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Sample records for time-dependent dalitz-plot analysis

  1. Measurement of CP-Violating Asymmetries in B0 to (rho pi)0 Using a Time-Dependent Dalitz Plot Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-09-26

    We report a measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in B{sup 0} {yields} ({rho}{pi}){sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decays using a time-dependent Dalitz plot analysis. The results are obtained from a data sample of 347 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays, collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. We measure 26 coefficients of the bilinear form factor terms occurring in the time-dependent decay rate of the B{sup 0} meson and derive the physically relevant quantities from these coefficients. In particular we find a three standard deviation evidence of direct CP-violation in the B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decays, with systematic uncertainties included. We also achieve a constraint of the angle {alpha} of the Unitarity Triangle. All results presented are preliminary.

  2. Measurement of CP-Violating Asymmetries in B0 to (rho pi)0 using a Time-Dependent Dalitz Plot Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2007-03-06

    We report a measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in B{sup 0} {yields} ({rho}{pi}){sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decays using a time-dependent Dalitz plot analysis. The results are obtained from a data sample of 375 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays, collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. We measure 26 coefficients of the bilinear form-factor terms occurring in the time-dependent decay rate of the B{sup 0} meson. We derive the physically relevant quantities from these coefficients. In particular, we measure a constraint on the angle {alpha} of the Unitarity Triangle.

  3. Time-dependent Dalitz-Plot Analysis of the Charmless Decay B^0 -> K^0S Pi Pi- at BABAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilic, J

    2009-10-17

    A time-dependent amplitude analysis of B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays is performed in order to extract the CP violation parameters of f{sub 0}(980)K{sub S}{sup 0} and {rho}{sup 0}(770)K{sub S}{sup 0} and direct CP asymmetries of K*{sup +}(892){pi}{sup -}. The results are obtained from the final BABAR data sample of (465 {+-} 5)10{sup 6} B{bar B} decays, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. The time dependent CP asymmetry for f{sub 0}(980)K{sub S}{sup 0} and {rho}{sup 0}(770)K{sub S}{sup 0} are measured to be S(f{sub 0}(980)K{sub S}{sup 0}) = -0.97 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.01 {+-} 0.01, and S({rho}{sup 0}(770)K{sub S}{sup 0}) = 0.67 {+-} 0.20 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.04, respectively. In decays to K*{sup +}(892){pi}{sup -} the direct CP asymmetry is found to be A{sub CP}(K*{sup {+-}}(892){pi}{sup {-+}}) = -0.18 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.00. The relative phases between B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}(892){pi}{sup -} and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup -}(892){pi}{sup +}, relevant for the extraction of the unitarity triangle angle {gamma}, is measured to be {Delta}{phi}(K*(892){pi}) = (34.9 {+-} 23.1 {+-} 7.5 {+-} 4.7){sup o}, where uncertainties are statistical, systematic and model-dependent, respectively. Fit fractions, direct CP asymmetries and the relative phases of different other resonant modes have also been measured. A new method for extracting longitudinal shower development information from longitudinally unsegmented calorimeters is also presented. This method has been implemented as a part of the BABAR final particle identification algorithm. A significant improvement in low momenta muon identification at BABAR is obtained.

  4. Measurement of CP-Violating Asymmetries in B0 to (rho pi)0 Using a Time-Dependent Dalitz Plot Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J.

    2005-01-14

    We present the preliminary measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in B{sup 0} {yields} ({rho}{pi}){sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decays using a time-dependent Dalitz plot analysis. The results are obtained from a data sample of 213 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays, collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. This analysis extends the narrow-rho quasi-two-body approximation used in the previous analysis, by taking into account the interference between the rho resonances of the three charges. We measure 16 coefficients of the bilinear form factor terms occurring in the time-dependent decay rate of the B{sup 0} meson with the use of a maximum-likelihood fit. We derive the physically relevant quantities from these coefficients. We measure the direct CP-violation parameters A{sub {rho}{pi}} = -0.088 {+-} 0.049 {+-} 0.013 and C = 0.34 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.05, where the first errors are statistical and the second systematic. For the mixing-induced CP-violation parameter we find S = -0.10 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.04, and for the dilution and strong phase shift parameters respectively, we obtain {Delta}C = 0.15 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.03 and {Delta}S = 0.22 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.03. For the angle alpha of the Unitarity Triangle we measure (113{sub -17}{sup +27} {+-} 6){sup o}, while only a weak constraint is achieved at the significance level of more than two standard deviations. Finally, for the relative strong phase {delta}{sub {+-}} between the B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} transitions we find (-67{sub -31}{sup +28} {+-} 7) deg, with a similarly weak constraint at two standard deviations and beyond.

  5. B0 --> K+ pi- pi0 Dalitz Plot Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Z

    2004-08-16

    The authors present preliminary results on the Dalitz plot analysis of B{sup 0} --> K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decays. The data sample comprises 213 million {Upsilon}(4S) --> B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. They report measurements of the inclusive branching fraction, quasi-two-body fractions and CP-violating charge asymmetries for intermediate states including K*(892){sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {rho}(770){sup -}K{sup +}. Observations of B{sup 0} decays to the K{pi}S-wave intermediate states, K{sub 0}*(1430){sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K{sub 0}*(1430){sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, are reported. Evidence of the decay B{sup 0} --> K*(892){sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} is seen. They set upper limits at 90% confidence level on branching fractions of the nonresonant and other less significant intermediate states.

  6. Measurement of cos2beta in B;{0}-->D;{(*)}h;{0} decays with a time-dependent Dalitz plot analysis of D-->K_{s};{0}pi;{+}pi;{-}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Vazquez, W Panduro; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Bailey, D; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N

    2007-12-07

    We study the time-dependent Dalitz plot of D-->K_{S};{0}pi;{+}pi;{-} in B;{0}-->D;{(*)}h;{0} decays, where h;{0} is a pi;{0}, eta, eta;{'}, or omega meson and D;{*}-->Dpi;{0}, using a data sample of 383x10;{6} Upsilon(4S)-->BB[over ] decays collected with the BABAR detector. We determine cos2beta=0.42+/-0.49+/-0.09+/-0.13, sin2beta=0.29+/-0.34+/-0.03+/-0.05, and |lambda|=1.01+/-0.08+/-0.02, where the first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic uncertainty, and the third, where given, is the Dalitz model uncertainty. Assuming the world average value for sin2beta and |lambda|=1, cos2beta>0 is preferred over cos2beta<0 at 86% confidence level.

  7. Dalitz plot analysis of the D+ ---> K- pi+ pi+ decay in the FOCUS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; /UC, Davis; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /CINVESTAV, IPN /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U.

    2007-05-01

    Using data collected by the high energy photoproduction experiment FOCUS at Fermilab we performed a Dalitz plot analysis of the Cabibbo favored decay D{sup +} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. This study uses 53653 Dalitz-plot events with a signal fraction of {approx} 97%, and represents the highest statistics, most complete Dalitz plot analysis for this channel. Results are presented and discussed using two different formalisms. The first is a simple sum of Breit-Wigner functions with freely fitted masses and widths. It is the model traditionally adopted and serves as comparison with the already published analyses. The second uses a K-matrix approach for the dominant S-wave, in which the parameters are fixed by first fitting K{pi} scattering data and continued to threshold by Chiral Perturbation Theory. We show that the Dalitz plot distribution for this decay is consistent with the assumption of two body dominance of the final state interactions and the description of these interactions is in agreement with other data on the K{pi} final state.

  8. Constraints on the unitarity triangle angle gamma from Dalitz plot analysis of B-0 -> DK+pi(-) decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Beteta, C. Abellan; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. -T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Gobel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hongming, L.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. -N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Rodrigues, B. Osorio; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Lopez, J. A. Rodriguez; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, I. T.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vazquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-01-01

    The first study is presented of CP violation with an amplitude analysis of the Dalitz plot of B-0 -> DK+pi(-) decays, with D -> K+pi(-), K+K-, and pi(+)pi(-). The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding to 3.0 fb(-1) of pp collisions collected with the LHCb detector. No significant CP

  9. Dalitz Plot Analysis of the Decay B+ -> K+K+K-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvoretskii, Alexei; /SLAC /Caltech

    2006-05-05

    The authors perform an analysis of the three-body charmless decay B{sup {+-}} {yields} K{sup {+-}}K{sup {+-}}K{sup {-+}} using a sample of 226.0 {+-} 2.5 million B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector and measure the total branching fraction and Cp asymmetry to be {beta} = (35.2 {+-} 0.9 {+-} 1.6) x 10{sup -6} and A{sub CP} = (-1.7 {+-} 2.6 {+-} 1.5)%. They fit the Dalitz plot distribution using an isobar model and report the measured values of magnitudes and phases of the production coefficients. The decay dynamics is dominated by the K{sup +}K{sup -} S-wave, for which we perform a partial-wave analysis in the region m(K{sup +}K{sup -}) < 2 GeV/c{sup 2}. They find no evidence of CP violation for individual components of the isobar model.

  10. Dalitz Plot Analysis of $B^0_d \\to K+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$ Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhitang; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-05-05

    This thesis describes a Dalitz plot analysis of B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decays. The data sample comprises 213 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California (SLAC). Preliminary results are presented for measurements of the inclusive branching fraction, quasi-two-body fractions and CP-violating charge asymmetries for intermediate states including K*(892){sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {rho}(770){sup -}K{sup +}. Observations of B{sup 0} decays to the K{pi} S-wave intermediate states, K*{sub 0}(1430){sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K*{sub 0}(1430){sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, are reported. Evidence of the decay B{sup 0} {yields} K*(892){sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} is seen. We set upper limits at 90% confidence level on branching fractions of the nonresonant and other less significant intermediate states.

  11. Measurement of CP violation parameters with a Dalitz plot analysis of B{+/-}-->D{pi{+}pi{-}pi{0}}K{+/-}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L

    2007-12-21

    We report the results of a CP violation analysis of the decay B{+/-}-->D{pi{+}pi{-}pi;{0}}K{+/-}, where D{pi{+}pi{-}pi{0}} indicates a neutral D meson detected in the final state pi{+}pi{-}pi{0}, excluding K{S}{0}pi{0}. The analysis makes use of 324 x 10{6}e{+}e{-}-->BB[over ] events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e;{+}e;{-} storage ring. Analyzing the pi;{+}pi;{-}pi;{0} Dalitz plot distribution and the B{+/-}-->D{pi{+}pi{-}pi{0}}K{+/-} branching fraction and decay rate asymmetry, we find the following one-standard-deviation constraints on the amplitude ratio and on the weak and strong phases: 0.06pi{+}pi{-}pi{0} decay amplitude.

  12. Evidence for CP violation in B+ -> K*(892)(+)pi(0) from a Dalitz plot analysis of B+ -> K-S(0) pi(+)pi(0) decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Sevilla, M. Franco; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Rohrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Buenger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Gruenberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lindemann, D.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.

    2017-01-01

    We report a Dalitz plot analysis of charmless hadronic decays of charged B mesons to the final state K 0 Sπ+π0 using the full BABAR data set of 470.9±2.8  million B ¯ B events collected at the Υ(4S) resonance. We measure the overall branching fraction and CP asymmetry to be

  13. Measurement of the CKM angle φ1 in B0D¯(*)0h0 , D¯0KS0π+π- decays with time-dependent binned Dalitz plot analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobyev, V.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Badhrees, I.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Behera, P.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Danilov, M.; Dash, N.; Di Carlo, S.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Greenwald, D.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hou, W. -S.; Inami, K.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jaegle, I.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, S. H.; Kinoshita, K.; Kodyš, P.; Kotchetkov, D.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y. -J.; Lange, J. S.; Li, C. H.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lubej, M.; Masuda, M.; Matsuda, T.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mussa, R.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nath, K. J.; Nayak, M.; Negishi, K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C. -S.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Paul, S.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Rauch, J.; Ritter, M.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schlüter, T.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shiu, J. -G.; Shwartz, B.; Simon, F.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Strube, J. F.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takizawa, M.; Tenchini, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vinokurova, A.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M. -Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Yelton, J.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhukova, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2016-09-06

    Measurement of the CKM angle Ψ 1 in B°→ $\\bar{D}$(*)0h0,$\\bar{D}$0→ K$0\\atop{s}$π+π- decays with time-dependent binned Dalitz plot analysis

  14. Constraints on the unitarity triangle angle γ from Dalitz plot analysis of B0→D K+π- decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hongming, L.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The first study is presented of C P violation with an amplitude analysis of the Dalitz plot of B0→D K+π- decays, with D →K+π-, K+K-, and π+π-. The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding to 3.0 fb-1 of p p collisions collected with the LHCb detector. No significant C P violation effect is seen, and constraints are placed on the angle γ of the unitarity triangle formed from elements of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix. Hadronic parameters associated with the B0→D K*(892 )0 decay are determined for the first time. These measurements can be used to improve the sensitivity to γ of existing and future studies of the B0→D K*(892 )0 decay.

  15. Investigation of the Charmless Decay B±→ K± K K± Using a Dalitz Plot Analysis at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Alistair Jepson [Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2006-09-01

    Results of an amplitude analysis of the B±→ K± K K± Dalitz plot are presented. The analysis is made using an integrated luminosity of 210.6 fb-1, recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory. This dataset corresponds to 231.8 million B$\\bar{B}$ pairs.

  16. A model-independent Dalitz plot analysis of $B^\\pm \\to D K^\\pm$ with $D \\to K^0_{\\rm S} h^+h^-$ ($h=\\pi, K$) decays and constraints on the CKM angle $\\gamma$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R.; Adametz, A.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves Jr, A.A.; Amato, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Appleby, R.B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J.J.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R.J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bates, A.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P.M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blanks, C.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N.H.; Brown, H.; Buchler-Germann, A.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chen, P.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H.V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G.A.; Craik, D.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P.N.Y.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; de Miranda, J.M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Buono, L.; Deplano, C.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dickens, J.; Dijkstra, H.; Diniz Batista, P.; Domingo Bonal, F.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisenhardt, S.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Elsby, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Falabella, A.; Farber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garnier, J-C.; Garofoli, J.; Garosi, P.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V.V.; Gobel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gandara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L.A.; Grauges, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Grunberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S.C.; Hall, S.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S.T.; Harrison, J.; Harrison, P.F.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J.A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicks, E.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Ilten, P.; Imong, J.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jahjah Hussein, M.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jaton, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C.R.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T.M.; Keaveney, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kim, Y.M.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, V.; Koopman, R.F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V.N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R.W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; von Loeben, J.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Luisier, J.; Raighne, A.Mac; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I.V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Magnin, J.; Maino, M.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mangiafave, N.; Marconi, U.; Marki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin, L.; Martin Sanchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Massafferri, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matveev, M.; Maurice, E.; Mazurov, A.; McCarthy, J.; McGregor, G.; McNulty, R.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Merkel, J.; Milanes, D.A.; Minard, M.N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Muller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A.D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J.M.; Owen, P.; Pal, B.K.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C.J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G.D.; Patel, M.; Patrick, G.N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perego, D.L.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pie Valls, B.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Qian, W.; Rademacker, J.H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M.S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reid, M.M.; Reis, A.C.dos; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D.A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogers, G.J.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J.J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salzmann, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Sannino, M.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santinelli, R.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Schaack, P.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schleich, S.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shatalov, P.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N.A.; Smith, E.; Smith, M.; Sobczak, K.; Soler, F.J.P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V.K.; Swientek, S.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M.T.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M.Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Urner, D.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J.J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Videau, I.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Visniakov, J.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D.R.; Watson, N.K.; Webber, A.D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M.P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F.F.; Wishahi, J.; Witek, M.; Witzeling, W.; Wotton, S.A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, F.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Young, R.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2012-01-01

    A binned Dalitz plot analysis of $B^\\pm \\to D K^\\pm$ decays, with $D \\to K^0_{\\rm S} \\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $D \\to K^0_{\\rm S} K^+ K^-$, is performed to measure the $CP$-violating observables $x_{\\pm}$ and $y_{\\pm}$ which are sensitive to the CKM angle $\\gamma$. The analysis exploits 1.0~$\\rm fb^{-1}$ of data collected by the LHCb experiment. The study makes no model-based assumption on the variation of the strong phase of the $D$ decay amplitude over the Dalitz plot, but uses measurements of this quantity from CLEO-c as input. The values of the parameters are found to be $x_- = (0.0 \\pm 4.3 \\pm 1.5 \\pm 0.6) \\times 10^{-2}$, $y_- = (2.7 \\pm 5.2 \\pm 0.8 \\pm 2.3) \\times 10^{-2}$, $x_+ = ( -10.3 \\pm 4.5 \\pm 1.8 \\pm 1.4 )\\times 10^{-2}$ and $y_+ = (-0.9 \\pm 3.7 \\pm 0.8 \\pm 3.0)\\times 10^{-2}$. The first, second, and third uncertainties are the statistical, the experimental systematic, and the error associated with the precision of the strong-phase parameters measured at CLEO-c, respectively. These results correspond to ...

  17. On a CP anisotropy measurement in the Dalitz plot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bediaga, I.; Gomes, A.; Guerrer, G.; Miranda, J.; Reis, A. C. dos; Bigi, I. I.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel use of the Dalitz plot to probe CP symmetry in three-body modes of B and D mesons. It is based on an observable inspired by astronomers' practice, namely the significance in the difference between corresponding Dalitz plot bins. It provides a model-independent mapping of local CP asymmetries. We illustrate the method for probing CP symmetry in the two complementary cases of B and D decays: in the former sizable or even large effects can be expected, yet have to be differentiated against leading standard model contributions, while in the latter one cannot count on sizable effects, yet has to deal with much less standard model background.

  18. Empirical parameterization of the $K^{+-} \\to \\pi^{+-}\\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}$ decay Dalitz plot

    CERN Document Server

    Batley, J R

    2010-01-01

    As first observed by the NA48/2 experiment at the CERN SPS, the $\\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}$ invariant mass ($M_{00}$) distribution from $K^{\\+-} -> \\pi^{+-}\\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}$ decay shows a cusp-like anomaly at $M_{00}=2m_{+}$, where $m_+$ is the charged pion mass. An analysis to extract the $\\pi\\pi$ scattering lengths in the isospin $I=0$ and $I=2$ states, $a_0$ and $a_2$, respectively, has been recently reported. In the present work the Dalitz plot of this decay is fitted to a new empirical parameterization suitable for practical purposes, such as Monte Carlo simulations of $K^{+-}->\\pi^{+-}\\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}$ decays.

  19. Study of CP Violation in Dalitz-Plot Analyses of B-Meson Decays to Three Kaons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindquist, Brian [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The Standard Model (SM) explains CP violation in terms of the CKM matrix. The BABAR experiment was designed mainly to test the CKM model in B decays. B decays that proceed through b → s loop diagrams, of which B {yields} KKK decays are an example, are sensitive to new physics effects that could lead to deviations from the CKM predictions for CP violation. We present studies of CP violation in the decays B+ → K+K-K+, B+ → KS0KS0K+, and B0 → K+K-KS0, using a Dalitz plot amplitude analysis. These studies are based on approximately 470 million B$\\bar{B}$ decays collected by BABAR at the PEP-II collider at SLAC. We perform measurements of time-dependent CP violation in B0 → K+K-KS0, including B0 → ΦKS0. We measure a CP-violating phase βeff (ΦKS0) = 0.36 ± 0.11 ± 0.04 rad., in agreement with the SM. This is the world's most precise measurement of this quantity. We also measure direct CP asymmetries in all three decay modes, including the direct CP asymmetry ACP (ΦK+) = (12.8 ± 4.4 ± 1.3)%, which is 2.8 sigma away from zero. This measurement is in tension with the SM, which predicts an asymmetry of a few percent. We also study the resonant and nonresonant features in the B → KKK Dalitz plots. We find that the hypothetical scalar fX(1500) resonance, introduced by prior analyses to explain an unknown peak in the mKK spectrum, cannot adequately describe the data. We conclude instead that the fX(1500) can be explained as the sum of the f0(1500), f'2(1525), and f0(1710) resonances, removing the need for the hypothetical fX(1500). We also find that an exponential

  20. Measurement of the ω→π+π−π0 Dalitz plot distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Adlarson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Using the production reactions pd→He3ω and pp→ppω, the Dalitz plot distribution for the ω→π+π−π0 decay is studied with the WASA detector at COSY, based on a combined data sample of (4.408±0.042×104 events. The Dalitz plot density is parametrised by a product of the P-wave phase space and a polynomial expansion in the normalised polar Dalitz plot variables Z and ϕ. For the first time, a deviation from pure P-wave phase space is observed with a significance of 4.1σ. The deviation is parametrised by a linear term 1+2αZ, with α determined to be +0.147±0.036, consistent with the expectations of ρ-meson-type final-state interactions of the P-wave pion pairs.

  1. Dalitz Plot Analyses of B^- \\to D^+ \\pi^-\\pi^-, B^+ \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ and D^+_s \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ at BABAR

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Liaoyuan; Collaboration, for the BABAR

    2009-01-01

    We report on the Dalitz plot analyses of B^- \\to D^+ \\pi^-\\pi^-, B^+ \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ and D^+_s \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+. The Dalitz plot method and the most recent BABAR results are discussed.

  2. Dalitz Plot Study of B0 to K+K-K0s Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-07-27

    We present a study of the dynamics in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0} decays with approximately 230 million B{bar B} events collected by the BABAR detector at SLAC. They find that the Dalitz plot distribution is best parameterized with the {phi}K{sub S}{sup 0} mode, an S-wave K{sup +}K{sup -} resonance near 1500 MeV/c{sup 2}, and a large non-resonant contribution. We set limits on resonances not included in the model, and study models for the non-resonant contribution.

  3. Amplitude Analysis and Measurement of the Time-dependent CP Asymmetry of B0 to KsKsKs Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-04-11

    We present the first results on the Dalitz-plot structure and improved measurements of the time-dependent CP-violation parameters of the process B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0} obtained using 468 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. The Dalitz-plot structure is probed by a time-integrated amplitude analysis that does not distinguish between B{sup 0} and {bar B}{sup 0} decays. We measure the total inclusive branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}) = (6.19 {+-} 0.48 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -6}, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third represents the Dalitz-plot signal model dependence. We also observe evidence for the intermediate resonant states f{sub 0}(980), f{sub 0}(1710), and f{sub 2}(2010). Their respective product branching fractions are measured to be (2.70{sub -1.19}{sup +1.25} {+-} 0.36 {+-} 1.17) x 10{sup -6}, (0.50{sub -0.24}{sup +0.46} {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.10) x 10{sup -6}, and (0.54{sub -0.20}{sup +0.21} {+-} 0.03 {+-} 0.52) x 10{sup -6}. Additionally, we determine the mixing-induced CP-violation parameters to be S = -0.94{sub -0.21}{sup +0.24} {+-} 0.06 and C = -0.17 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.04, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. These values are in agreement with the standard model expectation.

  4. Measurement of the quadratic slope parameter in the $K_{L}\\rightarrow 3\\pi^{0}$ decay Dalitz plot

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, A; Musa, L; Bevan, A; Dosanjh, R S; Gershon, T J; Hay, B; Kalmus, George Ernest; Munday, D J; Needham, M D; Olaiya, E; Parker, M A; White, T O; Wotton, S A; Barr, Giles David; Blümer, H; Bocquet, G; Ceccucci, Augusto; Cundy, Donald C; D'Agostini, Giulio; Doble, Niels T; Falaleev, V P; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Govi, G; Grafström, P; Kubischta, Werner; Lacourt, A; Lenti, M; Luitz, S; Norton, Alan Robert; Palestini, S; Panzer-Steindel, B; Tatishvili, G T; Taureg, Hans; Velasco, M; Wahl, H; Cheshkov, C; Khristov, P Z; Kekelidze, V D; Madigozhin, D T; Molokanova, N A; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Zinchenko, A I; Knowles, I; Lazzeroni, C; Martin, V; Parsons, H; Sacco, R; Walker, A; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Duclos, J; Frabetti, P L; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Savrié, M; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Collazuol, G; Graziani, G; Iacopini, E; Becker, H G; Eppard, M; Fox, H; Holtz, K; Kalter, A; Kleinknecht, K; Koch, U; Köpke, L; Pellmann, I A; Peters, A; Renk, B; Schmidt, S A; Schönharting, V; Schué, Yu; Wanke, R; Winhart, A; Chollet, J C; Crépé, S; Fayard, Louis; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Ocariz, J; Unal, G; Wingerter-Seez, I; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Cenci, P; Imbergamo, E; Lubrano, P; Mestvirishvili, A; Nappi, A; Pepé, M; Piccini, M; Carosi, R; Casali, R; Cerri, C; Cirilli, M; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Giudici, Sergio; Gorini, B; Mannelli, I; Pierazzini, G M; Sozzi, M; Chèze, J B; Cogan, J; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Formica, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Turlay, René; Vallage, B; Augustin, I; Bender, M; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; Arcidiacono, R; Biino, C; Marchetto, F; Menichetti, E; Pastrone, N; Nassalski, J P; Rondio, Ewa; Szleper, M; Wislicki, W; Wronka, S; Dibon, Heinz; Fischer, G; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Mikulec, I; Neuhofer, Günther; Pernicka, Manfred; Taurok, Anton

    2001-01-01

    A value of \\( (-6.1\\pm 0.9_{stat}\\pm 0.5_{syst})\\times 10^{-3} \\) is obtained for the quadratic slope parameter \\( h \\) in the \\( K_{L}\\rightarrow 3\\pi ^{0} \\) decay Dalitz plot at the NA48 experiment at the CERN SPS. The result is based on \\( 14.7\\times 10^{6} \\) fully reconstructed \\( K_{L}\\rightarrow 3\\pi ^{0}\\rightarrow 6\\gamma \\) decays. This is the most precise measurement of any of the Dalitz plot slope parameters in the charged and neutral kaon decays so far.

  5. Disentangling weak and strong interactions in B → K*(→ Kπ)π Dalitz-plot analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, Jerome [CNRS, Aix-Marseille Univ., Universite de Toulon, CPT UMR 7332, Marseille (France); Descotes-Genon, Sebastien [CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Universite Paris-Saclay, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique (UMR 8627), Orsay (France); Ocariz, Jose [Sorbonne Universites, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, UMR 7585, LPNHE, Paris (France); Universite Paris Diderot, LPNHE UMR 7585, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Perez Perez, Alejandro [Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS, IPHC UMR 7178, Strasbourg (France); Collaboration: For the CKMfitter Group

    2017-08-15

    Dalitz-plot analyses of B → Kππ decays provide direct access to decay amplitudes, and thereby weak and strong phases can be disentangled by resolving the interference patterns in phase space between intermediate resonant states. A phenomenological isospin analysis of B → K*(→ Kπ)π decay amplitudes is presented exploiting available amplitude analyses performed at the BaBar, Belle and LHCb experiments. A first application consists in constraining the CKM parameters thanks to an external hadronic input. A method, proposed some time ago by two different groups and relying on a bound on the electroweak penguin contribution, is shown to lack the desired robustness and accuracy, and we propose a more alluring alternative using a bound on the annihilation contribution. A second application consists in extracting information on hadronic amplitudes assuming the values of the CKM parameters from a global fit to quark flavour data. The current data yields several solutions, which do not fully support the hierarchy of hadronic amplitudes usually expected from theoretical arguments (colour suppression, suppression of electroweak penguins), as illustrated from computations within QCD factorisation. Some prospects concerning the impact of future measurements at LHCb and Belle II are also presented. Results are obtained with the CKMfitter analysis package, featuring the frequentist statistical approach and using the Rfit scheme to handle theoretical uncertainties. (orig.)

  6. First observation of the Charmless Decay B to K π0π0 and Study of its Dalitz Plot Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puccio, Eugenia Maria Teresa Irene [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-01

    Results for the first measurement of the inclusive branching and CP asymmetry of the charmless 3-body decay B+ → K+π0π0 are presented. The analysis uses a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 429.0 fb-1, recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory. This sample corresponds to 470.9 ±} 2.8 million B$\\bar{B}$ pairs. Measurements of the branching fractions (B) and CP asymmetries (ACP) of some of the intermediate resonances in the K+π0π0 Dalitz plot are also presented.

  7. Dalitz plot studies of D0 → KS0π+π− decays in a factorization approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leśniak Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A quasi two-body QCD factorization is used to study the D0 → KS0π+π− decays. The presently available high-statistics Dalitz plot data of this process measured by the Belle and BABAR Collaborations are analyzed together with the τ− → KS0π−ντ decay data. The total experimental branching fraction is also included in the fits which show a very good overall agreement with the experimental Dalitz plot density distributions. The branching fractions of the dominant channels compare well with those of the isobar Belle or BABAR models. We show that the branching fractions corresponding to the annihilation amplitudes are significant.

  8. Measurement of CP-Violating Asymmetries in the B0 to K+K-K0 Dalitz Plot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dujmic, D.

    2006-09-26

    The authors present a preliminary measurement of CP-violation parameters in the decay B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup 0}, using approximately 347 million B{bar B} events collected by the BABAR detector at SLAC. Reconstructing the neutral kaon as K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, or K{sub L}{sup 0}, they analyze the Dalitz plot distribution and measure fractions to intermediate states. They extract CP parameters from the asymmetries in amplitudes and phases between B{sup 0} and {bar B}{sup 0} decays across the Dalitz plot. For decays to {phi}K{sup 0}, they find {beta}{sub eff} = 0.06 {+-} 0.16 {+-} 0.05, A{sub CP} = -0.18 {+-} 0.20 {+-} 0.10, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second one is systematic. For decays to f{sub 0}K{sup 0}, they find {beta}{sub eff} = 0.18 {+-} 0.19 {+-} 0.04, A{sub CP} = 0.45 {+-} 0.28 {+-} 0.10. Combining all K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup 0} events and taking account of the different CP eigenvalues of the individual Dalitz plot components, they find {beta}{sub eff} = 0.361 {+-} 0.079 {+-} 0.037, A{sub CP} = -0.034 {+-} 0.079 {+-} 0.025. The trigonometric reflection at {pi}/2 - {beta}{sub eff} is disfavored at 4.6{sigma}. They also study angular distributions in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {phi}K{sup +} decays and measure the direct CP asymmetry in B{sup +} {yields} {phi}K{sup +} decays, A{sub CP} = 0.046 {+-} 0.046 {+-} 0.017.

  9. η→3π: Study of the Dalitz Plot and Extraction of the Quark Mass Ratio Q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Lanz, Stefan; Leutwyler, Heinrich; Passemar, Emilie

    2017-01-13

    The η→3π amplitude is sensitive to the quark mass difference m_{u}-m_{d} and offers a unique way to determine the quark mass ratio Q^{2}≡(m_{s}^{2}-m_{ud}^{2})/(m_{d}^{2}-m_{u}^{2}) from experiment. We calculate the amplitude dispersively and fit the KLOE Collaboration data on the charged mode, varying the subtraction constants in the range allowed by chiral perturbation theory. The parameter-free predictions obtained for the neutral Dalitz plot and the neutral-to-charged branching ratio are in excellent agreement with experiment. Our representation of the transition amplitude implies Q=22.0±0.7.

  10. Determination of the Dalitz plot parameter {alpha} for the decay {eta}{yields}3{pi}{sup 0} with the Crystal Ball at MAMI-B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unverzagt, M.; Beck, R.; Lang, M.; Nikolaev, A.; Schumann, S. [University Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); University Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Aguar-Bartolome, P.; Ahrens, J.; Arends, H.J.; Heid, E.; Jahn, O.; Krambrich, D.; Martinez-Fabregate, M.; Rost, M.; Thomas, A.; Walcher, T. [University Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Annand, J.R.M.; Codling, R.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I.J.D.; McGeorge, J.C.; Owens, R.O.; Rosner, G. [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Bekrenev, V. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Boillat, B.; Krusche, B.; Zehr, F. [University Basel, Institut fuer Physik, Basel (Switzerland); Braghieri, A.; Pedroni, P.; Rostomyan, T. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Branford, D.; Glazier, D.I.; Tarbert, C.M.; Watts, D.P. [Univ. of Edinburgh, School of Physics, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Briscoe, W.J. [The George Washington Univ., Center for Nuclear Studies, Washington, D.C. (United States); Brudvik, J.W.; Nefkens, B.M.K.; Prakhov, S.N.; Price, J.W.; Starostin, A. [Univ. of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Cherepnya, S.; Fil' kov, L.V.; Kashevarov, V.L. [Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Downie, E.J. [Univ. Mainz, Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Univ. of Glasgow, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Gregor, R.; Kotulla, M.; Lugert, S.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R. [Univ. Giessen, II. Physikalisches Inst., Giessen (Germany); Hornidge, D. [Mount Allison Univ., Sackville, NB (Canada); Kondratiev, R.; Lisin, V.; Polonski, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Korolija, M.; Mekterovic, D.; Supek, I. [Rudjer Boskovic Inst., Zagreb (Croatia); Manley, D.M. [Kent State Univ., Kent, OH (United States); Sober, D. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2009-02-15

    A precise measurement of the Dalitz plot parameter, {alpha}, for the {eta}{yields}3{pi}{sup 0} decay is presented. The experiment was performed with the Crystal Ball and TAPS large-acceptance photon detectors at the tagged photon beam facility of the MAMI-B electron accelerator in Mainz. High statistics of 1.8.10{sup 6} {eta}{yields}3{pi}{sup 0} events were obtained, giving the result {alpha}=-0.032{+-}0.002{sub stat}{+-}0.002{sub syst}. (orig.)

  11. Time dependent analysis and amplitude analysis of B0 → Ks0Ks0Ks0 decays with the BaBar experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitt, S.

    2010-09-01

    Two independent analyses of the decay channel B 0 → K s 0 K s 0 K s 0 have been performed on a data sample of 468 millions of BB-bar pairs recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at SLAC National Laboratory. The first analysis is a phase-space-integrated time-dependent analysis to extract the CP violation parameters S and C from the two sub-modes B 0 → 3K s 0 (π + π - ) and B 0 → 2K s 0 (π + π - )K s 0 (π 0 π 0 ) simultaneously and to compare them to the charmonium measurements. The result is: S = -0.94+0.24-0.21±0.06 and C = -0.17+0.18-0.18±0.04, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematical. The result is compatible within uncertainties with the Standard Model prediction and the charmonium modes measurements. The second analysis is a time-integrated amplitude (or Dalitz plot) analysis to extract the inclusive branching fraction and the branching fractions of the resonant modes that contribute to the decay. The result of the first amplitude analysis of this decay channel is: B(B 0 → K s 0 K s 0 K s 0 ) equal to (6.18 ± 0.47 ± 0.14 ± 0.06)*10 -6 ; B(B 0 → f 0 (980)K s 0 with f 0 (980) → K s 0 K s 0 ) equal to (2.69+1.25-1.18±0.35±1.87)*10 -6 ; B(B 0 → f 0 (1710)K s 0 with f 0 (1710) → K s 0 K s 0 ) equal to (0.50+0.46-0.23±0.04±0.12)*10 -6 ; B(B 0 → f 2 (2010)K s 0 with f 2 (2010) → K s 0 K s 0 ) equal to (0.54+0.21-0.20±0.03±0.44)*10 -6 ; B(B 0 → Nonresonant with K s 0 K s 0 K s 0 ) equal to (13.31+2.23-2.30±0.55±2.77)*10 -6 ; B(B 0 → χ c0 K s 0 with χ c0 → K s 0 K s 0 ) equal to (0.46+0.25-0.16±0.01±0.19)*10 -6 ; where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematical and the third corresponds to Dalitz plot model uncertainties. No significant contribution of the controversial f X (1500) resonance has been found. (author)

  12. Determination of the Dalitz-plot parameter {alpha} for the decay {eta}{yields}3{pi}{sup 0} with the Crystal Ball at MAMI; Bestimmung des Dalitz-Plot-Parameters {alpha} fuer den Zerfall {eta} {yields} 3{pi}{sup 0} mit dem Crystal Ball am MAMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unverzagt, Marc

    2008-05-26

    In order to determine the Dalitz-plot parameter {alpha} experiments were evaluated, Which were performed with the Crystal Ball/TAPS facility at the accelerator MAMI of the Institute for Nuclear Physics at the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz in the years 2004 and 2005. {eta} mesons wer produced via the reaction {gamma}p{yields}{eta}p. From four different analyses the following four in this thesis determined Dalitz-plot parameters with the given statistics resulted: {eta} without proton: {alpha}=-0.0314{+-}0.0013{sub -0.0014}{sup +0.0017} (1.1.10{sup 6} events), {eta} with proton: {alpha}=-0.0338{+-}0.0020{sub -0.0022}{sup +0.0019} (4.2.10{sup 5} events), {delta}{sup +} magnetic dipole moment without proton: {alpha}=-0.0277{+-}0.0013{sub -0.0019}{sup +0.0014} (7.1.10{sup 5} events), {delta}{sup +} magnetic dipole moment with proton: {alpha}=-0.0272{+-}0.0019{sub -0.0043}{sup +0.0022} (3.1.10{sup 5} events).

  13. Time dependent analysis of concrete in SAP2000

    OpenAIRE

    Varona Moya, Francisco de Borja

    2018-01-01

    This document presents an example of time-dependent analysis of a concrete column using SAP2000. In order to understand the parameters required by the software to run the analysis, the formulation of time dependent properties of concrete according to Model Code 1990 is included.

  14. Time-dependent reliability sensitivity analysis of motion mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Pengfei; Song, Jingwen; Lu, Zhenzhou; Yue, Zhufeng

    2016-01-01

    Reliability sensitivity analysis aims at identifying the source of structure/mechanism failure, and quantifying the effects of each random source or their distribution parameters on failure probability or reliability. In this paper, the time-dependent parametric reliability sensitivity (PRS) analysis as well as the global reliability sensitivity (GRS) analysis is introduced for the motion mechanisms. The PRS indices are defined as the partial derivatives of the time-dependent reliability w.r.t. the distribution parameters of each random input variable, and they quantify the effect of the small change of each distribution parameter on the time-dependent reliability. The GRS indices are defined for quantifying the individual, interaction and total contributions of the uncertainty in each random input variable to the time-dependent reliability. The envelope function method combined with the first order approximation of the motion error function is introduced for efficiently estimating the time-dependent PRS and GRS indices. Both the time-dependent PRS and GRS analysis techniques can be especially useful for reliability-based design. This significance of the proposed methods as well as the effectiveness of the envelope function method for estimating the time-dependent PRS and GRS indices are demonstrated with a four-bar mechanism and a car rack-and-pinion steering linkage. - Highlights: • Time-dependent parametric reliability sensitivity analysis is presented. • Time-dependent global reliability sensitivity analysis is presented for mechanisms. • The proposed method is especially useful for enhancing the kinematic reliability. • An envelope method is introduced for efficiently implementing the proposed methods. • The proposed method is demonstrated by two real planar mechanisms.

  15. Time-Dependent Neutron and Photon Dose-Field Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooten, Hasani Omar [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2005-08-01

    A unique tool is developed that allows the user to model physical representations of complicated glovebox facilities in two dimensions and determine neutral-particle flux and ambient dose-equivalent fields throughout that geometry. The Pandemonium code, originally designed to determine flux and dose-rates only, is improved to include realistic glovebox geometries, time-dependent source and detector positions, time-dependent shielding thickness calculations, time-integrated doses, a representative criticality accident scenario based on time-dependent reactor kinetics, and more rigorous photon treatment. A primary benefit of this work has been an extensive analysis and improvement of the photon model that is not limited to the application described in this thesis. The photon model has been extended in energy range to 10 MeV to include photons from fission and new photon buildup factors have been included that account for the effects of photon buildup at slant-path thicknesses as a function of angle, where the mean free path thickness has been preserved. The overall system of codes is user-friendly and it is directly applicable to facilities such as the plutonium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, where high-intensity neutron and photon emitters are regularly used. The codes may be used to determine a priori doses for given work scenarios in an effort to supply dose information to process models which will in turn assist decision makers on ensuring as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) compliance. In addition, coupling the computational results of these tools with the process model visualization tools will help to increase worker safety and radiological safety awareness.

  16. Time-dependent reliability analysis and condition assessment of structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingwood, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Structures generally play a passive role in assurance of safety in nuclear plant operation, but are important if the plant is to withstand the effect of extreme environmental or abnormal events. Relative to mechanical and electrical components, structural systems and components would be difficult and costly to replace. While the performance of steel or reinforced concrete structures in service generally has been very good, their strengths may deteriorate during an extended service life as a result of changes brought on by an aggressive environment, excessive loading, or accidental loading. Quantitative tools for condition assessment of aging structures can be developed using time-dependent structural reliability analysis methods. Such methods provide a framework for addressing the uncertainties attendant to aging in the decision process

  17. Time-dependent, multimode interaction analysis of the gyroklystron amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swati, M. V., E-mail: swati.mv.ece10@iitbhu.ac.in; Chauhan, M. S.; Jain, P. K. [Department of Electronics Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2016-08-15

    In this paper, a time-dependent multimode nonlinear analysis for the gyroklystron amplifier has been developed by extending the analysis of gyrotron oscillators by employing the self-consistent approach. The nonlinear analysis developed here has been validated by taking into account the reported experimental results for a 32.3 GHz, three cavity, second harmonic gyroklystron operating in the TE{sub 02} mode. The analysis has been used to estimate the temporal RF growth in the operating mode as well as the nearby competing modes. Device gain and bandwidth have been computed for different drive powers and frequencies. The effect of various beam parameters, such as beam voltage, beam current, and pitch factor, has also been studied. The computational results have estimated the gyroklystron saturated RF power ∼319 kW at 32.3 GHz with efficiency ∼23% and gain ∼26.3 dB with device bandwidth ∼0.027% (8 MHz) for a 70 kV, 20 A electron beam. The computed results are found to be in agreement with the experimental values within 10%.

  18. Time-dependent reliability analysis of flood defences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buijs, F.A.; Hall, J.W.; Sayers, P.B.; Gelder, P.H.A.J.M. van

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the underlying theory and a practical process for establishing time-dependent reliability models for components in a realistic and complex flood defence system. Though time-dependent reliability models have been applied frequently in, for example, the offshore, structural safety and nuclear industry, application in the safety-critical field of flood defence has to date been limited. The modelling methodology involves identifying relevant variables and processes, characterisation of those processes in appropriate mathematical terms, numerical implementation, parameter estimation and prediction. A combination of stochastic, hierarchical and parametric processes is employed. The approach is demonstrated for selected deterioration mechanisms in the context of a flood defence system. The paper demonstrates that this structured methodology enables the definition of credible statistical models for time-dependence of flood defences in data scarce situations. In the application of those models one of the main findings is that the time variability in the deterioration process tends to be governed the time-dependence of one or a small number of critical attributes. It is demonstrated how the need for further data collection depends upon the relevance of the time-dependence in the performance of the flood defence system.

  19. FRANTIC: a computer code for time dependent unavailability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesely, W.E.; Goldberg, F.F.

    1977-03-01

    The FRANTIC computer code evaluates the time dependent and average unavailability for any general system model. The code is written in FORTRAN IV for the IBM 370 computer. Non-repairable components, monitored components, and periodically tested components are handled. One unique feature of FRANTIC is the detailed, time dependent modeling of periodic testing which includes the effects of test downtimes, test overrides, detection inefficiencies, and test-caused failures. The exponential distribution is used for the component failure times and periodic equations are developed for the testing and repair contributions. Human errors and common mode failures can be included by assigning an appropriate constant probability for the contributors. The output from FRANTIC consists of tables and plots of the system unavailability along with a breakdown of the unavailability contributions. Sensitivity studies can be simply performed and a wide range of tables and plots can be obtained for reporting purposes. The FRANTIC code represents a first step in the development of an approach that can be of direct value in future system evaluations. Modifications resulting from use of the code, along with the development of reliability data based on operating reactor experience, can be expected to provide increased confidence in its use and potential application to the licensing process

  20. Time-Dependent Amplitude Analysis of B0→KS0π+π- decays with the BaBar Experiment and constraints on the CKM matrix using the B→K*π and B→ρK modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Perez, L.A.

    2008-12-01

    A time-dependent amplitude analysis of B 0 → K S 0 π + π - decays is performed to extract the CP violation parameters of f 0 (980)K S 0 and ρ 0 (770)K S 0 , and direct CP asymmetries of K * (892) ± π ± . The results are obtained from a data sample of (383 ± 3)*10 6 BB-bar decays, collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. Two solutions are found, with equivalent goodness-of-fit merits. Including systematic and Dalitz plot model uncertainties, the combined confidence interval for values of β(eff) in B 0 decays to f 0 (980)K S 0 is 18 degrees 0 decays to f 0 (980)K S 0 is excluded at 3.5 σ, including systematics. For B 0 decays to ρ 0 (770)K S 0 , the combined confidence interval is -9 degrees * (892) ± π ± the measured direct CP asymmetry parameter is A(CP) -0.20 ± 0.10 ± 0.01 ± 0.02. The measured phase difference between the decay amplitudes of B 0 → K * (892) + π - and B-bar 0 → K * (892) - π + excludes the [-132 degrees: +25 degrees] interval (at 95% C.L.). Branching fractions and CP asymmetries are measured for all significant intermediate resonant modes. The measurements on ρ 0 (770)K S 0 and K *± (892)π ± are used as inputs to a phenomenological analysis of B → K * π and B → ρK decays based solely on SU(2) isospin symmetry. Adding external information on the CKM matrix, constraints on the hadronic parameter space are set. For B → K * π, the preferred intervals for color-allowed electroweak penguins are marginally compatible with theoretical expectations. The constraints on CKM parameters are dominated by theoretical uncertainties. A prospective study, based on the expected increase in precision from measurements at LHCb, and at future programs such as Super-B or Belle-upgrade, illustrates the physics potential of this approach. (author)

  1. Dalitz plot analysis of eta(c) -> K+K-eta and eta(c) -> K+K-pi(0) in two-photon interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Campagnari, C.; Sevilla, M. Franco; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Bougher, J.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Piredda, G.; Buenger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Gruenberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Anulli, F.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindemann, D.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.

    2014-01-01

    We study the processes γγ→K+K−η and γγ→K+K−π0 using a data sample of 519  fb−1 recorded with the BABAR detector operating at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e− collider at center-of-mass energies at and near the Υ(nS) (n=2,3,4) resonances. We observe ηc→K+K−π0 and ηc→K+K−η decays, measure their

  2. Translation invariant time-dependent massive gravity: Hamiltonian analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourad, Jihad; Steer, Danièle A. [Laboratoire APC -- Astroparticule et Cosmologie, Université Paris Diderot, 75013 Paris (France); Noui, Karim, E-mail: mourad@apc.univ-paris7.fr, E-mail: karim.noui@lmpt.univ-tours.fr, E-mail: steer@apc.univ-paris7.fr [Laboratoire de Mathématiques et Physique Théorique, Université François Rabelais, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France)

    2014-09-01

    The canonical structure of the massive gravity in the first order moving frame formalism is studied. We work in the simplified context of translation invariant fields, with mass terms given by general non-derivative interactions, invariant under the diagonal Lorentz group, depending on the moving frame as well as a fixed reference frame. We prove that the only mass terms which give 5 propagating degrees of freedom are the dRGT mass terms, namely those which are linear in the lapse. We also complete the Hamiltonian analysis with the dynamical evolution of the system.

  3. Study of CP violation in Dalitz-plot analyses of B0 to K K-KS, B to K K-K , and B to KSKSK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-03-20

    We perform amplitude analyses of the decays B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub s}{sup 0}, B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}, and B{sup +} {yields}, and measure CP-violating parameters and partial branching fractions. The results are based on a data sample of approximately 470 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} decays, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. For B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}, we find a direct CP asymmetry in B{sup +} {yields} {phi}(1020)K{sup +} of A{sub CP} = (12.8 {+-} 4.4 {+-} 1.3)%, which differs from zero by 2.8{sigma}. For B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub s}{sup 0}, we measure the CP-violating phase {beta}{sub eff} ({phi}(1020)K{sub s}{sup 0}) = (21 {+-} 6 {+-} 2){sup o}. For B{sup +} {yields} K{sub s}{sup 0}K{sub s}{sup 0}K{sup +}, we measure an overall direct CP asymmetry of A{sub CP} = (4{sub -5}{sup +4} {+-} 2)%. We also perform an angular-moment analysis of the three channels, and determine that the f{sub X}(1500) state can be described well by the sum of the resonances f{sub 0}(1500), f{prime}{sub 2}(1525), and f{sub 0}(1710).

  4. Time-dependent reliability analysis of nuclear reactor operators using probabilistic network models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Y.; Miyata, K.; Kodaira, H.; Murakami, S.; Kondo, S.; Togo, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Human factors are very important for the reliability of a nuclear power plant. Human behavior has essentially a time-dependent nature. The details of thinking and decision making processes are important for detailed analysis of human reliability. They have, however, not been well considered by the conventional methods of human reliability analysis. The present paper describes the models for the time-dependent and detailed human reliability analysis. Recovery by an operator is taken into account and two-operators models are also presented

  5. Amplitude Analysis of the Decay $D_s^+ \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+$ in the Experiment E831/FOCUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilithz, Anderson Correa; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF

    2005-01-01

    We present in this thesis the Dalitz Plot analysis of the D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decay, with the data of the E831/FOCUS, that took data in 1996 and 1997. The masses and widhts of f{sub 0}(980) and f{sub 0}(1370) are free parametres of the fit on Dalitz Plot, objectiving to study in detail these resonances. After this analysis we present the Spectator Model study on the S wave in this decay. For this study we used the formalism developed by M. Svec [2] for scattering. We present the comparison between the Isobar Model, frequently used in Dalitz Plot analysis, and this formalism.

  6. Analysis of time-dependent changes in Bitemarks on Styrofoam sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djeapragassam Parimala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The scope of Bitemarks in forensic dentistry is widening as they help the forensic expert in identifying the perpetuator in medicolegal cases. The greatest challenge in Bitemarks analysis is the time-dependent changes produced in Bitemark patterns on various substrates at the scene of the crime. Aims: To analyze the time-dependent changes in Bitemarks on Styrofoam sheets. Settings and Design: Single centered prospective study. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five subjects were randomly chosen, and dental casts prepared. Then test bites were registered on Styrofoam sheets, overlays prepared from these test bites on subsequent days (day 1, 2, 3, 4 and checked for matching accuracy. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA to compare the overlays from dental stone cast with test bites on Styrofoam sheets on subsequent days. Results: The P value was found to be 1 which is statistically not significant implying that there were no significant time-dependent changes in the pattern of Bitemarks. Conclusions: There were no time-dependent changes in the pattern of Bitemarks on Styrofoam sheets hence they serve as better materials than Bitemarks on human skin or food substrates obtained from the scene of the crime.

  7. A Bimodal Hybrid Model for Time-Dependent Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghmaei-Sabegh, Saman; Shoaeifar, Nasser; Shoaeifar, Parva

    2018-03-01

    The evaluation of evidence provided by geological studies and historical catalogs indicates that in some seismic regions and faults, multiple large earthquakes occur in cluster. Then, the occurrences of large earthquakes confront with quiescence and only the small-to-moderate earthquakes take place. Clustering of large earthquakes is the most distinguishable departure from the assumption of constant hazard of random occurrence of earthquakes in conventional seismic hazard analysis. In the present study, a time-dependent recurrence model is proposed to consider a series of large earthquakes that occurs in clusters. The model is flexible enough to better reflect the quasi-periodic behavior of large earthquakes with long-term clustering, which can be used in time-dependent probabilistic seismic hazard analysis with engineering purposes. In this model, the time-dependent hazard results are estimated by a hazard function which comprises three parts. A decreasing hazard of last large earthquake cluster and an increasing hazard of the next large earthquake cluster, along with a constant hazard of random occurrence of small-to-moderate earthquakes. In the final part of the paper, the time-dependent seismic hazard of the New Madrid Seismic Zone at different time intervals has been calculated for illustrative purpose.

  8. Time dependent analysis of Xenon spatial oscillations in small power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decco, Claudia Cristina Ghirardello

    1997-01-01

    This work presents time dependent analysis of xenon spatial oscillations studying the influence of the power density distribution, type of reactivity perturbation, power level and core size, using the one-dimensional and three-dimensional analysis with the MID2 and citation codes, respectively. It is concluded that small pressurized water reactors with height smaller than 1.5 m are stable and do not have xenon spatial oscillations. (author)

  9. Analysis of time-dependent changes in Bitemarks on Styrofoam sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parimala, Djeapragassam; Daniel, Mariappan Jonathan; Srinivasan, Subramanian Vasudevan; Kumaran, Jimsha Vannathan

    2015-03-01

    The scope of Bitemarks in forensic dentistry is widening as they help the forensic expert in identifying the perpetuator in medicolegal cases. The greatest challenge in Bitemarks analysis is the time-dependent changes produced in Bitemark patterns on various substrates at the scene of the crime. To analyze the time-dependent changes in Bitemarks on Styrofoam sheets. Single centered prospective study. Twenty-five subjects were randomly chosen, and dental casts prepared. Then test bites were registered on Styrofoam sheets, overlays prepared from these test bites on subsequent days (day 1, 2, 3, 4) and checked for matching accuracy. The data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA to compare the overlays from dental stone cast with test bites on Styrofoam sheets on subsequent days. The P value was found to be 1 which is statistically not significant implying that there were no significant time-dependent changes in the pattern of Bitemarks. There were no time-dependent changes in the pattern of Bitemarks on Styrofoam sheets hence they serve as better materials than Bitemarks on human skin or food substrates obtained from the scene of the crime.

  10. Nonadiabatic analysis of strange-modes in hot massive stars with time-dependent convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonoi Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We carry out nonadiabatic analysis of strange-modes in hot massive stars with time-dependent convection (TDC. We find that the instability of the modes excited at the Fe bump is weaker with TDC than with frozen-in convection (FC. But the instability still remains with TDC, and could be a possible candidate for the trigger of luminous blue variable (LBV phenomena.

  11. Time-dependent Reliability Analysis of Flood Defence Assets Using Generic Fragility Curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nepal Jaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flood defence assets such as earth embankments comprise the vital part of linear flood defences in many countries including the UK and protect inland from flooding. The risks of flooding are likely to increase in the future due to increasing pressure on land use, increasing rainfall events and rising sea level caused by climate change also affect aging flood defence assets. Therefore, it is important that the flood defence assets are maintained at a high level of safety and serviceability. The high costs associated with preserving these deteriorating flood defence assets and the limited funds available for their maintenance require the development of systematic approaches to ensure the sustainable flood-risk management system. The integration of realistic deterioration measurement and reliabilitybased performance assessment techniques has tremendous potential for structural safety and economic feasibility of flood defence assets. Therefore, the need for reliability-based performance assessment is evident. However, investigations on time-dependent reliability analysis of flood defence assets are limited. This paper presents a novel approach for time-dependent reliability analysis of flood defence assets. In the analysis, time-dependent fragility curve is developed by using the state-based stochastic deterioration model. The applicability of the proposed approach is then demonstrated with a case study.

  12. Time-dependent amplitude analysis of $B^0 \\to K^0_S\\pi^ pi^-$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2009-05-26

    In this paper we present results from a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{sub s}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay. In Sec. II we describe the time-dependent DP formalism, and introduce the signal parameters that are extracted in the fit to data. In Sec. III we briefly describe the BABAR detector and the data set. In Sec. IV, we explain the selection requirements used to obtain the signal candidates and suppress backgrounds. In Sec. V we describe the fit method and the approach used to control experimental effects such as resolution. In Sec. VI we present the results of the fit, and extract parameters relevant to the contributing intermediate resonant states. In Sec. VII we discuss systematic uncertainties in the results, and finally we summarize the results in Sec. VIII.

  13. Time-dependent analysis of dissolver off-gas cleaning installations in a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, K.; Furrer, J.; Becker, G.; Obrowski, W.; Seghal, Y.P.; Weymann, J.

    1983-01-01

    The iodine- and aerosol-filtering test facility PASSAT of the Nuclear Research Centre in Karlsruhe has been investigated using a method which allows time-dependent analyses under accident conditions. This method which is closely related to fault-tree analysis needs subdivision in barriers of the system, and their logical combination in a tree. The barriers have binary states: defect and intact. The defect state will be described by a fault tree, whereas the intact state includes dependences of a barrier operation on physical parameters. The intact state enables time-dependent calculations. Calculations have been done for iodine filtering, because the best known entrance data are given. Results demonstrate clearly that the amount of iodine released increases only if both heaters failed, which heat the off-gas from 30 0 C to 80 0 C and then to 130 0 C. Additionally the integrated amount of iodine released depends on time period between the failures of the heaters

  14. Software for rapid time dependent ChIP-sequencing analysis (TDCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myschyshyn, Mike; Farren-Dai, Marco; Chuang, Tien-Jui; Vocadlo, David

    2017-11-25

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) and associated methods are widely used to define the genome wide distribution of chromatin associated proteins, post-translational epigenetic marks, and modifications found on DNA bases. An area of emerging interest is to study time dependent changes in the distribution of such proteins and marks by using serial ChIP-seq experiments performed in a time resolved manner. Despite such time resolved studies becoming increasingly common, software to facilitate analysis of such data in a robust automated manner is limited. We have designed software called Time-Dependent ChIP-Sequencing Analyser (TDCA), which is the first program to automate analysis of time-dependent ChIP-seq data by fitting to sigmoidal curves. We provide users with guidance for experimental design of TDCA for modeling of time course (TC) ChIP-seq data using two simulated data sets. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this fitting strategy is widely applicable by showing that automated analysis of three previously published TC data sets accurately recapitulates key findings reported in these studies. Using each of these data sets, we highlight how biologically relevant findings can be readily obtained by exploiting TDCA to yield intuitive parameters that describe behavior at either a single locus or sets of loci. TDCA enables customizable analysis of user input aligned DNA sequencing data, coupled with graphical outputs in the form of publication-ready figures that describe behavior at either individual loci or sets of loci sharing common traits defined by the user. TDCA accepts sequencing data as standard binary alignment map (BAM) files and loci of interest in browser extensible data (BED) file format. TDCA accurately models the number of sequencing reads, or coverage, at loci from TC ChIP-seq studies or conceptually related TC sequencing experiments. TC experiments are reduced to intuitive parametric values that facilitate biologically

  15. Time-Dependent Risk Estimation and Cost-Benefit Analysis for Mitigation Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Stiphout, T.; Wiemer, S.; Marzocchi, W.

    2009-04-01

    Earthquakes strongly cluster in space and time. Consequently, the most dangerous time is right after a moderate earthquake has happened, because their is a ‘high' (i.e., 2-5 percent) probability that this event will be followed by a subsequent aftershock which happens to be as large or larger than the initiating event. The seismic hazard during this time-period exceeds the background probability significantly and by several orders of magnitude. Scientists have developed increasingly accurate forecast models that model this time-dependent hazard, and such models are currently being validated in prospective testing. However, this probabilistic information in the hazard space is difficult to digest for decision makers, the media and general public. Here, we introduce a possible bridge between seismology and decision makers (authorities, civil defense) by proposing a more objective way to estimate time-dependent risk assessment. Short Term Earthquake Risk assessment (STEER) combines aftershock hazard and loss assessments. We use site-specific information on site effects and building class distribution and combine this with existing loss models to compute site specific time-dependent risk curves (probability of exceedance for fatalities, injuries, damages etc). We show the effect of uncertainties in the different components using Monte Carlo Simulations of the input parameters. This time-dependent risk curves can act as a decision support. We extend the STEER approach by introducing a Cost-Benefit approach for certain mitigation actions after a medium-sized earthquake. Such Cost-Benefit approaches have been recently developed for volcanic risk assessment to rationalize precautionary evacuations in densely inhabitated areas threatened by volcanoes. Here we extend the concept to time-dependent probabilistic seismic risk assessment. For the Cost-Benefit analysis of mitigation actions we calculate the ratio between the cost for the mitigation actions and the cost of the

  16. Performance Analysis of High-Order Numerical Methods for Time-Dependent Acoustic Field Modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Moy, Pedro Henrique Rocha

    2012-07-01

    The discretization of time-dependent wave propagation is plagued with dispersion in which the wavefield is perceived to travel with an erroneous velocity. To remediate the problem, simulations are run on dense and computationally expensive grids yielding plausible approximate solutions. This work introduces an error analysis tool which can be used to obtain optimal simulation parameters that account for mesh size, orders of spatial and temporal discretizations, angles of propagation, temporal stability conditions (usually referred to as CFL conditions), and time of propagation. The classical criteria of 10-15 nodes per wavelength for second-order finite differences, and 4-5 nodes per wavelength for fourth-order spectral elements are shown to be unrealistic and overly-optimistic simulation parameters for different propagation times. This work analyzes finite differences, spectral elements, optimally-blended spectral elements, and isogeometric analysis.

  17. Comparison of nested case-control and survival analysis methodologies for analysis of time-dependent exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Platt Robert W

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological studies of exposures that vary with time require an additional level of methodological complexity to account for the time-dependence of exposure. This study compares a nested case-control approach for the study of time-dependent exposure with cohort analysis using Cox regression including time-dependent covariates. Methods A cohort of 1340 subjects with four fixed and seven time-dependent covariates was used for this study. Nested case-control analyses were repeated 100 times for each of 4, 8, 16, 32, and 64 controls per case, and point estimates were compared to those obtained using Cox regression on the full cohort. Computational efficiencies were evaluated by comparing central processing unit times required for analysis of the cohort at sizes 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 times its initial size. Results Nested case-control analyses yielded results that were similar to results of Cox regression on the full cohort. Cox regression was found to be 125 times slower than the nested case-control approach (using four controls per case. Conclusions The nested case-control approach is a useful alternative for cohort analysis when studying time-dependent exposures. Its superior computational efficiency may be particularly useful when studying rare outcomes in databases, where the ability to analyze larger sample sizes can improve the power of the study.

  18. Asymptotic equilibrium diffusion analysis of time-dependent Monte Carlo methods for grey radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Larsen, Edward W.

    2004-01-01

    The equations of nonlinear, time-dependent radiative transfer are known to yield the equilibrium diffusion equation as the leading-order solution of an asymptotic analysis when the mean-free path and mean-free time of a photon become small. We apply this same analysis to the Fleck-Cummings, Carter-Forest, and N'kaoua Monte Carlo approximations for grey (frequency-independent) radiative transfer. Although Monte Carlo simulation usually does not require the discretizations found in deterministic transport techniques, Monte Carlo methods for radiative transfer require a time discretization due to the nonlinearities of the problem. If an asymptotic analysis of the equations used by a particular Monte Carlo method yields an accurate time-discretized version of the equilibrium diffusion equation, the method should generate accurate solutions if a time discretization is chosen that resolves temperature changes, even if the time steps are much larger than the mean-free time of a photon. This analysis is of interest because in many radiative transfer problems, it is a practical necessity to use time steps that are large compared to a mean-free time. Our asymptotic analysis shows that: (i) the N'kaoua method has the equilibrium diffusion limit, (ii) the Carter-Forest method has the equilibrium diffusion limit if the material temperature change during a time step is small, and (iii) the Fleck-Cummings method does not have the equilibrium diffusion limit. We include numerical results that verify our theoretical predictions

  19. Asymptotic analysis of blood flow in stented arteries: time dependency and direct simulations***

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichon Gostaf Kirill

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to extend in two distinct directions results recently obtained in [10]. In a first step we focus on the possible extension of our results to the time dependent case. Whereas in the second part some preliminary numerical simulations aim to give orders of magnitudes in terms of numerical costs of direct 3D simulations. We consider, in the first part, the time dependent rough problem for a simplified heat equation in a straight channel that mimics the axial velocity under an oscillating pressure gradient. We derive first order approximations with respect to ϵ, the size of the roughness. In order to understand the problem and set up correct boundary layer approximations, we perform a time periodic fourier analysis and check that no frequency can interact with the roughness. We show rigorously on this toy problem that the boundary layers remain stationary in time (independent on the frequency number. Finally we perform numerical tests validating our theoretical approach. In the second part, we determine actual limits, when running three-dimensional blood flow simulations of the non-homogenized stented arteries. We solve the stationary Stokes equations for an artery containing a saccular aneurysm. Consecutive levels of uniform mesh refinement, serve to relate spatial resolution, problem scale, and required computation time. Test computations are presented for femoral side aneurysm, where a simplified ten-wire stent model was placed across the aneurysm throat. We advocate the proposed stent homogenization model, by concluding that an actual computation power is not sufficient to run accurate, direct simulations of a pulsatile flow in stented vessels.

  20. Time-Dependent Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Using the Simulated Records, the Case of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Hajimohammadi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Common attenuation equations are developed by seismic records which belong to earthquakes that have happened so far. Although there are many recorded data during last 50 years, it is not possible to consider all possible wave propagation paths, site types and fault rupture mechanisms inclassical attenuation relations. This fact becomes more serious in near field cases and a common shortcoming in most attenuation equations is their low accuracyin estimation of near field parameters.Many important cities of the world such as Tehran are located nearby some active faults. For example, the North Tehran Fault is such a closeseismic source to Tehran Metropolitanarea andcould be considered asa near field source. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate near field effects in most of hazard analyses, risk management programs, structural designs, etc.In past, it was routine to use attenuation equations in hazard analyses. In this project for avoiding from insufficient performance of attenuation equations in near field, proposed simulation datum byZafarani, et al., (2012, were used directly in the hazard analysis without converting them into attenuation equations.Besides, time dependent hazard analysis (Non-PoissonianModel was used to taking into account the probable seismic activity of the North Tehran Fault.

  1. Time-dependent elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of total knee replacement under walking conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yonglin; Yang, Peiran; Fu, Zengliang; Jin, Zhongmin; Wang, Chengtao

    2011-06-01

    This work is concerned with the lubrication analysis of artificial knee joints, which plays an increasing significant role in clinical performance and longevity of components. Time-dependent elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis for normal total knee replacement is carried out under the cyclic variation in both load and speed representative of normal walking. An equivalent ellipsoid-on-plane model is adopted to represent an actual artificial knee. A full numerical method is developed to simultaneously solve the Reynolds and elasticity equations using the multigrid technique. The elastic deformation is based on the constrained column model. Results show that, under the combined effect of entraining and squeeze-film actions throughout the walking cycle, the predicted central film thickness tends to decrease in the stance phase but keeps a relatively larger value at the swing phase. Furthermore, the geometry of knee joint implant is verified to play an important role under its lubrication condition, and the length of time period is a key point to influence the lubrication performance of joint components.

  2. Modeling and analysis of time-dependent processes in a chemically reactive mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, M. P.; Ribeiro, C.; Soares, A. J.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we study the propagation of sound waves and the dynamics of local wave disturbances induced by spontaneous internal fluctuations in a reactive mixture. We consider a non-diffusive, non-heat conducting and non-viscous mixture described by an Eulerian set of evolution equations. The model is derived from the kinetic theory in a hydrodynamic regime of a fast chemical reaction. The reactive source terms are explicitly computed from the kinetic theory and are built in the model in a proper way. For both time-dependent problems, we first derive the appropriate dispersion relation, which retains the main effects of the chemical process, and then investigate the influence of the chemical reaction on the properties of interest in the problems studied here. We complete our study by developing a rather detailed analysis using the Hydrogen-Chlorine system as reference. Several numerical computations are included illustrating the behavior of the phase velocity and attenuation coefficient in a low-frequency regime and describing the spectrum of the eigenmodes in the small wavenumber limit.

  3. An Iterative Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) Analysis Using Time-dependent 3-D MHD Models as Kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, B. V.; Yu, H. S.; Hick, P. P.; Buffington, A.; Odstrcil, D.; Kim, T. K.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Tokumaru, M.; Bisi, M. M.; Kim, J.; Yun, J.

    2017-12-01

    The University of California, San Diego has developed an iterative remote-sensing time-dependent three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction technique which provides volumetric maps of density, velocity, and magnetic field. We have applied this technique in near real time for over 15 years with a kinematic model approximation to fit data from ground-based interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations. Our modeling concept extends volumetric data from an inner boundary placed above the Alfvén surface out to the inner heliosphere. We now use this technique to drive 3-D MHD models at their inner boundary and generate output 3-D data files that are fit to remotely-sensed observations (in this case IPS observations), and iterated. These analyses are also iteratively fit to in-situ spacecraft measurements near Earth. To facilitate this process, we have developed a traceback from input 3-D MHD volumes to yield an updated boundary in density, temperature, and velocity, which also includes magnetic-field components. Here we will show examples of this analysis using the ENLIL 3D-MHD and the University of Alabama Multi-Scale Fluid-Kinetic Simulation Suite (MS-FLUKSS) heliospheric codes. These examples help refine poorly-known 3-D MHD variables (i.e., density, temperature), and parameters (gamma) by fitting heliospheric remotely-sensed data between the region near the solar surface and in-situ measurements near Earth.

  4. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for functionals of the time-dependent nuclide density field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.L.; Weisbin, C.R.

    1978-04-01

    An approach to extend the present ORNL sensitivity program to include functionals of the time-dependent nuclide density field is developed. An adjoint equation for the nuclide field was derived previously by using generalized perturbation theory; the present derivation makes use of a variational principle and results in the same equation. The physical significance of this equation is discussed and compared to that of the time-dependent neutron adjoint equation. Computational requirements for determining sensitivity profiles and uncertainties for functionals of the time-dependent nuclide density vector are developed within the framework of the existing FORSS system; in this way the current capability is significantly extended. The development, testing, and use of an adjoint version of the ORIGEN isotope generation and depletion code are documented. Finally, a sample calculation is given which estimates the uncertainty in the plutonium inventory at shutdown of a PWR due to assumed uncertainties in uranium and plutonium cross sections. 8 figures, 4 tables

  5. Time-series analysis of multiple foreign exchange rates using time-dependent pattern entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Ryuji; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2018-01-01

    Time-dependent pattern entropy is a method that reduces variations to binary symbolic dynamics and considers the pattern of symbols in a sliding temporal window. We use this method to analyze the instability of daily variations in multiple foreign exchange rates. The time-dependent pattern entropy of 7 foreign exchange rates (AUD/USD, CAD/USD, CHF/USD, EUR/USD, GBP/USD, JPY/USD, and NZD/USD) was found to be high in the long period after the Lehman shock, and be low in the long period after Mar 2012. We compared the correlation matrix between exchange rates in periods of high and low of the time-dependent pattern entropy.

  6. Analysis of time-dependent reliability of degenerated reinforced concrete structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hongping

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Durability deterioration of structure is a highly random process. The maintenance of degenerated structure involves the calculation of the reliability of time-dependent structure. This study introduced reinforced concrete structure resistance decrease model and related statistical parameters of uncertainty, analyzed resistance decrease rules of corroded bending element of reinforced concrete structure, and finally calculated timedependent reliability of the corroded bending element of reinforced concrete structure, aiming to provide a specific theoretical basis for the application of time-dependent reliability theory.

  7. Time-series analysis of foreign exchange rates using time-dependent pattern entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Ryuji; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2013-08-01

    Time-dependent pattern entropy is a method that reduces variations to binary symbolic dynamics and considers the pattern of symbols in a sliding temporal window. We use this method to analyze the instability of daily variations in foreign exchange rates, in particular, the dollar-yen rate. The time-dependent pattern entropy of the dollar-yen rate was found to be high in the following periods: before and after the turning points of the yen from strong to weak or from weak to strong, and the period after the Lehman shock.

  8. Analysis of Two-Level Support Systems with Time-Dependent Overflow - A Banking Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barth, Wolfgang; Manitz, Michael; Stolletz, Raik

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the performance of call centers of financial service providers with two levels of support and a time-dependent overflow mechanism. Waiting calls from the front-office queue flow over to the back office if a waiting-time limit is reached and at least one back-office agent...

  9. Low Energy Excitations of a Bose-Einstein Condensate: A Time-Dependent Variational Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Garcia, V.M.; Michinel, H.; Cirac, J.; Lewenstein, M.; Zoller, P. [Departamento de Matematicas, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)]|[Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, E. U. Optica e Optometria, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)]|[Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de CC. Quimicas, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)]|[Comissariat a l`Energie Atomique, DSM/DRECAM/SPAM, Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    1996-12-01

    We solve the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation by a variational ansatz to calculate the excitation spectrum of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a trap. The trial wave function is a Gaussian which allows an essentially analytical treatment of the problem. Our results reproduce numerical calculations over the whole range from small to large particle numbers, and agree exactly with the Stringari results in the strong interaction limit. Excellent agreement is obtained with the recent JILA experiment and predictions for the negative scattering length case are also made. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Analysis of time-dependent particle transport in the tokamak boundary plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognlien, T. D.; Groebner, R. J.; Nam, S. K.

    2010-11-01

    Plasma particle transport in the edge and scrape-off layer of tokamaks is not well understood but is important for core fueling, helium removal, and impurity intrusion. A simple 1D model is presented to clarify the time-dependent impact of different possible mechanisms including penetration and ionization of recycled or injected neutrals, and plasma diffusion and convection. More detail of edge profile dynamics between Edge-Localized-Modes (ELMs) corresponding to re-building of the pedestal region is studied with the 2D UEDGE transport code. The influence of the ion pinch associated with perpendicular ion viscosity is evaluated. It is assumed that during quasi-steady-state discharges with regularly-spaced bursts of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs), the net pumping of all walls and pumps averaged over an ELM cycle is just sufficient to remove the small neutral beam particle source. The simulation results are then compared with similar time-dependent data for DIII-D edge density profiles between ELMs.

  11. Time-dependent regulation analysis dissects shifts between metabolic and gene-expression regulation during nitrogen starvation in baker's yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eunen, Karen; Bouwman, Jildau; Lindenbergh, Alexander; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Bakker, Barbara M.

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent regulation analysis is a new methodology that allows us to unravel, both quantitatively and dynamically, how and when functional changes in the cell are brought about by the interplay of gene expression and metabolism. In this first experimental implementation, we dissect the initial

  12. Time-dependent regulation analysis dissects shifts between metabolic and gen-expression regulation during differentiation of bloodstream forms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eunen, K.; Bouwman, J.; Lindenbergh, P.A.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Bakker, B.M.

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent regulation analysis is a new methodology that allows us to unravel, both quantitatively and dynamically, how and when functional changes in the cell are brought about by the interplay of gene expression and metabolism. In this first experimental implementation, we dissect the initial

  13. Uncertainty Propagation Analysis for the Monte Carlo Time-Dependent Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaukata, Nadeem; Shim, Hyung Jin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a conventional method to control the neutron population for super-critical systems is implemented. Instead of considering the cycles, the simulation is divided in time intervals. At the end of each time interval, neutron population control is applied on the banked neutrons. Randomly selected neutrons are discarded, until the size of neutron population matches the initial neutron histories at the beginning of time simulation. A time-dependent simulation mode has also been implemented in the development version of SERPENT 2 Monte Carlo code. In this mode, sequential population control mechanism has been proposed for modeling of prompt super-critical systems. A Monte Carlo method has been properly used in TART code for dynamic criticality calculations. For super-critical systems, the neutron population is allowed to grow over a period of time. The neutron population is uniformly combed to return it to the neutron population started with at the beginning of time boundary. In this study, conventional time-dependent Monte Carlo (TDMC) algorithm is implemented. There is an exponential growth of neutron population in estimation of neutron density tally for super-critical systems and the number of neutrons being tracked exceed the memory of the computer. In order to control this exponential growth at the end of each time boundary, a conventional time cut-off controlling population strategy is included in TDMC. A scale factor is introduced to tally the desired neutron density at the end of each time boundary. The main purpose of this paper is the quantification of uncertainty propagation in neutron densities at the end of each time boundary for super-critical systems. This uncertainty is caused by the uncertainty resulting from the introduction of scale factor. The effectiveness of TDMC is examined for one-group infinite homogeneous problem (the rod model) and two-group infinite homogeneous problem. The desired neutron density is tallied by the introduction of

  14. Methodology for time-dependent reliability analysis of accident sequences and complex reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula, H.M.

    1984-01-01

    The work presented here is of direct use in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and is of value to utilities as well as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Specifically, this report presents a methodology and a computer program to calculate the expected number of occurrences for each accident sequence in an event tree. The methodology evaluates the time-dependent (instantaneous) and the average behavior of the accident sequence. The methodology accounts for standby safety system and component failures that occur (a) before they are demanded, (b) upon demand, and (c) during the mission (system operation). With respect to failures that occur during the mission, this methodology is unique in the sense that it models components that can be repaired during the mission. The expected number of system failures during the mission provides an upper bound for the probability of a system failure to run - the mission unreliability. The basic event modeling includes components that are continuously monitored, periodically tested, and those that are not tested or are otherwise nonrepairable. The computer program ASA allows practical applications of the method developed. This work represents a required extension of the presently available methodology and allows a more realistic PRA of nuclear power plants

  15. Neoclassical and gyrokinetic analysis of time-dependent helium transport experiments on MAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, S.S.; O'Mullane, M.; Summers, H.P.; Garzotti, L.; Casson, F.J.; Dickinson, D.; Fox, M.F.J.; Patel, A.; Roach, C.M.; Valovič, M.

    2014-01-01

    Time-dependent helium gas puff experiments have been performed on the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) during a two point plasma current scan in L-mode and a confinement scan at 900 kA. An evaluation of the He II (n = 4 → 3) spectrum line induced by charge exchange suggests anomalous rates of diffusion and inward convection in the outer regions of both L-mode plasmas. Similar rates of diffusion are found in the H-mode plasma, however these rates are consistent with neoclassical predictions. The anomalous inward pinch found in the core of L-mode plasmas is also not apparent in the H-mode core. Linear gyrokinetic simulations of one flux surface in L-mode using the GS2 and GKW codes find that equilibrium flow shear is sufficient to stabilize ITG modes, consistent with beam emission spectroscopy (BES) observations, and suggest that collisionless TEMs may dominate the anomalous helium particle transport. A quasilinear estimate of the dimensionless peaking factor associated with TEMs is in good agreement with experiment. Collisionless TEMs are more stable in H-mode because the electron density gradient is flatter. The steepness of this gradient is therefore pivotal in determining the inward neoclassical particle pinch and the particle flux associated with TEM turbulence. (paper)

  16. Dynamic Creep Buckling: Analysis of Shell Structures Subjected to Time-dependent Mechanical and Thermal Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simitses, G. J.; Carlson, R. L.; Riff, R.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the present research is to develop a general mathematical model and solution methodologies for analyzing the structural response of thin, metallic shell structures under large transient, cyclic, or static thermomechanical loads. Among the system responses associated with these loads and conditions are thermal buckling, creep buckling, and ratcheting. Thus geometric and material nonlinearities (of high order) can be anticipated and must be considered in developing the mathematical model. A complete, true ab-initio rate theory of kinematics and kinetics for continuum and curved thin structures, without any restriction on the magnitude of the strains or the deformations, was formulated. The time dependence and large strain behavior are incorporated through the introduction of the time rates of metric and curvature in two coordinate systems: fixed (spatial) and convected (material). The relations between the time derivative and the covariant derivative (gradient) were developed for curved space and motion, so the velocity components supply the connection between the equations of motion and the time rates of change of the metric and curvature tensors.

  17. Interference and Molecular Transport-A Dynamical View: Time-Dependent Analysis of Disubstituted Benzenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, ShuGuang; Zhang, Yu; Koo, SiuKong; Tian, Heng; Yam, ChiYung; Chen, GuanHua; Ratner, Mark A

    2014-08-07

    The primary issue in molecular electronics is measuring and understanding how electrons travel through a single molecule strung between two electrodes. A key area involves electronic interference that occurs when electrons can follow more than one pathway through the molecular entity. When the phases developed along parallel pathways are inequivalent, interference effects can substantially reduce overall conductance. This fundamentally interesting issue can be understood using classical rules of physical organic chemistry, and the subject has been examined broadly. However, there has been little dynamical study of such interference effects. Here, we use the simplest electronic structure model to examine the coherent time-dependent transport through meta- and para-linked benzene circuits, and the effects of decoherence. We find that the phase-caused coherence/decoherence behavior is established very quickly (femtoseconds), that the localized dephasing at any site reduces the destructive interference of the meta-linked species (raising the conductance), and that thermal effects are essentially ineffectual for removing coherence effects.

  18. Time-series analysis of sleep wake stage of rat EEG using time-dependent pattern entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Ryuji; Shinba, Toshikazu; Mugishima, Go; Haraguchi, Hikaru; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2008-05-01

    We performed electroencephalography (EEG) for six male Wistar rats to clarify temporal behaviors at different levels of consciousness. Levels were identified both by conventional sleep analysis methods and by our novel entropy method. In our method, time-dependent pattern entropy is introduced, by which EEG is reduced to binary symbolic dynamics and the pattern of symbols in a sliding temporal window is considered. A high correlation was obtained between level of consciousness as measured by the conventional method and mean entropy in our entropy method. Mean entropy was maximal while awake (stage W) and decreased as sleep deepened. These results suggest that time-dependent pattern entropy may offer a promising method for future sleep research.

  19. 3D viscous time dependent analysis of a slow moving landslide by finite elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bru, Guadalupe; Fernández-Merodo, Josè Antonio; García-Davalillo, Juan Carlos; Herrera, Gerardo

    2017-04-01

    A methodology to study the cinematic behavior in time and 3D effects of slow moving landslides is presented by its application to the Portalet landslide, located in the Spanish Central Pyrenees. The area is characterize by the presence of several complex landslides triggered by glacial retreat and developed in weathered Devonian and Carboniferous slate materials. In summer 2004, the toe of two paleolanslides was excavated in order to construct a parking area, which reactivated the preexistent rupture surfaces and generated a new and smaller roto-translational landslide of about 5·105m3. Works were paralyzed and the road A-136 connecting Spain and France was temporary closed. In 2006 stabilizing solutions were performed, although surface and deep monitoring data reveal that the landslide is currently active. In this work the cinematic behavior of the Portalet parking landslide has been reproduced since the excavation in 2004 until 2016 by an advanced 3D finite element model (FEM) analysis. A detailed 3D litho-stratigraphic geometry has been defined using the information available from previous works(1-3): real topography, geological profiles, ground water level and material properties. The first step has been a stability analysis using the shear stress reduction (SSR) technique to calibrate the value of the friction angle of the soil layer where the rupture surface develops. In this step the sensibility of the mesh size has been studied, as is a critical parameter. Secondly, stability analysis results have been verified by simulating the parking excavation with a static analysis using Mohr-Coulomb elastoplastic failure criteria. In the last step the behavior of the landslide has been recreated using a hydromechanic coupled formulation for displacements and interstitial water pressure (u-pw), a simple elevation ground water model calculated from daily rainfall and a Perzyna viscous constitutive model of the solid skeleton which represent the creep detected by

  20. Time-Dependent Statistical Analysis of Wide-Area Time-Synchronized Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Messina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of spatial and temporal changes in the dynamic patterns of a nonstationary process is a problem of great theoretical and practical importance. On-line monitoring of large-scale power systems by means of time-synchronized Phasor Measurement Units (PMUs provides the opportunity to analyze and characterize inter-system oscillations. Wide-area measurement sets, however, are often relatively large, and may contain phenomena with differing temporal scales. Extracting from these measurements the relevant dynamics is a difficult problem. As the number of observations of real events continues to increase, statistical techniques are needed to help identify relevant temporal dynamics from noise or random effects in measured data. In this paper, a statistically based, data-driven framework that integrates the use of wavelet-based EOF analysis and a sliding window-based method is proposed to identify and extract, in near-real-time, dynamically independent spatiotemporal patterns from time synchronized data. The method deals with the information in space and time simultaneously, and allows direct tracking and characterization of the nonstationary time-frequency dynamics of oscillatory processes. The efficiency and accuracy of the developed procedures for extracting localized information of power system behavior from time-synchronized phasor measurements of a real event in Mexico is assessed.

  1. A martingale analysis of first passage times of time-dependent Wiener diffusion models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vaibhav; Feng, Samuel F; Cohen, Jonathan D; Leonard, Naomi Ehrich; Shenhav, Amitai

    2017-04-01

    Research in psychology and neuroscience has successfully modeled decision making as a process of noisy evidence accumulation to a decision bound. While there are several variants and implementations of this idea, the majority of these models make use of a noisy accumulation between two absorbing boundaries. A common assumption of these models is that decision parameters, e.g., the rate of accumulation (drift rate), remain fixed over the course of a decision, allowing the derivation of analytic formulas for the probabilities of hitting the upper or lower decision threshold, and the mean decision time. There is reason to believe, however, that many types of behavior would be better described by a model in which the parameters were allowed to vary over the course of the decision process. In this paper, we use martingale theory to derive formulas for the mean decision time, hitting probabilities, and first passage time (FPT) densities of a Wiener process with time-varying drift between two time-varying absorbing boundaries. This model was first studied by Ratcliff (1980) in the two-stage form, and here we consider the same model for an arbitrary number of stages (i.e. intervals of time during which parameters are constant). Our calculations enable direct computation of mean decision times and hitting probabilities for the associated multistage process. We also provide a review of how martingale theory may be used to analyze similar models employing Wiener processes by re-deriving some classical results. In concert with a variety of numerical tools already available, the current derivations should encourage mathematical analysis of more complex models of decision making with time-varying evidence.

  2. Numerical analysis and field study of time dependent exergy-energy of a gas-steam combined cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barari Bamdad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, time dependent exergy analysis of the Fars Combined Power Plant Cycle has been investigated. Exergy analysis has been used for investigating each part of actual combined cycle by considering irreversibility from Apr 2006 to Oct 2010. Performance analysis has been done for each part by evaluating exergy destruction in each month. By using of exergy analysis, aging of each part has been evaluated respect to time duration. In addition, the rate of lost work for each month has been calculated and variation of this parameter has been considered as a function of aging rate. Finally, effects of exergy destruction of each part have been investigated on exergy destruction of whole cycle. Entire analysis has been done for Unit 3 and 4 of gas turbine cycle which combined by Unit B of steam cycle in Fars Combined Power Plant Cycle located in Fars province in Iran.

  3. The analysis and attribution of the time-dependent neutron background resultant from sample irradiation in a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellers, M.T.; Corcoran, E.C.; Kelly, D.G.

    2013-01-01

    The Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC) has commissioned a Delayed Neutron Counting (DNC) system for the analysis of special nuclear materials. A significant, time-dependent neutron background with an initial maximum count rate, more than 50 times that of the time-independent background, was characterised during the validation of this system. This time-dependent background was found to be dependent on the presence of the polyethylene (PE) vials used to transport the fissile samples, yet was not an activation product of vial impurities. The magnitude of the time-dependent background was found to be irradiation site specific and independent of the mass of PE. The capability of RMCC's DNC system to analyze the neutron count rates in time intervals 235 U contamination was present on each irradiated vial. However, Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy measurements of material leached from the outer vial surfaces after their irradiations found only trace amounts of uranium, 0.118 ± 0.048 ng of 235 U derived from natural uranium. These quantities are insufficient to account for the time-independent background, and in fact could not be discriminated from the noise associated with time-independent background. It is suggested that delayed neutron emitters are deposited in the vial surface following fission recoil, leaving the main body of uranium within the irradiation site. This hypothesis is supported by the physical cleaning of the site with materials soaked in distilled water and HNO 3 , which lowered the background from a nominal 235 U mass equivalent of 120 to 50 ng per vial. (author)

  4. Engineering applications and analysis of vibratory motion fourth order fluid film over the time dependent heated flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohmand, Muhammad Ismail; Mamat, Mustafa Bin; Shah, Qayyum

    2017-07-01

    This article deals with the time dependent analysis of thermally conducting and Magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) liquid film flow of a fourth order fluid past a vertical and vibratory plate. In this article have been developed for higher order complex nature fluids. The governing-equations have been modeled in the terms of nonlinear partial differential equations with the help of physical boundary circumstances. Two different analytical approaches i.e. Adomian decomposition method (ADM) and the optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM), have been used for discoveryof the series clarification of the problems. Solutions obtained via two diversemethods have been compared using the graphs, tables and found an excellent contract. Variants of the embedded flow parameters in the solution have been analysed through the graphical diagrams.

  5. Structural characterization of a magnetic granular system under a time-dependent magnetic field: Voronoi tessellation and multifractal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moctezuma, R. E.; Arauz-Lara, J. L.; Donado, F.

    2018-04-01

    The structure of a two-dimensional magnetic granular system was determined by multifractal and Voronoi polygon analysis for a wide range of particle concentrations. Randomizing of the particle motions are produced by applying to the system a time-dependent sinusoidal magnetic field directed along the vertical direction. Both repulsive and attractive short-range interactions between the particles are induced. A direct observation of such system shows qualitatively that, as particle concentration increases, the structure evolves from being liquid-like at low particle concentrations to solid-like at high concentrations. We observe the formation of clusters which are small and weakly bonded and short-lived at low concentrations. Above a threshold particle concentration, clusters grow larger and are more strongly attached. In the system, one can distinguish the mobile particles from the immobile particles belonging to clusters, they can be considered separately as two different phases, a fluid and a solid. We determined the information entropy of the system as a whole and separately from each phase as particle concentration increases. The distribution of the Voronoi polygon areas are well fitted by a two-parameter gamma distribution and we have found that the regularity factor shows a notable change when pieces of the solid phase start to form. The methods we use here show that they can use even when the system is heterogeneous and they provide information when changes start.

  6. Improved methods for the marginal analysis of longitudinal data in the presence of time-dependent covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Chen; Westgate, Philip M

    2017-07-20

    Generalized estimating equations (GEEs) are commonly used for the marginal analysis of longitudinal data. In order to obtain consistent regression parameter estimates, these estimating equations must be unbiased. However, in the presence of certain types of time-dependent covariates, these equations can be biased unless they incorporate the independence working correlation structure. Moreover, in this case, regression parameter estimation can be very inefficient because not all valid moment conditions are incorporated within the corresponding estimating equations. Therefore, approaches based on the generalized method of moments or quadratic inference functions have been proposed in order to utilize all valid moment conditions. However, we have found in previous studies, as well as the current study, that such methods will not always provide valid inference and can also be improved upon in terms of finite-sample regression parameter estimation. Therefore, we propose both a modified GEE approach and a method selection strategy in order to ensure valid inference with the goal of improving regression parameter estimation. In a simulation study and application example, we compare existing and proposed methods and demonstrate that our modified GEE approach performs well, and the correlation information criterion has good accuracy with respect to selecting the best approach in terms of regression parameter estimation. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The neutral kaon decays to $\\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$ a detailed analysis of the CPLEAR data

    CERN Document Server

    Angelopoulos, Angelos; Aslanides, Elie; Backenstoss, Gerhard; Bargassa, P; Behnke, O; Benelli, A; Bertin, V; Blanc, F; Bloch, P; Carlson, P J; Carroll, M; Cawley, E; Chertok, M B; Danielsson, M; Dejardin, M; Derré, J; Ealet, A; Eleftheriadis, C; Faravel, L; Fassnacht, P; Fetscher, W; Fidecaro, Maria; Filipcic, A; Francis, D; Fry, J; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Gerber, H J; Go, A; Haselden, A; Hayman, P J; Henry-Coüannier, F; Hollander, R W; Jon-And, K; Kettle, P R; Kokkas, P; Kreuger, R; Le Gac, R; Leimgruber, F; Mandic, I; Manthos, N; Marel, Gérard; Mikuz, M; Miller, J; Montanet, François; Nakada, Tatsuya; Pagels, B; Papadopoulos, I M; Pavlopoulos, P; Polivka, G; Rickenbach, R; Roberts, B L; Ruf, T; Schäfer, M; Schaller, L A; Schietinger, T; Schopper, A; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thibault, C; Touchard, F; Touramanis, C; van Eijk, C W E; Vlachos, S; Weber, P; Wigger, O; Wolter, M; Zavrtanik, D; Zimmerman, D

    1998-01-01

    A detailed analysis of neutral kaons decaying to \\Pgpp \\Pgpm \\Pgpz\\ is presented based on the complete data set containing half a million events. Time-dependent decay rate asymmetries are measured between initially tagged \\PKz\\ and \\PaKz\\ and for different regions of the phase space. These asymmetries, resulting from the interference between the CP-conserving decay amplitude of \\PKzL\\ and the decay amplitude of \\PKzS\\ -- either CP-violating or CP-conserving -- allow the determinationof the \\PKzS\\ parameters \\etapmz\\ (CP-violating) and \\lampmz\\ (CP-conserving), and also of the main i sospin components of the \\PKzS\\ decay amplitude. The branching ratio of \\PKzS\\ $\\rightarrow$ \\Pgpp \\Pgpm \\Pgpz\\ (CP-conserving) is deduced directly from \\lampmz . In addition, we extract the slope parameters describing the energy dependence of the $\\PKzL \\rightarrow \\Pgpp \\Pgpm \\Pgpz $ Dalitz plot. The whole set of our results fits well within the current phenomenological picture of the neut ral-kaon system including CP violation ...

  8. Time-dependent structural transformation analysis to high-level Petri net model with active state transition diagram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito Ayumu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With an accumulation of in silico data obtained by simulating large-scale biological networks, a new interest of research is emerging for elucidating how living organism functions over time in cells. Investigating the dynamic features of current computational models promises a deeper understanding of complex cellular processes. This leads us to develop a method that utilizes structural properties of the model over all simulation time steps. Further, user-friendly overviews of dynamic behaviors can be considered to provide a great help in understanding the variations of system mechanisms. Results We propose a novel method for constructing and analyzing a so-called active state transition diagram (ASTD by using time-course simulation data of a high-level Petri net. Our method includes two new algorithms. The first algorithm extracts a series of subnets (called temporal subnets reflecting biological components contributing to the dynamics, while retaining positive mathematical qualities. The second one creates an ASTD composed of unique temporal subnets. ASTD provides users with concise information allowing them to grasp and trace how a key regulatory subnet and/or a network changes with time. The applicability of our method is demonstrated by the analysis of the underlying model for circadian rhythms in Drosophila. Conclusions Building ASTD is a useful means to convert a hybrid model dealing with discrete, continuous and more complicated events to finite time-dependent states. Based on ASTD, various analytical approaches can be applied to obtain new insights into not only systematic mechanisms but also dynamics.

  9. Time-Dependent and Time-Integrated Angular Analysis of B -> phi Ks pi0 and B -> phi K+ pi-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V

    2008-08-04

    We perform a time-dependent and time-integrated angular analysis of the B{sup 0} {yields} {psi}K*(892){sup 0}, {psi}K*{sub 2}(1430{sup 0}), and {psi}(K{pi}){sub S-wave}{sup 0} decays with the final sample of about 465 million B{bar B} pairs recorded with the BABAR detector. Overall, twelve parameters are measured for the vector-vector decay, nine parameters for the vector-tensor decay, and three parameters for the vector-scalar decay, including the branching fractions, CP-violation parameters, and parameters sensitive to final state interaction. We use the dependence on the K{pi} invariant mass of the interference between the scalar and vector or tensor components to resolve discrete ambiguities of the strong and weak phases. We use the time-evolution of the B {yields} {psi}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} channel to extract the CP-violation phase difference {Delta}{phi}{sub 00} = 0.28 {+-} 0.42 {+-} 0.04 between the B and {bar B} decay amplitudes. When the B {yields} {psi}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} channel is included, the fractions of longitudinal polarization f{sub L} of the vector-vector and vector-tensor decay modes are measured to be 0.494 {+-} 0.034 {+-} 0.013 and 0.901{sub -0.058}{sup +0.046} {+-} 0.037, respectively. This polarization pattern requires the presence of a helicity-plus amplitude in the vector-vector decay from a presently unknown source.

  10. Time dependence of ICD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorner, Reinhard

    2014-05-01

    We will discuss experimental studies of ICD in van der Vaals dimers of rare gas atoms and small molecules using the COLTRIMS technique. The talk will cover ICD after resonant Auger excitation (Nature 505, 664 (2014)) and two studies unveiling the time dependence of ICD in the energy (PRL 111, 233004 (2013)) and in the time domain (PRL 111, 093401 (2013)). A new technique to make ultrafast movies without the use of short pulses will be discussed.

  11. DEPTH-CHARGE static and time-dependent perturbation/sensitivity system for nuclear reactor core analysis. Revision I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.R.

    1985-04-01

    This report provides the background theory, user input, and sample problems required for the efficient application of the DEPTH-CHARGE system - a code black for both static and time-dependent perturbation theory and data sensitivity analyses. The DEPTH-CHARGE system is of modular construction and has been implemented within the VENTURE-BURNER computational system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The DEPTH module (coupled with VENTURE) solves for the three adjoint functions of Depletion Perturbation Theory and calculates the desired time-dependent derivatives of the response with respect to the nuclide concentrations and nuclear data utilized in the reference model. The CHARGE code is a collection of utility routines for general data manipulation and input preparation and considerably extends the usefulness of the system through the automatic generation of adjoint sources, estimated perturbed responses, and relative data sensitivity coefficients. Combined, the DEPTH-CHARGE system provides, for the first time, a complete generalized first-order perturbation/sensitivity theory capability for both static and time-dependent analyses of realistic multidimensional reactor models. This current documentation incorporates minor revisions to the original DEPTH-CHARGE documentation (ORNL/CSD-78) to reflect some new capabilities within the individual codes

  12. Nonequilibrium Dynamics of Anisotropic Large Spins in the Kondo Regime: Time-Dependent Numerical Renormalization Group Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosen, David; Wegewijs, Maarten R.; Hofstetter, Walter

    2008-02-01

    We investigate the time-dependent Kondo effect in a single-molecule magnet (SMM) strongly coupled to metallic electrodes. Describing the SMM by a Kondo model with large spin S>1/2, we analyze the underscreening of the local moment and the effect of anisotropy terms on the relaxation dynamics of the magnetization. Underscreening by single-channel Kondo processes leads to a logarithmically slow relaxation, while finite uniaxial anisotropy causes a saturation of the SMM’s magnetization. Additional transverse anisotropy terms induce quantum spin tunneling and a pseudospin-1/2 Kondo effect sensitive to the spin parity.

  13. Solar Potential Analysis and Integration of the Time-Dependent Simulation Results for Semantic 3d City Models Using Dynamizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, K.; Willenborg, B.; Sindram, M.; Kolbe, T. H.

    2017-10-01

    Semantic 3D city models play an important role in solving complex real-world problems and are being adopted by many cities around the world. A wide range of application and simulation scenarios directly benefit from the adoption of international standards such as CityGML. However, most of the simulations involve properties, whose values vary with respect to time, and the current generation semantic 3D city models do not support time-dependent properties explicitly. In this paper, the details of solar potential simulations are provided operating on the CityGML standard, assessing and estimating solar energy production for the roofs and facades of the 3D building objects in different ways. Furthermore, the paper demonstrates how the time-dependent simulation results are better-represented inline within 3D city models utilizing the so-called Dynamizer concept. This concept not only allows representing the simulation results in standardized ways, but also delivers a method to enhance static city models by such dynamic property values making the city models truly dynamic. The dynamizer concept has been implemented as an Application Domain Extension of the CityGML standard within the OGC Future City Pilot Phase 1. The results are given in this paper.

  14. Survival analysis with time-dependent covariates subject to missing data or measurement error: Multiple Imputation for Joint Modeling (MIJM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Betancur, Margarita; Carlin, John B; Brilleman, Samuel L; Tanamas, Stephanie K; Peeters, Anna; Wolfe, Rory

    2017-10-12

    Modern epidemiological studies collect data on time-varying individual-specific characteristics, such as body mass index and blood pressure. Incorporation of such time-dependent covariates in time-to-event models is of great interest, but raises some challenges. Of specific concern are measurement error, and the non-synchronous updating of covariates across individuals, due for example to missing data. It is well known that in the presence of either of these issues the last observation carried forward (LOCF) approach traditionally used leads to bias. Joint models of longitudinal and time-to-event outcomes, developed recently, address these complexities by specifying a model for the joint distribution of all processes and are commonly fitted by maximum likelihood or Bayesian approaches. However, the adequate specification of the full joint distribution can be a challenging modeling task, especially with multiple longitudinal markers. In fact, most available software packages are unable to handle more than one marker and offer a restricted choice of survival models. We propose a two-stage approach, Multiple Imputation for Joint Modeling (MIJM), to incorporate multiple time-dependent continuous covariates in the semi-parametric Cox and additive hazard models. Assuming a primary focus on the time-to-event model, the MIJM approach handles the joint distribution of the markers using multiple imputation by chained equations, a computationally convenient procedure that is widely available in mainstream statistical software. We developed an R package "survtd" that allows MIJM and other approaches in this manuscript to be applied easily, with just one call to its main function. A simulation study showed that MIJM performs well across a wide range of scenarios in terms of bias and coverage probability, particularly compared with LOCF, simpler two-stage approaches, and a Bayesian joint model. The Framingham Heart Study is used to illustrate the approach. © The Author 2017

  15. Mode coupling theory analysis of electrolyte solutions: Time dependent diffusion, intermediate scattering function, and ion solvation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Susmita; Yashonath, Subramanian; Bagchi, Biman

    2015-03-28

    A self-consistent mode coupling theory (MCT) with microscopic inputs of equilibrium pair correlation functions is developed to analyze electrolyte dynamics. We apply the theory to calculate concentration dependence of (i) time dependent ion diffusion, (ii) intermediate scattering function of the constituent ions, and (iii) ion solvation dynamics in electrolyte solution. Brownian dynamics with implicit water molecules and molecular dynamics method with explicit water are used to check the theoretical predictions. The time dependence of ionic self-diffusion coefficient and the corresponding intermediate scattering function evaluated from our MCT approach show quantitative agreement with early experimental and present Brownian dynamic simulation results. With increasing concentration, the dispersion of electrolyte friction is found to occur at increasingly higher frequency, due to the faster relaxation of the ion atmosphere. The wave number dependence of intermediate scattering function, F(k, t), exhibits markedly different relaxation dynamics at different length scales. At small wave numbers, we find the emergence of a step-like relaxation, indicating the presence of both fast and slow time scales in the system. Such behavior allows an intriguing analogy with temperature dependent relaxation dynamics of supercooled liquids. We find that solvation dynamics of a tagged ion exhibits a power law decay at long times-the decay can also be fitted to a stretched exponential form. The emergence of the power law in solvation dynamics has been tested by carrying out long Brownian dynamics simulations with varying ionic concentrations. The solvation time correlation and ion-ion intermediate scattering function indeed exhibit highly interesting, non-trivial dynamical behavior at intermediate to longer times that require further experimental and theoretical studies.

  16. Time dependent seismic hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidoro, B.; Iervolino, I.; Chioccarelli, E.; Giorgio, M.

    2012-04-01

    Probabilistic seismic hazard is usually computed trough a homogeneous Poisson process that even though it is a time-independent process it is widely used for its very convenient properties. However, when a single fault is of concern and/or the time scale is different from that of the long term, time-dependent processes are required. In this paper, different time-dependent models are reviewed with working examples. In fact, the Paganica fault (in central Italy) has been considered to compute both the probability of occurrence of at least one event in the lifespan of the structure, as well as the seismic hazard expressed in terms of probability of exceedance of an intensity value in a given time frame causing the collapse of the structure. Several models, well known or novel application to engineering hazard have been considered, limitation and issues in their applications are also discussed. The Brownian Passage Time (BPT) model is based on a stochastic modification of the deterministic stick-slip oscillator model for characteristic earthquakes; i.e., based on the addition of random perturbations (a Gaussian white noise) to the deterministic load path predicted by elastic rebound theory. This model assumes that the load state is at some ground level immediately after an event, increases steadly over time, reaches a failure threshold and relaxes instantaneously back to the ground level. For this model also a variable threshold has been considered to take into account the uncertainty of the threshold value. For the slip-predictable model it is assumed that the stress accumulates at a constant rate starting from some initial stress level. Stress is assumed to accumulate for a random period of time until an earthquake occurs. The size of the earthquake is governed by the stress release and it is a function of the elapsed time since the last event. In the time-predictable model stress buildup occurs at a constant rate until the accumulated stress reaches a threshold

  17. LHCb: Tagged time-dependent angular analysis of $B^0_s \\to J/\\psi K^+ K^-$ at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Syropoulos, V

    2013-01-01

    The time-dependent CP-violating asymmetry in $B^0_s\\to J/\\psi K^{+}K^{-}$ decays is measured using $1.0^{-1}$ of $pp$ of collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV collected with the LHCb detector. The decay time distribution of $B^0_s\\to J/\\psi K^{+}K^{-}$ is characterized by the decay widths $\\Gamma_{\\mathrm{H}}$ and $\\Gamma_{\\mathrm{L}}$ of the heavy and light mass eigenstates of the $B^0_s - \\bar{B^0_s}$ system and by a CP-violating phase $\\phi_s$. In a sample of approximately 27600 $B^0_s\\to J/\\psi K^{+}K^{-}$ events we measure $\\phi_s \\: = \\: 0.068 \\: \\pm \\: 0.091 \\: \\text{(stat)} \\: \\pm \\: 0.011 \\: \\text{(syst)} \\: \\text{rad}$. We also find an average $B^0_s$ decay width $\\Gamma_s \\equiv (\\Gamma_{\\mathrm{L}}+\\Gamma_{\\mathrm{H}})/2 \\: = \\: 0.671 \\: \\pm \\: 0.005 \\: \\text{(stat)} \\: \\pm \\: 0.006 \\: \\text{(syst)} \\: ps^{-1}$ and a decay width difference $\\Delta \\Gamma_s \\equiv \\Gamma_{\\mathrm{L}} - \\Gamma_{\\mathrm{H}} \\: = \\: 0.100 \\: \\pm \\: 0.016 \\: \\text{(stat)} \\: \\pm \\: 0.003 \\: \\text{(syst)} \\: ps^...

  18. Self-rated health and mortality risk in relation to gender and education: a time-dependent covariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Santos, Maria Teresa; Zunzunegui, Maria Victoria; Otero-Puime, Angel; Cañas, Ramiro; Casado-Collado, Alfonso Jaime

    2011-12-01

    This study examines the relations between self-rated health (SRH) at baseline, SRH as a time-dependent covariate (TDC), and mortality by gender and education in a community-dwelling older population in Spain. The data used are from the longitudinal study "Aging in Leganes", launched in 1993, carried out in a community-dwelling representative sample ( n  = 1,560) of the older population of Leganes (Spain). Mortality was assessed in 2008. Proportional regression models were fitted to examine the association between mortality and baseline SRH, and SRH as a TDC among subjects aged 65-85 at baseline. The multivariate analyses were stratified by gender and education and adjusted for sociodemographic factors, smoking and physical activity, physical and mental morbidity, and ADL disability. SRH and SRH as a TDC were significant predictors of mortality in men and in people with some education, but not in women or in illiterate persons. SRH and declines in SRH were associated with increased mortality risk in older men and in those who can read and write in this Mediterranean population. Given current improvements in education and decreasing gender inequality, health professionals in Spain should pay attention to both current SRH and declines in SRH in their patients regardless of gender and literacy.

  19. Probing the Elastic-Plastic, Time-Dependant Response of Test Fasteners using Finite Element Analysis (FEA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ML Renauld; H Lien

    2004-12-13

    The evolution of global and local stress/strain conditions in test fasteners under test conditions is investigated using elastic-plastic, time-dependent finite element analyses (FEA). For elastic-plastic response, tensile data from multiple specimens, material heats and test temperatures are integrated into a single, normalized flow curve from which temperature dependency is extracted. A primary creep model is calibrated with specimen- and fastener-based thermal relaxation data generated under a range of times, temperatures, stress levels and environments. These material inputs are used in analytical simulations of experimental test conditions for several types of fasteners. These fastener models are constructed with automated routines and contact conditions prescribed at all potentially mating surfaces. Thermal or mechanical room temperature pre-loading, as appropriate for a given fastener, is followed by a temperature ramp and a dwell time at constant temperature. While the amount of thermal stress relaxation is limited for the conditions modeled, local stress states are highly dependent upon geometry (thread root radius, for example), pre-loading history and thermal expansion differences between the test fastener and test fixture. Benefits of this FE approach over an elastic methodology for stress calculation will be illustrated with correlations of Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) initiation time and crack orientations in stress concentrations.

  20. A Numerical Method for Analysis of In Vitro Time-Dependent Inhibition Data. Part 1. Theoretical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagar, Swati; Jones, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of cytochromes P450 by time-dependent inhibitors (TDI) is a major cause of clinical drug-drug interactions. It is often difficult to predict in vivo drug interactions based on in vitro TDI data. In part 1 of these manuscripts, we describe a numerical method that can directly estimate TDI parameters for a number of kinetic schemes. Datasets were simulated for Michaelis-Menten (MM) and several atypical kinetic schemes. Ordinary differential equations were solved directly to parameterize kinetic constants. For MM kinetics, much better estimates of KI can be obtained with the numerical method, and even IC50 shift data can provide meaningful estimates of TDI kinetic parameters. The standard replot method can be modified to fit non-MM data, but normal experimental error precludes this approach. Non-MM kinetic schemes can be easily incorporated into the numerical method, and the numerical method consistently predicts the correct model at errors of 10% or less. Quasi-irreversible inactivation and partial inactivation can be modeled easily with the numerical method. The utility of the numerical method for the analyses of experimental TDI data is provided in our companion manuscript in this issue of Drug Metabolism and Disposition (Korzekwa et al., 2014b). PMID:24939654

  1. Time dependent analysis of Xenon spatial oscillations in small power reactors; Analise temporal das oscilacoes espaciais de Xenonio em reatores de pequeno porte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decco, Claudia Cristina Ghirardello

    1997-07-01

    This work presents time dependent analysis of xenon spatial oscillations studying the influence of the power density distribution, type of reactivity perturbation, power level and core size, using the one-dimensional and three-dimensional analysis with the MID2 and citation codes, respectively. It is concluded that small pressurized water reactors with height smaller than 1.5 m are stable and do not have xenon spatial oscillations. (author)

  2. Impact of the model-building strategy on inference about nonlinear and time-dependent covariate effects in survival analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynant, Willy; Abrahamowicz, Michal

    2014-08-30

    Cox's proportional hazards (PH) model assumes constant-over-time covariate effects. Furthermore, most applications assume linear effects of continuous covariates on the logarithm of the hazard. Yet, many prognostic factors have time-dependent (TD) and/or nonlinear (NL) effects, that is, violate these conventional assumptions. Detection of such complex effects could affect prognosis and clinical decisions. However, assessing the effects of each of the multiple, often correlated, covariates in flexible multivariable analyses is challenging. In simulations, we investigated the impact of the approach used to build the flexible multivariable model on inference about the TD and NL covariate effects. Results demonstrate that the conclusions regarding the statistical significance of the TD/NL effects depend heavily on the strategy used to decide which effects of the other covariates should be adjusted for. Both a failure to adjust for true TD and NL effects of relevant covariates and inclusion of spurious effects of covariates that conform to the PH and linearity assumptions increase the risk of incorrect conclusions regarding other covariates. In this context, iterative backward elimination of nonsignificant NL and TD effects from the multivariable model, which initially includes all these effects, may help discriminate between true and spurious effects. The practical importance of these issues was illustrated in an example that reassessed the predictive ability of selected biomarkers for survival in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. In conclusion, a careful model-building strategy and flexible modeling of multivariable survival data can yield new insights about predictors' roles and improve the validity of analyses. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Large-Scale Uncertainty and Error Analysis for Time-dependent Fluid/Structure Interactions in Wind Turbine Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Juan J. [Stanford University; Iaccarino, Gianluca [Stanford University

    2013-08-25

    solution to the long-time integration problem of spectral chaos approaches; 4. A rigorous methodology to account for aleatory and epistemic uncertainties, to emphasize the most important variables via dimension reduction and dimension-adaptive refinement, and to support fusion with experimental data using Bayesian inference; 5. The application of novel methodologies to time-dependent reliability studies in wind turbine applications including a number of efforts relating to the uncertainty quantification in vertical-axis wind turbine applications. In this report, we summarize all accomplishments in the project (during the time period specified) focusing on advances in UQ algorithms and deployment efforts to the wind turbine application area. Detailed publications in each of these areas have also been completed and are available from the respective conference proceedings and journals as detailed in a later section.

  4. Time-dependent behavior of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Tanabe, Tada-aki

    1992-01-01

    This paper is a condensed version of the material presented at the International Workshop on Finite Element Analysis of Reinforced Concrete, Session 4 -- Time Dependent Behavior, held at Columbia University, New York on June 3--6, 1991. Dr. P.A. Pfeiffer presented recent developments in time-dependent behavior of concrete and Professor T. Tanabe presented a review of research in Japan on time-dependent behavior of concrete. The paper discusses the recent research of time-dependent behavior of concrete in the past few years. 6 refs

  5. Time-dependent transport phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanucci, Gianluca; Kurth, S.; Gross, E. K. U.; Rubio, Angel

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes the ab initio theory of quantum transport. The Cini scheme can be combined with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). In this theory, the time-dependent density of an interacting system moving in an external, time-dependent local potential can be calculated via a fictitious system of non-interacting electrons moving in a local, effective, and time-dependent potential. Therefore this theory is well suited for the treatment of non-equilibrium transport problem...

  6. Integrated Logistics Support Analysis of the International Space Station Alpha, Background and Summary of Mathematical Modeling and Failure Density Distributions Pertaining to Maintenance Time Dependent Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehry-Fard, F.; Coulthard, Maurice H.

    1995-01-01

    The process of predicting the values of maintenance time dependent variable parameters such as mean time between failures (MTBF) over time must be one that will not in turn introduce uncontrolled deviation in the results of the ILS analysis such as life cycle costs, spares calculation, etc. A minor deviation in the values of the maintenance time dependent variable parameters such as MTBF over time will have a significant impact on the logistics resources demands, International Space Station availability and maintenance support costs. There are two types of parameters in the logistics and maintenance world: a. Fixed; b. Variable Fixed parameters, such as cost per man hour, are relatively easy to predict and forecast. These parameters normally follow a linear path and they do not change randomly. However, the variable parameters subject to the study in this report such as MTBF do not follow a linear path and they normally fall within the distribution curves which are discussed in this publication. The very challenging task then becomes the utilization of statistical techniques to accurately forecast the future non-linear time dependent variable arisings and events with a high confidence level. This, in turn, shall translate in tremendous cost savings and improved availability all around.

  7. Dynamic ultrasound imaging—A multivariate approach for the analysis and comparison of time-dependent musculoskeletal movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Löfstedt Tommy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Muscle functions are generally assumed to affect a wide variety of conditions and activities, including pain, ischemic and neurological disorders, exercise and injury. It is therefore very desirable to obtain more information on musculoskeletal contributions to and activity during clinical processes such as the treatment of muscle injuries, post-surgery evaluations, and the monitoring of progressive degeneration in neuromuscular disorders. The spatial image resolution achievable with ultrasound systems has improved tremendously in the last few years and it is nowadays possible to study skeletal muscles in real-time during activity. However, ultrasound imaging has an inherent problem that makes it difficult to compare different measurement series or image sequences from two or more subjects. Due to physiological differences between different subjects, the ultrasound sequences will be visually different – partly because of variation in probe placement and partly because of the difficulty of perfectly reproducing any given movement. Methods Ultrasound images of the biceps and calf of a single subject were transformed to achieve congruence and then efficiently compressed and stacked to facilitate analysis using a multivariate method known as O2PLS. O2PLS identifies related and unrelated variation in and between two sets of data such that different phases of the studied movements can be analysed. The methodology was used to study the dynamics of the Achilles tendon and the calf and also the Biceps brachii and upper arm. The movements of these parts of the body are both of interest in clinical orthopaedic research. Results This study extends the novel method of multivariate analysis of congruent images (MACI to facilitate comparisons between two series of ultrasound images. This increases its potential range of medical applications and its utility for detecting, visualising and quantifying the dynamics and functions of skeletal

  8. Time-dependent spectral analysis of interactions within groups of walking pedestrians and vertical structural motion using wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocian, M.; Brownjohn, J. M. W.; Racic, V.; Hester, D.; Quattrone, A.; Gilbert, L.; Beasley, R.

    2018-05-01

    A multi-scale and multi-object interaction phenomena can arise when a group of walking pedestrians crosses a structure capable of exhibiting dynamic response. This is because each pedestrian is an autonomous dynamic system capable of displaying intricate behaviour affected by social, psychological, biomechanical and environmental factors, including adaptations to the structural motion. Despite a wealth of mathematical models attempting to describe and simulate coupled crowd-structure system, their applicability can generally be considered uncertain. This can be assigned to a number of assumptions made in their development and the scarcity or unavailability of data suitable for their validation, in particular those associated with pedestrian-pedestrian and pedestrian-structure interaction. To alleviate this problem, data on behaviour of individual pedestrians within groups of six walkers with different spatial arrangements are gathered simultaneously with data on dynamic structural response of a footbridge, from a series of measurements utilising wireless motion monitors. Unlike in previous studies on coordination of pedestrian behaviour, the collected data can serve as a proxy for pedestrian vertical force, which is of critical importance from the point of view of structural stability. A bivariate analysis framework is proposed and applied to these data, encompassing wavelet transform, synchronisation measures based on Shannon entropy and circular statistics. A topological pedestrian map is contrived showing the strength and directionality of between-subjects interactions. It is found that the coordination in pedestrians' vertical force depends on the spatial collocation within a group, but it is generally weak. The relationship between the bridge and pedestrian behaviour is also analysed, revealing stronger propensity for pedestrians to coordinate their force with the structural motion rather than with each other.

  9. LHCb: Time-dependent amplitude analysis of semileptonically-tagged $D^0 \\to K^0_S \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Reichert, S

    2013-01-01

    The self-conjugate hadronic decay $D^0 \\to K^0_S \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ provides access to the measurement of the mixing parameters of the neutral $D$-meson system and allows to test for CP violation. A measurement of the mixing parameters $x_D$ and $y_D$ as well as of the parameters $|q/p|$ and $\\phi$, which govern indirect CP violation, will be performed based on a time-dependent amplitude-model analysis of the full LHCb dataset of 2011 and 2012 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3fb$^{-1}$.

  10. Measurement of D{0}-D[-over]{0} mixing from a time-dependent amplitude analysis of D{0}-->K+pi{-}pi{0} decays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Vazquez, W Panduro; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; da Costa, J Firmino; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Li, X; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Sanchez, P del Amo; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Esteve, L; Ganzhur, S F

    2009-11-20

    We present evidence of D{0}-D[-over ]{0} mixing using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D{0}-->K+pi{-}pi;{0} in a data sample of 384 fb{-1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e{-} collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Assuming CP conservation, we measure the mixing parameters x{Kpipi{0}}{'}=[2.61{-0.68}{+0.57}(stat)+/-0.39(syst)]%, y{Kpipi;{0}}{'}=[-0.06{-0.64}{+0.55}(stat)+/-0.34(syst)]%. This result is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations. We find no evidence of CP violation in mixing.

  11. Topic 5: Time-Dependent Behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Tanabe, Tada-aki

    1991-01-01

    This chapter is a report of the material presented at the International Workshop on Finite Element Analysis of Reinforced Concrete, Session 4 -- Time Dependent Behavior, held at Columbia University, New York on June 3--6, 1991. Dr. P.A. Pfeiffer presented recent developments in time-dependent behavior of concrete and Professor T. Tanabe presented a review of research in Japan on time-dependent behavior of concrete. The chapter discusses the recent research of time-dependent behavior of concrete in the past few years in both the USA-European and Japanese communities. The author appreciates the valuable information provided by Zdenek P. Bazant in preparing the USA-European Research section

  12. Novel algorithm and MATLAB-based program for automated power law analysis of single particle, time-dependent mean-square displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umansky, Moti; Weihs, Daphne

    2012-08-01

    In many physical and biophysical studies, single-particle tracking is utilized to reveal interactions, diffusion coefficients, active modes of driving motion, dynamic local structure, micromechanics, and microrheology. The basic analysis applied to those data is to determine the time-dependent mean-square displacement (MSD) of particle trajectories and perform time- and ensemble-averaging of similar motions. The motion of particles typically exhibits time-dependent power-law scaling, and only trajectories with qualitatively and quantitatively comparable MSD should be ensembled. Ensemble averaging trajectories that arise from different mechanisms, e.g., actively driven and diffusive, is incorrect and can result inaccurate correlations between structure, mechanics, and activity. We have developed an algorithm to automatically and accurately determine power-law scaling of experimentally measured single-particle MSD. Trajectories can then categorized and grouped according to user defined cutoffs of time, amplitudes, scaling exponent values, or combinations. Power-law fits are then provided for each trajectory alongside categorized groups of trajectories, histograms of power laws, and the ensemble-averaged MSD of each group. The codes are designed to be easily incorporated into existing user codes. We expect that this algorithm and program will be invaluable to anyone performing single-particle tracking, be it in physical or biophysical systems. Catalogue identifier: AEMD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 25 892 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5 572 780 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MATLAB (MathWorks Inc.) version 7.11 (2010b) or higher, program

  13. Numerical method for time-dependent localized corrosion analysis with moving boundaries by combining the finite volume method and voxel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Yuki; Takiyasu, Jumpei; Amaya, Kenji; Yakuwa, Hiroshi; Hayabusa, Keisuke

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A novel numerical method to analyze time dependent localized corrosion is developed. ► It takes electromigration, mass diffusion, chemical reactions, and moving boundaries. ► Our method perfectly satisfies the conservation of mass and electroneutrality. ► The behavior of typical crevice corrosion is successfully simulated. ► Both verification and validation of our method are carried out. - Abstract: A novel numerical method for time-dependent localized corrosion analysis is presented. Electromigration, mass diffusion, chemical reactions, and moving boundaries are considered in the numerical simulation of localized corrosion of engineering alloys in an underwater environment. Our method combines the finite volume method (FVM) and the voxel method. The FVM is adopted in the corrosion rate calculation so that the conservation of mass is satisfied. A newly developed decoupled algorithm with a projection method is introduced in the FVM to decouple the multiphysics problem into the electrostatic, mass transport, and chemical reaction analyses with electroneutrality maintained. The polarization curves for the corroding metal are used as boundary conditions for the metal surfaces to calculate the corrosion rates. The voxel method is adopted in updating the moving boundaries of cavities without remeshing and mesh-to-mesh solution mapping. Some modifications of the standard voxel method, which represents the boundaries as zigzag-shaped surfaces, are introduced to generate smooth surfaces. Our method successfully reproduces the numerical and experimental results of a capillary electrophoresis problem. Furthermore, the numerical results are qualitatively consistent with the experimental results for several examples of crevice corrosion.

  14. Time-Dependent Neutronic Analysis of a Power-Flattened Gas Cooled Accelerator Driven System Fuelled with Thorium, Uranium, Plutonium, and Curium Dioxides TRISO Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizem Bakır

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the power flattening and time-dependent neutronic analysis of a conceptual helium gas cooled Accelerator Driven System (ADS loaded with TRISO (tristructural-isotropic fuel particles. Target material is lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE. ThO2, UO2, PuO2, and CmO2 TRISO particles are used as fuel. PuO2 and CmO2 fuels are extracted from PWR-MOX spent fuel. Subcritical core is radially divided into 10 equidistant subzones in order to flatten the power produced in the core. Tens of thousands of these TRISO fuel particles are embedded in the carbon matrix fuel pebbles as five different cases. The high-energy Monte Carlo code MCNPX 2.7 with the LA150 library is used for the neutronic calculations. Time-dependent burnup calculations are carried out for thermal fission power (Pth of 1000 MW using the BURN card. The energy gain of the ADS is in the range of 99.98–148.64 at the beginning of a cycle. Furthermore, the peak-to-average fission power density ratio is obtained between 1.021 and 1.029 at the beginning of the cycle. These ratios show a good quasi-uniform power density for each case. Furthermore, up to 155.1 g 233U and 103.6 g 239Pu per day can be produced. The considered system has a high neutronic capability in terms of energy multiplication, fissile breeding, and spent fuel transmutation with thorium utilization.

  15. Study of CP Symmetry Violation in the Charmonium-K*(892) Channel By a Complete Time Dependent Angular Analysis (BaBar Experiment)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T' Jampens, Stephane; /Orsay

    2006-09-18

    This thesis presents the full-angular time-dependent analysis of the vector-vector channel B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}(K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0})*{sup 0}. After a review of the CP violation in the B meson system, the phenomenology of the charmonium-K*(892) channels is exposed. The method for the measurement of the transversity amplitudes of the B {yields} J/{psi}K*(892), based on a pseudo-likelihood method, is then exposed. The results from a 81.9 fb{sup -1} of collected data by the BABAR detector at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance peak are |A{sub 0}|{sup 2} = 0.565 {+-} 0.011 {+-} 0.004, |A{sub {parallel}}|{sup 2} = 0.206 {+-} 0.016 {+-} 0.007, |A{sub {perpendicular}}|{sup 2} = 0.228 {+-} 0.016 {+-} 0.007, {delta}{sub {parallel}} = -2.766 {+-} 0.105 {+-} 0.040 and {delta}{sub {perpendicular}} = 2.935 {+-} 0.067 {+-} 0.040. Note that ({delta}{sub {parallel}}, {delta}{sub {perpendicular}}) {yields} (-{delta}{sub {parallel}}, {pi} - {delta}{sub {perpendicular}}) is also a solution. The strong phases {delta}{sub {parallel}} and {delta}{sub {perpendicular}} are at {approx}> 3{sigma} from {+-}{pi}, signing the presence of final state interactions and the breakdown of the factorization hypothesis. The forward-backward analysis of the K{pi} mass spectrum revealed the presence of a coherent S-wave interfering with the K*(892). It is the first evidence of this wave in the K{pi} system coming from a B meson. The particularity of the B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}(K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0})*{sup 0} channel is to have a time-dependent but also an angular distribution which allows to measure sin 2{beta} but also cos2{beta}. The results from an unbinned maximum likelihood fit are sin 2{beta} = -0.10 {+-} 0.57 {+-} 0.14 and cos 2{beta} = 3.32{sub -0.96}{sup +0.76} {+-} 0.27 with the transversity amplitudes fixed to the values given above. The other solution for the strong phases flips the sign of cos 2{beta}. Theoretical considerations based on the s-quark helicity

  16. Amplitude Analysis of the Charmless Decays of Charged B Mesons to the Final States K+- Pi-+ Pi+- Using the BaBar Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latham, Thomas Edward; /Bristol U.

    2006-09-18

    Results of an amplitude analysis of the B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} Dalitz plot are presented. The analysis uses a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 210.6 fb{sup -1}, recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory. This sample corresponds to 231.8 million B{bar B} pairs. Branching fractions and 90% confidence level upper limits are calculated, averaged over charge conjugate states (B). For those modes that have significant branching fraction measurements CP violating charge asymmetry measurements are also presented (A{sub CP}). The results from the nominal fit are summarized.

  17. Competing risks and time-dependent covariates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortese, Giuliana; Andersen, Per K

    2010-01-01

    cumulative incidences at different subintervals of the entire study period. The final strategy is to extend the competing risks model by considering all the possible combinations between internal covariate levels and cause-specific events as final states. In all of those proposals, it is possible to estimate......Time-dependent covariates are frequently encountered in regression analysis for event history data and competing risks. They are often essential predictors, which cannot be substituted by time-fixed covariates. This study briefly recalls the different types of time-dependent covariates......, as classified by Kalbfleisch and Prentice [The Statistical Analysis of Failure Time Data, Wiley, New York, 2002] with the intent of clarifying their role and emphasizing the limitations in standard survival models and in the competing risks setting. If random (internal) time-dependent covariates...

  18. Multiscale characterization and prediction of monsoon rainfall in India using Hilbert-Huang transform and time-dependent intrinsic correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adarsh, S.; Reddy, M. Janga

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) approach is used for the multiscale characterization of All India Summer Monsoon Rainfall (AISMR) time series and monsoon rainfall time series from five homogeneous regions in India. The study employs the Complete Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition with Adaptive Noise (CEEMDAN) for multiscale decomposition of monsoon rainfall in India and uses the Normalized Hilbert Transform and Direct Quadrature (NHT-DQ) scheme for the time-frequency characterization. The cross-correlation analysis between orthogonal modes of All India monthly monsoon rainfall time series and that of five climate indices such as Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO), El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Sunspot Number (SN), Atlantic Multi Decadal Oscillation (AMO), and Equatorial Indian Ocean Oscillation (EQUINOO) in the time domain showed that the links of different climate indices with monsoon rainfall are expressed well only for few low-frequency modes and for the trend component. Furthermore, this paper investigated the hydro-climatic teleconnection of ISMR in multiple time scales using the HHT-based running correlation analysis technique called time-dependent intrinsic correlation (TDIC). The results showed that both the strength and nature of association between different climate indices and ISMR vary with time scale. Stemming from this finding, a methodology employing Multivariate extension of EMD and Stepwise Linear Regression (MEMD-SLR) is proposed for prediction of monsoon rainfall in India. The proposed MEMD-SLR method clearly exhibited superior performance over the IMD operational forecast, M5 Model Tree (MT), and multiple linear regression methods in ISMR predictions and displayed excellent predictive skill during 1989-2012 including the four extreme events that have occurred during this period.

  19. Combined lipidomic and proteomic analysis of isolated human islets exposed to palmitate reveals time-dependent changes in insulin secretion and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roomp, Kirsten; Kristinsson, Hjalti; Schvartz, Domitille; Ubhayasekera, Kumari; Sargsyan, Ernest; Manukyan, Levon; Chowdhury, Azazul; Manell, Hannes; Satagopam, Venkata; Groebe, Karlfried; Schneider, Reinhard; Bergquist, Jonas; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Bergsten, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have linked the accumulation of lipid metabolites to the development of beta-cell dysfunction and impaired insulin secretion. In most in vitro models of T2DM, rodent islets or beta-cell lines are used and typically focus is on specific cellular pathways or organs. Our aim was to, firstly, develop a combined lipidomics and proteomics approach for lipotoxicity in isolated human islets and, secondly, investigate if the approach could delineate novel and/ or confirm reported mechanisms of lipotoxicity. To this end isolated human pancreatic islets, exposed to chronically elevated palmitate concentrations for 0, 2 and 7 days, were functionally characterized and their levels of multiple targeted lipid and untargeted protein species determined. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from the islets increased on day 2 and decreased on day 7. At day 7 islet insulin content decreased and the proinsulin to insulin content ratio doubled. Amounts of cholesterol, stearic acid, C16 dihydroceramide and C24:1 sphingomyelin, obtained from the lipidomic screen, increased time-dependently in the palmitate-exposed islets. The proteomic screen identified matching changes in proteins involved in lipid biosynthesis indicating up-regulated cholesterol and lipid biosynthesis in the islets. Furthermore, proteins associated with immature secretory granules were decreased when palmitate exposure time was increased despite their high affinity for cholesterol. Proteins associated with mature secretory granules remained unchanged. Pathway analysis based on the protein and lipid expression profiles implicated autocrine effects of insulin in lipotoxicity. Taken together the study demonstrates that combining different omics approaches has potential in mapping of multiple simultaneous cellular events. However, it also shows that challenges exist for effectively combining lipidomics and proteomics in primary cells. Our findings provide

  20. Combined lipidomic and proteomic analysis of isolated human islets exposed to palmitate reveals time-dependent changes in insulin secretion and lipid metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Roomp

    Full Text Available Studies on the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM have linked the accumulation of lipid metabolites to the development of beta-cell dysfunction and impaired insulin secretion. In most in vitro models of T2DM, rodent islets or beta-cell lines are used and typically focus is on specific cellular pathways or organs. Our aim was to, firstly, develop a combined lipidomics and proteomics approach for lipotoxicity in isolated human islets and, secondly, investigate if the approach could delineate novel and/ or confirm reported mechanisms of lipotoxicity. To this end isolated human pancreatic islets, exposed to chronically elevated palmitate concentrations for 0, 2 and 7 days, were functionally characterized and their levels of multiple targeted lipid and untargeted protein species determined. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from the islets increased on day 2 and decreased on day 7. At day 7 islet insulin content decreased and the proinsulin to insulin content ratio doubled. Amounts of cholesterol, stearic acid, C16 dihydroceramide and C24:1 sphingomyelin, obtained from the lipidomic screen, increased time-dependently in the palmitate-exposed islets. The proteomic screen identified matching changes in proteins involved in lipid biosynthesis indicating up-regulated cholesterol and lipid biosynthesis in the islets. Furthermore, proteins associated with immature secretory granules were decreased when palmitate exposure time was increased despite their high affinity for cholesterol. Proteins associated with mature secretory granules remained unchanged. Pathway analysis based on the protein and lipid expression profiles implicated autocrine effects of insulin in lipotoxicity. Taken together the study demonstrates that combining different omics approaches has potential in mapping of multiple simultaneous cellular events. However, it also shows that challenges exist for effectively combining lipidomics and proteomics in primary cells. Our

  1. Integrated Logistics Support Analysis of the International Space Station Alpha: An Overview of the Maintenance Time Dependent Parameter Prediction Methods Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehry-Fard, F.; Coulthard, Maurice H.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this publication is to introduce the enhancement methods for the overall reliability and maintainability methods of assessment on the International Space Station. It is essential that the process to predict the values of the maintenance time dependent variable parameters such as mean time between failure (MTBF) over time do not in themselves generate uncontrolled deviation in the results of the ILS analysis such as life cycle costs, spares calculation, etc. Furthermore, the very acute problems of micrometeorite, Cosmic rays, flares, atomic oxygen, ionization effects, orbital plumes and all the other factors that differentiate maintainable space operations from non-maintainable space operations and/or ground operations must be accounted for. Therefore, these parameters need be subjected to a special and complex process. Since reliability and maintainability strongly depend on the operating conditions that are encountered during the entire life of the International Space Station, it is important that such conditions are accurately identified at the beginning of the logistics support requirements process. Environmental conditions which exert a strong influence on International Space Station will be discussed in this report. Concurrent (combined) space environments may be more detrimental to the reliability and maintainability of the International Space Station than the effects of a single environment. In characterizing the logistics support requirements process, the developed design/test criteria must consider both the single and/or combined environments in anticipation of providing hardware capability to withstand the hazards of the International Space Station profile. The effects of the combined environments (typical) in a matrix relationship on the International Space Station will be shown. The combinations of the environments where the total effect is more damaging than the cumulative effects of the environments acting singly, may include a

  2. Molecular network, pathway, and functional analysis of time-dependent gene changes associated with pancreatic cancer susceptibility to oncolytic vaccinia virotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Haddad

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our study reveals the ability to assess time-dependent changes in gene expression patterns in pancreatic cancer cells associated with infection and susceptibility to vaccinia viruses. This suggests that molecular assays may be useful to develop safer and more efficacious oncolyticvirotherapies and support the idea that these treatments may target pathways implicated in pancreatic cancer resistance to conventional therapies.

  3. Time-dependent problems and difference methods

    CERN Document Server

    Gustafsson, Bertil; Oliger, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition "". . . fills a considerable gap in the numerical analysis literature by providing a self-contained treatment . . . this is an important work written in a clear style . . . warmly recommended to any graduate student or researcher in the field of the numerical solution of partial differential equations."" -SIAM Review Time-Dependent Problems and Difference Methods, Second Edition continues to provide guidance for the analysis of difference methods for computing approximate solutions to partial differential equations for time-de

  4. Betweenness in time dependent networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsayed, Ahmad; Higham, Desmond J.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of betweenness has given rise to a very useful class of network centrality measures. Loosely, betweenness quantifies the level of importance of a node in terms of its propensity to act as an intermediary when messages are passed around the network. In this work we generalize a walk-based betweenness measure to the case of time-dependent networks, such as those arising in telecommunications and on-line social media. We also introduce a new kind of betweenness measure, temporal betweenness, which quantifies the importance of a time-point. We illustrate the effectiveness of these new measures on synthetic examples, and also give results on real data sets involving voice call, email and Twitter

  5. A measurement of the CKM angle $\\gamma$ from studies of $DK\\pi$ Dalitz plots

    CERN Document Server

    Craik, Daniel; Kreps, Michal

    Various measurements of quantities relating to $B^0_{(s)} \\to D K^\\pm\\pi^\\mp$ decays are reported from analyses building towards a measurement of the CKM angle $\\gamma$. The first observation of the decay $B^0_s \\to \\bar{D}^0 K^-\\pi^+$ is reported. Based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $1.0 \\,{\\rm fb}^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data recorded by the LHCb detector, the branching fraction relative to that of the topologically similar decay $B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0 \\pi^+\\pi^-$ is measured to be $$ \\frac{ {\\cal B}\\left(B^0_s \\to \\bar{D}^0 K^-\\pi^+\\right)}{ {\\cal B}\\left(B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0 \\pi^+\\pi^-\\right)} = 1.18 \\pm 0.05\\,\\text{(stat.)} \\pm 0.12\\,\\text{(syst.)} \\, . $$ In addition, the relative branching fraction of the decay $B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0 K^+\\pi^-$ is measured to be $$ \\frac{ {\\cal B}\\left(B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0 K^+\\pi^-\\right)}{ {\\cal B}\\left(B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0 \\pi^+\\pi^-\\right)} = 0.106 \\pm 0.007\\,\\text{(stat.)} \\pm 0.008\\,\\text{(syst.)} \\, . $$ The resonant substructures of $B^0_s \\to \\...

  6. Time Dependent Analysis of B0 →ρ0ρ0 Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipenkov, Ilya Leonidovich [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-10-01

    The BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider is located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It has been gathering data on the Υ(4S) resonance from 2000 until 2007 with the primary objective of studying CP violation in B-meson decays. In this thesis they provide a theoretical overview of how CP violation arises in the context of the Standard Model, why B decays are relevant, and how BABAR gathers the necessary data. Specifically, they present the analysis of B0 →ρ0ρ0 decays in a sample of 465 x 106 Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$. They measure the corresponding branching fraction β = (0.92 ± 0.32(stat.) ± 0.14(syst.)) x 10-6 and the longitudinal polarization fraction fL = 0.75-0.14+0.11(stat.) ± 0.04(syst.). The evidence for the B0→ ρ0ρ0 signal has a significance of 3.1 standard deviations (σ), when the systematic uncertainties are included. There is insufficient evidence for B decays into similar modes and the corresponding upper limits are determined to be βρ0f0 < 0.34 x 10-6, βf0f0 < 0.16 x 10-6, βρ0π+π- < 8.7 x 10-6, B π+π-π+π- < 21.1 x 10-6 at the 90% Confidence Level (CL). They also investigate the proper-time dependence of the longitudinal component in the decay and measure the Cp-violating coefficients SL = 0.3± 0.7(stat.) ± 0.2(syst.) and CL = 0.2 ± 0.8(stat.) ± 0.3(syst.). By combining these results with other measurements from the B → ρρ processes and performing an Isospin Analysis, they are able to restrict the unitarity angle α as well as its uncertainty due to penguin contributions, Δα. Namely, α = (92.4-6.5+6

  7. Network-timing-dependent plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent eDelattre

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bursts of activity in networks of neurons are thought to convey salient information and drive synaptic plasticity. Here we report that network bursts also exert a profound effect on Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP. In acute slices of juvenile rat somatosensory cortex we paired a network burst, which alone induced long-term depression (LTD, with STDP-induced long-term potentiation and depression (LTP and LTD. We observed that STDP-induced LTP was either unaffected, blocked or flipped into LTD by the network burst, and that STDP-induced LTD was either saturated or flipped into LTP, depending on the relative timing of the network burst with respect to spike coincidences of the STDP event. We hypothesized that network bursts flip STDP-induced LTP to LTD by depleting resources needed for LTP and therefore developed a resource-dependent STDP learning rule. In a model neural network under the influence of the proposed resource-dependent STDP rule, we found that excitatory synaptic coupling was homeostatically regulated to produce power law distributed burst amplitudes reflecting self-organized criticality, a state that ensures optimal information coding.

  8. Time-dependent multimode structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgu, E.

    1991-01-01

    In a previous paper, the authors sought to display the multimode kinetics structure and step changes were considered. In this paper, a similar study is undertaken in which ramp changes are considered. Throughout the previous study, a rather simple model of a bare, cylindrical, initially critical nuclear system was the focus. This system had a central region into which a control rod was suddenly inserted, or from which a control rod was suddenly ejected. (A rod follower concept was then adopted.) The mentioned transients were modeled by a two-mode synthesis approach that displayed, rather rigorously, the space-dependency behavior of the time- and space-dependent flux in question. It is useful to complete the picture previously drawn by a study within the authors' framework, where time-dependent changes now take place instead of step changes. In this paper, they consider a ramp rod drop in a bare cylindrical nuclear system as well as a ramp rod ejection from this system (still with a rod follower concept). The effect of a feedback mechanism is not taken into account

  9. Analysis of the dual phase lag bio-heat transfer equation with constant and time-dependent heat flux conditions on skin surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziaei Poor Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on temperature response of skin tissue due to time-dependent surface heat fluxes. Analytical solution is constructed for DPL bio-heat transfer equation with constant, periodic and pulse train heat flux conditions on skin surface. Separation of variables and Duhamel’s theorem for a skin tissue as a finite domain are employed. The transient temperature responses for constant and time-dependent boundary conditions are obtained and discussed. The results show that there is major discrepancy between the predicted temperature of parabolic (Pennes bio-heat transfer, hyperbolic (thermal wave and DPL bio-heat transfer models when high heat flux accidents on the skin surface with a short duration or propagation speed of thermal wave is finite. The results illustrate that the DPL model reduces to the hyperbolic model when τT approaches zero and the classic Fourier model when both thermal relaxations approach zero. However for τq = τT the DPL model anticipates different temperature distribution with that predicted by the Pennes model. Such discrepancy is due to the blood perfusion term in energy equation. It is in contrast to results from the literature for pure conduction material, where the DPL model approaches the Fourier heat conduction model when τq = τT . The burn injury is also investigated.

  10. Time-dependent projected Hartree-Fock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2015-03-28

    Projected Hartree-Fock (PHF) has recently emerged as an alternative approach to describing degenerate systems where static correlation is abundant, when the spin-symmetry is projected. Here, we derive a set of linearized time-dependent equations for PHF in order to be able to access excited states. The close connection of such linear-response time-dependent PHF (TDPHF) to the stability condition of a PHF wave function is discussed. Expanding this analysis also makes it possible to give analytical expressions for the projected coupling terms of Hamiltonian and overlaps between excited Slater determinants. TDPHF with spin-projection (TDSUHF) and its Tamm-Dancoff approximation are benchmarked for several electronically degenerate molecules including the dissociating H2, F2 and O3 at equilibrium, and the distorted ethylene. It is shown that they give consistently better descriptions of excited states than does time-dependent HF (TDHF). Furthermore, we demonstrate that they offer not only singly but also doubly excited states, which naturally arise upon spin-projection. We also address the thermodynamic limit of TDSUHF, using non-interacting He gas. While TDPHF singly excited states tend to converge to those of HF with the size of the system due to the lack of size-extensivity of PHF, doubly excited states remain reasonable even at the thermodynamic limit. We find that the overall performance of our method is systematically better than the regular TDHF in many cases at the same computational scaling.

  11. Dose-response analysis indicating time-dependent neurotoxicity caused by organic and inorganic mercury-Implications for toxic effects in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletz, Julia; Sánchez-Bayo, Francisco; Tennekes, Henk A

    2016-03-10

    A latency period preceding neurotoxicity is a common characteristic in the dose-response relationship induced by organic mercury. Latency periods have typically been observed with genotoxicants in carcinogenesis, with cancer being manifested a long time after the initiating event. These observations indicate that even a very small dose may cause extensive adverse effects later in life, so the toxicity of the genotoxic compound is dose and time-dependent. In children, methylmercury exposure during pregnancy (in utero) has been associated with delays in reaching developmental milestones (e.g., age at first walking) and decreases in intelligence, increasing in severity with increasing exposure. Ethylmercury exposure from thimerosal in some vaccines has been associated, in some studies, with autism and other neurological disorders in children. In this paper, we have examined whether dose-response data from in vitro and in vivo organic mercury toxicity studies fit the Druckrey-Küpfmüller equation c·t(n)=constant (c=exposure concentration, t=latency period), first established for genotoxic carcinogens, and whether or not irreversible effects are enhanced by time of exposure (n≥1), or else toxic effects are dose-dependent while time has only minor influence on the adverse outcome (ntime-dependent toxicity is irreversible binding to critical receptors causing adverse and cumulative effects. The results indicate that the Druckrey-Küpfmüller equation describes well the dose-response characteristics of organic mercury induced neurotoxic effects. This amounts to a paradigm shift in chemical risk assessment of mercurial compounds and highlights that it is vital to perform toxicity testing geared to investigate time-dependent effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. First Observation of C P Violation in B¯ 0→DCP (*)h0 Decays by a Combined Time-Dependent Analysis of BABAR and Belle Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Adametz, A.; Adye, T.; Ahmed, H.; Aihara, H.; Akar, S.; Alam, M. S.; Albert, J.; Al Said, S.; Andreassen, R.; Angelini, C.; Anulli, F.; Arinstein, K.; Arnaud, N.; Asner, D. M.; Aston, D.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Band, H. R.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barberio, E.; Bard, D. J.; Barlow, R. J.; Batignani, G.; Beaulieu, A.; Bellis, M.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bernard, D.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Bettarini, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bianchi, F.; Biasini, M.; Biswal, J.; Blinov, V. E.; Bloom, P. C.; Bobrov, A.; Bomben, M.; Bondar, A.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bozzi, C.; Bračko, M.; Briand, H.; Browder, T. E.; Brown, D. N.; Brown, D. N.; Bünger, C.; Burchat, P. R.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Calabrese, R.; Calcaterra, A.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cartaro, C.; Casarosa, G.; Cenci, R.; Červenkov, D.; Chang, P.; Chao, D. S.; Chauveau, J.; Cheaib, R.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, C.; Cheng, C. H.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, H. H. F.; Choi, S.-K.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cibinetto, G.; Cinabro, D.; Cochran, J.; Coleman, J. P.; Contri, R.; Convery, M. R.; Cowan, G.; Cowan, R.; Cremaldi, L.; Dalseno, J.; Dasu, S.; Davier, M.; Davis, C. L.; De Mori, F.; De Nardo, G.; Denig, A. G.; Derkach, D.; de Sangro, R.; Dey, B.; Di Lodovico, F.; Dingfelder, J.; Dittrich, S.; Doležal, Z.; Dorfan, J.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Dutta, D.; Ebert, M.; Echenard, B.; Eidelman, S.; Eigen, G.; Eisner, A. M.; Emery, S.; Ernst, J. A.; Faccini, R.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Feindt, M.; Ferber, T.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Field, R. C.; Filippi, A.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Flood, K. T.; Ford, W. T.; Forti, F.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fritsch, M.; Fry, J. R.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabyshev, N.; Gamba, D.; Garmash, A.; Gary, J. W.; Garzia, I.; Gaspero, M.; Gaur, V.; Gaz, A.; Gershon, T. J.; Getzkow, D.; Gillard, R.; Li Gioi, L.; Giorgi, M. A.; Glattauer, R.; Godang, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Golubev, V. B.; Gorodeisky, R.; Gradl, W.; Graham, M. T.; Grauges, E.; Griessinger, K.; Gritsan, A. V.; Grosdidier, G.; Grünberg, O.; Guttman, N.; Haba, J.; Hafner, A.; Hamilton, B.; Hara, T.; Harrison, P. F.; Hast, C.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hearty, C.; He, X. H.; Hess, M.; Hitlin, D. G.; Hong, T. M.; Honscheid, K.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Huard, Z.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Iijima, T.; Inguglia, G.; Innes, W. R.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Izen, J. M.; Jaegle, I.; Jawahery, A.; Jessop, C. P.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kass, R.; Kawasaki, T.; Kerth, L. T.; Khan, A.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, P.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; King, G. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Koch, H.; Kodyš, P.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Korpar, S.; Kovalskyi, D.; Kowalewski, R.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, R.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lacker, H. M.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lanceri, L.; Lange, D. J.; Lankford, A. J.; Latham, T. E.; Leddig, T.; Le Diberder, F.; Lee, D. H.; Lee, I. S.; Lee, M. J.; Lees, J. P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Leruste, Ph.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lewis, P.; Libby, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Long, O.; Lopes Pegna, D.; LoSecco, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Lueck, T.; Luitz, S.; Lukin, P.; Luppi, E.; Lusiani, A.; Luth, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Lynch, G.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Malaescu, B.; Mallik, U.; Manoni, E.; Marchiori, G.; Margoni, M.; Martellotti, S.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Masuda, M.; Mattison, T. S.; Matvienko, D.; McKenna, J. A.; Meadows, B. T.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyashita, T. S.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Monge, M. R.; Moon, H. K.; Morandin, M.; Muller, D. R.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakazawa, H.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nayak, M.; Neal, H.; Neri, N.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nugent, I. M.; Oberhof, B.; Ocariz, J.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olaiya, E. O.; Olsen, J.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Onorato, G.; Onuchin, A. P.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Oyanguren, A.; Pakhlova, G.; Pakhlov, P.; Palano, A.; Pal, B.; Palombo, F.; Pan, Y.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Paoloni, E.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Passaggio, S.; Patel, P. M.; Patrignani, C.; Patteri, P.; Payne, D. J.; Pedlar, T. K.; Peimer, D. R.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Pesántez, L.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Playfer, S.; Poireau, V.; Porter, F. C.; Posocco, M.; Prasad, V.; Prell, S.; Prepost, R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Pulliam, T.; Purohit, M. V.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Rama, M.; Randle-Conde, A.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Raven, G.; Ribežl, E.; Richman, J. D.; Ritchie, J. L.; Rizzo, G.; Roberts, D. A.; Robertson, S. H.; Röhrken, M.; Roney, J. M.; Roodman, A.; Rossi, A.; Rostomyan, A.; Rotondo, M.; Roudeau, P.; Sacco, R.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Santoro, V.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schroeder, T.; Schubert, K. R.; Schumm, B. A.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Sciacca, C.; Seiden, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Simard, M.; Simi, G.; Simon, F.; Simonetto, F.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Smith, A. J. S.; Smith, J. G.; Snyder, A.; So, R. Y.; Sobie, R. J.; Soffer, A.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sokolov, A.; Solodov, E. P.; Solovieva, E.; Spaan, B.; Spanier, S. M.; Starič, M.; Stocchi, A.; Stroili, R.; Stugu, B.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Sumihama, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Summers, D. J.; Sun, L.; Tamponi, U.; Taras, P.; Tasneem, N.; Teramoto, Y.; Tisserand, V.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Toki, W. H.; Touramanis, C.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Uwer, U.; Vahsen, S. E.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vasseur, G.; Va'vra, J.; Verderi, M.; Vinokurova, A.; Vitale, L.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Wagner, M. N.; Wagner, S. R.; Waldi, R.; Walsh, J. J.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; West, C. A.; Williams, K. M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wilson, J. R.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Won, E.; Wormser, G.; Wright, D. M.; Wu, S. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yusa, Y.; Zallo, A.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; BaBar Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    We report a measurement of the time-dependent C P asymmetry of B¯0 →DCP (*)h0 decays, where the light neutral hadron h0 is a π0, η , or ω meson, and the neutral D meson is reconstructed in the C P eigenstates K+K-, KS0π0, or KS0ω . The measurement is performed combining the final data samples collected at the ϒ (4 S ) resonance by the BABAR and Belle experiments at the asymmetric-energy B factories PEP-II at SLAC and KEKB at KEK, respectively. The data samples contain (471 ±3 )×106 B B ¯ pairs recorded by the BABAR detector and (772 ±11 )×106 B B ¯ pairs recorded by the Belle detector. We measure the C P asymmetry parameters -ηfS =+0.66 ±0.10 (stat)±0.06 (syst) and C =-0.02 ±0.07 (stat)±0.03 (syst). These results correspond to the first observation of C P violation in B¯0 →DCP (*)h0 decays. The hypothesis of no mixing-induced C P violation is excluded in these decays at the level of 5.4 standard deviations.

  13. Time-dependent Autler-Townes spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Qamar, S; Zubairy, M S

    2003-01-01

    Autler-Townes spontaneous emission spectroscopy is revisited for a time-dependent case. We report the results of spontaneous emission spectra for nonstationary scattered light signals using the definition of the time-dependent physical spectrum. This is a rare example of problems where time-dependent spectra can be calculated exactly.

  14. Analysis of time-dependent adaptations in whole-body energy balance in obesity induced by high-fat diet in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maghdoori Babak

    2011-06-01

    . Conclusion The thermogenic response induced by the HF diet was offset by increased energy efficiency and time-dependent reduction in physical activity, favoring fat accumulation. These adaptations were mainly driven by the nutrient composition of the diet, since control and HF animals spontaneously elicited isoenergetic intake.

  15. Holographic complexity for time-dependent backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momeni, Davood, E-mail: davoodmomeni78@gmail.com [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan); Faizal, Mir, E-mail: mirfaizalmir@googlemail.com [Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, University of British Columbia, Okanagan, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, British Columbia V1V 1V7 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, T1K 3M4 (Canada); Bahamonde, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.beltran.14@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Myrzakulov, Ratbay [Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of General Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan)

    2016-11-10

    In this paper, we will analyze the holographic complexity for time-dependent asymptotically AdS geometries. We will first use a covariant zero mean curvature slicing of the time-dependent bulk geometries, and then use this co-dimension one spacelike slice of the bulk spacetime to define a co-dimension two minimal surface. The time-dependent holographic complexity will be defined using the volume enclosed by this minimal surface. This time-dependent holographic complexity will reduce to the usual holographic complexity for static geometries. We will analyze the time-dependence as a perturbation of the asymptotically AdS geometries. Thus, we will obtain time-dependent asymptotically AdS geometries, and we will calculate the holographic complexity for such time-dependent geometries.

  16. Chemical selectivity in structure determination by the time dependent analysis of in situ XRPD data: a clear view of Xe thermal behavior inside a MFI zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palin, Luca; Caliandro, Rocco; Viterbo, Davide; Milanesio, Marco

    2015-07-14

    X-ray diffraction methods in general provide a representation of the average structure, thus allowing only limited chemical selectivity. As recently shown [D. Chernyshov, et al., Acta Crystallogr., Sect. A: Found. Crystallogr., 2011, 67, 327], some structural information on a subset of atoms can be obtained using the modulation enhanced diffraction (MED), thus providing a new tool that is able to enhance selectivity in diffraction. MED uses a periodic stimulus supplied in situ on a crystal while diffraction data are collected continuously during one or more stimulation periods. Such large data sets can then be treated by different methods. Herein, we present and compare phase sensitive detection (PSD) and principal component analysis (PCA) for in situ X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data treatment. The application of PCA to MED data is described for the first time in the present paper. Simulated and experimental MED powder data were produced using an MFI zeolite as a static spectator in which Xe, acting as the active species, is adsorbed and desorbed in a periodic manner. By demodulating the simulated and experimental data, MED allowed the powder diffraction pattern of the responding scattering density to be obtained and enabled the selective extraction of crystallographic information on Xe by solving the crystal structure of the active species independently of the static zeolite framework. The "real world" experiments indicated that the PSD-MED approach has some limitations related to the degree of fulfilment of some theoretical assumptions. When applied to in situ XRPD data, PCA, despite being based on blind statistical analysis, gave results similar to those obtained by PSD (based on Fourier analysis) for simulated data. Moreover, PCA is complementary to PSD thanks to its capability of gathering information on the Xe substructure even in the presence of a non-periodic stimulus, i.e. using the most simple stimulus shape as a single temperature ramp. In particular

  17. Time-dependent integrity during storage of natural surface water samples for the trace analysis of pharmaceutical products, feminizing hormones and pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prévost Michèle

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Monitoring and analysis of trace contaminants such as pharmaceuticals and pesticides require the preservation of the samples before they can be quantified using the appropriate analytical methods. Our objective is to determine the sample shelf life to insure proper quantification of ultratrace contaminants. To this end, we tested the stability of a variety of pharmaceutical products including caffeine, natural steroids, and selected pesticides under refrigerated storage conditions. The analysis was performed using multi-residue methods using an on-line solid-phase extraction combined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS/MS in the selected reaction monitoring mode. After 21 days of storage, no significant difference in the recoveries was observed compared to day 0 for pharmaceutical products, while for pesticides, significant losses occurred for DIA and simazine after 10 days (14% and 17% reduction respectively and a statistically significant decrease in the recovery was noted for cyanazine (78% disappearance. However, the estrogen and progestogen steroids were unstable during storage. The disappearance rates obtained after 21 days of storage vary from 63 to 72% for the feminizing hormones. Overall, pharmaceuticals and pesticides seem to be stable for refrigerated storage for up to about 10 days (except cyanazine and steroidal hormones can be quite sensitive to degradation and should not be stored for more than a few days.

  18. Time-dependent fracture of cementitious materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Zijl, G.P.A.G.; De Borst, R.; Rots, J.G.

    2000-01-01

    The response of cementitious materials is highly time dependent. On the one hand, it can lead to delayed collapse of structures fabricated of such materials. On the other hand, the time dependence is associated with the relaxation of peak stresses, which avoids, or postpones damage. A finite element

  19. Photocatalytic TMO-NMs adsorbent: Temperature-Time dependent Safranine degradation, sorption study validated under optimized effective equilibrium models parameter with standardized statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Rizwan; Khan, Farheen; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, chemically synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs), were employed for two processes: one is photocatalytic degradation and second one adsorption for the sorption of safranine (SA) dye in an aqueous medium at pH = 12.01. The optimized analytes amount (nano-adsorbent = 0.10 g, conc. range of SA dye 56.13 ppm to 154.37 ppm, pH = 12.01, temperature 303 K) reached to equilibrium point in 80 min, which acquired for chemical adsorption-degradation reactions. The degredated SA dye data’s recorded by UV-visible spectroscopy for the occurrence of TMO-NMs of CuO-NPs at anticipated period of interval. The feasible performance of CuO-NPs was admirable, shows good adsorption capacity qm = 53.676 mg g−1 and most convenient to best fitted results establish by linear regression equation, corresponded for selected kinetic model (pseudo second order (R2 = 0.9981), equilibrium isotherm models (Freundlich, Langmuir, Dubnin-Radushkevich (D-R), Temkin, H-J and Halsey), and thermodynamic parameters (∆H° = 75461.909 J mol−1, ∆S° = 253.761 J mol−1, ∆G° = −1427.93 J mol−1, Ea = 185.142 J mol−1) with error analysis. The statistical study revealed that CuO-NPs was an effective adsorbent certified photocatalytic efficiency (η = 84.88%) for degradation of SA dye, exhibited more feasibility and good affinity toward adsorbate, the sorption capacity increases with increased temperature at equilibrium point. PMID:28195174

  20. Collaborative Visualization and Analysis of Multi-dimensional, Time-dependent and Distributed Data in the Geosciences Using the Unidata Integrated Data Viewer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meertens, C. M.; Murray, D.; McWhirter, J.

    2004-12-01

    Over the last five years, UNIDATA has developed an extensible and flexible software framework for analyzing and visualizing geoscience data and models. The Integrated Data Viewer (IDV), initially developed for visualization and analysis of atmospheric data, has broad interdisciplinary application across the geosciences including atmospheric, ocean, and most recently, earth sciences. As part of the NSF-funded GEON Information Technology Research project, UNAVCO has enhanced the IDV to display earthquakes, GPS velocity vectors, and plate boundary strain rates. These and other geophysical parameters can be viewed simultaneously with three-dimensional seismic tomography and mantle geodynamic model results. Disparate data sets of different formats, variables, geographical projections and scales can automatically be displayed in a common projection. The IDV is efficient and fully interactive allowing the user to create and vary 2D and 3D displays with contour plots, vertical and horizontal cross-sections, plan views, 3D isosurfaces, vector plots and streamlines, as well as point data symbols or numeric values. Data probes (values and graphs) can be used to explore the details of the data and models. The IDV is a freely available Java application using Java3D and VisAD and runs on most computers. UNIDATA provides easy-to-follow instructions for download, installation and operation of the IDV. The IDV primarily uses netCDF, a self-describing binary file format, to store multi-dimensional data, related metadata, and source information. The IDV is designed to work with OPeNDAP-equipped data servers that provide real-time observations and numerical models from distributed locations. Users can capture and share screens and animations, or exchange XML "bundles" that contain the state of the visualization and embedded links to remote data files. A real-time collaborative feature allows groups of users to remotely link IDV sessions via the Internet and simultaneously view and

  1. Simulation of time-dependent Heisenberg models in one dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volosniev, A. G.; Hammer, H. -W.; Zinner, N. T.

    2016-01-01

    constants can be manipulated by time-dependent driving of the shape of the external confinement. As illustrative examples, we consider a harmonic trapping potential with a variable frequency and an infinite square well potential with a time-dependent barrier in the middle.......In this Letter, we provide a theoretical analysis of strongly interacting quantum systems confined by a time-dependent external potential in one spatial dimension. We show that such systems can be used to simulate spin chains described by Heisenberg Hamiltonians in which the exchange coupling...

  2. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  3. Study of the decay K0/sub L/ → πeν

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.G.; Sakitt, M.; Snape, G.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported from a Dalitz plot analysis of 17750 K 0 /sub e3/ candidates obtained in an experiment designed to study both the semileptonic and 3π decay modes of the K 0 /sub L/ with high efficiency across the Dalitz plot

  4. Time-dependent Dyson orbital theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gritsenko, O.V.; Baerends, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Although time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has become the tool of choice for real-time propagation of the electron density ρN(t) of N-electron systems, it also encounters problems in this application. The first problem is the neglect of memory effects stemming from the, in TDDFT

  5. Time dependent resonating Hartree-Bogoliubov theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Seiya; Fukutome, Hideo.

    1989-01-01

    Very recently, we have developed a theory of excitations in superconducting Fermion systems with large quantum fluctuations that can be described by resonance of time dependent non-orthogonal Hartree-Bogoliubov (HB) wave functions with different correlation structures. We have derived a new kind of variation equation called the time dependent Resonating HB equation, in order to determine both the time dependent Resonating HB wave functions and coefficients of a superposition of the HB wave functions. Further we have got a new approximation for excitations from time dependent small fluctuations of the Resonating HB ground state, i.e., the Resonating HB RPA. The Res HB RPA equation is represented in a given single particle basis. It, however, has drawbacks that the constraints for the Res HB RPA amplitudes are not taken into account and the equation contains equations which are not independent. We shall derive another form of the Res HB RPA equation eliminating these drawbacks. The Res HB RPA gives a unified description of the vibrons and resonons and their interactions. (author)

  6. Time dependent policy-based access control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasilikos, Panagiotis; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2017-01-01

    Access control policies are essential to determine who is allowed to access data in a system without compromising the data's security. However, applications inside a distributed environment may require those policies to be dependent on the actual content of the data, the flow of information, while...... also on other attributes of the environment such as the time. In this paper, we use systems of Timed Automata to model distributed systems and we present a logic in which one can express time-dependent policies for access control. We show how a fragment of our logic can be reduced to a logic...... that current model checkers for Timed Automata such as UPPAAL can handle and we present a translator that performs this reduction. We then use our translator and UPPAAL to enforce time-dependent policy-based access control on an example application from the aerospace industry....

  7. Time-dependent 2-stream particle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corngold, Noel

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We consider time-dependent transport in the 2-stream or “rod” model via an attractive matrix formalism. • After reviewing some classical problems in homogeneous media we discuss transport in materials with whose density may vary. • There we achieve a significant contraction of the underlying Telegrapher’s equation. • We conclude with a discussion of stochastics, treated by the “first-order smoothing approximation.” - Abstract: We consider time-dependent transport in the 2-stream or “rod” model via an attractive matrix formalism. After reviewing some classical problems in homogeneous media we discuss transport in materials whose density may vary. There we achieve a significant contraction of the underlying Telegrapher’s equation. We conclude with a discussion of stochastics, treated by the “first-order smoothing approximation.”

  8. Evolution in time-dependent fitness landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    Wilke, Claus O.

    1998-01-01

    Evolution in changing environments is an important, but little studied aspect of the theory of evolution. The idea of adaptive walks in fitness landscapes has triggered a vast amount of research and has led to many important insights about the progress of evolution. Nevertheless, the small step to time-dependent fitness landscapes has most of the time not been taken. In this work, some elements of a theory of adaptive walks on changing fitness landscapes are proposed, and are subsequently app...

  9. Time-dependent fracture toughness of cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonsomboon, Khaow; Koh, Ching Theng; Oyen, Michelle L

    2014-06-01

    The fracture and time-dependent properties of cornea are very important for the development of corneal scaffolds and prostheses. However, there has been no systematic study of cornea fracture; time-dependent behavior of cornea has never been investigated in a fracture context. In this work, fracture toughness of cornea was characterized by trouser tear tests, and time-dependent properties of cornea were examined by stress-relaxation and uniaxial tensile tests. Control experiments were performed on a photoelastic rubber sheet. Corneal fracture resistance was found to be strain-rate dependent, with values ranging from 3.39±0.57 to 5.40±0.48kJm(-2) over strain rates from 3 to 300mmmin(-1). Results from stress-relaxation tests confirmed that cornea is a nonlinear viscoelastic material. The cornea behaved closer to a viscous fluid at small strain but became relatively more elastic at larger strain. Although cornea properties are greatly dependent on time, the stress-strain responses of cornea were found to be insensitive to the strain rate when subjected to tensile loading. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dalitz analysis of B{sup -} → D{sup 0}π{sup -}π{sup 0} and B{sup 0} → D{sup -}π{sup +}π{sup 0} at the Belle experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heider, Manuel

    2015-06-19

    This analysis aims at strengthening the fundament of the Standard model by making a precision measurement of branching fractions in the decays B{sup -} → D{sup 0}π{sup -}π{sup 0} and B{sup 0} → D{sup -}π{sup +}π{sup 0}. The whole decay structure is examined utilizing the Dalitz plot analysis technique. The analysis is performed on 772 million B anti B pairs recorded with the Belle detector at the KEKB accelerator in Tsukuba, Japan. The neutral pions in the final state present the main challenge for this analysis, as they are highly prone to misreconstruction. To counteract the effects of misreconstruction without losing these candidates as signal, a migration matrix is used to backtrack the effects of misreconstruction. This analysis was performed blindly. The different aspects of the fit model are described along with the extraction of the signal yield.

  11. Two programs of utility in the performance of histograms and Dalitz plots by means of a CALCOMP-563 plotter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcedo, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.

    1973-01-01

    Full description of the whole structure and of the operation of every routine is given for both programs, as well as the data setup in punched cards and binary tape. To help the users we present and comment several examples of data sets and the corresponding output plots. The list of instructions in FORTRAN IV language is included. The same version of both programs is operative in the series 7090-94-IBM and 1106-08-UNIVAC. (Author)

  12. Time-dependent studies of multiphoton processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulander, K.C.; Schafer, K.J.; Krause, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Interest in intense-field laser-atom interactions has undergone very rapid growth over the past decade due to a number of very surprising observations made during short-pulse (much-lt 1 ns) excitation of atoms and molecules. Extensive results have been reported for electron and photon emission from atoms subject to high-intensity lasers. This wealth of data has greatly increased our detailed knowledge of the effects of electromagnetic radiation on the electrons in these systems. The richness of these results has encouraged the development of new theoretical methods to provide an understanding of the observations. This paper reports that one of the major techniques being used to study the dynamics of excitation and ionization is the direct solution of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation for an atom or molecule in a pulse laser field. The time-dependent methods allow the exact calculation of above-threshold ionization (ATI) spectra for real (three-dimensional) hydrogenic systems and of photon emission from atoms excited by lasers. Recently the possibility of high-frequency, high-intensity suppression of ionization has also been addressed

  13. The time-dependent simplified P2 equations: Asymptotic analyses and numerical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, U.; Miller, W.F. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Using an asymptotic expansion, the authors found that the modified time-dependent simplified P 2 (SP 2 ) equations are robust, high-order, asymptotic approximations to the time-dependent transport equation in a physical regime in which the conventional time-dependent diffusion equation is the leading-order approximation. Using diffusion limit analysis, they also asymptotically compared three competitive time-dependent equations (the telegrapher's equation, the time-dependent SP 2 equations, and the time-dependent simplified even-parity equation). As a result, they found that the time-dependent SP 2 equations contain higher-order asymptotic approximations to the time-dependent transport equation than the other competitive equations. The numerical results confirm that, in the vast majority of cases, the time-dependent SP 2 solutions are significantly more accurate than the time-dependent diffusion and the telegrapher's solutions. They have also shown that the time-dependent SP 2 equations have excellent characteristics such as rotational invariance (which means no ray effect), good diffusion limit behavior, guaranteed positivity in diffusive regimes, and significant accuracy, even in deep-penetration problems. Through computer-running-time tests, they have shown that the time-dependent SP 2 equations can be solved with significantly less computational effort than the conventionally used, time-dependent S N equations (for N > 2) and almost as fast as the time-dependent diffusion equation. From all these results, they conclude that the time-dependent SP 2 equations should be considered as an important competitor for an improved approximately transport equations solver. Such computationally efficient time-dependent transport models are important for problems requiring enhanced computational efficiency, such as neutronics/fluid-dynamics coupled problems that arise in the analyses of hypothetical nuclear reactor accidents

  14. The Circulating Concentration and 24-h Urine Excretion of Magnesium Dose- and Time-Dependently Respond to Oral Magnesium Supplementation in a Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Del Gobbo, Liana C; Hruby, Adela; Rosanoff, Andrea; He, Ka; Dai, Qi; Costello, Rebecca B; Zhang, Wen; Song, Yiqing

    2016-03-01

    Accurate determination of Mg status is important for improving nutritional assessment and clinical risk stratification. We aimed to quantify the overall responsiveness of Mg biomarkers to oral Mg supplementation among adults without severe diseases and their dose- and time responses using available data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We identified 48 Mg supplementation trials (n = 2131) through searches of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library up to November 2014. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to estimate weighted mean differences of biomarker concentrations between intervention and placebo groups. Restricted cubic splines were used to determine the dose- and time responses of Mg biomarkers to supplementation. Among the 35 biomarkers assessed, serum, plasma, and urine Mg were most commonly measured. Elemental Mg supplementation doses ranged from 197 to 994 mg/d. Trials ranged from 3 wk to 5 y (median: 12 wk). Mg supplementation significantly elevated circulating Mg by 0.04 mmol/L (95% CI: 0.02, 0.06) and 24-h urine Mg excretion by 1.52 mmol/24 h (95% CI: 1.20, 1.83) as compared to placebo. Circulating Mg concentrations and 24-h urine Mg excretion responded to Mg supplementation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, gradually reaching a steady state at doses of 300 mg/d and 400 mg/d, or after ~20 wk and 40 wk, respectively (all P-nonlinearity ≤ 0.001). The higher the circulating Mg concentration at baseline, the lower the responsiveness of circulating Mg to supplementation, and the higher the urinary excretion (all P-linearity urine calcium were significantly more elevated by Mg supplementation than by placebo (all P-values urine Mg excretion to oral Mg supplementation. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  15. Impact of Patient Factors on Recurrence Risk and Time Dependency of Oxaliplatin Benefit in Patients With Colon Cancer: Analysis From Modern-Era Adjuvant Studies in the Adjuvant Colon Cancer End Points (ACCENT) Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfro, Lindsay A.; Allegra, Carmen J.; André, Thierry; de Gramont, Aimery; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Haller, Daniel G.; Alberts, Steven R.; Yothers, Greg; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Fluorouracil plus leucovorin (FU + LV) adjuvant chemotherapy reduced the risk of recurrence and death across all time points in a pooled analysis of 20,898 patients with colon cancer from 18 randomized studies. The impact of oxaliplatin added to FU + LV on the time course of recurrence and survival remains unknown. Patients and Methods A total of 12,233 patients enrolled to the randomized trials C-07, C-08, N0147, MOSAIC (Adjuvant Treatment of Colon Cancer), and XELOXA (Adjuvant XELOX) were pooled to examine the impact of oxaliplatin and tumor-specific factors on the time course of recurrence and death. For each end point, continuous-time risk was modeled over 6 years post treatment in all oxaliplatin-treated patients and patients concurrently randomized to FU + LV with or without oxaliplatin; the latter analyses supported time-dependent treatment comparisons. Results Addition of oxaliplatin significantly reduced the risk of recurrence within the first 14 months post treatment for patients with stage II disease and within the first 4 years for patients with stage III disease. Oxaliplatin also significantly reduced risk of death from 2 to 6 years post treatment for patients with stage III disease, with no differences in timing of outcomes between treatment groups (ie, oxaliplatin did not simply postpone recurrence or death compared with FU + LV alone). Patients with stage II disease receiving oxaliplatin did not exhibit a significant reduction in risk of death in the first 6 years post treatment. Recurrence risk peaked near 14 months for both treatments, and risk of recurrence and death increased with increased tumor and nodal burden. Conclusions These analyses support the addition of oxaliplatin to fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant therapy in patients with stage III disease and underscore the need for adequate surveillance of patients with colon cancer during the first 3 years after adjuvant therapy. PMID:26811529

  16. AMPLITUDE ANALYSIS OF B{sup +-} --> {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {+-}} and B{sup {+-}} --> K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {+-}}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latham, T

    2004-08-11

    The authors present preliminary results of a maximum-likelihood Dalitz-plot analysis of the charmless hadronic B{sup {+-}} decays to the final states {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {+-}} and K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {+-}} from data corresponding to an integrated on-resonance luminosity of 166 fb{sup -1} recorded by the BABAR experiment at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory. They measure the total branching fractions B(B{sup {+-}} --> {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {+-}}) = (16.2 {+-} 2.1 {+-} 1.3) x 10{sup -6} and B(B{sup {+-}} --> K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {+-}}) = (61.4 {+-} 2.4 {+-} 4.5) x 10{sup -6}, and provide fit fractions and phases for intermediate resonance states.

  17. Time dependent non-extinction probability for prompt critical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregson, M. W.; Prinja, A. K.

    2009-01-01

    The time dependent non-extinction probability equation is presented for slab geometry. Numerical solutions are provided for a nested inner/outer iteration routine where the fission terms (both linear and non-linear) are updated and then held fixed over the inner scattering iteration. Time dependent results are presented highlighting the importance of the injection position and angle. The iteration behavior is also described as the steady state probability of initiation is approached for both small and large time steps. Theoretical analysis of the nested iteration scheme is shown and highlights poor numerical convergence for marginally prompt critical systems. An acceleration scheme for the outer iterations is presented to improve convergence of such systems. Theoretical analysis of the acceleration scheme is also provided and the associated decrease in computational run time addressed. (authors)

  18. Flavour tagged time dependent angular analysis of the Bs→J/ψϕ decay and extraction of ΔΓ and the weak phase ϕs in ATLAS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Böhm, Jan; Chudoba, Jiří; Havránek, Miroslav; Hejbal, Jiří; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Lysák, Roman; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Myška, Miroslav; Němeček, Stanislav; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Vrba, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 5 (2014), "052007-1"-"052007-26" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13009 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : scattering flavor * ATLAS * time dependence * CERN LHC Coll Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.643, year: 2014

  19. Time-dependent correlations in electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose; Escarela-Perez, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    In the last years, many electricity markets were subjected to deregulated operation where prices are set by the action of market participants. In this form, producers and consumers rely on demand and price forecasts to decide their bidding strategies, allocate assets, negotiate bilateral contracts, hedge risks, and plan facility investments. A basic feature of efficient market hypothesis is the absence of correlations between price increments over any time scale leading to random walk-type behavior of prices, so arbitrage is not possible. However, recent studies have suggested that this is not the case and correlations are present in the behavior of diverse electricity markets. In this paper, a temporal quantification of electricity market correlations is made by means of detrended fluctuation and Allan analyses. The approach is applied to two Canadian electricity markets, Ontario and Alberta. The results show the existence of correlations in both demand and prices, exhibiting complex time-dependent behavior with lower correlations in winter while higher in summer. Relatively steady annual cycles in demand but unstable cycles in prices are detected. On the other hand, the more significant nonlinear effects (measured in terms of a multifractality index) are found for winter months, while the converse behavior is displayed during the summer period. In terms of forecasting models, our results suggest that nonlinear recursive models (e.g., feedback NNs) should be used for accurate day-ahead price estimation. In contrast, linear models can suffice for demand forecasting purposes. (author)

  20. Tunable Time-Dependent Colloidal Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Andrew M.; Rogers, W. Benjamin; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    Self-assembly of colloidal particles can be driven by changes in temperature, density, or the concentration of solutes, and it is even possible to program the thermal response and equilibrium phase transitions of such systems. It is still difficult, however, to tune how the self-assembly process varies in time. We demonstrate control over the time-dependence of colloidal interactions, using DNA-functionalized colloidal particles with binding energies that are set by the concentration of a free linker strand in solution. We control the rate at which this free strand is consumed using a catalytic DNA reaction, whose rate is governed by the concentration of a catalyst strand. Varying the concentration of the linker, its competitor, and the catalyst at a fixed temperature, we can tune the rate and degree of the formation of colloidal aggregates and their following disassembly. Close to the colloidal melting point, the timescales of these out-of-equilibrium assembly and disassembly processes are determined by the rate of the catalytic reaction. Far below the colloidal melting point, however, the effects from varying our linker and competitor concentrations dominate.

  1. Time-Dependent Variations of Accretion Disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Weon Na

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available In dward nova we assume the primary star as a white dwarf and the secondary as the late type star which filled Roche lobe. Mass flow from the secondary star leads to the formation of thin accretion disk around the white dwarf. We use the α parameter as viscosity to maintain the disk form and propose that the outburst in dwarf nova cause the steep increase of source term. With these assumptions we solve the basic equations of stellar structure using Newton-Raphson method. We show the physical parameters like temperature, density, pressure, opacity, surface density, height and flux to the radius of disk. Changing the value of α, we compare several parameters when mass flow rate is constant with those of when luminosity of disk is brightest. At the same time, we obtain time-dependent variations of luminosity and mass of disk. We propose the suitable range of α is 0.15-0.18 to the difference of luminosity. We compare several parameters of disk with those of the normal late type stars which have the same molecular weight of disk is lower. Maybe the outburst in dwarf nova is due to the variation of the α value instead of increment of mass flow from the secondary star.

  2. Time dependent mean-field games

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2014-01-06

    We consider time dependent mean-field games (MFG) with a local power-like dependence on the measure and Hamiltonians satisfying both sub and superquadratic growth conditions. We establish existence of smooth solutions under a certain set of conditions depending both on the growth of the Hamiltonian as well as on the dimension. In the subquadratic case this is done by combining a Gagliardo-Nirenberg type of argument with a new class of polynomial estimates for solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation in terms of LrLp- norms of DpH. These techniques do not apply to the superquadratic case. In this setting we recur to a delicate argument that combines the non-linear adjoint method with polynomial estimates for solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation in terms of L1L1-norms of DpH. Concerning the subquadratic case, we substantially improve and extend the results previously obtained. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge, the superquadratic case has not been addressed in the literature yet. In fact, it is likely that our estimates may also add to the current understanding of Hamilton-Jacobi equations with superquadratic Hamiltonians.

  3. System reliability time-dependent models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debernardo, H.D.

    1991-06-01

    A probabilistic methodology for safety system technical specification evaluation was developed. The method for Surveillance Test Interval (S.T.I.) evaluation basically means an optimization of S.T.I. of most important system's periodically tested components. For Allowed Outage Time (A.O.T.) calculations, the method uses system reliability time-dependent models (A computer code called FRANTIC III). A new approximation, which was called Independent Minimal Cut Sets (A.C.I.), to compute system unavailability was also developed. This approximation is better than Rare Event Approximation (A.E.R.) and the extra computing cost is neglectible. A.C.I. was joined to FRANTIC III to replace A.E.R. on future applications. The case study evaluations verified that this methodology provides a useful probabilistic assessment of surveillance test intervals and allowed outage times for many plant components. The studied system is a typical configuration of nuclear power plant safety systems (two of three logic). Because of the good results, these procedures will be used by the Argentine nuclear regulatory authorities in evaluation of technical specification of Atucha I and Embalse nuclear power plant safety systems. (Author) [es

  4. Time-dependent analysis of B0 → KS0 π-π+γ decays and studies of the K+π-π+ system in B+ →k+π-π+γ decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, M.G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu; Lankford, A. J.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kim, J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Andreassen, P.R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Ford, W. T.; Smith, J.G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; De Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, B.V.V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, J.S.; Ahmed, H.U.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; de Lange, J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, J.M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.S.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Dey, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Nardo, L.G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J.B.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Sutherland-Smith, A.J.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hess, F.M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, J.F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, J.A.D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.H.; Leith, D. W G S; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M T; Shah Alam, MD; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw; Beaulieu, J.A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H F; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    We measure the time-dependent CP asymmetry in the radiative-penguin decay B0→KS0π-π+γ, using a sample of 471×106 (4S)→BB-events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- storage ring at SLAC. Using events with mKππ<1.8 GeV/c2, we measure the branching fractions of B+→K+π-π+γ and

  5. Progress Report on Alloy 617 Time Dependent Allowables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Julie Knibloe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Time dependent allowable stresses are required in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for design of components in the temperature range where time dependent deformation (i.e., creep) is expected to become significant. There are time dependent allowable stresses in Section IID of the Code for use in the non-nuclear construction codes, however, there are additional criteria that must be considered in developing time dependent allowables for nuclear components. These criteria are specified in Section III NH. St is defined as the lesser of three quantities: 100% of the average stress required to obtain a total (elastic, plastic, primary and secondary creep) strain of 1%; 67% of the minimum stress to cause rupture; and 80% of the minimum stress to cause the initiation of tertiary creep. The values are reported for a range of temperatures and for time increments up to 100,000 hours. These values are determined from uniaxial creep tests, which involve the elevated temperature application of a constant load which is relatively small, resulting in deformation over a long time period prior to rupture. The stress which is the minimum resulting from these criteria is the time dependent allowable stress St. In this report data from a large number of creep and creep-rupture tests on Alloy 617 are analyzed using the ASME Section III NH criteria. Data which are used in the analysis are from the ongoing DOE sponsored high temperature materials program, form Korea Atomic Energy Institute through the Generation IV VHTR Materials Program and historical data from previous HTR research and vendor data generated in developing the alloy. It is found that the tertiary creep criterion determines St at highest temperatures, while the stress to cause 1% total strain controls at low temperatures. The ASME Section III Working Group on Allowable Stress Criteria has recommended that the uncertainties associated with determining the onset of tertiary creep and the lack of significant

  6. Time-dependent constrained Hamiltonian systems and Dirac brackets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, Manuel de [Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain); Marrero, Juan C. [Departamento de Matematica Fundamental, Facultad de Matematicas, Universidad de La Laguna, La Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain); Martin de Diego, David [Departamento de Economia Aplicada Cuantitativa, Facultad de Ciencias Economicas y Empresariales, UNED, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-11-07

    In this paper the canonical Dirac formalism for time-dependent constrained Hamiltonian systems is globalized. A time-dependent Dirac bracket which reduces to the usual one for time-independent systems is introduced. (author)

  7. Time Dependent Data Mining in RAVEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chen, Jun [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Patel, Japan Ketan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maljovec, Daniel Patrick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Talbot, Paul William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    RAVEN is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. The goal of this type of analyses is to understand the response of such systems in particular with respect their probabilistic behavior, to understand their predictability and drivers or lack of thereof. Data mining capabilities are the cornerstones to perform such deep learning of system responses. For this reason static data mining capabilities were added last fiscal year (FY 15). In real applications, when dealing with complex multi-scale, multi-physics systems it seems natural that, during transients, the relevance of the different scales, and physics, would evolve over time. For these reasons the data mining capabilities have been extended allowing their application over time. In this writing it is reported a description of the new RAVEN capabilities implemented with several simple analytical tests to explain their application and highlight the proper implementation. The report concludes with the application of those newly implemented capabilities to the analysis of a simulation performed with the Bison code.

  8. Interacting particle systems in time-dependent geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A; Ball, R C; Grosskinsky, S; Somfai, E

    2013-01-01

    Many complex structures and stochastic patterns emerge from simple kinetic rules and local interactions, and are governed by scale invariance properties in combination with effects of the global geometry. We consider systems that can be described effectively by space–time trajectories of interacting particles, such as domain boundaries in two-dimensional growth or river networks. We study trajectories embedded in time-dependent geometries, and the main focus is on uniformly expanding or decreasing domains for which we obtain an exact mapping to simple fixed domain systems while preserving the local scale invariance properties. This approach was recently introduced in Ali et al (2013 Phys. Rev. E 87 020102(R)) and here we provide a detailed discussion on its applicability for self-affine Markovian models, and how it can be adapted to self-affine models with memory or explicit time dependence. The mapping corresponds to a nonlinear time transformation which converges to a finite value for a large class of trajectories, enabling an exact analysis of asymptotic properties in expanding domains. We further provide a detailed discussion of different particle interactions and generalized geometries. All our findings are based on exact computations and are illustrated numerically for various examples, including Lévy processes and fractional Brownian motion. (paper)

  9. First Observation of CP Violation in B[over ¯]^{0}→D_{CP}^{(*)}h^{0} Decays by a Combined Time-Dependent Analysis of BABAR and Belle Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Adametz, A; Adye, T; Ahmed, H; Aihara, H; Akar, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Al Said, S; Andreassen, R; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Arinstein, K; Arnaud, N; Asner, D M; Aston, D; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Barberio, E; Bard, D J; Barlow, R J; Batignani, G; Beaulieu, A; Bellis, M; Ben-Haim, E; Bernard, D; Bernlochner, F U; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Biswal, J; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P C; Bobrov, A; Bomben, M; Bondar, A; Bonneaud, G R; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bozzi, C; Bračko, M; Briand, H; Browder, T E; Brown, D N; Brown, D N; Bünger, C; Burchat, P R; Buzykaev, A R; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Casarosa, G; Cenci, R; Červenkov, D; Chang, P; Chao, D S; Chauveau, J; Cheaib, R; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Chen, C; Cheng, C H; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, H H F; Choi, S-K; Chrzaszcz, M; Cibinetto, G; Cinabro, D; Cochran, J; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Cremaldi, L; Dalseno, J; Dasu, S; Davier, M; Davis, C L; De Mori, F; De Nardo, G; Denig, A G; Derkach, D; de Sangro, R; Dey, B; Di Lodovico, F; Dingfelder, J; Dittrich, S; Doležal, Z; Dorfan, J; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Druzhinin, V P; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Dutta, D; Ebert, M; Echenard, B; Eidelman, S; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Faccini, R; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Feindt, M; Ferber, T; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Filippi, A; Finocchiaro, G; Fioravanti, E; Flood, K T; Ford, W T; Forti, F; Franco Sevilla, M; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Fulsom, B G; Gabathuler, E; Gabyshev, N; Gamba, D; Garmash, A; Gary, J W; Garzia, I; Gaspero, M; Gaur, V; Gaz, A; Gershon, T J; Getzkow, D; Gillard, R; Li Gioi, L; Giorgi, M A; Glattauer, R; Godang, R; Goh, Y M; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Golubev, V B; Gorodeisky, R; Gradl, W; Graham, M T; Grauges, E; Griessinger, K; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Grünberg, O; Guttman, N; Haba, J; Hafner, A; Hamilton, B; Hara, T; Harrison, P F; Hast, C; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hearty, C; He, X H; Hess, M; Hitlin, D G; Hong, T M; Honscheid, K; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y B; Huard, Z; Hutchcroft, D E; Iijima, T; Inguglia, G; Innes, W R; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Izen, J M; Jaegle, I; Jawahery, A; Jessop, C P; Joffe, D; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kang, K H; Kass, R; Kawasaki, T; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, P; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; King, G J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Koch, H; Kodyš, P; Kolomensky, Yu G; Korpar, S; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R; Kravchenko, E A; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kumar, R; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lacker, H M; Lafferty, G D; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Lankford, A J; Latham, T E; Leddig, T; Le Diberder, F; Lee, D H; Lee, I S; Lee, M J; Lees, J P; Leith, D W G S; Leruste, Ph; Lewczuk, M J; Lewis, P; Libby, J; Lockman, W S; Long, O; Lopes Pegna, D; LoSecco, J M; Lou, X C; Lueck, T; Luitz, S; Lukin, P; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Luth, V; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; MacFarlane, D B; Malaescu, B; Mallik, U; Manoni, E; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Martellotti, S; Martinez-Vidal, F; Masuda, M; Mattison, T S; Matvienko, D; McKenna, J A; Meadows, B T; Miyabayashi, K; Miyashita, T S; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Monge, M R; Moon, H K; Morandin, M; Muller, D R; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakazawa, H; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Nayak, M; Neal, H; Neri, N; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Nugent, I M; Oberhof, B; Ocariz, J; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Olaiya, E O; Olsen, J; Ongmongkolkul, P; Onorato, G; Onuchin, A P; Onuki, Y; Ostrowicz, W; Oyanguren, A; Pakhlova, G; Pakhlov, P; Palano, A; Pal, B; Palombo, F; Pan, Y; Panduro Vazquez, W; Paoloni, E; Park, C W; Park, H; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pedlar, T K; Peimer, D R; Peruzzi, I M; Pesántez, L; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Piilonen, L E; Pilloni, A; Piredda, G; Playfer, S; Poireau, V; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Prasad, V; Prell, S; Prepost, R; Puccio, E M T; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Pushpawela, B G; Rama, M; Randle-Conde, A; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Ribežl, E; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roberts, D A; Robertson, S H; Röhrken, M; Roney, J M; Roodman, A; Rossi, A; Rostomyan, A; Rotondo, M; Roudeau, P; Sacco, R; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Santoro, V; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schindler, R H; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schroeder, T; Schubert, K R; Schumm, B A; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Serednyakov, S I; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T-A; Shiu, J-G; Simard, M; Simi, G; Simon, F; Simonetto, F; Skovpen, Yu I; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snyder, A; So, R Y; Sobie, R J; Soffer, A; Sohn, Y-S; Sokoloff, M D; Sokolov, A; Solodov, E P; Solovieva, E; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Starič, M; Stocchi, A; Stroili, R; Stugu, B; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Sumihama, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Summers, D J; Sun, L; Tamponi, U; Taras, P; Tasneem, N; Teramoto, Y; Tisserand, V; Todyshev, K Yu; Toki, W H; Touramanis, C; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Usov, Y; Uwer, U; Vahsen, S E; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vasseur, G; Va'vra, J; Verderi, M; Vinokurova, A; Vitale, L; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Wagner, M N; Wagner, S R; Waldi, R; Walsh, J J; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Wang, P; Watanabe, Y; West, C A; Williams, K M; Wilson, F F; Wilson, J R; Wisniewski, W J; Won, E; Wormser, G; Wright, D M; Wu, S L; Wulsin, H W; Yamamoto, H; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zallo, A; Zhang, C C; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-09-18

    We report a measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry of B[over ¯]^{0}→D_{CP}^{(*)}h^{0} decays, where the light neutral hadron h^{0} is a π^{0}, η, or ω meson, and the neutral D meson is reconstructed in the CP eigenstates K^{+}K^{-}, K_{S}^{0}π^{0}, or K_{S}^{0}ω. The measurement is performed combining the final data samples collected at the ϒ(4S) resonance by the BABAR and Belle experiments at the asymmetric-energy B factories PEP-II at SLAC and KEKB at KEK, respectively. The data samples contain (471±3)×10^{6} BB[over ¯] pairs recorded by the BABAR detector and (772±11)×10^{6} BB[over ¯] pairs recorded by the Belle detector. We measure the CP asymmetry parameters -η_{f}S=+0.66±0.10(stat)±0.06(syst) and C=-0.02±0.07(stat)±0.03(syst). These results correspond to the first observation of CP violation in B[over ¯]^{0}→D_{CP}^{(*)}h^{0} decays. The hypothesis of no mixing-induced CP violation is excluded in these decays at the level of 5.4 standard deviations.

  10. Time Dependent Relative Risks in Life Insurance Medical Underwriting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneepkens, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Introduction .- Life insurance medicine focuses on mortality hazards in specified periods. People are free to insure their lives for shorter or longer terms. Because the chosen terms range from 1 year to a life time, life insurers have to take into account the fact that the predictive value of risk indicators can and will change over time. The time a risk indicator keeps its predictive value, will be dependent on its biological effects, volatility, and treatability. For a given applicant this implies that the relative hazard (RH) calculated for his/her medical condition should be dependent on the term of the insurance. The main objective of this study is to determine if some commonly used risk indicators - previously used to study age dependency of relative risks - have a predictive value that increases with the observation period. (1) Methods .- This population-based cohort study uses NHANES-data files from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) and the NHANES Linked Mortality Files 2010. Only participants aged 20 to 69 that were examined in mobile examination centers, without a history of some prevalent high risk diseases were included. The observed mortality was compared to the expected mortality in a Generalized Linear Model (GLM) with Poisson error structure with two reference populations, which both can serve as preferred reference for life insurers: The United States Life Tables 2008 (USLT) and the 2008 Valuation Basic Tables (VBT) based on the insured population of 35 US Life insurers. The time dependency of the RHs of the systolic blood pressure (SBP), aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), serum albumin and albuminuria, was assessed, with correction for ethnicity, household income, history of diabetes mellitus, BMI and serum cholesterol. To be able to compare the results with the results of the Age Dependency Study (ADS), the same data, risk indicators, statistical analysis method, and the

  11. First observation of CP violation in B¯0 → D(*)CP h0 decays by a combined time-dependent analysis of BaBar And Belle Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdesselam, A. [Univ. of Tabuk, Tabuk (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia). et al.

    2015-09-16

    We report a measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry of B¯0 → D(*)CPh0 decays, where the light neutral hadron h0 is a π0, η, or ω meson, and the neutral D meson is reconstructed in the CP eigenstates K+K, K0Sπ0, or K0Sω. The measurement is performed combining the final data samples collected at the Υ(4S) resonance by the BABAR and Belle experiments at the asymmetric-energy B factories PEP-II at SLAC and KEKB at KEK, respectively. The data samples contain (471±3)×106 BB¯ pairs recorded by the BABAR detector and (772±11)×106 BB¯ pairs recorded by the Belle detector. We measure the CP asymmetry parameters –ηfS=+0.66±0.10(stat)±0.06(syst) and C=–0.02±0.07(stat)±0.03(syst). These results correspond to the first observation of CP violation in B¯0 → D(*)CPh0 decays. As a result, the hypothesis of no mixing-induced CP violation is excluded in these decays at the level of 5.4 standard deviations.

  12. On the time-dependent Aharonov–Bohm effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Jing

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Aharonov–Bohm effect in the background of a time-dependent vector potential is re-examined for both non-relativistic and relativistic cases. Based on the solutions to the Schrodinger and Dirac equations which contain the time-dependent magnetic vector potential, we find that contrary to the conclusions in a recent paper (Singleton and Vagenas 2013 [4], the interference pattern will be altered with respect to time because of the time-dependent vector potential.

  13. Fuzzy economic production quantity model with time dependent demand rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta Kumar Indrajitsingha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this paper, an economic production quantity model is considered under a fuzzy environment. Both the demand cost and holding cost are considered using fuzzy pentagonal numbers. The Signed Distance Method is used to defuzzify the total cost function. Methods: The results obtained by these methods are compared with the help of a numerical example. Sensitivity analysis is also carried out to explore the effect of changes in the values of some of the system parameters. Results and conclusions: The fuzzy EPQ model with time dependent demand rate was presented together with the possible implementation. The behavior of changes in parameters was analyzed. The possible extension of the implementation of this method was presented.

  14. Thermal state of the general time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harmonic oscillator that has time-dependent mass or frequency may be a good example of time-dependent Hamiltonian systems. Although a large number of dynamical systems have been investigated using approximation and perturbation method in the literature [2,3], we confine our concern to the exact quantum solution ...

  15. Time-Dependent Rock Failure in a Heterogeneous Limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, K.; Kemeny, J.

    2015-12-01

    Time-dependent rock failure is an important aspect in the analysis of long-term rock stability for slopes, dam and bridge foundations, and underground storage facilities. An on-going project at the University of Arizona is using Kartchner Caverns in Benson, Arizona as a natural analog to study such failure by reconstructing the process of natural cave breakdown with subcritical crack growth modeling. Breakdown is thought to occur along joints through the time-dependent failure of rock bridges: sections of intact rock separating discontinuities in a rock mass. The Escabrosa limestone composing the caverns ranges from a more homogenous, even-grained texture to a more heterogeneous texture consisting of coarse-grained veins and solution cavities set in a fine-grained matrix. To determine if the veined regions are more susceptible to fracturing and act as the nuclei of rock bridge failure, fracture toughness tests were conducted for both textures. The subcritical crack growth parameters were calculated using the constant stress-rate method. Results indicate that the more heterogeneous limestone has a higher fracture strength, fracture toughness, and subcritical crack growth index n than the more homogeneous limestone. This is in agreement with previous studies which found that a more complex and heterogeneous microstructure produces a larger microcrack process zone, leading to higher fracture energies and lower susceptibility to subcritical crack growth. Thus, despite their solution cavities, the calcite veins do not localize failure or act as planes of weakness; instead, rock bridges fail through the more homogeneous limestone matrix.

  16. Time-dependent potential-functional embedding theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chen; Libisch, Florian; Peng, Qing; Carter, Emily A.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a time-dependent potential-functional embedding theory (TD-PFET), in which atoms are grouped into subsystems. In TD-PFET, subsystems can be propagated by different suitable time-dependent quantum mechanical methods and their interactions can be treated in a seamless, first-principles manner. TD-PFET is formulated based on the time-dependent quantum mechanics variational principle. The action of the total quantum system is written as a functional of the time-dependent embedding potential, i.e., a potential-functional formulation. By exploiting the Runge-Gross theorem, we prove the uniqueness of the time-dependent embedding potential under the constraint that all subsystems share a common embedding potential. We derive the integral equation that such an embedding potential needs to satisfy. As proof-of-principle, we demonstrate TD-PFET for a Na 4 cluster, in which each Na atom is treated as one subsystem and propagated by time-dependent Kohn-Sham density functional theory (TDDFT) using the adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA). Our results agree well with a direct TDDFT calculation on the whole Na 4 cluster using ALDA. We envision that TD-PFET will ultimately be useful for studying ultrafast quantum dynamics in condensed matter, where key regions are solved by highly accurate time-dependent quantum mechanics methods, and unimportant regions are solved by faster, less accurate methods

  17. Time-Dependent Damage Investigation of Rock Mass in an In Situ Experimental Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Quan; Cui, Jie; Chen, Jing

    2012-01-01

    In underground tunnels or caverns, time-dependent deformation or failure of rock mass, such as extending cracks, gradual rock falls, etc., are a costly irritant and a major safety concern if the time-dependent damage of surrounding rock is serious. To understand the damage evolution of rock mass in underground engineering, an in situ experimental testing was carried out in a large belowground tunnel with a scale of 28.5 m in width, 21 m in height and 352 m in length. The time-dependent damage of rock mass was detected in succession by an ultrasonic wave test after excavation. The testing results showed that the time-dependent damage of rock mass could last a long time, i.e., nearly 30 days. Regression analysis of damage factors defined by wave velocity, resulted in the time-dependent evolutional damage equation of rock mass, which corresponded with logarithmic format. A damage viscoelastic-plastic model was developed to describe the exposed time-dependent deterioration of rock mass by field test, such as convergence of time-dependent damage, deterioration of elastic modules and logarithmic format of damage factor. Furthermore, the remedial measures for damaged surrounding rock were discussed based on the measured results and the conception of damage compensation, which provides new clues for underground engineering design.

  18. Time-dependent deterministic transport on parallel architectures using PARTISN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcouffe, R.E.; Baker, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    In addition to the ability to solve the static transport equation, the authors have also incorporated time dependence into the parallel S N code PARTISN. Using a semi-implicit scheme, PARTISN is capable of performing time-dependent calculations for both fissioning and pure source driven problems. They have applied this to various types of problems such as shielding and prompt fission experiments. This paper describes the form of the time-dependent equations implemented, their solution strategies in PARTISN including iteration acceleration, and the strategies used for time-step control. Results are presented for a iron-water shielding calculation and a criticality excursion in a uranium solution configuration

  19. A Realization of a Quasi-Random Walk for Atoms in Time-Dependent Optical Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Hinkel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider the time dependent dynamics of an atom in a two-color pumped cavity, longitudinally through a side mirror and transversally via direct driving of the atomic dipole. The beating of the two driving frequencies leads to a time dependent effective optical potential that forces the atom into a non-trivial motion, strongly resembling a discrete random walk behavior between lattice sites. We provide both numerical and analytical analysis of such a quasi-random walk behavior.

  20. Functional differentiability in time-dependent quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penz, Markus, E-mail: markus.penz@uibk.ac.at; Ruggenthaler, Michael, E-mail: michael.ruggenthaler@uibk.ac.at [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Innsbruck, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2015-03-28

    In this work, we investigate the functional differentiability of the time-dependent many-body wave function and of derived quantities with respect to time-dependent potentials. For properly chosen Banach spaces of potentials and wave functions, Fréchet differentiability is proven. From this follows an estimate for the difference of two solutions to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation that evolve under the influence of different potentials. Such results can be applied directly to the one-particle density and to bounded operators, and present a rigorous formulation of non-equilibrium linear-response theory where the usual Lehmann representation of the linear-response kernel is not valid. Further, the Fréchet differentiability of the wave function provides a new route towards proving basic properties of time-dependent density-functional theory.

  1. Ambiguities in the Lagrangians formalism: the time-dependent case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    An intrinsic formulation of the equivalence problem for time-dependent Lagrangians is given. A new demostration of a theorem derived by Henneaux (1982) is obtained. The relationship to transformation groups is discussed. (Author) [pt

  2. Time-dependent rheological behaviour of bacterial cellulose hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xing; Shi, Zhijun; Kuśmierczyk, Piotr; Liu, Changqing; Yang, Guang; Sevostianov, Igor; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2016-01-01

    This work focuses on time-dependent rheological behaviour of bacterial cellulose (BC) hydrogel. Due to its ideal biocompatibility, BC hydrogel could be employed in biomedical applications. Considering the complexity of loading conditions in human body environment, time-dependent behaviour under relevant conditions should be understood. BC specimens are produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus ATCC 53582 at static-culture conditions. Time-dependent behaviour of specimens at several stress levels is experimentally determined by uniaxial tensile creep tests. We use fraction-exponential operators to model the rheological behaviour. Such a representation allows combination of good accuracy in analytical description of viscoelastic behaviour of real materials and simplicity in solving boundary value problems. The obtained material parameters allow us to identify time-dependent behaviour of BC hydrogel at high stress level with sufficient accuracy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Skinner-Rusk approach to time-dependent mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortés, Jorge; Martínez, Sonia; Cantrijn, Frans

    2002-01-01

    The geometric approach to autonomous classical mechanical systems in terms of a canonical first-order system on the Whitney sum of the tangent and cotangent bundle, developed by Skinner and Rusk, is extended to the time-dependent framework.

  4. Time dependent density functional calculation of plasmon response in clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Zhang, Feng-Shou; Eric, Suraud

    2003-02-01

    We have introduced a theoretical scheme for the efficient description of the optical response of a cluster based on the time-dependent density functional theory. The practical implementation is done by means of the fully fledged time-dependent local density approximation scheme, which is solved directly in the time domain without any linearization. As an example we consider the simple Na2 cluster and compute its surface plasmon photoabsorption cross section, which is in good agreement with the experiments.

  5. Existence of time-dependent density-functional theory for open electronic systems: time-dependent holographic electron density theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao; Yam, ChiYung; Wang, Fan; Chen, GuanHua

    2011-08-28

    We present the time-dependent holographic electron density theorem (TD-HEDT), which lays the foundation of time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) for open electronic systems. For any finite electronic system, the TD-HEDT formally establishes a one-to-one correspondence between the electron density inside any finite subsystem and the time-dependent external potential. As a result, any electronic property of an open system in principle can be determined uniquely by the electron density function inside the open region. Implications of the TD-HEDT on the practicality of TDDFT are also discussed.

  6. Recovery of time-dependent volatility in option pricing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zui-Cha; Hon, Y. C.; Isakov, V.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we investigate an inverse problem of determining the time-dependent volatility from observed market prices of options with different strikes. Due to the non linearity and sparsity of observations, an analytical solution to the problem is generally not available. Numerical approximation is also difficult to obtain using most of the existing numerical algorithms. Based on our recent theoretical results, we apply the linearisation technique to convert the problem into an inverse source problem from which recovery of the unknown volatility function can be achieved. Two kinds of strategies, namely, the integral equation method and the Landweber iterations, are adopted to obtain the stable numerical solution to the inverse problem. Both theoretical analysis and numerical examples confirm that the proposed approaches are effective. The work described in this paper was partially supported by a grant from the Research Grant Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Project No. CityU 101112) and grants from the NNSF of China (Nos. 11261029, 11461039), and NSF grants DMS 10-08902 and 15-14886 and by Emylou Keith and Betty Dutcher Distinguished Professorship at the Wichita State University (USA).

  7. Learning Probabilistic Inference through Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecevski, Dejan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerous experimental data show that the brain is able to extract information from complex, uncertain, and often ambiguous experiences. Furthermore, it can use such learnt information for decision making through probabilistic inference. Several models have been proposed that aim at explaining how probabilistic inference could be performed by networks of neurons in the brain. We propose here a model that can also explain how such neural network could acquire the necessary information for that from examples. We show that spike-timing-dependent plasticity in combination with intrinsic plasticity generates in ensembles of pyramidal cells with lateral inhibition a fundamental building block for that: probabilistic associations between neurons that represent through their firing current values of random variables. Furthermore, by combining such adaptive network motifs in a recursive manner the resulting network is enabled to extract statistical information from complex input streams, and to build an internal model for the distribution p* that generates the examples it receives. This holds even if p* contains higher-order moments. The analysis of this learning process is supported by a rigorous theoretical foundation. Furthermore, we show that the network can use the learnt internal model immediately for prediction, decision making, and other types of probabilistic inference. PMID:27419214

  8. Learning Probabilistic Inference through Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecevski, Dejan; Maass, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Numerous experimental data show that the brain is able to extract information from complex, uncertain, and often ambiguous experiences. Furthermore, it can use such learnt information for decision making through probabilistic inference. Several models have been proposed that aim at explaining how probabilistic inference could be performed by networks of neurons in the brain. We propose here a model that can also explain how such neural network could acquire the necessary information for that from examples. We show that spike-timing-dependent plasticity in combination with intrinsic plasticity generates in ensembles of pyramidal cells with lateral inhibition a fundamental building block for that: probabilistic associations between neurons that represent through their firing current values of random variables. Furthermore, by combining such adaptive network motifs in a recursive manner the resulting network is enabled to extract statistical information from complex input streams, and to build an internal model for the distribution p (*) that generates the examples it receives. This holds even if p (*) contains higher-order moments. The analysis of this learning process is supported by a rigorous theoretical foundation. Furthermore, we show that the network can use the learnt internal model immediately for prediction, decision making, and other types of probabilistic inference.

  9. Comparative analysis of the time-dependent functional and molecular changes in spinal cord degeneration induced by the G93A SOD1 gene mutation and by mechanical compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priestley John V

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations of the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 gene are linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, an invariably fatal neurological condition involving cortico-spinal degeneration. Mechanical injury can also determine spinal cord degeneration and act as a risk factor for the development of ALS. Results We have performed a comparative ontological analysis of the gene expression profiles of thoracic cord samples from rats carrying the G93A SOD1 gene mutation and from wild-type littermates subjected to mechanical compression of the spinal cord. Common molecular responses and gene expression changes unique to each experimental paradigm were evaluated against the functional development of each animal model. Gene Ontology categories crucial to protein folding, extracellular matrix and axonal formation underwent early activation in both experimental paradigms, but decreased significantly in the spinal cord from animals recovering from injury after 7 days and from the G93A SOD1 mutant rats at end-stage disease. Functional improvement after compression coincided with a massive up-regulation of growth-promoting gene categories including factors involved in angiogenesis and transcription, overcoming the more transitory surge of pro-apoptotic components and cell-cycle genes. The cord from G93A SOD1 mutants showed persistent over-expression of apoptotic and stress molecules with fewer neurorestorative signals, while functional deterioration was ongoing. Conclusion this study illustrates how cytoskeletal protein metabolism is central to trauma and genetically-induced spinal cord degeneration and elucidates the main molecular events accompanying functional recovery or decline in two different animal models of spinal cord degeneration.

  10. Natural excitation orbitals from linear response theories: Time-dependent density functional theory, time-dependent Hartree-Fock, and time-dependent natural orbital functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meer, R; Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2017-01-28

    Straightforward interpretation of excitations is possible if they can be described as simple single orbital-to-orbital (or double, etc.) transitions. In linear response time-dependent density functional theory (LR-TDDFT), the (ground state) Kohn-Sham orbitals prove to be such an orbital basis. In contrast, in a basis of natural orbitals (NOs) or Hartree-Fock orbitals, excitations often employ many orbitals and are accordingly hard to characterize. We demonstrate that it is possible in these cases to transform to natural excitation orbitals (NEOs) which resemble very closely the KS orbitals and afford the same simple description of excitations. The desired transformation has been obtained by diagonalization of a submatrix in the equations of linear response time-dependent 1-particle reduced density matrix functional theory (LR-TDDMFT) for the NO transformation, and that of a submatrix in the linear response time-dependent Hartree-Fock (LR-TDHF) equations for the transformation of HF orbitals. The corresponding submatrix is already diagonal in the KS basis in the LR-TDDFT equations. While the orbital shapes of the NEOs afford the characterization of the excitations as (mostly) simple orbital-to-orbital transitions, the orbital energies provide a fair estimate of excitation energies.

  11. Understanding the Origins of Time-Dependent Inhibition by Polypeptide Deformylase Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totoritis, Rachel; Duraiswami, Chaya; Taylor, Amy N.; Kerrigan, John J.; Campobasso, Nino; Smith, Katherine J.; Ward, Paris; King, Bryan W.; Murrayz-Thompson, Monique; Jones, Amber D.; Van Aller, Glenn S.; Aubart, Kelly M.; Zalacain, Magdalena; Thrall, Sara H.; Meek, Thomas D.; Schwartz, Benjamin (GSKPA)

    2012-03-15

    The continual bacterial adaptation to antibiotics creates an ongoing medical need for the development of novel therapeutics. Polypeptide deformylase (PDF) is a highly conserved bacterial enzyme, which is essential for viability. It has previously been shown that PDF inhibitors represent a promising new area for the development of antimicrobial agents, and that many of the best PDF inhibitors demonstrate slow, time-dependent binding. To improve our understanding of the mechanistic origin of this time-dependent inhibition, we examined in detail the kinetics of PDF catalysis and inhibition by several different PDF inhibitors. Varying pH and solvent isotope led to clear changes in time-dependent inhibition parameters, as did inclusion of NaCl, which binds to the active site metal of PDF. Quantitative analysis of these results demonstrated that the observed time dependence arises from slow binding of the inhibitors to the active site metal. However, we also found several metal binding inhibitors that exhibited rapid, non-time-dependent onset of inhibition. By a combination of structural and chemical modification studies, we show that metal binding is only slow when the rest of the inhibitor makes optimal hydrogen bonds within the subsites of PDF. Both of these interactions between the inhibitor and enzyme were found to be necessary to observe time-dependent inhibition, as elimination of either leads to its loss.

  12. Semiclassical approximation to time-dependent Hartree--Fock theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dworzecka, M.; Poggioli, R.

    1976-01-01

    Working within a time-dependent Hartree-Fock framework, one develops a semiclassical approximation appropriate for large systems. It is demonstrated that the standard semiclassical approach, the Thomas-Fermi approximation, is inconsistent with Hartree-Fock theory when the basic two-body interaction is short-ranged (as in nuclear systems, for example). However, by introducing a simple extension of the Thomas-Fermi approximation, one overcomes this problem. One also discusses the infinite nuclear matter problem and point out that time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory yields collective modes of the zero sound variety instead of ordinary hydrodynamic (first) sound. One thus emphasizes that one should be extremely circumspect when attempting to cast the equations of motion of time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory into a hydrodynamic-like form

  13. Time-dependent hierarchical regulation analysis: deciphering cellular adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggeman, F.J.; de Haan, J.; Hardin, H.M.; Bouwman, J.G.; Rossell Aragort, S.L.; van Eunen, K.; Bakker, B.M.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    2006-01-01

    Cells adapt to changes in their environment by the concerted action of many different regulatory mechanisms. Examples of such mechanisms are feedback inhibition by intermediates of metabolism, covalent modification of enzymes and changes in the abundance of mRNAs and proteins. These mechanisms act

  14. Time-dependent hierarchical regulation analysis: deciphering cellular adaptation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggeman, F.J.; Haan, J; Hardin, H.M.; Bouwman, J.; Rossell, S.; van Eunen, K.; Bakker, B.M.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    2006-01-01

    Cells adapt to changes in their environment by the concerted action of many different regulatory mechanisms. Examples of such mechanisms are feedback inhibition by intermediates of metabolism, covalent modification of enzymes and changes in the abundance of mRNAs and proteins. These mechanisms act

  15. Vacuum radiation induced by time dependent electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Many predictions of new phenomena given by strong field quantum electrodynamics (SFQED will be tested on next generation multi-petawatt laser facilities in the near future. These new phenomena are basis to understand physics in extremely strong electromagnetic fields therefore have attracted wide research interest. Here we discuss a new SFQED phenomenon that is named as vacuum radiation. In vacuum radiation, a virtual electron loop obtain energy from time dependent external electric field and radiate an entangled photon pair. Features of vacuum radiation in a locally time dependent electric field including spectrum, characteristic temperature, production rate and power are given.

  16. The nonlinear time-dependent response of isotactic polypropylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drozdov, Aleksey D.; Christiansen, Jesper de Claville

    2002-01-01

    Tensile creep tests, tensile relaxation tests and a tensile test with a constant strain rate are performed on injection-molded isotactic polypropylene at room temperature. A constitutive model is derived for the time-dependent behavior of semicrystalline polymers. A polymer is treated as an equiv......Tensile creep tests, tensile relaxation tests and a tensile test with a constant strain rate are performed on injection-molded isotactic polypropylene at room temperature. A constitutive model is derived for the time-dependent behavior of semicrystalline polymers. A polymer is treated...

  17. Vacuum radiation induced by time dependent electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bo, E-mail: zhangbolfrc@caep.cn [Department of High Energy Density Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Laboratory of Science and Technology on Plasma Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Zhang, Zhi-meng; Hong, Wei; He, Shu-Kai; Teng, Jian [Department of High Energy Density Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Laboratory of Science and Technology on Plasma Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Gu, Yu-qiu, E-mail: yqgu@caep.cn [Department of High Energy Density Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Laboratory of Science and Technology on Plasma Physics, Research Center of Laser Fusion, 621900, Mianyang, Sichuan (China)

    2017-04-10

    Many predictions of new phenomena given by strong field quantum electrodynamics (SFQED) will be tested on next generation multi-petawatt laser facilities in the near future. These new phenomena are basis to understand physics in extremely strong electromagnetic fields therefore have attracted wide research interest. Here we discuss a new SFQED phenomenon that is named as vacuum radiation. In vacuum radiation, a virtual electron loop obtain energy from time dependent external electric field and radiate an entangled photon pair. Features of vacuum radiation in a locally time dependent electric field including spectrum, characteristic temperature, production rate and power are given.

  18. Wave equations with time-dependent dissipation II. Effective dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Jens

    This article is intended to present a construction of structural representations of solutions to the Cauchy problem for wave equations with time-dependent dissipation above scaling. These representations are used to give estimates of the solution and its derivatives based on L(R), q⩾2. The article represents the second part within a series. In [Jens Wirth, Wave equations with time-dependent dissipation I. Non-effective dissipation, J. Differential Equations 222 (2) (2006) 487-514] weak dissipations below scaling were discussed.

  19. Thermal state of the general time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Taking advantage of dynamical invariant operator, we derived quantum mechanical solution of general time-dependent harmonic oscillator. ... The domain part of the email address of all email addresses used by the office of Indian Academy of Sciences, including those of the staff, the journals, various programmes, and ...

  20. BEC from a time-dependent variational point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benarous, Mohamed

    2005-01-01

    We use the time-dependent variational principle of Balian and Veneroni to derive a set of equations governing the dynamics of a trapped Bose gas at finite temperature. We show that this dynamics generalizes the Gross-Pitaevskii equations in that it introduces a consistent dynamical coupling between the evolution of the condensate density, the thermal cloud, and the 'anomalous' density

  1. A remark on the time-dependent pair distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hove, Léon van

    1958-01-01

    After recalling the classical work of Zernike and Prins on the pair distribution function of a liquid or gas and its role in X-ray scattering theory, one briefly discusses the time-dependent generalization of this distribution function, which is of special interest for neutron scattering. In line

  2. Coherent states of general time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. By introducing an invariant operator, we obtain exact wave functions for a general time-dependent quadratic harmonic oscillator. The coherent states, both in x- and p-spaces, are calculated. We confirm that the uncertainty product in coherent state is always larger than Η/2 and is equal to the minimum of the ...

  3. Approximate factorization for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. van der Houwen; B.P. Sommeijer (Ben)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe first application of approximate factorization in the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations (PDEs) can be traced back to the celebrated papers of Peaceman and Rachford and of Douglas in 1955. For linear problems, the Peaceman-Rachford- Douglas method can

  4. Path integral solution for some time-dependent potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storchak, S.N.

    1989-12-01

    The quantum-mechanical problem with a time-dependent potential is solved by the path integral method. The solution is obtained by the application of the previously derived general formula for rheonomic homogeneous point transformation and reparametrization in the path integral. (author). 4 refs

  5. Time-dependent density functional theory for periodic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootstra, Freddie

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis the time-dependent version of density functional theory is described, which has been developed for crystalline non-metallic systems with periodicity in one to three dimensions. The application of this theory to the calculation of the optical reponse properties of a wide range of

  6. Time-dependent quantum fluid density functional theory of hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A time-dependent generalized non-linear Schrödinger equation (GNLSE) of motion was earlier derived in our laboratory by combining density functional theory and quantum fluid dynamics in threedimensional space. In continuation of the work reported previously, the GNLSE is applied to provide additional knowledge on ...

  7. Construction of an exact solution of time-dependent Ginzburg ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A new approach is taken to calculate the speed of front propagation at which the interface moves from a superconducting to a normal region in a superconducting sample. Using time-dependent Ginzburg–Landau (TDGL) equations we have calculated the speed by constructing a new exact solution. This approach is based ...

  8. Time-dependent fracture of early age concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lennart; Stang, Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes

    2002-01-01

    An experimental method suitable for the determination of the time-dependent tension softening response of early age concrete is presented. The method is based on the wedge splitting test by Tschegg, which is well known to be suited for the determination of fracture mechanical parameters, i...

  9. Simulation of compressible viscous flow in time-dependent domains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Česenek, J.; Feistauer, M.; Horáček, Jaromír; Kučera, V.; Prokopova, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 219, č. 13 (2013), s. 7139-7150 ISSN 0096-3003 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/0207 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : time dependent domain * ALE method * semi-implicit time discretization * shock indicator Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.600, year: 2013

  10. Time dependent critical state in disks and rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmes, Herman K.; Kuper, A.R.; Kuper, A.R.; van de Klundert, L.J.M.; van de Klundert, L.J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have developed a model to calculate the response of the current distribution in disks and rings to a time-dependent applied magnetic field. In the model, the ring (or disk) is divided into concentric segments. The segments are assumed to be inductively coupled to each other and to the

  11. Ranking paths in stochastic time-dependent networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Relund; Andersen, Kim Allan; Pretolani, Daniele D.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we address optimal routing problems in networks where travel times are both stochastic and time-dependent. In these networks, the best route choice is not necessarily a path, but rather a time-adaptive strategy that assigns successors to nodes as a function of time. Nevertheless, in...

  12. Construction of an exact solution of time-dependent Ginzburg ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A new approach is taken to calculate the speed of front propagation at which the interface moves from a superconducting to a normal region in a superconducting sample. Using time-dependent Ginzburg–Landau (TDGL) equations we have calculated the speed by constructing a new exact solution. This approach ...

  13. Student Understanding of Time Dependence in Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emigh, Paul J.; Passante, Gina; Shaffer, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    The time evolution of quantum states is arguably one of the more difficult ideas in quantum mechanics. In this article, we report on results from an investigation of student understanding of this topic after lecture instruction. We demonstrate specific problems that students have in applying time dependence to quantum systems and in recognizing…

  14. Asymptotic time dependent neutron transport in multidimensional systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, M.E.; Sawan, M.E.; Wassef, W.A.; El-Gueraly, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    A model which predicts the asymptotic time behavior of the neutron distribution in multi-dimensional systems is presented. The model is based on the kernel factorization method used for stationary neutron transport in a rectangular parallelepiped. The accuracy of diffusion theory in predicting the asymptotic time dependence is assessed. The use of neutron pulse experiments for predicting the diffusion parameters is also investigated

  15. Time-Dependent Natural Convection Couette Flow of Heat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Time-Dependent Natural Convection Couette Flow of Heat Generating/Absorbing Fluid between Vertical Parallel Plates Filled With Porous Material. ... The numerical simulation conducted for some saturated liquids reveled that at t ≥ Pr the steady and unsteady state velocities (as well as the temperature of the fluid) ...

  16. Time-dependent effects of cardiovascular exercise on memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roig, Marc; Thomas, Richard; Mang, Cameron S

    2016-01-01

    We present new evidence supporting the hypothesis that the effects of cardiovascular exercise on memory can be regulated in a time-dependent manner. When the exercise stimulus is temporally coupled with specific phases of the memory formation process, a single bout of cardiovascular exercise may ...

  17. Examining the time dependence of DAMA's modulation amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Chris; Savage, Christopher; Sandick, Pearl; Freese, Katherine; Gondolo, Paolo

    2018-03-01

    If dark matter is composed of weakly interacting particles, Earth's orbital motion may induce a small annual variation in the rate at which these particles interact in a terrestrial detector. The DAMA collaboration has identified at a 9.3σ confidence level such an annual modulation in their event rate over two detector iterations, DAMA/NaI and DAMA/LIBRA, each with ˜ 7 years of observations. This data is well fit by a constant modulation amplitude for the two iterations of the experiment. We statistically examine the time dependence of the modulation amplitudes, which "by eye" appear to be decreasing with time in certain energy ranges. We perform a chi-squared goodness of fit test of the average modulation amplitudes measured by the two detector iterations which rejects the hypothesis of a consistent modulation amplitude at greater than 80, 96, and 99.6% for the 2-4, 2-5 and 2-6 keVee energy ranges, respectively. We also find that among the 14 annual cycles there are three ≳ 3σ departures from the average in our estimated data in the 5-6 keVee energy range. In addition, we examined several phenomenological models for the time dependence of the modulation amplitude. Using a maximum likelihood test, we find that descriptions of the modulation amplitude as decreasing with time are preferred over a constant modulation amplitude at anywhere between 1σ and 3σ , depending on the phenomenological model for the time dependence and the signal energy range considered. A time dependent modulation amplitude is not expected for a dark matter signal, at least for dark matter halo morphologies consistent with the DAMA signal. New data from DAMA/LIBRA-phase2 will certainly aid in determining whether any apparent time dependence is a real effect or a statistical fluctuation.

  18. Learning Bounds of ERM Principle for Sequences of Time-Dependent Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingchen Yao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many generalization results in learning theory are established under the assumption that samples are independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.. However, numerous learning tasks in practical applications involve the time-dependent data. In this paper, we propose a theoretical framework to analyze the generalization performance of the empirical risk minimization (ERM principle for sequences of time-dependent samples (TDS. In particular, we first present the generalization bound of ERM principle for TDS. By introducing some auxiliary quantities, we also give a further analysis of the generalization properties and the asymptotical behaviors of ERM principle for TDS.

  19. Tokamak power reactor ignition and time dependent fractional power operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vold, E.L.; Mau, T.K.; Conn, R.W.

    1986-06-01

    A flexible time-dependent and zero-dimensional plasma burn code with radial profiles was developed and employed to study the fractional power operation and the thermal burn control options for an INTOR-sized tokamak reactor. The code includes alpha thermalization and a time-dependent transport loss which can be represented by any one of several currently popular scaling laws for energy confinement time. Ignition parameters were found to vary widely in density-temperature (n-T) space for the range of scaling laws examined. Critical ignition issues were found to include the extent of confinement time degradation by alpha heating, the ratio of ion to electron transport power loss, and effect of auxiliary heating on confinement. Feedback control of the auxiliary power and ion fuel sources are shown to provide thermal stability near the ignition curve

  20. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, Manfred

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights.

  1. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuntz, M. (Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics, Boulder, CO (USA) Heidelberg Universitaet (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights. 74 refs.

  2. Local time dependence of turbulent magnetic fields in Saturn's magnetodisc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminker, V.; Delamere, P. A.; Ng, C. S.; Dennis, T.; Otto, A.; Ma, X.

    2017-04-01

    Net plasma transport in magnetodiscs around giant planets is outward. Observations of plasma temperature have shown that the expanding plasma is heating nonadiabatically during this process. Turbulence has been suggested as a source of heating. However, the mechanism and distribution of magnetic fluctuations in giant magnetospheres are poorly understood. In this study we attempt to quantify the radial and local time dependence of fluctuating magnetic field signatures that are suggestive of turbulence, quantifying the fluctuations in terms of a plasma heating rate density. In addition, the inferred heating rate density is correlated with magnetic field configurations that include azimuthal bend forward/back and magnitude of the equatorial normal component of magnetic field relative to the dipole. We find a significant local time dependence in magnetic fluctuations that is consistent with flux transport triggered in the subsolar and dusk sectors due to magnetodisc reconnection.

  3. Generalization of DT Equations for Time Dependent Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Lorenzo; Tudisco, Salvatore; Musumeci, Francesco; Scordino, Agata; Fallica, Giorgio; Mazzillo, Massimo; Zimbone, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    New equations for paralyzable, non paralyzable and hybrid DT models, valid for any time dependent sources are presented. We show how such new equations include the equations already used for constant rate sources, and how it’s is possible to correct DT losses in the case of time dependent sources. Montecarlo simulations were performed to compare the equations behavior with the three DT models. Excellent accordance between equations predictions and Montecarlo simulation was found. We also obtain good results in the experimental validation of the new hybrid DT equation. Passive quenched SPAD device was chosen as a device affected by hybrid DT losses and active quenched SPAD with 50 ns DT was used as DT losses free device. PMID:22163500

  4. Generalization of DT Equations for Time Dependent Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Mazzillo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available New equations for paralyzable, non paralyzable and hybrid DT models, valid for any time dependent sources are presented. We show how such new equations include the equations already used for constant rate sources, and how it’s is possible to correct DT losses in the case of time dependent sources. Montecarlo simulations were performed to compare the equations behavior with the three DT models. Excellent accordance between equations predictions and Montecarlo simulation was found. We also obtain good results in the experimental validation of the new hybrid DT equation. Passive quenched SPAD device was chosen as a device affected by hybrid DT losses and active quenched SPAD with 50 ns DT was used as DT losses free device.

  5. Characterization of Models for Time-Dependent Behavior of Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liingaard, Morten; Augustesen, Anders; Lade, Poul V.

    2004-01-01

    developed for metals and steel but are, to some extent, used to characterize time effects in geomaterials. The third part is a review of constitutive laws that describe not only viscous effects but also the inviscid ( rate-independent) behavior of soils, in principle, under any possible loading condition......  Different classes of constitutive models have been developed to capture the time-dependent viscous phenomena ~ creep, stress relaxation, and rate effects ! observed in soils. Models based on empirical, rheological, and general stress-strain-time concepts have been studied. The first part....... Special attention is paid to elastoviscoplastic models that combine inviscid elastic and time-dependent plastic behavior. Various general elastoviscoplastic models can roughly be divided into two categories: Models based on the concept of overstress and models based on nonstationary flow surface theory...

  6. Non-Perturbative Formulation of Time-Dependent String Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandre, J; Mavromatos, Nikolaos E; Alexandre, Jean; Ellis, John; Mavromatos, Nikolaos E.

    2006-01-01

    We formulate here a new world-sheet renormalization-group technique for the bosonic string, which is non-perturbative in the Regge slope alpha' and based on a functional method for controlling the quantum fluctuations, whose magnitudes are scaled by the value of alpha'. Using this technique we exhibit, in addition to the well-known linear-dilaton cosmology, a new, non-perturbative time-dependent background solution. Using the reparametrization invariance of the string S-matrix, we demonstrate that this solution is conformally invariant to alpha', and we give a heuristic inductive argument that conformal invariance can be maintained to all orders in alpha'. This new time-dependent string solution may be applicable to primordial cosmology or to the exit from linear-dilaton cosmology at large times.

  7. Time-dependent phase error correction using digital waveform synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Buskirk, Stephen

    2017-10-10

    The various technologies presented herein relate to correcting a time-dependent phase error generated as part of the formation of a radar waveform. A waveform can be pre-distorted to facilitate correction of an error induced into the waveform by a downstream operation/component in a radar system. For example, amplifier power droop effect can engender a time-dependent phase error in a waveform as part of a radar signal generating operation. The error can be quantified and an according complimentary distortion can be applied to the waveform to facilitate negation of the error during the subsequent processing of the waveform. A time domain correction can be applied by a phase error correction look up table incorporated into a waveform phase generator.

  8. Theoretical information measurement in nonrelativistic time-dependent approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafizade, S. A.; Hassanabadi, H.; Zarrinkamar, S.

    2018-02-01

    The information-theoretic measures of time-dependent Schrödinger equation are investigated via the Shannon information entropy, variance and local Fisher quantities. In our calculations, we consider the two first states n = 0,1 and obtain the position Sx (t) and momentum Sp (t) Shannon entropies as well as Fisher information Ix (t) in position and momentum Ip (t) spaces. Using the Fourier transformed wave function, we obtain the results in momentum space. Some interesting features of the information entropy densities ρs (x,t) and γs (p,t), as well as the probability densities ρ (x,t) and γ (p,t) for time-dependent states are demonstrated. We establish a general relation between variance and Fisher's information. The Bialynicki-Birula-Mycielski inequality is tested and verified for the states n = 0,1.

  9. High-temperature service and time dependent failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindeman, R.W.; Asada, Y.; Chang, S.J.; Todd, J.A. (eds.)

    1993-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the technical papers presented at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers 1993 Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference on July 25--29 in Denver, Colorado. This volume contains twelve papers related to materials and design methods for high temperatures, eight papers related to time dependent failure evaluation and prevention in pressure vessels and piping, and five papers related to constitutive equations in high temperature design.

  10. The time dependence of molecular iodine emission from Laminaria digitata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Orphal

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the first in situ detection of molecular iodine emitted from the brown macroalga Laminaria digitata under natural stress conditions. We show that the release of I2 occurs in short, strong bursts with a complex time signature. The new data indicate that algal control of I2 release in the form of an oscillatory time-dependence may be based on a nonlinear autocatalytic reaction scheme which is closely linked to the production of H2O2.

  11. The time dependence of molecular iodine emission from Laminaria digitata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixneuf, S.; Ruth, A. A.; Vaughan, S.; Varma, R. M.; Orphal, J.

    2009-02-01

    We present the first in situ detection of molecular iodine emitted from the brown macroalga Laminaria digitata under natural stress conditions. We show that the release of I2 occurs in short, strong bursts with a complex time signature. The new data indicate that algal control of I2 release in the form of an oscillatory time-dependence may be based on a nonlinear autocatalytic reaction scheme which is closely linked to the production of H2O2.

  12. Longitudinal dispersion with time-dependent source concentration ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An analytical solution is obtained to predict the contaminant concentration along unsteady ground-water flow in semi-in finite aquifer. Initially,the aquifer is not supposed to be solute free ,i.e.,aquifer is not clean.A time-dependent source concentration is considered at the origin of the aquifer and at the other end of the aquifer, ...

  13. Relating Time-Dependent Acceleration and Height Using an Elevator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinser, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    A simple experiment in relating a time-dependent linear acceleration function to height is explored through the use of a smartphone and an elevator. Given acceleration as a function of time, a(t), the velocity function and position functions are determined through integration as in v(t)=? a(t) dt (1) and x(t)=? v(t) dt. Mobile devices such as…

  14. Spectral methods for time dependent partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, D.; Turkel, E.

    1983-01-01

    The theory of spectral methods for time dependent partial differential equations is reviewed. When the domain is periodic Fourier methods are presented while for nonperiodic problems both Chebyshev and Legendre methods are discussed. The theory is presented for both hyperbolic and parabolic systems using both Galerkin and collocation procedures. While most of the review considers problems with constant coefficients the extension to nonlinear problems is also discussed. Some results for problems with shocks are presented.

  15. Rashba Effect in Presence of Time-Dependent Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobhani, Hadi; Hassanabadi, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Rashba effect in presence of a time-dependent interaction has been considered. Then time-evolution of such a system has been studied by using Lewis–Riesenfeld dynamical invariant and unitary transformation method. So appropriate dynamical invariant and unitary transformation according the considered system have been constructed as well as some special cases have come into this article which are common in physics. (paper)

  16. A time-dependent measurement of charm CP violation at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Smith, M

    2014-01-01

    A time dependent analysis of CP violation in charm mesons is presented through the measurement of the observable $A_{\\Gamma}$. This observable involves precise measurements of the D0 lifetime as it decays to a CP eigenstate. The results presented are the most precise to date. No CP violation is observed.

  17. 3D time-dependent flow computations using a molecular stress function model with constraint release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2002-01-01

    The numerical simulation of time dependent viscoelastic flow (in three dimensions) is of interest in connection with a variety of polymer processing operations. The application of the numerical simulation techniques is in the analysis and design of polymer processing problems. This is operations,...

  18. General time-dependent formulation of quantum scattering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Althorpe, Stuart C.

    2004-01-01

    We derive and explain the key ideas behind a time-dependent formulation of quantum scattering theory, applicable generally to systems with a finite-range scattering potential. The scattering is initiated and probed by plane wave packets, which are localized just outside the range of the potential. The asymptotic limits of conventional scattering theory (initiation in the remote past; detection in the remote future) are not taken. Instead, the differential cross section (DCS) is obtained by projecting the scattered wave packet onto the probe plane wave packets. The projection also yields a time-dependent version of the DCS. Cuts through the wave packet, just as it exits the scattering potential, yield time-dependent and time-independent angular distributions that give a close-up picture of the scattering which complements the DCS. We have previously applied the theory to interpret experimental cross sections of chemical reactions [e.g., S. C. Althorpe, F. Fernandez-Alonso, B. D. Bean, J. D. Ayers, A. E. Pomerantz, R. N. Zare, and E. Wrede, Nature (London) 416, 67 (2002)]. This paper gives the derivation of the theory, and explains its relation to conventional scattering theory. For clarity, the derivation is restricted to spherical-particle scattering, though it may readily be extended to general multichannel systems. We illustrate the theory using a simple application to hard-sphere scattering

  19. Time Dependent Geoid Constraints Upon Mantle Viscosity Stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, C.; Peltier, W. R.

    2004-12-01

    The global measurement of the time dependence of geoid height that is being provided by the GRACE satellite system that is now in space will eventually provide the basis for considerably more accurate inversions for mantle viscosity structure than are now possible. However, existing data on the time dependence of geoid height based upon the results of satellite laser ranging already provide very strong constraints upon the effective viscosity of the of the deepest mantle, especially when these are conbined with observations of the spectrum of relaxation times that characterize the process of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Such data, by themselves, very tightly constrain the viscosity structure in the upper mantle and transition zone. We will describe a series of new analyses of the expected global pattern of geoid height time dependence based upon the recently published refined model of the GIA process denoted ICE-5G(VM2), a model based upon a significant refinement of the ICE-4G(VM2) precursor ( see W.R. Peltier, Ann. Rev. Earth and Planet. Sci., 32, 111-149, 2004). The impact of the new model of surface loading upon the mantle viscosity inverse problem turns out to be both interesting and significant.

  20. Time-dependent fatigue--phenomenology and life prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, L.F.

    1979-01-01

    The time-dependent fatigue behavior of materials used or considered for use in present and advanced systems for power generation is outlined. A picture is first presented to show how basic mechanisms and phenomenological information relate to the performance of the component under consideration through the so-called local strain approach. By this means life prediction criteria and design rules can be formulated utilizing laboratory test information which is directly translated to predicting the performance of a component. The body of phenomenological information relative to time-dependent fatigue is reviewed. Included are effects of strain range, strain rate and frequency, environment and wave shape, all of which are shown to be important in developing both an understanding and design base for time dependent fatigue. Using this information, some of the current methods being considered for the life prediction of components are reviewed. These include the current ASME code case, frequency-modified fatigue equations, strain range partitioning, the damage function method, frequency separation and damage rate equations. From this review, it is hoped that a better perspective on future directions for basic material science at high temperature can be achieved

  1. Neutrino flavor instabilities in a time-dependent supernova model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Abbar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A dense neutrino medium such as that inside a core-collapse supernova can experience collective flavor conversion or oscillations because of the neutral-current weak interaction among the neutrinos. This phenomenon has been studied in a restricted, stationary supernova model which possesses the (spatial spherical symmetry about the center of the supernova and the (directional axial symmetry around the radial direction. Recently it has been shown that these spatial and directional symmetries can be broken spontaneously by collective neutrino oscillations. In this letter we analyze the neutrino flavor instabilities in a time-dependent supernova model. Our results show that collective neutrino oscillations start at approximately the same radius in both the stationary and time-dependent supernova models unless there exist very rapid variations in local physical conditions on timescales of a few microseconds or shorter. Our results also suggest that collective neutrino oscillations can vary rapidly with time in the regimes where they do occur which need to be studied in time-dependent supernova models.

  2. Time-Dependent-Asymmetric-Linear-Parsimonious Ancestral State Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Gilles

    2017-10-01

    The time-dependent-asymmetric-linear parsimony is an ancestral state reconstruction method which extends the standard linear parsimony (a.k.a. Wagner parsimony) approach by taking into account both branch lengths and asymmetric evolutionary costs for reconstructing quantitative characters (asymmetric costs amount to assuming an evolutionary trend toward the direction with the lowest cost). A formal study of the influence of the asymmetry parameter shows that the time-dependent-asymmetric-linear parsimony infers states which are all taken among the known states, except for some degenerate cases corresponding to special values of the asymmetry parameter. This remarkable property holds in particular for the Wagner parsimony. This study leads to a polynomial algorithm which determines, and provides a compact representation of, the parametric reconstruction of a phylogenetic tree, that is for all the unknown nodes, the set of all the possible reconstructed states associated with the asymmetry parameters leading to them. The time-dependent-asymmetric-linear parsimony is finally illustrated with the parametric reconstruction of the body size of cetaceans.

  3. Effect of a time-dependent field on subdiffusing particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shushin, A I

    2008-11-01

    We analyze the effect of a time-dependent external field on non-Markovian migration described by the continuous time random walk (CTRW) approach. The rigorous method of treating the problem is proposed which is based on the Markovian representations of the CTRW approach and field modulation. With the use of this method we derive the non-Markovian stochastic Liouville equation (SLE), that describes the effect of this field, and thoroughly analyze the relation of the derived SLE with equations proposed earlier. This SLE is applied to the case of subdiffusive migration in which the exact formulas for the first and second moments of spatial distribution are obtained. In the case of oscillating external field they predict unusual dependence of the first moment on oscillation phase and anomalous time behavior of field dependent contribution to the dispersion which agree with results of earlier works. Anomalous time dependence is also found in the case of a fluctuating field. The specific features of this time dependence are analyzed in detail.

  4. Amplitude analysis of $B^- \\to D^+ \\pi^- \\pi^-$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, V.V.; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozachuk, Anastasiia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Toriello, Francis; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhang, Yu; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-10-05

    The Dalitz plot analysis technique is used to study the resonant substructures of $B^- \\to D^+ \\pi^- \\pi^-$ decays in a data sample corresponding to 3.0 fb$^-1$ of $pp$ collision data recorded by the LHCb experiment during 2011 and 2012. A model-independent analysis of the angular moments demonstrates the presence of resonances with spins 1, 2 and 3 at high $D^+\\pi^-$ mass. The data are fitted with an amplitude model composed of a quasi-model-independent function to describe the $D^+\\pi^-$ S-wave together with virtual contributions from the $D^*(2007)^{0}$ and $B^{*0}$ states, and components corresponding to the $D^*_2(2460)^{0}$, $D^*_1(2680)^{0}$, $D^*_3(2760)^{0}$ and $D^*_2(3000)^{0}$ resonances. The masses and widths of these resonances are determined together with the branching fractions for their production in $B^- \\to D^+ \\pi^- \\pi^-$ decays. The $D^+\\pi^-$ S-wave has phase motion consistent with that expected due to the presence of the $D^*_0(2400)^{0}$ state. These results constitute the first obser...

  5. Characterizing time-dependent mechanics in metallic MEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geers M.G.D.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiments for characterization of time-dependent material properties in free-standing metallic microelectromechanical system (MEMS pose challenges: e.g. fabrication and handling (sub-μm sized specimens, control and measurement of sub-μN loads and sub-μm displacements over long periods and various temperatures [1]. A variety of experimental setups have been reported each having their pros and cons. One example is a micro-tensile tester with an ingenious electro-static specimen gripping system [2] aiding simple specimen design giving good results at μN and sub-μm levels, but without in-situ full-field observations. Other progressive examples assimilate the specimen, MEMS actuators and load cells on a single chip [3,4] yielding significant results at nN and nm levels with in-situ TEM/SEM observability, though not without complications: complex load actuator/sensor calibration per chip, measures to reduce fabrication failure and unfeasible cofabrication on wafers with commercial metallic MEMS. This work aims to overcome these drawbacks by developing experimental methods with high sensitivity, precision and in-situ full-field observation capabilities. Moreover, these should be applicable to simple free-standing metallic MEMS that can be co-fabricated with commercial devices. These methods will then serve in systematic studies into size-effects in time-dependent material properties. First a numeric-experimental method is developed. It characterizes bending deformation of onwafer μm-sized aluminum cantilevers. A specially designed micro-clamp is used to mechanically apply a constant precise deflection of the beam (zres <50 nm for a prolonged period, see fig. 1. After this period, the deflection by the micro-clamp is removed. Full-field height maps with the ensuing deformation are measured over time with confocal optical profilometry (COP. This yields the tip deflection as function of time with ~3 nm precision, see fig.2. To extract material

  6. Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobynde, M. I.; Shprits, Y.; Drozdov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights 1,2Dobynde M.I., 2,3Drozdov A.Y., 2,4Shprits Y.Y.1Skolkovo institute of science and technology, Moscow, Russia 2University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA 3Lomonosov Moscow State University Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow, Russia4Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USASpace radiation is the main restriction for long-term interplanetary space missions. It induces degradation of external components and propagates inside providing damage to internal environment. Space radiation particles and induced secondary particle showers can lead to variety of damage to astronauts in short- and long- term perspective. Contribution of two main sources of space radiation- Sun and out-of-heliosphere space varies in time in opposite phase due to the solar activity state. Currently the only habituated mission is the international interplanetary station that flights on the low Earth orbit. Besides station shell astronauts are protected with the Earth magnetosphere- a natural shield that prevents significant damage for all humanity. Current progress in space exploration tends to lead humanity out of magnetosphere bounds. With the current study we make estimations of spacecraft parameters and astronauts damage for long-term interplanetary flights. Applying time dependent model of GCR spectra and data on SEP spectra we show the time dependence of the radiation in a human phantom inside the shielding capsule. We pay attention to the shielding capsule design, looking for an optimal geometry parameters and materials. Different types of particles affect differently on the human providing more or less harm to the tissues. Incident particles provide a large amount of secondary particles while propagating through the shielding capsule. We make an attempt to find an optimal combination of shielding capsule parameters, namely material and thickness, that will effectively decrease

  7. Timing-dependent actions of NGF required for cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehoon Chung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Continuous NGF stimulation induces PC12 cell differentiation. However, why continuous NGF stimulation is required for differentiation is unclear. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of the timing-dependent requirement of NGF action for cell differentiation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address the timing-dependency of the NGF action, we performed a discontinuous stimulation assay consisting of a first transient stimulation followed by an interval and then a second sustained stimulation and quantified the neurite extension level. Consequently, we observed a timing-dependent action of NGF on cell differentiation, and discontinuous NGF stimulation similarly induced differentiation. The first stimulation did not induce neurite extension, whereas the second stimulation induced fast neurite extension; therefore, the first stimulation is likely required as a prerequisite condition. These observations indicate that the action of NGF can be divided into two processes: an initial stimulation-driven latent process and a second stimulation-driven extension process. The latent process appears to require the activities of ERK and transcription, but not PI3K, whereas the extension-process requires the activities of ERK and PI3K, but not transcription. We also found that during the first stimulation, the activity of NGF can be replaced by PACAP, but not by insulin, EGF, bFGF or forskolin; during the second stimulation, however, the activity of NGF cannot be replaced by any of these stimulants. These findings allowed us to identify potential genes specifically involved in the latent process, rather than in other processes, using a microarray. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate that NGF induces the differentiation of PC12 cells via mechanically distinct processes: an ERK-driven and transcription-dependent latent process, and an ERK- and PI3K-driven and transcription-independent extension process.

  8. TIME-DEPENDENT MODELS OF FLARES FROM SAGITTARIUS A*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodds-Eden, Katie; Genzel, Reinhard; Gillessen, Stefan; Eisenhauer, Frank; Sharma, Prateek; Quataert, Eliot; Porquet, Delphine

    2010-01-01

    The emission from Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole in the Galactic Center, shows order of magnitude variability ('flares') a few times a day that is particularly prominent in the near-infrared (NIR) and X-rays. We present a time-dependent model for these flares motivated by the hypothesis that dissipation of magnetic energy powers the flares. We show that episodic magnetic reconnection can occur near the last stable circular orbit in time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic simulations of black hole accretion-the timescales and energetics of these events are broadly consistent with the flares from Sgr A*. Motivated by these results, we present a spatially one-zone time-dependent model for the electron distribution function in flares, including energy loss due to synchrotron cooling and adiabatic expansion. Synchrotron emission from transiently accelerated particles can explain the NIR/X-ray light curves and spectra of a luminous flare observed on 2007 April 4. A significant decrease in the magnetic field strength during the flare (coincident with the electron acceleration) is required to explain the simultaneity and symmetry of the simultaneous light curves. Our models predict that the NIR and X-ray spectral indices are related by Δα ≅ 0.5 (where νF ν ∝ ν α ) and that there is only modest variation in the spectral index during flares. We also explore implications of this model for longer wavelength (radio-submillimeter) emission seemingly associated with X-ray and NIR flares; we argue that a few hour decrease in the submillimeter emission is a more generic consequence of large-scale magnetic reconnection than delayed radio emission from adiabatic expansion.

  9. Filter frequency response of time dependent signal using Laplace transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shestakov, Aleksei I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-16

    We analyze the effect a filter has on a time dependent signal x(t). If X(s) is the Laplace transform of x and H (s) is the filter Transfer function, the response in frequency space is X (s) H (s). Consequently, in real space, the response is the convolution (x*h) (t), where hi is the Laplace inverse of H. Effects are analyzed and analytically for functions such as (t/tc)2 e-t/t$_c$, where tc = const. We consider lowpass, highpass and bandpass filters.

  10. Shapes and dynamics from the time-dependent mean field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, P.D.; Goddard, P.M.; Rios, A.

    2015-01-01

    Explaining observed properties in terms of underlying shape degrees of freedom is a well-established prism with which to understand atomic nuclei. Self-consistent mean-field models provide one tool to understand nuclear shapes, and their link to other nuclear properties and observables. We present examples of how the time-dependent extension of the mean-field approach can be used in particular to shed light on nuclear shape properties, particularly looking at the giant resonances built on deformed nuclear ground states, and at dynamics in highly-deformed fission isomers. Example calculations are shown of 28 Si in the first case, and 240 Pu in the latter case

  11. Time-Dependent Mean-Field Games with Logarithmic Nonlinearities

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2015-10-06

    In this paper, we prove the existence of classical solutions for time-dependent mean-field games with a logarithmic nonlinearity and subquadratic Hamiltonians. Because the logarithm is unbounded from below, this nonlinearity poses substantial mathematical challenges that have not been addressed in the literature. Our result is proven by recurring to a delicate argument which combines Lipschitz regularity for the Hamilton-Jacobi equation with estimates for the nonlinearity in suitable Lebesgue spaces. Lipschitz estimates follow from an application of the nonlinear adjoint method. These are then combined with a priori bounds for solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation and a concavity argument for the nonlinearity.

  12. Time-dependent density-functional theory concepts and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ullrich, Carsten A

    2011-01-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) describes the quantum dynamics of interacting electronic many-body systems formally exactly and in a practical and efficient manner. TDDFT has become the leading method for calculating excitation energies and optical properties of large molecules, with accuracies that rival traditional wave-function based methods, but at a fraction of the computational cost.This book is the first graduate-level text on the concepts and applications of TDDFT, including many examples and exercises, and extensive coverage of the literature. The book begins with a s

  13. The time-dependent prize-collecting arc routing problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Black, Dan; Eglese, Richard; Wøhlk, Sanne

    2013-01-01

    A new problem is introduced named the Time-Dependent Prize-Collecting Arc Routing Problem (TD-PARP). It is particularly relevant to situations where a transport manager has to choose between a number of full truck load pick-ups and deliveries on a road network where travel times change...... with the time of day. Two metaheuristic algorithms, one based on Variable Neighborhood Search and one based on Tabu Search, are proposed and tested for a set of benchmark problems, generated from real road networks and travel time information. Both algorithms are capable of finding good solutions, though...

  14. Numerical solution of time dependent neutron transport equation. An application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barroso, Dalton Ellery Girao

    2000-01-01

    In this work we show a simple method to solve numerically the time-dependent neutron transport equation which is a simple extension of the numerical methods used to solve the time-independent static transport equation. This is possible because the time-discretized transport equation has the same form as the time-independent transport equation, with only some additional terms. A general outline of the method is given and used to evaluate the neutron flux in a microexplosion calculation of a highly compressed micro fissile system composed by DT-Pu-Be microsphere. (author)

  15. Time Dependent Hartree Fock Equation: Gateway to Nonequilibrium Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufty, James W.

    2007-01-01

    This is the Final Technical Report for DE-FG02-2ER54677 award 'Time Dependent Hartree Fock Equation - Gateway to Nonequilibrium Plasmas'. Research has focused on the nonequilibrium dynamics of electrons in the presence of ions, both via basic quantum theory and via semi-classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In addition, fundamental notions of dissipative dynamics have been explored for models of grains and dust, and for scalar fields (temperature) in turbulent edge plasmas. The specific topics addressed were Quantum Kinetic Theory for Metallic Clusters, Semi-classical MD Simulation of Plasmas , and Effects of Dissipative Dynamics.

  16. Evaluation of design safety factors for time-dependent buckling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, C.M.; Nickell, R.E.

    1977-02-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code rules concerning time-dependent (creep) buckling for Class 1 nuclear components have recently been changed. Previous requirements for a factor of ten on service life have been replaced with a factor of safety of 1.5 on loading for load-controlled buckling. This report examines the supposed equivalence of the two rules from the standpoint of materials behavior--specifically, the secondary creep strain rate exponent. The comparison is made using results obtained numerically for an axially-loaded, cylindrical shell with varying secondary creep exponents. A computationally efficient scheme for analyzing creep buckling problems is also presented

  17. Time dependent deformation in prestressed concrete girder: Measurement and prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal, Y. J.; Tyrer, P.

    1981-11-01

    Prestressed concrete girders which are intended for composite construction in bridges and other similar structures are often stored unloaded for some time before being placed in their final positions where top deck is being poured over. During that free storage the girders are subjected to creep and shrinkage which manifests itself through increased upward deformation usually defined as camber. The analytical estimation of this deformation is important as it controls the minimum thickness of the top deck. An attempt was made to correlate on site measurements with continuous computer modeling of the time-dependent behavior using data from recently adopted international standard for concrete structures.

  18. Time dependent modeling of non-LTE plasmas: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    During the period of performance of this contract Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) has aided Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the development of an unclassified modeling tool for studying time evolution of high temperature ionizing and recombining plasmas. This report covers the numerical code developed, (D)ynamic (D)etailed (C)onfiguration (A)ccounting (DDCA), which was written to run on the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center (NMFECC) network as well as the classified Livermore Computer Center (OCTOPUS) network. DDCA is a One-Dimensional (1D) time dependent hydrodynamic model which makes use of the non-LTE detailed atomic physics ionization model DCA. 5 refs

  19. Scattering theory for explicitely time-dependent interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perusch, M.

    1982-01-01

    Multiple ionization of hydrogen atoms has got increased attention in recent years in connection with high-power lasers. Due to the strong external electromagnetic fields, perturbation theory is no longer valid. The expression for the multiple ionization probability contains the projections of the time-dependent Hamilton operators and the Moeller operators. The main point of the present work is a proof of existence and completeness of the Moeller operators. The proof of existence and completeness is given. The final chapter contains a physical interpretation and discussion of the multiple ionization probability. (G.Q.)

  20. An Amplitude Analysis of the Decay B+- -> pi+- pi+- pi-+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-07-11

    The authors present a Dalitz-plot analysis of charmless B{sup {+-}} decays to the final state {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} using 210 fb{sup -1} of data recorded by the BABAR experiment at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV. We measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}) = (16.2 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(770){pi}{sup {+-}}) = (8.8 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.6{sub -0.7}{sup +0.1}) x 10{sup -6}. Measurements of branching fractions for the quasi-two-body decays B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(1450){pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(980){pi}{sup {+-}} and B{sup {+-}} f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup {+-}} are also presented. They observe no charge asymmetries for the above modes, and there is no evidence for the decays B{sup {+-}} {yields} {chi}{sub c0}{pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(1370){pi}{sup {+-}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {sigma}{pi}{sup {+-}}.

  1. Entanglement entropy with a time-dependent Hamiltonian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Allic

    2018-03-01

    The time evolution of entanglement tracks how information propagates in interacting quantum systems. We study entanglement entropy in CFT2 with a time-dependent Hamiltonian. We perturb by operators with time-dependent source functions and use the replica trick to calculate higher-order corrections to entanglement entropy. At first order, we compute the correction due to a metric perturbation in AdS3/CFT2 and find agreement on both sides of the duality. Past first order, we find evidence of a universal structure of entanglement propagation to all orders. The central feature is that interactions entangle unentangled excitations. Entanglement propagates according to "entanglement diagrams," proposed structures that are motivated by accessory spacetime diagrams for real-time perturbation theory. To illustrate the mechanisms involved, we compute higher-order corrections to free fermion entanglement entropy. We identify an unentangled operator, one which does not change the entanglement entropy to any order. Then, we introduce an interaction and find it changes entanglement entropy by entangling the unentangled excitations. The entanglement propagates in line with our conjecture. We compute several entanglement diagrams. We provide tools to simplify the computation of loop entanglement diagrams, which probe UV effects in entanglement propagation in CFT and holography.

  2. Time-dependent strains and stresses in a pumpkin balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerngross, T.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    This paper presents a study of pumpkin-shaped superpressure balloons consisting of gores made from a thin polymeric film attached to high stiffness meridional tendons This type of design is being used for the NASA ULDB balloons The gore film shows considerable time-dependent stress relaxation whereas the behaviour of the tendons is essentially time-independent Upon inflation and pressurization the instantaneous i e linear-elastic strain and stress distributions in the film show significantly higher values in the meridional direction However over time and due to the biaxial visco-elastic stress relaxation of the the gore material the em hoop strains increase and the em meridional stresses decrease whereas the em remaining strain and stress components remain substantially unchanged These results are important for a correct assessment of the structural integrity of a pumpkin balloon in a long-duration mission both in terms of the material performance and the overall stability of the shape of the balloon An experimental investigation of the time dependence of the biaxial strain distribution in the film of a 4 m diameter 48 gore pumpkin balloon is presented The inflated shape of selected gores has been measured using photogrammetry and the time variation in strain components at some particular points of these gores has been measured under constant pressure and temperature The results show good correlation with a numerical study using the ABAQUS finite-element package that includes a widely used model of

  3. Time-dependent patterns in quasivertical cylindrical binary convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Arantxa; Mercader, Isabel; Batiste, Oriol

    2018-02-01

    This paper reports on numerical investigations of the effect of a slight inclination α on pattern formation in a shallow vertical cylindrical cell heated from below for binary mixtures with a positive value of the Soret coefficient. By using direct numerical simulation of the three-dimensional Boussinesq equations with Soret effect in cylindrical geometry, we show that a slight inclination of the cell in the range α ≈0.036 rad =2∘ strongly influences pattern selection. The large-scale shear flow (LSSF) induced by the small tilt of gravity overcomes the squarelike arrangements observed in noninclined cylinders in the Soret regime, stratifies the fluid along the direction of inclination, and produces an enhanced separation of the two components of the mixture. The competition between shear effects and horizontal and vertical buoyancy alters significantly the dynamics observed in noninclined convection. Additional unexpected time-dependent patterns coexist with the basic LSSF. We focus on an unsual periodic state recently discovered in an experiment, the so-called superhighway convection state (SHC), in which ascending and descending regions of fluid move in opposite directions. We provide numerical confirmation that Boussinesq Navier-Stokes equations with standard boundary conditions contain the essential ingredients that allow for the existence of such a state. Also, we obtain a persistent heteroclinic structure where regular oscillations between a SHC pattern and a state of nearly stationary longitudinal rolls take place. We characterize numerically these time-dependent patterns and investigate the dynamics around the threshold of convection.

  4. Time-dependent penetrative mixed convection in a porous layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jendoubi, S.; Kulacki, F.A.

    1997-01-01

    In the last few decades, heat and mass transfer in porous media have been studied extensively by many investigators. The main motivations behind these studies were the wide range of applications and the interaction of multiple processes. Examples include geothermal energy production, drying of porous media, high level nuclear waste disposal, and energy-related engineering technologies. Here, a general two-dimensional, time-dependent model has been developed to investigate the transfer of heat and mass in a liquid saturated porous layer locally heated from above. Both free and mixed convection are considered. For mixed convection an eternal flow is assumed to enter the two-dimensional domain in the horizontal direction. At a finite segment of the top wall, two types of heat sources are applied: a constant flux heat source and a time varying heat, constant flux source. The latter is a representation of heat released by spent nuclear fuel in a mined repository located above the layer. Both time-dependent and steady solutions of the flow and temperature fields are obtained. For natural convection, the effects of Rayleigh number on the Nusselt number are obtained. For mixed convection, the effects of both Rayleigh and Peclet numbers are studied. In addition, the effects of the aspect ratio, as well as the length of the heated zone are examined

  5. On the time-dependent radiative transfer in photospheric plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, A.L.; Schweizer, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The paper is the second of a series investigating time-dependent radiative transfer processes of x-rays in photospheric plasmas. A quantitative discussion is presented of analytical results derived earlier along with a comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. The geometry considered is a homogeneous plasma ball with radius R. The source is concentrated on a concentric shell with radius r 0 < R. Point sources at the centre of the ball or semi-infinite geometries are discussed as limiting cases. Diffusion profiles are given for every scattering order and the total profile appears as the sum over these individual profiles. The comparison with Monte Carlo results is used to test the accuracy of the analytical approach and to adjust the time profiles of the first few scattering orders. The analytical theory yields good results over a wide range of situations. (author)

  6. Parametric Resonance in a Time-Dependent Harmonic Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Nesterov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the phenomenon of appearance of new resonances in a timedependent harmonic oscillator under an oscillatory decreasing force. The studied equation belongs to the class of adiabatic oscillators and arises in connection with the spectral problem for the one-dimensional Schr¨odinger equation with Wigner–von Neumann type potential. We use a specially developed method for asymptotic integration of linear systems of differential equations with oscillatory decreasing coefficients. This method uses the ideas of the averaging method to simplify the initial system. Then we apply Levinson’s fundamental theorem to get the asymptotics for its solutions. Finally, we analyze the features of a parametric resonance phenomenon. The resonant frequencies of perturbation are found and the pointwise type of the parametric resonance phenomenon is established. In conclusion, we construct an example of a time-dependent harmonic oscillator (adiabatic oscillator in which the parametric resonances, mentioned in the paper, may occur.

  7. Fundamental Constants in Physics and their Time Dependence

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    In the Standard Model of Particle Physics we are dealing with 28 fundamental constants. In the experiments these constants can be measured, but theoretically they are not understood. I will discuss these constants, which are mostly mass parameters. Astrophysical measurements indicate that the finestructure constant is not a real constant, but depends on time. Grand unification then implies also a time variation of the QCD scale. Thus the masses of the atomic nuclei and the magnetic moments of the nuclei will depend on time. I proposed an experiment, which is currently done by Prof. Haensch in Munich and his group. The first results indicate a time dependence of the QCD scale. I will discuss the theoretical implications.

  8. Time dependent variation of carrying capacity of prestressed precast beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tuan D.; Konečný, Petr; Matečková, Pavlína

    2018-04-01

    The article deals with the evaluation of the precast concrete element time dependent carrying capacity. The variation of the resistance is inherited property of laboratory as well as in-situ members. Thus the specification of highest, yet possible, laboratory sample resistance is important with respect to evaluation of laboratory experiments based on the test machine loading capabilities. The ultimate capacity is evaluated through the bending moment resistance of a simply supported prestressed concrete beam. The probabilistic assessment is applied. Scatter of random variables of compressive strength of concrete and effective height of the cross section is considered. Monte Carlo simulation technique is used to investigate the performance of the cross section of the beam with changes of tendons’ positions and compressive strength of concrete.

  9. Development of constitutive model for composites exhibiting time dependent properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupure, L; Joffe, R; Varna, J; Nyström, B

    2013-01-01

    Regenerated cellulose fibres and their composites exhibit highly nonlinear behaviour. The mechanical response of these materials can be successfully described by the model developed by Schapery for time-dependent materials. However, this model requires input parameters that are experimentally determined via large number of time-consuming tests on the studied composite material. If, for example, the volume fraction of fibres is changed we have a different material and new series of experiments on this new material are required. Therefore the ultimate objective of our studies is to develop model which determines the composite behaviour based on behaviour of constituents of the composite. This paper gives an overview of problems and difficulties, associated with development, implementation and verification of such model

  10. Monolayer phosphorene under time-dependent magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, J. P. G.; Aguiar, V.; Guedes, I.

    2018-02-01

    We obtain the exact wave function of a monolayer phosphorene under a low-intensity time-dependent magnetic field using the dynamical invariant method. We calculate the quantum-mechanical energy expectation value and the transition probability for a constant and an oscillatory magnetic field. For the former we observe that the Landau level energy varies linearly with the quantum numbers n and m and the magnetic field intensity B0. No transition takes place. For the latter, we observe that the energy oscillates in time, increasing linearly with the Landau level n and m and nonlinearly with the magnetic field. The (k , l) →(n , m) transitions take place only for l = m. We investigate the (0,0) →(n , 0) and (1 , l) and (2 , l) probability transitions.

  11. Two-dimensional time dependent Riemann solvers for neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, Thomas A.; Holloway, James Paul

    2005-01-01

    A two-dimensional Riemann solver is developed for the spherical harmonics approximation to the time dependent neutron transport equation. The eigenstructure of the resulting equations is explored, giving insight into both the spherical harmonics approximation and the Riemann solver. The classic Roe-type Riemann solver used here was developed for one-dimensional problems, but can be used in multidimensional problems by treating each face of a two-dimensional computation cell in a locally one-dimensional way. Several test problems are used to explore the capabilities of both the Riemann solver and the spherical harmonics approximation. The numerical solution for a simple line source problem is compared to the analytic solution to both the P 1 equation and the full transport solution. A lattice problem is used to test the method on a more challenging problem

  12. Stirring inertia in time-dependent low Reynolds number flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yecko, Philip; Luchtenburg, Dirk Martin (Mark); Forgoston, Eric; Billings, Lora

    2017-11-01

    Diagnosis of a kinematic flow and its transport using Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) based on finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) neglects dynamical effects, such as pressure, as well as dynamically important constraints, such as potential vorticity conservation. Chaotic advection, on the other hand, often neglects inertial effects, which are prominent in LCS. We present results for very low Reynolds number laboratory flows, including a Stokes double gyre, vertically sheared strain and a four roll mill. Images of tracer (dye) and FTLE fields computed from particle image velocimetry (PIV) reveal complementary sets of flow structures, giving a more complete picture of transport in these flows. We confirm by computing FTLE of an exact time-dependent Stokes flow solution and present implications of these findings for inertial object transport in flows. Support of NSF DMS-1418956 is gratefully acknoweldged.

  13. Time-Dependent Increase in Network Response to Stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Hamilton

    Full Text Available In vitro neuronal cultures have become a popular method with which to probe network-level neuronal dynamics and phenomena in controlled laboratory settings. One of the key dynamics of interest in these in vitro studies has been the extent to which cultured networks display properties indicative of learning. Here we demonstrate the effects of a high frequency electrical stimulation signal in training cultured networks of cortical neurons. Networks receiving this training signal displayed a time-dependent increase in the response to a low frequency probing stimulation, particularly in the time window of 20-50 ms after stimulation. This increase was found to be statistically significant as compared to control networks that did not receive training. The timing of this increase suggests potentiation of synaptic mechanisms. To further investigate this possibility, we leveraged the powerful Cox statistical connectivity method as previously investigated by our group. This method was used to identify and track changes in network connectivity strength.

  14. Observation of Broadband Time-Dependent Rabi Shifting in Microplasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compton, Ryan; Filin, Alex; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Levis, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Coherent broadband radiation in the form of Rabi sidebands is observed when a ps probe laser propagates through a weakly ionized, electronically excited microplasma generated in the focus of an intense pump beam. The sidebands arise from the interaction of the probe beam with pairs of excited states of a constituent neutral atom via the probe-induced Rabi oscillation. Sideband shifting of >90 meV from the probe carrier frequency results in an effective bandwidth of 200 meV. The sidebands are controlled by the intensity and temporal profile of the probe pulse; with amplitude and shift in agreement with the predictions of a time-dependent generalized Rabi cycling model.

  15. Time-Dependent Topology of Railway Prestressed Concrete Sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Ngamkhanong, Chayut; Kaewunruen, Sakdirat

    2017-10-01

    The railway sleepers are very important component of railway track structure. The sleepers can be manufactured by using timber, concrete, steel or other engineered materials. Nowadays, prestressed concrete has become most commonly used type of sleepers. Prestressed concrete sleepers have longer life-cycle and lower maintenance cost than reinforced concrete sleepers. They are expected to withstand high dynamic loads and harsh environments. However, durability and long-term performance of prestressed concrete sleepers are largely dependent on creep and shrinkage responses. This study investigates the long-term behaviours of prestressed concrete sleepers and proposes the shortening and deflection diagrams. Comparison between design codes of Eurocode 2 and AS3600-2009 provides the insight into the time-dependent performance of prestressed concrete sleepers. The outcome of this paper will improve the rail maintenance and inspection criteria in order to establish appropriate sensible remote track condition monitor network in practice.

  16. Origin of the spike-timing-dependent plasticity rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myoung Won; Choi, M. Y.

    2016-08-01

    A biological synapse changes its efficacy depending on the difference between pre- and post-synaptic spike timings. Formulating spike-timing-dependent interactions in terms of the path integral, we establish a neural-network model, which makes it possible to predict relevant quantities rigorously by means of standard methods in statistical mechanics and field theory. In particular, the biological synaptic plasticity rule is shown to emerge as the optimal form for minimizing the free energy. It is further revealed that maximization of the entropy of neural activities gives rise to the competitive behavior of biological learning. This demonstrates that statistical mechanics helps to understand rigorously key characteristic behaviors of a neural network, thus providing the possibility of physics serving as a useful and relevant framework for probing life.

  17. Spin-orbit torque induced spike-timing dependent plasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Abhronil, E-mail: asengup@purdue.edu; Al Azim, Zubair; Fong, Xuanyao; Roy, Kaushik [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2015-03-02

    Nanoelectronic devices that mimic the functionality of synapses are a crucial requirement for performing cortical simulations of the brain. In this work, we propose a ferromagnet-heavy metal heterostructure that employs spin-orbit torque to implement spike-timing dependent plasticity. The proposed device offers the advantage of decoupled spike transmission and programming current paths, thereby leading to reliable operation during online learning. Possible arrangement of such devices in a crosspoint architecture can pave the way for ultra-dense neural networks. Simulation studies indicate that the device has the potential of achieving pico-Joule level energy consumption (maximum 2 pJ per synaptic event) which is comparable to the energy consumption for synaptic events in biological synapses.

  18. New applications with time-dependent thermochemical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koukkari, P. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Laukkanen, L. [VTT Automation, Espoo (Finland); Penttilae, K. [Kemira Engineering Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    A new method (RATEMIX) to calculate multicomponent chemical reaction mixtures as a series of sequential thermochemical states was recently introduced. The procedure combines multicomponent thermodynamics with chemical kinetics and may be used to simulate the multicomponent reactors as a thermochemical natural process. The method combines the desired reaction rates sequentially with constrained Gibbs energy minimization. The reactant concentrations are determined by the experimental (Arrhenius) rate laws. During the course of the given reaction the subsequent side reactions are supposed to occur reversibly. At every sequential stage of the given reaction the temperature and composition of the reaction mixture are calculated by a thermodynamic subroutine, which minimizes the Gibbs energy of the system and takes into account the heat transfer between the system and its surroundings. The extents of reaction are included as algorithmic constraints in the Gibbs energy minimization procedure. Initially, the reactants are introduced to the system as inert copies to match both the mass and energy balance of the reactive system. During the calculation the copies are sequentially interchanged to the actual reactants which allows one to simulate the time-dependent reaction route by using the thermochemical procedure. For each intermediate stage, the temperature and composition are calculated and as well numerical estimates of the thermodynamic functions are obtained. The method is applicable in processes where the core thermodynamic and kinetic data of the system are known and the time-dependent heat transfer data can either be measured or estimated by calculation. The method has been used to simulate e.g. high temperature flame reactions, zinc vapour oxidation and a counter-current rotary drum with chemical reactions. The procedure has today been tested with SOLGASMIX, CHEMSAGE and HSC programs. (author)

  19. Time-dependent degenerative transformations in the lipidome of chalazia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Jadwiga C; Butovich, Igor A; McMahon, Anne; Hogan, Robert N; Itani, Kamel M; Mancini, Ronald; Molai, Mike; Linsenbardt, Emily

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to conduct histopathologic and lipidomic analyses of chalazia, in order to evaluate time-dependent changes in the lesion. Samples of surgically excised chalazia were collected over a period of 12 months from 10 patients (mean age 41 years; range, 23-58) with clinically diagnosed chalazia, who underwent scheduled surgery. The ages of chalazia varied from 2 to 28 weeks. To confirm the clinical diagnoses, the morphology of collected tissue samples was evaluated histologically after hematoxylin and eosin staining. The lipids from individual chalazia were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared with authentic lipid standards and with the lipids of meibum collected from normal controls. We observed gradual, lesion age-dependent transformation of the lipidome of chalazia from an almost normal meibum-like composition to a very different kind of lipidome. A rapid initial increase in the free cholesterol content was followed by a gradual replacement of extremely long chain meibomian-type lipids with a mixture of shorter-chain cholesteryl esters of the C14-C18 family, triacylglycerols, ceramides, phospholipids and sphingomyelins. In addition, a rapid disappearance of wax esters and cholesteryl esters of (1-O)-acyl-omega-hydroxy fatty acids from the lipidome of aging chalazia was observed. Our results are indicative of dramatic, time-dependent changes in the lesion that may involve cholesterol as a trigger and/or a marker of subsequent degeneration of the meibomian lipidome. We hypothesize that early inhibition of these transformations may be useful in reversing the course of the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Spike-timing dependent plasticity in the striatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Fino

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The striatum is the major input nucleus of basal ganglia, an ensemble of interconnected sub-cortical nuclei associated with fundamental processes of action-selection and procedural learning and memory. The striatum receives afferents from the cerebral cortex and the thalamus. In turn, it relays the integrated information towards the basal ganglia output nuclei through which it operates a selected activation of behavioral effectors. The striatal output neurons, the GABAergic medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs, are in charge of the detection and integration of behaviorally relevant information. This property confers to the striatum the ability to extract relevant information from the background noise and select cognitive-motor sequences adapted to environmental stimuli. As long-term synaptic efficacy changes are believed to underlie learning and memory, the corticostriatal long-term plasticity provides a fundamental mechanism for the function of the basal ganglia in procedural learning. Here, we reviewed the different forms of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP occurring at corticostriatal synapses. Most of the studies have focused on MSNs and their ability to develop long-term plasticity. Nevertheless, the striatal interneurons (the fast-spiking GABAergic, the NO synthase and cholinergic interneurons also receive monosynaptic afferents from the cortex and tightly regulated corticostriatal information processing. Therefore, it is important to take into account the variety of striatal neurons to fully understand the ability of striatum to develop long-term plasticity. Corticostriatal STDP with various spike-timing dependence have been observed depending on the neuronal sub-populations and experimental conditions. This complexity highlights the extraordinary potentiality in term of plasticity of the corticostriatal pathway.

  1. Implicit time-dependent finite different algorithm for quench simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, Norikiyo; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Tsuji, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1994-12-01

    A magnet in a fusion machine has many difficulties in its application because of requirement of a large operating current, high operating field and high breakdown voltage. A cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor is the best candidate to overcome these difficulties. However, there remained uncertainty in a quench event in the cable-in-conduit conductor because of a difficulty to analyze a fluid dynamics equation. Several scientists, then, developed the numerical code for the quench simulation. However, most of them were based on an explicit time-dependent finite difference scheme. In this scheme, a discrete time increment is strictly restricted by CFL (Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy) condition. Therefore, long CPU time was consumed for the quench simulation. Authors, then, developed a new quench simulation code, POCHI1, which is based on an implicit time dependent scheme. In POCHI1, the fluid dynamics equation is linearlized according to a procedure applied by Beam and Warming and then, a tridiagonal system can be offered. Therefore, no iteration is necessary to solve the fluid dynamics equation. This leads great reduction of the CPU time. Also, POCHI1 can cope with non-linear boundary condition. In this study, comparison with experimental results was carried out. The normal zone propagation behavior was investigated in two samples of CIC conductors which had different hydraulic diameters. The measured and simulated normal zone propagation length showed relatively good agreement. However, the behavior of the normal voltage shows a little disagreement. These results indicate necessity to improve the treatment of the heat transfer coefficient in the turbulent flow region and the electric resistivity of the copper stabilizer in high temperature and high field region. (author).

  2. Implicit time-dependent finite different algorithm for quench simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Norikiyo; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    1994-12-01

    A magnet in a fusion machine has many difficulties in its application because of requirement of a large operating current, high operating field and high breakdown voltage. A cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor is the best candidate to overcome these difficulties. However, there remained uncertainty in a quench event in the cable-in-conduit conductor because of a difficulty to analyze a fluid dynamics equation. Several scientists, then, developed the numerical code for the quench simulation. However, most of them were based on an explicit time-dependent finite difference scheme. In this scheme, a discrete time increment is strictly restricted by CFL (Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy) condition. Therefore, long CPU time was consumed for the quench simulation. Authors, then, developed a new quench simulation code, POCHI1, which is based on an implicit time dependent scheme. In POCHI1, the fluid dynamics equation is linearlized according to a procedure applied by Beam and Warming and then, a tridiagonal system can be offered. Therefore, no iteration is necessary to solve the fluid dynamics equation. This leads great reduction of the CPU time. Also, POCHI1 can cope with non-linear boundary condition. In this study, comparison with experimental results was carried out. The normal zone propagation behavior was investigated in two samples of CIC conductors which had different hydraulic diameters. The measured and simulated normal zone propagation length showed relatively good agreement. However, the behavior of the normal voltage shows a little disagreement. These results indicate necessity to improve the treatment of the heat transfer coefficient in the turbulent flow region and the electric resistivity of the copper stabilizer in high temperature and high field region. (author)

  3. The Bloch wave operator: generalizations and applications: II. The time-dependent case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolicard, Georges [Observatoire de Besancon (UMR-CNRS 6091), Universite de Franche-Comte, 41 bis, Avenue de l' Observatoire, 25000 Besancon (France); Killingbeck, John P [Observatoire de Besancon (UMR-CNRS 6091), Universite de Franche-Comte, 41 bis, Avenue de l' Observatoire, 25000 Besancon (France); Mathematics Department, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX (United Kingdom)

    2003-10-10

    Part II of the review shows how the stationary Bloch wave operator of part I can be suitably modified to give a time-dependent wave operator. This operator makes it possible to use a relatively small active space in order to describe the dynamical processes which occur in quantum mechanical systems which have a time-dependent Hamiltonian. A close study is made of the links between the time-dependent and time-independent wave operators at the adiabatic limit; the analysis clarifies the way in which the wave operator formalism allows the time evolution of a system or a wave packet to be described in terms of a fast evolution inside the active space together with weak transitions out of this space which can be treated by perturbation methods. Two alternative wave operator equations of motion are derived and analysed. The first one is a non-linear differential equation in the usual Hilbert space; the second one is a differential equation in an extended Hilbert space with an extra time variable added and becomes equivalent to the usual Bloch equation when the Floquet Hamiltonian is taken in place of the ordinary Hamiltonian. A study is made of the close relationships between the time-dependent wave operator formalism, the Floquet theory and the (t, t') theory. Some original methods of solution of the two forms of wave operator equation are proposed and lead to new techniques of integration for the time-dependent Schroedinger equation (e.g., the generalized Green equation procedure). Mixed procedures involving both the time-independent and time-dependent wave operators are shown to be applicable to the internal eigenstate problem for large complex matrices. A detailed account is given of the description of inelastic and photoreactive processes by means of the time-dependent wave operator formalism, with particular attention to laser-molecule interactions. The emphasis is on projection operator techniques, with special attention being given to the method of selection

  4. Interplay between chaotic and regular motion in a time-dependent barred galaxy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manos, T.; Bountis, T.; Skokos, Ch

    2013-06-01

    We study the distinction and quantification of chaotic and regular motion in a time-dependent Hamiltonian barred galaxy model. Recently, a strong correlation was found between the strength of the bar and the presence of chaotic motion in this system, as models with relatively strong bars were shown to exhibit stronger chaotic behavior compared to those having a weaker bar component. Here, we attempt to further explore this connection by studying the interplay between chaotic and regular behavior of star orbits when the parameters of the model evolve in time. This happens for example when one introduces linear time dependence in the mass parameters of the model to mimic, in some general sense, the effect of self-consistent interactions of the actual N-body problem. We thus observe, in this simple time-dependent model also, that the increase of the bar’s mass leads to an increase of the system’s chaoticity. We propose a new way of using the generalized alignment index (GALI) method as a reliable criterion to estimate the relative fraction of chaotic versus regular orbits in such time-dependent potentials, which proves to be much more efficient than the computation of Lyapunov exponents. In particular, GALI is able to capture subtle changes in the nature of an orbit (or ensemble of orbits) even for relatively small time intervals, which makes it ideal for detecting dynamical transitions in time-dependent systems. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Lyapunov analysis: from dynamical systems theory to applications’.

  5. Theoretical study of time-dependent, ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, we present a numerical study of the temporal buildup and decay of unsteady acoustic fields and acoustic streaming flows actuated by vibrating walls in the transverse cross-sectional plane of a long straight microchannel under adiabatic...... conditions and assuming temperature-independent material parameters. The unsteady streaming flow is obtained by averaging the time-dependent velocity field over one oscillation period, and as time increases, it is shown to converge towards the well-known steady time-averaged solution calculated...... in the frequency domain. Scaling analysis reveals that the acoustic resonance builds up much faster than the acoustic streaming, implying that the radiation force may dominate over the drag force from streaming even for small particles. However, our numerical time-dependent analysis indicates that pulsed actuation...

  6. A method for untriggered time-dependent searches for multiple flares from neutrino point sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gora, D.; Bernardini, E.; Cruz Silva, A.H.

    2011-04-01

    A method for a time-dependent search for flaring astrophysical sources which can be potentially detected by large neutrino experiments is presented. The method uses a time-clustering algorithm combined with an unbinned likelihood procedure. By including in the likelihood function a signal term which describes the contribution of many small clusters of signal-like events, this method provides an effective way for looking for weak neutrino flares over different time-scales. The method is sensitive to an overall excess of events distributed over several flares which are not individually detectable. For standard cases (one flare) the discovery potential of the method is worse than a standard time-dependent point source analysis with unknown duration of the flare by a factor depending on the signal-to-background level. However, for flares sufficiently shorter than the total observation period, the method is more sensitive than a time-integrated analysis. (orig.)

  7. A method for untriggered time-dependent searches for multiple flares from neutrino point sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gora, D. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Cracow (Poland); Bernardini, E.; Cruz Silva, A.H. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Cracow (Poland)

    2011-04-15

    A method for a time-dependent search for flaring astrophysical sources which can be potentially detected by large neutrino experiments is presented. The method uses a time-clustering algorithm combined with an unbinned likelihood procedure. By including in the likelihood function a signal term which describes the contribution of many small clusters of signal-like events, this method provides an effective way for looking for weak neutrino flares over different time-scales. The method is sensitive to an overall excess of events distributed over several flares which are not individually detectable. For standard cases (one flare) the discovery potential of the method is worse than a standard time-dependent point source analysis with unknown duration of the flare by a factor depending on the signal-to-background level. However, for flares sufficiently shorter than the total observation period, the method is more sensitive than a time-integrated analysis. (orig.)

  8. Analysis of the resonant components in $\\overline{B}^0 \\to J/\\psi \\pi^+ \\pi^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Dogaru, M; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nisar, S; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    Interpretation of CP violation measurements using charmonium decays, in both the B0 and Bs systems, can be subject to changes due to "penguin" type diagrams. These effects can be investigated using measurements of the Cabibbo-suppressed B0->J/\\psi pi+pi- decays. The final state composition of this channel is investigated using a 1.0/fb sample of data produced in 7 TeV pp collisions at the LHC and collected by the LHCb experiment. A modified Dalitz plot analysis is performed using both the invariant mass spectra and the decay angular distributions. An improved measurement of the B0->J/\\psi pi+pi- branching fraction of (3.97 +/-0.09+/- 0.11 +/- 0.16)x10^{-5} is reported where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic and the third is due to the uncertainty of the branching fraction of the decay B- -> J/\\psi K- used as a normalization channel. In the J/\\psi pi+pi- final state significant production of f0(500) and rho(770) resonances is found, both of which can be used for CP violation studie...

  9. Time-dependent histamine release from stored human blood products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Edvardsen, L; Vangsgaard, K

    1996-01-01

    storage. Whole blood (six units), plasma-reduced whole blood (six units), and plasma- and buffy coat-reduced (saline-adenine-glucose-mannitol) (SAGM) blood (six units) from unpaid healthy donors were stored in the blood bank for 35 days at 4 degrees C. Plasma histamine and total cell-bound histamine.......0 (range 176.0-910.0) nmol/l in whole blood and 475.0 (range 360.0-1560.0) nmol/l in plasma-reduced whole blood, while it was undetectable in SAGM blood. Spontaneous histamine release increased in a time-dependent manner from a median of 6.7 (range 2.2-17.4) nmol/l at the time of storage to 175.0 (range 33.......0-485.0) nmol/l at day 35 in whole blood, from 18.8 (range 8.2-38.5) to 328.5 (range 224.0-1137.0) nmol/l in plasma-reduced whole blood, and from 0.5 (range 0.5-1.5) to 2.2 (range 1.4-6.9) nmol/l in SAGM blood. These results show spontaneous histamine release during storage of human blood products which contain...

  10. Investigating the time-dependent zeta potential of wood surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muff, Livius F; Luxbacher, Thomas; Burgert, Ingo; Michen, Benjamin

    2018-05-15

    This work reports on streaming potential measurements through natural capillaries in wood and investigates the cause of a time-dependent zeta potential measured during the equilibration of wood cell-walls with an electrolyte solution. For the biomaterial, this equilibration phase takes several hours, which is much longer than for many other materials that have been characterized by electrokinetic measurements. During this equilibration phase the zeta potential magnitude is decaying due to two parallel mechanisms: (i) the swelling of the cell-wall which causes a dimensional change reducing the charge density at the capillary interface; (ii) the transport of ions from the electrolyte solution into the permeable cell-wall which alters the electrical potential at the interface by internal charge compensation. The obtained results demonstrate the importance of equilibration kinetics for an accurate determination of the zeta potential, especially for materials that interact strongly with the measurement electrolyte. Moreover, the change in zeta potential with time can be correlated with the bulk swelling of wood if the effect of electrolyte ion diffusion is excluded. This study shows the potential of streaming potential measurements of wood, and possibly of other hygroscopic and nanoporous materials, to reveal kinetic information about their interaction with liquids, such as swelling and ion uptake. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Supersymmetric gauge theory with space-time-dependent couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaewang; Fernández-Melgarejo, José J.; Sugimoto, Shigeki

    2018-01-01

    We study deformations of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory with couplings and masses depending on space-time. The conditions to preserve part of the supersymmetry are derived and a lot of solutions of these conditions are found. The main example is the case with ISO(1,1)× SO(3)× SO(3) symmetry, in which couplings, as well as masses and the theta parameter, can depend on two spatial coordinates. In the case in which ISO(1,1) is enhanced to ISO(1,2), it reproduces the supersymmetric Janus configuration found by Gaiotto and Witten [J. High Energy Phys. 06, 097 (2010)]. When SO(3)× SO(3) is enhanced to SO(6), it agrees with the world-volume theory of D3-branes embedded in F-theory (a background with 7-branes in type IIB string theory). We have also found the general solution of the supersymmetry conditions for the cases with ISO(1,1)× SO(2)× SO(4) symmetry. Cases with time-dependent couplings and/or masses are also considered.

  12. submitter Time-dependent CP violation in charm mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Inguglia, Gianluca

    CP violation is a well established phenomenon for B and K mesons, but for D0 mesons, bound states made up of a quark-antiquark pair containing a charm quark, a conclusive answer to the question whether there is CP vio- lation or not, has yet to be determined. I show here the phenomenology of time-dependent CP asymmetries in charm decays, and discuss the implica- tions of experimental tests aimed at the measurement of CP violation in the interference between mixing and decays of charm mesons, in particular when studying the decay channels D0 ! h+h (h = K; ). The decay channels considered can also be used to constrain quantities that are poorly measured or still to be investigated, such as MIX and c;eff , provided that the e ects of penguin pollution are ignored. I considered correlated production of D0 mesons at the SuperB experiment and its planned asymmetric run at the charm threshold and performed a study of simulated events, nding that a boost factor = 0:28 would not be su cient to produce competitive re- ...

  13. Residual distribution for general time-dependent conservation laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricchiuto, Mario; Csik, Arpad; Deconinck, Herman

    2005-01-01

    We consider the second-order accurate numerical solution of general time-dependent hyperbolic conservation laws over unstructured grids in the framework of the Residual Distribution method. In order to achieve full conservation of the linear, monotone and first-order space-time schemes of (Csik et al., 2003) and (Abgrall et al., 2000), we extend the conservative residual distribution (CRD) formulation of (Csik et al., 2002) to prismatic space-time elements. We then study the design of second-order accurate and monotone schemes via the nonlinear mapping of the local residuals of linear monotone schemes. We derive sufficient and necessary conditions for the well-posedness of the mapping. We prove that the schemes obtained with the CRD formulation satisfy these conditions by construction. Thus the nonlinear schemes proposed in this paper are always well defined. The performance of the linear and nonlinear schemes are evaluated on a series of test problems involving the solution of the Euler equations and of a two-phase flow model. We consider the resolution of strong shocks and complex interacting flow structures. The results demonstrate the robustness, accuracy and non-oscillatory character of the proposed schemes. d schemes

  14. Time-dependent effect in green synthesis of silver nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darroudi M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Majid Darroudi1,2, Mansor Bin Ahmad3, Reza Zamiri4, AK Zak5, Abdul Halim Abdullah1,3, Nor Azowa Ibrahim31Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Institute of Advanced Technology (ITMA, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 2Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran; 3Department of Chemistry, 4Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 5Low Dimensional Materials Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaAbstract: The application of “green” chemistry rules to nanoscience and nanotechnology is very important in the preparation of various nanomaterials. In this work, we successfully developed an eco-friendly chemistry method for preparing silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs in natural polymeric media. The colloidal Ag-NPs were synthesized in an aqueous solution using silver nitrate, gelatin, and glucose as a silver precursor, stabilizer, and reducing agent, respectively. The properties of synthesized colloidal Ag-NPs were studied at different reaction times. The ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis spectra were in excellent agreement with the obtained nanostructure studies performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and their size distributions. The prepared samples were also characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The use of eco-friendly reagents, such as gelatin and glucose, provides green and economic attributes to this work.Keywords: silver nanoparticles, gelatin, green chemistry, time-dependent effect, ultraviolet-visible spectra

  15. Transient fluctuation relations for time-dependent particle transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altland, Alexander; de Martino, Alessandro; Egger, Reinhold; Narozhny, Boris

    2010-09-01

    We consider particle transport under the influence of time-varying driving forces, where fluctuation relations connect the statistics of pairs of time-reversed evolutions of physical observables. In many “mesoscopic” transport processes, the effective many-particle dynamics is dominantly classical while the microscopic rates governing particle motion are of quantum-mechanical origin. We here employ the stochastic path-integral approach as an optimal tool to probe the fluctuation statistics in such applications. Describing the classical limit of the Keldysh quantum nonequilibrium field theory, the stochastic path integral encapsulates the quantum origin of microscopic particle exchange rates. Dynamically, it is equivalent to a transport master equation which is a formalism general enough to describe many applications of practical interest. We apply the stochastic path integral to derive general functional fluctuation relations for current flow induced by time-varying forces. We show that the successive measurement processes implied by this setup do not put the derivation of quantum fluctuation relations in jeopardy. While in many cases the fluctuation relation for a full time-dependent current profile may contain excessive information, we formulate a number of reduced relations, and demonstrate their application to mesoscopic transport. Examples include the distribution of transmitted charge, where we show that the derivation of a fluctuation relation requires the combined monitoring of the statistics of charge and work.

  16. Time-dependent motor properties of multipedal molecular spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samii, Laleh; Blab, Gerhard A; Bromley, Elizabeth H C; Linke, Heiner; Curmi, Paul M G; Zuckermann, Martin J; Forde, Nancy R

    2011-09-01

    Molecular spiders are synthetic biomolecular walkers that use the asymmetry resulting from cleavage of their tracks to bias the direction of their stepping motion. Using Monte Carlo simulations that implement the Gillespie algorithm, we investigate the dependence of the biased motion of molecular spiders, along with binding time and processivity, on tunable experimental parameters, such as number of legs, span between the legs, and unbinding rate of a leg from a substrate site. We find that an increase in the number of legs increases the spiders' processivity and binding time but not their mean velocity. However, we can increase the mean velocity of spiders with simultaneous tuning of the span and the unbinding rate of a spider leg from a substrate site. To study the efficiency of molecular spiders, we introduce a time-dependent expression for the thermodynamic efficiency of a molecular motor, allowing us to account for the behavior of spider populations as a function of time. Based on this definition, we find that spiders exhibit transient motor function over time scales of many hours and have a maximum efficiency on the order of 1%, weak compared to other types of molecular motors.

  17. Analysis of the resonant components in $\\overline{B}^0_s \\to J/\\psi\\pi^+\\pi^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2012-01-01

    The decay $B^0_s \\to J/\\psi\\pi^+\\pi^-$ can be exploited to study $CP$ violation. A detailed understanding of its structure is imperative in order to optimize its usefulness. An analysis of this three-body final state is performed using a 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ sample of data produced in 7 TeV $pp$ collisions at the LHC and collected by the LHCb experiment. A modified Dalitz plot analysis of the final state is performed using both the invariant mass spectra and the decay angular distributions. The $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ system is shown to be dominantly in an S-wave state, and the $CP$-odd fraction in this $B^0_s$ decay is shown to be greater than 0.977 at 95\\% confidence level. In addition, we report the first measurement of the $J/\\psi\\pi^+\\pi^-$ branching fraction relative to $J/\\psi\\phi$ of $(21.28 \\pm 0.51 \\pm 0.56)\\%$.

  18. Amplitude analysis and the branching fraction measurement of $\\bar{B}^0_s \\to J/\\psi K^+K^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Dogaru, M; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nisar, S; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    An amplitude analysis of the final state structure in the $\\overline{B}_s^0 \\to J/\\psi K^+K^-$ decay mode is performed using $1.0~\\rm fb^{-1}$ of data collected by the LHCb experiment in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy $pp$ collisions produced by the LHC. A modified Dalitz plot analysis of the final state is performed using both the invariant mass spectra and the decay angular distributions. Resonant structures are observed in the $K^+K^-$ mass spectrum as well as a significant non-resonant S-wave contribution. The largest resonant component is the $\\phi(1020)$, accompanied by $f_0(980)$, $f_2'(1525)$, and four additional resonances. The overall branching fraction is measured to be $\\mathcal{B}(\\overline{B}_s^0 \\to J/\\psi K^+K^-)=(7.70\\pm0.08\\pm 0.39\\pm 0.60)\\times 10^{-4}$, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second systematic, and the third due to the ratio of the number of $\\overline{B}_s^0$ to $B^-$ mesons produced. The mass and width of the $ f_2'(1525)$ are measured to be $1522.2\\pm 2.8^{+5....

  19. Multiconfiguration hartree-fock theory for pseudorelativistic systems: The time-dependent case

    KAUST Repository

    Hajaiej, Hichem

    2014-03-01

    In [Setting and analysis of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree-Fock equations, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 198 (2010) 273-330] the third author has studied in collaboration with Bardos, Catto and Mauser the nonrelativistic multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock system of equations arising in the modeling of molecular dynamics. In this paper, we extend the previous work to the case of pseudorelativistic atoms. We show the existence and the uniqueness of global-in-time solution to the underlying system under technical assumptions on the energy of the initial data and the charge of the nucleus. Moreover, we prove that the result can be extended to the case of neutron stars when the number of electrons is less than a critical number N cr. © 2014 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  20. Effects of time-dependent diffusion behaviors on the rumor spreading in social networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Laijun; Wang, Jiajia; Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Qin

    2016-01-01

    When considering roles of realistic external forces (e.g. authorities) and internal forces (e.g. the forgetting nature of human), diffusion behaviors like spreading, stifling and forgetting behaviors are time-dependent. They were incorporated in an SIR-like rumor spreading model to investigate the effects to rumor spreading dynamics. Mean-field equations were derived, and the steady state analysis was conducted. Simulations were carried out on different complex networks. We demonstrated that the combination of the three variable diffusion behaviors provides a faster and larger spreading expansion capacity. Network structure matters considerably in rumor spreading dynamics. - Highlights: • We incorporate time-dependent diffusion behaviors into a SIR-like rumor spreading model. • The combination of the three variable diffusion behaviors provides a faster and larger spreading expansion capacity. • Network structure matters considerably in rumor spreading dynamics.

  1. Effects of time-dependent diffusion behaviors on the rumor spreading in social networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Xiaoyan [School of Management, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Zhao, Laijun, E-mail: ljzhao70@sjtu.edu.cn [Sino–US Global Logistics Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Antai College of Economics and Management, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200052 (China); Wang, Jiajia [Sino–US Global Logistics Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Antai College of Economics and Management, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200052 (China); Wang, Xiaoli [School of Management, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China); Wang, Qin [College of Transport & Communications, Shanghai Maritime University, Shanghai 201306 (China)

    2016-05-27

    When considering roles of realistic external forces (e.g. authorities) and internal forces (e.g. the forgetting nature of human), diffusion behaviors like spreading, stifling and forgetting behaviors are time-dependent. They were incorporated in an SIR-like rumor spreading model to investigate the effects to rumor spreading dynamics. Mean-field equations were derived, and the steady state analysis was conducted. Simulations were carried out on different complex networks. We demonstrated that the combination of the three variable diffusion behaviors provides a faster and larger spreading expansion capacity. Network structure matters considerably in rumor spreading dynamics. - Highlights: • We incorporate time-dependent diffusion behaviors into a SIR-like rumor spreading model. • The combination of the three variable diffusion behaviors provides a faster and larger spreading expansion capacity. • Network structure matters considerably in rumor spreading dynamics.

  2. BINARY: an optical freezing array for assessing temperature and time dependence of heterogeneous ice nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Budke

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A new optical freezing array for the study of heterogeneous ice nucleation in microliter-sized droplets is introduced, tested and applied to the study of immersion freezing in aqueous Snomax® suspensions. In the Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARraY (BINARY ice nucleation can be studied simultaneously in 36 droplets at temperatures down to −40 °C (233 K and at cooling rates between 0.1 and 10 K min−1. The droplets are separated from each other in individual compartments, thus preventing a Wegener–Bergeron–Findeisen type water vapor transfer between droplets as well as avoiding the seeding of neighboring droplets by formation and surface growth of frost halos. Analysis of freezing and melting occurs via an automated real-time image analysis of the optical brightness of each individual droplet. As an application ice nucleation in water droplets containing Snomax® at concentrations from 1 ng mL−1 to 1 mg mL−1 was investigated. Using different cooling rates, a small time dependence of ice nucleation induced by two different classes of ice nucleators (INs contained in Snomax® was detected and the corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient was quantified. The observed time dependence is smaller than those of other types of INs reported in the literature, suggesting that the BINARY setup is suitable for quantifying time dependence for most other INs of atmospheric interest, making it a useful tool for future investigations.

  3. Nonlinear wave time dependent dynamic evolution in solar flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedun, V.; Erdelyi, R.

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the excitation, time dependent dynamic evolution and interaction of weakly nonlinear propagating (i.e. solitary) waves on vertical cylindrical magnetic flux tubes in a compressible solar atmospheric plasma. The axisymmetric flux tube has a field strength of 1000 G at its footpoint what is typical for photospheric regions. Solitons are excited by a footpoint driver. The propagation of the nonlinear signal is investigated by solving numerically a set of fully nonlinear 2D MHD equations in cylindrical coordinates. For the initial conditions the solutions of the linear dispersion relation for wave modes (in the present case we focus on the sausage mode) in a magnetic flux tube is applied. This dispersion relation is solved numerically for a range of plasma parameters. We compare our results with the works of Roberts [1], Wilson [2] (dispersion relation), Molotovshchikov [3] (nonlinear slow sausage waves) and Weisshaar [4] (numerical solutions of the Leibovich-Prichard-Roberts equation). (1) We found solitary solutions and investigate solitary propagating with external sound speed by solving the full MHD equations. (2) We also found a solitary wave propagating with the tube speed. A natural application of our studies may be spicule formation in the chromosphere, as suggested by Roberts [5], where it was demonstrated theoretically, that a solar photospheric magnetic flux tube can support the propagation of solitons governed by the Benjamin-Ono (slow mode) equations. Future possible improvements in modeling and the relevance of the photospheric chromospheric transition region coupling by spicules is suggested. [1] B. Roberts and A. Webb, Sol. Phys., 1978, v. 56, p. 5 [2] P.R. Wilson, Astron. Astrophys., 1980, v. 87, p. 121 [3] A.L. Molotovshchikov and M.S. Ruderman, Sol. Phys., 1987, v. 109, p. 247 [4] E. Weisshaar, Phys. Fluids A, 1989, v. 1(8), p. 1406 [5] B. Roberts and A. Mangeney, Royal Astronomical Society, Monthly

  4. Spike-timing dependent plasticity and the cognitive map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eBush

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of place cells – single pyramidal neurons that encode spatial location – it has been hypothesised that the hippocampus may act as a cognitive map of known environments. This putative function has been extensively modelled using auto-associative networks, which utilise rate-coded synaptic plasticity rules in order to generate strong bi-directional connections between concurrently active place cells that encode for neighbouring place fields. However, empirical studies using hippocampal cultures have demonstrated that the magnitude and direction of changes in synaptic strength can also be dictated by the relative timing of pre- and post- synaptic firing according to a spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP rule. Furthermore, electrophysiology studies have identified persistent ‘theta-coded’ temporal correlations in place cell activity in vivo, characterised by phase precession of firing as the corresponding place field is traversed. It is not yet clear if STDP and theta-coded neural dynamics are compatible with cognitive map theory and previous rate-coded models of spatial learning in the hippocampus. Here, we demonstrate that an STDP rule based on empirical data obtained from the hippocampus can mediate rate-coded Hebbian learning when pre- and post- synaptic activity is stochastic and has no persistent sequence bias. We subsequently demonstrate that a spiking recurrent neural network that utilises this STDP rule, alongside theta-coded neural activity, allows the rapid development of a cognitive map during directed or random exploration of an environment of overlapping place fields. Hence, we establish that STDP and phase precession are compatible with rate-coded models of cognitive map development.

  5. Time dependence of microsecond intense electron beam transport in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucey, R.F. Jr.; Gilgenback, R.M.; Tucker, J.E.; Brake, M.L.; Enloe, C.L.; Repetti, T.E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present results of long-pulse (0.5 μs) electron beam propagation in the ion focused regime (IFR). Electron beam parameters are 800 kV with several hundred amperes injected current. For injection into air (from 0.7 mTorr to 75 mTorr) and helium (from 14 mTorr to 227 mTorr) the authors observe a ''time-dependent propagation window'' in which efficient (up to 100%) propagation starts at a time comparable to the electron impact ionization time needed to achieve n/sub i/ -- (1/γ/sup 2/)n/sub eb/. The transport goes abruptly to zero about 50-150 ns after this initial propagation. This is followed by erratic propagation often consisting of numerous narrower pulses 10-40 ns wide. In these pulses the transported current can be 100% of the injected current, but is generally lower. As the fill pressure is increased, there are differences in the propagated beam pulse, which can be summarized as follows: 1) the temporal occurrence of the beam propagation window shifts to earlier times, 2) the propagated beam current has much faster risetimes, 3) a larger portion of the injected beam is propagated. Similar results are observed when the electron beam is propagated in helium. However, at a given pressure, the beam transport window occurs at later times and exhibits a slower risetime. These effects are consistent with electron beam-induced ionization. Experiments are being performed to determine if the observed beam instability is due to the ion hose instability or streaming instability

  6. Solving the time dependent vehicle routing problem by metaheuristic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Farhana; Potts, Chris; Bennell, Julia

    2015-02-01

    The problem we consider in this study is Time Dependent Vehicle Routing Problem (TDVRP) which has been categorized as non-classical VRP. It is motivated by the fact that multinational companies are currently not only manufacturing the demanded products but also distributing them to the customer location. This implies an efficient synchronization of production and distribution activities. Hence, this study will look into the routing of vehicles which departs from the depot at varies time due to the variation in manufacturing process. We consider a single production line where demanded products are being process one at a time once orders have been received from the customers. It is assumed that order released from the production line will be loaded into scheduled vehicle which ready to be delivered. However, the delivery could only be done once all orders scheduled in the vehicle have been released from the production line. Therefore, there could be lateness on the delivery process from awaiting all customers' order of the route to be released. Our objective is to determine a schedule for vehicle routing that minimizes the solution cost including the travelling and tardiness cost. A mathematical formulation is developed to represent the problem and will be solved by two metaheuristics; Variable Neighborhood Search (VNS) and Tabu Search (TS). These algorithms will be coded in C ++ programming and run using 56's Solomon instances with some modification. The outcome of this experiment can be interpreted as the quality criteria of the different approximation methods. The comparison done shown that VNS gave the better results while consuming reasonable computational efforts.

  7. Pharmacokinetics: time-dependent changes--autoinduction of carbamazepine epoxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertilsson, L.; Tomson, T.; Tybring, G.

    1986-01-01

    Drugs labeled with stable isotopes have been useful to study time-dependent changes in kinetics. Early studies suggested that carbamazepine (CBZ) may induce its own metabolism, but this could not be proved until tetradeuterium-labeled CBZ (CBZ-D4) was synthesized and then given to patients. CBZ-D4 was administered to three children during long-term treatment of epilepsy with CBZ. After 17 to 32 days of treatment, the plasma clearance of CBZ-D4 was doubled, but during the next four months, there was no further increase, indicating that autoinduction was complete within one month. Two patients with chronic alcoholism were treated with CBZ for five days. Half of the first dose of 600 mg was comprised of CBZ-D4. The half-life of this CBZ-D4 dose in the two patients (20 and 26 hr, respectively) was similar to the post-steady-state half-life of CBZ (23 hr in both patients) measured later. A single dose of CBZ given one week after the last maintenance dose had a longer half-life (46 and 45 hr, respectively), which probably is close to the disposition of the drug before starting the treatment with CBZ. This shows that autoinduction of CBZ metabolism was completed during the very first doses of CBZ. Autoinduction also disappeared rapidly after stopping the treatment. We have shown that it is mainly the epoxide-diol pathway that is induced, both during autoinduction and after induction with other antiepileptic agents

  8. Riccati and Ermakov Equations in Time-Dependent and Time-Independent Quantum Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Schuch

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The time-evolution of the maximum and the width of exact analytic wave packet (WP solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (SE represents the particle and wave aspects, respectively, of the quantum system. The dynamics of the maximum, located at the mean value of position, is governed by the Newtonian equation of the corresponding classical problem. The width, which is directly proportional to the position uncertainty, obeys a complex nonlinear Riccati equation which can be transformed into a real nonlinear Ermakov equation. The coupled pair of these equations yields a dynamical invariant which plays a key role in our investigation. It can be expressed in terms of a complex variable that linearizes the Riccati equation. This variable also provides the time-dependent parameters that characterize the Green's function, or Feynman kernel, of the corresponding problem. From there, also the relation between the classical and quantum dynamics of the systems can be obtained. Furthermore, the close connection between the Ermakov invariant and the Wigner function will be shown. Factorization of the dynamical invariant allows for comparison with creation/annihilation operators and supersymmetry where the partner potentials fulfil (real Riccati equations. This provides the link to a nonlinear formulation of time-independent quantum mechanics in terms of an Ermakov equation for the amplitude of the stationary state wave functions combined with a conservation law. Comparison with SUSY and the time-dependent problems concludes our analysis.

  9. Analysis of the nonleptonic charmonium modes Bs0→J /ψ f2'(1525 ) and Bs0→J /ψ K+K-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, César A.; Quintero, Néstor; Vera, Carlos E.; Villalba, Alexis

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we present an analysis of the nonleptonic charmonium modes Bs0→J /ψ f2'(1525 ) and Bs0→J /ψ K+K-. Within the framework of the factorization approach and using the perturbative QCD for the evaluation of the relevant form factors, we find a branching fraction for the two-body channel of BR (Bs0→J /ψ f2'(1525 ))=(1.6-0.7+0.9)×10-4 which is in agreement with the experimental values reported by the LHCb and Belle Collaborations. The associated polarization fractions to this vector-tensor mode are also presented. On the other hand, nonresonant and resonant contributions to the three-body decay Bs0→J /ψ K+K- are carefully investigated. The dominant contributions of the resonances ϕ (1020 ) and f2'(1525 ) are properly taken into account. A detailed analysis of the K+K- invariant mass distributions and Dalitz plot are also performed. The overall result BR (Bs0→J /ψ K+K-)=(9.3-1.1+1.3)×10-4 is also in satisfactory agreement with the experimental information reported by LHCb and Belle.

  10. Iterative solution of the time dependent Schrodinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, Zs.G.; Nagy, L.; Borbely, S.; Toekesi, K.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The most accurate theoretical method used to investigate the interaction between atoms and ultrashort (few-cycle) UV / XUV laser pulses is the direct numerical solution of the time dependent Schrodinger equation (TDSE). The aim of the present work is to test various methods used for the solution of the TDSE, and to find the less resource consuming one. The recently developed iterative solution of TDSE (iTDSE model) is an extension of the momentum-space strongfield approximation (MSSFA), in which the Coulomb potential was considered only as a first order perturbation. In the iTDSE model the higher order terms were gradually introduced, until convergence was achieved. The converged iTDSE results were compared with the 'exact' results, obtained from the direct solution of the TDSE (see [2-3]). The MSSFA method provides accurate results only in the half-cycle pulse limit, and its shortcomings are revealed only in the long pulse limit. As any perturbative approach, the MSSFA time propagation is not unitary (norm of the wave function is not conserved). Beside this due to the weak Coulomb potential (i.e. first order perturbation) the ionization probability amplitude is overestimated and the Δl = ±1 selection rule is not fulfilled, which leads to erroneous wave function dynamics. The direct solution of the TDSE does not have the above presented shortcomings, but during production runs it requires a large amount of CPU power and memory even in the framework of the single active electron approach. The newly implemented extension of the MSSFA model (the iTDSE model) eliminates all the MSSFA model's shortcomings providing accurate results. The main advantage of the iTDSE model is that it requires considerably less computer resources (CPU time and memory) then the direct solution, while it provides results as accurate as the direct solution. The most critical part of the iTDSE approach is the temporal propagation, which involves the

  11. Measurement of gamma in B-+ to D(*) K-+ and B-+ to D K*-+ Decays with a Dalitz Analysis of D to Ks pi- pi+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-08-04

    We present a measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa CP-violating phase {gamma} with a Dalitz plot analysis of neutral D-meson decays to the K{sub S}{sup 0} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} final state from B{sup {-+}} {yields} D{sup (*)}K{sup {-+}} and B{sup {-+}} {yields} DK*{sup {-+}} decays, using a sample of 227 million B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector. We measure {gamma} = (67 {+-} 28 {+-} 13 {+-} 11){sup o}, where the first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic uncertainty and the third reflects the Dalitz model uncertainty. This result suffers from a two-fold ambiguity. The contribution to the Dalitz model uncertainty due to the description of the {pi}{pi} S-wave in D{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, evaluated using a K-matrix formalism, is found to be 3{sup o}.

  12. Inventory Model for Deteriorating Items with Quadratic Time Dependent Demand under Trade Credits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Tripathi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an EOQ model is developed for a deteriorating item with quadratic time dependent demand rate under trade credit. Mathematical models are also derived under two different situations i.e. Case I; the credit period is less than the cycle time for settling the account and Case II; the credit period is greater than or equal to the cycle time for settling the account. The numerical examples are also given to validate the proposed model. Sensitivity analysis is given to study the effect of various parameters on ordering policy and optimal total profit. Mathematica 7.1 software is used for finding optimal numerical solutions.

  13. Bivariate spline solution of time dependent nonlinear PDE for a population density over irregular domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Juan B; Lai, Ming-Jun; Slavov, George

    2015-12-01

    We study a time dependent partial differential equation (PDE) which arises from classic models in ecology involving logistic growth with Allee effect by introducing a discrete weak solution. Existence, uniqueness and stability of the discrete weak solutions are discussed. We use bivariate splines to approximate the discrete weak solution of the nonlinear PDE. A computational algorithm is designed to solve this PDE. A convergence analysis of the algorithm is presented. We present some simulations of population development over some irregular domains. Finally, we discuss applications in epidemiology and other ecological problems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Decoupled Scheme for Time-Dependent Natural Convection Problem II: Time Semidiscreteness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhang

    2014-01-01

    stability and the corresponding optimal error estimates are presented. Furthermore, a decoupled numerical scheme is proposed by decoupling the nonlinear terms via temporal extrapolation; optimal error estimates are established. Finally, some numerical results are provided to verify the performances of the developed algorithms. Compared with the coupled numerical scheme, the decoupled algorithm not only keeps good accuracy but also saves a lot of computational cost. Both theoretical analysis and numerical experiments show the efficiency and effectiveness of the decoupled method for time-dependent natural convection problem.

  15. Effects of time-dependent diffusion behaviors on the rumor spreading in social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Laijun; Wang, Jiajia; Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Qin

    2016-05-01

    When considering roles of realistic external forces (e.g. authorities) and internal forces (e.g. the forgetting nature of human), diffusion behaviors like spreading, stifling and forgetting behaviors are time-dependent. They were incorporated in an SIR-like rumor spreading model to investigate the effects to rumor spreading dynamics. Mean-field equations were derived, and the steady state analysis was conducted. Simulations were carried out on different complex networks. We demonstrated that the combination of the three variable diffusion behaviors provides a faster and larger spreading expansion capacity. Network structure matters considerably in rumor spreading dynamics.

  16. An economic production model for time dependent demand with rework and multiple production setups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R. Singh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a model for time dependent demand with multiple productions and rework setups. Production is demand dependent and greater than the demand rate. Production facility produces items in m production setups and one rework setup (m, 1 policy. The major reason of reverse logistic and green supply chain is rework, so it reduces the cost of production and other ecological problems. Most of the researchers developed a rework model without deteriorating items. A numerical example and sensitivity analysis is shown to describe the model.

  17. Time-dependent density functional theory for multi-component systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiecheng Li; Peiqing Tong

    1985-10-01

    The Runge-Gross version of Hohenberg-Kohn-Sham's density functional theory is generalized to multi-component systems, both for arbitrary time-dependent pure states and for arbitrary time-dependent ensembles. (author)

  18. Critique of the foundations of time-dependent density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirmer, J.; Dreuw, A.

    2007-01-01

    The general expectation that, in principle, the time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) is an exact formulation of the time evolution of an interacting N-electron system is critically reexamined. It is demonstrated that the previous TDDFT foundation, resting on four theorems by Runge and Gross (RG) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 52, 997 (1984)], is invalid because undefined phase factors corrupt the RG action integral functionals. Our finding confirms much of a previous analysis by van Leeuwen [Int. J. Mod. Phys. B 15, 1969 (2001)]. To analyze the RG theorems and other aspects of TDDFT, an utmost simplification of the Kohn-Sham (KS) concept has been introduced, in which the ground-state density is obtained from a single KS equation for one spatial (spinless) orbital. The time-dependent (TD) form of this radical Kohn-Sham (rKS) scheme, which has the same validity status as the ordinary KS version, has proved to be a valuable tool for analysis. The rKS concept is used to clarify also the alternative nonvariational formulation of TD KS theory. We argue that it is just a formal theory, allowing one to reproduce but not predict the time development of the exact density of the interacting N-electron system. Besides the issue of the formal exactness of TDDFT, it is shown that both the static and time-dependent KS linear response equations neglect the particle-particle (p-p) and hole-hole (h-h) matrix elements of the perturbing operator. For a local (multiplicative) operator this does not lead to a loss of information due to a remarkable general property of local operators. Accordingly, no logical inconsistency arises with respect to DFT, because DFT requires any external potential to be local. For a general nonlocal operator the error resulting from the neglected matrix elements is of second order in the electronic repulsion

  19. Modeling Broadband Variability of Blazars with Time-Dependent Multi-Zone Radiative Transfer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossati, Giovanni

    This proposal aims at fully exploiting the large body of X-ray and multiwavelength observational data on TeV gamma-ray bright blazars for a detailed comparison with state- of-the art blazar radiation transfer simulations. The aim of this investigation is to develop diagnostics on critical jet parameters and shock physics, such as the magnetic field, the kinetic energy content in the jets, the characteristics of the shock acceleration mechanisms, and the detailed influence on geometry on the observed spectral variability features. Our project will comprises a systematic, uniform re-analysis of the relevant (in particular, X-ray) data sets. We will extract time-dependent spectral energy distributions, light curves, and intra-band as well as inter-band time lags from the available data. The modeling tasks will start with a quick sweep through parameter space using a semi- analytical internal-shock model. This will help to narrow down parameters such as the Lorentz factors of interacting emission regions, the overall energy requirements, the characteristics of the electron distributions accelerated at internal shocks, and the magnetic field. The parameters of this semi-analytical internal-shock model that allow for a representation of time-dependent SEDs, light curves and inter-band time lags, will form the starting point for our detailed modeling using our state-of-the-art time-dependent multi-zone Monte-Carlo simulation code. Using that code, we will explore in more detail the characteristics of the particle acceleration in active regions and the influence of various geometries on the observable features. By capitalizing on archival data of several NASA space astrophysics missions our proposal is in agreement with the NASA ADAP research objective, "the analysis io NASA space astrophysics data that are archived in the public domain at the time of submission", as stated in the NASA Research announcement.

  20. Theoretical study of time-dependent, ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, we present a numerical study of the temporal buildup and decay of unsteady acoustic fields and acoustic streaming flows actuated by vibrating walls in the transverse cross-sectional plane of a long straight microchannel under adiabatic conditions and assuming temperature-independent material parameters. The unsteady streaming flow is obtained by averaging the time-dependent velocity field over one oscillation period, and as time increases, it is shown to converge towards the well-known steady time-averaged solution calculated in the frequency domain. Scaling analysis reveals that the acoustic resonance builds up much faster than the acoustic streaming, implying that the radiation force may dominate over the drag force from streaming even for small particles. However, our numerical time-dependent analysis indicates that pulsed actuation does not reduce streaming significantly due to its slow decay. Our analysis also shows that for an acoustic resonance with a quality factor Q, the amplitude of the oscillating second-order velocity component is Q times larger than the usual second-order steady time-averaged velocity component. Consequently, the well-known criterion v(1)≪c(s) for the validity of the perturbation expansion is replaced by the more restrictive criterion v(1)≪c(s)/Q. Our numerical model is available as supplemental material in the form of comsol model files and matlab scripts.

  1. Time Dependence of Collision Probabilities During Satellite Conjunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Doyle T.; Hejduk, Matthew D.; Johnson, Lauren C.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Conjunction Assessment Risk Analysis (CARA) team has recently implemented updated software to calculate the probability of collision (P (sub c)) for Earth-orbiting satellites. The algorithm can employ complex dynamical models for orbital motion, and account for the effects of non-linear trajectories as well as both position and velocity uncertainties. This “3D P (sub c)” method entails computing a 3-dimensional numerical integral for each estimated probability. Our analysis indicates that the 3D method provides several new insights over the traditional “2D P (sub c)” method, even when approximating the orbital motion using the relatively simple Keplerian two-body dynamical model. First, the formulation provides the means to estimate variations in the time derivative of the collision probability, or the probability rate, R (sub c). For close-proximity satellites, such as those orbiting in formations or clusters, R (sub c) variations can show multiple peaks that repeat or blend with one another, providing insight into the ongoing temporal distribution of risk. For single, isolated conjunctions, R (sub c) analysis provides the means to identify and bound the times of peak collision risk. Additionally, analysis of multiple actual archived conjunctions demonstrates that the commonly used “2D P (sub c)” approximation can occasionally provide inaccurate estimates. These include cases in which the 2D method yields negligibly small probabilities (e.g., P (sub c)) is greater than 10 (sup -10)), but the 3D estimates are sufficiently large to prompt increased monitoring or collision mitigation (e.g., P (sub c) is greater than or equal to 10 (sup -5)). Finally, the archive analysis indicates that a relatively efficient calculation can be used to identify which conjunctions will have negligibly small probabilities. This small-P (sub c) screening test can significantly speed the overall risk analysis computation for large numbers of conjunctions.

  2. Exact solution of a quantum forced time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Kyu Hwang; George, Thomas F.; Um, Chung IN

    1992-01-01

    The Schrodinger equation is used to exactly evaluate the propagator, wave function, energy expectation values, uncertainty values, and coherent state for a harmonic oscillator with a time dependent frequency and an external driving time dependent force. These quantities represent the solution of the classical equation of motion for the time dependent harmonic oscillator.

  3. Time dependencies in the occurrences of epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasemidis, L D; Olson, L D; Savit, R S; Sackellares, J C

    1994-01-01

    A new method of analysis, developed within the framework of nonlinear dynamics, is applied to patient recorded time series of the occurrence of epileptic seizures. These data exhibit broad band spectra and generally have no obvious structure. The goal is to detect hidden internal dependencies in the data without making any restrictive assumptions, such as linearity, about the structure of the underlying system. The basis of our approach is a conditional probabilistic analysis in a phase space reconstructed from the original data. The data, recorded from patients with intractable epilepsy over a period of 1-3 years, consist of the times of occurrences of hundreds of partial complex seizures. Although the epileptic events appear to occur independently, we show that the epileptic process is not consistent with the rules of a homogeneous Poisson process or generally with a random (IID) process. More specifically, our analysis reveals dependencies of the occurrence of seizures on the occurrence of preceding seizures. These dependencies can be detected in the interseizure interval data sets as well as in the rate of seizures per time period. We modeled patient's inaccuracy in recording seizure events by the addition of uniform white noise and found that the detected dependencies are persistent after addition of noise with standard deviation as great as 1/3 of the standard deviation of the original data set. A linear autoregressive analysis fails to capture these dependencies or produces spurious ones in most of the cases.

  4. On the time-dependent behavior of FGM plates

    OpenAIRE

    Altenbach, Holm; Eremeyev, Victor,

    2009-01-01

    International audience; A non-classical plate theory based on the direct approach is introduced and applied to plates composed of functionally graded materials (FGM). The governing two-dimensional equations are formulated for a deformable surface, the viscoelastic stiffness parameters are identified assuming linear-viscoelastic material behavior. In addition, the material properties are changing in the thickness direction. Solving some problems of the global structural analysis it can be show...

  5. Classification of transient behaviours in a time-dependent toggle switch model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verd, Berta; Crombach, Anton; Jaeger, Johannes

    2014-04-04

    Waddington's epigenetic landscape is an intuitive metaphor for the developmental and evolutionary potential of biological regulatory processes. It emphasises time-dependence and transient behaviour. Nowadays, we can derive this landscape by modelling a specific regulatory network as a dynamical system and calculating its so-called potential surface. In this sense, potential surfaces are the mathematical equivalent of the Waddingtonian landscape metaphor. In order to fully capture the time-dependent (non-autonomous) transient behaviour of biological processes, we must be able to characterise potential landscapes and how they change over time. However, currently available mathematical tools focus on the asymptotic (steady-state) behaviour of autonomous dynamical systems, which restricts how biological systems are studied. We present a pragmatic first step towards a methodology for dealing with transient behaviours in non-autonomous systems. We propose a classification scheme for different kinds of such dynamics based on the simulation of a simple genetic toggle-switch model with time-variable parameters. For this low-dimensional system, we can calculate and explicitly visualise numerical approximations to the potential landscape. Focussing on transient dynamics in non-autonomous systems reveals a range of interesting and biologically relevant behaviours that would be missed in steady-state analyses of autonomous systems. Our simulation-based approach allows us to identify four qualitatively different kinds of dynamics: transitions, pursuits, and two kinds of captures. We describe these in detail, and illustrate the usefulness of our classification scheme by providing a number of examples that demonstrate how it can be employed to gain specific mechanistic insights into the dynamics of gene regulation. The practical aim of our proposed classification scheme is to make the analysis of explicitly time-dependent transient behaviour tractable, and to encourage the wider

  6. Time-dependent, many-body scattering theory and nuclear reaction applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, F.S.

    1977-01-01

    The channel component state form of the channel coupling array theory of many-body scattering is briefly reviewed. These states obey a non-hermitian matrix equation whose exact solution yields the Schroedinger eigenstates, eigenvalues and scattering amplitudes. A time-dependent formulation of the theory is introduced in analogy to the time-dependent Schrodinger equation and several consequences of the development are noted. These include an interaction picture, a single (matrix) S operator, and the usual connection between the t = 0 time-dependent and the time-independent scattering states. Finally, the channel component states (psi/sub j/) are shown to have the useful property that only psi/sub j/ has (two-body) outgoing waves in channel j: psi/sub m/, m not equal to j, is asymptotically zero in two-body channel j. This formalism is then considered as a means for direct nuclear reaction analysis. Typical bound state approximations are introduced and it is shown that a DWBA amplitude occurs in only one channel. The non-time-reversal invariance of the approximate theory is noted. Results of calculations based on a realistic model for two sets of light-ion induced, one-particle transfer reactions are discussed and compared with the coupled reaction channel (CRC) results using the CRC procedure of Cotanch and Vincent. Angular distributions for the two calculational methods are found to be similar in shape and magnitude. Higher ordercorrections are small as are time-reversal non-invariant effects. Post- and prior-type CRC calculations are seen to differ; the latter are closer to the full CRC results

  7. Time-dependent reliability of corrosion-affected RC beams. Part 3: Effect of corrosion initiation time and its variability on time-dependent failure probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhargava, Kapilesh; Mori, Yasuhiro; Ghosh, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper forms the third part of a study which addresses time-dependent reliability analyses of reinforced concrete (RC) beams affected by reinforcement corrosion. Parts 1 and 2 of the reliability study are presented in companion papers. Part 1 of the reliability study presents evaluation of probabilistic descriptions for time-dependent strengths of a typical simply supported corrosion-affected RC beam. These probabilistic descriptions, i.e., mean and coefficient of variation (c.o.v.) for the time-dependent strengths are presented for two limit states: (a) flexural failure; and (b) shear failure. Part 2 of the reliability study presents evaluation of time-dependent failure probability for the considered RC beam by utilizing the information on probabilistic descriptions for time-dependent strengths available in Part 1. Evaluation of time-dependent failure probability considering the variability in time-dependent strengths and/or time-dependent degradation functions is also presented. This paper investigates the effects of time to corrosion initiation and its variability on failure probability of the same RC beam presented in companion papers. By considering variability in the identified variables that could affect the expected time of first corrosion, simple estimations are presented for mean time to corrosion initiation and variability associated with time to corrosion initiation. Evaluation of time-dependent failure probability for the beam is presented by considering estimated probabilistic descriptions, i.e., mean and c.o.v. for time to corrosion initiation. Parametric analyses show that failure probability for the beam is sensitive to the mode of strength degradation and time to corrosion initiation.

  8. Mode of action classification of chemicals using multi-concentration time-dependent cellular response profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Zhankun; Khare, Swanand; Cheung, Aaron; Huang, Biao; Pan, Tianhong; Zhang, Weiping; Ibrahim, Fadi; Jin, Can; Gabos, Stephan

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we present a new statistical pattern recognition method for classifying cytotoxic cellular responses to toxic agents. The advantage of the proposed method is to quickly assess the toxicity level of an unclassified toxic agent on human health by bringing cytotoxic cellular responses with similar patterns (mode of action, MoOA) into the same class. The proposed method is a model-based hierarchical classification approach incorporating principal component analysis (PCA) and functional data analysis (FDA). The cytotoxic cell responses are represented by multi-concentration time-dependent cellular response profiles (TCRPs) which are dynamically recorded by using the xCELLigence real-time cell analysis high-throughput (RTCA HT) system. The classification results obtained using our algorithm show satisfactory discrimination and are validated using biological facts by examining common chemical mechanisms of actions with treatment on human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantifying Time Dependent Moisture Storage and Transport Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peuhkuri, Ruut H

    2003-01-01

    analysis on these other materials. The true moisture capacity of a material can not be described by the slope of the sorption isotherms alone, when the material is exposed to dynamic changes in the moisture conditions. Still, the assumption of an immediate equilibrium is well accepted in the simulation...... models. A number of small specimens are exposed to ab- and desorption steps in a controlled relative humidity and temperature. The change in the bulk moisture content is followed continuously as the specimen is directly attached to a balance. The experimental results show retarded sorption. A preliminary...

  10. Attainable conditions and exact invariant for the time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guasti, Manuel Fernandez [Lab. de Optica Cuantica, Dep. de Fisica, Universidad A. Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Mexico DF, Ap. Post. 55-534 (Mexico)

    2006-09-22

    The time-dependent oscillator equation is solved numerically for various trajectories in amplitude and phase variables. The solutions exhibit a finite time-dependent parameter whenever the squared amplitude times the derivative of the phase is invariant. If the invariant relationship does not hold, the time-dependent parameter has divergent singularities. These observations lead to the proposition that the harmonic oscillator equation with finite time-dependent parameter must have amplitude and phase solutions fulfilling the invariant relationship. Since the time-dependent parameter or the potential must be finite for any real oscillator implementation, the invariant must hold for any such physically realizable system.

  11. Nonperturbative Time Dependent Solution of a Simple Ionization Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costin, Ovidiu; Costin, Rodica D.; Lebowitz, Joel L.

    2018-02-01

    We present a non-perturbative solution of the Schrödinger equation {iψ_t(t,x)=-ψ_{xx}(t,x)-2(1 +α sinω t) δ(x)ψ(t,x)} , written in units in which \\hbar=2m=1, describing the ionization of a model atom by a parametric oscillating potential. This model has been studied extensively by many authors, including us. It has surprisingly many features in common with those observed in the ionization of real atoms and emission by solids, subjected to microwave or laser radiation. Here we use new mathematical methods to go beyond previous investigations and to provide a complete and rigorous analysis of this system. We obtain the Borel-resummed transseries (multi-instanton expansion) valid for all values of α, ω, t for the wave function, ionization probability, and energy distribution of the emitted electrons, the latter not studied previously for this model. We show that for large t and small α the energy distribution has sharp peaks at energies which are multiples of ω, corresponding to photon capture. We obtain small α expansions that converge for all t, unlike those of standard perturbation theory. We expect that our analysis will serve as a basis for treating more realistic systems revealing a form of universality in different emission processes.

  12. Excitation energies from range-separated time-dependent density and density matrix functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernal, Katarzyna

    2012-05-14

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) in the adiabatic formulation exhibits known failures when applied to predicting excitation energies. One of them is the lack of the doubly excited configurations. On the other hand, the time-dependent theory based on a one-electron reduced density matrix functional (time-dependent density matrix functional theory, TD-DMFT) has proven accurate in determining single and double excitations of H(2) molecule if the exact functional is employed in the adiabatic approximation. We propose a new approach for computing excited state energies that relies on functionals of electron density and one-electron reduced density matrix, where the latter is applied in the long-range region of electron-electron interactions. A similar approach has been recently successfully employed in predicting ground state potential energy curves of diatomic molecules even in the dissociation limit, where static correlation effects are dominating. In the paper, a time-dependent functional theory based on the range-separation of electronic interaction operator is rigorously formulated. To turn the approach into a practical scheme the adiabatic approximation is proposed for the short- and long-range components of the coupling matrix present in the linear response equations. In the end, the problem of finding excitation energies is turned into an eigenproblem for a symmetric matrix. Assignment of obtained excitations is discussed and it is shown how to identify double excitations from the analysis of approximate transition density matrix elements. The proposed method used with the short-range local density approximation (srLDA) and the long-range Buijse-Baerends density matrix functional (lrBB) is applied to H(2) molecule (at equilibrium geometry and in the dissociation limit) and to Be atom. The method accounts for double excitations in the investigated systems but, unfortunately, the accuracy of some of them is poor. The quality of the other

  13. Time-dependent neo-deterministic seismic hazard scenarios for the 2016 Central Italy earthquakes sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peresan, Antonella; Kossobokov, Vladimir; Romashkova, Leontina; Panza, Giuliano F.

    2017-04-01

    Predicting earthquakes and related ground shaking is widely recognized among the most challenging scientific problems, both for societal relevance and intrinsic complexity of the problem. The development of reliable forecasting tools requires their rigorous formalization and testing, first in retrospect, and then in an experimental real-time mode, which imply a careful application of statistics to data sets of limited size and different accuracy. Accordingly, the operational issues of prospective validation and use of time-dependent neo-deterministic seismic hazard scenarios are discussed, reviewing the results in their application in Italy and surroundings. Long-term practice and results obtained for the Italian territory in about two decades of rigorous prospective testing, support the feasibility of earthquake forecasting based on the analysis of seismicity patterns at the intermediate-term middle-range scale. Italy is the only country worldwide where two independent, globally tested, algorithms are simultaneously applied, namely CN and M8S, which permit to deal with multiple sets of seismic precursors to allow for a diagnosis of the intervals of time when a strong event is likely to occur inside a given region. Based on routinely updated space-time information provided by CN and M8S forecasts, an integrated procedure has been developed that allows for the definition of time-dependent seismic hazard scenarios, through the realistic modeling of ground motion by the neo-deterministic approach (NDSHA). This scenario-based methodology permits to construct, both at regional and local scale, scenarios of ground motion for the time interval when a strong event is likely to occur within the alerted areas. CN and M8S predictions, as well as the related time-dependent ground motion scenarios associated with the alarmed areas, are routinely updated since 2006. The issues and results from real-time testing of the integrated NDSHA scenarios are illustrated, with special

  14. Time Dependence of Aerosol Light Scattering Downwind of Forest Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, L. I.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Wang, J.; Lewis, E. R.; Springston, S. R.; Chand, D.; Shilling, J.; Arnott, W. P.; Freedman, A.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E.; Zhang, Q.; Yokelson, R. J.; Adachi, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    In the first phase of BBOP (Biomass Burn Observation Project), a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored study, wildland fires in the Pacific Northwest were sampled from the G-1 aircraft via sequences of transects that encountered emission whose age (time since emission) ranged from approximately 15 minutes to four hours. Comparisons between transects allowed us to determine the near-field time evolution of trace gases, aerosol particles, and optical properties. The fractional increase in aerosol concentration with plume age was typically less than a third of the fractional increase in light scattering. In some fires the increase in light scattering exceeded a factor of two. Two possible causes for the discrepancy between scattering and aerosol mass are i) the downwind formation of refractory tar balls that are not detected by the AMS and therefore contribute to scattering but not to aerosol mass and ii) changes to the aerosol size distribution. Both possibilities are considered. Our information on tar balls comes from an analysis of TEM grids. A direct determination of size changes is complicated by extremely high aerosol number concentrations that caused coincidence problems for the PCASP and UHSAS probes. We instead construct a set of plausible log normal size distributions and for each member of the set do Mie calculations to determine mass scattering efficiency (MSE), angstrom exponents, and backscatter ratios. Best fit size distributions are selected by comparison with observed data derived from multi-wavelength scattering measurements, an extrapolated FIMS size distribution, and mass measurements from an SP-AMS. MSE at 550 nm varies from a typical near source value of 2-3 to about 4 in aged air.

  15. A GIS-based time-dependent seismic source modeling of Northern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Mahdi; Alesheikh, Ali Asghar; Zolfaghari, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    The first step in any seismic hazard study is the definition of seismogenic sources and the estimation of magnitude-frequency relationships for each source. There is as yet no standard methodology for source modeling and many researchers have worked on this topic. This study is an effort to define linear and area seismic sources for Northern Iran. The linear or fault sources are developed based on tectonic features and characteristic earthquakes while the area sources are developed based on spatial distribution of small to moderate earthquakes. Time-dependent recurrence relationships are developed for fault sources using renewal approach while time-independent frequency-magnitude relationships are proposed for area sources based on Poisson process. GIS functionalities are used in this study to introduce and incorporate spatial-temporal and geostatistical indices in delineating area seismic sources. The proposed methodology is used to model seismic sources for an area of about 500 by 400 square kilometers around Tehran. Previous researches and reports are studied to compile an earthquake/fault catalog that is as complete as possible. All events are transformed to uniform magnitude scale; duplicate events and dependent shocks are removed. Completeness and time distribution of the compiled catalog is taken into account. The proposed area and linear seismic sources in conjunction with defined recurrence relationships can be used to develop time-dependent probabilistic seismic hazard analysis of Northern Iran.

  16. OECD/NEA benchmark for time-dependent neutron transport calculations without spatial homogenization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Jason, E-mail: jason.hou@ncsu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Ivanov, Kostadin N. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Boyarinov, Victor F.; Fomichenko, Peter A. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Sq. 1, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • A time-dependent homogenization-free neutron transport benchmark was created. • The first phase, known as the kinetics phase, was described in this work. • Preliminary results for selected 2-D transient exercises were presented. - Abstract: A Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) benchmark for the time-dependent neutron transport calculations without spatial homogenization has been established in order to facilitate the development and assessment of numerical methods for solving the space-time neutron kinetics equations. The benchmark has been named the OECD/NEA C5G7-TD benchmark, and later extended with three consecutive phases each corresponding to one modelling stage of the multi-physics transient analysis of the nuclear reactor core. This paper provides a detailed introduction of the benchmark specification of Phase I, known as the “kinetics phase”, including the geometry description, supporting neutron transport data, transient scenarios in both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) configurations, as well as the expected output parameters from the participants. Also presented are the preliminary results for the initial state 2-D core and selected transient exercises that have been obtained using the Monte Carlo method and the Surface Harmonic Method (SHM), respectively.

  17. Existence of a time-dependent heat flux-related ponderomotive effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schamel, H.; Sack, C.

    1980-01-01

    The existence of a new ponderomotive effect associated with high-frequency waves is pointed out. It originates when time-dependency, mean velocities, or divergent heat fluxes are involved and it supplements the two effects known previously, namely, the ponderomotive force and fake heating. Two proofs are presented; the first is obtained by establishing the momentum equations generalized by including radiation effects and the second by solving the quasi-linear-type diffusion equation explicitly. For a time-dependent wave packet the solution exhibits a new contribution in terms of an integral over previous states. Owing to this term, the plasma has a memory which leads to a breaking of the time symmetry of the plasma response. The range, influenced by the localized wave packet, expands during the course of time due to streamers emanating from the wave active region. Perturbations, among which is the heat flux, are carried to remote positions and, consequently, the region accessible to wave heating is increased. The density dip appears to be less pronounced at the center, and its generation and decay are delayed. The analysis includes a self-consistent action of high-frequency waves as well as the case of traveling wave packets. In order to establish the existence of this new effect, the analytical results are compared with recent microwave experiments. The possibility of generating fast particles by this new ponderomotive effect is emphasized

  18. Applying Boundary Conditions Using a Time-Dependent Lagrangian for Modeling Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Jonathan; Shadwick, B. A.

    2016-10-01

    Modeling the evolution of a short, intense laser pulse propagating through an underdense plasma is of particular interest in the physics of laser-plasma interactions. Numerical models are typically created by first discretizing the equations of motion and then imposing boundary conditions. Using the variational principle of Chen and Sudan, we spatially discretize the Lagrangian density to obtain discrete equations of motion and a discrete energy conservation law which is exactly satisfied regardless of the spatial grid resolution. Modifying the derived equations of motion (e.g., enforcing boundary conditions) generally ruins energy conservation. However, time-dependent terms can be added to the Lagrangian which force the equations of motion to have the desired boundary conditions. Although some foresight is needed to choose these time-dependent terms, this approach provides a mechanism for energy to exit the closed system while allowing the conservation law to account for the loss. An appropriate time discretization scheme is selected based on stability analysis and resolution requirements. We present results using this variational approach in a co-moving coordinate system and compare such results to those using traditional second-order methods. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-SC0008382 and by the National Science Foundation under Contract No. PHY- 1104683.

  19. Convective instability in a time-dependent buoyancy driven boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooker, A.M.H.; Patterson, J.C.; Graham, T.; Schoepf, W. [University of Western Australia, Nedlands (Australia). Centre for Water Research

    2000-01-01

    The stability of the parallel time-dependent boundary layer adjacent to a suddenly heated vertical wall is described. The flow is investigated through experiments in water, through direct numerical simulation and also through linear stability analysis. The full numerical simulation of the flow shows that small perturbations to the wall boundary conditions, that are also present in the experimental study, are responsible for triggering the instability. As a result, oscillatory behaviour in the boundary layer is observed well before the transition to a steady two-dimensional flow begins. The properties of the observed oscillations are compared with those predicted by a linear stability analysis of the unsteady boundary layer using a quasi-stationary assumption and also using non-stationary assumptions by the formulation of parabolized equations (PSE). (Author)

  20. Time-dependent geminal method applied to laser-driven beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötstedt, Erik; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2018-01-01

    We introduce the time-dependent geminal method, in which the total wave function is written as an antisymmetrized product of time-dependent geminals. A geminal is a two-electron orbital depending on the coordinates of two electrons, and each geminal is expanded as a sum of products of time-dependent one-electron orbitals. The equation of motion for the geminal coefficients similar to the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equation is derived. The evaluation of the largest eigenvalues of the second-order reduced density matrix is proposed as a way to measure the extent of the intergeminal correlation in a time-dependent wave function. Using the time-dependent geminal method, we simulate the evolution of the time-dependent wave function of a beryllium atom exposed to an intense laser pulse at two different wavelengths, 400 and 10 nm. The results are compared to those obtained by the time-dependent Hartree-Fock method and by the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method.

  1. Estimating the minimum delay optimal cycle length based on a time-dependent delay formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Y. Zakariya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For fixed time traffic signal control, the well-known Webster’s formula is widely used to estimate the minimum delay optimal cycle length. However, this formula overestimates the cycle length for high degrees of saturation. In this paper, we propose two regression formulas for estimating the minimum delay optimal cycle length based on a time-dependent delay formula as used in the Canadian Capacity Guide and the Highway Capacity Manual (HCM. For this purpose, we develop a search algorithm to determine the minimum delay optimal cycle length required for the regression analysis. Numerical results show that the proposed formulas give a better estimation for the optimal cycle length at high intersection flow ratios compared to Webster’s formula.

  2. Fusion hindrance in heavy systems with time-dependent Hartree-Fock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washiyama, Kouhei

    2017-11-01

    We analyze fusion hindrance in heavy systems, where the fusion probability around the Coulomb barrier is hindered compared with that in light and medium-mass systems. We perform simulations of central collisions around the Coulomb barrier in heavy systems with time-dependent Hartree‒Fock (TDHF) and find that the fusion hindrance is realized in TDHF simulations. We extract nucleus‒nucleus potential and energy dissipation in heavy systems by a method combining a microscopic TDHF evolution to a macroscopic collective equation of motion. We find that the extracted potentials exhibit a dynamical increase at small relative distances, while the extracted friction coefficients show rather a behavior similar to that in light and medium-mass systems. We find from our analysis that the dynamical increase in potential is a main contribution to this fusion hindrance.

  3. Time-dependent viscometry study of endoglucanase action on xyloglucan: A real-time approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spier, Vivian Cristina; Sierakowski, Maria Rita; Ibrahim, Amid Tony; Scholze Baum, Jéssica C; Silveira, Joana Lea M; de Freitas, Rilton Alves

    2015-11-01

    Hydrolysis of xyloglucan from Tamarindus indica and Hymenaea courbaril seeds with endoglucanase (EGII), which randomly breaks the (1→4)-linked β-glycosidic bonds of the polymer chain, was monitored in real time using time-dependent viscometry analysis (TDV). For both samples there was a decrease in the intrinsic viscosity ([η]), viscosity average molar mass (Mv), radius de gyration (Rg) and persistence length (Lp) immediately after the addition of the enzyme. It was observed the formation of oligosaccharides and oligomers composed of ∼2 units, up to 140min. Galactose-containing side chains two positions away from the non-substituted glucose, modulated the action of EGII, and the complete hydrolysis of the XG oligomers occurred after 24h. The results demonstrate for the first time the real-time degradation of xyloglucan as well the macromolecular and oligosaccharide composition during the EGII hydrolysis process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Time-Dependent Toroidal Compactification Proposals and the Bianchi Type I Model: Classical and Quantum Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Toledo Sesma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We construct an effective four-dimensional model by compactifying a ten-dimensional theory of gravity coupled with a real scalar dilaton field on a time-dependent torus. This approach is applied to anisotropic cosmological Bianchi type I model for which we study the classical coupling of the anisotropic scale factors with the two real scalar moduli produced by the compactification process. Under this approach, we present an isotropization mechanism for the Bianchi I cosmological model through the analysis of the ratio between the anisotropic parameters and the volume of the Universe which in general keeps constant or runs into zero for late times. We also find that the presence of extra dimensions in this model can accelerate the isotropization process depending on the momenta moduli values. Finally, we present some solutions to the corresponding Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW equation in the context of standard quantum cosmology.

  5. Failure Criterion For Isotropic Time Dependent Materials Which Accounts for Multi-Axial Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, D. E.; Anderson, G. L.; Macon, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle program has recently conducted testing to characterize the effects of multi-axial loading, temperature and time on the failure characteristics of TIGA321, EA913NA, EA946 (three filled epoxy adhesives). From the test data a "Multi-Axial, Temperature, and Time Dependent" or MATT failure criterion was developed. It is shown that this criterion simplifies, for constant load and constant load rate conditions, into a form that can be easily used for stress analysis. Failure for TIGA321 and EA913NA are characterized below their glass transition temperature. Failure for EA946 is characterized for conditions that pass through its glass transition. The MATT failure criterion is shown to be accurate for a wide range of conditions for these adhesives.

  6. Chemical dynamics in the gas phase: Time-dependent quantum mechanics of chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, S.K. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A major goal of this research is to obtain an understanding of the molecular reaction dynamics of three and four atom chemical reactions using numerically accurate quantum dynamics. This work involves: (i) the development and/or improvement of accurate quantum mechanical methods for the calculation and analysis of the properties of chemical reactions (e.g., rate constants and product distributions), and (ii) the determination of accurate dynamical results for selected chemical systems, which allow one to compare directly with experiment, determine the reliability of the underlying potential energy surfaces, and test the validity of approximate theories. This research emphasizes the use of recently developed time-dependent quantum mechanical methods, i.e. wave packet methods.

  7. Time-dependent Second Order Scattering Theory for Weather Radar with a Finite Beam Width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Tanelli, Simone; Im, Eastwood; Ito, Shigeo; Oguchi, Tomohiro

    2006-01-01

    Multiple scattering effects from spherical water particles of uniform diameter are studied for a W-band pulsed radar. The Gaussian transverse beam-profile and the rectangular pulse-duration are used for calculation. An second-order analytical solution is derived for a single layer structure, based on a time-dependent radiative transfer theory as described in the authors' companion paper. When the range resolution is fixed, increase in footprint radius leads to increase in the second order reflectivity that is defined as the ratio of the second order return to the first order one. This feature becomes more serious as the range increases. Since the spaceborne millimeter-wavelength radar has a large footprint radius that is competitive to the mean free path, the multiple scattering effect must be taken into account for analysis.

  8. Determination of time-dependent uncertainty of the total solar irradiance records from 1978 to present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fröhlich Claus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The existing records of total solar irradiance (TSI since 1978 differ not only in absolute values, but also show different trends. For the study of TSI variability these records need to be combined and three composites have been devised; however, the results depend on the choice of the records and the way they are combined. A new composite should be based on all existing records with an individual qualification. It is proposed to use a time-dependent uncertainty for weighting of the individual records. Methods. The determination of the time-dependent deviation of the TSI records is performed by comparison with the square root of the sunspot number (SSN. However, this correlation is only valid for timescales of the order of a year or more because TSI and SSN react quite differently to solar activity changes on shorter timescales. Hence the results concern only periods longer than the one-year-low-pass filter used in the analysis. Results. Besides the main objective to determine an investigator-independent uncertainty, the comparison of TSI with √SSN turns out to be a powerful tool for the study of the TSI long-term changes. The correlation of √SSN with TSI replicates very well the TSI minima, especially the very low value of the recent minimum. The results of the uncertainty determination confirm not only the need for adequate corrections for degradation, but also show that a rather detailed analysis is needed. The daily average of all TSI values available on that day, weighted with the correspondingly determined uncertainty, is used to construct a “new” composite, which, overall, compares well with the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD composite. Finally, the TSI − √SSN comparison proves to be an important diagnostic tool not only for estimating uncertainties of observations, but also for a better understanding of the long-term variability of TSI.

  9. Time-dependent approach for single trial classification of covert visuospatial attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonin, L.; Leeb, R.; Millán, J. del R.

    2012-08-01

    Recently, several studies have started to explore covert visuospatial attention as a control signal for brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Covert visuospatial attention represents the ability to change the focus of attention from one point in the space without overt eye movements. Nevertheless, the full potential and possible applications of this paradigm remain relatively unexplored. Voluntary covert visuospatial attention might allow a more natural and intuitive interaction with real environments as neither stimulation nor gazing is required. In order to identify brain correlates of covert visuospatial attention, classical approaches usually rely on the whole α-band over long time intervals. In this work, we propose a more detailed analysis in the frequency and time domains to enhance classification performance. In particular, we investigate the contribution of α sub-bands and the role of time intervals in carrying information about visual attention. Previous neurophysiological studies have already highlighted the role of temporal dynamics in attention mechanisms. However, these important aspects are not yet exploited in BCI. In this work, we studied different methods that explicitly cope with the natural brain dynamics during visuospatial attention tasks in order to enhance BCI robustness and classification performances. Results with ten healthy subjects demonstrate that our approach identifies spectro-temporal patterns that outperform the state-of-the-art classification method. On average, our time-dependent classification reaches 0.74 ± 0.03 of the area under the ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve (AUC) value with an increase of 12.3% with respect to standard methods (0.65 ± 0.4). In addition, the proposed approach allows faster classification (<1 instead of 3 s), without compromising performances. Finally, our analysis highlights the fact that discriminant patterns are not stable for the whole trial period but are changing over short time

  10. Time-dependent formulation of the linear unitary transformation and the time evolution of general time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wensen

    2004-01-01

    A time-dependent closed-form formulation of the linear unitary transformation for harmonic-oscillator annihilation and creation operators is presented in the Schroedinger picture using the Lie algebraic approach. The time evolution of the quantum mechanical system described by a general time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonian is investigated by combining this formulation with the time evolution equation of the system. The analytic expressions of the evolution operator and propagator are found. The motion of a charged particle with variable mass in the time-dependent electric field is considered as an illustrative example of the formalism. The exact time evolution wave function starting from a Gaussian wave packet and the operator expectation values with respect to the complicated evolution wave function are obtained readily

  11. A class of Galerkin Schemes for Time-Dependent Radiative Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egger, Herbert; Schlottbom, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The numerical solution of time-dependent radiative transfer problems is challenging, due to the high dimension and to the anisotropic structure of the underlying integro-partial differential equation. In this paper we propose a general framework for designing numerical methods for time-dependent

  12. Simulating the time-dependent behaviour of excavations in hard rock

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malan, DF

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available associated with using viscoelastic theory to simulate the time-dependent behaviour of hard rock, a viscoelastic convergence solution for the incremental enlargement of a tabular excavation is discussed. Data on the time dependent deformation of a tunnel...

  13. Modelling time-dependent mechanical behaviour of softwood using deformation kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang; Svensson, Staffan

    2010-01-01

    The time-dependent mechanical behaviour (TDMB) of softwood is relevant, e.g., when wood is used as building material where the mechanical properties must be predicted for decades ahead. The established mathematical models should be able to predict the time-dependent behaviour. However, these models...

  14. Exact norm-conserving stochastic time-dependent Hartree-Fock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tessieri, Luca; Wilkie, Joshua; Cetinbas, Murat

    2005-01-01

    We derive an exact single-body decomposition of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for N pairwise interacting fermions. Each fermion obeys a stochastic time-dependent norm-preserving wave equation. As a first test of the method, we calculate the low energy spectrum of helium. An extension of the method to bosons is outlined

  15. Electron-nuclear coupling in time-dependent multicomponent density functional theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butriy, Olena O.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis we developed the time-dependent version of the multicomponent density functional approach to treat time-dependent electron-nuclear systems. The method enables to describe the electron-nuclear coupling fully quantum mechanically. No Born-Oppenheimer approximation is involved in the

  16. Time-dependent transport in interacting and noninteracting resonant-tunneling systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Wingreen, Ned S.; Meir, Yigal

    1994-01-01

    We consider a mesoscopic region coupled to two leads under the influence of external time-dependent voltages. The time dependence is coupled to source and drain contacts, the gates controlling the tunnel-barrier heights, or to the gates that define the mesoscopic region. We derive, with the Keldysh...

  17. Time-Dependence effect in alumite recording media with perpendicular anisotropy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phan le kim, P.L.K.; Lodder, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we will present a study of the time-dependence effect in alumite perpendicular media at different thicknesses. Important parameters of the time-dependence effect such as magnetic viscosity and activation volume are investigated. Viscosity as a function of applied field (viscosity

  18. Time-dependent density-functional calculation of nuclear response functions

    OpenAIRE

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Basic issues of the time-dependent density-functional theory are discussed, especially on the real-time calculation of the linear response functions. Some remarks on the derivation of the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations and on the numerical methods are given.

  19. Time-dependent approach for single trial classification of covert visuospatial attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonin, L; Leeb, R; Del R Millán, J

    2012-08-01

    Recently, several studies have started to explore covert visuospatial attention as a control signal for brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Covert visuospatial attention represents the ability to change the focus of attention from one point in the space without overt eye movements. Nevertheless, the full potential and possible applications of this paradigm remain relatively unexplored. Voluntary covert visuospatial attention might allow a more natural and intuitive interaction with real environments as neither stimulation nor gazing is required. In order to identify brain correlates of covert visuospatial attention, classical approaches usually rely on the whole α-band over long time intervals. In this work, we propose a more detailed analysis in the frequency and time domains to enhance classification performance. In particular, we investigate the contribution of α sub-bands and the role of time intervals in carrying information about visual attention. Previous neurophysiological studies have already highlighted the role of temporal dynamics in attention mechanisms. However, these important aspects are not yet exploited in BCI. In this work, we studied different methods that explicitly cope with the natural brain dynamics during visuospatial attention tasks in order to enhance BCI robustness and classification performances. Results with ten healthy subjects demonstrate that our approach identifies spectro-temporal patterns that outperform the state-of-the-art classification method. On average, our time-dependent classification reaches 0.74 ± 0.03 of the area under the ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve (AUC) value with an increase of 12.3% with respect to standard methods (0.65 ± 0.4). In addition, the proposed approach allows faster classification (time intervals. These results support the hypothesis that visual attention information is actually indexed by subject-specific α sub-bands and is time dependent.

  20. Time dependent effect of chronic embryonic exposure to ethanol on zebrafish: Morphology, biochemical and anxiety alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlan, Nurul Farhana; Sata, Nurul Syafida Asma Mohd; Hassan, Siti Norhidayah; Bakar, Noraini Abu; Ahmad, Syahida; Zulkifli, Syaizwan Zahmir; Abdullah, Che Azurahanim Che; Ibrahim, Wan Norhamidah Wan

    2017-08-14

    Exposure to ethanol during critical period of development can cause severe impairments in the central nervous system (CNS). This study was conducted to assess the neurotoxic effects of chronic embryonic exposure to ethanol in the zebrafish, taking into consideration the time dependent effect. Two types of exposure regimen were applied in this study. Withdrawal exposure group received daily exposure starting from gastrulation until hatching, while continuous exposure group received daily exposure from gastrulation until behavioural assessment at 6dpf (days post fertilization). Chronic embryonic exposure to ethanol decreased spontaneous tail coiling at 24hpf (hour post fertilization), heart rate at 48hpf and increased mortality rate at 72hpf. The number of apoptotic cells in the embryos treated with ethanol was significantly increased as compared to the control. We also measured the morphological abnormalities and the most prominent effects can be observed in the treated embryos exposed to 1.50% and 2.00%. The treated embryos showed shorter body length, larger egg yolk, smaller eye diameter and heart edema as compared to the control. Larvae received 0.75% continuous ethanol exposure exhibited decreased swimming activity and increased anxiety related behavior, while withdrawal ethanol exposure showed increased swimming activity and decreased anxiety related behavior as compared to the respective control. Biochemical analysis exhibited that ethanol exposure for both exposure regimens altered proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and nucleic acids of the zebrafish larvae. Our results indicated that time dependent effect of ethanol exposure during development could target the biochemical processes thus leading to induction of apoptosis and neurobehavioral deficits in the zebrafish larvae. Thus it raised our concern about the safe limit of alcohol consumption for pregnant mother especially during critical periods of vulnerability for developing nervous system. Copyright © 2017

  1. Prediction of the time-dependent failure rate for normally operating components taking into account the operational history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrbanic, I.; Simic, Z.; Sljivac, D. [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing

    2008-09-15

    The prediction of the time-dependent failure rate has been studied, taking into account the operational history of a component used in applications such as system modeling in a probabilistic safety analysis in order to evaluate the impact of equipment aging and maintenance strategies on the risk measures considered. We have selected a time-dependent model for the failure rate which is based on the Weibull distribution and the principles of proportional age reduction by equipment overhauls. Estimation of the parameters that determine the failure rate is considered, including the definition of the operational history model and likelihood function for the Bayesian analysis of parameters for normally operating repairable components. The operational history is provided as a time axis with defined times of overhauls and failures. An example for demonstration is described with prediction of the future behavior for seven different operational histories. (orig.)

  2. ESHOL study reanalysis: All-cause mortality considered by competing risks and time-dependent covariates for renal transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Maduell

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: The results of this analysis of the ESHOL trial confirm that post-dilution OL-HDF reduces all-cause mortality versus hemodialysis in prevalent patients. The original results of the ESHOL study, which censored patients discontinuing the study for any reason, were confirmed in the present ITT population without censures and when all-cause mortality was considered by time-dependent and competing risks for transplantation.

  3. Recent charm mixing results from BABAR, Belle, and CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles, M.

    2009-01-01

    A summary of the results of several recent studies of charm mixing is presented. A number of different methods were used, including the measurement of lifetime ratios for final states of different CP, time dependence of wrong-sign hadronic decays, fits to time-dependent Dalitz plots, and searches for wrong-sign semi-leptonic decays. Taken together, they suggest mixing is of order 1%. The status of searches for indirect CP violation is also reported

  4. Recent charm mixing results from BABAR, Belle, and CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    A summary of the results of several recent studies of charm mixing is presented. A number of different methods were used, including the measurement of lifetime ratios for final states of different CP, time dependence of wrong-sign hadronic decays, fits to time-dependent Dalitz plots, and searches for wrong-sign semi-leptonic decays. Taken together, they suggest mixing is of order 1%. The status of searches for indirect CP violation is also reported

  5. Second quantized scalar QED in homogeneous time-dependent electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2014-12-01

    We formulate the second quantization of a charged scalar field in homogeneous, time-dependent electromagnetic fields, in which the Hamiltonian is an infinite system of decoupled, time-dependent oscillators for electric fields, but it is another infinite system of coupled, time-dependent oscillators for magnetic fields. We then employ the quantum invariant method to find various quantum states for the charged field. For time-dependent electric fields, a pair of quantum invariant operators for each oscillator with the given momentum plays the role of the time-dependent annihilation and the creation operators, constructs the exact quantum states, and gives the vacuum persistence amplitude as well as the pair-production rate. We also find the quantum invariants for the coupled oscillators for the charged field in time-dependent magnetic fields and advance a perturbation method when the magnetic fields change adiabatically. Finally, the quantum state and the pair production are discussed when a time-dependent electric field is present in parallel to the magnetic field.

  6. Influence of time dependent effects on the disposal environments of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    Reviews are presented firstly of potential events and processes which may affect the evolution of the disposal environments of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes in Britain and secondly of previous studies carried out worldwide in the field of time dependent effects. From the latter review available methodologies for incorporating time dependence into radiological assessments are identified. Finally, proposals are presented for the design and development of a time dependent effects model, based on the existing far field state model (FFSM) developed for ONWI in USA. (author)

  7. Modelling long term rockslide displacements with non-linear time-dependent relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caro, Mattia; Volpi, Giorgio; Castellanza, Riccardo; Crosta, Giovanni; Agliardi, Federico

    2015-04-01

    Rockslides undergoing rapid changes in behaviour pose major risks in alpine areas, and require careful characterization and monitoring both for civil protection and mitigation activities. In particular, these instabilities can undergo very slow movement with occasional and intermittent acceleration/deceleration stages of motion potentially leading to collapse. Therefore, the analysis of such instabilities remains a challenging issue. Rockslide displacements are strongly conditioned by hydrologic factors as suggested by correlations with groundwater fluctuations, snowmelt, with a frequently observed delay between perturbation and system reaction. The aim of this work is the simulation of the complex time-dependent behaviour of two case studies for which also a 2D transient hydrogeological simulation has been performed: Vajont rockslide (1960 to 1963) and the recent Mt. de La Saxe rockslide (2009 to 2012). Non-linear time-dependent constitutive relationships have been used to describe long-term creep deformation. Analyses have been performed using a "rheological-mechanical" approach that fits idealized models (e.g. viscoelastic, viscoplastic, elasto-viscoplastic, Burgers, nonlinear visco-plastic) to the experimental behaviour of specific materials by means of numerical constants. Bidimensional simulations were carried out using the finite difference code FLAC. Displacements time-series, available for the two landslides, show two superimposed deformation mechanisms: a creep process, leading to movements under "steady state" conditions (e.g. constant groundwater level), and a "dynamic" process, leading to an increase in displacement rate due to changes of external loads (e.g. groundwater level). For both cases sliding mass is considered as an elasto-plastic body subject to its self-weight, inertial and seepage forces varying with time according to water table fluctuation (due to snowmelt or changing in reservoir level) and derived from the previous hydrogeological

  8. Time-Dependent Effects of Glaze Ice on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Tabatabaei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to estimate the dynamic loads acting over a glaze-iced airfoil. This work studies the performance of unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS simulations in predicting the oscillations over an iced airfoil. The structure and size of time-averaged vortices are compared to measurements. Furthermore, the accuracy of a two-equation eddy viscosity turbulence model, the shear stress transport (SST model, is investigated in the case of the dynamic load analysis over a glaze-iced airfoil. The computational fluid dynamic analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of critical ice accretions on a 0.610 m chord NACA 0011 airfoil. Leading edge glaze ice accretion was simulated with flat plates (spoiler-ice extending along the span of the blade. Aerodynamic performance coefficients and pressure profiles were calculated and validated for the Reynolds number of 1.83 × 106. Furthermore, turbulent separation bubbles were studied. The numerical results confirm both time-dependent phenomena observed in previous similar measurements: (1 low-frequency mode, with a Strouhal number Sth≈0,013–0.02, and (2 higher frequency mode with a Strouhal number StL≈0,059–0.69. The higher frequency motion has the same characteristics as the shedding mode and the lower frequency motion has the flapping mode characteristics.

  9. A time-dependent search for high-energy neutrinos from bright GRBs with ANTARES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celli Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrophysical point-like neutrino sources, like Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs, are one of the main targets for neutrino telescopes, since they are among the best candidates for Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR acceleration. From the interaction between the accelerated protons and the intense radiation fields of the source jet, charged mesons are produced, which then decay into neutrinos. The methods and the results of a search for high-energy neutrinos in spatial and temporal correlation with the detected gamma-ray emission are presented for four bright GRBs observed between 2008 and 2013: a time-dependent analysis, optimised for each flare of the selected bursts, is performed to predict detailed neutrino spectra. The internal shock scenario of the fireball model is investigated, relying on the neutrino spectra computed through the numerical code NeuCosmA. The analysis is optimized on a per burst basis, through the maximization of the signal discovery probability. Since no events in ANTARES data passed the optimised cuts, 90% C.L. upper limits are derived on the expected neutrino fluences.

  10. Time-dependent 2-D modeling of edge plasma transport with high intermittency due to blobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2012-01-01

    The results on time-dependent 2-D fluid modeling of edge plasmas with non-diffusive intermittent transport across the magnetic field (termed cross-field) based on the novel macro-blob approach are presented. The capability of this approach to simulate the long temporal evolution (∼0.1 s) of the background plasma and simultaneously the fast spatiotemporal dynamics of blobs (∼10 −4 s) is demonstrated. An analysis of a periodic sequence of many macro-blobs (PSMB) is given showing that the resulting plasma attains a dynamic equilibrium. Plasma properties in the dynamic equilibrium are discussed. In PSMB modeling, the effect of macro-blob generation frequency on edge plasma parameters is studied. Comparison between PSMB modeling and experimental profile data is given. The calculations are performed for the same plasma discharge using two different models for anomalous cross-field transport: time-average convection and PSMB. Parametric analysis of edge plasma variation with transport coefficients in these models is presented. The capability of the models to accurately simulate enhanced transport due to blobs is compared. Impurity dynamics in edge plasma with macro-blobs is also studied showing strong impact of macro-blob on profiles of impurity charge states caused by enhanced outward transport of high-charge states and simultaneous inward transport of low-charge states towards the core. Macro-blobs cause enhancement of sputtering rates, increase radiation and impurity concentration in plasma, and change erosion/deposition patterns.

  11. Spike-timing-dependent learning rule to encode spatiotemporal patterns in a network of spiking neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Masahiko

    2002-01-01

    We study associative memory neural networks based on the Hodgkin-Huxley type of spiking neurons. We introduce the spike-timing-dependent learning rule, in which the time window with the negative part as well as the positive part is used to describe the biologically plausible synaptic plasticity. The learning rule is applied to encode a number of periodical spatiotemporal patterns, which are successfully reproduced in the periodical firing pattern of spiking neurons in the process of memory retrieval. The global inhibition is incorporated into the model so as to induce the gamma oscillation. The occurrence of gamma oscillation turns out to give appropriate spike timings for memory retrieval of discrete type of spatiotemporal pattern. The theoretical analysis to elucidate the stationary properties of perfect retrieval state is conducted in the limit of an infinite number of neurons and shows the good agreement with the result of numerical simulations. The result of this analysis indicates that the presence of the negative and positive parts in the form of the time window contributes to reduce the size of crosstalk term, implying that the time window with the negative and positive parts is suitable to encode a number of spatiotemporal patterns. We draw some phase diagrams, in which we find various types of phase transitions with change of the intensity of global inhibition.

  12. Finite moments approach to the time-dependent neutron transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Hyun

    1994-02-01

    Currently, nodal techniques are widely used in solving the multidimensional diffusion equation because of savings in computing time and storage. Thanks to the development of computer technology, one can now solve the transport equation instead of the diffusion equation to obtain more accurate solution. The finite moments method, one of the nodal methods, attempts to represent the fluxes in the cell and on cell surfaces more rigorously by retaining additional spatial moments. Generally, there are two finite moments schemes to solve the time-dependent transport equation. In one, the time variable is treated implicitly with finite moments method in space variable (implicit finite moments method), the other method uses finite moments method in both space and time (space-time finite moments method). In this study, these two schemes are applied to two types of time-dependent neutron transport problems. One is a fixed source problem, the other a heterogeneous fast reactor problem with delayed neutrons. From the results, it is observed that the two finite moments methods give almost the same solutions in both benchmark problems. However, the space-time finite moments method requires a little longer computing time than that of the implicit finite moments method. In order to reduce the longer computing time in the space-time finite moments method, a new iteration strategy is exploited, where a few time-stepwise calculation, in which original time steps are grouped into several coarse time divisions, is performed sequentially instead of performing iterations over the entire time steps. This strategy results in significant reduction of the computing time and we observe that 2-or 3-stepwise calculation is preferable. In addition, we propose a new finite moments method which is called mixed finite moments method in this thesis. Asymptotic analysis for the finite moments method shows that accuracy of the solution in a heterogeneous problem mainly depends on the accuracy of the

  13. Considering Time-Dependency of Social Vulnerability in Crisis Modeling and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, C.; Steinnocher, K.; Freire, S.; Loibl, W.; Peters-Anders, J.; Ungar, J.

    2012-04-01

    and emergency management. The vulnerability of each relevant element at risk, including human beings and society in general and its time-dependent variation is characterized both by its pre-event status and by its possible evolution during a crisis. Particularly in metropolitan areas, the spatial distribution of population is highly time-dependent due to human activities and mobility. Identifying distinct day-/nighttime population distribution characteristics is a major improvement compared to standard residence-based models, but does however only display part of reality. New technologies and data processing capabilities allow moving into the field of real-time representation of human movement. The focus of this contribution will be on illustrating, through project examples and by putting it in an emergency and crisis management context, two main categories, (1) the mapping of cell phone user activity, and (2) the use of volunteered geographic information (VGI).

  14. A multi scale approximation solution for the time dependent Boltzmann-transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merk, B.

    2004-03-01

    The basis of all transient simulations for nuclear reactor cores is the reliable calculation of the power production. The local power distribution is generally calculated by solving the space, time, energy and angle dependent neutron transport equation known as Boltzmann equation. The computation of exact solutions of the Boltzmann equation is very time consuming. For practical numerical simulations approximated solutions are usually unavoidable. The objective of this work is development of an effective multi scale approximation solution for the Boltzmann equation. Most of the existing methods are based on separation of space and time. The new suggested method is performed without space-time separation. This effective approximation solution is developed on the basis of an expansion for the time derivative of different approximations to the Boltzmann equation. The method of multiple scale expansion is used for the expansion of the time derivative, because the problem of the stiff time behaviour can't be expressed by standard expansion methods. This multiple scale expansion is used in this work to develop approximation solutions for different approximations of the Boltzmann equation, starting from the expansion of the point kinetics equations. The resulting analytic functions are used for testing the applicability and accuracy of the multiple scale expansion method for an approximation solution with 2 delayed neutron groups. The results are tested versus the exact analytical results for the point kinetics equations. Very good agreement between both solutions is obtained. The validity of the solution with 2 delayed neutron groups to approximate the behaviour of the system with 6 delayed neutron groups is demonstrated in an additional analysis. A strategy for a solution with 4 delayed neutron groups is described. A multiple scale expansion is performed for the space-time dependent diffusion equation for one homogenized cell with 2 delayed neutron groups. The result is

  15. Analytical Solution of Heat Conduction for Hollow Cylinders with Time-Dependent Boundary Condition and Time-Dependent Heat Transfer Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Te-Wen Tu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical solution for the heat transfer in hollow cylinders with time-dependent boundary condition and time-dependent heat transfer coefficient at different surfaces is developed for the first time. The methodology is an extension of the shifting function method. By dividing the Biot function into a constant plus a function and introducing two specially chosen shifting functions, the system is transformed into a partial differential equation with homogenous boundary conditions only. The transformed system is thus solved by series expansion theorem. Limiting cases of the solution are studied and numerical results are compared with those in the literature. The convergence rate of the present solution is fast and the analytical solution is simple and accurate. Also, the influence of physical parameters on the temperature distribution of a hollow cylinder along the radial direction is investigated.

  16. NMR-Based Metabonomic Investigation of Heat Stress in Myotubes Reveals a Time-Dependent Change in the Metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straadt, Ida K; Young, Jette F; Bross, Peter

    2010-01-01

    NMR-based metabonomics was applied to elucidate the time-dependent stress responses in mouse myotubes after heat exposure of either 42 or 45 degrees C for 1 h. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that the gradual time-dependent changes in metabolites contributing to the clustering...... and separation of the control samples from the different time points after heat stress primarily are in the metabolites glucose, leucine, lysine, phenylalanine, creatine, glutamine, and acetate. In addition, PC scores revealed a maximum change in metabolite composition 4 h after the stress exposure; thereafter......, samples returned toward control samples, however, without reaching the control samples even 10 h after stress. The results also indicate that the myotubes efficiently regulate the pH level by release of lactate to the culture medium at a heat stress level of 42 degrees C, which is a temperature level...

  17. The time-dependent close-coupling method for atomic and molecular collision processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pindzola, M S [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States); Robicheaux, F [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States); Loch, S D [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States); Berengut, J C [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States); Topcu, T [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States); Colgan, J [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Foster, M [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Griffin, D C [Department of Physics, Rollins College, Winter Park, FL (United States); Ballance, C P [Department of Physics, Rollins College, Winter Park, FL (United States); Schultz, D R [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Minami, T [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Badnell, N R [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Witthoeft, M C [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Plante, D R [Department of Mathematics, Stetson University, Deland, FL (United States); Mitnik, D M [Department of Physics, University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ludlow, J A [Department of Applied Mathematics, Queen' s University, Belfast (United Kingdom); Kleiman, U [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Dresden (Germany)

    2007-04-14

    We review the development of the time-dependent close-coupling method to study atomic and molecular few body dynamics. Applications include electron and photon collisions with atoms, molecules, and their ions. (topical review)

  18. Investigation into the mechanisms of time dependent deformation of hard rocks.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Drescher, K

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The testing undertaken for this dissertation is intended to help quantify the various time-dependant deformation processes around typical deep level hard rock tabular excavations. Three mechanisms were investigated and two different hard rock types...

  19. The master symmetry and time dependent symmetries of the differential–difference KP equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanizadeh, Farbod

    2014-01-01

    We first obtain the master symmetry of the differential–difference KP equation. Then we show how this master symmetry, through sl(2,C)-representation of the equation, can construct generators of time dependent symmetries. (paper)

  20. Integration of the time-dependent heat equation in the fuel rod performance program IAMBUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, G.

    1982-01-01

    An iterative numerical method for integration of the time-dependent heat equation is described. No presuppositions are made for the dependency of the thermal conductivity and heat capacity on space, time and temperature. (orig.) [de

  1. Evaluation of time-dependent void nucleation theory under ion bombardment conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprague, J.A.; Russell, K.C.; Choi, Y.H.

    1975-01-01

    The applicability of a steady state and time-dependent homogeneous void nucleation theory to charged-particle irradiation experiments was investigated. The steady-state theory was found to be inappropriate, since significant changes in a metal's microstructure would likely occur before the void nucleation rate could reach steady state. Two types of time dependence were examined, that of the point defect concentrations at the beginning of an irradiation and the longer-term time dependence of void nucleation. It was found that vacancy and interstitial clustering significantly reduce the relaxation time for the point defect concentrations. An efficient form of time-dependent homogeneous nucleation theory was applied to ion bombardment conditions to predict void size distributions

  2. Experimental quantum-walk revival with a time-dependent coin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, P; Zhang, R; Qin, H; Zhan, X; Bian, Z H; Li, J; Sanders, Barry C

    2015-04-10

    We demonstrate a quantum walk with time-dependent coin bias. With this technique we realize an experimental single-photon one-dimensional quantum walk with a linearly ramped time-dependent coin flip operation and thereby demonstrate two periodic revivals of the walker distribution. In our beam-displacer interferometer, the walk corresponds to movement between discretely separated transverse modes of the field serving as lattice sites, and the time-dependent coin flip is effected by implementing a different angle between the optical axis of half-wave plate and the light propagation at each step. Each of the quantum-walk steps required to realize a revival comprises two sequential orthogonal coin-flip operators, with one coin having constant bias and the other coin having a time-dependent ramped coin bias, followed by a conditional translation of the walker.

  3. Application of Trotter approximation for solving time dependent neutron transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancic, V.

    1987-01-01

    A method is proposed to solve multigroup time dependent neutron transport equation with arbitrary scattering anisotropy. The recurrence relation thus obtained is simple, numerically stable and especially suitable for treatment of complicated geometries. (author)

  4. Prediction of time dependent standby failure rates for periodically tested components taking into account the operational history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simic, Zdenko; Vrbanic, Ivan; Vukovic, Igor [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing

    2009-11-15

    The prediction of time dependent standby failure rates was studied, taking into account the operational history of a component. These studies are important for applications such as system modeling in probabilistic safety analysis to evaluate the impact of equipment aging and maintenance strategies on the risk measures (e.g. reactor core damage frequency) considered. The time dependent model for the standby failure rate is defined based on the Weibull distribution and the principles of proportional age reduction by equipment overhauls. The parameters which determine the standby failure rate are estimated, including the definition of the operational history model and likelihood function for Bayesian analysis of parameters for periodically tested standby repairable components. The operational history is provided as time axis with defined times of overhauls, surveillance tests and failures. Assessment of time dependent unavailability due to the failure of periodically tested standby components is described. As an example, the prediction of the future behavior of components for seven different operational histories is described. (orig.)

  5. Dynamic acoustics for the STAR-100. [computer algorithms for time dependent sound waves in jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, A.; Turkel, E.

    1979-01-01

    An algorithm is described to compute time dependent acoustic waves in a jet. The method differs from previous methods in that no harmonic time dependence is assumed, thus permitting the study of nonharmonic acoustical behavior. Large grids are required to resolve the acoustic waves. Since the problem is nonstiff, explicit high order schemes can be used. These have been adapted to the STAR-100 with great efficiencies and permitted the efficient solution of problems which would not be feasible on a scalar machine.

  6. Measuring time dependent volatility and cross-sectional correlation in Australian equity returns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, William K.

    2008-05-01

    In this study we examine the time-dependent nature of volatility and cross-correlation of Australian equity returns data. Volatility and correlation estimates are calculated using methods that allow for non-stationary behaviour. By averaging the estimates across the entire data set we show that the correlation in ASX stock returns displays evidence of significant time-dependent behaviour. We also find that the volatility estimates do not display similar non-stationary patterns.

  7. Navy Operational Planner: Anti-Submarine Warfare with Time-Dependent Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    horizon . We develop three test cases with varying degrees of time- dependence in the performance data, and show that taking this new information into... account changes the operational plans generated and can lead to better employment of ASW platforms due to the more realistic representation of...ocean or atmospheric conditions that vary over the planning horizon . We develop three test cases with varying degrees of time-dependence in the

  8. Time-dependent--S-matrix Hartree-Fock theory of complex reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, J.J.; Lichtner, P.C.; Dworzecka, M.

    1980-01-01

    Some limitations of the conventional time-dependent Hartree-Fock method for describing complex reactions are noted, and one particular ubiquitous defect is discussed in detail: the post-breakup spurious cross channel correlations which arise whenever several asymptotic reaction channels must be simultaneously described by a single determinant. A reformulated time-dependent--S-matrix Hartree-Fock theory is proposed, which obviates this difficulty. Axiomatic requirements minimal to assure that the time-dependent--S-matrix Hartree-Fock theory represents an unambiguous and physically interpretable asymptotic reaction theory are utilized to prescribe conditions upon the definition of acceptable asymptotic channels. That definition, in turn, defines the physical range of the time-dependent--S-matrix Hartree-Fock theory to encompass the collisions of mathematically well-defined ''time-dependent Hartree-Fock droplets.'' The physical properties of these objects then circumscribe the content of the Hartree-Fock single determinantal description. If their periodic vibrations occur for continuous ranges of energy then the resulting ''classical'' time-dependent Hartree-Fock droplets are seen to be intrinsically dissipative, and the single determinantal description of their collisions reduces to a ''trajectory'' theory which can describe the masses and relative motions of the fragments but can provide no information about specific asymptotic excited states beyond their constants of motion, or the average properties of the limit, if it exists, of their equilibrization process. If, on the other hand, the periodic vibrations of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock droplets are discrete in energy, then the time-dependent--S-matrix Hartree-Fock theory can describe asymptotically the time-average properties of the whole spectrum of such periodic vibrations

  9. Does being physically active prevent future disability in older people? Attenuated effects when taking time-dependent confounders into account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreisel, Stefan H; Blahak, Christian; Bäzner, Hansjörg; Hennerici, Michael G

    2017-12-21

    Causal experimental evidence that physical activity prevents disability in older people is sparse. Being physically active has nonetheless been shown to be associated with disability-free survival in observational studies. Observational studies are, however, prone to bias introduced by time-dependent confounding. Time-dependent confounding occurs when an exposure (e.g. being physically active at some time-point) potentially affects the future status of a confounder (such as depression sometime later), and both variables have an effect on latter outcome (i.e. disability). "Conventional" analysis with e.g. Cox-regression is the mainstay when analyzing longitudinal observational studies. Unfortunately, it does not provide unbiased estimates in the presence of time-dependent confounding. Marginal structural models (MSM) - a relatively new class of causal models - have the potential to adequately account for time-dependent confounding. Here we analyze the effect of older people being physically active on disability, in a large long-term observational study. We address time-dependent confounding by using marginal structural models and provide a non-technical practical demonstration of how to implement this type of modeling. Data is from 639 elderly individuals ascertained in the European multi-center Leukoaraiosis and Disability study (LADIS), followed-up yearly over a period of three years. We estimated the effect of self-reported physical activity on the probability to transit to instrumental disability in the presence of a large set of potential confounders. We compare the results of "conventional" modeling approaches to those estimated using marginal structural models, highlighting discrepancies. A "conventional" Cox-regression-like adjustment for salient baseline confounders signals a significant risk reduction under physical activity for later instrumental disability (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.44-0.90). However, given MSM estimation, the effect is attenuated towards null

  10. Contaminant transport in soil with depth-dependent reaction coefficients and time-dependent boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guangyao; Fu, Bojie; Zhan, Hongbin; Ma, Ying

    2013-05-01

    Predicting the fate and movement of contaminant in soils and groundwater is essential to assess and reduce the risk of soil contamination and groundwater pollution. Reaction processes of contaminant often decreased monotonously with depth. Time-dependent input sources usually occurred at the inlet of natural or human-made system such as radioactive waste disposal site. This study presented a one-dimensional convection-dispersion equation (CDE) for contaminant transport in soils with depth-dependent reaction coefficients and time-dependent inlet boundary conditions, and derived its analytical solution. The adsorption coefficient and degradation rate were represented as sigmoidal functions of soil depth. Solute breakthrough curves (BTCs) and concentration profiles obtained from CDE with depth-dependent and constant reaction coefficients were compared, and a constant effective reaction coefficient, which was calculated by arithmetically averaging the depth-dependent reaction coefficient, was proposed to reflect the lumped depth-dependent reaction effect. With the effective adsorption coefficient and degradation rate, CDE could produce similar BTCs and concentration profiles as those from CDE with depth-dependent reactions in soils with moderate chemical heterogeneity. In contrast, the predicted concentrations of CDE with fitted reaction coefficients at a certain depth departed significantly from those of CDE with depth-dependent reactions. Parametric analysis was performed to illustrate the effects of sinusoidally and exponentially decaying input functions on solute BTCs. The BTCs and concentration profiles obtained from the solutions for finite and semi-infinite domain were compared to investigate the effects of effluent boundary condition. The finite solution produced higher concentrations at the increasing limb of the BTCs and possessed a higher peak concentration than the semi-infinite solution which had a slightly long tail. Furthermore, the finite solution gave

  11. Burst-time-dependent plasticity robustly guides ON/OFF segregation in the lateral geniculate nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julijana Gjorgjieva

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous retinal activity (known as "waves" remodels synaptic connectivity to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN during development. Analysis of retinal waves recorded with multielectrode arrays in mouse suggested that a cue for the segregation of functionally distinct (ON and OFF retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in the LGN may be a desynchronization in their firing, where ON cells precede OFF cells by one second. Using the recorded retinal waves as input, with two different modeling approaches we explore timing-based plasticity rules for the evolution of synaptic weights to identify key features underlying ON/OFF segregation. First, we analytically derive a linear model for the evolution of ON and OFF weights, to understand how synaptic plasticity rules extract input firing properties to guide segregation. Second, we simulate postsynaptic activity with a nonlinear integrate-and-fire model to compare findings with the linear model. We find that spike-time-dependent plasticity, which modifies synaptic weights based on millisecond-long timing and order of pre- and postsynaptic spikes, fails to segregate ON and OFF retinal inputs in the absence of normalization. Implementing homeostatic mechanisms results in segregation, but only with carefully-tuned parameters. Furthermore, extending spike integration timescales to match the second-long input correlation timescales always leads to ON segregation because ON cells fire before OFF cells. We show that burst-time-dependent plasticity can robustly guide ON/OFF segregation in the LGN without normalization, by integrating pre- and postsynaptic bursts irrespective of their firing order and over second-long timescales. We predict that an LGN neuron will become ON- or OFF-responsive based on a local competition of the firing patterns of neighboring RGCs connecting to it. Finally, we demonstrate consistency with ON/OFF segregation in ferret, despite differences in the firing properties of retinal waves. Our

  12. Time-dependent density functional methods for Raman spectra in open-shell systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Fredy W; Schatz, George C

    2014-01-16

    We present an implementation of a time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) linear response module in NWChem for unrestricted DFT calculations and apply it to the calculation of resonant Raman spectra in open-shell molecular systems using the short-time approximation. The new source code was validated and applied to simulate Raman spectra on several doublet organic radicals (e.g., benzyl, benzosemiquinone, TMPD, trans-stilbene anion and cation, and methyl viologen) and the metal complex copper phthalocyanine. We also introduce a divide-and-conquer approach for the evaluation of polarizabilities in relatively large systems (e.g., copper phthalocyanine). The implemented tool gives comparisons with experiment that are similar to what is commonly found for closed-shell systems, with good agreement for most features except for small frequency shifts, and occasionally large deviations for some modes that depend on the molecular system studied, experimental conditions not being accounted in the modeling such as solvation effects and extra solvent-based peaks, and approximations in the underlying theory. The approximations used in the quantum chemical modeling include (i) choice of exchange-correlation functional and basis set; (ii) harmonic approximation used in the frequency analysis to determine vibrational normal modes; and (iii) short-time approximation (omission of nuclear motion effects) used in calculating resonant Raman spectra.

  13. Targeting the microbiota to address diet-induced obesity: a time dependent challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siobhan F Clarke

    Full Text Available Links between the gut microbiota and host metabolism have provided new perspectives on obesity. We previously showed that the link between the microbiota and fat deposition is age- and time-dependent subject to microbial adaptation to diet over time. We also demonstrated reduced weight gain in diet-induced obese (DIO mice through manipulation of the gut microbiota with vancomycin or with the bacteriocin-producing probiotic Lactobacillus salivarius UCC118 (Bac(+, with metabolic improvement achieved in DIO mice in receipt of vancomycin. However, two phases of weight gain were observed with effects most marked early in the intervention phase. Here, we compare the gut microbial populations at the early relative to the late stages of intervention using a high throughput sequencing-based analysis to understand the temporal relationship between the gut microbiota and obesity. This reveals several differences in microbiota composition over the intervening period. Vancomycin dramatically altered the gut microbiota composition, relative to controls, at the early stages of intervention after which time some recovery was evident. It was also revealed that Bac(+ treatment initially resulted in the presence of significantly higher proportions of Peptococcaceae and significantly lower proportions of Rikenellaceae and Porphyromonadaceae relative to the gut microbiota of L. salivarius UCC118 bacteriocin negative (Bac(- administered controls. These differences were no longer evident at the later time. The results highlight the resilience of the gut microbiota and suggest that interventions may need to be monitored and continually adjusted to ensure sustained modification of the gut microbiota.

  14. Time-dependent effect of composted tannery sludge on the chemical and microbial properties of soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Ricardo Silva; Santos, Vilma Maria; de Melo, Wanderley Jose; Nunes, Luis Alfredo Pinheiro Leal; van den Brink, Paul J; Araújo, Ademir Sérgio Ferreira

    2017-12-01

    Composting has been suggested as an efficient method for tannery sludge recycling before its application to the soil. However, the application of composted tannery sludge (CTS) should be monitored to evaluate its effect on the chemical and microbial properties of soil. This study evaluated the time-dependent effect of CTS on the chemical and microbial properties of soil. CTS was applied at 0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 Mg ha -1 and the soil chemical and microbial properties were evaluated at 0, 45, 75, 150, and 180 days. Increased CTS rates increased the levels of Ca, Cr, and Mg. While Soil pH, organic C, and P increased with the CTS rates initially, this effect decreased over time. Soil microbial biomass, respiration, metabolic quotient, and dehydrogenase increased with the application of CTS, but decreased over time. Analysis of the Principal Response Curve showed a significant effect of CTS rate on the chemical and microbial properties of the soil over time. The weight of each variable indicated that all soil properties, except β-glucosidase, dehydrogenase and microbial quotient, increased due to the CTS application. However, the highest weights were found for Cr, pH, Ca, P, phosphatase and total organic C. The application of CTS in the soil changed the chemical and microbial properties over time, indicating Cr, pH, Ca, phosphatase, and soil respiration as the more responsive chemical and microbial variables by CTS application.

  15. Time dependence of risks and benefits in pediatric primary prevention implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Elizabeth S; Triedman, John K; Cecchin, Frank; Mah, Doug Y; Abrams, Dominic J; Walsh, Edward P; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Alexander, Mark E

    2014-12-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) used to prevent sudden cardiac arrest in children not only provide appropriate therapy in 25% of patients but also result in a significant incidence of inappropriate shocks and other device complications. ICDs placed for secondary prevention have higher rates of appropriate therapy than those placed for primary prevention. Pediatric patients with primary prevention ICDs were studied to determine time-dependent incidence of appropriate use and adverse events. A total of 140 patients aged prevention were retrospectively identified. Demographics and times to first appropriate shock; adverse events (including inappropriate shock, lead failure, reintervention, and complication); generator replacement and follow-up were noted. During mean follow-up of 4 years, appropriate shock occurred in 19% patients and first adverse event (excluding death/transplant) occurred in 36%. Risk of death or transplant was ≈1% per year and was not related to receiving appropriate therapy. Conditional survival analysis showed rates of appropriate therapy and adverse events decrease soon after implantation, but adverse events are more frequent than appropriate therapy throughout follow-up. Primary prevention ICDs were associated with appropriate therapy in 19% and adverse event in 36% in this cohort. The incidence of both first appropriate therapy and device-related adverse events decreased during longer periods of follow-up after implantation. This suggests that indications for continued device therapy in pediatric primary prevention ICD patients might be reconsidered after a period of nonuse. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Time dependent ROC curves for the estimation of true prognostic capacity of microarray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucher, Yohann; Danger, Richard

    2012-11-22

    Microarray data can be used to identify prognostic signatures based on time-to-event data. The analysis of microarrays is often associated with overfitting and many papers have dealt with this issue. However, little attention has been paid to incomplete time-to-event data (truncated and censored follow-up). We have adapted the 0.632+ bootstrap estimator for the evaluation of time-dependent ROC curves. The interpretation of ROC-based results is well-established among the scientific and medical community. Moreover, the results do not depend on the incidence of the event, as opposed to many other prognostic statistics. Here, we have tested this methodology by simulations. We have illustrated its utility by analyzing a data set of diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma patients. Our results demonstrate the well-adapted properties of the 0.632+ ROC-based approach to evaluate the true prognostic capacity of a microarray-based signature. This method has been implemented in an R package ROCt632.

  17. Magy: Time dependent, multifrequency, self-consistent code for modeling electron beam devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botton, M.; Antonsen, T.M.; Levush, B.

    1997-01-01

    A new MAGY code is being developed for three dimensional modeling of electron beam devices. The code includes a time dependent multifrequency description of the electromagnetic fields and a self consistent analysis of the electrons. The equations of motion are solved with the electromagnetic fields as driving forces and the resulting trajectories are used as current sources for the fields. The calculations of the electromagnetic fields are based on the waveguide modal representation, which allows the solution of relatively small number of coupled one dimensional partial differential equations for the amplitudes of the modes, instead of the full solution of Maxwell close-quote s equations. Moreover, the basic time scale for updating the electromagnetic fields is the cavity fill time and not the high frequency of the fields. In MAGY, the coupling among the various modes is determined by the waveguide non-uniformity, finite conductivity of the walls, and the sources due to the electron beam. The equations of motion of the electrons are solved assuming that all the electrons traverse the cavity in less than the cavity fill time. Therefore, at each time step, a set of trajectories are calculated with the high frequency and other external fields as the driving forces. The code includes a verity of diagnostics for both electromagnetic fields and particles trajectories. It is simple to operate and requires modest computing resources, thus expected to serve as a design tool. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  18. State-to-state three-atom time-dependent reactive scattering in hyperspherical coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jeff; Parker, Gregory A

    2013-02-07

    We present a time-dependent, hyperspherical wave packet method for calculating three-atom state-to-state S-matrix elements. The wave packet is propagated in time using adiabatically adjusting, principal axes hyperspherical coordinates that treat all arrangement channels equivalently, allowing the simultaneous analysis of the products in all three arrangement channels. We take advantage of the symmetry of the potential energy surface and decompose the initial wave packet into its component irreducible representations, propagating each component separately. Each irreducible representation component of the wave packet is analyzed by projecting it onto the hyperspherical basis at a fixed, asymptotic hyperradius, and irreducible representation dependent S-matrix elements are obtained by matching the hyperspherical projections to symmetry-adapted Jacobi coordinate boundary conditions. We obtain arrangement channel-dependent S-matrix elements as linear combinations of the irreducible representation dependent elements. State-to-state H + H(2) and F + H(2) results for zero total angular momentum are presented.

  19. Time-dependent modeling of dust injection in semi-detached ITER divertor plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Roman; Krasheninnikov, Sergei

    2017-10-01

    At present, it is generally understood that dust related issues will play important role in operation of the next step fusion devices, i.e. ITER, and in the development of future fusion reactors. Recent progress in research on dust in magnetic fusion devises has outlined several topics of particular concern: a) degradation of fusion plasma performance; b) impairment of in-vessel diagnostic instruments; and c) safety issues related to dust reactivity and tritium retention. In addition, observed dust events in fusion edge plasmas are highly irregular and require consideration of temporal evolution of both the dust and the fusion plasma. In order to address the dust-related fusion performance issues, we have coupled the dust transport code DUSTT and the edge plasma transport code UEDGE in time-dependent manner, allowing modeling of transient dust-induced phenomena in fusion edge plasmas. Using the coupled codes we simulate burst-like injection of tungsten dust into ITER divertor plasma in semi-detached regime, which is considered as preferable ITER divertor operational mode based on the plasma and heat load control restrictions. Analysis of transport of the dust and the dust-produced impurities, and of dynamics of the ITER divertor and edge plasma in response to the dust injection will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under Award Number DE-FG02-06ER54852.

  20. Harnessing Wisdom of the Crowds Dynamics for Time-dependent Reputation and Ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Elizabeth M.

    The "wisdom of the crowds" is a concept used to describe the utility of harnessing group behaviour, where user opinion evolves over time and the opinion of the masses collectively demonstrates wisdom. Web 2.0 is a new medium where users are not just consumers, but are also contributors. By contributing content to the system, users become part of the network and relationships between users and content can be derived. Example applications are collaborative bookmarking networks such as dcl.icio.us and file sharing applications such as You Tube and Fliekr. These networks rely on user contributed content, described and classified using tags. The wealth of user generated content can be hard to navigate and search due to difficulties in comparing documents with similar tags and the application of traditional information retrieval scoring techniques are limited. Evaluating the time evolving interests of users may be used to derive quality of content. In this chapter, we explore a technique to rank documents based on reputation. The reputation is a combination of the number of bookmarkers, the reputation of the bookmarking user and the time dynamics of the document. Additionally, this reputation measure is extended to take into account the time-dependent, term-dependent reputation of a document. Experimental results and analysis are presented on a large collaborative IBM bookmarking network called Dogear.

  1. A perfectly matched layer for the time-dependent wave equation in heterogeneous and layered media

    KAUST Repository

    Duru, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    A mathematical analysis of the perfectly matched layer (PML) for the time-dependent wave equation in heterogeneous and layered media is presented. We prove the stability of the PML for discontinuous media with piecewise constant coefficients, and derive energy estimates for discontinuous media with piecewise smooth coefficients. We consider a computational setup consisting of smaller structured subdomains that are discretized using high order accurate finite difference operators for approximating spatial derivatives. The subdomains are then patched together into a global domain by a weak enforcement of interface conditions using penalties. In order to ensure the stability of the discrete PML, it is necessary to transform the interface conditions to include the auxiliary variables. In the discrete setting, the transformed interface conditions are crucial in deriving discrete energy estimates analogous to the continuous energy estimates, thus proving stability and convergence of the numerical method. Finally, we present numerical experiments demonstrating the stability of the PML in a layered medium and high order accuracy of the proposed interface conditions. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  2. The time dependent association of adrenaline administration and survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewy, Gordon A; Bobrow, Bentley J; Chikani, Vatsal; Sanders, Arthur B; Otto, Charles W; Spaite, Daniel W; Kern, Karl B

    2015-11-01

    Recommended for decades, the therapeutic value of adrenaline (epinephrine) in the resuscitation of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is controversial. To investigate the possible time-dependent outcomes associated with adrenaline administration by Emergency Medical Services personnel (EMS). A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from a near statewide cardiac resuscitation database between 1 January 2005 and 30 November 2013. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze the effect of the time interval between EMS dispatch and the initial dose of adrenaline on survival. The primary endpoints were survival to hospital discharge and favourable neurologic outcome. Data from 3469 patients with witnessed OHCA were analyzed. Their mean age was 66.3 years and 69% were male. An initially shockable rhythm was present in 41.8% of patients. Based on a multivariable logistic regression model with initial adrenaline administration time interval (AATI) from EMS dispatch as the covariate, survival was greatest when adrenaline was administered very early but decreased rapidly with increasing (AATI); odds ratio 0.94 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.92-0.97). The AATI had no significant effect on good neurological outcome (OR=0.96, 95% CI=0.90-1.02). In patients with OHCA, survival to hospital discharge was greater in those treated early with adrenaline by EMS especially in the subset of patients with a shockable rhythm. However survival rapidly decreased with increasing adrenaline administration time intervals (AATI). Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Shear History on Rheology of Time-Dependent Colloidal Silica Gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo H. S. Santos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a rheological study describing the effects of shear on the flow curves of colloidal gels prepared with different concentrations of fumed silica (4%, 5%, 6%, and 7% and a hydrophobic solvent (Hydrocarbon fuel, JP-8. Viscosity measurements as a function of time were carried out at different shear rates (10, 50, 100, 500, and 1000 s−1, and based on this data, a new structural kinetics model was used to describe the system. Previous work has based the analysis of time dependent fluids on the viscosity of the intact material, i.e., before it is sheared, which is a condition very difficult to achieve when weak gels are tested. The simple action of loading the gel in the rheometer affects its structure and rheology, and the reproducibility of the measurements is thus seriously compromised. Changes in viscosity and viscoelastic properties of the sheared material are indicative of microstructural changes in the gel that need to be accounted for. Therefore, a more realistic method is presented in this work. In addition, microscopical images (Cryo-SEM were obtained to show how the structure of the gel is affected upon application of shear.

  4. On the subsystem formulation of linear-response time-dependent DFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavanello, Michele

    2013-05-28

    A new and thorough derivation of linear-response subsystem time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is presented and analyzed in detail. Two equivalent derivations are presented and naturally yield self-consistent subsystem TD-DFT equations. One reduces to the subsystem TD-DFT formalism of Neugebauer [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 134116 (2007)]. The other yields Dyson type equations involving three types of subsystem response functions: coupled, uncoupled, and Kohn-Sham. The Dyson type equations for subsystem TD-DFT are derived here for the first time. The response function formalism reveals previously hidden qualities and complications of subsystem TD-DFT compared with the regular TD-DFT of the supersystem. For example, analysis of the pole structure of the subsystem response functions shows that each function contains information about the electronic spectrum of the entire supersystem. In addition, comparison of the subsystem and supersystem response functions shows that, while the correlated response is subsystem additive, the Kohn-Sham response is not. Comparison with the non-subjective partition DFT theory shows that this non-additivity is largely an artifact introduced by the subjective nature of the density partitioning in subsystem DFT.

  5. Model-independent measurement of the CKM angle gamma using B-0 -> DK*0 decays with D -> K (S) (0) pi (+)pi (-) and K (S) (0) K+K-

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Cheung, S-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gandara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hongming, L.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J-P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Cid, E. Lemos; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusardi, N.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; Mcnab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Casasus, M. Plo; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Pernas, M. Ramos; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Molina, V. Rives; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Valls, P. Ruiz; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, I. T.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Azquez Sierra, C. V.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-01-01

    A binned Dalitz plot analysis of the decays B (0) -> DK*(0), with D -> K (S) (0) pi(+)pi(-) and D -> K (S) (0) K+K-, is performed to measure the observables x(+/-) and y(+/-), which are related to the CKM angle gamma and the hadronic parameters of the decays. The D decay strong phase variation over

  6. Nonlinear dynamic response of a simply supported rectangular functionally graded material plate under the time-dependent thermal mechanical loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Y. X. [Beijing Information Science and Technology University, Beijing (China); Zhang, W. [Beijing University of Technology, Beijing (China); Yang, J. [RMIT University, Bundoora (Australia); Li, S. Y. [Ttianjin University of Technology and Education, Tianjin (China)

    2011-07-15

    An analysis on nonlinear dynamic characteristics of a simply supported functionally graded materials (FGMs) rectangular plate subjected to the transversal and in-plane excitations is presented in the time dependent thermal environment. Here we look the FGM Plates as isotropic materials which is assumed to be temperature dependent and graded in the thickness direction according to the power-law distribution in terms of volume fractions of the constituents. The geometrical nonlinearity using Von Karman's assumption is introduced. The formulation also includes in-plane and rotary inertia effects. In the framework of Reddy's third-order shear deformation plate theory, the governing equations of motion for the FGM plate are derived by the Hamilton's principle. Then the equations of motion with two degree- of-freedom under combined the time-dependent thermomechanical loads can be obtained by using Galerkin's method. Using numerical method, the control equations are analyzed to obtain the response curves. Under certain conditions the periodic and chaotic motions of the FGM plate are found. It is found that because of the existence of the temperature which relate to the time the motions of the FGM plate show the great difference. A period motion can be changed into the chaotic motions which are affected by the time dependent temperature.

  7. Time-dependent extraction kinetics of infused components of different Indian black tea types using UV spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asir Gani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Time-dependent aqueous extraction of six tea types was carried out with leaf–water–ratio of 0.5 g/100 ml, temperature of extraction 90°C and time of extraction ranging from 1 to 10 min. UV–vis spectroscopic analysis in the range varying from 220 to 900 nm of the aqueous tea extracts showed a prominent peak at 273 nm in the ultraviolet region which can be associated with n → π* electronic transition of caffeine molecules. Parabolic diffusion, Power law, hyperbolic, Weibull’s and Elovich’s models were fitted to represent the aqueous soluble component extraction behaviour for time-dependent extraction of aqueous extractables. Parabolic diffusion model, Power law and Elovich’s model were a close fit to the experimental data for all the selected tea types with correlation coefficients (R2 ranging 0.8029–0.9953, whereas hyperbolic and Weibull’s models showed poor fitness to represent the extraction behaviour of fanning and AO leaf, LD, fanning and dust, respectively, with R2 < 0.8, for time-dependent aqueous soluble component extraction.

  8. New constraints on time-dependent variations of fundamental constants using Planck data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Luke; Chluba, Jens

    2018-02-01

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) today allow us to answer detailed questions about the properties of our Universe, targeting both standard and non-standard physics. In this paper, we study the effects of varying fundamental constants (i.e. the fine-structure constant, αEM, and electron rest mass, me) around last scattering using the recombination codes COSMOREC and RECFAST++. We approach the problem in a pedagogical manner, illustrating the importance of various effects on the free electron fraction, Thomson visibility function and CMB power spectra, highlighting various degeneracies. We demonstrate that the simpler RECFAST++ treatment (based on a three-level atom approach) can be used to accurately represent the full computation of COSMOREC. We also include explicit time-dependent variations using a phenomenological power-law description. We reproduce previous Planck 2013 results in our analysis. Assuming constant variations relative to the standard values, we find the improved constraints αEM/αEM, 0 = 0.9993 ± 0.0025 (CMB only) and me/me, 0 = 1.0039 ± 0.0074 (including BAO) using Planck 2015 data. For a redshift-dependent variation, αEM(z) = αEM(z0) [(1 + z)/1100]p with αEM(z0) ≡ αEM, 0 at z0 = 1100, we obtain p = 0.0008 ± 0.0025. Allowing simultaneous variations of αEM(z0) and p yields αEM(z0)/αEM, 0 = 0.9998 ± 0.0036 and p = 0.0006 ± 0.0036. We also discuss combined limits on αEM and me. Our analysis shows that existing data are not only sensitive to the value of the fundamental constants around recombination but also its first time derivative. This suggests that a wider class of varying fundamental constant models can be probed using the CMB.

  9. The genomic response of Ishikawa cells to bisphenol A exposure is dose- and time-dependent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naciff, Jorge M.; Khambatta, Zubin S.; Reichling, Timothy D.; Carr, Gregory J.; Tiesman, Jay P.; Singleton, David W.; Khan, Sohaib A.; Daston, George P.

    2010-01-01

    A reliable in vitro model to determine the potential estrogenic activity of chemicals of interest is still unavailable. To further investigate the usefulness of a human-derived cell line, we determined the transcriptional changes induced by bisphenol A (BPA) in Ishikawa cells at various doses (1 nM, 100 nM, 10 μM, and 100 μM) and time points (8, 24 and 48 h) by comparing the response of approximately 38,500 human genes and ESTs between treatment groups and controls (vehicle-treated). By trend analysis, we determined that the expression of 2794 genes was modified by BPA in a dose- and time-dependent manner (p ≤ 0.0001). However, the majority of gene expression changes induced in Ishikawa cells were elicited by the highest doses of BPA evaluated (10-100 μM), while the genomic response of the cells exposed to low doses of BPA was essentially negligible. By comparing the Ishikawa cells' response to BPA vs.17α-ethynyl estradiol we determined that the change in the expression of 307 genes was identical in the direction of the change, although the magnitude of the change for some genes was different. Further, the response of Ishikawa cells to high doses of BPA shared similarities to the estrogenic response of the rat uterus, specifically, 362 genes were regulated in a similar manner in vivo as well as in vitro. Gene ontology analysis indicated that BPA results in changes to multiple molecular pathways affecting various biological processes particularly associated with cell organization and biogenesis, regulation of translation, cell proliferation, and intracellular transport; processes also affected by estrogen exposure in the uterus of the rat. These results indicate that Ishikawa cells are capable of generating a biologically relevant estrogenic response after exposure to chemicals with varied estrogenic activity, and offer an in vitro model to assess this mode of action.

  10. Pressure and time dependence of the cardiopulmonary reflex response in patients with hypertensive cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto M.E.B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The first minutes of the time course of cardiopulmonary reflex control evoked by lower body negative pressure (LBNP in patients with hypertensive cardiomyopathy have not been investigated in detail. We studied 15 hypertensive patients with left ventricular dysfunction (LVD and 15 matched normal controls to observe the time course response of the forearm vascular resistance (FVR during 3 min of LBNP at -10, -15, and -40 mmHg in unloading the cardiopulmonary receptors. Analysis of the average of 3-min intervals of FVR showed a blunted response of the LVD patients at -10 mmHg (P = 0.03, but a similar response in both groups at -15 and -40 mmHg. However, using a minute-to-minute analysis of the FVR at -15 and -40 mmHg, we observed a similar response in both groups at the 1st min, but a marked decrease of FVR in the LVD group at the 3rd min of LBNP at -15 mmHg (P = 0.017, and -40 mmHg (P = 0.004. Plasma norepinephrine levels were analyzed as another neurohumoral measurement of cardiopulmonary receptor response to LBNP, and showed a blunted response in the LVD group at -10 (P = 0.013, -15 (P = 0.032 and -40 mmHg (P = 0.004. We concluded that the cardiopulmonary reflex response in patients with hypertensive cardiomyopathy is blunted at lower levels of LBNP. However, at higher levels, the cardiopulmonary reflex has a normal initial response that decreases progressively with time. As a consequence of the time-dependent response, the cardiopulmonary reflex response should be measured over small intervals of time in clinical studies.

  11. Adjoint-based sensitivities and data assimilation with a time-dependent marine ice sheet model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Dan; Heimbach, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    To date, assimilation of observational data using large-scale ice models has consisted only of time-dependent inversions of surface velocities for basal traction, bed elevation, or ice stiffness. These inversions are for the most part based on control methods (Macayeal D R, 1992, A tutorial on the use of control methods in ice sheet modeling), which involve generating and solving the adjoint of the ice model. Quite a lot has been learned about the fast-flowing parts of the Antarctic Ice Sheet from such inversions. Still, there are limitations to these "snapshot" inversions. For instance, they cannot capture time-dependent dynamics, such as propagation of perturbations through the ice sheet. They cannot assimilate time-dependent observations, such as surface elevation changes. And they are problematic for initializing time-dependent ice sheet models, as such initializations may contain considerable model drift. We have developed an adjoint for a time-dependent land ice model, with which we will address such issues. The land ice model implements a hybrid shallow shelf-shallow ice stress balance and can represent the floating, fast-sliding, and frozen bed regimes of a marine ice sheet. The adjoint is generated by a combination of analytic methods and the use of automated differentiation (AD) software. Experiments with idealized geometries have been carried out; adjoint sensitivities reveal the "vulnerable" regions of ice shelves, and preliminary inversions of "synthetic" observations (e.g. simultaneous inversion of basal traction and topography) yield encouraging results.

  12. Multi-scale simulations of droplets in generic time-dependent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, Felix; Biferale, Luca; Sbragaglia, Mauro; Toschi, Federico

    2017-11-01

    We study the deformation and dynamics of droplets in time-dependent flows using a diffuse interface model for two immiscible fluids. The numerical simulations are at first benchmarked against analytical results of steady droplet deformation, and further extended to the more interesting case of time-dependent flows. The results of these time-dependent numerical simulations are compared against analytical models available in the literature, which assume the droplet shape to be an ellipsoid at all times, with time-dependent major and minor axis. In particular we investigate the time-dependent deformation of a confined droplet in an oscillating Couette flow for the entire capillary range until droplet break-up. In this way these multi component simulations prove to be a useful tool to establish from ``first principles'' the dynamics of droplets in complex flows involving multiple scales. European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie Grant Agreement No 642069. & European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework Program, ERC Grant Agreement No 339032.

  13. Decay of autoionizing states in time-dependent density functional and reduced density matrix functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Varun; Brics, Martins; Bauer, Dieter [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Autoionizing states are inaccessible to time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using known, adiabatic Kohn-Sham (KS) potentials. We determine the exact KS potential for a numerically exactly solvable model Helium atom interacting with a laser field that is populating an autoionizing state. The exact single-particle density of the population in the autoionizing state corresponds to that of the energetically lowest quasi-stationary state in the exact KS potential. We describe how this exact potential controls the decay by a barrier whose height and width allows for the density to tunnel out and decay with the same rate as in the ab initio time-dependent Schroedinger calculation. However, devising a useful exchange-correlation potential that is capable of governing such a scenario in general and in more complex systems is hopeless. As an improvement over TDDFT, time-dependent reduced density matrix functional theory has been proposed. We are able to obtain for the above described autoionization process the exact time-dependent natural orbitals (i.e., the eigenfunctions of the exact, time-dependent one-body reduced density matrix) and study the potentials that appear in the equations of motion for the natural orbitals and the structure of the two-body density matrix expanded in them.

  14. Time-dependent fluorescence in nanoconfined solvents: Linear-response approximations and Gaussian statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Brian B.; Thompson, Ward H.

    2011-08-01

    The time-dependent fluorescence of a model dye molecule in a nanoconfined solvent is used to test approximations based on the dynamic and static linear-response theories and the assumption of Gaussian statistics. Specifically, the results of nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations are compared to approximate expressions involving time correlation functions obtained from equilibrium simulations. Solvation dynamics of a model diatomic dye molecule dissolved in acetonitrile confined in a spherical hydrophobic cavity of radius 12, 15, and 20 Å is used as the test case. Both the time-dependent fluorescence energy, expressed as the normalized dynamic Stokes shift, and the time-dependent position of the dye molecule after excitation are examined. While the dynamic linear-response approximation fails to describe key aspects of the solvation dynamics, assuming Gaussian statistics reproduces the full nonequilibrium simulations well. The implications of these results are discussed.

  15. Numerical studies of time-independent and time-dependent scattering by several elliptical cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigsch, Martin

    2007-07-01

    A numerical solution to the problem of time-dependent scattering by an array of elliptical cylinders with parallel axes is presented. The solution is an exact one, based on the separation-of-variables technique in the elliptical coordinate system, the addition theorem for Mathieu functions, and numerical integration. Time-independent solutions are described by a system of linear equations of infinite order which are truncated for numerical computations. Time-dependent solutions are obtained by numerical integration involving a large number of these solutions. First results of a software package generating these solutions are presented: wave propagation around three impenetrable elliptical scatterers. As far as we know, this method described has never been used for time-dependent multiple scattering.

  16. On the algebraic approach to the time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urdaneta, Ines; Palma, Alejandro; Sandoval, Lourdes

    2010-01-01

    The unitary operator V(t) that diagonalizes the time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonian (TDQH) into a time-dependent harmonic oscillator (TDHO) is obtained using a Lie algebra. The method involves a factorization of the TDQH into a TDHO through a unitary Bogoliubov transformation in terms of creation and annihilation operators with time-dependent coefficients. It is shown that this operator can be easily achieved by means of the factorization, together with the commonly known Wei-Norman theorem. We discuss the conditions under which this unitary operator converges to the evolution operator U(t) of the Schroedinger equation for the TDQH, giving then a straightforward calculation of the evolution operator with respect to the procedures published in the literature.

  17. Time-dependent model of the Martian atmosphere for use in orbit lifetime and sustenance studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, R. D.; Stewart, A. I.

    1984-01-01

    A time-dependent model of the Martian atmosphere suitable for calculation of long-term aerodynamic effects on low altitude satellites is presented. The atmospheric model is both position dependent, through latitude and longitude effects, and time dependent. The time dependency includes diurnal and seasonal effects, effects of annual motion, long and short term solar activity effects, and periodic dust storm effects. Nine constituent gases are included in the model. Uncertainties in exospheric temperature, turbidity, and turbopause altitude are used to produce bounds on the expected density. A computer model - a Fortran subroutine which, when given the Julian date, Cartesian position of the sun and the spacecraft in aerocentric coordinates, returns the local values of mass density, temperature, scale height, and upper and lower bounds on the mass density is presented.

  18. Time-dependent model of the Martian atmosphere for use in orbit lifetime and sustenance studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, R. D.; Stewart, A. I.

    1984-09-01

    A time-dependent model of the Martian atmosphere suitable for calculation of long-term aerodynamic effects on low altitude satellites is presented. The atmospheric model is both position dependent, through latitude and longitude effects, and time dependent. The time dependency includes diurnal and seasonal effects, effects of annual motion, long and short term solar activity effects, and periodic dust storm effects. Nine constituent gases are included in the model. Uncertainties in exospheric temperature, turbidity, and turbopause altitude are used to produce bounds on the expected density. A computer model - a Fortran subroutine which, when given the Julian date, Cartesian position of the sun and the spacecraft in aerocentric coordinates, returns the local values of mass density, temperature, scale height, and upper and lower bounds on the mass density is presented.

  19. On the algebraic approach to the time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urdaneta, Ines; Palma, Alejandro [Instituto de Fisica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Sandoval, Lourdes, E-mail: urdaneta@sirio.ifuap.buap.m [Facultad de Ciencias de la Computacion, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2010-09-24

    The unitary operator V(t) that diagonalizes the time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonian (TDQH) into a time-dependent harmonic oscillator (TDHO) is obtained using a Lie algebra. The method involves a factorization of the TDQH into a TDHO through a unitary Bogoliubov transformation in terms of creation and annihilation operators with time-dependent coefficients. It is shown that this operator can be easily achieved by means of the factorization, together with the commonly known Wei-Norman theorem. We discuss the conditions under which this unitary operator converges to the evolution operator U(t) of the Schroedinger equation for the TDQH, giving then a straightforward calculation of the evolution operator with respect to the procedures published in the literature.

  20. Effective Potential from the Generalized Time-Dependent Schrödinger Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifce Sandev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the generalized time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the force free case, as a generalization, for example, of the standard time-dependent Schrödinger equation, time fractional Schrödinger equation, distributed order time fractional Schrödinger equation, and tempered in time Schrödinger equation. We relate it to the corresponding standard Schrödinger equation with effective potential. The general form of the effective potential that leads to a standard time-dependent Schrodinger equation with the same solution as the generalized one is derived explicitly. Further, effective potentials for several special cases, such as Dirac delta, power-law, Mittag-Leffler and truncated power-law memory kernels, are expressed in terms of the Mittag-Leffler functions. Such complex potentials have been used in the transport simulations in quantum dots, and in simulation of resonant tunneling diode.

  1. Exact-exchange time-dependent density-functional theory with the frequency-dependent kernel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigeta, Yasuteru; Hirao, Kimihiko; Hirata, So

    2006-01-01

    The effects of the adiabatic approximation in time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) on dynamic polarizabilities and van der Waals C 6 coefficients have been analyzed quantitatively. These effects are shown to be small in the off-resonance region of the perturbation frequencies by comparing the results from the exact-exchange TDDFT employing the optimized effective potentials and the corresponding frequency-dependent kernel [time-dependent optimized effective potentials (TDOEP)] and those from the frequency-independent kernel [adiabatic TDOEP (ATDOEP)]. The magnitude of the computed dynamic polarizabilities near the static limit is found to be in the order: time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF)>ATDOEP>TDOEP, whereas that of C 6 is: TDHF>TDOEP>ATDOEP

  2. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Time-Dependent Quantum Molecular Dynamics : Theory and Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lathouwers, L

    1992-01-01

    From March 30th to April 3rd, 1992, a NATO Advanced Research workshop entitled "Time Dependent Quantum Molecular Dynamics: Theory and Experiment" was held at Snowbird, Utah. The organizing committee consisted of J. BROECKHOVE (Antwerp, Belgium), L. CEDERBAUM (Heidelberg, Germany), L. LATHOUWERS (Antwerp, Belgium), N. OHRN (Gainesville, Florida) and J. SIMONS (Salt Lake City, Utah). Fifty-two participants from eleven different countries attended the meeting at which thirty-three talks and one poster session were held. Twenty-eight participants submitted contributions to the proceedings of the meeting, which are reproduced in this volume. The workshop brought together experts in different areas 0 f molecular quantum dynamics, all adhering to the time dependent approach. The aim was to discuss and compare methods and applications. The ~amiliarityo~ the aUdience with the concepts o~ time dependent approaches greatly facilitated topical discussions and probing towards new applications. A broad area of subject matt...

  3. Time-dependent wave-packet description of dissociative electron attachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gertitschke, P.L.; Domcke, W.

    1993-01-01

    A time-dependent description of the dissociative-attachment process is formulated within the framework of the projection-operator formalism of scattering theory. A generally applicable computational scheme for the solution of the resulting integro-differential equation of motion is developed. The concepts and computational techniques are illustrated for a model of a d-wave shape resonance as well as for the p-wave 2 Σ u + shape resonance in electron-H 2 collisions. It is shown that the time-dependent wave-packet picture yields qualitative insight into the dynamics of the dissociative-attachment reaction. The origin of the complete failure of the local-complex-potential approximation for the 2 Σ u + resonance in e+H 2 becomes apparent in the time-dependent picture

  4. Communication: Time-dependent optimized coupled-cluster method for multielectron dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeshi; Pathak, Himadri; Orimo, Yuki; Ishikawa, Kenichi L.

    2018-02-01

    Time-dependent coupled-cluster method with time-varying orbital functions, called time-dependent optimized coupled-cluster (TD-OCC) method, is formulated for multielectron dynamics in an intense laser field. We have successfully derived the equations of motion for CC amplitudes and orthonormal orbital functions based on the real action functional, and implemented the method including double excitations (TD-OCCD) and double and triple excitations (TD-OCCDT) within the optimized active orbitals. The present method is size extensive and gauge invariant, a polynomial cost-scaling alternative to the time-dependent multiconfiguration self-consistent-field method. The first application of the TD-OCC method of intense-laser driven correlated electron dynamics in Ar atom is reported.

  5. Theory of time-dependent intense-field collisional resonance fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiber, P. D.; Cooper, J.; Burnett, K.; Kunasz, C. V.; Raymer, M. G.

    1983-01-01

    The time-dependent theory of Courtens and Szoke (1977) is generalized using the approach of Burnett et al. (1982) to derive time-dependent spectral intensities of resonance fluorescence from atoms driven by a pulsed laser in the presence of collisions. These results are valid both for laser detunings inside and outside the usual impact region of the spectrum, including Zeeman degeneracy effects. This theory is applied to a simple but important example (J = 0 to J = 1) to obtain quantitative predictions for the observable scattered-light spectrum which can be directly compared with recent experiments.

  6. Time-Dependent Networks as Models to Achieve Fast Exact Time-Table Queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gert Stølting; Jacob, Rico

    2003-01-01

    We consider efficient algorithms for exact time-table queries, i.e. algorithms that find optimal itineraries for travelers using a train system. We propose to use time-dependent networks as a model and show advantages of this approach over space-time networks as models.......We consider efficient algorithms for exact time-table queries, i.e. algorithms that find optimal itineraries for travelers using a train system. We propose to use time-dependent networks as a model and show advantages of this approach over space-time networks as models....

  7. Time-dependent Networks as Models to Achieve Fast Exact Time-table Queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Jacob, Rico

    2001-01-01

    We consider efficient algorithms for exact time-table queries, i.e. algorithms that find optimal itineraries. We propose to use time-dependent networks as a model and show advantages of this approach over space-time networks as models.......We consider efficient algorithms for exact time-table queries, i.e. algorithms that find optimal itineraries. We propose to use time-dependent networks as a model and show advantages of this approach over space-time networks as models....

  8. Efficient computation of the MCTDHF approximation to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othmar Koch

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss analytical and numerical properties of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method for the approximate solution of the time-dependent multi-particle (electronic Schrödinger equation which are relevant for an efficient implementation of this model reduction technique. Particularly, we focus on a discretization and low rank approximation in the evaluation of the meanfield terms occurring in the MCTDHF equations of motion, which is crucial for the computational tractability of the problem. We give error bounds for this approximation and demonstrate the achieved gain in performance.

  9. Exact solutions to the supply chain equations for arbitrary, time-dependent demands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warburton, Roger D.H.; Hodgson, J.P.E.; Nielsen, Erland Hejn

    2014-01-01

    for the estimated demand and the target work in progress when the demand is time-dependent. The resulting inventory equation is solved in terms of the Lambert modes with all of the demand non-linearities confined to the pre-shape function. The series solution is exact, and all terms are reasonably easy to calculate......, so users can determine the inventory behavior to any desired precision. To illustrate, we solve the equations for a non-linear, quadratic time-dependence in the demand. For practical use, only a few terms in the series are required, a proposition illustrated by the For All Practical Purposes (FAPP...

  10. Time-Dependent Decline in Multifocal Electroretinogram Requires Faster Recording Procedures in Anesthetized Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nina Buus; Christiansen, Anders Tolstrup; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The time-dependent effect of anesthetics on the retinal function is debated. We hypothesize that in anesthetized animals there is a time-dependent decline that requires optimized multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) recording procedures. METHODS: Conventional and four-frame global-flash mf...... by determining the necessary time-of-delay from intraocular injection of a drug to full effect. TRANSLATIONAL RELEVANCE: General anesthesia is a possible source of error in mfERG recordings. Therefore, it is important to investigate the translational relevance of the results to mfERG recordings in children...

  11. Quantum Many-Body System in Presence of Time-Dependent Potential and Electric Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobhani, Hadi; Hassanabadi, Hassan [Shahrood University of Technology, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    In this article, a quantum many-body system is considered. Then two time-dependent interactions have been added to the system. Changing of them is assumed in general form. After that, by using algebraic method, time evolution of this many-body system has been investigated. In order to study the time evolution, Lewis-Riesenfeld dynamical invariant and time evolution operator method have been used. Appropriate dynamical invariants are constructed and their Eigenvalues are derived as well as appropriate time evolution operators are constructed. These calculations have been done in general form so there are no limiting assumptions on changing of time-dependent functions.

  12. Quantum Many-Body System in Presence of Time-Dependent Potential and Electric Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobhani, Hadi; Hassanabadi, Hassan

    2017-01-01

    In this article, a quantum many-body system is considered. Then two time-dependent interactions have been added to the system. Changing of them is assumed in general form. After that, by using algebraic method, time evolution of this many-body system has been investigated. In order to study the time evolution, Lewis-Riesenfeld dynamical invariant and time evolution operator method have been used. Appropriate dynamical invariants are constructed and their Eigenvalues are derived as well as appropriate time evolution operators are constructed. These calculations have been done in general form so there are no limiting assumptions on changing of time-dependent functions.

  13. Rate-Independent Processes with Linear Growth Energies and Time-Dependent Boundary Conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kružík, Martin; Zimmer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 3 (2012), s. 591-604 ISSN 1937-1632 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/10/0357 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : concentrations * oscillations * time-dependent boundary conditions * rate-independent evolution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/MTR/kruzik-rate-independent processes with linear growth energies and time-dependent boundary conditions.pdf

  14. Long-lifetime Martian orbit selection using a time-dependent model of the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, R. D.; Stewart, A. I.; Chow, C.-C.; Uphoff, C.

    1984-01-01

    A mathematical model of the time-dependent Martian atmosphere has been developed in order to accurately calculate the effects of aerodynamic drag on a low altitude satellite. The time-dependent properties of the model include solar activity effects, dust storm effects, seasonal and diurnal variations, and annual motion effects. Position effects are accounted for through Martian latitude and longitude. Expected values of mass density, temperature, scale height, and the estimated standard deviation of the mass density are provided. An example of the use of the model in selecting an orbit for the Mars Geochemical/Climatology Orbiter is given.

  15. Long-lifetime Martian orbit selection using a time-dependent model of the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, R. D.; Stewart, A. I.; Chow, C.-C.; Uphoff, C.

    1984-08-01

    A mathematical model of the time-dependent Martian atmosphere has been developed in order to accurately calculate the effects of aerodynamic drag on a low altitude satellite. The time-dependent properties of the model include solar activity effects, dust storm effects, seasonal and diurnal variations, and annual motion effects. Position effects are accounted for through Martian latitude and longitude. Expected values of mass density, temperature, scale height, and the estimated standard deviation of the mass density are provided. An example of the use of the model in selecting an orbit for the Mars Geochemical/Climatology Orbiter is given.

  16. Low-energy fusion dynamics of weakly bound nuclei: A time dependent perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz-Torres A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent dynamical fusion models for weakly bound nuclei at low incident energies, based on a time-dependent perspective, are briefly presented. The main features of both the PLATYPUS model and a new quantum approach are highlighted. In contrast to existing timedependent quantum models, the present quantum approach separates the complete and incomplete fusion from the total fusion. Calculations performed within a toy model for 6Li + 209Bi at near-barrier energies show that converged excitation functions for total, complete and incomplete fusion can be determined with the time-dependent wavepacket dynamics.

  17. Low-energy fusion dynamics of weakly bound nuclei: A time dependent perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Torres, A.; Boselli, M.

    2016-05-01

    Recent dynamical fusion models for weakly bound nuclei at low incident energies, based on a time-dependent perspective, are briefly presented. The main features of both the PLATYPUS model and a new quantum approach are highlighted. In contrast to existing timedependent quantum models, the present quantum approach separates the complete and incomplete fusion from the total fusion. Calculations performed within a toy model for 6Li + 209Bi at near-barrier energies show that converged excitation functions for total, complete and incomplete fusion can be determined with the time-dependent wavepacket dynamics.

  18. Time-Dependent Mean-Field Games in the Subquadratic Case

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2014-10-14

    In this paper we consider time-dependent mean-field games with subquadratic Hamiltonians and power-like local dependence on the measure. We establish existence of classical solutions under a certain set of conditions depending on both the growth of the Hamiltonian and the dimension. This is done by combining regularity estimates for the Hamilton-Jacobi equation based on the Gagliardo-Nirenberg interpolation inequality with polynomial estimates for the Fokker-Planck equation. This technique improves substantially the previous results on the regularity of time-dependent mean-field games.

  19. Simulation of transverse beam splitting using time-dependent dipolar or quadrupolar kicks

    CERN Document Server

    Capoani, Federico

    2017-01-01

    Two simple systems with high relevance for accelerator physics have been studied in detail in the context of this Summer Student Project. These systems describe the motion under the influence of detuning with amplitude due to non-linear magnets and an external, time-dependent force of dipolar or quadrupolar nature.Two simple systems with high relevance for accelerator physics have been studied in detail in the context of this Summer Student Project. These systems describe the motion under the influence of detuning with amplitude due to non-linear magnets and an external, time-dependent force of dipolar or quadrupolar nature.

  20. Supervised spike-timing-dependent plasticity: a spatiotemporal neuronal learning rule for function approximation and decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franosch, Jan-Moritz P; Urban, Sebastian; van Hemmen, J Leo

    2013-12-01

    How can an animal learn from experience? How can it train sensors, such as the auditory or tactile system, based on other sensory input such as the visual system? Supervised spike-timing-dependent plasticity (supervised STDP) is a possible answer. Supervised STDP trains one modality using input from another one as "supervisor." Quite complex time-dependent relationships between the senses can be learned. Here we prove that under very general conditions, supervised STDP converges to a stable configuration of synaptic weights leading to a reconstruction of primary sensory input.

  1. Time dependent mean field approximation to the many-body S-matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhassid, Y.; Koonin, S.E.

    1980-01-01

    Time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) calculations are a good description of some inclusive properties of deep inelastic heavy-ion collisions. The first steps toward a mean-field theory that approximates specific elements of the many-body S matrix are presented. A many-body system with pairwise interactions excited by an external, time-dependent one-body field is considered. The methods are used to solve the forced Lipkin model. The moduli of elastic and excitation amplitudes are plotted. 3 figures

  2. The Modification of Time-Dependent Mechanical Properties of Polyamides due to Sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florjancic, Urska; Zupancic, Barbara; Sutton, Elizabeth; Sitar, Ksenija Rener; Marion, Ljubo; Batista, Urska; Groselj, Dusan; Emri, Igor

    2008-07-01

    We examine the effect of sterilization on functionality and durability of Polyamide 6. Nowadays there are several applications of this material in medicine in a form of surgical sewing material, vascular catheters and other implants. Understanding the time-dependent behavior of PA-6 is critical in predicting the durability of different medical products made from this polymer. We show that two PA-6 materials having different initial kinetics and processed with the same technology, when exposed to sterilization, change their time-dependent mechanical properties, and hence the durability in significantly different ways.

  3. Dynamical grid method for time dependent simulations of axisymmetric instabilities in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardin, S.C.; Johnson, J.L.; Greene, J.M.; Grimm, R.C.

    1977-07-01

    A natural nonorthogonal time-dependent coordinate transformation based on the magnetic field lines is utilized for the numerical integration of the two-dimensional axisymmetric time-dependent ideal MHD equations in tokamak geometry. The finite-difference grid is treated as a dynamical variable, and its equations of motion are integrated simultaneously with those for the fluid and magnetic field. The method is applicable to tokamak systems of arbitrary pressure and cross section. It is particularly useful for the nearly incompressible ideal MHD modes which are of interest in tokamak stability studies

  4. Vibrationally resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy with time-dependent density functional based tight binding

    OpenAIRE

    Rüger, Robert; Niehaus, Thomas; van Lenthe, Erik; Heine, Thomas; Visscher, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    We report a time-dependent density functional based tight-binding (TD-DFTB) scheme for the calculation of UV/Vis spectra, explicitly taking into account the excitation of nuclear vibrations via the adiabatic Hessian Franck-Condon (AH|FC) method with a harmonic approximation for the nuclear wavefunction. The theory of vibrationally resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy is first summarized from the viewpoint of TD-DFTB. The method is benchmarked against time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) ...

  5. Time-dependent expression and distribution of Egr-1 during skeletal muscle wound healing in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yan-Yan; Ye, Guang-Hua; Lin, Ke-Zhi; Yu, Lin-Sheng; Wu, Shu-Zhen; Dong, Miao-Wu; Han, Jun-Ge; Feng, Xiang-Ping; Li, Xing-Biao

    2013-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1) plays an important role in regulation of inflammation and tissue repair, but little is known about its expression after trauma to skeletal muscles. A preliminary study on time-dependent expression and distribution of Egr-1 was performed by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and Western blotting during skeletal muscle wound healing in rats. An animal model of skeletal muscle contusion was established in 45 Sprague-Dawley male rats. Samples were taken at 6 h, 12 h, 1 day, 3 days, 5 days, 7 days, 10 days, 14 days and 21 days post-injury, respectively (5 rats in each posttraumatic interval). 5 rats were employed as control. In the uninjured controls, Egr-1 positive staining was observed in the sarcoplasm and nuclei of normal myofibers. In wounded specimens, a small number of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs), a number of mononuclear cells (MNCs), fibroblastic cells (FBCs) and regenerated multinucleated myotubes showed positive reaction for Egr-1 in contused zones. By morphometric analysis, an increase in Egr-1 expression was verified at inflammatory phase after contusion, which reached a peak in the regenerated phase overlapping with the fibrotic phase during skeletal muscle wound healing. The expression tendency was further confirmed by Western blotting assay. By immunofluorescent staining for co-localization, the Egr-1-positive MNCs and FBCs in wounds were identified as macrophages and myofibroblasts. The results demonstrate that the expression of Egr-1 is up-regulated and temporally distributed in certain cell types after trauma to skeletal muscles, which may be closely involved in inflammatory response, fibrotic repair and muscle regeneration during skeletal muscle wound healing.

  6. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory with space partition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, Haruhide; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2017-02-01

    Aiming at efficient numerical analysis of time-dependent (TD) many-electron dynamics of atoms involving multielectron continua, the TD restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory with space partition (TD-RASSCF-SP) is presented. The TD-RASSCF-SP wave function is expanded in terms of TD configuration-interaction coefficients with Slater determinants composed of two kinds of TD orbitals: M ̂ orbitals are defined to be nonvanishing in the inner region (V ̂), a small volume around the atomic nucleus, and M ˇ orbitals are nonvanishing in the large outer region (V ˇ). For detailed discussion of the SP strategy, the equations of motion are derived by two different formalisms for comparison. To ensure continuous differentiability of the wave function across the two regions, one of the formalisms makes use of the property of the finite-element discrete-variable-representation (FEDVR) functions and introduces additional time-independent orbitals. The other formalism is more general and is based on the Bloch operator as in the R -matrix theory, but turns out to be less practical for numerical applications. Hence, using the FEDVR-based formalism, the numerical performance is tested by computing double-ionization dynamics of atomic beryllium in intense light fields. To achieve high accuracy, M ̂ should be set large to take into account the strong many-electron correlation around the nucleus. On the other hand, M ˇ can be set much smaller than M ̂ for capturing the weaker correlation between the two outgoing photoelectrons. As a result, compared with more accurate multiconfigurational TD Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method, the TD-RASSCF-SP method may achieve comparable accuracy in the description of the double-ionization dynamics. There are, however, difficulties related to the stiffness of the equations of motion of the TD-RASSCF-SP method, which makes the required time step for this method smaller than the one needed for the MCTDHF approach.

  7. Time-dependent geoid anomalies at subduction zones due to the seismic cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambiotti, G.; Sabadini, R.; Yuen, D. A.

    2018-01-01

    We model the geoid anomalies excited during a megathrust earthquake cycle at subduction zones, including the interseismic phase and the contribution from the infinite series of previous earthquakes, within the frame of self-gravitating, spherically symmetric, compressible, viscoelastic Earth models. The fault cuts the whole 50 km lithosphere, dips 20°, and the slip amplitude, together with the length of the fault, are chosen in order to simulate an Mw = 9.0 earthquake, while the viscosity of the 170 km thick asthenosphere ranges from 1017 to 1020 Pa s. On the basis of a new analysis from the Correspondence Principle, we show that the geoid anomaly is characterized by a periodic anomaly due to the elastic and viscous contribution from past earthquakes and to the back-slip of the interseismic phase, and by a smaller static contribution from the steady-state response to the previous infinite earthquake cycles. For asthenospheric viscosities from 1017-1018 to 1019-1020 Pa s, the characteristic relaxation times of the Earth model change from shorter to longer timescales compared to the 400 yr earthquake recurrence time, which dampen the geoid anomaly for the higher asthenospheric viscosities, since the slower relaxation cannot contribute its whole strength within the interseismic cycle. The geoid anomaly pattern is characterized by a global, time-dependent positive upwarping of the geoid topography, involving the whole hanging wall and partially the footwall compared to the sharper elastic contribution, attaining, for a moment magnitude Mw = 9.0, amplitudes as high as 6.6 cm for the lowermost asthenospheric viscosities during the viscoelastic response compared to the elastic maximum of 3.8 cm. The geoid anomaly vanishes due to the back-slip of the interseismic phase, leading to its disappearance at the end of the cycle before the next earthquake. Our results are of importance for understanding the post-seismic and interseismic geoid patterns at subduction zones.

  8. Numerical and experimental investigations on the time dependent behavior of a salt dome with a high-level waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prij, J.; Vons, L.H.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented of in-situ measurements, performed in a 300 m deep dry-drilled borehole, in the ASSE-mine. Convergence measurements at ambient as well as elevated temperatures and pressure measurements at elevated temperatures are discussed. Creep equations derived from these experiments are used for the numerical analysis of the time dependent behavior of a salt dome with a HLW repository. The analyses show that the total stresses in the salt remain compressive with deviatoric components smaller than 3 MPa. 9 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  9. The role of the CI expansion length in time-dependent studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Inga S.; Stewart, Zachary; Wilson, Angela K.

    2018-01-01

    With the recent advances in experimental attosecond science, theoretical predictions of electron dynamics can now be validated against experiment. Time-dependent studies of the electron motion in molecules can be used to obtain information about electronic transitions and the interaction of the electrons with electromagnetic fields. Often, these approaches rely on single-excited wave functions. Presented here is a first attempt to evaluate the accuracy of the time-dependent configuration interaction method so that the optimal representation of the electronic wave function for time-dependent studies can be assessed. A quantifier is determined that can aid in finding this optimal representation. The approach is demonstrated on a variety of molecules that include both localized and intramolecular charge transfer electron excitations. Observables including excitation energies, dipole moments, strengths, and static polarizabilities are obtained from time-independent and time-dependent calculations and are compared to experimental data. In this way, a rigorous routine is developed by which the reliability and accuracy of the CI wave function can be assessed and which represents a first step to a more quantitative description of electron dynamics in molecules.

  10. Hydraulic mechanism and time-dependent characteristics of loose gully deposits failure induced by rainfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Failure of loose gully deposits under the effect of rainfall contributes to the potential risk of debris flow. In the past decades, researches on hydraulic mechanism and time-dependent characteristics of loose deposits failure are frequently reported, however adequate measures for reducing debris flow are not available practically. In this context, a time-dependent model was established to determine the changes of water table of loose deposits using hydraulic and topographic theories. In addition, the variation in water table with elapsed time was analyzed. The formulas for calculating hydrodynamic and hydrostatic pressures on each strip and block unit of deposit were proposed, and the slope stability and failure risk of the loose deposits were assessed based on the time-dependent hydraulic characteristics of established model. Finally, the failure mechanism of deposits based on infinite slope theory was illustrated, with an example, to calculate sliding force, anti-sliding force and residual sliding force applied to each slice. The results indicate that failure of gully deposits under the effect of rainfall is the result of continuously increasing hydraulic pressure and water table. The time-dependent characteristics of loose deposit failure are determined by the factors of hydraulic properties, drainage area of interest, rainfall pattern, rainfall duration and intensity.

  11. Little rip cosmological models with quadratic equation of state with time dependent parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelote, R. D.; Khadekar, G. S.

    2018-02-01

    We have studied flat FRW cosmological model of the universe filled with an ideal fluid with quadratic equation of state (EOS) with time dependent parameters ω(t) and Λ(t). We found the equation of the state parameter ω(t) is less than -1 and also found Little Rip (LR) and Pseudo Rip (PR) behavior for dark energy.

  12. Application of Seemingly Unrelated Regression in Medical Data with Intermittently Observed Time-Dependent Covariates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sareh Keshavarzi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In many studies with longitudinal data, time-dependent covariates can only be measured intermittently (not at all observation times, and this presents difficulties for standard statistical analyses. This situation is common in medical studies, and methods that deal with this challenge would be useful. Methods. In this study, we performed the seemingly unrelated regression (SUR based models, with respect to each observation time in longitudinal data with intermittently observed time-dependent covariates and further compared these models with mixed-effect regression models (MRMs under three classic imputation procedures. Simulation studies were performed to compare the sample size properties of the estimated coefficients for different modeling choices. Results. In general, the proposed models in the presence of intermittently observed time-dependent covariates showed a good performance. However, when we considered only the observed values of the covariate without any imputations, the resulted biases were greater. The performances of the proposed SUR-based models in comparison with MRM using classic imputation methods were nearly similar with approximately equal amounts of bias and MSE. Conclusion. The simulation study suggests that the SUR-based models work as efficiently as MRM in the case of intermittently observed time-dependent covariates. Thus, it can be used as an alternative to MRM.

  13. Time-evolution operators for (coupled) time-dependent oscillators and Lie algebraic structure theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, F.; Korsch, H. J.

    1988-03-01

    This paper deals with the application of Lie algebraic structure theory to time-dependent quantum systems making use of the Levi-Malcev decomposition of the Lie algebra generated by the Hamiltonian and the Wei-Norman representation of the time-evolution operator. In particular, (coupled) harmonic-oscillator systems are studied. Explicit formulas for expectation values and transition probabilities are derived.

  14. The effect of time-dependent coupling on non-equilibrium steady states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Neidhardt, Hagen; Zagrebnov, Valentin

    Consider (for simplicity) two one-dimensional semi-infinite leads coupled to a quantum well via time dependent point interactions. In the remote past the system is decoupled, and each of its components is at thermal equilibrium. In the remote future the system is fully coupled. We define and comp...

  15. The effect of time-dependent coupling on non-equilibrium steady states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Neidhardt, Hagen; Zagrebnov, Valentin A.

    2009-01-01

    Consider (for simplicity) two one-dimensional semi-infinite leads coupled to a quantum well via time dependent point interactions. In the remote past the system is decoupled, and each of its components is at thermal equilibrium. In the remote future the system is fully coupled. We define and comp...

  16. Heat conduction in a plate-type fuel element with time-dependent boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faya, A.J.G.; Maiorino, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    A method for the solution of boundary-value problems with variable boundary conditions is applied to solve a heat conduction problem in a plate-type fuel element with time dependent film coefficient. The numerical results show the feasibility of the method in the solution of this class of problems. (Author) [pt

  17. Space-time discontinuous Galerkin method for parabolic problems in time-dependent domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janivita Joto Sudirham, J.J.S.; Sudirham, J.J.; van der Vegt, Jacobus J.W.; van Damme, Rudolf M.J.

    2004-01-01

    In this report a space-time discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element method for the solution of the advection-diffusion-reaction equation in time-dependent domains is presented and analyzed. The variational formulation is based on a combination of the space-time DG method developed by van der Vegt

  18. A new approximation method for time-dependent problems in quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amore, Paolo; Aranda, Alfredo; Fernandez, Francisco M.; Jones, Hugh

    2005-01-01

    We propose an approximate solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation using the method of stationary states combined with a variational matrix method for finding the energies and eigenstates. We illustrate the effectiveness of the method by applying it to the time development of the wave-function in the quantum-mechanical version of the inflationary slow-roll transition

  19. Theory of coherent time-dependent transport in one-dimensional multiband semiconductor super-lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotvig, J.; Smith, H.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1996-01-01

    We present an analytical study of one-dimensional semiconductor superlattices in external electric fields, which may be time dependent. A number of general results for the (quasi)energies and eigenstates are derived. An equation of motion for the density matrix is obtained for a two-band model...

  20. Time dependent Hartree-Fock treatment of elastic scattering of electrons by H and He/+/.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    Time dependent Hartree-Fock theory, in its coupled and uncoupled forms, is used to calculate the elastic singlet p-wave phase shifts for the scattering of electrons by H and He/+/. On comparison with the best available results it is concluded that the coupled scheme, which contains correlation to at least first order, is superior. Levinson's theorem is confirmed.

  1. Vibrationally resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy with time-dependent density functional based tight binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruger, R.; Niehaus, T.; van Lenthe, E.; Heine, T.; Visscher, L.

    2016-01-01

    We report a time-dependent density functional based tight-binding (TD-DFTB) scheme for the calculation of UV/Vis spectra, explicitly taking into account the excitation of nuclear vibrations via the adiabatic Hessian Franck-Condon method with a harmonic approximation for the nu- clear wavefunction.

  2. Photodissociation of NaH using time-dependent Fourier grid method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have solved the time dependent Schrödinger equation by using the Chebyshev polynomial scheme and Fourier grid Hamiltonian method to calculate the dissociation cross section of NaH molecule by 1-photon absorption from the 1+ state to the 1 state. We have found that the results differ significantly from an ...

  3. Exact solutions of Feinberg–Horodecki equation for time-dependent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    analytically solved whose time-dependent potentials are constant, linear and quadratic functions of the coordinates [1–6]. In an interesting work, Molski [7] has demonstrated the possibility of describing the biological systems in terms of the time-like supersymmetric quantum mechanics [8] to include space-like quantum ...

  4. Kinetic study of time-dependent fixation of U{sup VI} on biochar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashry, A. [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington, Leicestershire LE12 5RD (United Kingdom); Radiation Protection Department, Nuclear Research Centre, Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Bailey, E.H., E-mail: liz.bailey@nottingham.ac.uk [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington, Leicestershire LE12 5RD (United Kingdom); Chenery, S.R.N. [British Geological Survey, Nicker Hill, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Young, S.D. [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington, Leicestershire LE12 5RD (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    Biochar, a by-product from the production of biofuel and syngas by gasification, was tested as a material for adsorption and fixation of U{sup VI} from aqueous solutions. A batch experiment was conducted to study the factors that influence the adsorption and time-dependent fixation on biochar at 20 °C, including pH, initial concentration of U{sup VI} and contact time. Uranium (U{sup VI}) adsorption was highly dependent on pH but adsorption on biochar was high over a wide range of pH values, from 4.5 to 9.0, and adsorption strength was time-dependent over several days. The experimental data for pH > 7 were most effectively modelled using a Freundlich adsorption isotherm coupled to a reversible first order kinetic equation to describe the time-dependent fixation of U{sup VI} within the biochar structure. Desorption experiments showed that U{sup VI} was only sparingly desorbable from the biochar with time and isotopic dilution with {sup 233}U{sup VI} confirmed the low, or time-dependent, lability of adsorbed {sup 238}U{sup VI}. Below pH 7 the adsorption isotherm trend suggested precipitation, rather than true adsorption, may occur. However, across all pH values (4.5-9) measured saturation indices suggested precipitation was possible: autunite below pH 6.5 and either swartzite, liebigite or bayleyite above pH 6.5.

  5. Kinetic study of time-dependent fixation of UVI on biochar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashry, A.; Bailey, E.H.; Chenery, S.R.N.; Young, S.D.

    2016-01-01

    Biochar, a by-product from the production of biofuel and syngas by gasification, was tested as a material for adsorption and fixation of U VI from aqueous solutions. A batch experiment was conducted to study the factors that influence the adsorption and time-dependent fixation on biochar at 20 °C, including pH, initial concentration of U VI and contact time. Uranium (U VI ) adsorption was highly dependent on pH but adsorption on biochar was high over a wide range of pH values, from 4.5 to 9.0, and adsorption strength was time-dependent over several days. The experimental data for pH > 7 were most effectively modelled using a Freundlich adsorption isotherm coupled to a reversible first order kinetic equation to describe the time-dependent fixation of U VI within the biochar structure. Desorption experiments showed that U VI was only sparingly desorbable from the biochar with time and isotopic dilution with 233 U VI confirmed the low, or time-dependent, lability of adsorbed 238 U VI . Below pH 7 the adsorption isotherm trend suggested precipitation, rather than true adsorption, may occur. However, across all pH values (4.5-9) measured saturation indices suggested precipitation was possible: autunite below pH 6.5 and either swartzite, liebigite or bayleyite above pH 6.5.

  6. On the time evolution operator for time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, F.M.

    1989-01-01

    The Schroedinger equation with a time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonian is investigated. The time-evolution operator is written as a product of exponential operators determined by the Heisenberg equations of motion. This product operator is shown to be global in the occupation number representation when the Hamiltonian is Hermitian. The success of some physical applications of the product-form representation is explained

  7. Stochastic time-dependent vehicle routing problem: Mathematical models and ant colony algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyu Duan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the stochastic time-dependent vehicle routing problem. Two mathematical models named robust optimal schedule time model and minimum expected schedule time model are proposed for stochastic time-dependent vehicle routing problem, which can guarantee delivery within the time windows of customers. The robust optimal schedule time model only requires the variation range of link travel time, which can be conveniently derived from historical traffic data. In addition, the robust optimal schedule time model based on robust optimization method can be converted into a time-dependent vehicle routing problem. Moreover, an ant colony optimization algorithm is designed to solve stochastic time-dependent vehicle routing problem. As the improvements in initial solution and transition probability, ant colony optimization algorithm has a good performance in convergence. Through computational instances and Monte Carlo simulation tests, robust optimal schedule time model is proved to be better than minimum expected schedule time model in computational efficiency and coping with the travel time fluctuations. Therefore, robust optimal schedule time model is applicable in real road network.

  8. Optimal adaptive control for quantum metrology with time-dependent Hamiltonians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shengshi; Jordan, Andrew N.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum metrology has been studied for a wide range of systems with time-independent Hamiltonians. For systems with time-dependent Hamiltonians, however, due to the complexity of dynamics, little has been known about quantum metrology. Here we investigate quantum metrology with time-dependent Hamiltonians to bridge this gap. We obtain the optimal quantum Fisher information for parameters in time-dependent Hamiltonians, and show proper Hamiltonian control is generally necessary to optimize the Fisher information. We derive the optimal Hamiltonian control, which is generally adaptive, and the measurement scheme to attain the optimal Fisher information. In a minimal example of a qubit in a rotating magnetic field, we find a surprising result that the fundamental limit of T2 time scaling of quantum Fisher information can be broken with time-dependent Hamiltonians, which reaches T4 in estimating the rotation frequency of the field. We conclude by considering level crossings in the derivatives of the Hamiltonians, and point out additional control is necessary for that case. PMID:28276428

  9. Thyroid status affects the rat cardiac beta-adrenoceptor system transiently and time-dependently

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaveling, J.; Batink, H. D.; Taguchi, K.; de Jong, J.; Michel, M. C.; Pfaffendorf, M.; van Zwieten, A.

    1998-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to investigate the time-dependency of the influence of dysthyroid states on the beta-adrenoceptor system in rat heart left ventricle. Therefore, the influence of acute and chronic hyper- and hypothyroidism on beta-adrenoceptor-induced left ventricular responses,

  10. Modelling Faculty Replacement Strategies Using a Time-Dependent Finite Markov-Chain Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, E. Raymond; Magg, Alexander A.; Carrigan, Sarah D.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the use of a time-dependent Markov-chain model to develop faculty-replacement strategies within a college at a research university. The study suggests that a stochastic modelling approach can provide valuable insight when planning for personnel needs in the immediate (five-to-ten year) future. (MSE)

  11. Time-dependent field equations for paraxial relativistic electron beams: Beam Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, W.M.; Yu, S.S.; Lee, E.P.

    1987-01-01

    A simplified set of field equations for a paraxial relativistic electron beam is presented. These equations for the beam electrostatic potential phi and pinch potential Phi identical to A/sub z/ - phi retain previously neglected time-dependent terms and for axisymmetric beams reduce exactly to Maxwell's equations

  12. One-dimensional multiple-well oscillators: A time-dependent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) is solved numerically to calculate the ground- and first three excited-state ... tum mechanical approach is employed here for the first time to calculate the energy eigen- values, expectation values x2j (j = 1,2,... ..... Delhi, for financial support. References. [1] E Magyari, Phys. Lett.

  13. The Keldysh formalism applied to time-dependent current-density-functional theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gidopoulos, NI; Wilson, S

    2003-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate how to derive the Kohn-Sham equations of time-dependent current-density functional theory from a generating action functional defined on a Keldysh time contour. These Kohn-Sham equations contain an exchange-correlation contribution to the vector potential. For this

  14. Optimal Preventive Maintenance Schedule based on Lifecycle Cost and Time-Dependent Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    cost PC , the inspection cost IC and an expected variable cost EVC [2, 32]. These costs are a function of quality and reliability. The lifecycle...expected variable cost EVC is a function of the time- dependent reliability which is used to estimate the expected present value of repairing and/or

  15. A time-dependent Green's function-based model for stream ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DRINIE

    2003-07-03

    Jul 3, 2003 ... Because the ratio of the depth to lateral dimensions of most aquifers is extremely small, this assumption is ... problem in a novel way that accommodates medium heterogeneity, varying bedrock profile, and point .... has been developed on the basis of Eq. (11), incorporating the time- dependent fundamental ...

  16. Reparametrization in the path integral over finite dimensional manifold with a time-dependent metric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storchak, S.N.

    1988-01-01

    The path reparametrization procedure in the path integral is considered using the methods of stochastic processes for diffusion on finite dimensional manifold with a time-dependent metric. the reparametrization Jacobian has been obtained. The formulas of reparametrization for a symbolic presentation of the path integral have been derived

  17. Quantum trajectory in a time-dependent potential : oscillator in a monochromatic field

    OpenAIRE

    Nishiyama, Yoshio

    2002-01-01

    The 'quantum trajectory' obeying the Schrodinger equation with a time dependent potential is theoretically determined. As an illustration of the theory the trajectory of a charged harmonic oscillator in an electromagnetic field obeying the wave equation is shown along with the orbital motion of the corresponding classical particle.

  18. Mechanical and time-dependent behavior of wood-plastic composites subjected to tension and compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott E. Hamel; John C. Hermanson; Steven M. Cramer

    2012-01-01

    The thermoplastics within wood—plastic composites (WPCs) are known to experience significant time-dependent deformation or creep. In some formulations, creep deformation can be twice as much as the initial quasi-static strain in as little as 4 days. While extensive work has been done on the creep behavior of pure polymers, little information is available on the...

  19. Adiabatic dynamics of periodic waves in Bose-Einstein condensates with time dependent atomic scattering length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullaev, F.Kh.; Kamchatnov, A.M.; Konotop, V.V.; Brazhnyi, V.A.

    2003-01-01

    Evolution of periodic matter waves in one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates with time-dependent scattering length is described. It is shown that variation of the effective nonlinearity is a powerful tool for controlled generation of bright and dark solitons starting with periodic waves

  20. Time-dependent solutions for stochastic systems with delays: Perturbation theory and applications to financial physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, T.D.

    2006-01-01

    First-order approximations of time-dependent solutions are determined for stochastic systems perturbed by time-delayed feedback forces. To this end, the theory of delay Fokker-Planck equations is applied in combination with Bayes' theorem. Applications to a time-delayed Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and the geometric Brownian walk of financial physics are discussed

  1. Branch and price for the time-dependent vehicle routing problem with time windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabia, Said; Dabia, Said; Van Woensel, Tom

    2013-01-01

    solution methods to the DM-TDVRPTW are based on (meta-)heuristics. The decomposition of an arc-based formulation leads to a setpartitioning problem as the master problem, and a time-dependent shortest path problem with resource constraints as the pricing problem. The master problem is solved by means...

  2. A method for calculating the time-dependent surface temperature of a cylinder containing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fynbo, P.B.

    1981-02-01

    A method is described by which the surface temperature of a steel cylinder containing radioactive waste can be calculated. The method assumes a time-dependent continuous line source in cylindrical symmetry and it applies Laplace transformation. The resultant laplace transform is approximated and then inverted (by convolution). The method is computationally fast and future generalisations to similar problems are suggested. (author)

  3. An alternative way of computation of amplitudes and intensities in time-dependent Moessbauer spectroscopy (TDMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christoskov, I.D.; Vapirev, E.I.

    1990-01-01

    An alternative way of presenting the time-dependent amplitudes and intensities of radiation, corresponding to resonant absorption and scattering experiments, is developed. Infinite series of Bessel functions with complex coefficients are replaced by simple for calculation definite integrals and the number of Bessel function calls is reduced to one per a tabulation point. Thus the calculational effort for experimental data processing becomes smaller

  4. Time-adaptive and history-adaptive multicriterion routing in stochastic, time-dependent networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pretolani, Daniele; Nielsen, Lars Relund; Andersen, Kim Allan

    2009-01-01

    We compare two different models for multicriterion routing in stochastic time-dependent networks: the classic "time-adaptive'' model and the more flexible "history-adaptive'' one. We point out several properties of the sets of efficient solutions found under the two models. We also devise a metho...

  5. Spherical time dependent Thomas-Fermi calculation of the dynamical evolution of hot and compressed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemeth, J.; Barranco, M.; Ngo, C.; Tomasi, E.

    1985-01-01

    We have used a self-consistent time dependent Thomas-Fermi model at finite temperature to calculate the dynamical evolution of hot and compressed nuclei. It has been found that nuclei can accomodate more thermal energy than compressional energy before they break. (orig.)

  6. Exact solution for a time-dependent multi-mode coupled quadratic Bose system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Xiuwei; Mu Haifeng [College of Physics, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China); Liu Shuyan [College of Electric and Electronic Engineering, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China); Guo Chun, E-mail: hai-fengmu@163.co [Office of Teaching Affairs, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China)

    2010-11-12

    By utilizing generalized linear quantum transformation theory, the evolution operator, normal and anti-normal Wigner characteristic functions, P- and Q-representations of a multi-mode coupled quadratic Boson system are presented. The squeezing properties of a time-dependent double-mode coupled quadratic Bose system are investigated as a specific example.

  7. Numerical modelling of softwood time-dependent behaviour based on microstructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang

    2010-01-01

    The time-dependent mechanical behaviour of softwood such as creep or relaxation can be predicted, from knowledge of the microstructural arrangement of the cell wall, by applying deformation kinetics. This has been done several times before; however, often without considering the constraints defined...

  8. Emergence of slow collective oscillations in neural networks with spike-timing dependent plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Kaare; Imparato, Alberto; Torcini, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The collective dynamics of excitatory pulse coupled neurons with spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is studied. The introduction of STDP induces persistent irregular oscillations between strongly and weakly synchronized states, reminiscent of brain activity during slow-wave sleep. We explain...

  9. New numerical methods for solving the time-dependent Maxwell equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H; Kole, JS; Michielsen, KFL; Figge, MT; Berz, M; Makino, K

    2005-01-01

    We review some recent developments in numerical algorithms to solve the time-dependent Maxwell equations for systems with spatially varying permittivity and permeabilitly. We show that the Suzuki product-formula approach can be used to construct a family of unconditionally stable algorithms, the

  10. Determination of relaxation modulus of time-dependent materials using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulova, Alexandra; Govekar, Edvard; Emri, Igor

    2017-08-01

    Health monitoring systems for plastic based structures require the capability of real time tracking of changes in response to the time-dependent behavior of polymer based structures. The paper proposes artificial neural networks as a tool of solving inverse problem appearing within time-dependent material characterization, since the conventional methods are computationally demanding and cannot operate in the real time mode. Abilities of a Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) and a Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFN) to solve ill-posed inverse problems on an example of determination of a time-dependent relaxation modulus curve segment from constant strain rate tensile test data are investigated. The required modeling data composed of strain rate, tensile and related relaxation modulus were generated using existing closed-form solution. Several neural networks topologies were tested with respect to the structure of input data, and their performance was compared to an exponential fitting technique. Selected optimal topologies of MLP and RBFN were tested for generalization and robustness on noisy data; performance of all the modeling methods with respect to the number of data points in the input vector was analyzed as well. It was shown that MLP and RBFN are capable of solving inverse problems related to the determination of a time dependent relaxation modulus curve segment. Particular topologies demonstrate good generalization and robustness capabilities, where the topology of RBFN with data provided in parallel proved to be superior compared to other methods.

  11. The Limit Behavior of a Stochastic Logistic Model with Individual Time-Dependent Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilun Shang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a variant of the stochastic logistic model that allows individual variation and time-dependent infection and recovery rates. The model is described as a heterogeneous density dependent Markov chain. We show that the process can be approximated by a deterministic process defined by an integral equation as the population size grows.

  12. Photodissociation of NaH using time-dependent Fourier grid method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We have solved the time dependent Schrödinger equation by using the Chebyshev poly- nomial scheme and Fourier grid Hamiltonian method to calculate the dissociation cross section of. NaH molecule by 1-photon absorption from the X1Σ· state to the B1Π state. We have found that the results differ significantly ...

  13. Measurement of D0 - $\\bar{D}$0 Mixing With a Time-Dependent Amplitude Analysis of D0 → K+ π- π0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelliccioni, Mario [University of Turin, Torino (Italy)

    2013-06-10

    Flavor mixing of neutral mesons is a long and well known phenomenon in particle physics. Experimental evidence of mixing of the neutral kaon was obtained in 1956, followed in 1987 by the evidence of Bd mixing. In 1974, A. Pais and S. B. Treiman firstly introduced the idea of charm mixing and CP violation. Even though many searches were conducted over time, it was clear that the small scale at which both amplitude and frequency of the oscillation took place made any possible observation challenging. In 2007, both the BABAR and Belle experiments announced the first evidence of mixing in the charm sector. The analyses concerned the study of a two body decay of the D0 meson. Few months later, BABAR presented the analysis of the decay D0 → K+π-π0 . This is the main topic of this thesis.

  14. Transit-time and age distributions for nonlinear time-dependent compartmental systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, Holger; Müller, Markus; Sierra, Carlos A

    2018-02-06

    Many processes in nature are modeled using compartmental systems (reservoir/pool/box systems). Usually, they are expressed as a set of first-order differential equations describing the transfer of matter across a network of compartments. The concepts of age of matter in compartments and the time required for particles to transit the system are important diagnostics of these models with applications to a wide range of scientific questions. Until now, explicit formulas for transit-time and age distributions of nonlinear time-dependent compartmental systems were not available. We compute densities for these types of systems under the assumption of well-mixed compartments. Assuming that a solution of the nonlinear system is available at least numerically, we show how to construct a linear time-dependent system with the same solution trajectory. We demonstrate how to exploit this solution to compute transit-time and age distributions in dependence on given start values and initial age distributions. Furthermore, we derive equations for the time evolution of quantiles and moments of the age distributions. Our results generalize available density formulas for the linear time-independent case and mean-age formulas for the linear time-dependent case. As an example, we apply our formulas to a nonlinear and a linear version of a simple global carbon cycle model driven by a time-dependent input signal which represents fossil fuel additions. We derive time-dependent age distributions for all compartments and calculate the time it takes to remove fossil carbon in a business-as-usual scenario.

  15. Time-dependence Effects in Photospheric-Phase Type II Supernova Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John

    2007-08-01

    We have incorporated time-dependent terms into the statistical and radiative equilibrium calculations of the non-LTE line-blanketed radiative transfer code CMFGEN. To illustrate the significant improvements in spectral fitting achieved for photospheric phase Type II SN, and to document the effects associated with time dependence, we model the outer 6.1 Msolar of ejecta of a BSG/RSG progenitor star. Hopping by 3-day increments, we compute the UV to near-IR spectral evolution for both continuum and lines, from the fully ionized conditions at one week to the partially recombined conditions at 6 weeks after the explosion. We confirm the importance of allowing for time-dependence in the modeling of Type-II SN, as recently discussed by Utrobin & Chugai for SN1987A. However unlike Utrobin & Chugai, who treated the radiation field in a core-halo approximation and assumed the Sobolev approximation for line formation, we allow for the full interaction between the radiation field and level populations, and study the effects on the full spectrum. At the hydrogen-recombination epoch, HI lines and NaD are considerably stronger and broader than in equivalent steady-state models, while CaII is weakened. Former successes of steady-state CMFGEN models are unaffected, while former discrepancies are cured. Time dependence affects all lines, while the continuum, from the UV to the optical, changes only moderately. We identify two key effects: First, time dependence together with the energy gain through changes in ionization and excitation lead to an over-ionization in the vicinity of the photosphere, dramatically affecting line optical depths and profiles. Second, the ionization is frozen-in at large radii/velocities. This stems solely from the time-scale contrast between recombination and expansion and will occur, modulo non-thermal excitation effects, in all SN types. The importance of this effect on spectral analyses, across SN types and epochs, remains to be determined.

  16. A time dependent search for neutrino emission from micro-quasars with the ANTARES telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galata, S.

    2012-01-01

    The ANTARES collaboration has successfully built, deployed and is currently operating an underwater Cherenkov detector dedicated to high energy neutrino astronomy. The primary aim of the experiment is to detect cosmic sources of neutrinos in order to reveal the production sites of cosmic rays. Among the sources likely to be significant sources of neutrinos are those accelerating relativistic jets, like gamma ray bursts, active galactic nuclei and micro-quasars. Micro-quasars are binary systems formed by a compact object accreting mass from a companion star. The mass transfer causes the emission of X-rays, whereas the onset of magnetic forces in the accreting plasma can cause the acceleration of relativistic jets, which are observed by radio telescopes via their non-thermal synchrotron emission. In some systems, a correlation between X-ray and radio light curves indicates an interplay between accretion and ejection respectively. Some micro-quasars are also high energy and very high energy gamma ray emitters. In this thesis, a time dependent search for neutrino emission from micro-quasars was performed with a multi-messenger approach (photon/neutrino). The data from the X-ray monitors RXTE/ASM and SWIFT/BAT, and the gamma-ray telescope FERMI/LAT were used to select transient events in which the source was supposed to accelerate relativistic jets. The restriction of the analysis to the ejection periods allows a drastic reduction of atmospheric muon and neutrino background, and thus to increase the chances of a discovery. The search was performed with the ANTARES data taken between 2007 and 2010. Statistical analysis was carried out using an un-binned likelihood method based on a likelihood ratio test. The cuts for the event selection were optimized in order to maximize the chance of a discovery. As no neutrino signal was observed in correlation with these micro-quasars, upper limits on the neutrino fluxes of the micro-quasars under study were calculated and compared

  17. Two programs of utility in the performance of histograms and Dalitz plots by means of a CALCOMP-563 plotter; Dos programas de utilidad para el dibujo de historgramas y diagramas de Dalitz mediante el trazador CALCOMP-563