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Sample records for time temperature indicator

  1. Diacetylene time-temperature indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, G.N.; Yee, K.C.

    1980-01-01

    An improved recording device is described, useful for measuring the integrated time-temperature or integrated radiation-dosage history of an article, comprising a substrate onto which an acetylenic compound, containing at least two conjugated c*c groups, in an inactive form, is deposited. The inactive form is capable of being converted by melt or solvent recrystallization to an active form, which undergoes 1,4-addition polymerization resulting in an irreversible, progressive color change. The color change produced at any given point in time represents an integrated time-temperature history of thermal annealing or integrated radiation-dosage history of exposure to actinic radiation to which an article has been exposed. Also described is a process for producing an inactive form of the acetylenic compound. A film and a fiber, made from the inactive form of an acetylenic compound are also described

  2. Time temperature indicators as devices intelligent packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Pavelková

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Food packaging is an important part of food production. Temperature is a one of crucial factor which affecting the quality and safety of food products during distribution, transport and storage. The one way of control of food quality and safety is the application of new packaging systems, which also include the intelligent or smart packaging. Intelligent packaging is a packaging system using different indicators for monitoring the conditions of production, but in particular the conditions during transport and storage. Among these indicators include the time-temperature indicators to monitor changes in temperature, which is exposed the product and to inform consumers about the potential risks associated with consumption of these products. Time temperature indicators are devices that show an irreversible change in a physical characteristic, usually color or shape, in response to temperature history. Some are designed to monitor the evolution of temperature with time along the distribution chain and others are designed to be used in the consumer packages.

  3. Design, fabrication and characterisation of a microfluidic time-temperature indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, P.; Wedrich, K.; Müller, L.; Mehner, H.; Hoffmann, M.

    2017-11-01

    This paper describes a concept for a passive microfluidic time-temperature indicator (TTI) intended for intelligent food packaging. A microfluidic system is presented that makes use of the temperature-dependent flow of suitable food ingredients in a microcapillary. Based on the creeping distance inside the capillary, the time-temperature integral can be determined. A demonstrator of the microsystem has been designed, fabricated and characterised using liquid sugar alcohols as indicator fluids. To enable a first wireless read-out of the passive TTI, the sensor was read out using a commercial RFID equipment, and capacitive measurements have been carried out.

  4. Development of Aa New Time Temperature Indicator for Enzymatic Validation of Pasteurization of Meat Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizio, Ana Paula Dutra Resem; Prentice, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the development of a new smart time-temperature indicator (TTI) of pasteurization whose operating principle is based on the complexation reaction between starch and iodine, and the subsequent action of an amylase on this complex causing its discoloration at a rate dependent on time and temperature of the medium. Laboratory simulations and tests in a manufacturing plant evaluated different enzyme concentrations in the TTI prototypes when exposed to pasteurization conditions. The results showed that the color response of the indicators was visually interpreted as adaptive to measurement using appropriate equipment, with satisfactory reliability in all conditions studied. The TTI containing 6.5% amylase was one whose best results were suited for use in validating the cooking of hams. When attached to the primary packaging of the product, this TTI indicated the pasteurization process inexpensively, easily, accurately, and nondestructively. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  5. Hybrid analysis for indicating patients with breast cancer using temperature time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lincoln F; Santos, Alair Augusto S M D; Bravo, Renato S; Silva, Aristófanes C; Muchaluat-Saade, Débora C; Conci, Aura

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Diagnosis and treatment in early stages increase cure chances. The temperature of cancerous tissue is generally higher than that of healthy surrounding tissues, making thermography an option to be considered in screening strategies of this cancer type. This paper proposes a hybrid methodology for analyzing dynamic infrared thermography in order to indicate patients with risk of breast cancer, using unsupervised and supervised machine learning techniques, which characterizes the methodology as hybrid. The dynamic infrared thermography monitors or quantitatively measures temperature changes on the examined surface, after a thermal stress. In the dynamic infrared thermography execution, a sequence of breast thermograms is generated. In the proposed methodology, this sequence is processed and analyzed by several techniques. First, the region of the breasts is segmented and the thermograms of the sequence are registered. Then, temperature time series are built and the k-means algorithm is applied on these series using various values of k. Clustering formed by k-means algorithm, for each k value, is evaluated using clustering validation indices, generating values treated as features in the classification model construction step. A data mining tool was used to solve the combined algorithm selection and hyperparameter optimization (CASH) problem in classification tasks. Besides the classification algorithm recommended by the data mining tool, classifiers based on Bayesian networks, neural networks, decision rules and decision tree were executed on the data set used for evaluation. Test results support that the proposed analysis methodology is able to indicate patients with breast cancer. Among 39 tested classification algorithms, K-Star and Bayes Net presented 100% classification accuracy. Furthermore, among the Bayes Net, multi-layer perceptron, decision table and random forest classification algorithms, an

  6. Temperature indicating device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angus, J.P.; Salt, D.

    1988-01-01

    A temperature indicating device comprises a plurality of planar elements some undergoing a reversible change in appearance at a given temperature the remainder undergoing an irreversible change in appearance at a given temperature. The device is useful in indicating the temperature which an object has achieved as well as its actual temperature. The reversible change is produced by liquid crystal devices. The irreversible change is produced by an absorbent surface carrying substances e.g. waxes which melt at predetermined temperatures and are absorbed by the surface; alternatively paints may be used. The device is used for monitoring processes of encapsulation of radio active waste. (author)

  7. Development and application of a tyrosinase-based time-temperature indicator (TTI) for determining the quality of turbot sashimi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fengjuan; Ge, Lei; Li, Zhenxing; Lin, Hong; Mao, Xiangzhao

    2017-10-01

    Time-temperature indicators (TTIs) are convenient intuitive devices that are widely used to predict food quality. The aim of this study is to develop a new simple device which can be attached to food packages as a quality indicator for turbot sashimi. In this study, a solid TTI based on the reaction between tyrosinase and tyrosine was developed. The Arrhenius behavior of this enzymatic TTI was studied. The kinetics of the tyrosinase-based TTI was investigated in the form of color change from colorless to dark black induced by the enzymatic reaction. The mathematical formula for the color alterations as a function of time and temperature was established. The longest indication time for the developed TTI was 50 hours at 4°C. The activation energy of the tyrosinase-based TTI was 0.409 kJ mol-1. The suitability of the tyrosinase-based TTI was validated for turbot sashimi using total plate count. The feasibility of using this TTI as a quality indicator for turbot sashimi was assessed based on the activation energy and indication time. Therefore, the tyrosinasebased TTI system developed in this study could be used as an effective tool for monitoring the quality changes of turbot sashimi during the distribution and storage.

  8. MODIS Land Surface Temperature time series reconstruction with Open Source GIS: A new quality of temperature based ecological indicators in complex terrain (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neteler, M.

    2009-12-01

    In complex terrain like the Central European Alps, meteorological stations and ground surveys are usually sparsely and/or irregularly distributed and often favor agricultural areas. The application of traditional geospatial interpolation methods in complex terrain remains challenging and difficult to optimize. An alternative data source is remote sensing: high temporal resolution satellite data are continuously gaining interest since these data are intrinsically spatialized: continuous field of observations is obtained with this tool instead of point data. The increasing data availability suggests using these time series as surrogate to certain measures from meteorological stations, especially for temperature and related derivatives. The Terra and Aqua satellites with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) provide four Earth coverages per day at various resolutions. We analyzed 8 years (2000 to 2008) of daily land surface temperature (LST) data from MODIS in an area located in the Southern European Alps. A method was developed to reconstruct incomplete maps (cloud coverage, invalid pixels) based on image statistics and on a model that includes additional GIS layers. The original LST map resolution of 1000m could be improved to 200m in this process which renders the resulting LST maps applicable at regional scales. We propose the use of these reconstructed daily LST time series as surrogate to meteorological observations especially in the area of epidemiological modeling where data are typically aggregated to decadal indicators. From these daily LST map series, derivable indicators include: 1) temperatures minima, means and maxima for annual/monthly/decadal periods; 2) unusual hot summers;3) the calculation of growing degree days, and 4) spring temperature increase or autumnal temperature decrease. Since more than 8 years of MODIS LST data are available today, even preliminary gradients can be extracted to assess multi-annual temperature trends

  9. Satellite- versus temperature-derived green wave indices for predicting the timing of spring migration of avian herbivores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shariati Najafabadi, M.; Najafabadi, M.S.; Darvishzadeh, R.; Skidmore, A.K.; Kölzsch, Andrea; Vrieling, A.; Nolet, Bart A.; Exo, Klaus-Michael; Meratnia, Nirvana; Havinga, Paul J.M.; Stahl, Julia; Toxopeus, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    According to the green wave hypothesis, herbivores follow the flush of spring growth of forage plants during their spring migration to northern breeding grounds. In this study we compared two green wave indices for predicting the timing of the spring migration of avian herbivores: the

  10. Gamma radiographic exposure time indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risbud, V.H.; Thiagarajan, A.; Gangadharan, P.

    1979-01-01

    In industrial radiography, with the proper selection of source and film, the radiographic quality depends very much on the exposure time, which in turn depends upon the source strength and the source to film distance. Conventional methods to arrive at correct exposure time involve time consuming calculations and in these methods the knowledge of the above mentioned parameters is imperative. An instrument to determine the required exposure time has been developed which indicates exposure times in about 30 secs. This covers two commonly used gamma radiography sources, viz., 192 Ir and 60 Co and six commonly used radiography films of different speeds. Knowledge of source strength and source to film distance is not required with the use of this instrument. With a knowledge of the total exposure required by the film to give the required sensitivity and by the measurement of radiation level at the film location, the correct exposure time is determined. The radiation level is measured by placing a GM counter behind the radiographic specimen at the film location. To match the responses of the film and the GM counter, the counter is incorporated in a suitably designed probe. In this instruments, an integrator to integrate the GM-pulses and a constant current integrator (timer) are started simultaneously. The voltage at the GM-pulse integrator is compared with a preselected voltage, (selected on the basis of film type, source, source strength and order of object thickness) by a comparator. The comparator is so adjusted that when the GM-pulse integrator voltage exceeds the preselected voltage, it switches its state and stops the integration of constant current. The constant current integrator output which is proportional to the time taken for the GM-pulse integrator to reach the preselected voltage, is read on a meter graduated in terms of exposure time. The instrument can measure exposure times from 5 minutes to 10 hours read in two ranges, the range-changing being automatic

  11. Using temperature and time criteria to control the effectiveness of continuous thermal sanitation of piggery effluent in terms of set microbial indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunault, C; Pourcher, A M; Burton, C H

    2011-12-01

    To determine the minimal conditions (temperature-time), necessary to achieve set sanitation targets for selected microbial indicators during the continuous thermal treatment of pig slurry. The effectiveness of thermal treatment between 55 and 96°C was studied using Escherichia coli, enterococci, sulfite-reducing Clostridia (SRC), mesophilic culturable bacteria (MCB), F+-specific and somatic phages. Identification of SRC and MCB was performed using 16S rRNA gene analysis. Ten minutes at 70°C or 1 h at 60°C was sufficient to reduce the vegetative bacteria by 4-5 log(10), but it had little effect on somatic phages nor on spore formers, dominated by Clostridium sp. At 96°C, somatic phages were still detected, but there was a reduction of 3.1 log(10) for SRC and of 1.4 log(10) for MCB. At 96°C, Clostridium botulinum was identified among the thermotolerant MCB. Only those hygienic risks relating to mesophilic vegetative bacteria can be totally eliminated from pig slurry treated at 60°C (60 min) or 70°C (cost treatment using heat recovery). However, even at 96°C, certain pathogens may persist. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology. No claim to French Government works.

  12. Temperature uniformity mapping in a high pressure high temperature reactor using a temperature sensitive indicator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauwet, T.; Plancken, van der I.; Vervoort, L.; Matser, A.M.; Hendrickx, M.; Loey, van A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the first prototype ovomucoid-based pressure–temperature–time indicator (pTTI) for high pressure high temperature (HPHT) processing was described. However, for temperature uniformity mapping of high pressure (HP) vessels under HPHT sterilization conditions, this prototype needs to be

  13. Multiple Indicator Stationary Time Series Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivo, Stephen A.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the propriety and practical advantages of specifying multivariate time series models in the context of structural equation modeling for time series and longitudinal panel data. For time series data, the multiple indicator model specification improves on classical time series analysis. For panel data, the multiple indicator model…

  14. Theta, time reversal and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiotto, Davide [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Kapustin, Anton [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Komargodski, Zohar [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science,Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Seiberg, Nathan [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2017-05-17

    SU(N) gauge theory is time reversal invariant at θ=0 and θ=π. We show that at θ=π there is a discrete ’t Hooft anomaly involving time reversal and the center symmetry. This anomaly leads to constraints on the vacua of the theory. It follows that at θ=π the vacuum cannot be a trivial non-degenerate gapped state. (By contrast, the vacuum at θ=0 is gapped, non-degenerate, and trivial.) Due to the anomaly, the theory admits nontrivial domain walls supporting lower-dimensional theories. Depending on the nature of the vacuum at θ=π, several phase diagrams are possible. Assuming area law for space-like loops, one arrives at an inequality involving the temperatures at which CP and the center symmetry are restored. We also analyze alternative scenarios for SU(2) gauge theory. The underlying symmetry at θ=π is the dihedral group of 8 elements. If deconfined loops are allowed, one can have two O(2)-symmetric fixed points. It may also be that the four-dimensional theory around θ=π is gapless, e.g. a Coulomb phase could match the underlying anomalies.

  15. Theta, time reversal and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaiotto, Davide; Kapustin, Anton; Komargodski, Zohar; Seiberg, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    SU(N) gauge theory is time reversal invariant at θ=0 and θ=π. We show that at θ=π there is a discrete ’t Hooft anomaly involving time reversal and the center symmetry. This anomaly leads to constraints on the vacua of the theory. It follows that at θ=π the vacuum cannot be a trivial non-degenerate gapped state. (By contrast, the vacuum at θ=0 is gapped, non-degenerate, and trivial.) Due to the anomaly, the theory admits nontrivial domain walls supporting lower-dimensional theories. Depending on the nature of the vacuum at θ=π, several phase diagrams are possible. Assuming area law for space-like loops, one arrives at an inequality involving the temperatures at which CP and the center symmetry are restored. We also analyze alternative scenarios for SU(2) gauge theory. The underlying symmetry at θ=π is the dihedral group of 8 elements. If deconfined loops are allowed, one can have two O(2)-symmetric fixed points. It may also be that the four-dimensional theory around θ=π is gapless, e.g. a Coulomb phase could match the underlying anomalies.

  16. European summer temperatures since Roman times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luterbacher, J; Werner, J P; Smerdon, J E; Fernández-Donado, L; González-Rouco, F J; Barriopedro, D; Ljungqvist, F C; Büntgen, U; Frank, D; Zorita, E; Wagner, S; Esper, J; McCarroll, D; Toreti, A; Jungclaus, J H; Bothe, O; Barriendos, M; Bertolin, C; Camuffo, D; Brázdil, R

    2016-01-01

    The spatial context is critical when assessing present-day climate anomalies, attributing them to potential forcings and making statements regarding their frequency and severity in a long-term perspective. Recent international initiatives have expanded the number of high-quality proxy-records and developed new statistical reconstruction methods. These advances allow more rigorous regional past temperature reconstructions and, in turn, the possibility of evaluating climate models on policy-relevant, spatio-temporal scales. Here we provide a new proxy-based, annually-resolved, spatial reconstruction of the European summer (June–August) temperature fields back to 755 CE based on Bayesian hierarchical modelling (BHM), together with estimates of the European mean temperature variation since 138 BCE based on BHM and composite-plus-scaling (CPS). Our reconstructions compare well with independent instrumental and proxy-based temperature estimates, but suggest a larger amplitude in summer temperature variability than previously reported. Both CPS and BHM reconstructions indicate that the mean 20th century European summer temperature was not significantly different from some earlier centuries, including the 1st, 2nd, 8th and 10th centuries CE. The 1st century (in BHM also the 10th century) may even have been slightly warmer than the 20th century, but the difference is not statistically significant. Comparing each 50 yr period with the 1951–2000 period reveals a similar pattern. Recent summers, however, have been unusually warm in the context of the last two millennia and there are no 30 yr periods in either reconstruction that exceed the mean average European summer temperature of the last 3 decades (1986–2015 CE). A comparison with an ensemble of climate model simulations suggests that the reconstructed European summer temperature variability over the period 850–2000 CE reflects changes in both internal variability and external forcing on multi-decadal time

  17. Alerting and vitalizing effects of color temperature during daytime: findings on subjective and objective indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, K.C.H.J.; Kort, de Y.A.W.; Haans, A.; Gennip, van D. A. P.; Ham, J.; Kort, de Y. A. W.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of correlated colour temperature on alertness, vitality and performance during daytime. Results of a within-groups experiment demonstrate time dependent effects on subjective indicators; objective measures are still being analysed.

  18. Relation between Wet-Bulb Globe Temperature and Thermal Work Limit Indices with Body Core Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Jalali

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to heat stress in casting and smelting industries can cause adverse health effects on employees who working in such industries. The present study was set to assess the correlation and agreement of heat stress indices, including wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT, and thermal work limit (TWL, and the deep body temperature indices in workers of several casting and smelting industries located in the vicinity of Tehran, Iran. In This cross-sectional study 40 workers randomly selected and were examined. WBGT and TWL were the indices used for assessing heat stress, and the tympanic temperature and the oral temperature were measured as the heat strain indices. The correlation and agreement of indices were measured using SPSS vs.16. The results of the assessment of WBGT, TWL, the tympanic temperature, and oral temperature showed that 80, 17.5, 40, and 32.5 percent of workers exposed to heat stress higher than permissible limits proposed by standard bodies. Moreover, the present study showed that the significant correlation coefficient between heat stress and heat strain indices was in the range of 0.844- 0.869. Further, there was observed a good agreement between TWL and heat strain indices. The agreement between TWL and the oral temperature was 0.63 (P-value≤ 0.001 and between TWL and tympanic temperature was 0.612 (P-value≤ 0.001. However, the agreement between WBGT and heat strain indices was not satisfactory. These values were 0.154 (P-value ≥ 0.068 and 0.215 (P-value≥ 0.028 for the oral temperature and the tympanic temperature, respectively. The TWL index had a better agreement than WBGT with heat strain indices so TWL index is the better choice for assessing the heat stress in casting and metal smelting industries.

  19. Managing Perishables with Time and temperature History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketzenberg, M.; Bloemhof, J.M.; Gaukler, G.

    2015-01-01

    We address the use and value of time and temperature information to manage perishables in the contextof a retailer that sells a random lifetime product subject to stochastic demand and lost sales. The product’s lifetime is largely determined by the temperature history and the flow time through the

  20. Reliability of temperature signal in various climate indicators from northern Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertti Hari

    Full Text Available We collected relevant observational and measured annual-resolution time series dealing with climate in northern Europe, focusing in Finland. We analysed these series for the reliability of their temperature signal at annual and seasonal resolutions. Importantly, we analysed all of the indicators within the same statistical framework, which allows for their meaningful comparison. In this framework, we employed a cross-validation procedure designed to reduce the adverse effects of estimation bias that may inflate the reliability of various temperature indicators, especially when several indicators are used in a multiple regression model. In our data sets, timing of phenological observations and ice break-up were connected with spring, tree ring characteristics (width, density, carbon isotopic composition with summer and ice formation with autumn temperatures. Baltic Sea ice extent and the duration of ice cover in different watercourses were good indicators of winter temperatures. Using combinations of various temperature indicator series resulted in reliable temperature signals for each of the four seasons, as well as a reliable annual temperature signal. The results hence demonstrated that we can obtain reliable temperature information over different seasons, using a careful selection of indicators, combining the results with regression analysis, and by determining the reliability of the obtained indicator.

  1. Time-temperature superposition in viscous liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Boye; Dyre, Jeppe; Christensen, Tage Emil

    2001-01-01

    with a reduced time definition based on a recently proposed expression for the relaxation time, where G [infinity] reflects the fictive temperature. All parameters entering the reduced time were determined from independent measurements of the frequency-dependent shear modulus of the equilibrium liquid....

  2. High temperature refractive indices of GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.; Stepanov, S.; Gott, A.; Shields, P.A.; Zhirnov, E.; Wang, W.N. [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Steimetz, E.; Zettler, J.T. [LayTec, Helmholtzstr. 13-14, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    Undoped GaN (u-GaN) films were grown by low pressure metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (LP-MOVPE) on sapphire substrates. In situ optical monitoring was applied to the growth process either using a LayTec EpiR-DA TT spectroscopic reflectometer or Filmetrics F30. Refractive indices of u-GaN films at 1060 C were obtained in a spectral range from 370-900 nm. A peak at 412{+-}5 nm in refractive index spectra was observed, which most likely corresponds to the band-gap of hexagonal GaN at a temperature of 1060 C. Refractive indices below this band-gap are fitted well to the first-order Sellmeier formula. As an example of the applications of the refractive indices, the effective film thicknesses of GaN during the resumption from 3 dimensional (3D) to 2 dimensional (2D) growth have been calculated from the spectra recorded by a LayTec system using the optical constants obtained. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Time-temperature equivalence in Martensite tempering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackenberg, Robert E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thomas, Grant A. [CSM; Speer, John G. [CSM; Matlock, David K. [CSM; Krauss, George [CSM

    2008-06-16

    The relationship between time and temperature is of great consequence in many materials-related processes including the tempering of martensite. In 1945, Hollomon and Jaffe quantified the 'degree of tempering' as a function of both tempering time, t, and tempering temperature, T, using the expression, T(log t + c). Here, c is thought to be a material constant and appears to decrease linearly with increasing carbon content. The Hollomon-Jaffe tempering parameter is frequently cited in the literature. This work reviews the original derivation of the tempering parameter concept, and presents the use of the characteristics diffusion distance as an alternative time-temperature relationship during martensite tempering. During the tempering of martensite, interstitial carbon atoms diffuse to form carbides. In addition, austenite decomposes, dislocations and grain boundaries rearrange, associated with iron self diffusion. Since these are all diffusional processes, it is reasonable to expect the degree of tempering to relate to the extent of diffusion.

  4. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  5. Variation in rhinarium temperature indicates sensory specializations in placental mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gläser, Nele; Kröger, Ronald H H

    2017-07-01

    The rhinarium, a specialized nose-tip characterized by an area of naked and wet skin around the nostrils, is a typical mammalian structure. The type and amount of innervation suggests a sensory role and morphological diversity implies so far unidentified species-specific functional specializations. Rhinaria also vary in temperature and this may be related to the functions of these sensory organs. We performed a comparative study on rhinarium temperature in order to learn more about possible correlations with phylogeny and ecology. We have concentrated on terrestrial carnivorans and large herbivores, but also investigated a number of other species, some of them lacking typical rhinaria. We used infrared (IR) thermography to determine nose skin temperatures from safe distances and without interfering with the animals' behavior. In all groups studied, the temperature of the rhinarium/nose-tip decreased with decreasing ambient temperature. At all ambient temperatures, rhinarium temperature was lower, by 9-17°C, in carnivorans compared to herbivores. Glires (rodents and lagomorphs), haplorrhine primates, and omnivorous Perisso- and Artiodactyla were intermediate. In strepsirrhine primates, rhinarium temperature was similar to ambient temperature. Our findings in Strepsirrhini are consistent with the hypothesis that their rhinaria have an indirect role in chemical communication. Warm rhinaria in herbivores suggest a tactile function, while the low skin temperatures on carnivoran rhinaria may make the skin particularly sensitive to warming. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Predicting monsoon rainfall and pressure indices from sea surface temperature

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.

    The relationship between the sea surface temperature (SST) in the Indian Ocean and monsoon rainfall has been examined by using 21 years data set (1967-87) of MOHSST.6 (Met. Office Historical Sea Surface Temperature data set, obtained from U.K. Met...

  7. Changes in Indices of Daily Temperature and Precipitation Extremes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It's a known fact that climate change will bring about increases in the occurrence of weather extreme events such as elevated temperature, drought, and floods; most especially in areas classified as hotspots to climate change – such as northwest Nigeria. This study investigates trends in extreme temperature and ...

  8. Amide proton temperature coefficients as hydrogen bond indicators in proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cierpicki, Tomasz; Otlewski, Jacek

    2001-01-01

    Correlations between amide proton temperature coefficients (Δσ HN /ΔT) and hydrogen bonds were investigated for a data set of 793 amides derived from 14 proteins. For amide protons showing temperature gradients more positive than -4.6 ppb/K there is a hydrogen bond predictivity value exceeding 85%. It increases to over 93% for amides within the range between -4 and -1 ppb/K. Detailed analysis shows an inverse proportionality between amide proton temperature coefficients and hydrogen bond lengths. Furthermore, for hydrogen bonds of similar bond lengths, values of temperature gradients in α-helices are on average 1 ppb/K more negative than in β-sheets. In consequence, a number of amide protons in α-helices involved in hydrogen bonds shorter than 2 A show Δσ HN /ΔT 10 helices and 98% in β-turns have temperature coefficients more positive than -4.6ppb/K. Ring current effect also significantly influences temperature coefficients of amide protons. In seven out of eight cases non-hydrogen bonded amides strongly deshielded by neighboring aromatic rings show temperature coefficients more positive than -2 ppb/K. In general, amide proton temperature gradients do not change with pH unless they correspond to conformational changes. Three examples of pH dependent equilibrium showing hydrogen bond formation at higher pH were found. In conclusion, amide proton temperature coefficients offer an attractive and simple way to confirm existence of hydrogen bonds in NMR determined structures

  9. Statistics of particle time-temperature histories.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewson, John C.; Lignell, David O.; Sun, Guangyuan

    2014-10-01

    Particles in non - isothermal turbulent flow are subject to a stochastic environment tha t produces a distribution of particle time - temperature histories. This distribution is a function of the dispersion of the non - isothermal (continuous) gas phase and the distribution of particles relative to that gas phase. In this work we extend the one - dimensional turbulence (ODT) model to predict the joint dispersion of a dispersed particle phase and a continuous phase. The ODT model predicts the turbulent evolution of continuous scalar fields with a model for the cascade of fluctuations to smaller sc ales (the 'triplet map') at a rate that is a function of the fully resolved one - dimens ional velocity field . Stochastic triplet maps also drive Lagrangian particle dispersion with finite Stokes number s including inertial and eddy trajectory - crossing effect s included. Two distinct approaches to this coupling between triplet maps and particle dispersion are developed and implemented along with a hybrid approach. An 'instantaneous' particle displacement model matches the tracer particle limit and provide s an accurate description of particle dispersion. A 'continuous' particle displacement m odel translates triplet maps into a continuous velocity field to which particles respond. Particles can alter the turbulence, and modifications to the stochastic rate expr ession are developed for two - way coupling between particles and the continuous phase. Each aspect of model development is evaluated in canonical flows (homogeneous turbulence, free - shear flows and wall - bounded flows) for which quality measurements are ava ilable. ODT simulations of non - isothermal flows provide statistics for particle heating. These simulations show the significance of accurately predicting the joint statistics of particle and fluid dispersion . Inhomogeneous turbulence coupled with the in fluence of the mean flow fields on particles of varying properties

  10. Time-Temperature Profiling of United Kingdom Consumers' Domestic Refrigerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ellen W; Redmond, Elizabeth C

    2016-12-01

    Increased consumer demand for convenience and ready-to-eat food, along with changes to consumer food purchase and storage practices, have resulted in an increased reliance on refrigeration to maximize food safety. Previous research suggests that many domestic refrigerators operate at temperatures exceeding recommendations; however, the results of several studies were determined by means of one temperature data point, which, given temperature fluctuation, may not be a true indicator of actual continual operating temperatures. Data detailing actual operating temperatures and the effects of consumer practices on temperatures are limited. This study has collated the time-temperature profiles of domestic refrigerators in consumer kitchens (n = 43) over 6.5 days with concurrent self-reported refrigerator usage. Overall, the findings established a significant difference (P < 0.05) between one-off temperature (the recording of one temperature data point) and mean operating temperature. No refrigerator operated at ≤5.0°C for the entire duration of the study. Mean temperatures exceeding 5.0°C were recorded in the majority (91%) of refrigerators. No significant associations or differences were determined for temperature profiles and demographics, including household size, or refrigerator characteristics (age, type, loading, and location). A positive correlation (P < 0.05) between room temperature and refrigerator temperature was determined. Reported door opening frequency correlated with temperature fluctuation (P < 0.05). Thermometer usage was determined to be infrequent. Cumulatively, research findings have established that the majority of domestic refrigerators in consumer homes operate at potentially unsafe temperatures and that this is influenced by consumer usage. The findings from this study may be utilized to inform the development of shelf-life testing based on realistic domestic storage conditions. Furthermore, the data can inform the development of future

  11. Role of blood bag temperature indicators in maintaining patent temperature of the returned unused blood bags in blood bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurasyikin, Y; Leong, C F; Fadhlullah, T M; Hafiz, W M; Nadiah, Z; Atieqah, A N; Ling, T J; Das, S

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the temperature chain of red blood cells (RBC) returned unused blood bags using blood temperature indicator and ascertain the factors like transportation time, type, size of coolant box and number of bags per box. A total of 250 blood bags with the indicator were observed for the temperature changes with other factors like transportation time, type and size of coolant box and number of bags per box. The recordings were performed at several checkpoints located between the blood bank and the wards. Out of the 250 bags, 74 (29.6%) showed colour changes in which 64 (86.3%) were returned unused (RU) blood bags. The transportation time for these 74 bags was 818.3 ± 941.643 min, significantly higher than bags without colour changes, (p=0.02). Interestingly, 71.4% of the colour changes occurred within the ward. The 7 litre coolant box with an average of 1-5 blood bags per box had a statistically significant higher percentage of colour change with 59.2% compared to the 5 litre coolant box (p=0.05). This study showed that the temperature chain of blood bags was often not well maintained. These results could be mainly due to the non-adherence to the standard operating procedure (SOP) of blood transfusion and the usage of non-standardized coolant boxes.

  12. Spatiotemporal trends in extreme rainfall and temperature indices over Upper Tapi Basin, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyank J.; Loliyana, V. D.; S. R., Resmi; Timbadiya, P. V.; Patel, P. L.

    2017-12-01

    The flood risk across the globe is intensified due to global warming and subsequent increase in extreme temperature and precipitation. The long-term trends in extreme rainfall (1944-2013) and temperature (1969-2012) indices have been investigated at annual, seasonal, and monthly time scales using nonparametric Mann-Kendall (MK), modified Mann-Kendall (MMK), and Sen's slope estimator tests. The extreme rainfall and temperature indices, recommended by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection Monitoring Indices (ETCCDMI), have been analyzed at finer spatial scales for trend detection. The results of trend analyses indicate decreasing trend in annual total rainfall, significant decreasing trend in rainy days, and increasing trend in rainfall intensity over the basin. The seasonal rainfall has been found to decrease for all the seasons except postmonsoon, which could affect the rain-fed agriculture in the basin. The 1- and 5-day annual maximum rainfalls exhibit mixed trends, wherein part of the basin experiences increasing trend, while other parts experience a decreasing trend. The increase in dry spells and concurrent decrease in wet spells are also observed over the basin. The extreme temperature indices revealed increasing trends in hottest and coldest days, while decreasing trends in coldest night are found over most parts of the basin. Further, the diurnal temperature range is also found to increase due to warming tendency in maximum temperature (T max) at a faster rate compared to the minimum temperature (T min). The increase in frequency and magnitude of extreme rainfall in the basin has been attributed to the increasing trend in maximum and minimum temperatures, reducing forest cover, rapid pace of urbanization, increase in human population, and thereby increase in the aerosol content in the atmosphere. The findings of the present study would significantly help in sustainable water resource planning, better decision-making for policy framework, and setting up

  13. Customising turnaround time indicators to requesting clinician: a 10-year study through balanced scorecard indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Maria; López-Garrigós, Maite; Santo-Quiles, Ana; Gutierrez, Mercedes; Lugo, Javier; Lillo, Rosa; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study is, first to present a 10-year monitoring of postanalytical turnaround time (TAT) adapted to different clinicians and patient situations, second to evaluate and analyse the indicators results during that period of time, and finally to show a synthetic appropriate indicator to be included in the balanced scorecard management system. TAT indicator for routine samples was devised as the percentage of certain key tests that were verified before a specific time on the phlebotomy day. A weighted mean synthetic indicator was also designed. They were calculated for inpatients at 15:00 and 12:00 and for primary care patients only at 15:00. The troponin TAT of emergency department patients, calculated as the difference between the troponin verification and registration time, was selected as the stat laboratory TAT indicator. The routine and stat TAT improved along the 10-year study period. The synthetic indicator showed the same trend. The implementation of systematic and continuous monitoring over years, promoted a continuous improvement in TAT which will probably benefit patient outcome and safety.

  14. Atmospheric QBO and ENSO indices with high vertical resolution from GNSS radio occultation temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsen, Hallgeir; Ladstädter, Florian; Scherllin-Pirscher, Barbara; Steiner, Andrea K.

    2018-03-01

    We provide atmospheric temperature variability indices for the tropical troposphere and stratosphere based on global navigation satellite system (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) temperature measurements. By exploiting the high vertical resolution and the uniform distribution of the GNSS RO temperature soundings we introduce two approaches, both based on an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis. The first method utilizes the whole vertical and horizontal RO temperature field from 30° S to 30° N and from 2 to 35 km altitude. The resulting indices, the leading principal components, resemble the well-known patterns of the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the tropics. They provide some information on the vertical structure; however, they are not vertically resolved. The second method applies the EOF analysis on each altitude level separately and the resulting indices contain information on the horizontal variability at each densely available altitude level. They capture more variability than the indices from the first method and present a mixture of all variability modes contributing at the respective altitude level, including the QBO and ENSO. Compared to commonly used variability indices from QBO winds or ENSO sea surface temperature, these new indices cover the vertical details of the atmospheric variability. Using them as proxies for temperature variability is also of advantage because there is no further need to account for response time lags. Atmospheric variability indices as novel products from RO are expected to be of great benefit for studies on atmospheric dynamics and variability, for climate trend analysis, as well as for climate model evaluation.

  15. changes in indices of daily temperature and precipitation extremes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr A.B.Ahmed

    increased risk of more intense, more frequent and longer-lasting heat waves in a ... present climate will experience the greatest increase in heat wave severity in ... often cause population displacement, and diseases outbreaks are very peculiar .... Most of the definitions for the indices were presented in the work of Peterson ...

  16. Real-Time Pore Pressure Detection: Indicators and Improved Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jincai Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High uncertainties may exist in the predrill pore pressure prediction in new prospects and deepwater subsalt wells; therefore, real-time pore pressure detection is highly needed to reduce drilling risks. The methods for pore pressure detection (the resistivity, sonic, and corrected d-exponent methods are improved using the depth-dependent normal compaction equations to adapt to the requirements of the real-time monitoring. A new method is proposed to calculate pore pressure from the connection gas or elevated background gas, which can be used for real-time pore pressure detection. The pore pressure detection using the logging-while-drilling, measurement-while-drilling, and mud logging data is also implemented and evaluated. Abnormal pore pressure indicators from the well logs, mud logs, and wellbore instability events are identified and analyzed to interpret abnormal pore pressures for guiding real-time drilling decisions. The principles for identifying abnormal pressure indicators are proposed to improve real-time pore pressure monitoring.

  17. Gold nanoparticle-based thermal history indicator for monitoring low-temperature storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yi-Cheng; Lu, Lin; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2015-01-01

    We describe a gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based thermal history indicator (THI) for monitoring low-temperature storage. The THI was prepared from tetrachloroaurate using gelatin as a reducing reagent. Gelatin also acts as a stabilizer to control the growth of the AuNPs. The size and shape of the AuNPs were characterized by UV–vis spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy and are initially found to be spherical with an average particle size of ∼19 nm. Initially, the color of the THIs is slightly pink, but after a 90-day storage in the freezer, as both the size and shape of the AuNPs change, the color of the THIs turns to red. After 90 days the absorbance peaks of THIs held at room temperature are red-shifted from 538 to 572 nm and possessed larger amplitude compared to those stored in the freezer. The color change is a function of both storage time and temperature. The observed increase in size is mainly due to storage temperature while the change in shape is mainly due to storage time. The THIs experiencing higher temperature treatments exhibit a more intense color change which is attributed to a localized surface plasmon resonance effect. Thus, the observed visual color changes can provide information regarding the thermal history the material has experienced. Accordingly, when used in conjunction with time-temperature sensitive products, the THI may serve as a proactive system for monitoring and controlling product quality and/or safety. For example, the THI is useful in safeguarding high-value biological products such as enzymes, antibodies, plasma, stem cells and other perishables that have to be stored at low temperatures. (author)

  18. Inland Water Temperature: An Ideal Indicator for the National Climate Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, S. J.; Lenters, J. D.; O'Reilly, C.; Healey, N. C.

    2014-12-01

    NASA is a significant contributor to the U.S. National Climate Assessment (NCA), which is a central component of the 2012-2022 U.S. Global Change Research Program Strategic Plan. The NCA has identified the need for indicators that provide a clear, concise way of communicating to NCA audiences about not only the status and trends of physical drivers of the climate system, but also the ecological and socioeconomic impacts, vulnerabilities, and responses to those drivers. We are using thermal infrared satellite data in conjunction with in situ measurements to produce water temperatures for all the large inland water bodies in North America for potential use as an indicator for the NCA. Recent studies have revealed significant warming of inland waters throughout the world. The observed rate of warming is - in many cases - greater than that of the ambient air temperature. These rapid, unprecedented changes in inland water temperatures have profound implications for lake hydrodynamics, productivity, and biotic communities. Scientists are just beginning to understand the global extent, regional patterns, physical mechanisms, and ecological consequences of lake warming. As part of our earlier studies we have collected thermal infrared satellite data from those satellite sensors that provide long-term and frequent spaceborne thermal infrared measurements of inland waters including ATSR, AVHRR, and MODIS and used these to examine trends in water surface temperature for approximately 100 of the largest inland water bodies in the world. We are now extending this work to generate temperature time-series of all North American inland water bodies that are sufficiently large to be studied using 1km resolution satellite data for the last 3 decades. These data are then being related to changes in the surface air temperature and compared with regional trends in water surface temperature derived from CMIP5/IPCC model simulations/projections to better predict future temperature changes

  19. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Global Temperature Time Series

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The global temperature time series provides time series charts using station based observations of daily temperature. These charts provide information about the...

  20. Effects of temperature on bleeding time and clotting time in normal male and female volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeri, C R; MacGregor, H; Cassidy, G; Tinney, R; Pompei, F

    1995-04-01

    This study was done to assess the effects of temperature on bleeding time and clotting time in normal male and female volunteers. Open study utilizing normal volunteers. University research laboratory. Fifty-four healthy male and female volunteers, ranging in age from 19 to 35 yrs, who were not receiving medications. The study was done and the samples of venous blood and shed blood collected at the template bleeding time site were obtained at a convenient time for each volunteer. Skin temperature was changed from +20 degrees to +38 degrees C and blood samples were obtained from the antecubital vein of each volunteer. The effect of local skin temperature ranging from +20 degrees to +38 degrees C on bleeding time was evaluated in 38 normal volunteers (19 male and 19 female). Skin temperature was maintained at +20 degrees to +38 degrees C by cooling or warming the forearm. At each temperature, measurements were made of complete blood count, bleeding time, and thromboxane B2 concentrations in shed blood collected at the template bleeding time site and in serum and plasma isolated from blood collected from the antecubital vein. Clotting time studies were measured in 16 normal volunteers (eight male and eight female) at temperatures ranging from +22 degrees to +37 degrees C. At +32 degrees C, the bleeding time was longer and hematocrit was lower in female than in male volunteers. However, at local skin temperatures of < +32 degrees C, both the males and females exhibited significantly increased bleeding times, which were associated with a reduction in shed blood thromboxane B2. Each 1 degree C decrease in temperature was associated with a 15% decrease in the shed blood thromboxane B2 concentration. Clotting times were three times longer at +22 degrees C than at +37 degrees C. Each 1 degree C reduction in the temperature of the clotted blood was associated with a 15% reduction in the serum thromboxane B2 concentration. Our data indicate that during surgical procedures, it

  1. European summer temperatures since Roman times

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luterbacher, J.; Werner, J. P.; Smerdon, J. E.; Fernandez-Donado, L.; González-Rouco, J. F.; Barriopedro, D.; Ljungqvist, F. C.; Büntgen, Ulf; Zorita, E.; Wagner, S.; Esper, J.; McCarroll, D.; Toreti, A.; Frank, D.; Jungclaus, J.; Barriendos, M.; Bertolin, C.; Bothe, O.; Brázdil, Rudolf; Camuffo, D.; Dobrovolný, Petr; Gagen, M.; Garica-Bustamante, E.; Ge, Q.; Gomez-Navarro, J. J.; Guiot, J.; Hao, Z.; Hegerl, G.; Holmgren, K.; Klimenko, V. V.; Martin-Chivelet, J.; Pfister, C.; Roberts, N.; Schindler, A.; Schurer, A.; Solomina, O.; von Gunten, L.; Wahl, E.; Wanner, H.; Wetter, O.; Xoplaki, E.; Yuan, N.; Zanchettin, D.; Zhang, H.; Zerefos, C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2016), č. článku 024001. ISSN 1748-9326 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-04291S Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : reconstructing climate anomalies * high-resolution paleoclimatology * northern-hemisphere temperature * tree-ring chronologies * last 1000 years * volcanic - eruptions * forcing reconstructions * bayesian algorithm * pmip simulations * past millennium * Common Era * heat waves * paleoclimatology * Bayesian hierarchical modelling * European summer temperature reconstruction * ensemble of climate model simulations * Medieval Climate Anomaly Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 4.404, year: 2016

  2. Echocardiography as an indication of continuous-time cardiac quiescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, C. A.; Auffermann, W. F.; Shah, A. J.; Inan, O. T.; Bhatti, P. T.; Tridandapani, S.

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) angiography using prospective gating requires that data be acquired during intervals of minimal cardiac motion to obtain diagnostic images of the coronary vessels free of motion artifacts. This work is intended to assess B-mode echocardiography as a continuous-time indication of these quiescent periods to determine if echocardiography can be used as a cost-efficient, non-ionizing modality to develop new prospective gating techniques for cardiac CT. These new prospective gating approaches will not be based on echocardiography itself but on CT-compatible modalities derived from the mechanics of the heart (e.g. seismocardiography and impedance cardiography), unlike the current standard electrocardiogram. To this end, echocardiography and retrospectively-gated CT data were obtained from ten patients with varied cardiac conditions. CT reconstructions were made throughout the cardiac cycle. Motion of the interventricular septum (IVS) was calculated from both echocardiography and CT reconstructions using correlation-based, deviation techniques. The IVS was chosen because it (1) is visible in echocardiography images, whereas the coronary vessels generally are not, and (2) has been shown to be a suitable indicator of cardiac quiescence. Quiescent phases were calculated as the minima of IVS motion and CT volumes were reconstructed for these phases. The diagnostic quality of the CT reconstructions from phases calculated from echocardiography and CT data was graded on a four-point Likert scale by a board-certified radiologist fellowship-trained in cardiothoracic radiology. Using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test, no significant difference in the diagnostic quality of the coronary vessels was found between CT volumes reconstructed from echocardiography- and CT-selected phases. Additionally, there was a correlation of 0.956 between the echocardiography- and CT-selected phases. This initial work suggests that B-mode echocardiography can be used as a

  3. Time-temperature-sensitization and time-temperature-precipitation behavior of alloy 625

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, M.; Heubner, U.

    1996-01-01

    Time-Temperature-Sensitization diagrams have been established for a low-carbon version of alloy 625 (UNS N06625). Sensitization in terms of a 50 microm (2 mils) intergranular penetration criterion starts after about 3 h aging time at 750 C (soft annealed condition) or after less than 1 h aging time at 800 C (solution annealed condition) when tested according to ASTM-G 28 method A. Grain boundary precipitation of carbides occurs during aging of both the soft annealed and the solution annealed material, but the soft annealed material exhibits a more pronounced general precipitation of Ni 3 (Nb,Mo) phase giving rise to more distinct loss of ductility. Sensitization of alloy 625 may be retarded by lowering its iron content

  4. Effect of transportation during periods of high ambient temperature on physiologic and behavioral indices of beef heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurer, Miles E; White, Brad J; Anderson, David E; Miesner, Matt D; Mosier, Derek A; Coetzee, Johann F; Amrine, David E

    2013-03-01

    To determine the effect of transportation during periods of high ambient temperature on physiologic and behavioral indices of beef heifers. 20 heifers (mean body weight, 217.8 kg). Ten heifers were transported 518 km when the maximum ambient temperature was ≥ 32.2°C while the other 10 heifers served as untransported controls. Blood samples were collected from transported heifers at predetermined intervals during the transportation period. For all heifers, body weights, nasal and rectal temperatures, and behavioral indices were measured at predetermined intervals for 3 days after transportation. A week later, the entire process was repeated such that each group was transported twice and served as the control twice. Transported heifers spent more time near the hay feeder on the day of transportation, had lower nasal and rectal temperatures for 24 hours after transportation, and spent more time lying down for 2 days after transportation, compared with those indices for control heifers. Eight hours after transportation, the weight of transported heifers decreased 6%, whereas that of control heifers increased 0.6%. At 48 hours after initiation of transportation, weight, rectal temperature, and time spent at various pen locations did not differ between transported and control heifers. Cortisol concentrations were higher 4 hours after initiation of transportation, compared with those determined just prior to transportation. Results indicated transportation during periods of high ambient temperatures caused transient changes in physiologic and behavioral indices of beef heifers.

  5. Stratospheric Temperature Trends Observed by TIMED/SABER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, T.; Tan, R.

    2017-12-01

    Trends in the stratospheric temperature are studied based on the temperature profile observation from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER). The spatially trends are evaluated in different time scales ranging from decadal to monthly resolved. The results indicate a signature of BDC acceleration. There are strong warming trends (up to 9 K/decade) in the middle to upper stratosphere in the high latitude spring, summer, and autumn seasons, accompanied by strong cooling trends in the lower stratosphere. Besides, strong warming trends occurs through the whole stratosphere over the Southern Hemisphere, which confirms Antarctic ozone layer healing since 2000. In addition, the results demonstrate a significant warming trends in the middle of tropical stratosphere, which becomes strongest during June-July-August.

  6. EBR-II secondary sodium loop Plugging Temperature Indicator control system upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.B.; Gehrman, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary sodium coolant loop Plugging Temperature Indicator (PTI) control system was upgraded in 1993 to a real-time computer based system. This was done to improve control, to remove obsolete and high maintenance equipment, and to provide a graphical CRT based operator interface. A goal was to accomplish this inexpensively using small, reliable computer and display hardware with a minimum of purchased software. This paper describes the PTI system, the upgraded control system and its operator interface, and development methods and tools. The paper then assesses how well the system met its goals, discusses lessons learned and operational improvements noted, and provides some recommendations and suggestions on applying small real-time control systems of this type

  7. Extreme temperature indices analyses: A case study of five meteorological stations in Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Husna; Salleh, Nur Hanim Mohd

    2015-10-01

    Extreme temperature events affect many human and natural systems. Changes in extreme temperature events can be detected and monitored by developing the indices based on the extreme temperature data. As an effort to provide the understanding of these changes to the public, a study of extreme temperature indices is conducted at five meteorological stations in Peninsular Malaysia. In this study, changes in the means and extreme events of temperature are assessed and compared using the daily maximum and minimum temperature data for the period of 2004 to 2013. The absolute extreme temperature indices; TXx, TXn, TXn and TNn provided by Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI) are utilized and linear trends of each index are extracted using least square likelihood method. The results indicate that there exist significant decreasing trend in the TXx index for Kota Bharu station and increasing trend in TNn index for Chuping and Kota Kinabalu stations. The comparison between the trend in mean and extreme temperatures show the same significant tendency for Kota Bharu and Kuala Terengganu stations.

  8. Indications for knee arthroplasty have remained consistent over time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Grove; Husted, Henrik; Otte, Kristian Stahl

    2012-01-01

    Between 2004 and 2009, the incidence of primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in Denmark has almost doubled. It has been speculated that this increase may be a result of patients being operated on weaker indications. The purpose of this study was to compare preoperative degrees of osteoarthritis...

  9. Temperature has a causal effect on avian timing of reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.E.; Holleman, L.J.M.; Caro, S.P.

    2009-01-01

    Many bird species reproduce earlier in years with high spring temperatures, but little is known about the causal effect of temperature. Temperature may have a direct effect on timing of reproduction but the correlation may also be indirect, for instance via food phenology. As climate change has led

  10. Real-time optoacoustic monitoring of temperature in tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larina, Irina V; Larin, Kirill V; Esenaliev, Rinat O

    2005-01-01

    To improve the safety and efficacy of thermal therapy, it is necessary to map tissue temperature in real time with submillimetre spatial resolution. Accurate temperature maps may provide the necessary control of the boundaries of the heated regions and minimize thermal damage to surrounding normal tissues. Current imaging modalities fail to monitor tissue temperature in real time with high resolution and accuracy. We investigated a non-invasive optoacoustic method for accurate, real-time monitoring of tissue temperature during thermotherapy. In this study, we induced temperature gradients in tissue and tissue-like samples and monitored the temperature distribution using the optoacoustic technique. The fundamental harmonic of a Q-switched Nd : YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm) was used for optoacoustic wave generation and probing of tissue temperature. The tissue temperature was also monitored with a multi-sensor temperature probe inserted in the samples. Good agreement between optoacoustically measured and actual tissue temperatures was obtained. The accuracy of temperature monitoring was better than 1 0 C, while the spatial resolution was about 1 mm. These data suggest that the optoacoustic technique has the potential to be used for non-invasive, real-time temperature monitoring during thermotherapy

  11. Changes in a suite of indicators of extreme temperature and precipitation under 1.5 and 2 degrees warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerenson, Travis; Tebaldi, Claudia; Sanderson, Ben; Lamarque, Jean-François

    2018-03-01

    Following the 2015 Paris agreement, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was tasked with assessing climate change impacts and mitigation options for a world that limits warming to 1.5 °C in a special report. To aid the scientific assessment process three low-warming ensembles were generated over the 21st century based on the Paris targets using NCAR-DOE community model, CESM1-CAM5. This study used those simulation results and computed ten extreme climate indices, from definitions created by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices, to determine if the three different scenarios cause different intensity and frequency of extreme precipitation or temperature over the 21st century. After computing the indices, statistical tests were used to determine if significant changes affect their characteristics. It was found that at the grid point level significant changes emerge in all scenarios, for nearly all indices. The temperature indices show widespread significant change, while the behavior of precipitation indices reflects the larger role that internal variability plays, even by the end of the century. Nonetheless differences can be assessed, in substantial measure for many of these indices: changes in nearly all indices have a strong correlation to global mean temperature, so that scenarios and times with greater temperature change experience greater index changes for many regions. This is particularly true of the temperature-related indices, but can be assessed for some regions also for the indices related to precipitation intensity. These results thus show that even for scenarios that are separated by only half of a degree in global average temperature, the statistics of extremes are significantly different.

  12. The Validity of 21 cm Spin Temperature as a Kinetic Temperature Indicator in Atomic and Molecular Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, Gargi [Dept. of Physics, UM-DAE Centre for Excellence in Basic Sciences, University of Mumbai, Mumbai 400098 (India); Ferland, G. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Hubeny, I., E-mail: gargishaw@gmail.com, E-mail: gary@uky.edu, E-mail: hubeny@as.arizona.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2017-07-10

    The gas kinetic temperature ( T {sub K} ) of various interstellar environments is often inferred from observations that can deduce level populations of atoms, ions, or molecules using spectral line observations; H i 21 cm is perhaps the most widely used, and has a long history. Usually the H i 21 cm line is assumed to be in thermal equilibrium and the populations are given by the Boltzmann distribution. A variety of processes, many involving Ly α , can affect the 21 cm line. Here we show how this is treated in the spectral simulation code Cloudy, and present numerical simulations of environments where this temperature indicator is used, with a detailed treatment of the physical processes that determine level populations within H{sup 0}. We discuss situations where this temperature indicator traces T {sub K}, cases where it fails, as well as the effects of Ly α pumping on the 21 cm spin temperature. We also show that the Ly α excitation temperature rarely traces the gas kinetic temperature.

  13. Effect of temperature and time on solvothermal synthesis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of temperature and time study on solvothermal synthesis of BaTiO3 revealed that a moderate reaction temperature i.e. 185◦C and longer reaction time favour tetragonal phase stabiliza- tion. Dissolution–precipitation appears to be the transformation mechanism for the crystallization of BaTiO3 from particulate TiO2 ...

  14. British Military surgical key performance indicators: time for an update?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Max Er; Sharrock, A E; Hansen, C L; Newton, N J; Bowley, D M; Midwinter, M

    2016-10-01

    Key performance indicators (KPIs) are metrics that compare actual care against an ideal structure, process or outcome standard. KPIs designed to assess performance in deployed military surgical facilities have previously been published. This study aimed to review the overall performance of surgical trauma care for casualties treated at Role 3 Camp Bastion, Medical Treatment Facility, Afghanistan, in light of the existing Defence Medical Services (DMS) KPIs. The secondary aims were to assess the utility of the surgical KPIs and make recommendations for future surgical trauma care review. Data on 22 surgical parameters were prospectively collected for 150 injured patients who had primary surgery at Camp Bastion between 1 May 2013 and 20 August 2013. Additional information for these patients was obtained using the Joint Theatre Trauma Register. The authors assessed data recording, applicability and compliance with the KPIs. Median data recording was 100% (IQR 98%-100%), median applicability was 56% (IQR 10%-99%) and median compliance was 78% (IQR 58%-93%). One KPI was not applicable to any patient in our population. Eleven KPIs achieved >80% compliance, five KPIs had 80%-60% compliance and five KPIs had performance of the surgical aspect of military trauma care in 2013. The KPIs highlight areas for improvement in service delivery. Individual KPI development should be driven by evidence and reflect advances in practice and knowledge. A method of stakeholder consultation, and sequential refinement following evidence review, may be the right process to develop the future set of DMS KPIs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Innovative techniques to analyze time series of geomagnetic activity indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasis, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Potirakis, Stelios M.; Eftaxias, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic storms are undoubtedly among the most important phenomena in space physics and also a central subject of space weather. The non-extensive Tsallis entropy has been recently introduced, as an effective complexity measure for the analysis of the geomagnetic activity Dst index. The Tsallis entropy sensitively shows the complexity dissimilarity among different "physiological" (normal) and "pathological" states (intense magnetic storms). More precisely, the Tsallis entropy implies the emergence of two distinct patterns: (i) a pattern associated with the intense magnetic storms, which is characterized by a higher degree of organization, and (ii) a pattern associated with normal periods, which is characterized by a lower degree of organization. Other entropy measures such as Block Entropy, T-Complexity, Approximate Entropy, Sample Entropy and Fuzzy Entropy verify the above mentioned result. Importantly, the wavelet spectral analysis in terms of Hurst exponent, H, also shows the existence of two different patterns: (i) a pattern associated with the intense magnetic storms, which is characterized by a fractional Brownian persistent behavior (ii) a pattern associated with normal periods, which is characterized by a fractional Brownian anti-persistent behavior. Finally, we observe universality in the magnetic storm and earthquake dynamics, on a basis of a modified form of the Gutenberg-Richter law for the Tsallis statistics. This finding suggests a common approach to the interpretation of both phenomena in terms of the same driving physical mechanism. Signatures of discrete scale invariance in Dst time series further supports the aforementioned proposal.

  16. TIME-TEMPERATURE-TRANSFORMATION (TTT) DIAGRAMS FOR FUTURE WASTE COMPOSITIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billings, A.; Edwards, T.

    2010-01-01

    As a part of the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms defined by the Department of Energy - Office of Environmental Management, the waste form stability must be determined for each of the projected high-level waste (HLW) types at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Specifically, WAPS 1.4.1 requires the glass transition temperature (T g ) to be defined and time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagrams to be developed. The T g of a glass is an indicator of the approximate temperature where the supercooled liquid converts to a solid on cooling or conversely, where the solid begins to behave as a viscoelastic solid on heating. A TTT diagram identifies the crystalline phases that can form as a function of time and temperature for a given waste type or more specifically, the borosilicate glass waste form. In order to assess durability, the Product Consistency Test (PCT) was used and the durability results compared to the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. The measurement of glass transition temperature and the development of TTT diagrams have already been performed for the seven Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) projected compositions as defined in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and in SRNL-STI-2009-00025. Additional phase transformation information exists for other projected compositions, but overall these compositions did not cover composition regions estimated for future waste processing. To develop TTT diagrams for future waste types, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) fabricated two caches of glass from reagent grade oxides to simulate glass compositions which would be likely processed with and without Al dissolution. These were used for glass transition temperature measurement and TTT diagram development. The glass transition temperatures of both glasses were measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and were recorded to be 448 C and 452 C. Using the previous TTT diagrams as guidance

  17. A Modified Design of a Thermocouple Based Digital Temperature Indicator with Opto-Isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. BERA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the conventional thermocouple based digital temperature indicator the millivolt signal obtained from a thermocouple is first amplified and then converted into a digital signal by using analog-to-digital converter (ADC. This digital signal is then indicated as digital display of temperature using digital counter circuit or microprocessor/microcontroller based circuitry. In the present paper a modified AD conversion technique along with opto-isolation is used to indicate digitally the temperature without using any conventional analog-to-digital converter. The theory and design of the measuring technique are described in the paper. The non-linearity of thermocouple is eliminated by using look-up table within software program. The performance of the circuit has been experimentally tested by using mV input signal instead of a thermocouple as well as using a K-type thermocouple. The experimental results are reported in the paper.

  18. Time dependent temperature distribution in pulsed Ti:sapphire lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoncristiani, A. Martin; Byvik, Charles E.; Farrukh, Usamah O.

    1988-01-01

    An expression is derived for the time dependent temperature distribution in a finite solid state laser rod for an end-pumped beam of arbitrary shape. The specific case of end pumping by circular (constant) or Gaussian beam is described. The temperature profile for a single pump pulse and for repetitive pulse operation is discussed. The particular case of the temperature distribution in a pulsed titanium:sapphire rod is considered.

  19. An elapsed time-temperature monitor for blood storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, G E; Cloud, S; Myhre, B A

    1977-01-01

    Blood should not be allowed to exceed 10 C while being stored or transported. However, one cannot test the internal temperature of a unit of blood without contaminating it. Most blood banks have established an arbitrary time limit beyond which a blood unit cannot be kept out of the refrigerator. This method is ineffective if blood is stored in a satellite refrigerator, since the blood may be moved in and out of the refrigerator and the blood bank personnel will be unaware of it. An elapsed time indicator is described which employs a small condenser (E-Cell-Plessey Electronics) charged with a known amount of electricity. If the device is removed from the refrigerator, it begins to discharge at a known rate. The amount of time subsequently can be determined by the loss of charge. The prototype of this instrument has been found to be quite accurate and small (2 inches X 2 inches X 1 inch). It would be rather inexpensive if made in considerable numbers.

  20. A Generalized Time-Dependent Harmonic Oscillator at Finite Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majima, H.; Suzuki, A.

    2006-01-01

    We show how a generalized time-dependent harmonic oscillator (GTHO) is extended to a finite temperature case by using thermo field dynamics (TFD). We derive the general time-dependent annihilation and creation operators for the system, and obtain the time-dependent quasiparticle annihilation and creation operators for the GTHO by using the temperature-dependent Bogoliubov transformation of TFD. We also obtain the thermal state as a two-mode squeezed vacuum state in the time-dependent case as well as in the time-independent case. The general formula is derived to calculate the thermal expectation value of operators

  1. Influence of Sensor Ingestion Timing on Consistency of Temperature Measures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goodman, Daniel A; Kenefick, Robert W; Cadarette, Bruce S; Cheuvront, Samuel N

    2009-01-01

    ... (ITS) to measure core body temperature have been demonstrated. However, the effect of elapsed time between ITS ingestion and Tint measurement has not been thoroughly studied. Methods: Eight volunteers...

  2. Flowering time of butterfly nectar food plants is more sensitive to temperature than the timing of butterfly adult flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharouba, Heather M; Vellend, Mark

    2015-09-01

    1. Variation among species in their phenological responses to temperature change suggests that shifts in the relative timing of key life cycle events between interacting species are likely to occur under climate warming. However, it remains difficult to predict the prevalence and magnitude of these shifts given that there have been few comparisons of phenological sensitivities to temperature across interacting species. 2. Here, we used a broad-scale approach utilizing collection records to compare the temperature sensitivity of the timing of adult flight in butterflies vs. flowering of their potential nectar food plants (days per °C) across space and time in British Columbia, Canada. 3. On average, the phenology of both butterflies and plants advanced in response to warmer temperatures. However, the two taxa were differentially sensitive to temperature across space vs. across time, indicating the additional importance of nontemperature cues and/or local adaptation for many species. 4. Across butterfly-plant associations, flowering time was significantly more sensitive to temperature than the timing of butterfly flight and these sensitivities were not correlated. 5. Our results indicate that warming-driven shifts in the relative timing of life cycle events between butterflies and plants are likely to be prevalent, but that predicting the magnitude and direction of such changes in particular cases is going to require detailed, fine-scale data. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2015 British Ecological Society.

  3. Temperature and curing time affect composite sorption and solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Luscino Alves de Castro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the effect of temperature and curing time on composite sorption and solubility. Material and Methods: Seventy five specimens (8×2 mm were prepared using a commercial composite resin (ICE, SDI. Three temperatures (10°C, 25°C and 60°C and five curing times (5 s, 10 s, 20 s, 40 s and 60 s were evaluated. The specimens were weighed on an analytical balance three times: A: before storage (M1; B: 7 days after storage (M2; C: 7 days after storage plus 1 day of drying (M3. The storage solution consisted of 75% alcohol/25% water. Sorption and solubility were calculated using these three weights and specimen dimensions. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U Tests (α=5%. Results: The results showed that time, temperature and their interaction influenced the sorption and solubility of the composite (p0.05. The 60°C composite temperature led to lower values of sorption for all curing times when compared with the 10°C temperature (p0.05. Solubility was similar at 40 s and 60 s for all temperatures (p>0.05, but was higher at 10°C than at 60°C for all curing times (p0.05. Conclusions: In conclusion, higher temperatures or longer curing times led to lower sorption and solubility values for the composite tested; however, this trend was only significant in specific combinations of temperature and curing times.

  4. Changes in Skin Surface Temperature during Muscular Endurance indicated Strain – An Explorative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Fröhlich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Non-contact thermography enables the diagnosis of the distribution of skin surface temperature during athletic movement. Resistance exercise results in stress of required musculature, which is supposed to be measurable thermographically in terms of skin surface temperature change. Objective: This study aims to evaluate the application of thermography to analyze changes in skin temperature, representing specific muscle groups, during and after resistance exercise. Method: Thirteen male participants (age: 27.1 ± 4.9 years, height: 181.5 ± 5.7 cm, mass: 74.8 ± 7.4 kg completed the study. On 5 separate visits to the laboratory, participants performed one of 5 resistance exercise to target specific muscles (M. pectoralis major, M. rectus abdominis, M. trapezius, M. erector spinae, M. quadriceps femoris. The exercise protocol consisted of 3 sets of 20 repetitions, with 1 minute rest between exercise sets. The average skin surface temperature above the muscle groups used was thermographically determined using standard methods at 7 time points; pre-exercise, immediately following each exercise set, and post exercise (2, 3, and 6 minutes after the finale exercise set. The measurement areas were standardized using anatomic reference points. Results: From an inferential statistical point of view, no significant change in the average temperature caused by the applied resistance training was found for the individual muscle groups over time at the individual measurement times (all P>0.08. However, thermography showed a characteristic chronological temperature curve for the five body areas between measurement times, as well as a distinctive spatial temperature distribution over the measurement areas. Discussion: Based on the thermographic image data and the characteristic temperature curve, it is possible to identify the primarily used functional musculature after device-controlled resistance training. Therefore, thermography seems to be

  5. 76 FR 81363 - Temperature-Indicating Devices; Thermally Processed Low-Acid Foods Packaged in Hermetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... amended FDA's regulations for thermally processed low-acid foods packaged in hermetically sealed... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 113 [Docket No. FDA-2007-N-0265] (formerly 2007N-0026) Temperature-Indicating Devices; Thermally Processed Low-Acid...

  6. Temperature programmed retention indices : calculation from isothermal data Part 2: Results with nonpolar columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curvers, J.M.P.M.; Rijks, J.A.; Cramers, C.A.M.G.; Knauss, K.; Larson, P.

    1985-01-01

    The procedure for calculating linear temperature programmed indices as described in part 1 has been evaluated using five different nonpolar columns, with OV-1 as the stationary phase. For fourty-three different solutes covering five different classes of components, including n-alkanes and

  7. Analyzing the impact of ambient temperature indicators on transformer life in different regions of Chinese mainland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Cui-fen; Gao, Wen-Sheng; Liu, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Regression analysis is applied to quantitatively analyze the impact of different ambient temperature characteristics on the transformer life at different locations of Chinese mainland. 200 typical locations in Chinese mainland are selected for the study. They are specially divided into six regions so that the subsequent analysis can be done in a regional context. For each region, the local historical ambient temperature and load data are provided as inputs variables of the life consumption model in IEEE Std. C57.91-1995 to estimate the transformer life at every location. Five ambient temperature indicators related to the transformer life are involved into the partial least squares regression to describe their impact on the transformer life. According to a contribution measurement criterion of partial least squares regression, three indicators are conclusively found to be the most important factors influencing the transformer life, and an explicit expression is provided to describe the relationship between the indicators and the transformer life for every region. The analysis result is applicable to the area where the temperature characteristics are similar to Chinese mainland, and the expressions obtained can be applied to the other locations that are not included in this paper if these three indicators are known.

  8. Analyzing the Impact of Ambient Temperature Indicators on Transformer Life in Different Regions of Chinese Mainland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Cui-fen; Gao, Wen-Sheng; Liu, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Regression analysis is applied to quantitatively analyze the impact of different ambient temperature characteristics on the transformer life at different locations of Chinese mainland. 200 typical locations in Chinese mainland are selected for the study. They are specially divided into six regions so that the subsequent analysis can be done in a regional context. For each region, the local historical ambient temperature and load data are provided as inputs variables of the life consumption model in IEEE Std. C57.91-1995 to estimate the transformer life at every location. Five ambient temperature indicators related to the transformer life are involved into the partial least squares regression to describe their impact on the transformer life. According to a contribution measurement criterion of partial least squares regression, three indicators are conclusively found to be the most important factors influencing the transformer life, and an explicit expression is provided to describe the relationship between the indicators and the transformer life for every region. The analysis result is applicable to the area where the temperature characteristics are similar to Chinese mainland, and the expressions obtained can be applied to the other locations that are not included in this paper if these three indicators are known. PMID:23843729

  9. A model for quantification of temperature profiles via germination times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pipper, Christian Bressen; Adolf, Verena Isabelle; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik

    2013-01-01

    Current methodology to quantify temperature characteristics in germination of seeds is predominantly based on analysis of the time to reach a given germination fraction, that is, the quantiles in the distribution of the germination time of a seed. In practice interpolation between observed...... time and a specific type of accelerated failure time models is provided. As a consequence the observed number of germinated seeds at given monitoring times may be analysed directly by a grouped time-to-event model from which characteristics of the temperature profile may be identified and estimated...... germination fractions at given monitoring times is used to obtain the time to reach a given germination fraction. As a consequence the obtained value will be highly dependent on the actual monitoring scheme used in the experiment. In this paper a link between currently used quantile models for the germination...

  10. Land surface temperature as an indicator of the unsaturated zone thickness: A remote sensing approach in the Atacama Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urqueta, Harry; Jódar, Jorge; Herrera, Christian; Wilke, Hans-G; Medina, Agustín; Urrutia, Javier; Custodio, Emilio; Rodríguez, Jazna

    2018-01-15

    Land surface temperature (LST) seems to be related to the temperature of shallow aquifers and the unsaturated zone thickness (∆Z uz ). That relationship is valid when the study area fulfils certain characteristics: a) there should be no downward moisture fluxes in an unsaturated zone, b) the soil composition in terms of both, the different horizon materials and their corresponding thermal and hydraulic properties, must be as homogeneous and isotropic as possible, c) flat and regular topography, and d) steady state groundwater temperature with a spatially homogeneous temperature distribution. A night time Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image and temperature field measurements are used to test the validity of the relationship between LST and ∆Z uz at the Pampa del Tamarugal, which is located in the Atacama Desert (Chile) and meets the above required conditions. The results indicate that there is a relation between the land surface temperature and the unsaturated zone thickness in the study area. Moreover, the field measurements of soil temperature indicate that shallow aquifers dampen both the daily and the seasonal amplitude of the temperature oscillation generated by the local climate conditions. Despite empirically observing the relationship between the LST and ∆Z uz in the study zone, such a relationship cannot be applied to directly estimate ∆Z uz using temperatures from nighttime thermal satellite images. To this end, it is necessary to consider the soil thermal properties, the soil surface roughness and the unseen water and moisture fluxes (e.g., capillarity and evaporation) that typically occur in the subsurface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Time to get happy: associations of time perspective with indicators of well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseferidi, Sofia-Ioanna; Griva, Fay; Anagnostopoulos, Fotios

    2017-06-01

    The present study examined associations of time perspective (TP) with indicators of well-being including satisfaction with life, anxiety and depression, after controlling for sociodemographic factors. Adult participants (N = 413) completed a web-based questionnaire that included a short version of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale. Life satisfaction was more strongly associated with the present hedonistic dimension, suggesting that the tendency to take risks and to fulfil one's desires may lead to experiencing pleasure in a 'seize the day' approach to life. The existence of depressive symptoms and elevated anxiety levels were associated with higher scores on the past present and the present fatalistic dimensions, suggesting that feeling hopeless, or dwelling on bad moments from the past may be largely related to feeling depressed and anxious. Considering the recently reported implications of TP in clinical and counseling settings, the present study contributes to the growing body of research that associates TP with mental health and psychological well-being.

  12. Temperature dependence of fluctuation time scales in spin glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenning, Gregory G.; Bowen, J.; Sibani, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Using a series of fast cooling protocols we have probed aging effects in the spin glass state as a function of temperature. Analyzing the logarithmic decay found at very long time scales within a simple phenomenological barrier model, leads to the extraction of the fluctuation time scale of the s...

  13. Relative frequencies and significance of faecal coliforms as indicators related to water temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auban, E G; Ripolles, A A; Domarco, M J

    1983-01-01

    The faecal coliforms at different sites of a hypereutrophic lake near Valencia (Albufera) were identified and their relative amounts established along an annual cycle. Using lauryl tryptose broth at 35 degrees C, followed by incubation at 44.4 degrees C in 2% brilliant green bile, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae are practically the only coliforms present. A positive correlation was found between the water temperature and the relative amount of these two coliforms: K. pneumoniae predominates at high water temperatures, whereas E. coli shows preponderance during the cold period. The role of K. pneumoniae as the only faecal indicator under the circumstances described in the work is emphasized and discussed.

  14. Towards the standardization of time--temperature parameter usage in elevated temperature data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhoff, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    Work devoted to establishment of recommended practices for correlating and extrapolating relevant data on creep-rupture properties of materials at high temperatures is described. An analysis of the time-temperature parameter is included along with descriptions of analysis and evaluation methods. Results of application of the methods are compared

  15. Sensitive Indicators of Zonal Stipa Species to Changing Temperature and Precipitation in Inner Mongolia Grassland, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiaomin; Zhou, Guangsheng; Wang, Yuhui; Song, Xiliang

    2016-01-01

    Climate change often induces shifts in plant functional traits. However, knowledge related to sensitivity of different functional traits and sensitive indicator representing plant growth under hydrothermal change remains unclear. Inner Mongolia grassland is predicted to be one of the terrestrial ecosystems which are most vulnerable to climate change. In this study, we analyzed the response of four zonal Stipa species (S. baicalensis, S. grandis, S. breviflora, and S. bungeana) from Inner Mongolia grassland to changing temperature (control, increased 1.5, 2, 4, and 6°C), precipitation (decreased 30 and 15%, control, increased 15 and 30%) and their combined effects via climate control chambers. The relative change of functional traits in the unit of temperature and precipitation change was regarded as sensitivity coefficient and sensitive indicators were examined by pathway analysis. We found that sensitivity of the four Stipa species to changing temperature and precipitation could be ranked as follows: S. bungeana > S. grandis > S. breviflora > S. baicalensis. In particular, changes in leaf area, specific leaf area and root/shoot ratio could account for 86% of the changes in plant biomass in the four Stipa species. Also these three measurements were more sensitive to hydrothermal changes than the other functional traits. These three functional indicators reflected the combination of plant production capacity (leaf area), adaptive strategy (root/shoot ratio), instantaneous environmental effects (specific leaf area), and cumulative environmental effects (leaf area and root/shoot ratio). Thus, leaf area, specific leaf area and root/shoot ratio were chosen as sensitive indicators in response to changing temperature and precipitation for Stipa species. These results could provide the basis for predicting the influence of climate change on Inner Mongolia grassland based on the magnitude of changes in sensitive indicators. PMID:26904048

  16. The effect of lower body cooling on the changes in three core temperature indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basset, F A; Cahill, F; Handrigan, G; DuCharme, M B; Cheung, S S

    2011-01-01

    Rectal (T re ), ear canal (T ear ) and esophageal (T es ) temperatures have been used in the literature as core temperature indices in humans. The aim of the study was to investigate if localized lower body cooling would have a different effect on each of these measurements. We hypothesized that prolonged lower body surface cooling will result in a localized cooling effect for the rectal temperature not reflected in the other core measurement sites. Twelve participants (mean ± SD; 26.8 ± 6.0 years; 82.6 ± 13.9 kg; 179 ± 10 cm, BSA = 2.00 ± 0.21 m 2 ) attended one experimental session consisting of sitting on a rubberized raft floor surface suspended in 5 °C water in a thermoneutral air environment (∼21.5 ± 0.5 °C). Experimental conditions were (a) a baseline phase during which participants were seated for 15 min in an upright position on an insulated pad (1.408 K . m 2 . W −1 ); (b) a cooling phase during which participants were exposed to the cooling surface for 2 h, and (c) an insulation phase during which the baseline condition was repeated for 1 h. Temperature data were collected at 1 Hz, reduced to 1 min averages, and transformed from absolute values to a change in temperature from baseline (15 min average). Metabolic data were collected breath-by-breath and integrated over the same temperature epoch. Within the baseline phase no significant change was found between the three indices of core temperature. By the end of the cooling phase, T re was significantly lower (Δ = −1.0 ± 0.4 °C) from baseline values than from T ear (Δ = −0.3 ± 0.3 °C) and T es (Δ = −0.1 ± 0.3 °C). T re continued to decrease during the insulation phase from Δ −1.0 ± 0.4 °C to as low as Δ −1.4 ± 0.5 °C. By the end of the insulation phase T re had slightly risen back to Δ −1.3 ± 0.4 °C but remained significantly different from baseline values and from the other two core measures. Metabolic data showed no variation throughout the experiment. In

  17. Time-resolving electron temperature diagnostic for ALCATOR C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairfax, S.A.

    1984-05-01

    A diagnostic that provides time-resolved central electron temperatures has been designed, built, and tested on the ALCATOR C Tokamak. The diagnostic uses an array of fixed-wavelength x-ray crystal monochromators to sample the x-ray continuum and determine the absolute electron temperature. The resolution and central energy of each channel were chosen to exclude any contributions from impurity line radiation. This document describes the need for such a diagnostic, the design methodology, and the results with typical ALCATOR C plasmas. Sawtooth (m = 1) temperature oscillations were observed after pellet fueling of the plasma. This is the first time that such oscillations have been observed with an x-ray temperature diagnostic

  18. Time dependence of magnetization of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkin, A.I.; Geshkenbein, V.B.

    1988-10-01

    Magnetization of high T c superconductors logarithmically decreases with time. There is a maximum in the temperature dependence of the coefficient at this logarithm. If one assumes that there do exist two kinds of pinning centers, then this dependence can be described in the Anderson theory of thermal creeps of Abrikosov's vortices. The temperature dependence of the critical current is also discussed. (author). 23 refs

  19. The effect of water temperature and water hardness on reproductive indicators Hemichromis lifalili

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Kopecký

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work we investigated the effect of temperature and water hardness on reproductive indicators Hemichromis lifalili in aquarium conditions. From bred individuals we have compiled three breeding pairs, which we placed in aquariums with different temperature and water hardness. In experimental pairs, we evaluated these reproductive variables: number of spawning eggs, the number of hatched, dead and bred individuals. Experiments showed that 28 °C, and 8 °N water hardness increased the reproductive activity of fish and the quantity of fish hatched. Decreasing temperature in the tanks was proportionally increased the number of unhatched individuals, and the mortality. The mortality was 88 pieces per swab at 25 °C. Water at 28 °C and 8 °N hardness was reached swab to 1200 eggs pieces.

  20. Time response of temperature sensors using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Roberto Carlos dos

    2010-01-01

    In a PWR nuclear power plant, the primary coolant temperature and feedwater temperature are measured using RTDs (Resistance Temperature Detectors). These RTDs typically feed the plant's control and safety systems and must, therefore, be very accurate and have good dynamic performance. The response time of RTDs is characterized by a single parameter called the Plunge Time Constant defined as the time it takes the sensor output to achieve 63.2 percent of its final value after a step change in temperature. Nuclear reactor service conditions are difficult to reproduce in the laboratory, and an in-situ test method called LCSR (Loop Current Step Response) test was developed to measure remotely the response time of RTDs. >From this test, the time constant of the sensor is identified by means of the LCSR transformation that involves the dynamic response modal time constants determination using a nodal heat-transfer model. This calculation is not simple and requires specialized personnel. For this reason an Artificial Neural Network has been developed to predict the time constant of RTD from LCSR test transient. It eliminates the transformations involved in the LCSR application. A series of LCSR tests on RTDs generates the response transients of the sensors, the input data of the networks. Plunge tests are used to determine the time constants of the RTDs, the desired output of the ANN, trained using these sets of input/output data. This methodology was firstly applied to theoretical data simulating 10 RTDs with different time constant values, resulting in an average error of about 0.74 %. Experimental data from three different RTDs was used to predict time constant resulting in a maximum error of 3,34 %. The time constants values predicted from ANN were compared with those obtained from traditional way resulting in an average error of about 18 % and that shows the network is able to predict accurately the sensor time constant. (author)

  1. Difference in canopy and air temperature as an indicator of grassland water stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffková, R.

    2006-01-01

    In 2003–2005 in conditions of the moderately warm region of the Třeboň Basin (Czech Republic) the difference between canopy temperature (T c ) and air temperature at 2 m (T a ) was tested as an indicator of grassland water stress. To evaluate water stress ten-minute averages of temperature difference T c –T a were chosen recorded on days without rainfall with intensive solar radiation from 11.00 to 14.00 CET. Water stress in the zone of the major portion of root biomass (0–0.2 m) in the peak growing season (minimum presence of dead plant residues) documented by a sudden increase in temperature difference, its value 5–12°C and unfavourable canopy temperatures due to overheating (> 30°C) was indicated after high values of suction pressure approaching the wilting point (1300 kPa) were reached. High variability of temperature difference in the conditions of sufficient supply of water to plants was explained by the amount of dead plant residues in canopy, value of vapour pressure deficit (VPD), actual evapotranspiration rate (ETA) and soil moisture content. At the beginning of the growing season (presence of dead plant residues and voids) we proved moderately strong negative linear correlations of T c –T a with VPD and T c –T a with ETA rate and moderately strong positive linear correlations of ETA rate with VPD. In the period of intensive growth (the coverage of dead plant residues and voids lower than 10%) moderately strong linear correlations of T c –T a with VPD and multiple linear correlations of T c –T a with VPD and soil moisture content at a depth of 0.10–0.40 m were demonstrated. (author)

  2. Thermal input control and enhancement for laser based residual stress measurements using liquid temperature indicating coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechersky, Martin J.

    1999-01-01

    An improved method for measuring residual stress in a material comprising the steps of applying a spot of temperature indicating coating to the surface to be studied, establishing a speckle pattern surrounds the spot of coating with a first laser then heating the spot of coating with a far infrared laser until the surface plastically deforms. Comparing the speckle patterns before and after deformation by subtracting one pattern from the other will produce a fringe pattern that serves as a visual and quantitative indication of the degree to which the plasticized surface responded to the stress during heating and enables calculation of the stress.

  3. THE INFLUENCE OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE BRAZING UPON INDICATORS OF MATERIAL BRAZEABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Koleňák

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of both common and extreme parameters of AISI 321stainless steel high-temperature brazing using the NI 102 brazing alloy upon material brazeability indicators. The ascertainment of the wetting angle, the area over which Ni brazing alloy spreads, the width of AISI 321 steel's dissolubility band, and the width of Ni brazing alloy’s diffusion band into the basic material.

  4. Real-time temperature field measurement based on acoustic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Yong; Jia, Jiabin; Polydorides, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic tomography can be used to measure the temperature field from the time-of-flight (TOF). In order to capture real-time temperature field changes and accurately yield quantitative temperature images, two improvements to the conventional acoustic tomography system are studied: simultaneous acoustic transmission and TOF collection along multiple ray paths, and an offline iteration reconstruction algorithm. During system operation, all the acoustic transceivers send modulated and filtered wideband Kasami sequences simultaneously to facilitate fast and accurate TOF measurements using cross-correlation detection. For image reconstruction, the iteration process is separated and executed offline beforehand to shorten computation time for online temperature field reconstruction. The feasibility and effectiveness of the developed methods are validated in the simulation study. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method can reduce the processing time per frame from 160 ms to 20 ms, while the reconstruction error remains less than 5%. Hence, the proposed method has great potential in the measurement of rapid temperature change with good temporal and spatial resolution. (paper)

  5. The Global Streamflow Indices and Metadata Archive (GSIM – Part 2: Quality control, time-series indices and homogeneity assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Gudmundsson

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This is Part 2 of a two-paper series presenting the Global Streamflow Indices and Metadata Archive (GSIM, which is a collection of daily streamflow observations at more than 30 000 stations around the world. While Part 1 (Do et al., 2018a describes the data collection process as well as the generation of auxiliary catchment data (e.g. catchment boundary, land cover, mean climate, Part 2 introduces a set of quality controlled time-series indices representing (i the water balance, (ii the seasonal cycle, (iii low flows and (iv floods. To this end we first consider the quality of individual daily records using a combination of quality flags from data providers and automated screening methods. Subsequently, streamflow time-series indices are computed for yearly, seasonal and monthly resolution. The paper provides a generalized assessment of the homogeneity of all generated streamflow time-series indices, which can be used to select time series that are suitable for a specific task. The newly generated global set of streamflow time-series indices is made freely available with an digital object identifier at https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.887470 and is expected to foster global freshwater research, by acting as a ground truth for model validation or as a basis for assessing the role of human impacts on the terrestrial water cycle. It is hoped that a renewed interest in streamflow data at the global scale will foster efforts in the systematic assessment of data quality and provide momentum to overcome administrative barriers that lead to inconsistencies in global collections of relevant hydrological observations.

  6. The Global Streamflow Indices and Metadata Archive (GSIM) - Part 2: Quality control, time-series indices and homogeneity assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Lukas; Do, Hong Xuan; Leonard, Michael; Westra, Seth

    2018-04-01

    This is Part 2 of a two-paper series presenting the Global Streamflow Indices and Metadata Archive (GSIM), which is a collection of daily streamflow observations at more than 30 000 stations around the world. While Part 1 (Do et al., 2018a) describes the data collection process as well as the generation of auxiliary catchment data (e.g. catchment boundary, land cover, mean climate), Part 2 introduces a set of quality controlled time-series indices representing (i) the water balance, (ii) the seasonal cycle, (iii) low flows and (iv) floods. To this end we first consider the quality of individual daily records using a combination of quality flags from data providers and automated screening methods. Subsequently, streamflow time-series indices are computed for yearly, seasonal and monthly resolution. The paper provides a generalized assessment of the homogeneity of all generated streamflow time-series indices, which can be used to select time series that are suitable for a specific task. The newly generated global set of streamflow time-series indices is made freely available with an digital object identifier at https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.887470" target="_blank">https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.887470 and is expected to foster global freshwater research, by acting as a ground truth for model validation or as a basis for assessing the role of human impacts on the terrestrial water cycle. It is hoped that a renewed interest in streamflow data at the global scale will foster efforts in the systematic assessment of data quality and provide momentum to overcome administrative barriers that lead to inconsistencies in global collections of relevant hydrological observations.

  7. Temperature of thermal plasma jets: A time resolved approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahasrabudhe, S N; Joshi, N K; Barve, D N; Ghorui, S; Tiwari, N; Das, A K, E-mail: sns@barc.gov.i [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai - 400 094 (India)

    2010-02-01

    Boltzmann Plot method is routinely used for temperature measurement of thermal plasma jets emanating from plasma torches. Here, it is implicitly assumed that the plasma jet is 'steady' in time. However, most of the experimenters do not take into account the variations due to ripple in the high current DC power supplies used to run plasma torches. If a 3-phase transductor type of power supply is used, then the ripple frequency is 150 Hz and if 3- phase SCR based power supply is used, then the ripple frequency is 300 Hz. The electrical power fed to plasma torch varies at ripple frequency. In time scale, it is about 3.3 to 6.7 ms for one cycle of ripple and it is much larger than the arc root movement times which are within 0.2 ms. Fast photography of plasma jets shows that the luminosity of plasma jet also varies exactly like the ripple in the power supply voltage and thus with the power. Intensity of line radiations varies nonlinearly with the instantaneous power fed to the torch and the simple time average of line intensities taken for calculation of temperature is not appropriate. In this paper, these variations and their effect on temperature determination are discussed and a method to get appropriate data is suggested. With a small adaptation discussed here, this method can be used to get temperature profile of plasma jet within a short time.

  8. Time - Temperature Relationships of Test Head Fired and Backfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence S. Davis; Robert E. Martin

    1960-01-01

    Time-temperature relations were measured during the course of a preliminary investigation of the thermal characteristics of forest fires. Observations on 5 head fires and 5 backfires in 8-year-old gallberry-palmetto roughs on the Alapaha Experimental Range near Tifton, Georgia, are the basis for this report.

  9. Time-temperature-transformation kinetics in SRL waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Bickford, D.F.; Karraker, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    Time-temperature-transformation (TTT) curves have been determined for SRL 165 waste glass. Extent and sequence of crystallization were determined by XRD and SEM. The incipient crystallization product, spinel, can be determined at one volume percent by magnetic susceptibility. The type and percentage of crystallization is correlated with waste glass durability. 20 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  10. "Deflategate": Time, Temperature, and Moisture Effects on Football Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Jack; Beljak, Lauren; Macatangay, Dahlia-Marie; Helmuth-Malone, Lilly; McWilliams, Catharina; Raptis, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper in "The Physics Teacher (TPT)", DiLisi and Rarick used the National Football League "Deflategate" controversy to introduce to physics students the physics of a bouncing ball. In this paper, we measure and analyze the environmental effects of time, ambient temperature, and moisture on the internal pressure of…

  11. Influence of different storage times and temperatures on blood gas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of storage temperature and time on blood gas and acid-base balance of ovine venous blood. Ten clinically healthy sheep were used in this study. A total number of 30 blood samples, were divided into three different groups, and were stored in a refrigerator adjusted ...

  12. Effect of Brewing Time and Temperature on the release of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    Moringa oleifera blended leaves sample at brewing temperature and time of 29oC and 2mins respectively. ... most countries they are taken as tea to treat diabetics, obesity, fever ... human and highly toxic to insects, making it an ideal.

  13. A photometric analysis of ZZ Ceti stars: A parameter-free temperature indicator?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeron, P [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Leggett, S K [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, Hawaii 96720 (United States); Harris, H C, E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.c, E-mail: sleggett@gemini.ed, E-mail: hch@nofs.navy.mi [US Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, Flagstaff, Arizona 86001 (United States)

    2009-06-01

    We present a model atmosphere analysis of optical VRI and infrared JHK photometric data of about two dozen ZZ Ceti stars. We first show from a theoretical point of view that the resulting energy distributions are not particularly sensitive to surface gravity or to the assumed convective efficiency, a result which suggests a parameter-free effective temperature indicator for ZZ Ceti stars. We then fit the observed energy distributions with our grid of model atmospheres and compare the photometric effective temperatures with the spectroscopic values obtained from fits to the hydrogen line profiles. Our results are finally discussed in the context of the determination of the empirical boundaries of the ZZ Ceti instability strip.

  14. High temperature, short time pasteurization temperatures inversely affect bacterial numbers during refrigerated storage of pasteurized fluid milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, M L; Huck, J R; Sonnen, M; Barbano, D M; Boor, K J

    2009-10-01

    The grade A Pasteurized Milk Ordinance specifies minimum processing conditions of 72 degrees C for at least 15 s for high temperature, short time (HTST) pasteurized milk products. Currently, many US milk-processing plants exceed these minimum requirements for fluid milk products. To test the effect of pasteurization temperatures on bacterial numbers in HTST pasteurized milk, 2% fat raw milk was heated to 60 degrees C, homogenized, and treated for 25 s at 1 of 4 different temperatures (72.9, 77.2, 79.9, or 85.2 degrees C) and then held at 6 degrees C for 21 d. Aerobic plate counts were monitored in pasteurized milk samples at d 1, 7, 14, and 21 postprocessing. Bacterial numbers in milk processed at 72.9 degrees C were lower than in milk processed at 85.2 degrees C on each sampling day, indicating that HTST fluid milk-processing temperatures significantly affected bacterial numbers in fluid milk. To assess the microbial ecology of the different milk samples during refrigerated storage, a total of 490 psychrotolerant endospore-forming bacteria were identified using DNA sequence-based subtyping methods. Regardless of processing temperature, >85% of the isolates characterized at d 0, 1, and 7 postprocessing were of the genus Bacillus, whereas more than 92% of isolates characterized at d 14 and 21 postprocessing were of the genus Paenibacillus, indicating that the predominant genera present in HTST-processed milk shifted from Bacillus spp. to Paenibacillus spp. during refrigerated storage. In summary, 1) HTST processing temperatures affected bacterial numbers in refrigerated milk, with higher bacterial numbers in milk processed at higher temperatures; 2) no significant association was observed between genus isolated and pasteurization temperature, suggesting that the genera were not differentially affected by the different processing temperatures; and 3) although typically present at low numbers in raw milk, Paenibacillus spp. are capable of growing to numbers that can

  15. Use of Landsat Land Surface Temperature and Vegetation Indices for Monitoring Drought in the Salt Lake Basin Area, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Orhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to investigate multitemporal land surface temperature (LST changes by using satellite remote sensing data. The study included a real-time field work performed during the overpass of Landsat-5 satellite on 21/08/2011 over Salt Lake, Turkey. Normalized vegetation index (NDVI, vegetation condition index (VCI, and temperature vegetation index (TVX were used for evaluating drought impact over the region between 1984 and 2011. In the image processing step, geometric and radiometric correction procedures were conducted to make satellite remote sensing data comparable with in situ measurements carried out using thermal infrared thermometer supported by hand-held GPS. The results showed that real-time ground and satellite remote sensing data were in good agreement with correlation coefficient (R2 values of 0.90. The remotely sensed and treated satellite images and resulting thematic indices maps showed that dramatic land surface temperature changes occurred (about 2∘C in the Salt Lake Basin area during the 28-year period (1984–2011. Analysis of air temperature data also showed increases at a rate of 1.5–2∘C during the same period. Intensification of irrigated agriculture particularly in the southern basin was also detected. The use of water supplies, especially groundwater, should be controlled considering particularly summer drought impacts on the basin.

  16. Spatial patterns in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. H. Holmes

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the structural difference in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle (DTC over land resulting from choice of measuring device or model framework. It is shown that the timing can be reliably estimated from temporally sparse observations acquired from a constellation of low Earth-orbiting satellites given record lengths of at least three months. Based on a year of data, the spatial patterns of mean DTC timing are compared between temperature estimates from microwave Ka-band, geostationary thermal infrared (TIR, and numerical weather prediction model output from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO. It is found that the spatial patterns can be explained by vegetation effects, sensing depth differences and more speculatively the orientation of orographic relief features. In absolute terms, the GMAO model puts the peak of the DTC on average at 12:50 local solar time, 23 min before TIR with a peak temperature at 13:13 (both averaged over Africa and Europe. Since TIR is the shallowest observation of the land surface, this small difference represents a structural error that possibly affects the model's ability to assimilate observations that are closely tied to the DTC. The equivalent average timing for Ka-band is 13:44, which is influenced by the effect of increased sensing depth in desert areas. For non-desert areas, the Ka-band observations lag the TIR observations by only 15 min, which is in agreement with their respective theoretical sensing depth. The results of this comparison provide insights into the structural differences between temperature measurements and models, and can be used as a first step to account for these differences in a coherent way.

  17. Predicting East African spring droughts using Pacific and Indian Ocean sea surface temperature indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Christopher C.; Hoell, Andrew; Shukla, Shraddhanand; Blade, Ileana; Liebmann, Brant; Roberts, Jason B.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2014-01-01

    In southern Ethiopia, Eastern Kenya, and southern Somalia poor boreal spring rains in 1999, 2000, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2011 contributed to severe food insecurity and high levels of malnutrition. Predicting rainfall deficits in this region on seasonal and decadal time frames can help decision makers support disaster risk reduction while guiding climate-smart adaptation and agricultural development. Building on recent research that links more frequent droughts to a stronger Walker Circulation, warming in the Indo-Pacific warm pool, and an increased western Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) gradient, we explore the dominant modes of East African rainfall variability, links between these modes and sea surface temperatures, and a simple index-based monitoring-prediction system suitable for drought early warning.

  18. Temperature sensitivity indicates that chlorination of organic matter in forest soil is primarily biotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastviken, David; Svensson, Teresia; Karlsson, Susanne; Sandén, Per; Oberg, Gunilla

    2009-05-15

    Old assumptions that chloride is inert and that most chlorinated organic matter in soils is anthropogenic have been challenged by findings of naturally formed organochlorines. Such natural chlorination has been recognized for several decades, but there are still very few measurements of chlorination rates or estimates of the quantitative importance of terrestrial chlorine transformations. While much is known about the formation of specific compounds, bulk chlorination remains poorly understood in terms of mechanisms and effects of environmental factors. We quantified bulk chlorination rates in coniferous forest soil using 36Cl-chloride in tracer experiments at different temperatures and with and without molecular oxygen (O2). Chlorination was enhanced by the presence of O2 and had a temperature optimum at 20 degrees C. Minimum rates were found at high temperatures (50 degrees C) or under anoxic conditions. The results indicate (1) that most of the chlorination between 4 and 40 degrees C was biotic and driven by O2 dependent enzymes, and (2) that there is also slower background chlorination occurring under anoxic conditions at 20 degrees C and under oxic conditions at 50 degrees C. Hence, while oxic and biotic chlorination clearly dominated, chlorination by other processes including possible abiotic reactions was also detected.

  19. Observed Trends in Indices of Daily Precipitation and Temperature Extremes in Rio de Janeiro State (brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, W. L.; Dereczynski, C. P.; Cavalcanti, I. F.

    2013-05-01

    One of the main concerns of contemporary society regarding prevailing climate change is related to possible changes in the frequency and intensity of extreme events. Strong heat and cold waves, droughts, severe floods, and other climatic extremes have been of great interest to researchers because of its huge impact on the environment and population, causing high monetary damages and, in some cases, loss of life. The frequency and intensity of extreme events associated with precipitation and air temperature have been increased in several regions of the planet in recent years. These changes produce serious impacts on human activities such as agriculture, health, urban planning and development and management of water resources. In this paper, we analyze the trends in indices of climatic extremes related to daily precipitation and maximum and minimum temperatures at 22 meteorological stations of the National Institute of Meteorology (INMET) in Rio de Janeiro State (Brazil) in the last 50 years. The present trends are evaluated using the software RClimdex (Canadian Meteorological Service) and are also subjected to statistical tests. Preliminary results indicate that periods of drought are getting longer in Rio de Janeiro State, except in the North/Northwest area. In "Vale do Paraíba", "Região Serrana" and "Região dos Lagos" the increase of consecutive dry days is statistically significant. However, we also detected an increase in the total annual rainfall all over the State (taxes varying from +2 to +8 mm/year), which are statistically significant at "Região Serrana". Moreover, the intensity of heavy rainfall is also growing in most of Rio de Janeiro, except in "Costa Verde". The trends of heavy rainfall indices show significant increase in the "Metropolitan Region" and in "Região Serrana", factor that increases the vulnerability to natural disasters in these areas. With respect to temperature, it is found that the frequency of hot (cold) days and nights is

  20. In situ response time measurements of RTD temperature sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, I.M.P.

    1985-01-01

    The loop-current-step-response test provides a mean for determining the time constant of resistence thermometers. The test consist in heating the sensor a few degrees above ambient temperature by causing a step pertubation in the electric current that flows through the sensor leads. The developed mathematical transformation permits to use data collected during the internal heating transient to predict the sensor response to perturbations in fluid temperature. Experimental data obtained show that the time constant determined by method is within 15 percent of true value. The loop-current-step-response test is a remote in situ test, which can be performed with the sensor installed in the process. Consequently it takes account the local heat transfer conditions, and appropriated for nuclear power plants, where sensors are installed in points of difficult access. (author) [pt

  1. Future weather types and their influence on mean and extreme climate indices for precipitation and temperature in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Riediger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In Central Europe, the spatial and temporal distributions of precipitation and temperature are determined by the occurrence of major weather types. In this paper, we examine climate indices (i.e. mean values or hot, cold, wet and dry days for different weather types in a recent (1971–2000 and future climate (2070–2099. The weather types are classified objectively for the control run and for the A1B scenario with an ensemble of eight global climate simulations (GCM to be compared with different reanalyses. To derive climate indices, the high-resolution, regionalized reference dataset HYRAS and an ensemble of nine regional climate simulations (RCM are used. Firstly, the reliability of simulated weather patterns and their climate indices are tested in the control period. The reanalyses circulation climatology can be reproduced well by the GCM ensemble mean. For temperature and precipitation, each climate index is characterized and evaluated in terms of defined weather patterns. The comparison of HYRAS and RCM data show reliable mean temperature values with differences between weather classes by +2$+2$ to -6$-6$ °C during winter (13 to 19 °C in summer. The analysis of observed and simulated precipitation reveal that mean winter precipitation is significantly influenced by the direction of air flow, while in summer, mesoscale atmospheric patterns of cyclonic rotation play a larger role. Secondly, the analysis of potential future changes simulated by the RCM ensemble were able to demonstrate that weather type changes, superior climate trends (such as mean warming and their interaction lead to major changes for precipitation and temperature in Central Europe. While temperature differences between cold and warm weather types are nearly stable over time, the ensemble temperature changes (with a range of +2$+2$ to +4$+4$ °C reinforce warm/hot conditions in the future winter and summer. Milder, wetter winters can be explained by an increased

  2. The effect of rearing temperature in larval development of pejerrey, Odontesthes bonariensis: morphological indicators of development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Chalde

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that in pejerrey water temperature not only affects growth rates but also directs the sexual differentiation process. This fact rise the question of how different the development of pejerrey larvae of the same age is when reared at different temperatures. A description of developmental stages for the embryonic and larval periods of the pejerrey, Odontesthes bonariensis, and the influence of rearing temperature on larval development are presented. Then, larval development was studied at three rearing temperatures, and changes in general morphology, fin morphology, and caudal fin structure have been taken into consideration within the thermal range involved in the temperature sex determination of this species. Fin fold reabsorption, caudal fin formation, and body shape were selected to follow the events leading to the acquisition of the juvenile morphology. The juvenile phenotype was defined when the fin fold was reabsorpted and the caudal fin acquired its definitive homocercal structure. The moment at which the juvenile phenotype was achieved, was evaluated in relation to larval age, size and, shape. The size resulted as the best indicator of development in pejerrey.A temperatura da água não afeta apenas as taxas de crescimento no peixe-rei, mas também direciona o processo de diferenciação sexual. Este fato levanta o questionamento de quão diferente é o desenvolvimento de larvas do peixe-rei da mesma idade quando criadas em temperaturas diferentes. Este trabalho teve como objetivo apresentar uma descrição do de desenvolvimento de embriões e larvas do peixe-rei, Odontesthes bonariensis, e a influência da temperatura de criação no desenvolvimento das larvas. Neste trabalho, o desenvolvimento das larvas foi estudado em três temperaturas diferentes de cultivo. Foram consideradas as alterações ocorridas na morfologia geral, assim como na morfologia e na estrutura da nadadeira caudal dentro da variação termal da

  3. Effect of Time and Temperature on Thickened Infant Formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosa, Memorie M; Dodrill, Pamela

    2017-04-01

    Unlike adult populations, who primarily depend on liquids for hydration alone, infants rely on liquids to provide them with hydration and nutrition. Speech-language pathologists working within pediatric medical settings often identify dysphagia in patients and subsequently recommend thickened liquids to reduce aspiration risk. Caregivers frequently report difficulty attempting to prepare infant formula to the prescribed thickness. This study was designed to determine (1) the relationship between consistencies in modified barium swallow studies and thickened infant formulas and (2) the effects of time and temperature on the resulting thickness of infant formula. Prepackaged barium consistencies and 1 standard infant formula that was thickened with rice cereal and with 2 commercially available thickening agents were studied. Thickness was determined via a line spread test after various time and temperature conditions were met. There were significant differences between the thickened formula and barium test consistencies. Formula thickened with rice cereal separated over time into thin liquid and solid residue. Formula thickened with a starch-based thickening agent was thicker than the desired consistency immediately after mixing, and it continued to thicken over time. The data from this project suggest that nectar-thick and honey-thick infant formulas undergo significant changes in flow rates within 30 minutes of preparation or if refrigerated and then reheated after 3 hours. Additional empirical evidence is warranted to determine the most reliable methods and safest products for thickening infant formula when necessary for effective dysphagia management.

  4. Derivation of the canopy conductance from surface temperature and spectral indices for estimating evapotranspiration in semiarid vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morillas, L.; Garcia, M.; Zarco-Tejada, P.; Ladron de Guevara, M.; Villagarcia, L.; Were, A.; Domingo, F.

    2009-01-01

    This work evaluates the possibilities for estimating stomata conductance (C) and leaf transpiration (Trf) at the ecosystem scale from radiometric indices and surface temperature. The relationships found between indices and the transpiration component of the water balance in a semiarid tussock ecosystem in SE Spain are discussed. Field data were collected from spring 2008 until winter 2009 in order to observe the annual variability of the relationships and the behaviour of spectral indices and surface temperature. (Author) 11 refs.

  5. Taste and Temperature in Swallowing Transit Time after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula C. Cola

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oropharyngeal dysphagia is common in individuals after stroke. Taste and temperature are used in dysphagia rehabilitation. The influence of stimuli, such as taste and temperature, on swallowing biomechanics has been investigated in both healthy individuals and in individuals with neurological disease. However, some questions still remain unanswered, such as how the sequence of offered stimuli influences the pharyngeal response. The goal of the present study was to determine the influence of the sequence of stimuli, sour taste and cold temperature, on pharyngeal transit time during deglutition in individuals after stroke. Methods: The study included 60 individuals with unilateral ischemic stroke, 29 males and 31 females, aged 41–88 years (mean age: 66.2 years examined 0–50 days after ictus (median: 6 days, with mild to moderate oropharyngeal dysphagia. Exclusion criteria were hemorrhagic stroke patients, patients with decreased level of consciousness, and clinically unstable patients, as confirmed by medical evaluation. The individuals were divided into two groups of 30 individuals each. Group 1 received a nonrandomized sequence of stimuli (i.e. natural, cold, sour, and sour-cold and group 2 received a randomized sequence of stimuli. A videofluoroscopic swallowing study was performed to analyze the pharyngeal transit time. Four different stimuli (natural, cold, sour, and sour-cold were offered. The images were digitalized and specific software was used to measure the pharyngeal transit time. Since the values did not present regular distribution and uniform variances, nonparametric tests were performed. Results: Individuals in group 1 presented a significantly shorter pharyngeal transit time with the sour-cold stimulus than with the other stimuli. Individuals in group 2 did not show a significant difference in pharyngeal transit time between stimuli. Conclusions: The results showed that the sequence of offered stimuli influences

  6. Capillary refill time is an unreliable indicator of cardiovascular status in term neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeFlore, Judy L; Engle, William D

    2005-06-01

    Decisions regarding the need for volume replacement in neonates often are made in the immediate newborn period. Capillary refill time (CRT) is used as an indicator of circulatory status; however, recent data show that CRT varies considerably with age, ambient and skin temperature, anatomical site of measurement, and duration of pressure. The purpose of this study was to (1) examine the relationship between CRT and heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) in term neonates, and (2) evaluate the differences among CRT values measured at 3 body sites and with varying duration of cutaneous pressure. This was a prospective, cross-sectional, correlational study. Subjects Forty-two appropriate-weight-for-gestational-age (AGA) neonates with birthweights, (M = 3407; SD = +/- 540 g), gestational ages (M = 39 weeks; SD = +/- 1 week), and sex (21 males, 21 females). Infants had no history of perinatal distress or maternal chorioamnionitis. Each neonate was studied prospectively 1 to 4 hours after birth. The infants were clothed with only a diaper and evaluated on a radiant warmer bed set to achieve an axillary temperature of 36.5 degrees to 37.0 degrees C. Capillary refill time was measured with a digital stopwatch at 3 sites: volar surface of finger (F), plantar surface of heel (H), and lower sternum (St), using brief (1- to 2-second) and extended (3- to 4-second) pressure. Heart rate was auscultated and counted for 60 seconds, and BP was measured by oscillometry. Relationships among variables were assessed by Pearson correlation coefficient, analysis of variance, and multiple regression analysis. The Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was applied. Capillary refill time, blood pressure, and heart rate. There was no significant site variation for CRT for either brief (2.4 +/- 0.6 to 2.9 +/- 1.0 seconds) or extended (3.8 +/- 0.8 to 4.3 +/- 0.8 seconds) pressure. However, regardless of site, CRT was greater when extended versus brief pressure was used (P correlations

  7. Conduction-corrected modified effective temperature as the indices of combined and separate effect of environmental factors on sensational temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurazumi, Yoshihito [School of Life Studies, Sugiyama Jogakuen University, 17-3 Hoshigaoka-motomachi, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8662 (Japan); Tsuchikawa, Tadahiro [School of Human Science and Environment, University of Hyogo, 1-1-12 Hon-cho, Shinzaike, Himeji, Hyogo 670-0092 (Japan); Kondo, Emi [Graduate School Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cyo, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 468555 (Japan); Horikoshi, Tetsumi [Department of Techno-Business Administration, Graduate School of Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 468555 (Japan); Matsubara, Naoki [Division of Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Kyoto Prefectural University, Nakaragi-cho, Shimogamo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 608522 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    In living spaces, people sit or lie on the floor and adopt a posture in which much of the surface of the body is in contact with the floor. When the temperature of the spatial structure or the surface temperature of an object in contact with the human body is not equivalent to the air temperature, these effects are non-negligible. Most research examining the physiological and psychological responses of the human body has involved subjects sitting in chairs. Research that takes into account body heat balance and assessments of thermal conduction into the environment is uncommon. Thus, in this study, conduction-corrected modified effective temperature (ETF), which is a new thermal environmental index incorporating heat conduction, is defined in order to make possible the evaluation of thermal environments that take into account different postures. This sensational temperature index converts the effects of the following parameters into a temperature equivalent: air velocity, thermal radiation, contact material surface temperature and humidity. This index has the features of a summation formula. Through the use of these parameters, it is possible to represent and quantify their composite influence on bodily sensation and the effects of discrete meteorological elements through an evaluation on an identical axis. (author)

  8. Proximate effects of temperature versus evolved intrinsic constraints for embryonic development times among temperate and tropical songbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ton, Riccardo; Martin, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    The relative importance of intrinsic constraints imposed by evolved physiological trade-offs versus the proximate effects of temperature for interspecific variation in embryonic development time remains unclear. Understanding this distinction is important because slow development due to evolved trade-offs can yield phenotypic benefits, whereas slow development from low temperature can yield costs. We experimentally increased embryonic temperature in free-living tropical and north temperate songbird species to test these alternatives. Warmer temperatures consistently shortened development time without costs to embryo mass or metabolism. However, proximate effects of temperature played an increasingly stronger role than intrinsic constraints for development time among species with colder natural incubation temperatures. Long development times of tropical birds have been thought to primarily reflect evolved physiological trade-offs that facilitate their greater longevity. In contrast, our results indicate a much stronger role of temperature in embryonic development time than currently thought.

  9. Comparison of Microbial Communities in Swine Manure at Various Temperatures and storage times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joung-Soo; Yang, Seung Hak; Kim, Bong-Soo; Lee, Eun Young

    2018-01-26

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of temperature and storage time on the evolution of bacterial communities in swine manure. Manure was stored at -20°C, 4°C, 20°C, or 37°C and sampled at 7-day intervals over 28 days of storage, for a total of 5 time points. To assess the bacterial species present, 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences were analyzed using pyrosequencing. After normalization, 113,934 sequence reads were obtained, with an average length of 466.6 ± 4.4 bp. The diversity indices of the communities reduced as temperature and storage time increased, and the slopes of rarefaction curves decreased from the second week in samples stored at -20 °C and 4 °C. These results indicate that the richness of the bacterial community in the manure reduced as temperature and storage time increased. Firmicutes were the dominant phylum in all samples examined, ranging from 89.3% to 98.8% of total reads, followed by Actinobacteria, which accounted for 0.6% to 7.9%. A change in community composition was observed in samples stored at 37 °C during the first 7 days, indicating that temperature plays an important role in determining the microbiota of swine manure. Clostridium, Turicibacter, Streptococcus, and Lactobacillus within Firmicutes, and Corynebacterium within Actinobacteria were the most dominant genera in fresh manure and all stored samples. Based on our findings, we propose Clostridium as an indicator genus of swine manure decomposition in an anaerobic environment. The proportions of dominant genera changed in samples stored at 20 °C and 37 °C during the fourth week. Based on these results, it was concluded that the microbial communities of swine manure change rapidly as storage time and temperature increase.

  10. Is reticular temperature a useful indicator of heat stress in dairy cattle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammer, S; Lambertz, C; Gauly, M

    2016-12-01

    The present study investigated whether reticular temperature (RT) in dairy cattle is a useful indicator of heat stress considering the effects of milk yield and water intake (WI). In total, 28 Holstein-Friesian dairy cows raised on 3 farms in Lower Saxony, Germany, were studied from March to December 2013. During the study, RT and barn climate parameters (air temperature, relative humidity) were measured continuously and individual milk yield was recorded daily. Both the daily temperature-humidity index (THI) and the daily median RT per cow were calculated. Additionally, the individual WI (amount and frequency) of 10 cows during 100d of the study was recorded on 1 farm. Averaged over all farms, daily THI ranged between 35.4 and 78.9 with a mean (±standard deviation) of 60.2 (±8.7). Dairy cows were on average (±standard deviation) 110.9d in milk (±79.3) with a mean (±standard deviation) milk yield of 35.2kg/d (±9.1). The RT was affected by THI, milk yield, days in milk, and WI. Up to a THI threshold of 65, RT remained constant at 39.2°C. Above this threshold, RT increased to 39.3°C and further to 39.4°C when THI ≥70. The correlation between THI ≥70 and RT was 0.22, whereas the coefficient ranged between r=-0.08 to +0.06 when THI cows yielded ≥30kg/d and THI ≥70 (39.5°C) compared with milk yields <30kg and THI <70 (39.3°C). The WI, which averaged (±standard deviation) 11.5 l (±5.7) per drinking bout, caused a mean decrease in RT of 3.2°C and was affected by the amount of WI (r=0.60). After WI, it took up to 2h until RT reached the initial level before drinking. In conclusion, RT increased when the THI threshold of 65 was exceeded. A further increase was noted when THI ≥70. Nevertheless, the effects of WI and milk yield have to be considered carefully when RT is used to detect hyperthermia in dairy cattle. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of setting time and temperature hydration in mortar with substituent ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, R.A.; Alves, L.S.; Evangelista, A.C.J.; Almeida, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    The workability of mortar is determined mainly by the kinetics of hydration of the hydraulic binder, the process of gelation / hydration of this material in aqueous solutions is significantly influenced by the presence of additives. As a result, this work aims at studying changes in setting time and temperature of hydration of mortars with 10, 15 and 30% of Portland cement replaced by residues of porcelain and ceramic bricks. The influence of these residues in the cement hydration process was studied by testing takes time, temperature, hydration and X-ray diffraction. The results indicate that the mortar setting time not changed significantly since the temperature of hydration has a minor variation on what is preferred because it reduces the microcracks created in mortar during drying.(author)

  12. Effect of ageing time and temperature on the strain ageing behaviour of quenched zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheem, K.S.; Park, W.K.; Yook, C.C.

    1977-01-01

    The strain ageing behaviour of quenched Zircaloy-4 has been studied as a function of ageing time and temperature in the temperature range 523-588 K for a short-ageing time of 1 to 52 seconds. A the test conditions, the strain ageing stress increased with ageing time and temperature at a strain rate of 5.55x10 -4 sec -1 . Applying stress on the quenched Zircaloy-4, the strain ageing effect indicated following two states: an initial stage having an activation energy of 0.39ev considered to be due to Snoek type ordering of interstitial oxygen atoms in the stress field of a dislocaiton and a second stage havingan activation energy of 0.60 ev, due to mainly long range diffusion of oxygen atoms. (author)

  13. Thermal sterilization of heat-sensitive products using high-temperature short-time sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, A; Kiefer, M; Leuenberger, H

    2001-03-01

    High-temperature short-time (HTST) sterilization with a continuous-flow sterilizer, developed for this study, was evaluated. The evaluation was performed with respect to (a) the chemical degradation of two heat-sensitive drugs in HTST range (140-160 degrees C) and (b) the microbiological effect of HTST sterilization. Degradation kinetics of two heat-sensitive drugs showed that a high peak temperature sterilization process resulted in less chemical degradation for the same microbiological effect than a low peak temperature process. Both drugs investigated could be sterilized with acceptable degradation at HTST conditions. For the evaluation of the microbiological effect, Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 spores were used as indicator bacteria. Indicator spore kinetics (D(T), z value, k, and E(a)), were determined in the HTST range. A comparison between the Bigelow model (z value concept) and the Arrhenius model, used to describe the temperature coefficient of the microbial inactivation, demonstrated that the Bigelow model is more accurate in prediction of D(T) values in the HTST range. The temperature coefficient decreased with increasing temperature. The influence of Ca(2+) ions and pH value on the heat resistance of the indicator spores, which is known under typical sterilization conditions, did not change under HTST conditions.

  14. Correspondence between imaginary-time and real-time finite-temperature field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobes, R.

    1990-01-01

    It is known that one-particle-irreducible graphs found using the imaginary-time formalism of finite-temperature field theory differ in general with those of the real-time formalism. Here it is shown that within the real-time formalism one can consider a sum of graphs, motivated by causality arguments, which at least in a number of simple examples agree with the corresponding analytically continued imaginary-time result. The occurrence of multiple statistical factors in this sum of graphs is discussed

  15. Time and Temperature Test Results for PFP Thermal Stabilization Furnaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COMPTON, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The national standard for plutonium storage acceptability (standard DOE-STD-3013-99, generally known as ''the 3013 standard'') has been revised to clarify the requirement for processes that will produce acceptable storage materials. The 3013 standard (Reference 1) now states that ''Oxides shall be stabilized by heating the material in an oxidizing atmosphere to a Material Temperature of at least 950 C (1742 F) for not less than 2 hours.'' The process currently in use for producing stable oxides for storage at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) heats a furnace atmosphere to 1000 C and holds it there for 2 hours. The temperature of the material being stabilized is not measured directly during this process. The Plutonium Process Support Laboratories (PPSL) were requested to demonstrate that the process currently in use at PFP is an acceptable method of producing stable plutonium dioxide consistently. A spare furnace identical to the production furnaces was set up and tested under varying conditions with non-radioactive surrogate materials. Reference 2 was issued to guide the testing program. The process currently in use at the PFP for stabilizing plutonium-bearing powders was shown to heat all the material in the furnace to at least 950 C for at least 2 hours. The current process will work for (1) relatively pure plutonium dioxide, (2) dioxide powders mixed with up to 20 weight percent magnesium oxide, and (3) dioxide powders with up to 11 weight percent magnesium oxide and 20 weight percent magnesium nitrate hexahydrate. Time and temperature data were also consistent with a successful demonstration for a mixture containing 10 weight percent each of sodium and potassium chloride; however, the molten chloride salts destroyed the thermocouples in the powder and temperature data were unavailable for part of that run. These results assume that the current operating limits of no more than 2500 grams per furnace charge and a powder height of no more than 1.5 inches remain

  16. Land surface temperature as potential indicator of burn severity in forest Mediterranean ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintano, C.; Fernández-Manso, A.; Calvo, L.; Marcos, E.; Valbuena, L.

    2015-04-01

    Forest fires are one of the most important causes of environmental alteration in Mediterranean countries. Discrimination of different degrees of burn severity is critical for improving management of fire-affected areas. This paper aims to evaluate the usefulness of land surface temperature (LST) as potential indicator of burn severity. We used a large convention-dominated wildfire, which occurred on 19-21 September, 2012 in Northwestern Spain. From this area, a 1-year series of six LST images were generated from Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) data using a single channel algorithm. Further, the Composite Burn Index (CBI) was measured in 111 field plots to identify the burn severity level (low, moderate, and high). Evaluation of the potential relationship between post-fire LST and ground measured CBI was performed by both correlation analysis and regression models. Correlation coefficients were higher in the immediate post-fire LST images, but decreased during the fall of 2012 and increased again with a second maximum value in summer, 2013. A linear regression model between post-fire LST and CBI allowed us to represent spatially predicted CBI (R-squaredadj > 85%). After performing an analysis of variance (ANOVA) between post-fire LST and CBI, a Fisher's least significant difference test determined that two burn severity levels (low-moderate and high) could be statistically distinguished. The identification of such burn severity levels is sufficient and useful to forest managers. We conclude that summer post-fire LST from moderate resolution satellite data may be considered as a valuable indicator of burn severity for large fires in Mediterranean forest ecosytems.

  17. Constant pressure and temperature discrete-time Langevin molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Department of Mathematics, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Farago, Oded [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Be' er Sheva 84105 (Israel); Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Be' er Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2014-11-21

    We present a new and improved method for simultaneous control of temperature and pressure in molecular dynamics simulations with periodic boundary conditions. The thermostat-barostat equations are built on our previously developed stochastic thermostat, which has been shown to provide correct statistical configurational sampling for any time step that yields stable trajectories. Here, we extend the method and develop a set of discrete-time equations of motion for both particle dynamics and system volume in order to seek pressure control that is insensitive to the choice of the numerical time step. The resulting method is simple, practical, and efficient. The method is demonstrated through direct numerical simulations of two characteristic model systems—a one-dimensional particle chain for which exact statistical results can be obtained and used as benchmarks, and a three-dimensional system of Lennard-Jones interacting particles simulated in both solid and liquid phases. The results, which are compared against the method of Kolb and Dünweg [J. Chem. Phys. 111, 4453 (1999)], show that the new method behaves according to the objective, namely that acquired statistical averages and fluctuations of configurational measures are accurate and robust against the chosen time step applied to the simulation.

  18. Using Landsat Spectral Indices in Time-Series to Assess Wildfire Disturbance and Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Hislop

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Satellite earth observation is being increasingly used to monitor forests across the world. Freely available Landsat data stretching back four decades, coupled with advances in computer processing capabilities, has enabled new time-series techniques for analyzing forest change. Typically, these methods track individual pixel values over time, through the use of various spectral indices. This study examines the utility of eight spectral indices for characterizing fire disturbance and recovery in sclerophyll forests, in order to determine their relative merits in the context of Landsat time-series. Although existing research into Landsat indices is comprehensive, this study presents a new approach, by comparing the distributions of pre and post-fire pixels using Glass’s delta, for evaluating indices without the need of detailed field information. Our results show that in the sclerophyll forests of southeast Australia, common indices, such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI and the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR, both accurately capture wildfire disturbance in a pixel-based time-series approach, especially if images from soon after the disturbance are available. However, for tracking forest regrowth and recovery, indices, such as NDVI, which typically capture chlorophyll concentration or canopy ‘greenness’, are not as reliable, with values returning to pre-fire levels in 3–5 years. In comparison, indices that are more sensitive to forest moisture and structure, such as NBR, indicate much longer (8–10 years recovery timeframes. This finding is consistent with studies that were conducted in other forest types. We also demonstrate that additional information regarding forest condition, particularly in relation to recovery, can be extracted from less well known indices, such as NBR2, as well as textural indices incorporating spatial variance. With Landsat time-series gaining in popularity in recent years, it is critical to

  19. Magnetic local time dependence of geomagnetic disturbances contributing to the AU and AL indices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomita, S; Nose´, M; Iyemori, T

    2010-01-01

    activity in the auroral zone. In the present study, we examine magnetic local time (MLT) dependence of geomagnetic field variations contributing to the AU and AL indices. We use 1-min geomagnetic field data obtained in 2003. It is found that both AU and AL indices have two ranges of MLT (AU: 15:00-22:00MLT...

  20. 3D Printed "Earable" Smart Devices for Real-Time Detection of Core Body Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Hiroki; Chao, Minghan; Gao, Yuji; Wu, Eric; Tai, Li-Chia; Chen, Kevin; Matsuoka, Yasutomo; Iwai, Kosuke; Fahad, Hossain M; Gao, Wei; Nyein, Hnin Yin Yin; Lin, Liwei; Javey, Ali

    2017-07-28

    Real-time detection of basic physiological parameters such as blood pressure and heart rate is an important target in wearable smart devices for healthcare. Among these, the core body temperature is one of the most important basic medical indicators of fever, insomnia, fatigue, metabolic functionality, and depression. However, traditional wearable temperature sensors are based upon the measurement of skin temperature, which can vary dramatically from the true core body temperature. Here, we demonstrate a three-dimensional (3D) printed wearable "earable" smart device that is designed to be worn on the ear to track core body temperature from the tympanic membrane (i.e., ear drum) based on an infrared sensor. The device is fully integrated with data processing circuits and a wireless module for standalone functionality. Using this smart earable device, we demonstrate that the core body temperature can be accurately monitored regardless of the environment and activity of the user. In addition, a microphone and actuator are also integrated so that the device can also function as a bone conduction hearing aid. Using 3D printing as the fabrication method enables the device to be customized for the wearer for more personalized healthcare. This smart device provides an important advance in realizing personalized health care by enabling real-time monitoring of one of the most important medical parameters, core body temperature, employed in preliminary medical screening tests.

  1. A space and time scale-dependent nonlinear geostatistical approach for downscaling daily precipitation and temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Jha, Sanjeev Kumar

    2015-07-21

    A geostatistical framework is proposed to downscale daily precipitation and temperature. The methodology is based on multiple-point geostatistics (MPS), where a multivariate training image is used to represent the spatial relationship between daily precipitation and daily temperature over several years. Here, the training image consists of daily rainfall and temperature outputs from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at 50 km and 10 km resolution for a twenty year period ranging from 1985 to 2004. The data are used to predict downscaled climate variables for the year 2005. The result, for each downscaled pixel, is daily time series of precipitation and temperature that are spatially dependent. Comparison of predicted precipitation and temperature against a reference dataset indicates that both the seasonal average climate response together with the temporal variability are well reproduced. The explicit inclusion of time dependence is explored by considering the climate properties of the previous day as an additional variable. Comparison of simulations with and without inclusion of time dependence shows that the temporal dependence only slightly improves the daily prediction because the temporal variability is already well represented in the conditioning data. Overall, the study shows that the multiple-point geostatistics approach is an efficient tool to be used for statistical downscaling to obtain local scale estimates of precipitation and temperature from General Circulation Models. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Temperature Stabilization of the NIFFTE Time Projection Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caleb

    2017-09-01

    The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) is a collaboration measuring nuclear fission cross sections for use in advanced nuclear reactors. A neutron beam incident on targets of Uranium-235, Uranium-238, and Plutonium-239 is used to measure the neutron induced fission cross sections for these isotopes. A Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is used to record these reactions. Significant heat is generated by the readout cards mounted on the TPC, which are cooled by fans. One proposed measurement of the experiment is to compare the cross sections of the target to a proton target of gaseous hydrogen. A constant temperature inside the TPC's pressure vessel is desirable to maintain a constant number of hydrogen target atoms. In addition, a constant temperature minimizes the strain and wrinkles on an amplifying mesh inside the TPC. This poster describes the successful work to develop, build, and install a fan controller using a Raspberry Pi, an Arduino, and a custom circuit board to implement an algorithm called Proportional-Integral-Derivative control. This research was supported by US DOE MENP Grant DE-FG02-03ER41243.

  3. Effect of Anneal temperature and Time on Change of Texture and Hardness of Al-Cu-Mg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masrukan; Adolf Asih, S.

    2000-01-01

    Observation of the effect of annealing temperature to its texture and hardness of the Al-Cu-Mg has been done. In this experiments aluminium alloy powder and 5 pieces cubes of this alloy with size of 8 x 8 x 8 mm 3 were used. The powder was not annealed, 2 pieces cube were annealed for 20 hours at temperatures of 200 o C and 300 o respectively, finally 3 pieces cube were annealed at temperature of 400 o C. Texture measurement was done using x-ray diffraction with wave length of 1.78892 A using inverse pole figure method. The hardness testing results at constant temperature of 400 o C and various time indicated that the hardness values are decreased with increasing annealed time. Also, at hardness testing for constant time and various annealing temperatures indicated that the hardness values decreased with increasing annealing temperature

  4. Positive selection in octopus haemocyanin indicates functional links to temperature adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oellermann, Michael; Strugnell, Jan M; Lieb, Bernhard; Mark, Felix C

    2015-07-05

    Octopods have successfully colonised the world's oceans from the tropics to the poles. Yet, successful persistence in these habitats has required adaptations of their advanced physiological apparatus to compensate impaired oxygen supply. Their oxygen transporter haemocyanin plays a major role in cold tolerance and accordingly has undergone functional modifications to sustain oxygen release at sub-zero temperatures. However, it remains unknown how molecular properties evolved to explain the observed functional adaptations. We thus aimed to assess whether natural selection affected molecular and structural properties of haemocyanin that explains temperature adaptation in octopods. Analysis of 239 partial sequences of the haemocyanin functional units (FU) f and g of 28 octopod species of polar, temperate, subtropical and tropical origin revealed natural selection was acting primarily on charge properties of surface residues. Polar octopods contained haemocyanins with higher net surface charge due to decreased glutamic acid content and higher numbers of basic amino acids. Within the analysed partial sequences, positive selection was present at site 2545, positioned between the active copper binding centre and the FU g surface. At this site, methionine was the dominant amino acid in polar octopods and leucine was dominant in tropical octopods. Sites directly involved in oxygen binding or quaternary interactions were highly conserved within the analysed sequence. This study has provided the first insight into molecular and structural mechanisms that have enabled octopods to sustain oxygen supply from polar to tropical conditions. Our findings imply modulation of oxygen binding via charge-charge interaction at the protein surface, which stabilize quaternary interactions among functional units to reduce detrimental effects of high pH on venous oxygen release. Of the observed partial haemocyanin sequence, residue 2545 formed a close link between the FU g surface and the

  5. A Real-Time evaluation system for a state-of-charge indication algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pop, V.; Bergveld, H.J.; Notten, P.H.L.; Regtien, Paulus P.L.

    2005-01-01

    The known methods of State-of-Charge (SoC) indication in portable applications are not accurate enough under all practical conditions. This paper describes a real- time evaluation LabVIEW system for an SoC algorithm, that calculates the SoC in [%] and also the remaining run-time available under the

  6. A real-time evaluation system for a state-of-charge indication algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pop, V.; Bergveld, H.J.; Notten, P.H.L.; Regtien, P.P.L.

    2005-01-01

    The known methods of State-of-Charge (SoC) indication in portable applications are not accurate enough under all practical conditions. This paper describes a real- time evaluation LabVIEW system for an SoC algorithm, that calculates the SoC in [%] and also the remaining run-time available under the

  7. Development of indicators of vegetation recovery based on time series analysis of SPOT Vegetation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhermitte, S.; Tips, M.; Verbesselt, J.; Jonckheere, I.; Van Aardt, J.; Coppin, Pol

    2005-10-01

    Large-scale wild fires have direct impacts on natural ecosystems and play a major role in the vegetation ecology and carbon budget. Accurate methods for describing post-fire development of vegetation are therefore essential for the understanding and monitoring of terrestrial ecosystems. Time series analysis of satellite imagery offers the potential to quantify these parameters with spatial and temporal accuracy. Current research focuses on the potential of time series analysis of SPOT Vegetation S10 data (1999-2001) to quantify the vegetation recovery of large-scale burns detected in the framework of GBA2000. The objective of this study was to provide quantitative estimates of the spatio-temporal variation of vegetation recovery based on remote sensing indicators. Southern Africa was used as a pilot study area, given the availability of ground and satellite data. An automated technique was developed to extract consistent indicators of vegetation recovery from the SPOT-VGT time series. Reference areas were used to quantify the vegetation regrowth by means of Regeneration Indices (RI). Two kinds of recovery indicators (time and value- based) were tested for RI's of NDVI, SR, SAVI, NDWI, and pure band information. The effects of vegetation structure and temporal fire regime features on the recovery indicators were subsequently analyzed. Statistical analyses were conducted to assess whether the recovery indicators were different for different vegetation types and dependent on timing of the burning season. Results highlighted the importance of appropriate reference areas and the importance of correct normalization of the SPOT-VGT data.

  8. The spin project: safety and performance indicators in different time frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storck, R.; Becker, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Safety and performance indicators have been under discussion for many years in several countries and international organisations. If those indicators refer to the long term safety of the total disposal system, they are often called safety indicators. If they refer to the performance of subsystems or the total system from a more technical point of view, they are sometimes called performance indicators. The need for indicators other than dose rates derives e.g. from the long time frames involved in safety assessments of waste disposal systems and the increasing uncertainty in dose rate calculations over time due to uncertainty in evolution of the surface environment and of behaviour of man. Before introducing additional indicators into a safety case of a potential repository site, the applicability and usefulness of different indicators have to be investigated and evaluated. The systematic analysis and testing of safety and performance indicators for use in different time horizons after closure of the disposal facility is the task of the SPIN project. This is done by re-calculating four recent studies concerning repository projects in granite formations. (authors)

  9. Devolatilization kinetics of woody biomass at short residence times and high heating rates and peak temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Joakim M.; Gadsbøll, Rasmus; Thomsen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    This work combines experimental and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results to derive global kinetics for biomass (pine wood) devolatilization during heating rates on the order of 105Ks-1, bulk flow peak temperatures between 1405 and 1667K, and particle residence times below 0.1s. Experiments......Jmol-1. The accuracy of the derived global kinetics was supported by comparing predictions to experimental results from a 15kW furnace. The work emphasizes the importance of characterizing the temperature history of the biomass particles when deriving pyrolysis kinetics. The present results indicate...

  10. Creep behavior of bone cement: a method for time extrapolation using time-temperature equivalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R L; Farrar, D F; Rose, J; Forster, H; Morgan, I

    2003-04-01

    The clinical lifetime of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement is considerably longer than the time over which it is convenient to perform creep testing. Consequently, it is desirable to be able to predict the long term creep behavior of bone cement from the results of short term testing. A simple method is described for prediction of long term creep using the principle of time-temperature equivalence in polymers. The use of the method is illustrated using a commercial acrylic bone cement. A creep strain of approximately 0.6% is predicted after 400 days under a constant flexural stress of 2 MPa. The temperature range and stress levels over which it is appropriate to perform testing are described. Finally, the effects of physical aging on the accuracy of the method are discussed and creep data from aged cement are reported.

  11. Control of insects and mites in grain using a high temperature/short time (HTST) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourier; Poulsen

    2000-07-01

    Wheat infested with grain mites (Acari) and Sitophilus granarius, and maize infested with Prostephanus truncatus, were exposed to hot air in a CIMBRIA HTST Microline toaster((R)). Inlet temperatures of the hot air were in the range of 150-750 degrees C decreasing to outlet temperatures in the range of 100-300 degrees C during the exposure period. A rotating drum, connected to a natural-gas burner was fed with grain which was in constant movement along the drum and thereby mixed thoroughly during the process. The capacity of the toaster was 1000 kg per hour.Complete control of grain mites and adult S. granarius in wheat was obtained with an inlet temperature of 300-350 degrees C and an average residence time in the drum of 6 s. More than 99% mortality was obtained for all stages of S. granarius with an inlet temperature of 300-350 degrees C and an average exposure period of 40 s. For control of P. truncatus in maize, an inlet temperature of 700 degrees C resulted in a complete disinfestation when the exposure time was 19 s.The reduction in grain moisture content was 0.5-1% at treatments giving 100% control. Germination tests indicate that it is possible to choose a combination of inlet temperatures and exposure periods which effectively kills mites and insects in small grains, without harming the functional properties of the grain.Economy of the method was considered to be competitive with fumigation using phosphine.

  12. Evaluation of CORDEX-Arctic daily precipitation and temperature-based climate indices over Canadian Arctic land areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaconescu, Emilia Paula; Mailhot, Alain; Brown, Ross; Chaumont, Diane

    2018-03-01

    This study focuses on the evaluation of daily precipitation and temperature climate indices and extremes simulated by an ensemble of 12 Regional Climate Model (RCM) simulations from the ARCTIC-CORDEX experiment with surface observations in the Canadian Arctic from the Adjusted Historical Canadian Climate Dataset. Five global reanalyses products (ERA-Interim, JRA55, MERRA, CFSR and GMFD) are also included in the evaluation to assess their potential for RCM evaluation in data sparse regions. The study evaluated the means and annual anomaly distributions of indices over the 1980-2004 dataset overlap period. The results showed that RCM and reanalysis performance varied with the climate variables being evaluated. Most RCMs and reanalyses were able to simulate well climate indices related to mean air temperature and hot extremes over most of the Canadian Arctic, with the exception of the Yukon region where models displayed the largest biases related to topographic effects. Overall performance was generally poor for indices related to cold extremes. Likewise, only a few RCM simulations and reanalyses were able to provide realistic simulations of precipitation extreme indicators. The multi-reanalysis ensemble provided superior results to individual datasets for climate indicators related to mean air temperature and hot extremes, but not for other indicators. These results support the use of reanalyses as reference datasets for the evaluation of RCM mean air temperature and hot extremes over northern Canada, but not for cold extremes and precipitation indices.

  13. Temperature, humidity and time. Combined effects on radiochromic film dosimeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdel-Fattah, A.A.; Miller, A.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of both relative humidity and temperature during irradiation on the dose response of FWT-60-00 and Riso B3 radiochromic film dosimeters have been investigated in the relative humidity (RH) range 11-94% and temperature range 20-60 degrees C for irradiation by Co-60 photons and 10-Me......V electrons. The results show that humidity and temperature cannot be treated as independent variables, rather there appears to be interdependence between absorbed dose, temperature, and humidity. Dose rate does not seem to play a significant role. The dependence of temperature during irradiation is +0.......25 +/- 0.1% per degrees C for the FWT-60-00 dosimeters and +0.5 +/- 0.1% per degrees C For Riso B3 dosimeters at temperatures between 20 and 50 degrees C and at relative humidities between 20 and 53%. At extreme conditions both with respect to temperature and to humidity, the dosimeters show much stronger...

  14. Iron and zinc partitioning between coexisting stannite and sphalerite: a possible indicator of temperature and sulfur fugacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, M.; Shikazono, N.

    1985-10-01

    Stannite and sphalerite coexisting with iron sulfides (pyrite and/or pyrrhotite) from Japanese ore deposits associated with tin mineralization were analyzed. Based on the iron and zinc partitioning between stannite and sphalerite, the formation temperature and sulfur fugacity for this mineral assemblage were estimated. A good correlation between stannite-sphalerite temperatures and filling temperatures of fluid inclusions and sulfur isotope temperatures was obtained. This good correlation suggests that the stannite-sphalerite pair is a useful indicator of temperature and sulfur fugacity. It is deduced that the formation temperatures are not different for skarn-type, polymetallic vein-type and Sn-W vein-type deposits, whereas the sulfur fugacities are different; sulfur fugacities increase from the skarn-type through the Sn-W vein-type to the polymetallic vein-type deposits.

  15. PCR detection of malaria parasites in desiccated Anopheles mosquitoes is uninhibited by storage time and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rider Mark A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reliable methods to preserve mosquito vectors for malaria studies are necessary for detecting Plasmodium parasites. In field settings, however, maintaining a cold chain of storage from the time of collection until laboratory processing, or accessing other reliable means of sample preservation is often logistically impractical or cost prohibitive. As the Plasmodium infection rate of Anopheles mosquitoes is a central component of the entomological inoculation rate and other indicators of transmission intensity, storage conditions that affect pathogen detection may bias malaria surveillance indicators. This study investigated the effect of storage time and temperature on the ability to detect Plasmodium parasites in desiccated Anopheles mosquitoes by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Methods Laboratory-infected Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes were chloroform-killed and stored over desiccant for 0, 1, 3, and 6 months while being held at four different temperatures: 28, 37, -20 and -80°C. The detection of Plasmodium DNA was evaluated by real-time PCR amplification of a 111 base pair region of block 4 of the merozoite surface protein. Results Varying the storage time and temperature of desiccated mosquitoes did not impact the sensitivity of parasite detection. A two-way factorial analysis of variance suggested that storage time and temperature were not associated with a loss in the ability to detect parasites. Storage of samples at 28°C resulted in a significant increase in the ability to detect parasite DNA, though no other positive associations were observed between the experimental storage treatments and PCR amplification. Conclusions Cold chain maintenance of desiccated mosquito samples is not necessary for real-time PCR detection of parasite DNA. Though field-collected mosquitoes may be subjected to variable conditions prior to molecular processing, the storage of samples over an inexpensive and logistically

  16. Pressure-dependent refractive indices of gases by THz time-domain spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Bark Hyeon; Jeon, Tea-In

    2016-12-12

    Noncontact terahertz time-domain spectroscopy was employed to measure pressure-dependent refractive indices of gases such as helium (He), argon (Ar), krypton (Kr), oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), methane (CH4), and carbon dioxide (CO2). The refractive indices of these gases scaled linearly with pressure, for pressures in the 55-3,750 torr range. At the highest pressure, the refractive indices ((n-1) x 106) of He and CO2 were 170 and 2,390, respectively. The refractive index of CO2 was 14.1-fold higher than that of He, owing to the stronger polarizability of CO2. Although the studied gases differed in terms of their molecular structure, their refractive indices were strongly determined by polarizability. The measured refractive indices agreed well with the theoretical calculations.

  17. Uncertainty in temperature-based determination of time of death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Martin; Erdmann, Bodo; Schenkl, Sebastian; Muggenthaler, Holger; Hubig, Michael; Mall, Gita; Zachow, Stefan

    2018-03-01

    Temperature-based estimation of time of death (ToD) can be performed either with the help of simple phenomenological models of corpse cooling or with detailed mechanistic (thermodynamic) heat transfer models. The latter are much more complex, but allow a higher accuracy of ToD estimation as in principle all relevant cooling mechanisms can be taken into account. The potentially higher accuracy depends on the accuracy of tissue and environmental parameters as well as on the geometric resolution. We investigate the impact of parameter variations and geometry representation on the estimated ToD. For this, numerical simulation of analytic heat transport models is performed on a highly detailed 3D corpse model, that has been segmented and geometrically reconstructed from a computed tomography (CT) data set, differentiating various organs and tissue types. From that and prior information available on thermal parameters and their variability, we identify the most crucial parameters to measure or estimate, and obtain an a priori uncertainty quantification for the ToD.

  18. Time series modelling of increased soil temperature anomalies during long period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirvani, Amin; Moradi, Farzad; Moosavi, Ali Akbar

    2015-10-01

    Soil temperature just beneath the soil surface is highly dynamic and has a direct impact on plant seed germination and is probably the most distinct and recognisable factor governing emergence. Autoregressive integrated moving average as a stochastic model was developed to predict the weekly soil temperature anomalies at 10 cm depth, one of the most important soil parameters. The weekly soil temperature anomalies for the periods of January1986-December 2011 and January 2012-December 2013 were taken into consideration to construct and test autoregressive integrated moving average models. The proposed model autoregressive integrated moving average (2,1,1) had a minimum value of Akaike information criterion and its estimated coefficients were different from zero at 5% significance level. The prediction of the weekly soil temperature anomalies during the test period using this proposed model indicated a high correlation coefficient between the observed and predicted data - that was 0.99 for lead time 1 week. Linear trend analysis indicated that the soil temperature anomalies warmed up significantly by 1.8°C during the period of 1986-2011.

  19. EISCAT measurements of ion temperatures which indicate non-isotropic ion velocity distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perraut, S.; Brekke, A.; Hubert, D.

    1984-01-01

    Substantial increases of the ion temperature can be observed at high latitudes as a consequence of strong convection electric fields. We have measured, with EISCAT, three independent components of the ion velocity vector and temperature in the same scattering volume, at about 300 km. During periods of strong variations in ion velocity (consequently of the E-field), the ion temperatures derived at the 3 sites are different. This difference, which appears to be systematic for the two experiments studied, can be interpreted in terms of different ion temperature perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field, i.e. Tsub(i perpendicular) greater than Tsub(i parallel). Assuming that a bi-Maxwellian distribution is present for convection electric field strengths as large as 50 mV m -1 , one obtains an anisotropy factor of approximately 1.5. It also appears that resonant charge exchange is the dominant collision process. During the evening sector events studied, the electron density was decreasing, whereas the electron temperature was generally increasing. Such events are strongly related to variations in the magnetic H component detected on the ground. (author)

  20. The relative value of safety and performance indicators and qualitative arguments in different time frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.; Rohlig, K.J.; Batandjieva, B.; Griffault, L.; Regent, A.; Schneider, J.; Storck, R.; Umeki, H.

    2002-01-01

    Indicators complementary to dose or risk are of great importance for the provision of multiple lines of reasoning at different time frames and therefore for the building of confidence within a safety case and that regulations should acknowledge this fact. They are also of great value with regard to the understanding of the safety case by and the communication to different audiences. The relative value of such indicators changes with time. For longer timescales qualitative information becomes more important. The meaning of calculated dose or risk is different for different timescales (ranging from expected performance to illustration) but dose or risk remains a valuable and central information for any time considered in a Safety Assessment. Certain indicators (concentrations and fluxes) can provide information by avoiding certain uncertainties which increase remarkably with time (biosphere, dilution) but apart from that no generic opinion or recommendation can be derived since the value of specific indicators and the required degree of aggregation (over different nuclides or even of consequence and probability) strongly depends on the many parameter. (authors)

  1. Time-course mortality and radiosensitivity indices in Tribolium spp. developing from irradiated pupae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, Md Mahbub

    1999-01-01

    Effects of gamma irradiation (1-5 Krad) on the time-course mortality and radiosensitivity indices in adults of Tribolium anaphe, T. brevicornis, T. castaneum, T. destructor, T. freemani developing from irradiated 1 day old and pre-emergence (4-5 day old) pupae were studied. Adult longevity was significantly (P<0.001) affected by irradiation and was linearly dose dependent. T. destructor was markedly more radioresistant than the other species at all dose levels and had a longer life expectancy. The mean survival times of adults developing from irradiated early and late pupae were shorter in females than in males for all the species. The radiosensitivity indices did not vary widely among the species and these values decreased as the dose increased in all the species which clearly indicate that the resistance of the species was dose-dependent. (author)

  2. The impact of baking time and bread storage temperature on bread crumb properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, Geertrui M; Lagrain, Bert; Fierens, Ellen; Delcour, Jan A

    2013-12-15

    Two baking times (9 and 24 min) and storage temperatures (4 and 25 °C) were used to explore the impact of heat exposure during bread baking and subsequent storage on amylopectin retrogradation, water mobility, and bread crumb firming. Shorter baking resulted in less retrogradation, a less extended starch network and smaller changes in crumb firmness and elasticity. A lower storage temperature resulted in faster retrogradation, a more rigid starch network with more water inclusion and larger changes in crumb firmness and elasticity. Crumb to crust moisture migration was lower for breads baked shorter and stored at lower temperature, resulting in better plasticized biopolymer networks in crumb. Network stiffening, therefore, contributed less to crumb firmness. A negative relation was found between proton mobilities of water and biopolymers in the crumb gel network and crumb firmness. The slope of this linear function was indicative for the strength of the starch network. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Measurements of water temperature in fountains as an indicator of potential secondary water pollution caused by Legionella bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bąk, Joanna

    2018-02-01

    At high air temperatures persisting for a long time, water temperature in the fountains may also increase significantly. This can cause a sudden and significant increase in Legionella bacteria, which results in secondary water contamination. This phenomenon with water - air aerosol generated by fountains can be very dangerous for people. During the test, water temperature measurements in fountains in Poland were made. These research tests was conducted in the spring and summer. The research was conducted in order to determine whether there is a possibility of growth of Legionella bacteria. One of the aims of the study was to determine what temperature range occurs in the fountains and how the temperature changes in the basin of the fountain and when the highest temperature occurs. Single temperature measurements were made and also the temperature distribution was measured during daylight hours. The water temperature in most cases was greater than 20°C, but in no case exceed 26°C. The paper presents also the review about the effect of water temperature on the presence and bacterial growth. The study confirmed the existence of the risk of increasing the number of bacteria of the genus Legionella in the water in the fountains.

  4. Measurements of water temperature in fountains as an indicator of potential secondary water pollution caused by Legionella bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bąk Joanna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available At high air temperatures persisting for a long time, water temperature in the fountains may also increase significantly. This can cause a sudden and significant increase in Legionella bacteria, which results in secondary water contamination. This phenomenon with water – air aerosol generated by fountains can be very dangerous for people. During the test, water temperature measurements in fountains in Poland were made. These research tests was conducted in the spring and summer. The research was conducted in order to determine whether there is a possibility of growth of Legionella bacteria. One of the aims of the study was to determine what temperature range occurs in the fountains and how the temperature changes in the basin of the fountain and when the highest temperature occurs. Single temperature measurements were made and also the temperature distribution was measured during daylight hours. The water temperature in most cases was greater than 20°C, but in no case exceed 26°C. The paper presents also the review about the effect of water temperature on the presence and bacterial growth. The study confirmed the existence of the risk of increasing the number of bacteria of the genus Legionella in the water in the fountains.

  5. Method for determining thermo-physical properties of specimens. [photographic recording of changes in thin film phase-change temperature indicating material in wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The square root of the product of thermophysical properties q, c and k, where p is density, c is specific heat and k is thermal conductivity, is determined directly on a test specimen such as a wind tunnel model. The test specimen and a reference specimen of known specific heat are positioned at a given distance from a heat source. The specimens are provided with a coating, such as a phase change coating, to visually indicate that a given temperature was reached. A shutter interposed between the heat source and the specimens is opened and a motion picture camera is actuated to provide a time record of the heating step. The temperature of the reference specimen is recorded as a function of time. The heat rate to which both the test and reference specimens were subjected is determined from the temperature time response of the reference specimen by the conventional thin-skin calorimeter equation.

  6. Heat balance model for a human body in the form of wet bulb globe temperature indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoi, Tomonori; Mochida, Tohru; Kurazumi, Yoshihito; Kuwabara, Kohei; Horiba, Yosuke; Sawada, Shin-Ichi

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to expand the empirically derived wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index to a rational thermal index based on the heat balance for a human body. We derive the heat balance model in the same form as the WBGT for a human engaged in moderate intensity work with a metabolic heat production of 174W/m 2 while wearing typical vapor-permeable clothing under shady and sunny conditions. Two important relationships are revealed based on this derivation: (1) the natural wet bulb and black globe temperature coefficients in the WBGT coincide with the heat balance equation for a human body with a fixed skin wettedness of approximately 0.45 at a fixed skin temperature; and (2) the WBGT can be interpreted as the environmental potential to increase skin temperature rather than the heat storage rate of a human body. We propose an adjustment factor calculation method that supports the application of WBGT for humans dressed in various clothing types and working under various air velocity conditions. Concurrently, we note difficulties in adjusting the WBGT by using a single factor for humans wearing vapor-impermeable protective clothing. The WBGT for shady conditions does not need adjustment depending on the positive radiant field (i.e., when a radiant heat source exists), whereas that for the sunny condition requires adjustments because it underestimates heat stress, which may result in insufficient human protection measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The ear skin temperature as an indicator of the thermal comfort of pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Heidi Mai-Lis; Jørgensen, Erik; Dybkjær, Lise

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between the ear skin temperature and the behaviour of pigs. Fifty-four pigs weighing 75 ± 5 kg were used in three replications (18 pigs per replication) and housed in pens (six pigs per pen) in a controlled climate facility. The room temper...

  8. Temperature, humidity and time., Combined effects on radiochromic film dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Fattah, A.A.; Miller, A.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of both relative humidity and temperature during irradiation on the dose response of FWT-60-00 and Riso B3 radiochromic film dosimeters have been investigated in the relative humidity (RH) range 11-94% and temperature range 20-60 o C for irradiation by 60 Co photons and 10-MeV electrons. The results show that humidity and temperature cannot be treated as independent variables, rather there appears to be interdependence between absorbed dose, temperature, and humidity. Dose rate does not seem to play a significant role. The dependence of temperature during irradiation is + 0.25 ± 0.1% per o C for the FWT-60-00 dosimeters and +0.5 ± 0.1% per o C for Riso B3 dosimeters at temperatures between 20 and 50 o C and at relative humidities between 20 and 53%. At extreme conditions both with respect to temperature and to humidity, the dosimeters show much stronger dependences. Whenever possible one should use dosimeters sealed in pouches under controlled intermediate humidity conditions (30-50%) or, if that is impractical, one should maintain conditions of calibration as close as possible to the conditions of use. Without that precaution, severe dosimetry errors may result. (author)

  9. Quantifying cardinal temperatures and thermal time required for germination of Silybum marianum seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Parmoon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The response of seed germination to environmental factors can be estimated by nonlinear regression. The present study was performed to compare four nonlinear regression models (segmented, beta, beta modified, and dent-like to describe the germination rate–temperature relationships of milk thistle (Silybum marianum L. at six constant temperatures, with the aim of identifying the cardinal temperatures and thermal times required to reach different germination percentiles. Models and statistical indices were calibrated using an iterative optimization method and their performance was compared by root mean square error (RMSE, coefficient of determination (R2 and Akaike information criterion correction (AICc. The beta model was found to be the best model for predicting the required time to reach 50% germination (D50, (R2 = 0.99; RMSE = 0.004; AICc = − 276.97. Based on the model outputs, the base, optimum, and maximum temperatures of seed germination were 5.19 ± 0.79, 24.01 ± 0.11, and 34.32 ± 0.36 °C, respectively. The thermal times required for 50% and 90% germination were 4.99 and 7.38 degree-days, respectively.

  10. Firing technology in practice - temperature, residence time, corrosion; Feuerungstechnik in der Praxis - Temperatur, Verweilzeit, Korrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freimann, P.; Holl, D. [Muellheizkraftwerk Betriebsgesellschaft mbH, Burgkirchen/Alz (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    In a circular dated 1st Sept. 1994, i.e., after the issue of the pertinent planning decision, the Federal Environmental Ministry, BMU, laid down uniform standards on measurements and the parameterisation of the evaluation system for different operation states and loads. Subsequently, TUeV, the German Technical Control Board, prepared the parameterisation curves on the basis of these specifications. The implementation of the BMU paper of 1st Sept. 1994 did not result in any advantage, nor did it lead to a reduction of plant emissions, nor to advantages in the operation of the waste-fuelled cogeneration plant. On the contrary, elevated gas consumption and operating trouble due to frequent feed stops worsened the operating state of the plant. Elevated crude gas temperature in the boiler reduced the lifetime of the two boilers to a critical degree. An operating temperature of 850 C and a residence time of approx. 1 sec. in Burgkirchen waste-fuelled cogeneration plant have not worsened emission values while rendering the plant operable again. [Deutsch] Durch Rundschreiben d. BMU vom 01.09.1994 - also nach Erlass des Planfeststellungsbeschlusses - wurden einheitliche Vorgaben ueber Messungen und Parametrierung des Auswertesystems fuer die verschiedenen Betriebs- bzw. Lastzustaende erlassen. Unter Beruecksichtigung dieser Vorgaben wurden vom TUeV die Parametrierungskurven erstellt. Die Umsetzung des BMU-Papieres vom 01.09.1994 ergab keinerlei Vorteile, weder gab es eine Verringerung der anlagenbedingten Emissionen noch Vorteile fuer den Betrieb des MHKW`s. Im Gegenteil, erhoehte Gasverbraeuche und Betriebsstoerungen durch oftmalige Beschickungsstops verschlechterten den Betriebszustand. Erhoehte Rohgastemperatur im Kessel reduzierten die Lebensdauer der beiden Kessel kritisch. Der Betrieb mit 850 C und mit einer Verweilzeit von ca. 1 sec. fuehrt im MHKW Burgkirchen zu keiner Verschlechterung der Emissionswerte, macht aber die Anlagen wieder betreibbar. (orig./SR)

  11. Near-Real-Time DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS Daily Polar Gridded Brightness Temperatures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Near-Real-Time DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS Daily Polar Gridded Brightness Temperature product provides near-real-time brightness temperatures for both the Northern and...

  12. Deprivation and health risk indicators in full-time permanent workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusto, Gaëlle; Vol, Sylviane; Lasfargues, Gérard; Guillaud, Christian; Lantieri, Olivier; Tichet, Jean

    2014-08-01

    Association between deprivation and health is well established, particularly among unemployed or fixed-term contract or temporary contract subjects. This study aimed to assess if this relationship existed as well in full-time permanent workers. Biometrical, biological, behavioural and psychosocial health risk indicators and an individual deprivation score, the Evaluation of Precarity and Inequalities in Health Examination Centres score, were recorded from January 2007 to June 2008, in 34 905 full-time permanent workers aged 18-70 years, all volunteers for a free health examination. Comparisons of the behavioural, metabolic, cardiovascular and health risk indicators between quintiles of the deprivation score with adjustments on age and socioeconomic categories were made by covariance analysis or logistic regression. For both genders, degradation of nutritional behaviours, metabolic and cardiovascular indicators and health appeared gradually with deprivation, even for deprivation score usually considered as an insignificant value. The absence of only one social support or one social network was associated with a degradation of health. Full-time permanent workers with the poorest health risk indicators had more frequent social exclusion signs. These results were independent of socioeconomic categories and age. Understanding how deprivation influences health status may lead to more effective interventions to reduce social inequalities in health. The deprivation Evaluation of Precarity and Inequalities in Health Examination Centres score is a relevant tool to detect subjects who could benefit from preventive interventions. Our findings suggest that this deprivation score should be used as a health risk indicator even in full-time permanent workers. Assessing deprivation is useful to design and evaluate specific intervention programmes. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  13. Gene expression profile indicates involvement of NO in Camellia sinensis pollen tube growth at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Junting; Wang, Weidong; Li, Dongqin; Shu, Zaifa; Ye, Xiaoli; Chang, Pinpin; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-10-18

    Nitric oxide (NO) functions as a critical signaling molecule in the low-temperature stress responses in plants, including polarized pollen tube growth in Camellia sinensis. Despite this, the potential mechanisms underlying the participation of NO in pollen tube responses to low temperature remain unclear. Here, we investigate alterations to gene expression in C. sinensis pollen tubes exposed to low-temperature stress and NO using RNA-Seq technology, in order to find the potential candidate genes related to the regulation of pollen tube elongation by NO under low-temperature stress. Three libraries were generated from C. sinensis cv. 'Longjingchangye' pollen tubes cultured at 25 °C (CsPT-CK) and 4 °C (CsPT-LT) or with 25 μM DEA NONOate (CsPT-NO). The number of unigenes found for the three biological replications were 39,726, 40,440 and 41,626 for CsPT-CK; 36,993, 39,070 and 39,439 for CsPT-LT; and 39,514, 38,298 and 39,061 for CsPT-NO. A total of 36,097 unique assembled and annotated sequences from C. sinensis pollen tube reads were found in a BLAST search of the following databases: NCBI non-redundant nucleotide, Swiss-prot protein, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, Cluster of Orthologous Groups of proteins, and Gene Ontology. The absolute values of log 2 Ratio > 1 and probability > 0.7 were used as the thresholds for significantly differential gene expression, and 766, 497 and 929 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found from the comparison analyses of the CK-VS-LT, CK-VS-NO and LT-VS-NO libraries, respectively. Genes related to metabolism and signaling pathways of plant hormones, transcription factors (TFs), vesicle polarized trafficking, cell wall biosynthesis, the ubiquitination machinery of the ubiquitin system and species-specific secondary metabolite pathways were mainly observed in the CK-VS-LT and CK-VS-NO libraries. Differentially expressed unigenes related to the inhibition of C. sinensis pollen tube growth under low

  14. Time-Resolved Surface Temperature Measurement for Pulsed Ablative Thrusters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Antonsen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    .... The diagnostic draws on heritage from the experimental dynamic crack propagation community which has used photovoltaic infrared detectors to measure temperature rise in materials in the process of fracture...

  15. Indication criteria for cataract extraction and gender differences in waiting time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirthwaite, Goldina; Lundström, Mats; Albrecht, Susanne; Swahnberg, Katarina

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate national indication criteria tool for cataract extraction (NIKE), a clinical tool for establishing levels of indications for cataract surgery, in relation to gender differences in waiting times for cataract extraction (CE). Data were collected by The Swedish National Cataract Register (NCR). Eye clinics report to NCR voluntarily and on regular basis (98% coverage). Comparisons regarding gender difference in waiting times were performed between NIKE-categorized and non-NIKE-categorized patients, as well as between different indication groups within the NIKE-system. All calculations were performed in spss version 20. Multivariate analyses were carried out using logistic regression, and single variable analyses were carried out by Student's t-test or chi square as appropriate. Gender, age, visual acuity and NIKE-categorization were associated with waiting time. Female patients had a longer waiting time to CE than male, both within and outside the NIKE-system. Gender difference in waiting time was somewhat larger among patients who had not been categorized by NIKE. In the non-NIKE-categorized group, women waited 0.20 months longer than men. In the group which was NIKE-categorized, women waited 0.18 months longer than men. It is reasonable to assume that prioritizing patients by means of NIKE helps to reduce the gender differences in waiting time. Gender differences in waiting time have decreased as NIKE was introduced and there may be a variety of explanations for this. However, with the chosen study design, we could not distinguish between effects related to NIKE and those due to other factors which occurred during the study period. © 2013 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Applying Time Series Analysis Model to Temperature Data in Greenhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhafid Hasni

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research is to find an appropriate Seasonal Auto-Regressive Integrated Moving Average (SARIMA Model for fitting the inside air temperature (Tin of a naturally ventilated greenhouse under Mediterranean conditions by considering the minimum of Akaike Information Criterion (AIC. The results of fitting were as follows: the best SARIMA Model for fitting air temperature of greenhouse is SARIMA (1,0,0 (1,0,224.

  17. Local temperature fine-tunes the timing of spring migration in birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøttrup, Anders P.; Rainio, Kalle; Coppack, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    and predict consequences of climatic change for migratory birds. In order to better understand migration phenology and adaptation in environmental changes, we here assess the scale at which weather affects timing of spring migration in passerine birds. We use three commonly used proxies of spring......-time climatic conditions: (1) vegetation "greenness" (NDVI) in Europe, (2) local spring temperatures in northern Europe, and (3) the North Atlantic Oscillation Index (NAO) as predictors of the phenology of avian migration as well as the strength of their effect on different subsets of populations...... breeding area. Local temperature was the best single predictor of phenology with the highest explanatory power achieved in combination with NAO. Furthermore, early individuals are more affected by climatic variation compared to individuals on later passage, indicating that climatic change affects subsets...

  18. Time spent on home food preparation and indicators of healthy eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais, Pablo; Aggarwal, Anju; Drewnowski, Adam

    2014-12-01

    The amount of time spent on food preparation and cooking may have implications for diet quality and health. However, little is known about how food-related time use relates to food consumption and spending, either at restaurants or for food consumed at home. To quantitatively assess the associations among the amount of time habitually spent on food preparation and patterns of self-reported food consumption, food spending, and frequency of restaurant use. This was a cross-sectional study of 1,319 adults in a population-based survey conducted in 2008-2009. The sample was stratified into those who spent 2 hours/day on food preparation and cleanup. Descriptive statistics and multivariable regression models examined differences between time-use groups. Analyses were conducted in 2011-2013. Individuals who spent the least amount of time on food preparation tended to be working adults who placed a high priority on convenience. Greater amount of time spent on home food preparation was associated with indicators of higher diet quality, including significantly more frequent intake of vegetables, salads, fruits, and fruit juices. Spending food preparation was associated with significantly more money spent on food away from home and more frequent use of fast food restaurants compared to those who spent more time on food preparation. The findings indicate that time might be an essential ingredient in the production of healthier eating habits among adults. Further research should investigate the determinants of spending time on food preparation. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. METHODS OF EVALUATION AND INDICATORS OF OPTIMAL TEMPERATURE OF INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES AND VEHICLES IN OPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Volkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of forming methods of determination and system, as a part of the computer-integrated technology of transport operation, estimation of indecies of the optimal temperature state of the ICE and the vehicle under operation conditions, which is provided with the help of analysis of possible schemes and processes of the complex system of combined heating, using the technology of heat accumulation are described.

  20. Time-scale effects on the gain-loss asymmetry in stock indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sándor, Bulcsú; Simonsen, Ingve; Nagy, Bálint Zsolt; Néda, Zoltán

    2016-08-01

    The gain-loss asymmetry, observed in the inverse statistics of stock indices is present for logarithmic return levels that are over 2 % , and it is the result of the non-Pearson-type autocorrelations in the index. These non-Pearson-type correlations can be viewed also as functionally dependent daily volatilities, extending for a finite time interval. A generalized time-window shuffling method is used to show the existence of such autocorrelations. Their characteristic time scale proves to be smaller (less than 25 trading days) than what was previously believed. It is also found that this characteristic time scale has decreased with the appearance of program trading in the stock market transactions. Connections with the leverage effect are also established.

  1. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of xanthophylls at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Hong; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Gibson, George N; Frank, Harry A

    2008-03-20

    Many of the spectroscopic features and photophysical properties of xanthophylls and their role in energy transfer to chlorophyll can be accounted for on the basis of a three-state model. The characteristically strong visible absorption of xanthophylls is associated with a transition from the ground state S0 (1(1)Ag-) to the S2 (1(1)Bu+) excited state. The lowest lying singlet state denoted S1 (2(1)Ag-), is a state into which absorption from the ground state is symmetry forbidden. Ultrafast optical spectroscopic studies and quantum computations have suggested the presence of additional excited singlet states in the vicinity of S1 (2(1)Ag-) and S2 (1(1)Bu+). One of these is denoted S* and has been suggested in previous work to be associated with a twisted molecular conformation of the molecule in the S1 (2(1)Ag-) state. In this work, we present the results of a spectroscopic investigation of three major xanthophylls from higher plants: violaxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin. These molecules have systematically increasing extents of pi-electron conjugation from nine to eleven conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds. All-trans isomers of the molecules were purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and studied by steady-state and ultrafast time-resolved optical spectroscopy at 77 K. Analysis of the data using global fitting techniques has revealed the inherent spectral properties and ultrafast dynamics of the excited singlet states of each of the molecules. Five different global fitting models were tested, and it was found that the data are best explained using a kinetic model whereby photoexcitation results in the promotion of the molecule into the S2 (1(1)Bu+) state that subsequently undergoes decay to a vibrationally hot S1 (1(1)Ag-) state and with the exception of violaxanthin also to the S* state. The vibrationally hot S1 (1(1)Ag-) state then cools to a vibrationally relaxed S1 (2(1)Ag-) state in less than a picosecond. It was also found that a portion

  2. Water pH and temperature in Lake Biwa from MBT'/CBT indices during the last 282 000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajioka, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Takemura, K.; Hayashida, A.

    2014-03-01

    We generated a 282 000-year record of water pH and temperature in Lake Biwa, central Japan, by analysing the methylation index (MBT') and cyclisation ratio (CBT) of branched tetraethers in sediments from piston and borehole cores to understand the responses of precipitation and air temperature in central Japan to the East Asian monsoon variability on the orbital timescale. Because water pH in Lake Biwa is determined by phosphorus input driven by precipitation, the record of water pH should indicate changes in summer precipitation in central Japan. The estimated pH showed significant periodicity at 19 and 23 ka (precession) and at 41 ka (obliquity). The variation in the estimated pH agrees with variation in the pollen temperature index. This indicates synchronous variation in summer air temperature and precipitation in central Japan, which contradicts the conclusions of previous studies. The variation in estimated pH was also synchronous with the variation of oxygen isotopes in stalagmites in China, suggesting that East Asian summer monsoon precipitation was governed by Northern Hemisphere summer insolation on orbital timescales. However, the estimated winter temperatures were higher during interglacials and lower during glacials, showing an eccentricity cycle. This suggests that the temperature variation reflected winter monsoon variability.

  3. Microsatellite markers for the palaeo-temperature indicator Pentapharsodinium dalei (Dinophyceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundholm, Nina; Nielsen, Lene Rostgaard; Ribeiro, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Pentapharsodinium dalei is a widely distributed cold-water dinoflagellate, which is used in palaeoecology as an indicator of relatively warmer conditions in polar and subpolar regions. This species has been proposed to be one of the first indicators of global warming at high latitudes.We developed...... dinucleotide polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed as multiplex polymerase chain reactions and were genotyped in 32 strains. The number of alleles per locus varied between 4 and 12, and the estimated gene diversity varied from 0.588 to 0.891. The haploid state of the vegetative cells was confirmed...

  4. Improved Geothermometry Through Multivariate Reaction-path Modeling and Evaluation of Geomicrobiological Influences on Geochemical Temperature Indicators: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattson, Earl [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fujita, Yoshiko [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McLing, Travis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Neupane, Ghanashyam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Palmer, Carl [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Reed, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thompson, Vicki [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The project was aimed at demonstrating that the geothermometric predictions can be improved through the application of multi-element reaction path modeling that accounts for lithologic and tectonic settings, while also accounting for biological influences on geochemical temperature indicators. The limited utilization of chemical signatures by individual traditional geothermometer in the development of reservoir temperature estimates may have been constraining their reliability for evaluation of potential geothermal resources. This project, however, was intended to build a geothermometry tool which can integrate multi-component reaction path modeling with process-optimization capability that can be applied to dilute, low-temperature water samples to consistently predict reservoir temperature within ±30 °C. The project was also intended to evaluate the extent to which microbiological processes can modulate the geochemical signals in some thermal waters and influence the geothermometric predictions.

  5. High Temperature Ultrasonic Transducer for Real-time Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Mohammad Hossein; Sinclair, Anthony N.; Coyle, Thomas W.

    A broadband ultrasonic transducer with a novel porous ceramic backing layer is introduced to operate at 700 °C. 36° Y-cut lithium niobate (LiNbO3) single crystal was selected for the piezoelectric element. By appropriate choice of constituent materials, porosity and pore size, the acoustic impedance and attenuation of a zirconia-based backing layer were optimized. An active brazing alloy with high temperature and chemical stability was selected to bond the transducer layers together. Prototype transducers have been tested at temperatures up to 700 °C. The experiments confirmed that transducer integrity was maintained.

  6. Real Time Computer for Plugging Indicator Control of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manimaran, M.; Manoj, P.; Shanmugam, A.; Murali, N.; Satya Murty, S.A.V.

    2013-06-01

    Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is in the advanced stage of construction at Kalpakkam, India. Liquid sodium is used as coolant to transfer the heat produced in the reactor core to steam water circuit. Impurities present in the sodium are removed using purification circuit. Plugging indicator is a device used to measure the purity of the sodium. Versa Module Europa bus based Real Time Computer (RTC) system is used for plugging indicator control. Hot standby architecture consisting of dual redundant RTC system with switch over logic system is the configuration adopted to achieve fault tolerance. Plugging indicator can be controlled in two modes namely continuous and discontinuous mode. Software based Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) algorithms are developed for plugging indicator control wherein the set point changes dynamically for every scan interval of the RTC system. Set points and PID constants are kept as configurable in runtime in order to control the process in very efficient manner, which calls for reliable communication between RTC system and control station, hence TCP/IP protocol is adopted. Performance of the RTC system for plugging indicator control was thoroughly studied in the laboratory by simulating the inputs and monitored the control outputs. The control outputs were also monitored for different PID constants. Continuous and discontinuous mode plots were generated. (authors)

  7. Light hydrocarbons as redox and temperature indicators in the geothermal field of El Tatio (northern Chile)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tassi, F. [University of Florence (Italy). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Martinez, C. [University Catolica del Norte, Antofagasta (Chile). Dept. of Earth Science; Vaselli, O. [University of Florence (Italy). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, Florence (Italy). National Council of Research; Capaccioni, B. [University of Urbino (Italy). Institute of Volcanology and Geochemistry; Viramonte, J. [National University of Salta (Argentina). Institute GEONORTE and CONICET

    2005-11-15

    El Tatio (northern Chile), one of the largest geothermal fields of South America, is presently undergoing a new program of geothermal exploration, after the failure of the first exploration phase in the early 1970s. The geochemical features of the fluid discharges characterizing this system mainly consist of boiling pools and fumaroles, and represent the result of a complex mixing process involving 3 main components: (i) hydrothermal; (ii) atmospheric; (iii) magmatic. Chemical reactions involving light hydrocarbons equilibrate at higher temperature than those directly measured in the geothermal wells and calculated on the basis of the composition of the inorganic gas species. This suggests that in the deeper parts of the hydrothermal system temperatures higher than 300{sup o}C may be achieved. Such results can have a strong impact for the evaluation of the potential resources of this geothermal system. Moreover, the chemical characteristics of the organic gas fraction allow the assessment of the chemical-physical conditions governing the geochemical processes acting on geothermal fluids at depth. (author)

  8. Percentile-Based ETCCDI Temperature Extremes Indices for CMIP5 Model Output: New Results through Semiparametric Quantile Regression Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Yang, C.

    2017-12-01

    Climate extremes often manifest as rare events in terms of surface air temperature and precipitation with an annual reoccurrence period. In order to represent the manifold characteristics of climate extremes for monitoring and analysis, the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI) had worked out a set of 27 core indices based on daily temperature and precipitation data, describing extreme weather and climate events on an annual basis. The CLIMDEX project (http://www.climdex.org) had produced public domain datasets of such indices for data from a variety of sources, including output from global climate models (GCM) participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). Among the 27 ETCCDI indices, there are six percentile-based temperature extremes indices that may fall into two groups: exceedance rates (ER) (TN10p, TN90p, TX10p and TX90p) and durations (CSDI and WSDI). Percentiles must be estimated prior to the calculation of the indices, and could more or less be biased by the adopted algorithm. Such biases will in turn be propagated to the final results of indices. The CLIMDEX used an empirical quantile estimator combined with a bootstrap resampling procedure to reduce the inhomogeneity in the annual series of the ER indices. However, there are still some problems remained in the CLIMDEX datasets, namely the overestimated climate variability due to unaccounted autocorrelation in the daily temperature data, seasonally varying biases and inconsistency between algorithms applied to the ER indices and to the duration indices. We now present new results of the six indices through a semiparametric quantile regression approach for the CMIP5 model output. By using the base-period data as a whole and taking seasonality and autocorrelation into account, this approach successfully addressed the aforementioned issues and came out with consistent results. The new datasets cover the historical and three projected (RCP2.6, RCP4.5 and RCP

  9. Research on floral timing by ambient temperature comes into blossom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhage, D.S.L.; Angenent, G.C.; Immink, R.G.H.

    2014-01-01

    The floral transition is an essential process in the life cycle of flower-bearing plants, because their reproductive success depends on it. To determine the right moment of flowering, plants respond to many environmental signals, including day length, light quality, and temperature. Small changes in

  10. An integrated, indicator framework for assessing large-scale variations and change in seasonal timing and phenology (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, J. L.; Weltzin, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    As part of an effort to develop an Indicator System for the National Climate Assessment (NCA), the Seasonality and Phenology Indicators Technical Team (SPITT) proposed an integrated, continental-scale framework for understanding and tracking seasonal timing in physical and biological systems. The framework shares several metrics with the EPA's National Climate Change Indicators. The SPITT framework includes a comprehensive suite of national indicators to track conditions, anticipate vulnerabilities, and facilitate intervention or adaptation to the extent possible. Observed, modeled, and forecasted seasonal timing metrics can inform a wide spectrum of decisions on federal, state, and private lands in the U.S., and will be pivotal for international efforts to mitigation and adaptation. Humans use calendars both to understand the natural world and to plan their lives. Although the seasons are familiar concepts, we lack a comprehensive understanding of how variability arises in the timing of seasonal transitions in the atmosphere, and how variability and change translate and propagate through hydrological, ecological and human systems. For example, the contributions of greenhouse warming and natural variability to secular trends in seasonal timing are difficult to disentangle, including earlier spring transitions from winter (strong westerlies) to summer (weak easterlies) patterns of atmospheric circulation; shifts in annual phasing of daily temperature means and extremes; advanced timing of snow and ice melt and soil thaw at higher latitudes and elevations; and earlier start and longer duration of the growing and fire seasons. The SPITT framework aims to relate spatiotemporal variability in surface climate to (1) large-scale modes of natural climate variability and greenhouse gas-driven climatic change, and (2) spatiotemporal variability in hydrological, ecological and human responses and impacts. The hierarchical framework relies on ground and satellite observations

  11. Development of High Temperature Short Time Vertebrate-Blood Pasteurization Equipment for Tsetse Fly Diets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moravek, I; Lach, J [Department of Manufacturing Systems, Slovak Technical University Namestie Slobody 17 812 31 Bratislava (Slovakia); Takac, P [Institute of Zoology, SAV, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-07-15

    Tsetse flies feed only on vertebrate blood, but the collection and processing of blood is expensive, it must be stored at -20{sup o}C requiring costly storage rooms and reliable electricity, and it must be irradiated to reduce bacterial contamination. This is tolerable for small colonies, but as colony size increases to service large- scale programmes, the supply and processing of blood becomes critical. Blood is normally collected from cattle at slaughter. This process is necessarily not aseptic, and large-scale collection is only possible where the animals are suspended for bleeding. One alternative to blood decontamination is using the High Temperature Short time Pasteurization (HTST) method. The food processing industry uses pasteurization to reduce bacterial load in a wide range of products. Our previous results indicated that for the control of the blood pasteurization process, to reach satisfactory bacteriological purity and at the same time to prevent the blood from coagulating, it is important to study temperature and time and also some other parameters that could predict blood coagulation. Crucial for blood coagulation is to study blood viscosity. Classical heat exchangers are not suitable for blood pasteurization. In such equipment the blood coagulation depends on temperature and time. Besides the relatively low temperatures, blood is coagulating with cumulative time until total shutdown of blood flow. After a series of experiments we found a solution using microwave systems. To verify the microwave heating concept, we built an experimental workstation. First we verified the accuracy of the applicator design from the aspect of output adaptation to the power source. Also we installed measuring equipment. This system complies with the requirements of quick heating with sufficiently high heat accumulation. By utilizing standard components for the base of the microwave generator, it is possible to markedly reduce the final price of the equipment. (author)

  12. A Delay Time Measurement of ULTRAS (Ultra-high Temperature Ultrasonic Response Analysis System) for a High Temperature Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Kil Mo; Kim, Sang Baik

    2010-01-01

    The temperature measurement of very high temperature core melt is of importance in a high temperature as the molten pool experiment in which gap formation between core melt and the reactor lower head, and the effect of the gap on thermal behavior are to be measured. The existing temperature measurement techniques have some problems, which the thermocouple, one of the contact methods, is restricted to under 2000 .deg. C, and the infrared thermometry, one of the non-contact methods, is unable to measure an internal temperature and very sensitive to the interference from reacted gases. In order to solve these problems, the delay time technique of ultrasonic wavelets due to high temperature has two sorts of stage. As a first stage, a delay time measurement of ULTRAS (Ultra-high Temperature Ultrasonic Response Analysis System) is suggested. As a second stage, a molten material temperature was measured up to 2300 .deg. C. Also, the optimization design of the UTS (ultrasonic temperature sensor) with persistence at the high temperature was suggested in this paper. And the utilization of the theory suggested in this paper and the efficiency of the developed system are performed by special equipment and some experiments supported by KRISS (Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science)

  13. IAEA activities related to safety indicators, time frames and reference scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batandjieva, B.; Hioki, K.; Metcalf, P.

    2002-01-01

    The fundamental principles for the safe management of radioactive waste have been agreed internationally and form the basis for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management that entered into force in June 2001. Protection of human health and the environment and safety of facilities (including radioactive waste disposal facilities) are widely recognised principles to be followed and demonstrated in post-closure safety assessment of waste repositories. Dose and risk are at present internationally agreed safety criteria, used for judging the acceptability of such facilities. However, there have been a number of activities initiated and co-ordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) which have provided an international forum for discussion and consensus building on the use safety indicators which are complementary to dose and risk. The Agency has been working on the definition of other safety indicators, such as flux, time, environmental concentration, etc.; the desired characteristics, and use of these indicators in different time frames. The IAEA has focused on safety indicators related to geological disposal, exploring their role in the development of a safety case, evaluating the advantages and disadvantages of using other safety indicators and how they complement the dose and risk indicators. The use of these indicators have been discussed also from regulatory perspective, mainly in terms of achieving reasonable assurance and confidence in safety assessments for waste repositories and decision making in the presence of uncertainty in the context of disposal of long-lived waste. Considerable effort has also been expended by the Agency on the development and application of principles for defining critical groups and biospheres for deep geological repositories. One of the important and successful IAEA programmes in this field is the Biosphere Modelling and Assessment (BIOMASS) project

  14. Developmental Times of Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) at Constant Temperatures and Applications in Forensic Entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong-Qiang; Li, Xue-Bo; Shao, Ru-Yue; Lyu, Zhou; Li, Hong-Wei; Li, Gen-Ping; Xu, Lyu-Zi; Wan, Li-Hua

    2016-09-01

    The characteristic life stages of infesting blowflies (Calliphoridae) such as Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) are powerful evidence for estimating the death time of a corpse, but an established reference of developmental times for local blowfly species is required. We determined the developmental rates of C. megacephala from southwest China at seven constant temperatures (16-34°C). Isomegalen and isomorphen diagrams were constructed based on the larval length and time for each developmental event (first ecdysis, second ecdysis, wandering, pupariation, and eclosion), at each temperature. A thermal summation model was constructed by estimating the developmental threshold temperature D0 and the thermal summation constant K. The thermal summation model indicated that, for complete development from egg hatching to eclosion, D0 = 9.07 ± 0.54°C and K = 3991.07 ± 187.26 h °C. This reference can increase the accuracy of estimations of postmortem intervals in China by predicting the growth of C. megacephala. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  15. Temperature dependence on the time and momentum spectra in germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, P.J.; MacKenzie, I.K.

    1982-01-01

    Recent measurements using the slow-#betta# + beam at Brookhaven, have suggested a thermally activated trapping mechanism which inhibited positron diffusion in single-crystal Ge. Supporting evidence has now been obtained from both Doppler broadening and lifetime measurements but, in both cases, the temperature dependence was so weak that it required the use of dual digital stabilization and unusual statistical precision in both types of spectrometry. (Auth.)

  16. Effects of Temperature on Time Dependent Rheological Characteristics of Koumiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdal Sabancı

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The rheological properties of koumiss were investigated at different temperatures (4, 10, and 20°C. Experimental shear stress–shear rate data were fitted to different rheological models. The consistency of koumiss was predicted by using the power-law model since it described the consistency of koumiss best with highest regression coefficient and lowest errors (root mean square error and chi-square. Koumiss exhibited shear thinning behavior (n

  17. Water pH and temperature in Lake Biwa from MBT'/CBT indices during the last 280 000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajioka, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Takemura, K.; Hayashida, A.; Kitagawa, H.

    2014-10-01

    We generated a 280 000 yr record of water pH and temperature in Lake Biwa, central Japan, by analysing the methylation index (MBT') and cyclisation ratio (CBT) of branched tetraethers in sediments from piston and borehole cores. Our aim was to understand the responses of precipitation and air temperature in central Japan to the East Asian monsoon variability on orbital timescales. Because the water pH in Lake Biwa is determined by phosphorus and alkali cation inputs, the record of water pH should indicate the changes in precipitation and temperature in central Japan. Comparison with a pollen assemblage in a Lake Biwa core suggests that lake water pH was determined by summer temperature in the low-eccentricity period before 55 ka, while it was determined by summer precipitation in the high-eccentricity period after 55 ka. From 130 to 55 ka, the variation in lake pH (summer precipitation) lagged behind that in summer temperature by several thousand years. This perspective is consistent with the conclusions of previous studies (Igarashi and Oba, 2006; Yamamoto, 2009), in that the temperature variation preceded the precipitation variation in central Japan.

  18. Mapping air temperature using time series analysis of LST : The SINTESI approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alfieri, S.M.; De Lorenzi, F.; Menenti, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new procedure to map time series of air temperature (Ta) at fine spatial resolution using time series analysis of satellite-derived land surface temperature (LST) observations. The method assumes that air temperature is known at a single (reference) location such as in gridded

  19. Refractive indices of ternary liquid mixtures containing aliphatic alcohols at several temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sovilj Milan N.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The refractive indices of ternary liquid mixtures (2-propanol+2-butanol+ethanol and (chloroform+2-propanol+2-butanol were measured at 20, 25, 30, and 35°C, and atmospheric pressure. The results were used to calculate the refractive index deviations over the entire mole fraction range for the mixtures. The refractive index deviations for the ternary mixtures were further fitted to empirical correlations (Cibulka Nagata-Tamura, and Lopez et al to estimate the ternary fitting parameters. Standard deviations and average percentage deviations from the regression lines are shown. The best fit was obtained by the Nagata-Tamura empirical correlation. Some of the existing predictive equations for the refractive index deviations (Tsao-Smith, Köhler, and Colinet were tested.

  20. In vivo bleeding time and in vitro thrombelastography measurements are better indicators of dilutional hypothermic coagulopathy than prothrombin time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirabadi, Bijan S; Crissey, Jacqueline M; Deguzman, Rodolfo; Holcomb, John B

    2007-06-01

    The coagulopathy of trauma is generally confirmed by prothrombin time (PT) > or =16 seconds or an international normalized ratio > or =1.5. However, the utility of these values as a screening test is unknown. We examined different coagulation tests to determine the best predictor of coagulopathic bleeding and mortality in a small animal hemorrhage model. Coagulopathy was induced in male New Zealand White rabbits by warfarin (W; 2 mg/kg for 2 days; n = 7), or hemodilution and hypothermia (HH; 50% blood exchange with Hextend, 34.5 +/- 0.3 degrees C; n = 7). Normal (N) rabbits without pretreatment served as the control (n = 7). Blood samples collected after coagulopathy induction and analyzed by prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), and thromboelastography (TEG) tests. Liver bleeding time (BT) was also measured before injury. An uncontrolled hemorrhage was created by a longitudinal splenic incision and the abdomen was closed. Rabbits were resuscitated with Hextend solution (25 mL/kg) to return blood pressure to baseline and monitored for 2 hours or until death at which time blood loss was measured. Warfarin-induced coagulopathy increased BT, PT, and aPTT. TEG showed increased reaction (R) and clot formation (K) times and marked decrease in clotting rate (alpha angle and Vmax). Hemodilution hypothermia coagulopathy increased only BT and aPTT, and decreased the clotting rate (alpha angle and Vmax) and strength of the clot. After injury, blood losses were higher in coagulopathic rabbits (W = 54.6 +/- 4.2 and HH = 51.1 +/- 8.9 mL/kg) than in normal rabbits (30.6 +/- 12.4 mL/kg) and resulted in 86%, 100%, and 0% death, respectively. BT and Vmax consistently predicted coagulopathic bleeding and death in all animals. Although satisfactory in warfarin-induced coagulopathy, PT was not a valid screening test for dilutional and hypothermic coagulopathy. BT and TEG measurements of blood clotting rate are better indicators of coagulopathic bleeding

  1. Predicting long-term temperature increase for time-dependent SAR levels with a single short-term temperature response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carluccio, Giuseppe; Bruno, Mary; Collins, Christopher M

    2016-05-01

    Present a novel method for rapid prediction of temperature in vivo for a series of pulse sequences with differing levels and distributions of specific energy absorption rate (SAR). After the temperature response to a brief period of heating is characterized, a rapid estimate of temperature during a series of periods at different heating levels is made using a linear heat equation and impulse-response (IR) concepts. Here the initial characterization and long-term prediction for a complete spine exam are made with the Pennes' bioheat equation where, at first, core body temperature is allowed to increase and local perfusion is not. Then corrections through time allowing variation in local perfusion are introduced. The fast IR-based method predicted maximum temperature increase within 1% of that with a full finite difference simulation, but required less than 3.5% of the computation time. Even higher accelerations are possible depending on the time step size chosen, with loss in temporal resolution. Correction for temperature-dependent perfusion requires negligible additional time and can be adjusted to be more or less conservative than the corresponding finite difference simulation. With appropriate methods, it is possible to rapidly predict temperature increase throughout the body for actual MR examinations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A Comprehensive Real-Time Indoor Air-Quality Level Indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungho Kang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The growing concern about Indoor Air-Quality has accelerated the development of small, low-cost air-quality monitoring systems. These systems are capable of monitoring various indoor air pollutants in real time, notifying users about the current air-quality status and gathering the information to the central server. However, most Internet of Things (IoT-based air-quality monitoring systems numerically present the sensed value per pollutant, making it difficult for general users to identify how polluted the air is. Therefore, in this paper, we first introduce a tiny air-quality monitoring system that we developed and, based on the system, we also test the applicability of the comprehensive Air-Quality Index (AQI, which is widely used all over the world, in terms of its capacity for a comprehensive indoor air-quality indication. We also develop design considerations for an IoT-based air-quality monitoring system and propose a real-time comprehensive indoor air-quality level indication method, which effectively copes with dynamic changes and is efficient in terms of processing and memory overhead.

  3. Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters: Indications, Indwelling Time, Removal, Success and Complication Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashbayev, Alisher; Belenky, Alexander; Litvin, Sergey; Knizhnik, Michael; Bachar, Gil N; Atar, Eli

    2016-02-01

    Various vena cava filters (VCF) are designed with the ability to be retrieved percutaneously. Yet, despite this option most of them remain in the inferior vena cava (IVC). To report our experience in the placement and retrieval of three different types of VCFs, and to compare the indications for their insertion and retrieval as reported in the literature. During a 5 year period three types of retrievable VCF (ALN, OptEase, and Celect) were inserted in 306 patients at the Rabin Medical Center (Beilinson and Hasharon hospitals). Indications, retrieval rates, median time to retrieval, success and complication rates were viewed and assessed in the three groups of filter types and were compared with the data of similar studies in the literature. Of the 306 VCFs inserted, 31 (10.1%) were retrieved with equal distribution in the three groups. In most patients the reason for filter insertion was venous thromboembolic events (VTE) and contraindications to anticoagulant therapy. Mean age was 68.38 ± 17.5 years (range 18-99) and was noted to be significantly higher compared to similar studies (53-56 years) (P < 0.0001). Multi-trauma patients were significantly older (71.11 ± 14.99 years) than post-pulmonary embolism patients (48.03 ± 20.98 years, P < 0.0001) and patients with preventive indication (26.00 ± 11.31, P < 0.0001). The mean indwelling time was 100.6 ± 103.399 days. Our results are comparable with the results of other studies, and there was no difference in percentage of retrieval or complications between patients in each of the three groups. In 1 of 10 patients filters should be removed after an average of 3.5 months. All three IVC filter types used are safe to insert and retrieve.

  4. A direct indication of plasma potential diagnostic with fast time response and high accuracy based on a differential emissive probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, W.E.; Hershkowitz; Intrator, T.

    1985-01-01

    The floating potential of the emissive probe has been used to directly measure the plasma potential. The authors have recently presented another method for directly indicating the plasma potential with a differential emissive probe. In this paper they describe the effects of probe size, plasma density and plasma potential fluctuation on plasma potential measurements and give methods for reducing errors. A control system with fast time response (α 20 μs) and high accuracy (the order of the probe temperature T/sub w//e) for maintaining a differential emissive probe at plasma potential has been developed. It can be operated in pulsed discharge plasma to measure plasma potential dynamic characteristics. A solid state optical coupler is employed to improve circuit performance. This system was tested experimentally by measuring the plasma potential in an argon plasma device an on the Phaedrus tandem mirror

  5. A direct indication of plasma potential diagnostic with fast time response and high accuracy based on a differential emissive probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, W.E.; Hershkowitz, N.; Intrator, T.

    1985-01-01

    The floating potential of the emissive probe has been used to directly measure the plasma potential. The authors have recently presented another method for directly indicating the plasma potential with a differential emissive probe. In this paper they describe the effects of probe size, plasma density and plasma potential fluctuation on plasma potential measurements and give methods for reducing errors. A control system with fast time response (≅ 20 μs) and high accuracy (the order of the probe temperature T/sub w//e) for maintaining a differential emissive probe at plasma potential has been developed. It can be operated in pulsed discharge plasma to measure plasma potential dynamic characteristics. A solid state optical coupler is employed to improve circuit performance. This system was tested experimentally by measuring the plasma potential in an argon plasma device and on the Phaedrus tandem mirror

  6. Real time algorithm temperature compensation in tunable laser / VCSEL based WDM-PON system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias Olmedo, Miguel; Rodes Lopez, Roberto; Pham, Tien Thang

    2012-01-01

    We report on a real time experimental validation of a centralized algorithm for temperature compensation of tunable laser/VCSEL at ONU and OLT, respectively. Locking to a chosen WDM channel is shown for temperature changes over 40°C.......We report on a real time experimental validation of a centralized algorithm for temperature compensation of tunable laser/VCSEL at ONU and OLT, respectively. Locking to a chosen WDM channel is shown for temperature changes over 40°C....

  7. Time Course Changes in Selected Biochemical Stress Indices in Broilers Exposed to Short-term Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta Bedáňová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Time course changes in selected biochemical stress indices (corticosterone, triglycerides, glucose, cholesterol following short-term noise exposure at 100 dB for 28 min were studied in broilers aged 42 days. Corticosterone concentrations were found to increase during the first 10 min of noise exposure and to differ significantly from the control (background sound – 50 dB at Time 10 min and 14 min, then decreased continually and at 28 min returned to the initial prestress value. Triglyceride concentrations increased in broilers exposed to 100 dB noise during the first 12 min with a significant difference from the control at 12 min and 14 min. Glucose concentrations were higher due to 100 dB noise exposure for almost the entire period monitored, with significant differences between 100 dB and control broilers at 6 min and from 10 min to 14 min. Similarly as for the corticosterone concentration, a drop in triglycerides and glucose concentrations was seen approximately from Time 14 min and a return to the pre-stress value at 28 min. The cholesterol concentrations showed various temporal patterns with no significant difference between 100 dB and control broilers in this experiment. The pattern of response found in the study indicates that 100 dB noise represents a stress factor in broilers, however, there is the ability of broilers to adapt to an increased level of noise at this intensity after the first 14 min of exposure. The findings obtained in the study may contribute to expanding detailed knowledge of physiological stress responses to this specific noise stimulus in poultry, and could thereby be used to improve the welfare of broilers in intensive housing systems.

  8. High day- and night-time temperatures affect grain growth dynamics in contrasting rice genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wanju; Yin, Xinyou; Struik, Paul C; Solis, Celymar; Xie, Fangming; Schmidt, Ralf C; Huang, Min; Zou, Yingbin; Ye, Changrong; Jagadish, S V Krishna

    2017-11-02

    Rice grain yield and quality are predicted to be highly vulnerable to global warming. Five genotypes including heat-tolerant and susceptible checks, a heat-tolerant near-isogenic line and two hybrids were exposed to control (31 °C/23 °C, day/night), high night-time temperature (HNT; 31 °C/30 °C), high day-time temperature (HDT; 38 °C/23 °C) and high day- and night-time temperature (HNDT; 38 °C/30 °C) treatments for 20 consecutive days during the grain-filling stage. Grain-filling dynamics, starch metabolism enzymes, temporal starch accumulation patterns and the process of chalk formation were quantified. Compensation between the rate and duration of grain filling minimized the impact of HNT, but irreversible impacts on seed-set, grain filling and ultimately grain weight were recorded with HDT and HNDT. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated irregular and smaller starch granule formation affecting amyloplast build-up with HDT and HNDT, while a quicker but normal amylopast build-up was recorded with HNT. Our findings revealed temporal variation in the starch metabolism enzymes in all three stress treatments. Changes in the enzymatic activity did not derail starch accumulation under HNT when assimilates were sufficiently available, while both sucrose supply and the conversion of sucrose into starch were affected by HDT and HNDT. The findings indicate differential mechanisms leading to high day and high night temperature stress-induced loss in yield and quality. Additional genetic improvement is needed to sustain rice productivity and quality under future climates. © Society for Experimental Biology 2017.

  9. Time-dependent fracture of materials at elevated temperature for solar thermal power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, G.D.

    1979-01-01

    Various Solar Thermal Power Systems are briefly described. The components of solar power systems in which time-dependent fracture problems become important are identified. Typical materials of interest, temperature ranges, and stress states are developed; and the number of cycles during the design life of these systems are indicated. The ASME Code procedures used by designers to predict the life of these components are briefly described. Some of the major problems associated with the use of these ASME procedures in the design of solar components are indicated. Finally, a number of test and development needs are identified which would enable the designers to predict the life of the solar power system components with a reasonable degree of confidence

  10. Neurophysiological and behavioral indices of time pressure effects on visuomotor task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobounov, S M; Fukada, K; Simon, R; Rearick, M; Ray, W

    2000-06-01

    Using a video game format, this study examined the effects of time pressure (TP) on behavioral and electrocortical indices. The behavioral results were consistent with previous time pressure research in that TP reduced time to perform a task and increases behavioral errors. In addition, electroencephalogram (EEG) measures showed distinctive patterns associated with TP in the theta, mu, and gamma bands along the midline. Site specific changes in the success vs. failure trials were also seen in midline theta at Fz, gamma at Fz, and mu at Cz. Right parietal alpha also differentiated TP and success vs. failure trials. In specific TP (1) increased frontal midline theta activity and (2) increased gamma at midline (frontal, central, and partietal) and in right frontal areas. The results of these findings are discussed in terms of the formation of specific neurocognitive strategies as evidenced by the topographic distribution of task-related modulation of the EEG within certain frequency bands. It is suggested that the effect of TP on visuomotor performance is mediated by adopting either task-relevant or task-irrelevant neurocognitive strategies as evidenced by successful or failed trials, respectively. Whether these strategies are formulated prior to performance or appear spontaneously during task performance remains unclear and is awaiting further experimentation.

  11. factor high order fuzzy time series with applications to temperature

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    In this paper, a novel two – factor high – order fuzzy time series forecasting method based on .... to balance between local and global exploitations of the swarms. While, .... Although, there were a number of outliers but, the spread at the spot in ...

  12. Influence of the Time Perspective on New Product Development Success Indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazerouni, Afrooz M.; Achiche, Sofiane; Hisarciklilar, Onur

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the underlying reasons for new product development success is central to effective new product management. However, difficulties related to estimating to what extent the objectives are being fulfilled and assessing the trade-offs between different project goals makes the new product...... of this research is to determine the appropriate sets of metrics to be used for assessing success during each phase of a product lifecycle. A practical case study was carried out by investigating 28 companies from Canadian and Danish industries. The companies are various industrial sectors. The data collection...... as they change depending on where a product is in its lifecycle. The influence of this time perspective on success indicators of new product developments has not been explored very extensively. In this paper, we investigate the success criteria during different phases of the product lifecycle. The goal...

  13. Evaluating real-time air-quality data as earthquake indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Yi-Tang; Huang, Jr-Chung; Tu, Jien-Yi; Engling, Guenter; Lin, Chuan-Yao; Lin, Fei-Jan; Huang, Chao-Hao

    2010-01-01

    A catastrophic earthquake, namely the 921-earthquake, occurred with a magnitude of M L = 7.3 in Taiwan on September 21, 1999, causing severe disaster. The evaluation of real-time air-quality data, obtained by the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (EPA), revealed a staggering increase in ambient SO 2 concentrations by more than one order of magnitude across the island several hours prior to the earthquake, particularly at background stations. The abrupt increase in SO 2 concentrations likely resulted from seismic-triggered degassing instead of air pollution. An additional case of a large earthquake (M L = 6.8), occurring on March 31, 2002, was examined to confirm our observations of significantly enhanced SO 2 concentrations in ambient air prior to large earthquakes. The coincidence between large earthquakes and increases in trace gases during the pre-quake period (several hours) indicates the potential of employing air-quality monitoring data to forecast catastrophic earthquakes.

  14. Time-Domain Reflectometry for Tamper Indication in Unattended Monitoring Systems for Safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedeschi, Jonathan R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Leon E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moore, David E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sheen, David M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Conrad, Ryan C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) continues to expand its use of unattended, remotely monitored measurement systems. An increasing number of systems and an expanding family of instruments create challenges in terms of deployment efficiency and the implementation of data authentication measures. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) leads a collaboration that is exploring various tamper-indicating (TI) measures that could help to address some of the long-standing detector and data-transmission authentication challenges with IAEA’s unattended systems. PNNL is investigating the viability of active time-domain reflectometry (TDR) along two parallel but interconnected paths: (1) swept-frequency TDR as the highly flexible, laboratory gold standard to which field-deployable options can be compared, and (2) a low-cost commercially available spread-spectrum TDR technology as one option for field implementation. This report describes PNNL’s progress and preliminary findings from the first year of the study, and describes the path forward.

  15. Breast cancer screening in Italy: evaluating key performance indicators for time trends and activity volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Livia; Castagno, Roberta; Giorgi, Daniela; Piccinelli, Cristiano; Ventura, Leonardo; Segnan, Nereo; Zappa, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Together with the National centre for screening monitoring (ONS), GISMa supports annual collection of data on national breast screening activities. Aggregated data on implementation and performance are gathered through a standardized form to calculate process and impact indicators. Analyzed data belong to 153 local programmes in the period 2006-2011 (2006-2012 for participation rate only). During the whole period, Italian crude participation rate exceeded GISMa's acceptable standard (50%), even though a higher participation in northern and central Italy compared to southern Italy and Islands was observed. Time trend analysis of diagnostic indicators confirmed in 2011 an adequate quality of breast screening performance, especially at subsequent screening. Recall rate at initial screening did not reach the acceptable standard (performance was achieved at subsequent screening. The same trend was followed by the overall detection rate and positive predictive value. They both showed a progressive reduction (from 6.2‰ in 2006 to 4.5‰ in 2011 for DR and from 8.0% in 2006 to 5.2% in 2011 for PPV, respectively) at initial screening and a good, stable trend at subsequent screening. Activity volume analysis shows that in programmes with greater activity (test/year ≥10,000) RR at both initial and subsequent screening has a better performance. This is also true for DR and PPV where programmes with high volumes of activity do better, especially when compared with those that interpret fewer than 5,000 mammograms per year. In spite of a few limits, these results are reassuring, and they reward the efforts made by screening professionals. It is therefore important to continue to monitor screening indicators and suggest, test, and evaluate new strategies for continuous improvement.

  16. Time variations of geomagnetic activity indices Kp and Ap: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Rangarajan

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Kp and Ap indices covering the period 1932 to 1995 are analysed in a fashion similar to that attempted by Bartels for the 1932–1961 epoch to examine the time variations in their characteristics. Modern analysis techniques on the extended data base are used for further insight. The relative frequencies of occurrence of Kp with different magnitudes and the seasonal and solar cycle dependences are seen to be remarkably consistent despite the addition of 35 years of observations. Many of the earlier features seen in the indices and special intervals are shown to be replicated in the present analysis. Time variations in the occurrence of prolonged periods of geomagnetic calm or of enhanced activity are presented and their relation to solar activity highlighted. It is shown that in the declining phase the occurrence frequencies of Kp = 4–5 (consecutively over 4 intervals can be used as a precursor for the maximum sunspot number to be expected in the next cycle. The semi-annual variation in geomagnetic activity is re-examined utilising not only the Ap index but also the occurrence frequencies of Kp index with different magnitudes. Lack of dependence of the amplitude of semi-annual variation on sunspot number is emphasised. Singular spectrum analysis of the mean monthly Ap index shows some distinct periodic components. The temporal evolution of ~44 month, ~21 month and ~16 month oscillations are examined and it is postulated that while QBO and the 16 month oscillations could be attributed to solar wind and IMF oscillations with analogous periodicity, the 44 month variation is associated with a similar periodicity in recurrent high speed stream caused by sector boundary passage. It is reconfirmed that there could have been only one epoch around 1940 when solar wind speed could have exhibited a 1.3-year periodicity comparable to that seen during the post-1986 period.

  17. Time variations of geomagnetic activity indices Kp and Ap: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Rangarajan

    Full Text Available Kp and Ap indices covering the period 1932 to 1995 are analysed in a fashion similar to that attempted by Bartels for the 1932–1961 epoch to examine the time variations in their characteristics. Modern analysis techniques on the extended data base are used for further insight. The relative frequencies of occurrence of Kp with different magnitudes and the seasonal and solar cycle dependences are seen to be remarkably consistent despite the addition of 35 years of observations. Many of the earlier features seen in the indices and special intervals are shown to be replicated in the present analysis. Time variations in the occurrence of prolonged periods of geomagnetic calm or of enhanced activity are presented and their relation to solar activity highlighted. It is shown that in the declining phase the occurrence frequencies of Kp = 4–5 (consecutively over 4 intervals can be used as a precursor for the maximum sunspot number to be expected in the next cycle. The semi-annual variation in geomagnetic activity is re-examined utilising not only the Ap index but also the occurrence frequencies of Kp index with different magnitudes. Lack of dependence of the amplitude of semi-annual variation on sunspot number is emphasised. Singular spectrum analysis of the mean monthly Ap index shows some distinct periodic components. The temporal evolution of ~44 month, ~21 month and ~16 month oscillations are examined and it is postulated that while QBO and the 16 month oscillations could be attributed to solar wind and IMF oscillations with analogous periodicity, the 44 month variation is associated with a similar periodicity in recurrent high speed stream caused by sector boundary passage. It is reconfirmed that there could have been only one epoch around 1940 when solar wind speed could have exhibited a 1.3-year periodicity comparable to that seen during the post-1986 period.

  18. Development of potential map for landslides by comparing instability indices of various time periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Jie-Lun; Tian, Yu-Qing; Chen, Yie-Ruey; Tsai, Kuang-Jung

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, extreme rainfall events occur frequently and induced serious landslides and debris flow disasters in Taiwan. The instability indices will differ when using landslide maps of different time periods. We analyzed the landslide records during the period year, 2008 2012, the landslide area contributed 0.42% 2.94% of the total watershed area, the 2.94% was caused by the typhoon Morakot in August, 2009, which brought massive rainfall in which the cumulative maximum rainfall was up to 2900 mm. We analyzed the instability factors including elevation, slope, aspect, soil, and geology. And comparing the instability indices by using individual landslide map of 2008 2012, the landslide maps of the union of the five years, and interaction of the five years. The landslide area from union of the five years contributed 3.71%,the landslide area from interaction of the five years contributed 0.14%. In this study, Kriging was used to establish the susceptibility map in selected watershed. From interaction of the five years, we found the instability index above 4.3 can correspond to those landslide records. The potential landslide area of the selected watershed, where collapses occur more likely, belongs to high level and medium-high level; the area is 13.43% and 3.04% respectively.

  19. Spice and time evolution of bio indicators and issues on pure environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loktionov, A.A.; Polyakov, A.I.

    1999-01-01

    The pure environment and high-quality sound goods of all kinds of productive activity is an issue of a big concern for the developed countries at present time. Using the soft processes and sound products is a global ecological goal, since they contaminate the environment less and provide for excellent living conditions and high economic efficiency. Analysis of biological indicators evolution in a certain process, in terms of modern physics of nonequilibrium systems [1], reveals for new methods to settle urgent issues on pure environment and sound products.When analyzing evolution of a certain indicator, in terms of molecular ecology [2], it is necessary to take into account the fact that there are two types of variability - modification and genotype. For the modification variability (MV), a genetic material is homogeneous, and all changes are explained by variations of the environmental conditions, which may possesses an adaptive nature. For the genotype variability, the nature or attribute of an organism possesses a stick-slip changing because of its cell genetic nature transformation - mutation - and is inherited along the generations

  20. Predictability of monthly temperature and precipitation using automatic time series forecasting methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papacharalampous, Georgia; Tyralis, Hristos; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the predictability of monthly temperature and precipitation by applying automatic univariate time series forecasting methods to a sample of 985 40-year-long monthly temperature and 1552 40-year-long monthly precipitation time series. The methods include a naïve one based on the monthly values of the last year, as well as the random walk (with drift), AutoRegressive Fractionally Integrated Moving Average (ARFIMA), exponential smoothing state-space model with Box-Cox transformation, ARMA errors, Trend and Seasonal components (BATS), simple exponential smoothing, Theta and Prophet methods. Prophet is a recently introduced model inspired by the nature of time series forecasted at Facebook and has not been applied to hydrometeorological time series before, while the use of random walk, BATS, simple exponential smoothing and Theta is rare in hydrology. The methods are tested in performing multi-step ahead forecasts for the last 48 months of the data. We further investigate how different choices of handling the seasonality and non-normality affect the performance of the models. The results indicate that: (a) all the examined methods apart from the naïve and random walk ones are accurate enough to be used in long-term applications; (b) monthly temperature and precipitation can be forecasted to a level of accuracy which can barely be improved using other methods; (c) the externally applied classical seasonal decomposition results mostly in better forecasts compared to the automatic seasonal decomposition used by the BATS and Prophet methods; and (d) Prophet is competitive, especially when it is combined with externally applied classical seasonal decomposition.

  1. Effects of sintering time and temperature to the characteristics of FeCrAl powder compacts formed at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. M.; Rahman, H. Y.; Awang, M. A. A.; Sopyan, I.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the outcomes of an experimental investigation on the effect of sintering schedule, i.e., holding time and temperature to the final properties of FeCrAl powder compacts prepared through uniaxial die compaction process at above room temperature. The feedstock was prepared by mechanically mixing iron powder ASC 100.29 with chromium (22 wt%) and aluminium (11 wt%) for 30 min at room temperature. A cylindrical shape die was filled with the powder mass and heated for one hour for uniform heating of the die assembly together with the powder mass. Once the temperature reached to the setup temperature, i.e., 150°C, the powder mass was formed by applying an axial pressure of 425 MPa simultaneously from upward and downward directions. The as-pressed green compacts were then cooled to room temperature and subsequently sintered in argon gas fired furnace at a rate of 5°C/min for three different holding times, i.e., 30, 60, and 90 min at three different sintering temperatures, i.e., 800, 900, and 1000°C. The sintered samples were characterized for their density, electrical resistivity, bending strength, and microstructure. The results revealed that the sample sintered at 1000°C for 90 min achieved the better characteristics.

  2. Elevated temperature alters the lunar timing of Planulation in the brooding coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camerron M Crowder

    Full Text Available Reproductive timing in corals is associated with environmental variables including temperature, lunar periodicity, and seasonality. Although it is clear that these variables are interrelated, it remains unknown if one variable in particular acts as the proximate signaler for gamete and or larval release. Furthermore, in an era of global warming, the degree to which increases in ocean temperatures will disrupt normal reproductive patterns in corals remains unknown. Pocillopora damicornis, a brooding coral widely distributed in the Indo-Pacific, has been the subject of multiple reproductive ecology studies that show correlations between temperature, lunar periodicity, and reproductive timing. However, to date, no study has empirically measured changes in reproductive timing associated with increased seawater temperature. In this study, the effect of increased seawater temperature on the timing of planula release was examined during the lunar cycles of March and June 2012. Twelve brooding corals were removed from Hobihu reef in Nanwan Bay, southern Taiwan and placed in 23 and 28°C controlled temperature treatment tanks. For both seasons, the timing of planulation was found to be plastic, with the high temperature treatment resulting in significantly earlier peaks of planula release compared to the low temperature treatment. This suggests that temperature alone can influence the timing of larval release in Pocillopora damicornis in Nanwan Bay. Therefore, it is expected that continued increases in ocean temperature will result in earlier timing of reproductive events in corals, which may lead to either variations in reproductive success or phenotypic acclimatization.

  3. The relative importance of water temperature and residence time in predicting cyanobacteria abundance in regulated rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, YoonKyung; Cho, Kyung Hwa; Lee, Hyuk; Kang, Taegu; Kim, Joon Ha

    2017-11-01

    Despite a growing awareness of the problems associated with cyanobacterial blooms in rivers, and particularly in regulated rivers, the drivers of bloom formation and abundance in rivers are not well understood. We developed a Bayesian hierarchical model to assess the relative importance of predictors of summer cyanobacteria abundance, and to test whether the relative importance of each predictor varies by site, using monitoring data from 16 sites in the four major rivers of South Korea. The results suggested that temperature and residence time, but not nutrient levels, are important predictors of summer cyanobacteria abundance in rivers. Although the two predictors were of similar significance across the sites, the residence time was marginally better in accounting for the variation in cyanobacteria abundance. The model with spatial hierarchy demonstrated that temperature played a consistently significant role at all sites, and showed no effect from site-specific factors. In contrast, the importance of residence time varied significantly from site to site. This variation was shown to depend on the trophic state, indicated by the chlorophyll-a and total phosphorus levels. Our results also suggested that the magnitude of weir inflow is a key factor determining the cyanobacteria abundance under baseline conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Sensory characteristics of meat cooked for prolonged times at low temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Bach; Gunvig, Annemarie; Tørngren, Mari Ann

    2012-01-01

    species, and cooking loss increased with increasing temperature. A done appearance was developed with increasing heating time at 58 °C in pork and beef, while in chicken the done appearance was only affected by temperature. Flavor attributes were less affected by the LTLT treatment for all species......The present study evaluated the sensory characteristics of low temperature long time (LTLT) treated Semitendinosus from pork and beef and Pectoralis profundus from chicken. Semitendinosus and Pectoralis profundus muscles were heat treated at 53°C and 58°C for Tc + 6 h, Tc + 17 h, and Tc + 30 h...... (only Semitendinosus from pork and beef). Tc was the time for the samples to equalize with the temperature in the water bath. Tenderness increased with increasing heating temperature and time in pork and beef, but not in chicken. Juiciness decreased with increasing heating temperature and time in all...

  5. Trends over time in tree and seedling phylogenetic diversity indicate regional differences in forest biodiversity change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Kevin M; Woodall, Christopher W

    2012-03-01

    Changing climate conditions may impact the short-term ability of forest tree species to regenerate in many locations. In the longer term, tree species may be unable to persist in some locations while they become established in new places. Over both time frames, forest tree biodiversity may change in unexpected ways. Using repeated inventory measurements five years apart from more than 7000 forested plots in the eastern United States, we tested three hypotheses: phylogenetic diversity is substantially different from species richness as a measure of biodiversity; forest communities have undergone recent changes in phylogenetic diversity that differ by size class, region, and seed dispersal strategy; and these patterns are consistent with expected early effects of climate change. Specifically, the magnitude of diversity change across broad regions should be greater among seedlings than in trees, should be associated with latitude and elevation, and should be greater among species with high dispersal capacity. Our analyses demonstrated that phylogenetic diversity and species richness are decoupled at small and medium scales and are imperfectly associated at large scales. This suggests that it is appropriate to apply indicators of biodiversity change based on phylogenetic diversity, which account for evolutionary relationships among species and may better represent community functional diversity. Our results also detected broadscale patterns of forest biodiversity change that are consistent with expected early effects of climate change. First, the statistically significant increase over time in seedling diversity in the South suggests that conditions there have become more favorable for the reproduction and dispersal of a wider variety of species, whereas the significant decrease in northern seedling diversity indicates that northern conditions have become less favorable. Second, we found weak correlations between seedling diversity change and latitude in both zones

  6. The Perforation-Operation time Interval; An Important Mortality Indicator in Peptic Ulcer Perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surapaneni, Sushama; S, Rajkumar; Reddy A, Vijaya Bhaskar

    2013-05-01

    To find out the significance of the Perforation-Operation Interval (POI) with respect to an early prognosis, in patients with peritonitis which is caused by peptic ulcer perforation. Case series. Place and Duration of the Study: Department of General Surgery, Konaseema Institute of Medical Sciences and RF Amalapuram, Andhra Pradesh, India from 2008-2011. This study included 150 patients with generalized peritonitis, who were diagnosed to have Perforated Peptic Ulcers (PPUs). The diagnosis of the PPUs was established on the basis of the history , the clinical examination and the radiological findings. The perforation-operation interval was calculated from the time of onset of the symptoms like severe abdominal pain or vomiting till the time the patient was operated. Out of the 150 patients 134 were males and 16 were females, with a male : female ratio of 9:1. Their ages ranged between 25-70 years. Out of the 150 patients, 65 patients (43.3%) presented within 24 hours of the onset of severe abdominal pain (Group A), 27 patients (18%) presented between 24-48 hours of the onset of severe abdominal pain (Group B) and 58 patients (38.6%) presented after 48 hours. There was no mortality in Group A and the morbidity was more in Group B and Group C. There were 15 deaths in Group C. The problem of peptic ulcer perforation with its complication, can be decreased by decreasing the perforation -operation time interval, which as per our study, appeared to be the single most important mortality and morbidity indicator in peptic ulcer perforation.

  7. Spatio-temporal prediction of daily temperatures using time-series of MODIS LST images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengl, T.; Heuvelink, G.B.M.; Percec Tadic, M.; Pebesma, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    A computational framework to generate daily temperature maps using time-series of publicly available MODIS MOD11A2 product Land Surface Temperature (LST) images (1 km resolution; 8-day composites) is illustrated using temperature measurements from the national network of meteorological stations

  8. The case of the missing mechanism : How does temperature influence seasonal timing in endotherms?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caro, Samuel P; Schaper, Sonja V; Hut, Roelof A; Ball, Gregory F; Visser, Marcel E

    2013-01-01

    Temperature has a strong effect on the seasonal timing of life-history stages in both mammals and birds, even though these species can regulate their body temperature under a wide range of ambient temperatures. Correlational studies showing this effect have recently been supported by experiments

  9. Relation between Euclidean and real time calculations of Green functions at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochkarev, A.

    1993-01-01

    We find a relation between the semiclassical approximation of the temperature (Matsubara) two-point correlator and the corresponding classical Green function in real time at finite temperature. The anharmonic oscillator at finite temperature is used to illustrate our statement, which is however of rather general origin

  10. Time-temperature-transformation diagram of Zr-based Zr-Al-Cu-Ni metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goh, T.T.; Li, Y.; Ng, S.C.

    1996-01-01

    The critical cooling rates R c for glass formation in four Zr-based Zr-Al-Cu-Ni alloys were determined using techniques developed by Uhlmann based on theories of homogeneous nucleation, crystal growth and transformation kinetics. It involves the construction of a time-temperature-transformation curve which requires the knowledge of the viscosity-temperature curve of the alloys. Two types of viscosity-temperature expressions, namely Andrade expression and Doolittle expression, were used to model the viscosity of the Zr-based alloys and the choice of the viscosity-temperature expression which gives the best estimate of the calculated time-temperature-transformation curve is discussed. (author)

  11. Interrelated temperature dependence of bulk etch rate and track length saturation time in CR-39 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azooz, A.A.; Al-Jubbori, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • New empirical parameterization of CR-39 bulk etch rate. • Bulk etch rates measurements using two different methods give consistent results. • Temperature independence of track saturation length. • Two empirical relation between bulk etch rate and temperature are suggested. • Simple inverse relation between bulk etch rate and track saturation time. -- Abstract: Experimental measurements of the etching solution temperature dependence of bulk etch rate using two independent methods revealed a few interesting properties. It is found that while the track saturation length is independent of etching temperature, the etching time needed to reach saturation is strongly temperature-dependent. It is demonstrated that there is systematic simple inverse relation between track saturation time, and etching solution temperature. In addition, and although, the relation between the bulk etch rate and etching solution temperature can be reasonably described by a modified form of the Arrhenius equation, better fits can be obtained by another equation suggested in this work

  12. Investigating real-time monitoring of fatigue indicators of New Zealand forestry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Judy; Hinze, Annika; Griffiths, Christopher

    2017-12-27

    The New Zealand forestry industry has one of the highest fatality and injury rates of any industrial sector in the country. Worker fatigue has been identified as one of the main contributing factors. Currently no independent and objective large data source is available that might support an analysis of this, or provide the basis for ongoing monitoring to further investigate. In order to successfully manage fatigue in the forestry workplace, we must identify suitable ways of detecting it. Industry partners are increasingly looking at monitoring solutions (particularly lightweight, wearable technology) that aim to measure worker activities and physiological metrics in order to determine if they are fatigued. In this article we present the results of studies which investigate whether or not such technology can capture meaningful data in a reliable way that is both practical and usable within the forestry domain. Two series of studies were undertaken with in-situ forestry workers using reaction and decision-making times as a measure of potential impairment, while considering activity levels (via step count and heart rate) and job-roles. We present the results of these studies and further provide a comparison of results across different ambient temperatures (winter vs. summer periods). The results of our studies suggest that it may not be possible to identify correlations between workloads (based on both physical and cognitive stresses) and fatigue measures using in-situ measurements as results are highly personalised to individual workers and can be misleading if the wider context is not also taken into consideration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reticulo-rumen temperature as a predictor of calving time in primiparous and parous Holstein females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, J B G; Ahola, J K; Weller, Z D; Peel, R K; Whittier, J C; Barcellos, J O J

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this research was to define and analyze drops in reticulo-rumen temperature (Trr) as an indicator of calving time in Holstein females. Data were collected from 111 primiparous and 150 parous Holstein females between November 2012 and March 2013. Between -15 and -5 d relative to anticipated calving date, each female received an orally administered temperature sensing reticulo-rumen bolus that collected temperatures hourly. Daily mean Trr was calculated from d -5 to 0 relative to using all Trr values (A-Trr) or only Trr values ≥37.7°C (W-Trr) not altered by water intake. To identify a Trr drop, 2 methodologies for computing the baseline temperature were used. Generalized linear models (GLM) were used to estimate the probability of calving within the next 12 or 24 h for primiparous, parous, and all females, based on the size of the Trr drop. For all GLM, a large drop in Trr corresponded with a large estimated probability of calving. The predictive power of the GLM was assessed using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The ROC curve analyses showed that all models, regardless of methodology in calculation of the baseline or tested category (primiparous or parous), were able to predict calving; however, area under the ROC curve values, an indication of prediction quality, were greater for methods predicting calving within 24 h. Further comparisons between GLM for primiparous and parous, and using baseline 1 and 2, provide insight on the differences in predictive performance. Based on the GLM, Trr drops of 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4°C were identified as useful indicators of parturition and further analyzed using sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic odds ratios. Based on sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic odds ratios, the best indicator of calving was an average Trr drop ≥0.2°C, regardless of methodology used to compute the baseline or category of animal evaluated. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by

  14. Review of resistance temperature detector time response characteristics. Safety evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    A Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD) is used extensively for monitoring water temperatures in nuclear reactor plants. The RTD element does not respond instantaneously to changes in water temperature, but rather there is a time delay before the element senses the temperature change, and in nuclear reactors this delay must be factored into the computation of safety setpoints. For this reason it is necessary to have an accurate description of the RTD time response. This report is a review of the current state of the art of describing and measuring this time response

  15. Relationship between the Arctic oscillation and surface air temperature in multi-decadal time-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi L.; Tamura, Mina

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a simple energy balance model (EBM) was integrated in time, considering a hypothetical long-term variability in ice-albedo feedback mimicking the observed multi-decadal temperature variability. A natural variability was superimposed on a linear warming trend due to the increasing radiative forcing of CO2. The result demonstrates that the superposition of the natural variability and the background linear trend can offset with each other to show the warming hiatus for some period. It is also stressed that the rapid warming during 1970-2000 can be explained by the superposition of the natural variability and the background linear trend at least within the simple model. The key process of the fluctuating planetary albedo in multi-decadal time scale is investigated using the JRA-55 reanalysis data. It is found that the planetary albedo increased for 1958-1970, decreased for 1970-2000, and increased for 2000-2012, as expected by the simple EBM experiments. The multi-decadal variability in the planetary albedo is compared with the time series of the AO mode and Barents Sea mode of surface air temperature. It is shown that the recent AO negative pattern showing warm Arctic and cold mid-latitudes is in good agreement with planetary albedo change indicating negative anomaly in high latitudes and positive anomaly in mid-latitudes. Moreover, the Barents Sea mode with the warm Barents Sea and cold mid-latitudes shows long-term variability similar to planetary albedo change. Although further studies are needed, the natural variabilities of both the AO mode and Barents Sea mode indicate some possible link to the planetary albedo as suggested by the simple EBM to cause the warming hiatus in recent years.

  16. Flow characteristics of a pilot-scale high temperature, short time pasteurizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasula, P M; Kozempel, M F

    2004-09-01

    In this study, we present a method for determining the fastest moving particle (FMP) and residence time distribution (RTD) in a pilot-scale high temperature, short time (HTST) pasteurizer to ensure that laboratory or pilot-scale HTST apparatus meets the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance standards for pasteurization of milk and can be used for obtaining thermal inactivation data. The overall dimensions of the plate in the pasteurizer were 75 x 115 mm, with a thickness of 0.5 mm and effective diameter of 3.0 mm. The pasteurizer was equipped with nominal 21.5- and 52.2-s hold tubes, and flow capacity was variable from 0 to 20 L/h. Tracer studies were used to determine FMP times and RTD data to establish flow characteristics. Using brine milk as tracer, the FMP time for the short holding section was 18.6 s and for the long holding section was 36 s at 72 degrees C, compared with the nominal times of 21.5 and 52.2 s, respectively. The RTD study indicates that the short hold section was 45% back mixed and 55% plug flow for whole milk at 72 degrees C. The long hold section was 91% plug and 9% back mixed for whole milk at 72 degrees C. This study demonstrates that continuous laboratory and pilot-scale pasteurizers may be used to study inactivation of microorganisms only if the flow conditions in the holding tube are established for comparison with commercial HTST systems.

  17. PASTEURISASI HIGH TEMPERATURE SHORT TIME (HTST) SUSU TERHADAP Listeria monocytogenes PADA PENYIMPANAN REFRIGERATOR

    OpenAIRE

    SABIL, SYAHRIANA

    2015-01-01

    2015 SYAHRIANA SABIL (I 111 11 273). Pasteurisasi High Temperature Short Time (HTST) Susu terhadap Listeria monocytogenes pada Penyimpanan Refrigerator. Dibimbing oleh RATMAWATI MALAKA dan FARIDA NUR YULIATI. Pasteurisasi High Temperature Short Time (HTST) merupakan proses pemanasan susu di bawah titik didih yang diharapkan dapat membunuh Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) karena bersifat patogen dan mengakibatkan listeriosis yang merupakan penyakit zoonosis. Tu...

  18. Occupant Time Period of Thermal Adaption to Change of Outdoor Air Temperature in Naturally Ventilated Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    liu, weiwei; Wargocki, Pawel; Xiong, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The present work proposed a method to determine time period of thermal adaption of occupants in naturally ventilated building, based on the relationship between their neutral temperatures and running mean outdoor air temperature. Based on the data of the field investigation, the subjects’ time...

  19. Optimizing residence time, temperature and speed to improve TMP pulp properties and reduce energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabourin, M.; Xu, E.; Cort, B.; Boileau, I.; Waller, A.

    1997-04-01

    The concept of reducing energy consumption in pulp mills by increasing the disc speed of refining has been established using single disc and double disc refiners in both pilot plant and mill applications. The RTS study evaluated in this paper reviews the effect of high-speed single disc refining coupled with shortdwell-high pressure retention conditions. Coupling these variables permitted evaluation of an optimum residence time, temperature and speed (RTS) operational window. The objective of the RTS conditions to sufficiently soften the wood chips through high temperature such that the fibre is more receptive to initial defiberization at high intensity. The improved pulp from the primary refiner at high intensity could potentially demonstrate improvements in physical pulp properties at a reduced specific energy requirement. The spruce/fir RTS-TMP described here required significantly less specific energy and produced TMP with slightly improved strength properties and equivalent optical properties compared to conventional TMP pulp. Studies on the radiate pine furnish indicated that the physical pulp property/specific energy relationships could be adjusted by manipulating the residence time. 4 refs., 10 tabs., 10 figs.

  20. Derivation of the canopy conductance from surface temperature and spectral indices for estimating evapotranspiration in semiarid vegetation; Monitorizacion de conductancia en vegetacion semiarida a partir de indices espectrales y temperatura de supeficie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morillas, L.; Garcia, M.; Zarco-Tejada, P.; Ladron de Guevara, M.; Villagarcia, L.; Were, A.; Domingo, F.

    2009-07-01

    This work evaluates the possibilities for estimating stomata conductance (C) and leaf transpiration (Trf) at the ecosystem scale from radiometric indices and surface temperature. The relationships found between indices and the transpiration component of the water balance in a semiarid tussock ecosystem in SE Spain are discussed. Field data were collected from spring 2008 until winter 2009 in order to observe the annual variability of the relationships and the behaviour of spectral indices and surface temperature. (Author) 11 refs.

  1. Time-temperature characteristics of the various heat-affected zones in HT-9 weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulds, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Temperatures at different distances from the fusion boundary were measured during GTA weld depositing MTS-4 filler wire on 9.52-mm (3/8 in.) thick HT-9 plate. Peak temperature measurements indicate each of the heat-affected regions to be austenitized. An exponential expression has been used to describe the cooling curves as a function of peak temperature (or distance) from the fusion boundary

  2. Influence of temperature on patch residence time in parasitoids: physiological and behavioural mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiroux, Joffrey; Abram, Paul K.; Louâpre, Philippe; Barrette, Maryse; Brodeur, Jacques; Boivin, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Patch time allocation has received much attention in the context of optimal foraging theory, including the effect of environmental variables. We investigated the direct role of temperature on patch time allocation by parasitoids through physiological and behavioural mechanisms and its indirect role via changes in sex allocation and behavioural defences of the hosts. We compared the influence of foraging temperature on patch residence time between an egg parasitoid, Trichogramma euproctidis, and an aphid parasitoid, Aphidius ervi. The latter attacks hosts that are able to actively defend themselves, and may thus indirectly influence patch time allocation of the parasitoid. Patch residence time decreased with an increase in temperature in both species. The increased activity levels with warming, as evidenced by the increase in walking speed, partially explained these variations, but other mechanisms were involved. In T. euproctidis, the ability to externally discriminate parasitised hosts decreased at low temperature, resulting in a longer patch residence time. Changes in sex allocation with temperature did not explain changes in patch time allocation in this species. For A. ervi, we observed that aphids frequently escaped at intermediate temperature and defended themselves aggressively at high temperature, but displayed few defence mechanisms at low temperature. These defensive behaviours resulted in a decreased patch residence time for the parasitoid and partly explained the fact that A. ervi remained for a shorter time at the intermediate and high temperatures than at the lowest temperature. Our results suggest that global warming may affect host-parasitoid interactions through complex mechanisms including both direct and indirect effects on parasitoid patch time allocation.

  3. Diamond's temperature: Unruh effect for bounded trajectories and thermal time hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinetti, Pierre; Rovelli, Carlo

    2003-01-01

    We study the Unruh effect for an observer with a finite lifetime, using the thermal time hypothesis. The thermal time hypothesis maintains that: (i) time is the physical quantity determined by the flow defined by a state over an observable algebra and (ii) when this flow is proportional to a geometric flow in spacetime, the temperature is the ratio between flow parameter and proper time. An eternal accelerated Unruh observer has access to the local algebra associated with a Rindler wedge. The flow defined by the Minkowski vacuum of a field theory over this algebra is proportional to a flow in spacetime and the associated temperature is the Unruh temperature. An observer with a finite lifetime has access to the local observable algebra associated with a finite spacetime region called a 'diamond'. The flow defined by the Minkowski vacuum of a (four-dimensional, conformally invariant) quantum field theory over this algebra is also proportional to a flow in spacetime. The associated temperature generalizes the Unruh temperature to finite lifetime observers. Furthermore, this temperature does not vanish even in the limit in which the acceleration is zero. The temperature associated with an inertial observer with lifetime Τ which we denote as 'diamond's temperature', is T D = 2 h/ π k b Τ. This temperature is related to the fact that a finite lifetime observer does not have access to all the degrees of freedom of the quantum field theory. However, we do not attempt to provide any physical interpretation of our proposed assignment of a temperature

  4. Real-time motion analysis reveals cell directionality as an indicator of breast cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Weiger

    Full Text Available Cancer cells alter their migratory properties during tumor progression to invade surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant sites. However, it remains unclear how migratory behaviors differ between tumor cells of different malignancy and whether these migratory behaviors can be utilized to assess the malignant potential of tumor cells. Here, we analyzed the migratory behaviors of cell lines representing different stages of breast cancer progression using conventional migration assays or time-lapse imaging and particle image velocimetry (PIV to capture migration dynamics. We find that the number of migrating cells in transwell assays, and the distance and speed of migration in unconstrained 2D assays, show no correlation with malignant potential. However, the directionality of cell motion during 2D migration nicely distinguishes benign and tumorigenic cell lines, with tumorigenic cell lines harboring less directed, more random motion. Furthermore, the migratory behaviors of epithelial sheets observed under basal conditions and in response to stimulation with epidermal growth factor (EGF or lysophosphatitic acid (LPA are distinct for each cell line with regard to cell speed, directionality, and spatiotemporal motion patterns. Surprisingly, treatment with LPA promotes a more cohesive, directional sheet movement in lung colony forming MCF10CA1a cells compared to basal conditions or EGF stimulation, implying that the LPA signaling pathway may alter the invasive potential of MCF10CA1a cells. Together, our findings identify cell directionality as a promising indicator for assessing the tumorigenic potential of breast cancer cell lines and show that LPA induces more cohesive motility in a subset of metastatic breast cancer cells.

  5. The general use of the time-temperature-pressure superposition principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    This note is a supplement to Dynamic of Polymeric Liquids (DPL) section 3.6(a). DPL do only concern material functions and only the effect of the temperature on these. This is a short introduction to the general use of the time-temperature-pressure superposition principle.......This note is a supplement to Dynamic of Polymeric Liquids (DPL) section 3.6(a). DPL do only concern material functions and only the effect of the temperature on these. This is a short introduction to the general use of the time-temperature-pressure superposition principle....

  6. Modelling temporal and large-scale spatial variability of soil respiration from soil water availability, temperature and vegetation productivity indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichstein, M.; Rey, A.; Freibauer, A.; Tenhunen, J.; Valentini, R.; Soil Respiration Synthesis Team

    2003-04-01

    Field-chamber measurements of soil respiration from 17 different forest and shrubland sites in Europe and North America were summarized and analyzed with the goal to develop a model describing seasonal, inter-annual and spatial variability of soil respiration as affected by water availability, temperature and site properties. The analysis was performed at a daily and at a monthly time step. With the daily time step, the relative soil water content in the upper soil layer expressed as a fraction of field capacity was a good predictor of soil respiration at all sites. Among the site variables tested, those related to site productivity (e.g. leaf area index) correlated significantly with soil respiration, while carbon pool variables like standing biomass or the litter and soil carbon stocks did not show a clear relationship with soil respiration. Furthermore, it was evidenced that the effect of precipitation on soil respiration stretched beyond its direct effect via soil moisture. A general statistical non-linear regression model was developed to describe soil respiration as dependent on soil temperature, soil water content and site-specific maximum leaf area index. The model explained nearly two thirds of the temporal and inter-site variability of soil respiration with a mean absolute error of 0.82 µmol m-2 s-1. The parameterised model exhibits the following principal properties: 1) At a relative amount of upper-layer soil water of 16% of field capacity half-maximal soil respiration rates are reached. 2) The apparent temperature sensitivity of soil respiration measured as Q10 varies between 1 and 5 depending on soil temperature and water content. 3) Soil respiration under reference moisture and temperature conditions is linearly related to maximum site leaf area index. At a monthly time-scale we employed the approach by Raich et al. (2002, Global Change Biol. 8, 800-812) that used monthly precipitation and air temperature to globally predict soil respiration (T

  7. Measuring quality indicators in the operating room: cleaning and turnover time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jericó, Marli de Carvalho; Perroca, Márcia Galan; da Penha, Vivian Colombo

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory-descriptive study was carried out in the Surgical Center Unit of a university hospital aiming to measure time spent with concurrent cleaning performed by the cleaning service and turnover time and also investigated potential associations between cleaning time and the surgery's magnitude and specialty, period of the day and the room's size. The sample consisted of 101 surgeries, computing cleaning time and 60 surgeries, computing turnover time. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze time and Pearson's correlation to study potential correlations. The time spent in concurrent cleaning was 7.1 minutes and turnover time was 35.6 minutes. No association between cleaning time and the other variables was found. These findings can support nurses in the efficient use of resources thereby speeding up the work process in the operating room.

  8. Definition of Time Induction of Self-Ignition of the Substance on the Prognostic Extrapolation Depending on the Basis of Indicators Fire and Explosion Hazard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sechin, A; Kyrmakova, O; Osipenko, S

    2016-01-01

    In this article the research directed on development of a technique of definition of time of induction of the self-ignition of substances and materials which is an indicator of the beginning of development of an emergency is conducted. The experiment consisting in supervision over process of self-ignition of coal and oil deposits was the basis for research. On the basis of experimental data the curve expressing analytic - expected dependence of size of temperature of ignition on induction time was constructed. Proceeding from graphical representation of process, functional dependence of time of induction on a temperature indicator was received: y = 16920 • x 0 537 . By means of known indicators of such substances as bitumen oil oxidized (the combustible solid substance received by oxidation of residual product of oil refining) and tar oil (the combustible solid substance which is residual product of oil refining) and the received algorithm, verification of reliability of the received dependence and a technique of definition of time of induction of spontaneous ignition of deposits of oil in general was carried out. The practical importance of the conducted research is that having data on time of induction of process of self-ignition, by means of preventive measures becomes possible to avoid and prevent accidents in oil and oil processing branches, at the same time loss of property and loss of human life. (paper)

  9. Performance of a Predictive Model for Calculating Ascent Time to a Target Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Woo Moon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop an artificial neural network (ANN prediction model for controlling building heating systems. This model was used to calculate the ascent time of indoor temperature from the setback period (when a building was not occupied to a target setpoint temperature (when a building was occupied. The calculated ascent time was applied to determine the proper moment to start increasing the temperature from the setback temperature to reach the target temperature at an appropriate time. Three major steps were conducted: (1 model development; (2 model optimization; and (3 performance evaluation. Two software programs—Matrix Laboratory (MATLAB and Transient Systems Simulation (TRNSYS—were used for model development, performance tests, and numerical simulation methods. Correlation analysis between input variables and the output variable of the ANN model revealed that two input variables (current indoor air temperature and temperature difference from the target setpoint temperature, presented relatively strong relationships with the ascent time to the target setpoint temperature. These two variables were used as input neurons. Analyzing the difference between the simulated and predicted values from the ANN model provided the optimal number of hidden neurons (9, hidden layers (3, moment (0.9, and learning rate (0.9. At the study’s conclusion, the optimized model proved its prediction accuracy with acceptable errors.

  10. Mesospheric temperature estimation from meteor decay times of weak and strong meteor trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Han; Kim, Yong Ha; Jee, Geonhwa; Lee, Changsup

    2012-11-01

    Neutral temperatures near the mesopause region were estimated from the decay times of the meteor echoes observed by a VHF meteor radar during a period covering 2007 to 2009 at King Sejong Station (62.22°S, 58.78°W), Antarctica. While some previous studies have used all meteor echoes to determine the slope from a height profile of log inverse decay times for temperature estimation, we have divided meteor echoes into weak and strong groups of underdense meteor trails, depending on the strength of estimated relative electron line densities within meteor trails. We found that the slopes from the strong group are inappropriate for temperature estimation because the decay times of strong meteors are considerably scattered, whereas the slopes from the weak group clearly define the variation of decay times with height. We thus utilize the slopes only from the weak group in the altitude region between 86 km and 96 km to estimate mesospheric temperatures. The meteor estimated temperatures show a typical seasonal variation near the mesopause region and the monthly mean temperatures are in good agreement with SABER temperatures within a mean difference of 4.8 K throughout the year. The meteor temperatures, representing typically the region around the altitude of 91 km, are lower on average by 2.1 K than simultaneously measured SATI OH(6-2) rotational temperatures during winter (March-October).

  11. Temperature effects on the immature development time of Culex eduardoi Casal and Garcia (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loetti, V.; Schweigmann, N.J.; Burroni, N.E., E-mail: nburroni@ege.fcen.uba.a [Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Grupo de Estudio de Mosquitos

    2011-01-15

    The effect of constant temperatures on the development time from first instar to adult emergence was studied in Culex eduardoi Casal and Garcia reared at 7, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 or 33 deg C. Data were adjusted to the linear degree-day model and the nonlinear Briere model. According to the linear model, the development time was inversely related to the rearing temperatures between 7 deg C and 25 deg C. Maximum mortality (100%) was recorded at temperatures > 30 deg C. According to the linear model, the development threshold temperature and thermal constant were 5.7 deg C and 188.8 degree days, respectively. The lower and upper threshold temperatures and the optimum temperature for the nonlinear model were -2.3, 30.0 and 28.1 deg C, respectively. (author)

  12. The influence of measurement and relaxation time on flux jumps in high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaobin; Zhou Youhe; Tu Shandong

    2010-01-01

    The influence of the magnetization and relaxation time on flux jumps in high temperature superconductors (HTSC) under varying magnetic field is studied using the fundamental electromagnetic field equations and the thermal diffusion equation; temperature variety corresponding to flux jump is also discussed. We find that for a low sweep rate of the applied magnetic field, the measurement and relaxation times can reduce flux jump and to constrain the number of flux jumps, even stabilizing the HTSC, since much heat produced by the motion of magnetic flux can transfer into coolant during the measurement and relaxation times. As high temperature superconductors are subjected to a high sweep rate or a strong pulsed magnetic field, magnetization undergoes from stability or oscillation to jump for different pause times. And the period of temperature oscillation is equal to the measurement and relaxation time.

  13. Dynamic temperature estimation and real time emergency rating of transmission cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, R. S.; Holboll, J.; Gudmundsdottir, Unnur Stella

    2012-01-01

    enables real time emergency ratings, such that the transmission system operator can make well-founded decisions during faults. Hereunder is included the capability of producing high resolution loadability vs. time schedules within few minutes, such that the TSO can safely control the system.......). It is found that the calculated temperature estimations are fairly accurate — within 1.5oC of the finite element method (FEM) simulation to which it is compared — both when looking at the temperature profile (time dependent) and the temperature distribution (geometric dependent). The methodology moreover...

  14. Calculation of nonzero-temperature Casimir forces in the time domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Kai; Reid, M. T. Homer; McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; White, Jacob K.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    We show how to compute Casimir forces at nonzero temperatures with time-domain electromagnetic simulations, for example, using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Compared to our previous zero-temperature time-domain method, only a small modification is required, but we explain that some care is required to properly capture the zero-frequency contribution. We validate the method against analytical and numerical frequency-domain calculations, and show a surprising high-temperature disappearance of a nonmonotonic behavior previously demonstrated in a pistonlike geometry.

  15. Effectiveness of mouse minute virus inactivation by high temperature short time treatment technology: a statistical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Marie; Quesada, Guillermo Miro; Chen, Dayue

    2011-11-01

    Viral contamination of mammalian cell cultures in GMP manufacturing facility represents a serious safety threat to biopharmaceutical industry. Such adverse events usually require facility shutdown for cleaning/decontamination, and thus result in significant loss of production and/or delay of product development. High temperature short time (HTST) treatment of culture media has been considered as an effective method to protect GMP facilities from viral contaminations. Log reduction factor (LRF) has been commonly used to measure the effectiveness of HTST treatment for viral inactivation. However, in order to prevent viral contaminations, HTST treatment must inactivate all infectious viruses (100%) in the medium batch since a single virus is sufficient to cause contamination. Therefore, LRF may not be the most appropriate indicator for measuring the effectiveness of HTST in preventing viral contaminations. We report here the use of the probability to achieve complete (100%) virus inactivation to assess the effectiveness of HTST treatment. By using mouse minute virus (MMV) as a model virus, we have demonstrated that the effectiveness of HTST treatment highly depends upon the level of viral contaminants in addition to treatment temperature and duration. We believe that the statistical method described in this report can provide more accurate information about the power and potential limitation of technologies such as HTST in our shared quest to mitigate the risk of viral contamination in manufacturing facilities. Copyright © 2011 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A real-time heat strain risk classifier using heart rate and skin temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buller, Mark J; Latzka, William A; Yokota, Miyo; Tharion, William J; Moran, Daniel S

    2008-01-01

    Heat injury is a real concern to workers engaged in physically demanding tasks in high heat strain environments. Several real-time physiological monitoring systems exist that can provide indices of heat strain, e.g. physiological strain index (PSI), and provide alerts to medical personnel. However, these systems depend on core temperature measurement using expensive, ingestible thermometer pills. Seeking a better solution, we suggest the use of a model which can identify the probability that individuals are 'at risk' from heat injury using non-invasive measures. The intent is for the system to identify individuals who need monitoring more closely or who should apply heat strain mitigation strategies. We generated a model that can identify 'at risk' (PSI ≥ 7.5) workers from measures of heart rate and chest skin temperature. The model was built using data from six previously published exercise studies in which some subjects wore chemical protective equipment. The model has an overall classification error rate of 10% with one false negative error (2.7%), and outperforms an earlier model and a least squares regression model with classification errors of 21% and 14%, respectively. Additionally, the model allows the classification criteria to be adjusted based on the task and acceptable level of risk. We conclude that the model could be a valuable part of a multi-faceted heat strain management system. (note)

  17. Modeling temporal and large-scale spatial variability of soil respiration from soil water availability, temperature and vegetation productivity indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichstein, Markus; Rey, Ana; Freibauer, Annette; Tenhunen, John; Valentini, Riccardo; Banza, Joao; Casals, Pere; Cheng, Yufu; Grünzweig, Jose M.; Irvine, James; Joffre, Richard; Law, Beverly E.; Loustau, Denis; Miglietta, Franco; Oechel, Walter; Ourcival, Jean-Marc; Pereira, Joao S.; Peressotti, Alessandro; Ponti, Francesca; Qi, Ye; Rambal, Serge; Rayment, Mark; Romanya, Joan; Rossi, Federica; Tedeschi, Vanessa; Tirone, Giampiero; Xu, Ming; Yakir, Dan

    2003-12-01

    Field-chamber measurements of soil respiration from 17 different forest and shrubland sites in Europe and North America were summarized and analyzed with the goal to develop a model describing seasonal, interannual and spatial variability of soil respiration as affected by water availability, temperature, and site properties. The analysis was performed at a daily and at a monthly time step. With the daily time step, the relative soil water content in the upper soil layer expressed as a fraction of field capacity was a good predictor of soil respiration at all sites. Among the site variables tested, those related to site productivity (e.g., leaf area index) correlated significantly with soil respiration, while carbon pool variables like standing biomass or the litter and soil carbon stocks did not show a clear relationship with soil respiration. Furthermore, it was evidenced that the effect of precipitation on soil respiration stretched beyond its direct effect via soil moisture. A general statistical nonlinear regression model was developed to describe soil respiration as dependent on soil temperature, soil water content, and site-specific maximum leaf area index. The model explained nearly two thirds of the temporal and intersite variability of soil respiration with a mean absolute error of 0.82 μmol m-2 s-1. The parameterized model exhibits the following principal properties: (1) At a relative amount of upper-layer soil water of 16% of field capacity, half-maximal soil respiration rates are reached. (2) The apparent temperature sensitivity of soil respiration measured as Q10 varies between 1 and 5 depending on soil temperature and water content. (3) Soil respiration under reference moisture and temperature conditions is linearly related to maximum site leaf area index. At a monthly timescale, we employed the approach by [2002] that used monthly precipitation and air temperature to globally predict soil respiration (T&P model). While this model was able to

  18. A hierarchical model of daily stream temperature using air-water temperature synchronization, autocorrelation, and time lags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin H. Letcher

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Water temperature is a primary driver of stream ecosystems and commonly forms the basis of stream classifications. Robust models of stream temperature are critical as the climate changes, but estimating daily stream temperature poses several important challenges. We developed a statistical model that accounts for many challenges that can make stream temperature estimation difficult. Our model identifies the yearly period when air and water temperature are synchronized, accommodates hysteresis, incorporates time lags, deals with missing data and autocorrelation and can include external drivers. In a small stream network, the model performed well (RMSE = 0.59°C, identified a clear warming trend (0.63 °C decade−1 and a widening of the synchronized period (29 d decade−1. We also carefully evaluated how missing data influenced predictions. Missing data within a year had a small effect on performance (∼0.05% average drop in RMSE with 10% fewer days with data. Missing all data for a year decreased performance (∼0.6 °C jump in RMSE, but this decrease was moderated when data were available from other streams in the network.

  19. Discrimination of Temperature and Strain in Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis Using a Multicore Optical Fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Mohamed A S; Wang, Mohan; Milione, Giovanni; Li, Ming-Jun; Li, Shenping; Huang, Yue-Kai; Wang, Ting; Chen, Kevin P

    2018-04-12

    Brillouin optical time domain analysis is the sensing of temperature and strain changes along an optical fiber by measuring the frequency shift changes of Brillouin backscattering. Because frequency shift changes are a linear combination of temperature and strain changes, their discrimination is a challenge. Here, a multicore optical fiber that has two cores is fabricated. The differences between the cores' temperature and strain coefficients are such that temperature (strain) changes can be discriminated with error amplification factors of 4.57 °C/MHz (69.11 μ ϵ /MHz), which is 2.63 (3.67) times lower than previously demonstrated. As proof of principle, using the multicore optical fiber and a commercial Brillouin optical time domain analyzer, the temperature (strain) changes of a thermally expanding metal cylinder are discriminated with an error of 0.24% (3.7%).

  20. Discrimination of Temperature and Strain in Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis Using a Multicore Optical Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. S. Zaghloul

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Brillouin optical time domain analysis is the sensing of temperature and strain changes along an optical fiber by measuring the frequency shift changes of Brillouin backscattering. Because frequency shift changes are a linear combination of temperature and strain changes, their discrimination is a challenge. Here, a multicore optical fiber that has two cores is fabricated. The differences between the cores’ temperature and strain coefficients are such that temperature (strain changes can be discriminated with error amplification factors of 4.57 °C/MHz (69.11 μ ϵ /MHz, which is 2.63 (3.67 times lower than previously demonstrated. As proof of principle, using the multicore optical fiber and a commercial Brillouin optical time domain analyzer, the temperature (strain changes of a thermally expanding metal cylinder are discriminated with an error of 0.24% (3.7%.

  1. Interactive effects of food quality, temperature and rearing time on condition of juvenile black bream Acanthopagrus butcheri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, B D; Elsdon, T S; Gillanders, B M

    2010-06-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to determine the interactive effects of temperature and diet on condition indices of juvenile black bream Acanthopagrus butcheri, reared for time periods ranging from 2 to 42 days. After fish were reared for varying periods, growth, morphometric (Fulton's K) and biochemical [RNA:DNA (R:D) ratios] indices were measured. Fulton's K responded primarily to temperature, with progressive decrease in condition over time for fish reared at high temperatures. In contrast, R:D ratios were primarily affected by diet composition, with the highest values observed for fish reared on fish-based diets as opposed to vegetable-based diets. Significant effects of rearing time were also observed for Fulton's K and R:D ratios, as were some interactive treatment effects. In addition, Fulton's K and R:D ratios were not significantly correlated, perhaps due to the different periods of time integrated by each index or their relative sensitivity to lipid and protein deposition. These results highlight the complex responses of these condition indices to environmental variables and nutritional status.

  2. Exploring Time Perspective in Greek Young Adults: Validation of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory and Relationships with Mental Health Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostopoulos, Fotios; Griva, Fay

    2012-01-01

    In this article we examine the factorial structure of the Greek version of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI; Zimbardo and Boyd in "J Personal Soc Psychol" 77:1271-1288, 1999), in a sample of 337 university students, using principal axis factoring (PAF) with oblique rotation, and its dimensionality using parallel analysis.…

  3. Time-Lapse and Slow-Motion Tracking of Temperature Changes: Response Time of a Thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moggio, L.; Onorato, P.; Gratton, L. M.; Oss, S.

    2017-01-01

    We propose the use of a smartphone based time-lapse and slow-motion video techniques together with tracking analysis as valuable tools for investigating thermal processes such as the response time of a thermometer. The two simple experimental activities presented here, suitable also for high school and undergraduate students, allow one to measure…

  4. Imaging technique for real-time temperature monitoring during cryotherapy of lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Elena; Liopo, Anton; Nadvoretskiy, Vyacheslav; Ermilov, Sergey

    2016-11-01

    Noninvasive real-time temperature imaging during thermal therapies is able to significantly improve clinical outcomes. An optoacoustic (OA) temperature monitoring method is proposed for noninvasive real-time thermometry of vascularized tissue during cryotherapy. The universal temperature-dependent optoacoustic response (ThOR) of red blood cells (RBCs) is employed to convert reconstructed OA images to temperature maps. To obtain the temperature calibration curve for intensity-normalized OA images, we measured ThOR of 10 porcine blood samples in the range of temperatures from 40°C to -16°C and analyzed the data for single measurement variations. The nonlinearity (ΔTmax) and the temperature of zero OA response (T0) of the calibration curve were found equal to 11.4±0.1°C and -13.8±0.1°C, respectively. The morphology of RBCs was examined before and after the data collection confirming cellular integrity and intracellular compartmentalization of hemoglobin. For temperatures below 0°C, which are of particular interest for cryotherapy, the accuracy of a single temperature measurement was ±1°C, which is consistent with the clinical requirements. Validation of the proposed OA temperature imaging technique was performed for slow and fast cooling of blood samples embedded in tissue-mimicking phantoms.

  5. Effect of semen extender and storage temperature on ram sperm motility over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storage of ram semen for long period of time depends on a number of factors, including type of extender and storage temperature. A study compared the effect of semen extender and storage temperature on motility of ram semen stored for 72 h. Semen collected via electroejaculator from 5 mature Katahd...

  6. Multi-species time-history measurements during high-temperature acetone and 2-butanone pyrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Lam, Kingyiu; Ren, Wei; Pyun, Sunghyun; Farooq, Aamir; Davidson, David Frank; Hanson, Ronald Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    High-temperature acetone and 2-butanone pyrolysis studies were conducted behind reflected shock waves using five species time-history measurements (ketone, CO, CH3, CH4 and C2H4). Experimental conditions covered temperatures of 1100-1600 Kat 1.6 atm

  7. Temperature affects the timing of spawning and migration of North Sea mackerel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Teunis; Gislason, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Climate change accentuates the need for knowing how temperature impacts the life history and productivity of economically and ecologically important species of fish. We examine the influence of temperature on the timing of the spawning and migrations of North Sea Mackerel using data from larvae C...

  8. Impact of landfill liner time-temperature history on the service life of HDPE geomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, R Kerry; Islam, M Z

    2009-10-01

    The observed temperatures in different landfills are used to establish a number of idealized time-temperature histories for geomembrane liners in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. These are then used for estimating the service life of different HDPE geomembranes. The predicted antioxidant depletion times (Stage I) are between 7 and 750 years with the large variation depending on the specific HDPE geomembrane product, exposure conditions, and most importantly, the magnitude and duration of the peak liner temperature. The higher end of the range corresponds to data from geomembranes aged in simulated landfill liner tests and a maximum liner temperature of 37 degrees C. The lower end of the range corresponds to a testing condition where geomembranes were immersed in a synthetic leachate and a maximum liner temperature of 60 degrees C. The total service life of the geomembranes was estimated to be between 20 and 3300 years depending on the time-temperature history examined. The range illustrates the important role that time-temperature history could play in terms of geomembrane service life. The need for long-term monitoring of landfill liner temperature and for geomembrane ageing studies that will provide improved data for assessing the likely long-term performance of geomembranes in MSW landfills are highlighted.

  9. Evaluation of the effect of temperature and time of incubation on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The complete blood count (CBC) is one of the most common tests requested by physicians. The results of this test are affected by different factors such as temperature and time of incubation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate changes in CBC results at room temperature (RT). In a cross-sectional study, ...

  10. Remote sensing measurements of sea surface temperature as an indicator of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in oyster meat and human illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Stephanie; Paduraru, Peggy; Romero-Barrios, Pablo; Henderson, Sarah B; Galanis, Eleni

    2017-08-31

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) is a naturally occurring bacterium found in marine environments worldwide. It can cause gastrointestinal illness in humans, primarily through raw oyster consumption. Water temperatures, and potentially other environmental factors, play an important role in the growth and proliferation of Vp in the environment. Quantifying the relationships between environmental variables and indicators or incidence of Vp illness is valuable for public health surveillance to inform and enable suitable preventative measures. This study aimed to assess the relationship between environmental parameters and Vp in British Columbia (BC), Canada. The study used Vp counts in oyster meat from 2002-2015 and laboratory confirmed Vp illnesses from 2011-2015 for the province of BC. The data were matched to environmental parameters from publicly available sources, including remote sensing measurements of nighttime sea surface temperature (SST) obtained from satellite readings at a spatial resolution of 1 km. Using three separate models, this paper assessed the relationship between (1) daily SST and Vp counts in oyster meat, (2) weekly mean Vp counts in oysters and weekly Vp illnesses, and (3) weekly mean SST and weekly Vp illnesses. The effects of salinity and chlorophyll a were also evaluated. Linear regression was used to quantify the relationship between SST and Vp, and piecewise regression was used to identify SST thresholds of concern. A total of 2327 oyster samples and 293 laboratory confirmed illnesses were included. In model 1, both SST and salinity were significant predictors of log(Vp) counts in oyster meat. In model 2, the mean log(Vp) count in oyster meat was a significant predictor of Vp illnesses. In model 3, weekly mean SST was a significant predictor of weekly Vp illnesses. The piecewise regression models identified a SST threshold of approximately 14 o C for both model 1 and 3, indicating increased risk of Vp in oyster meat and Vp illnesses at higher

  11. SABER (TIMED) and MLS (UARS) Temperature Observations of Mesospheric and Stratospheric QBO and Related Tidal Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Frank T.; Mayr, Hans G.; Reber, Carl A.; Russell, James; Mlynczak, Marty; Mengel, John

    2006-01-01

    More than three years of temperature observations from the SABER (TIMED) and MLS WARS) instruments are analyzed to study the annual and inter-annual variations extending from the stratosphere into the upper mesosphere. The SABER measurements provide data from a wide altitude range (15 to 95 km) for the years 2002 to 2004, while the MLS data were taken in the 16 to 55 km altitude range a decade earlier. Because of the sampling properties of SABER and MLS, the variations with local solar time must be accounted for when estimating the zonal mean variations. An algorithm is thus applied that delineates with Fourier analysis the year-long variations of the migrating tides and zonal mean component. The amplitude of the diurnal tide near the equator shows a strong semiannual periodicity with maxima near equinox, which vary from year to year to indicate the influence from the Quasi-biennial Oscillation (QBO) in the zonal circulation. The zonal mean QBO temperature variations are analyzed over a range of latitudes and altitudes, and the results are presented for latitudes from 48"s to 48"N. New results are obtained for the QBO, especially in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, and at mid-latitudes. At Equatorial latitudes, the QBO amplitudes show local peaks, albeit small, that occur at different altitudes. From about 20 to 40 km, and within about 15" of the Equator, the amplitudes can approach 3S K for the stratospheric QBO or SQBO. For the mesospheric QBO or MQBO, we find peaks near 70 km, with temperature amplitudes reaching 3.5"K, and near 85 km, the amplitudes approach 2.5OK. Morphologically, the amplitude and phase variations derived from the SABER and MLS measurements are in qualitative agreement. The QBO amplitudes tend to peak at the Equator but then increase again pole-ward of about 15" to 20'. The phase progression with altitude varies more gradually at the Equator than at mid-latitudes. A comparison of the observations with results from the Numerical Spectral

  12. Effect of temperature and time of pasteurization on the milk quality during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakar

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available A study on the effect of temperature and time of pasteurization on the milk quality during storage was carried out using fresh milk. The aim of the experiment was to asses the storage time of pasteurized milk for consumption without nutrient losses. A completely randomized factorial design, 2 x 8 was used, with pasteurization temperature (T, consisted of 2 levels, the low temperature long time (LTLT, i.e. fresh milk was warmed at 65oC for 30 minutes (T1 and the high temperature short time (HTST, i.e. fresh milk was warmed at 71oC for 15 seconds (T2; and storage time (S, consisted of 8 levels, i.e. 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, and 21 hours respectively, as the factors, with 3 replicates. Parameters measured were alcohol test, water, fat, and protein concentrations, and microbial population of pasteurized milk during storage. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and simple linear regression. The result showed that water and fat concentrations and microbial population was not significantly different (P>0.05 in pasteurization temperature treatment, but was significantly different (P<0.05 due to storage time treatment. Meanwhile, the protein concentration was significantly different (P<0.05 either in pasteurization temperature or storage time. It was concluded that pasteurized milk was still suitable for consumption at 15-21 hours storage, while protein concentration tended to be better when was pasteurized at 65oC.

  13. SMAP L1B Radiometer Half-Orbit Time-Ordered Brightness Temperatures V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level-1B (L1B) product provides calibrated estimates of time-ordered geolocated brightness temperatures measured by the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)...

  14. Natural convection in square enclosure induced by inner circular cylinder with time-periodic pulsating temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Zhu; Zhang, Wei; Xi, Guang

    2015-01-01

    The periodic unsteady natural convection flow and heat transfer in a square enclosure containing a concentric circular cylinder is numerically studied. The temperature of the inner circular cylinder fluctuates periodically with time at higher

  15. Time-dependent electron temperature diagnostics for high-power aluminum z-pinch plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Mock, R.C.

    1996-08-01

    Time-resolved x-ray pinhole photographs and time-integrated radially-resolved x-ray crystal-spectrometer measurements of azimuthally-symmetric aluminum-wire implosions suggest that the densest phase of the pinch is composed of a hot plasma core surrounded by a cooler plasma halo. The slope of the free-bound x-ray continuum, provides a time-resolved, model-independent diagnostic of the core electron temperature. A simultaneous measurement of the time-resolved K-shell line spectra provides the electron temperature of the spatially averaged plasma. Together, the two diagnostics support a 1-D Radiation-Hydrodynamic model prediction of a plasma whose thermalization on axis produces steep radial gradients in temperature, from temperatures in excess of a kilovolt in the core to below a kilovolt in the surrounding plasma halo

  16. Joint analysis of time-to-event and multiple binary indicators of latent classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    Multiple categorical variables are commonly used in medical and epidemiological research to measure specific aspects of human health and functioning. To analyze such data, models have been developed considering these categorical variables as imperfect indicators of an individual's "true" status o...

  17. Temperature dependence of 1H NMR relaxation time, T2, for intact and neoplastic plant tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewa, Czesław J.; Lewa, Maria

    Temperature dependences of the spin-spin proton relaxation time, T2, have been shown for normal and tumorous tissues collected from kalus culture Nicotiana tabacum and from the plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana. For neoplastic plant tissues, time T2 was increased compared to that for intact plants, a finding similar to that for animal and human tissues. The temperature dependences obtained were compared to analogous relations observed with animal tissues.

  18. Sintering of nickel catalysts. Effects of time, atmosphere, temperature, nickel-carrier interactions, and dopants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehested, Jens; Gelten, Johannes A.P.; Helveg, Stig [Haldor Topsoee A/S, Nymoellevej 55, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2006-08-01

    Supported nickel catalysts are widely used in the steam-reforming process for industrial scale production of hydrogen and synthesis gas. This paper provides a study of sintering in nickel-based catalysts (Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ni/MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}). Specifically the influence of time, temperature, atmosphere, nickel-carrier interactions and dopants on the rate of sintering is considered. To probe the sintering kinetics, all catalysts were analyzed by sulfur chemisorption to determine the Ni surface area. Furthermore selected samples were further analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), mercury porosimetry, BET area measurements, and electron microscopy (EM). The observed sintering rates as a function of time, temperature, and P{sub H{sub 2}O}/P{sub H{sub 2}} ratio were consistent with recent model predictions [J. Sehested, J.A.P. Gelten, I.N. Remediakis, H. Bengaard, J.K. Norskov, J. Catal. 223 (2004) 432] over a broad range of environmental conditions. However, exposing the catalysts to severe sintering conditions the loss of nickel surface area is faster than model predictions and the deviation is attributed to a change in the sintering mechanism and nickel removal by nickel-carrier interactions. Surprisingly, alumina-supported Ni particles grow to sizes larger than the particle size of the carrier indicating that the pore diameter does not represent an upper limit for Ni particle growth. The effects of potassium promotion and sulfur poisoning on the rates of sintering were also investigated. No significant effects of the dopants were observed after ageing at ambient pressure. However, at high pressures of steam and hydrogen (31bar and H{sub 2}O:H{sub 2}=10:1) potassium promotion increased the sintering rate relative to that of the unpromoted catalyst. Sulfur also enhances the rate of sintering at high pressures, but the effect of sulfur is less than for potassium. (author)

  19. Effect of aging time and aging temperature on fatigue and fracture behavior of 6063 aluminum alloy under seawater influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, R.A.; Abdul-Wahab, S.A.; Pervez, T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes experimentally the effect of seawater corrosion, aging time, and aging temperature on the fatigue resistance property of 6063 aluminum alloy. The 6063 aluminum alloy that was used for the study was heat treated and soaked in seawater for different intervals of time between 2 and 30 weeks. It was found that the maximum fatigue resistance property in the 6063 aluminum alloy was observed when aged between 7 and 9 h and heat treated at temperatures between 160 o C and 200 o C. Generally at constant load, the results indicated that the number of cycles to fail the 6063 aluminum alloy decreased with increasing the soaking time in seawater. Moreover, fracture surfaces were considered and studied under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results showed that the brittle fracture pattern tended to occur with the increase in aging time and temperature. The fatigue striations were observed very clearly at low and peak aging temperature. The increase in the fatigue resistance property with aging time was linked with the vacancies assisted diffusion mechanism and also by the hindering of dislocation movement by impure atoms

  20. Thermotolerance in preirradiated intestine and its influence on time-temperature relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hume, S.P.; Marigold, J.C.; Manjil, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    The crypt compartment of mouse jejunum showed a transient increase in thermal susceptibility approximately 10 days after moderate X-ray doses to the abdomen (9-10 Gy). The increase in response was manifest as an increase in slope of the crypt dose-response curve but was limited to temperatures below 43 0 C. As a result, the 43 0 C inflexion in the Arrhenius plot (the relationship between treatment time and temperature) for thermal sensitivity of crypts was eliminated in preirradiated tissue, and the curve became monophasic over the range 42.0-44.5 0 C. At temperatures below 42 0 C, the curve again deviated. At supranormal temperatures of 42 0 C and below, the durations of hyperthermia needed for measurable effect were sufficient to allow thermotolerance to be expressed within the heating period. Neither the threshold heating times nor this thermotolerance were affected by prior irradiation. In the temperature range 42-43 0 C, an earlier development of thermotolerance could be demonstrated in control tissue by challenging with an acute high-temperature heat treatment. This thermotolerance was eliminated in preirradiated tissue, resulting in the apparent increase in sensitivity. The findings support the view that the complex nature of the time-temperature relationship seen in normal tissue in vivo is a manifestation of the ability of the tissue to progressively acquire a thermotolerant state during treatment at temperatures below approximately 43 0 C, so that the intrinsic sensitivity is modulated while being assessed

  1. New insights into soil temperature time series modeling: linear or nonlinear?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonakdari, Hossein; Moeeni, Hamid; Ebtehaj, Isa; Zeynoddin, Mohammad; Mahoammadian, Abdolmajid; Gharabaghi, Bahram

    2018-03-01

    Soil temperature (ST) is an important dynamic parameter, whose prediction is a major research topic in various fields including agriculture because ST has a critical role in hydrological processes at the soil surface. In this study, a new linear methodology is proposed based on stochastic methods for modeling daily soil temperature (DST). With this approach, the ST series components are determined to carry out modeling and spectral analysis. The results of this process are compared with two linear methods based on seasonal standardization and seasonal differencing in terms of four DST series. The series used in this study were measured at two stations, Champaign and Springfield, at depths of 10 and 20 cm. The results indicate that in all ST series reviewed, the periodic term is the most robust among all components. According to a comparison of the three methods applied to analyze the various series components, it appears that spectral analysis combined with stochastic methods outperformed the seasonal standardization and seasonal differencing methods. In addition to comparing the proposed methodology with linear methods, the ST modeling results were compared with the two nonlinear methods in two forms: considering hydrological variables (HV) as input variables and DST modeling as a time series. In a previous study at the mentioned sites, Kim and Singh Theor Appl Climatol 118:465-479, (2014) applied the popular Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) neural network and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) nonlinear methods and considered HV as input variables. The comparison results signify that the relative error projected in estimating DST by the proposed methodology was about 6%, while this value with MLP and ANFIS was over 15%. Moreover, MLP and ANFIS models were employed for DST time series modeling. Due to these models' relatively inferior performance to the proposed methodology, two hybrid models were implemented: the weights and membership function of MLP and

  2. Temperature dependence of relaxation times in proton components of fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Kagayaki; Iwabuchi, Taku; Saito, Kensuke; Obara, Makoto; Honda, Masatoshi; Imai, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    We examined the temperature dependence of relaxation times in proton components of fatty acids in various samples in vitro at 11 tesla as a standard calibration data for quantitative temperature imaging of fat. The spin-lattice relaxation time, T 1 , of both the methylene (CH 2 ) chain and terminal methyl (CH 3 ) was linearly related to temperature (r>0.98, P 2 signal for calibration and observed the signal with 18% of CH 3 to estimate temperature. These findings suggested that separating the fatty acid components would significantly improve accuracy in quantitative thermometry for fat. Use of the T 1 of CH 2 seems promising in terms of reliability and reproducibility in measuring temperature of fat. (author)

  3. Temperature dependence of fluorescence decay time and emission spectrum of bismuth germanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melcher, C.L.; Liberman, A.; Schweitzer, J.S.; Simonetti, J.

    1985-01-01

    Bismuth germanate has become an increasingly popular replacement for NaI(Tl) scintillators in recent years, mainly due to its higher detection efficiency. However, its scintillation efficiency and fluorescence decay time are strongly temperature dependent. Optimum performance of detector systems which employ BGO crystals depends on knowledge of the BGO pulse shape and intensity and its emission spectrum at the operating temperature of the detector. Measurements of these quantities are presented over the temperature range -47 0 C to +111 0 C. Although the emission spectrum shifts only slightly over this temperature range, the scintillation efficiency and fluorescence decay time are strongly temperature dependent. In addition to the usefulness of these data for optimizing detector design, the results imply that luminescence quenching in BGO cannot be characterized by a single thermal activation to a radiationless transition but that a more complex model is required to characterize the light output from BGO crystals

  4. The effect of melting temperature and time on the TiC particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Kun [Key Laboratory of Materials Liquid Structure and Heredity, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Ji' nan 250061 (China); Liu Xiangfa, E-mail: xfliu@sdu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Materials Liquid Structure and Heredity, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Ji' nan 250061 (China)

    2009-09-18

    In the present work, the microstructure formation process and particle size distribution of TiC in Al-Ti-C master alloys are investigated by particle size analysis, which is based on the morphology characterizing from scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The TiC particle size distributions at different melting temperatures and during different melting times are researched. It is demonstrated that the TiC particle sizes increase with melting temperature and melting time elapsed. The micro size particles appear when the melting temperature is high enough.

  5. The effect of melting temperature and time on the TiC particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Kun; Liu Xiangfa

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, the microstructure formation process and particle size distribution of TiC in Al-Ti-C master alloys are investigated by particle size analysis, which is based on the morphology characterizing from scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The TiC particle size distributions at different melting temperatures and during different melting times are researched. It is demonstrated that the TiC particle sizes increase with melting temperature and melting time elapsed. The micro size particles appear when the melting temperature is high enough.

  6. Time Variations of the Spectral Indices of the Suprathermal Distribution as observed by WIND/STICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruesbeck, J. R.; Christian, E. R.; Lepri, S. T.; Thomas, J.; Zurbuchen, T.; Gloeckler, G.

    2011-12-01

    Suprathermal particle spectra, measured in various regions of the heliosphere and heliosheath by Ulysses, ACE and Voyager, have recently been reported. In many cases long accumulation times had to be used to obtain sufficient statistical accuracy, and corrections were necessary, since only a fraction of phase space was measured. The SupraThermal Ion Composition Spectrometer (STICS), onboard Wind, enables observations of the suprathermal plasma in the solar wind at much higher time resolution. In addition, the STICS samples nearly full three-dimensional phase space, enabling measurements of anisotropies. We present a multi-year investigation of the spectral index of the suprathermal distribution, accumulated over 1 day and less, where we see significant time variation. An average lower bound value of the spectral index is at ~ -5, however, there are time periods during which the observed distributions steepen. We will also present an analysis of time and spatial variations of the suprathermal particle fluxes, observed by STICS and other instruments. In particular, we will compare the observed variability with predictions from a model by Bochsler and Moebius, based on data of the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX), who postulated that energetic neutral atoms, from outside of the heliosheath, which then penetrate the inner heliosphere and are finally ionized, could be a source of the very suprathermal populations we observe.

  7. Posterior Segment Intraocular Foreign Body: Extraction Surgical Techniques, Timing, and Indications for Vitrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dante A. Guevara-Villarreal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular penetrating injury with Intraocular Foreign Body (IOFB is a common form of ocular injury. Several techniques to remove IOFB have been reported by different authors. The aim of this publication is to review different timing and surgical techniques related to the extraction of IOFB. Material and Methods. A PubMed search on “Extraction of Intraocular Foreign Body,” “Timing for Surgery Intraocular Foreign Body,” and “Surgical Technique Intraocular Foreign Body” was made. Results. Potential advantages of immediate and delayed IOFB removal have been reported with different results. Several techniques to remove IOFB have been reported by different authors with good results. Conclusion. The most important factor at the time to perform IOFB extraction is the experience of the surgeon.

  8. Biodiversity patterns, environmental drivers and indicator species on a High-temperature Hydrothermal edifice, mid-Atlantic ridge

    KAUST Repository

    Sarrazin, Jozée

    2015-04-25

    Knowledge on quantitative faunal distribution patterns of hydrothermal communities in slow-spreading vent fields is particularly scarce, despite the importance of these ridges in the global mid-ocean system. This study assessed the composition, abundance and diversity of 12 benthic faunal assemblages from various locations on the Eiffel Tower edifice (Lucky Strike vent field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge) and investigated the role of key environmental conditions (temperature, total dissolved iron (TdFe), sulfide (TdS), copper (TdCu) and pH) on the distribution of macro- and meiofaunal species at small spatial scales (< 1 m). There were differences in macro- and meiofaunal community structure between the different sampling locations, separating the hydrothermal community of the Eiffel Tower edifice into three types of microhabitats: (1) cold microhabitats characterized by low temperatures (<6 °C), high TdCu (up to 2.4±1.37 µmol l−1), high pH (up to 7.34±0.13) but low TdS concentrations (<6.98±5.01 µmol l−1); (2) warm microhabitats characterized by warmer temperatures (>6 °C), low pH (<6.5) and high TdS/TdFe concentrations (>12.8 µmol l−1/>1.1 µmol l−1 respectively); and (3) a third microhabitat characterized by intermediate abiotic conditions. Environmental conditions showed more variation in the warm microhabitats than in the cold microhabitats. In terms of fauna, the warm microhabitats had lower macro- and meiofaunal densities, and lower richness and Shannon diversity than the cold microhabitats. Six macrofaunal species (Branchipolynoe seepensis, Amathys lutzi, Bathymodiolus azoricus, Lepetodrilus fucensis, Protolira valvatoides and Chorocaris chacei) and three meiofaunal taxa (Paracanthonchus, Cephalochaetosoma and Microlaimus) were identified as being significant indicator species/taxa of particular microhabitats. Our results also highlight very specific niche separation for copepod juveniles among the different hydrothermal microhabitats. Some sampling

  9. ICF implosion hotspot ion temperature diagnostic techniques based on neutron time-of-flight method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Qi; Song Zifeng; Chen Jiabin; Zhan Xiayu

    2013-01-01

    Ion temperature of implosion hotspot is a very important parameter for inertial confinement fusion. It reflects the energy level of the hotspot, and it is very sensitive to implosion symmetry and implosion speed. ICF implosion hotspot ion temperature diagnostic techniques based on neutron time-of-flight method were described. A neutron TOF spectrometer was developed using a ultrafast plastic scintillator as the neutron detector. Time response of the spectrometer has 1.1 ns FWHM and 0.5 ns rising time. TOF spectrum resolving method based on deconvolution and low pass filter was illuminated. Implosion hotspot ion temperature in low neutron yield and low ion temperature condition at Shenguang-Ⅲ facility was acquired using the diagnostic techniques. (authors)

  10. Topological transitions at finite temperatures: A real-time numerical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, D.Yu.; Rubakov, V.A.; Shaposhnikov, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    We study topological transitions at finite temperatures within the (1+1)-dimensional abelian Higgs model by a numerical simulation in real time. Basic ideas of the real-time approach are presented and some peculiarities of the Metropolis technique are discussed. It is argued that the processes leading to topological transitions are of classical origin; the transitions can be observed by solving the classical field equations in real time. We show that the topological transitions actually pass via the sphaleron configuration. The transition rate as a function of temperature is found to be in good agreement with the analytical predictions. No extra suppression of the rate is observed. The conditions of applicability of our approach are discussed. The temperature interval where the low-temperature broken phase persists is estimated. (orig.)

  11. Real time evolution at finite temperatures with operator space matrix product states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pižorn, Iztok; Troyer, Matthias; Eisler, Viktor; Andergassen, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method to simulate the real time evolution of one-dimensional quantum many-body systems at finite temperature by expressing both the density matrices and the observables as matrix product states. This allows the calculation of expectation values and correlation functions as scalar products in operator space. The simulations of density matrices in inverse temperature and the local operators in the Heisenberg picture are independent and result in a grid of expectation values for all intermediate temperatures and times. Simulations can be performed using real arithmetics with only polynomial growth of computational resources in inverse temperature and time for integrable systems. The method is illustrated for the XXZ model and the single impurity Anderson model. (paper)

  12. Real time evolution at finite temperatures with operator space matrix product states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pižorn, Iztok; Eisler, Viktor; Andergassen, Sabine; Troyer, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    We propose a method to simulate the real time evolution of one-dimensional quantum many-body systems at finite temperature by expressing both the density matrices and the observables as matrix product states. This allows the calculation of expectation values and correlation functions as scalar products in operator space. The simulations of density matrices in inverse temperature and the local operators in the Heisenberg picture are independent and result in a grid of expectation values for all intermediate temperatures and times. Simulations can be performed using real arithmetics with only polynomial growth of computational resources in inverse temperature and time for integrable systems. The method is illustrated for the XXZ model and the single impurity Anderson model.

  13. Control of nanoparticle agglomeration through variation of the time-temperature profile in chemical vapor synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djenadic, Ruzica; Winterer, Markus, E-mail: markus.winterer@uni-due.de [Universität Duisburg-Essen, Nanoparticle Process Technology, Faculty of Engineering and CENIDE (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    The influence of the time-temperature history on the characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, degree of agglomeration, or crystallinity is investigated for chemical vapor synthesis (CVS). A simple reaction-coagulation-sintering model is used to describe the CVS process, and the results of the model are compared to experimental data. Nanocrystalline titania is used as model material. Titania nanoparticles are generated from titanium-tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in a hot-wall reactor. Pure anatase particles and mixtures of anatase, rutile (up to 11 vol.%), and brookite (up to 29 vol.%) with primary particle sizes from 1.7 nm to 10.5 nm and agglomerate particle sizes from 24.3 nm to 55.6 nm are formed depending on the particle time-temperature history. An inductively heated furnace with variable inductor geometry is used as a novel system to control the time-temperature profile in the reactor externally covering a large wall temperature range from 873 K to 2023 K. An appropriate choice of inductor geometry, i.e. time-temperature profile, can significantly reduce the degree of agglomeration. Other particle characteristics such as crystallinity are also substantially influenced by the time-temperature profile.

  14. Trends over time in tree and seedling phylogenetic diversity indicate regional differences in forest biodiversity change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin M. Potter; Christopher W. Woodall

    2012-01-01

    Changing climate conditions may impact the short-term ability of forest tree species to regenerate in many locations. In the longer term, tree species may be unable to persist in some locations while they become established in new places. Over both time frames, forest tree biodiversity may change in unexpected ways. Using repeated inventory measurements five years...

  15. Functional relationship of room temperature and setting time of alginate impression material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Irnawati

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Indonesia is a tropical country with temperature variation. A lot of dental clinics do not use air conditioner. The room temperature influences water temperature for mixing alginate impression materials. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the functional relationship of room temperature and initial setting time of alginate impression materials. Methods: The New Kromopan® alginate (normal and fast sets were used. The initial setting time were tested at 23 (control, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 and 31 degrees Celcius room temperatures (n = 5. The initial setting time was tested based on ANSI/ADA Specification no. 18 (ISO 1563. The alginate powder was mixed with distilled water (23/50 ratio, put in the metal ring mould, and the initial setting time was measured by test rod. Data were statistically analyzed by linear regression (α = 0.05. result: The initial setting times were 149.60 ± 0.55 (control and 96.40 ± 0.89 (31° C seconds for normal set, and 122.00 ± 1.00 (control and 69.60 ± 0.55 (31° C seconds for fast set. The coefficient of determination of room temperature to initial setting time of alginate were R2 = 0.74 (normal set and R2 = 0.88 (fast set. The regression equation for normal set was Y = 257.6 – 5.5 X (p < 0.01 and fast set was Y = 237.7 – 5.6 X (p < 0.01. Conclusions: The room temperature gave high contribution and became a strength predictor for initial setting time of alginates. The share contribution to the setting time was 0.74% for normal set and 0.88% for fast set alginates.

  16. Is rumination time an indicator of methane production in dairy cows?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetouni, Larissa; Difford, Gareth; Lassen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    As long as large-scale recording of expensive to measure and labor-consuming traits, such as dry matter intake (DMI) and methane (CH4) production continues to be challenging in practical conditions, alternative traits that are already routinely recorded in dairy herds should be investigated...... RT and both CH4P and DMI were close to zero, regardless of lactation stage and dataset (PP or MP). However, CH4P and DMI were highly correlated, both across lactation stages and datasets. In conclusion, RT is unsuitable to be used as an indicator trait for either CH4 production or DMI. Our study...

  17. Apple detection using infrared thermal image, 3: Real-time temperature measurement of apple tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.H.; Takahashi, T.; Fukuchi, H.; Sun, M.; Terao, H.

    1998-01-01

    In Part 1, we reported the thermal distribution characteristics and the identification methods of apples, leaves and branches by using the infrared thermal image at the specific time. This paper reports the temperature changing characteristics and the relationships among apples, leaves and air temperature based on the information measured by the infrared thermal image equipment in the real-time for 24 hours. As a result, it was confirmed that the average temperature of apples was 1 degree C or more higher than the one of the leaves, and the average temperature of the leaves was almost same as the air temperature within daytime and about 3 hours period after sunset. It was also clarified for a remarkable temperature difference not to exist for midnight and the early morning between the apples and the leaves, and both became almost as well as the air temperature. Moreover, a binary image was easily obtained and the apples could be detected by using this temperature difference informat

  18. Thermal time constant: optimising the skin temperature predictive modelling in lower limb prostheses using Gaussian processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Neha; Glesk, Ivan; Buis, Arjan

    2016-06-01

    Elevated skin temperature at the body/device interface of lower-limb prostheses is one of the major factors that affect tissue health. The heat dissipation in prosthetic sockets is greatly influenced by the thermal conductive properties of the hard socket and liner material employed. However, monitoring of the interface temperature at skin level in lower-limb prosthesis is notoriously complicated. This is due to the flexible nature of the interface liners used which requires consistent positioning of sensors during donning and doffing. Predicting the residual limb temperature by monitoring the temperature between socket and liner rather than skin and liner could be an important step in alleviating complaints on increased temperature and perspiration in prosthetic sockets. To predict the residual limb temperature, a machine learning algorithm - Gaussian processes is employed, which utilizes the thermal time constant values of commonly used socket and liner materials. This Letter highlights the relevance of thermal time constant of prosthetic materials in Gaussian processes technique which would be useful in addressing the challenge of non-invasively monitoring the residual limb skin temperature. With the introduction of thermal time constant, the model can be optimised and generalised for a given prosthetic setup, thereby making the predictions more reliable.

  19. The use of bivalves as rapid, real-time indicators of aquatic pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markich, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    The ability of bivalves to filter large volumes of water on a daily basis, combined with the relatively high permeability of their cell membranes, make them valuable organisms to use in the contemporary detection of pollution. Bivalves are well known to respond to chemical contaminants by isolating their soft tissues from the aquatic medium by valve closure. The sensory acuity (via specialized sensory regions including the osphradium) and associated repertoire of this behavioral response can be employed to assess subtle effects exerted by chemical contaminants, such as complex effluents, that may ultimately influence the survival of these organisms. As hazard assessment tools, behavioral studies reflect sublethal toxicity and often yield a highly sensitive estimate of the lowest observable effect concentration (LOEC). Moreover, valve movement behavior has been identified as one of the more sensitive biological early warning measures to a variety of aquatic contaminants, in comparison with those used in other aquatic animal phyla. Therefore, the valve movement behavior of both freshwater (Hyridella depressa, Velesunio angasi and V. ambiguus) and marine (Mytilus edulis) bivalves was continuously monitored, using an on-line computer based data acquisition system, during exposure to either trace metals (e.g. Cu, Cd, Mn and U) or complex effluents (ie treated sewage effluent and acid leachate derived from contaminated Sydney Harbour sediments), in the context of using the valve movement behavior of the bivalve species to indicate the biological significance of exposure to the above-mentioned pollutants. The results indicate that several components of the valve movement behavior of each bivalve provide quantifiable and ecologically interpretable sub-lethal endpoints for the rapid and sensitive evaluation of waters containing either complex effluents or elevated levels of trace metals

  20. Adjustment of sleep and the circadian temperature rhythm after flights across nine time zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gander, Philippa H.; Myhre, Grete; Graeber, R. Curtis; Lauber, John K.; Andersen, Harald T.

    1989-01-01

    The adjustment of sleep-wake patterns and the circadian temperature rhythm was monitored in nine Royal Norwegian Airforce volunteers operating P-3 aircraft during a westward training deployment across nine time zones. Subjects recorded all sleep and nap times, rated nightly sleep quality, and completed personality inventories. Rectal temperature, heart rate, and wrist activity were continuously monitored. Adjustment was slower after the return eastward flight than after the outbound westward flight. The eastward flight produced slower readjustment of sleep timing to local time and greater interindividual variability in the patterns of adjustment of sleep and temperature. One subject apparently exhibited resynchronization by partition, with the temperature rhythm undergoing the reciprocal 15-h delay. In contrast, average heart rates during sleep were significantly elevated only after westward flight. Interindividual differences in adjustment of the temperature rhythm were correlated with some of the personality measures. Larger phase delays in the overall temperature waveform (as measured on the 5th day after westward flight) were exhibited by extraverts, and less consistently by evening types.

  1. First Indications of Intraplate Deformations in Central Germany from Reprocessed GNSS Time Series and Geological Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Matthias; Leinen, Stefan; Läufer, Gwendolyn; Lehné, Rouwen

    2013-04-01

    Six years of GPS data have been reprocessed in ITRF2008 for a regional SAPOS CORS network in the federal state of Hesse with 25 stations and some anchor sites of IGS and EPN to derive accurate and consistent coordinate time series. Based on daily network solutions coordinate time series parameters like velocities, offsets in case of antenna changes and annual periodic variation have been estimated. The estimation process includes the fitting of a sophisticated stochastic model for the time series which accounts for inherent time correlation. The results are blended with geological data to verify information from geology on potential recent deformations by the geodetic analyses. Besides of some information on the reprocessing of the GNSS the results the stochastics of the derived velocity field will be discussed in detail. Special emphasis will be on the intra-plate deformation: for the horizontal component the residual velocity field after removal of a plate rotation model is presented, while for the vertical velocities the datum-induced systematic effect is removed in order to analyze the remaining vertical motion. The residual velocity field is then matched with the geology for Hesse. Correlation of both vertical and horizontal movements with major geological structures reveals good accordance. SAPOS stations with documented significant subsidence are mainly located in tertiary Graben structures such as the Lower Hessian Basin (station Kassel), the Wetterau (station Kloppenheim) or the Upper Rhine Graben (Station Darmstadt). From the geological point of view these structures are supposed to be subsiding ones. Other major geological features, i.e. the Rhenish Shield as well as the East Hessian Bunter massif are supposed to be affected by recent uplift. SAPOS stations located in these regions match the assumed movement (e.g. Weilburg, Wiesbaden, Bingen, Fulda). Furthermore SAPOS-derived horizontal movements seem to trace tectonic movements in the region, i

  2. Spatio-temporal prediction of daily temperatures using time-series of MODIS LST images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengl, Tomislav; Heuvelink, Gerard B. M.; Perčec Tadić, Melita; Pebesma, Edzer J.

    2012-01-01

    A computational framework to generate daily temperature maps using time-series of publicly available MODIS MOD11A2 product Land Surface Temperature (LST) images (1 km resolution; 8-day composites) is illustrated using temperature measurements from the national network of meteorological stations (159) in Croatia. The input data set contains 57,282 ground measurements of daily temperature for the year 2008. Temperature was modeled as a function of latitude, longitude, distance from the sea, elevation, time, insolation, and the MODIS LST images. The original rasters were first converted to principal components to reduce noise and filter missing pixels in the LST images. The residual were next analyzed for spatio-temporal auto-correlation; sum-metric separable variograms were fitted to account for zonal and geometric space-time anisotropy. The final predictions were generated for time-slices of a 3D space-time cube, constructed in the R environment for statistical computing. The results show that the space-time regression model can explain a significant part of the variation in station-data (84%). MODIS LST 8-day (cloud-free) images are unbiased estimator of the daily temperature, but with relatively low precision (±4.1°C); however their added value is that they systematically improve detection of local changes in land surface temperature due to local meteorological conditions and/or active heat sources (urban areas, land cover classes). The results of 10-fold cross-validation show that use of spatio-temporal regression-kriging and incorporation of time-series of remote sensing images leads to significantly more accurate maps of temperature than if plain spatial techniques were used. The average (global) accuracy of mapping temperature was ±2.4°C. The regression-kriging explained 91% of variability in daily temperatures, compared to 44% for ordinary kriging. Further software advancement—interactive space-time variogram exploration and automated retrieval

  3. Mesospheric temperatures estimated from the meteor decay times over King Sejong Station(62.2°S, 58.8°W), Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Kim, Y.; Jee, G.

    2010-12-01

    A VHF meteor radar has ben operated at King Sejong Station (62.2°S, 58.8°W), Antarctica since March 2007 for the observations of the neutral winds in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region. In addition, the radar observation allows usto estimate the neutral temperature from the measured meteor decay times of the meteor echoes by utilizing Hocking's method (Hocking, 1999). For this temperature estimation, the meteor echoes observed from March 2007 to July 2009 were divded, for the first time, into weak and strong echoes depending on the strength of estimated relative electron line densities. The estimated temperatures are then compared the temperature measurements from the spectral airglow temperature imager (SATI) which has also been operated at the same location since 2002. The estimated temperatures from strong echoes were significantly lower than the temperatures estimated from weak echoes by on average about 31 K. As was done in most previous studies, we also derived the temperature by using all echoes without dividing into weak and strong, which produces about 10 K lower than the weak echoes. Among these hree estimated temperatures, the one from weak echoes was most similar to the SATI temperature. This result indicates that the strong echoes tend to reduce the estimated temperature and therefore need to be removed in the estimation procedure. We will also present the comparison of the estimated temperature with other measurements, for example, from the TIMED/SABER instrument and the NRLMSISE-00 empirical model results as a further validation.

  4. Time-dependent radiolytic yields at room temperature and temperature-dependent absorption spectra of the solvated electrons in polyols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Mingzhang; Mostafavi, M.; Lampre, I.; Muroya, Y.; Katsumura, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The molar extinction coefficients at the absorption maximum of the solvated electron spectrum have been evaluated to be 900, 970, and 1000 mol -1 ·m 2 for 1,2-ethanediol (12ED), 1,2-propanediol (12PD), and 1,3-propanediol (13PD), respectively. These values are two-third or three-fourth of the value usually reported in the published report. Picosecond pulse radiolysis studies have aided in depicting the radiolytic yield of the solvated electron in these solvents as a function of time from picosecond to microsecond. The radiolytic yield in these viscous solvents is found to be strongly different from that of the water solution. The temperature dependent absorption spectra of the solvated electron in 12ED, 12PD, and 13PD have been also investigated. In all the three solvents, the optical spectra shift to the red with increasing temperature. While the shape of the spectra does not change in 13PD, a widening on the blue side of the absorption band is observed in 12ED and 12PD at elevated temperatures. (authors)

  5. Tracing temperature in a nanometer size region in a picosecond time period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kaoru; Kitayama, Takumi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuda, Makoto; Sataka, Masao; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Toulemonde, Marcel; Bouffard, Serge; Kimura, Kenji

    2015-08-21

    Irradiation of materials with either swift heavy ions or slow highly charged ions leads to ultrafast heating on a timescale of several picosecond in a region of several nanometer. This ultrafast local heating result in formation of nanostructures, which provide a number of potential applications in nanotechnologies. These nanostructures are believed to be formed when the local temperature rises beyond the melting or boiling point of the material. Conventional techniques, however, are not applicable to measure temperature in such a localized region in a short time period. Here, we propose a novel method for tracing temperature in a nanometer region in a picosecond time period by utilizing desorption of gold nanoparticles around the ion impact position. The feasibility is examined by comparing with the temperature evolution predicted by a theoretical model.

  6. Real-time three-dimensional temperature mapping in photothermal therapy with optoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyaga Landa, Francisco Javier; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís.; Sroka, Ronald; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Ablation and photothermal therapy are widely employed medical protocols where the selective destruction of tissue is a necessity as in cancerous tissue removal or vascular and brain abnormalities. Tissue denaturation takes place when the temperature reaches a threshold value while the time of exposure determines the lesion size. Therefore, the spatio-temporal distribution of temperature plays a crucial role in the outcome of these clinical interventions. We demonstrate fast volumetric temperature mapping with optoacoustic tomography based on real-time optoacoustic readings from the treated region. The performance of the method was investigated in tissue-mimicking phantom experiments. The new ability to non-invasively measure temperature volumetrically in an entire treated region with high spatial and temporal resolutions holds potential for improving safety and efficacy of thermal ablation and to advance the general applicability of laser-based therapy.

  7. Mean-cluster approach indicates cell sorting time scales are determined by collective dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatrici, Carine P.; de Almeida, Rita M. C.; Brunnet, Leonardo G.

    2017-03-01

    Cell migration is essential to cell segregation, playing a central role in tissue formation, wound healing, and tumor evolution. Considering random mixtures of two cell types, it is still not clear which cell characteristics define clustering time scales. The mass of diffusing clusters merging with one another is expected to grow as td /d +2 when the diffusion constant scales with the inverse of the cluster mass. Cell segregation experiments deviate from that behavior. Explanations for that could arise from specific microscopic mechanisms or from collective effects, typical of active matter. Here we consider a power law connecting diffusion constant and cluster mass to propose an analytic approach to model cell segregation where we explicitly take into account finite-size corrections. The results are compared with active matter model simulations and experiments available in the literature. To investigate the role played by different mechanisms we considered different hypotheses describing cell-cell interaction: differential adhesion hypothesis and different velocities hypothesis. We find that the simulations yield normal diffusion for long time intervals. Analytic and simulation results show that (i) cluster evolution clearly tends to a scaling regime, disrupted only at finite-size limits; (ii) cluster diffusion is greatly enhanced by cell collective behavior, such that for high enough tendency to follow the neighbors, cluster diffusion may become independent of cluster size; (iii) the scaling exponent for cluster growth depends only on the mass-diffusion relation, not on the detailed local segregation mechanism. These results apply for active matter systems in general and, in particular, the mechanisms found underlying the increase in cell sorting speed certainly have deep implications in biological evolution as a selection mechanism.

  8. [Breastfeeding indicators produced at time of vaccination in four Primary Care Centres in southern Santiago, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glisser, Mario Boris; Barragán, Tatiana del Carmen; Weisstaub, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    To compare official breastfeeding (BF) data with those obtained by interviews conducted during regular vaccination visits. A pilot descriptive study with convenience sampling was conducted by interviewing guardians of children attending vaccination in four Primary Care Centres in south Santiago. BF prevalence indicators were calculated and stratified by age and education of mothers. A comparison was made between the results and the official ones reported by each Centre. Chi-squared (X2) was calculated to evaluate differences (P<.05) RESULTS: A total of 1990 cases were analysed, in which exclusive BF prevalence was 43.4%, 34.2% and 8.8%, at 2, 4, and 6 months, respectively. At the sixth month, official data (41%) was significantly higher (P<.001). Mothers with less than 12 years of schooling have a lower prevalence of exclusive BF at the 4th month than those with higher education (28.4% vs. 37.8%, respectively, P<.05). Even considering the small size of the sample studied, exclusive BF prevalence obtained is surprisingly lower than official reported data. That difference might be explained by: (a) children brought to vaccinations are roughly two fold the number brought to well-child clinics and, (b) potential bias in official data obtained by staff in charge of promotion and education on BF practices, which could distort the results. Further studies are needed to improve the methodology for collecting and analysis BF data. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Time-Dependent Behavior of Shrinkage Strain for Early Age Concrete Affected by Temperature Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Yu; Yi, Zhijian; Wang, Weina; Wang, Di

    2017-01-01

    Shrinkage has been proven to be an important property of early age concrete. The shrinkage strain leads to inherent engineering problems, such as cracking and loss of prestress. Atmospheric temperature is an important factor in shrinkage strain. However, current research does not provide much attention to the effect of atmospheric temperature on shrinkage of early age concrete. In this paper, a laboratory study was undertaken to present the time-dependent shrinkage of early age concrete under...

  10. Pt-Rh alloys. Investigation of creep rate and rupture time at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trumic, Biserka; Gomidzelovic, Lidija; Marjanovic, Sasa; Ivanovic, Aleksandra; Dimitrijevic, Silvana [Belgrade Univ., Bor (Serbia). Inst. of Mining and Metallurgy; Krstic, Vesna

    2013-02-01

    The results of experimental investigation of creep rate and rupture time of the alloys of Pt-Rh system are presented in this paper. Selected alloys with 7-40 wt.-% Rh content were examined using a universal device for tensile testing of materials at high temperatures, and monitoring structure changes of the samples by electron microscopy. Investigations were performed in the temperature range between 1200 C and 1700 C at a stress between 2 MPa and 15 MPa. (orig.)

  11. Natural convection in square enclosure induced by inner circular cylinder with time-periodic pulsating temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Zhu

    2015-03-01

    The periodic unsteady natural convection flow and heat transfer in a square enclosure containing a concentric circular cylinder is numerically studied. The temperature of the inner circular cylinder fluctuates periodically with time at higher averaged value while the temperature of the enclosure keeps lower constant, and the natural convection is driven by the temperature difference. The two-dimensional natural convection is simulated with high accuracy temporal spectral method and local radial basis functions method. The Rayleigh number is studied in the range 103 ≤ Ra ≤ 106, the temperature pulsating period ranges from 0.01 to 100 and the temperature pulsating amplitudes are a = 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5. Numerical results reveal that the fluid flow and heat transfer is strongly dependent on the pulsating temperature of inner cylinder. Comparing with the steady state natural convection, the heat transfer is enhanced generally for the time-periodic unsteady natural convection, and the local maximum heat transfer rate is observed for Ra = 105 and 106. Moreover, the phenomenon of backward heat transfer is discussed quantitatively. Also, the influence of pulsating temperature on the unsteady fluid flow and heat transfer are discussed and analyzed.

  12. The indications and timing for operative management of spinal epidural abscess: literature review and treatment algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchman, Alexander; Pham, Martin; Hsieh, Patrick C

    2014-08-01

    Delayed or inappropriate treatment of spinal epidural abscess (SEA) can lead to serious morbidity or death. It is a rare event with significant variation in its causes, anatomical locations, and rate of progression. Traditionally the treatment of choice has involved emergency surgical evacuation and a prolonged course of antibiotics tailored to the offending pathogen. Recent publications have advocated antibiotic treatment without surgical decompression in select patient populations. Clearly defining those patients who can be safely treated in this manner remains in evolution. The authors review the current literature concerning the treatment and outcome of SEA to make recommendations concerning what population can be safely triaged to nonoperative management and the optimal timing of surgery. A PubMed database search was performed using a combination of search terms and Medical Subject Headings, to identify clinical studies reporting on the treatment and outcome of SEA. The literature review revealed 28 original case series containing at least 30 patients and reporting on treatment and outcome. All cohorts were deemed Class III evidence, and in all but two the data were obtained retrospectively. Based on the conclusions of these studies along with selected smaller studies and review articles, the authors present an evidence-based algorithm for selecting patients who may be safe candidates for nonoperative management. Patients who are unable to undergo an operation, have a complete spinal cord injury more than 48 hours with low clinical or radiographic concern for an ascending lesion, or who are neurologically stable and lack risk factors for failure of medical management may be initially treated with antibiotics alone and close clinical monitoring. If initial medical management is to be undertaken the patient should be made aware that delayed neurological deterioration may not fully resolve even after prompt surgical treatment. Patients deemed good surgical

  13. Indications of energetic consequences of decoherence at short times for scattering from open quantum systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Decoherence of quantum entangled particles is observed in most systems, and is usually caused by system-environment interactions. Disentangling two subsystems A and B of a quantum system AB is tantamount to erasure of quantum phase relations between A and B. It is widely believed that this erasure is an innocuous process, which e.g. does not affect the energies of A and B. Surprisingly, recent theoretical investigations by different groups showed that disentangling two systems, i.e. their decoherence, can cause an increase of their energies. Applying this result to the context of neutron Compton scattering from H2 molecules, we provide for the first time experimental evidence which supports this prediction. The results reveal that the neutron-proton collision leading to the cleavage of the H-H bond in the sub-femtosecond timescale is accompanied by larger energy transfer (by about 3% than conventional theory predicts. It is proposed to interpreted the results by considering the neutron-proton collisional system as an entangled open quantum system being subject to decoherence owing to the interactions with the “environment” (i.e., two electrons plus second proton of H2.

  14. Comparing temporal order judgments and choice reaction time tasks as indices of exogenous spatial cuing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskes, Gail A; Klein, Raymond M; Dove, Mary Beth; Coolican, Jamesie; Shore, David I

    2007-11-30

    Attentional disorders are common in individuals with neurological or psychiatric conditions and impact on recovery and outcome. Thus, it is critical to develop theory-based measures of attentional function to understand potential mechanisms underlying the disorder and to evaluate the effect of intervention. The present study compared two alternative methods to measure the effects of attentional cuing that could be used in populations of individuals who may not be able to make manual responses normally or may show overall slowing in responses. Spatial attention was measured with speeded and unspeeded methods using either manual or voice responses in two standard attention paradigms: the cued target discrimination reaction time (RT) paradigm and the unspeeded temporal order judgment (TOJ) task. The comparison of speeded and unspeeded tasks specifically addresses the concern about interpreting RT differences between cued and uncued trials (taken as a proxy for attention) in the context of drastically different baseline RTs. We found significant cuing effects for both tasks (speeded RT and untimed TOJ) and both response types (vocal and manual) giving clinicians and researchers alternative methods with which to measure the effects of attention in different populations who may not be able to perform the standard speeded RT task.

  15. Interlaboratory comparison of real-time pcr protocols for quantification of general fecal indicator bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, O.C.; Sivaganesan, M.; Peed, L.; Kelty, C.A.; Blackwood, A.D.; Greene, M.R.; Noble, R.T.; Bushon, R.N.; Stelzer, E.A.; Kinzelman, J.; Anan'Eva, T.; Sinigalliano, C.; Wanless, D.; Griffith, J.; Cao, Y.; Weisberg, S.; Harwood, V.J.; Staley, C.; Oshima, K.H.; Varma, M.; Haugland, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    The application of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for the rapid identification of fecal bacteria in environmental waters is being considered for use as a national water quality metric in the United States. The transition from research tool to a standardized protocol requires information on the reproducibility and sources of variation associated with qPCR methodology across laboratories. This study examines interlaboratory variability in the measurement of enterococci and Bacteroidales concentrations from standardized, spiked, and environmental sources of DNA using the Entero1a and GenBac3 qPCR methods, respectively. Comparisons are based on data generated from eight different research facilities. Special attention was placed on the influence of the DNA isolation step and effect of simplex and multiplex amplification approaches on interlaboratory variability. Results suggest that a crude lysate is sufficient for DNA isolation unless environmental samples contain substances that can inhibit qPCR amplification. No appreciable difference was observed between simplex and multiplex amplification approaches. Overall, interlaboratory variability levels remained low (<10% coefficient of variation) regardless of qPCR protocol. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  16. The auditory comprehension changes over time after sport-related concussion can indicate multisensory processing dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białuńska, Anita; Salvatore, Anthony P

    2017-12-01

    Although science findings and treatment approaches of a concussion have changed in recent years, there continue to be challenges in understanding the nature of the post-concussion behavior. There is growing a body of evidence that some deficits can be related to an impaired auditory processing. To assess auditory comprehension changes over time following sport-related concussion (SRC) in young athletes. A prospective, repeated measures mixed-design was used. A sample of concussed athletes ( n  = 137) and the control group consisted of age-matched, non-concussed athletes ( n  = 143) were administered Subtest VIII of the Computerized-Revised Token Test (C-RTT). The 88 concussed athletes selected for final analysis (neither previous history of brain injury, neurological, psychiatric problems, nor auditory deficits) were evaluated after injury during three sessions (PC1, PC2, and PC3); controls were tested once. Between- and within-group comparisons using RMANOVA were performed on the C-RTT Efficiency Score (ES). ES of the SRC athletes group improved over consecutive testing sessions ( F  =   14.7, p   2.0, Ps integration and/or motor execution can be compromised after a concussion.

  17. Identifying Time Periods of Minimal Thermal Gradient for Temperature-Driven Structural Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, John; Glisic, Branko

    2018-03-01

    Temperature changes play a large role in the day to day structural behavior of structures, but a smaller direct role in most contemporary Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) analyses. Temperature-Driven SHM will consider temperature as the principal driving force in SHM, relating a measurable input temperature to measurable output generalized strain (strain, curvature, etc.) and generalized displacement (deflection, rotation, etc.) to create three-dimensional signatures descriptive of the structural behavior. Identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient provides the foundation for the formulation of the temperature-deformation-displacement model. Thermal gradients in a structure can cause curvature in multiple directions, as well as non-linear strain and stress distributions within the cross-sections, which significantly complicates data analysis and interpretation, distorts the signatures, and may lead to unreliable conclusions regarding structural behavior and condition. These adverse effects can be minimized if the signatures are evaluated at times when thermal gradients in the structure are minimal. This paper proposes two classes of methods based on the following two metrics: (i) the range of raw temperatures on the structure, and (ii) the distribution of the local thermal gradients, for identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient on a structure with the ability to vary the tolerance of acceptable thermal gradients. The methods are tested and validated with data collected from the Streicker Bridge on campus at Princeton University.

  18. Temperature gradient method for lipid phase diagram construction using time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffrey, M.; Hing, F.S.

    1987-01-01

    A method that enables temperature-composition phase diagram construction at unprecedented rates is described and evaluated. The method involves establishing a known temperature gradient along the length of a metal rod. Samples of different compositions contained in long, thin-walled capillaries are positioned lengthwise on the rod and equilibrated such that the temperature gradient is communicated into the sample. The sample is then moved through a focused, monochromatic synchrotron-derived x-ray beam and the image-intensified diffraction pattern from the sample is recorded on videotape continuously in live-time as a function of position and, thus, temperature. The temperature at which the diffraction pattern changes corresponds to a phase boundary, and the phase(s) existing (coexisting) on either side of the boundary can be identified on the basis of the diffraction pattern. Repeating the measurement on samples covering the entire composition range completes the phase diagram. These additional samples can be conveniently placed at different locations around the perimeter of the cylindrical rod and rotated into position for diffraction measurement. Temperature-composition phase diagrams for the fully hydrated binary mixtures, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC)/dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE)/DPPC, have been constructed using the new temperature gradient method. They agree well with and extend the results obtained by other techniques. In the DPPE/DPPC system structural parameters as a function of temperature in the various phases including the subgel phase are reported. The potential limitations of this steady-state method are discussed

  19. Time domain reflectometry measured moisture content of sewage sludge compost across temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lu; Chen, Tong-Bin; Gao, Ding; Liu, Hong-Tao; Chen, Jun; Zheng, Guo-Di

    2013-01-01

    Time domain reflectometry (TDR) is a prospective measurement technology for moisture content of sewage sludge composting material; however, a significant dependence upon temperature has been observed. The objective of this study was to assess the impacts of temperature upon moisture content measurement and determine if TDR could be used to monitor moisture content in sewage sludge compost across a range of temperatures. We also investigated the combined effects of temperature and conductivity on moisture content measurement. The results revealed that the moisture content of composting material could be determined by TDR using coated probes, even when the measured material had a moisture content of 0.581 cm(3)cm(-3), temperature of 70°C and conductivity of 4.32 mS cm(-1). TDR probes were calibrated as a function of dielectric properties that included temperature effects. When the bulk temperature varied from 20°C to 70°C, composting material with 0.10-0.70 cm(3)cm(-3) moisture content could be measured by TDR using coated probes, and calibrations based on different temperatures minimized the errors. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Time and temperature dependence of cascade induced defect production in in situ experiments and computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori

    1993-01-01

    Understanding of the defect production and annihilation processes in a cascade is important in modelling of radiation damage for establishing irradiation correlation. In situ observation of heavy ion radiation damage has a great prospect in this respect. Time and temperature dependence of formation and annihilation of vacancy clusters in a cascade with a time resolution of 30 ms has been studied with a facility which comprises a heavy ion accelerator and an electron microscope. Formation and annihilation rates of defect clusters have been separately measured by this technique. The observed processes have been analysed by simple kinetic equations, taking into account the sink effect of surface and the defect clusters themselves together with the annihilation process due to thermal emission of vacancies from the defect clusters. Another tool to study time and temperature dependence of defect production in a cascade is computer simulation. Recent results of molecular dynamics calculations on the temperature dependence of cascade evolution are presented, including directional and temperature dependence of the lengths of replacement collision sequences, temperature dependence of the process to reach thermal equilibrium and so on. These results are discussed under general time frame of radiation damage evolution covering from 10 -15 to 10 9 s, and several important issues for the general understanding have been identified. (orig.)

  1. On the zero temperature limit of the Kubo-transformed quantum time correlation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández de la Peña, Lisandro

    2014-04-01

    The zero temperature limit of several quantum time correlation functions is analysed. It is shown that while the canonical quantum time correlation function retains the full dynamical information as temperature approaches zero, the Kubo-transformed and the thermally symmetrised quantum time correlation functions lose all dynamical information at this limit. This is shown to be a consequence of the projection onto the ground state, via the limiting process of the quantities ? and ?, either together as a product, or separately. Although these findings would seem to suggest that finite-temperature methods commonly used to estimate Kubo correlation functions would be incapable of retaining any ground state dynamics, we propose a route for recovering in principle all dynamical information at the ground state. It is first shown that the usual frequency space relation between canonical and Kubo correlation functions also holds for microcanonical time correlation functions. Since the Kubo-transformed microcanonical correlation function can be obtained from the usual finite-temperature function by including a projection onto the corresponding microcanonical ensemble, finite-temperature methods, properly modified to incorporate such a constraint, can be used to capture full quantum dynamics at any arbitrary energy state, including the ground state. This approach is illustrated with the application of centroid dynamics to the ground state dynamics of the harmonic oscillator.

  2. The time of day effects of warm temperature on flowering time involve PIF4 and PIF5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thines, Bryan C.; Duarte, Maritza I.; Harmon, Frank G.

    2014-01-01

    Warm temperature promotes flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana and this response involves multiple signalling pathways. To understand the temporal dynamics of temperature perception, tests were carried out to determine if there was a daily window of enhanced sensitivity to warm temperature (28 °C). Warm temperature applied during daytime, night-time, or continuously elicited earlier flowering, but the effects of each treatment were unequal. Plants exposed to warm night (WN) conditions flowered nearly as early as those in constant warm (CW) conditions, while treatment with warm days (WD) caused later flowering than either WN or CW. Flowering in each condition relied to varying degrees on the activity of CO , FT , PIF4 , and PIF5 , as well as the action of unknown genes. The combination of signalling pathways involved in flowering depended on the time of the temperature cue. WN treatments caused a significant advance in the rhythmic expression waveform of CO, which correlated with pronounced up-regulation of FT expression, while WD caused limited changes in CO expression and no stimulation of FT expression. WN- and WD-induced flowering was partially CO independent and, unexpectedly, dependent on PIF4 and PIF5 . pif4-2, pif5-3, and pif4-2 pif5-3 mutants had delayed flowering under all three warm conditions. The double mutant was also late flowering in control conditions. In addition, WN conditions alone imposed selective changes to PIF4 and PIF5 expression. Thus, the PIF4 and PIF5 transcription factors promote flowering by at least two means: inducing FT expression in WN and acting outside of FT by an unknown mechanism in WD. PMID:24574484

  3. Mask CD relationship to temperature at the time backscatter is received

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zable, Harold; Kronmiller, Tom; Pearman, Ryan; Guthrie, Bill; Shirali, Nagesh; Masuda, Yukihiro; Kamikubo, Takashi; Nakayamada, Noriaki; Fujimura, Aki

    2017-07-01

    Mask writers need to be able to write sub-50nm features accurately. Nano-imprint lithography (NIL) masters need to create sub-20nm line and space (L:S) patterns reliably. Increasingly slower resists are deployed, but mask write times need to remain reasonable. The leading edge EBM-9500 offers 1200A/cm2 current density to shoot variable shaped beam (VSB) to write the masks. Last year, thermal effect correction (TEC) was introduced by NuFlare in the EBM-95001. It is a GPU-accelerated inline correction for the effect that the temperature of the resist has on CD. For example, a 100nm CD may print at 102nm where that area was at a comparably high temperature at the time of the shot. Since thermal effect is a temporal effect, the simulated temperature of the surface of the mask is dynamically updated for the effect of each shot in order to accurately predict the cumulative effect that is the temperature at the location of the shot at the time of the shot and therefore its impact on CD. The shot dose is changed to reverse the effects of the temperature change. This paper for the first time reveals an enhancement to this thermal model and a simulator for it. It turns out that the temperature at the time each location receives backscatter from other shots also make a difference to the CD. The effect is secondary, but still measurable for some resists and substrates. Results of a test-chip study will be presented. The computation required for the backscatter effect is substantial. It has been demonstrated that this calculation can be performed fast enough to be inline with the EBM-9500 with a reasonable-sized computing platform. Run-time results and the computing architecture will be presented.

  4. Using Overall Equipment Effectiveness indicator to measure the level of planned production time usage of sewing machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Krynke

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The chapter presents the results of utilization of the OEE indicator to measure the level of operating time usage of sewing machine production of air bags. The idea of an OEE indictor, which is a key metrics in Total Productive Maintenance (TPM program, is presented. The goals and benefits of its calculation are included. The research object – KL 110 air bags sewing machine - what for the machine is used. The calculation of TPM indicators for the analysed machine is presented. The calculation of TPM indicators was undertaken over a period of six months of the machine’s working time. It was indicated that the overall effectiveness of the machine is at a level of 65,7%, the time losses were 34,3%. Most of the losses were related to low performance. Only Availability indicator reaches a word class level, if other indicators such as Performance, Quality and OEE should be improved, their value should be increased. Activities to improve the effectiveness of the machine utilization were determined.

  5. Temperature and entropy of Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2003-01-01

    In the light of recent interest in quantum gravity in de Sitter space, we investigate semiclassical aspects of four-dimensional Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time using the method of complex paths. The standard semiclassical techniques (such as Bogoliubov coefficients and Euclidean field theory) have been useful to study quantum effects in space-times with single horizons; however, none of these approaches seem to work for Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time or, in general, for space-times with multiple horizons. We extend the method of complex paths to space-times with multiple horizons and obtain the spectrum of particles produced in these space-times. We show that the temperature of radiation in these space-times is proportional to the effective surface gravity--the inverse harmonic sum of surface gravity of each horizon. For the Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time, we apply the method of complex paths to three different coordinate systems--spherically symmetric, Painleve, and Lemaitre. We show that the equilibrium temperature in Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time is the harmonic mean of cosmological and event horizon temperatures. We obtain Bogoliubov coefficients for space-times with multiple horizons by analyzing the mode functions of the quantum fields near the horizons. We propose a new definition of entropy for space-times with multiple horizons, analogous to the entropic definition for space-times with a single horizon. We define entropy for these space-times to be inversely proportional to the square of the effective surface gravity. We show that this definition of entropy for Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time satisfies the D-bound conjecture

  6. Influence of time presetting procedure for rapid local heat;.ng on brazing temperature conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lezhnin, G.P.; Tul'skikh, V.E.

    1985-01-01

    Correlation of known and suggested presetting procedures for heating period during induction brazing was conducted. It is shown that brazing time must be established considering heat propagation during heating in order to obtain the assigned joint temperature regardless of heating rate change. Methods for temperature calculation in assigned zones of the joint are suggested. The suggested presetting procedure for heating time was applied for induction vacuum brazing of a tube of 12Kh18N10T steel to a pipe connection of VT20 alloy

  7. Phyocyanin extraction from microalgae Spirulina platensis assisted by ultrasound irradiation: effect of time and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadiyanto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed to extract phycocyanin from microalgae Spirulina platensis using an extraction assisted by ultrasound irradiation. The extraction was conducted by using variable of extraction time, temperature and ultrasound frequency, while ethanol was used as solvent. The results show that the yield of phycocyanin extract was 15.97% at constant frequency of 42 kHz and 11.24% at constant frequency of 28 kHz, while the soxhlet extraction method obtained yield at 11.13%. The ultrasound could reduce the extraction time from 4 hrs (conventional to 20 minutes, while the optimum temperature of extraction was found at 55°C.

  8. Effect of ageing time and temperature on corrosion behaviour of aluminum alloy 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadpale, Vikas; Banjare, Pragya N.; Manoj, Manoranjan Kumar

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of corrosion behaviour of aluminium alloy 2014 were studied by potentiodynamic polarization in 1 mole of NaCl solution of aged sample. The experimental testing results concluded that, corrosion resistance of Aluminum alloy 2014 degraded with the increasing the temperature (150°C & 200°C) and time of ageing. Corroded surface of the aged specimens was tested under optical microscopes for microstructures for phase analysis. Optical micrographs of corroded surfaces showed general corrosion and pitting corrosion. The corrosion resistance of lower ageing temperature and lower ageing time is higher because of its fine distribution of precipitates in matrix phase.

  9. A Statistical Method to Predict Flow Permanence in Dryland Streams from Time Series of Stream Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Arismendi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent and ephemeral streams represent more than half of the length of the global river network. Dryland freshwater ecosystems are especially vulnerable to changes in human-related water uses as well as shifts in terrestrial climates. Yet, the description and quantification of patterns of flow permanence in these systems is challenging mostly due to difficulties in instrumentation. Here, we took advantage of existing stream temperature datasets in dryland streams in the northwest Great Basin desert, USA, to extract critical information on climate-sensitive patterns of flow permanence. We used a signal detection technique, Hidden Markov Models (HMMs, to extract information from daily time series of stream temperature to diagnose patterns of stream drying. Specifically, we applied HMMs to time series of daily standard deviation (SD of stream temperature (i.e., dry stream channels typically display highly variable daily temperature records compared to wet stream channels between April and August (2015–2016. We used information from paired stream and air temperature data loggers as well as co-located stream temperature data loggers with electrical resistors as confirmatory sources of the timing of stream drying. We expanded our approach to an entire stream network to illustrate the utility of the method to detect patterns of flow permanence over a broader spatial extent. We successfully identified and separated signals characteristic of wet and dry stream conditions and their shifts over time. Most of our study sites within the entire stream network exhibited a single state over the entire season (80%, but a portion of them showed one or more shifts among states (17%. We provide recommendations to use this approach based on a series of simple steps. Our findings illustrate a successful method that can be used to rigorously quantify flow permanence regimes in streams using existing records of stream temperature.

  10. A statistical method to predict flow permanence in dryland streams from time series of stream temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arismendi, Ivan; Dunham, Jason B.; Heck, Michael; Schultz, Luke; Hockman-Wert, David

    2017-01-01

    Intermittent and ephemeral streams represent more than half of the length of the global river network. Dryland freshwater ecosystems are especially vulnerable to changes in human-related water uses as well as shifts in terrestrial climates. Yet, the description and quantification of patterns of flow permanence in these systems is challenging mostly due to difficulties in instrumentation. Here, we took advantage of existing stream temperature datasets in dryland streams in the northwest Great Basin desert, USA, to extract critical information on climate-sensitive patterns of flow permanence. We used a signal detection technique, Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), to extract information from daily time series of stream temperature to diagnose patterns of stream drying. Specifically, we applied HMMs to time series of daily standard deviation (SD) of stream temperature (i.e., dry stream channels typically display highly variable daily temperature records compared to wet stream channels) between April and August (2015–2016). We used information from paired stream and air temperature data loggers as well as co-located stream temperature data loggers with electrical resistors as confirmatory sources of the timing of stream drying. We expanded our approach to an entire stream network to illustrate the utility of the method to detect patterns of flow permanence over a broader spatial extent. We successfully identified and separated signals characteristic of wet and dry stream conditions and their shifts over time. Most of our study sites within the entire stream network exhibited a single state over the entire season (80%), but a portion of them showed one or more shifts among states (17%). We provide recommendations to use this approach based on a series of simple steps. Our findings illustrate a successful method that can be used to rigorously quantify flow permanence regimes in streams using existing records of stream temperature.

  11. Analytical model based on cohesive energy to indicate the edge and corner effects on melting temperature of metallic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shidpour, Reza; Hamid, Delavari H.; Vossoughi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The effect of edge and corner atoms of nanoparticle (solid line) cause melting temperature drops more compared to considering them as same as only surface atoms (dash line). This reduction is significant especially when the size of nanoparticle is below 10 nm. - Abstract: An analytical model based on cohesive energy has been conducted to study the effects of edge, corner, and inward surface relaxation as varying parameters on melting temperature of nanoparticles. It is shown that taking into account the edge and corner (EC) atoms of nanoparticle, causes to drop melting temperature more, when compared to consider them the same as only surface atoms. This reduction is significant especially when the size of nanoparticle is below 10 nm. The results are supported by available experimental results of tin, lead and gold melting temperature (T m ). Finally, it is shown that inward relaxation increases melting temperature slightly.

  12. Effect of timing of subcutaneous meloxicam administration on indicators of pain after knife castration of weaned calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez, D M; Marti, S; Pajor, E A; Moya, D; Gellatly, D; Janzen, E D; Schwartzkopf-Genswein, K S

    2017-12-01

    The newly revised Canadian Codes of Practice for the management of beef cattle requires that as of 2018, calves older than 6 mo of age be castrated using pain control. Castration is a husbandry procedure commonly done without pain control, and there is a lack of agreement on an effective pain mitigation strategy specific to castration. The aim of this study was to identify the optimal time of administration of meloxicam prior to castration. Thirty-four Angus and Angus crossbred bull calves (282 ± 28.0 kg BW) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments receiving a single s.c. injection of meloxicam (0.5 mg/kg BW): 6 h (6H; = 11), 3 h (3H; = 12), or immediately (0H; = 11) before knife castration. Measurements included visual analog scale (VAS), head movement (HM), accelerometer movement (AM) and strain gauge exertion force (EF) on the squeeze chute, stride length (SL), lying and standing behavior, salivary cortisol (SC), haptoglobin, serum amyloid A (SAA), substance P (SP), and scrotal temperature (ST). Samples were collected on d -7, -5, -2, -1, and immediately before castration (T0) and 30, 60, 120, and 240 min and 1, 2, 5, 7, 14, 21, and 28 d after castration, except for VAS, AM, EF, and HM, which were obtained at the time of castration. A time × treatment effect ( = 0.01) was observed for SP, where 0H had lower concentrations than 3H and 6H calves 1 d after castration, whereas 3H calves tended to have greater levels than 6H calves 5 d after castration. Mean ST was greater ( castration, whereas 6H and 3H calves had greater ST compared to 0H calves 240 min after castration. On d 1 after castration, 6H calves had greater ST than 0H and 3H calves, whereas 0H calves had greater ST compared to 3H and 6H calves on d 28 after castration. The SL tended ( = 0.09) to be shorter in 3H and 6H calves than 0H calves 30, 60, 120, and 240 min after castration. Number of peaks from the AM between 2 and 3 SD above or below the mean were greater ( = 0.03) in 3H and 6H calves than

  13. APPLICATION OF SOFT COMPUTING TECHNIQUES FOR PREDICTING COOLING TIME REQUIRED DROPPING INITIAL TEMPERATURE OF MASS CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Bhattarai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Minimizing the thermal cracks in mass concrete at an early age can be achieved by removing the hydration heat as quickly as possible within initial cooling period before the next lift is placed. Recognizing the time needed to remove hydration heat within initial cooling period helps to take an effective and efficient decision on temperature control plan in advance. Thermal properties of concrete, water cooling parameters and construction parameter are the most influencing factors involved in the process and the relationship between these parameters are non-linear in a pattern, complicated and not understood well. Some attempts had been made to understand and formulate the relationship taking account of thermal properties of concrete and cooling water parameters. Thus, in this study, an effort have been made to formulate the relationship for the same taking account of thermal properties of concrete, water cooling parameters and construction parameter, with the help of two soft computing techniques namely: Genetic programming (GP software “Eureqa” and Artificial Neural Network (ANN. Relationships were developed from the data available from recently constructed high concrete double curvature arch dam. The value of R for the relationship between the predicted and real cooling time from GP and ANN model is 0.8822 and 0.9146 respectively. Relative impact on target parameter due to input parameters was evaluated through sensitivity analysis and the results reveal that, construction parameter influence the target parameter significantly. Furthermore, during the testing phase of proposed models with an independent set of data, the absolute and relative errors were significantly low, which indicates the prediction power of the employed soft computing techniques deemed satisfactory as compared to the measured data.

  14. TIME-TEMPERATURE-TRANSFORMATION DIAGRAMS FOR THE SLUDGE BATCH 3 - FRIT 418 GLASS SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billings, A.; Edwards, Tommy

    2009-01-01

    As a part of the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms defined by the Department of Energy - Office of Environmental Management, the phase stability must be determined for each of the projected high-level waste (HLW) types at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Specifically, WAPS 1.4.1 requires the glass transition temperature (Tg) to be defined and time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagrams to be developed. The Tg of a glass is an indicator of the approximate temperature where the supercooled liquid converts to a solid on cooling or conversely, where the solid begins to behave as a viscoelastic solid on heating. A TTT diagram identifies the crystalline phases that can form as a function of time and temperature for a given waste type or more specifically, the borosilicate glass waste form. In order to assess durability, the Product Consistency Test (PCT) was used and the durability results compared to the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. The measurement of glass transition temperature and the development of TTT diagrams have already been performed for the seven Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) projected compositions as defined in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP). These measurements were performed before DWPF start-up and the results were incorporated in Volume 7 of the Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). Additional information exists for other projected compositions, but overall these compositions did not consider some of the processing scenarios now envisioned for DWPF to accelerate throughput. Changes in DWPF processing strategy have required this WAPS specification to be revisited to ensure that the resulting phases have been bounded. Frit 418 was primarily used to process HLW Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) at 38% waste loading (WL) through the DWPF. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) fabricated a cache of glass from reagent grade oxides to simulate the SB3-Frit 418 system at a 38 wt % WL for glass

  15. A Real-Time Temperature Data Transmission Approach for Intelligent Cooling Control of Mass Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of the study presented in this paper is to propose a real-time temperature data transmission approach for intelligent cooling control of mass concrete. A mathematical description of a digital temperature control model is introduced in detail. Based on pipe mounted and electrically linked temperature sensors, together with postdata handling hardware and software, a stable, real-time, highly effective temperature data transmission solution technique is developed and utilized within the intelligent mass concrete cooling control system. Once the user has issued the relevant command, the proposed programmable logic controllers (PLC code performs all necessary steps without further interaction. The code can control the hardware, obtain, read, and perform calculations, and display the data accurately. Hardening concrete is an aggregate of complex physicochemical processes including the liberation of heat. The proposed control system prevented unwanted structural change within the massive concrete blocks caused by these exothermic processes based on an application case study analysis. In conclusion, the proposed temperature data transmission approach has proved very useful for the temperature monitoring of a high arch dam and is able to control thermal stresses in mass concrete for similar projects involving mass concrete.

  16. Interactions between particulate air pollution and temperature in air pollution mortality time series studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Steven

    2004-01-01

    In many community time series studies on the effect of particulate air pollution on mortality, particulate air pollution is modeled additively. In this study, we investigated the interaction between daily particulate air pollution and daily mean temperature in Cook County, Illinois and Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, using data for the period 1987-1994. This was done through the use of joint particulate air pollution-temperature response surfaces and by stratifying the effect of particulate air pollution on mortality by temperature. Evidence that the effect of particulate air pollution on mortality may depend on temperature is found. However, the results were sensitive to the number of degrees of freedom used in the confounder adjustments, the particulate air pollution exposure measure, and how the effects of temperature on mortality are modeled. The results were less sensitive to the estimation method used--generalized linear models and natural cubic splines or generalized additive models and smoothing splines. The results of this study suggest that in community particulate air pollution mortality time series studies the possibility of an interaction between daily particulate air pollution and daily mean temperature should be considered

  17. Meteorological Reference Years of Daily Mean Temperature during the Slighting Time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchante Jimenez, M.; Ramirez Santigosa, L.; Navarro Fernandez, A.; Mora Lopez, L.; Sidrach de Cardona Ortin, M.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the characterization of the daily mean temperature during the sunlight time has been analyzed. An algorithm for the hourly series generation from extreme daily values has been applied to evaluate the daily mean temperature during the sunlight time. A generic algorithm has been enhanced as a function of the sunrise time. This algorithm allows taking into account the fractions related to the sunrise and sunset hours. This methodology has been applied in data from 45 Spanish stations, uniformly distributed in the Iberian Peninsula. Data for a period of 14 years has been used in most of locations, and once the interest variable has been calculated, the meteorological reference year of the daily mean temperature during the sunlight time has been evaluated in each stations. The next step is the evaluation of the daily mean temperature during the sunlight time in any point into the zone of evaluation, not only in the measured stations. From the result data in each measured station, an geographic information system has been used in order to calculate the interpolation, obtaining maps with a data each 5 km. for each of the 365 days of the year. Then, this results can be superposed with the solar radiation evaluation obtaining the input data for the sizing of the photovoltaic grid connected system in any point of the Spanish geography. (Author) 64 refs

  18. LITERATURE REVIEW OF PUO2 CALCINATION TIME AND TEMPERATURE DATA FOR SPECIFIC SURFACE AREA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, G.

    2012-03-06

    The literature has been reviewed in December 2011 for calcination data of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) from plutonium oxalate Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} precipitation with respect to the PuO{sub 2} specific surface area (SSA). A summary of the literature is presented for what are believed to be the dominant factors influencing SSA, the calcination temperature and time. The PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} calcination data from this review has been regressed to better understand the influence of calcination temperature and time on SSA. Based on this literature review data set, calcination temperature has a bigger impact on SSA versus time. However, there is still some variance in this data set that may be reflecting differences in the plutonium oxalate preparation or different calcination techniques. It is evident from this review that additional calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} needs to be collected and evaluated to better define the relationship. The existing data set has a lot of calcination times that are about 2 hours and therefore may be underestimating the impact of heating time on SSA. SRNL recommends that more calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} be collected and this literature review data set be augmented to better refine the relationship between PuO{sub 2} SSA and its calcination parameters.

  19. Concentration of Umami Compounds in Pork Meat and Cooking Juice with Different Cooking Times and Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotola-Pukkila, Minna K; Pihlajaviita, Seija T; Kaimainen, Mika T; Hopia, Anu I

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the concentrations of umami compounds in pork loins cooked at 3 different temperatures and 3 different lengths of cooking times. The pork loins were cooked with the sous vide technique. The free amino acids (FAAs), glutamic acid and aspartic acid; the 5'-nucleotides, inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP) and adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP); and corresponding nucleoside inosine of the cooked meat and its released juice were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Under the experimental conditions used, the cooking temperature played a more important role than the cooking time in the concentration of the analyzed compounds. The amino acid concentrations in the meat did not remain constant under these experimental conditions. The most notable effect observed was that of the cooking temperature and the higher amino acid concentrations in the released juice of meat cooked at 80 °C compared with 60 and 70 °C. This is most likely due to the heat induced hydrolysis of proteins and peptides releasing water soluble FAAs from the meat into the cooking juice. In this experiment, the cooking time and temperature had no influence on the IMP concentrations observed. However, the AMP concentrations increased with the increasing temperature and time. This suggests that the choice of time and temperature in sous vide cooking affects the nucleotide concentration of pork meat. The Sous vide technique proved to be a good technique to preserve the cooking juice and the results presented here show that cooking juice is rich in umami compounds, which can be used to provide a savory or brothy taste. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Time trends in minimum mortality temperatures in Castile-La Mancha (Central Spain): 1975-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Isidro J.; Criado-Alvarez, Juan José; Diaz, Julio; Linares, Cristina; Mayoral, Sheila; Montero, Juan Carlos

    2008-03-01

    The relationship between air temperature and human mortality is described as non-linear, with mortality tending to rise in response to increasingly hot or cold ambient temperatures from a given minimum mortality or optimal comfort temperature, which varies from some areas to others according to their climatic and socio-demographic characteristics. Changes in these characteristics within any specific region could modify this relationship. This study sought to examine the time trend in the maximum temperature of minimum organic-cause mortality in Castile-La Mancha, from 1975 to 2003. The analysis was performed by using daily series of maximum temperatures and organic-cause mortality rates grouped into three decades (1975-1984, 1985-1994, 1995-2003) to compare confidence intervals ( p ARIMA models (Box-Jenkins) and cross-correlation functions (CCF) at seven lags. We observed a significant decrease in comfort temperature (from 34.2°C to 27.8°C) between the first two decades in the Province of Toledo, along with a growing number of significant lags in the summer CFF (1, 3 and 5, respectively). The fall in comfort temperature is attributable to the increase in the effects of heat on mortality, due, in all likelihood, to the percentage increase in the elderly population.

  1. Relaxation Behavior by Time-Salt and Time-Temperature Superpositions of Polyelectrolyte Complexes from Coacervate to Precipitate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samim Ali

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Complexation between anionic and cationic polyelectrolytes results in solid-like precipitates or liquid-like coacervate depending on the added salt in the aqueous medium. However, the boundary between these polymer-rich phases is quite broad and the associated changes in the polymer relaxation in the complexes across the transition regime are poorly understood. In this work, the relaxation dynamics of complexes across this transition is probed over a wide timescale by measuring viscoelastic spectra and zero-shear viscosities at varying temperatures and salt concentrations for two different salt types. We find that the complexes exhibit time-temperature superposition (TTS at all salt concentrations, while the range of overlapped-frequencies for time-temperature-salt superposition (TTSS strongly depends on the salt concentration (Cs and gradually shifts to higher frequencies as Cs is decreased. The sticky-Rouse model describes the relaxation behavior at all Cs. However, collective relaxation of polyelectrolyte complexes gradually approaches a rubbery regime and eventually exhibits a gel-like response as Cs is decreased and limits the validity of TTSS.

  2. Ichthyoplankton Time Series: A Potential Ocean Observing Network to Provide Indicators of Climate Impacts on Fish Communities along the West Coast of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koslow, J. A.; Brodeur, R.; Duffy-Anderson, J. T.; Perry, I.; jimenez Rosenberg, S.; Aceves, G.

    2016-02-01

    Ichthyoplankton time series available from the Bering Sea, Gulf of Alaska and California Current (Oregon to Baja California) provide a potential ocean observing network to assess climate impacts on fish communities along the west coast of North America. Larval fish abundance reflects spawning stock biomass, so these data sets provide indicators of the status of a broad range of exploited and unexploited fish populations. Analyses to date have focused on individual time series, which generally exhibit significant change in relation to climate. Off California, a suite of 24 midwater fish taxa have declined > 60%, correlated with declining midwater oxygen concentrations, and overall larval fish abundance has declined 72% since 1969, a trend based on the decline of predominantly cool-water affinity taxa in response to warming ocean temperatures. Off Oregon, there were dramatic differences in community structure and abundance of larval fishes between warm and cool ocean conditions. Midwater deoxygenation and warming sea surface temperature trends are predicted to continue as a result of global climate change. US, Canadian, and Mexican fishery scientists are now collaborating in a virtual ocean observing network to synthesize available ichthyoplankton time series and compare patterns of change in relation to climate. This will provide regional indicators of populations and groups of taxa sensitive to warming, deoxygenation and potentially other stressors, establish the relevant scales of coherence among sub-regions and across Large Marine Ecosystems, and provide the basis for predicting future climate change impacts on these ecosystems.

  3. Short-time, high temperature mechanical testing of electrically conductive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marion, R.H.; Karnes, C.H.

    1975-10-01

    Design and performance details are given for a facility which was developed to obtain the mechanical properties of materials under high heating rate or transient temperature conditions and medium strain rates. The system is shown to be applicable to materials possessing electrical resistivities ranging from that of aluminum to that of graphite without taxing the heating capability. Heating rates as high as 2000 0 K/s in graphite are attained under controlled conditions. Methods of measuring temperature and the effects of expected temperature distributions are discussed. A method for measuring strain valid for transient temperature conditions to 3000 0 K is described. Results are presented for the stress-strain behavior of 316 stainless steel and ATJ(S) graphite obtained for heating times of a few seconds. (auth)

  4. INVESTIGATIONS INTO THE INFLUENCE OF GRAPHITIZATION-TIME AND -TEMPERATURE ON THE ASH CONTENT OF ELECTROGRAPHITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wege, E

    1963-06-15

    The de-ashing of carbon bodies at higher temperatures was found to be relatively speedy procedure. Under equal conditions, after equal time perrods, the ratio between momentary ash content and original ash content is constant, low final ash content means low original ash content. Since the ash content of the packing dust affects the graphitization system, it seemed possible to increase the de-ashing rate by the use of purex packrng dust, or to decrease the de-ashing rate by the use of impure packing dust. Since the de-ashing speed is dependent on the temperature, small differences in the effective temperature will affect the ash content considerably. Thus, in order to prevent large differences in the final product as far as the ash content is concerned, it is suggested that the most uniform furnace temperatures be ensured. (P.C.H.)

  5. Identifying Time Periods of Minimal Thermal Gradient for Temperature-Driven Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Reilly

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Temperature changes play a large role in the day to day structural behavior of structures, but a smaller direct role in most contemporary Structural Health Monitoring (SHM analyses. Temperature-Driven SHM will consider temperature as the principal driving force in SHM, relating a measurable input temperature to measurable output generalized strain (strain, curvature, etc. and generalized displacement (deflection, rotation, etc. to create three-dimensional signatures descriptive of the structural behavior. Identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient provides the foundation for the formulation of the temperature–deformation–displacement model. Thermal gradients in a structure can cause curvature in multiple directions, as well as non-linear strain and stress distributions within the cross-sections, which significantly complicates data analysis and interpretation, distorts the signatures, and may lead to unreliable conclusions regarding structural behavior and condition. These adverse effects can be minimized if the signatures are evaluated at times when thermal gradients in the structure are minimal. This paper proposes two classes of methods based on the following two metrics: (i the range of raw temperatures on the structure, and (ii the distribution of the local thermal gradients, for identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient on a structure with the ability to vary the tolerance of acceptable thermal gradients. The methods are tested and validated with data collected from the Streicker Bridge on campus at Princeton University.

  6. Time-temperature relationships for hyperthermal radiosensitisation in mouse intestine: influence of thermotolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hume, S.P.; Marigold, J.C.L.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal enhancement of radiation injury to the crypt compartment of mouse small intestinal mucosa has been measured as a function of heating time for temperatures in the range 41.0-44.0 0 C. All the hyperthermal treatments used were themselves subthreshold for gross tissue injury. With this limitation, thermoradiosensitisation increased linearly with duration of hyperthermia for temperatures in the range 42.3-44.0 0 C. Using temperatures below 42.0 0 C, there was a saturation in effect for treatments longer than approximately 40-90 min. For temperatures above the transition, a 1 0 C change was equivalent to a factor of 2.6 in heating time; below the transition, a 1 0 C change was equivalent to a factor of 5.4. Time-temperature relationships for thermoradiosensitisation in other rodent tissues are reviewed and compared with the general relationships for direct thermal injury, previously derived from experimental studies. The results are discussed with relevance to the interpretation of in vivo thermal enhancement of radiation injury. (Auth.)

  7. Real-time reactor coolant system pressure/temperature limit system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, D.G.; Schemmel, R.R.; Van Scooter, W.E. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an system, used in controlling the operating of a nuclear reactor coolant system, which automatically calculates and displays allowable reactor coolant system pressure/temperature limits within the nuclear reactor coolant system based upon real-time inputs. It comprises: means for producing signals representative of real-time operating parameters of the nuclear reactor cooling system; means for developing pressure and temperature limits relating the real-time operating parameters of the nuclear reactor coolant system, for normal and emergency operation thereof; means for processing the signals representative of real-time operating parameters of the nuclear reactor coolant system to perform calculations of a best estimate of signals, check manual inputs against permissible valves and test data acquisition hardware for validity and over/under range; and means for comparing the representative signals with limits for the real-time operating parameters to produce a signal for a real-time display of the pressure and temperature limits and of the real-time operating parameters use an operator in controlling the operation of the nuclear reactor coolant system

  8. Trend analysis of air temperature and precipitation time series over Greece: 1955-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marougianni, G.; Melas, D.; Kioutsioukis, I.; Feidas, H.; Zanis, P.; Anandranistakis, E.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a database of air temperature and precipitation time series from the network of Hellenic National Meteorological Service has been developed in the framework of the project GEOCLIMA, co-financed by the European Union and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Competitiveness and Entrepreneurship" of the Research Funding Program COOPERATION 2009. Initially, a quality test was applied to the raw data and then missing observations have been imputed with a regularized, spatial-temporal expectation - maximization algorithm to complete the climatic record. Next, a quantile - matching algorithm was applied in order to verify the homogeneity of the data. The processed time series were used for the calculation of temporal annual and seasonal trends of air temperature and precipitation. Monthly maximum and minimum surface air temperature and precipitation means at all available stations in Greece were analyzed for temporal trends and spatial variation patterns for the longest common time period of homogenous data (1955 - 2010), applying the Mann-Kendall test. The majority of the examined stations showed a significant increase in the summer maximum and minimum temperatures; this could be possibly physically linked to the Etesian winds, because of the less frequent expansion of the low over the southeastern Mediterranean. Summer minimum temperatures have been increasing at a faster rate than that of summer maximum temperatures, reflecting an asymmetric change of extreme temperature distributions. Total annual precipitation has been significantly decreased at the stations located in western Greece, as well as in the southeast, while the remaining areas exhibit a non-significant negative trend. This reduction is very likely linked to the positive phase of the NAO that resulted in an increase in the frequency and persistence of anticyclones over the Mediterranean.

  9. A linearization time-domain CMOS smart temperature sensor using a curvature compensation oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Chen, Hao-Wen

    2013-08-28

    This paper presents an area-efficient time-domain CMOS smart temperature sensor using a curvature compensation oscillator for linearity enhancement with a -40 to 120 °C temperature range operability. The inverter-based smart temperature sensors can substantially reduce the cost and circuit complexity of integrated temperature sensors. However, a large curvature exists on the temperature-to-time transfer curve of the inverter-based delay line and results in poor linearity of the sensor output. For cost reduction and error improvement, a temperature-to-pulse generator composed of a ring oscillator and a time amplifier was used to generate a thermal sensing pulse with a sufficient width proportional to the absolute temperature (PTAT). Then, a simple but effective on-chip curvature compensation oscillator is proposed to simultaneously count and compensate the PTAT pulse with curvature for linearization. With such a simple structure, the proposed sensor possesses an extremely small area of 0.07 mm2 in a TSMC 0.35-mm CMOS 2P4M digital process. By using an oscillator-based scheme design, the proposed sensor achieves a fine resolution of 0.045 °C without significantly increasing the circuit area. With the curvature compensation, the inaccuracy of -1.2 to 0.2 °C is achieved in an operation range of -40 to 120 °C after two-point calibration for 14 packaged chips. The power consumption is measured as 23 mW at a sample rate of 10 samples/s.

  10. Decay Of Bacterial Pathogens, Fecal Indicators, And Real-Time Quantitative PCR Genetic Markers In Manure-Amended Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined persistence and decay of bacterial pathogens, fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), and emerging real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) genetic markers for rapid detection of fecal pollution in manure-amended agricultural soils. Known concentrations of transformed green...

  11. Decay Of Bacterial Pathogen, Fecal Indicators, And Real-Time Quantitative PCR Genetic Markers In Manure Amended Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined persistence and decay of bacterial pathogens, fecal indicator bacteria, and emerging real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) genetic markers for rapid detection of fecal pollution in manre-amended agricultural soils. Known concentrations of transformed green fluore...

  12. Determination of new time-temperature-transformation diagrams for lead-calcium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, F.; Lambertin, M. [Arts et Metiers Paristech, LaBoMaP, ENSAM, Rue porte de Paris, 71250 Cluny (France); Delfaut-Durut, L. [CEA, centre de Valduc [SEMP, LECM], 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Maitre, A. [SPCTS, UFR Sciences et techniques, 87060 Limoges (France); Vilasi, M. [LCSM, Universite Nancy I, 54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)

    2008-12-01

    The Pb-Ca is an age hardening alloy that allows for an increase in the hardness compared to pure lead. The hardening is obtained after different successive ageing transformations. In addition, this hardening is followed by an overageing which induces a softening. The ageing and overageing transformation mechanisms are now well identified in lead-calcium alloys. In this paper, we propose to represent the domain of stability of each transformation via time-temperature-transformation diagrams for a calcium concentration from 600 to 1280 ppm and in a range of temperatures from -20 to 180 C. These diagrams are constructed with the data obtained by in situ ageing with metallographic observations, hardness and electrical resistance measurements. The specificities of lead-calcium such as its fast ageing at ambient temperature and its overageing over time required the design of specific devices to be able to identify the characteristics of these alloys. (author)

  13. Zeta-function regularization approach to finite temperature effects in Kaluza-Klein space-times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bytsenko, A.A.; Vanzo, L.; Zerbini, S.

    1992-01-01

    In the framework of heat-kernel approach to zeta-function regularization, in this paper the one-loop effective potential at finite temperature for scalar and spinor fields on Kaluza-Klein space-time of the form M p x M c n , where M p is p-dimensional Minkowski space-time is evaluated. In particular, when the compact manifold is M c n = H n /Γ, the Selberg tracer formula associated with discrete torsion-free group Γ of the n-dimensional Lobachevsky space H n is used. An explicit representation for the thermodynamic potential valid for arbitrary temperature is found. As a result a complete high temperature expansion is presented and the roles of zero modes and topological contributions is discussed

  14. Determination of time constants of reactor pressure and temperature sensors: the dynamic data system method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.M.; Hsu, M.C.; Chow, M.C.

    1979-01-01

    A new modeling technique is introduced for on-line sensor time constant identification, both for the resistance temperature detector (RTD) and for the pressure sensor using power plant operational data. The sensor's time constant is estimated from a real characteristic root of the fitted autoregressive moving average model. The RTD's time constant values were identified to be 8.4 s, with a standard deviation of 1.2 s. The pressure sensor time constant was identified to be 28.6 ms, with a standard deviation of 3.5 ms

  15. Quantum dynamics at finite temperature: Time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christov, Ivan P., E-mail: ivan.christov@phys.uni-sofia.bg

    2016-08-15

    In this work we investigate the ground state and the dissipative quantum dynamics of interacting charged particles in an external potential at finite temperature. The recently devised time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo (TDQMC) method allows a self-consistent treatment of the system of particles together with bath oscillators first for imaginary-time propagation of Schrödinger type of equations where both the system and the bath converge to their finite temperature ground state, and next for real time calculation where the dissipative dynamics is demonstrated. In that context the application of TDQMC appears as promising alternative to the path-integral related techniques where the real time propagation can be a challenge.

  16. Analysis of Temperature and Wind Measurements from the TIMED Mission: Comparison with UARS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Frank; Mayr, Hans; Killeen, Tim; Russell, Jim; Reber, Skip

    2004-01-01

    We report on an analysis of temperature and wind data based respectively on measurements with the SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) and TIDI (TIMED Doppler Interferometer) instruments on the TIMED (Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Energetics and Dynamics) mission. Comparisons are made with corresponding results obtained from the HRDI (High Resolution Doppler Imager), MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) and CLAES (Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer) instruments on the UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) spacecraft. The TIMED and UARS instruments have important common and uncommon properties in their sampling of the data as a function local solar time. For comparison between the data from the two satellite missions, we present the derived diurnal tidal and zonal-mean variations of temperature and winds, obtained as functions of season, latitude, and altitude. The observations are also compared with results from the Numerical Spectral Model (NSM).

  17. On-line measurements of response time of temperature and pressure sensors in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    A review of modern techniques for in-situ response time testing of resistance temperature detectors (RTDs), and pressure, level and flow transmitters is presented. These techniques have been developed and validated for use in pressurized and boiling water reactors. The significance of the modern techniques is that they permit testing of installed sensors at process operating conditions and thereby provide the actual in-service response times of the sensors. (author)

  18. Compositional and Mechanical Properties of Peanuts Roasted to Equivalent Colors using Different Time/Temperature Combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peanuts in North America and Europe are primarily consumed after dry roasting. Standard industry practice is to roast peanuts to a specific surface color (Hunter L-value) for a given application; however, equivalent surface colors can be attained using different roast temperature/time combinations,...

  19. High day- and night-time temperatures affect grain growth dynamics in contrasting rice genotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, Wanju; Yin, Xinyou; Struik, Paul C.; Solis, Celymar; Xie, Fangming; Schmidt, Ralf C.; Huang, Min; Zou, Yingbin; Ye, Changrong; Jagadish, S.V.K.

    2017-01-01

    Rice grain yield and quality are predicted to be highly vulnerable to global warming. Five genotypes including heat-tolerant and susceptible checks, a heat-tolerant near-isogenic line and two hybrids were exposed to control (31 °C/23 °C, day/night), high night-time temperature (HNT; 31 °C/30 °C),

  20. Volatile compound profile of sous-vide cooked lamb loins at different temperature-time combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, Mar; Ruiz, Jorge; Del Pulgar, José Sánchez; Pérez-Palacios, Trinidad; Antequera, Teresa

    2015-02-01

    Lamb loins were subjected to sous-vide cooking at different combinations of temperature (60 and 80°C) and time (6 and 24h) to assess the effect on the volatile compound profile. Major chemical families in cooked samples were aliphatic hydrocarbons and aldehydes. The volatile compound profile in sous-vide cooked lamb loin was affected by the cooking temperature and time. Volatile compounds arising from lipid oxidation presented a high abundance in samples cooked at low or moderate cooking conditions (60°C for 6 and 24h, 80°C for 6h), while a more intense time and temperature combination (80°C for 24h) resulted on a higher concentration of volatile compounds arising from Strecker degradations of amino acids, as 2-methylpropanal and 3-methylbutanal. Therefore, sous-vide cooking at moderately high temperatures for long times would result in the formation of a stronger meaty flavor and roast notes in lamb meat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Optimizing headspace sampling temperature and time for analysis of volatile oxidation products in fish oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørbæk, Karen; Jensen, Benny

    1997-01-01

    Headspace-gas chromatography (HS-GC), based on adsorption to Tenax GR(R), thermal desorption and GC, has been used for analysis of volatiles in fish oil. To optimize sam sampling conditions, the effect of heating the fish oil at various temperatures and times was evaluated from anisidine values (AV...

  2. Torrefaction of agricultural by-products: Effects of temperature and time on energy yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural by-products, such as apple, grape, olive, and tomato pomaces as well as almond and walnut shells, were torrefied at different temperatures and times. Torrefaction of biomass involves heating in an inert atmosphere to remove volatile components for improved grindability and increased ene...

  3. Influence of temperature and hydroxide concentration on the settling time of hydroxy-catalysis bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, S.; Cagnoli, G.; Elliffe, E.; Faller, J.; Hough, J.; Martin, I.; Rowan, S.

    2007-01-01

    Many applications using bonded optical components have stringent requirements on the strength, rigidity, stability and alignment of the bonds. Hydroxy-catalysis bonding fulfills these requirements. Here we investigate methods by which the bonding time may be extended to better aid the precise prealignment of optical components through controlling the temperature and concentration of the bonding solution

  4. Body temperature predicts the direction of internal desynchronization in humans isolated from time cues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daan, Serge; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-ichi

    2013-01-01

    This publication presents a new analysis of experiments that were carried out in human subjects in isolation from time cues, under supervision of Jurgen Aschoff and Rutger Wever at the Max Planck Institute for Behavioural Physiology (Erling-Andechs, Germany, 1964-1974). Mean rectal temperatures

  5. Postmortem time estimation using body temperature and a finite-element computer model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, E.A. den; Lotens, W.A.

    2004-01-01

    In the Netherlands most murder victims are found 2-24 h after the crime. During this period, body temperature decrease is the most reliable method to estimate the postmortem time (PMT). Recently, two murder cases were analysed in which currently available methods did not provide a su.ciently

  6. Effect of storage time and temperature on the rheological and microstructural properties of gluten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolas, Y.; Smit, R.J.M.; van Aalst, H.; Esselink, F.J.; Weegels, P.L.; Agterof, W.G.M.

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the effects of frozen storage on the rheological and microstructural properties of gluten, two model systems were investigated: System A, gluten and water; System B, gluten, water, and NaCl. The storage time was varied from 1 to 16 weeks and the storage temperature was varied from -5

  7. Recovery time of high temperature superconducting tapes exposed in liquid nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng, Jie; Zeng, Weina; Yao, Zhihao; Zhao, Anfeng; Hu, Daoyu; Hong, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel method based on a sequence of AC pulses is presented. • Liquid nitrogen temperature is used as criterion to judge whether the sample has recovered. • Recovery time of some tape doesn't increase with the amplitude of fault current. • This phenomenon is caused by boiling heat transfer process of liquid nitrogen. • This phenomenon can be used in optimizing both the limiting rate and reclosing system. - Abstract: The recovery time is a crucial parameter to high temperature superconducting tapes, especially in power applications. The cooperation between the reclosing device and the superconducting facilities mostly relies on the recovery time of the superconducting tapes. In this paper, a novel method is presented to measure the recovery time of several different superconducting samples. In this method criterion used to judge whether the sample has recovered is the liquid nitrogen temperature, instead of the critical temperature. An interesting phenomenon is observed during the testing of superconducting samples exposed in the liquid nitrogen. Theoretical explanations of this phenomenon are presented from the aspect of heat transfer. Optimization strategy of recovery characteristics based on this phenomenon is also briefly discussed.

  8. Effect of temperature and hydraulic retention time on hydrogen producing granules: Homoacetogenesis and morphological characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, A. A.; Danko, A. S.; Alves, M. M.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of temperature and hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the homoacetogenesisi and on the morphological characteristics of hydrogen producing granules was investigated. Hydrogen was produced using an expanded granular sludge blanket (EGSB) reactor, fed with glucose and L-arabinose, under mesophilic (37 degree centigrade), thermophilic (55 degree centigrade), and hyper thermophilic (70 degree centigrade) conditions. (Author)

  9. Time-Dependent Gene Profiling Indicates the Presence of Different Phases for Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalina Andreeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia/reperfusion (IR injury has been associated with several retinal pathologies, and a few genes/gene products have been linked to IR injury. However, the big picture of temporal changes, regarding the affected gene networks, pathways, and processes remains to be determined. The purpose of the present study was to investigate initial, intermediate, and later stages to characterize the etiology of IR injury in terms of the pathways affected over time. Analyses indicated that at the initial stage, 0-hour reperfusion following the ischemic period, the ischemia-associated genes were related to changes in metabolism. In contrast, at the 24-hour time point, the signature events in reperfusion injury include enhanced inflammatory and immune responses as well as cell death indicating that this would be a critical period for the development of any interventional therapeutic strategies. Genes in the signal transduction pathways, particularly transmitter receptors, are downregulated at this time. Activation of the complement system pathway clearly plays an important role in the later stages of reperfusion injury. Together, these results demonstrate that the etiology of injury related to IR is characterized by the appearance of specific patterns of gene expression at any given time point during retinal IR injury. These results indicate that evaluation of treatment strategies with respect to time is very critical.

  10. Time and temperature affect glycolysis in blood samples regardless of fluoride-based preservatives: a potential underestimation of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Mary; Daly, Niamh; O'Kelly, Ruth; Turner, Michael J

    2017-11-01

    Background The inhibition of glycolysis prior to glucose measurement is an important consideration when interpreting glucose tolerance tests. This is particularly important in gestational diabetes mellitus where prompt diagnosis and treatment is essential. A study was planned to investigate the effect of preservatives and temperature on glycolysis. Methods Blood samples for glucose were obtained from consented females. Lithium heparin and fluoride-EDTA samples transported rapidly in ice slurry to the laboratory were analysed for glucose concentration and then held either in ice slurry or at room temperature for varying time intervals. Paired fluoride-citrate samples were received at room temperature and held at room temperature, with analysis at similar time intervals. Results No significant difference was noted between mean glucose concentrations when comparing different sample types received in ice slurry. The mean glucose concentrations decreased significantly for both sets of samples when held at room temperature (0.4 mmol/L) and in ice slurry (0.2 mmol/L). A review of patient glucose tolerance tests reported in our hospital indicated that 17.8% exceeded the recommended diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes mellitus. It was predicted that if the results of fasting samples were revised to reflect the effect of glycolysis at room temperature, the adjusted diagnostic rate could increase to 35.3%. Conclusion Preanalytical handling of blood samples for glucose analysis is vital. Fluoride-EDTA is an imperfect antiglycolytic, even when the samples are transported and analysed rapidly provides such optimal conditions. The use of fluoride-citrate tubes may offer a viable alternative in the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus.

  11. Observation on Surface Change of Fragile Glass: Temperature - Time Dependence Studied by X-Ray Reflectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikkawa, Hiroyuki; Kitahara, Amane; Takahashi, Isao

    2004-01-01

    The structural change of a fragile glass surface close to the glass transition temperature Tg is studied by using X-ray reflectivity. Measurements were performed on surfaces of maltitol, which is a typical polyalcohol fragile glass with Tg = 320K. Upon both heating and cooling, we find the following features which are also noticed in silicate glass surfaces: (i) On heating, the surface morphology indicates a variation at temperatures below Tg; (ii) A drastic increase in surface roughness occurs at a temperature about 333K on heating, which is 13K higher than Tg; (iii) During the cooling of the sample, formation of a low-density surface layer (3nm at 293K) is observed. Prior to the crystallization, nm - μm sized domains were grown at the surface, which might not be reported for other glasses

  12. Cumulative Effective Hölder Exponent Based Indicator for Real-Time Fetal Heartbeat Analysis during Labour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzik, Zbigniew R.; van Wijngaarden, Willem J.

    We introduce a special purpose cumulative indicator, capturing in real time the cumulative deviation from the reference level of the exponent h (local roughness, Hölder exponent) of the fetal heartbeat during labour. We verify that the indicator applied to the variability component of the heartbeat coincides with the fetal outcome as determined by blood samples. The variability component is obtained from running real time decomposition of fetal heartbeat into independent components using an adaptation of an oversampled Haar wavelet transform. The particular filters used and resolutions applied are motivated by obstetricial insight/practice. The methodology described has the potential for real-time monitoring of the fetus during labour and for the prediction of the fetal outcome, allerting the attending staff in the case of (threatening) hypoxia.

  13. Quantifying and modeling long-range cross correlations in multiple time series with applications to world stock indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Duan; Podobnik, Boris; Horvatić, Davor; Stanley, H Eugene

    2011-04-01

    We propose a modified time lag random matrix theory in order to study time-lag cross correlations in multiple time series. We apply the method to 48 world indices, one for each of 48 different countries. We find long-range power-law cross correlations in the absolute values of returns that quantify risk, and find that they decay much more slowly than cross correlations between the returns. The magnitude of the cross correlations constitutes "bad news" for international investment managers who may believe that risk is reduced by diversifying across countries. We find that when a market shock is transmitted around the world, the risk decays very slowly. We explain these time-lag cross correlations by introducing a global factor model (GFM) in which all index returns fluctuate in response to a single global factor. For each pair of individual time series of returns, the cross correlations between returns (or magnitudes) can be modeled with the autocorrelations of the global factor returns (or magnitudes). We estimate the global factor using principal component analysis, which minimizes the variance of the residuals after removing the global trend. Using random matrix theory, a significant fraction of the world index cross correlations can be explained by the global factor, which supports the utility of the GFM. We demonstrate applications of the GFM in forecasting risks at the world level, and in finding uncorrelated individual indices. We find ten indices that are practically uncorrelated with the global factor and with the remainder of the world indices, which is relevant information for world managers in reducing their portfolio risk. Finally, we argue that this general method can be applied to a wide range of phenomena in which time series are measured, ranging from seismology and physiology to atmospheric geophysics.

  14. Quantifying and modeling long-range cross correlations in multiple time series with applications to world stock indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Duan; Podobnik, Boris; Horvatić, Davor; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2011-04-01

    We propose a modified time lag random matrix theory in order to study time-lag cross correlations in multiple time series. We apply the method to 48 world indices, one for each of 48 different countries. We find long-range power-law cross correlations in the absolute values of returns that quantify risk, and find that they decay much more slowly than cross correlations between the returns. The magnitude of the cross correlations constitutes “bad news” for international investment managers who may believe that risk is reduced by diversifying across countries. We find that when a market shock is transmitted around the world, the risk decays very slowly. We explain these time-lag cross correlations by introducing a global factor model (GFM) in which all index returns fluctuate in response to a single global factor. For each pair of individual time series of returns, the cross correlations between returns (or magnitudes) can be modeled with the autocorrelations of the global factor returns (or magnitudes). We estimate the global factor using principal component analysis, which minimizes the variance of the residuals after removing the global trend. Using random matrix theory, a significant fraction of the world index cross correlations can be explained by the global factor, which supports the utility of the GFM. We demonstrate applications of the GFM in forecasting risks at the world level, and in finding uncorrelated individual indices. We find ten indices that are practically uncorrelated with the global factor and with the remainder of the world indices, which is relevant information for world managers in reducing their portfolio risk. Finally, we argue that this general method can be applied to a wide range of phenomena in which time series are measured, ranging from seismology and physiology to atmospheric geophysics.

  15. Influence of temperature and brewing time of nettle (Urtica dioica L.) infusions on vitamin C content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolska, Jolanta; Czop, Michał; Jakubczyk, Karolina; Janda, Katarzyna

    Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica L.) can be found in temperate climate zones of Europe, Africa and America Nettle may be a source of nutritional ingredients, mineral salts, vitamins and antioxidants. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of temperature and brewing time Urtica dioica L. infusions from different parts of this plant on vitamin C (ascorbic acid) content. Infusions of nettle leaf, stem and root were prepared at room temperature, 50°C, 60°C, 70°C and 80°C for 10 minutes. Leaf infusions were also brewed for 5, 10, 15 and 20 minutes at initial water temperature of 60°C. The amount of vitamin C was determined by the spectrophotometric method. The best temperature of brewing nettle infusions, in terms of vitamin C concentration, is between 50 °C and 60 °C as it is sufficient to extract the substance, yet not high enough to destroy it. The optimal time of brewing appeared to be 10 minutes as the prolonged exposure to high temperature appeared to be detrimental for ascorbic acid as well.

  16. The effect of temperature and Pasteurization time on Staphylococcus aureus isolates from dairy products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniarti, Maria Nia; Amarantini, Charis; Budiarso, Tri Yahya

    2017-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a potential pathogenic bacterial cause of disease in humans and animals due to the ability of adhesion to epithelial tissue. Many cases of food poisoning are caused by S. aureus bacteria. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of temperature and time on the growth of S. aureus isolates from milk products. The samples are derived from previous research namely pasteurized milk, street vendor and café milk, milk powder, and sweetened condensed milk products. The treatment temperatures and times studied were temperature 60 °C, 65 °C, 70 °C, 75 °C, 80 °C, and 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, and 60 minutes. The results show that at temperatures of 60 °C and 65 °C, S. aureus isolates did not grow at 60 minutes. All isolates of S. aureus died when the temperatures were increased to 70 °C and 80 °C, at 50 and 20 minutes, respectively.

  17. Temperature variation in metal ceramic technology analyzed using time domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin I.; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-01-01

    The quality of dental prostheses is essential in providing good quality medical services. The metal ceramic technology applied in dentistry implies ceramic sintering inside the dental oven. Every ceramic material requires a special sintering chart which is recommended by the producer. For a regular dental technician it is very difficult to evaluate if the temperature inside the oven remains the same as it is programmed on the sintering chart. Also, maintaining the calibration in time is an issue for the practitioners. Metal ceramic crowns develop a very accurate pattern for the ceramic layers depending on the temperature variation inside the oven where they are processed. Different patterns were identified in the present study for the samples processed with a variation in temperature of +30 °C to +50 °C, respectively - 30 0°C to -50 °C. The OCT imagistic evaluations performed for the normal samples present a uniform spread of the ceramic granulation inside the ceramic materials. For the samples sintered at a higher temperature an alternation between white and darker areas between the enamel and opaque layers appear. For the samples sintered at a lower temperature a decrease in the ceramic granulation from the enamel towards the opaque layer is concluded. The TD-OCT methods can therefore be used efficiently for the detection of the temperature variation due to the ceramic sintering inside the ceramic oven.

  18. Time series modelling of global mean temperature for managerial decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romilly, Peter

    2005-07-01

    Climate change has important implications for business and economic activity. Effective management of climate change impacts will depend on the availability of accurate and cost-effective forecasts. This paper uses univariate time series techniques to model the properties of a global mean temperature dataset in order to develop a parsimonious forecasting model for managerial decision-making over the short-term horizon. Although the model is estimated on global temperature data, the methodology could also be applied to temperature data at more localised levels. The statistical techniques include seasonal and non-seasonal unit root testing with and without structural breaks, as well as ARIMA and GARCH modelling. A forecasting evaluation shows that the chosen model performs well against rival models. The estimation results confirm the findings of a number of previous studies, namely that global mean temperatures increased significantly throughout the 20th century. The use of GARCH modelling also shows the presence of volatility clustering in the temperature data, and a positive association between volatility and global mean temperature.

  19. Revised Correlation between Odin/OSIRIS PMC Properties and Coincident TIMED/SABER Mesospheric Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feofilov, A. G.; Petelina, S. V.; Kutepov, A. A.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Russell, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging System (OSIRIS) instrument on board the Odin satellite detects Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) through the enhancement in the limb-scattered solar radiance. The Sounding of the Atmosphere using the Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on board the TIMED satellite is a limb scanning infrared radiometer that measures temperature and vertical profiles and energetic parameters for minor constituents in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The combination of OSIRIS and SABER data has been previously used to statistically derive thermal conditions for PMC existence [Petelina et al., 2005]. a, A.A. Kutepov, W.D. Pesnell, In this work, we employ the simultaneous common volume measurements of PMCs by OSIRIS and temperature profiles measured by SABER for the Northern Hemisphere summers of 2002-2005 and corrected in the polar region by accounting for the vibrational-vibrational energy exchange among the CO2 isotopes [Kutepov et al., 2006]. For each of 20 coincidences identified within plus or minus 1 degree latitude, plus or minus 2 degrees longitude and less than 1 hour time the frost point temperatures were calculated using the corresponding SABER temperature profile and water vapor densities of 1,3, and 10 ppmv. We found that the PMC presence and brightness correlated only with the temperature threshold that corresponds to the frost point. The absolute value of the temperature below the frost point, however, didn't play a significant role in the intensity of PMC signal for the majority of selected coincidences. The presence of several bright clouds at temperatures above the frost point is obviously related to the limitation of the limb geometry when some near- or far-field PMCs located at higher (and warmer) altitudes appear to be at lower altitudes.

  20. Aerobic vs. anaerobic scope: sibling species of fish indicate that temperature dependence of hypoxia tolerance can predict future survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Christina; Munday, Philip L; Nilsson, Göran E

    2014-03-01

    The temperature dependence of aerobic scope has been suggested to be a major determinant of how marine animals will cope with future rises in environmental temperature. Here, we present data suggesting that in some animals, the temperature dependence of anaerobic scope (i.e., the capacity for surviving severe hypoxia) may determine present-day latitudinal distributions and potential for persistence in a warmer future. As a model for investigating the role of anaerobic scope, we studied two sibling species of coral-dwelling gobies, Gobiodon histrio, and G. erythrospilus, with different latitudinal distributions, but which overlap in equal abundance at Lizard Island (14°40'S) on the Great Barrier Reef. These species did not differ in the temperature dependence of resting oxygen consumption or critical oxygen concentration (the lowest oxygen level where resting oxygen consumption can be maintained). In contrast, the more equatorial species (G. histrio) had a better capacity to endure anaerobic conditions at oxygen levels below the critical oxygen concentration at the high temperatures (32-33 °C) more likely to occur near the equator, or in a warmer future. These results suggest that anaerobic scope, in addition to aerobic scope, could be important in determining the impacts of global warming on some marine animals. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Remote sensing of temperature and wind using acoustic travel-time measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Manuela; Fischer, Gabi; Raabe, Armin; Weisse, Frank [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Meteorologie; Ziemann, Astrid [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Professur fuer Meteorologie

    2013-04-15

    A remote sensing technique to detect area-averaged temperature and flow properties within an area under investigation, utilizing acoustic travel-time measurements, is introduced. This technique uses the dependency of the speed of acoustic signals on the meteorological parameters temperature and wind along the propagation path. The method itself is scalable: It is applicable for investigation areas with an extent of some hundred square metres as well as for small-scale areas in the range of one square metre. Moreover, an arrangement of the acoustic transducers at several height levels makes it possible to determine profiles and gradients of the meteorological quantities. With the help of two examples the potential of this remote sensing technique for simultaneously measuring averaged temperature and flow fields is demonstrated. A comparison of time histories of temperature and wind values derived from acoustic travel-time measurements with point measurements shows a qualitative agreement whereas calculated root-mean-square errors differ for the two example applications. They amount to 1.4 K and 0.3 m/s for transducer distances of 60 m and 0.4 K and 0.2 m/s for transducer distances in the range of one metre. (orig.)

  2. The effect of temperature and time of extraction on the quality of Semi Refined Carrageenan (SRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heriyanto Heri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Euchema cottonii is a good source of kappa-carrageenan and can be found cultivated in the Indonesia coastal areas in which one of them is in Banten Province. Carrageenans have many applications and are utilized in human food and pet-food industry. Carrageenans are also utilized in non-food industry such as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, printing and textile formulations. Hence, the present study features on the cooking process cooking time and cooking temperature. The effects of these parameters on carrageenan quality such as gel viscosity and gel strength were studied. The process of extraction of carrageenan was conducted with variations temperature: 60, 70, and 80 °C and the variation of time: 1, 2, and 3 hours. Alkaline substance used was KOH with 8% concentration and the ratio of solvent to dry seaweed 8:1. From the present investigation, it was observed that SRC extraction reached the best condition at temperature 70 °C for 2 hours with the value of yield 30.20%, 5.90% moisture content, 18.34% ash content, sulfate content of 6.94%, viscosity of 190 cP, and the gel strength 714.45 g / cm2. The treatment of temperature and extraction time significantly affected the quality of the SRC yield parameter, viscosity and gel strength.

  3. Effect of Temperature, Time, and Material Thickness on the Dehydration Process of Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. K. Correia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effects of temperature, time, and thickness of tomatoes fruits during adiabatic drying process. Dehydration, a simple and inexpensive process compared to other conservation methods, is widely used in the food industry in order to ensure a long shelf life for the product due to the low water activity. This study aimed to obtain the best processing conditions to avoid losses and keep product quality. Factorial design and surface response methodology were applied to fit predictive mathematical models. In the dehydration of tomatoes through the adiabatic process, temperature, time, and sample thickness, which greatly contribute to the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of the final product, were evaluated. The optimum drying conditions were 60°C with the lowest thickness level and shorter time.

  4. Time and temperature reduction of the sealing process of porous aluminium oxide films with organic additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bautista, A.; Lopez, V.; Otero, E.; Lizarbe, R.; Gonzalez, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Different sealing processes of anode coating in aluminium oxide have been industrially used for more than 30 years. In two of the preceding decades a great effort was realized to reduce costs in the traditional hydrothermal sealing in deionized boiling water (SHT), a very expensive process due to its endurance and high temperature on which it develops. New sealing procedures are proposed, on which by means of the use of organic additives, the time or the temperature of the SHT is essentially reduced. (Author) 10 refs

  5. Influence of annealing time and temperature on the Fe3Al intermetallic alloys microstructure modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Garbala

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available There is an industry interesting in intermetallic alloys in recent years. There are widely possibilities to adopt this kind of materials for structural units. More expensive materials can be replaced by them. A property which limits their wider application is the low plasticity at environment and elevated temperatures. In paper the results of the thermal microstructure modification are shown. To this end, the influence of annealing time and temperature on the intermetallic phase Fe3Al grain size was investigated. The impact of these factors on micro-hardness was examined as well. It was found that these operations cause the grain size reduction and the micro-hardness decrease.

  6. Long-term creep modeling of wood using time temperature superposition principle

    OpenAIRE

    Gamalath, Sandhya Samarasinghe

    1991-01-01

    Long-term creep and recovery models (master curves) were developed from short-term data using the time temperature superposition principle (TTSP) for kiln-dried southern pine loaded in compression parallel-to-grain and exposed to constant environmental conditions (~70°F, ~9%EMC). Short-term accelerated creep (17 hour) and recovery (35 hour) data were collected for each specimen at a range of temperature (70°F-150°F) and constant moisture condition of 9%. The compressive stra...

  7. An assessment of the quality indicators of operative and non-operative times in a public university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Altair da Silva; Leão, Luiz Eduardo Villaça; Novais, Maykon Anderson Pires de; Zucchi, Paola

    2015-01-01

    To assess the operative time indicators in a public university hospital. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using data from operating room database. The sample was obtained from January 2011 to January 2012. The operations performed in sequence in the same operating room, between 7:00 am and 5:00 pm, elective or emergency, were included. The procedures with incomplete data in the system were excluded, as well as the operations performed after 5:00 pm or on weekends or holidays. We measured the operative and non-operative time of 8,420 operations. The operative time (mean and standard deviation) of anesthesias and operations were 177.6 ± 110 and 129.8 ± 97.1 minutes, respectively. The total time of the patient in operative room (mean and standard deviation) was 196.8 ± 113.2. The non-operative time, e.g., between the arrival of the patient and the onset of anesthesia was 14.3 ± 17.3 minutes. The time to set the next patient in operating room was 119.8 ± 79.6 minutes. Our total non-operative time was 155 minutes. Delays frequently occurred in our operating room and had a major effect on patient flow and resource utilization. The non-operative time was longer than the operative time. It is possible to increase the operating room capacity by management and training of the professionals involved. The indicators provided a tool to improve operating room efficiency.

  8. Permafrost at its limits: The most easterly evidence of existing permafrost in the European Alps as indicated by ground temperature and geoelectrical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, A.; Kühnast, B.

    2009-04-01

    Mountain permafrost is a widespread phenomenon in alpine regions in the European Alps. For instance, some 2000 km² or 4% of the Austrian Alps are underlain by permafrost. Up to recent times most research on permafrost issues in Austria focused on the central and highest section of the Austrian Alps. By contrast, knowledge concerning marginal permafrost zones is fairly limited. To increase knowledge about the easternmost limit of permafrost in the European Alps, a research project focusing on the Seckauer Tauern Mountains (14°30'E to 15°00'E) and particularly on the Hochreichart area was initiated in 2004 by the first author. Since then, different methods have been applied such as e.g. geomorphic mapping, numerical permafrost modelling, multi-annual BTS measurements (since 2004) or continuous ground surface and near ground surface temperature measurements by miniature temperature data loggers/MTDs (since 2004). In order to verify the temperature data and to extend the spatial knowledge about permafrost distribution beyond point information, a geoelectrical survey was carried out at the end of August 2008 by applying the electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method along a 120 m long profile covering the upper part of the rooting zone of a (more-or-less) relict rock glacier and the talus slope above. For this survey the two-dimensional (2D) electrical surveys was performed using the Wenner-Alfa configuration with 2.5 m spacing and an LGM-Lippmann 4-Punkt light hp resistivity-meter. The ERT results indicate an active layer of 2 to 4 m underlain by a permafrost body along 3/4 of the entire profile with resistivity values between 50 to 100 kOhm.m and extending to a depth of 10 to 15 m. The permafrost body is substantially thicker at the lower part of the profile (rock glacier; first 50 m of profile) compared to most of the upper part (talus slope). Focusing on the talus slope, the permafrost body is thickest on the central section of the profile (~5-6 m thickness

  9. The interactive effects of transportation and lairage time on welfare indicators, carcass and meat quality traits in slaughter pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čobanović, N.; Vasilev, D.; Dimitrijević, M.; Teodorović, V.; Parunović, N.; Betić, N.; Karabasil, N.

    2017-09-01

    This study assessed the effects of transportation and lairage time and their interaction on welfare, carcass and meat quality traits in slaughter pigs under commercial conditions. The study was conducted on 120 pigs with a live weight of approximately 115 kg and about six months old. A complete blood picture was measured in pigs to assess pre-slaughter stress. Also, nine different carcass quality parameters including live weight, hot and cold carcass weights, cooling loss, dressing percentage, backfat thickness, meatiness and skin lesions score were measured. The pH and temperature measurements were performed 45 minutes post-mortem. The results showed that short transportation time and slaughtering without lairaging and long transportation time and overnight lairaging negatively influenced the hematological parameters, which meant that the animal welfare was seriously compromised under these pre-slaughter conditions. Long transportation time and overnight lairaging reduced live and carcass weights and increased the incidence of skin lesions on the carcass and DFD pork. In addition, short transportation time and slaughtering without lairaging caused a significant deterioration in pork quality. It can be concluded that, from the standpoint of animal welfare, carcass and meat quality, the above-mentioned pre-slaughter conditions are not recommended to the farmers and/or pork producers.

  10. Time lapse microscopy of temperature control during self-assembly of 3D DNA crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Fiona W.; Jong, Michael Alexander; Tan, Andre; Tseng, Robert; Park, Eunice; Ohayon, Yoel P.; Sha, Ruojie; Mao, Chengde; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2017-10-01

    DNA nanostructures are created by exploiting the high fidelity base-pairing interactions of double-stranded branched DNA molecules. These structures present a convenient medium for the self-assembly of macroscopic 3D crystals. In some self-assemblies in this system, crystals can be formed by lowering the temperature, and they can be dissolved by raising it. The ability to monitor the formation and melting of these crystals yields information that can be used to monitor crystal formation and growth. Here, we describe the development of an inexpensive tool that enables direct observation of the crystal growth process as a function of both time and temperature. Using the hanging-drop crystallization of the well-characterized 2-turn DNA tensegrity triangle motif for our model system, its response to temperature has been characterized visually.

  11. Changes in setting time of alginate impression material with different water temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decky J. Indrani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies showed that setting process of alginates can be influenced by temperature. Purpose: To determine the changes in setting time due to differences in water temperature and to determine the correlation between water temperature and the setting time. Methods: Seven groups of dough alginate were prepared by mixing alginate powder and water, each using a temperature between 13° C–28° C with a interval of 2.5° C. A sample mold (Θ = 30 mm, t = 16 mm was placed on a flat plate and filled with doug alginate. Immediately the flat end of a polished acrylic rod was placed in contact with the surface of dough alginate. Setting time of alginat was measured from the starting of the mix to the time when the alginate does not adhere to the end of the rod. Setting time alginate data were analyzed using one way ANOVA, LSD and Pearson. Results: Setting time of alginate with water temperature between 13° C–28° C were 87 to 119.4 seconds and were significantly different (p < 0.01. The setting time between group were also significantly different (p<0.01. There was an inverse correlation between water temperature and the setting time (r = -0.968. Conclusion: Water temperature between 13° C–28°C with a difference of 2.5° C produced significant differences in alginate setting time; the lower the water temperature being used the longer the setting time was produced.Latar belakang: Penelitian-penelitian sebelumnya menunjukkan bahwa proses pengerasan alginat dapat dipengaruhi oleh suhu. Tujuan: Mengetahui perubahan waktu pengerasan alginat akibat perbedaan suhu air serta mengetahui hubungan antara suhu air dan waktu pengerasan. Metode: Tujuh kelompok adonan alginat yang dipersiapkan dengan mencampur bubuk alginat dan air, masingmasing menggunakan suhu antara 13°C–28° C dengan interval 2,5° C. Pengukuran waktu pengerasan alginat dilakukan sesuai dengan spesifikasi ADA no.18. Sebuah cetakan sampel terbuat dari pralon berbentuk

  12. Olive paste oil content on a dry weight basis (OPDW): an indicator for optimal harvesting time in modern olive orchards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zipori, I.; Bustan, A.; Kerem, Z.; Dag, A.

    2016-07-01

    In modern oil olive orchards, mechanical harvesting technologies have significantly accelerated harvesting outputs, thereby allowing for careful planning of harvest timing. While optimizing harvest time may have profound effects on oil yield and quality, the necessary tools to precisely determine the best date are rather scarce. For instance, the commonly used indicator, the fruit ripening index, does not necessarily correlate with oil accumulation. Oil content per fruit fresh weight is strongly affected by fruit water content, making the ripening index an unreliable indicator. However, oil in the paste, calculated on a dry weight basis (OPDW), provides a reliable indication of oil accumulation in the fruit. In most cultivars tested here, OPDW never exceeded ca. 0.5 g·g–1 dry weight, making this threshold the best indicator for the completion of oil accumulation and its consequent reduction in quality thereafter. The rates of OPDW and changes in quality parameters strongly depend on local conditions, such as climate, tree water status and fruit load. We therefore propose a fast and easy method to determine and monitor the OPDW in a given orchard. The proposed method is a useful tool for the determination of optimal harvest timing, particularly in large plots under intensive cultivation practices, with the aim of increasing orchard revenues. The results of this research can be directly applied in olive orchards, especially in large-scale operations. By following the proposed method, individual plots can be harvested according to sharp thresholds of oil accumulation status and pre-determined oil quality parameters, thus effectively exploiting the potentials of oil yield and quality. The method can become a powerful tool for scheduling the harvest throughout the season, and at the same time forecasting the flow of olives to the olive mill. (Author)

  13. Development of sustainable performance indicators to assess the benefits of real-time monitoring in mechanised underground mining

    OpenAIRE

    Govindan, Rajesh; Cao, Wenzhuo; Korre, Anna; Durucan, Sevket; Graham, Peter; Simon, Clara; Barlow, Glenn; Pemberton, Ross

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the development and quantification of a catalogue of Sustainable Performance Indicators (SPIs) for the assessment of the benefits real-time mining can offer in small and complex mechanised underground mining operations. The SPIs investigated in detail include: ‒ grade accuracy and error of the resource model, ‒ high/low grade ore classification accuracy and error, ‒ additional high grade ore identified per unit volume, ‒ profit expected per unit volume, ‒ or...

  14. Hilbert-Schmidt and Sobol sensitivity indices for static and time series Wnt signaling measurements in colorectal cancer - part A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Shriprakash

    2017-12-04

    Ever since the accidental discovery of Wingless [Sharma R.P., Drosophila information service, 1973, 50, p 134], research in the field of Wnt signaling pathway has taken significant strides in wet lab experiments and various cancer clinical trials, augmented by recent developments in advanced computational modeling of the pathway. Information rich gene expression profiles reveal various aspects of the signaling pathway and help in studying different issues simultaneously. Hitherto, not many computational studies exist which incorporate the simultaneous study of these issues. This manuscript ∙ explores the strength of contributing factors in the signaling pathway, ∙ analyzes the existing causal relations among the inter/extracellular factors effecting the pathway based on prior biological knowledge and ∙ investigates the deviations in fold changes in the recently found prevalence of psychophysical laws working in the pathway. To achieve this goal, local and global sensitivity analysis is conducted on the (non)linear responses between the factors obtained from static and time series expression profiles using the density (Hilbert-Schmidt Information Criterion) and variance (Sobol) based sensitivity indices. The results show the advantage of using density based indices over variance based indices mainly due to the former's employment of distance measures & the kernel trick via Reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) that capture nonlinear relations among various intra/extracellular factors of the pathway in a higher dimensional space. In time series data, using these indices it is now possible to observe where in time, which factors get influenced & contribute to the pathway, as changes in concentration of the other factors are made. This synergy of prior biological knowledge, sensitivity analysis & representations in higher dimensional spaces can facilitate in time based administration of target therapeutic drugs & reveal hidden biological information within

  15. [Real time diagnostics of instantaneous temperature of combustion and explosion process by modern spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xue-tie; Wang, Jun-de; Li, Yan; Liu, Da-bing

    2003-04-01

    The combustion temperature is one of the important parameters to express flame combustion and explosion characteristics. It will effectively guide the design and manufacture of new model explosives, industrial explosive materials, and weapons. The recent developments and applications of real time diagnostics of instantaneous temperature of combustion and explosion processes by modern spectroscopic methods, such as atomic absorption-emission method, atomic emission two-line spectroscopy, atomic emission multiline spectroscopy, molecular rotation-vibration spectroscopy, coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and plane laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), were reviewed in this paper. The maximum time resolution of atomic absorption-emission method is 25 microseconds. The time resolution of atomic emission two-line spectroscopy can reach 0.1 microsecond. These two methods can completely suit the need of real time and instantaneous temperature diagnostics of violent explosion and flame combustion. Other methods will also provide new effective research methods for the processes and characteristics of combustion, flame and explosion.

  16. Real-time finite-temperature correlators from AdS/CFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, Edwin; Vaman, Diana; Wu Chaolun; Arnold, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we use anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence ideas in conjunction with insights from finite-temperature real-time field theory formalism to compute 3-point correlators of N=4 super Yang-Mills operators, in real time and at finite temperature. To this end, we propose that the gravity field action is integrated only over the right and left quadrants of the Penrose diagram of the anti-de Sitter-Schwarzschild background, with a relative sign between the two terms. For concreteness we consider the case of a scalar field in the black hole background. Using the scalar field Schwinger-Keldysh bulk-to-boundary propagators, we give the general expression of a 3-point real-time Green's correlator. We then note that this particular prescription amounts to adapting the finite-temperature analog of Veltman's circling rules to tree-level Witten diagrams, and comment on the retarded and Feynman scalar bulk-to-boundary propagators. We subject our prescription to several checks: Kubo-Martin-Schwinger identities, the largest time equation, and the zero-temperature limit. When specializing to a particular retarded (causal) 3-point function, we find a very simple answer: the momentum-space correlator is given by three causal (two advanced and one retarded) bulk-to-boundary propagators, meeting at a vertex point which is integrated from spatial infinity to the horizon only. This result is expected based on analyticity, since the retarded n-point functions are obtained by analytic continuation from the imaginary-time Green's function, and based on causality considerations.

  17. Reorientational Dynamics of Enzymes Adsorbed on Quartz: A Temperature-Dependent Time-Resolved TIRF Anisotropy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeslik, C.; Royer, C.; Hazlett, T.; Mantulin, W.

    2003-01-01

    The preservation of enzyme activity and protein binding capacity upon protein adsorption at solid interfaces is important for biotechnological and medical applications. Because these properties are partly related to the protein flexibility and mobility, we have studied the internal dynamics and the whole-body reorientational rates of two enzymes, staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) and hen egg white lysozyme, over the temperature range of 20–80°C when the proteins are adsorbed at the silica/water interface and, for comparison, when they are dissolved in buffer. The data were obtained using a combination of two experimental techniques, total internal reflection fluorescence spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements in the frequency domain, with the protein Trp residues as intrinsic fluorescence probes. It has been found that the internal dynamics and the whole-body rotation of SNase and lysozyme are markedly reduced upon adsorption over large temperature ranges. At elevated temperatures, both protein molecules appear completely immobilized and the fractional amplitudes for the whole-body rotation, which are related to the order parameter for the local rotational freedom of the Trp residues, remain constant and do not approach zero. This behavior indicates that the angular range of the Trp reorientation within the adsorbed proteins is largely restricted even at high temperatures, in contrast to that of the dissolved proteins. The results of this study thus provide a deeper understanding of protein activity at solid surfaces. PMID:12668461

  18. Impact of Air Temperature on London Ambulance Call-Out Incidents and Response Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marliyyah A. Mahmood

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ambulance services are in operation around the world and yet, until recently, ambulance data has only been used for operational purposes rather than for assessing public health. Ambulance call-out data offers new and valuable (near real-time information that can be used to assess the impact of environmental conditions, such as temperature, upon human health. A detailed analysis of London ambulance data at a selection of dates between 2003 and 2015 is presented and compared to London temperature data. In London, the speed of ambulance response begins to suffer when the mean daily air temperature drops below 2 °C or rises above 20 °C. This is explained largely by the increased number of calls past these threshold temperatures. The baseline relationships established in this work will inform the prediction of likely changes in ambulance demand (and illness types that may be caused by seasonal temperature changes and the increased frequency and intensity of extreme/severe weather events, exacerbated by climate change, in the future.

  19. Temperature effect on gastric emptying time of hybrid grouper (Epinephelus spp.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De, Moumita; Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd. [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Das, Simon K. [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Marine Ecosystem Research Centre (EKOMAR), Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    Knowledge of fish gastric emptying time is a necessary component for understanding the fish feeding rates, energy budgets and commercial production of fishes in aquaculture. The hybrid grouper Epinephelus spp. is getting popular as a culture species in Malaysia for their faster growth rate compared to commonly cultured grouper species (giant grouper Epinephelus lanceolatus and tiger grouper Epinephelus fuscoguttatus). There are data suggests that elevated sea water temperature affects gastric emptying time (GET) of fishes. Hence, this study aims to study the GET of hybrid grouper at different temperature (22, 26, 30, 34°C) in laboratory condition with commercial diet pellet. The gastric emptying times (GETs) at different temperatures were determined X-radiographically, using barium sulfate (BaSO{sub 4}) as a contrast medium food marker. The food marker and X-radiography showed that initial voidance of fecal matter began 4-6 h after feeding at all temperature. The fastest GET (13 h) was obsereved in the 30°C group, whereas the longest (17 h) GET was seen in 22°C group fed with artificial diet pellet. Not much differences in GET were recorded between the 26 and 34°C groups as 34°C groups fed lesser amount compared to 26°C groups. Nevertheless a substantial delay in GET was observed in the 22°C group. The findings of this study suggest to culture hybrid grouper between 26 to 30°C with commercial diet pellet as this temperature ranges proliferate the faster digestion process which may contribute faster growth rate of this commerical important fish species. Overall, these findings may have important consequences for optimization of commercial production of hybrid grouper.

  20. Temperature effect on gastric emptying time of hybrid grouper (Epinephelus spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Moumita; Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd.; Das, Simon K.

    2014-09-01

    Knowledge of fish gastric emptying time is a necessary component for understanding the fish feeding rates, energy budgets and commercial production of fishes in aquaculture. The hybrid grouper Epinephelus spp. is getting popular as a culture species in Malaysia for their faster growth rate compared to commonly cultured grouper species (giant grouper Epinephelus lanceolatus and tiger grouper Epinephelus fuscoguttatus). There are data suggests that elevated sea water temperature affects gastric emptying time (GET) of fishes. Hence, this study aims to study the GET of hybrid grouper at different temperature (22, 26, 30, 34°C) in laboratory condition with commercial diet pellet. The gastric emptying times (GETs) at different temperatures were determined X-radiographically, using barium sulfate (BaSO4) as a contrast medium food marker. The food marker and X-radiography showed that initial voidance of fecal matter began 4-6 h after feeding at all temperature. The fastest GET (13 h) was obsereved in the 30°C group, whereas the longest (17 h) GET was seen in 22°C group fed with artificial diet pellet. Not much differences in GET were recorded between the 26 and 34°C groups as 34°C groups fed lesser amount compared to 26°C groups. Nevertheless a substantial delay in GET was observed in the 22°C group. The findings of this study suggest to culture hybrid grouper between 26 to 30°C with commercial diet pellet as this temperature ranges proliferate the faster digestion process which may contribute faster growth rate of this commerical important fish species. Overall, these findings may have important consequences for optimization of commercial production of hybrid grouper.

  1. Temperature effect on gastric emptying time of hybrid grouper (Epinephelus spp.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, Moumita; Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd.; Das, Simon K.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of fish gastric emptying time is a necessary component for understanding the fish feeding rates, energy budgets and commercial production of fishes in aquaculture. The hybrid grouper Epinephelus spp. is getting popular as a culture species in Malaysia for their faster growth rate compared to commonly cultured grouper species (giant grouper Epinephelus lanceolatus and tiger grouper Epinephelus fuscoguttatus). There are data suggests that elevated sea water temperature affects gastric emptying time (GET) of fishes. Hence, this study aims to study the GET of hybrid grouper at different temperature (22, 26, 30, 34°C) in laboratory condition with commercial diet pellet. The gastric emptying times (GETs) at different temperatures were determined X-radiographically, using barium sulfate (BaSO 4 ) as a contrast medium food marker. The food marker and X-radiography showed that initial voidance of fecal matter began 4-6 h after feeding at all temperature. The fastest GET (13 h) was obsereved in the 30°C group, whereas the longest (17 h) GET was seen in 22°C group fed with artificial diet pellet. Not much differences in GET were recorded between the 26 and 34°C groups as 34°C groups fed lesser amount compared to 26°C groups. Nevertheless a substantial delay in GET was observed in the 22°C group. The findings of this study suggest to culture hybrid grouper between 26 to 30°C with commercial diet pellet as this temperature ranges proliferate the faster digestion process which may contribute faster growth rate of this commerical important fish species. Overall, these findings may have important consequences for optimization of commercial production of hybrid grouper

  2. Rock bream iridovirus (RBIV) replication in rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus) exposed for different time periods to susceptible water temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Myung-Hwa; Nikapitiya, Chamilani; Vinay, Tharabenahalli-Nagaraju; Lee, Jehee; Jung, Sung-Ju

    2017-11-01

    Rock bream iridovirus (RBIV) is a member of the Megalocytivirus genus that causes severe mortality to rock bream. Water temperature is known to affect the immune system and susceptibility of fish to RBIV infection. In this study, we evaluated the time dependent virus replication pattern and time required to completely eliminate virus from the rock bream body against RBIV infection at different water temperature conditions. The rock bream was exposed to the virus and held at 7 (group A1), 4 (group A2) and 2 days (group A3) at 23 °C before the water temperature was reduced to 17 °C. A total of 28% mortality was observed 24-35 days post infection (dpi) in only the 7 day exposure group at 23 °C. In all 23 °C exposure groups, virus replication peaked at 20 to 22 dpi (10 6 -10 7 /μl). In recovery stages (30-100 dpi), the virus copy number was gradually reduced, from 10 6 to 10 1 with faster decreases in the shorter exposure period group at 23 °C. When the water temperature was increased in surviving fish from 17 to 26 °C at 70 dpi, they did not show any mortality or signs of disease and had low virus copy numbers (below 10 2 /μl). Thus, fish need at least 50 days from peaked RBIV levels (approximately 20-25 dpi) to inhibit the virus. This indicates that maintaining the fish at low water temperature (17 °C) for 70 days is sufficient to eradicate RBIV from fish body. Thus, RBIV could be eliminated slowly from the fish body and the virus may be completely eliminated under the threshold of causing mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A Capacity-Restraint Transit Assignment Model When a Predetermination Method Indicates the Invalidity of Time Independence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyang Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The statistical independence of time of every two adjacent bus links plays a crucial role in deciding the feasibility of using many mathematical models to analyze urban transit networks. Traditional research generally ignores the time independence that acts as the ground of their models. Assumption is usually made that time independence of every two adjacent links is sound. This is, however, actually groundless and probably causes problematic conclusions reached by corresponding models. Many transit assignment models such as multinomial probit-based models lose their effects when the time independence is not valid. In this paper, a simple method to predetermine the time independence is proposed. Based on the predetermination method, a modified capacity-restraint transit assignment method aimed at engineering practice is put forward and tested through a small contrived network and a case study in Nanjing city, China, respectively. It is found that the slope of regression equation between the mean and standard deviation of normal distribution acts as the indicator of time independence at the same time. Besides, our modified assignment method performs better than the traditional one with more reasonable results while keeping the property of simplicity well.

  4. The impact of temperature changes on summer time ozone and its precursors in the Eastern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Im

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Changes in temperature due to variability in meteorology and climate change are expected to significantly impact atmospheric composition. The Mediterranean is a climate sensitive region and includes megacities like Istanbul and large urban agglomerations such as Athens. The effect of temperature changes on gaseous air pollutant levels and the atmospheric processes that are controlling them in the Eastern Mediterranean are here investigated. The WRF/CMAQ mesoscale modeling system is used, coupled with the MEGAN model for the processing of biogenic volatile organic compound emissions. A set of temperature perturbations (spanning from 1 to 5 K is applied on a base case simulation corresponding to July 2004. The results indicate that the Eastern Mediterranean basin acts as a reservoir of pollutants and their precursor emissions from large urban agglomerations. During summer, chemistry is a major sink at these urban areas near the surface, and a minor contributor at downwind areas. On average, the atmospheric processes are more effective within the first 1000 m above ground. Temperature increases lead to increases in biogenic emissions by 9±3% K−1. Ozone mixing ratios increase almost linearly with the increases in ambient temperatures by 1±0.1 ppb O3 K−1 for all studied urban and receptor stations except for Istanbul, where a 0.4±0.1 ppb O3 K−1 increase is calculated, which is about half of the domain-averaged increase of 0.9±0.1 ppb O3 K−1. The computed changes in atmospheric processes are also linearly related with temperature changes.

  5. Effect of Pouring Time and Storage Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Casts Made from Irreversible Hydrocolloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Farzin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the dimensional stability of casts made from an alginate impression material poured immediately and stored after specific periods.Materials and Methods: The common alginate used in Iran (Super; Iralgin, Golchai Co.,Tehran, Iran was tested. A master model was mounted on a special device and used to obtain the impressions. These impressions were stored at 23°C (SD=1 and 4°C (SD=1 in100% relative humidity, then poured with gypsum immediately and again after 12, 25, 45 and 60 minutes. The casts were measured with a traveling microscope with the precision of 0.5 micrometer.Results: The dimensional stability of the alginate and impressions were both significantly time and temperature dependent. The impressions were dimensionally stable significantly until 12 minutes of storage at room temperature and until 45 minutes of storage at 4°C(SD=1.Conclusion: The dimensional stability of the alginate impressions was influenced by the storage time and environment temperature, but a humid environment and 4°C (SD=1temperature may delay the pouring.

  6. Effects of temperature and time on deoxynivalenol (DON and zearalenone (ZON content in corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jauković Marko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fumonisins are Fusarium mycotoxins that occur in corn and corn-based foods and they have been implicated in several animal and human diseases. Their effect on human health is unclear, however, fumonisins are considered to be risk factors for cancer. Baking, frying, and extrusion cooking of corn at high temperatures (190°C reduce fumonisin concentrations in foods, with the amount of reduction achieved depending on cooking time, temperature, recipe, and other factors. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of temperature (200 and 220 °C and time (15 and 20 min on the detoxification of corn flour deliberately contaminated with DON and ZON. After processing at 200°C for 15 min, an average of 12% and after 20 min an average of 15% of DON was lost. At 200°C ZON content was reduced by 22% (after 15 min and by 27% (after 20 min. Higher temperature (220°C did not significantly affect further reduction of DON or ZON content. The process was only partially effective in both cases. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-31023 i br. TR-31053

  7. Increasing temperature causes flowering onset time changes of alpine ginger Roscoea in the Central Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmalingam Mohandass

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent herbarium-based phenology assessments of many plant species have found significant responses to global climate change over the previous century. In this study, we investigate how the flowering phenology of three alpine ginger Roscoea species responses to climate change over the century from 1913 to 2011, by comparing between herbarium-based phenology records and direct flowering observations. According to the observations, flowering onset of the three alpine ginger species occurred either 22 days earlier or was delayed by 8–30 days when comparing the mean peak flowering date between herbarium-based phenology records and direct flowering observations. It is likely that this significant change in flowering onset is due to increased annual minimum and maximum temperatures and mean annual temperature by about 0.053°C per year. Our results also show that flowering time changes occurred due to an increasing winter–spring minimum temperature and monsoon minimum temperature, suggesting that these Roscoea species respond greatly to climate warming resulting in changes on flowering times.

  8. Temperature Trends in the Polar Mesosphere between 2002-2007 using TIMED/SABER Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Richard A.; Kutepov, Alexander A.; Pesnell, William Dean; Latteck, Ralph; Russell, James M.

    2008-01-01

    The TIMED Satellite was launched on December 7, 2001 to study the dynamics and energy of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The TIMED/SABER instrument is a limb scanning infrared radiometer designed to measure a large number of minor constituents as well as the temperature of the region. In this study, we have concentrated on the polar mesosphere, to investigate the temperature characteristics as a function of spatial and temporal considerations. We used the recently revised SABER dataset (1.07) that contains improved temperature retrievals in the Earth polar summer regions. Weekly averages are used to make comparisons between the winter and summer, as well as to study the variability in different quadrants of each hemisphere. For each year studied, the duration of polar summer based on temperature measurements compares favorably with the PMSE (Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes) season measured by radar at the ALOMAR Observatory in Norway (69 N). The PMSE period should also define the summer period suitable for the occurrence of polar mesospheric clouds. The unusual short and relatively warm polar summer in the northern hemisphere

  9. Temperature profiles of time dependent tokamak plasmas from the parallel Ohm's law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micozzi, P.; Roccella, M.

    1993-01-01

    Profile consistency based on the parallel component of Ohm's law has been used to obtain electron temperature profiles. A resistive neoclassical term and a term that accounts for the bootstrap current contributions have been considered in Ohm's law. A numerical code has been developed to find solutions according to the MHD equilibrium equations. For stationary plasmas, the temperature profiles, obtained by a procedure in which a pseudo-parabolic shape of (J φ /R) is assumed and the peak temperature known from experiments is used, are close to the experimental data for several very different machines (JET, TFTR, ASDEX, ALCATOR-C and FT). The main feature of the model is its capability to provide an easy parametrization of Ohm's law also in non-stationary cases, without going through the complication of a detailed solution of the magnetic field diffusion equation. A rule for estimating a maximum value of the current diffusion time inside the plasma volume in such situations is given. This rule accounts for both the temperature profiles and the stabilization times in some non-stationary pulses observed in JET. (author). 28 refs, 12 figs

  10. The Effect of Temperature and Drying Method on Drying Time and Color Quality of Mint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Bahmanpour

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Mint (Mentha spicata L. cbelongs to the Lamiaceae family, is an herbaceous, perennial, aromatic and medicinal plant that cultivated for its essential oils and spices. Since the essential oil is extracted from dried plant, choosing the appropriate drying method is essential for gaining high quality essential oil.Vacuum drying technology is an alternative to conventional drying methods and reported by many authors as an efficient method for improving the drying quality especially color characteristics. On the other side, solar dryers are also useful for saving time and energy. In this study the effect of two method of dryings including vacuum-infrared versus solar at three different conventional temperatures (30, 40 and 50°C on mint plant is evaluated while factorial experiment with randomized complete block is applied. Drying time as well as color characteristics areconsidered for evaluation of each method of drying. Materials and Methods Factorial experiment with randomized complete block was applied in order to evaluate the effect of drying methods (vacuum-infrared versus solar and temperature (30, 40 and 50°C on drying time and color characteristics of mint. The initially moisture content of mint leaves measured according to the standard ASABE S358.2 during 24 hours inside an oven at 104 °C. Drying the samples continued until the moisture content (which real time measured reached to 10% wet basis. The components of a vacuum dryer consisted of a cylindrical vacuum chamber (0.335 m3 and a vacuum pump (piston version. The temperature of the chamber was controlled using three infrared bulbs using on-off controller. Temperature and weight of the products registered real time using a data acquisition system. The components of a solar dryer were consisting of a solar collector and a temperature control system which was turning the exhaust fan on and off in order to maintain the specific temperature. A date acquisition system was

  11. Biodiversity patterns, environmental drivers and indicator species on a high-temperature hydrothermal edifice, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    OpenAIRE

    Sarrazin, Jozée; Legendre, Pierre; de Busserolles, Fanny; Fabri, Marie-Claire; Guilini, Katja; Ivanenko, Viatcheslav N.; Morineaux, Marie; Vanreusel, Ann; Sarradin, Pierre-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge on quantitative faunal distribution patterns of hydrothermal communities in slow-spreading vent fields is particularly scarce, despite the importance of these ridges in the global mid-ocean system. This study assessed the composition, abundance and diversity of 12 benthic faunal assemblages from various locations on the Eiffel Tower edifice (Lucky Strike vent field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge) and investigated the role of key environmental conditions (temperature, total dissolved iron (TdFe...

  12. Effect of time and temperature on grain size of V and V-Cr-Ti alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Rink, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    Grain growth studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of time and temperature on the grain size of pure V, V-4 wt.%Cr-4 wt.%Ti, and V-5 wt.%Cr-5 wt.%Ti alloys. The temperatures used in the study were 500, 650, 800, and 1000 degrees C, and exposure times ranged between 100 and ∼5000 h. All three materials exhibited negligible grain growth at 500, 650, and 800 degrees C, even after ∼5000 h. At 1000 degrees C, pure V showed substantial grain growth after only 100 h, and V-4Cr-4Ti showed growth after 2000 h, while V-5Cr-5Ti showed no grain growth after exposure for up to 2000 h

  13. Short communication: Changes in body temperature of calves up to 2 months of age as affected by time of day, age, and ambient temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T M; Bateman, H G; Suarez-Mena, F X; Dennis, T S; Schlotterbeck, R L

    2016-11-01

    Extensive measurements of calf body temperature are limited in the literature. In this study, body temperatures were collected by taping a data logger to the skin over the tail vein opposing the rectum of Holstein calves between 4 and 60d of age during 3 different periods of the summer and fall. The summer period was separated into moderate (21-33°C average low to high) and hot (25-37°C) periods, whereas the fall exhibited cool (11-19°C) ambient temperatures. Tail temperatures were compared in a mixed model ANOVA using ambient temperature, age of calf, and time of day (10-min increments) as fixed effects and calf as a random effect. Measures within calf were modeled as repeated effects of type autoregressive 1. Calf temperature increased 0.0325°C (±0.00035) per 1°C increase in ambient temperature. Body temperature varied in a distinct, diurnal pattern with time of day, with body temperatures being lowest around 0800h and highest between 1700 and 2200h. During periods of hot weather, the highest calf temperature was later in the day (~2200h). Calf minimum, maximum, and average body temperatures were all higher in hot than in moderate periods and higher in moderate than in cool periods. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Acrylamide formation in almonds (Prunus dulcis): influences of roasting time and temperature, precursors, varietal selection, and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gong; Huang, Guangwei; Xiao, Lu; Seiber, James; Mitchell, Alyson E

    2011-08-10

    Acrylamide is a probable human carcinogen that is found in many roasted and baked foods. This paper describes two sensitive and reliable LC-(ESI)MS/MS methods for the analysis of (1) acrylamide and (2) common acrylamide precursors (i.e., glucose, fructose, asparagine, and glutamine) in raw and roasted almonds. These methods were used to evaluate the impact of roasting temperatures (between 129 and 182 °C) and times on acrylamide formation. Controlling the roasting temperature at or below 146 °C resulted in acrylamide levels below 200 ppb at all roasting times evaluated. Six varieties of almonds collected in various regions of California over two harvest years and roasted at 138 °C for 22 min had acrylamide levels ranging from 117 ± 5 μg/kg (Sonora) to 221 ± 95 μg/kg (Butte) with an average of 187 ± 71 μg/kg. A weak correlation between asparagine content in raw almonds and acrylamide formation was observed (R(2) = 0.6787). No statistical relationship was found between acrylamide formation and almond variety, orchard region, or harvest year. Stability studies on roasted almonds indicated that acrylamide levels decreased by 12.9-68.5% (average of 50.2%) after 3 days of storage at 60 °C. Short-term elevated temperature storage may be another approach for mitigating acrylamide levels in roasted almonds.

  15. Influence of different sanitizers on food contaminant bacteria: effect of exposure temperature, contact time, and product concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezar Augusto Beltrame

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of four Sanitizers - peracetic acid, chlorhexidine, quaternary ammonium, and organic acids - was tested in this work using different bacteria recognized as a problem to meat industry, Salmonella sp., S. aureus, E. coli and L. monocytogenes. The effects of sanitizer concentration (0.2, 0.5, 0.6, 1.0, 1.1 and 1.4%, at different temperatures (10 and 45 °C and contact time (2, 10, 15, 18 and 25 minutes were evaluated. Tests in an industrial plant were also carried out considering previously obtained results. In a general way, peracetic acid presented higher efficiencies using low concentration (0.2% and contact time (2 minutes at 10 °C. The tests performed in industrial scale showed that peracetic acid presented a good performance in concentration and contact time lower than that suggested by the suppliers. The use of chlorhexidine and quaternary ammonium led to reasonable results at the indicated conditions, and organic acids were ineffective under concentration and contact time higher than those indicated by the suppliers in relation to Staphylococcus aureus. The results, in general, show that the choice for the most adequate sanitizer depends on the microorganism contaminant, the time available for sanitizer application, and also on the process cost.

  16. Antarctic Iceberg Tracking Based on Time Series of Aqua AMSR-E Microwave Brightness Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonski, S.; Peterson, C. A.

    2006-12-01

    Observations of icebergs are identified as one of the requirements for the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) in the area of reducing loss of life and property from natural and human-induced disasters. However, iceberg observations are not included among targets in the GEOSS 10-Year Implementation Plan, and thus there is an unfulfilled need for iceberg detection and tracking in the near future. Large Antarctic icebergs have been tracked by the National Ice Center and by the academic community using a variety of satellite sensors including both passive and active microwave imagers, such as SSM/I (Special Sensor Microwave/Imager) deployed on the DMSP (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program) spacecraft. Improvements provided in recent years by NASA and non-NASA satellite radars, scatterometers, and radiometers resulted in an increased number of observed icebergs and even prompted a question: `Is The Number of Antarctic Icebergs Really Increasing?' [D.G. Long, J. Ballantyne, and C. Bertoia, Eos, AGU Transactions 83(42):469&474, 15 October 2002]. AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System) represents an improvement over SSM/I, its predecessor. AMSR-E has more measurement channels and higher spatial resolution than SSM/I. For example, the instantaneous field of view of the AMSR-E's 89-GHz channels is 6 km by 4 km versus 16 km by 14 km for SSM/I's comparable 85-GHz channels. AMSR-E, deployed on the Aqua satellite, scans across a 1450-km swath and provides brightness temperature measurements with near-global coverage every one or two days. In polar regions, overlapping swaths generate coverage up to multiple times per day and allow for creation of image time series with high temporal resolution. Despite these advantages, only incidental usage of AMSR-E data for iceberg tracking has been reported so far, none in an operational environment. Therefore, an experiment was undertaken in the RPC (Rapid Prototyping Capability

  17. Leaf d15N as a physiological indicator of the responsiveness of N2-fixing alfalfa plants to elevated [CO2], temperature and low water availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idoia eAriz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The natural 15N/14N isotope composition (δ15N of a tissue is a consequence of its N source and N physiological mechanisms in response to the environment. It could potentially be used as a tracer of N metabolism in plants under changing environmental conditions, where primary N metabolism may be complex, and losses and gains of N fluctuate over time. In order to test the utility of δ15N as an indicator of plant N status in N2-fixing plants grown under various environmental conditions, alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. plants were subjected to distinct conditions of [CO2] (400 versus 700 mol mol-1, temperature (ambient versus ambient + 4ºC and water availability (fully watered versus water deficiency - WD. As expected, increased [CO2] and temperature stimulated photosynthetic rates and plant growth, whereas these parameters were negatively affected by WD. The determination of δ15N in leaves, stems, roots and nodules showed that leaves were the most representative organs of the plant response to increased [CO2] and WD. Depletion of heavier N isotopes in plants grown under higher [CO2] and WD conditions reflected decreased transpiration rates, but could also be related to a higher N demand in leaves, as suggested by the decreased leaf N and total soluble protein (TSP contents detected at 700 mol mol-1 [CO2] and WD conditions. In summary, leaf δ15N provides relevant information integrating parameters which condition plant responsiveness (e.g. photosynthesis, TSP, N demand and water transpiration to environmental conditions.

  18. A diagnostic for time-resolved spatial profiles measurements on the ion temperature on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocken, H.J.B.M.; Ven, H.W van der.

    1980-05-01

    A neutral particle scattering experiment for a continuous measurement of the ion temperature and ion density of the JET plasma in the hydrogen and deuterium phase is proposed. Space- and time-resolved measurements are possible by injection of a mono-energetic particle beam into the plasma and from the analysis of the velocity distribution of the scattered particles. The requirements on the injection system are specified and a suitable analyzer system is described

  19. Time dependent shear stress and temperature distribution over an insulated flat plate moving at hypersonic speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodkiewicz, C. M.; Gupta, R. N.

    1971-01-01

    The laminar two-dimensional flow over a stepwise accelerated flat plate moving with hypersonic speed at zero angle of attack is analysed. The governing equations in the self-similar form are linearized and solved numerically for small times. The solutions obtained are the deviations of the velocity and the temperature profiles from those of steady state. The presented results may be used to find the first order boundary layer induced pressure on the plate.

  20. The influence of temperature and reaction time in the degradation of natural rubber latex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Zaleha Isa; Rosiyah Yahya; Aziz Hassan; Mohd Tahir

    2007-01-01

    Liquid natural rubber (LNR /LENR) should be considered as a new material instead of a new type of rubber though they have the same configuration as the rubber used. In this work, thermal degradation of natural rubber latex was carried out to obtain LNR/LENR by varying the reaction time at different temperatures. The degraded polymers were characterized structurally using FTIR and NMR spectroscopies and the average molecular weights were determined by membrane-osmometry and viscometry. (author)

  1. CARBON CRYOGEL MICROSPHERE FOR ETHYL LEVULINATE PRODUCTION: EFFECT OF CARBONIZATION TEMPERATURE AND TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUZAKKIR M. ZAINOL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The side products of biomass and bio-fuel industry have shown potential in producing carbon catalyst. The carbon cryogel was synthesized from ligninfurfural mixture based on the following details: 1.0 of lignin to furfural (L/F ratio, 1.0 of lignin to water (L/W ratio, and 8M of acid concentration. The lignin-furfural sol-gel mixture, initially prepared via polycondensation reaction at 90 °C for 30 min, was followed by freeze drying and carbonization process. Effects of carbonization temperature and time were investigated on the total acidity and surface area of the carbon cryogel. Furthermore, the effects of these parameters were studied on the ethyl levulinate yield through esterification reaction of levulinic acid in ethanol. The esterification reaction was conducted at reflux temperature, 10 h of reaction time, 19 molar ratio of ethanol to levulinic acid, and 15.0 wt.% carbon cryogel loading. Based on the carbonization temperature and time studies, the carbon cryogel carbonized at 500 °C and 4 h exhibited good performance as solid acid catalyst. Large total surface area and acidity significantly influenced the catalytic activity of carbon cryogel with 80.0 wt.% yield of ethyl levulinate. Thus, carbon cryogel is highly potential as acid catalyst for the esterification of levulinic acid with ethanol.

  2. Time-temperature dependent variations in beta-carotene contents in carrot using different spectrophotometric techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Rahat; Khan, Saranjam; Shah, Attaullah; Ali, Hina; Bilal, Muhammad

    2018-05-01

    The current study presents time dependent variations in the concentration of beta-carotene in carrot under different storage-temperature conditions using UV–VIS and Raman spectrophotometric techniques. The UV–VIS absorption spectra of beta-carotene extracted from carrot shows three distinct absorption peaks at 442, 467, and 500 nm with maximum absorption at 467 nm. These absorption peaks are very much reproducible and are assigned to β-carotene. Similarly, Raman spectra of carrot samples also confirmed the three main Raman peaks of beta-carotene at shift positions 1003, 1150, and 1515 cm‑1. An overall decrease in beta-carotene content has been observed for time-temperature conditions. These results depict a decrease of about 40% in the content of beta-carotene when carrot samples were stored in a refrigerator (4 °C) for the first 20 d, whereas a decrease of about 25% was observed when carrot samples were stored in a freezer (‑16 °C) for the same period. The objective of this study is to investigate the possible use of Raman spectroscopy and UV–VIS spectroscopy for quick and detailed analysis of changes (degradation) in beta-carotene content associated with time and temperature in storage (frozen foods) in order to promote quality foods for consumers. Future study with a greater focus on the concentration/content of beta-carotene in other fruits/vegetables is also desirable.

  3. Effect of frying temperature and time on image characterizations of pellet snacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi Moghaddam, Toktam; BahramParvar, Maryam; Razavi, Seyed M A

    2015-05-01

    The development of non-destructive methods for the evaluation of food properties has important advantages for the food processing industries. So, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of frying temperature (150, 170, and 190 °C) and time (0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 and 4.5 min) on image properties (L*, a* and b*, fractal dimension, correlation, entropy, contrast and homogeneity) of pellet snacks. Textures were computed separately for eight channels (RGB, R, G, B, U, V, H and S). Enhancing the frying time from 0.5 min to 2.5 min increased the fractal dimension; but its increase from 2.5 min to 4.5 min could not expand the samples. Then, the highest volume of pellet snacks was observed at 2.5 min. Features derived from the image texture contained better information than color features. The best result was for U channel which showed that increasing the frying time increased the contrast, entropy and correlation. Developing the frying temperature up to 170 °C decreased contrast, entropy and correlation of images; however these factors were increased when frying temperature was 190 °C. These results were invert for homogeneity.

  4. Outdoor time, physical activity, sedentary time, and health indicators at ages 7 to 14: 2012/2013 Canadian Health Measures Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larouche, Richard; Garriguet, Didier; Gunnell, Katie E; Goldfield, Gary S; Tremblay, Mark S

    2016-09-21

    International data show that the majority of children and youth are not sufficiently active. According to recent research, children who spend more time outdoors accumulate more daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and engage in less sedentary behaviour. However, the generalizability of these findings is uncertain, and few studies investigated whether outdoor time is associated with other physical and psychosocial health indicators. This study examined associations between outdoor time and measures of physical activity, sedentary time, and physical and psychosocial health in a nationally representative sample of 7-to-14-year-olds (n = 1,159) who participated in the 2012/2013 Canadian Health Measures Survey. Physical activity and sedentary time were measured with Actical accelerometers. Direct measures of height, weight, waist circumference, grip strength, blood pressure, cholesterol, and glycohemoglobin were obtained. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire was used to assess psychosocial health. Relationships between outdoor time and physical health measures were examined with multi-variable linear regression models adjusted for age, sex, parental education, and household income. Logistic regression models controlling for the same variables were used for psychosocial health. Each additional hour spent outdoors per day was associated with 7.0 more minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, 762 more steps, and 13 fewer minutes of sedentary time. As well, each hour outdoors was associated with lower odds of negative psychosocial outcomes (specifically, peer relationship problems and total difficulties score). Outdoor time was not associated with any of the measures of physical health. Children reporting more time outdoors are more active, less sedentary, and less likely to have peer relationship problems, compared with those who spend less time outdoors.

  5. A cost effective model for appropriate administration of red cell units and salvaging un-transfused red cell units by using temperature sensitive indicators for blood component transportation in a hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aseem K Tiwari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A rule called "30-min rule" defines that red cell unit cannot be used if it has been out of blood bank refrigerator for over 30 min. This rule is useful to guide initiation of transfusion, but is inadequate for deciding whether to reuse or discard units received-back at blood transfusion services (BTS. A simple cost-effective temperature-sensitive indicator was evaluated to decide upon reuse (cold chain was uninterrupted or discard (where cold chain was interrupted in a simulation exercise. Materials and Methods: Temperature-sensitive indicators TH-F™ that irreversibly changed color from white to red demonstrated that heat excursion has occurred and the cumulative temperature has exceeded 10°C for over 30 min, were used in outdated red cells for simulating units, which are not used and received-back. These units were also tagged with a standard temperature monitoring device, which was a re-usable credit card sized device, which would log the actual time and temperature. In few units percent hemolysis was also calculated. Results: Statistically insignificant elevation in average temperature was noted in 102 simulated units at the time of return to BTS (Δ 0.04°C, despite the fact that these units were in the transport box for over 4 h. The average supernatant hemoglobin in these units was 0.24%, much below the prescribed threshold. Conclusion: Transportation of blood in controlled conditions with temperature-sensitive indicator is a cost-effective model to save blood, a precious human resource.

  6. Time, stress, and temperature-dependent deformation in nanostructured copper: Stress relaxation tests and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xu-Sheng; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Wang, Guo-Yong; Zhai, Hui-Ru; Dai, L.H.; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, stress relaxation tests, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted on coarse-grained (cg), nanograined (ng), and nanotwinned (nt) copper at temperatures of 22 °C (RT), 30 °C, 40 °C, 50 °C, and 75 °C. The comprehensive investigations provide sufficient information for the building-up of a formula to describe the time, stress, and temperature-dependent deformation and clarify the relationship among the strain rate sensitivity parameter, stress exponent, and activation volume. The typically experimental curves of logarithmic plastic strain rate versus stress exhibited a three staged relaxation process from a linear high stress relaxation region to a subsequent nonlinear stress relaxation region and finally to a linear low stress relaxation region, which only showed-up at the test temperatures higher than 22 °C, 22 °C, and 30 °C, respectively, in the tested cg-, ng-, and nt-Cu specimens. The values of stress exponent, stress-independent activation energy, and activation volume were determined from the experimental data in the two linear regions. The determined activation parameters, HRTEM images, and MD simulations consistently suggest that dislocation-mediated plastic deformation is predominant in all tested cg-, ng-, and nt-Cu specimens in the initial linear high stress relaxation region at the five relaxation temperatures, whereas in the linear low stress relaxation region, the grain boundary (GB) diffusion-associated deformation is dominant in the ng- and cg-Cu specimens, while twin boundary (TB) migration, i.e., twinning and detwinning with parallel partial dislocations, governs the time, stress, and temperature-dependent deformation in the nt-Cu specimens.

  7. Strength and Anisotropy in Tournemire Shale: Temperature, Pressure and Time Dependences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnelye, A.; Schubnel, A.; Zhi, G.; David, C.; Dick, P.

    2017-12-01

    Time and temperature dependent rock deformation has both scientific and socio-economic implications for natural hazards, the oil and gas industry and nuclear waste disposal. During the past decades, most studies on brittle creep have focused on igneous rocks and porous sedimentary rocks. To our knowledge, only few studies have been carried out on the brittle creep behavior of shale. We conducted a series of creep experiments on shale specimens coming from the French Institute for Nuclear Safety (IRSN) underground research laboratory located in Tournemire, France, under two different temperatures (26°C, 75°C) and confining pressures (10 MPa, 80 MPa), for three orientations (σ1along, perpendicular and 45° to bedding). In these long-term experiments (approximately 10 days), stress and strains were recorded continuously, while ultrasonic acoustic velocities were recorded every 1 15 minutes. The brittle creep failure stress of our Tournemire shale samples was systematically observed 50% higher than its short-term peak strength, with larger final axial strain accumulated. During creep, ultrasonic wave velocities first decreased, and then increased gradually. The magnitude of elastic wave velocity variations showed an important orientation and temperature dependence: velocities measured perpendicular to bedding showed increased variation, variation that was enhanced at higher temperature and higher pressure. The case of complete elastic anisotropy reversal was observed for sample deformed perpendicular to bedding, with amount of axial strain needed to reach anisotropy reversal reduced at higher temperature. SEM observations highlight the competition between crack growth, sealing/healing, and possibly mineral rotation, pressure solution or anisotropic compaction during creep defromation. Our study highlights that the short-term peak strength has little meaning in shale material, which can over-consolidate importantly by `plastic' flow. In addition, we show that elastic

  8. Temperature and time stability of whole blood lactate: implications for feasibility of pre-hospital measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watkins Timothy R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the time and temperature stability of whole blood lactate using experimental conditions applicable to the out-of-hospital environment. Findings We performed a prospective, clinical laboratory-based study at an academic hospital. Whole blood lactate was obtained by venipuncture from five post-prandial, resting subjects. Blood was stored in lithium heparinized vacutainers in three temperature conditions: 1 room temperature (20°C, 2 wrapped in a portable, instant ice pack (0°C, or 3 wet ice (0°C. Lactate concentrations (mmol/L were measured at 0, 5, 10, 20, and 30 minutes after sampling, and compared using repeated measures analysis of variance. Mean baseline lactate among resting subjects (N = 5 was 1.24 mmol/L (95%CI: 0.49,1.98 mmol/L. After 30 minutes, lactate concentration increased, on average, by 0.08 mmol/L (95%CI: 0.02,0.13 mmol/L, 0.18 mmol/L (95%CI: 0.07,0.28 mmol/L, and 0.36 mmol/L (95%CI: 0.24,0.47 mmol/L when stored in wet ice, ice pack, and room temperature, respectively. The increase in lactate was similar in samples wrapped in portable ice pack or stored in wet ice at all time points (p > 0.05, and met criteria for equivalence at 30 minutes. However, lactate measurements from whole blood stored at room temperature were significantly greater, on average, than wet ice or portable ice pack within five and ten minutes, respectively (p Conclusions Whole blood lactate measurements using samples stored in a portable ice pack are similar to wet ice for up to 30 minutes. These conditions are applicable to the out-of-hospital environment, and should inform future studies of pre-hospital measurement of lactate.

  9. The influence of storage time and temperature on the measurement of serum, plasma and urine osmolality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezuidenhout, Karla; Rensburg, Megan A; Hudson, Careen L; Essack, Younus; Davids, M Razeen

    2016-07-01

    Many clinical laboratories require that specimens for serum and urine osmolality determination be processed within 3 h of sampling or need to arrive at the laboratory on ice. This protocol is based on the World Health Organization report on sample storage and stability, but the recommendation lacks good supporting data. We studied the effect of storage temperature and time on osmolality measurements. Blood and urine samples were obtained from 16 patients and 25 healthy volunteers. Baseline serum, plasma and urine osmolality measurements were performed within 30 min. Measurements were then made at 3, 6, 12, 24 and 36 h on samples stored at 4-8℃ and room temperature. We compared baseline values with subsequent measurements and used difference plots to illustrate changes in osmolality. At 4-8℃, serum and plasma osmolality were stable for up to 36 h. At room temperature, serum and plasma osmolality were very stable for up to 12 h. At 24 and 36 h, changes from baseline osmolality were statistically significant and exceeded the total allowable error of 1.5% but not the reference change value of 4.1%. Urine osmolality was extremely stable at room temperature with a mean change of less than 1 mosmol/kg at 36 h. Serum and plasma samples can be stored at room temperature for up to 36 h before measuring osmolality. Cooling samples to 4-8℃ may be useful when delays in measurement beyond 12 h are anticipated. Urine osmolality is extremely stable for up to 36 h at room temperature. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Femtosecond Time-Resolved Resonance-Enhanced CARS of Gaseous Iodine at Room Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Ping; Fan Rong-Wei; Xia Yuan-Qin; Yu Xin; Chen De-Ying; Yao Yong

    2011-01-01

    Time-resolved resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is applied to investigate molecular dynamics in gaseous iodine. 40 fs laser pulses are applied to create and monitor the high vibrational states of iodine at room temperature (corresponding to a vapor pressure as low as about 35 Pa) by femtosecond time-resolved CARS. Depending on the time delay between the probe pulse and the pump/Stokes pulse pairs, the high vibrational states both on the electronically ground states and the excited states can be detected as oscillations in the CARS transient signal. It is proved that the femtosecond time-resolved CARS technique is a promising candidate for investigating the molecular dynamics of a low concentration system and can be applied to environmental and atmospheric monitoring measurements. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  11. Frequency and temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity of KTaO3; Li and PbTiO3; La, Cu: Indication of a low temperature polaron mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levstik, A.; Filipic, C.; Bidault, O.; Maglione, M.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the concept of polarons has again been at the focus of solid-state research, as it can constitute the basis for understanding the high-temperature superconductivity or the colossal magnetoresistance of materials. More than a decade ago there were some indications that polarons play an important role in explaining low temperature maxima in imaginary part of the dielectric constant ε '' (T) in ABO 3 perovskites. In the present work we report the ac electrical conductivities of KTaO 3 ; Li and PbTiO 3 ; La, Cu and their frequency and temperature dependence. The real part of the complex ac conductivity was found to follow the universal dielectric response σ ' ∝ν s . A detailed theoretical analysis of the temperature dependence of the parameter s revealed that, at low temperatures, the tunnelling of small polarons is the dominating charge transport mechanism in ABO 3 perovskites

  12. Multi-species time-history measurements during high-temperature acetone and 2-butanone pyrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Lam, Kingyiu

    2013-01-01

    High-temperature acetone and 2-butanone pyrolysis studies were conducted behind reflected shock waves using five species time-history measurements (ketone, CO, CH3, CH4 and C2H4). Experimental conditions covered temperatures of 1100-1600 Kat 1.6 atm, for mixtures of 0.25-1.5% ketone in argon. During acetone pyrolysis, the CO concentration time-history was found to be strongly sensitive to the acetone dissociation rate constant κ1 (CH3COCH3 → CH3 + CH3CO), and this could be directly determined from the CO time-histories, yielding κ1(1.6 atm) = 2.46 × 1014 exp(-69.3 [kcal/mol]/RT) s-1 with an uncertainty of ±25%. This rate constant is in good agreement with previous shock tube studies from Sato and Hidaka (2000) [3] and Saxena et al. (2009) [4] (within 30%) at temperatures above 1450 K, but is at least three times faster than the evaluation from Sato and Hidaka at temperatures below 1250 K. Using this revised κ1 value with the recent mechanism of Pichon et al. (2009) [5], the simulated profiles during acetone pyrolysis show excellent agreement with all five species time-history measurements. Similarly, the overall 2-butanone decomposition rate constant κtot was inferred from measured 2-butanone time-histories, yielding κ tot(1.5 atm) = 6.08 × 1013 exp(-63.1 [kcal/mol]/RT) s -1 with an uncertainty of ±35%. This rate constant is approximately 30% faster than that proposed by Serinyel et al. (2010) [11] at 1119 K, and approximately 100% faster at 1412 K. Using the measured 2-butanone and CO time-histories and an O-atom balance analysis, a missing removal pathway for methyl ketene was identified. The rate constant for the decomposition of methyl ketene was assumed to be the same as the value for the ketene decomposition reaction. Using the revised κtot value and adding the methyl ketene decomposition reaction to the Serinyel et al. mechanism, the simulated profiles during 2-butanone pyrolysis show good agreement with the measurements for all five species.

  13. Real-Time Prediction of Temperature Elevation During Robotic Bone Drilling Using the Torque Signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Arne; Gavaghan, Kate; Stebinger, Manuel; Williamson, Tom; Weber, Stefan; Zysset, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Bone drilling is a surgical procedure commonly required in many surgical fields, particularly orthopedics, dentistry and head and neck surgeries. While the long-term effects of thermal bone necrosis are unknown, the thermal damage to nerves in spinal or otolaryngological surgeries might lead to partial paralysis. Previous models to predict the temperature elevation have been suggested, but were not validated or have the disadvantages of computation time and complexity which does not allow real time predictions. Within this study, an analytical temperature prediction model is proposed which uses the torque signal of the drilling process to model the heat production of the drill bit. A simple Green's disk source function is used to solve the three dimensional heat equation along the drilling axis. Additionally, an extensive experimental study was carried out to validate the model. A custom CNC-setup with a load cell and a thermal camera was used to measure the axial drilling torque and force as well as temperature elevations. Bones with different sets of bone volume fraction were drilled with two drill bits ([Formula: see text]1.8 mm and [Formula: see text]2.5 mm) and repeated eight times. The model was calibrated with 5 of 40 measurements and successfully validated with the rest of the data ([Formula: see text]C). It was also found that the temperature elevation can be predicted using only the torque signal of the drilling process. In the future, the model could be used to monitor and control the drilling process of surgeries close to vulnerable structures.

  14. All-Digital Time-Domain CMOS Smart Temperature Sensor with On-Chip Linearity Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Chen, Chao-Lieh; Lin, Yi

    2016-01-30

    This paper proposes the first all-digital on-chip linearity enhancement technique for improving the accuracy of the time-domain complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) smart temperature sensor. To facilitate on-chip application and intellectual property reuse, an all-digital time-domain smart temperature sensor was implemented using 90 nm Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). Although the inverter-based temperature sensor has a smaller circuit area and lower complexity, two-point calibration must be used to achieve an acceptable inaccuracy. With the help of a calibration circuit, the influence of process variations was reduced greatly for one-point calibration support, reducing the test costs and time. However, the sensor response still exhibited a large curvature, which substantially affected the accuracy of the sensor. Thus, an on-chip linearity-enhanced circuit is proposed to linearize the curve and achieve a new linearity-enhanced output. The sensor was implemented on eight different Xilinx FPGA using 118 slices per sensor in each FPGA to demonstrate the benefits of the linearization. Compared with the unlinearized version, the maximal inaccuracy of the linearized version decreased from 5 °C to 2.5 °C after one-point calibration in a range of -20 °C to 100 °C. The sensor consumed 95 μW using 1 kSa/s. The proposed linearity enhancement technique significantly improves temperature sensing accuracy, avoiding costly curvature compensation while it is fully synthesizable for future Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) system.

  15. A Real-Time Recording Model of Key Indicators for Energy Consumption and Carbon Emissions of Sustainable Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Wu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Buildings’ sustainability is one of the crucial parts for achieving urban sustainability. Applied to buildings, life-cycle assessment encompasses the analysis and assessment of the environmental effects of building materials, components and assemblies throughout the entire life of the building construction, use and demolition. Estimate of carbon emissions is essential and crucial for an accurate and reasonable life-cycle assessment. Addressing the need for more research into integrating analysis of real-time and automatic recording of key indicators for a more accurate calculation and comparison, this paper aims to design a real-time recording model of these crucial indicators concerning the calculation and estimation of energy use and carbon emissions of buildings based on a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID-based system. The architecture of the RFID-based carbon emission recording/tracking system, which contains four functional layers including data record layer, data collection/update layer, data aggregation layer and data sharing/backup layer, is presented. Each of these layers is formed by RFID or network devices and sub-systems that operate at a specific level. In the end, a proof-of-concept system is developed to illustrate the implementation of the proposed architecture and demonstrate the feasibility of the design. This study would provide the technical solution for real-time recording system of building carbon emissions and thus is of great significance and importance to improve urban sustainability.

  16. A Real-Time Recording Model of Key Indicators for Energy Consumption and Carbon Emissions of Sustainable Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weiwei; Yang, Huanjia; Chew, David; Hou, Yanhong; Li, Qiming

    2014-01-01

    Buildings' sustainability is one of the crucial parts for achieving urban sustainability. Applied to buildings, life-cycle assessment encompasses the analysis and assessment of the environmental effects of building materials, components and assemblies throughout the entire life of the building construction, use and demolition. Estimate of carbon emissions is essential and crucial for an accurate and reasonable life-cycle assessment. Addressing the need for more research into integrating analysis of real-time and automatic recording of key indicators for a more accurate calculation and comparison, this paper aims to design a real-time recording model of these crucial indicators concerning the calculation and estimation of energy use and carbon emissions of buildings based on a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)-based system. The architecture of the RFID-based carbon emission recording/tracking system, which contains four functional layers including data record layer, data collection/update layer, data aggregation layer and data sharing/backup layer, is presented. Each of these layers is formed by RFID or network devices and sub-systems that operate at a specific level. In the end, a proof-of-concept system is developed to illustrate the implementation of the proposed architecture and demonstrate the feasibility of the design. This study would provide the technical solution for real-time recording system of building carbon emissions and thus is of great significance and importance to improve urban sustainability. PMID:24831109

  17. Does diet mediate associations of volume and bouts of sedentary time with cardiometabolic health indicators in adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Elly A; Carson, Valerie; McNaughton, Sarah A; Dunstan, David W; Healy, Genevieve N; Salmon, Jo

    2017-03-01

    Examine the mediating role of diet in the relationship between volume and duration of sedentary time with cardiometabolic health in adolescents. Adolescents (12-19 years) participating in the 2003/04 and 2005/06 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were examined. Cardiometabolic health indicators were body mass index z-scores (zBMI) (n = 1,797) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) (n = 812). An ActiGraph hip-worn accelerometer was used to derive total sedentary time and usual sedentary bout duration. Dietary intake was assessed using two 24-hour dietary recalls. Mediation analyses were conducted to examine five dietary mediators [total energy intake, discretionary foods, sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), fruits and vegetables, and dietary quality] of the relationship between total sedentary time and usual sedentary bout duration with zBMI and MetS. Total sedentary time was inversely associated with zBMI (β = -1.33; 95% CI -2.53 to -0.13) but attenuated after adjusting for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. No significant associations were observed between usual sedentary bout duration with zBMI or either sedentary measure with MetS. None of the five dietary variables mediated any of the relationships examined. Further studies are needed to explore associations of specific time periods (e.g., after school) and bout durations with both cardiometabolic health indicators and dietary behaviors. © 2017 The Authors. Obesity published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Obesity Society (TOS).

  18. Detection of nicotine as an indicator of tobacco smoke by direct analysis in real time (DART) tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuki, Ákos; Nagy, Lajos; Nagy, Tibor; Zsuga, Miklós; Kéki, Sándor

    2015-01-01

    The residual tobacco smoke contamination (thirdhand smoke, THS) on the clothes of a smoker was examined by direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectrometry. DART-MS enabled sensitive and selective analysis of nicotine as the indicator of tobacco smoke pollution. Tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) experiments were also performed to confirm the identification of nicotine. Transferred thirdhand smoke originated from the fingers of a smoker onto other objects was also detected by DART mass spectrometry. DART-MS/MS was utilized for monitoring the secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS) in the air of the laboratory using nicotine as an indicator. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the application of DART-MS and DART-MS/MS to the detection of thirdhand smoke and to the monitoring of secondhand smoke.

  19. Time--temperature relation of embryonic development in the northwestern salamander, Ambystoma gracile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, H A

    1976-04-01

    A field and laboratory study on temperature-related embryonic development of Ambystoma gracile was made on a population from northwestern Washington. Natural spawning began in the beaver pond during early March, and the duration of embryonic development (stages 1 to 46) was about 62 days. Average water temperature in the pond during embryonic development was 8.5/sup 0/C (range, 4.4 to 14.3/sup 0/C). The laboratory data of embryonic development at constant temperatures show that the limits of temperature tolerance are about 5 to 22.5/sup 0/C. Rate of development was measured by determining time required to develop from first cleavage (stage 2) to gill circulation (stage 37); representative rates are 12.7 days at 20/sup 0/C, 27 days at 12/sup 0/C, and 89 days at 7/sup 0/C. Embryos of A. gracile have the slowest rate of development when compared with embryos of four other species of Ambystoma (maculatum, mexicanum, tigrinum, and jeffersonianum) and with embryos of three Pacific Northwest frogs (Ascaphus truei, Rana aurora, and Hyla regilla).

  20. Extracting the temperature of hot carriers in time- and angle-resolved photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulstrup, Søren; Hofmann, Philip; Johannsen, Jens Christian; Grioni, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of light with a material's electronic system creates an out-of-equilibrium (non-thermal) distribution of optically excited electrons. Non-equilibrium dynamics relaxes this distribution on an ultrafast timescale to a hot Fermi-Dirac distribution with a well-defined temperature. The advent of time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TR-ARPES) experiments has made it possible to track the decay of the temperature of the excited hot electrons in selected states in the Brillouin zone, and to reveal their cooling in unprecedented detail in a variety of emerging materials. It is, however, not a straightforward task to determine the temperature with high accuracy. This is mainly attributable to an a priori unknown position of the Fermi level and the fact that the shape of the Fermi edge can be severely perturbed when the state in question is crossing the Fermi energy. Here, we introduce a method that circumvents these difficulties and accurately extracts both the temperature and the position of the Fermi level for a hot carrier distribution by tracking the occupation statistics of the carriers measured in a TR-ARPES experiment

  1. Extracting the temperature of hot carriers in time- and angle-resolved photoemission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulstrup, Søren; Johannsen, Jens Christian; Grioni, Marco; Hofmann, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of light with a material's electronic system creates an out-of-equilibrium (non-thermal) distribution of optically excited electrons. Non-equilibrium dynamics relaxes this distribution on an ultrafast timescale to a hot Fermi-Dirac distribution with a well-defined temperature. The advent of time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TR-ARPES) experiments has made it possible to track the decay of the temperature of the excited hot electrons in selected states in the Brillouin zone, and to reveal their cooling in unprecedented detail in a variety of emerging materials. It is, however, not a straightforward task to determine the temperature with high accuracy. This is mainly attributable to an a priori unknown position of the Fermi level and the fact that the shape of the Fermi edge can be severely perturbed when the state in question is crossing the Fermi energy. Here, we introduce a method that circumvents these difficulties and accurately extracts both the temperature and the position of the Fermi level for a hot carrier distribution by tracking the occupation statistics of the carriers measured in a TR-ARPES experiment.

  2. Drosophila mitotypes determine developmental time in a diet and temperature dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towarnicki, Samuel G; Ballard, J William O

    2017-07-01

    It is well known that specific mitochondrial (mt) DNA mutations can reduce organismal fitness and influence mitochondrial-nuclear interactions. However, determining specific mtDNA mutations that are beneficial has been elusive. In this study, we vary the diet and environmental temperature to study larval development time of two Drosophila melanogaster mitotypes (Alstonville and Dahomey), in two nuclear genetic backgrounds, and investigate developmental differences through weight, feeding rate, and movement. To manipulate the diet, we utilize the nutritional geometric framework to manipulate isocaloric diets of differing macronutrient ratios (1:2 and 1:16 protein: carbohydrate (P:C) ratios) and raise flies at three temperatures (19°C, 23°C and 27°C). Larvae with Dahomey mtDNA develop more slowly than Alstonville when fed the 1:2 P:C diet at all temperatures and developed more quickly when fed the 1:16 P:C diet at 23°C and 27°C. We determined that Dahomey larvae eat more, move less, and weigh more than Alstonville larvae when raised on the 1:16 P:C diet and that these physiological responses are modified by temperature. We suggest that 1 (or more) of 4 mtDNA changes is likely responsible for the observed effects and posit the mtDNA changes moderate a physiological trade-off between consumption and foraging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamical equations for time-ordered Green’s functions: from the Keldysh time-loop contour to equilibrium at finite and zero temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ness, H; Dash, L K

    2012-01-01

    We study the dynamical equation of the time-ordered Green’s function at finite temperature. We show that the time-ordered Green’s function obeys a conventional Dyson equation only at equilibrium and in the limit of zero temperature. In all other cases, i.e. finite temperature at equilibrium or non-equilibrium, the time-ordered Green’s function obeys instead a modified Dyson equation. The derivation of this result is obtained from the general formalism of the non-equilibrium Green’s functions on the Keldysh time-loop contour. At equilibrium, our result is fully consistent with the Matsubara temperature Green’s function formalism and also justifies rigorously the correction terms introduced in an ad hoc way with Hedin and Lundqvist. Our results show that one should use the appropriate dynamical equation for the time-ordered Green’s function when working beyond the equilibrium zero-temperature limit.

  4. Reference of Temperature and Time during tempering process for non-stoichiometric FTO films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J. K.; Liang, B.; Zhao, M. J.; Gao, Y.; Zhang, F. C.; Zhao, H. L.

    2015-10-01

    In order to enhance the mechanical strength of Low-E glass, Fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) films have to be tempered at high temperatures together with glass substrates. The effects of tempering temperature (600 °C ~ 720 °C) and time (150 s ~ 300 s) on the structural and electrical properties of FTO films were investigated. The results show all the films consist of non-stoichiometric, polycrystalline SnO2 without detectable amounts of fluoride. 700 °C and 260 s may be the critical tempering temperature and time, respectively. FTO films tempered at 700 °C for 260 s possesses the resistivity of 7.54 × 10-4 Ω•cm, the average transmittance in 400 ~ 800 nm of ~80%, and the calculated emissivity of 0.38. Hall mobility of FTO films tempered in this proper condition is mainly limited by the ionized impurity scattering. The value of [O]/[Sn] at the film surface is much higher than the stoichiometric value of 2.0 of pure crystalline SnO2.

  5. Simple DNA extraction of urine samples: Effects of storage temperature and storage time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Huey Hian; Ang, Hwee Chen; Hoe, See Ying; Lim, Mae-Lynn; Tai, Hua Eng; Soh, Richard Choon Hock; Syn, Christopher Kiu-Choong

    2018-06-01

    Urine samples are commonly analysed in cases with suspected illicit drug consumption. In events of alleged sample mishandling, urine sample source identification may be necessary. A simple DNA extraction procedure suitable for STR typing of urine samples was established on the Promega Maxwell ® 16 paramagnetic silica bead platform. A small sample volume of 1.7mL was used. Samples were stored at room temperature, 4°C and -20°C for 100days to investigate the influence of storage temperature and time on extracted DNA quantity and success rate of STR typing. Samples stored at room temperature exhibited a faster decline in DNA yield with time and lower typing success rates as compared to those at 4°C and -20°C. This trend can likely be attributed to DNA degradation. In conclusion, this study presents a quick and effective DNA extraction protocol from a small urine volume stored for up to 100days at 4°C and -20°C. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Real time thermal hydraulic model for high temperature gas-cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Zhe; Sun Jun; Ma Yuanle; Zhang Ruipeng

    2013-01-01

    A real-time thermal hydraulic model of the reactor core was described and integrated into the simulation system for the high temperature gas-cooled pebble bed reactor nuclear power plant, which was developed in the vPower platform, a new simulation environment for nuclear and fossil power plants. In the thermal hydraulic model, the helium flow paths were established by the flow network tools in order to obtain the flow rates and pressure distributions. Meanwhile, the heat structures, representing all the solid heat transfer elements in the pebble bed, graphite reflectors and carbon bricks, were connected by the heat transfer network in order to solve the temperature distributions in the reactor core. The flow network and heat transfer network were coupled and calculated in real time. Two steady states (100% and 50% full power) and two transients (inlet temperature step and flow step) were tested that the quantitative comparisons of the steady results with design data and qualitative analysis of the transients showed the good applicability of the present thermal hydraulic model. (authors)

  7. Time-resolved and temperature tuneable measurements of fluorescent intensity using a smartphone fluorimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Arafat; Canning, John; Yu, Zhikang; Ast, Sandra; Rutledge, Peter J; Wong, Joseph K-H; Jamalipour, Abbas; Crossley, Maxwell J

    2017-05-30

    A smartphone fluorimeter capable of time-based fluorescence intensity measurements at various temperatures is reported. Excitation is provided by an integrated UV LED (λ ex = 370 nm) and detection obtained using the in-built CMOS camera. A Peltier is integrated to allow measurements of the intensity over T = 10 to 40 °C. All components are controlled using a smartphone battery powered Arduino microcontroller and a customised Android application that allows sequential fluorescence imaging and quantification every δt = 4 seconds. The temperature dependence of fluorescence intensity for four emitters (rhodamine B, rhodamine 6G, 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin and 6-(1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane)2-ethyl-naphthalimide) are characterised. The normalised fluorescence intensity over time of the latter chemosensor dye complex in the presence of Zn 2+ is observed to accelerate with an increasing rate constant, k = 1.94 min -1 at T = 15 °C and k = 3.64 min -1 at T = 30 °C, approaching a factor of ∼2 with only a change in temperature of ΔT = 15 °C. Thermally tuning these twist and bend associated rates to optimise sensor approaches and device applications is proposed.

  8. Influence of acidification, pasteurization, centrifugation and storage time and temperature on watermelon juice quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarazona-Díaz, Martha Patricia; Aguayo, Encarna

    2013-12-01

    Watermelon juice has gained increasing popularity among consumers as a rich natural source of functional compounds such as lycopene and citrulline. However, the final quality of the juice depends significantly on its acidification, pasteurization, centrifugation and storage time and temperature. In this study, these characteristics were assessed in watermelon juice pasteurized at 87.7 °C for 20 s and stored for up to 30 days at 4 or 8 °C. The acidifier citric acid provided an adequate sensory quality, similar to natural watermelon juice. Centrifugation and pasteurization significantly reduced the red color, bioactive compounds (lycopene, antioxidant capacity and total polyphenols) and sensory quality of the juice, particularly when the storage time was extended and a temperature of 8 °C was used (P ≤ 0.05). All treated juices were microbiologically safe for up to 30 days when stored at 4 or 8 °C. In terms of sensory acceptability, only non-centrifuged juices stored for up to 20 days at 4 °C remained above the commercial limit. The present results suggest that using a non-centrifugation process and a storage temperature of 4 °C yields a watermelon juice that better retains its sensory and functional qualities. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Influence of temperature and time during malaxation on fatty acid profile and oxidation of centrifuged avocado oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica del Pilar RAMÍREZ-ANAYA

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Virgin oil from avocados (Persea americana Mill. is obtained by mechanical processes after pulp malaxation at temperatures that minimize oxidation and improve separation. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of time (0, 20, 30, 40, 60, 120 and 180 min and temperature (40 and 50 °C conditions during pulp malaxation on extraction yield, nutritional value (normalized fatty acid profile and specific extintion (K232 and K270 of virgin oil extracted under laboratory conditions from avocados cultivated in southern Jalisco, Mexico. When pulp was malaxated for 120 min at 40 and 50 °C, a larger proportion of oil was extracted (82.9 ± 0.3% and 80.2 ± 0.8%, respectively. We observed that the normalized percentage of the fatty acids linoleic (18 ± 2% and linolenic (1.2 ± 0.2% decreased with mixing time, while that of palmitoleic (9 ± 1%, oleic (51.6 ± 1.2% and stearic (0.5 ± 0.1% remained without change. The ω-6:ω-3 ratio (15 ± 1 was higher than the recommended values but similar to those reported as favorable for health. Specific extinction (K232, 2.2 ± 0.3 and K270, 0.20 ± 0.03 indicate that the oxidation level remained low. Malaxation at 40 or 50 °C did not significantly alter the characteristics of the oil, but time significantly affected yield.

  10. Time-dependent deformation at elevated temperatures in basalt from El Hierro, Stromboli and Teide volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, P. M.; Fahrner, D.; Harnett, C. E.; Fazio, M.

    2014-12-01

    Time dependent deformation describes the process whereby brittle materials deform at a stress level below their short-term material strength (Ss), but over an extended time frame. Although generally well understood in engineering (where it is known as static fatigue or "creep"), knowledge of how rocks creep and fail has wide ramifications in areas as diverse as mine tunnel supports and the long term stability of critically loaded rock slopes. A particular hazard relates to the instability of volcano flanks. A large number of flank collapses are known such as Stromboli (Aeolian islands), Teide, and El Hierro (Canary Islands). Collapses on volcanic islands are especially complex as they necessarily involve the combination of active tectonics, heat, and fluids. Not only does the volcanic system generate stresses that reach close to the failure strength of the rocks involved, but when combined with active pore fluid the process of stress corrosion allows the rock mass to deform and creep at stresses far lower than Ss. Despite the obvious geological hazard that edifice failure poses, the phenomenon of creep in volcanic rocks at elevated temperatures has yet to be thoroughly investigated in a well controlled laboratory setting. We present new data using rocks taken from Stromboli, El Heirro and Teide volcanoes in order to better understand the interplay between the fundamental rock mechanics of these basalts and the effects of elevated temperature fluids (activating stress corrosion mechanisms). Experiments were conducted over short (30-60 minute) and long (8-10 hour) time scales. For this, we use the method of Heap et al., (2011) to impose a constant stress (creep) domain deformation monitored via non-contact axial displacement transducers. This is achieved via a conventional triaxial cell to impose shallow conditions of pressure (<25 MPa) and temperature (<200 °C), and equipped with a 3D laboratory seismicity array (known as acoustic emission, AE) to monitor the micro

  11. [Temperature sensitivity and the indicators of respiration in humans in the normal state and during local cooling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyreva, T V; Simonova, T G

    1991-01-01

    The examination has shown that people who have many cold spots on the forearm possess high ventilation volume and breathing frequency and low value of oxygen utilization. These facts can evidence for the effect of cold skin receptors on the respiratory patterns. The skin temperature, at which the maximal cooling-induced changes of respiratory parameters are observed depends on the dynamic activity of cold skin thermoreceptors: the greater number of cold spots in the hand and forearm, the lesser cooling is necessary to cause the maximal increase of oxygen consumption and change of respiratory volume. The latter increased in the case of hand cooling and decreased in the case of the forearm cooling.

  12. Analytical solution of transient temperature in continuous wave end-pumped laser slab: Reduction of temperature distribution and time of thermal response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibib Khalid S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical solution of transient 3-D heat equation based on integral transform method is derived. The result are compared with numerical solution, and good agreements are obtained. Minimization of response time and temperature distribution through a laser slab are tested. It is found that the increasing in the lateral convection heat transfer coefficient can significantly reduce the response time and the temperature distribution while no effect on response time is observed when changing pumping profile from Gaussian to top hat beam in spite of the latter reduce the temperature distribution, also it is found that dividing the pumping power between two slab ends might reduce the temperature distribution and it has no effect on thermal response time.

  13. Seasonal dynamics of surface chlorophyll concentration and sea surface temperature, as indicator of hydrological structure of the ocean (by satellite data)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevyrnogov, Anatoly; Vysotskaya, Galina

    Continuous monitoring of phytopigment concentrations and sea surface temperature in the ocean by space-borne methods makes possible to estimate ecological condition of biocenoses in critical areas. Unlike land vegetation, hydrological processes largely determine phytoplank-ton dynamics, which may be either recurrent or random. The types of chlorophyll concentration dynamics and sea surface temperature can manifest as zones quasistationary by seasonal dynamics, quasistationary areas (QSA). In the papers of the authors (A. Shevyrnogov, G. Vysotskaya, E. Shevyrnogov, A study of the stationary and the anomalous in the ocean surface chlorophyll distribution by satellite data. International Journal of Remote Sensing, Vol. 25, No.7-8, pp. 1383-1387, April 2004 & A. P. Shevyrnogov, G. S. Vysotskaya, J. I. Gitelson, Quasistationary areas of chlorophyll concentra-tion in the world ocean as observed satellite data Advances in Space Research, Volume 18, Issue 7, Pages 129-132, 1996) existence of zones, which are quasi-stationary with similar seasonal dynamics of chlorophyll concentration at surface layer of ocean, was shown. Results were obtained on the base of processing of time series of satellite images SeaWiFS. It was shown that fronts and frontal zones coincide with dividing lines between quasi-stationary are-as, especially in areas of large oceanic streams. To study the dynamics of the ocean for the period from 1985 through 2012 we used data on the temperature of the surface layer of the ocean and chlorophyll concentration (AVHRR, SeaWiFS and MODIS). Biota of surface oceanic layer is more stable in comparison with quickly changing surface tem-perature. It gives a possibility to circumvent influence of high-frequency component (for exam-ple, a diurnal cycle) in investigation of dynamics of spatial distribution of surface streams. In addition, an analyses of nonstable ocean productivity phenomena, stood out time series of satellite images, showed existence of areas with

  14. Effect of austempering temperature and time on mechanical properties of SAE 9260 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalwatkar, Ranjit; Prabhu, N.; Singh, R. K. P.

    2018-04-01

    This work describes the effect of austempering heat treatment on microstrcuture and mechanical properties of SAE 9260 steel. Steel samples, austenitized at 900 °C for one hour, were isothermally heat treated in the temperature range 300,325 and 350 °C for different times. Microstructural characterization was carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopes. The microstructure of the austempered samples consisted of bainitic ferrite and retained austenite. The volume fraction of retained austenite was determined using X-ray diffraction. Isothermal heat treatment at 350 °C for 20 min, resulted in a retained austenite content of around 38% in the microstructure. Increase in isothermal transformation temperature led to an increase in the fraction of retained austenite. Also, good combination of strength and ductility was obtained in the samples with increased amounts of retained austenite.

  15. Apparatus for dynamic measurement of gases released from materials heated under programmed temperature-time control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early, J.W.; Abernathey, R.M.

    1982-04-01

    This apparatus, a prototype of one being constructed for hotcell examination of irradiated nuclear materials, measures dynamic release rates and integrated volumes of individual gases from materials heated under controlled temperature-time programs. It consists of an inductively heated vacuum furnace connected to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A computerized control system with data acquisition provides scanning rates down to 1s and on-line tabular and graphic displays. Heating rates are up to 1300 0 C/min to a maximum temperature of 2000 0 C. The measurement range is about 10 -6 to 10 -2 torr-liter/s for H 2 , CH 4 , H 2 O, N 2 , and CO and 10 -8 to 10 -2 torr-liter/s for He, Kr, and Xe. Applications are described for measurements of Kr and Xe in mixed oxide fuel, various gases in UO 2 pellets, and He in 238 PuO 2 power and heat sources

  16. MOSS spectroscopic camera for imaging time resolved plasma species temperature and flow speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, Clive; Howard, John

    2000-01-01

    A MOSS (Modulated Optical Solid-State) spectroscopic camera has been devised to monitor the spatial and temporal variations of temperatures and flow speeds of plasma ion species, the Doppler broadening measurement being made of spectroscopic lines specified. As opposed to a single channel MOSS spectrometer, the camera images light from plasma onto an array of light detectors, being mentioned 2D imaging of plasma ion temperatures and flow speeds. In addition, compared to a conventional grating spectrometer, the MOSS camera shows an excellent light collecting performance which leads to the improvement of signal to noise ratio and of time resolution. The present paper first describes basic items of MOSS spectroscopy, then follows MOSS camera with an emphasis on the optical system of 2D imaging. (author)

  17. Joint Temperature-Lasing Mode Compensation for Time-of-Flight LiDAR Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Alhashimi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We propose an expectation maximization (EM strategy for improving the precision of time of flight (ToF light detection and ranging (LiDAR scanners. The novel algorithm statistically accounts not only for the bias induced by temperature changes in the laser diode, but also for the multi-modality of the measurement noises that is induced by mode-hopping effects. Instrumental to the proposed EM algorithm, we also describe a general thermal dynamics model that can be learned either from just input-output data or from a combination of simple temperature experiments and information from the laser’s datasheet. We test the strategy on a SICK LMS 200 device and improve its average absolute error by a factor of three.

  18. MOSS spectroscopic camera for imaging time resolved plasma species temperature and flow speed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael, Clive; Howard, John [Australian National Univ., Plasma Research Laboratory, Canberra (Australia)

    2000-03-01

    A MOSS (Modulated Optical Solid-State) spectroscopic camera has been devised to monitor the spatial and temporal variations of temperatures and flow speeds of plasma ion species, the Doppler broadening measurement being made of spectroscopic lines specified. As opposed to a single channel MOSS spectrometer, the camera images light from plasma onto an array of light detectors, being mentioned 2D imaging of plasma ion temperatures and flow speeds. In addition, compared to a conventional grating spectrometer, the MOSS camera shows an excellent light collecting performance which leads to the improvement of signal to noise ratio and of time resolution. The present paper first describes basic items of MOSS spectroscopy, then follows MOSS camera with an emphasis on the optical system of 2D imaging. (author)

  19. Temperature-Controlled High-Speed AFM: Real-Time Observation of Ripple Phase Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hirohide; Miyagi, Atsushi; Redondo-Morata, Lorena; Scheuring, Simon

    2016-11-01

    With nanometer lateral and Angstrom vertical resolution, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has contributed unique data improving the understanding of lipid bilayers. Lipid bilayers are found in several different temperature-dependent states, termed phases; the main phases are solid and fluid phases. The transition temperature between solid and fluid phases is lipid composition specific. Under certain conditions some lipid bilayers adopt a so-called ripple phase, a structure where solid and fluid phase domains alternate with constant periodicity. Because of its narrow regime of existence and heterogeneity ripple phase and its transition dynamics remain poorly understood. Here, a temperature control device to high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) to observe dynamics of phase transition from ripple phase to fluid phase reversibly in real time is developed and integrated. Based on HS-AFM imaging, the phase transition processes from ripple phase to fluid phase and from ripple phase to metastable ripple phase to fluid phase could be reversibly, phenomenologically, and quantitatively studied. The results here show phase transition hysteresis in fast cooling and heating processes, while both melting and condensation occur at 24.15 °C in quasi-steady state situation. A second metastable ripple phase with larger periodicity is formed at the ripple phase to fluid phase transition when the buffer contains Ca 2+ . The presented temperature-controlled HS-AFM is a new unique experimental system to observe dynamics of temperature-sensitive processes at the nanoscopic level. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Effects of timing of signal indicating jump directions on knee biomechanics in jump-landing-jump tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Mitchell L; Hinshaw, Taylour J; Wadley, Haley A; Zhu, Qin; Wilson, Margaret A; Byra, Mark; Dai, Boyi

    2018-03-01

    A variety of the available time to react (ATR) has been utilised to study knee biomechanics during reactive jump-landing tasks. The purpose was to quantify knee kinematics and kinetics during a jump-land-jump task of three possible directions as the ATR was reduced. Thirty-four recreational athletes performed 45 trials of a jump-land-jump task, during which the direction of the second jump (lateral, medial or vertical) was indicated before they initiated the first jump, the instant they initiated the first jump, 300 ms before landing, 150 ms before landing or at the instant of landing. Knee joint angles and moments close to the instant of landing were significantly different when the ATR was equal to or more than 300 ms before landing, but became similar when the ATR was 150 ms or 0 ms before landing. As the ATR was decreased, knee moments decreased for the medial jump direction, but increased for the lateral jump direction. When the ATR is shorter than an individual's reaction time, the movement pattern cannot be pre-planned before landing. Knee biomechanics are dependent on the timing of the signal and the subsequent jump direction. Precise control of timing and screening athletes with low ATR are suggested.

  1. Time Series Data Analysis of Wireless Sensor Network Measurements of Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Siddhartha; Bergmann, Neil; Jurdak, Raja; Kusy, Branislav

    2017-05-26

    Wireless sensor networks have gained significant traction in environmental signal monitoring and analysis. The cost or lifetime of the system typically depends on the frequency at which environmental phenomena are monitored. If sampling rates are reduced, energy is saved. Using empirical datasets collected from environmental monitoring sensor networks, this work performs time series analyses of measured temperature time series. Unlike previous works which have concentrated on suppressing the transmission of some data samples by time-series analysis but still maintaining high sampling rates, this work investigates reducing the sampling rate (and sensor wake up rate) and looks at the effects on accuracy. Results show that the sampling period of the sensor can be increased up to one hour while still allowing intermediate and future states to be estimated with interpolation RMSE less than 0.2 °C and forecasting RMSE less than 1 °C.

  2. Landuse effects on runoff generating processes in tussock grassland indicated by mean transit time estimation using tritium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, M. K.; Fahey, B. D.

    2010-02-01

    The east Otago uplands of New Zealand's South Island have long been studied because of the environmental consequences of converting native tussock grasslands to other land covers, notably forestry and pasture for stock grazing. Early studies showed that afforestation substantially reduced annual water yield, stream peak flows, and 7-day low flows, mainly as a consequence of increased interception. Tritium measurements have indicated that surprisingly old water is present in catchments GH1 and GH2, and the small headwater wetland and catchment (GH5). The old water contributes strongly to baseflow (and therefore also to quickflow). The data have been simulated assuming the presence of two types of water in the baseflow, young water from shallow aquifers connecting hillside regolith with the stream, and old water from deep bedrock aquifers, respectively. The mean transit time of the young water is of the order of months, while that of the old water is 25-26 years as revealed by the presence of tritium originating from the bomb-peak in NZ rainfall in late 1960s and early 1970s. Such a long transit time indicates slow release from groundwater reservoirs within the bedrock, which constitute by far the larger of the water stores. Comparison of the results from catchments GH1 (tussock) and GH2 (pine forest) suggests that about equal quantities of water (85 mm annually) are contributed from the deep aquifers in the two catchments, although runoff from the shallow aquifers has been strongly reduced by afforestation in GH2.

  3. Influence of different maceration time and temperatures on total phenols, colour and sensory properties of Cabernet Sauvignon wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şener, Hasan; Yildirim, Hatice Kalkan

    2013-12-01

    Maceration and fermentation time and temperatures are important factors affecting wine quality. In this study different maceration times (3 and 6 days) and temperatures (15  and 25 ) during production of red wine (Vitis vinifera L. Cabernet Sauvignon) were investigated. In all wines standard wine chemical parameters and some specific parameters as total phenols, tartaric esters, total flavonols and colour parameters (CD, CI, T, dA%, %Y, %R, %B, CIELAB values) were determined. Sensory evaluation was performed by descriptive sensory analysis. The results demonstrated not only the importance of skin contact time and temperature during maceration but also the effects of transition temperatures (different maceration and fermentation temperatures) on wine quality as a whole. The results of sensory descriptive analyses revealed that the temperature significantly affected the aroma and flavour attributes of wines. The highest scores for 'cassis', 'clove', 'fresh fruity' and 'rose' characters were obtained in wines produced at low temperature (15 ) of maceration (6 days) and fermentation.

  4. On board short-time high temperature heat treatment of ballast water: a field trial under operational conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilez-Badia, Gemma; McCollin, Tracy; Josefsen, Kjell D; Vourdachas, Anthony; Gill, Margaret E; Mesbahi, Ehsan; Frid, Chris L J

    2008-01-01

    A ballast water short-time high temperature heat treatment technique was applied on board a car-carrier during a voyage from Egypt to Belgium. Ballast water from three tanks was subjected for a few seconds to temperatures ranging from 55 degrees C to 80 degrees C. The water was heated using the vessel's heat exchanger steam and a second heat exchanger was used to pre-heat and cool down the water. The treatment was effective at causing mortality of bacteria, phytoplankton and zooplankton. The International Maritime Organization (IMO) standard was not agreed before this study was carried out, but comparing our results gives a broad indication that the IMO standard would have been met in some of the tests for the zooplankton, in all the tests for the phytoplankton; and probably on most occasions for the bacteria. Passing the water through the pump increased the kill rate but increasing the temperature above 55 degrees C did not improve the heat treatment's efficacy.

  5. Variability of OH rotational temperatures on time scales from hours to 15 years by kinetic temperature variations, emission layer changes, and non-LTE effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Rotational temperatures derived from hydroxyl (OH) line emission are frequently used to study atmospheric temperatures at altitudes of about 87 km. While the measurement only requires intensities of a few bright lines of an OH band, the interpretation can be complicated. Ground-based temperatures are averages for the entire, typically 8 km wide emission layer. Variations in the rotational temperature are then caused by changes of the kinetic temperature and the OH emission profile. The latter can also be accompanied by differences in the layer-averaged efficiency of the thermalisation of the OH rotational level populations. Since this especially depends on the frequency of collisions with O_2, which is low at high altitudes, the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) contribution to the measured temperatures can be significant and variable. In order to understand the impact of the different sources of OH rotational temperature variations from time scales of hours to a solar cycle, we have studied spectra from the astronomical echelle spectrographs X-shooter and UVES located at Cerro Paranal in Chile. While the X-shooter data spanning 3.5 years allowed us to measure temperatures for 25 OH and two O_2 bands, the UVES spectra cover no more than 10 OH bands simultaneously but a period of about 15 years. These data have been complemented by kinetic temperature and OH and O_2 emission profiles from the multi-channel radiometer SABER on the TIMED satellite. Taking the O_2 and SABER kinetic temperatures as reference and considering the different band-dependent emission profiles, we could evaluate the contribution of non-LTE effects to the measured OH rotational temperatures depending on line set, band, and time. Non-LTE contributions are significant for most bands and can exceed 10 K. The amplitudes of their average nocturnal and seasonal variation are of the order of 1 to 2 K.

  6. Rumination time and reticuloruminal temperature as possible predictors of dystocia in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, L; Kézér, F L; Ruff, F; Szenci, O

    2017-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore changes of rumination time and reticuloruminal pH and temperature of dairy cows and heifers (means ± standard deviation; age = 5.8 ± 1.9; parity = 2.7 ± 1.4; body condition score = 3.2 ± 0.2) with eutocic (EUT, n = 10) and dystocic calving (DYS, n = 8). The recording period lasted from 3 d before calving until 7 d in milk. For the comparison of rumination time and reticuloruminal characteristics between groups, time to return to baseline (the time interval required to return to baseline from the delivery of the calf) and area under the curve (AUC; both for prepartum and postpartum periods) were calculated for each parameter. Rumination time decreased from baseline 28 h before calving both for EUT and DYS cows; after 20 h before calving, it decreased to 32.4 ± 2.3 and 13.2 ± 2.0 min/4 h between 8 and 4 h before delivery in EUT and DYS cows, respectively, and then it decreased below 10 and 5 min during the last 4 h before calving. Until 12 h after delivery, rumination time reached 42.6 ± 2.7 and 51.0 ± 3.1 min/4 h in DYS and EUT dams, respectively; however, AUC and time to return to baseline suggested lower rumination activity in DYS cows than in EUT dams for the 168-h postpartum observational period. Reticuloruminal pH decreased from baseline 56 h before calving both for EUT and DYS cows, but did not differ between groups before delivery. Reticuloruminal pH showed a decreasing tendency and clear diurnal variation after calving for both EUT and DYS cows, with slightly higher AUC values in DYS cows. In DYS cows, reticuloruminal temperature decreased from baseline 32 h before calving by 0.23 ± 0.02°C, whereas in EUT cows such a decrease was found only 20 h before delivery (0.48 ± 0.05°C). The AUC of reticuloruminal temperature calculated for the prepartum period was greater in EUT cows than in DYS cows. During the first 4 h after calving, reticuloruminal temperature decreased from 39.68 ± 0.09 to 38.96 ± 0.10

  7. Characterization of x-ray diffraction and electron spin resonance: Effects of sintering time and temperature on bovine hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusrini, Eny; Sontang, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    The physical and chemical properties of a hydroxyapatite produced by the sintering of bovine bone were investigated by powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD), electron spin resonance (ESR), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and differential thermal analysis (DTA). A bovine bone powder was sintered at different temperatures ranging from 500 to 1400 °C. The influences of post-irradiation storage on the radiation ESR response of the bovine bone powder before and after sintering were also studied. The results indicate that the sintered bovine bone powder contained hydroxyapatite. Diffraction patterns were sharp and clear based on the (211), (300), and (202) reflections corresponding to bovine hydroxyapatite (BHA), which confirmed the phase purity and high crystalline grade of the BHA produced. The PXRD profile of BHA was dependent on sintering temperatures and times. The molecular formula of BHA was determined by Rietveld analysis showed a similar structure and composition to calcium hydroxyapatite in hexagonal P6 3 /m space group a=b=9.435 Å and c=6.895 Å. ESR data showed that the sintering process can decrease the number of free radicals in BHA; it also revealed that the number of free radicals is constant during long storage periods (75 days). The sintering technique described in this study may be used to extract hydroxyapatite from biowaste bovine bone, leading to its application as a bone filler. - Highlights: ► Natural hydroxyapatite was produced from the bio-wasting bovine bones by sintering method. ► PXRD profile of BHA is dependent on the different temperatures and times in sintering process. ► ESR data is useful to study the typical of free radicals formed in the samples after irradiation. ► Stability and physicochemical properties of BHA is dependent on the different storage times. ► Technique is able to be used to find the natural hydroxyapatite applicable for bone filler.

  8. Developing first time-series of land surface temperature from AATSR with uncertainty estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghent, Darren; Remedios, John

    2013-04-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is the radiative skin temperature of the land, and is one of the key parameters in the physics of land-surface processes on regional and global scales. Earth Observation satellites provide the opportunity to obtain global coverage of LST approximately every 3 days or less. One such source of satellite retrieved LST has been the Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR); with LST retrieval being implemented in the AATSR Instrument Processing Facility in March 2004. Here we present first regional and global time-series of LST data from AATSR with estimates of uncertainty. Mean changes in temperature over the last decade will be discussed along with regional patterns. Although time-series across all three ATSR missions have previously been constructed (Kogler et al., 2012), the use of low resolution auxiliary data in the retrieval algorithm and non-optimal cloud masking resulted in time-series artefacts. As such, considerable ESA supported development has been carried out on the AATSR data to address these concerns. This includes the integration of high resolution auxiliary data into the retrieval algorithm and subsequent generation of coefficients and tuning parameters, plus the development of an improved cloud mask based on the simulation of clear sky conditions from radiance transfer modelling (Ghent et al., in prep.). Any inference on this LST record is though of limited value without the accompaniment of an uncertainty estimate; wherein the Joint Committee for Guides in Metrology quote an uncertainty as "a parameter associated with the result of a measurement that characterizes the dispersion of the values that could reasonably be attributed to the measurand that is the value of the particular quantity to be measured". Furthermore, pixel level uncertainty fields are a mandatory requirement in the on-going preparation of the LST product for the upcoming Sea and Land Surface Temperature (SLSTR) instrument on-board Sentinel-3

  9. Runoff generating processes in adjacent tussock grassland and pine plantation catchments as indicated by mean transit time estimation using tritium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Stewart

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The east Otago uplands of New Zealand's South Island have long been studied because of the environmental consequences of converting native tussock grasslands to other land covers, notably forestry and pasture for stock grazing. Early studies showed that afforestation substantially reduced annual water yield, stream peak flows, and 7-day low flows, mainly as a consequence of increased interception. Tritium measurements have indicated that surprisingly old water is present in catchments GH1 and GH2, and the small headwater wetland and catchment (GH5, and contributes strongly to baseflow. The data have been simulated assuming the presence of two types of water in the baseflow, young water from shallow aquifers connecting hillside regolith with the stream, and old water from deep bedrock aquifers, respectively. The mean transit time of the young water is approximately one month, while that of the old water is 25–26 years as revealed by the presence of tritium originating from the bomb-peak in NZ rainfall in late 1960s and early 1970s. Such a long transit time indicates slow release from groundwater reservoirs within the bedrock, which constitute by far the larger of the water stores. Comparison of the results from catchments GH1 (tussock and GH2 (pine forest suggests that about equal quantities of water (85 mm/a are contributed from the deep aquifers in the two catchments, although runoff from the shallow aquifers has been strongly reduced by afforestation in GH2. This study has revealed the presence of a long transit time component of water in runoff in a catchment with crystalline metamorphic bedrock.

  10. Runoff generating processes in adjacent tussock grassland and pine plantation catchments as indicated by mean transit time estimation using tritium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, M. K.; Fahey, B. D.

    2010-06-01

    The east Otago uplands of New Zealand's South Island have long been studied because of the environmental consequences of converting native tussock grasslands to other land covers, notably forestry and pasture for stock grazing. Early studies showed that afforestation substantially reduced annual water yield, stream peak flows, and 7-day low flows, mainly as a consequence of increased interception. Tritium measurements have indicated that surprisingly old water is present in catchments GH1 and GH2, and the small headwater wetland and catchment (GH5), and contributes strongly to baseflow. The data have been simulated assuming the presence of two types of water in the baseflow, young water from shallow aquifers connecting hillside regolith with the stream, and old water from deep bedrock aquifers, respectively. The mean transit time of the young water is approximately one month, while that of the old water is 25-26 years as revealed by the presence of tritium originating from the bomb-peak in NZ rainfall in late 1960s and early 1970s. Such a long transit time indicates slow release from groundwater reservoirs within the bedrock, which constitute by far the larger of the water stores. Comparison of the results from catchments GH1 (tussock) and GH2 (pine forest) suggests that about equal quantities of water (85 mm/a) are contributed from the deep aquifers in the two catchments, although runoff from the shallow aquifers has been strongly reduced by afforestation in GH2. This study has revealed the presence of a long transit time component of water in runoff in a catchment with crystalline metamorphic bedrock.

  11. Hepatitis C virus epitope exposure and neutralization by antibodies is affected by time and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabo, Michelle C; Luca, Vincent C; Ray, Stuart C

    2012-01-01

    A recent study with flaviviruses suggested that structural dynamics of the virion impact antibody neutralization via exposure of ostensibly cryptic epitopes. To determine whether this holds true for the distantly related hepatitis C virus (HCV), whose neutralizing epitopes may be obscured...... by a glycan shield, apolipoprotein interactions, and the hypervariable region on the E2 envelope protein, we assessed how time and temperature of pre-incubation altered monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of HCV. Notably, several MAbs showed increased inhibitory activity when pre-binding was performed...

  12. Effect of frying temperature and time on image characterizations of pellet snacks

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi Moghaddam, Toktam; BahramParvar, Maryam; Razavi, Seyed M. A.

    2014-01-01

    The development of non-destructive methods for the evaluation of food properties has important advantages for the food processing industries. So, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of frying temperature (150, 170, and 190 °C) and time (0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 and 4.5 min) on image properties (L*, a* and b*, fractal dimension, correlation, entropy, contrast and homogeneity) of pellet snacks. Textures were computed separately for eight channels (RGB, R, G, B, U, V, H and S). Enhancing...

  13. Time resolved IR-LIGS experiments for gas-phase trace detection and temperature measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantoni, R.; Giorgi, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dip. Innovazione; Snels, M. [CNR, Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy). Istituto per i Materiali Speciali; Latzel, H.

    1997-01-01

    Time resolved Laser Induced Grating Spectroscopy (LIGS) has been performed to detect different gases in mixtures at atmospheric pressure or higher. The possibility of trace detection of minor species and of temperature measurements has been demonstrated for various molecular species either of environmental interest or involved in combustion processes. In view of the application of tracing unburned hydrocarbons in combustion chambers, the coupling of the IR-LIGS technique with imaging detection has been considered and preliminary results obtained in small size ethylene/air flames are shown.

  14. Decay Time Measurement for Different Energy Depositions of Plastic Scintillator Fabricated by High Temperature Polymerization Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Son, Jaebum; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Yong-Kyun [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Plastic scintillators are based on organic fluorite. They have many advantages such as fast rise and decay time, high optical transmission, ease of manufacturing, low cost, and large available size. For these reasons they are widely used for particle identification. Also, protection of people against a variety of threats (such as nuclear, radiological, and explosive) represents a true challenge along with the continuing development of science and technology. The plastic scintillator is widely used in various devise, which serves for nuclear, photonics, quantum, and high-energy physics. The plastic scintillator is probably the most widely used organic detector, and polystyrene is one of the most widely used materials in the making of the plastic scintillator detector. Thus, a styrene monomer as a solvent was used to fabricate the plastic scintillator by using high temperature polymerization reaction, and then the emission wavelength and the decay times for different energy depositions were measured by using the fabricated plastic scintillator. A plastic scintillator was fabricated to measure decay time for different energy depositions using the high temperature polymerization. Emission wavelength was measured of 426.05 nm to confirm a scintillator property using the spectrophotometer. Four gamma-ray sources (Cs-137, Co-60, Na-22, and Ba-133) were used to evaluate effect for decay time of different energy depositions. The average decay time of the fabricated plastic scintillator was measured to approximately 4.72 ns slightly higher more than commercial plastic scintillator. In future, light output and linearity will be measured to evaluate other property compared with the commercial scintillator.

  15. Decay Time Measurement for Different Energy Depositions of Plastic Scintillator Fabricated by High Temperature Polymerization Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Son, Jaebum; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Yong-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Plastic scintillators are based on organic fluorite. They have many advantages such as fast rise and decay time, high optical transmission, ease of manufacturing, low cost, and large available size. For these reasons they are widely used for particle identification. Also, protection of people against a variety of threats (such as nuclear, radiological, and explosive) represents a true challenge along with the continuing development of science and technology. The plastic scintillator is widely used in various devise, which serves for nuclear, photonics, quantum, and high-energy physics. The plastic scintillator is probably the most widely used organic detector, and polystyrene is one of the most widely used materials in the making of the plastic scintillator detector. Thus, a styrene monomer as a solvent was used to fabricate the plastic scintillator by using high temperature polymerization reaction, and then the emission wavelength and the decay times for different energy depositions were measured by using the fabricated plastic scintillator. A plastic scintillator was fabricated to measure decay time for different energy depositions using the high temperature polymerization. Emission wavelength was measured of 426.05 nm to confirm a scintillator property using the spectrophotometer. Four gamma-ray sources (Cs-137, Co-60, Na-22, and Ba-133) were used to evaluate effect for decay time of different energy depositions. The average decay time of the fabricated plastic scintillator was measured to approximately 4.72 ns slightly higher more than commercial plastic scintillator. In future, light output and linearity will be measured to evaluate other property compared with the commercial scintillator

  16. Association between Global Assessment of Functioning scores and indicators of functioning, severity, and prognosis in first-time schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhler-Forsberg, Ole; Horsdal, Henriette Thisted; Baandrup, Lone

    2016-01-01

    are associated with other indicators of functioning, severity, and hospitalization. METHODS: A Danish population-based cohort study of adults (≥18 years) with a recorded GAF-F score at first-time schizophrenia diagnosis during 2004-2011 was performed. The internal validity of GAF-F was evaluated by assessing its...... of schizophrenia with a GAF-F score at first-time diagnosis (73.0% inpatients; 62.6% males). GAF-F was associated with several baseline measures of functioning and illness severity, such as female sex, being in work, and a longer baseline hospitalization. Lower GAF-F scores were associated with higher.......36-3.90), fitting a dose-response relationship (P=0.031). This association was not found in females. CONCLUSION: GAF-F at first-time schizophrenia diagnosis showed good internal validity against other measures of functionality in a Danish hospital setting. Severe impairment (as measured by the GAF-F score) at first...

  17. Nuclear grade cable thermal life model by time temperature superposition algorithm based on Matlab GUI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yanyun; Gu Shenjie; Lou Tianyang

    2014-01-01

    Background: As nuclear grade cable must endure harsh environment within design life, it is critical to predict cable thermal life accurately owing to thermal aging, which is one of dominant factors of aging mechanism. Purpose: Using time temperature superposition (TTS) method, the aim is to construct nuclear grade cable thermal life model, predict cable residual life and develop life model interactive interface under Matlab GUI. Methods: According to TTS, nuclear grade cable thermal life model can be constructed by shifting data groups at various temperatures to preset reference temperature with translation factor which is determined by non linear programming optimization. Interactive interface of cable thermal life model developed under Matlab GUI consists of superposition mode and standard mode which include features such as optimization of translation factor, calculation of activation energy, construction of thermal aging curve and analysis of aging mechanism., Results: With calculation result comparison between superposition and standard method, the result with TTS has better accuracy than that with standard method. Furthermore, confidence level of nuclear grade cable thermal life with TTS is higher than that with standard method. Conclusion: The results show that TTS methodology is applicable to thermal life prediction of nuclear grade cable. Interactive Interface under Matlab GUI achieves anticipated functionalities. (authors)

  18. Influence of water activity, temperature and time on mycotoxins production on barley rootlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, J M M; Cavaglieri, L R; Fraga, M E; Direito, G M; Dalcero, A M; Rosa, C A R

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the ochratoxin (OT) and aflatoxin (AF) production by three strains of Aspergillus spp. under different water activities, temperature and incubation time on barley rootlets (BR). Aspergillus ochraceus and Aspergillus flavus were able to produce mycotoxins on BR. Aspergillus ochraceus produced ochratoxin A (OTA) at 0.80 water activity (a(w)), at 25 and 30 degrees C as optimal environmental conditions. The OTA production varies at different incubation days depending on a(w). Aflatoxin B(1) (AFB1) accumulation was obtained at 25 degrees C, at 0.80 and 0.95 a(w), after 14 and 21 incubation days respectively. Temperature was a critical factor influencing OTA and AFB(1) production. This study demonstrates that BR support OTA and AFB(1) production at relatively low water activity (0.80 a(w)) and high temperatures (25-30 degrees C). The study of ecophysiological parameters and their interactions would determine the prevailing environmental factors, which enhance the mycotoxin production on BR used as animal feed.

  19. A soft-computing methodology for noninvasive time-spatial temperature estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, César A; Ruano, Maria Graça; Ruano, António E; Pereira, Wagner C A

    2008-02-01

    The safe and effective application of thermal therapies is restricted due to lack of reliable noninvasive temperature estimators. In this paper, the temporal echo-shifts of backscattered ultrasound signals, collected from a gel-based phantom, were tracked and assigned with the past temperature values as radial basis functions neural networks input information. The phantom was heated using a piston-like therapeutic ultrasound transducer. The neural models were assigned to estimate the temperature at different intensities and points arranged across the therapeutic transducer radial line (60 mm apart from the transducer face). Model inputs, as well as the number of neurons were selected using the multiobjective genetic algorithm (MOGA). The best attained models present, in average, a maximum absolute error less than 0.5 degrees C, which is pointed as the borderline between a reliable and an unreliable estimator in hyperthermia/diathermia. In order to test the spatial generalization capacity, the best models were tested using spatial points not yet assessed, and some of them presented a maximum absolute error inferior to 0.5 degrees C, being "elected" as the best models. It should be also stressed that these best models present implementational low-complexity, as desired for real-time applications.

  20. Optimization of basic parameters in temperature-programmed gas chromatographic separations of multi-component samples within a given time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Repka, D.; Krupcik, J.; Brunovska, A.; Leclercq, P.A.; Rijks, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    A new procedure is introduced for the optimization of column peak capacity in a given time. The opitmization focuses on temperature-programmed operating conditions, notably the initial temperature and hold time, and the programming rate. Based conceptually upon Lagrange functions, experiments were

  1. Temperature Observation Time and Type Influence Estimates of Heat-Related Mortality in Seven U.S. Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Robert E; Hondula, David M; Patel, Anjali P

    2016-06-01

    Extreme heat is a leading weather-related cause of mortality in the United States, but little guidance is available regarding how temperature variable selection impacts heat-mortality relationships. We examined how the strength of the relationship between daily heat-related mortality and temperature varies as a function of temperature observation time, lag, and calculation method. Long time series of daily mortality counts and hourly temperature for seven U.S. cities with different climates were examined using a generalized additive model. The temperature effect was modeled separately for each hour of the day (with up to 3-day lags) along with different methods of calculating daily maximum, minimum, and mean temperature. We estimated the temperature effect on mortality for each variable by comparing the 99th versus 85th temperature percentiles, as determined from the annual time series. In three northern cities (Boston, MA; Philadelphia, PA; and Seattle, WA) that appeared to have the greatest sensitivity to heat, hourly estimates were consistent with a diurnal pattern in the heat-mortality response, with strongest associations for afternoon or maximum temperature at lag 0 (day of death) or afternoon and evening of lag 1 (day before death). In warmer, southern cities, stronger associations were found with morning temperatures, but overall the relationships were weaker. The strongest temperature-mortality relationships were associated with maximum temperature, although mean temperature results were comparable. There were systematic and substantial differences in the association between temperature and mortality based on the time and type of temperature observation. Because the strongest hourly temperature-mortality relationships were not always found at times typically associated with daily maximum temperatures, temperature variables should be selected independently for each study location. In general, heat-mortality was more closely coupled to afternoon and maximum

  2. Microstructures Indicate Large Influence of Temperature and Fluid Pressure on the Reactivation of the Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, B.; Janssen, C.; Schleicher, A.; Toy, V.; Dresen, G.

    2017-12-01

    The transpressional Alpine Fault within New Zealand's South Island is the major structure that accommodates relative motion between the Pacific and the Australian Plates. It has been intensively studied, because it is late in its 291-year seismic cycle (Cochran et al., 2017; doi: 10.1016/j.epsl.2017.02.026), is likely to generate large (i.e. MW > 8) earthquakes, thus presents the biggest seismic hazard in the region. However, because it is severely misoriented in the present-day stress field for reactivation (Boese et al., 2013; doi: 10.1016/j.epsl.2013.06.030), supra-lithostatic fluid-pressures are required for rupture nucleation. We have analyzed microstructures (SEM and TEM), geochemistry (ICP-OES) and mineralogy (XRD) of outcrop samples of the fault core to investigate the influence of fluids on the geomechanical behavior of the fault. Fluid-related alteration is pervasive within 20 m of the principal slip zone (PSZ) (Sutherland et al., 2012; doi: 10.1130/G33614.1), which is an incohesive, cemented and repeatedly reworked fault gouge mostly consisting of a fine-grained matrix composed of comminuted detrital quartz and feldspar as well as authigenic chlorite and calcite. Authigenic phases seal the PSZ for interseismic cross-fault fluid flow and enable fluid pressure to build-up. Notable, smectite, previously considered to significantly influence propagation of Alpine Fault ruptures, is not present in these samples. Undeformed, euhedral chlorite grains suggest that the processes leading to fault sealing are not only active at greater depths but also close to the surface. The absence of smectite and the presence of undeformed chlorite at very shallow depths can be attributed to the fault's high geothermal gradient of > 120 °C km-1 (Sutherland et al., 2012; doi:10.1038/nature22355), which gives temperature conditions unfavorable for smectite to be stable and fostering chlorite growth. A pervasive network of anastomosing calcite veins in the fault core, depicting

  3. Carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in wood constituents of Pinus halepensis as indicators of precipitation, temperature and vapour pressure deficit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrio, J.P.; Voltas, J.

    2005-01-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions (δ 13 C, δ 18 O) in tree rings have been shown to bear relevant climatic signals. However, little is known about the interrelationship between both isotopes in wood constituents for species from other than relatively wet climates. We hypothesized that in a species adapted to temporary droughts (e.g. Pinus halepensis Mill.) the signal derived from δ 18 O in precipitation would be hidden by the strong variability in leaf transpirative enrichment. To test this assumption, we compared the effect of precipitation, temperature and vapour pressure deficit (VPD) on δ 18 O and δ 13 C along 23 sites covering the ecological range for this species. We extracted the cores from the south side of four to six adult dominant trees per aspect (north/south) within each site. For each aspect and site, fragments of the period 1975-1999 were pooled and milled to a fine powder. To further test the postulated need for cellulose purification in the assessment of climatic information, we studied these relationships in whole and extracted wood, holocellulose and lignin. In all wood fractions, δ 13 C was related to annual precipitation [r=0.58 (P 18 O only holocellulose showed consistent relationships with climatic data, being strongly significant for VPD [r=0.66 (P 18 O in precipitation, confirming that transpirative enrichment (driven by VPD) dampened the source signal in P. halepensis. The relationships between δ 13 C and δ 18 O were generally poor, regardless of the wood constituent, suggesting that although both variables were somewhat related to transpirative demand, they were relatively independent. This was further confirmed by building stepwise models using both isotopes to predict annual and seasonal precipitation [r 2 = 0.34 (P 2 = 0.15 (P 2 = 0.31 (P< 0.01) to 0.55 (P< 0.001)]. We concluded that, even when partially describing the same climate variables, the information underlying the two isotopes can be regarded as complementary

  4. Effects of time-temperature profiles on glow curves of germanium-doped optical fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, S. E.; Alawiah, A.; Bradley, D. A.; Mohd Noor, N.

    2017-08-01

    The Germanium (Ge) doped silica optical fibres have demonstrated the great potential to be developed as a thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeter that can be used in various applications in radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology, UV dosimetry system and food irradiation industry. Different time-temperature profile (TTP) parameters of the TL reader have been employed by many researchers in various of TL studies. Nevertheless, none of those studies adequately addressed the effects of the reader's preheat temperature and heating rate on the kinetic parameters of the TL glow curve specifically, the Ge-doped silica optical fibres. This research addresses the issue of TTP parameters with special attention to the determination of the kinetic parameters of the glow curve. The glow curve responses were explored and the kinetic parameters were analyzed by the WinGCF software, to show the effect of the preheat temperature and heating rate of the reader on Ge-doped fibre irradiated with 18 Gy of 6 MV photons radiation. The effect of TTP parameters was discussed and compared against the commercial fibre and tailored made fibre of 6 mol% Ge-doped of flat and cylindrical shape. The deconvolution of glow peaks and the kinetic parameters were obtained by the WinGCF software. This enables to fit accurately (1.5%temperature was used to read commercial fibre (50 °C) and cylindrical fibre (80 °C and 160 °C). It is found that the glow peaks of cylindrical fibre exhibit the highest peak integral as compared to flat and commercial fibres. This study revealed the possible relationship between the reader's TTP parameters and the kinetic parameters of TL glow curves for the commercial and tailored made Ge-doped silica optical fibres.

  5. Neutron time-of-flight ion temperature diagnostic for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrien, R.E.; Simmons, D.F.; Holmberg, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    We are constructing a T i diagnostic for low neutron yield (5 x 10 7 to above 10 9 ) d-d and d-t targets in the Nova facility at Livermore. The diagnostic measures the neutron energy spread with 960 scintillator-photomultiplier detectors located 28 m from the target and operates in the single-hit mode. Each detector can measure a single neutron arrival with time resolution of 1 ns or better. The arrival time distribution is constructed from the results of typically 200--500 detector measurements. The ion temperature is determined from the spread in neutron energy ΔE n ∝ T i 1/2 , which is related to the arrival time spread by Δt/t = 1(1/2 ΔE n /E n ). Each neutron arrival is detected by using a photomultiplier tube to observe the recoil proton from elastic scattering in a fast plastic scintillator. The timing electronics for each channel consist of a novel constant fraction-like discriminator and a multiple hit time-to-digital converter (TDC). The overall system design, together with single channel performance data, is presented

  6. Time response prediction of Brazilian Nuclear Power Plant temperature sensors using neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Roberto Carlos dos; Pereira, Iraci Martinez, E-mail: rcsantos@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work presents the results of the time constants values predicted from ANN using Angra I Brazilian nuclear power plant data. The signals obtained from LCSR loop current step response test sensors installed in the process presents noise end fluctuations that are inherent of operational conditions. Angra I nuclear power plant has 20 RTDs as part of the protection reactor system. The results were compared with those obtained from traditional way. Primary coolant RTDs (Resistance Temperature Detector) typically feed the plant's control and safety systems and must, therefore, be very accurate and have good dynamic performance. An in-situ test method called LCSR - loop current step response test was developed to measure remotely the response time of RTDs. In the LCSR method, the response time of the sensor is identified by means of the LCSR transformation that involves the dynamic response modal time constants determination using a nodal heat transfer model. For this reason, this calculation is not simple and requires specialized personnel. This work combines the two methodologies, Plunge test and LCSR test, using neural networks. With the use of neural networks it will not be necessary to use the LCSR transformation to determine sensor's time constant and this leads to more robust results. (author)

  7. Time response prediction of Brazilian Nuclear Power Plant temperature sensors using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Roberto Carlos dos; Pereira, Iraci Martinez

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of the time constants values predicted from ANN using Angra I Brazilian nuclear power plant data. The signals obtained from LCSR loop current step response test sensors installed in the process presents noise end fluctuations that are inherent of operational conditions. Angra I nuclear power plant has 20 RTDs as part of the protection reactor system. The results were compared with those obtained from traditional way. Primary coolant RTDs (Resistance Temperature Detector) typically feed the plant's control and safety systems and must, therefore, be very accurate and have good dynamic performance. An in-situ test method called LCSR - loop current step response test was developed to measure remotely the response time of RTDs. In the LCSR method, the response time of the sensor is identified by means of the LCSR transformation that involves the dynamic response modal time constants determination using a nodal heat transfer model. For this reason, this calculation is not simple and requires specialized personnel. This work combines the two methodologies, Plunge test and LCSR test, using neural networks. With the use of neural networks it will not be necessary to use the LCSR transformation to determine sensor's time constant and this leads to more robust results. (author)

  8. Global Model of Time-Modulated Electronegative Discharges for Neutral Radical and Electron Temperature Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungjin; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.

    2003-10-01

    Control and reduction of neutral radical flux/ion flux ratio and electron temperature Te is required for next generation etching in the microelectronics industry. We investigate time-modulated power for these purposes using a volume-averaged (global) oxygen discharge model, We consider pressures of 10-50 mTorr and plasma densities of 10^10-10^11 cm-3. In this regime, the discharge is found to be weakly electronegative. The modulation period and the duty ratio (on-time/period) are varied to determine the optimum conditions for reduction of FR= O-atom flux/ion flux and T_e. Two chambers with different height/diameter ratios (SMART Contract SM99-10051.

  9. High-Temperature Short-Time Pasteurization System for Donor Milk in a Human Milk Bank Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Escuder-Vieco

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Donor milk is the best alternative for the feeding of preterm newborns when mother's own milk is unavailable. For safety reasons, it is usually pasteurized by the Holder method (62.5°C for 30 min. Holder pasteurization results in a microbiological safe product but impairs the activity of many biologically active compounds such as immunoglobulins, enzymes, cytokines, growth factors, hormones or oxidative stress markers. High-temperature short-time (HTST pasteurization has been proposed as an alternative for a better preservation of some of the biological components of human milk although, at present, there is no equipment available to perform this treatment under the current conditions of a human milk bank. In this work, the specific needs of a human milk bank setting were considered to design an HTST equipment for the continuous and adaptable (time-temperature combination processing of donor milk. Microbiological quality, activity of indicator enzymes and indices for thermal damage of milk were evaluated before and after HTST treatment of 14 batches of donor milk using different temperature and time combinations and compared to the results obtained after Holder pasteurization. The HTST system has accurate and simple operation, allows the pasteurization of variable amounts of donor milk and reduces processing time and labor force. HTST processing at 72°C for, at least, 10 s efficiently destroyed all vegetative forms of microorganisms present initially in raw donor milk although sporulated Bacillus sp. survived this treatment. Alkaline phosphatase was completely destroyed after HTST processing at 72 and 75°C, but γ-glutamil transpeptidase showed higher thermoresistance. Furosine concentrations in HTST-treated donor milk were lower than after Holder pasteurization and lactulose content for HTST-treated donor milk was below the detection limit of analytical method (10 mg/L. In conclusion, processing of donor milk at 72°C for at least 10 s in

  10. High-Temperature Short-Time Pasteurization System for Donor Milk in a Human Milk Bank Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escuder-Vieco, Diana; Espinosa-Martos, Irene; Rodríguez, Juan M; Corzo, Nieves; Montilla, Antonia; Siegfried, Pablo; Pallás-Alonso, Carmen R; Fernández, Leónides

    2018-01-01

    Donor milk is the best alternative for the feeding of preterm newborns when mother's own milk is unavailable. For safety reasons, it is usually pasteurized by the Holder method (62.5°C for 30 min). Holder pasteurization results in a microbiological safe product but impairs the activity of many biologically active compounds such as immunoglobulins, enzymes, cytokines, growth factors, hormones or oxidative stress markers. High-temperature short-time (HTST) pasteurization has been proposed as an alternative for a better preservation of some of the biological components of human milk although, at present, there is no equipment available to perform this treatment under the current conditions of a human milk bank. In this work, the specific needs of a human milk bank setting were considered to design an HTST equipment for the continuous and adaptable (time-temperature combination) processing of donor milk. Microbiological quality, activity of indicator enzymes and indices for thermal damage of milk were evaluated before and after HTST treatment of 14 batches of donor milk using different temperature and time combinations and compared to the results obtained after Holder pasteurization. The HTST system has accurate and simple operation, allows the pasteurization of variable amounts of donor milk and reduces processing time and labor force. HTST processing at 72°C for, at least, 10 s efficiently destroyed all vegetative forms of microorganisms present initially in raw donor milk although sporulated Bacillus sp. survived this treatment. Alkaline phosphatase was completely destroyed after HTST processing at 72 and 75°C, but γ-glutamil transpeptidase showed higher thermoresistance. Furosine concentrations in HTST-treated donor milk were lower than after Holder pasteurization and lactulose content for HTST-treated donor milk was below the detection limit of analytical method (10 mg/L). In conclusion, processing of donor milk at 72°C for at least 10 s in this HTST system

  11. High-Temperature Short-Time Pasteurization System for Donor Milk in a Human Milk Bank Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escuder-Vieco, Diana; Espinosa-Martos, Irene; Rodríguez, Juan M.; Corzo, Nieves; Montilla, Antonia; Siegfried, Pablo; Pallás-Alonso, Carmen R.; Fernández, Leónides

    2018-01-01

    Donor milk is the best alternative for the feeding of preterm newborns when mother's own milk is unavailable. For safety reasons, it is usually pasteurized by the Holder method (62.5°C for 30 min). Holder pasteurization results in a microbiological safe product but impairs the activity of many biologically active compounds such as immunoglobulins, enzymes, cytokines, growth factors, hormones or oxidative stress markers. High-temperature short-time (HTST) pasteurization has been proposed as an alternative for a better preservation of some of the biological components of human milk although, at present, there is no equipment available to perform this treatment under the current conditions of a human milk bank. In this work, the specific needs of a human milk bank setting were considered to design an HTST equipment for the continuous and adaptable (time-temperature combination) processing of donor milk. Microbiological quality, activity of indicator enzymes and indices for thermal damage of milk were evaluated before and after HTST treatment of 14 batches of donor milk using different temperature and time combinations and compared to the results obtained after Holder pasteurization. The HTST system has accurate and simple operation, allows the pasteurization of variable amounts of donor milk and reduces processing time and labor force. HTST processing at 72°C for, at least, 10 s efficiently destroyed all vegetative forms of microorganisms present initially in raw donor milk although sporulated Bacillus sp. survived this treatment. Alkaline phosphatase was completely destroyed after HTST processing at 72 and 75°C, but γ-glutamil transpeptidase showed higher thermoresistance. Furosine concentrations in HTST-treated donor milk were lower than after Holder pasteurization and lactulose content for HTST-treated donor milk was below the detection limit of analytical method (10 mg/L). In conclusion, processing of donor milk at 72°C for at least 10 s in this HTST system

  12. Time indices of multiphasic development in genotypes of sweet cherry are similar from dormancy to cessation of pit growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibeaut, David M; Whiting, Matthew D; Einhorn, Todd

    2017-02-01

    The archetypical double sigmoid-shaped growth curve of the sweet cherry drupe (Prunus avium) does not address critical development from eco-dormancy to anthesis and has not been correlated to reproductive bud development. Accurate representation of the growth and development of post-anthesis ovaries is confounded by anthesis timing, fruiting-density and the presence of unfertilized and defective ovaries whose growth differs from those that persist to maturation. These factors were addressed to assess pre-anthesis and full-season growth and development of three sweet cherry cultivars, 'Chelan', 'Bing' and 'Sweetheart', differing primarily in seasonal duration and fruit size. Volume was calculated from photographic measurements of reproductive buds, ovaries and pits at all phases of development. A population of unfertilized ovaries was produced using bee-exclusion netting to enable a statistical comparison with an open pollinated population to detect differences in size and shape between successful and failing fruit growth. Anthesis timing and fruiting-density were manipulated by floral extinction at the spur and whole-tree scales. Developmental time indices were analysed using polynomial curve fitting of log-transformed data supported by Richards and logistic functions of asymptotic growth of the pit and maturing fruit, respectively. Pre-anthesis growth began at the completion of eco-dormancy. A slight decline in relative growth rate (RGR) was observed during bud scale separation approx. -16 d from anthesis (DFA) before resumption of exponential growth to a maximum about 14 DFA. After anthesis, reduced growth of unfertilized or defective ovaries was partly discriminated from successful fruit at 5 DFA and completely at 25 DFA. Time indices of RGR inflections were similar among cultivars when adjusted for anthesis date alone, until the end of pit growth. Asymptotic growth of the pit underpinned the declining growth rate of fruit at the end of the first exponential

  13. A hybrid feature selection and health indicator construction scheme for delay-time-based degradation modelling of rolling element bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Deng, Congying; Zhang, Yi

    2018-03-01

    Rolling element bearings are mechanical components used frequently in most rotating machinery and they are also vulnerable links representing the main source of failures in such systems. Thus, health condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rolling element bearings have long been studied to improve operational reliability and maintenance efficiency of rotatory machines. Over the past decade, prognosis that enables forewarning of failure and estimation of residual life attracted increasing attention. To accurately and efficiently predict failure of the rolling element bearing, the degradation requires to be well represented and modelled. For this purpose, degradation of the rolling element bearing is analysed with the delay-time-based model in this paper. Also, a hybrid feature selection and health indicator construction scheme is proposed for extraction of the bearing health relevant information from condition monitoring sensor data. Effectiveness of the presented approach is validated through case studies on rolling element bearing run-to-failure experiments.

  14. The effects of temperature for development time, fecundity and reproduction on some ornamental aphid species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihal OZDER

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The development time, survivorship and reproduction of the Sarucallis kahawaluokalani (Kirkaldy, Eucallipterus tiliae L., Capitophorus elaeagni del Guercio, Aphis nerii Boyer de Fonscolombe, Cinara cedri Mimeur were studied on the Lagerstroemia indica L., Tilia tomentosa Moench, Elaeagnus angustifolia L., Nerium oleander L. and Cedrus libani Loud. at four constant temperatures (20C, 22.5C, 25C and 27.5C. Total nymphal development time ranged from 7.78 d at 22.5C to 9.81 d at 25C of C.elaeagni, 9.32 d at 25C to 12.5 d at 20C of E. tiliae, 7.08 d at 27,5C to 11.14 d at 20C of S. kahawaluokalani, 15.85 d at 25C to 12.57 d at 20C of A. nerii and 13.00 d at 20C to 10.07 d at 25C of C. cedri. The intrinsic rate of increase (rm at 22.5C had the highest value for S. kahawaluokalani and C. elaeagni (0.5703 and (0.2945 among all tested constant temperatures. The calculated rm was higher at 25C for E. tiliae (1.4124 and C. cedri (0.2975 and at 20C A. nerii (0.2648. That the optimal temperature for E. tiliae and C.cedri on T. tomentosa and C. libani was 25C, for C. elaeagni and E. tiliae was 22.5C on E. angustifolia and T. tomentosa and for A. nerii was 20C on N. oleander.

  15. Estimating the time and temperature relationship for causation of deep-partial thickness skin burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, John P; Plourde, Brian; Vallez, Lauren; Stark, John; Diller, Kenneth R

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to develop and present a simple procedure for evaluating the temperature and exposure-time conditions that lead to causation of a deep-partial thickness burn and the effect that the immediate post-burn thermal environment can have on the process. A computational model has been designed and applied to predict the time required for skin burns to reach a deep-partial thickness level of injury. The model includes multiple tissue layers including the epidermis, dermis, hypodermis, and subcutaneous tissue. Simulated exposure temperatures ranged from 62.8 to 87.8°C (145-190°F). Two scenarios were investigated. The first and worst case scenario was a direct exposure to water (characterized by a large convection coefficient) with the clothing left on the skin following the exposure. A second case consisted of a scald insult followed immediately by the skin being washed with cool water (20°C). For both cases, an Arrhenius injury model was applied whereby the extent and depth of injury were calculated and compared for the different post-burn treatments. In addition, injury values were compared with experiment data from the literature to assess verification of the numerical methodology. It was found that the clinical observations of injury extent agreed with the calculated values. Furthermore, inundation with cool water decreased skin temperatures more quickly than the clothing insulating case and led to a modest decrease in the burn extent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  16. Mixing times towards demographic equilibrium in insect populations with temperature variable age structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damos, Petros

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we use entropy related mixing rate modules to measure the effects of temperature on insect population stability and demographic breakdown. The uncertainty in the age of the mother of a randomly chosen newborn, and how it is moved after a finite act of time steps, is modeled using a stochastic transformation of the Leslie matrix. Age classes are represented as a cycle graph and its transitions towards the stable age distribution are brought forth as an exact Markov chain. The dynamics of divergence, from a non equilibrium state towards equilibrium, are evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy. Moreover, Kullback-Leibler distance is applied as information-theoretic measure to estimate exact mixing times of age transitions probabilities towards equilibrium. Using empirically data, we show that on the initial conditions and simulated projection's trough time, that population entropy can effectively be applied to detect demographic variability towards equilibrium under different temperature conditions. Changes in entropy are correlated with the fluctuations of the insect population decay rates (i.e. demographic stability towards equilibrium). Moreover, shorter mixing times are directly linked to lower entropy rates and vice versa. This may be linked to the properties of the insect model system, which in contrast to warm blooded animals has the ability to greatly change its metabolic and demographic rates. Moreover, population entropy and the related distance measures that are applied, provide a means to measure these rates. The current results and model projections provide clear biological evidence why dynamic population entropy may be useful to measure population stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Modeling minimum temperature using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system based on spectral analysis of climate indices: A case study in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojatollah Daneshmand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, a lot of attention is paid to the application of intelligent systems in predicting natural phenomena. Artificial neural network systems, fuzzy logic, and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference are used in this field. Daily minimum temperature of the meteorology station of the city of Mashhad, in northeast of Iran, in a 42-year statistical period, 1966-2008, has been received from the Iranian meteorological organization. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system is used for modeling and forecasting the monthly minimum temperature. To find appropriate inputs, three approaches, i.e. spectral analysis, correlation coefficient, and the knowledge of experts,are used. By applying fast Fourier transform to the parameter of monthly minimum temperature and climate indices, and by using correlation coefficient and the knowledge of experts, 3 indices, Nino 1 + 2, NP, and PNA, are selected as model inputs. A hybrid training algorithm is used to train the system. According to simulation results, a correlation coefficient of 0.987 between the observed values and the predicted values, as well as amean absolute percentage deviations of 27.6% indicate an acceptable estimation of the model.

  18. Data indicating temperature response of Ti–6Al–4V thin-walled structure during its additive manufacture via Laser Engineered Net Shaping

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    Garrett J. Marshall

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An OPTOMEC Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™ 750 system was retrofitted with a melt pool pyrometer and in-chamber infrared (IR camera for nondestructive thermal inspection of the blown-powder, direct laser deposition (DLD process. Data indicative of temperature and heat transfer within the melt pool and heat affected zone atop a thin-walled structure of Ti–6Al–4V during its additive manufacture are provided. Melt pool temperature data were collected via the dual-wavelength pyrometer while the dynamic, bulk part temperature distribution was collected using the IR camera. Such data are provided in Comma Separated Values (CSV file format, containing a 752×480 matrix and a 320×240 matrix of temperatures corresponding to individual pixels of the pyrometer and IR camera, respectively. The IR camera and pyrometer temperature data are provided in blackbody-calibrated, raw forms. Provided thermal data can aid in generating and refining process-property-performance relationships between laser manufacturing and its fabricated materials.

  19. Trends in indices for extremes in daily air temperature over Utah, USA Tendências de indices de extremos para temperatura do ar diária sobre Utah, EUA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antonio Costa dos Santos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to obtain analysis of the trends in eleven annual extreme indices of temperature for Utah, United State of America (USA. The analyses have been obtained for 28 meteorological stations, in general, for the period of 1930 to 2006, characterizing a long-term period and with high quality data. The software used to process the data was the RClimdex 1.0. The analysis has identified that the temperature increased in Utah during the last century, evidencing the importance of the ongoing research on climate change in many parts of the world.O principal objetivo desse estudo foi analisar as tendências de onze indices de extremos climáticos baseados em dados diários de temperatura do ar, obtidos a partir de 28 estações meteorológicas localizadas em Utah, Estados Unidos da America (EUA. Em geral, os dados foram coletados entre 1930 e 2006, apresentando coerente resolução temporal e espacial. O software utilizado no processamento dos dados foi o RClimdex 1.0. As análises dos índices extremos mostraram que a temperatura aumentou em Utah durante o último século, evidenciando a importância das pesquisas sobre mudanças climáticas em diferentes partes do mundo.

  20. Carbonate clumped isotopes and in situ temperature monitoring for Holocene soils in the San Luis Valley, USA indicate springtime carbonate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, A. M.; Paces, J. B.; Ruleman, C.

    2017-12-01

    Pedogenic carbonate horizons are abundant in semi-arid and arid regions worldwide and within the geologic record. They present a widely distributed archive of past environmental conditions, driven by global climate or tectonically-controlled elevation changes. Oxygen and carbon isotopes in calcite-rich nodules and clast rinds are widely-applied indicators of past soil water and CO2 composition linked to changing precipitation and plant communities. The temperature of carbonate formation, however, provides key constraint on past water/CO2 values and elucidate why they may have changed in the past. Clumped isotope thermometry can provide this constraint and additional climate information, given the carbonate forming system is well understood. We present preliminary clumped isotope (Δ47) temperatures for Holocene soil carbonates, constrained by 14C and U-Th disequilibrium dating, compared with two years of in situ soil temperature data to better understand the mechanism and seasonality of carbonate formation in the San Luis Valley region of the southern Rocky Mountains. Five temperature-monitoring sites ranging in elevation (1940-2450 m) and latitude (36.2-37.9°N) were installed in a variety of settings (range front, valley center, and canyon). The resulting records show indistinguishable seasonal temperature variations at >60 cm depth. This suggests Δ47 temperatures should be comparable at sites across the region. Temperatures based on Δ47 measurements of Holocene (>1.8 to 11.0 ka BP) carbonates at these sites yield consistent inter-site temperatures of 10±4°C, which are similar to modern springtime soil temperatures at depth. This seasonality matches previous results of isotopic modeling at sites further south along the Rio Grande corridor. Temperatures during March to May show multiple, abrupt warming and cooling cycles on weekly timescales caused by wetting and drying of the soil during spring precipitation events. This may drive carbonate precipitation

  1. Time trends and sex differences in associations between socioeconomic status indicators and overweight-obesity in Mexico (2006-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada, Amado D; Lozada-Tequeanes, Ana L

    2015-12-16

    Although the associations between specific socioeconomic status (SES) indicators and overweight or obesity (OWOB) have been studied in different countries, fewer evidence exists for these associations when multiple SES indicators are considered simultaneously. Furthermore, there are few studies investigating time trends in OWOB and their relation with SES in upper-middle income countries, especially for men. The present study contributes to a better understanding of the nature and evolution of the associations between SES indicators and OWOB in the Mexican adult population. We pooled data from the 2006 and 2012 National Health and Nutrition Surveys in Mexico and obtained covariate-adjusted prevalence from a design-based logistic multiple regression model. Covariates included a wealth index, education, occupational status, marital status, and all interactions for each covariate with sex (male/female) and survey year. For men, the association between wealth and OWOB remained positive in general but curvature was more evident in 2012. The wealth-OWOB association in women showed an inverted-U pattern at both years with a positive slope that turned into a negative one as wealth increased. Among women, OWOB prevalence at the college/university education level was approximately 12.0 ± 2.4 (percentage points ± standard error) lower compared with the elementary education level. We did not find differences between educational categories for men in 2006, but in 2012 OWOB tended to be higher among the more educated. The prevalence of obesity in women increased at wealth levels from the middle and upper-middle section of the wealth distributions. Overall OWOB prevalence was near 70 % in 2012 for both sexes. Among Mexican women, the associations between SES indicators and excess body weight were consistent to those found in developed countries. Among Mexican men, higher education was not associated with a lower prevalence of OWOB but the positive association between