how video helped them gaining an overall deeper understanding of psychotherapy and themselves as therapists. At the beginning they felt anxious and exposed but it decreased over time and became a learning...

  16. A high capacity data recording device based on a digital audio processor and a video cassette recorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezanilla, F

    1985-01-01

    A modified digital audio processor, a video cassette recorder, and some simple added circuitry are assembled into a recording device of high capacity. The unit converts two analog channels into digital form at 44-kHz sampling rate and stores the information in digital form in a common video cassette. Bandwidth of each channel is from direct current to approximately 20 kHz and the dynamic range is close to 90 dB. The total storage capacity in a 3-h video cassette is 2 Gbytes. The information can be retrieved in analog or digital form. PMID:3978213

  17. Time-lapse three-dimensional inversion of complex conductivity data using an active time constrained (ATC) approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoulis, M.; Revil, A.; Werkema, D.D.; Minsley, B.J.; Woodruff, W.F.; Kemna, A.

    2011-01-01

    Induced polarization (more precisely the magnitude and phase of impedance of the subsurface) is measured using a network of electrodes located at the ground surface or in boreholes. This method yields important information related to the distribution of permeability and contaminants in the shallow subsurface. We propose a new time-lapse 3-D modelling and inversion algorithm to image the evolution of complex conductivity over time. We discretize the subsurface using hexahedron cells. Each cell is assigned a complex resistivity or conductivity value. Using the finite-element approach, we model the in-phase and out-of-phase (quadrature) electrical potentials on the 3-D grid, which are then transformed into apparent complex resistivity. Inhomogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions are used at the boundary of the domain. The calculation of the Jacobian matrix is based on the principles of reciprocity. The goal of time-lapse inversion is to determine the change in the complex resistivity of each cell of the spatial grid as a function of time. Each model along the time axis is called a 'reference space model'. This approach can be simplified into an inverse problem looking for the optimum of several reference space models using the approximation that the material properties vary linearly in time between two subsequent reference models. Regularizations in both space domain and time domain reduce inversion artefacts and improve the stability of the inversion problem. In addition, the use of the time-lapse equations allows the simultaneous inversion of data obtained at different times in just one inversion step (4-D inversion). The advantages of this new inversion algorithm are demonstrated on synthetic time-lapse data resulting from the simulation of a salt tracer test in a heterogeneous random material described by an anisotropic semi-variogram. ?? 2011 The Authors Geophysical Journal International ?? 2011 RAS.

  18. Time-lapse Imaging of Primary Preneoplastic Mammary Epithelial Cells Derived from Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nakles, Rebecca E.; Millman, Sarah L.; Cabrera, M. Carla; Johnson, Peter; Mueller, Susette; Hoppe, Philipp S.; Schroeder, Timm; Furth, Priscilla A.

    2013-01-01

    Time-lapse imaging can be used to compare behavior of cultured primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from different genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer. For example, time between cell divisions (cell lifetimes), apoptotic cell numbers, evolution of morphological changes, and mechanism of colony formation can be quantified and compared in cells carrying specific genetic lesions. Primary mammary epithelial cell cultures are generated from mammary glands without...

  19. Coding the Complexity of Activity in Video Recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harter, Christopher Daniel; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    scheme, based on the theoretical principles of activity theory, was constructed in a video analysis software program, as a tool for coding and analyzing video data, without being too descriptive or prescriptive and in a variety of research fields. As of now, the coding scheme is a prototype developed......This paper presents a theoretical approach to coding and analyzing video data on human interaction and activity, using principles found in cultural historical activity theory. The systematic classification or coding of information contained in video data on activity can be arduous and time...... consuming; however, it is one of the ways to make sense of complex information, which in turn can add value to the process of exploring selected themes. By reviewing earlier attempts at using Activity Theory as a tool for guiding the examination of human activity in human–computer interaction by Susanne...

  20. Time-lapse electromagnetic induction surveys under olive tree canopies reveal soil moisture dynamics and controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Gonzalo; Giraldez Cervera, Juan Vicente; Vanderlinden, Karl

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture (θ) is a critical variable that exerts an important control on plant status and development. Soil sampling, neutron attenuation and electromagnetic methods such as TDR or FDR have been used widely to measure θ and provide point data at a possible range of temporal resolutions. However, these methods require either destructive sampling or permanently installed devices with often limiting measurement depths, or are extremely time-consuming. Moreover, the small support of such measurements compromises its value in heterogeneous soils. To overcome such limitations electromagnetic induction (EMI) can be tested to monitor θ at different spatial and temporal scales. This work investigates the potential of EMI to characterize the spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture from apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) under the canopy of individual olive trees. During one year we measured θ with a frequency of 5 min and ECa on an approximately weekly basis along transects from the tree trunk towards the inter-row area. CS-616 soil moisture sensors where horizontally installed in the walls of a trench at depths of 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 m at five locations along the transect, with a separation of 0.8 m. The Dualem-21S sensor was used to measure weekly the ECa at 0.2 m increments, from the tree trunk to a distance of 4.4 m. The results showed similar drying and wetting patterns for θ and ECa. Both variables showed a decreasing pattern from the tree trunk towards the drip line, followed by a sharp increment and constant values towards the center of the inter-row space. This pattern reflects clearly the influence of root-zone water uptake under the tree canopy and higher θ values in the inter-row area where root-water uptake is smaller. Time-lapse ECa data responded to evaporation and infiltration fluxes with the highest sensitivity for the 1 and 1.5 m ECa signals, as compared to the 0.5 and 3.0 m signals. Overall these preliminary results revealed the

  1. A Novel Methodology for Characterizing Cell Subpopulations in Automated Time-lapse Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Hattab

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Time-lapse imaging of cell colonies in microfluidic chambers provides time series of bioimages, i.e., biomovies. They show the behavior of cells over time under controlled conditions. One of the main remaining bottlenecks in this area of research is the analysis of experimental data and the extraction of cell growth characteristics, such as lineage information. The extraction of the cell line by human observers is time-consuming and error-prone. Previously proposed methods often fail because of their reliance on the accurate detection of a single cell, which is not possible for high density, high diversity of cell shapes and numbers, and high-resolution images with high noise. Our task is to characterize subpopulations in biomovies. In order to shift the analysis of the data from individual cell level to cellular groups with similar fluorescence or even subpopulations, we propose to represent the cells by two new abstractions: the particle and the patch. We use a three-step framework: preprocessing, particle tracking, and construction of the patch lineage. First, preprocessing improves the signal-to-noise ratio and spatially aligns the biomovie frames. Second, cell sampling is performed by assuming particles, which represent a part of a cell, cell or group of contiguous cells in space. Particle analysis includes the following: particle tracking, trajectory linking, filtering, and color information, respectively. Particle tracking consists of following the spatiotemporal position of a particle and gives rise to coherent particle trajectories over time. Typical tracking problems may occur (e.g., appearance or disappearance of cells, spurious artifacts. They are effectively processed using trajectory linking and filtering. Third, the construction of the patch lineage consists in joining particle trajectories that share common attributes (i.e., proximity and fluorescence intensity and feature common ancestry. This step is based on patch finding

  2. Seizure semiology inferred from clinical descriptions and from video recordings. How accurate are they?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniczky, Simona Alexandra; Fogarasi, András; Neufeld, Miri; Andersen, Noémi Becser; Wolf, Peter; van Emde Boas, Walter; Beniczky, Sándor

    2012-06-01

    To assess how accurate the interpretation of seizure semiology is when inferred from witnessed seizure descriptions and from video recordings, five epileptologists analyzed 41 seizures from 30 consecutive patients who had clinical episodes in the epilepsy monitoring unit. For each clinical episode, the consensus conclusions (at least 3 identical choices) based on the descriptions and, separately, of the video recordings were compared with the clinical conclusions at the end of the diagnostic work-up, including data from the video-EEG recordings (reference standard). Consensus conclusion was reached in significantly more cases based on the interpretation of video recordings (88%) than on the descriptions (66%), and the overall accuracy was higher for the video recordings (85%) than for the descriptions (54%). When consensus was reached, the concordance with the reference standard was substantial for the descriptions (k=0.67) and almost perfect for the video recordings (k=0.95). Video recordings significantly increase the accuracy of seizure interpretation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Time-Lapse Monitoring of an Engineering Scaled Excavation at Federal District, Brazil by Passive Ambient NoiseInterferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Soto, M., Sr.; Hussain, Y.; Martinez-Carvajal, H., Sr.; Martino, S., Sr.; Rocha, M., Sr.

    2016-12-01

    gave Rayleigh wave velocity changes (dv/v=-dt/t). These changes correlated well with initiation and propagation of fracture at the face of this normal slope. It is concluded that cost effective technique, PANI has a good potential for the monitoring of time lapse changes of evolving fractures.

  4. Chemistry of cometary meteoroids from video-tape records of meteor spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millman, P. M.

    1982-01-01

    The chemistry of the cometary meteoroids was studied by closed circuit television observing systems. Vidicon cameras produce basic data on standard video tape and enable the recording of the spectra of faint shower meteors, consequently the chemical study is extended to smaller particles and we have a larger data bank than is available from the more conventional method of recording meteor spectra by photography. The two main problems in using video tape meteor spectrum records are: (1) the video tape recording has a much lower resolution than the photographic technique; (2) video tape is relatively new type of data storage in astronomy and the methods of quantitative photometry have not yet been fully developed in the various fields where video tape is used. The use of the most detailed photographic meteor spectra to calibrate the video tape records and to make positive identification of the more prominent chemical elements appearing in the spectra may solve the low resolution problem. Progress in the development of standard photometric techniques for the analysis of video tape records of meteor spectra is reported.

  5. Accomplished Teaching: Using Video Recorded Micro-Teaching Discourse to Build Candidate Teaching Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Denise

    2017-01-01

    Objectives of this articles are to present the findings of video recorded communication between teacher candidates and peers during simulated micro-teaching. The micro-teaching activity in its entirety combines conventional face-to-face interaction, video micro-teaching, peer and instructor feedback, alongside self-reflection to undergird the…

  6. Video-recorded accidents conflicts and road user behaviour: A step forward in traffic safety research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, A.R.A. van der

    2008-01-01

    TNO Human Factors conducted long-term video observations to collect data on the pre-crash phase of real accidents (what exactly happened just before the collision?). The video recordings of collisions were used to evaluate and validate the safety value of indepth accident analyses, road scene

  7. Onboard Systems Record Unique Videos of Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Ecliptic Enterprises Corporation, headquartered in Pasadena, California, provided onboard video systems for rocket and space shuttle launches before it was tasked by Ames Research Center to craft the Data Handling Unit that would control sensor instruments onboard the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) spacecraft. The technological capabilities the company acquired on this project, as well as those gained developing a high-speed video system for monitoring the parachute deployments for the Orion Pad Abort Test Program at Dryden Flight Research Center, have enabled the company to offer high-speed and high-definition video for geosynchronous satellites and commercial space missions, providing remarkable footage that both informs engineers and inspires the imagination of the general public.

  8. 75 FR 63434 - Availability of Compliance Guide for the Use of Video or Other Electronic Monitoring or Recording...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ...] Availability of Compliance Guide for the Use of Video or Other Electronic Monitoring or Recording Equipment in... the availability of a compliance guide on the use of video or other electronic monitoring or recording... providing this draft guide to advise establishments that video or other electronic monitoring or recording...

  9. Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Site Characterization and Time-lapse Monitoring Using Reflection Seismic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshuhail, Abdullah A.

    2011-12-01

    Of the various disciplines involved in carbon capture and storage, seismic methods are critically important. In this dissertation, two case studies in west-central Alberta were investigated by employing reflection seismic methods, rock physics and numerical modelling. In the first case study, regional and local seismic site characterization was undertaken as part of the Wabamun Area CO2 Sequestration Project. The results show that P-wave reflection seismology can be an effective tool in regional and local mapping of the continuity of the carbonate Nisku aquifer as well as in delineating geologic discontinuities, such as karsting, that may compromise storage integrity. Furthermore, the information provided by the seismic data was valuable when integrated with petrophysical data in order to reduce the ambiguity in identifying CO 2 injection "sweet spots". Results from the fluid substitution and numerical forward seismic modelling suggest that CO2 anomalies in stiff carbonate aquifers like the Nisku Formation are small and so is the change in seismic response. For instance, the maximum change in reflection time and NRMS amplitude in time-lapse P-wave reflection surface seismic data was found to be ˜ 1.5 ms and ˜ 24%, respectively. Detection of these small changes depends on a number of factors, including data repeatability, frequency bandwidth and CO2 saturation scheme. The change in the S-wave properties is much smaller than in the acoustic properties suggesting that it is unlikely that PS-wave would be successful in identifying CO 2 anomaly. The second case study pertains to 4-D seismic monitoring at the Pembina-Cardium CO2 Pilot Project site where multi-component surface seismic and walk-away vertical seismic profile methods were implemented as part of the monitoring program. The quality of these data, in particular, was compromised by interference caused by infrastructure development which resulted in the loss of ˜ 20% of the seismic shot locations. The 4-D

  10. Improved Rocket Test Engine Video Recording with Computational Photography and Computer Vision Techniques

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High energy processes such as rocket engine flight certification ground testing require high-speed, high dynamic range video imaging in order to capture and record...

  11. Improved Rocket Test Engine Video Recording with Computational Photography and Computer Vision Techniques

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rocket engine flight certification ground testing requires high-speed video recording that can capture essential information for NASA. This need is particularly true...

  12. Recorded peer video chat as a research and development tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otrel-Cass, Kathrin; Cowie, Bronwen

    2016-01-01

    When practising teachers take time to exchange their experiences and reflect on their teaching realities as critical friends, they add meaning and depth to educational research. When peer talk is facilitated through video chat platforms, teachers can meet (virtually) face to face even when...

  13. 3D reconstruction of cystoscopy videos for comprehensive bladder records

    OpenAIRE

    Lurie, Kristen L.; Angst, Roland; Zlatev, Dimitar V.; Liao, Joseph C.; Ellerbee Bowden, Audrey K.

    2017-01-01

    White light endoscopy is widely used for diagnostic imaging of the interior of organs and body cavities, but the inability to correlate individual 2D images with 3D organ morphology limits its utility for quantitative or longitudinal studies of disease physiology or cancer surveillance. As a result, most endoscopy videos, which carry enormous data potential, are used only for real-time guidance and are discarded after collection. We present a computational method to reconstruct and visualize ...

  14. Spatiotemporal monitoring of soil water content profiles in an irrigated field using probabilistic inversion of time-lapse EMI data

    KAUST Repository

    Moghadas, Davood

    2017-10-17

    Monitoring spatiotemporal variations of soil water content (θ) is important across a range of research fields, including agricultural engineering, hydrology, meteorology and climatology. Low frequency electromagnetic induction (EMI) systems have proven to be useful tools in mapping soil apparent electrical conductivity (σa) and soil moisture. However, obtaining depth profile water content is an area that has not been fully explored using EMI. To examine this, we performed time-lapse EMI measurements using a CMD mini-Explorer sensor along a 10 m transect of a maize field over a 6 day period. Reference data were measured at the end of the profile via an excavated pit using 5TE capacitance sensors. In order to derive a time-lapse, depth-specific subsurface image of electrical conductivity (σ), we applied a probabilistic sampling approach, DREAM(ZS), on the measured EMI data. The inversely estimated σ values were subsequently converted to θ using the Rhoades et al. (1976) petrophysical relationship. The uncertainties in measured σa, as well as inaccuracies in the inverted data, introduced some discrepancies between estimated σ and reference values in time and space. Moreover, the disparity between the measurement footprints of the 5TE and CMD Mini-Explorer sensors also led to differences. The obtained θ permitted an accurate monitoring of the spatiotemporal distribution and variation of soil water content due to root water uptake and evaporation. The proposed EMI measurement and modeling technique also allowed for detecting temporal root zone soil moisture variations. The time-lapse θ monitoring approach developed using DREAM(ZS) thus appears to be a useful technique to understand spatiotemporal patterns of soil water content and provide insights into linked soil moisture vegetation processes and the dynamics of soil moisture/infiltration processes.

  15. Effect of time lapse on the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography for detection of vertical root fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskandarloo, Amir; Shokri, Abbas, E-mail: Dr.a.shokri@gmail.com [Dental Research Center, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asl, Amin Mahdavi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jalalzadeh, Mohsen [Department of Endodontics, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tayari, Maryam [Department of Pedodontics, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseinipanah, Mohammad [Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fardmal, Javad [Research Center for Health Sciences and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Accurate and early diagnosis of vertical root fractures (VRFs) is imperative to prevent extensive bone loss and unnecessary endodontic and prosthodontic treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of time lapse on the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for VRFs in endodontically treated dog’s teeth. Forty eight incisors and premolars of three adult male dogs underwent root canal therapy. The teeth were assigned to two groups: VRFs were artificially induced in the first group (n=24) while the teeth in the second group remained intact (n=24). The CBCT scans were obtained by NewTom 3G unit immediately after inducing VRFs and after one, two, three, four, eight, 12 and 16 weeks. Three oral and maxillofacial radiologists blinded to the date of radiographs assessed the presence/absence of VRFs on CBCT scans. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy values were calculated and data were analyzed using SPSS v.16 software and ANOVA. The total accuracy of detection of VRFs immediately after surgery, one, two, three, four, eight, 12 and 16 weeks was 67.3%, 68.7%, 66.6%, 64.6%, 64.5%, 69.4%, 68.7%, 68% respectively. The effect of time lapse on detection of VRFs was not significant (p>0.05). Overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CBCT for detection of VRFs were 74.3%, 62.2%, 67.2% respectively. Cone beam computed tomography is a valuable tool for detection of VRFs. Time lapse (four months) had no effect on detection of VRFs on CBCT scans. (author)

  16. Spatiotemporal monitoring of soil water content profiles in an irrigated field using probabilistic inversion of time-lapse EMI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadas, Davood; Jadoon, Khan Zaib; McCabe, Matthew F.

    2017-12-01

    Monitoring spatiotemporal variations of soil water content (θ) is important across a range of research fields, including agricultural engineering, hydrology, meteorology and climatology. Low frequency electromagnetic induction (EMI) systems have proven to be useful tools in mapping soil apparent electrical conductivity (σa) and soil moisture. However, obtaining depth profile water content is an area that has not been fully explored using EMI. To examine this, we performed time-lapse EMI measurements using a CMD mini-Explorer sensor along a 10 m transect of a maize field over a 6 day period. Reference data were measured at the end of the profile via an excavated pit using 5TE capacitance sensors. In order to derive a time-lapse, depth-specific subsurface image of electrical conductivity (σ), we applied a probabilistic sampling approach, DREAM(ZS) , on the measured EMI data. The inversely estimated σ values were subsequently converted to θ using the Rhoades et al. (1976) petrophysical relationship. The uncertainties in measured σa, as well as inaccuracies in the inverted data, introduced some discrepancies between estimated σ and reference values in time and space. Moreover, the disparity between the measurement footprints of the 5TE and CMD Mini-Explorer sensors also led to differences. The obtained θ permitted an accurate monitoring of the spatiotemporal distribution and variation of soil water content due to root water uptake and evaporation. The proposed EMI measurement and modeling technique also allowed for detecting temporal root zone soil moisture variations. The time-lapse θ monitoring approach developed using DREAM(ZS) thus appears to be a useful technique to understand spatiotemporal patterns of soil water content and provide insights into linked soil moisture vegetation processes and the dynamics of soil moisture/infiltration processes.

  17. A multimethod Global Sensitivity Analysis to aid the calibration of geomechanical models via time-lapse seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, D. C.; Angus, D. A.; Garcia, A.; Fisher, Q. J.; Parsons, S.; Kato, J.

    2018-03-01

    Time-lapse seismic attributes are used extensively in the history matching of production simulator models. However, although proven to contain information regarding production induced stress change, it is typically only loosely (i.e. qualitatively) used to calibrate geomechanical models. In this study we conduct a multimethod Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) to assess the feasibility and aid the quantitative calibration of geomechanical models via near-offset time-lapse seismic data. Specifically, the calibration of mechanical properties of the overburden. Via the GSA, we analyse the near-offset overburden seismic traveltimes from over 4000 perturbations of a Finite Element (FE) geomechanical model of a typical High Pressure High Temperature (HPHT) reservoir in the North Sea. We find that, out of an initially large set of material properties, the near-offset overburden traveltimes are primarily affected by Young's modulus and the effective stress (i.e. Biot) coefficient. The unexpected significance of the Biot coefficient highlights the importance of modelling fluid flow and pore pressure outside of the reservoir. The FE model is complex and highly nonlinear. Multiple combinations of model parameters can yield equally possible model realizations. Consequently, numerical calibration via a large number of random model perturbations is unfeasible. However, the significant differences in traveltime results suggest that more sophisticated calibration methods could potentially be feasible for finding numerous suitable solutions. The results of the time-varying GSA demonstrate how acquiring multiple vintages of time-lapse seismic data can be advantageous. However, they also suggest that significant overburden near-offset seismic time-shifts, useful for model calibration, may take up to 3 yrs after the start of production to manifest. Due to the nonlinearity of the model behaviour, similar uncertainty in the reservoir mechanical properties appears to influence overburden

  18. Obstetric and perinatal outcomes of pregnancies conceived with embryos cultured in a time-lapse monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insua, Maria Fernanda; Cobo, Ana Cristina; Larreategui, Zaloa; Ferrando, Marcos; Serra, Vicente; Meseguer, Marcos

    2017-09-01

    To compare obstetric and perinatal outcomes of singleton pregnancies resulting from embryos incubated in a time-lapse system (TLS) with those of embryos grown in standard IVF incubators (SI). Retrospective description of a cohort of patients who conceived during a randomized, controlled trial. Private university-affiliated IVF center. Of 856 randomized patients, 378 gave birth to a live-born infant: 216 of the deliveries originated from embryos incubated in TLS, and 162 deliveries were from embryos cultured in SI. Embryo incubation and selection in TLS. Delivery and neonatal outcomes. No significant differences were observed in the baseline characteristics of the study population. The delivery rate was 49.3% (TLS) vs. 40.0% (SI), and multiple deliveries were higher in the TLS group: 31.0% (67 of 216) vs. 24.7% (40 of 162) in the SI group. When singleton pregnancies were analyzed no differences were found between the two groups in the rate of obstetric problems with respect to weeks at delivery: 38.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] 38.4-39.1) (TLS) vs. 39.5 (95% CI 38.0-39.9) (SI); preterm births (outcomes such as birth weight: 3,163 g (95% CI 3,035-3,292 g) (TLS) vs. 3,074 (95% CI 2,913-3,236) (SI); low birth weight (obstetric and perinatal outcomes when a time-lapse incubator was used rather than a more widely used conventional incubator. As far as we know this is the first report from a randomized study of the neonatal outcomes of time-lapse monitoring. Our results suggest that this technology is an effective and safe alternative for embryo incubation, though trials of larger numbers of patients are required to further confirm our conclusions. NCT01549262. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Dynamic Programming Model for Optimizing Frequency of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring in Geological CO2 Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjya, D.; Mukerji, T.; Mascarenhas, O.; Weyant, J.

    2005-12-01

    Designing a cost-effective and reliable monitoring program is crucial to the success of any geological CO2 storage project. Effective design entails determining both, the optimal measurement modality, as well as the frequency of monitoring the site. Time-lapse seismic provides the best spatial coverage and resolution for reservoir monitoring. Initial results from Sleipner (Norway) have demonstrated effective monitoring of CO2 plume movement. However, time-lapse seismic is an expensive monitoring technique especially over the long term life of a storage project and should be used judiciously. We present a mathematical model based on dynamic programming that can be used to estimate site-specific optimal frequency of time-lapse surveys. The dynamics of the CO2 sequestration process are simplified and modeled as a four state Markov process with transition probabilities. The states are M: injected CO2 safely migrating within the target zone; L: leakage from the target zone to the adjacent geosphere; R: safe migration after recovery from leakage state; and S: seepage from geosphere to the biosphere. The states are observed only when a monitoring survey is performed. We assume that the system may go to state S only from state L. We also assume that once observed to be in state L, remedial measures are always taken to bring it back to state R. Remediation benefits are captured by calculating the expected penalty if CO2 seeped into the biosphere. There is a trade-off between the conflicting objectives of minimum discounted costs of performing the next time-lapse survey and minimum risk of seepage and its associated costly consequences. A survey performed earlier would spot the leakage earlier. Remediation methods would have been utilized earlier, resulting in savings in costs attributed to excessive seepage. On the other hand, there are also costs for the survey and remedial measures. The problem is solved numerically using Bellman's optimality principal of dynamic

  20. High definition in minimally invasive surgery: a review of methods for recording, editing, and distributing video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Christopher R; Hogle, Nancy J; Landman, Jaime; Fowler, Dennis L

    2008-09-01

    The use of high-definition cameras and monitors during minimally invasive procedures can provide the surgeon and operating team with more than twice the resolution of standard definition systems. Although this dramatic improvement in visualization offers numerous advantages, the adoption of high definition cameras in the operating room can be challenging because new recording equipment must be purchased, and several new technologies are required to edit and distribute video. The purpose of this review article is to provide an overview of the popular methods for recording, editing, and distributing high-definition video. This article discusses the essential technical concepts of high-definition video, reviews the different kinds of equipment and methods most often used for recording, and describes several options for video distribution.

  1. Estimation of soil hydraulic parameters by integrated hydrogeophysical inversion of time-lapse GPR data measured at Selhausen, Germany

    KAUST Repository

    Jadoon, Khan

    2012-06-01

    We present an integrated hydrogeophysical inversion approach that uses time-lapse off-ground ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data to estimate soil hydraulic parameters, and apply it to a dataset collected in the field. Off-ground GPR data are mainly sensitive to the near-surface water content profile and dynamics, and are thus related to soil hydraulic parameters, such as the parameters of the hydraulic conductivity and water retention functions. The hydrological simulator HYDRUS 1-D was used with a two-layer single- and dual-porosity model. To monitor the soil water content dynamics, time-lapse GPR and time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements were performed, whereby only GPR data was used in the inversion. The dual porosity model provided better results compared to the single porosity model for describing the soil water dynamics, which is supported by field observations of macropores. Furthermore, the GPR-derived water content profiles reconstructed from the integrated hydrogeophysical inversion were in good agreement with TDR observations. These results suggest that the proposed method is promising for non-invasive characterization of the shallow subsurface hydraulic properties and monitoring water dynamics at the field scale.

  2. Time-lapse imaging of primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakles, Rebecca E; Millman, Sarah L; Cabrera, M Carla; Johnson, Peter; Mueller, Susette; Hoppe, Philipp S; Schroeder, Timm; Furth, Priscilla A

    2013-02-08

    Time-lapse imaging can be used to compare behavior of cultured primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from different genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer. For example, time between cell divisions (cell lifetimes), apoptotic cell numbers, evolution of morphological changes, and mechanism of colony formation can be quantified and compared in cells carrying specific genetic lesions. Primary mammary epithelial cell cultures are generated from mammary glands without palpable tumor. Glands are carefully resected with clear separation from adjacent muscle, lymph nodes are removed, and single-cell suspensions of enriched mammary epithelial cells are generated by mincing mammary tissue followed by enzymatic dissociation and filtration. Single-cell suspensions are plated and placed directly under a microscope within an incubator chamber for live-cell imaging. Sixteen 650 μm x 700 μm fields in a 4x4 configuration from each well of a 6-well plate are imaged every 15 min for 5 days. Time-lapse images are examined directly to measure cellular behaviors that can include mechanism and frequency of cell colony formation within the first 24 hr of plating the cells (aggregation versus cell proliferation), incidence of apoptosis, and phasing of morphological changes. Single-cell tracking is used to generate cell fate maps for measurement of individual cell lifetimes and investigation of cell division patterns. Quantitative data are statistically analyzed to assess for significant differences in behavior correlated with specific genetic lesions.

  3. The history of consumer magnetic video tape recording, from a rarity to a mass product

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luitjens, S.B.; Rijckaert, A.M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Since the Þrst experiments on magnetic recording by Valdemar Poulsen in 1898 the use of this technology has grown tremendously and magnetic storage is used in almost every home in the world. A special challenge was the recording of video signals which need a high bandwidth. In the 1950s, television

  4. Introducing video recording in primary care midwifery for research purposes: procedure, dataset, and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelten, Evelien R; Martin, Linda; Gitsels, Janneke T; Pereboom, Monique T R; Hutton, Eileen K; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    video recording studies have been found to be complex; however very few studies describe the actual introduction and enrolment of the study, the resulting dataset and its interpretation. In this paper we describe the introduction and the use of video recordings of health care provider (HCP)-client interactions in primary care midwifery for research purposes. We also report on the process of data management, data coding and the resulting data set. we describe our experience in undertaking a study using video recording to assess the interaction of the midwife and her client in the first antenatal consultation, in a real life clinical practice setting in the Netherlands. Midwives from six practices across the Netherlands were recruited to videotape 15-20 intakes. The introduction, complexity of the study and intrusiveness of the study were discussed within the research group. The number of valid recordings and missing recordings was measured; reasons not to participate, non-response analyses, and the inter-rater reliability of the coded videotapes were assessed. Video recordings were supplemented by questionnaires for midwives and clients. The Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS) was used for coding as well as an obstetric topics scale. at the introduction of the study, more initial hesitation in co-operation was found among the midwives than among their clients. The intrusive nature of the recording on the interaction was perceived to be minimal. The complex nature of the study affected recruitment and data collection. Combining the dataset with the questionnaires and medical records proved to be a challenge. The final dataset included videotapes of 20 midwives (7-23 recordings per midwife). Of the 460 eligible clients, 324 gave informed consent. The study resulted in a significant dataset of first antenatal consultations involving recording 269 clients and 194 partners. video recording of midwife-client interaction was both feasible and challenging and resulted

  5. Quantifying motion in video recordings of neonatal seizures by feature trackers based on predictive block matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayiannis, N B; Sami, A; Frost, J D; Wise, M S; Mizrahi, E M

    2004-01-01

    This work introduces predictive block matching, a method developed to track motion in video by exploiting the advantages of block motion estimation and adaptive block matching. The proposed method relies on a pure translation motion model to estimate the displacement of a block between two successive video frames before initiating the search for the best match of the block tracked throughout the frame sequence. The search for the best match relies on adaptive block matching, which employs an update strategy based on Kalman filtering to account for the changing appearance of the block. Predictive block matching was used to extract motor activity signals from video recordings of neonatal seizures.

  6. A Novel Method for Real-Time Audio Recording With Intraoperative Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugamoto, Yuji; Hamamoto, Yasuyoshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Fukunaga, Toru; Tasaki, Kentaro; Asai, Yo; Takeshita, Nobuyoshi; Maruyama, Tetsuro; Hosokawa, Takashi; Tamachi, Tomohide; Aoyama, Hiromichi; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2015-01-01

    Although laparoscopic surgery has become widespread, effective and efficient education in laparoscopic surgery is difficult. Instructive laparoscopy videos with appropriate annotations are ideal for initial training in laparoscopic surgery; however, the method we use at our institution for creating laparoscopy videos with audio is not generalized, and there have been no detailed explanations of any such method. Our objectives were to demonstrate the feasibility of low-cost simple methods for recording surgical videos with audio and to perform a preliminary safety evaluation when obtaining these recordings during operations. We devised a method for the synchronous recording of surgical video with real-time audio in which we connected an amplifier and a wireless microphone to an existing endoscopy system and its equipped video-recording device. We tested this system in 209 cases of laparoscopic surgery in operating rooms between August 2010 and July 2011 and prospectively investigated the results of the audiovisual recording method and examined intraoperative problems. Numazu City Hospital in Numazu city, Japan. Surgeons, instrument nurses, and medical engineers. In all cases, the synchronous input of audio and video was possible. The recording system did not cause any inconvenience to the surgeon, assistants, instrument nurse, sterilized equipment, or electrical medical equipment. Statistically significant differences were not observed between the audiovisual group and control group regarding the operating time, which had been divided into 2 slots-performed by the instructors or by trainees (p > 0.05). This recording method is feasible and considerably safe while posing minimal difficulty in terms of technology, time, and expense. We recommend this method for both surgical trainees who wish to acquire surgical skills effectively and medical instructors who wish to teach surgical skills effectively. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery

  7. The air gap between tape and drum in a video recorder

    OpenAIRE

    Moes, H.

    1991-01-01

    Lubrication with ambient air is not quite generally applied. The best known application is the "oil bearing" in tape recording systems for audio, video and computer applications; where the gap height that is needed for effective lubrication may quite easily be attained. This air gap reduces tape friction and wear of tape and recording head substantially. On the other hand, though, the air gap for effective magnetic recording is very small. These conflicting demands on the lubrication conditio...

  8. Visualization of living terminal hypertrophic chondrocytes of growth plate cartilage in situ by differential interference contrast microscopy and time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnum, C E; Turgai, J; Wilsman, N J

    1990-09-01

    The functional unit within the growth plate consists of a column of chondrocytes that passes through a sequence of phases including proliferation, hypertrophy, and death. It is important to our understanding of the biology of the growth plate to determine if distal hypertrophic cells are viable, highly differentiated cells with the potential of actively controlling terminal events of endochondral ossification prior to their death at the chondro-osseous junction. This study for the first time reports on the visualization of living hypertrophic chondrocytes in situ, including the terminal hypertrophic chondrocyte. Chondrocytes in growth plate explants are visualized using rectified differential interference contrast microscopy. We record and measure, using time-lapse cinematography, the rate of movement of subcellular organelles at the limit of resolution of this light microscopy system. Control experiments to assess viability of hypertrophic chondrocytes include coincubating organ cultures with the intravital dye fluorescein diacetate to assess the integrity of the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic esterases. In this system, all hypertrophic chondrocytes, including the very terminal chondrocyte, exist as rounded, fully hydrated cells. By the criteria of intravital dye staining and organelle movement, distal hypertrophic chondrocytes are identical to chondrocytes in the proliferative and early hypertrophic cell zones.

  9. Linear array of photodiodes to track a human speaker for video recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeTone, D.; Neal, H.; Lougheed, R.

    2012-12-01

    Communication and collaboration using stored digital media has garnered more interest by many areas of business, government and education in recent years. This is due primarily to improvements in the quality of cameras and speed of computers. An advantage of digital media is that it can serve as an effective alternative when physical interaction is not possible. Video recordings that allow for viewers to discern a presenter's facial features, lips and hand motions are more effective than videos that do not. To attain this, one must maintain a video capture in which the speaker occupies a significant portion of the captured pixels. However, camera operators are costly, and often do an imperfect job of tracking presenters in unrehearsed situations. This creates motivation for a robust, automated system that directs a video camera to follow a presenter as he or she walks anywhere in the front of a lecture hall or large conference room. Such a system is presented. The system consists of a commercial, off-the-shelf pan/tilt/zoom (PTZ) color video camera, a necklace of infrared LEDs and a linear photodiode array detector. Electronic output from the photodiode array is processed to generate the location of the LED necklace, which is worn by a human speaker. The computer controls the video camera movements to record video of the speaker. The speaker's vertical position and depth are assumed to remain relatively constant- the video camera is sent only panning (horizontal) movement commands. The LED necklace is flashed at 70Hz at a 50% duty cycle to provide noise-filtering capability. The benefit to using a photodiode array versus a standard video camera is its higher frame rate (4kHz vs. 60Hz). The higher frame rate allows for the filtering of infrared noise such as sunlight and indoor lighting-a capability absent from other tracking technologies. The system has been tested in a large lecture hall and is shown to be effective.

  10. Linear array of photodiodes to track a human speaker for video recording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeTone, D; Neal, H; Lougheed, R

    2012-01-01

    Communication and collaboration using stored digital media has garnered more interest by many areas of business, government and education in recent years. This is due primarily to improvements in the quality of cameras and speed of computers. An advantage of digital media is that it can serve as an effective alternative when physical interaction is not possible. Video recordings that allow for viewers to discern a presenter's facial features, lips and hand motions are more effective than videos that do not. To attain this, one must maintain a video capture in which the speaker occupies a significant portion of the captured pixels. However, camera operators are costly, and often do an imperfect job of tracking presenters in unrehearsed situations. This creates motivation for a robust, automated system that directs a video camera to follow a presenter as he or she walks anywhere in the front of a lecture hall or large conference room. Such a system is presented. The system consists of a commercial, off-the-shelf pan/tilt/zoom (PTZ) color video camera, a necklace of infrared LEDs and a linear photodiode array detector. Electronic output from the photodiode array is processed to generate the location of the LED necklace, which is worn by a human speaker. The computer controls the video camera movements to record video of the speaker. The speaker's vertical position and depth are assumed to remain relatively constant– the video camera is sent only panning (horizontal) movement commands. The LED necklace is flashed at 70Hz at a 50% duty cycle to provide noise-filtering capability. The benefit to using a photodiode array versus a standard video camera is its higher frame rate (4kHz vs. 60Hz). The higher frame rate allows for the filtering of infrared noise such as sunlight and indoor lighting–a capability absent from other tracking technologies. The system has been tested in a large lecture hall and is shown to be effective.

  11. High-resolution X-ray television and high-resolution video recorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haendle, J.; Horbaschek, H.; Alexandrescu, M.

    1977-01-01

    The improved transmission properties of the high-resolution X-ray television chain described here make it possible to transmit more information per television image. The resolution in the fluoroscopic image, which is visually determined, depends on the dose rate and the inertia of the television pick-up tube. This connection is discussed. In the last few years, video recorders have been increasingly used in X-ray diagnostics. The video recorder is a further quality-limiting element in X-ray television. The development of function patterns of high-resolution magnetic video recorders shows that this quality drop may be largely overcome. The influence of electrical band width and number of lines on the resolution in the X-ray television image stored is explained in more detail. (orig.) [de

  12. Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Z; Terry, N; Hubbard, S S; Csatho, B

    2013-02-12

    In this study, we evaluate the possibility of monitoring soil moisture variation using tomographic ground penetrating radar travel time data through Bayesian inversion, which is integrated with entropy memory function and pilot point concepts, as well as efficient sampling approaches. It is critical to accurately estimate soil moisture content and variations in vadose zone studies. Many studies have illustrated the promise and value of GPR tomographic data for estimating soil moisture and associated changes, however, challenges still exist in the inversion of GPR tomographic data in a manner that quantifies input and predictive uncertainty, incorporates multiple data types, handles non-uniqueness and nonlinearity, and honors time-lapse tomograms collected in a series. To address these challenges, we develop a minimum relative entropy (MRE)-Bayesian based inverse modeling framework that non-subjectively defines prior probabilities, incorporates information from multiple sources, and quantifies uncertainty. The framework enables us to estimate dielectric permittivity at pilot point locations distributed within the tomogram, as well as the spatial correlation range. In the inversion framework, MRE is first used to derive prior probability distribution functions (pdfs) of dielectric permittivity based on prior information obtained from a straight-ray GPR inversion. The probability distributions are then sampled using a Quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) approach, and the sample sets provide inputs to a sequential Gaussian simulation (SGSim) algorithm that constructs a highly resolved permittivity/velocity field for evaluation with a curved-ray GPR forward model. The likelihood functions are computed as a function of misfits, and posterior pdfs are constructed using a Gaussian kernel. Inversion of subsequent time-lapse datasets combines the Bayesian estimates from the previous inversion (as a memory function) with new data. The memory function and pilot point design takes

  13. Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Terry, Neil C.; Hubbard, Susan S.

    2013-02-22

    In this study, we evaluate the possibility of monitoring soil moisture variation using tomographic ground penetrating radar travel time data through Bayesian inversion, which is integrated with entropy memory function and pilot point concepts, as well as efficient sampling approaches. It is critical to accurately estimate soil moisture content and variations in vadose zone studies. Many studies have illustrated the promise and value of GPR tomographic data for estimating soil moisture and associated changes, however, challenges still exist in the inversion of GPR tomographic data in a manner that quantifies input and predictive uncertainty, incorporates multiple data types, handles non-uniqueness and nonlinearity, and honors time-lapse tomograms collected in a series. To address these challenges, we develop a minimum relative entropy (MRE)-Bayesian based inverse modeling framework that non-subjectively defines prior probabilities, incorporates information from multiple sources, and quantifies uncertainty. The framework enables us to estimate dielectric permittivity at pilot point locations distributed within the tomogram, as well as the spatial correlation range. In the inversion framework, MRE is first used to derive prior probability density functions (pdfs) of dielectric permittivity based on prior information obtained from a straight-ray GPR inversion. The probability distributions are then sampled using a Quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) approach, and the sample sets provide inputs to a sequential Gaussian simulation (SGSIM) algorithm that constructs a highly resolved permittivity/velocity field for evaluation with a curved-ray GPR forward model. The likelihood functions are computed as a function of misfits, and posterior pdfs are constructed using a Gaussian kernel. Inversion of subsequent time-lapse datasets combines the Bayesian estimates from the previous inversion (as a memory function) with new data. The memory function and pilot point design takes advantage of

  14. Subsurface Hydrologic Processes Revealed by Time-lapse GPR in Two Contrasting Soils in the Shale Hills CZO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L.; Lin, H.; Nyquist, J.; Toran, L.; Mount, G.

    2017-12-01

    Linking subsurface structures to their functions in determining hydrologic processes, such as soil moisture dynamics, subsurface flow patterns, and discharge behaviours, is a key to understanding and modelling hydrological systems. Geophysical techniques provide a non-invasive approach to investigate this form-function dualism of subsurface hydrology at the field scale, because they are effective in visualizing subsurface structure and monitoring the distribution of water. In this study, we used time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to compare the hydrologic responses of two contrasting soils in the Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory. By integrating time-lapse GPR with artificial water injection, we observed distinct flow patterns in the two soils: 1) in the deep Rushtown soil (over 1.5 m depth to bedrock) located in a concave hillslope, a lateral preferential flow network extending as far as 2 m downslope was identified above a less permeable layer and via a series of connected macropores; whereas 2) in the shallow Weikert soil ( 0.3 m depth to saprock) located in a planar hillslope, vertical infiltration into the permeable fractured shale dominated the flow field, while the development of lateral preferential flow along the hillslope was restrained. At the Weikert soil site, the addition of brilliant blue dye to the water injection followed by in situ excavation supported GPR interpretation that only limited lateral preferential flow formed along the soil-saprock interface. Moreover, seasonally repeated GPR surveys indicated different patterns of profile moisture distribution in the two soils that in comparison with the dry season, a dense layer within the BC horizon in the deep Rushtown soil prevented vertical infiltration in the wet season, leading to the accumulation of soil moisture above this layer; whereas, in the shallow Weikert soil, water infiltrated into saprock in wet seasons, building up water storage within the fractured bedrock (i.e., the

  15. Development of Video-Tape Recording for Research on Teaching and Learning

    OpenAIRE

    赤堀, 正宜; アカホリ, マサヨシ; Masayoshi, Akahori

    1988-01-01

    Video-tape recording for research on teaching and learning is known as the most effective and popular method in analysis of teaching. In the first experiment of micro-teaching at Stanford University in 1963, video-tape recording was used for evaluation of teaching practice by student teachers, and since then this method has been used for research on teaching methods. The Institute has been producing teacher-training audio-visual materials since 1984. This paper reports the search and developm...

  16. A Modular and Affordable Time-Lapse Imaging and Incubation System Based on 3D-Printed Parts, a Smartphone, and Off-The-Shelf Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Vera, Rodrigo; Schwan, Emil; Fatsis-Kavalopoulos, Nikos; Kreuger, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Time-lapse imaging is a powerful tool for studying cellular dynamics and cell behavior over long periods of time to acquire detailed functional information. However, commercially available time-lapse imaging systems are expensive and this has limited a broader implementation of this technique in low-resource environments. Further, the availability of time-lapse imaging systems often present workflow bottlenecks in well-funded institutions. To address these limitations we have designed a modular and affordable time-lapse imaging and incubation system (ATLIS). The ATLIS enables the transformation of simple inverted microscopes into live cell imaging systems using custom-designed 3D-printed parts, a smartphone, and off-the-shelf electronic components. We demonstrate that the ATLIS provides stable environmental conditions to support normal cell behavior during live imaging experiments in both traditional and evaporation-sensitive microfluidic cell culture systems. Thus, the system presented here has the potential to increase the accessibility of time-lapse microscopy of living cells for the wider research community.

  17. Imaging subsurface migration of dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer using 3-D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auken, Esben; Doetsch, Joseph; Fiandaca, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater by leaking CO2 is a potential risk of carbon sequestration. With the help of a field experiment in western Denmark, we investigate to what extent surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can detect and image dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer. For this purpose...... of aeolian and glacial sands near the surface and marine sands below 10m depth. 3-D time-lapse ERT inversions clearly image the dissolved CO2 plume with decreased electrical resistivity values. We can image the geochemical changes induced by the dissolved CO2 until the end of the acquisition, 120days after......-intrusive surface electrical resistivity tomography. © 2013 Elsevier B.V....

  18. A time-lapse gravity survey of the Coso geothermal field, China Lake Naval Air Weapons Station, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Geoffrey; Cronkite-Ratcliff, Collin; Blake, Kelly

    2018-04-19

    We have conducted a gravity survey of the Coso geothermal field to continue the time-lapse gravity study of the area initiated in 1991. In this report, we outline a method of processing the gravity data that minimizes the random errors and instrument bias introduced into the data by the Scintrex CG-5 relative gravimeters that were used. After processing, the standard deviation of the data was estimated to be ±13 microGals. These data reveal that the negative gravity anomaly over the Coso geothermal field, centered on gravity station CER1, is continuing to increase in magnitude over time. Preliminary modeling indicates that water-table drawdown at the location of CER1 is between 65 and 326 meters over the last two decades. We note, however, that several assumptions on which the model results depend, such as constant elevation and free-water level over the study period, still require verification.

  19. Acquiring fluorescence time-lapse movies of budding yeast and analyzing single-cell dynamics using GRAFTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zopf, Christopher J; Maheshri, Narendra

    2013-07-18

    Fluorescence time-lapse microscopy has become a powerful tool in the study of many biological processes at the single-cell level. In particular, movies depicting the temporal dependence of gene expression provide insight into the dynamics of its regulation; however, there are many technical challenges to obtaining and analyzing fluorescence movies of single cells. We describe here a simple protocol using a commercially available microfluidic culture device to generate such data, and a MATLAB-based, graphical user interface (GUI) -based software package to quantify the fluorescence images. The software segments and tracks cells, enables the user to visually curate errors in the data, and automatically assigns lineage and division times. The GUI further analyzes the time series to produce whole cell traces as well as their first and second time derivatives. While the software was designed for S. cerevisiae, its modularity and versatility should allow it to serve as a platform for studying other cell types with few modifications.

  20. Technical Note: Semi-automated effective width extraction from time-lapse RGB imagery of a remote, braided Greenlandic river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, C. J.; Smith, L. C.; Finnegan, D. C.; LeWinter, A. L.; Pitcher, L. H.; Chu, V. W.

    2015-06-01

    River systems in remote environments are often challenging to monitor and understand where traditional gauging apparatus are difficult to install or where safety concerns prohibit field measurements. In such cases, remote sensing, especially terrestrial time-lapse imaging platforms, offer a means to better understand these fluvial systems. One such environment is found at the proglacial Isortoq River in southwestern Greenland, a river with a constantly shifting floodplain and remote Arctic location that make gauging and in situ measurements all but impossible. In order to derive relevant hydraulic parameters for this river, two true color (RGB) cameras were installed in July 2011, and these cameras collected over 10 000 half hourly time-lapse images of the river by September of 2012. Existing approaches for extracting hydraulic parameters from RGB imagery require manual or supervised classification of images into water and non-water areas, a task that was impractical for the volume of data in this study. As such, automated image filters were developed that removed images with environmental obstacles (e.g., shadows, sun glint, snow) from the processing stream. Further image filtering was accomplished via a novel automated histogram similarity filtering process. This similarity filtering allowed successful (mean accuracy 79.6 %) supervised classification of filtered images from training data collected from just 10 % of those images. Effective width, a hydraulic parameter highly correlated with discharge in braided rivers, was extracted from these classified images, producing a hydrograph proxy for the Isortoq River between 2011 and 2012. This hydrograph proxy shows agreement with historic flooding observed in other parts of Greenland in July 2012 and offers promise that the imaging platform and processing methodology presented here will be useful for future monitoring studies of remote rivers.

  1. Technical Note: Semi-automated classification of time-lapse RGB imagery for a remote Greenlandic river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, C. J.; Smith, L. C.; Finnegan, D. C.; LeWinter, A. L.; Pitcher, L. H.; Chu, V. W.

    2015-01-01

    River systems in remote environments are often challenging to monitor and understand where traditional gauging apparatus are difficult to install or where safety concerns prohibit field measurements. In such cases, remote sensing, especially terrestrial time lapse imaging platforms, offer a means to better understand these fluvial systems. One such environment is found at the proglacial Isortoq River in southwest Greenland, a river with a constantly shifting floodplain and remote Arctic location that make gauging and in situ measurements all but impossible. In order to derive relevant hydraulic parameters for this river, two RGB cameras were installed in July of 2011, and these cameras collected over 10 000 half hourly time-lapse images of the river by September of 2012. Existing approaches for extracting hydraulic parameters from RGB imagery require manual or supervised classification of images into water and non-water areas, a task that was impractical for the volume of data in this study. As such, automated image filters were developed that removed images with environmental obstacles (e.g. shadows, sun glint, snow) from the processing stream. Further image filtering was accomplished via a novel automated histogram similarity filtering process. This similarity filtering allowed successful (mean accuracy 79.6%) supervised classification of filtered images from training data collected from just 10% of those images. Effective width, a hydraulic parameter highly correlated with discharge in braided rivers, was extracted from these classified images, producing a hydrograph proxy for the Isortoq River between 2011 and 2012. This hydrograph proxy shows agreement with historic flooding observed in other parts of Greenland in July 2012 and offers promise that the imaging platform and processing methodology presented here will be useful for future monitoring studies of remote rivers.

  2. In vivo time-lapse imaging of cell proliferation and differentiation in the optic tectum of Xenopus laevis tadpoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestman, Jennifer E.; Lee-Osbourne, Jane; Cline, Hollis T.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the function of neural progenitors in the developing CNS of Xenopus laevis tadpoles using in vivo time-lapse confocal microscopy to collect images through the tectum at intervals of 2 to 24 hours over 3 days. Neural progenitor cells were labeled with fluorescent protein reporters based on expression of endogenous Sox2 transcription factor. With this construct, we identified Sox2-expressing cells as radial glia and as a component of the progenitor pool of cells in the developing tectum that gives rise to neurons and other radial glia. Lineage analysis of individual radial glia and their progeny demonstrated that less than 10% of radial glia undergo symmetric divisions resulting in two radial glia, while the majority of radial glia divide asymmetrically to generate neurons and radial glia. Time-lapse imaging revealed the direct differentiation of radial glia into neurons. Although radial glia may guide axons as they navigate to superficial tectum, we find no evidence that radial glia function as a scaffold for neuronal migration at early stages of tectal development. Over three days, the number of labeled cells increased 20%, as the fraction of radial glia dropped and the proportion of neuronal progeny increased to approximately 60% of the labeled cells. Tadpoles provided with short-term visual enhancement generated significantly more neurons, with a corresponding decrease in cell proliferation. Together these results demonstrate that radial glial cells are neural progenitors in the developing optic tectum and reveal that visual experience increases the proportion of neurons generated in an intact animal. PMID:22113462

  3. Time-lapse ERT and DTS for seasonal and short-term monitoring of an alpine river hyporheic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaga, Jacopo; Laura, Busato; Mariateresa, Perri; Giorgio, Cassiani

    2016-04-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) is the area located beneath and adjacent to rivers and streams, where the interactions between surface water and groundwater take place. This complex physical domain allows the transport of several substances from a stream to the unconfined aquifer below, and vice versa, thus playing a fundamental role in the river ecosystem. The importance of the hyporheic zone makes its characterization a goal shared by several disciplines, which range from applied geophysics to biogeochemistry, from hydraulics to ecology. The frontier field of HZ characterization stays in applied non-invasive methodologies as Electrical Resistivity Tomography - ERT - and Distributed Temperature Sensing - DTS. ERT is commonly applied in cross-well configuration or with a superficial electrodes deployment while DTS is used in hydro-geophysics in the last decade, revealing a wide applicability to the typical issues of this field of study. DTS for hydro-geophysics studies is based on Raman scattering and employs heat as tracer and uses a fiber-optic cable to acquire temperature values. We applied both techniques for an alpine river case studies located in Val di Sole, TN, Italy. The collected measurements allow high-resolution characterization of the hyporheic zone, overcoming the critical problem of invasive measurements under riverbeds. In this work, we present the preliminary results regarding the characterization of the hyporheic zone of the alpine river obtained combining ERT and DTS time-lapse measurements. The data collection benefits from an innovative instrumentation deployment, which consists of both an ERT multicore cable and a DTS fiber-optic located in two separated boreholes drilled 5m under the watercourse and perpendicular to it. In particular we present the first year monitoring results and a short time-lapse monitoring experiment conducted during summer 2015. The site and the results here described are part of the EU FP7 CLIMB (Climate Induced Changes on the

  4. OPTICAL FLOW APPLIED TO TIME-LAPSE IMAGE SERIES TO ESTIMATE GLACIER MOTION IN THE SOUTHERN PATAGONIA ICE FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lannutti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we assessed the feasibility of using optical flow to obtain the motion estimation of a glacier. In general, former investigations used to detect glacier changes involve solutions that require repeated observations which are many times based on extensive field work. Taking into account glaciers are usually located in geographically complex and hard to access areas, deploying time-lapse imaging sensors, optical flow may provide an efficient solution at good spatial and temporal resolution to describe mass motion. Several studies in computer vision and image processing community have used this method to detect large displacements. Therefore, we carried out a test of the proposed Large Displacement Optical Flow method at the Viedma Glacier, located at South Patagonia Icefield, Argentina. We collected monoscopic terrestrial time-lapse imagery, acquired by a calibrated camera at every 24 hour from April 2014 until April 2015. A filter based on temporal correlation and RGB color discretization between the images was applied to minimize errors related to changes in lighting, shadows, clouds and snow. This selection allowed discarding images that do not follow a sequence of similarity. Our results show a flow field in the direction of the glacier movement with acceleration in the terminus. We analyzed the errors between image pairs, and the matching generally appears to be adequate, although some areas show random gross errors related to the presence of changes in lighting. The proposed technique allowed the determination of glacier motion during one year, providing accurate and reliable motion data for subsequent analysis.

  5. Videorec as gameplay: Recording playthroughs and video game engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Menotti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines an alternative genealogy of “non-narrative machinima” by the means of tracing a parallel with different cinematographic genres. It analyses the circuit of production and distribution of such material as a field for modes of superplay, in which users both compete and collaborate. Doing so, it proposes that the recording of playthroughs, a practice seemingly secondary to videogame consumption, might constitute an essential part of its culture and development, creating meaningful interfaces between players and industries.

  6. Harmonic oscillator in heat bath: Exact simulation of time-lapse-recorded data and exact analytical benchmark statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrelykke, Simon F; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The stochastic dynamics of the damped harmonic oscillator in a heat bath is simulated with an algorithm that is exact for time steps of arbitrary size. Exact analytical results are given for correlation functions and power spectra in the form they acquire when computed from experimental time...... to the extent that it is interpreted as a damped harmonic oscillator at finite temperature-such as an AFM cantilever. (iii) Three other models of fundamental interest are limiting cases of the damped harmonic oscillator at finite temperature; it consequently bridges their differences and describes the effects...

  7. Surgeon-Manipulated Live Surgery Video Recording Apparatuses: Personal Experience and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapi, Emin

    2017-06-01

    Visual recording of surgical procedures is a method that is used quite frequently in practices of plastic surgery. While presentations containing photographs are quite common in education seminars and congresses, video-containing presentations find more favour. For this reason, the presentation of surgical procedures in the form of real-time video display has increased especially recently. Appropriate technical equipment for video recording is not available in most hospitals, so there is a need to set up external apparatus in the operating room. Among these apparatuses can be listed such options as head-mounted video cameras, chest-mounted cameras, and tripod-mountable cameras. The head-mounted video camera is an apparatus that is capable of capturing high-resolution and detailed close-up footage. The tripod-mountable camera enables video capturing from a fixed point. Certain user-specific modifications can be made to overcome some of these restrictions. Among these modifications, custom-made applications are one of the most effective solutions. The article makes an attempt to present the features and experiences concerning the use of a combination of a head- or chest-mounted action camera, a custom-made portable tripod apparatus of versatile features, and an underwater camera. The descriptions we used are quite easy-to-assembly, quickly installed, and inexpensive apparatuses that do not require specific technical knowledge and can be manipulated by the surgeon personally in all procedures. The author believes that video recording apparatuses will be integrated more to the operating room, become a standard practice, and become more enabling for self-manipulation by the surgeon in the near future. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  8. Identifying a hydraulic parameterization from on-ground GPR time lapse measurements of a pumping experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagenbach, A.; Buchner, J.; Klenk, P.; Roth, K.

    2012-04-01

    We show the potential of on-ground Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) to identify the hydraulic parameterization model with a semi-quantitative analysis based on numerical simulations of the radar signal. A pumping experiment has been conducted at the ASSESS-GPR site to establish a fluctuating water table, while an on-ground GPR antenna recorded traces over time at a fixed location. These measurements allow the identification of the capillary fringe and its tracking through the soil. The typical dynamics of soil water content with a transient water table can be recovered from the recorded radargrams. The characteristic reflections from the capillary fringe parameterized by the commonly used hydraulic parameterization models are investigated by numerical simulations. The results for the van Genuchten parametrization, for its simplified version with m = 1 - 1/n, and for the Brooks-Corey parameterization are compared with the measured signal. This allows to identify the appropriate hydraulic parameterization model. We show that our measurements are not consistent with the commonly used simplified van Genuchten parameterization with m = 1 - 1/n.

  9. The client’s ideas and fantasies of the supervisor in video recorded psychotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Jensen, Karen Boelt; Madsen, Ninna Skov

    2010-01-01

    by two independent researchers and a third auditor. Furthermore, clients rated the overall influence of video recording and the influence across time on Likert scales. Results: This paper only focus on the results concerning the clients’ fantasy relationship to the supervisor. In general the clients...

  10. The air gap between tape and drum in a video recorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moes, H.

    1991-01-01

    Lubrication with ambient air is not quite generally applied. The best known application is the "oil bearing" in tape recording systems for audio, video and computer applications; where the gap height that is needed for effective lubrication may quite easily be attained. This air gap reduces tape

  11. Visual recognition of mirror, video-recorded, and still images in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakura, Tomiko; Yokota, Hiroki; Ohmichi, Yusuke; Ohmichi, Mika; Nakano, Takashi; Naito, Munekazu

    2018-01-01

    Several recent studies have claimed that rodents have good visual recognition abilities. However, the extent to which rats can recognize other rats and distinguish between males and females using visual information alone remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the ability of rats to visually recognize mirror, video-recorded, and still images and to discriminate between images of males and females. Rats were tested in a place preference apparatus with a mirror, a video-recorded image of a rat, or a still image of a rat at one end. The data were assessed using t-test with Bonferroni correction. Male and female rats spent significantly more time in the mirror chamber and the video-recorded image chamber than in their respective blank chambers (P mirror than in the blank chamber (P mirror, moving or still image experiments. Identical results were obtained regardless of whether the rat in the image was the same or opposite sex. These results indicate that rats can process the differences in mirror, video-recorded, and still images as visual information, but are unable to use this information to distinguish between the sexes.

  12. Seizure semiology inferred from clinical descriptions and from video recordings. How accurate are they?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Simona Alexandra; Fogarasi, András; Neufeld, Miri

    2012-01-01

    To assess how accurate the interpretation of seizure semiology is when inferred from witnessed seizure descriptions and from video recordings, five epileptologists analyzed 41 seizures from 30 consecutive patients who had clinical episodes in the epilepsy monitoring unit. For each clinical episode...

  13. The impact of online video lecture recordings and automated feedback on student performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieling, M. B.; Hofman, W. H. A.

    To what extent a blended learning configuration of face-to-face lectures, online on-demand video recordings of the face-to-face lectures and the offering of online quizzes with appropriate feedback has an additional positive impact on the performance of these students compared to the traditional

  14. A time-lapse lidar survey of the Mam Tor landslide, Derbyshire, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgetts, David; Rutter, Ernest

    2013-04-01

    Since 2004 a terrestrial lidar survey of the Mam Tor landslide in Castleton, Derbyshire, has been undertaken each year. Using a Riegl LMSZ420i laser scanner, the data has been collected during the winter months, while the vegetation is at a minimum, to ensure the surveys record a surface as close to the true geometry of the landslip as possible. These surveys, when combined and viewed in sequence provide an accurate record of the landslides movement over this time. The main challenge in comparing yearly scans of a progressively moving feature (at up to 500mm/year) is to ensure that each year's scan is in the correct place relative to the others, to this end features outside of the landslip are used as reference points to ensure consistent cross referencing of the landslip scans. In addition to this each year the laser scanner is sited in the same position within the study area, to ensure the same areal coverage over consecutive years. In-house software called Virtual Reality Geological Studio (VRGS) is used to interpret and analyse the landslip data (in both point cloud and triangulated mesh form), providing tools for comparing surface elevation, but also to tracking individual features (such as individual boulders) from year to year allowing movement vectors to be mapped across the area of the landslip. These vectors can then be compared with other measurements from total-station surveys to act as a check on the validity of the lidar mapping approach. Topographic sections will be shown through several parts of the slip to facilitate year by year comparison. The landslide itself has formed within the Carboniferous Edale Mudstone Formation, is approximately 900m long, 270 to 300m wide and up to 20m thick. The landslip is estimated to be over 3200 years old.

  15. Evaluating Student Self-Assessment through Video-Recorded Patient Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Tammy R; Kearney, Rachel C; Kissell, Denise; Salisbury, Jessica

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine if the use of a video-recorded clinical session affects the accuracy of dental hygiene student self-assessment and dental hygiene instructor feedback. A repeated measures experiment was conducted. The use of the ODU 11/12 explorer was taught to students and participating faculty through video and demonstration. Students then demonstrated activation of the explorer on a student partner using the same technique. While faculty completed the student assessment in real time, the sessions were video recorded. After completing the activation of the explorer, students and faculty completed an assessment of the student's performance using a rubric. A week later, both students and faculty viewed the video of the clinical skill performance and reassessed the student's performance using the same rubric. The student videos were randomly assigned a number, so faculty reassessed the performance without access to the student's identity or the score that was initially given. Twenty-eight students and 4 pre-clinical faculty completed the study. Students' average score was 4.68±1.16 on the first assessment and slightly higher 4.89±1.45 when reviewed by video. Faculty average scores were 5.07±2.13 at the first assessment and 4.79±2.54 on the second assessment with the video. No significant differences were found between the differences in overall scores, there was a significant difference in the scores of the grading criteria compared to the expert assessment scores (p=0.0001). This pilot study shows that calibration and assessment without bias in education is a challenge. Analyzing and incorporating new techniques can result in more exact assessment of student performance and self-assessment. Copyright © 2016 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  16. Imaging rainfall infiltration processes with the time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhengyuan; Jiang, Guoming; Zhang, Guibin; Zhang, Gang

    2017-04-01

    Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) was carried out continuously for ten days to map the subsurface resistivity distribution along a potentially hazardous hillslope at the Jieshou Junior High School in Taoyuan, Taiwan. The inversions confirm the viability of ERI in tracking the movement of groundwater flow and rainfall infiltration by recording the variation of subsurface resistivity distribution. Meanwhile, relative-water-saturation (RWS) maps can be obtained from ERI images via Archie's Law, which provide a more intuitive reflection of the variation of subsurface rainfall infiltration and a more capable means of estimating the stability of a landslide body. What is more, we then found that the averaged RWS is significantly correlated with daily precipitation. Our observations indicate that real-time ERI is effective in monitoring subterraneous rainfall infiltration, and thereby in estimating the stability of a potential landslide body. When the agglomerate rainfall in the landslide slippage surface was infiltrated quickly without sustaining hydraulic pressure along the landslide slippage surface, the probability of landslides occurring was very low. On the contrary, the probability of landslides occurring could be increased due to the overpressure of pore fluids. Keywords Electrical Resistivity Imaging; Depth-of-Investigation; Archie's Law; Landslide Monitoring; Rainfall Infiltration; Preferential Path

  17. Time lapse imaging of thaw-bulb development beneath arctic streams using ground-penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosten, T. R.; Bradford, J. H.; McNamara, J. P.; Bowden, W.; Gooseff, M. N.

    2004-12-01

    We are investigating the responses of arctic tundra stream geomorphology, hyporheic zone hydrology, and biogeochemical cycling to climate change. Field results from summer, 2003, demonstrate that GPR is an effective tool for imaging the depth to sub-stream permafrost. The results presented here are the next step in the use of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data for measuring sub-stream thaw over the summer season. We acquired a series of GPR profiles at seven sites from May - September, 2004, using 100, 200, and 400 MHz antennas. We selected sites with the objective of including stream reaches spanning a range of geomorphologic conditions in rivers and streams on Alaska's North Slope. Generally the streams can be placed into two categories: 1) as low-energy water flow with organic material lining the streambeds (peat streams) or 2) as high-energy water flow with cobble to gravel material lining the streambeds (alluvial streams). We acquired data using a pulsed radar system with high-power transmitter. Early in the field season we used the 400 and 200 MHz antennas to maximize resolution potential, then gradually shifted to the lower frequency 100 MHz antennas later in the season to increase depth of penetration. We placed the radar antennas in the bottom of a small rubber boat, then pulled the boat across the bank and through the stream while triggering at a constant interval via a string odometer system. Depth to permafrost was verified by pressing a metal probe through the active layer to the point of refusal. In addition, we recorded temperature data using thermocouples placed at varying substream depths along two of the seven GPR profiles. We used the temperature profiles to constrain and verify the GPR interpretation. At several sites we obtained excellent results and have produced images of thaw-bulb growth through the summer season in both alluvial and peat stream morphologies.

  18. Observing the Testing Effect using Coursera Video-Recorded Lectures: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Paul Zhihao; Lim, Stephen Wee Hun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the testing effect in Coursera video-based learning. One hundred and twenty-three participants either (a) studied an instructional video-recorded lecture four times, (b) studied the lecture three times and took one recall test, or (c) studied the lecture once and took three tests. They then took a final recall test, either immediately or a week later, through which their learning was assessed. Whereas repeated studying produced better recall performance than did repeated testing when the final test was administered immediately, testing produced better performance when the final test was delayed until a week after. The testing effect was observed using Coursera lectures. Future directions are documented.

  19. A System for Reflective Learning Using Handwriting Tablet Devices for Real-Time Event Bookmarking into Simultaneously Recorded Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Taira

    2012-01-01

    The author demonstrates a new system useful for reflective learning. Our new system offers an environment that one can use handwriting tablet devices to bookmark symbolic and descriptive feedbacks into simultaneously recorded videos in the environment. If one uses video recording and feedback check sheets in reflective learning sessions, one can…

  20. Time-lapse gravity and levelling in the sinkhole-endangered urban area of Bad Frankenhausen, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobe, Martin; Gabriel, Gerald; Weise, Adelheid; Krawczyk, Charlotte; Vogel, Detlef

    2017-04-01

    Sinkholes, resulting from subrosion in the subsurface, can reach diameters of several hundred meters and thus pose a severe hazard for infrastructure and inhabitants in urban areas. Subrosion is the leaching of readily-soluble rocks, such as rock salt, gypsum, anhydrite and limestone by ground or meteoric water and leads to mass transport and relocation. Two scenarios of sinkhole evolution are conceivable: First, the surface subsides continuously in order to compensate for the mass loss. Second, the mass relocation leads to development of subsurface cavities. If they reach a critical size and the cover layers are not supported anymore, the surface collapses abruptly. To improve the understanding of subrosion processes and the related surface deformation a case study is conducted in Bad Frankenhausen, Germany, where subrosion leaches the Zechstein evaporates of the Permian. One part of the study is to analyse the spatiotemporal development of sinkholes by applying time-lapse observations. Therefore, we established a monitoring network consisting of 15 gravity and additional levelling points covering the main sinkhole areas in the city centre. In March 2014, the baseline survey was carried out. Since then, quarterly measurement campaigns are performed. In each campaign four different gravity meters are used to collect a statistical significant amount of data and to control the plausibility of our data. The gravity measurements are complemented by levelling surveys. The rectification of the time-lapse gravity data comprises the correction for jumps and systematic errors, as well as for well calculable influences, such as earth tides and air pressure changes. Furthermore, special interest was applied to seasonal changes of hydrological parameters such as soil moisture or groundwater level. We found the hydrological influence to be in the single digit up to the lower two-digit µGal range, depending on the season and the station. The standard deviations of the adjusted

  1. Student-Built Underwater Video and Data Capturing Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitt, F.

    2016-12-01

    Students from Stockbridge High School Robotics Team invention is a low cost underwater video and data capturing device. This system is capable of shooting time-lapse photography and/or video for up to 3 days of video at a time. It can be used in remote locations without having to change batteries or adding additional external hard drives for data storage. The video capturing device has a unique base and mounting system which houses a pi drive and a programmable raspberry pi with a camera module. This system is powered by two 12 volt batteries, which makes it easier for users to recharge after use. Our data capturing device has the same unique base and mounting system as the underwater camera. The data capturing device consists of an Arduino and SD card shield that is capable of collecting continuous temperature and pH readings underwater. This data will then be logged onto the SD card for easy access and recording. The low cost underwater video and data capturing device can reach depths up to 100 meters while recording 36 hours of video on 1 terabyte of storage. It also features night vision infrared light capabilities. The cost to build our invention is $500. The goal of this was to provide a device that can easily be accessed by marine biologists, teachers, researchers and citizen scientists to capture photographic and water quality data in marine environments over extended periods of time.

  2. An effective assay for high cellular resolution time-lapse imaging of sensory placode formation and morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Raman M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vertebrate peripheral nervous system contains sensory neurons that arise from ectodermal placodes. Placodal cells ingress to move inside the head to form sensory neurons of the cranial ganglia. To date, however, the process of placodal cell ingression and underlying cellular behavior are poorly understood as studies have relied upon static analyses on fixed tissues. Visualizing placodal cell behavior requires an ability to distinguish the surface ectoderm from the underlying mesenchyme. This necessitates high resolution imaging along the z-plane which is difficult to accomplish in whole embryos. To address this issue, we have developed an imaging system using cranial slices that allows direct visualization of placode formation. Results We demonstrate an effective imaging assay for capturing placode development at single cell resolution using chick embryonic tissue ex vivo. This provides the first time-lapse imaging of mitoses in the trigeminal placodal ectoderm, ingression, and intercellular contacts of placodal cells. Cell divisions with varied orientations were found in the placodal ectoderm all along the apical-basal axis. Placodal cells initially have short cytoplasmic processes during ingression as young neurons and mature over time to elaborate long axonal processes in the mesenchyme. Interestingly, the time-lapse imaging data reveal that these delaminating placodal neurons begin ingression early on from within the ectoderm, where they start to move and continue on to exit as individual or strings of neurons through common openings on the basal side of the epithelium. Furthermore, dynamic intercellular contacts are abundant among the delaminating placodal neurons, between these and the already delaminated cells, as well as among cells in the forming ganglion. Conclusions This new imaging assay provides a powerful method to analyze directly development of placode-derived sensory neurons and subsequent ganglia

  3. Field measurement of erosion rates: time-lapse monitoring of rapid stone flaking at Howden Minster, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehne, E.; Pinchin, S.

    2012-04-01

    The use of a solar-powered, field time-lapse camera and environmental monitoring system enabled measurements of the pattern and rate of loss of stone from the surface of Howden Minster, an abandoned monastery in Yorkshire dating to 1380 AD. Acquiring a photograph every 1-3 hours allowed the stone damage to be correlated with local environmental conditions. Image comparison techniques borrowed from observational astronomy, such as blink comparison, were used to determine what elements had changed from image to image. Results indicate that loss is episodic rather than continuous and in several cases is related to specific environmental conditions, such as condensation/dew formation or high winds. Damage was found also to be synchronous, with surface change (flaking, granular disintegration, and loss of flakes) occurring at the same time on different stone blocks. Crystallization pressure from magnesium sulfate phase transitions appear to be the main cause of the loss of stone surfaces. Significant variation in surface loss rates was observed and appears to be related to variations in salt concentration. An examination of stone texture by ESEM/EDS revealed signification variations and suggests that salt concentrations are controlled in part by stone micromorphology. Quantitative data on rates of surface loss are not available from most monuments. Time-lapse methods permit the relatively inexpensive acquisition of this type of data, which is needed to aid conservation decision-making and the evaluation of interventions. Such tools should also prove useful to geomorphologists studying honeycomb weathering, the moving rocks on Death Valley's Racetrack Playa, and other phenomena that are otherwise difficult to study. Context: The rapid deterioration of magnesian limestone structures in the north of England has been a serious problem for more than one hundred years. While air quality in England has improved during this period, the rate of stone loss in these carved stone

  4. Video event data recording of a taxi driver used for diagnosis of epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Kotaro Sakurai; Junko Yamamoto; Tsugiko Kurita; Youji Takeda; Ichiro Kusumi

    2014-01-01

    A video event data recorder (VEDR) in a motor vehicle records images before and after a traffic accident. This report describes a taxi driver whose seizures were recorded by VEDR, which was extremely useful for the diagnosis of epilepsy. The patient was a 63-year-old right-handed Japanese male taxi driver. He collided with a streetlight. Two years prior to this incident, he raced an engine for a long time while parked. The VEDR enabled confirmation that the accidents depended on an epileptic ...

  5. Remote estimation of the hydraulic properties of a sand using full-waveform integrated hydrogeophysical inversion of time-lapse, off-ground GPR data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambot, S.; Slob, E.; Rhebergen, J.B.; Lopera, O.; Jadoon, K.Z.; Vereecken, H.

    2009-01-01

    We used integrated hydrogeophysical inversion of time-lapse, proximal ground penetrating radar (GPR) data to remotely infer the unsaturated soil hydraulic properties of a laboratory sand during an infiltration event. The inversion procedure involved full-waveform modeling of the radar signal and

  6. Monitoring channel head erosion processes in response to an artificially induced abrupt base level change using time-lapse photography 2301

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headcut and channel extension in response to an abrupt base level change in 2004 of approximately 1m was studied in a 1.29 ha semiarid headwater drainage on the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in southeastern Arizona, USA. Field observations and time-lapse photography were coupled with hy...

  7. Time-lapse analysis of methane quantity in Mary Lee group of coal seams using filter-based multiple-point geostatistical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacan, C. Özgen; Olea, Ricardo A.

    2013-01-01

    Coal seam degasification and its success are important for controlling methane, and thus for the health and safety of coal miners. During the course of degasification, properties of coal seams change. Thus, the changes in coal reservoir conditions and in-place gas content as well as methane emission potential into mines should be evaluated by examining time-dependent changes and the presence of major heterogeneities and geological discontinuities in the field. In this work, time-lapsed reservoir and fluid storage properties of the New Castle coal seam, Mary Lee/Blue Creek seam, and Jagger seam of Black Warrior Basin, Alabama, were determined from gas and water production history matching and production forecasting of vertical degasification wellbores. These properties were combined with isotherm and other important data to compute gas-in-place (GIP) and its change with time at borehole locations. Time-lapsed training images (TIs) of GIP and GIP difference corresponding to each coal and date were generated by using these point-wise data and Voronoi decomposition on the TI grid, which included faults as discontinuities for expansion of Voronoi regions. Filter-based multiple-point geostatistical simulations, which were preferred in this study due to anisotropies and discontinuities in the area, were used to predict time-lapsed GIP distributions within the study area. Performed simulations were used for mapping spatial time-lapsed methane quantities as well as their uncertainties within the study area.

  8. Assessing Uncertainty and Repeatability in Time-Lapse VSP Monitoring of CO2 Injection in a Brine Aquifer, Frio Formation, Texas (A Case Study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazari, Siamak [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Daley, Thomas M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division

    2013-02-07

    This study was done to assess the repeatability and uncertainty of time-lapse VSP response to CO2 injection in the Frio formation near Houston Texas. A work flow was built to assess the effect of time-lapse injected CO2 into two Frio brine reservoir intervals, the ‘C’ sand (Frio1) and the ‘Blue sand’ (Frio2). The time-lapse seismic amplitude variations with sensor depth for both reservoirs Frio1 and Frio2 were computed by subtracting the seismic response of the base survey from each of the two monitor seismic surveys. Source site 1 has been considered as one of the best sites for evaluating the time-lapse response after injection. For site 1, the computed timelapse NRMS levels after processing had been compared to the estimated time-lapse NRMS level before processing for different control reflectors, and for brine aquifers Frio1, and Frio2 to quantify detectability of amplitude difference. As the main interest is to analyze the time-lapse amplitude variations, different scenarios have been considered. Three different survey scenarios were considered: the base survey which was performed before injection, monitor1 performed after the first injection operation, and monitor2 which was after the second injection. The first scenario was base-monitor1, the second was basemonitor2, and the third was monitor1-monitor2. We considered three ‘control’ reflections above the Frio to assist removal of overburden changes, and concluded that third control reflector (CR3) is the most favorable for the first scenario in terms of NRMS response, and first control reflector (CR1) is the most favorable for the second and third scenarios in terms of NRMS response. The NRMS parameter is shown to be a useful measure to assess the effect of processing on time-lapse data. The overall NRMS for the Frio VSP data set was found to be in the range of 30% to 80% following basic processing. This could be considered as an estimated baseline in assessing the utility

  9. The Relationship between Cell Number, Division Behavior and Developmental Potential of Cleavage Stage Human Embryos: A Time-Lapse Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyi Kong

    Full Text Available Day 3 cleavage embryo transfer is routine in many assisted reproductive technology centers today. Embryos are usually selected according to cell number, cell symmetry and fragmentation for transfer. Many studies have showed the relationship between cell number and embryo developmental potential. However, there is limited understanding of embryo division behavior and their association with embryo cell number and developmental potential. A retrospective and observational study was conducted to investigate how different division behaviors affect cell number and developmental potential of day 3 embryos by time-lapse imaging. Based on cell number at day 3, the embryos (from 104 IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI treatment cycles, n = 799 were classified as follows: less than 5 cells (10C; n = 42. Division behavior, morphokinetic parameters and blastocyst formation rate were analyzed in 5 groups of day 3 embryos with different cell numbers. In 10C embryos increased compared to 7-8C embryos (45.8%, 33.3% vs. 11.1%, respectively. In ≥5C embryos, FR and DC significantly reduced developmental potential, whereas 10C. In NB embryos, the cell cycle elongation or shortening was the main cause for abnormally low or high cell number, respectively. After excluding embryos with abnormal division behaviors, the developmental potential, implantation rate and live birth rate of day 3 embryos increased with cell number.

  10. The sexual phase of the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata: cytological and time-lapse cinematography characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalco, Eleonora; Amato, Alberto; Ferrante, Maria Immacolata; Montresor, Marina

    2016-11-01

    Pseudo-nitzschia is a thoroughly studied pennate diatom genus for ecological and biological reasons. Many species in this genus, including Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata, can produce domoic acid, a toxin responsible for amnesic shellfish poisoning. Physiological, phylogenetic and biological features of P. multistriata were studied extensively in the past. Life cycle stages, including the sexual phase, fundamental in diatoms to restore the maximum cell size and avoid miniaturization to death, have been well described for this species. P. multistriata is heterothallic; sexual reproduction is induced when strains of opposite mating type are mixed, and proceeds with cells producing two functionally anisogamous gametes each; however, detailed cytological information for this process is missing. By means of confocal laser scanning microscopy and nuclear staining, we followed the nuclear fate during meiosis, and using time-lapse cinematography, we timed every step of the sexual reproduction process from mate pairing to initial cell hatching. The present paper depicts cytological aspects during gametogenesis in P. multistriata, shedding light on the chloroplast behaviour during sexual reproduction, finely describing the timing of the sexual phases and providing reference data for further studies on the molecular control of this fundamental process.

  11. Comparative effects of ionizing radiation on cycle time and mitotic duration. A time-lapse cinematography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Hooghe, M.C.; Hemon, D.; Valleron, A.J.; Malaise, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of 60 Co γ rays on the length of the intermitotic period, the duration of mitosis, and the division probability of EMT6 cells have been studied in vitro using time-lapse cinematography. Irradiation increases the duration of the mitosis and of the cycle in comparable proportions: both parameters are practically doubled by a dose of 10 Gy. When daughters of irradiated cells die, the mitotic delay and lengthening of mitosis of their mother cells are longer than average. Mitotic delay and lengthening of mitosis depend on the age of cells at the moment of irradiation. The mitotic delay increases progressively when cells are irradiated during the first 8 h of their cycle (i.e., before the transition point), whereas mitosis is slightly prolonged. On the other hand, when the cells are irradiated after this transition point the mitotic delay decreases markedly, whereas the lengthening of mitosis increases sharply. These results tend to indicate that two different mechanisms are responsible for mitotic delay and prolongation of mitosis observed after irradiation

  12. Random walk behavior of migrating cortical interneurons in the marginal zone: time-lapse analysis in flat-mount cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Daisuke H; Yanagida, Mitsutoshi; Zhu, Yan; Mikami, Sakae; Nagasawa, Takashi; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Murakami, Fujio

    2009-02-04

    Migrating neurons are thought to travel from their origin near the ventricle to distant territories along stereotypical pathways by detecting environmental cues in the extracellular milieu. Here, we report a novel mode of neuronal migration that challenges this view. We performed long-term, time-lapse imaging of medial ganglionic eminence (MGE)-derived cortical interneurons tangentially migrating in the marginal zone (MZ) in flat-mount cortices. We find that they exhibit a diverse range of behaviors in terms of the rate and direction of migration. Curiously, a predominant population of these neurons repeatedly changes its direction of migration in an unpredictable manner. Trajectories of migration vary from one neuron to another. The migration of individual cells lasts for long periods, sometimes up to 2 d. Theoretical analyses reveal that these behaviors can be modeled by a random walk. Furthermore, MZ cells migrate from the cortical subventricular zone to the cortical plate, transiently accumulating in the MZ. These results suggest that MGE-derived cortical interneurons, once arriving at the MZ, are released from regulation by guidance cues and initiate random walk movement, which potentially contributes to their dispersion throughout the cortex.

  13. Fusion of Time-Lapse Gravity Survey and Hydraulic Tomography for Estimating Spatially Varying Hydraulic Conductivity and Specific Yield Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jui-Pin; Yeh, Tian-Chyi Jim; Cheng, Ching-Chung; Zha, Yuanyuan; Chang, Liang-Cheng; Hwang, Cheinway; Wang, Yu-Li; Hao, Yonghong

    2017-10-01

    Hydraulic conductivity >(K>) and specific yield (Sy) are important aquifer parameters, pertinent to groundwater resources management and protection. These parameters are commonly estimated through a traditional cross-well pumping test. Employing the traditional approach to obtain detailed spatial distributions of the parameters over a large area is generally formidable. For this reason, this study proposes a stochastic method that integrates hydraulic head and time-lapse gravity based on hydraulic tomography (HT) to efficiently derive the spatial distribution of K and Sy over a large area. This method is demonstrated using several synthetic experiments. Results of these experiments show that the K and Sy fields estimated by joint inversion of the gravity and head data set from sequential injection tests in unconfined aquifers are superior to those from the HT based on head data alone. We attribute this advantage to the mass constraint imposed on HT by gravity measurements. Besides, we find that gravity measurement can detect the change of aquifer's groundwater storage at kilometer scale, as such they can extend HT's effectiveness over greater volumes of the aquifer. Furthermore, we find that the accuracy of the estimated fields is improved as the number of the gravity stations is increased. The gravity station's location, however, has minor effects on the estimates if its effective gravity integration radius covers the well field.

  14. Cinemechanometry (CMM): A method to determine the forces that drive morphogenetic movements from time-lapse images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, P Graham; Veldhuis, Jim H; Narasimhan, Sriram; Brodland, G Wayne

    2010-09-01

    Although cell-level mechanical forces are crucial to tissue self-organization in contexts ranging from embryo development to cancer metastases to regenerative engineering, the absence of methods to map them over time has been a major obstacle to new understanding. Here, we present a technique for constructing detailed, dynamic maps of the forces driving morphogenetic events from time-lapse images. Forces in the cell are considered to be separable into unknown active driving forces and known passive forces, where actomyosin systems and microtubules contribute primarily to the first group and intermediate filaments and cytoplasm to the latter. A finite-element procedure is used to estimate the field of forces that must be applied to the passive components to produce their observed incremental deformations. This field is assumed to be generated by active forces resolved along user-defined line segments whose location, often along cell edges, is informed by the underlying biology. The magnitudes and signs of these forces are determined by a mathematical inverse method. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated using noisy synthetic data from a cross section of a generic invagination and from a planar aggregate that involves two cell types, edge forces that vary with time and a neighbor change.

  15. Formation and spreading of TDP-43 aggregates in cultured neuronal and glial cells demonstrated by time-lapse imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Ishii

    Full Text Available TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43 is a main constituent of cytoplasmic aggregates in neuronal and glial cells in cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. We have previously demonstrated that adenovirus-transduced artificial TDP-43 cytoplasmic aggregates formation is enhanced by proteasome inhibition in vitro and in vivo. However, the relationship between cytoplasmic aggregate formation and cell death remains unclear. In the present study, rat neural stem cell lines stably transfected with EGFP- or Sirius-expression vectors under the control of tubulin beta III, glial fibrillary acidic protein, or 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase promoter were differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, respectively, in the presence of retinoic acid. The differentiated cells were then transduced with adenoviruses expressing DsRed-tagged human wild type and C-terminal fragment TDP-43 under the condition of proteasome inhibition. Time-lapse imaging analyses revealed growing cytoplasmic aggregates in the transduced neuronal and glial cells, followed by collapse of the cell. The aggregates remained insoluble in culture media, consisted of sarkosyl-insoluble granular materials, and contained phosphorylated TDP-43. Moreover, the released aggregates were incorporated into neighboring neuronal cells, suggesting cell-to-cell spreading. The present study provides a novel tool for analyzing the detailed molecular mechanisms of TDP-43 proteinopathy in vitro.

  16. Formation and spreading of TDP-43 aggregates in cultured neuronal and glial cells demonstrated by time-lapse imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tomohiro; Kawakami, Emiko; Endo, Kentaro; Misawa, Hidemi; Watabe, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a main constituent of cytoplasmic aggregates in neuronal and glial cells in cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. We have previously demonstrated that adenovirus-transduced artificial TDP-43 cytoplasmic aggregates formation is enhanced by proteasome inhibition in vitro and in vivo. However, the relationship between cytoplasmic aggregate formation and cell death remains unclear. In the present study, rat neural stem cell lines stably transfected with EGFP- or Sirius-expression vectors under the control of tubulin beta III, glial fibrillary acidic protein, or 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase promoter were differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, respectively, in the presence of retinoic acid. The differentiated cells were then transduced with adenoviruses expressing DsRed-tagged human wild type and C-terminal fragment TDP-43 under the condition of proteasome inhibition. Time-lapse imaging analyses revealed growing cytoplasmic aggregates in the transduced neuronal and glial cells, followed by collapse of the cell. The aggregates remained insoluble in culture media, consisted of sarkosyl-insoluble granular materials, and contained phosphorylated TDP-43. Moreover, the released aggregates were incorporated into neighboring neuronal cells, suggesting cell-to-cell spreading. The present study provides a novel tool for analyzing the detailed molecular mechanisms of TDP-43 proteinopathy in vitro.

  17. Through the Looking Glass: Time-lapse Microscopy and Longitudinal Tracking of Single Cells to Study Anti-cancer Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Russell T; Orth, James D

    2016-05-14

    The response of single cells to anti-cancer drugs contributes significantly in determining the population response, and therefore is a major contributing factor in the overall outcome. Immunoblotting, flow cytometry and fixed cell experiments are often used to study how cells respond to anti-cancer drugs. These methods are important, but they have several shortcomings. Variability in drug responses between cancer and normal cells, and between cells of different cancer origin, and transient and rare responses are difficult to understand using population averaging assays and without being able to directly track and analyze them longitudinally. The microscope is particularly well suited to image live cells. Advancements in technology enable us to routinely image cells at a resolution that enables not only cell tracking, but also the observation of a variety of cellular responses. We describe an approach in detail that allows for the continuous time-lapse imaging of cells during the drug response for essentially as long as desired, typically up to 96 hr. Using variations of the approach, cells can be monitored for weeks. With the employment of genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors numerous processes, pathways and responses can be followed. We show examples that include tracking and quantification of cell growth and cell cycle progression, chromosome dynamics, DNA damage, and cell death. We also discuss variations of the technique and its flexibility, and highlight some common pitfalls.

  18. A Sparse Bayesian Imaging Technique for Efficient Recovery of Reservoir Channels With Time-Lapse Seismic Measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Sana, Furrukh

    2016-06-01

    Subsurface reservoir flow channels are characterized by high-permeability values and serve as preferred pathways for fluid propagation. Accurate estimation of their geophysical structures is thus of great importance for the oil industry. The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is a widely used statistical technique for estimating subsurface reservoir model parameters. However, accurate reconstruction of the subsurface geological features with the EnKF is challenging because of the limited measurements available from the wells and the smoothing effects imposed by the \\\\ell _{2} -norm nature of its update step. A new EnKF scheme based on sparse domain representation was introduced by Sana et al. (2015) to incorporate useful prior structural information in the estimation process for efficient recovery of subsurface channels. In this paper, we extend this work in two ways: 1) investigate the effects of incorporating time-lapse seismic data on the channel reconstruction; and 2) explore a Bayesian sparse reconstruction algorithm with the potential ability to reduce the computational requirements. Numerical results suggest that the performance of the new sparse Bayesian based EnKF scheme is enhanced with the availability of seismic measurements, leading to further improvement in the recovery of flow channels structures. The sparse Bayesian approach further provides a computationally efficient framework for enforcing a sparse solution, especially with the possibility of using high sparsity rates through the inclusion of seismic data.

  19. Using Grounded Theory to Analyze Qualitative Observational Data that is Obtained by Video Recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Griffiths

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for the collection and analysis of qualitative data that is derived by observation and that may be used to generate a grounded theory. Video recordings were made of the verbal and non-verbal interactions of people with severe and complex disabilities and the staff who work with them. Three dyads composed of a student/teacher or carer and a person with a severe or profound intellectual disability were observed in a variety of different activities that took place in a school. Two of these recordings yielded 25 minutes of video, which was transcribed into narrative format. The nature of the qualitative micro data that was captured is described and the fit between such data and classic grounded theory is discussed. The strengths and weaknesses of the use of video as a tool to collect data that is amenable to analysis using grounded theory are considered. The paper concludes by suggesting that using classic grounded theory to analyze qualitative data that is collected using video offers a method that has the potential to uncover and explain patterns of non-verbal interactions that were not previously evident.

  20. Analyzing communication skills of Pediatric Postgraduate Residents in Clinical Encounter by using video recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Attia; Khan, Rehan Ahmed; Jabeen, Uzma; Rathore, Ahsan Waheed

    2017-01-01

    To analyze communication skills of pediatric postgraduate residents in clinical encounter by using video recordings. This qualitative exploratory research was conducted through video recording at The Children's Hospital Lahore, Pakistan. Residents who had attended the mandatory communication skills workshop offered by CPSP were included. The video recording of clinical encounter was done by a trained audiovisual person while the resident was interacting with the patient in the clinical encounter. Data was analyzed by thematic analysis. Initially on open coding 36 codes emerged and then through axial and selective coding these were condensed to 17 subthemes. Out of these four main themes emerged: (1) Courteous and polite attitude, (2) Marginal nonverbal communication skills, (3) Power game/Ignoring child participation and (4) Patient as medical object/Instrumental behaviour. All residents treated the patient as a medical object to reach a right diagnosis and ignored them as a human being. There was dominant role of doctors and marginal nonverbal communication skills were displayed by the residents in the form of lack of social touch, and appropriate eye contact due to documenting notes. A brief non-medical interaction for rapport building at the beginning of interaction was missing and there was lack of child involvement. Paediatric postgraduate residents were polite while communicating with parents and child but lacking in good nonverbal communication skills. Communication pattern in our study was mostly one-way showing doctor's instrumental behaviour and ignoring the child participation.

  1. Monitoring infiltration with time-lapse relative gravity: An option for non-invasive determination of soil hydraulic parameters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Gottwein, P.

    2012-04-01

    Various hydrogeophysical methods have been proposed to monitor infiltration and determine soil hydraulic parameters using coupled hydrogeophysical inversion. Methods include electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), ground penetrating radar (GPR, both surface and cross-hole) as well as passive microwave radiometry. Depending on the measurement set-up, both ERT and GPR can provide high-resolution images of soil water content. However, soil water content monitoring with both ERT and GPR depends on the validity and accuracy of empirical relationships linking soil water content to electrical resistivity (ERT) and dielectric permittivity (GPR). This has emerged as one of the main limitations for the performance of soil water monitoring with both GPR and ERT. As an alternative, ground-based time-lapse relative gravity (TLRG) is proposed for infiltration monitoring. The method is based on the fact that water content changes in the subsurface constitute changes in subsurface density and can be monitored as changes in the gravitational field. The advantage of TLRG over GPR and ERT is that TLRG directly senses mass changes. Thus, no empirical relationship is required to link water content changes to changes in a geophysical property. This study evaluates the performance of TLRG for infiltration monitoring and hydrogeophysical inversion of soil hydraulic parameters. Results include both synthetic infiltration experiments and a real-world infiltration experiment monitored with TLRG. In the synthetic experiments, soil water content profiles are generated using analytical infiltration solutions. Soil water content profiles are translated into gravity signals and are corrupted with random noise to produce synthetic data. The synthetic data is subsequently used in a hydrogeophysical inversion of soil hydraulic parameters. Fitted parameter confidence intervals and covariances are evaluated. The same inversion procedure is used on the real-world data. The results show that TLRG data

  2. Segmentation of Environmental Time Lapse Image Sequences for the Determination of Shore Lines Captured by Hand-Held Smartphone Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröhnert, M.; Meichsner, R.

    2017-09-01

    The relevance of globally environmental issues gains importance since the last years with still rising trends. Especially disastrous floods may cause in serious damage within very short times. Although conventional gauging stations provide reliable information about prevailing water levels, they are highly cost-intensive and thus just sparsely installed. Smartphones with inbuilt cameras, powerful processing units and low-cost positioning systems seem to be very suitable wide-spread measurement devices that could be used for geo-crowdsourcing purposes. Thus, we aim for the development of a versatile mobile water level measurement system to establish a densified hydrological network of water levels with high spatial and temporal resolution. This paper addresses a key issue of the entire system: the detection of running water shore lines in smartphone images. Flowing water never appears equally in close-range images even if the extrinsics remain unchanged. Its non-rigid behavior impedes the use of good practices for image segmentation as a prerequisite for water line detection. Consequently, we use a hand-held time lapse image sequence instead of a single image that provides the time component to determine a spatio-temporal texture image. Using a region growing concept, the texture is analyzed for immutable shore and dynamic water areas. Finally, the prevalent shore line is examined by the resultant shapes. For method validation, various study areas are observed from several distances covering urban and rural flowing waters with different characteristics. Future work provides a transformation of the water line into object space by image-to-geometry intersection.

  3. Proliferation of pulmonary endothelial cells: time-lapse cinematography of growth to confluence and restitution of monolayer after wounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, U S; Absher, M; Olazabal, B M; Brown, L M; Ryan, J W

    1982-01-01

    A fundamental characteristic of vascular endothelium is that it exists as a monolayer, a condition that must be met in both vascular growth and repair. Maintenance of the monolayer is important both for the exchange of nutrients and for interactions between blood solutes and endothelial enzymes and transport systems. We have used time-lapse cinematography to compare proliferative behavior of bovine pulmonary endothelial cells in (1) establishment of a monolayer from a low-density seed (7.5 X 10(4) cells in a 60 mm dish) and (2) restitution of a confluent monolayer (approx. 2.9 x 10(6) cells in a 60 mm dish) following a mechanical wound (removal of cells from an area 5 x 15 mm by scraping). Culture 2 was not refed after wounding. In culture 2, approx. 30% of the cells accounted for repopulation (confluence in 40 hr). In culture 1, all cells entered into division. Participating cells of culture 2 began division immediately (69 divisions/filmed area in 10 hr, vs. four divisions in culture 1). Interdivision times (IDT) were longer and relatively constant in culture 1 until near confluence; none were less than 10 h, whereas in 2, 24% of the IDT's were less than or equal to 10 hr. Remarkably, IDTs of culture 2 decreased steadily until confluence was re-established. Cell migration in culture 1 was multidirectional while direction of migration in culture 2 was always into the wound area. Mean migration rate (MIG) in culture 2 was related to the site of origin of the cells, those dividing farthest from the unwounded area had fastest MIGs. Neither culture formed more than a single layer of cells. Although the cell kinetics of cultures 1 and 2 differed, the same goal, confluence, was achieved in either case.

  4. Documentation of normal and leukemic myelopoietic progenitor cells with high-resolution phase-contrast time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, I T

    2001-08-01

    The high-resolution phase-contrast, time-lapse cinematography using oil immersion lenses and 16-mm film demonstrates the kinetic cell events as maturation, locomotion, mitosis, and apoptosis of cells cultivated at 37 degrees C for up to 10 days. 0.5 v/v frozen-thawed sera with presumably high cytokine concentrations were added to the plasma or agar clot. Vital progenitor cells from human bone marrow and blood have a large, bright, unstructured nucleus with a large nucleolus and a narrow rim of cytoplasm (nuclear/cytoplasmic volume ratio = 0.7). Their nuclei are 6-14 micrometer in diameter and double their volume within 8 h. Many (70%) move at a mean speed of 2 micrometer/min, and many (30%) multiply with alpha-2alpha mitoses, generating progenitor cell families. Various disturbances during the course of mitosis lead to the formation of polyploid cells, thereby yielding the megakaryocytic cell line. Some of the progenitor cells undergo asymmetric alpha-alphan mitoses: One of the two initially identical daughter cells remains a progenitor cell in the morphological sense, whereas the other daughter cell - depending on the size of its mother cell - matures in the same culture medium to form a granulocytopoietic, monocytopoietic or erythrocytopoietic cell line. - In acute myeloid leukemias (AML), the blasts and their nuclei are slightly larger than the corresponding progenitor cells and move faster (5 micrometer/min). Symmetric alpha-2alpha mitoses permit unlimited multiplication of the leukemic blasts if contact with cytotoxic lymphocytes does not render them apoptotic. This results in more stromal cells than normal. Granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and anemia occur due to the genetic impairment of signaling control for asymmetric alpha-alphan mitoses, and thrombocytopenia occurs due to the reduction in polyploidization. Copyright 2001 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg

  5. 2D Time-lapse Resistivity Monitoring of an Organic Produced Gas Plume in a Landfill using ERT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, N. D.; Mendonça, C. A.; Doherty, R.

    2014-12-01

    This project has the objective to study a landfill located on the margins of Tietê River, in São Paulo, Brazil, using the electroresistivity tomography method (ERT). Due to huge organic matter concentrations in the São Paulo Basin quaternary sediments, there is subsurface depth related biogas accumulation (CH4 and CO2), induced by anaerobic degradation of the organic matter. 2D resistivity sections were obtained from a test area since March 2012, a total of 7 databases, being the last one dated from October 2013. The studied line has the length of 56m, the electrode interval is of 2m. In addition, there are two boreholes along the line (one with 3 electrodes and the other one with 2) in order to improve data quality and precision. The boreholes also have a multi-level sampling system that indicates the fluid (gas or water) presence in relation to depth. With our results it was possible to map the gas plume position and its area of extension in the sections as it is a positive resistivity anomaly, with the gas level having approximately 5m depth. With the time-lapse analysis (Matlab script) between the obtained 2D resistivity sections from the site, it was possible to map how the biogas volume and position change in the landfill in relation to time. Our preliminary results show a preferential gas pathway through the subsurface studied area. A consistent relation between the gas depth and obtained microbiological data from archea and bacteria population was also observed.

  6. 3D full-waveform inversion of time-lapse horizontal borehole GPR data to map soil water content variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotzsche, A.; Van Der Kruk, J.; Oberroehrmann, M.; Vanderborght, J.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is a key state variable that controls water and mass fluxes in soil-plant systems and is variable in space and time. Over the last year's, hydrogeophysical methods such as ground penetrating radar (GPR) have been used to determine electromagnetic properties as proxies for soil water content (SWC). Here, we combined zero-offset-profiles (ZOP) GPR measurements within multiple horizontal minirhizotubes at different depths to determine the spatial and temporal variability of SWC under a winter wheat stand at the Selhausen test site (Germany). We studied spatio-temporal variations of SWC under three different treatments: rainfed, irrigated and sheltered. We acquired 15 time-lapse ZOP GPR dataset during the growing season of the wheat in the rhizotron facility using horizontal boreholes with a separation of 0.75m and a length of 6m at six depths between 0.1-1.2m. The obtained radar velocities were converted to SWC using the 4-phase volumetric complex refractive index model. SWC values obtained using standard ray-based processing methods were not reliable close to the surface (0.1-0.2m depth) because of the inference of the critically refracted air wave and the direct wave through the subsurface. Therefore, we implemented a full-waveform inversion that uses accurate 3D forward modeling of GPRMax that incorporates the air and soil interactions. The shuffled complex evolution (SCE) method allowed us to retrieve quantitative medium properties that explained the measured data with a R² of at least 0.95, and improved SWC estimates at all depths. The final SWC distributions for wet and dry conditions showed that the vertical variability is significantly larger than the lateral variability caused by strong influence of precipitation and irrigation events.

  7. Gas piston activity of the Nyiragongo lava lake: First insights from a Stereographic Time-Lapse Camera system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smets, Benoît; d'Oreye, Nicolas; Kervyn, Matthieu; Kervyn, François

    2017-10-01

    Nyiragongo volcano (D.R. Congo), in the western branch of the East African Rift System, is one of the most active volcanoes on Earth. Its eruptive activity is mainly characterized by the presence of a persistent lava lake in its main crater. As observed at other persistent lava lakes, the Nyiragongo lava lake level exhibits metric vertical variations in the form of minutes-to hour-long cycles, which we infer to be gas piston activity. To study this activity, we developed and tested a Stereographic Time-Lapse Camera (STLC) system, which takes stereo-pairs of photographs of the Nyiragongo crater at regular intervals. Each pair of gas- and steam-free images during daytime allows the production of a 3D point cloud. The comparison of the point clouds provides a measurement of topographic changes related to variations in lava lake level. The processing of a first dataset acquired between 18 and 20 September 2011, at an acquisition rate of 1 pair of images every 2 min, revealed cycles of vertical lava lake level variations reaching up to 3.8 m. Lava lake level variations >0.5 m are detected significantly. They are interpreted to result from gas accumulation and release in the lava lake itself. The limitations of the STLC approach are related to the number of cameras used and the atmospheric masking by steam and volcanic gas in the Nyiragongo crater. The proposed photogrammetric approach could be applied elsewhere or in other disciplines, where frequent topographic changes occur.

  8. Time-lapse downhole electrical resistivity monitoring of subsurface CO2 storage at the Maguelone shallow experimental site (Languedoc, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denchik, Nataliya; Pezard, Philippe; Lofi, Johanna; Perroud, Hervé; Neyens, Denis; Luquot, Linda

    2015-04-01

    A shallow field experimental site for CO2 injection was established at Maguelone (Languedoc,France), in order to test in an integrated manner a suite of surface and downhole hydrogeophysical monitoring methods. The objective is to improve our understanding of gas transport in the shallow subsurface and to determine the sensitivity of CO2 monitoring systems for leakage detection. The site offers a natural laboratory to study the processes associated with CO2 injection in a clastic and clay-rich context saturated with saline fluids. Prior to CO2injection, three nitrogen (N2) injections were undertaken in 2012 to measure the site response to neutral gas injection. In 2013, a volume of 111 m3 of CO2 was injected during 3.5 hours at 15 meter depth. During each experiment, the gas plumes were successfully detected from pressure monitoring, time-lapse induction logging and downhole resistivity monitoring with downhole dipole-dipole arrays. Increases in resistivity are attributed to free gas propagation (either N2 or CO2) whereas decreases in resistivity correlate with CO2 dissolution in the pore fluid. Chemical analyses confirm this hypothesis with a decrease in pH and an increase in the concentration of dissolved species in the later case. The next stage of the project will be performing the CO2 injection experiments with improved monitoring schema using results of the present study. In perspective, besides of improving our understanding of gas transport in the shallow subsurface, the additional issues could not just show a capability of used geophysical and geochemical techniques to monitor the CO2 plume and to detect near-surface CO2 migration pathways, but to help quantifying potential CO2 migration.

  9. AnimalFinder: A semi-automated system for animal detection in time-lapse camera trap images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price Tack, Jennifer L.; West, Brian S.; McGowan, Conor P.; Ditchkoff, Stephen S.; Reeves, Stanley J.; Keever, Allison; Grand, James B.

    2017-01-01

    Although the use of camera traps in wildlife management is well established, technologies to automate image processing have been much slower in development, despite their potential to drastically reduce personnel time and cost required to review photos. We developed AnimalFinder in MATLAB® to identify animal presence in time-lapse camera trap images by comparing individual photos to all images contained within the subset of images (i.e. photos from the same survey and site), with some manual processing required to remove false positives and collect other relevant data (species, sex, etc.). We tested AnimalFinder on a set of camera trap images and compared the presence/absence results with manual-only review with white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), wild pigs (Sus scrofa), and raccoons (Procyon lotor). We compared abundance estimates, model rankings, and coefficient estimates of detection and abundance for white-tailed deer using N-mixture models. AnimalFinder performance varied depending on a threshold value that affects program sensitivity to frequently occurring pixels in a series of images. Higher threshold values led to fewer false negatives (missed deer images) but increased manual processing time, but even at the highest threshold value, the program reduced the images requiring manual review by ~40% and correctly identified >90% of deer, raccoon, and wild pig images. Estimates of white-tailed deer were similar between AnimalFinder and the manual-only method (~1–2 deer difference, depending on the model), as were model rankings and coefficient estimates. Our results show that the program significantly reduced data processing time and may increase efficiency of camera trapping surveys.

  10. PFLOTRAN-E4D: A parallel open source PFLOTRAN module for simulating time-lapse electrical resistivity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Chen, Xingyuan

    2017-02-01

    Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is finding increased application for remotely monitoring processes occurring in the near subsurface in three-dimensions (i.e. 4D monitoring). However, there are few codes capable of simulating the evolution of subsurface resistivity and corresponding tomographic measurements arising from a particular process, particularly in parallel and with an open source license. Herein we describe and demonstrate an electrical resistivity tomography module for the PFLOTRAN subsurface flow and reactive transport simulation code, named PFLOTRAN-E4D. The PFLOTRAN-E4D module operates in parallel using a dedicated set of compute cores in a master-slave configuration. At each time step, the master processes receives subsurface states from PFLOTRAN, converts those states to bulk electrical conductivity, and instructs the slave processes to simulate a tomographic data set. The resulting multi-physics simulation capability enables accurate feasibility studies for ERT imaging, the identification of the ERT signatures that are unique to a given process, and facilitates the joint inversion of ERT data with hydrogeological data for subsurface characterization. PFLOTRAN-E4D is demonstrated herein using a field study of stage-driven groundwater/river water interaction ERT monitoring along the Columbia River, Washington, USA. Results demonstrate the complex nature of subsurface electrical conductivity changes, in both the saturated and unsaturated zones, arising from river stage fluctuations and associated river water intrusion into the aquifer. The results also demonstrate the sensitivity of surface based ERT measurements to those changes over time. PFLOTRAN-E4D is available with the PFLOTRAN development version with an open-source license at https://bitbucket.org/pflotran/pflotran-dev.

  11. PFLOTRAN-E4D: A parallel open source PFLOTRAN module for simulating time-lapse electrical resistivity data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Chen, Xingyuan

    2017-02-01

    Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is finding increased application for remotely monitoring processes occurring in the near subsurface in three-dimensions (i.e. 4D monitoring). However, there are few codes capable of simulating the evolution of subsurface resistivity and corresponding tomographic measurements arising from a particular process, particularly in parallel and with an open source license. Herein we describe and demonstrate an electrical resistivity tomography module for the PFLOTRAN subsurface simulation code, named PFLOTRAN-E4D. The PFLOTRAN-E4D module operates in parallel using a dedicated set of compute cores in a master-slave configuration. At each time step, the master processes receives subsurface states from PFLOTRAN, converts those states to bulk electrical conductivity, and instructs the slave processes to simulate a tomographic data set. The resulting multi-physics simulation capability enables accurate feasibility studies for ERT imaging, the identification of the ERT signatures that are unique to a given process, and facilitates the joint inversion of ERT data with hydrogeological data for subsurface characterization. PFLOTRAN-E4D is demonstrated herein using a field study of stage-driven groundwater/river water interaction ERT monitoring along the Columbia River, Washington, USA. Results demonstrate the complex nature of changes subsurface electrical conductivity, in both the saturated and unsaturated zones, arising from water table changes and from river water intrusion into the aquifer. The results also demonstrate the sensitivity of surface based ERT measurements to those changes over time. PFLOTRAN-E4D is available with the PFLOTRAN development version with an open-source license at https://bitbucket.org/pflotran/pflotran-dev .

  12. In vivo time-lapse imaging of skin burn wound healing using second-harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Hase, Eiji; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2014-02-01

    Wound healing is a process to repair the damaged tissue caused by thermal burn, incised wound, or stab wound. Although the wound healing has many aspects, it is common for dynamics of collagen fiber, such as decomposition, production, or growth, to be closely related with wound healing. If such the healing process can be visualized as a timelapse image of the collagen fiber in the same subject, one may obtain new findings regarding biological repairing mechanisms in the healing process. In this article, to investigate the temporal modoification of dermal collagen fiber in the burn wound healing, we used second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy, showing high selectivity and good image contrast to collagen molecules as well as high spatial resolution, optical three-dimensional sectioning, minimal invasiveness, deep penetration, the absence of interference from background light, and in vivo measurement without additional staining. Since SHG light arises from a non-centrosymmetric triple helix of three polypeptide chains in the collagen molecule, SHG intensity sensitively reflects the structure maturity of collagen molecule and its aggregates. A series of time-lapse SHG images during the wound healing process of 2 weeks clearly indicated that condensation and melting of dermal collagen fibers by the deep dermal burn, decomposition of the damaged collagen fibers in the inflammation phase, production of new collagen fibers in the proliferation phase, and the growth of the new collagen fibers in the remodeling phase. These results show a high potential of SHG microscopy for optical assessment of the wound healing process in vivo.

  13. SEGMENTATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL TIME LAPSE IMAGE SEQUENCES FOR THE DETERMINATION OF SHORE LINES CAPTURED BY HAND-HELD SMARTPHONE CAMERAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kröhnert

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of globally environmental issues gains importance since the last years with still rising trends. Especially disastrous floods may cause in serious damage within very short times. Although conventional gauging stations provide reliable information about prevailing water levels, they are highly cost-intensive and thus just sparsely installed. Smartphones with inbuilt cameras, powerful processing units and low-cost positioning systems seem to be very suitable wide-spread measurement devices that could be used for geo-crowdsourcing purposes. Thus, we aim for the development of a versatile mobile water level measurement system to establish a densified hydrological network of water levels with high spatial and temporal resolution. This paper addresses a key issue of the entire system: the detection of running water shore lines in smartphone images. Flowing water never appears equally in close-range images even if the extrinsics remain unchanged. Its non-rigid behavior impedes the use of good practices for image segmentation as a prerequisite for water line detection. Consequently, we use a hand-held time lapse image sequence instead of a single image that provides the time component to determine a spatio-temporal texture image. Using a region growing concept, the texture is analyzed for immutable shore and dynamic water areas. Finally, the prevalent shore line is examined by the resultant shapes. For method validation, various study areas are observed from several distances covering urban and rural flowing waters with different characteristics. Future work provides a transformation of the water line into object space by image-to-geometry intersection.

  14. Single-cell time-lapse analysis of depletion of the universally conserved essential protein YgjD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackermann Martin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The essential Escherichia coli gene ygjD belongs to a universally conserved group of genes whose function has been the focus of a number of recent studies. Here, we put ygjD under control of an inducible promoter, and used time-lapse microscopy and single cell analysis to investigate the phenotypic consequences of the depletion of YgjD protein from growing cells. Results We show that loss of YgjD leads to a marked decrease in cell size and termination of cell division. The transition towards smaller size occurs in a controlled manner: cell elongation and cell division remain coupled, but cell size at division decreases. We also find evidence that depletion of YgjD leads to the synthesis of the intracellular signaling molecule (pppGpp, inducing a cellular reaction resembling the stringent response. Concomitant deletion of the relA and spoT genes - leading to a strain that is uncapable of synthesizing (pppGpp - abrogates the decrease in cell size, but does not prevent termination of cell division upon YgjD depletion. Conclusions Depletion of YgjD protein from growing cells leads to a decrease in cell size that is contingent on (pppGpp, and to a termination of cell division. The combination of single-cell timelapse microscopy and statistical analysis can give detailed insights into the phenotypic consequences of the loss of essential genes, and can thus serve as a new tool to study the function of essential genes.

  15. Application of time-lapse ERT to Characterize Soil-Water-Disease Interactions of Citrus Orchard - Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddinti, S. R.; Kbvn, D. P.; Ranjan, S.; Suradhaniwar, S.; J, P. A.; R M, G.

    2015-12-01

    Vidarbha region in Maharashtra, India (home for mandarin Orange) experience severe climatic uncertainties resulting in crop failure. Phytopthora are the soil-borne fungal species that accumulate in the presence of moisture, and attack the root / trunk system of Orange trees at any stage. A scientific understanding of soil-moisture-disease relations within the active root zone under different climatic, irrigation, and crop cycle conditions can help in practicing management activities for improved crop yield. In this study, we developed a protocol for performing 3-D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) at micro scale resolution to monitor the changes in resistivity distribution within the root zone of Orange trees. A total of 40 electrodes, forming a grid of 3.5 m x 2 m around each Orange tree were used in ERT survey with gradient and Wenner configurations. A laboratory test on un-disturbed soil samples of the region was performed to plot the variation of electrical conductivity with saturation. Curve fitting techniques were applied to get the modified Archie's model parameters. The calibrated model was further applied to generate the 3-D soil moisture profiles of the study area. The point estimates of soil moisture were validated using TDR probe measurements at 3 different depths (10, 20, and 40 cm) near to the root zone. In order to understand the effect of soil-water relations on plant-disease relations, we performed ERT analysis at two locations, one at healthy and other at Phytopthora affected Orange tree during the crop cycle, under dry and irrigated conditions. The degree to which an Orange tree is affected by Phytopthora under each condition is evaluated using 'grading scale' approach following visual inspection of the canopy features. Spatial-temporal distribution of moisture profiles is co-related with grading scales to comment on the effect of climatic and irrigation scenarios on the degree and intensity of crop disease caused by Phytopthora.

  16. Observing the Testing Effect using Coursera Video-recorded Lectures: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Zhihao eYONG

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the testing effect in Coursera video-based learning. One hundred and twenty-three participants either (a studied an instructional video-recorded lecture four times, (b studied the lecture three times and took one recall test, or (c studied the lecture once and took three tests. They then took a final recall test, either immediately or a week later, through which their learning was assessed. Whereas repeated studying produced better recall performance than did repeated testing when the final test was administered immediately, testing produced better performance when the final test was delayed until a week after. The testing effect was observed using Coursera lectures. Future directions are documented.

  17. SIGMATA: Storage Integrity Guaranteeing Mechanism against Tampering Attempts for Video Event Data Recorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuckmin Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The usage and market size of video event data recorders (VEDRs, also known as car black boxes, are rapidly increasing. Since VEDRs can provide more visual information about car accident situations than any other device that is currently used for accident investigations (e.g., closed-circuit television, the integrity of the VEDR contents is important to any meaningful investigation. Researchers have focused on the file system integrity or photographic approaches to integrity verification. However, unlike other general data, the video data in VEDRs exhibit a unique I/O behavior in that the videos are stored chronologically. In addition, the owners of VEDRs can manipulate unfavorable scenes after accidents to conceal their recorded behavior. Since prior arts do not consider the time relationship between the frames and fail to discover frame-wise forgery, a more detailed integrity assurance is required. In this paper, we focus on the development of a frame-wise forgery detection mechanism that resolves the limitations of previous mechanisms. We introduce SIGMATA, a novel storage integrity guaranteeing mechanism against tampering attempts for VEDRs. We describe its operation, demonstrate its effectiveness for detecting possible frame-wise forgery, and compare it with existing mechanisms. The result shows that the existing mechanisms fail to detect any frame-wise forgery, while our mechanism thoroughly detects every frame-wise forgery. We also evaluate its computational overhead using real VEDR videos. The results show that SIGMATA indeed discovers frame-wise forgery attacks effectively and efficiently, with the encoding overhead less than 1.5 milliseconds per frame.

  18. Video event data recording of a taxi driver used for diagnosis of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaro Sakurai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A video event data recorder (VEDR in a motor vehicle records images before and after a traffic accident. This report describes a taxi driver whose seizures were recorded by VEDR, which was extremely useful for the diagnosis of epilepsy. The patient was a 63-year-old right-handed Japanese male taxi driver. He collided with a streetlight. Two years prior to this incident, he raced an engine for a long time while parked. The VEDR enabled confirmation that the accidents depended on an epileptic seizure and he was diagnosed with symptomatic localization-related epilepsy. The VEDR is useful not only for traffic accident evidence; it might also contribute to a driver's health care and road safety.

  19. Video event data recording of a taxi driver used for diagnosis of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Kotaro; Yamamoto, Junko; Kurita, Tsugiko; Takeda, Youji; Kusumi, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    A video event data recorder (VEDR) in a motor vehicle records images before and after a traffic accident. This report describes a taxi driver whose seizures were recorded by VEDR, which was extremely useful for the diagnosis of epilepsy. The patient was a 63-year-old right-handed Japanese male taxi driver. He collided with a streetlight. Two years prior to this incident, he raced an engine for a long time while parked. The VEDR enabled confirmation that the accidents depended on an epileptic seizure and he was diagnosed with symptomatic localization-related epilepsy. The VEDR is useful not only for traffic accident evidence; it might also contribute to a driver's health care and road safety.

  20. Video event data recording of a taxi driver used for diagnosis of epilepsy☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Kotaro; Yamamoto, Junko; Kurita, Tsugiko; Takeda, Youji; Kusumi, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    A video event data recorder (VEDR) in a motor vehicle records images before and after a traffic accident. This report describes a taxi driver whose seizures were recorded by VEDR, which was extremely useful for the diagnosis of epilepsy. The patient was a 63-year-old right-handed Japanese male taxi driver. He collided with a streetlight. Two years prior to this incident, he raced an engine for a long time while parked. The VEDR enabled confirmation that the accidents depended on an epileptic seizure and he was diagnosed with symptomatic localization-related epilepsy. The VEDR is useful not only for traffic accident evidence; it might also contribute to a driver's health care and road safety. PMID:25667862

  1. Audio-video recording of informed consent process: Boon or bane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Niranjan G; Dalal, Jeroze J; Kulkarni, Tejashree N

    2014-01-01

    The Drugs Technical Advisory Board has recommended inclusion of audio-video (AV) recording of the informed consent process while conducting clinical trials in India. It is included as draft rule in the gazette of India notification dated 7(th) June 2013. This will soon become a law. There are many anticipated advantages of AV recording like reliability, transparency, and improvement in quality of conduct of informed consent process. However, at the same time the industry will need to address challenges in infrastructure, maintaining confidentiality, cost implication, and so on. AV recording will help reassure the government and community about standards maintained by the industry/institute while conducting informed consent process, thereby increasing society's faith in clinical research.

  2. Audio-video recording of informed consent process: Boon or bane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan G Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Drugs Technical Advisory Board has recommended inclusion of audio-video (AV recording of the informed consent process while conducting clinical trials in India. It is included as draft rule in the gazette of India notification dated 7 th June 2013. This will soon become a law. There are many anticipated advantages of AV recording like reliability, transparency, and improvement in quality of conduct of informed consent process. However, at the same time the industry will need to address challenges in infrastructure, maintaining confidentiality, cost implication, and so on. AV recording will help reassure the government and community about standards maintained by the industry/institute while conducting informed consent process, thereby increasing society′s faith in clinical research.

  3. Localizing wushu players on a platform based on a video recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peczek, Piotr M.; Zabołotny, Wojciech M.

    2017-08-01

    This article describes the development of a method to localize an athlete during sports performance on a platform, based on a static video recording. Considered sport for this method is wushu - martial art. However, any other discipline can be applied. There are specified requirements, and 2 algorithms of image processing are described. The next part presents an experiment that was held based on recordings from the Pan American Wushu Championship. Based on those recordings the steps of the algorithm are shown. Results are evaluated manually. The last part of the article concludes if the algorithm is applicable and what improvements have to be implemented to use it during sports competitions as well as for offline analysis.

  4. Quantitative high-resolution observations of soil water dynamics in a complicated architecture with time-lapse Ground-Penetrating Radar

    OpenAIRE

    P. Klenk; S. Jaumann; K. Roth

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution time-lapse Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) observations of advancing and retreating water tables can yield a wealth of information about near-surface water content dynamics. In this study, we present and analyze a series of imbibition, drainage and infiltration experiments which have been carried out at our artificial ASSESS test site and observed with surface based GPR. The test site features a complicated but known subsurface architecture co...

  5. In situ monitoring of corrosion mechanisms and phosphate inhibitor surface deposition during corrosion of zinc-magnesium-aluminium (ZMA) alloys using novel time-lapse microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, James; Cooze, Nathan; Gallagher, Callum; Lewis, Tom; Prosek, Tomas; Thierry, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    In situ time-lapse optical microscopy was used to examine the microstructural corrosion mechanisms in three zinc-magnesium-aluminium (ZMA) alloy coated steels immersed in 1% NaCl pH 7. Preferential corrosion of MgZn(2) lamellae within the eutectic phases was observed in all the ZMA alloys followed by subsequent dissolution of Zn rich phases. The total extent and rate of corrosion, measured using time-lapse image analysis and scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) estimated mass loss, decreased as Mg and Al alloying additions were increased up to a level of 3 wt% Mg and 3.7 wt% Al. This was probably due to the increased presence of MgO and Al(2)O(3) at the alloy surface retarding the kinetics of cathodic oxygen reduction. The addition of 1 × 10(-2) mol dm(-3) Na(3)PO(4) to 1% NaCl pH 7 had a dramatic influence on the corrosion mechanism for a ZMA with passivation of anodic sites through phosphate precipitation observed using time-lapse image analysis. Intriguing rapid precipitation of filamentous phosphate was also observed and it is postulated that these filaments nucleate and grow due to super saturation effects. Polarisation experiments showed that the addition of 1 × 10(-2) mol dm(-3) Na(3)PO(4) to the 1% NaCl electrolyte promoted an anodic shift of 50 mV in open circuit potential for the ZMA alloy with a reduction in anodic current of 2.5 orders of magnitude suggesting that it was acting primarily as an anodic inhibitor supporting the inferences from the time-lapse investigations. These phosphate additions resulted in a 98% reduction in estimated mass loss as measured by SVET demonstrating the effectiveness of phosphate inhibitors for this alloy system.

  6. "How To" Videos Improve Residents Performance of Essential Perioperative Electronic Medical Records and Clinical Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, Veronica; Caskey, Robert C; Dumon, Kristoffel R; Soegaard Ballester, Jacqueline M; Brooks, Ari D; Morris, Jon B; Dempsey, Daniel T

    The ability to use electronic medical records (EMR) is an essential skill for surgical residents. However, frustration and anxiety surrounding EMR tasks may detract from clinical performance. We created a series of brief, 1-3 minutes "how to" videos demonstrating 7 key perioperative EMR tasks: booking OR cases, placing preprocedure orders, ordering negative-pressure wound dressing supplies, updating day-of-surgery history and physical notes, writing brief operative notes, discharging patients from the postanesthesia care unit, and checking vital signs. Additionally, we used "Cutting Insights"-a locally developed responsive mobile application for surgical trainee education-as a platform for providing interns with easy access to these videos. We hypothesized that exposure to these videos would lead to increased resident efficiency and confidence in performing essential perioperative tasks, ultimately leading to improved clinical performance. Eleven surgery interns participated in this initiative. Before watching the "how to" videos, each intern was timed performing the aforementioned 7 key perioperative EMR tasks. They also underwent a simulated perioperative emergency requiring the performance of 3 of these EMR tasks in conjunction with 5 other required interventions (including notifying the chief resident, the anesthesia team, and the OR coordinator; and ordering fluid boluses, appropriate laboratories, and blood products). These simulations were scored on a scale from 0 to 8. The interns were then directed to watch the videos. Two days later, their times for performing the 7 tasks and their scores for a similar perioperative emergency simulation were once again recorded. Before and after watching the videos, participants were surveyed to assess their confidence in performing each EMR task using a 5-point Likert scale. We also elicited their opinions of the videos and web-based mobile application using a 5-point scale. Statistical analyses to assess for

  7. Consent for audio-video recording of informed consent process in rural South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Chand Chauhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objectives: In recent times, audio-video (A-V recording of consent process for all the study subjects entering a clinical trial has been made mandatory. A-V recording of informed consent process is a big challenge due to confidentiality and the sociocultural environment in India. It is important to find out the acceptability for A-V recording of the consent process and reasons for refusal, if any to address this new challenge. Materials and Methods: A descriptive survey was done among 150 residents of a rural community of South India. Acceptability for A-V recording of consent process was assessed among those who had given the informed written consent for participation in the study. An attempt to find the factors determining the refusal was also made. Results: More than one-third (34% of the study subjects refused to give consent for A-V recording of consent process. Not interested in recording or don′t like to be recorded (39% were the most common reasons to refuse for A-V recording of consent process. The refusal was higher among female and younger age-group adult subjects. Socioeconomic status was not found to be significantly associated with refusal to consent for A-V recording. Conclusion: Refusal for A-V recording of consent process is high in the South Indian rural population. Before any major clinical trial, particularly a field trial, an assessment of consent for A-V recording would be helpful in recruitment of study subjects.

  8. Use of selfie sticks and iPhones to record operative photos and videos in plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Basur Chandrappa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of smartphone has become ubiquitous. With smartphone cameras becoming powerful, they are replacing digital cameras and digital SLRs as primary instruments to take photos and record videos. It is natural even for plastic surgeons that smartphones are handy to take still photographs and even record high-definition or 4K videos. Another invention which has become popular with smartphone photography is a selfie stick. We explain the possibility and methodology of using an iPhone and selfie stick to take operative photographs and high-quality videos.

  9. Classifying Normal and Abnormal Status Based on Video Recordings of Epileptic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on video recordings of the movement of the patients with epilepsy, this paper proposed a human action recognition scheme to detect distinct motion patterns and to distinguish the normal status from the abnormal status of epileptic patients. The scheme first extracts local features and holistic features, which are complementary to each other. Afterwards, a support vector machine is applied to classification. Based on the experimental results, this scheme obtains a satisfactory classification result and provides a fundamental analysis towards the human-robot interaction with socially assistive robots in caring the patients with epilepsy (or other patients with brain disorders in order to protect them from injury.

  10. Video Game Preservation in the UK: A Survey of Records Management Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair Bachell

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Video games are a cultural phenomenon; a medium like no other that has become one of the largest entertainment sectors in the world. While the UK boasts an enviable games development heritage, it risks losing a major part of its cultural output through an inability to preserve the games that are created by the country’s independent games developers. The issues go deeper than bit rot and other problems that affect all digital media; loss of context, copyright and legal issues, and the throwaway culture of the ‘next’ game all hinder the ability of fans and academics to preserve video games and make them accessible in the future. This study looked at the current attitudes towards preservation in the UK’s independent (‘indie’ video games industry by examining current record-keeping practices and analysing the views of games developers. The results show that there is an interest in preserving games, and possibly a desire to do so, but issues of piracy and cost prevent the industry from undertaking preservation work internally, and from allowing others to assume such responsibility. The recommendation made by this paper is not simply for preservation professionals and enthusiasts to collaborate with the industry, but to do so by advocating the commercial benefits that preservation may offer to the industry.

  11. Video-Recorded Validation of Wearable Step Counters under Free-living Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Lindsay P; Park, Susan; Springer, Cary M; Feyerabend, McKenzie D; Steeves, Jeremy A; Bassett, David R

    2018-01-30

    The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of 14 step counting methods under free-living conditions. MethodsTwelve adults (mean±SD, age: 35±13 yr) wore a chest harness that held a GoPro camera pointed down at the feet during all waking hours for one day. The GoPro continuously recorded video of all steps taken throughout the day. Simultaneously, participants wore two StepWatch [SW] devices on each ankle (all programmed with different settings), one activPAL [AP] on each thigh, four devices at the waist (Fitbit Zip [FZ], Yamax Digi-Walker SW-200 [DW], New Lifestyles NL-2000 [NL], and ActiGraph GT9X [AG]), and two devices on the dominant and non-dominant wrists (Fitbit Charge [FC] and AG). The GoPro videos were downloaded to a computer and researchers counted steps using a hand tally device, which served as the criterion method. The SW devices recorded between 95.3% to 102.8% of actual steps taken throughout the day (P>0.05). Eleven step counting methods estimated less than 100% of actual steps; FZ, DW, and AG with the Moving Average Vector Magnitude algorithm (MAVM) on both wrists recorded 71% to 91% of steps (P>0.05), while the AP, NL, AG (without Low Frequency Extension [no-LFE], MAVM) worn on the hip, and FC recorded 69% to 84% of steps (P0.05), while the AG (LFE) on both wrists and the hip recorded 128% to 220% of steps (P<0.05). Across all waking hours of one day, step counts differ between devices. The SW, regardless of settings, was the most accurate method of counting steps.

  12. Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Toelle

    2008-11-30

    This project, 'Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations', investigated the potential for monitoring CO{sub 2} floods in carbonate reservoirs through the use of standard p-wave seismic data. This primarily involved the use of 4D seismic (time lapse seismic) in an attempt to observe and map the movement of the injected CO{sub 2} through a carbonate reservoir. The differences between certain seismic attributes, such as amplitude, were used for this purpose. This technique has recently been shown to be effective in CO{sub 2} monitoring in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) projects, such as Weyborne. This study was conducted in the Charlton 30/31 field in the northern Michigan Basin, which is a Silurian pinnacle reef that completed its primary production in 1997 and was scheduled for enhanced oil recovery using injected CO{sub 2}. Prior to injection an initial 'Base' 3D survey was obtained over the field and was then processed and interpreted. CO{sub 2} injection within the main portion of the reef was conducted intermittently during 13 months starting in August 2005. During this time, 29,000 tons of CO{sub 2} was injected into the Guelph formation, historically known as the Niagaran Brown formation. By September 2006, the reservoir pressure within the reef had risen to approximately 2000 lbs and oil and water production from the one producing well within the field had increased significantly. The determination of the reservoir's porosity distribution, a critical aspect of reservoir characterization and simulation, proved to be a significant portion of this project. In order to relate the differences observed between the seismic attributes seen on the multiple 3D seismic surveys and the actual location of the CO{sub 2}, a predictive reservoir simulation model was developed based on seismic attributes obtained from the base 3D seismic survey and available well data. This

  13. Video recording of neonatal resuscitation: A feasibility study to inform widespread adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivananda, Sandesh; Twiss, Jennifer; El-Gouhary, Enas; El-Helou, Salhab; Williams, Connie; Murthy, Prashanth; Suresh, Gautham

    2017-02-08

    To determine the feasibility of introducing video recording (VR) of neonatal resuscitation (NR) in a perinatal centre. This was a prospective cohort quality improvement study on preterm infants and their caregivers. Based on evidence and experience of other centers using VR intervention, a contextually relevant implementation and evaluation strategy was designed in the planning phase. The components of intervention were pre-resuscitation team huddle, VR of NR and video debriefing (VD), all occurring on the same day. Various domains of feasibility and sustainability as well as feasibility criteria were predefined. Data for analysis was collected using quantitative and qualitative methods. Seventy-one caregivers participated in VD of 14 NRs facilitated by six trained instructors. Ninety-one percent of caregivers perceived enhanced learning and patient safety and, 48 issues were identified related to policy, caregiver roles, and latent safety threats. Ninety percent of caregivers expressed their willingness to participate in VD activity and supported the idea of integrating it into a resuscitation team routine. Eighty-three percent and 50% of instructors expressed satisfaction with video review software and quality of audio VR. No issues about maintenance of infant or caregivers' confidentiality and erasure of videos were reported. Criteria for feasibility were met (refusal rate of 50% of occasions, and < 20% caregivers' perceiving a negative impact on team performance). Necessary adaptations to enhance sustainability were identified. VR of NR as a standard of care quality assurance activity to enhance caregivers' learning and create opportunities that improve patient safety is feasible. Despite its complexity with inherent challenges in implementation, the intervention was acceptable, implementable, and potentially sustainable with adaptations.

  14. Individualized music played for agitated patients with dementia: analysis of video-recorded sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragneskog, H; Asplund, K; Kihlgren, M; Norberg, A

    2001-06-01

    Many nursing home patients with dementia suffer from symptoms of agitation (e.g. anxiety, shouting, irritability). This study investigated whether individualized music could be used as a nursing intervention to reduce such symptoms in four patients with severe dementia. The patients were video-recorded during four sessions in four periods, including a control period without music, two periods where individualized music was played, and one period where classical music was played. The recordings were analysed by systematic observations and the Facial Action Coding System. Two patients became calmer during some of the individualized music sessions; one patient remained sitting in her armchair longer, and the other patient stopped shouting. For the two patients who were most affected by dementia, the noticeable effect of music was minimal. If the nursing staff succeed in discovering the music preferences of an individual, individualized music may be an effective nursing intervention to mitigate anxiety and agitation for some patients.

  15. Investigating interactional competence using video recordings in ESL classrooms to enhance communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnasamy, Hariharan N.

    2016-08-01

    Interactional competence, or knowing and using the appropriate skills for interaction in various communication situations within a given speech community and culture is important in the field of business and professional communication [1], [2]. Similar to many developing countries in the world, Malaysia is a growing economy and undergraduates will have to acquire appropriate communication skills. In this study, two aspects of the interactional communicative competence were investigated, that is the linguistic and paralinguistic behaviors in small group communication as well as conflict management in small group communication. Two groups of student participants were given a problem-solving task based on a letter of complaint. The two groups of students were video recorded during class hours for 40 minutes. The videos and transcription of the group discussions were analyzed to examine the use of language and interaction in small groups. The analysis, findings and interpretations were verified with three lecturers in the field of communication. The results showed that students were able to accomplish the given task using verbal and nonverbal communication. However, participation was unevenly distributed with two students talking for less than a minute. Negotiation was based more on alternative views and consensus was easily achieved. In concluding, suggestions are given on ways to improve English language communication.

  16. Video-EEG recordings in full-term neonates of diabetic mothers: observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Conde, José Ramón; González González, Nieves Luisa; González Barrios, Desiré; González Campo, Candelaria; Suárez Hernández, Yaiza; Sosa Comino, Elena

    2013-11-01

    To determine whether full-term newborn infants of diabetic mothers (IDM) present immature/disorganised EEG patterns in the immediate neonatal period, and whether there was any relationship with maternal glycaemic control. Cohort study with an incidental sample performed in a tertiary hospital neonatal unit. 23 IDM and 22 healthy newborns born between 2010 and 2013. All underwent video-EEG recording lasting >90 min at 48-72 h of life. We analysed the percentage of indeterminate sleep, transient sharp waves per hour and mature-for-gestational age EEG patterns (discontinuity, maximum duration of interburst interval (IBI), asynchrony, asymmetry, δ brushes, encoches frontales and α/θ rolandic activity). The group of IDM was divided into two subgroups according to maternal HbA1c: (1) HbA1c≥6% and (2) HbA1cIDM presented significantly higher percentage of indeterminate sleep (57% vs 25%; pIDM with maternal HbA1c≥6% showed greater percentage of δ brushes in the burst (14% vs 4%; p=0.007). Full-term IDM newborns showed video-EEG features of abnormal development of brain function. Maternal HbA1c levels<6% during pregnancy could minimise the risk of cerebral dysmaturity.

  17. Observer variability in posture assessment from video recordings: The effect of partly visible periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trask, Catherine; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Rostami, Mehdi; Heiden, Marina

    2017-04-01

    Observers rank partly visible postures on video frames differently than fully visible postures, but it's not clear if this is due to differences in observer perception. This study investigated the effect of posture visibility on between-observer variability in assessments of trunk and arm posture. Trained observers assessed trunk and arm postures from video recordings of 84 pulp mill shifts using a work sampling approach; postures were also categorized as 'fully' or 'partly' visible. Between-worker, between-day, and between-observer variance components and corresponding confidence intervals were calculated. Although no consistent gradient was seen for the trunk, right upper arm posture showed smaller between-observer variance when all observers rated a posture as fully visible. This suggests that, partly-visible data, especially when observers disagree as to the level of visibility, introduces more between-observer variability when compared to fully visible data. Some previously-identified differences in daily posture summaries may be related to this phenomenon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Estimation of soil hydraulic parameters in the field by integrated hydrogeophysical inversion of time-lapse ground-penetrating radar data

    KAUST Repository

    Jadoon, Khan

    2012-01-01

    An integrated hydrogeophysical inversion approach was used to remotely infer the unsaturated soil hydraulic parameters from time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data collected at a fixed location over a bare agricultural field. The GPR model combines a full-waveform solution of Maxwell\\'s equations for three-dimensional wave propaga- tion in planar layered media together with global reflection and transmission functions to account for the antenna and its interactions with the medium. The hydrological simu- lator HYDRUS-1D was used with a two layer single- and dual-porosity model. The radar model was coupled to the hydrodynamic model, such that the soil electrical properties (permitivity and conductivity) that serve as input to the GPR model become a function of the hydrodynamic model output (water content), thereby permiting estimation of the soil hydraulic parameters from the GPR data in an inversion loop. To monitor the soil water con- tent dynamics, time-lapse GPR and time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements were performed, whereby only GPR data was used in the inversion. Significant effects of water dynamics were observed in the time-lapse GPR data and in particular precipitation and evaporation events were clearly visible. The dual porosity model provided betier results compared to the single porosity model for describing the soil water dynamics, which is sup- ported by field observations of macropores. Furthermore, the GPR-derived water content profiles reconstructed from the integrated hydrogeophysical inversion were in good agree- ment with TDR observations. These results suggest that the proposed method is promising for non-invasive characterization of the shallow subsurface hydraulic properties and moni- toring water dynamics at the field scale. © Soil Science Society of America.

  19. Fractal measures of video-recorded trajectories can classify motor subtypes in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Thiago C.; Vivas, Jamile; Peña, Norberto; Miranda, José G. V.

    2016-11-01

    Parkinson's Disease is one of the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases in the world and affects millions of individuals worldwide. The clinical criteria for classification of motor subtypes in Parkinson's Disease are subjective and may be misleading when symptoms are not clearly identifiable. A video recording protocol was used to measure hand tremor of 14 individuals with Parkinson's Disease and 7 healthy subjects. A method for motor subtype classification was proposed based on the spectral distribution of the movement and compared with the existing clinical criteria. Box-counting dimension and Hurst Exponent calculated from the trajectories were used as the relevant measures for the statistical tests. The classification based on the power-spectrum is shown to be well suited to separate patients with and without tremor from healthy subjects and could provide clinicians with a tool to aid in the diagnosis of patients in an early stage of the disease.

  20. Point-of-View Recording Devices for Intraoperative Neurosurgical Video Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Porras

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: The ability to record and stream neurosurgery is an unprecedented opportunity to further research, medical education, and quality improvement. Here, we appraise the ease of implementation of existing POV devices when capturing and sharing procedures from the neurosurgical operating room, and detail their potential utility in this context.Methods: Our neurosurgical team tested and critically evaluated features of the Google Glass and Panasonic HX-A500 cameras including ergonomics, media quality, and media sharing in both the operating theater and the angiography suite.Results: Existing devices boast several features that facilitate live recording and streaming of neurosurgical procedures. Given that their primary application is not intended for the surgical environment, we identified a number of concrete, yet improvable, limitations.Conclusion: The present study suggests that neurosurgical video capture and live streaming represents an opportunity to contribute to research, education, and quality improvement. Despite this promise, shortcomings render existing devices impractical for serious consideration. We describe the features that future recording platforms should possess to improve upon existing technology.

  1. Checking Interceptions and Audio Video Recordings by the Court after Referral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Grădinaru

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In any event, the prosecutor and the judiciary should pay particular attention to the risk of theirfalsification, which can be achieved by taking only parts of conversations or communications that took place in thepast and are declared to be registered recently, or by removing parts of conversations or communications, or evenby the translation or removal of images. This is why the legislature provided an express provision for theirverification. Provisions of art. 916 Paragraph 1 Criminal Procedure Code offers the possibility of a technicalexpertise regarding the originality and continuity of the records, at the prosecutor's request, the parties or exofficio, where there are doubts about the correctness of the registration in whole or in part, especially if notsupported by all the evidence. Therefore, audio or video recordings serve themselves as evidence in criminalproceedings, if not appealed or confirmed by technical expertise, if there were doubts about their conformity withreality. In the event that there is lack of expertise from the authenticity of records, they will not be accepted asevidence in solving a criminal case, thus eliminating any probative value of the intercepted conversations andcommunications in that case, by applying article 64 Par. 2 Criminal Procedure Code.

  2. Low-cost synchronization of high-speed audio and video recordings in bio-acoustic experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurijssen, Dennis; Verreycken, Erik; Geipel, Inga; Daems, Walter; Peremans, Herbert; Steckel, Jan

    2018-02-27

    In this paper, we present a method for synchronizing high-speed audio and video recordings of bio-acoustic experiments. By embedding a random signal into the recorded video and audio data, robust synchronization of a diverse set of sensor streams can be performed without the need to keep detailed records. The synchronization can be performed using recording devices without dedicated synchronization inputs. We demonstrate the efficacy of the approach in two sets of experiments: behavioral experiments on different species of echolocating bats and the recordings of field crickets. We present the general operating principle of the synchronization method, discuss its synchronization strength and provide insights into how to construct such a device using off-the-shelf components. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Combination of metabolism measurement and a time-lapse system provides an embryo selection method based on oxygen uptake and chronology of cytokinesis timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejera, Alberto; Castelló, Damia; de Los Santos, Jose Maria; Pellicer, Antonio; Remohí, Jose; Meseguer, Marcos

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate correlations between oxygen consumption (OC) measurements before and after embryo cytokinesis, observing OC during embryo cleavages and combining that information with morphokinetics to relate to implantation potential. Prospective cohort study. University-affiliated private IVF unit. A total of 1,150 injected oocytes in 86 first oocyte donation cycles with embryo transfer on day 3. None. We analyzed the embryo OC and combined this data with the cytokinesis event, exact timing (in hours) of blastomeric cleavages, with the use of an incubator equipped with time-lapse videography, gathering a total of 7,630 measurements during the cytokinesis (active phase) and consecutive measurements after this division (passive phase), correlating this data with embryo outcome. OC was found to increase during embryo cleavage, showing high levels during first division with a strong correlation with implantation success. Moreover, those embryos with slow or fast development gave rise to lower OC levels, whereas higher levels were associated with optimal embryo division ranges linked to higher implantation potential. A detailed analysis of OC by time-lapse observations enhances the value that these measurements represented as markers of embryo quality, especially during the cytokinesis events produced during preimplantation development. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Simultaneous Gram and viability staining on activated sludge exposed to erythromycin: 3D CLSM time-lapse imaging of bacterial disintegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louvet, Jean-Noël; Attik, Ghania; Dumas, Dominique; Potier, Olivier; Pons, Marie-Noëlle

    2011-11-01

    The effect of erythromycin on activated sludge bacteria according to their Gram type was investigated with 3-dimensional Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) time-lapse imaging. The fluorescent stains SYTOX Green and Texas Red-X conjugate of wheat germ agglutinin stained dying bacteria and Gram(+) bacteria respectively. Time-lapse imaging allowed an understanding of the staining mechanism and the measurement of the death rate. In presence of erythromycin (10mg/L), Gram(+) bacteria had a higher mortality rate than the Gram(-) bacteria. This result suggests that antibiotic in wastewater could change the activated sludge bacteria composition, according to their Gram type by selecting the bacteria which are the least sensitive to the antibiotics. However bacterial death was followed by bacterial disintegration leading to a decrease in the fluorescence. Results suggested that the viability indicators based on membrane integrity should be used with a correct sampling method, which can give the initial quantity of living bacteria. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of human embryo development using morphological criteria in an era of time-lapse, algorithms and 'OMICS': is looking good still important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, David K; Balaban, Basak

    2016-10-01

    With the worldwide move towards single embryo transfer there has been a renewed focus on the requirement for reliable means of assessing embryo viability. In an era of 'OMICS' technologies, and algorithms created through the use of time-lapse microscopy, the actual appearance of the human embryo as it progresses through each successive developmental stage to the blastocyst appears to have been somewhat neglected in recent years. Here we review the key features of the human preimplantation embryo and consider the relationship between morphological characteristics and developmental potential. Further, the impact of the culture environment on morphological traits, how key morphological qualities reflect aspects of embryo physiology, and how computer-assisted analysis of embryo morphology may facilitate a more quantitative approach to selection are discussed. The clinical introduction of time-lapse systems has reopened our eyes and given us a new vantage point from which to view the beauty of the initial stages of human life. Rather than a future in which the morphology of the embryo is deemed irrelevant, we propose that key features, such as multinucleation, cell size and blastocyst differentiation should be included in future iterations of selection/deselection algorithms. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved.For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Time-lapse deselection model for human day 3 in vitro fertilization embryos: the combination of qualitative and quantitative measures of embryo growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanhe; Chapple, Vincent; Feenan, Katie; Roberts, Peter; Matson, Phillip

    2016-03-01

    To present a time-lapse deselection model involving both qualitative and quantitative parameters for assessing embryos on day 3. Retrospective cohort study and prospective validation. Private IVF center. A total of 270 embryos with known implantation data (KID) after day 3 transfer from 212 IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles were retrospectively analyzed for building the proposed deselection model, followed by prospective validation using an additional 66 KID embryos. None. Morphological score on day 3, embryo morphokinetic parameters, abnormal cleavage patterns, and known implantation results. All included embryos were categorized either retrospectively or prospectively into 7 grades (A+, A, B, C, D, E, F). Qualitative deselection parameters included poor conventional day 3 morphology, abnormal cleavage patterns identified via time-lapse monitoring, and deselection effectively predicts day 3 embryo implantation potential and is applicable to all IVF embryos regardless of insemination method by using PNF as the reference starting time point. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. On-Board Video Recording Unravels Bird Behavior and Mortality Produced by High-Speed Trains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eladio L. García de la Morena

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Large high-speed railway (HSR networks are planned for the near future to accomplish increased transport demand with low energy consumption. However, high-speed trains produce unknown avian mortality due to birds using the railway and being unable to avoid approaching trains. Safety and logistic difficulties have precluded until now mortality estimation in railways through carcass removal, but information technologies can overcome such problems. We present the results obtained with an experimental on-board system to record bird-train collisions composed by a frontal recording camera, a GPS navigation system and a data storage unit. An observer standing in the cabin behind the driver controlled the system and filled out a form with data of collisions and bird observations in front of the train. Photographs of the train front taken before and after each journey were used to improve the record of killed birds. Trains running the 321.7 km line between Madrid and Albacete (Spain at speeds up to 250–300 km/h were equipped with the system during 66 journeys along a year, totaling approximately 14,700 km of effective recording. The review of videos produced 1,090 bird observations, 29.4% of them corresponding to birds crossing the infrastructure under the catenary and thus facing collision risk. Recordings also showed that 37.7% bird crossings were of animals resting on some element of the infrastructure moments before the train arrival, and that the flight initiation distance of birds (mean ± SD was between 60 ± 33 m (passerines and 136 ± 49 m (raptors. Mortality in the railway was estimated to be 60.5 birds/km year on a line section with 53 runs per day and 26.1 birds/km year in a section with 25 runs per day. Our results are the first published estimation of bird mortality in a HSR and show the potential of information technologies to yield useful data for monitoring the impact of trains on birds via on-board recording systems. Moreover

  8. Time-Lapse Analysis of Methane Quantity in the Mary Lee Group of Coal Seams Using Filter-Based Multiple-Point Geostatistical Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacan, C Özgen; Olea, Ricardo A

    2013-08-01

    Coal seam degasification and its success are important for controlling methane, and thus for the health and safety of coal miners. During the course of degasification, properties of coal seams change. Thus, the changes in coal reservoir conditions and in-place gas content as well as methane emission potential into mines should be evaluated by examining time-dependent changes and the presence of major heterogeneities and geological discontinuities in the field. In this work, time-lapsed reservoir and fluid storage properties of the New Castle coal seam, Mary Lee/Blue Creek seam, and Jagger seam of Black Warrior Basin, Alabama, were determined from gas and water production history matching and production forecasting of vertical degasification wellbores. These properties were combined with isotherm and other important data to compute gas-in-place (GIP) and its change with time at borehole locations. Time-lapsed training images (TIs) of GIP and GIP difference corresponding to each coal and date were generated by using these point-wise data and Voronoi decomposition on the TI grid, which included faults as discontinuities for expansion of Voronoi regions. Filter-based multiple-point geostatistical simulations, which were preferred in this study due to anisotropies and discontinuities in the area, were used to predict time-lapsed GIP distributions within the study area. Performed simulations were used for mapping spatial time-lapsed methane quantities as well as their uncertainties within the study area. The systematic approach presented in this paper is the first time in literature that history matching, TIs of GIPs and filter simulations are used for degasification performance evaluation and for assessing GIP for mining safety. Results from this study showed that using production history matching of coalbed methane wells to determine time-lapsed reservoir data could be used to compute spatial GIP and representative GIP TIs generated through Voronoi decomposition

  9. Energy use of televisions and video cassette recorders in the U.S.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Alan; Rosen, Karen

    1999-03-01

    In an effort to more accurately determine nationwide energy consumption, the U.S. Department of Energy has recently commissioned studies with the goal of improving its understanding of the energy use of appliances in the miscellaneous end-use category. This study presents an estimate of the residential energy consumption of two of the most common domestic appliances in the miscellaneous end-use category: color televisions (TVs) and video cassette recorders (VCRs). The authors used a bottom-up approach in estimating national TV and VCR energy consumption. First, they obtained estimates of stock and usage from national surveys, while TV and VCR power measurements and other data were recorded at repair and retail shops. Industry-supplied shipment and sales distributions were then used to minimize bias in the power measurement samples. To estimate national TV and VCR energy consumption values, ranges of power draw and mode usage were created to represent situations in homes with more than one unit. Average energy use values for homes with one unit, two units, etc. were calculated and summed to provide estimates of total national TV and VCR energy consumption.

  10. Comparison of video and direct observation methods for measuring oral behaviour in veal calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Verga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Measuring behaviour, especially oral behaviour, has always been a debated issue: therefore the aim of this paper is to closely examine the study of oral behaviour in calves and the approaching methodology. Behavioural observations were conducted by two media (direct observations by check sheets and indirect observations by videotapes recorded by cam- eras connected to a digital field switcher and a time-lapse video recorder in order to compare data and assess the reli- ability and validity of the two methods in identifying some oral behavioural patterns in calves. The study was carried out on 54 Polish Friesian calves housed in group pens and in individual crates. The behaviour of the calves was investigated during the fattening period on the 2nd, 7th, 13th, 18th and 23rd week, one hour before and one hour after each of the two meals. Two experienced observers checked the behaviour of the calves, including oral behaviours on structures and buckets and oral stereotypies, by direct observations using a scan sampling every 2 min- utes. The calves' behaviour was also video recorded on the same days in which the direct observations were carried out and analysed by the same two observers. Percentages of time spent on each type of behaviour were calculated and anal- ysed by Chi-square test. Regardless of the housing system, the comparison between direct and indirect observations revealed significant differences in almost every behavioural category. Licking, biting and nibbling structures, nibbling and sucking the bucket, playing with the bucket and the teat, chewing and oral stereotypies were significantly higher in direct observations compared to indirect (P < 0.001, while inactivity was higher in video recorded observations (P < 0.001. In conclusion, regardless of the type of housing, our results revealed an objective difficulty in analysing videotapes with very detailed behavioural categories, like oral behaviours. Although video recording can

  11. Understanding leachate flow in municipal solid waste landfills by combining time-lapse ERT and subsurface flow modelling - Part I: Analysis of infiltration shape on two different waste deposit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, M; Clément, R; Moreau, S; Duquennoi, C; Loisel, S; Touze-Foltz, N

    2016-09-01

    Landfill bioreactors are based on an acceleration of in-situ waste biodegradation by performing leachate recirculation. To quantify the water content and to evaluate the leachate injection system, in-situ methods are required to obtain spatially distributed information, usually electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). In a previous study, the MICS (multiple inversions and clustering strategy) methodology was proposed to improve the hydrodynamic interpretation of ERT results by a precise delimitation of the infiltration area. In this study, MICS was applied on two ERT time-lapse data sets recorded on different waste deposit cells in order to compare the hydrodynamic behaviour of leachate flow between the two cells. This comparison is based on an analysis of: (i) the volume of wetted waste assessed by MICS and the wetting rate, (ii) the infiltration shapes and (iii) the pore volume used by the leachate flow. This paper shows that leachate hydrodynamic behaviour is comparable from one waste deposit cell to another with: (i) a high leachate infiltration speed at the beginning of the infiltration, which decreases with time, (ii) a horizontal anisotropy of the leachate infiltration shape and (iii) a very small fraction of the pore volume used by the leachate flow. This hydrodynamic information derived from MICS results can be useful for subsurface flow modelling used to predict leachate flow at the landfill scale. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Abnormal eating behavior in video-recorded meals in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianini, Loren; Liu, Ying; Wang, Yuanjia; Attia, Evelyn; Walsh, B Timothy; Steinglass, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Eating behavior during meals in anorexia nervosa (AN) has long been noted to be abnormal, but little research has been done carefully characterizing these behaviors. These eating behaviors have been considered pathological, but are not well understood. The current study sought to quantify ingestive and non-ingestive behaviors during a laboratory lunch meal, compare them to the behaviors of healthy controls (HC), and examine their relationships with caloric intake and anxiety during the meal. A standardized lunch meal was video-recorded for 26 individuals with AN and 10 HC. Duration, frequency, and latency of 16 mealtime behaviors were coded using computer software. Caloric intake, dietary energy density (DEDS), and anxiety were also measured. Nine mealtime behaviors were identified that distinguished AN from HC: staring at food, tearing food, nibbling/picking, dissecting food, napkin use, inappropriate utensil use, hand fidgeting, eating latency, and nibbling/picking latency. Among AN, a subset of these behaviors was related to caloric intake and anxiety. These data demonstrate that the mealtime behaviors of patients with AN and HC differ significantly, and some of these behaviors may be associated with food intake and anxiety. These mealtime behaviors may be important treatment targets to improve eating behavior in individuals with AN. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A comparison of camera trap and permanent recording video camera efficiency in wildlife underpasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumeau, Jonathan; Petrod, Lana; Handrich, Yves

    2017-09-01

    In the current context of biodiversity loss through habitat fragmentation, the effectiveness of wildlife crossings, installed at great expense as compensatory measures, is of vital importance for ecological and socio-economic actors. The evaluation of these structures is directly impacted by the efficiency of monitoring tools (camera traps…), which are used to assess the effectiveness of these crossings by observing the animals that use them. The aim of this study was to quantify the efficiency of camera traps in a wildlife crossing evaluation. Six permanent recording video systems sharing the same field of view as six Reconyx HC600 camera traps installed in three wildlife underpasses were used to assess the exact proportion of missed events ( event being the presence of an animal within the field of view), and the error rate concerning underpass crossing behavior (defined as either Entry or Refusal ). A sequence of photographs was triggered by either animals ( true trigger ) or artefacts ( false trigger ). We quantified the number of false triggers that had actually been caused by animals that were not visible on the images ("false" false triggers). Camera traps failed to record 43.6% of small mammal events (voles, mice, shrews, etc.) and 17% of medium-sized mammal events. The type of crossing behavior ( Entry or Refusal ) was incorrectly assessed in 40.1% of events, with a higher error rate for entries than for refusals. Among the 3.8% of false triggers, 85% of them were "false" false triggers. This study indicates a global underestimation of the effectiveness of wildlife crossings for small mammals. Means to improve the efficiency are discussed.

  14. Application of video recording technology to improve husbandry and reproduction in the carmine bee-eater (Merops n. nubicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrie, Gina M; Sky, Christy; Schutz, Paul J; Quinones, Glorieli; Breeding, Shawnlei; Plasse, Chelle; Leighty, Katherine A; Bettinger, Tammie L

    2016-01-01

    Incorporating technology with research is becoming increasingly important to enhance animal welfare in zoological settings. Video technology is used in the management of avian populations to facilitate efficient information collection on aspects of avian reproduction that are impractical or impossible to obtain through direct observation. Disney's Animal Kingdom(®) maintains a successful breeding colony of Northern carmine bee-eaters. This African species is a cavity nester, making their nesting behavior difficult to study and manage in an ex situ setting. After initial research focused on developing a suitable nesting environment, our goal was to continue developing methods to improve reproductive success and increase likelihood of chicks fledging. We installed infrared bullet cameras in five nest boxes and connected them to a digital video recording system, with data recorded continuously through the breeding season. We then scored and summarized nesting behaviors. Using remote video methods of observation provided much insight into the behavior of the birds in the colony's nest boxes. We observed aggression between birds during the egg-laying period, and therefore immediately removed all of the eggs for artificial incubation which completely eliminated egg breakage. We also used observations of adult feeding behavior to refine chick hand-rearing diet and practices. Although many video recording configurations have been summarized and evaluated in various reviews, we found success with the digital video recorder and infrared cameras described here. Applying emerging technologies to cavity nesting avian species is a necessary addition to improving management in and sustainability of zoo avian populations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Time-lapse cinematography study of the germinal vesicle behaviour in mouse primary oocytes treated with activators of protein kinases A and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, H; Mulnard, J

    1988-12-01

    A passive erratic movement of the germinal vesicle (GV), already visible in small incompetent oocytes, is followed by an active scalloping of the nuclear membrane soon before GV breakdown (GVBD) in cultured competent oocytes. Maturation can be inhibited by activators of protein kinase A (PK-A) and protein kinase C (PK-C). Our time-lapse cinematography analysis allowed us to describe an unexpected behaviour of the GV when PK-C, but not PK-A, is activated: GV undergoes a displacement toward the cortex according to the same biological clock which triggers the programmed translocation of the spindle in control oocytes. It is concluded that, when oocytes become committed to undergo maturation, the cytoplasm acquires a PK-A-controlled "centrifugal displacement property" which is not restricted to the spindle.

  16. Time lapse imaging analysis of the effect of ER stress modulators on apoptotic cell assessed by caspase3/7 activation in NG108-15 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Saito

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the data from the long term time lapse imaging of neuronal cell line NG108-15 that were treated with apoptosis inducer or various ER stress inducers. Use of the fluorescent reporter for activated caspase3/7 in combination with the conventional light microscope allowed us to investigate the time course of apoptosis induction at the single cell level. Quantitative as well as qualitative data are presented here to show the effect of two different ER stress modulating chemical compounds on caspase3/7-dependent apoptosis in neuronal cell line NG108-15 cells. Additional results and interpretation of our data concerning ER stress and apoptosis in NG108-15 cells can be found in Suga et al. (2015 [1] and in Suga et al. (2015 [2].

  17. Bayesian Markov-Chain-Monte-Carlo inversion of time-lapse crosshole GPR data to characterize the vadose zone at the Arrenaes Site, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholer, Marie; Irving, James; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms

    2012-01-01

    We examined to what extent time-lapse crosshole ground-penetrating radar traveltimes, measured during a forced infiltration experiment at the Arreneas field site in Denmark, could help to quantify vadose zone hydraulic properties and their corresponding uncertainties using a Bayesian Markov......-chain-Monte-Carlo inversion approach with different priors. The ground-penetrating radar (GPR) geophysical method has the potential to provide valuable information on the hydraulic properties of the vadose zone because of its strong sensitivity to soil water content. In particular, recent evidence has suggested...... in Denmark, could help to quantify VGM parameters and their uncertainties in a layered medium, as well as the corresponding soil hydraulic properties. We used a Bayesian Markov-chain-Monte-Carlo inversion approach. We first explored the advantages and limitations of this approach with regard to a realistic...

  18. Noninferiority, randomized, controlled trial comparing embryo development using media developed for sequential or undisturbed culture in a time-lapse setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardarson, Thorir; Bungum, Mona; Conaghan, Joe; Meintjes, Marius; Chantilis, Samuel J; Molnar, Laszlo; Gunnarsson, Kristina; Wikland, Matts

    2015-12-01

    To study whether a culture medium that allows undisturbed culture supports human embryo development to the blastocyst stage equivalently to a well-established sequential media. Randomized, double-blinded sibling trial. Independent in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics. One hundred twenty-eight patients, with 1,356 zygotes randomized into two study arms. Embryos randomly allocated into two study arms to compare embryo development on a time-lapse system using a single-step medium or sequential media. Percentage of good-quality blastocysts on day 5. Percentage of day 5 good-quality blastocysts was 21.1% (standard deviation [SD] ± 21.6%) and 22.2% (SD ± 22.1%) in the single-step time-lapse medium (G-TL) and the sequential media (G-1/G-2) groups, respectively. The mean difference (-1.2; 95% CI, -6.0; 3.6) between the two media systems for the primary end point was less than the noninferiority margin of -8%. There was a statistically significantly lower number of good-quality embryos on day 3 in the G-TL group [50.7% (SD ± 30.6%) vs. 60.8% (SD ± 30.7%)]. Four out of the 11 measured morphokinetic parameters were statistically significantly different for the two media used. The mean levels of ammonium concentration in the media at the end of the culture period was statistically significantly lower in the G-TL group as compared with the G-2 group. We have shown that a single-step culture medium supports blastocyst development equivalently to established sequential media. The ammonium concentrations were lower in the single-step media, and the measured morphokinetic parameters were modified somewhat. NCT01939626. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Modeling of time-lapse multi-scale seismic monitoring of CO2 injected into a fault zone to enhance the characterization of permeability in enhanced geothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R.; Borgia, A.; Daley, T. M.; Oldenburg, C. M.; Jung, Y.; Lee, K. J.; Doughty, C.; Altundas, B.; Chugunov, N.; Ramakrishnan, T. S.

    2017-12-01

    Subsurface permeable faults and fracture networks play a critical role for enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) by providing conduits for fluid flow. Characterization of the permeable flow paths before and after stimulation is necessary to evaluate and optimize energy extraction. To provide insight into the feasibility of using CO2 as a contrast agent to enhance fault characterization by seismic methods, we model seismic monitoring of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) injected into a fault. During the CO2 injection, the original brine is replaced by scCO2, which leads to variations in geophysical properties of the formation. To explore the technical feasibility of the approach, we present modeling results for different time-lapse seismic methods including surface seismic, vertical seismic profiling (VSP), and a cross-well survey. We simulate the injection and production of CO2 into a normal fault in a system based on the Brady's geothermal field and model pressure and saturation variations in the fault zone using TOUGH2-ECO2N. The simulation results provide changing fluid properties during the injection, such as saturation and salinity changes, which allow us to estimate corresponding changes in seismic properties of the fault and the formation. We model the response of the system to active seismic monitoring in time-lapse mode using an anisotropic finite difference method with modifications for fracture compliance. Results to date show that even narrow fault and fracture zones filled with CO2 can be better detected using the VSP and cross-well survey geometry, while it would be difficult to image the CO2 plume by using surface seismic methods.

  20. Interpretaion of synthetic seismic time-lapse monitoring data for Korea CCS project based on the acoustic-elastic coupled inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, J.; Min, D.; Kim, W.; Huh, C.; Kang, S.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, the CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) is one of the promising methods to reduce the CO2 emission. To evaluate the success of the CCS project, various geophysical monitoring techniques have been applied. Among them, the time-lapse seismic monitoring is one of the effective methods to investigate the migration of CO2 plume. To monitor the injected CO2 plume accurately, it is needed to interpret seismic monitoring data using not only the imaging technique but also the full waveform inversion, because subsurface material properties can be estimated through the inversion. However, previous works for interpreting seismic monitoring data are mainly based on the imaging technique. In this study, we perform the frequency-domain full waveform inversion for synthetic data obtained by the acoustic-elastic coupled modeling for the geological model made after Ulleung Basin, which is one of the CO2 storage prospects in Korea. We suppose the injection layer is located in fault-related anticlines in the Dolgorae Deformed Belt and, for more realistic situation, we contaminate the synthetic monitoring data with random noise and outliers. We perform the time-lapse full waveform inversion in two scenarios. One scenario is that the injected CO2 plume migrates within the injection layer and is stably captured. The other scenario is that the injected CO2 plume leaks through the weak part of the cap rock. Using the inverted P- and S-wave velocities and Poisson's ratio, we were able to detect the migration of the injected CO2 plume. Acknowledgment This work was financially supported by the Brain Korea 21 project of Energy Systems Engineering, the "Development of Technology for CO2 Marine Geological Storage" program funded by the Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs (MLTM) of Korea and the Korea CCS R&D Center (KCRC) grant funded by the Korea government (Ministry of Education, Science and Technology) (No. 2012-0008926).

  1. IR Hiding: A Method to Prevent Video Re-shooting by Exploiting Differences between Human Perceptions and Recording Device Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takayuki; Gohshi, Seiichi; Echizen, Isao

    A method is described to prevent video images and videos displayed on screens from being re-shot by digital cameras and camcorders. Conventional methods using digital watermarking for re-shooting prevention embed content IDs into images and videos, and they help to identify the place and time where the actual content was shot. However, these methods do not actually prevent digital content from being re-shot by camcorders. We developed countermeasures to stop re-shooting by exploiting the differences between the sensory characteristics of humans and devices. The countermeasures require no additional functions to use-side devices. It uses infrared light (IR) to corrupt the content recorded by CCD or CMOS devices. In this way, re-shot content will be unusable. To validate the method, we developed a prototype system and implemented it on a 100-inch cinema screen. Experimental evaluations showed that the method effectively prevents re-shooting.

  2. 77 FR 40619 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for What's In Your Health Record Video Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... the public to create and submit short, compelling videos sharing how getting access to your health... one way to crowd source stories from the public about how they are benefiting from health information... create a short video clip [2 minutes or less] on a particular topic, and will award cash prizes to...

  3. Effect of a Neonatal Resuscitation Course on Healthcare Providers' Performances Assessed by Video Recording in a Low-Resource Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisanuto, Daniele; Bertuola, Federica; Lanzoni, Paolo; Cavallin, Francesco; Matediana, Eduardo; Manzungu, Olivier Wingi; Gomez, Ermelinda; Da Dalt, Liviana; Putoto, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the effect of an adapted neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) course on healthcare providers' performances in a low-resource setting through the use of video recording. A video recorder, mounted to the radiant warmers in the delivery rooms at Beira Central Hospital, Mozambique, was used to record all resuscitations. One-hundred resuscitations (50 before and 50 after participation in an adapted NRP course) were collected and assessed based on a previously published score. All 100 neonates received initial steps; from these, 77 and 32 needed bag-mask ventilation (BMV) and chest compressions (CC), respectively. There was a significant improvement in resuscitation scores in all levels of resuscitation from before to after the course: for "initial steps", the score increased from 33% (IQR 28-39) to 44% (IQR 39-56), pproviders improved after participation in an adapted NRP course. Video recording was well-accepted by the staff, useful for objective assessment of performance during resuscitation, and can be used as an educational tool in a low-resource setting.

  4. Identifying a soil hydraulic parameterisation from on-ground GPR time lapse measurements of a pumping experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagenbach, A.; Buchner, J.; Klenk, P.; Roth, K.

    2012-08-01

    We show the potential of on-ground Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) to identify the hydraulic parameterisation with a semi-quantitative analysis based on numerical simulations of the radar signal. A pumping experiment has been conducted at the ASSESS-GPR site to establish a fluctuating water table, while an on-ground GPR antenna recorded traces over time at a fixed location. These measurements allow to identify and track the capillary fringe in the soil. The typical dynamics of soil water content with a transient water table can be deduced from the recorded radargrams. The characteristic reflections from the capillary fringes in model soils that are described by commonly used hydraulic parameterisations are investigated by numerical simulations. The parameterisations used are: (i) full van Genuchten, (ii) simplified van Genuchten with m = 1 - 1/n and (iii) Brooks-Corey. All three yield characteristically different reflections, which allows the identification of an appropriate parameterisation by comparing to the measured signals. We show that these are not consistent with the commonly used simplified van Genuchten parameterisation with m = 1 - 1/n.

  5. Automated extraction of temporal motor activity signals from video recordings of neonatal seizures based on adaptive block matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayiannis, Nicolaos B; Sami, Abdul; Frost, James D; Wise, Merrill S; Mizrahi, Eli M

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents an automated procedure developed to extract quantitative information from video recordings of neonatal seizures in the form of motor activity signals. This procedure relies on optical flow computation to select anatomical sites located on the infants' body parts. Motor activity signals are extracted by tracking selected anatomical sites during the seizure using adaptive block matching. A block of pixels is tracked throughout a sequence of frames by searching for the most similar block of pixels in subsequent frames; this search is facilitated by employing various update strategies to account for the changing appearance of the block. The proposed procedure is used to extract temporal motor activity signals from video recordings of neonatal seizures and other events not associated with seizures.

  6. Morphological changes at Colima volcano caused the 2015 Hurricane Patricia investigated by repeated drone surveys and time lapse cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Thomas R.; Navarro, Carlos; Arambula, Raul; Salzer, Jackie; Reyes, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    Colima is one of the most active volcanoes in Latin America, with frequent dome building eruptions and pyroclastic flow hazards. In July 2015 Colima had a new climax of eruptive activity, profoundly changing the summit morphology and redistributing volcanic ashes to the lower volcano apron. These unconsolidated ashes are prone to be mobilized by rainfall events, and therefore required close monitoring. A major hurricane then had landfall in western Mexico in October 2015, accumulating c. 450 mm of rainfall at a meteorological station at Nevado de Colima (3461 m) and immense lahar and ash deposit mobilization from Colima Volcano. Hurricane Patricia was the largest ever recorded category 5 storm, directly crossing the state of Colima. Due to the successful scientific advice and civil protection no human losses were directly associated to this lahar hazards. We have conducted drone overflight in profound valleys that directed the pyroclastic flows and lahars two days before and three days after the hurricane. Over 8,000 close range aerial photographs could be recorded, along with GPS locations of ground stations. Images were processed using the structure from motion methodology, and digital elevation models compared. Erosion locally exceeded 10 m vertically and caused significant landscape change. Mass mobilization unloaded the young pyroclastic deposits and led to significant underground heat loss and water boiling in the affected areas. We also firstly report the use of camera array set-ups along the same valley to monitor lahar deposition and erosion from different perspectives. Combining these photos using photogrammetric techniques allow time series of digital elevation change studies at the deepening erosional ravines, with large potential for future geomorphic monitoring. This study shows that photo monitoring is very useful for studying the link of volcano landscape evolution and hydrometerological extremes and for rapid assessment of indirect volcanic hazards.

  7. The reliability and accuracy of estimating heart-rates from RGB video recorded on a consumer grade camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Adam; Vincely, Vinoin; Lloyd, Paige; Hugenberg, Kurt; Vishwanath, Karthik

    2017-03-01

    Video Photoplethysmography (VPPG) is a numerical technique to process standard RGB video data of exposed human skin and extracting the heart-rate (HR) from the skin areas. Being a non-contact technique, VPPG has the potential to provide estimates of subject's heart-rate, respiratory rate, and even the heart rate variability of human subjects with potential applications ranging from infant monitors, remote healthcare and psychological experiments, particularly given the non-contact and sensor-free nature of the technique. Though several previous studies have reported successful correlations in HR obtained using VPPG algorithms to HR measured using the gold-standard electrocardiograph, others have reported that these correlations are dependent on controlling for duration of the video-data analyzed, subject motion, and ambient lighting. Here, we investigate the ability of two commonly used VPPG-algorithms in extraction of human heart-rates under three different laboratory conditions. We compare the VPPG HR values extracted across these three sets of experiments to the gold-standard values acquired by using an electrocardiogram or a commercially available pulseoximeter. The two VPPG-algorithms were applied with and without KLT-facial feature tracking and detection algorithms from the Computer Vision MATLAB® toolbox. Results indicate that VPPG based numerical approaches have the ability to provide robust estimates of subject HR values and are relatively insensitive to the devices used to record the video data. However, they are highly sensitive to conditions of video acquisition including subject motion, the location, size and averaging techniques applied to regions-of-interest as well as to the number of video frames used for data processing.

  8. Time-lapse two-color 3D imaging of live cells with doubled resolution using structured illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiolka, Reto; Shao, Lin; Rego, E Hesper; Davidson, Michael W; Gustafsson, Mats G L

    2012-04-03

    Previous implementations of structured-illumination microscopy (SIM) were slow or designed for one-color excitation, sacrificing two unique and extremely beneficial aspects of light microscopy: live-cell imaging in multiple colors. This is especially unfortunate because, among the resolution-extending techniques, SIM is an attractive choice for live-cell imaging; it requires no special fluorophores or high light intensities to achieve twice diffraction-limited resolution in three dimensions. Furthermore, its wide-field nature makes it light-efficient and decouples the acquisition speed from the size of the lateral field of view, meaning that high frame rates over large volumes are possible. Here, we report a previously undescribed SIM setup that is fast enough to record 3D two-color datasets of living whole cells. Using rapidly programmable liquid crystal devices and a flexible 2D grid pattern algorithm to switch between excitation wavelengths quickly, we show volume rates as high as 4 s in one color and 8.5 s in two colors over tens of time points. To demonstrate the capabilities of our microscope, we image a variety of biological structures, including mitochondria, clathrin-coated vesicles, and the actin cytoskeleton, in either HeLa cells or cultured neurons.

  9. Gemvid, an open source, modular, automated activity recording system for rats using digital video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leprince Pierre

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measurement of locomotor activity is a valuable tool for analysing factors influencing behaviour and for investigating brain function. Several methods have been described in the literature for measuring the amount of animal movement but most are flawed or expensive. Here, we describe an open source, modular, low-cost, user-friendly, highly sensitive, non-invasive system that records all the movements of a rat in its cage. Methods Our activity monitoring system quantifies overall free movements of rodents without any markers, using a commercially available CCTV and a newly designed motion detection software developed on a GNU/Linux-operating computer. The operating principle is that the amount of overall movement of an object can be expressed by the difference in total area occupied by the object in two consecutive picture frames. The application is based on software modules that allow the system to be used in a high-throughput workflow. Documentation, example files, source code and binary files can be freely downloaded from the project website at http://bioinformatics.org/gemvid/. Results In a series of experiments with objects of pre-defined oscillation frequencies and movements, we documented the sensitivity, reproducibility and stability of our system. We also compared data obtained with our system and data obtained with an Actiwatch device. Finally, to validate the system, results obtained from the automated observation of 6 rats during 7 days in a regular light cycle are presented and are accompanied by a stability test. The validity of this system is further demonstrated through the observation of 2 rats in constant dark conditions that displayed the expected free running of their circadian rhythm. Conclusion The present study describes a system that relies on video frame differences to automatically quantify overall free movements of a rodent without any markers. It allows the monitoring of rats in their own

  10. The challenge associated with the robust computation of meteor velocities from video and photographic records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egal, A.; Gural, P. S.; Vaubaillon, J.; Colas, F.; Thuillot, W.

    2017-09-01

    The CABERNET project was designed to push the limits for obtaining accurate measurements of meteoroids orbits from photographic and video meteor camera recordings. The discrepancy between the measured and theoretic orbits of these objects heavily depends on the semi-major axis determination, and thus on the reliability of the pre-atmospheric velocity computation. With a spatial resolution of 0.01° per pixel and a temporal resolution of up to 10 ms, CABERNET should be able to provide accurate measurements of velocities and trajectories of meteors. To achieve this, it is necessary to improve the precision of the data reduction processes, and especially the determination of the meteor's velocity. In this work, most of the steps of the velocity computation are thoroughly investigated in order to reduce the uncertainties and error contributions at each stage of the reduction process. The accuracy of the measurement of meteor centroids is established and results in a precision of 0.09 pixels for CABERNET, which corresponds to 3.24‧‧. Several methods to compute the velocity were investigated based on the trajectory determination algorithms described in Ceplecha (1987) and Borovicka (1990), as well as the multi-parameter fitting (MPF) method proposed by Gural (2012). In the case of the MPF, many optimization methods were implemented in order to find the most efficient and robust technique to solve the minimization problem. The entire data reduction process is assessed using simulated meteors, with different geometrical configurations and deceleration behaviors. It is shown that the multi-parameter fitting method proposed by Gural(2012)is the most accurate method to compute the pre-atmospheric velocity in all circumstances. Many techniques that assume constant velocity at the beginning of the path as derived from the trajectory determination using Ceplecha (1987) or Borovicka (1990) can lead to large errors for decelerating meteors. The MPF technique also allows one to

  11. Combining time-lapse electrical resistivity, suction cup and tensiometer measurements to monitor snowmelt and solute transport at Oslo airport, Gardermoen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloem, Esther; French, Helen K.

    2013-04-01

    Geophysical methods provide indirect measurements of subsurface properties over larger volumes than traditional techniques, and are potentially cost-efficient. However, the usefulness of any individual set of geophysical measurements (akin to a snapshot at one point in time) is severely limited by the problem of non-uniqueness or ambiguity when used to study contaminated sites, where the attendant processes vary in space and time. To make progress on soil contamination assessment and site characterization there is a strong need to integrate quasi field-scale, extensively instrumented tools, with non-invasive (geophysical) methods. The impact of annual infiltration of large quantities of de-icing chemicals at Oslo airport, Gardermoen, represents common challenge for all airports with winter frost. It is also similar to the challenge posed by de-icing salt application along roads. To improve risk assessment, monitoring, and treatment strategies for natural attenuation, we require a better understanding on the resistivity effects from infiltrating snowmelt and contaminant movement to the methods suitable for monitoring resistivity changes over time at contaminated sites. Electrical and electromagnetic methods are widely applied for soil mapping and detecting of contaminated plumes. Time-lapse measurements have become a common method to characterize changes in water saturation and solute transport in the unsaturated zone (French and Binley, 2004; French et al. 2002). The non-uniqueness of the interpretation techniques can be reduced by constraining the inversion through the addition of independent measurements along the same profile. Such measurements include soil physical properties, soil suction, contaminant concentration and temperatures. At the research field station at Gardermoen, a degradable de-icing chemical and an inactive tracer were added to the snow cover prior to snowmelt. In order to link geophysical measurements to solute transport processes in the

  12. Video-recorded Micro-teaching Situations and Their Contribution towards the Pre-Service Professional Training of Student Teachers for the Secondary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, W. J.

    Students in the Faculty of Education at the University of Pretoria have their student teaching performance assessed through the use of video-recorded micro-teaching situations. Three sources of video-teaching situations are used in the training of student teachers: (1) while teaching specific high school subjects; (2) senior teachers in their high…

  13. A Study of Behavioral Change in 50 Severely Multi-Sensorily Handicapped Children Through Application of the Video-Tape Recorded Behavioral Evaluation Protocol. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, W. Scott

    Examined with 49 deaf-blind children (under 9 years old) was the use of the Telediagnostic Behavior Evaluation Protocol, a video-tape recorded evaluation protocol. To further develop the Telediagnostic Protocol and delineate the characteristics of the Ss observed during the process of test development, Ss were video-taped in eight 3-minute…

  14. Monitoring the body temperature of cows and calves using video recordings from an infrared thermography camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Gundula; Schmidt, Mariana; Ammon, Christian; Rose-Meierhöfer, Sandra; Burfeind, Onno; Heuwieser, Wolfgang; Berg, Werner

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the variability of temperatures measured by a video-based infrared camera (IRC) in comparison to rectal and vaginal temperatures. The body surface temperatures of cows and calves were measured contactless at different body regions using videos from the IRC. Altogether, 22 cows and 9 calves were examined. The differences of the measured IRC temperatures among the body regions, i.e. eye (mean: 37.0 °C), back of the ear (35.6 °C), shoulder (34.9 °C) and vulva (37.2 °C), were significant (P infrared thermography videos has the advantage to analyze more than 1 picture per animal in a short period of time, and shows potential as a monitoring system for body temperatures in cattle.

  15. Classifying head movements in video-recorded conversations based on movement velocity, acceleration and jerk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongejan, Bart; Paggio, Patrizia; Navarretta, Costanza

    2017-01-01

    This paper is about the automatic annotation of head movements in videos of face-to-face conversations. Manual annotation of gestures is resource consuming, and modelling gesture behaviours in different types of communicative settings requires many types of annotated data. Therefore, developing...... methods for automatic annotation is crucial. We present an approach where an SVM classifier learns to classify head movements based on measurements of velocity, acceleration, and the third derivative of position with respect to time, jerk. Consequently, annotations of head movements are added to new video...

  16. Application of RVA and Time-Lapse Photography to Explore Effects of Extent of Chlorination, Milling Extraction Rate, and Particle-Size Reduction of Flour on Cake-Baking Functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three factors (extent of chlorination, milling extraction rate and particle-size reduction) in the cake-bakeing functionality of Croplan 594W flour were explored by Rapid Visco-Analyzer (RVA) and time-lapse photography. The extent of chlorination and milling extraction rate showed dramatic effects,...

  17. Estimating the hydrogeological parameters of an unconfined aquifer with the time-lapse resistivity-imaging method during pumping tests: Case studies at the Pengtsuo and Dajou sites, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ping-Yu; Chang, Lian-Cheng; Hsu, Shao-Yiu; Tsai, Jui-Pin; Chen, Wen-Fu

    2017-09-01

    We conducted time-lapse resistivity imaging during pumping tests at the Pengtsuo and Dajou test sites in Taiwan in order to examine the feasibility of estimating hydrogeological parameters with resistivity variations. Core logs reveal that the subsurface consists mainly of at least 100-m-thick gravel and sand at the two test sites. The resistivity differences between the pumping stages and pre-pumping background are well correlated to water level changes that are due to the dewatering of pumping activity. Therefore, it is possible to use the geometry of resistivity anomalies to estimate the hydraulic conductivity of the unconfined aquifer using the distance-drawdown equation for pumping tests in unsaturated aquifers. For each site, we used the contours of resistivity variations and recorded water levels in the pumping well to depict the bottom of the drawdown cone. The estimated hydraulic conductivity and specific yield, respectively, are 1.33 × 10- 4 m/s and 0.12 at the Pengtsuo site, and are 2.50 × 10- 4 m/s and 0.22 at the Dajou site. These values are consistent with the parameters that engineers from Taiwan Sugar Company calculated previously regarding groundwater-level variations in multiple wells (9.65 × 10- 5 m/s and 0.13 at Pengtsuo, and 1.00 × 10- 3 m/s and 0.19 at Dajou). This consistency suggests that resistivity imaging can perhaps serve as an alternative way to yield information about hydrogeological parameters.

  18. Quantitative high-resolution observations of soil water dynamics in a complicated architecture using time-lapse ground-penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, P.; Jaumann, S.; Roth, K.

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) observations of advancing and retreating water tables can yield a wealth of information about near-surface water content dynamics. In this study, we present and analyze a series of imbibition, drainage and infiltration experiments that have been carried out at our artificial ASSESS test site and observed with surface-based GPR. The test site features a complicated but known subsurface architecture constructed with three different kinds of sand. It allows the study of soil water dynamics with GPR under a wide range of different conditions. Here, we assess in particular (i) the feasibility of monitoring the dynamic shape of the capillary fringe reflection and (ii) the relative precision of monitoring soil water dynamics averaged over the whole vertical extent by evaluating the bottom reflection. The phenomenology of the GPR response of a dynamically changing capillary fringe is developed from a soil physical point of view. We then explain experimentally observed phenomena based on numerical simulations of both the water content dynamics and the expected GPR response.

  19. Quantitative high-resolution observations of soil water dynamics in a complicated architecture with time-lapse Ground-Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, P.; Jaumann, S.; Roth, K.

    2014-11-01

    High-resolution time-lapse Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) observations of advancing and retreating water tables can yield a wealth of information about near-surface water content dynamics. In this study, we present and analyze a series of imbibition, drainage and infiltration experiments which have been carried out at our artificial ASSESS test site and observed with surface based GPR. The test site features a complicated but known subsurface architecture constructed with three different kinds of sand. It allows studying soil water dynamics with GPR under a wide range of different conditions. Here, we assess in particular (i) the accurate determination of soil water dynamics averaged over the whole vertical extent by evaluating the bottom reflection and (ii) the feasibility of monitoring the dynamic shape of the capillary fringe reflection. The phenomenology of the GPR response of a dynamically changing capillary fringe is developed from a soil physical point of view. We then explain experimentally observed phenomena based on numerical simulations of both the water content dynamics and the expected GPR response.

  20. New algorithm to determine true colocalization in combination with image restoration and time-lapse confocal microscopy to MAP kinases in mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ignacio Villalta

    Full Text Available The subcellular localization and physiological functions of biomolecules are closely related and thus it is crucial to precisely determine the distribution of different molecules inside the intracellular structures. This is frequently accomplished by fluorescence microscopy with well-characterized markers and posterior evaluation of the signal colocalization. Rigorous study of colocalization requires statistical analysis of the data, albeit yet no single technique has been established as a standard method. Indeed, the few methods currently available are only accurate in images with particular characteristics. Here, we introduce a new algorithm to automatically obtain the true colocalization between images that is suitable for a wide variety of biological situations. To proceed, the algorithm contemplates the individual contribution of each pixel's fluorescence intensity in a pair of images to the overall Pearsońs correlation and Manders' overlap coefficients. The accuracy and reliability of the algorithm was validated on both simulated and real images that reflected the characteristics of a range of biological samples. We used this algorithm in combination with image restoration by deconvolution and time-lapse confocal microscopy to address the localization of MEK1 in the mitochondria of different cell lines. Appraising the previously described behavior of Akt1 corroborated the reliability of the combined use of these techniques. Together, the present work provides a novel statistical approach to accurately and reliably determine the colocalization in a variety of biological images.

  1. Proliferation kinetics of cultured cells after irradiation with X-rays and 14 MeV neutrons studied by time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, M W; Stap, J; Barendsen, G W

    1984-06-01

    Exponentially growing cells of an established line derived from a mouse osteosarcoma (MOS) have been studied by time-lapse cinematography after irradiation with 3 Gy of 200 kV X-rays or 1.5 Gy of 14 MeV neutrons. Cell cycle times (Tc) of individual cells and their progeny in three subsequent generations as well as the occurrence of aberrant mitosis have been determined to evaluate the variation in expression of damage in relation to the stage in the intermitotic cycle and the radiation quality. The results show that the radiation doses applied cause an equal elongation of the mean Tc, which is largest in the irradiated cells but persists in the three subsequent generations. After 3 Gy of X-rays, mitotic delay is largest in cells irradiated in later stages of the cycle, but this difference is not observed after 1.5 Gy of 14 MeV neutrons. In subsequent generations the Tc values show larger variations among descendents of cells treated in the same stage of the cycle as compared to controls but this variation is equal for the doses of X-rays and neutrons applied. Division probability was significantly reduced in irradiated cells as well as in subsequent generations, whereby with neutrons as compared to X-rays the damage is expressed in earlier generations, with less variation as a function of the cell cycle.

  2. Proliferation kinetics of cultured cells after irradiation with X-rays and 14 MeV neutrons studied by time-lapse cinematography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kooi, M.W.; Stap, J.; Barendsen, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    Exponentially growing cells of an established line derived from a mouse osteosarcoma (MOS) have been studied by time-lapse cinematography after irradiation with 3 Gy of 200 kV X- rays or 1.5 Gy of 14 MeV neutrons. The results show that the radiation doses applied cause an equal elongation of the mean cell cycle time Tsub(c), which is largest in the irradiated cells but persists in the three subsequent generations. After 3 Gy of X-rays, mitotic delay is largest in cells irradiated in later stages of the cycle, but this difference is not observed after 1.5 Gy of 14 MeV neutrons. In subsequent generations the Tsub(c) values show larger variations among descendents of cells treated in the same stage of the cycle as compared to controls but this variation is equal for the doses of X-rays and neutrons applied. Division probability was significantly reduced in irradiated cells as well as in subsequent generations, whereas with neutrons as compared to X-rays the damage is expressed in earlier generations, with less variation as a function of the cell cycle. (author)

  3. CellDyM: A room temperature operating cryogenic cell for the dynamic monitoring of snow metamorphism by time-lapse X-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calonne, N.; Flin, F.; Lesaffre, B.; Dufour, A.; Roulle, J.; Puglièse, P.; Philip, A.; Lahoucine, F.; Geindreau, C.; Panel, J.-M.; Roscoat, S. Rolland; Charrier, P.

    2015-05-01

    Monitoring the time evolution of snow microstructure in 3-D is crucial for a better understanding of snow metamorphism. We, therefore, designed a cryogenic cell that precisely controls the experimental conditions of a sample while it is scanned by X-ray tomography. Based on a thermoelectrical regulation and a vacuum insulation, the cell operates at room temperature. It is, thus, adaptable to diverse scanners, offering advantages in terms of imaging techniques, resolution, and speed. Three-dimensional time-lapse series were obtained under equitemperature and temperature gradient conditions at a 7.8 μm precision. The typical features of each metamorphism and the anisotropic faceting behavior between the basal and prismatic planes, known to occur close to -2°C, were observed in less than 30 h. These results are consistent with the temperature fields expected from heat conduction simulations through the cell. They confirm the cell's accuracy and the interest of relatively short periods to study snow metamorphism.

  4. Revelation of Different Nanoparticle-Uptake Behavior in Two Standard Cell Lines NIH/3T3 and A549 by Flow Cytometry and Time-Lapse Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Jochums

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The uptake of nanomaterials into different cell types is a central pharmacological issue for the determination of nanotoxicity as well as for the development of drug delivery strategies. Most responses of the cells depend on their intracellular interactions with nanoparticles (NPs. Uptake behavior can be precisely investigated in vitro, with sensitive high throughput methods such as flow cytometry. In this study, we investigated two different standard cell lines, human lung carcinoma (A549 and mouse fibroblast (NIH/3T3 cells, regarding their uptake behavior of titanium dioxide NPs. Cells were incubated with different concentrations of TiO2 NPs and samples were taken at certain time points to compare the uptake kinetics of both cell lines. Samples were analyzed with the help of flow cytometry by studying changes in the side and forward scattering signal. To additionally enable a detection via fluorescence, NPs were labeled with the fluorescent dye fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC and propidium iodide (PI. We found that NIH/3T3 cells take up the studied NPs more efficiently than A549 cells. These findings were supported by time-lapse microscopic imaging of the cells incubated with TiO2 NPs. Our results confirm that the uptake behavior of individual cell types has to be considered before interpreting any results of nanomaterial studies.

  5. Mobility Effect on Poroelastic Seismic Signatures in Partially Saturated Rocks With Applications in Time-Lapse Monitoring of a Heavy Oil Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Luanxiao; Yuan, Hemin; Yang, Jingkang; Han, De-hua; Geng, Jianhua; Zhou, Rui; Li, Hui; Yao, Qiuliang

    2017-11-01

    Conventional seismic analysis in partially saturated rocks normally lays emphasis on estimating pore fluid content and saturation, typically ignoring the effect of mobility, which decides the ability of fluids moving in the porous rocks. Deformation resulting from a seismic wave in heterogeneous partially saturated media can cause pore fluid pressure relaxation at mesoscopic scale, thereby making the fluid mobility inherently associated with poroelastic reflectivity. For two typical gas-brine reservoir models, with the given rock and fluid properties, the numerical analysis suggests that variations of patchy fluid saturation, fluid compressibility contrast, and acoustic stiffness of rock frame collectively affect the seismic reflection dependence on mobility. In particular, the realistic compressibility contrast of fluid patches in shallow and deep reservoir environments plays an important role in determining the reflection sensitivity to mobility. We also use a time-lapse seismic data set from a Steam-Assisted Gravity Drainage producing heavy oil reservoir to demonstrate that mobility change coupled with patchy saturation possibly leads to seismic spectral energy shifting from the baseline to monitor line. Our workflow starts from performing seismic spectral analysis on the targeted reflectivity interface. Then, on the basis of mesoscopic fluid pressure diffusion between patches of steam and heavy oil, poroelastic reflectivity modeling is conducted to understand the shift of the central frequency toward low frequencies after the steam injection. The presented results open the possibility of monitoring mobility change of a partially saturated geological formation from dissipation-related seismic attributes.

  6. An integrable, web-based solution for easy assessment of video-recorded performances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subhi, Yousif; Todsen, Tobias; Konge, Lars

    2014-01-01

    , and access to this information should be restricted to select personnel. A local software solution may also ease the need for customization to local needs and integration into existing user databases or project management software. We developed an integrable web-based solution for easy assessment of video...

  7. A Blended Learning Study on Implementing Video Recorded Speaking Tasks in Task-Based Classroom Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkgoz, Yasemin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates designing and implementing a speaking course in which face-to-face instruction informed by the principles of Task-Based Learning is blended with the use of technology, the video, for the first-year student teachers of English in Turkish higher education. The study consisted of three hours of task-based classroom…

  8. Head-camera video recordings of trauma core competency procedures can evaluate surgical resident's technical performance as well as colocated evaluators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Colin F; Pasley, Jason; Garofalo, Evan; Shackelford, Stacy; Chen, Hegang; Longinaker, Nyaradzo; Granite, Guinevere; Pugh, Kristy; Hagegeorge, George; Tisherman, Samuel A

    2017-07-01

    Unbiased evaluation of trauma core competency procedures is necessary to determine if residency and predeployment training courses are useful. We tested whether a previously validated individual procedure score (IPS) for individual procedure vascular exposure and fasciotomy (FAS) performance skills could discriminate training status by comparing IPS of evaluators colocated with surgeons to blind video evaluations. Performance of axillary artery (AA), brachial artery (BA), and femoral artery (FA) vascular exposures and lower extremity FAS on fresh cadavers by 40 PGY-2 to PGY-6 residents was video-recorded from head-mounted cameras. Two colocated trained evaluators assessed IPS before and after training. One surgeon in each pretraining tertile of IPS for each procedure was randomly identified for blind video review. The same 12 surgeons were video-recorded repeating the procedures less than 4 weeks after training. Five evaluators independently reviewed all 96 randomly arranged deidentified videos. Inter-rater reliability/consistency, intraclass correlation coefficients were compared by colocated versus video review of IPS, and errors. Study methodology and bias were judged by Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument and the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies criteria. There were no differences (p ≥ 0.5) in IPS for AA, FA, FAS, whether evaluators were colocated or reviewed video recordings. Evaluator consistency was 0.29 (BA) - 0.77 (FA). Video and colocated evaluators were in total agreement (p = 1.0) for error recognition. Intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.73 to 0.92, dependent on procedure. Correlations video versus colocated evaluations were 0.5 to 0.9. Except for BA, blinded video evaluators discriminated (p Education Research Study Quality Instrument criteria scored 15.5/19, Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2 showed low bias risk. Video evaluations of AA, FA, and FAS procedures with IPS are unbiased, valid, and

  9. Associations between thin slice ratings of affect and rapport and perceived patient-centeredness in primary care: Comparison of audio and video recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Stephen G; Penner, Louis A; Eggly, Susan

    2017-06-01

    To investigate associations between ratings of "thin slices" from recorded clinic visits and perceived patient-centeredness; to compare ratings from video recordings (sound and images) versus audio recordings (sound only). We analyzed 133 video-recorded primary care visits and patient perceptions of patient-centeredness. Observers rated thirty-second thin slices on variables assessing patient affect, physician affect, and patient-physician rapport. Video and audio ratings were collected independently. In multivariable analyses, ratings of physician positive affect (but not patient positive affect) were significantly positively associated with perceived patient-centeredness using both video and audio thin slices. Patient-physician rapport was significantly positively associated with perceived patient-centeredness using audio, but not video thin slices. Ratings from video and audio thin slices were highly correlated and had similar underlying factor structures. Physician (but not patient) positive affect is significantly associated with perceptions of patient-centeredness and can be measured reliably using either video or audio thin slices. Additional studies are needed to determine whether ratings of patient-physician rapport are associated with perceived patient-centeredness. Observer ratings of physician positive affect have a meaningful positive association with patients' perceptions of patient-centeredness. Patients appear to be highly attuned to physician positive affect during patient-physician interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Student perspectives on using egocentric video recorded by smart glasses to assess communicative and clinical skills with standardised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahl, D A; Schrader, S M; Edwards, P C

    2016-07-06

    This exploratory study evaluated student perceptions of their ability to self- and peer assess (i) interpersonal communication skills and (ii) clinical procedures (a head and neck examination) during standardised patient (SP) interactions recorded by Google Glass compared to a static camera. Students compared the Google Glass and static camera recordings using an instrument consisting of 20 Likert-type items and four open- and closed-text items. The Likert-type items asked students to rate how effectively they could assess specific aspects of interpersonal communication and a head and neck examination in these two different types of recordings. The interpersonal communication items included verbal, paraverbal and non-verbal subscales. The open- and closed-text items asked students to report on more globally the differences between the two types of recordings. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were conducted for all survey items. An inductive thematic analysis was conducted to determine qualitative emergent themes from the open-text questions. Students found the Glass videos more effective for assessing verbal (t 22 = 2.091, P = 0.048) and paraverbal communication skills (t 22 = 3.304, P = 0.003), whilst they reported that the static camera video was more effective for assessing non-verbal communication skills (t 22 = -2.132, P = 0.044). Four principle themes emerged from the students' open-text responses comparing Glass to static camera recordings for self- and peer assessment: (1) first-person perspective, (2) assessment of non-verbal communication, (3) audiovisual experience and (4) student operation of Glass. Our findings suggest that students perceive that Google Glass is a valuable tool for facilitating self- and peer assessment of SP examinations because of students' perceived ability to emphasise and illustrate communicative and clinical activities from a first-person perspective. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons

  11. High-speed three-frame image recording system using colored flash units and low-cost video equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racca, Roberto G.; Scotten, Larry N.

    1995-05-01

    This article describes a method that allows the digital recording of sequences of three black and white images at rates of several thousand frames per second using a system consisting of an ordinary CCD camcorder, three flash units with color filters, a PC-based frame grabber board and some additional electronics. The maximum framing rate is determined by the duration of the flashtube emission, and for common photographic flash units lasting about 20 microsecond(s) it can exceed 10,000 frames per second in actual use. The subject under study is strobe- illuminated using a red, a green and a blue flash unit controlled by a special sequencer, and the three images are captured by a color CCD camera on a single video field. Color is used as the distinguishing parameter that allows the overlaid exposures to be resolved. The video output for that particular field will contain three individual scenes, one for each primary color component, which potentially can be resolved with no crosstalk between them. The output is electronically decoded into the primary color channels, frame grabbed and stored into digital memory, yielding three time-resolved images of the subject. A synchronization pulse provided by the flash sequencer triggers the frame grabbing so that the correct video field is acquired. A scheme involving the use of videotape as intermediate storage allows the frame grabbing to be performed using a monochrome video digitizer. Ideally each flash- illuminated scene would be confined to one color channel, but in practice various factors, both optical and electronic, affect color separation. Correction equations have been derived that counteract these effects in the digitized images and minimize 'ghosting' between frames. Once the appropriate coefficients have been established through a calibration procedure that needs to be performed only once for a given configuration of the equipment, the correction process is carried out transparently in software every time a

  12. Understanding leachate flow in municipal solid waste landfills by combining time-lapse ERT and subsurface flow modelling - Part II: Constraint methodology of hydrodynamic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, M; Oxarango, L; Duquennoi, C; Touze-Foltz, N; Forquet, N; Clément, R

    2016-09-01

    Leachate recirculation is a key process in the operation of municipal solid waste landfills as bioreactors. To ensure optimal water content distribution, bioreactor operators need tools to design leachate injection systems. Prediction of leachate flow by subsurface flow modelling could provide useful information for the design of such systems. However, hydrodynamic models require additional data to constrain them and to assess hydrodynamic parameters. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a suitable method to study leachate infiltration at the landfill scale. It can provide spatially distributed information which is useful for constraining hydrodynamic models. However, this geophysical method does not allow ERT users to directly measure water content in waste. The MICS (multiple inversions and clustering strategy) methodology was proposed to delineate the infiltration area precisely during time-lapse ERT survey in order to avoid the use of empirical petrophysical relationships, which are not adapted to a heterogeneous medium such as waste. The infiltration shapes and hydrodynamic information extracted with MICS were used to constrain hydrodynamic models in assessing parameters. The constraint methodology developed in this paper was tested on two hydrodynamic models: an equilibrium model where, flow within the waste medium is estimated using a single continuum approach and a non-equilibrium model where flow is estimated using a dual continuum approach. The latter represents leachate flows into fractures. Finally, this methodology provides insight to identify the advantages and limitations of hydrodynamic models. Furthermore, we suggest an explanation for the large volume detected by MICS when a small volume of leachate is injected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Monitoring the evolution and migration of a methane gas plume in an unconfined sandy aquifer using time-lapse GPR and ERT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steelman, Colby M.; Klazinga, Dylan R.; Cahill, Aaron G.; Endres, Anthony L.; Parker, Beth L.

    2017-10-01

    Fugitive methane (CH4) leakage associated with conventional and unconventional petroleum development (e.g., shale gas) may pose significant risks to shallow groundwater. While the potential threat of stray (CH4) gas in aquifers has been acknowledged, few studies have examined the nature of its migration and fate in a shallow groundwater flow system. This study examines the geophysical responses observed from surface during a 72 day field-scale simulated CH4 leak in an unconfined sandy aquifer at Canadian Forces Base Borden, Canada, to better understand the transient behaviour of fugitive CH4 gas in the subsurface. Time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) were used to monitor the distribution and migration of the gas-phase and assess any impacts to groundwater hydrochemistry. Geophysical measurements captured the transient formation of a CH4 gas plume emanating from the injector, which was accompanied by an increase in total dissolved gas pressure (PTDG). Subsequent reductions in PTDG were accompanied by reduced bulk resistivity around the injector along with an increase in the GPR reflectivity along horizontal bedding reflectors farther downgradient. Repeat temporal GPR reflection profiling identified three events with major peaks in reflectivity, interpreted to represent episodic lateral CH4 gas release events into the aquifer. Here, a gradual increase in PTDG near the injector caused a sudden lateral breakthrough of gas in the direction of groundwater flow, causing free-phase CH4 to migrate much farther than anticipated based on groundwater advection. CH4 accumulated along subtle permeability boundaries demarcated by grain-scale bedding within the aquifer characteristic of numerous Borden-aquifer multi-phase flow experiments. Diminishing reflectivity over a period of days to weeks suggests buoyancy-driven migration to the vadose zone and/or CH4 dissolution into groundwater. Lateral and vertical CH4 migration was

  14. Time-lapse cinematography-compatible polystyrene-based microwell culture system: a novel tool for tracking the development of individual bovine embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Satoshi; Akai, Tomonori; Somfai, Tamás; Hirayama, Muneyuki; Aikawa, Yoshio; Ohtake, Masaki; Hattori, Hideshi; Kobayashi, Shuji; Hashiyada, Yutaka; Konishi, Kazuyuki; Imai, Kei

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a polystyrene-based well-of-the-well (WOW) system using injection molding to track individual embryos throughout culture using time-lapse cinematography (TLC). WOW culture of bovine embryos following in vitro fertilization was compared with conventional droplet culture (control). No differences between control- and WOW-cultured embryos were observed during development to the blastocyst stage. Morphological quality and inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE) cell numbers were not different between control- and WOW-derived blastocysts; however, apoptosis in both the ICM and TE cells was reduced in WOW culture (P < 0.01). Oxygen consumption in WOW-derived blastocysts was closer to physiological level than that of control-derived blastocysts. Moreover, WOW culture improved embryo viability, as indicated by increased pregnancy rates at Days 30 and 60 after embryo transfer (P < 0.05). TLC monitoring was performed to evaluate the cleavage pattern and the duration of the first cell cycle of embryos from oocytes collected by ovum pickup; correlations with success of pregnancy were determined. Logistic regression analysis indicated that the cleavage pattern correlated with success of pregnancy (P < 0.05), but cell cycle length did not. Higher pregnancy rates (66.7%) were observed for animals in which transferred blastocysts had undergone normal cleavage, identified by the presence of two blastomeres of the same size without fragmentation, than among those with abnormal cleavage (33.3%). These results suggest that our microwell culture system is a powerful tool for producing and selecting healthy embryos and for identifying viability biomarkers.

  15. Remotely Measuring Trash Fluxes in the Flood Canals of Megacities with Time Lapse Cameras and Computer Vision Algorithms - a Case Study from Jakarta, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlar, F.; Turpin, E.; Kerkez, B.

    2014-12-01

    As megacities around the world continue to develop at breakneck speeds, future development, investment, and social wellbeing are threatened by a number of environmental and social factors. Chief among these is frequent, persistent, and unpredictable urban flooding. Jakarta, Indonesia with a population of 28 million, is a prime example of a city plagued by such flooding. Yet although Jakarta has ample hydraulic infrastructure already in place with more being constructed, the increasingly severity of the flooding it experiences is not from a lack of hydraulic infrastructure but rather a failure of existing infrastructure. As was demonstrated during the most recent floods in Jakarta, the infrastructure failure is often the result of excessive amounts of trash in the flood canals. This trash clogs pumps and reduces the overall system capacity. Despite this critical weakness of flood control in Jakarta, no data exists on the overall amount of trash in the flood canals, much less on how it varies temporally and spatially. The recent availability of low cost photography provides a means to obtain such data. Time lapse photography postprocessed with computer vision algorithms yields a low cost, remote, and automatic solution to measuring the trash fluxes. When combined with the measurement of key hydrological parameters, a thorough understanding of the relationship between trash fluxes and the hydrology of massive urban areas becomes possible. This work examines algorithm development, quantifying trash parameters, and hydrological measurements followed by data assimilation into existing hydraulic and hydrological models of Jakarta. The insights afforded from such an approach allows for more efficient operating of hydraulic infrastructure, knowledge of when and where critical levels of trash originate from, and the opportunity for community outreach - which is ultimately needed to reduce the trash in the flood canals of Jakarta and megacities around the world.

  16. Ionomycin-induced calcium influx induces neurite degeneration in mouse neuroblastoma cells: analysis of a time-lapse live cell imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Saki; Nakanishi, Ayumi; Takazawa, Minami; Okihiro, Shunsuke; Urano, Shiro; Fukui, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species induce neuronal cell death. However, the detailed mechanisms of cell death have not yet been elucidated. Previously, we reported neurite degeneration before the induction of cell death. Here, we attempted to elucidate the mechanisms of neurite degeneration before the induction of cell death using the neuroblastoma N1E-115 cell line and a time-lapse live cell imaging system. Treatment with the calcium ionophore ionomycin induced cell death and neurite degeneration in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Treatment with a low concentration of ionomycin immediately produced a significant calcium influx into the intracellular region in N1E-115 cells. After 1-h incubation with ionomycin, the fluorescence emission of MitoSOX TM increased significantly compared to the control. Finally, analysis using a new mitochondrial specific fluorescence dye, MitoPeDPP, indicated that treatment with ionomycin significantly increased the mitochondrial lipid hydroperoxide production in N1E-115 cells. The fluorescence emissions of Fluo-4 AM and MitoPeDPP were detected in the cell soma and neurite regions in ionomycin-treated N1E-115 cells. However, the emissions of neurites were much lower than those of the cell soma. TBARS values of ionomycin-treated cells significantly increased compared to the control. These results indicate that ionomycin induces calcium influx into the intracellular region and reactive oxygen species production in N1E-115 cells. Lipid hydroperoxide production was induced in ionomycin-treated N1E-115 cells. Calcium influx into the intracellular region is a possible activator of neurite degeneration.

  17. The turbulent life of juvenile icebergs: Observations from an array of high-rate time-lapse cameras in LeConte Bay, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienholz, C.; Amundson, J. M.; Jackson, R. H.; Motyka, R. J.; Nash, J. D.; Sutherland, D.

    2017-12-01

    Tidewater glacier behavior is driven by poorly understood processes occurring at the ice-ocean interface, including sedimentation and erosion, iceberg calving, and submarine melting. These processes are inherently difficult to observe, calling for innovative field techniques and numerical models. As part of a multi-year field effort to constrain ocean-glacier heat and mass exchange, we deployed an array of high-rate time-lapse cameras (sampling intervals between 15 seconds and 2 minutes) to monitor the terminus of LeConte Glacier and its proglacial fjord. The camera array has operated continuously for more than a year. Our high sampling rates enable tracking of iceberg motion with optical flow algorithms, which have been used widely in computer vision but less so in glaciology and oceanography. Such algorithms track individual features (e.g., corners of icebergs), which is ideal for iceberg-rich fjords, where motion can vary substantially over short temporal and spatial scales (e.g., due to complex surface currents or different iceberg sizes). We process our data to quantify subdaily to seasonal patterns in surface currents and relate them to forcing from tides, wind, and glacier runoff. Flow is most variable close to the glacier terminus due to frequent calving events and turbulent plume dynamics. Farther down fjord, more consistent patterns emerge, driven by tides, wind, and runoff and altered by fjord geometry. Our tracking results compare favorably to and complement our Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler measurements from boats and moorings. Given their high spatial and temporal resolution, our observations will place important surface constraints on forthcoming hydrodynamic modeling efforts. The deployment of the cameras in a harsh environment and the corresponding image processing provided an opportunity to test hardware and software thoroughly, which will prove useful for similar systems at other glaciers.

  18. Fighting for territories: time-lapse analysis of dental pulp and dental follicle stem cells in co-culture reveals specific migratory capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Schiraldi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell migration is a critical step during the repair of damaged tissues. In order to achieve appropriate cell-based therapies for tooth and periodontal ligament repair it is necessary first to understand the dynamics of tissue-specific stem cell populations such as dental pulp stem cells (DPSC and dental follicle stem cells (DFSC. Using time-lapse imaging, we analysed migratory and proliferative capabilities of these two human stem cell lines in vitro. When cultured alone, both DPSC and DFSC exhibited low and irregular migration profiles. In co-cultures, DFSC, but not DPSC, spectacularly increased their migration activity and velocity. DFSC rapidly surrounded the DPSC, thus resembling the in vivo developmental process, where follicle cells encircle both dental epithelium and pulp. Cell morphology was dependent on the culture conditions (mono-culture or co-culture and changed over time. Regulatory genes involved in dental cell migration and differentiation such as TWIST1, MSX1, RUNX2, SFRP1 and ADAM28, were also evaluated in co-cultures. MSX1 up-regulation indicates that DPSC and DFSC retain their odontogenic potential. However, DPSC lose their capacity to differentiate into odontoblasts in the presence of DFSC, as suggested by RUNX2 up-regulation and TWIST1 down-regulation. In contrast, the unchanged levels of SFRP1 expression suggest that DFSC retain their potential to form periodontal tissues even in the presence of DPSC. These findings demonstrate that stem cells behave differently according to their environment, retain their genetic memory, and compete with each other to acquire the appropriate territory. Understanding the mechanisms involved in stem cell migration may lead to new therapeutic approaches for tooth repair.

  19. Vapor flux and recrystallization during dry snow metamorphism under a steady temperature gradient as observed by time-lapse micro-tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Pinzer

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dry snow metamorphism under an external temperature gradient is the most common type of recrystallization of snow on the ground. The changes in snow microstructure modify the physical properties of snow, and therefore an understanding of this process is essential for many disciplines, from modeling the effects of snow on climate to assessing avalanche risk. We directly imaged the microstructural changes in snow during temperature gradient metamorphism (TGM under a constant gradient of 50 K m−1, using in situ time-lapse X-ray micro-tomography. This novel and non-destructive technique directly reveals the amount of ice that sublimates and is deposited during metamorphism, in addition to the exact locations of these phase changes. We calculated the average time that an ice volume stayed in place before it sublimated and found a characteristic residence time of 2–3 days. This means that most of the ice changes its phase from solid to vapor and back many times in a seasonal snowpack where similar temperature conditions can be found. Consistent with such a short timescale, we observed a mass turnover of up to 60% of the total ice mass per day. The concept of hand-to-hand transport for the water vapor flux describes the observed changes very well. However, we did not find evidence for a macroscopic vapor diffusion enhancement. The picture of {temperature gradient metamorphism} produced by directly observing the changing microstructure sheds light on the micro-physical processes and could help to improve models that predict the physical properties of snow.

  20. Reliability of Alberta Infant Motor Scale Using Recorded Video Observations Among the Preterm Infants in India: A Reliability Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena Kirthika S

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assessment of motor function is a vital characteristic of infant development. Alberta Infant Motor scale (AIMS is considered to be one of the tool available for screening the developmental delays, but this scale was formulated by using western samples. Every country has its own ethnic and cultural background and various differences are observed in the culture and ethnicity. Therefore, there is a need to obtain reliability for the use of AIMS in south Indian population. Purpose: To find the intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS on pre-term infants using the recorded video observations in Indian population. Method: 30 preterm infants in three age groups, 0-3 months (10 infants, 4-7 months (10 infants, 8-18 months (10 infants were recruited for this reliability study. The AIMS was administered to the preterm infants and the performance was videotaped. The performance was then rescored by the same therapist, immediately from the video and on another two consecutive months to estimate intra-rater reliability using ICC (3,1, two-way mixed effects model. For reporting inter-rater reliability, AIMS was scored by three different raters, using ICC (2,k two-way random effects model and by two other therapists to examine the inter and intra-rater reliability. Results: The two-way mixed effects model for intra-rater reliability of AIMS, ICC (3,1 = 0.99 and for reporting inter-rater reliability of AIMS by two-way random effects model, ICC (2,k = 0.96. Conclusion: AIMS has excellent intra and inter-rater reliability using recorded video observations among the preterm infants in India

  1. Three-camera setup to record simultaneously standardized high-definition video for smile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Akhter; Makhija, Parmanand G; Ummer, Aseena Alungal; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Kuijpers, Mette A R

    2017-11-01

    Our objective was to develop a photographic setup that would simultaneously capture subjects' smiles from 3 views, both statically and dynamically, and develop a software to crop the produced video clip and slice the frames to study the smile at different stages. Facial images were made of 96 subjects, aged 18 to 28 years, in natural head position using a standardized setup of 3 digital single lens reflex cameras, with a reference sticker (10 × 10 mm) on the forehead of each subject. To test the reproducibility of the setup, 1 operator took 3 images of all subjects on the same day and on 3 different days in a subset of 26 subjects. For the same-day observations, correlation coefficients varied between 0.87 and 0.93. For the observations on 3 different days, correlation coefficients were also high. The duplicate measurement error and the mean difference between measurements were small and not significant, pointing to good reliability. This new technique to capture standardized high-definition video and still images simultaneously from 3 positions is a reliable and practical tool. The technique is easy to learn and implement in the orthodontic office. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Checklist to Help Faculty Assess ACGME Milestones in a Video-Recorded OSCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easdown, L Jane; Wakefield, Marsha L; Shotwell, Matthew S; Sandison, Michael R

    2017-10-01

    Faculty members need to assess resident performance using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Milestones. In this randomized study we used an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) around the disclosure of an adverse event to determine whether use of a checklist improved the quality of milestone assessments by faculty. In 2013, a total of 20 anesthesiology faculty members from 3 institutions were randomized to 2 groups to assess 5 videos of trainees demonstrating advancing levels of competency on the OSCE. One group used milestones alone, and the other used milestones plus a 13-item checklist with behavioral anchors based on ideal performance. We classified faculty ratings as either correct or incorrect with regard to the competency level demonstrated in each video, and then used logistic regression analysis to assess the effect of checklist use on the odds of correct classification. Thirteen of 20 faculty members rated assessing performance using milestones alone as difficult or very difficult . Checklist use was associated with significantly greater odds of correct classification at entry level (odds ratio [OR] = 9.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.0-21.2) and at junior level (OR = 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.7) performance. For performance at other competency levels checklist use did not affect the odds of correct classification. A majority of anesthesiology faculty members reported difficulty with assessing a videotaped OSCE of error disclosure using milestones as primary assessment tools. Use of the checklist assisted in correct assessments at the entry and junior levels.

  3. A comparison between flexible electrogoniometers, inclinometers and three-dimensional video analysis system for recording neck movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnaz, Letícia; Moriguchi, Cristiane S; de Oliveira, Ana Beatriz; Santiago, Paulo R P; Caurin, Glauco A P; Hansson, Gert-Åke; Coury, Helenice J C Gil

    2013-11-01

    This study compared neck range of movement recording using three different methods goniometers (EGM), inclinometers (INC) and a three-dimensional video analysis system (IMG) in simultaneous and synchronized data collection. Twelve females performed neck flexion-extension, lateral flexion, rotation and circumduction. The differences between EGM, INC, and IMG were calculated sample by sample. For flexion-extension movement, IMG underestimated the amplitude by 13%; moreover, EGM showed a crosstalk of about 20% for lateral flexion and rotation axes. In lateral flexion movement, all systems showed similar amplitude and the inter-system differences were moderate (4-7%). For rotation movement, EGM showed a high crosstalk (13%) for flexion-extension axis. During the circumduction movement, IMG underestimated the amplitude of flexion-extension movements by about 11%, and the inter-system differences were high (about 17%) except for INC-IMG regarding lateral flexion (7%) and EGM-INC regarding flexion-extension (10%). For application in workplace, INC presents good results compared to IMG and EGM though INC cannot record rotation. EGM should be improved in order to reduce its crosstalk errors and allow recording of the full neck range of movement. Due to non-optimal positioning of the cameras for recording flexion-extension, IMG underestimated the amplitude of these movements. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Live-cell time-lapse imaging and single-cell tracking of in vitro cultured neural stem cells - Tools for analyzing dynamics of cell cycle, migration, and lineage selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltti, Katja M; Cummings, Brian J; Carta, Krystal; Manughian-Peter, Ayla; Worne, Colleen L; Singh, Kulbir; Ong, Danier; Maksymyuk, Yuriy; Khine, Michelle; Anderson, Aileen J

    2018-01-15

    Neural stem cell (NSC) cultures have been considered technically challenging for time-lapse analysis due to high motility, photosensitivity, and growth at confluent densities. We have tested feasibility of long-term live-cell time-lapse analysis for NSC migration and differentiation studies. Here, we describe a method to study the dynamics of cell cycle, migration, and lineage selection in cultured multipotent mouse or human NSCs using single-cell tracking during a long-term, 7-14 day live-cell time-lapse analysis. We used in-house made PDMS inserts with five microwells on a glass coverslip petri-dish to constrain NSC into the area of acquisition during long-term live-cell imaging. In parallel, we have defined image acquisition settings for single-cell tracking of cell cycle dynamics using Fucci-reporter mouse NSC for 7 days as well as lineage selection and migration using human NSC for 14 days. Overall, we show that adjustments of live-cell analysis settings can extend the time period of single-cell tracking in mouse or human NSC from 24-72 h up to 7-14 days and potentially longer. However, we emphasize that experimental use of repeated fluorescence imaging will require careful consideration of controls during acquisition and analysis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Time-lapse electric resistivity in a stressed mangrove forest to image the role of the root zone in porewater salt distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, C. M.; Krauss, K.; Kruse, S.

    2017-12-01

    The movement and storage of porewater salts is poorly understood in mangrove forests with limited surface water exchange between the forest and neighboring lagoon. These mangroves are often the most stressed, and have the most unfavorable salinity balance that often transition to mortality during extreme drought. A time-lapse resistivity survey was conducted in a stressed mangrove forest over a diel period. Resistivity is sensitive to the entire soil volume, including fine roots. The objective was to image changes in porewater salinity structures around both mangrove trees, where roots can be a prolific contributor to soil volume, and a salt pan with little or no vegetation. Throughout the diel period, salt pan conductivities remained relatively constant. The most significant temporal changes occur in the root zone around mangrove trees. Particularly interesting is a drop in resistivity (increased conductivity) at sunset when transpiration from individual trees decreases (or even ceases), potentially identifying a cumulative concentration of salts around the mangrove root zone after a full day of transpiration. The resistivity gradient decreases immediately after its peak at sunset, potentially identifying the consequences of hydraulic redistribution in diluting soils surrounding trees immediately after transpiration ceases. This is quicker than expected, and may imply a very strong and rapid eco-hydrological connection in the tree-facilitated salinity balance essential to their survival under the most salinity-stressed environments. At sunrise, resistivity increases, further suggesting dilution of salts via hydraulic redistribution of fresh water from the tree into the upper soil layers, or suggests an accumulation of salts within roots when presumably less water is moving through the trees. Repeated electric resistivity arrays provide spatial and temporal information about these salts and contribute to an overall understanding of how stressed mangrove forests

  6. Time-lapse resistivity measurements combined with soil water sampling to characterize solute movement in the unsaturated zone at Oslo airport, Gardermoen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloem, E.; French, H. K.; Binley, A.; Schotanus, D.; Eggen, G.

    2010-12-01

    Pollution of soils is a widespread problem and is an important part of the still to be implemented Soil Directive (EU). To improve risk assessment, monitoring, and treatment strategies for natural attenuation, we require a better understanding of the effect of soil heterogeneity on contaminant movement and methods for monitoring the effects of this heterogeneity at contaminated sites. Geophysical methods provide indirect measurements of subsurface properties over larger volumes than tradition techniques, and are potentially cost-efficient. However, the usefulness of any individual set of geophysical measurements (akin to a snapshot at one point in time) is severely limited by the problem of non-uniqueness or ambiguity when used to study contaminated sites, where the attendant processes vary in space and time. To make progress on soil contamination assessment and site characterization there is a strong need to integrate quasi field-scale, extensively instrumented tools, such as the multi-compartment sampler, with non-invasive (geophysical) and invasive (soil sampling, soil water sampling) methods. We illustrate this approach in an application to solute transport at Oslo airport, Norway. The impact of annual infiltration of large quantities of de-icing chemicals at Oslo airport, Gardermoen, represents common challenge for all airports with winter frost. It is also similar to the challenge posed by de-icing salt application along roads. At the research field station at Gardermoen, a degradable de-icing chemical and an inactive tracer were added to the snow cover prior to snowmelt and to the surface during an irrigation experiment performed after the snowmelt. In order to link geophysical measurements to solute transport processes in the unsaturated zone, time-lapse cross borehole resistivity as well as surface resistivity measurements were conducted at the same time as soil water samples were extracted. Measurements of soil temperature, and tension were also carried

  7. Monitoring the evolution and migration of a methane gas plume in an unconfined sandy aquifer using time-lapse GPR and ERT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steelman, Colby M; Klazinga, Dylan R; Cahill, Aaron G; Endres, Anthony L; Parker, Beth L

    2017-10-01

    Fugitive methane (CH 4 ) leakage associated with conventional and unconventional petroleum development (e.g., shale gas) may pose significant risks to shallow groundwater. While the potential threat of stray (CH 4 ) gas in aquifers has been acknowledged, few studies have examined the nature of its migration and fate in a shallow groundwater flow system. This study examines the geophysical responses observed from surface during a 72day field-scale simulated CH 4 leak in an unconfined sandy aquifer at Canadian Forces Base Borden, Canada, to better understand the transient behaviour of fugitive CH 4 gas in the subsurface. Time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) were used to monitor the distribution and migration of the gas-phase and assess any impacts to groundwater hydrochemistry. Geophysical measurements captured the transient formation of a CH 4 gas plume emanating from the injector, which was accompanied by an increase in total dissolved gas pressure (P TDG ). Subsequent reductions in P TDG were accompanied by reduced bulk resistivity around the injector along with an increase in the GPR reflectivity along horizontal bedding reflectors farther downgradient. Repeat temporal GPR reflection profiling identified three events with major peaks in reflectivity, interpreted to represent episodic lateral CH 4 gas release events into the aquifer. Here, a gradual increase in P TDG near the injector caused a sudden lateral breakthrough of gas in the direction of groundwater flow, causing free-phase CH 4 to migrate much farther than anticipated based on groundwater advection. CH 4 accumulated along subtle permeability boundaries demarcated by grain-scale bedding within the aquifer characteristic of numerous Borden-aquifer multi-phase flow experiments. Diminishing reflectivity over a period of days to weeks suggests buoyancy-driven migration to the vadose zone and/or CH 4 dissolution into groundwater. Lateral and vertical CH 4

  8. Reliable assessment of general surgeons' non-technical skills based on video-recordings of patient simulated scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanager, Lene; Beier-Holgersen, Randi; Dieckmann, Peter; Konge, Lars; Rosenberg, Jacob; Oestergaard, Doris

    2013-11-01

    Nontechnical skills are essential for safe and efficient surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of an assessment tool for surgeons' nontechnical skills, Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons dk (NOTSSdk), and the effect of rater training. A 1-day course was conducted for 15 general surgeons in which they rated surgeons' nontechnical skills in 9 video recordings of scenarios simulating real intraoperative situations. Data were gathered from 2 sessions separated by a 4-hour training session. Interrater reliability was high for both pretraining ratings (Cronbach's α = .97) and posttraining ratings (Cronbach's α = .98). There was no statistically significant development in assessment skills. The D study showed that 2 untrained raters or 1 trained rater was needed to obtain generalizability coefficients >.80. The high pretraining interrater reliability indicates that videos were easy to rate and Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons dk easy to use. This implies that Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons dk (NOTSSdk) could be an important tool in surgical training, potentially improving safety and quality for surgical patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. New technologies in the Physical Education class. A positive experience with the digital video recording and vertical jump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rojano Ortega

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the Basic Competences is to highlight the essential learning of the Secondary School Curriculum. The fourth Basic Competence introduces in the Secondary School Program the use of the Information and Communication Technologies as an essential element to be informed, to learn and to communicate. To that effect, this article tries to bring the new technologies to the Physical Education Class, specifically to the analysis of the vertical jump. This jump has been traditionally evaluated with the Sargent’s test but this test has some errors which derive from the measuring process. Nowadays there are new very precise instruments often used in sports for the analysis of the vertical jump, but their high prices make it difficult to introduce them in the school. With this article we want to show that the digital video recording and the video edition programs constitute a very appropriate way to evaluate the vertical jump because it causes in the students great interest and implication.

  10. In the here and now: enhanced motor corticospinal excitability in novices when watching live compared to video recorded dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jola, Corinne; Grosbras, Marie-Hélène

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced motor corticospinal excitability (MCE) in passive action observation is thought to signify covert motor resonance with the actions seen. Actions performed by others are an important social stimulus and thus, motor resonance is prevalent during social interaction. However, most studies employ simple/short snippets of recorded movements devoid of any real-life social context, which has recently been criticized for lacking ecological validity. Here, we investigated whether the co-presence of the actor and the spectator has an impact on motor resonance by comparing novices' MCE for the finger (FDI) and the arm (ECR) with single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation when watching five-minute solos of ballet dance, Bharatanatyam (Indian dance) and an acting control condition either live or on video. We found that (1) MCE measured in the arm muscle was significantly enhanced in the live compared to the video condition, (2) differences across performances were only evident in the live condition, and (3) our novices reported enjoying the live presentations significantly more. We suggest that novice spectators' MCE is susceptible to the performers' live presence.

  11. Automatic lameness detection based on consecutive 3D-video recordings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertem, van T.; Viazzi, S.; Steensels, M.; Maltz, E.; Antler, A.; Alchanatis, V.; Schlageter-Tello, A.; Lokhorst, C.; Romanini, C.E.B.; Bahr, C.; Berckmans, D.; Halachmi, I.

    2014-01-01

    Manual locomotion scoring for lameness detection is a time-consuming and subjective procedure. Therefore, the objective of this study is to optimise the classification output of a computer vision based algorithm for automated lameness scoring. Cow gait recordings were made during four consecutive

  12. Quantitative monitoring of CO2 injection at Sleipner using seismic full waveform inversion in the time lapse mode and rock physics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queisser, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration is a technology to achieve a considerable deceleration of CO 2 emission promptly. Since 1996 one of the largest CO 2 storage projects is taking place at Sleipner in the Norwegian North Sea. In order to monitor injected CO 2 , time lapse seismic monitoring surveys have been carried out. Estimating subsurface parameters from the Sleipner seismic data is a challenging problem due to the specific geology of the storage reservoir, which is further complicated by injected CO 2 . Most seismic imaging methods enable only qualitative insights into the subsurface. Motivated by the need for a quantitative seismic monitoring of the injected CO 2 , I have applied 2D seismic full waveform inversion to seismic data sets from Sleipner from 1994 (baseline), 1999 and 2006 along three seismic lines to infer subsurface parameters and parameter changes in the storage reservoir. The P-wave velocity is the major parameter, as it is the most sensitive to CO 2 injection. An energy preconditioning of the gradient has been implemented. The usual source wavelet calibration did not prove to be reliable. An alternative source calibration has been successfully applied. By comparing seismic images with inversion results, I found that using seismic images to locate CO 2 accumulations in the subsurface may be misleading. The quantitative imaging approach using full waveform inversion resulted in a consistent evolution of the model parameter with time. Major reductions in P-wave velocity and hence the CO 2 accumulations could be quantitatively imaged down to a resolution of 10 m. Observed travel time shifts due to CO 2 injection are comparable to those derived from the inversion result. In order to estimate CO 2 saturations, rock physical concepts have been combined and extended to arrive at a rock physical formulation of the subsurface at Sleipner. I used pseudo Monte Carlo rock physics modeling to assess the influence of lithologic heterogeneity on the CO 2

  13. Simultaneous recordings of ocular microtremor and microsaccades with a piezoelectric sensor and a video-oculography system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. McCamy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Our eyes are in continuous motion. Even when we attempt to fix our gaze, we produce so called “fixational eye movements”, which include microsaccades, drift, and ocular microtremor (OMT. Microsaccades, the largest and fastest type of fixational eye movement, shift the retinal image from several dozen to several hundred photoreceptors and have equivalent physical characteristics to saccades, only on a smaller scale (Martinez-Conde, Otero-Millan & Macknik, 2013. OMT occurs simultaneously with drift and is the smallest of the fixational eye movements (∼1 photoreceptor width, >0.5 arcmin, with dominant frequencies ranging from 70 Hz to 103 Hz (Martinez-Conde, Macknik & Hubel, 2004. Due to OMT’s small amplitude and high frequency, the most accurate and stringent way to record it is the piezoelectric transduction method. Thus, OMT studies are far rarer than those focusing on microsaccades or drift. Here we conducted simultaneous recordings of OMT and microsaccades with a piezoelectric device and a commercial infrared video tracking system. We set out to determine whether OMT could help to restore perceptually faded targets during attempted fixation, and we also wondered whether the piezoelectric sensor could affect the characteristics of microsaccades. Our results showed that microsaccades, but not OMT, counteracted perceptual fading. We moreover found that the piezoelectric sensor affected microsaccades in a complex way, and that the oculomotor system adjusted to the stress brought on by the sensor by adjusting the magnitudes of microsaccades.

  14. A software oscilloscope for DOS computers with an integrated remote control for a video tape recorder. The assignment of acoustic events to behavioural observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höller, P

    1995-12-01

    With only a little knowledge of programming IBM compatible computers in Basic, it is possible to create a digital software oscilloscope with sampling rates up to 17 kHz (depending on the CPU- and bus-speed). The only additional hardware requirement is a common sound card compatible with the Soundblaster. The system presented in this paper is built to analyse the direction a flying bat is facing during sound emission. For this reason the system works with some additional hardware devices, in order to monitor video sequences at the computer screen, overlaid by an online oscillogram. Using an RS232-interface for a Panasonic video tape recorder both the oscillogram and the video tape recorder can be controlled simultaneously and moreover be analysed frame by frame. Not only acoustical events, but also APs, myograms, EEGs and other physiological data can be digitized and analysed in combination with the behavioural data of an experimental subject.

  15. Seizure semiology reflects spread from frontal to temporal lobe: evolution of hyperkinetic to automotor seizures as documented by invasive EEG video recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezer, Fadime Irsel; Agan, Kadriye; Borggraefe, Ingo; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2013-09-01

    This patient report demonstrates the importance of seizure evolution in the localising value of seizure semiology. Spread of epileptic activity from frontal to temporal lobe, as demonstrated by invasive recordings, was reflected by change from hyperkinetic movements to arrest of activity with mild oral and manual automatisms. [Published with video sequences].

  16. 'Too much, too late': mixed methods multi-channel video recording study of computerized decision support systems and GP prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, James; Thomson, Fionagh; Milne, Heather; Buckingham, Susan; Sheikh, Aziz; Fernando, Bernard; Cresswell, Kathrin; Williams, Robin; Pinnock, Hilary

    2013-06-01

    Computerized decision support systems (CDSS) are commonly deployed to support prescribing, although over-riding of alerts by prescribers remains a concern. We aimed to understand how general practitioners (GPs) interact with prescribing CDSS in order to inform deliberation on how better to support prescribing decisions in primary care. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of interactions between GPs, patients, and computer systems using multi-channel video recordings of 112 primary care consultations with eight GPs in three UK practices. 132 prescriptions were issued in the course of 73 of the consultations, of which 81 (61%) attracted at least one alert. Of the total of 117 alerts, only three resulted in the GP checking, but not altering, the prescription. CDSS provided information and safety alerts at the point of generating a prescription. This was 'too much, too late' as the majority of the 'work' of prescribing occurred prior to using the computer. By the time an alert appeared, the GP had formulated the problem(s), potentially spent several minutes considering, explaining, negotiating, and reaching agreement with the patient about the proposed treatment, and had possibly given instructions and printed an information leaflet. CDSS alerts do not coincide with the prescribing workflow throughout the whole GP consultation. Current systems interrupt to correct decisions that have already been taken, rather than assisting formulation of the management plan. CDSS are likely to be more acceptable and effective if the prescribing support is provided much earlier in the process of generating a prescription.

  17. Development of fast video recording of plasma interaction with a lithium limiter on T-11M tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarev, V.B., E-mail: v_lazarev@triniti.ru [SSC RF TRINITI Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dzhurik, A.S.; Shcherbak, A.N. [SSC RF TRINITI Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belov, A.M. [NRC “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The paper presents the results of the study of tokamak plasma interaction with lithium capillary-porous system limiters and PFC by high-speed color camera. • Registration of emission near the target in SOL in neutral lithium light and e-folding length for neutral Lithium measurements. • Registration of effect of MHD instabilities on CPS Lithium limiter. • A sequence of frames shows evolution of lithium bubble on the surface of lithium limiter. • View of filament structure near the plasma edge in ohmic mode. - Abstract: A new high-speed color camera with interference filters was installed for fast video recording of plasma-surface interaction with a Lithium limiter on the base of capillary-porous system (CPS) in T-11M tokamak vessel. The paper presents the results of the study of tokamak plasma interaction (frame exposure time up to 4 μs) with CPS Lithium limiter in a stable stationary phase, unstable regimes with internal disruption and results of processing of the image of the light emission around the probe, i.e. e-folding length for neutral Lithium penetration and e-folding length for Lithium ion flux in SOL region.

  18. Slit-lamp management in contact lenses laboratory classes: learning upgrade with monitor visualization of webcam video recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arines, Justo; Gargallo, Ana

    2014-07-01

    The training in the use of the slit lamp has always been difficult for students of the degree in Optics and Optometry. Instruments with associated cameras helps a lot in this task, they allow teachers to observe and control if the students evaluate the eye health appropriately, correct use errors and show them how to do it with a visual demonstration. However, these devices are more expensive than those that do not have an integrated camera connected to a display unit. With the aim to improve students' skills in the management of slit lamp, we have adapted USB HD webcams (Microsoft Lifecam HD-5000) to the objectives of the slit lamps available in our contact lenses laboratory room. The webcams are connected to a PC running Linux Ubuntu 11.0; therefore that is a low-cost device. Our experience shows that single method has several advantages. It allows us to take pictures with a good quality of different conditions of the eye health; we can record videos of eye evaluation and make demonstrations of the instrument. Besides it increases the interactions between students because they could see what their colleagues are doing and take conscious of the mistakes, helping and correcting each others. It is a useful tool in the practical exam too. We think that the method supports the training in optometry practice and increase the students' confidence without a huge outlay.

  19. Necessity is the mother of invention: video recording firsthand perspectives of critical medical procedures to make simulated training more effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, K Anders

    2014-01-01

    The traditional apprenticeship model for training doctors requires ample opportunities in the clinic for trainees to learn core procedures under the supervision of skilled doctors. In this issue, Kyser and colleagues document that the learning opportunities for residents to master certain core procedures, such as forceps and vacuum deliveries, are insufficient in many teaching hospitals. To address this serious problem, this author argues that learning techniques (i.e., deliberate practice and simulator use) from other domains of expertise, such as chess, music, and sports, must be adapted for use in medicine. For example, medical procedures should be videotaped and indexed for access over the Internet. Trainees then could view recordings of rare emergency procedures and complications and practice their decision-making skills. Evidence suggests that training outside the constraints of the clinic could be more effective in improving performance because trainees are able to engage in deliberate practice and focus on their individual weaknesses in executing procedures and making decisions. For example, with video and simulator training, trainees have the opportunity to repeatedly perform only the parts of a procedure that they find challenging until they have attained a level of acceptable speed and control. More generally, training could be structured around the particular needs of individual learners and scheduled when the learners are rested and able to concentrate fully on learning. Training also should include opportunities for learners to practice repeatedly with different patient descriptions requiring the same or different, yet related, procedures to teach trainees effective discrimination and execution.

  20. Different effectiveness of closed embryo culture system with time-lapse imaging (EmbryoScope(TM)) in comparison to standard manual embryology in good and poor prognosis patients: a prospectively randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan-Guang; Lazzaroni-Tealdi, Emanuela; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Lin; Barad, David H; Kushnir, Vitaly A; Darmon, Sarah K; Albertini, David F; Gleicher, Norbert

    2016-08-24

    Previously manual human embryology in many in vitro fertilization (IVF) centers is rapidly being replaced by closed embryo incubation systems with time-lapse imaging. Whether such systems perform comparably to manual embryology in different IVF patient populations has, however, never before been investigated. We, therefore, prospectively compared embryo quality following closed system culture with time-lapse photography (EmbryoScope™) and standard embryology. We performed a two-part prospectively randomized study in IVF (clinical trial # NCT92256309). Part A involved 31 infertile poor prognosis patients prospectively randomized to EmbryoScope™ and standard embryology. Part B involved embryos from 17 egg donor-recipient cycles resulting in large egg/embryo numbers, thus permitting prospectively alternative embryo assignments to EmbryoScope™ and standard embryology. We then compared pregnancy rates and embryo quality on day-3 after fertilization and embryologist time utilized per processed embryo. Part A revealed in poor prognosis patients no differences in day-3 embryo scores, implantation and clinical pregnancy rates between EmbryoScope™ and standard embryology. The EmbryoScope™, however, more than doubled embryology staff time (P embryology. Appropriately designed and powered prospectively randomized studies appear urgently needed in well-defined patient populations before the uncontrolled utilization of these instruments further expands. NCT02246309 Registered September 18, 2014.

  1. Nursing students' self-evaluation using a video recording of foley catheterization: effects on students' competence, communication skills, and learning motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Moon Sook; Yoo, Il Young; Lee, Hyejung

    2010-07-01

    An opportunity for a student to evaluate his or her own performance enhances self-awareness and promotes self-directed learning. Using three outcome measures of competency of procedure, communication skills, and learning motivation, the effects of self-evaluation using a video recording of the student's Foley catheterization was investigated in this study. The students in the experimental group (n = 20) evaluated their Foley catheterization performance by reviewing the video recordings of their own performance, whereas students in the control group (n = 20) received written evaluation guidelines only. The results showed that the students in the experimental group had better scores on competency (p motivation (p = 0.018) than the control group at the post-test, which was conducted 8 weeks after the pretest. Self-awareness of one's own performance developed by reviewing a videotape appears to increase the competency of clinical skills in nursing students. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Initial evaluation of prospective cardiac triggering using photoplethysmography signals recorded with a video camera compared to pulse oximetry and electrocardiography at 7T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicher, Nicolai; Kukuk, Markus; Maderwald, Stefan; Ladd, Mark E

    2016-11-24

    Accurate synchronization between magnetic resonance imaging data acquisition and a subject's cardiac activity ("triggering") is essential for reducing image artifacts but conventional, contact-based methods for this task are limited by several factors, including preparation time, patient inconvenience, and susceptibility to signal degradation. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the performance of a new contact-free triggering method developed with the aim to eventually replace conventional methods in non-cardiac imaging applications. In this study, the method's performance is evaluated in the context of 7 Tesla non-enhanced angiography of the lower extremities. Our main contribution is a basic algorithm capable of estimating in real-time the phase of the cardiac cycle from reflection photoplethysmography signals obtained from skin color variations of the forehead recorded with a video camera. Instead of finding the algorithm's parameters heuristically, they were optimized using videos of the forehead as well as electrocardiography and pulse oximetry signals that were recorded from eight healthy volunteers in and outside the scanner, with and without active radio frequency and gradient coils. Based on the video characteristics, synthetic signals were generated and the "best available" values of an objective function were determined using mathematical optimization. The performance of the proposed method with optimized algorithm parameters was evaluated by applying it to the recorded videos and comparing the computed triggers to those of contact-based methods. Additionally, the method was evaluated by using its triggers for acquiring images from a healthy volunteer and comparing the result to images obtained using pulse oximetry triggering. During evaluation of the videos recorded inside the bore with active radio frequency and gradient coils, the pulse oximeter triggers were labeled in 62.5% as "potentially usable" for cardiac triggering, the electrocardiography

  3. Marine snow, zooplankton and thin layers: indications of a trophic link from small-scale sampling with the Video Plankton Recorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, Klas O.; St. John, Michael; Temming, Axel

    2012-01-01

    distribution patterns of fragile marine snow aggregates and zooplankton in the Baltic Sea during late spring 2002. By using this non-invasive optical sampling technique we recorded a peak in copepod abundance (ca. 18 ind. l−1) associated with a pronounced thin layer (50 to 55 m) of marine snow (maximum...... sampling does not collect marine snow quantitatively and cannot resolve so-called thin layers in which this interaction occurs. Hence, field evidence for the importance of the marine snow−zooplankton link is scarce. Here we employed a Video Plankton Recorder (VPR) to quantify small-scale (metres) vertical...

  4. The Effect of Rubric-Guided, Focused, Personalized Coaching Sessions and Video-Recorded Presentations on Teaching Skills Among Fourth-Year Medical Students: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchekmedyian, Vatche; Shields, Helen M; Pelletier, Stephen R; Pazo, Valeria C

    2017-11-01

    As medical students become residents, teaching becomes an expected and integral responsibility. Yet, training-for-teaching opportunities are lacking. In 2014, the authors designed a pilot study using rubric-guided, focused, personalized coaching sessions and video-recorded presentations to improve student teaching skills among fourth-year students at Harvard Medical School. In 2014-2015, the authors recruited students from an elective on how to tutor preclinical students for the pilot, which consisted of four phases: a precoaching teaching presentation, a 30- to 45-minute coaching session, a postcoaching teaching presentation, and blinded reviewer ratings. Students' pre- and postcoaching presentations were video recorded. Using a scoring rubric for 15 teaching skills, students rated their pre- and postcoaching videos. Blinded reviewers also rated the pre- and postcoaching presentations using the same rubric with an additional category to gauge their overall impression. Fourteen students completed all four phases of the pilot. Students' ratings demonstrated statistically significant improvement in several teaching skills, including presentation content (P teaching skills, including opening statement and learning objectives (P teaching settings, addressing the interventions' generalizability, training coaches, and performing additional evaluations.

  5. Observing Observers: Using Video to Prompt and Record Reflections on Teachers' Pedagogies in Four Regions of Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, David A; Simmt, Elaine; Savard, Annie; Suurtamm, Christine; Manuel, Dominic; Lin, Terry Wan Jung; Quigley, Brenna; Knipping, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Regional differences in performance in mathematics across Canada prompted us to conduct a comparative study of middle-school mathematics pedagogy in four regions. We built on the work of Tobin, using a theoretical framework derived from the work of Maturana. In this paper, we describe the use of video as part of the methodology used. We used…

  6. The Effect of Theme Preference on Academic Word List Use: A Case for Smartphone Video Recording Feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromik, Nicolas A.

    2017-01-01

    Sixty-seven Japanese English as a Second Language undergraduate learners completed one smartphone video production per week for 12 weeks, based on a teacher-selected theme. Designed as a case study for this specific context, data from students' oral performances was analyzed on a weekly basis for their use of the Academic Word List (AWL). A…

  7. Design and construction of a long-term continuous video-EEG monitoring unit for simultaneous recording of multiple small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, E H; Williamson, J M; Cornett, J F; Spradlin, S; Chen, Z F

    1997-12-01

    In recent years several new rat models of human limbic/mesial temporal lobe epilepsy have been described [1,2,4-7,11,15-17]. Unlike earlier models such as kindling in which the seizures are induced by an exogenous stimulus, these new models are characterized by seizures that occur spontaneously at random intervals. Although the spontaneity of the seizures makes these models more like human epilepsy, documentation of these seizures by direct observation is highly inefficient, and sub-behavioral electrographic seizures could be missed. Continuous paper EEG and video recording have been used [5-7,15], but these techniques are resource intensive. The slow paper speed required by long-term paper recordings limits the ability to differentiate between true seizure activity and electrical artifact. Subtle behavioral seizures are likely to be missed during rapid review of video recordings alone [16]. Ambulatory cassette EEG recordings have been used [3], but the systems require expensive proprietary hardware, and the systems have limited channels for recording (8-16). To improve the utility of the models, we developed a long-term EEG/video monitoring system to detect the electrographic seizures and document their behavioral accompaniment. The system is based on commercially available components, including a computerized EEG seizure detection system that was initially developed for human seizure monitoring [8,9,13]. Seizures are reliably detected and the data are reduced so that 24 h of recording can be reviewed in 30-90 min. Although the computer program is accurate, special care must be taken in system design and construction to reduce sources of electrical artifact that can cause false detections when multiple animals are recorded simultaneously on a single EEG machine. During data review it is necessary to differentiate between electrical artifact induced by animal activity from true seizure activity by key EEG patterns. Certain seizure patterns (less than 3 hz. low

  8. First year midwifery students' experience with self-recorded and assessed video of selected midwifery practice skills at Otago Polytechnic in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Carolyn; Patterson, Jean; Miller, Suzanne

    2018-01-01

    Studying undergraduate midwifery at a distance has advantages in terms of accessibility and community support but presents challenges for practice based competence assessment. Student -recorded videos provide opportunities for completing the assigned skills, self-reflection, and assessment by a lecturer. This research asked how midwifery students experienced the process of completing the Video Assessment of Midwifery Practice Skills (VAMPS) in 2014 and 2015. The aim of the survey was to identify the benefits and challenges of the VAMPS assessment and to identify opportunities for improvement from the students' perspective. All students who had participated in the VAMPS assessment during 2014 and 2015 were invited to complete an online survey. To maintain confidentiality for the students, the Qualtrics survey was administered and the data downloaded by the Organisational Research Officer. Ethical approval was granted by the organisational ethics committee. Descriptive statistics were generated and students' comments were collated. The VAMPS provided an accessible option for the competence assessment and the opportunity for self-reflection and re-recording to perfect their skill which the students appreciated. The main challenges related to the technical aspects of recording and uploading the assessment. This study highlighted some of the benefits and challenges experienced by the midwifery students and showed that practice skills can be successfully assessed at distance. The additional benefit of accessibility afforded by video assessment is a new and unique finding for undergraduate midwifery education and may resonate with other educators seeking ways to assess similar skill sets with cohorts of students studying at distance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sleep disorders in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) recorded overnight by video-polysomnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Rosalia; Gagliano, Antonella; Aricò, Irene; Calarese, Tiziana; Cedro, Clemente; Bruni, Oliviero; Condurso, Rosaria; Germanò, Eva; Gervasi, Giuseppe; Siracusano, Rosamaria; Vita, Giuseppe; Bramanti, Placido

    2009-12-01

    To outline specific sleep disturbances in different clinical subsets of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and to confirm, by means of nocturnal video-polysomnography (video-PSG), a variety of sleep disorders in ADHD besides the classically described periodic leg movement disorder (PLMD), restless legs syndrome (RLS) and sleep related breathing disorder (SRBD). Fifty-five ADHD children (47 M, 8F; mean age=8.9 y) were included: 16 had Inattentive and 39 Hyperactive/Impulsive or Combined ADHD subtype. Behavior assessment by Conners and SNAP-IV Scales, a structured sleep interview and a nocturnal video-PSG were administered. Most children/parents reported disturbed, fragmentary sleep at night; complaints were motor restlessness (50%), sleep walking (47.6%), night terrors (38%), confusional arousals (28.5%), snoring (21.4%), and leg discomfort at night associated with RLS (11.9%). There is a significant difference (p value <0.05 or <0.001) in almost all the studied sleep variables between ADHD children and controls. International RLS Rating Scale scoring, Periodic Limb Movements during Sleep (PLMS) and Wake (PLMW) indexes, hyperactivity and opposition scores and ADHD subtype appear related. Different sleep disorders seem to address specific ADHD phenotypes and correlate with severity of symptoms as in sleep related movement disorders occurring in Hyperactive/Impulsive and Combined ADHD subtypes. Besides, an abnormality of the arousal process in slow wave sleep with consequent abnormal prevalence of disorders of arousal possibly enhanced by SRBD has also been detected in 52% of our sample. This study underlines the opportunity to propose and promote the inclusion of sleep studies, possibly by video-PSG, as part of the diagnostic screening for ADHD. This strategy could address the diagnosis and treatment of different specific ADHD phenotypic expressions that might be relevant to children's symptoms and contribute to ADHD severity.

  10. An educational activity for upgrading of the teaching abilities that used self-evaluation of recorded video for one’s own micro teaching

    OpenAIRE

    太田, 伸幸; 児嶋, 文寿

    2007-01-01

    In this study, it was distributed that recorded video for one’s own micro teaching in teaching methods of education Ⅱ on the moment. It was examined that effects of upgrading of the teaching abilities particularly ability for self-modeling and for evaluation by a class of oneself looking back on contents of a description of a report made from self-evaluation prior to, just after and after micro teaching, class evaluation from the undergraduates who became students role. In a self-evaluation r...

  11. Video Golf

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    George Nauck of ENCORE!!! invented and markets the Advanced Range Performance (ARPM) Video Golf System for measuring the result of a golf swing. After Nauck requested their assistance, Marshall Space Flight Center scientists suggested video and image processing/computing technology, and provided leads on commercial companies that dealt with the pertinent technologies. Nauck contracted with Applied Research Inc. to develop a prototype. The system employs an elevated camera, which sits behind the tee and follows the flight of the ball down range, catching the point of impact and subsequent roll. Instant replay of the video on a PC monitor at the tee allows measurement of the carry and roll. The unit measures distance and deviation from the target line, as well as distance from the target when one is selected. The information serves as an immediate basis for making adjustments or as a record of skill level progress for golfers.

  12. Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics beneath Seafloor Mounds. Integrating Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Methods and In Situ Observations of Multiple Oceanographic Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutken, Carol [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Macelloni, Leonardo [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); D' Emidio, Marco [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Dunbar, John [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Higley, Paul [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This study was designed to investigate temporal variations in hydrate system dynamics by measuring changes in volumes of hydrate beneath hydrate-bearing mounds on the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico, the landward extreme of hydrate occurrence in this region. Direct Current Resistivity (DCR) measurements were made contemporaneously with measurements of oceanographic parameters at Woolsey Mound, a carbonate-hydrate complex on the mid-continental slope, where formation and dissociation of hydrates are most vulnerable to variations in oceanographic parameters affected by climate change, and where changes in hydrate stability can readily translate to loss of seafloor stability, impacts to benthic ecosystems, and venting of greenhouse gases to the water-column, and eventually, the atmosphere. We focused our study on hydrate within seafloor mounds because the structurally-focused methane flux at these sites likely causes hydrate formation and dissociation processes to occur at higher rates than at sites where the methane flux is less concentrated and we wanted to maximize our chances of witnessing association/dissociation of hydrates. We selected a particularly well-studied hydrate-bearing seafloor mound near the landward extent of the hydrate stability zone, Woolsey Mound (MC118). This mid-slope site has been studied extensively and the project was able to leverage considerable resources from the team’s research experience at MC118. The site exhibits seafloor features associated with gas expulsion, hydrates have been documented at the seafloor, and changes in the outcropping hydrates have been documented, photographically, to have occurred over a period of months. We conducted observatory-based, in situ measurements to 1) characterize, geophysically, the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate and its temporal variability, and 2) contemporaneously record relevant environmental parameters (temperature, pressure, salinity, turbidity, bottom currents) to

  13. A Physical Activity Reference Data-Set Recorded from Older Adults Using Body-Worn Inertial Sensors and Video Technology—The ADAPT Study Data-Set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Kevin Bourke

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity monitoring algorithms are often developed using conditions that do not represent real-life activities, not developed using the target population, or not labelled to a high enough resolution to capture the true detail of human movement. We have designed a semi-structured supervised laboratory-based activity protocol and an unsupervised free-living activity protocol and recorded 20 older adults performing both protocols while wearing up to 12 body-worn sensors. Subjects’ movements were recorded using synchronised cameras (≥25 fps, both deployed in a laboratory environment to capture the in-lab portion of the protocol and a body-worn camera for out-of-lab activities. Video labelling of the subjects’ movements was performed by five raters using 11 different category labels. The overall level of agreement was high (percentage of agreement >90.05%, and Cohen’s Kappa, corrected kappa, Krippendorff’s alpha and Fleiss’ kappa >0.86. A total of 43.92 h of activities were recorded, including 9.52 h of in-lab and 34.41 h of out-of-lab activities. A total of 88.37% and 152.01% of planned transitions were recorded during the in-lab and out-of-lab scenarios, respectively. This study has produced the most detailed dataset to date of inertial sensor data, synchronised with high frame-rate (≥25 fps video labelled data recorded in a free-living environment from older adults living independently. This dataset is suitable for validation of existing activity classification systems and development of new activity classification algorithms.

  14. [Evaluation of Japanese school lunch cooks' work by foreign researchers: an attempt to promote an effective discussion by presenting a video tape record].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, M

    1999-05-01

    The aim of this study was to collect and examine foreign researchers' evaluations of Japanese school lunch cooks' workload, risk of musculoskeletal disorders, and some related issues by means of video tape discussion method at international conferences. The author reported work-related musculoskeletal disorders of Japanese school lunch cooks' at three international conferences. Together with the presentation a video tape recorded at one school kitchen during working hours was shown and the participants at the conferences were asked to evaluate the workload and risks of the Japanese school lunch cooks in the form of a questionnaire. Out of 151 participants from 21 countries at three conferences, 86 participants from 18 countries answered the questionnaire. The median of the values for Japanese school cooks' workload, derived by the Visual Analogue Scale method ranging from 0 (easy) to 10 (severe), was 8.5. Concerning the possibility of occurrence of musculoskeletal problems, 83% of the respondents pointed out that the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders was certain, and 17% of them estimated that it was probable. Out of 18 countries from which participants came from, 12 countries were serving meals at school, and school lunch cooks in these 12 countries had similar occupational problems to those in Japan, such as musculoskeletal disorders, skin disorders and injuries, etc. The participants also pointed out that Japanese school lunch cooks were exposed to various problems, i.e., excessive workloads for women, and too few replacements of manual work by machinery. On the other hand, the cleanliness of the school kitchen, quality of meals, and conscientious cooking work were evaluated as very high. There were 36 researchers who asked for a copy of the video tape in order to use it in the education of industrial health personnel, medical students, and so on. These results showed the same tendency as Japanese researchers have found over the past 16 years. The video

  15. Does sharing the electronic health record in the consultation enhance patient involvement? A mixed-methods study using multichannel video recording and in-depth interviews in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Heather; Huby, Guro; Buckingham, Susan; Hayward, James; Sheikh, Aziz; Cresswell, Kathrin; Pinnock, Hilary

    2016-06-01

    Sharing the electronic health-care record (EHR) during consultations has the potential to facilitate patient involvement in their health care, but research about this practice is limited. We used multichannel video recordings to identify examples and examine the practice of screen-sharing within 114 primary care consultations. A subset of 16 consultations was viewed by the general practitioner and/or patient in 26 reflexive interviews. Screen-sharing emerged as a significant theme and was explored further in seven additional patient interviews. Final analysis involved refining themes from interviews and observation of videos to understand how screen-sharing occurred, and its significance to patients and professionals. Eighteen (16%) of 114 videoed consultations involved instances of screen-sharing. Screen-sharing occurred in six of the subset of 16 consultations with interviews and was a significant theme in 19 of 26 interviews. The screen was shared in three ways: 'convincing' the patient of a diagnosis or treatment; 'translating' between medical and lay understandings of disease/medication; and by patients 'verifying' the accuracy of the EHR. However, patients and most GPs perceived the screen as the doctor's domain, not to be routinely viewed by the patient. Screen-sharing can facilitate patient involvement in the consultation, depending on the way in which sharing comes about, but the perception that the record belongs to the doctor is a barrier. To exploit the potential of sharing the screen to promote patient involvement, there is a need to reconceptualise and redesign the EHR. © 2014 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A Peer-Reviewed Instructional Video is as Effective as a Standard Recorded Didactic Lecture in Medical Trainees Performing Chest Tube Insertion: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saun, Tomas J; Odorizzi, Scott; Yeung, Celine; Johnson, Marjorie; Bandiera, Glen; Dev, Shelly P

    Online medical education resources are becoming an increasingly used modality and many studies have demonstrated their efficacy in procedural instruction. This study sought to determine whether a standardized online procedural video is as effective as a standard recorded didactic teaching session for chest tube insertion. A randomized control trial was conducted. Participants were taught how to insert a chest tube with either a recorded didactic teaching session, or a New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) video. Participants filled out a questionnaire before and after performing the procedure on a cadaver, which was filmed and assessed by 2 blinded evaluators using a standardized tool. Western University, London, Ontario. Level of clinical care: institutional. A total of 30 fourth-year medical students from 2 graduating classes at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry were screened for eligibility. Two students did not complete the study and were excluded. There were 13 students in the NEJM group, and 15 students in the didactic group. The NEJM group׳s average score was 45.2% (±9.56) on the prequestionnaire, 67.7% (±12.9) for the procedure, and 60.1% (±7.65) on the postquestionnaire. The didactic group׳s average score was 42.8% (±10.9) on the prequestionnaire, 73.7% (±9.90) for the procedure, and 46.5% (±7.46) on the postquestionnaire. There was no difference between the groups on the prequestionnaire (Δ + 2.4%; 95% CI: -5.16 to 9.99), or the procedure (Δ -6.0%; 95% CI: -14.6 to 2.65). The NEJM group had better scores on the postquestionnaire (Δ + 11.15%; 95% CI: 3.74-18.6). The NEJM video was as effective as video-recorded didactic training for teaching the knowledge and technical skills essential for chest tube insertion. Participants expressed high satisfaction with this modality. It may prove to be a helpful adjunct to standard instruction on the topic. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc

  17. Pollen Bearing Honey Bee Detection in Hive Entrance Video Recorded by Remote Embedded System for Pollination Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babic, Z.; Pilipovic, R.; Risojevic, V.; Mirjanic, G.

    2016-06-01

    Honey bees have crucial role in pollination across the world. This paper presents a simple, non-invasive, system for pollen bearing honey bee detection in surveillance video obtained at the entrance of a hive. The proposed system can be used as a part of a more complex system for tracking and counting of honey bees with remote pollination monitoring as a final goal. The proposed method is executed in real time on embedded systems co-located with a hive. Background subtraction, color segmentation and morphology methods are used for segmentation of honey bees. Classification in two classes, pollen bearing honey bees and honey bees that do not have pollen load, is performed using nearest mean classifier, with a simple descriptor consisting of color variance and eccentricity features. On in-house data set we achieved correct classification rate of 88.7% with 50 training images per class. We show that the obtained classification results are not far behind from the results of state-of-the-art image classification methods. That favors the proposed method, particularly having in mind that real time video transmission to remote high performance computing workstation is still an issue, and transfer of obtained parameters of pollination process is much easier.

  18. Comparative effects of 60Co γ-rays and neon and helium ions on cycle duration and division probability of EMT 6 cells. A time-lapse cinematography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collyn-d'Hooghe, M.; Hemon, D.; Gilet, R.

    1981-01-01

    Exponentially growing cultures of EMT 6 cells were irradiated in vitro with neon ions, helium ions or 60 Co γ-rays. Time-lapse cinematography allowed the determination, for individual cells, of cycle duration, success of the mitotic division and the age of the cell at the moment of irradiation. Irradiation induced a significant mitotic delay increasing proportionally with the delivered dose. Using mitotic delay as an endpoint, the r.b.e. for neon ions with respect to 60 Co γ-rays was 3.3 +- 0.2 while for helium ions it was 1.2 +- 0.1. Mitotic delay was greatest in those cells that had progressed furthest in their cycle at the time of irradiation. No significant mitotic delay was observed in the post-irradiation generation. Division probability was significantly reduced by irradiation both in the irradiated and in the post-irradiated generation. The reduction in division probability obtained with 3 Gy of neon ions was similar to that obtained after irradiation with 6 Gy of helium ions or 60 Co γ-rays. (author)

  19. Comparative effects of 60Co gamma-rays and neon and helium ions on cycle duration and division probability of EMT 6 cells. A time-lapse cinematography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collyn-d'Hooghe, M; Hemon, D; Gilet, R; Curtis, S B; Valleron, A J; Malaise, E P

    1981-03-01

    Exponentially growing cultures of EMT 6 cells were irradiated in vitro with neon ions, helium ions or 60Co gamma-rays. Time-lapse cinematography allowed the determination, for individual cells, of cycle duration, success of the mitotic division and the age of the cell at the moment of irradiation. Irradiation induced a significant mitotic delay increasing proportionally with the delivered dose. Using mitotic delay as an endpoint, the r.b.e. for neon ions with respect to 60Co gamma-rays was 3.3 +/- 0.2 while for helium ions it was 1.2 +/- 0.1. Mitotic delay was greatest in those cells that had progressed furthest in their cycle at the time of irradiation. No significant mitotic delay was observed in the post-irradiation generation. Division probability was significantly reduced by irradiation both in the irradiated and in the post-irradiated generation. The reduction in division probability obtained with 3 Gy of neon ions was similar to that obtained after irradiation with 6 Gy of helium ions or 60Co gamma-rays.

  20. Video library for video imaging detection at intersection stop lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this activity was to record video that could be used for controlled : evaluation of video image vehicle detection system (VIVDS) products and software upgrades to : existing products based on a list of conditions that might be diffic...

  1. Effect of treadmill training based real-world video recording on balance and gait in chronic stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ki Hun; Lee, Wan Hee

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of treadmill training based real-world video recording (TRWVR) for balance and gait ability in chronic stroke patients. Thirty chronic stroke patients were randomly assigned to either the TRWVR group (n=15) or the control group (n=15). Both groups participated in a standard rehabilitation program; in addition, the TRWVR group participated in TRWVR for 30 min per day, three times per week, for 6 weeks, and the control group participated in treadmill walking training for 30 min per day, three times per week, for 6 weeks. Balance ability was measured using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go test (TUG) and the postural sway by force platform system. Gait performance was measured using a pressure sensitive walkway. Significant differences in the time factor for dynamic balance and gait (Pgait (Pgait in chronic stroke patients when added to treadmill walking. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Inter- and intra-specific diurnal habitat selection of zooplankton during the spring bloom observed by Video Plankton Recorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sainmont, Julie; Gislason, Astthor; Heuschele, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Recorder (VPR), a tool that allows mapping of vertical zooplankton distributions with a far greater spatial resolution than conventional zooplankton nets. The study took place over a full day–night cycle in Disko Bay, Greenland, during the peak of the phytoplankton spring bloom. The sampling revealed...... a large abundance of copepods performing DVM (up during night and down during day). Migration behavior was expressed differently among the abundant groups with either a strong DVM (euphausiids), an absence of DVM (i.e., permanently deep; ostracods) or a marked DVM, driven by strong surface avoidance...

  3. Video Bioinformatics Analysis of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Colony Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sabrina; Fonteno, Shawn; Satish, Shruthi; Bhanu, Bir; Talbot, Prue

    2010-01-01

    Because video data are complex and are comprised of many images, mining information from video material is difficult to do without the aid of computer software. Video bioinformatics is a powerful quantitative approach for extracting spatio-temporal data from video images using computer software to perform dating mining and analysis. In this article, we introduce a video bioinformatics method for quantifying the growth of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) by analyzing time-lapse videos collected in a Nikon BioStation CT incubator equipped with a camera for video imaging. In our experiments, hESC colonies that were attached to Matrigel were filmed for 48 hours in the BioStation CT. To determine the rate of growth of these colonies, recipes were developed using CL-Quant software which enables users to extract various types of data from video images. To accurately evaluate colony growth, three recipes were created. The first segmented the image into the colony and background, the second enhanced the image to define colonies throughout the video sequence accurately, and the third measured the number of pixels in the colony over time. The three recipes were run in sequence on video data collected in a BioStation CT to analyze the rate of growth of individual hESC colonies over 48 hours. To verify the truthfulness of the CL-Quant recipes, the same data were analyzed manually using Adobe Photoshop software. When the data obtained using the CL-Quant recipes and Photoshop were compared, results were virtually identical, indicating the CL-Quant recipes were truthful. The method described here could be applied to any video data to measure growth rates of hESC or other cells that grow in colonies. In addition, other video bioinformatics recipes can be developed in the future for other cell processes such as migration, apoptosis, and cell adhesion. PMID:20495527

  4. Sound for digital video

    CERN Document Server

    Holman, Tomlinson

    2013-01-01

    Achieve professional quality sound on a limited budget! Harness all new, Hollywood style audio techniques to bring your independent film and video productions to the next level.In Sound for Digital Video, Second Edition industry experts Tomlinson Holman and Arthur Baum give you the tools and knowledge to apply recent advances in audio capture, video recording, editing workflow, and mixing to your own film or video with stunning results. This fresh edition is chockfull of techniques, tricks, and workflow secrets that you can apply to your own projects from preproduction

  5. Annual National Vocational-Technical Teacher Education Seminar Proceedings: Micro-Teaching and Video Recording (3rd, Miami Beach, Fla., Oct. 20-23, 1969. Final Report. Leadership Series No. 25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotrell, Calvin J., Ed.; Bice, Gary R., Ed.

    This second of two volumes resulting from a seminar attended by 232 vocational-technical leaders from 34 states and the District of Columbia, covers the general sessions and the sub-seminar on micro-teaching and video recording. General session presentations on teacher education by Martin W. Essex, Virgil S. Lagomarceno, and William G. Loomis are…

  6. Ladder beam and camera video recording system for evaluating forelimb and hindlimb deficits after sensorimotor cortex injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soblosky, J S; Colgin, L L; Chorney-Lane, D; Davidson, J F; Carey, M E

    1997-12-30

    Hindlimb and forelimb deficits in rats caused by sensorimotor cortex lesions are frequently tested by using the narrow flat beam (hindlimb), the narrow pegged beam (hindlimb and forelimb) or the grid-walking (forelimb) tests. Although these are excellent tests, the narrow flat beam generates non-parametric data so that using more powerful parametric statistical analyses are prohibited. All these tests can be difficult to score if the rat is moving rapidly. Foot misplacements, especially on the grid-walking test, are indicative of an ongoing deficit, but have not been reliably and accurately described and quantified previously. In this paper we present an easy to construct and use horizontal ladder-beam with a camera system on rails which can be used to evaluate both hindlimb and forelimb deficits in a single test. By slow motion videotape playback we were able to quantify and demonstrate foot misplacements which go beyond the recovery period usually seen using more conventional measures (i.e. footslips and footfaults). This convenient system provides a rapid and reliable method for recording and evaluating rat performance on any type of beam and may be useful for measuring sensorimotor recovery following brain injury.

  7. Classifying the Infrasonic Fingerprints of a Dynamic Volcanic System: A Quantitative Comparison of Optical and Infrasound Records at Villarrica Volcano, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A. J. C.; Palma, J.; Keller, W.; Johnson, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    On March 3, 2015 Villarrica Volcano underwent an abrupt change in volcanic behavior that culminated in a large fire fountaining event lasting 30 minutes that prompted the evacuation of residents within 9 km from the vent. This paroxysm was the first in 30 years and changed summit morphology by temporarily capping the previously stable lava lake with volcanic material. After March 3, Villarrica exhibited a period of quiescence before reactivating with various levels of ash venting associated with strombolian style activity. Ten infrasound arrays, each comprising three pressure transducers, were deployed in January and February that recorded until mid June and serendipitously chronicled the awakening, paroxysm, and recovery to a more open vent system typical to Villarrica. Coincidentally, several optical datasets were gathered. Time lapse photography, provided by Proyecto Observacion Villarrica Internet (POVI), recorded vent activity at an interval of ~15 seconds with a 240 mm zoom lens at 16 km from the vent, starting December 2014 until March 12, 2015. Additionally, video footage of the vent was recorded at 30 frames per second (fps) with a 50 mm lensed surveillance camera between March 4 and June of 2015 at a distance of 16 km from the vent. The combined infrasound and image processing approach offers novel insight into the various acoustic signatures of a dynamic and violent volcanic system. Video parameters, including plume color, ascent rate, and duration of venting are synthesized as time series. These video metrics of vent activity are then quantitatively compared to the corresponding infrasound waveform. The result is the classification of several different infrasound modes of activity during the diverse eruptive sequence of Villarrica between January and June of 2015.

  8. Talking Video in 'Everyday Life'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlvenny, Paul

    /video monitors and displays or edited video footage. The main uses of video in these programmes can be categorised into the following: (a) live video monitoring/surveillance and commentary; (b) live video relay and instructional feedback from one space to another; and (c) video prompted recall. Examples from......’re Killing the Kids, and Driving Mum and Dad Mad all use video as a prominent element of not only the audiovisual spectacle of reality television but also the interactional therapy, counselling, coaching and/or instruction intrinsic to these programmes. Thus, talk-on-video is used to intervene...... observation and instruction (directives) relayed across different spaces; 2) the use of recorded video by participants to visualise, spatialise and localise talk and action that is distant in time and/or space; 3) the translating, stretching and cutting of social experience in and through the situated use...

  9. Dashboard Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleue, Alan D.; Depcik, Chris; Peltier, Ted

    2012-01-01

    Last school year, I had a web link emailed to me entitled "A Dashboard Physics Lesson." The link, created and posted by Dale Basier on his "Lab Out Loud" blog, illustrates video of a car's speedometer synchronized with video of the road. These two separate video streams are compiled into one video that students can watch and analyze. After seeing…

  10. Video microblogging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornoe, Nis; Barkhuus, Louise

    2010-01-01

    Microblogging is a recently popular phenomenon and with the increasing trend for video cameras to be built into mobile phones, a new type of microblogging has entered the arena of electronic communication: video microblogging. In this study we examine video microblogging, which is the broadcasting...... of short videos. A series of semi-structured interviews offers an understanding of why and how video microblogging is used and what the users post and broadcast....

  11. Video demystified

    CERN Document Server

    Jack, Keith

    2004-01-01

    This international bestseller and essential reference is the "bible" for digital video engineers and programmers worldwide. This is by far the most informative analog and digital video reference available, includes the hottest new trends and cutting-edge developments in the field. Video Demystified, Fourth Edition is a "one stop" reference guide for the various digital video technologies. The fourth edition is completely updated with all new chapters on MPEG-4, H.264, SDTV/HDTV, ATSC/DVB, and Streaming Video (Video over DSL, Ethernet, etc.), as well as discussions of the latest standards throughout. The accompanying CD-ROM is updated to include a unique set of video test files in the newest formats. *This essential reference is the "bible" for digital video engineers and programmers worldwide *Contains all new chapters on MPEG-4, H.264, SDTV/HDTV, ATSC/DVB, and Streaming Video *Completely revised with all the latest and most up-to-date industry standards.

  12. Collaborative Video Sketching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Birgitte; Gundersen, Peter Bukovica; Hautopp, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces to what we define as a collaborative video sketching process. This process links various sketching techniques with digital storytelling approaches and creative reflection processes in video productions. Traditionally, sketching has been used by designers across various...... findings: 1) They are based on a collaborative approach. 2) The sketches act as a mean to externalizing hypotheses and assumptions among the participants. Based on our analysis we present an overview of factors involved in collaborative video sketching and shows how the factors relate to steps, where...... the participants: shape, record, review and edit their work, leading the participants to new insights about their work....

  13. Collaborative Video Sketching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundersen, Peter; Ørngreen, Rikke; Hautopp, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces to what we define as a collaborative video sketching process. This process links various sketching techniques with digital storytelling approaches and creative reflection processes in video productions. The empirical data is based on workshop sessions with researchers...... common features are important findings: 1) They are based on a collaborative approach. 2) The sketches act as a mean to externalizing hypotheses and assumptions among the participants. Based on our analysis we present an overview of factors involved in collaborative video sketching and shows how...... the factors relate to steps, where the participants: shape, record, review and edit their work, leading the participants to new insights about their work...

  14. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Volume 419. Antineoplastic, Immunogenic and Other Effects of the Tetrapeptide Tuftsin: A Natural Macrophage Activator Held at New York on 16-17 February 1983,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-30

    induced periestical osteogenesis in mice. Calcif. Tissue int. 33:135-142. 12. PHILIPS, J. M., G. F. BABCOCK & K. NISHIOKA. 1981. Tuftsin: A naturally...recorded on a Panasonic time-lapse video tape recorder (NV-8030) and displayed on a Panasonic TV monitor (NV-5300), from which polaroid photographs...time-lapse video tape recorder (NV-8030) and displayed on a Panasonic TV monitor (WV-5300), from S which polaroid photographs were taken.’ Lenses

  15. Medical video server construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dańda, Jacek; Juszkiewicz, Krzysztof; Leszczuk, Mikołaj; Loziak, Krzysztof; Papir, Zdzisław; Sikora, Marek; Watza, Rafal

    2003-01-01

    The paper discusses two implementation options for a Digital Video Library, a repository used for archiving, accessing, and browsing of video medical records. Two crucial issues to be decided on are a video compression format and a video streaming platform. The paper presents numerous decision factors that have to be taken into account. The compression formats being compared are DICOM as a format representative for medical applications, both MPEGs, and several new formats targeted for an IP networking. The comparison includes transmission rates supported, compression rates, and at least options for controlling a compression process. The second part of the paper presents the ISDN technique as a solution for provisioning of tele-consultation services between medical parties that are accessing resources uploaded to a digital video library. There are several backbone techniques (like corporate LANs/WANs, leased lines or even radio/satellite links) available, however, the availability of network resources for hospitals was the prevailing choice criterion pointing to ISDN solutions. Another way to provide access to the Digital Video Library is based on radio frequency domain solutions. The paper describes possibilities of both, wireless and cellular network's data transmission service to be used as a medical video server transport layer. For the cellular net-work based solution two communication techniques are used: Circuit Switched Data and Packet Switched Data.

  16. Making Sense of Video Analytics: Lessons Learned from Clickstream Interactions, Attitudes, and Learning Outcome in a Video-Assisted Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakos, Michail N.; Chorianopoulos, Konstantinos; Chrisochoides, Nikos

    2015-01-01

    Online video lectures have been considered an instructional media for various pedagogic approaches, such as the flipped classroom and open online courses. In comparison to other instructional media, online video affords the opportunity for recording student clickstream patterns within a video lecture. Video analytics within lecture videos may…

  17. Analyzing crime scene videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Cindy C.; Peloquin, Tracy D.

    1999-02-01

    Since late 1996 the Forensic Identification Services Section of the Ontario Provincial Police has been actively involved in state-of-the-art image capture and the processing of video images extracted from crime scene videos. The benefits and problems of this technology for video analysis are discussed. All analysis is being conducted on SUN Microsystems UNIX computers, networked to a digital disk recorder that is used for video capture. The primary advantage of this system over traditional frame grabber technology is reviewed. Examples from actual cases are presented and the successes and limitations of this approach are explored. Suggestions to companies implementing security technology plans for various organizations (banks, stores, restaurants, etc.) will be made. Future directions for this work and new technologies are also discussed.

  18. Immersive video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moezzi, Saied; Katkere, Arun L.; Jain, Ramesh C.

    1996-03-01

    Interactive video and television viewers should have the power to control their viewing position. To make this a reality, we introduce the concept of Immersive Video, which employs computer vision and computer graphics technologies to provide remote users a sense of complete immersion when viewing an event. Immersive Video uses multiple videos of an event, captured from different perspectives, to generate a full 3D digital video of that event. That is accomplished by assimilating important information from each video stream into a comprehensive, dynamic, 3D model of the environment. Using this 3D digital video, interactive viewers can then move around the remote environment and observe the events taking place from any desired perspective. Our Immersive Video System currently provides interactive viewing and `walkthrus' of staged karate demonstrations, basketball games, dance performances, and typical campus scenes. In its full realization, Immersive Video will be a paradigm shift in visual communication which will revolutionize television and video media, and become an integral part of future telepresence and virtual reality systems.

  19. Video Surveillance: Privacy Issues and Legal Compliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood Rajpoot, Qasim; Jensen, Christian D.

    2015-01-01

    Pervasive usage of video surveillance is rapidly increasing in developed countries. Continuous security threats to public safety demand use of such systems. Contemporary video surveillance systems offer advanced functionalities which threaten the privacy of those recorded in the video. There is a......Pervasive usage of video surveillance is rapidly increasing in developed countries. Continuous security threats to public safety demand use of such systems. Contemporary video surveillance systems offer advanced functionalities which threaten the privacy of those recorded in the video....... There is a need to balance the usage of video surveillance against its negative impact on privacy. This chapter aims to highlight the privacy issues in video surveillance and provides a model to help identify the privacy requirements in a video surveillance system. The authors make a step in the direction...

  20. Feedback on video recorded consultations in medical teaching: why students loathe and love it – a focus-group based qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baerheim Anders

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Feedback on videotaped consultations is a useful way to enhance consultation skills among medical students. The method is becoming increasingly common, but is still not widely implemented in medical education. One obstacle might be that many students seem to consider this educational approach a stressful experience and are reluctant to participate. In order to improve the process and make it more acceptable to the participants, we wanted to identify possible problems experienced by students when making and receiving feedback on their video taped consultations. Methods Nineteen of 75 students at the University of Bergen, Norway, participating in a consultation course in their final term of medical school underwent focus group interviews immediately following a video-based feedback session. The material was audio-taped, transcribed, and analysed by phenomenological qualitative analysis. Results The study uncovered that some students experienced emotional distress before the start of the course. They were apprehensive and lacking in confidence, expressing fear about exposing lack of skills and competence in front of each other. The video evaluation session and feedback process were evaluated positively however, and they found that their worries had been exaggerated. The video evaluation process also seemed to help strengthen the students' self esteem and self-confidence, and they welcomed this. Conclusion Our study provides insight regarding the vulnerability of students receiving feedback from videotaped consultations and their need for reassurance and support in the process, and demonstrates the importance of carefully considering the design and execution of such educational programs.

  1. Dashboard Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleue, Alan D.; Depcik, Chris; Peltier, Ted

    2012-11-01

    Last school year, I had a web link emailed to me entitled "A Dashboard Physics Lesson." The link, created and posted by Dale Basier on his Lab Out Loud blog, illustrates video of a car's speedometer synchronized with video of the road. These two separate video streams are compiled into one video that students can watch and analyze. After seeing this website and video, I decided to create my own dashboard videos to show to my high school physics students. I have produced and synchronized 12 separate dashboard videos, each about 10 minutes in length, driving around the city of Lawrence, KS, and Douglas County, and posted them to a website.2 Each video reflects different types of driving: both positive and negative accelerations and constant speeds. As shown in Fig. 1, I was able to capture speed, distance, and miles per gallon from my dashboard instrumentation. By linking this with a stopwatch, each of these quantities can be graphed with respect to time. I anticipate and hope that teachers will find these useful in their own classrooms, i.e., having physics students watch the videos and create their own motion maps (distance-time, speed-time) for study.

  2. Video games

    OpenAIRE

    Kolář, Vojtěch

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is based on a detailed analysis of various topics related to the question of whether video games can be art. In the first place it analyzes the current academic discussion on this subject and confronts different opinions of both supporters and objectors of the idea, that video games can be a full-fledged art form. The second point of this paper is to analyze the properties, that are inherent to video games, in order to find the reason, why cultural elite considers video games as i...

  3. Feasibility study of utilizing ultraportable projectors for endoscopic video display (with videos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shou-Jiang; Fehring, Amanda; Mclemore, Mac; Griswold, Michael; Wang, Wanmei; Paine, Elizabeth R; Wu, Ruonan; To, Filip

    2014-10-01

    Modern endoscopy requires video display. Recent miniaturized, ultraportable projectors are affordable, durable, and offer quality image display. Explore feasibility of using ultraportable projectors in endoscopy. Prospective bench-top comparison; clinical feasibility study. Masked comparison study of images displayed via 2 Samsung ultraportable light-emitting diode projectors (pocket-sized SP-HO3; pico projector SP-P410M) and 1 Microvision Showwx-II Laser pico projector. BENCH-TOP FEASIBILITY STUDY: Prerecorded endoscopic video was streamed via computer. CLINICAL COMPARISON STUDY: Live high-definition endoscopy video was simultaneously displayed through each processor onto a standard liquid crystal display monitor and projected onto a portable, pull-down projection screen. Endoscopists, endoscopy nurses, and technicians rated video images; ratings were analyzed by linear mixed-effects regression models with random intercepts. All projectors were easy to set up, adjust, focus, and operate, with no real-time lapse for any. Bench-top study outcomes: Samsung pico preferred to Laser pico, overall rating 1.5 units higher (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.7-2.4), P < .001; Samsung pocket preferred to Laser pico, 3.3 units higher (95% CI = 2.4-4.1), P < .001; Samsung pocket preferred to Samsung pico, 1.7 units higher (95% CI = 0.9-2.5), P < .001. The clinical comparison study confirmed the Samsung pocket projector as best, with a higher overall rating of 2.3 units (95% CI = 1.6-3.0), P < .001, than Samsung pico. Low brightness currently limits pico projector use in clinical endoscopy. The pocket projector, with higher brightness levels (170 lumens), is clinically useful. Continued improvements to ultraportable projectors will supply a needed niche in endoscopy through portability, reduced cost, and equal or better image quality. © The Author(s) 2013.

  4. Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Electronic Health Records KidsHealth / For Teens / Electronic Health Records ...

  5. Deep video deblurring

    KAUST Repository

    Su, Shuochen

    2016-11-25

    Motion blur from camera shake is a major problem in videos captured by hand-held devices. Unlike single-image deblurring, video-based approaches can take advantage of the abundant information that exists across neighboring frames. As a result the best performing methods rely on aligning nearby frames. However, aligning images is a computationally expensive and fragile procedure, and methods that aggregate information must therefore be able to identify which regions have been accurately aligned and which have not, a task which requires high level scene understanding. In this work, we introduce a deep learning solution to video deblurring, where a CNN is trained end-to-end to learn how to accumulate information across frames. To train this network, we collected a dataset of real videos recorded with a high framerate camera, which we use to generate synthetic motion blur for supervision. We show that the features learned from this dataset extend to deblurring motion blur that arises due to camera shake in a wide range of videos, and compare the quality of results to a number of other baselines.

  6. Headlines: Planet Earth: Improving Climate Literacy with Short Format News Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, L. F.; Kulikov, A.; Jackson, R.

    2012-12-01

    One of the challenges of communicating climate science is the sense that climate change is remote and unconnected to daily life--something that's happening to someone else or in the future. To help face this challenge, NASA's Global Climate Change website http://climate.nasa.gov has launched a new video series, "Headlines: Planet Earth," which focuses on current climate news events. This rapid-response video series uses 3D video visualization technology combined with real-time satellite data and images, to throw a spotlight on real-world events.. The "Headlines: Planet Earth" news video products will be deployed frequently, ensuring timeliness. NASA's Global Climate Change Website makes extensive use of interactive media, immersive visualizations, ground-based and remote images, narrated and time-lapse videos, time-series animations, and real-time scientific data, plus maps and user-friendly graphics that make the scientific content both accessible and engaging to the public. The site has also won two consecutive Webby Awards for Best Science Website. Connecting climate science to current real-world events will contribute to improving climate literacy by making climate science relevant to everyday life.

  7. SnapVideo: Personalized Video Generation for a Sightseeing Trip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luming; Jing, Peiguang; Su, Yuting; Zhang, Chao; Shaoz, Ling

    2017-11-01

    Leisure tourism is an indispensable activity in urban people's life. Due to the popularity of intelligent mobile devices, a large number of photos and videos are recorded during a trip. Therefore, the ability to vividly and interestingly display these media data is a useful technique. In this paper, we propose SnapVideo, a new method that intelligently converts a personal album describing of a trip into a comprehensive, aesthetically pleasing, and coherent video clip. The proposed framework contains three main components. The scenic spot identification model first personalizes the video clips based on multiple prespecified audience classes. We then search for some auxiliary related videos from YouTube 1 according to the selected photos. To comprehensively describe a scenery, the view generation module clusters the crawled video frames into a number of views. Finally, a probabilistic model is developed to fit the frames from multiple views into an aesthetically pleasing and coherent video clip, which optimally captures the semantics of a sightseeing trip. Extensive user studies demonstrated the competitiveness of our method from an aesthetic point of view. Moreover, quantitative analysis reflects that semantically important spots are well preserved in the final video clip. 1 https://www.youtube.com/.

  8. Video Analytics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Distante, Cosimo; Hua, Gang

    2017-01-01

    This book collects the papers presented at two workshops during the 23rd International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR): the Third Workshop on Video Analytics for Audience Measurement (VAAM) and the Second International Workshop on Face and Facial Expression Recognition (FFER) from Real...... World Videos. The workshops were run on December 4, 2016, in Cancun in Mexico. The two workshops together received 13 papers. Each paper was then reviewed by at least two expert reviewers in the field. In all, 11 papers were accepted to be presented at the workshops. The topics covered in the papers...

  9. Video Analytics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book collects the papers presented at two workshops during the 23rd International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR): the Third Workshop on Video Analytics for Audience Measurement (VAAM) and the Second International Workshop on Face and Facial Expression Recognition (FFER) from Real...... World Videos. The workshops were run on December 4, 2016, in Cancun in Mexico. The two workshops together received 13 papers. Each paper was then reviewed by at least two expert reviewers in the field. In all, 11 papers were accepted to be presented at the workshops. The topics covered in the papers...

  10. Video systems for alarm assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwoll, D.A.; Matter, J.C.; Ebel, P.E.

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to present technical information that should be useful to NRC licensees in designing closed-circuit television systems for video alarm assessment. There is a section on each of the major components in a video system: camera, lens, lighting, transmission, synchronization, switcher, monitor, and recorder. Each section includes information on component selection, procurement, installation, test, and maintenance. Considerations for system integration of the components are contained in each section. System emphasis is focused on perimeter intrusion detection and assessment systems. A glossary of video terms is included. 13 figs., 9 tabs

  11. A simple, inexpensive video camera setup for the study of avian nest activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabine, J.B.; Meyers, J.M.; Schweitzer, Sara H.

    2005-01-01

    Time-lapse video photography has become a valuable tool for collecting data on avian nest activity and depredation; however, commercially available systems are expensive (>USA $4000/unit). We designed an inexpensive system to identify causes of nest failure of American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) and assessed its utility at Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia. We successfully identified raccoon (Procyon lotor), bobcat (Lynx rufus), American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos), and ghost crab (Ocypode quadrata) predation on oystercatcher nests. Other detected causes of nest failure included tidal overwash, horse trampling, abandonment, and human destruction. System failure rates were comparable with commercially available units. Our system's efficacy and low cost (<$800) provided useful data for the management and conservation of the American Oystercatcher.

  12. Quantitative 3D video microscopy of HIV transfer across T cell virological synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, Wolfgang; McNerney, Gregory P; Chen, Ping; Dale, Benjamin M; Gordon, Ronald E; Chuang, Frank Y S; Li, Xiao-Dong; Asmuth, David M; Huser, Thomas; Chen, Benjamin K

    2009-03-27

    The spread of HIV between immune cells is greatly enhanced by cell-cell adhesions called virological synapses, although the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. With use of an infectious, fluorescent clone of HIV, we tracked the movement of Gag in live CD4 T cells and captured the direct translocation of HIV across the virological synapse. Quantitative, high-speed three-dimensional (3D) video microscopy revealed the rapid formation of micrometer-sized "buttons" containing oligomerized viral Gag protein. Electron microscopy showed that these buttons were packed with budding viral crescents. Viral transfer events were observed to form virus-laden internal compartments within target cells. Continuous time-lapse monitoring showed preferential infection through synapses. Thus, HIV dissemination may be enhanced by virological synapse-mediated cell adhesion coupled to viral endocytosis.

  13. Akademisk video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    der dog opstået nye muligheder og udfordringer i forhold til at formidle og distribuere forskningsresultater til forskellige målgrupper via video. Samtidig er klassiske metodologiske problematikker som forskerens positionering i forhold til det undersøgte stadig aktuelle. Både klassiske og nye...

  14. Objective Assessment of IP Video Calls with Asterisk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Kapicak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with an objective assessment of IP video calls transmission over GSM and UMTS networks. Video transmission is affected by many factors in mobile network. Among these factors belong packet loss, latency and transmission rate of the mobile network. Network properties were simulated by Simena network simulator. Our team have developed a unique technique for finding defects in video appearing in video calls. This technique is built on modified Asterisk SW PBX with enabled video recording and playback functions. Transmitted video files are compared with original video file by means of size of transmitted video file and in-video-defects. We are using MSU VQMT software for finding in video defects; more precisely we are using VQM method for comparing two video sources.

  15. Digital Diva: Opera on Video

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    What is it about video recording that brings out the purist in theater practitioners and theorists? Time and again they reinforce a hierarchy that relegates the recording of theater to a derivative and debased status in relation to the unique and inimitable condition of a live performance. Whether produced for archival, documentary, or research purposes, recordings are seen to offer only the faintest trace of something now lost, something now properly preserved only in the ever...

  16. Hysteroscopy video summarization and browsing by estimating the physician's attention on video segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavião, Wilson; Scharcanski, Jacob; Frahm, Jan-Michael; Pollefeys, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Specialists often need to browse through libraries containing many diagnostic hysteroscopy videos searching for similar cases, or even to review the video of one particular case. Video searching and browsing can be used in many situations, like in case-based diagnosis when videos of previously diagnosed cases are compared, in case referrals, in reviewing the patient records, as well as for supporting medical research (e.g. in human reproduction). However, in terms of visual content, diagnostic hysteroscopy videos contain lots of information, but only a reduced number of frames are actually useful for diagnosis/prognosis purposes. In order to facilitate the browsing task, we propose in this paper a technique for estimating the clinical relevance of video segments in diagnostic hysteroscopies. Basically, the proposed technique associates clinical relevance with the attention attracted by a diagnostic hysteroscopy video segment during the video acquisition (i.e. during the diagnostic hysteroscopy conducted by a specialist). We show that the resulting video summary allows specialists to browse the video contents nonlinearly, while avoiding spending time on spurious visual information. In this work, we review state-of-art methods for summarizing general videos and how they apply to diagnostic hysteroscopy videos (considering their specific characteristics), and conclude that our proposed method contributes to the field with a summarization and representation method specific for video hysteroscopies. The experimental results indicate that our method tends to produce compact video summaries without discarding clinically relevant information. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. State of the art in video system performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    The closed circuit television (CCTV) system that is onboard the Space Shuttle has the following capabilities: camera, video signal switching and routing unit (VSU); and Space Shuttle video tape recorder. However, this system is inadequate for use with many experiments that require video imaging. In order to assess the state-of-the-art in video technology and data storage systems, a survey was conducted of the High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video Technology (HHVT) products. The performance of the state-of-the-art solid state cameras and image sensors, video recording systems, data transmission devices, and data storage systems versus users' requirements are shown graphically.

  18. Your Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Your Medical Records KidsHealth / For Teens / Your Medical Records What's ... Print en español Tus historias clínicas What Are Medical Records? Each time you climb up on a ...

  19. Video material and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, G F; Jeavons, P M; Edson, A S

    1994-01-01

    Nine patients who had epileptic attacks while playing computer games were studied in the laboratory. Patients had an EEG recorded as well as their response to intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) at flash rates of 1-60 fps. In addition, pattern sensitivity was assessed in all patients by a gratings pattern. Only 2 patients had no previous history of convulsions, and only 2 had a normal basic EEG. All but 1 were sensitive to IPS, and all but 1 were pattern sensitive. Most patients were male, but although this appears to conflict with previously published literature results regarding the sex ratio in photosensitivity, it was due to the male predominance of video game usage. We compared our results with those reported in the literature. Diagnosing video game epilepsy requires performing an EEG with IPS and pattern stimulation. We propose a standard method of testing.

  20. Ice Shelf Rift Time-Lapse Photography, Antarctica, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — From November 2004 to March 2005, on the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica, an automated "web cam" was operated on the southward facing lip of a large ice-shelf rift to...

  1. Time-lapse resistivity surveys over simulated clandestine graves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jervis, John R; Pringle, Jamie K; Tuckwell, George W

    2009-11-20

    The aim of this study was to develop a better understanding of how electrical resistivity surveys can be used to locate clandestine graves. Resistivity surveys were conducted regularly over three simulated clandestine graves containing a pig cadaver, no cadaver and a pig cadaver wrapped in tarpaulin, respectively. Additionally, soil and groundwater samples were collected from two more simulated graves outside the survey area. The grave containing a pig cadaver was detectable from a low resistivity anomaly in the survey data. Groundwater data suggest that the resistivity anomaly associated with the surveyed pig grave was caused by a localised increase in groundwater conductivity. Wrapping a cadaver was found to initially change the resistivity response of a grave to a high resistivity anomaly. Resistivity surveys did not detect the disturbed soil in the grave that did not contain a cadaver. Although soil samples showed grave soil to be more porous than undisturbed soil, the lack of response from the grave that did not contain a cadaver suggests that disturbed soil was not responsible for the resistivity anomalies observed in this study. Resistivity surveys successfully detected all graves containing cadavers throughout the study, whilst also showing the potential to eliminate the need for mass excavation in a genuine search.

  2. Assessing ground compaction via time lapse surface wave analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dal Moro, Giancarlo; Al-Arifi, N.; Moustafa, S.S.R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2016), s. 249-256 ISSN 1214-9705 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : Full velocity spectrum (FVS) analysis * ground compaction * ground compaction * phase velocities * Rayleigh waves * seismic data inversion * surface wave dispersion * surface waves Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 0.699, year: 2016

  3. Maxillofacial injury: A retrospective analysis of time lapse between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-04

    1,2 BDS, MB BCh, PhD, DSc, FCD. 1 Division of .... where a large force to the body is required (i.e. a serious ... SAJS 141. Table 3. Frequency distribution for the five time groups (days) by study year and for all years combined.

  4. Distinguished Books. Notable Books of 2002; Best Books for Young Adults; Audiobooks for Young Adults; Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers; Notable Children's Books; Notable Children's Videos; Notable Recordings for Children; Notable Software for Children; Bestsellers of 2002; Literary Prizes, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryles, Daisy; Riippa, Laurele; Ink, Gary

    2003-01-01

    Includes bibliographies of notable books of 2002, including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry; books for young adults, including fiction, nonfiction, audiobooks, and titles for reluctant readers; notable books for children; videos for children; children's recordings and software; bestsellers, fiction and nonfiction; paperback bestsellers; almanacs,…

  5. Distinguished Books. Notable Books of 2001; Best Books for Young Adults; Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers; Audiobooks for Young Adults; Notable Children's Books; Notable Children's Videos; Notable Recordings for Children; Notable software and Web Sites for Children; Bestsellers of 2001; Literary Prizes, 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryles, Daisy; Riippa, Laurele; Ink, Gary

    2002-01-01

    Presents bibliographies of notable books, best books for young adults, audiobooks for young adults, notable children's books, notable children's videos, notable recordings for children, and notable software and Web sites for children; discusses bestsellers; and lists literary prizes awarded in 2001. (LRW)

  6. Reliability of video-based identification of footstrike pattern and video time frame at initial contact in recreational runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsted, Camma; Larsen, L H; Nielsen, R.O.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Two-dimensional video recordings are used in clinical practice to identify footstrike pattern. However, knowledge about the reliability of this method of identification is limited. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate intra- and inter-rater reliability of visual identification of footstrike pattern...... and video time frame at initial contact during treadmill running using two-dimensional (2D) video recordings. METHODS: Thirty-one recreational runners were recorded twice, 1 week apart, with a high-speed video camera. Two blinded raters evaluated each video twice with an interval of at least 14 days...

  7. Video ambulatory EEG: A good alternative to inpatient video telemetry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandler, Rosalind; Ponnusamy, Athi; Wragg, Claire

    2017-04-01

    Video ambulatory EEG (V-AEEG) is a new technique which could add increased capacity for long term EEG monitoring to overstretched inpatient video telemetry (IPVT) services. We compare V-AEEG and IPVT for diagnostic efficacy, recording quality, patient acceptability and technologist time required. Forty-one V-AEEG and 64 IPVT adult patients were included. Patients were investigated to diagnose attacks or to obtain polysomnography (PSG) prior to multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). Number of attacks recorded, whether the diagnostic question was answered, quality of video and EEG recording and patients' preference for investigation at home or in hospital were noted. For V-AEEG patients, ease of procedure and extra technologist time required were recorded. Of patients investigated for diagnosis of attacks, 74% V-AEEG patients and 62% IPVT had typical attacks during the investigation. All PSGs were useful in interpreting the MSLTs. Diagnostic questions were answered by 73% V-AEEGs and 73% IPVTs. Quality of EEG and video recording was similar using V-AEEG and IPVT. Four patients had difficulty using V-AEEG equipment but diagnostic information was lost in only one. 5% of V-AEEG patients would have preferred hospital investigation but 45% of IPVT patients would have preferred home investigation. Extra technologist time for home visits (mean 2h) was required only for the first 7 patients. Video EEG recording quality and diagnostic efficacy from V-AEEG are similar to IPVT. V-AEEG is acceptable to most patients and does not require additional technical time. Hence, V-AEEG offers a convenient, economical alternative to IPVT. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An immersive system for browsing and visualizing surveillance video

    OpenAIRE

    DeCamp, Philip James; Shaw, George Macaulay; Kubat, Rony Daniel; Roy, Deb K.

    2010-01-01

    HouseFly is an interactive data browsing and visualization system that synthesizes audio-visual recordings from multiple sensors, as well as the meta-data derived from those recordings, into a unified viewing experience. The system is being applied to study human behavior in both domestic and retail situations grounded in longitudinal video recordings. HouseFly uses an immersive video technique to display multiple streams of high resolution video using a realtime warping procedure that projec...

  9. Video Production as a Communications Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witsch, Michael J.

    1980-01-01

    Tells how to get maximum use from minimal video production equipment, including using the equipment to record book reviews and vocabulary quiz shows, to resolve conflict, and to showcase the community. (RL)

  10. 47 CFR 76.1710 - Operator interests in video programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operator interests in video programming. 76....1710 Operator interests in video programming. (a) Cable operators are required to maintain records in... interests in all video programming services as well as information regarding their carriage of such...

  11. A Case Study of Trust Issues in Scientific Video Collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M.A.L. Beauxis-Aussalet (Emmanuelle); E. Arslanova (Elvira); L. Hardman (Lynda); J.R. van Ossenbruggen (Jacco)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractIn-situ video recording of underwater ecosystems is able to provide valuable information for biology research and natural resources management, e.g. changes in species abundance. Searching the videos manually, however, requires costly human effort. Our video analysis tool supports the

  12. The Learning Potential of Video Sketching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Henningsen, Birgitte; Gundersen, Peter Bukovica

    2017-01-01

    been identified: shaping, recording, viewing and editing. Combined with the different modes, these steps constitute the basis of our video sketching framework. This framework has been used as a tool for redesigning learning activities. It suggests new scenarios to include in future research using......This paper introduces a video sketching technique applied to learning settings and investigates what participants learn from creating and redesigning videos while sketching. This process links various sketching techniques and creative reflection processes to video productions. Traditionally...... a new one or another is rejected. Also, video can make participants very and even too self-aware, though in explanatory and persuasive sessions, this may support participants to use more precise and explicit language. Based on these experiments, four different steps of collaborative video sketching have...

  13. Holografisk Video

    OpenAIRE

    Waldemarsson, Lars-Åke

    2006-01-01

    Detta examensarbete utgår ifrån en artikel i vilken en metod för att skapa holografisk video beskrivs. Syftet med arbetet är att återskapa denna metod. Metoden bygger på projicering av hologram med hjälp av delar från en projektor, en laser och några linser. Först görs en litteraturstudie för att få förståelse över hur metoden fungerar. Här behandlas hur ögat ser djup och vilka olika typer av displayer det finns för att återge tredimensionella holografiska bilder. Vidare beskrivs skillnaden m...

  14. The Learning Potential of Video Sketching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Henningsen, Birgitte; Gundersen, Peter Bukovica

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces a video sketching technique applied to learning settings and investigates what participants learn from creating and redesigning videos while sketching. This process links various sketching techniques and creative reflection processes to video productions. Traditionally......, designers across various disciplines have used sketching as an integrative part of their everyday practice, and sketching has proven to have a multitude of purposes in professional design. The purpose of this paper is to explore what happens when an extra layer of video recording is added during the early...... sketching phases. Using empirical examples, this paper presents and discusses the video recording of sketching sessions. The empirical data is based on workshop sessions with researchers, students and teachers. Inspired by the work of Olofsson and Sjölén (2007), the sketching sessions were organised...

  15. Comparing audio and video data for rating communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kristine; Herman, Ruth; Bontempo, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    Video recording has become increasingly popular in nursing research, adding rich nonverbal, contextual, and behavioral information. However, benefits of video over audio data have not been well established. We compared communication ratings of audio versus video data using the Emotional Tone Rating Scale. Twenty raters watched video clips of nursing care and rated staff communication on 12 descriptors that reflect dimensions of person-centered and controlling communication. Another group rated audio-only versions of the same clips. Interrater consistency was high within each group with Interclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) (2,1) for audio .91, and video = .94. Interrater consistency for both groups combined was also high with ICC (2,1) for audio and video = .95. Communication ratings using audio and video data were highly correlated. The value of video being superior to audio-recorded data should be evaluated in designing studies evaluating nursing care.

  16. Jump frequency may contribute to risk of jumper's knee: a study of interindividual and sex differences in a total of 11,943 jumps video recorded during training and matches in young elite volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Martin A; Bahr, Roald

    2014-09-01

    Male sex, total training volume (number of hours per week) and match exposure (number of sets played per week) are risk factors for jumper's knee among young elite volleyball players. However, it is not known whether jump frequency differs among players on the same squad. To examine interindividual and sex differences in jump frequency during training and matches in young elite volleyball players. Observational study. Norwegian elite volleyball boarding school training programme. Student-athletes (26 boys and 18 girls, 16-18 years). Individual jump counts were recorded based on visual analysis of video recordings obtained from 1 week of volleyball training (9 training sessions for boys and 10 for girls, 14.1 h and 17.8 h of training, respectively) and 10 matches (5.9 h for boys (16 sets) and 7.7 h for girls (21 sets). A total of 11,943 jumps were recorded, 4138 during matches and 7805 during training. As training attendance and jump frequency varied substantially between players, the total exposure in training ranged from 50 to 666 jumps/week among boys and from 11 to 251 jumps/week among girls. On average, this corresponded to 35.7 jumps/h for boys and 13.7 jumps/h for girls (Student t test, p=0.002). Total jump exposure during matches ranged between 1 and 339 jumps among boys and between 0 and 379 jumps among girls, corresponding to an average jump frequency of 62.2 jumps/h for boys and 41.9 jumps/h for girls (Student t test, pvolleyball players. Total jump volume may represent a more important risk factor for jumper's knee than total training volume, warranting further research attention. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Quality of Experience Assessment of Video Quality in Social Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif Ali Laghari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Video sharing on social clouds is popular among the users around the world. High-Definition (HD videos have big file size so the storing in cloud storage and streaming of videos with high quality from cloud to the client are a big problem for service providers. Social clouds compress the videos to save storage and stream over slow networks to provide quality of service (QoS. Compression of video decreases the quality compared to original video and parameters are changed during the online play as well as after download. Degradation of video quality due to compression decreases the quality of experience (QoE level of end users. To assess the QoE of video compression, we conducted subjective (QoE experiments by uploading, sharing, and playing videos from social clouds. Three popular social clouds, Facebook, Tumblr, and Twitter, were selected to upload and play videos online for users. The QoE was recorded by using questionnaire given to users to provide their experience about the video quality they perceive. Results show that Facebook and Twitter compressed HD videos more as compared to other clouds. However, Facebook gives a better quality of compressed videos compared to Twitter. Therefore, users assigned low ratings for Twitter for online video quality compared to Tumblr that provided high-quality online play of videos with less compression.

  18. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... YouTube Videos >> NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia Listen NEI YouTube Videos YouTube Videos Home Age-Related Macular Degeneration ... Retinopathy of Prematurity Science Spanish Videos Webinars NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia Embedded video for NEI YouTube Videos: ...

  19. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... YouTube Videos > NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia NEI YouTube Videos YouTube Videos Home Age-Related Macular Degeneration Amblyopia ... of Prematurity Science Spanish Videos Webinars NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia Embedded video for NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia ...

  20. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NEI YouTube Videos > NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia NEI YouTube Videos YouTube Videos Home Age-Related Macular Degeneration ... Retinopathy of Prematurity Science Spanish Videos Webinars NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia Embedded video for NEI YouTube Videos: ...

  1. Exchanging digital video of laryngeal examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, John M; Deutsch, Thomas

    2004-03-01

    Laryngeal examinations, especially stroboscopic examinations, are increasingly recorded using digital video formats on computer media, rather than using analog formats on videotape. It would be useful to share these examinations with other medical professionals in formats that would facilitate reliable and high-quality playback on a personal computer by the recipients. Unfortunately, a personal computer is not well designed for reliable presentation of artifact-free video. It is particularly important that laryngeal video play without artifacts of motion or color because these are often the characteristics of greatest clinical interest. With proper tools and procedures, and with reasonable compromises in image resolution and the duration of the examination, digital video of laryngeal examinations can be reliably exchanged. However, the tools, procedures, and formats for recording, converting to another digital format ("transcoding"), communicating, copying, and playing digital video with a personal computer are not familiar to most medical professionals. Some understanding of digital video and the tools available is required of those wanting to exchange digital video. Best results are achieved by recording to a digital format best suited for recording (such as MJPEG or DV),judiciously selecting a segment of the recording for sharing, and converting to a format suited to distribution (such as MPEG1 or MPEG2) using a medium suited to the situation (such as e-mail attachment, CD-ROM, a "clip" within a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation, or DVD-Video). If digital video is sent to a colleague, some guidance on playing files and using a PC media player is helpful.

  2. Making Sense of Video Analytics: Lessons Learned from Clickstream Interactions, Attitudes, and Learning Outcome in a Video-Assisted Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michail N. Giannakos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Online video lectures have been considered an instructional media for various pedagogic approaches, such as the flipped classroom and open online courses. In comparison to other instructional media, online video affords the opportunity for recording student clickstream patterns within a video lecture. Video analytics within lecture videos may provide insights into student learning performance and inform the improvement of video-assisted teaching tactics. Nevertheless, video analytics are not accessible to learning stakeholders, such as researchers and educators, mainly because online video platforms do not broadly share the interactions of the users with their systems. For this purpose, we have designed an open-access video analytics system for use in a video-assisted course. In this paper, we present a longitudinal study, which provides valuable insights through the lens of the collected video analytics. In particular, we found that there is a relationship between video navigation (repeated views and the level of cognition/thinking required for a specific video segment. Our results indicated that learning performance progress was slightly improved and stabilized after the third week of the video-assisted course. We also found that attitudes regarding easiness, usability, usefulness, and acceptance of this type of course remained at the same levels throughout the course. Finally, we triangulate analytics from diverse sources, discuss them, and provide the lessons learned for further development and refinement of video-assisted courses and practices.

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed ... Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic ...

  4. 61214++++','DOAJ-ART-EN'); return false;" href="+++++https://jual.nipissingu.ca/wp-content/uploads/sites/25/2014/06/v61214.m4v">61214++++">Jailed - Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron CULBERT

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available As the public education system in Northern Ontario continues to take a downward spiral, a plethora of secondary school students are being placed in an alternative educational environment. Juxtaposing the two educational settings reveals very similar methods and characteristics of educating our youth as opposed to using a truly alternative approach to education. This video reviews the relationship between public education and alternative education in a remote Northern Ontario setting. It is my belief that the traditional methods of teaching are not appropriate in educating at risk students in alternative schools. Paper and pencil worksheets do not motivate these students to learn and succeed. Alternative education should emphasize experiential learning, a just in time curriculum based on every unique individual and the students true passion for everyday life. Cameron Culbert was born on February 3rd, 1977 in North Bay, Ontario. His teenage years were split between attending public school and his willed curriculum on the ski hill. Culbert spent 10 years (1996-2002 & 2006-2010 competing for Canada as an alpine ski racer. His passion for teaching and coaching began as an athlete and has now transferred into the classroom and the community. As a graduate of Nipissing University (BA, BEd, MEd. Camerons research interests are alternative education, physical education and technology in the classroom. Currently Cameron is an active educator and coach in Northern Ontario.

  5. Video Design Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte; Christensen, Kasper Skov; Iversen, Ole Sejer

    We introduce Video Design Games to train educators in teaching design. The Video Design Game is a workshop format consisting of three rounds in which participants observe, reflect and generalize based on video snippets from their own practice. The paper reports on a Video Design Game workshop...

  6. Rare Disease Video Portal

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Bocanegra, Carlos Luis

    2011-01-01

    Rare Disease Video Portal (RD Video) is a portal web where contains videos from Youtube including all details from 12 channels of Youtube. Rare Disease Video Portal (RD Video) es un portal web que contiene los vídeos de Youtube incluyendo todos los detalles de 12 canales de Youtube. Rare Disease Video Portal (RD Video) és un portal web que conté els vídeos de Youtube i que inclou tots els detalls de 12 Canals de Youtube.

  7. A system for endobronchial video analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Patrick D.; Higgins, William E.

    2017-03-01

    Image-guided bronchoscopy is a critical component in the treatment of lung cancer and other pulmonary disorders. During bronchoscopy, a high-resolution endobronchial video stream facilitates guidance through the lungs and allows for visual inspection of a patient's airway mucosal surfaces. Despite the detailed information it contains, little effort has been made to incorporate recorded video into the clinical workflow. Follow-up procedures often required in cancer assessment or asthma treatment could significantly benefit from effectively parsed and summarized video. Tracking diagnostic regions of interest (ROIs) could potentially better equip physicians to detect early airway-wall cancer or improve asthma treatments, such as bronchial thermoplasty. To address this need, we have developed a system for the postoperative analysis of recorded endobronchial video. The system first parses an input video stream into endoscopic shots, derives motion information, and selects salient representative key frames. Next, a semi-automatic method for CT-video registration creates data linkages between a CT-derived airway-tree model and the input video. These data linkages then enable the construction of a CT-video chest model comprised of a bronchoscopy path history (BPH) - defining all airway locations visited during a procedure - and texture-mapping information for rendering registered video frames onto the airwaytree model. A suite of analysis tools is included to visualize and manipulate the extracted data. Video browsing and retrieval is facilitated through a video table of contents (TOC) and a search query interface. The system provides a variety of operational modes and additional functionality, including the ability to define regions of interest. We demonstrate the potential of our system using two human case study examples.

  8. Photogrammetric Applications of Immersive Video Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatek, K.; Tokarczyk, R.

    2014-05-01

    The paper investigates immersive videography and its application in close-range photogrammetry. Immersive video involves the capture of a live-action scene that presents a 360° field of view. It is recorded simultaneously by multiple cameras or microlenses, where the principal point of each camera is offset from the rotating axis of the device. This issue causes problems when stitching together individual frames of video separated from particular cameras, however there are ways to overcome it and applying immersive cameras in photogrammetry provides a new potential. The paper presents two applications of immersive video in photogrammetry. At first, the creation of a low-cost mobile mapping system based on Ladybug®3 and GPS device is discussed. The amount of panoramas is much too high for photogrammetric purposes as the base line between spherical panoramas is around 1 metre. More than 92 000 panoramas were recorded in one Polish region of Czarny Dunajec and the measurements from panoramas enable the user to measure the area of outdoors (adverting structures) and billboards. A new law is being created in order to limit the number of illegal advertising structures in the Polish landscape and immersive video recorded in a short period of time is a candidate for economical and flexible measurements off-site. The second approach is a generation of 3d video-based reconstructions of heritage sites based on immersive video (structure from immersive video). A mobile camera mounted on a tripod dolly was used to record the interior scene and immersive video, separated into thousands of still panoramas, was converted from video into 3d objects using Agisoft Photoscan Professional. The findings from these experiments demonstrated that immersive photogrammetry seems to be a flexible and prompt method of 3d modelling and provides promising features for mobile mapping systems.

  9. Automated Video Quality Assessment for Deep-Sea Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirenne, B.; Hoeberechts, M.; Kalmbach, A.; Sadhu, T.; Branzan Albu, A.; Glotin, H.; Jeffries, M. A.; Bui, A. O. V.

    2015-12-01

    Video provides a rich source of data for geophysical analysis, often supplying detailed information about the environment when other instruments may not. This is especially true of deep-sea environments, where direct visual observations cannot be made. As computer vision techniques improve and volumes of video data increase, automated video analysis is emerging as a practical alternative to labor-intensive manual analysis. Automated techniques can be much more sensitive to video quality than their manual counterparts, so performing quality assessment before doing full analysis is critical to producing valid results.Ocean Networks Canada (ONC), an initiative of the University of Victoria, operates cabled ocean observatories that supply continuous power and Internet connectivity to a broad suite of subsea instruments from the coast to the deep sea, including video and still cameras. This network of ocean observatories has produced almost 20,000 hours of video (about 38 hours are recorded each day) and an additional 8,000 hours of logs from remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives. We begin by surveying some ways in which deep-sea video poses challenges for automated analysis, including: 1. Non-uniform lighting: Single, directional, light sources produce uneven luminance distributions and shadows; remotely operated lighting equipment are also susceptible to technical failures. 2. Particulate noise: Turbidity and marine snow are often present in underwater video; particles in the water column can have sharper focus and higher contrast than the objects of interest due to their proximity to the light source and can also influence the camera's autofocus and auto white-balance routines. 3. Color distortion (low contrast): The rate of absorption of light in water varies by wavelength, and is higher overall than in air, altering apparent colors and lowering the contrast of objects at a distance.We also describe measures under development at ONC for detecting and mitigating

  10. Algorithm for video summarization of bronchoscopy procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczuk, Mikołaj I; Duplaga, Mariusz

    2011-12-20

    The duration of bronchoscopy examinations varies considerably depending on the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures used. It can last more than 20 minutes if a complex diagnostic work-up is included. With wide access to videobronchoscopy, the whole procedure can be recorded as a video sequence. Common practice relies on an active attitude of the bronchoscopist who initiates the recording process and usually chooses to archive only selected views and sequences. However, it may be important to record the full bronchoscopy procedure as documentation when liability issues are at stake. Furthermore, an automatic recording of the whole procedure enables the bronchoscopist to focus solely on the performed procedures. Video recordings registered during bronchoscopies include a considerable number of frames of poor quality due to blurry or unfocused images. It seems that such frames are unavoidable due to the relatively tight endobronchial space, rapid movements of the respiratory tract due to breathing or coughing, and secretions which occur commonly in the bronchi, especially in patients suffering from pulmonary disorders. The use of recorded bronchoscopy video sequences for diagnostic, reference and educational purposes could be considerably extended with efficient, flexible summarization algorithms. Thus, the authors developed a prototype system to create shortcuts (called summaries or abstracts) of bronchoscopy video recordings. Such a system, based on models described in previously published papers, employs image analysis methods to exclude frames or sequences of limited diagnostic or education value. The algorithm for the selection or exclusion of specific frames or shots from video sequences recorded during bronchoscopy procedures is based on several criteria, including automatic detection of "non-informative", frames showing the branching of the airways and frames including pathological lesions. The paper focuses on the challenge of generating summaries of

  11. Algorithm for Video Summarization of Bronchoscopy Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszczuk Mikołaj I

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The duration of bronchoscopy examinations varies considerably depending on the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures used. It can last more than 20 minutes if a complex diagnostic work-up is included. With wide access to videobronchoscopy, the whole procedure can be recorded as a video sequence. Common practice relies on an active attitude of the bronchoscopist who initiates the recording process and usually chooses to archive only selected views and sequences. However, it may be important to record the full bronchoscopy procedure as documentation when liability issues are at stake. Furthermore, an automatic recording of the whole procedure enables the bronchoscopist to focus solely on the performed procedures. Video recordings registered during bronchoscopies include a considerable number of frames of poor quality due to blurry or unfocused images. It seems that such frames are unavoidable due to the relatively tight endobronchial space, rapid movements of the respiratory tract due to breathing or coughing, and secretions which occur commonly in the bronchi, especially in patients suffering from pulmonary disorders. Methods The use of recorded bronchoscopy video sequences for diagnostic, reference and educational purposes could be considerably extended with efficient, flexible summarization algorithms. Thus, the authors developed a prototype system to create shortcuts (called summaries or abstracts of bronchoscopy video recordings. Such a system, based on models described in previously published papers, employs image analysis methods to exclude frames or sequences of limited diagnostic or education value. Results The algorithm for the selection or exclusion of specific frames or shots from video sequences recorded during bronchoscopy procedures is based on several criteria, including automatic detection of "non-informative", frames showing the branching of the airways and frames including pathological lesions. Conclusions

  12. Characterizing popularity dynamics of online videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhuo-Ming; Shi, Yu-Qiang; Liao, Hao

    2016-07-01

    Online popularity has a major impact on videos, music, news and other contexts in online systems. Characterizing online popularity dynamics is nature to explain the observed properties in terms of the already acquired popularity of each individual. In this paper, we provide a quantitative, large scale, temporal analysis of the popularity dynamics in two online video-provided websites, namely MovieLens and Netflix. The two collected data sets contain over 100 million records and even span a decade. We characterize that the popularity dynamics of online videos evolve over time, and find that the dynamics of the online video popularity can be characterized by the burst behaviors, typically occurring in the early life span of a video, and later restricting to the classic preferential popularity increase mechanism.

  13. Content-based retrieval in videos from laparoscopic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeffmann, Klaus; Beecks, Christian; Lux, Mathias; Uysal, Merih Seran; Seidl, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    In the field of medical endoscopy more and more surgeons are changing over to record and store videos of their endoscopic procedures for long-term archival. These endoscopic videos are a good source of information for explanations to patients and follow-up operations. As the endoscope is the "eye of the surgeon", the video shows the same information the surgeon has seen during the operation, and can describe the situation inside the patient much more precisely than an operation report would do. Recorded endoscopic videos can also be used for training young surgeons and in some countries the long-term archival of video recordings from endoscopic procedures is even enforced by law. A major challenge, however, is to efficiently access these very large video archives for later purposes. One problem, for example, is to locate specific images in the videos that show important situations, which are additionally captured as static images during the procedure. This work addresses this problem and focuses on contentbased video retrieval in data from laparoscopic surgery. We propose to use feature signatures, which can appropriately and concisely describe the content of laparoscopic images, and show that by using this content descriptor with an appropriate metric, we are able to efficiently perform content-based retrieval in laparoscopic videos. In a dataset with 600 captured static images from 33 hours recordings, we are able to find the correct video segment for more than 88% of these images.

  14. The Learning Potential of Video Sketching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundersen, Peter Bukovica; Ørngreen, Rikke; Hautopp, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    , designers across various disciplines have used sketching as an integrative part of their everyday practice, and sketching has proven to have a multitude of purposes in professional design. The purpose of this paper is to explore what happens when an extra layer of video recording is added during the early...... a new one or another is rejected. Also, video can make participants very and even too self-aware, though in explanatory and persuasive sessions, this may support participants to use more precise and explicit language. Based on these experiments, four different steps of collaborative video sketching have...... been identified: shaping, recording, viewing and editing. Combined with the different modes, these steps constitute the basis of our video sketching framework. This framework has been used as a tool for redesigning learning activities. It suggests new scenarios to include in future research using...

  15. Photogrammetric Applications of Immersive Video Cameras

    OpenAIRE

    Kwiatek, K.; Tokarczyk, R.

    2014-01-01

    The paper investigates immersive videography and its application in close-range photogrammetry. Immersive video involves the capture of a live-action scene that presents a 360° field of view. It is recorded simultaneously by multiple cameras or microlenses, where the principal point of each camera is offset from the rotating axis of the device. This issue causes problems when stitching together individual frames of video separated from particular cameras, however there are ways to ov...

  16. Video-Stimulated Accounts: Young Children Accounting for Interactional Matters in Front of Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Maryanne

    2012-01-01

    Research in the early years places increasing importance on participatory methods to engage children. The playback of video-recording to stimulate conversation is a research method that enables children's accounts to be heard and attends to a participatory view. During video-stimulated sessions, participants watch an extract of video-recording of…

  17. Efficient Temporal Action Localization in Videos

    KAUST Repository

    Alwassel, Humam

    2018-04-17

    State-of-the-art temporal action detectors inefficiently search the entire video for specific actions. Despite the encouraging progress these methods achieve, it is crucial to design automated approaches that only explore parts of the video which are the most relevant to the actions being searched. To address this need, we propose the new problem of action spotting in videos, which we define as finding a specific action in a video while observing a small portion of that video. Inspired by the observation that humans are extremely efficient and accurate in spotting and finding action instances in a video, we propose Action Search, a novel Recurrent Neural Network approach that mimics the way humans spot actions. Moreover, to address the absence of data recording the behavior of human annotators, we put forward the Human Searches dataset, which compiles the search sequences employed by human annotators spotting actions in the AVA and THUMOS14 datasets. We consider temporal action localization as an application of the action spotting problem. Experiments on the THUMOS14 dataset reveal that our model is not only able to explore the video efficiently (observing on average 17.3% of the video) but it also accurately finds human activities with 30.8% mAP (0.5 tIoU), outperforming state-of-the-art methods

  18. Modular integrated video system (MIVS) review station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    An unattended video surveillance unit, the Modular Integrated Video System (MIVS), has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories for International Safeguards use. An important support element of this system is a semi-automatic Review Station. Four component modules, including an 8 mm video tape recorder, a 4-inch video monitor, a power supply and control electronics utilizing a liquid crystal display (LCD) are mounted in a suitcase for probability. The unit communicates through the interactive, menu-driven LCD and may be operated on facility power through the world. During surveillance, the MIVS records video information at specified time intervals, while also inserting consecutive scene numbers and tamper event information. Using either of two available modes of operation, the Review Station reads the inserted information and counts the number of missed scenes and/or tamper events encountered on the tapes, and reports this to the user on the LCD. At the end of a review session, the system will summarize the results of the review, stop the recorder, and advise the user of the completion of the review. In addition, the Review Station will check for any video loss on the tape

  19. Computer-Aided Video Differential Planimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Michael; Djoleto, Ben D.

    1984-08-01

    THE VIDEO DIFFERENTIAL PLANIMETER (VDP)1 is a re-mote sensing instrument that can measure minute changes in the area of any object seen by an optical scanning system. The composite video waveforms obtained by scanning the object against a contrasting back-ground are amplified and shaped to yield a sequence of constant amplitude pulses whose polarity distinguishes the studied area from its background and whose varying widths reflect the dynamics of the viewed object. These pulses are passed through a relatively long time-constant capacitor-resistor circuit and are then fed into an integrator. The net integration voltage resulting from the most recent sequence of object-background time pulses is recorded and the integrator is returned to zero at the end of each video frame. If the object's area remains constant throughout the following frame, the integrator's summation will also remain constant. However, if the object's area varies, the positive and negative time pulses entering the integrator will change, and the integrator's summation will vary proportionately. The addition of a computer interface and a video recorder enhances the versatility and the resolving power of the VDP by permitting the repeated study and analysis of selected portions of the recorded data, thereby uncovering the major sources of the object's dynamics. Among the medical and biological procedures for which COMPUTER-AIDED VIDEO DIFFERENTIAL PLANIMETRY is suitable are Ophthalmoscopy, Endoscopy, Microscopy, Plethysmography, etc. A recent research study in Ophthalmoscopy2 will be cited to suggest a useful application of Video Differential Planimetry.

  20. Videos, Podcasts and Livechats

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Doctor Find a Provider Meet the Team Blog Articles & Stories News Resources Links Videos Podcasts Webinars For ... Doctor Find a Provider Meet the Team Blog Articles & Stories News Provider Directory Donate Resources Links Videos ...

  1. Understanding Video Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide Smith, Jonas; Tosca, Susana Pajares; Egenfeldt-Nielsen, Simon

    From Pong to PlayStation 3 and beyond, Understanding Video Games is the first general introduction to the exciting new field of video game studies. This textbook traces the history of video games, introduces the major theories used to analyze games such as ludology and narratology, reviews...... larger questions about the medium: * What defines a video game? * Who plays games? * Why do we play games? * How do games affect the player? Extensively illustrated, Understanding Video Games is an indispensable and comprehensive resource for those interested in the ways video games are reshaping...... entertainment and society. A companion website (www.routledge.com/textbooks/9780415977210) features student resources including discussion questions for each chapter, a glossary of key terms, a video game timeline, and links to other video game studies resources for further study....

  2. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... group for me? Find a Group Upcoming Events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support ANetwork ... for me? Find a group Back Upcoming events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support Back ...

  3. Videos, Podcasts and Livechats

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Team Blog Articles & Stories News Resources Links Videos Podcasts Webinars For the Media For Clinicians For ... Family Caregivers Glossary Menu In this section Links Videos Podcasts Webinars For the Media For Clinicians For ...

  4. Videos, Podcasts and Livechats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Team Blog Articles & Stories News Resources Links Videos Podcasts Webinars For the Media For Clinicians For ... Family Caregivers Glossary Menu In this section Links Videos Podcasts Webinars For the Media For Clinicians For ...

  5. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for me? Find a Group Upcoming Events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support ANetwork Peer ... me? Find a group Back Upcoming events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support Back ANetwork ...

  6. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Find a Group Upcoming Events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support ANetwork Peer Support Program ... a group Back Upcoming events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support Back ANetwork Peer Support ...

  7. Videos, Podcasts and Livechats

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Provider Meet the Team Blog Articles & Stories News Resources Links Videos Podcasts Webinars For the Media ... a Provider Meet the Team Blog Articles & Stories News Provider Directory Donate Resources Links Videos Podcasts Webinars ...

  8. Video Screen Capture Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article is an introduction to video screen capture. Basic information of two software programs, QuickTime for Mac and BlueBerry Flashback Express for PC, are also discussed. Practical applications for video screen capture are given.

  9. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... group for me? Find a Group Upcoming Events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support ANetwork ... for me? Find a group Back Upcoming events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support Back ...

  10. Videos, Podcasts and Livechats

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Resources Links Videos Podcasts Webinars For the Media For Clinicians For Policymakers For Family Caregivers Glossary ... this section Links Videos Podcasts Webinars For the Media For Clinicians For Policymakers For Family Caregivers Glossary ...

  11. Making good physics videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, James

    2017-05-01

    Online videos are an increasingly important way technology is contributing to the improvement of physics teaching. Students and teachers have begun to rely on online videos to provide them with content knowledge and instructional strategies. Online audiences are expecting greater production value, and departments are sometimes requesting educators to post video pre-labs or to flip our classrooms. In this article, I share my advice on creating engaging physics videos.

  12. 47 CFR 79.3 - Video description of video programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Video description of video programming. 79.3... CLOSED CAPTIONING AND VIDEO DESCRIPTION OF VIDEO PROGRAMMING § 79.3 Video description of video programming. (a) Definitions. For purposes of this section the following definitions shall apply: (1...

  13. Developing a Promotional Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epley, Hannah K.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for Extension professionals to show clientele the benefits of their program. This article shares how promotional videos are one way of reaching audiences online. An example is given on how a promotional video has been used and developed using iMovie software. Tips are offered for how professionals can create a promotional video and…

  14. Do-It-Yourself Whiteboard-Style Physics Video Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Scott Samuel; Aiken, John Mark; Greco, Edwin; Schatz, Michael; Lin, Shih-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Video lectures are increasingly being used in physics instruction. For example, video lectures can be used to "flip" the classroom, i.e., to deliver, via the Internet, content that is traditionally transmitted by in-class lectures (e.g., presenting concepts, working examples, etc.), thereby freeing up classroom time for more interactive instruction. To date, most video lectures are live lecture recordings or screencasts. The hand-animated "whiteboard" video is an alternative to these more common styles and affords unique creative opportunities such as stop-motion animation or visual "demonstrations" of phenomena that would be difficult to demo in a classroom. In the spring of 2013, a series of whiteboard-style videos were produced to provide video lecture content for Georgia Tech introductory physics instruction, including flipped courses and a MOOC. This set of videos (which also includes screencasts and live recordings) can be found on the "Your World is Your Lab" YouTube channel. In this article, we describe this method of video production, which is suitable for an instructor working solo or in collaboration with students; we explore students' engagement with these videos in a separate work. A prominent example of whiteboard animation is the "Minute Physics" video series by Henry Reich, whose considerable popularity and accessible, cartoony style were the original inspiration for our own video lectures.

  15. Advanced video coding systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Wen

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive and accessible text/reference presents an overview of the state of the art in video coding technology. Specifically, the book introduces the tools of the AVS2 standard, describing how AVS2 can help to achieve a significant improvement in coding efficiency for future video networks and applications by incorporating smarter coding tools such as scene video coding. Topics and features: introduces the basic concepts in video coding, and presents a short history of video coding technology and standards; reviews the coding framework, main coding tools, and syntax structure of AV

  16. Intelligent video surveillance systems

    CERN Document Server

    Dufour, Jean-Yves

    2012-01-01

    Belonging to the wider academic field of computer vision, video analytics has aroused a phenomenal surge of interest since the current millennium. Video analytics is intended to solve the problem of the incapability of exploiting video streams in real time for the purpose of detection or anticipation. It involves analyzing the videos using algorithms that detect and track objects of interest over time and that indicate the presence of events or suspect behavior involving these objects.The aims of this book are to highlight the operational attempts of video analytics, to identify possi

  17. VBR video traffic models

    CERN Document Server

    Tanwir, Savera

    2014-01-01

    There has been a phenomenal growth in video applications over the past few years. An accurate traffic model of Variable Bit Rate (VBR) video is necessary for performance evaluation of a network design and for generating synthetic traffic that can be used for benchmarking a network. A large number of models for VBR video traffic have been proposed in the literature for different types of video in the past 20 years. Here, the authors have classified and surveyed these models and have also evaluated the models for H.264 AVC and MVC encoded video and discussed their findings.

  18. The Use of Videos in Teaching - Some Experiences From the University of Copenhagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Bregnhøj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper covers videos created and used in different learning patterns. The videos are grouped according to the teaching or learning activities in which they are used. One group of videos are used by the teacher for one-way communication, including: online lectures, experts interacting with one another, instruction videos and introduction videos. Further videos are teacher-student interactive videos, including: feedback on student deliveries, student productions and interactive videos. Examples from different courses at different faculties at The University of Copenhagen of different types of videos (screencasts, pencasts and different kinds of camera recordings, from quick-and-dirty videos made by teachers at their own computer to professionally produced studio recordings as well as audio files are presented with links, as an empirical basis for the discussion. The paper is very practically oriented and looks at e.g. which course design and teaching situation is suitable for which type of video; at which point is an audio file preferable to a video file; and how to produce videos easily and without specialized equipment, if you don’t have access to (or time for professional assistance. In the article, we also point out how a small amount of tips & tricks regarding planning, design and presentation technique can improve recordings made by teachers themselves. We argue that the way to work with audio and video is to start by analyzing the pedagogical needs, in this way adapting the type and use of audio and video to the pedagogical context.

  19. The Use of Videos in Teaching - Some Experiences From the University of Copenhagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Bregnhøj

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper covers videos created and used in different learning patterns. The videos are grouped according to the teaching or learning activities in which they are used. One group of videos are used by the teacher for one-way communication, including: online lectures, experts interacting with one another, instruction videos and introduction videos. Further videos are teacher-student interactive videos, including: feedback on student deliveries, student productions and interactive videos. Examples from different courses at different faculties at The University of Copenhagen of different types of videos (screencasts, pencasts and different kinds of camera recordings, from quick-and-dirty videos made by teachers at their own computer to professionally produced studio recordings as well as audio files are presented with links, as an empirical basis for the discussion. The paper is very practically oriented and looks at e.g. which course design and teaching situation is suitable for which type of video; at which point is an audio file preferable to a video file; and how to produce videos easily and without specialized equipment, if you don’t have access to (or time for professional assistance. In the article, we also point out how a small amount of tips & tricks regarding planning, design and presentation technique can improve recordings made by teachers themselves. We argue that the way to work with audio and video is to start by analyzing the pedagogical needs, in this way adapting the type and use of audio and video to the pedagogical context.

  20. Managed Video as a Service for a Video Surveillance Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Benta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for security systems hasresulted in rapid development of video surveillance and videosurveillance has turned into a major area of interest andmanagement challenge. Personal experience in specializedcompanies helped me to adapt demands of users of videosecurity systems to system performance. It is known thatpeople wish to obtain maximum profit with minimum effort,but security is not neglected. Surveillance systems and videomonitoring should provide only necessary information and torecord only when there is activity. Via IP video surveillanceservices provides more safety in this sector, being able torecord information on servers located in other locations thanthe IP cameras. Also, these systems allow real timemonitoring of goods or activities that take place in supervisedperimeters. View live and recording can be done via theInternet from any computer, using a web browser. Access tothe surveillance system is granted after a user and passwordauthentication.