WorldWideScience

Sample records for time structure chronomics

  1. Daily chronomics of proteomic profile in aging and rotenone-induced Parkinson's disease model in male Wistar rat and its modulation by melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagota, Anita; Mattam, Ushodaya

    2017-08-01

    Aging is associated with changes in several basic parameters of circadian timing system (CTS) in mammals leading to circadian dysfunction. We had reported earlier that upon aging and in rotenone induced Parkinson's disease (RIPD) rat model there were significant alterations in the core clock genes expression levels and daily pulses. To identify biomarkers of aging and PD chronomics of proteomic day-night profiles in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), pineal and substantia nigra (SN) in 3 month (m), 12, 24 m and RIPD rat model were studied at two time points i.e. Zeitgeber Time (ZT)-6 (mid-day) and ZT-18 (mid-night). Proteome analysis was done by using two dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis and the spots showing robust day-night variations were identified by using MALDI TOF/TOF analysis. In 3 m rats the number of proteins showing day-night variations were relatively more than 12, 24 m and RIPD rat model in SCN and SN. But in pineal there was increase in number of protein spots showing day-night variations in 24 m. Mass spectroscopy of the protein spots showing robust day night variation in aging and RIPD rats were identified. As melatonin, a multitasking molecule, an endogenous synchronizer of rhythm, an antioxidant and an antiaging drug, declines with aging, the effects of melatonin administration on differential alterations in chronomics of 2-D protein profiles in aging and RIPD male Wistar rats were studied. We report here that the melatonin could be playing an important role in modulating the chronomics of 2-D protein profiles. Additionally, various proteins were identified for the first time in this study showing significant day night variation in SCN, pineal and SN may prove useful towards targeting novel treatments for circadian dysfunction, good health and longevity.

  2. Circadian time structure of circulating plasma lipid peroxides, antioxidant enzymes and other small molecules in peptic ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ranjana; Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Masood, Tariq; Tripathi, Anil Kumar; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Singh, Raj Kumar; Schwartzkopff, Othild; Cornelissen, Germaine

    2015-12-07

    The circadian rhythm, as part of a broad time structure (chronome) of lipid peroxides and antioxidant defense mechanisms may relate to prevention, efficacy and management of preventive and curative chronotherapy. Fifty newly diagnosed patients with peptic ulcers, 30-45 years of age, and 60 age-matched clinically healthy volunteers were synchronized for one week with diurnal activity from about 06:00 to about 22:00 and nocturnal rest. Breakfast was served around 08:30, lunch around 13:30 and dinner around 20:30. Drugs known to affect the free-radical systems were not taken. Blood samples were collected at 6-hour intervals for 24h under standardized, presumably 24-hour synchronized conditions. Plasma lipid peroxides, in the form of malondialdehyde (MDA), blood superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxide (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), catalase (CAT) activities, and serum total protein, albumin, ascorbic acid, total serum cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol concentrations were determined. By population-mean cosinor analysis, a marked circadian variation was demonstrated for all variables in healthy subjects and in ulcer patients (pascorbic acid, and HDL-C. They also had smaller circadian amplitude of SOD, CAT, GPx, GR, ascorbic acid, T-C, and HDL-C, but larger circadian amplitude of MDA and albumin. As compared to healthy subjects, the circadian acrophase of ulcer patients occurred later for MDA and GR and earlier for GPx. Mapping circadian rhythms, important chronome components that include trends with age and extra-circadian components characterizing antioxidants and pro-oxidants, is needed for exploring their putative role as markers in the treatment and management of peptic ulcers. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. 24 Hours chronomics of ambulatory blood pressure and its relation with circadian rhythm of 6-sulfatoxy melatonin in night shift health care workers

    OpenAIRE

    B. Anjum; Narsingh Verma; Sandeep Tiwari; Abbas A Mahdi; Ranjana Singh; Qulsoom Naaz; Saumya Mishra; Prerna Singh; Suman Gautam; Shipra Bhardwaj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Night shift workers have altered circadian pattern of blood pressure/heart rate and hormones like melatonin and cortisol. Due to this variation, night shift worker suffers from various cardiovascular disorders and hormonal disturbances. Methods: The Present study was aimed to investigate the effects of rotating night shift on 24 hours chronomics of BP/HR and its relation with 6-sulfatoxy melatonin levels. 62 healthy nursing professionals, aged 20-40 year, performing day and ni...

  4. Space-time structure

    CERN Document Server

    Schrödinger, Erwin

    1985-01-01

    In response to repeated requests this classic book on space-time structure by Professor Erwin Schrödinger is now available in the Cambridge Science Classics series. First published in 1950, and reprinted in 1954 and 1960, this lucid and profound exposition of Einstein's 1915 theory of gravitation still provides valuable reading for students and research workers in the field.

  5. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L.O.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The same argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions

  6. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The ame argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions.

  7. Time structure of cascade showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Takao

    1984-01-01

    Interesting results have been reported on the time structure of the electromagnetic components of air showers which have been obtained by using recent fast electronic circuit technology. However, these analyses and explanations seem not very persuasive. One of the reasons is that there is not satisfactory theoretical calculation yet to explain the delay of electromagnetic components in cascade processes which are the object of direct observation. Therefore, Monte Carlo calculation was attempted for examining the relationship between the altitude at which high energy γ-ray is generated up in the air and the time structure of cascade showers at the level of observation. The investigation of a dominant factor over the delay of electromagnetic components indicated that the delay due to the multiple scattering of electrons was essential. The author used the analytical solution found by himself of C. N. Yang's equation for the study on the delay due to multiple scattering. The results were as follows: The average delay time and the spread of distribution of electromagnetic cascades were approximately in linear relationship with the mass of a material having passed in a thin uniform medium; the rise time of arrival time distribution for electromagnetic cascade showers was very steep under the condition that they were generated up in the air and observed on the ground; the subpeaks delayed by tens of ns in arrival time may sometimes appear due to the perturbation in electromagnetic cascade processes. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  8. Quadratic Term Structure Models in Discrete Time

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Realdon

    2006-01-01

    This paper extends the results on quadratic term structure models in continuos time to the discrete time setting. The continuos time setting can be seen as a special case of the discrete time one. Recursive closed form solutions for zero coupon bonds are provided even in the presence of multiple correlated underlying factors. Pricing bond options requires simple integration. Model parameters may well be time dependent without scuppering such tractability. Model estimation does not require a r...

  9. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation time structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeard, N.; Silly, M.G.; Chauvet, C.; Guzzo, M.; Ricaud, J.P.; Izquierdo, M.; Sirotti, F.; Krizmancic, D.; Guzzo, M.; Stebel, L.; Pittana, P.; Sergo, R.; Cautero, G.; Dufour, G.; Rochet, F.

    2011-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation time structure is becoming a common tool for studying dynamic properties of materials. The main limitation is often the wide time domain the user would like to access with pump-probe experiments. In order to perform photoelectron spectroscopy experiments over time scales from milliseconds to picoseconds it is mandatory to measure the time at which each measured photoelectron was created. For this reason the usual CCD camera based two-dimensional detection of electron energy analyzers has been replaced by a new delay-line detector adapted to the time structure of the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation source. The new two-dimensional delay-line detector has a time resolution of 5 ns and was installed on a Scienta SES 2002 electron energy analyzer. The first application has been to characterize the time of flight of the photo emitted electrons as a function of their kinetic energy and the selected pass energy. By repeating the experiment as a function of the available pass energy and of the kinetic energy, a complete characterization of the analyzer behaviour in the time domain has been obtained. Even for kinetic energies as low as 10 eV at 2 eV pass energy, the time spread of the detected electrons is lower than 140 ns. These results and the time structure of the SOLEIL filling modes assure the possibility of performing pump-probe photoelectron spectroscopy experiments with the time resolution given by the SOLEIL pulse width, the best performance of the beamline and of the experimental station. (authors)

  10. Real Time Structured Light and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilm, Jakob

    Structured light scanning is a versatile method for 3D shape acquisition. While much faster than most competing measurement techniques, most high-end structured light scans still take in the order of seconds to complete. Low-cost sensors such as Microsoft Kinect and time of flight cameras have made......, increased processing power, and methods presented in this thesis, it is possible to perform structured light scans in real time with 20 depth measurements per second. This offers new opportunities for studying dynamic scenes, quality control, human-computer interaction and more. This thesis discusses...... several aspects of real time structured light systems and presents contributions within calibration, scene coding and motion correction aspects. The problem of reliable and fast calibration of such systems is addressed with a novel calibration scheme utilising radial basis functions [Contribution B...

  11. Network structure and travel time perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathi, Pavithra; Levinson, David; Hochmair, Hartwig

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to test the systematic variation in the perception of travel time among travelers and relate the variation to the underlying street network structure. Travel survey data from the Twin Cities metropolitan area (which includes the cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul) is used for the analysis. Travelers are classified into two groups based on the ratio of perceived and estimated commute travel time. The measures of network structure are estimated using the street network along the identified commute route. T-test comparisons are conducted to identify statistically significant differences in estimated network measures between the two traveler groups. The combined effect of these estimated network measures on travel time is then analyzed using regression models. The results from the t-test and regression analyses confirm the influence of the underlying network structure on the perception of travel time.

  12. Network structure of multivariate time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasa, Lucas; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2015-10-21

    Our understanding of a variety of phenomena in physics, biology and economics crucially depends on the analysis of multivariate time series. While a wide range tools and techniques for time series analysis already exist, the increasing availability of massive data structures calls for new approaches for multidimensional signal processing. We present here a non-parametric method to analyse multivariate time series, based on the mapping of a multidimensional time series into a multilayer network, which allows to extract information on a high dimensional dynamical system through the analysis of the structure of the associated multiplex network. The method is simple to implement, general, scalable, does not require ad hoc phase space partitioning, and is thus suitable for the analysis of large, heterogeneous and non-stationary time series. We show that simple structural descriptors of the associated multiplex networks allow to extract and quantify nontrivial properties of coupled chaotic maps, including the transition between different dynamical phases and the onset of various types of synchronization. As a concrete example we then study financial time series, showing that a multiplex network analysis can efficiently discriminate crises from periods of financial stability, where standard methods based on time-series symbolization often fail.

  13. Structural Time Domain Identification Toolbox User's Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Brincker, Rune

    This manual describes the Structural Time Domain Identification toolbox for use with MA TLAB. This version of the tool box has been developed using the PC-based MA TLAB version 4.2c, but is compatible with prior versions of MATLAB and UNIX-based versions. The routines of the toolbox are the so...

  14. Outlier Detection in Structural Time Series Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marczak, Martyna; Proietti, Tommaso

    investigate via Monte Carlo simulations how this approach performs for detecting additive outliers and level shifts in the analysis of nonstationary seasonal time series. The reference model is the basic structural model, featuring a local linear trend, possibly integrated of order two, stochastic seasonality......Structural change affects the estimation of economic signals, like the underlying growth rate or the seasonally adjusted series. An important issue, which has attracted a great deal of attention also in the seasonal adjustment literature, is its detection by an expert procedure. The general......–to–specific approach to the detection of structural change, currently implemented in Autometrics via indicator saturation, has proven to be both practical and effective in the context of stationary dynamic regression models and unit–root autoregressions. By focusing on impulse– and step–indicator saturation, we...

  15. Mach's principle and space-time structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raine, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    Mach's principle, that inertial forces should be generated by the motion of a body relative to the bulk of matter in the universe, is shown to be related to the structure imposed on space-time by dynamical theories. General relativity theory and Mach's principle are both shown to be well supported by observations. Since Mach's principle is not contained in general relativity this leads to a discussion of attempts to derive Machian theories. The most promising of these appears to be a selection rule for solutions of the general relativistic field equations, in which the space-time metric structure is generated by the matter content of the universe only in a well-defined way. (author)

  16. Timing of Earnings and Capital Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Miglo, Anton

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows that asymmetric information about the timing of earnings can affect corporate capital structure. It sheds some new light on two following questions: why may profitable firms be interested in issuing equity, and why does debt not necessarily signal a firm quality. These issues seem to be puzzling from the classical pecking-order theory or signalling theory point of view. The paper also contributes to the analysis of the link between debt-equity choice and subsequent performanc...

  17. Symplectic Structure of Intrinsic Time Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyo Eyo Ita

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Poisson structure of intrinsic time gravity is analysed. With the starting point comprising a unimodular three-metric with traceless momentum, a trace-induced anomaly results upon quantization. This leads to a revision of the choice of momentum variable to the (mixed index traceless momentric. This latter choice unitarily implements the fundamental commutation relations, which now take on the form of an affine algebra with SU(3 Lie algebra amongst the momentric variables. The resulting relations unitarily implement tracelessness upon quantization. The associated Poisson brackets and Hamiltonian dynamics are studied.

  18. Time-space structure of nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miya, Kenzo

    2003-01-01

    New idea to analyze the structure of nuclear safety and to investigate functioning property of hierarchical principle is applied to nuclear safety in this paper. The nuclear safety is expressed by three principles such as 1) the action and subject are partitioned and classified by time and space, 2) introduction of hierarchy with three strata to the closed object and hierarchy with many strata to the open object and 3) application of 'element, relation and abstraction' to the engineering system as a framework of intellectual activity. For example, prevention of core melt is the closed object and it is obtained by acting hierarchies with three strata (operation stop, cooling and closing radiation) as the safety functions. Prevention of increase of accident is open object, so that, space hierarchy with many strata of prevention is used for the safety security of reactor. The safety security method of reactor consists of three processes, that is 1) the basic process to make clear the continuous operating time on the basis of regular inspection, 2) the action process of operating ECCS to prevent core damage accident, when a large leakage happens and 3) many strata prevention process of stopping a leak in the environment. (S.Y.)

  19. Structural Equation Modeling of Multivariate Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Toit, Stephen H. C.; Browne, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    The covariance structure of a vector autoregressive process with moving average residuals (VARMA) is derived. It differs from other available expressions for the covariance function of a stationary VARMA process and is compatible with current structural equation methodology. Structural equation modeling programs, such as LISREL, may therefore be…

  20. Dynamical structure of space and time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannikov-Proskuryakov, S.S.

    2000-01-01

    A mathematically correct solution of the problem of ultraviolet divergences requires a radical change of our ideas on space and matter. We show that the space is a discontinuum in small which is the carrier of a new dynamical structure. Taking into account this structure, a new theory of elementary particles can be suggested

  1. Space time manifolds and contact structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. L. Duggal

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A new class of contact manifolds (carring a global non-vanishing timelike vector field is introduced to establish a relation between spacetime manifolds and contact structures. We show that odd dimensional strongly causal (in particular, globally hyperbolic spacetimes can carry a regular contact structure. As examples, we present a causal spacetime with a non regular contact structure and a physical model [Gödel Universe] of Homogeneous contact manifold. Finally, we construct a model of 4-dimensional spacetime of general relativity as a contact CR-submanifold.

  2. Detecting nonlinear structure in time series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theiler, J.

    1991-01-01

    We describe an approach for evaluating the statistical significance of evidence for nonlinearity in a time series. The formal application of our method requires the careful statement of a null hypothesis which characterizes a candidate linear process, the generation of an ensemble of ''surrogate'' data sets which are similar to the original time series but consistent with the null hypothesis, and the computation of a discriminating statistic for the original and for each of the surrogate data sets. The idea is to test the original time series against the null hypothesis by checking whether the discriminating statistic computed for the original time series differs significantly from the statistics computed for each of the surrogate sets. While some data sets very cleanly exhibit low-dimensional chaos, there are many cases where the evidence is sketchy and difficult to evaluate. We hope to provide a framework within which such claims of nonlinearity can be evaluated. 5 refs., 4 figs

  3. Time series modelling of overflow structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, J.; Harremoës, P.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamics of a storage pipe is examined using a grey-box model based on on-line measured data. The grey-box modelling approach uses a combination of physically-based and empirical terms in the model formulation. The model provides an on-line state estimate of the overflows, pumping capacities...... and available storage capacity in the pipe as well as predictions of future states. A linear overflow relation is found, differing significantly from the traditional modelling approach. This is due to complicated overflow structures in a hydraulic sense where the overflow is governed by inertia from the inflow...... to the overflow structures. The capacity of a pump draining the storage pipe has been estimated for two rain events, revealing that the pump was malfunctioning during the first rain event. The grey-box modelling approach is applicable for automated on-line surveillance and control. (C) 1997 IAWQ. Published...

  4. Structure of Student Time Management Scale (STMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, M.

    2013-01-01

    With the aim of constructing a Student Time Management Scale (STMS), the initial version was administered and data were collected from 523 standard eleventh students. (Mean age = 15.64). The data obtained were subjected to Reliability and Factor analysis using PASW Statistical software version 18. From 42 items 14 were dropped, resulting in the…

  5. Modelling road accidents: An approach using structural time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junus, Noor Wahida Md; Ismail, Mohd Tahir

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the trend of road accidents in Malaysia for the years 2001 until 2012 was modelled using a structural time series approach. The structural time series model was identified using a stepwise method, and the residuals for each model were tested. The best-fitted model was chosen based on the smallest Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and prediction error variance. In order to check the quality of the model, a data validation procedure was performed by predicting the monthly number of road accidents for the year 2012. Results indicate that the best specification of the structural time series model to represent road accidents is the local level with a seasonal model.

  6. Issues in the representation of time and structure in music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, H.

    1993-01-01

    This article discusses the issues in the design of a representational system for music. Following decisions as to the primitives of such a system, their time structure and general structuring is discussed. Most of the issues are presented as controversies, using extremes to clarify the underlying

  7. Stability and the structure of continuous-time economic models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, H.J.; Schoonbeek, L.

    In this paper we investigate the relationship between the stability of macroeconomic, or macroeconometric, continuous-time models and the structure of the matrices appearing in these models. In particular, we concentrate on dominant-diagonal structures. We derive general stability results for models

  8. GENERIC Integrators: Structure Preserving Time Integration for Thermodynamic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öttinger, Hans Christian

    2018-04-01

    Thermodynamically admissible evolution equations for non-equilibrium systems are known to possess a distinct mathematical structure. Within the GENERIC (general equation for the non-equilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling) framework of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, which is based on continuous time evolution, we investigate the possibility of preserving all the structural elements in time-discretized equations. Our approach, which follows Moser's [1] construction of symplectic integrators for Hamiltonian systems, is illustrated for the damped harmonic oscillator. Alternative approaches are sketched.

  9. Endurance time method for Seismic analysis and design of structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estekanchi, H.E.; Vafai, A.; Sadeghazar, M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a new method for performance based earthquake analysis and design has been introduced. In this method, the structure is subjected to accelerograms that impose increasing dynamic demand on the structure with time. Specified damage indexes are monitored up to the collapse level or other performance limit that defines the endurance limit point for the structure. Also, a method for generating standard intensifying accelerograms has been described. Three accelerograms have been generated using this method. Furthermore, the concept of Endurance Time has been described by applying these accelerograms to single and multi degree of freedom linear systems. The application of this method for analysis of complex nonlinear systems has been explained. Endurance Time method provides a uniform approach to seismic analysis and design of complex structures that can be applied in numerical and experimental investigations

  10. Time-varying correlation and common structures in volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    This thesis studies time series properties of the covariance structure of multivariate asset returns. First, the time-varying feature of correlation is investigated at the intraday level with a new correlation model incorporating the intraday correlation dynamics. Second, the thesis develops a

  11. Continuous Time Structural Equation Modeling with R Package ctsem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles C. Driver

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We introduce ctsem, an R package for continuous time structural equation modeling of panel (N > 1 and time series (N = 1 data, using full information maximum likelihood. Most dynamic models (e.g., cross-lagged panel models in the social and behavioural sciences are discrete time models. An assumption of discrete time models is that time intervals between measurements are equal, and that all subjects were assessed at the same intervals. Violations of this assumption are often ignored due to the difficulty of accounting for varying time intervals, therefore parameter estimates can be biased and the time course of effects becomes ambiguous. By using stochastic differential equations to estimate an underlying continuous process, continuous time models allow for any pattern of measurement occasions. By interfacing to OpenMx, ctsem combines the flexible specification of structural equation models with the enhanced data gathering opportunities and improved estimation of continuous time models. ctsem can estimate relationships over time for multiple latent processes, measured by multiple noisy indicators with varying time intervals between observations. Within and between effects are estimated simultaneously by modeling both observed covariates and unobserved heterogeneity. Exogenous shocks with different shapes, group differences, higher order diffusion effects and oscillating processes can all be simply modeled. We first introduce and define continuous time models, then show how to specify and estimate a range of continuous time models using ctsem.

  12. Memory Efficient Data Structures for Explicit Verification of Timed Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taankvist, Jakob Haahr; Srba, Jiri; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2014-01-01

    Timed analysis of real-time systems can be performed using continuous (symbolic) or discrete (explicit) techniques. The explicit state-space exploration can be considerably faster for models with moderately small constants, however, at the expense of high memory consumption. In the setting of timed......-arc Petri nets, we explore new data structures for lowering the used memory: PTries for efficient storing of configurations and time darts for semi-symbolic description of the state-space. Both methods are implemented as a part of the tool TAPAAL and the experiments document at least one order of magnitude...... of memory savings while preserving comparable verification times....

  13. Thermal stress ratcheting analysis of a time-hardening structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hada, Kazuhiko

    1999-01-01

    Thermal stress ratcheting and shakedown is analyzed for a time-hardening structure: the yield stress increases as time goes on under exposure to neutron irradiation or thermal aging. New three modes of ratcheting and shakedown are identified as transition to other deformation modes. Stress regimes and thermal ratchet strains are formulated as a function of time-increasing yield stress. Moreover, a new model of trouble occurrence frequency as a modification to a bath-tube curve is proposed for calculating a time period of a thermal cycle. Application of the proposed formulation tells us a benefit of taking into account the time hardening due to neutron irradiation. (author)

  14. Time Crystal Platform: From Quasicrystal Structures in Time to Systems with Exotic Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giergiel, Krzysztof; Miroszewski, Artur; Sacha, Krzysztof

    2018-04-01

    Time crystals are quantum many-body systems that, due to interactions between particles, are able to spontaneously self-organize their motion in a periodic way in time by analogy with the formation of crystalline structures in space in condensed matter physics. In solid state physics properties of space crystals are often investigated with the help of external potentials that are spatially periodic and reflect various crystalline structures. A similar approach can be applied for time crystals, as periodically driven systems constitute counterparts of spatially periodic systems, but in the time domain. Here we show that condensed matter problems ranging from single particles in potentials of quasicrystal structure to many-body systems with exotic long-range interactions can be realized in the time domain with an appropriate periodic driving. Moreover, it is possible to create molecules where atoms are bound together due to destructive interference if the atomic scattering length is modulated in time.

  15. Wake force computation in the time domain for long structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bane, K.; Weiland, T.

    1983-07-01

    One is often interested in calculating the wake potentials for short bunches in long structures using TBCI. For ultra-relativistic particles it is sufficient to solve for the fields only over a window containing the bunch and moving along with it. This technique reduces both the memory and the running time required by a factor that equals the ratio of the structure length to the window length. For example, for a bunch with sigma/sub z/ of one picosecond traversing a single SLAC cell this improvement factor is 15. It is thus possible to solve for the wakefields in very long structures: for a given problem, increasing the structure length will not change the memory required while only adding linearly to the CPU time needed

  16. Freely floating structures trapping time-harmonic water waves (revisited)

    OpenAIRE

    Kuznetsov, Nikolay; Motygin, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    We study the coupled small-amplitude motion of the mechanical system consisting of infinitely deep water and a structure immersed in it. The former is bounded above by a free surface, whereas the latter is formed by an arbitrary finite number of surface-piercing bodies floating freely. The mathematical model of time-harmonic motion is a spectral problem in which the frequency of oscillations serves as the spectral parameter. It is proved that there exist axisymmetric structures consisting of ...

  17. Time-dependent reliability analysis and condition assessment of structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingwood, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Structures generally play a passive role in assurance of safety in nuclear plant operation, but are important if the plant is to withstand the effect of extreme environmental or abnormal events. Relative to mechanical and electrical components, structural systems and components would be difficult and costly to replace. While the performance of steel or reinforced concrete structures in service generally has been very good, their strengths may deteriorate during an extended service life as a result of changes brought on by an aggressive environment, excessive loading, or accidental loading. Quantitative tools for condition assessment of aging structures can be developed using time-dependent structural reliability analysis methods. Such methods provide a framework for addressing the uncertainties attendant to aging in the decision process

  18. Real-Time 3D Profile Measurement Using Structured Light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, L; Zhang, Z J; Ma, H; Yu, Y J

    2006-01-01

    The paper builds a real-time system of 3D profile measurement using structured-light imaging. It allows a hand-held object to rotate free in the space-time coded light field, which is projected by the projector. The surface of measured objects with projected coded light is imaged; the system shows surface reconstruction results of objects online. This feedback helps user to adjust object's pose in the light field according to the dismissed or error data, which would achieve the integrality of data used in reconstruction. This method can acquire denser data cloud and have higher reconstruction accuracy and efficiency. According to the real-time requirements, the paper presents the non-restricted light plane modelling which suits stripe structured light system, designs the three-frame stripes space-time coded pattern, and uses the advance ICP algorithms to acquire 3D data alignment from multiple view

  19. Coping with Unemployment: Personality, Role Demands, and Time Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoye, Greet; Lootens, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Time structure has been found to be an important coping mechanism for dealing with the negative effects of unemployment on psychological well-being. This study extends the literature by investigating personality (openness to experience, conscientiousness, extraversion, neuroticism, and proactivity) and role demands (marital status, being the only…

  20. Some techniques to improve time structure of slow extracted beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Y.; Sato, H.; Toyama, T.; Marutsuka, K.; Sueno, T.; Mikawa, K.; Ninomiya, S.; Yoshii, M.

    1992-01-01

    In order to improve the time structure of slow extracted beam spill for the KEK 12GeV PS, the spill control system has been upgraded by adding feed forward signal to feedback signal. Further, the wake field in the RF cavity has been cancelled by the beam bunch signal to reduce the re-bunch effect during extraction period. (author)

  1. Structural Time Domain Identification (STDI) Toolbox for Use with MATLAB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune

    1997-01-01

    The Structural Time Domain Identification (STDI) toolbox for use with MATLABTM is developed at Aalborg University, Denmark, based on the system identification research performed during recent years. By now, a reliable set of functions offers a wide spectrum of services for all the important steps...

  2. Structural Time Domain Identification (STDI) Toolbox for Use with MATLAB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune

    The Structural Time Domain Identification (STDI) toolbox for use with MATLABTM is developed at Aalborg University, Denmark, based on the system identification research performed during recent years. By now, a reliable set of functions offers a wide spectrum of services for all the important steps...

  3. Broadband Structural Dynamics: Understanding the Impulse-Response of Structures Across Multiple Length and Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    Spectral domain response calculated • Time domain response obtained through inverse transform Approach 4: WASABI Wavelet Analysis of Structural Anomalies...differences at unity scale! Time Function Transform Apply Spectral Domain Transfer Function Time Function Inverse Transform Transform Transform  mtP

  4. Time-Darts: A Data Structure for Verification of Closed Timed Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Srba

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Symbolic data structures for model checking timed systems have been subject to a significant research, with Difference Bound Matrices (DBMs still being the preferred data structure in several mature verification tools. In comparison, discretization offers an easy alternative, with all operations having linear-time complexity in the number of clocks, and yet valid for a large class of closed systems. Unfortunately, fine-grained discretization causes itself a state-space explosion. We introduce a new data structure called time-darts for the symbolic representation of state-spaces of timed automata. Compared with the complete discretization, a single time-dart allows to represent an arbitrary large set of states, yet the time complexity of operations on time-darts remain linear in the number of clocks. We prove the correctness of the suggested reachability algorithm and perform several experiments in order to compare the performance of time-darts and the complete discretization. The main conclusion is that in all our experiments the time-dart method outperforms the complete discretization and it scales significantly better for models with larger constants.

  5. Structural damage detection robust against time synchronization errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Guirong; Dyke, Shirley J

    2010-01-01

    Structural damage detection based on wireless sensor networks can be affected significantly by time synchronization errors among sensors. Precise time synchronization of sensor nodes has been viewed as crucial for addressing this issue. However, precise time synchronization over a long period of time is often impractical in large wireless sensor networks due to two inherent challenges. First, time synchronization needs to be performed periodically, requiring frequent wireless communication among sensors at significant energy cost. Second, significant time synchronization errors may result from node failures which are likely to occur during long-term deployment over civil infrastructures. In this paper, a damage detection approach is proposed that is robust against time synchronization errors in wireless sensor networks. The paper first examines the ways in which time synchronization errors distort identified mode shapes, and then proposes a strategy for reducing distortion in the identified mode shapes. Modified values for these identified mode shapes are then used in conjunction with flexibility-based damage detection methods to localize damage. This alternative approach relaxes the need for frequent sensor synchronization and can tolerate significant time synchronization errors caused by node failures. The proposed approach is successfully demonstrated through numerical simulations and experimental tests in a lab

  6. Changes in the structural and functional characteristics of fisher (Pekania pennanti) rest structures over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill Zielinski; Fredrick V. Schlexer

    2015-01-01

    Resting habitat used by fishers (Pekania pennanti) has been relatively well studied but information on the persistence of their resting structures over time is unknown. We selected for reexamination 73 of 195 resting structures used by by fishers in northwestern California and compared their condition on the date they were found with their...

  7. Detecting structural breaks in time series via genetic algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doerr, Benjamin; Fischer, Paul; Hilbert, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    of the time series under consideration is available. Therefore, a black-box optimization approach is our method of choice for detecting structural breaks. We describe a genetic algorithm framework which easily adapts to a large number of statistical settings. To evaluate the usefulness of different crossover...... and mutation operations for this problem, we conduct extensive experiments to determine good choices for the parameters and operators of the genetic algorithm. One surprising observation is that use of uniform and one-point crossover together gave significantly better results than using either crossover...... operator alone. Moreover, we present a specific fitness function which exploits the sparse structure of the break points and which can be evaluated particularly efficiently. The experiments on artificial and real-world time series show that the resulting algorithm detects break points with high precision...

  8. Time-Frequency Methods for Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Pyayt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Detection of early warning signals for the imminent failure of large and complex engineered structures is a daunting challenge with many open research questions. In this paper we report on novel ways to perform Structural Health Monitoring (SHM of flood protection systems (levees, earthen dikes and concrete dams using sensor data. We present a robust data-driven anomaly detection method that combines time-frequency feature extraction, using wavelet analysis and phase shift, with one-sided classification techniques to identify the onset of failure anomalies in real-time sensor measurements. The methodology has been successfully tested at three operational levees. We detected a dam leakage in the retaining dam (Germany and “strange” behaviour of sensors installed in a Boston levee (UK and a Rhine levee (Germany.

  9. Structure and Hierarchy in Real-Time Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, Michael Oliver

    The development of digital systems is particularly challenging, if their correctness depends on the right timing of operations. One approach to enhance the reliability of such systems is model-based development. This allows for a formal analysis throughout all stages of design. Model......-based development is hindered mainly by the lack of adequate modeling languages and the high computational cost of the analysis. In this thesis we improve the situation along both axes. First, we bring the mathematical model closer to the human designer. This we achieve by casting hierarchical structures--as known...... that have the potential to reduce time and memory consumption drastically. The first technique makes use of structural information, in particular loops, to exploit regularities in the reachable state space. Via shortcut-like additions to the model we avoid repetition of similar states during an exhaustive...

  10. Spatial structure increases the waiting time for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Erik A.; Kostadinov, Rumen; Maley, Carlo C.; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2011-11-01

    Cancer results from a sequence of genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to a variety of abnormal phenotypes including increased proliferation and survival of somatic cells and thus to a selective advantage of pre-cancerous cells. The notion of cancer progression as an evolutionary process has been attracting increasing interest in recent years. A great deal of effort has been made to better understand and predict the progression to cancer using mathematical models; these mostly consider the evolution of a well-mixed cell population, even though pre-cancerous cells often evolve in highly structured epithelial tissues. In this study, we propose a novel model of cancer progression that considers a spatially structured cell population where clones expand via adaptive waves. This model is used to assess two different paradigms of asexual evolution that have been suggested to delineate the process of cancer progression. The standard scenario of periodic selection assumes that driver mutations are accumulated strictly sequentially over time. However, when the mutation supply is sufficiently high, clones may arise simultaneously on distinct genetic backgrounds, and clonal adaptation waves interfere with each other. We find that in the presence of clonal interference, spatial structure increases the waiting time for cancer, leads to a patchwork structure of non-uniformly sized clones and decreases the survival probability of virtually neutral (passenger) mutations, and that genetic distance begins to increase over a characteristic length scale Lc. These characteristic features of clonal interference may help us to predict the onset of cancers with pronounced spatial structure and to interpret spatially sampled genetic data obtained from biopsies. Our estimates suggest that clonal interference likely occurs in the progression of colon cancer and possibly other cancers where spatial structure matters.

  11. Simple Model with Time-Varying Fine-Structure ``Constant''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, M. S.

    2009-10-01

    Extending the original version written in colaboration with L.A. Trevisan, we study the generalisation of Dirac's LNH, so that time-variation of the fine-structure constant, due to varying electrical and magnetic permittivities is included along with other variations (cosmological and gravitational ``constants''), etc. We consider the present Universe, and also an inflationary scenario. Rotation of the Universe is a given possibility in this model.

  12. Lagrangian structures in time-periodic vortical flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kostrykin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lagrangian trajectories of fluid particles are experimentally studied in an oscillating four-vortex velocity field. The oscillations occur due to a loss of stability of a steady flow and result in a regular reclosure of streamlines between the vortices of the same sign. The Eulerian velocity field is visualized by tracer displacements over a short time period. The obtained data on tracer motions during a number of oscillation periods show that the Lagrangian trajectories form quasi-regular structures. The destruction of these structures is determined by two characteristic time scales: the tracers are redistributed sufficiently fast between the vortices of the same sign and much more slowly transported into the vortices of opposite sign. The observed behavior of the Lagrangian trajectories is quantitatively reproduced in a new numerical experiment with two-dimensional model of the velocity field with a small number of spatial harmonics. A qualitative interpretation of phenomena observed on the basis of the theory of adiabatic chaos in the Hamiltonian systems is given. The Lagrangian trajectories are numerically simulated under varying flow parameters. It is shown that the spatial-temporal characteristics of the Lagrangian structures depend on the properties of temporal change in the streamlines topology and on the adiabatic parameter corresponding to the flow. The condition for the occurrence of traps (the regions where the Lagrangian particles reside for a long time is obtained.

  13. Spectral and time-resolved studies on ocular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, D.; Jentsch, S.; Schenke, S.; Hammer, M.; Biskup, C.; Gaillard, E.

    2007-07-01

    Measurements of endogeous fluorophores open the possibility for evaluation of metabolic state at the eye. For interpretation of 2-dimensional measurements of time-resolved auto fluorescence in 2 separate spectral ranges at the human eye, comparing measurements were performed on porcine eyes. Determining excitation and emission spectra, attention was drawn of proof of coenzymes NADH and FAD in isolated anatomical structures cornea, aqueous humor, lens, vitreous, neuronal retina, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), choroid, and sclera. All these structures exhibit auto fluorescence, highest in lens. Excitation at 350 nm results in local fluorescence maxima at 460 nm, corresponding to NADH, in all structures. This short-wave excitation allows metabolic studies only at the anterior eye, because of the limited transmission of the ocular media. During excitation at 446 nm the existence of FAD is expressed by local fluorescence maxima at 530 nm. The composition fluorescence spectra allow no discrimination between single ocular structures. Approximating the dynamic fluorescence by a double exponential function, the shortest lifetimes were detected in RPE and neuronal retina. The histograms of mean lifetime t M cover each other on lens with cornea and also on sclera with choroid. Despite the lifetimes are close between RPE and neuronal retina, the relative contributions Q I are wide different. The gradient of trend lines in cluster diagrams of amplitudes α II vs. α I allows a discrimination of ocular structures.

  14. Identification of Time Varying Civil Engineering Structures using Multivariate Recursive Time Domain Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Skjærbæk, P. S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    with the smoothed quanties which have been obtained from SARCOF. The results show the usefulness of the technique for identification of a time varying civil engineering structure. It is found that all the techniques give reliable estiates of the frequencies of the two lowest modes and the first mode shape. Only...

  15. Family structure as a predictor of screen time among youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Rachel; McIsaac, Michael; Janssen, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The family plays a central role in the development of health-related behaviors among youth. The objective of this study was to determine whether non-traditional parental structure and shared custody arrangements predict how much time youth spend watching television, using a computer recreationally, and playing video games. Participants were a nationally representative sample of Canadian youth (N = 26,068) in grades 6-10 who participated in the 2009/10 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Survey. Screen time in youth from single parent and reconstituted families, with or without regular visitation with their non-residential parent, was compared to that of youth from traditional dual-parent families. Multiple imputation was used to account for missing data. After multiple imputation, the relative odds of being in the highest television, computer use, video game, and total screen time quartiles were not different in boys and girls from non-traditional families by comparison to boys and girls from traditional dual-parent families. In conclusion, parental structure and child custody arrangements did not have a meaningful impact on screen time among youth.

  16. Family structure as a predictor of screen time among youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel McMillan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The family plays a central role in the development of health-related behaviors among youth. The objective of this study was to determine whether non-traditional parental structure and shared custody arrangements predict how much time youth spend watching television, using a computer recreationally, and playing video games. Participants were a nationally representative sample of Canadian youth (N = 26,068 in grades 6–10 who participated in the 2009/10 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Survey. Screen time in youth from single parent and reconstituted families, with or without regular visitation with their non-residential parent, was compared to that of youth from traditional dual-parent families. Multiple imputation was used to account for missing data. After multiple imputation, the relative odds of being in the highest television, computer use, video game, and total screen time quartiles were not different in boys and girls from non-traditional families by comparison to boys and girls from traditional dual-parent families. In conclusion, parental structure and child custody arrangements did not have a meaningful impact on screen time among youth.

  17. Extremal inversion of lunar travel time data. [seismic velocity structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhard, N.; Jackson, D. D.

    1975-01-01

    The tau method, developed by Bessonova et al. (1974), of inversion of travel times is applied to lunar P-wave travel time data to find limits on the velocity structure of the moon. Tau is the singular solution to the Clairaut equation. Models with low-velocity zones, with low-velocity zones at differing depths, and without low-velocity zones, were found to be consistent with data and within the determined limits. Models with and without a discontinuity at about 25-km depth have been found which agree with all travel time data to within two standard deviations. In other words, the existence of the discontinuity and its size and location have not been uniquely resolved. Models with low-velocity channels are also possible.

  18. Nucleon structure functions in noncommutative space-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiei, A.; Rezaei, Z.; Mirjalili, A. [Yazd University, Physics Department, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    In the context of noncommutative space-time we investigate the nucleon structure functions which play an important role in identifying the internal structure of nucleons. We use the corrected vertices and employ new vertices that appear in two approaches of noncommutativity and calculate the proton structure functions in terms of the noncommutative tensor θ{sub μν}. To check our results we plot the nucleon structure function (NSF), F{sub 2}(x), and compare it with experimental data and the results from the GRV, GJR and CT10 parametrization models. We show that with the new vertex that arises the noncommutativity correction will lead to a better consistency between theoretical results and experimental data for the NSF. This consistency will be better for small values of the Bjorken variable x. To indicate and confirm the validity of our calculations we also act conversely. We obtain a lower bound for the numerical values of Λ{sub NC} scale which correspond to recent reports. (orig.)

  19. Time structure measurement of the ATLAS RPC gap current

    CERN Document Server

    Aielli, G; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The current absorbed by an RPC represents the sum of the charge delivered in the gas by the ionizing events interesting the gap, integrated by the electrodes time constant. This is typically of the order of tens of ms thus dominating the gas discharge time scale and characterizing the granular structure observed in the current signal. In most cases this structure is considered as noise to be further integrated to observe the average gap current, used often as a detector monitoring parameter or to precisely measure the uncorrelated background rate effects. A remarkable case is given if a large number of particles is passing trough the detector within an integration time constant producing a current peak clearly detectable above the average noise. The ATLAS RPC system is equipped with a dedicated current monitoring based on an ADC capable of reading out the average value as well as the transient peaks of the currents above a given threshold. A study on such data was used to spot the gap HV noise, to monitor the...

  20. Visual Timing of Structured Dance Movements Resembles Auditory Rhythm Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi-Huang; Salazar-López, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Temporal mechanisms for processing auditory musical rhythms are well established, in which a perceived beat is beneficial for timing purposes. It is yet unknown whether such beat-based timing would also underlie visual perception of temporally structured, ecological stimuli connected to music: dance. In this study, we investigated whether observers extracted a visual beat when watching dance movements to assist visual timing of these movements. Participants watched silent videos of dance sequences and reproduced the movement duration by mental recall. We found better visual timing for limb movements with regular patterns in the trajectories than without, similar to the beat advantage for auditory rhythms. When movements involved both the arms and the legs, the benefit of a visual beat relied only on the latter. The beat-based advantage persisted despite auditory interferences that were temporally incongruent with the visual beat, arguing for the visual nature of these mechanisms. Our results suggest that visual timing principles for dance parallel their auditory counterparts for music, which may be based on common sensorimotor coupling. These processes likely yield multimodal rhythm representations in the scenario of music and dance. PMID:27313900

  1. Space-time structure and the origin of physical law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    In the first part of this theses the author adopts a traditional world view, with space-time a topologically simple geometrical manifold, matter being represented by smooth classical fields, and space a Riemannian submanifold of space-time. It is shown how to characterize the space-time geometry in terms of fields defined on three-dimensional space. Accepting a finite number of the fields induced on space as independent initial data, a procedure is given for constructing dynamical and constraint equations which will propagate these fields forward in time. When the initial data are restricted to include only the hypersurface metric and the extrinsic curvature, the resulting equations combine to form the Einstein gravitational field equations with the cosmological term. The synthesis of gravitational and quantum physics is approached by proposing that the objective world underlying the perceived world is a four-dimensional topological manifold w, with no physically significant field structure and an unconstrianed and complex global topology. Conventional space-time is then a topologically simple replacement manifold for w. A preliminary outline of the correspondence is presented, based on a similarity between a natural graphical representation of 2 and the Feynman graphs of quantum field theory

  2. Dynamic Analysis of Partially Embedded Structures Considering Soil-Structure Interaction in Time Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Mahmoudpour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis and design of structures subjected to arbitrary dynamic loadings especially earthquakes have been studied during past decades. In practice, the effects of soil-structure interaction on the dynamic response of structures are usually neglected. In this study, the effect of soil-structure interaction on the dynamic response of structures has been examined. The substructure method using dynamic stiffness of soil is used to analyze soil-structure system. A coupled model based on finite element method and scaled boundary finite element method is applied. Finite element method is used to analyze the structure, and scaled boundary finite element method is applied in the analysis of unbounded soil region. Due to analytical solution in the radial direction, the radiation condition is satisfied exactly. The material behavior of soil and structure is assumed to be linear. The soil region is considered as a homogeneous half-space. The analysis is performed in time domain. A computer program is prepared to analyze the soil-structure system. Comparing the results with those in literature shows the exactness and competency of the proposed method.

  3. Soft Time-Suboptimal Controlling Structure for Mechanical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulczycki, Piotr; Wisniewski, Rafal; Kowalski, Piotr

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents conception of a soft control structure based on the time-optimal approach. Its parameters are selected in accordance with the rules of the statistical decision theory and additionally it allows to eliminate rapid changes in control values. The object is a basic mechanical system......, with uncertain (also non-stationary) mass treated as a stochastic process. The methodology proposed here is of a universal nature and may easily be applied with respect to other uncertainty elements of timeoptimal controlled mechanical systems....

  4. Review of time-dependent fatigue behaviour of structural alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenstreet, W.L.

    1978-01-01

    A review and assessment of time-dependent fatigue was needed to provide an understanding of time-dependent fatigue processes, to define the limits of our present knowledge, and to establish bases for the development of verified design methods for structural components and systems for operation at elevated temperatures. This report reviews the present state of understanding of that phenomena, commonly called 'creep fatigue', and separates it into crack-initiation and crack propagation processes. Criteria for describing material behavior for each of these processes are discussed and described within the extent of present knowledge, which is limited largely to experience with one-dimensional loading. Behaviors of types 304 and 316 stainless steel are emphasized. Much of the treatment of time-dependent failure present here is new and of a developing nature; areas of agreement and areas requiring further resolution are enumerated'. These words are from the abstract of the report on a comprehensive study of time-dependent fatigue. This paper briefly reviews some of the contents and discusses important conclusions reached, especially in terms of current status and needs for additional work. (Auth.)

  5. LHCb: Time structure analysis of the LHCb Online network

    CERN Multimedia

    Antichi, G; Campora Perez, D H; Liu, G; Neufeld, N; Giordano, S; Owezarski, P; Moore, A

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb Online Network is a real time high performance network, in which 350 data sources send data over a Gigabit Ethernet LAN to more than 1500 receiving nodes. The aggregated throughput of the application, called Event Building, is more than 60 GB/s. The protocol employed by LHCb makes the sending nodes transmit simultaneously portions of events to one receiving node at a time, which is selected using a credit-token scheme. The resulting traffic is very bursty and sensitive to irregularities in the temporal distribution of packet-bursts to the same destination or region of the network. In order to study the relevant properties of such a dataflow, a non-disruptive monitoring setup based on a networking capable FPGA (NetFPGA) has been deployed. The NetFPGA allows order of hundred nano-second precise time-stamping of packets. We study in detail the timing structure of the Event Building communication, and we identify potential effects of micro-bursts like buffer packet drops or jitter.

  6. Time-variant random interval natural frequency analysis of structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binhua; Wu, Di; Gao, Wei; Song, Chongmin

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a new robust method namely, unified interval Chebyshev-based random perturbation method, to tackle hybrid random interval structural natural frequency problem. In the proposed approach, random perturbation method is implemented to furnish the statistical features (i.e., mean and standard deviation) and Chebyshev surrogate model strategy is incorporated to formulate the statistical information of natural frequency with regards to the interval inputs. The comprehensive analysis framework combines the superiority of both methods in a way that computational cost is dramatically reduced. This presented method is thus capable of investigating the day-to-day based time-variant natural frequency of structures accurately and efficiently under concrete intrinsic creep effect with probabilistic and interval uncertain variables. The extreme bounds of the mean and standard deviation of natural frequency are captured through the embedded optimization strategy within the analysis procedure. Three particularly motivated numerical examples with progressive relationship in perspective of both structure type and uncertainty variables are demonstrated to justify the computational applicability, accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method.

  7. Time domain structures in a colliding magnetic flux rope experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shawn Wenjie; Gekelman, Walter; Dehaas, Timothy; Vincena, Steve; Pribyl, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    Electron phase-space holes, regions of positive potential on the scale of the Debye length, have been observed in auroras as well as in laboratory experiments. These potential structures, also known as Time Domain Structures (TDS), are packets of intense electric field spikes that have significant components parallel to the local magnetic field. In an ongoing investigation at UCLA, TDS were observed on the surface of two magnetized flux ropes produced within the Large Plasma Device (LAPD). A barium oxide (BaO) cathode was used to produce an 18 m long magnetized plasma column and a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) source was used to create 11 m long kink unstable flux ropes. Using two probes capable of measuring the local electric and magnetic fields, correlation analysis was performed on tens of thousands of these structures and their propagation velocities, probability distribution function and spatial distribution were determined. The TDS became abundant as the flux ropes collided and appear to emanate from the reconnection region in between them. In addition, a preliminary analysis of the permutation entropy and statistical complexity of the data suggests that the TDS signals may be chaotic in nature. Work done at the Basic Plasma Science Facility (BaPSF) at UCLA which is supported by DOE and NSF.

  8. Absolute symbolic addressing, a structure making time-sharing easier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debraine, P.

    1968-08-01

    Time-sharing of computers asks for a certain number of conditions, particularly, an efficient dynamic loading of programs and data. This paper indicates a paging method making linkages with a minimum of table-looking operations. The principle is to use associative memory registers for calling blocks of physical memory, the block address being given by the concatenation of a file number (located in a base register) and a page number (located in the instruction proper). The position within the block is given by a displacement located in the instruction. A second associated base register contains the local part (page number + displacement) of the base address. This extended base register system allows executing programs in a very large programming complex without loss of time. The addresses are fixed at assembly time and the blocks can be loaded anywhere without modification for execution. The various problems associated with the execution of complex programs are presented in this context and shown to be easily solved by the proposed system, the realization of which would be very easy starting from the computer structures existing now. (author) [fr

  9. Multivariate time series with linear state space structure

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive study of multivariate time series with linear state space structure. The emphasis is put on both the clarity of the theoretical concepts and on efficient algorithms for implementing the theory. In particular, it investigates the relationship between VARMA and state space models, including canonical forms. It also highlights the relationship between Wiener-Kolmogorov and Kalman filtering both with an infinite and a finite sample. The strength of the book also lies in the numerous algorithms included for state space models that take advantage of the recursive nature of the models. Many of these algorithms can be made robust, fast, reliable and efficient. The book is accompanied by a MATLAB package called SSMMATLAB and a webpage presenting implemented algorithms with many examples and case studies. Though it lays a solid theoretical foundation, the book also focuses on practical application, and includes exercises in each chapter. It is intended for researchers and students wor...

  10. Virtual Black Holes and Space-Time Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    't Hooft, Gerard

    2018-01-01

    In the standard formalism of quantum gravity, black holes appear to form statistical distributions of quantum states. Now, however, we can present a theory that yields pure quantum states. It shows how particles entering a black hole can generate firewalls, which however can be removed, replacing them by the `footprints' they produce in the out-going particles. This procedure can preserve the quantum information stored inside and around the black hole. We then focus on a subtle but unavoidable modification of the topology of the Schwarzschild metric: antipodal identification of points on the horizon. If it is true that vacuum fluctuations include virtual black holes, then the structure of space-time is radically different from what is usually thought.

  11. Timely deposition of macromolecular structures is necessary for peer review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joosten, Robbie P.; Soueidan, Hayssam; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2013-01-01

    Deposition of crystallographic structures should be concurrent with or prior to manuscript submission for peer review, enabling validation and increasing reliability of the PDB. Most of the macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), which are used daily by thousands of educators and scientists alike, are determined by X-ray crystallography. It was examined whether the crystallographic models and data were deposited to the PDB at the same time as the publications that describe them were submitted for peer review. This condition is necessary to ensure pre-publication validation and the quality of the PDB public archive. It was found that a significant proportion of PDB entries were submitted to the PDB after peer review of the corresponding publication started, and many were only submitted after peer review had ended. It is argued that clear description of journal policies and effective policing is important for pre-publication validation, which is key in ensuring the quality of the PDB and of peer-reviewed literature

  12. Timely deposition of macromolecular structures is necessary for peer review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joosten, Robbie P. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Soueidan, Hayssam; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Perrakis, Anastassis, E-mail: a.perrakis@nki.nl [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01

    Deposition of crystallographic structures should be concurrent with or prior to manuscript submission for peer review, enabling validation and increasing reliability of the PDB. Most of the macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), which are used daily by thousands of educators and scientists alike, are determined by X-ray crystallography. It was examined whether the crystallographic models and data were deposited to the PDB at the same time as the publications that describe them were submitted for peer review. This condition is necessary to ensure pre-publication validation and the quality of the PDB public archive. It was found that a significant proportion of PDB entries were submitted to the PDB after peer review of the corresponding publication started, and many were only submitted after peer review had ended. It is argued that clear description of journal policies and effective policing is important for pre-publication validation, which is key in ensuring the quality of the PDB and of peer-reviewed literature.

  13. Pre-Big Bang, space-time structure, asymptotic Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Mestres Luis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Planck and other recent data in Cosmology and Particle Physics can open the way to controversial analyses concerning the early Universe and its possible ultimate origin. Alternatives to standard cosmology include pre-Big Bang approaches, new space-time geometries and new ultimate constituents of matter. Basic issues related to a possible new cosmology along these lines clearly deserve further exploration. The Planck collaboration reports an age of the Universe t close to 13.8 Gyr and a present ratio H between relative speeds and distances at cosmic scale around 67.3 km/s/Mpc. The product of these two measured quantities is then slightly below 1 (about 0.95, while it can be exactly 1 in the absence of matter and cosmological constant in patterns based on the spinorial space-time we have considered in previous papers. In this description of space-time we first suggested in 1996-97, the cosmic time t is given by the modulus of a SU(2 spinor and the Lundmark-Lemaître-Hubble (LLH expansion law turns out to be of purely geometric origin previous to any introduction of standard matter and relativity. Such a fundamental geometry, inspired by the role of half-integer spin in Particle Physics, may reflect an equilibrium between the dynamics of the ultimate constituents of matter and the deep structure of space and time. Taking into account the observed cosmic acceleration, the present situation suggests that the value of 1 can be a natural asymptotic limit for the product H t in the long-term evolution of our Universe up to possible small corrections. In the presence of a spinorial space-time geometry, no ad hoc combination of dark matter and dark energy would in any case be needed to get an acceptable value of H and an evolution of the Universe compatible with observation. The use of a spinorial space-time naturally leads to unconventional properties for the space curvature term in Friedmann-like equations. It therefore suggests a major modification of

  14. Real-time range acquisition by adaptive structured light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koninckx, Thomas P; Van Gool, Luc

    2006-03-01

    The goal of this paper is to provide a "self-adaptive" system for real-time range acquisition. Reconstructions are based on a single frame structured light illumination. Instead of using generic, static coding that is supposed to work under all circumstances, system adaptation is proposed. This occurs on-the-fly and renders the system more robust against instant scene variability and creates suitable patterns at startup. A continuous trade-off between speed and quality is made. A weighted combination of different coding cues--based upon pattern color, geometry, and tracking--yields a robust way to solve the correspondence problem. The individual coding cues are automatically adapted within a considered family of patterns. The weights to combine them are based on the average consistency with the result within a small time-window. The integration itself is done by reformulating the problem as a graph cut. Also, the camera-projector configuration is taken into account for generating the projection patterns. The correctness of the range maps is not guaranteed, but an estimation of the uncertainty is provided for each part of the reconstruction. Our prototype is implemented using unmodified consumer hardware only and, therefore, is cheap. Frame rates vary between 10 and 25 fps, dependent on scene complexity.

  15. An Empirical Study on Market Timing Theory of Capital Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatius Rony Setyawan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The theory of capital structure has advanced remarkably. This development began as many firms had options to consider various external factors determining the composition of debt and equity. Not only the asymmetric information or the conflict among bondholders and shareholders initiated the Pecking Order Theory and the Static Trade-off Theory respectively but also the overvalued or undervalued of stock price had to be taken as a determinant factor for identifying the ideal debt-equity mix. The author maintains these factors as they were pioneers to this theory on Market Timing Theory (MTT introduced by Baker and Wurgler (2002. The essence of this theory is described when stock prices are overvalued, firms will finance projects through debts, otherwise the firms will be undervalued and be relied on equity financing. Using the methodology introduced by Baker and Wurgler (2002, the author selected only samples of IPOs of firms during 2008-2009 to limit the scope of this study. The main objective of this study is to test the hypothèses of Market Timing Theory formulated by Dahlan (2004 and by Kusumawati and Danny (2006 which have been proven by the GLS model, and the OLS model-like as in Baker and Wurgler (2002, Susilawati (2008 and Saad (2010. This study concludes that the market-to-book ratio has a negative effect on the market leverage. The implication is that when firms achieve certain level of earnings growth, the stock price will be overvalued, so it would be the right timing for firms to proceed equity financing. Under the robustness test with GLS Random Effect, the hypothèses of MTT is supported.

  16. An Empirical Study on Market Timing Theory of Capital Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatius Rony Setyawan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The theory of capital structure has advanced remarkably. This development began as many firms had options to consider various external factors determining the composition of debt and equity. Not only the asymmetric information or the conflict among bondholders and shareholders initiated the Pecking Order Theory and the Static Trade-off Theory respectively but also the overvalued or undervalued of stock price had to be taken as a determinant factor for identifying the ideal debt-equity mix. The author maintains these factors as they were pioneers to this theory on Market Timing Theory (MTT introduced by Baker and Wurgler (2002. The essence of this theory is described when stock prices are overvalued, firms will finance projects through debts, otherwise the firms will be undervalued and be relied on equity financing. Using the methodology introduced by Baker and Wurgler (2002, the author selected only samples of IPOs of firms during 2008-2009 to limit the scope of this study. The main objective of this study is to test the hypothèses of Market Timing Theory formulated by Dahlan (2004 and by Kusumawati and Danny (2006 which have been proven by the GLS model, and the OLS model-like as in Baker and Wurgler (2002, Susilawati (2008 and Saad (2010. This study concludes that the market-to-book ratio has a negative effect on the market leverage. The implication is that when firms achieve certain level of earnings growth, the stock price will be overvalued, so it would be the right timing for firms to proceed equity financing. Under the robustness test with GLS Random Effect, the hypothèses of MTT is supported.

  17. Industrial electricity demand for Turkey: A structural time series analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilaver, Zafer; Hunt, Lester C.

    2011-01-01

    This research investigates the relationship between Turkish industrial electricity consumption, industrial value added and electricity prices in order to forecast future Turkish industrial electricity demand. To achieve this, an industrial electricity demand function for Turkey is estimated by applying the structural time series technique to annual data over the period 1960 to 2008. In addition to identifying the size and significance of the price and industrial value added (output) elasticities, this technique also uncovers the electricity Underlying Energy Demand Trend (UEDT) for the Turkish industrial sector and is, as far as is known, the first attempt to do this. The results suggest that output and real electricity prices and a UEDT all have an important role to play in driving Turkish industrial electricity demand. Consequently, they should all be incorporated when modelling Turkish industrial electricity demand and the estimated UEDT should arguably be considered in future energy policy decisions concerning the Turkish electricity industry. The output and price elasticities are estimated to be 0.15 and - 0.16 respectively, with an increasing (but at a decreasing rate) UEDT and based on the estimated equation, and different forecast assumptions, it is predicted that Turkish industrial electricity demand will be somewhere between 97 and 148 TWh by 2020. -- Research Highlights: → Estimated output and price elasticities of 0.15 and -0.16 respectively. → Estimated upward sloping UEDT (i.e. energy using) but at a decreasing rate. → Predicted Turkish industrial electricity demand between 97 and 148 TWh in 2020.

  18. Fitting ARMA Time Series by Structural Equation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buuren, Stef

    1997-01-01

    This paper outlines how the stationary ARMA (p,q) model (G. Box and G. Jenkins, 1976) can be specified as a structural equation model. Maximum likelihood estimates for the parameters in the ARMA model can be obtained by software for fitting structural equation models. The method is applied to three problem types. (SLD)

  19. Correction of Motion Artifacts for Real-Time Structured Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilm, Jakob; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2015-01-01

    While the problem of motion is often mentioned in conjunction with structured light imaging, few solutions have thus far been proposed. A method is demonstrated to correct for object or camera motion during structured light 3D scene acquisition. The method is based on the combination of a suitabl...

  20. Time-frequency Methods for Structural Health Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pyayt, A.L.; Kozionov, A.P.; Mokhov, I.I.; Lang, B.; Meijer, R.J.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of early warning signals for the imminent failure of large and complex engineered structures is a daunting challenge with many open research questions. In this paper we report on novel ways to perform Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of flood protection systems (levees, earthen dikes and

  1. Time-frequency methods for structural health monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pyayt, A.L.; Kozionov, A.P.; Mokhov, I.I.; Lang, B.; Meijer, R.J.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of early warning signals for the imminent failure of large and complex engineered structures is a daunting challenge with many open research questions. In this paper we report on novel ways to perform Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of flood protection systems (levees, earthen dikes and

  2. Effect of annealing time on structural and magnetic properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We studied the effects on the structural and magnetic properties of Fe3O4 thin films. The films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). XRD studies showed pure single phase spinel cubic structure of Fe3O4 with a preferential [111] ...

  3. Climate limits across space and time on European forest structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, A. L. S.; Neumann, M.; Hasenauer, H.

    2017-12-01

    The impact climate has on forests has been extensively studied. However, the large scale effect climate has on forest structures, such as average diameters, heights and basal area are understudied in a spatially explicit manner. The limits, tipping points and thresholds that climate places on forest structures dictate the services a forest may provide, the vulnerability of a forest to mortality and the potential value of the timber there within. The majority of current research either investigates climate impacts on forest pools and fluxes, on a tree physiological scale or on case studies that are used to extrapolate results and potential impacts. A spatially explicit study on how climate affects forest structure over a large region would give valuable information to stakeholders who are more concerned with ecosystem services that cannot be described by pools and fluxes but require spatially explicit information - such as biodiversity, habitat suitability, and market values. In this study, we quantified the limits that climate (maximum, minimum temperature and precipitation) places on 3 forest structures, diameter at breast height, height, and basal area throughout Europe. Our results show clear climatic zones of high and low upper limits for each forest structure variable studied. We also spatially analyzed how climate restricts the potential bio-physical upper limits and creates tipping points of each forest structure variable and which climate factors are most limiting. Further, we demonstrated how the climate change has affected 8 individual forests across Europe and then the continent as a whole. We find that diameter, height and basal area are limited by climate in different ways and that areas may have high upper limits in one structure and low upper limits in another limitted by different climate variables. We also found that even though individual forests may have increased their potential upper limit forest structure values, European forests as a whole

  4. Capturing Structure Implicitly from Time-Series having Limited Data

    OpenAIRE

    Emaasit, Daniel; Johnson, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Scientific fields such as insider-threat detection and highway-safety planning often lack sufficient amounts of time-series data to estimate statistical models for the purpose of scientific discovery. Moreover, the available limited data are quite noisy. This presents a major challenge when estimating time-series models that are robust to overfitting and have well-calibrated uncertainty estimates. Most of the current literature in these fields involve visualizing the time-series for noticeabl...

  5. Real-time centre detection of an OLED structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, R.S.; Jonker, P.P.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2009-01-01

    The research presented in this paper focuses on real-time image processing for visual servoing, i.e. the positioning of a x-y table by using a camera only instead of encoders. A camera image stream plus real-time image processing determines the position in the next iteration of the table controller.

  6. Real-Time Center Detection of an OLED Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, R.S.; Jonker, P.P.; Nijmeijer, H.; Blanc-Talon, J.; Philips, W.; Popescu, D.; Scheunders, P.

    2009-01-01

    The research presented in this paper focuses on real-time image processing for visual servoing, i.e. the positioning of a x-y table by using a camera only instead of encoders. A camera image stream plus real-time image processing determines the position in the next iteration of the table controller.

  7. Extracting energy and structure properties of glass-forming liquids from structural relaxation time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lianwen

    2012-04-18

    A comprehensive examination of the kinetic liquid model (Wang et al 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 455104) is carried out by fitting the structural relaxation time of 26 different glass-forming liquids in a wide temperature range, including most of the well-studied materials. Careful analysis of the compiled reported data reveals that experimental inaccuracies should not be overlooked in any 'benchmark test' of relating theories or models (e.g. in Lunkenheimer et al 2010 Phys. Rev. E 81 051504). The procedure, accuracy, ability, and efficiency of the kinetic liquid model are discussed in detail and in comparison with other available fitting methods. In general, the kinetic liquid model could be verified by 17 of the 26 compiled data sets and can serve as a meaningful approximative method for analyzing these liquids. Nonetheless, further experimental examinations in a wide temperature range are needed and are called for. Through fitting, the microscopic details of these liquids are extracted, namely, the enthalpy, entropy, and cooperativity in structural relaxation, which may facilitate further quantitative analysis to both the liquidus and glassy states of these materials.

  8. Dynamic Analysis of Partially Embedded Structures Considering Soil-Structure Interaction in Time Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoudpour, Sanaz; Attarnejad, Reza; Behnia, Cambyse

    2011-01-01

    Analysis and design of structures subjected to arbitrary dynamic loadings especially earthquakes have been studied during past decades. In practice, the effects of soil-structure interaction on the dynamic response of structures are usually neglected. In this study, the effect of soil-structure interaction on the dynamic response of structures has been examined. The substructure method using dynamic stiffness of soil is used to analyze soil-structure system. A coupled model based on finite el...

  9. Space-time-matter analytic and geometric structures

    CERN Document Server

    Brüning, Jochen

    2018-01-01

    At the boundary of mathematics and mathematical physics, this monograph explores recent advances in the mathematical foundations of string theory and cosmology. The geometry of matter and the evolution of geometric structures as well as special solutions, singularities and stability properties of the underlying partial differential equations are discussed.

  10. Centre-containing spiral-geometric structure of the space-time and nonrelativistic relativity of the unit time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakhazizyan, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of nonrelativistic dependence of unit length and unit time on the position in the space is considered on the basis of centre-containing spiral-geometric structure of the space-time. The experimental results of variation of the unit time are analyzed which well agree with the requirements of the model proposed. 13 refs.; 12 figs

  11. Space-time reactor kinetics for heterogeneous reactor structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisic, N [Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1969-11-15

    An attempt is made to formulate time dependent diffusion equation based on Feinberg-Galanin theory in the from analogue to the classical reactor kinetic equation. Parameters of these equations could be calculated using the existing codes for static reactor calculation based on the heterogeneous reactor theory. The obtained kinetic equation could be analogues in form to the nodal kinetic equation. Space-time distribution of neutron flux in the reactor can be obtained by solving these equations using standard methods.

  12. Representation and Analysis of Real-Time Control Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    external processes which cannot be forced to cooperate with programmed processes through use of a synchronization primitive such as a semaphore [Dijkstre...amounts to each task, but the time slices are synchronized with program execution. The length of the codestrip is determined by the response time...which might be synchronous or asynchronous with respect to the executing task. The notation can represent total and partial orderings among its tasks, and

  13. Evolutionary Algorithms for the Detection of Structural Breaks in Time Series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doerr, Benjamin; Fischer, Paul; Hilbert, Astrid

    2013-01-01

    Detecting structural breaks is an essential task for the statistical analysis of time series, for example, for fitting parametric models to it. In short, structural breaks are points in time at which the behavior of the time series changes. Typically, no solid background knowledge of the time...

  14. On the Space-Time Structure of Sheared Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Mare, Martin Tobias; Mann, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    We develop a model that predicts all two-point correlations in high Reynolds number turbulent flow, in both space and time. This is accomplished by combining the design philosophies behind two existing models, the Mann spectral velocity tensor, in which isotropic turbulence is distorted according......-assisted feed forward control and wind-turbine wake modelling....

  15. Seismic travel-time tomography for detailed global mantle structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijwaard, H.

    1999-01-01

    The object of this thesis is to use travel-time tomography to focus and enhance the existing global image of the Earth's mantle and crust. This image is still rather blurred with respect to the considerably sharper pictures commonly obtained in regional studies. The improvement is basically

  16. Seismic travel-time tomography for detailed global mantle structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijwaard, H.

    1999-01-01

    The object of this thesis is to use travel-time tomography to focus and enhance the existing global image of the Earth's mantle and crust. This image is still rather blurred with respect to the considerably sharper pictures commonly obtained in regional studies. The improvement is basically obtained

  17. The Time-Dependent Structure of the Electron Reconnection Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji; Kuznetsova, Masha; Klimas, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Collisionless magnetic reconnection is often associated with time-dependent behavior. Specifically, current layers in the diffusion region can become unstable to tearing-type instabilities on one hand, or to instabilities with current-aligned wave vectors on the other. In the former case, the growth of tearing instabilities typically leads to the production of magnetic islands, which potentially provide feedback on the reconnection process itself, as well as on the rate of reconnection. The second class of instabilities tend to modulate the current layer along the direction of the current flow, for instance generating kink-type perturbations, or smaller-scale turbulence with the potential to broaden the current layer. All of these processes contribute to rendering magnetic reconnection time-dependent. In this presentation, we will provide a summary of these effects, and a discussion of how much they contribute to the overall magnetic reconnection rate.

  18. An integral time series on simulated labeling using fractal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djainal, D.D.

    1997-01-01

    This research deals with the detection of time series of vertical two-phase flow, in attempt to developed an objective indicator of time series flow patterns. One of new method is fractal analysis which can complement conventional methods in the description of highly irregular fluctuations. in the present work, fractal analysis applied to analyze simulated boiling coolant signal. this simulated signals built by sum random elements in small subchannels of the coolant channel. Two modes are defined and both modes are characterized by their void fractions. in the case of unimodal-PDF signals, the difference between these modes is relative small. on other hand, bimodal-PDF signals have relative large range. in this research, fractal dimension can indicate the characters of that signals simulation

  19. Time variation of the fine structure constant driven by quintessence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anchordoqui, Luis; Goldberg, Haim

    2003-01-01

    There are indications from the study of quasar absorption spectra that the fine structure constant α may have been measurably smaller for redshifts z>2. Analyses of other data ( 149 Sm fission rate for the Oklo natural reactor, variation of 187 Re β-decay rate in meteorite studies, atomic clock measurements) which probe variations of α in the more recent past imply much smaller deviations from its present value. In this work we tie the variation of α to the evolution of the quintessence field proposed by Albrecht and Skordis, and show that agreement with all these data, as well as consistency with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations, can be achieved for a range of parameters. Some definite predictions follow for upcoming space missions searching for violations of the equivalence principle

  20. Highly comparative time-series analysis: the empirical structure of time series and their methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Ben D; Little, Max A; Jones, Nick S

    2013-06-06

    The process of collecting and organizing sets of observations represents a common theme throughout the history of science. However, despite the ubiquity of scientists measuring, recording and analysing the dynamics of different processes, an extensive organization of scientific time-series data and analysis methods has never been performed. Addressing this, annotated collections of over 35 000 real-world and model-generated time series, and over 9000 time-series analysis algorithms are analysed in this work. We introduce reduced representations of both time series, in terms of their properties measured by diverse scientific methods, and of time-series analysis methods, in terms of their behaviour on empirical time series, and use them to organize these interdisciplinary resources. This new approach to comparing across diverse scientific data and methods allows us to organize time-series datasets automatically according to their properties, retrieve alternatives to particular analysis methods developed in other scientific disciplines and automate the selection of useful methods for time-series classification and regression tasks. The broad scientific utility of these tools is demonstrated on datasets of electroencephalograms, self-affine time series, heartbeat intervals, speech signals and others, in each case contributing novel analysis techniques to the existing literature. Highly comparative techniques that compare across an interdisciplinary literature can thus be used to guide more focused research in time-series analysis for applications across the scientific disciplines.

  1. Spatio-temporal structure of storm-time chorus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Santolík, Ondřej; Gurnett, D. A.; Pickett, J. S.; M. Parrot, M.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 108, A7 (2003), s. 7-1-7-14, doi:10.1029/2002JA009791, 2003 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/03/0832; GA MŠk ME 650 Grant - others:NASA(US) NAG5-9974 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911; CEZ:MSM 113200004 Keywords : storm -time chorus emissions * whistler mode * propagation analysis Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.992, year: 2003

  2. Emission spectra of gaseous avalanches and their time structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraga, M.M.; Lima, E.P. de; Marques, R.F.; Policarpo, A.J.P.L.; Alves, M.A.F.; Salete, M.; Leite, S.C.P.

    1993-01-01

    Following previous measurements in argon/methane mixtures, the authors now report on the emission spectra of argon/ethane and methane/ethane mixtures, in the region from 120 to 450 nm, for a single wire chamber working in the proportional and/or self-quenching streamer modes. Identification of radicals and fragments is attempted. The time evolution of VUV light, relevant to photon feedback processes, is presented for the CI lines at 156.1 and 165.7nm in argon/methane, argon/ethane and methane/ethane mixtures

  3. On the structure of space-time caustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosquist, K.

    1983-01-01

    Caustics formed by timelike and null geodesics in a space-time M are investigated. Care is taken to distinguish the conjugate points in the tangent space (T-conjugate points) from conjugate points in the manifold (M-conjugate points). It is shown that most nonspacelike conjugate points are regular, i.e. with all neighbouring conjugate points having the same degree of degeneracy. The regular timelike T-conjugate locus is shown to be a smooth 3-dimensional submanifold of the tangent space. Analogously, the regular null T-conjugate locus is shown to be a smooth 2-dimensional submanifold of the light cone in the tangent space. The smoothness properties of the null caustic are used to show that if an observer sees focusing in all directions, then there will necessarily be a cusp in the caustic. If, in addition, all the null conjugate points have maximal degree of degeneracy (as in the closed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universes), then the space-time is closed. (orig.)

  4. Generalized Artificial Life Structure for Time-dependent Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TSAU Minhe; KAO Weiwen; CHANG Albert

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, more attention has been paid on artificial life researches. Artificial life(AL) is a research on regulating gene parameters of digital organisms under complicated problematic environments through natural selections and evolutions to achieve the final emergence of intelligence. Most recent studies focused on solving certain real problems by artificial life methods, yet without much address on the AL life basic mechanism. The real problems are often very complicated, and the proposed methods sometimes seem too simple to handle those problems. This study proposed a new approach in AL research, named "generalized artificial life structure(GALS)", in which the traditional "gene bits" in genetic algorithms is first replaced by "gene parameters", which could appear anywhere in GALS. A modeling procedure is taken to normalize the input data, and AL "tissue" is innovated to make AL more complex. GALS is anticipated to contribute significantly to the fitness of AL evolution. The formation of"tissue" begins with some different AL basic cells, and then tissue is produced by the casual selections of one or several of these cells. As a result, the gene parameters, represented by "tissues", could become highly diversified. This diversification should have obvious effects on improving gene fitness. This study took the innovative method of GALS in a stock forecasting problem under a carefully designed manipulating platform. And the researching results verify that the GALS is successful in improving the gene evolution fitness.

  5. Topological properties and global structure of space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, P.G.; De Sabbata, V.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: measurement of gravity and gauge fields using quantum mechanical probes; gravitation at spatial infinity; field theories on supermanifolds; supergravities and Kaluza-Klein theories; boundary conditions at spatial infinity; singularities - global and local aspects; matter at the horizon of the Schwarzschild black hole; introluction to string theories; cosmic censorship and the strengths of singularities; conformal quantisation in singular spacetimes; solar system tests in transition; integration and global aspects of supermanifolds; the space-time of the bimetric general relativity theory; gravitation without Lorentz invariance; a uniform static magnetic field in Kaluza-Klein theory; introduction to topological geons; and a simple model of a non-asymptotically flat Schwarzschild black hole

  6. Cooling of the Building Structure by Night-time Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Nikolai

    In modern, extensively glazed office buildings, due to high solar and internal loads and increased comfort expectations, air conditioning is increasingly applied even in moderate and cold climates, like in Central and Northern Europe. Particularly in these cases, night-time ventilation is often......, without considering any building-specific parameters. A method for quantifying the climatic cooling potential (CCP) was developed based on degree-hours of the difference between building and external air temperature. Applying this method to climatic data of 259 stations shows very high night cooling...... potential over the whole of Northern Europe and still significant potential in Central, Eastern and even some regions of Southern Europe. However, due to the inherent stochastic properties of weather patterns, series of warmer nights can occur at some locations, where passive cooling by night...

  7. Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy for Structure-II Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeya, Kei; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao

    2009-01-01

    For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has...... a characteristic broad absorption peak at 0.5 THz corresponding to the dipole moment of THF molecules. The refractive indices of THF and propane hydrates are 1.725 and 1.775 at 1 THz, respectively, and show a slight but clear difference from the refractive index of ice (1.79). THz-TDS is a potentially useful...... technique for the ondestructive inspection of gas hydrates. # 2009 The Japan Society of Applied Physics...

  8. Physical relativity. Space-time structure from a dynamical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Harvey R.

    Physical Relativity explores the nature of the distinction at the heart of Einstein's 1905 formulation of his special theory of relativity: that between kinematics and dynamics. Einstein himself became increasingly uncomfortable with this distinction, and with the limitations of what he called the 'principle theory' approach inspired by the logic of thermodynamics. A handful of physicists and philosophers have over the last century likewise expressed doubts about Einstein's treatment of the relativistic behaviour of rigid bodies and clocks in motion in the kinematical part of his great paper, and suggested that the dynamical understanding of length contraction and time dilation intimated by the immediate precursors of Einstein is more fundamental. Harvey Brown both examines and extends these arguments (which support a more 'constructive' approach to relativistic effects in Einstein's terminology), after giving a careful analysis of key features of the pre-history of relativity theory. He argues furthermore that the geometrization of the theory by Minkowski in 1908 brought illumination, but not a causal explanation of relativistic effects. Finally, Brown tries to show that the dynamical interpretation of special relativity defended in the book is consistent with the role this theory must play as a limiting case of Einstein's 1915 theory of gravity: the general theory of relativity. Appearing in the centennial year of Einstein's celebrated paper on special relativity, Physical Relativity is an unusual, critical examination of the way Einstein formulated his theory. It also examines in detail certain specific historical and conceptual issues that have long given rise to debate in both special and general relativity theory, such as the conventionality of simultaneity, the principle of general covariance, and the consistency or otherwise of the special theory with quantum mechanics. Harvey Brown's new interpretation of relativity theory will interest anyone working on

  9. Analysis of time-dependent reliability of degenerated reinforced concrete structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hongping

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Durability deterioration of structure is a highly random process. The maintenance of degenerated structure involves the calculation of the reliability of time-dependent structure. This study introduced reinforced concrete structure resistance decrease model and related statistical parameters of uncertainty, analyzed resistance decrease rules of corroded bending element of reinforced concrete structure, and finally calculated timedependent reliability of the corroded bending element of reinforced concrete structure, aiming to provide a specific theoretical basis for the application of time-dependent reliability theory.

  10. Market size structure and small business lending : Are crisis times different from normal times?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, Allen N.; Cerqueiro, G.M.; Penas, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom holds that small banks have comparative advantages vis-à-vis large banks in serving small firms, while recent literature suggests this may not be the case. Using a panel of recent US start-ups, we investigate how small bank presence affects these firms in normal times (2004–06)

  11. Cluster Analysis of Time-Dependent Crystallographic Data: Direct Identification of Time-Independent Structural Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostov, Konstantin S.; Moffat, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The initial output of a time-resolved macromolecular crystallography experiment is a time-dependent series of difference electron density maps that displays the time-dependent changes in underlying structure as a reaction progresses. The goal is to interpret such data in terms of a small number of crystallographically refinable, time-independent structures, each associated with a reaction intermediate; to establish the pathways and rate coefficients by which these intermediates interconvert; and thereby to elucidate a chemical kinetic mechanism. One strategy toward achieving this goal is to use cluster analysis, a statistical method that groups objects based on their similarity. If the difference electron density at a particular voxel in the time-dependent difference electron density (TDED) maps is sensitive to the presence of one and only one intermediate, then its temporal evolution will exactly parallel the concentration profile of that intermediate with time. The rationale is therefore to cluster voxels with respect to the shapes of their TDEDs, so that each group or cluster of voxels corresponds to one structural intermediate. Clusters of voxels whose TDEDs reflect the presence of two or more specific intermediates can also be identified. From such groupings one can then infer the number of intermediates, obtain their time-independent difference density characteristics, and refine the structure of each intermediate. We review the principles of cluster analysis and clustering algorithms in a crystallographic context, and describe the application of the method to simulated and experimental time-resolved crystallographic data for the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein. PMID:21244840

  12. Density perturbations due to the inhomogeneous discrete spatial structure of space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, C.

    1998-01-01

    For the case that space-time permits an inhomogeneous discrete spatial structure due to varying gravitational fields or a foam-like structure of space-time, it is demonstrated that thermodynamic reasoning implies that matter-density perturbations will arise in the early universe

  13. Evaluation of time integration methods for transient response analysis of nonlinear structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, K.C.

    1975-01-01

    Recent developments in the evaluation of direct time integration methods for the transient response analysis of nonlinear structures are presented. These developments, which are based on local stability considerations of an integrator, show that the interaction between temporal step size and nonlinearities of structural systems has a pronounced effect on both accuracy and stability of a given time integration method. The resulting evaluation technique is applied to a model nonlinear problem, in order to: 1) demonstrate that it eliminates the present costly process of evaluating time integrator for nonlinear structural systems via extensive numerical experiments; 2) identify the desirable characteristics of time integration methods for nonlinear structural problems; 3) develop improved stiffly-stable methods for application to nonlinear structures. Extension of the methodology for examination of the interaction between a time integrator and the approximate treatment of nonlinearities (such as due to pseudo-force or incremental solution procedures) is also discussed. (Auth.)

  14. Time Reversal Methods for Structural Health Monitoring of Metallic Structures Using Guided Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    measure elastic properties of thin isotropic materials and laminated composite plates. Two types of waves propagate a symmetric wave and antisymmetric...compare it to the original signal. In this time reversal procedure wave propagation from point-A to point-B and can be modeled as a convolution ...where * is the convolution operator and transducer transmit and receive transfer function are neglected for simplification. In the frequency

  15. A method for measuring the time structure of synchrotron x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1989-08-01

    We describe a method employing a plastic scintillator coupled to a fast photomultiplier tube to generate a timing pulse from the x-ray bursts emitted from a synchrotron radiation source. This technique is useful for performing synchrotron experiments where detailed knowledge of the timing distribution is necessary, such as time resolved spectroscopy or fluorescence lifetime experiments. By digitizing the time difference between the timing signal generated on one beam crossing with the timing signal generated on the next beam crossing, the time structure of a synchrotron beam can be analyzed. Using this technique, we have investigated the single bunch time structure at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) during pilot runs in January, 1989, and found that the majority of the beam (96%) is contained in one rf bucket, while the remainder of the beam (4%) is contained in satellite rf buckets preceeding and following the main rf bucket by 19 ns. 1 ref., 4 figs

  16. JiTTree: A Just-in-Time Compiled Sparse GPU Volume Data Structure

    KAUST Repository

    Labschutz, Matthias

    2015-08-12

    Sparse volume data structures enable the efficient representation of large but sparse volumes in GPU memory for computation and visualization. However, the choice of a specific data structure for a given data set depends on several factors, such as the memory budget, the sparsity of the data, and data access patterns. In general, there is no single optimal sparse data structure, but a set of several candidates with individual strengths and drawbacks. One solution to this problem are hybrid data structures which locally adapt themselves to the sparsity. However, they typically suffer from increased traversal overhead which limits their utility in many applications. This paper presents JiTTree, a novel sparse hybrid volume data structure that uses just-in-time compilation to overcome these problems. By combining multiple sparse data structures and reducing traversal overhead we leverage their individual advantages. We demonstrate that hybrid data structures adapt well to a large range of data sets. They are especially superior to other sparse data structures for data sets that locally vary in sparsity. Possible optimization criteria are memory, performance and a combination thereof. Through just-in-time (JIT) compilation, JiTTree reduces the traversal overhead of the resulting optimal data structure. As a result, our hybrid volume data structure enables efficient computations on the GPU, while being superior in terms of memory usage when compared to non-hybrid data structures.

  17. JiTTree: A Just-in-Time Compiled Sparse GPU Volume Data Structure

    KAUST Repository

    Labschutz, Matthias; Bruckner, Stefan; Groller, M. Eduard; Hadwiger, Markus; Rautek, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Sparse volume data structures enable the efficient representation of large but sparse volumes in GPU memory for computation and visualization. However, the choice of a specific data structure for a given data set depends on several factors, such as the memory budget, the sparsity of the data, and data access patterns. In general, there is no single optimal sparse data structure, but a set of several candidates with individual strengths and drawbacks. One solution to this problem are hybrid data structures which locally adapt themselves to the sparsity. However, they typically suffer from increased traversal overhead which limits their utility in many applications. This paper presents JiTTree, a novel sparse hybrid volume data structure that uses just-in-time compilation to overcome these problems. By combining multiple sparse data structures and reducing traversal overhead we leverage their individual advantages. We demonstrate that hybrid data structures adapt well to a large range of data sets. They are especially superior to other sparse data structures for data sets that locally vary in sparsity. Possible optimization criteria are memory, performance and a combination thereof. Through just-in-time (JIT) compilation, JiTTree reduces the traversal overhead of the resulting optimal data structure. As a result, our hybrid volume data structure enables efficient computations on the GPU, while being superior in terms of memory usage when compared to non-hybrid data structures.

  18. JiTTree: A Just-in-Time Compiled Sparse GPU Volume Data Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labschütz, Matthias; Bruckner, Stefan; Gröller, M Eduard; Hadwiger, Markus; Rautek, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Sparse volume data structures enable the efficient representation of large but sparse volumes in GPU memory for computation and visualization. However, the choice of a specific data structure for a given data set depends on several factors, such as the memory budget, the sparsity of the data, and data access patterns. In general, there is no single optimal sparse data structure, but a set of several candidates with individual strengths and drawbacks. One solution to this problem are hybrid data structures which locally adapt themselves to the sparsity. However, they typically suffer from increased traversal overhead which limits their utility in many applications. This paper presents JiTTree, a novel sparse hybrid volume data structure that uses just-in-time compilation to overcome these problems. By combining multiple sparse data structures and reducing traversal overhead we leverage their individual advantages. We demonstrate that hybrid data structures adapt well to a large range of data sets. They are especially superior to other sparse data structures for data sets that locally vary in sparsity. Possible optimization criteria are memory, performance and a combination thereof. Through just-in-time (JIT) compilation, JiTTree reduces the traversal overhead of the resulting optimal data structure. As a result, our hybrid volume data structure enables efficient computations on the GPU, while being superior in terms of memory usage when compared to non-hybrid data structures.

  19. Real-Time Structural Overload Control via Control Allocation Optimization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This control methodology utilizes real-time vehicle structural load and shape measurements to actively respond to and protect against vehicle damage due to...

  20. Time Reversal Acoustic Structural Health Monitoring Using Array of Embedded Sensors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Time Reversal Acoustic (TRA) structural health monitoring with an embedded sensor array represents a new approach to in-situ nondestructive evaluation of air-space...

  1. Nonlinear Aerodynamics-Structure Time Simulation for HALE Aircraft Design/Analysis, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Time simulation of a nonlinear aerodynamics model (NA) developed at Virginia Tech coupled with a nonlinear structure model (NS) is proposed as a design/analysis...

  2. Modal Vibration Control in Periodic Time-Varying Structures with Focus on Rotor Blade Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    2004-01-01

    of active modal controllers. The main aim is to reduce vibrations in periodic time-varying structures. Special emphasis is given to vibration control of coupled bladed rotor systems. A state feedback modal control law is developed based on modal analysis in periodic time-varying structures. The first step...... in the procedure is a transformation of the model into a time-invariant modal form by applying the modal matrices, which are also periodic time-variant. Due to coupled rotor and blade motions complex vibration modes occur in the modal transformed state space model. This implies that the modal transformed model...

  3. Time structure of ns duration bunches with single crystal diamond detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duenas, J.A., E-mail: jose.duenas@dfa.uhu.es [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Campus de El Carmen, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Ausset, P. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay (IPNO), Universite Paris-Sub 11, CNRS/IN2P3, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Berjillos, R. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Campus de El Carmen, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Gardes, D.; Junquera, T.; Lavergne, L. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay (IPNO), Universite Paris-Sub 11, CNRS/IN2P3, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Martel, I. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Campus de El Carmen, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Martinet, G.; Rauly, E.; Said, A. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay (IPNO), Universite Paris-Sub 11, CNRS/IN2P3, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Sanchez Benitez, A.M. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Campus de El Carmen, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Semsoun, A.; Waast, B. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay (IPNO), Universite Paris-Sub 11, CNRS/IN2P3, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2011-06-11

    A single crystal diamond detector (SC-DD) has been used to obtain the time structure of bunches with lengths between 4 and 88 ns. This was achieved by setting an electronic chain based on a time-to-amplitude converter (TAC), which used the output of the diamond detector as the start of the time interval, and the accelerator RF as the stop. Moreover, the SC-DD not only provided the time information, but also the energy of the beam.

  4. Stress wave timing nondestructive evaluation tools for inspecting historic structures : a guide for use and interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Ross; Roy F. Pellerin; Norbert Volny; William W. Salsig; Robert H. Falk

    2000-01-01

    This guide was prepared to assist inspectors in the use of stress wave timing instruments and various methods of locating and defining areas of decay in timber members in historic structures. The first two sections provide (a) background information regarding conventional methods to locate and measure decay in historic structures and (b) the principles of stress wave...

  5. A new topology for curved space--time which incorporates the causal, differential, and conformal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawking, S.W.; King, A.R.; McCarthy, P.J.

    1976-01-01

    A new topology is proposed for strongly causal space--times. Unlike the standard manifold topology (which merely characterizes continuity properties), the new topology determines the causal, differential, and conformal structures of space--time. The topology is more appealing, physical, and manageable than the topology previously proposed by Zeeman for Minkowski space. It thus seems that many calculations involving the above structures may be made purely topological

  6. Real-Time Impact Visualization Inspection of Aerospace Composite Structures with Distributed Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Liang; Baier, Horst

    2015-07-08

    For the future design of smart aerospace structures, the development and application of a reliable, real-time and automatic monitoring and diagnostic technique is essential. Thus, with distributed sensor networks, a real-time automatic structural health monitoring (SHM) technique is designed and investigated to monitor and predict the locations and force magnitudes of unforeseen foreign impacts on composite structures and to estimate in real time mode the structural state when impacts occur. The proposed smart impact visualization inspection (IVI) technique mainly consists of five functional modules, which are the signal data preprocessing (SDP), the forward model generator (FMG), the impact positioning calculator (IPC), the inverse model operator (IMO) and structural state estimator (SSE). With regard to the verification of the practicality of the proposed IVI technique, various structure configurations are considered, which are a normal CFRP panel and another CFRP panel with "orange peel" surfaces and a cutout hole. Additionally, since robustness against several background disturbances is also an essential criterion for practical engineering demands, investigations and experimental tests are carried out under random vibration interfering noise (RVIN) conditions. The accuracy of the predictions for unknown impact events on composite structures using the IVI technique is validated under various structure configurations and under changing environmental conditions. The evaluated errors all fall well within a satisfactory limit range. Furthermore, it is concluded that the IVI technique is applicable for impact monitoring, diagnosis and assessment of aerospace composite structures in complex practical engineering environments.

  7. Identifying Time Periods of Minimal Thermal Gradient for Temperature-Driven Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Reilly

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Temperature changes play a large role in the day to day structural behavior of structures, but a smaller direct role in most contemporary Structural Health Monitoring (SHM analyses. Temperature-Driven SHM will consider temperature as the principal driving force in SHM, relating a measurable input temperature to measurable output generalized strain (strain, curvature, etc. and generalized displacement (deflection, rotation, etc. to create three-dimensional signatures descriptive of the structural behavior. Identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient provides the foundation for the formulation of the temperature–deformation–displacement model. Thermal gradients in a structure can cause curvature in multiple directions, as well as non-linear strain and stress distributions within the cross-sections, which significantly complicates data analysis and interpretation, distorts the signatures, and may lead to unreliable conclusions regarding structural behavior and condition. These adverse effects can be minimized if the signatures are evaluated at times when thermal gradients in the structure are minimal. This paper proposes two classes of methods based on the following two metrics: (i the range of raw temperatures on the structure, and (ii the distribution of the local thermal gradients, for identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient on a structure with the ability to vary the tolerance of acceptable thermal gradients. The methods are tested and validated with data collected from the Streicker Bridge on campus at Princeton University.

  8. Identifying Time Periods of Minimal Thermal Gradient for Temperature-Driven Structural Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, John; Glisic, Branko

    2018-03-01

    Temperature changes play a large role in the day to day structural behavior of structures, but a smaller direct role in most contemporary Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) analyses. Temperature-Driven SHM will consider temperature as the principal driving force in SHM, relating a measurable input temperature to measurable output generalized strain (strain, curvature, etc.) and generalized displacement (deflection, rotation, etc.) to create three-dimensional signatures descriptive of the structural behavior. Identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient provides the foundation for the formulation of the temperature-deformation-displacement model. Thermal gradients in a structure can cause curvature in multiple directions, as well as non-linear strain and stress distributions within the cross-sections, which significantly complicates data analysis and interpretation, distorts the signatures, and may lead to unreliable conclusions regarding structural behavior and condition. These adverse effects can be minimized if the signatures are evaluated at times when thermal gradients in the structure are minimal. This paper proposes two classes of methods based on the following two metrics: (i) the range of raw temperatures on the structure, and (ii) the distribution of the local thermal gradients, for identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient on a structure with the ability to vary the tolerance of acceptable thermal gradients. The methods are tested and validated with data collected from the Streicker Bridge on campus at Princeton University.

  9. The Time Structure of Hadronic Showers in Imaging Calorimeters with Scintillator and RPC Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The intrinsic time structure of hadronic showers has been studied to evaluate its influence on the timing capability and on the required integration time of highly granular hadronic calorimeters in future collider experiments. The experiments have been carried with systems of 15 detector cells, using both scintillator tiles with SiPM readout and RPCs, read out with fast digitizers and deep buffers. These were installed behind the CALICE scintillator - Tungsten and RPC - Tungsten calorimeters as well as behind the CALICE semi-digital RPC - Steel calorimeter during test beam periods at the CERN SPS. We will discuss the technical aspects of these systems, and present results on the measurement of the time structure of hadronic showers in steel and tungsten calorimeters. These are compared to GEANT4 simulations, providing important information for the validation and the improvement of the physics models. In addition, a comparison of the observed time structure with scintillator and RPC active elements will be pre...

  10. Life time forecasting method upon occurrence of stress corrosion cracking of structure and test device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzai, Hideya; Kida, Toshitaka; Urayama, Yoshinao; Kikuchi, Eiji; Shimanuki, Sei; Kuniya, Jiro; Nakata, Kiyotomo; Izumitani, Masakiyo; Hattori, Shigeo.

    1993-01-01

    A load stress is applied to a metal piece made of a material identical with the constituent material of a structure and having the sensitivity enhanced to a predetermined level, and plurality of such pieces are immersed in a corrosive circumstance in this state. Then, the time from the immersion till the rupture thereof and the number of ruptured pieces of the metal pieces are detected while observing them. The relation with the probability of rupture is plotted on a paper to determine the life time for the occurrence of minimum stress corrosion creacks (SSC) of the metal pieces. Based on the relationship between the previously determined stress and the life time for the occurrence of minimum SSC, the ratio between the life time for the occurrence of minimum SSC relative to estimated stress applied to the structure and the life time for the occurrence of minimum SSC relative to the stress applied to the metal pieces is determined as a first SSC acceleration rate. The ratio between the time of occurrence for minimum SSC and the sensitivity is determined as a second SSC acceleration rate. The first and the second SSC acceleration rates are multiplied to estimate the time for the occurrence of SSC of the structure. Then, the life time for the occurrence of SSC for the equipments and structures can be recognized quantitatively, to prevent ruptures of actual equipments and extend the life time. (N.H.)

  11. Time scale defined by the fractal structure of the price fluctuations in foreign exchange markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yoshiaki

    2010-04-01

    In this contribution, a new time scale named C-fluctuation time is defined by price fluctuations observed at a given resolution. The intraday fractal structures and the relations of the three time scales: real time (physical time), tick time and C-fluctuation time, in foreign exchange markets are analyzed. The data set used is trading prices of foreign exchange rates; US dollar (USD)/Japanese yen (JPY), USD/Euro (EUR), and EUR/JPY. The accuracy of the data is one minute and data within a minute are recorded in order of transaction. The series of instantaneous velocity of C-fluctuation time flowing are exponentially distributed for small C when they are measured by real time and for tiny C when they are measured by tick time. When the market is volatile, for larger C, the series of instantaneous velocity are exponentially distributed.

  12. Identification of the structure parameters using short-time non-stationary stochastic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarczewska, Kamila; Koszela, Piotr; Śniady, PaweŁ; Korzec, Aleksandra

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach to the flexural stiffness or eigenvalue frequency identification of a linear structure using a non-stationary stochastic excitation process. The idea of the proposed approach lies within time domain input-output methods. The proposed method is based on transforming the dynamical problem into a static one by integrating the input and the output signals. The output signal is the structure reaction, i.e. structure displacements due to the short-time, irregular load of random type. The systems with single and multiple degrees of freedom, as well as continuous systems are considered.

  13. Generation time, net reproductive rate, and growth in stage-age-structured populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Coulson, Tim

    2014-01-01

    examples to show how reproductive timing Tc and level R0 are shaped by stage dynamics (individual trait changes), selection on the trait, and parent-offspring phenotypic correlation. We also show how population structure can affect dispersion in reproduction among ages and stages. These macroscopic...... to age-structured populations. Here we generalize this result to populations structured by stage and age by providing a new, unique measure of reproductive timing (Tc) that, along with net reproductive rate (R0), has a direct mathematical relationship to and approximates growth rate (r). We use simple...

  14. Scattering analysis of periodic structures using finite-difference time-domain

    CERN Document Server

    ElMahgoub, Khaled; Elsherbeni, Atef Z

    2012-01-01

    Periodic structures are of great importance in electromagnetics due to their wide range of applications such as frequency selective surfaces (FSS), electromagnetic band gap (EBG) structures, periodic absorbers, meta-materials, and many others. The aim of this book is to develop efficient computational algorithms to analyze the scattering properties of various electromagnetic periodic structures using the finite-difference time-domain periodic boundary condition (FDTD/PBC) method. A new FDTD/PBC-based algorithm is introduced to analyze general skewed grid periodic structures while another algor

  15. Time-resolved measurements of coherent structures in the turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeHew, J. A.; Guala, M.; McKeon, B. J.

    2013-04-01

    Time-resolved particle image velocimetry was used to examine the structure and evolution of swirling coherent structure (SCS), one interpretation of which is a marker for a three-dimensional coherent vortex structure, in wall-parallel planes of a turbulent boundary layer with a large field of view, 4.3 δ × 2.2 δ. Measurements were taken at four different wall-normal locations ranging from y/ δ = 0.08-0.48 at a friction Reynolds number, Re τ = 410. The data set yielded statistically converged results over a larger field of view than typically observed in the literature. The method for identifying and tracking swirling coherent structure is discussed, and the resulting trajectories, convection velocities, and lifespan of these structures are analyzed at each wall-normal location. The ability of a model in which the entirety of an individual SCS travels at a single convection velocity, consistent with the attached eddy hypothesis of Townsend (The structure of turbulent shear flows. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1976), to describe the data is investigated. A methodology for determining whether such structures are "attached" or "detached" from the wall is also proposed and used to measure the lifespan and convection velocity distributions of these different structures. SCS were found to persist for longer periods of time further from the wall, particularly those inferred to be "detached" from the wall, which could be tracked for longer than 5 eddy turnover times.

  16. Time-of-Flight Adjustment Procedure for Acoustic Measurements in Structural Timber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danbiel F. Llana; Guillermo Iñiguez-Gonzalez; Francisco Arriaga; Xiping Wang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of timber length on time-of-flight acoustic longitudinal measurements was investigated on the structural timber of four Spanish species: radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), laricio pine (Pinus nigra Arn.), and maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.). Time-of-flight longitudinal measurements were conducted on 120 specimens of...

  17. Measurement of average continuous-time structure of a bond and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The expected continuous-time structure of a bond and bond's interest rate risk in an investment settings was studied. We determined the expected number of years an investor or manager will wait until the stock comes to maturity. The expected principal amount to be paid back per stock at time 't' was determined, while ...

  18. Decision making with a time limit: The effects of presentation modality and structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Y.; Theune, Mariet; Nijholt, Antinus; Norros, L.; Koskinen, H.; Salo, L.; Savioja, P.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a user experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of information presentation factors (modality and structure) on decision making behavior, using a time-limited task. The time constraint required subjects to develop heuristic strategies to substitute the defined normative

  19. Impact of Stock Market Structure on Intertrade Time and Price Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Yuen, Ainslie; Perakakis, Pandelis

    2014-01-01

    We analyse times between consecutive transactions for a diverse group of stocks registered on the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, and we relate the dynamical properties of the intertrade times with those of the corresponding price fluctuations. We report that market structure strongly impacts the scale-invariant temporal organisation in the transaction timing of stocks, which we have observed to have long-range power-law correlations. Specifically, we find that, compared to NYSE stocks, stocks registered on the NASDAQ exhibit significantly stronger correlations in their transaction timing on scales within a trading day. Further, we find that companies that transfer from the NASDAQ to the NYSE show a reduction in the correlation strength of transaction timing on scales within a trading day, indicating influences of market structure. We also report a persistent decrease in correlation strength of intertrade times with increasing average intertrade time and with corresponding decrease in companies' market capitalization–a trend which is less pronounced for NASDAQ stocks. Surprisingly, we observe that stronger power-law correlations in intertrade times are coupled with stronger power-law correlations in absolute price returns and higher price volatility, suggesting a strong link between the dynamical properties of intertrade times and the corresponding price fluctuations over a broad range of time scales. Comparing the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, we demonstrate that the stronger correlations we find in intertrade times for NASDAQ stocks are associated with stronger correlations in absolute price returns and with higher volatility, suggesting that market structure may affect price behavior through information contained in transaction timing. These findings do not support the hypothesis of universal scaling behavior in stock dynamics that is independent of company characteristics and stock market structure. Further, our results have implications for utilising transaction timing

  20. Impact of stock market structure on intertrade time and price dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Yuen, Ainslie; Perakakis, Pandelis

    2014-01-01

    We analyse times between consecutive transactions for a diverse group of stocks registered on the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, and we relate the dynamical properties of the intertrade times with those of the corresponding price fluctuations. We report that market structure strongly impacts the scale-invariant temporal organisation in the transaction timing of stocks, which we have observed to have long-range power-law correlations. Specifically, we find that, compared to NYSE stocks, stocks registered on the NASDAQ exhibit significantly stronger correlations in their transaction timing on scales within a trading day. Further, we find that companies that transfer from the NASDAQ to the NYSE show a reduction in the correlation strength of transaction timing on scales within a trading day, indicating influences of market structure. We also report a persistent decrease in correlation strength of intertrade times with increasing average intertrade time and with corresponding decrease in companies' market capitalization-a trend which is less pronounced for NASDAQ stocks. Surprisingly, we observe that stronger power-law correlations in intertrade times are coupled with stronger power-law correlations in absolute price returns and higher price volatility, suggesting a strong link between the dynamical properties of intertrade times and the corresponding price fluctuations over a broad range of time scales. Comparing the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, we demonstrate that the stronger correlations we find in intertrade times for NASDAQ stocks are associated with stronger correlations in absolute price returns and with higher volatility, suggesting that market structure may affect price behavior through information contained in transaction timing. These findings do not support the hypothesis of universal scaling behavior in stock dynamics that is independent of company characteristics and stock market structure. Further, our results have implications for utilising transaction timing

  1. Less-structured time in children's daily lives predicts self-directed executive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Jane E; Semenov, Andrei D; Michaelson, Laura; Provan, Lindsay S; Snyder, Hannah R; Munakata, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Executive functions (EFs) in childhood predict important life outcomes. Thus, there is great interest in attempts to improve EFs early in life. Many interventions are led by trained adults, including structured training activities in the lab, and less-structured activities implemented in schools. Such programs have yielded gains in children's externally-driven executive functioning, where they are instructed on what goal-directed actions to carry out and when. However, it is less clear how children's experiences relate to their development of self-directed executive functioning, where they must determine on their own what goal-directed actions to carry out and when. We hypothesized that time spent in less-structured activities would give children opportunities to practice self-directed executive functioning, and lead to benefits. To investigate this possibility, we collected information from parents about their 6-7 year-old children's daily, annual, and typical schedules. We categorized children's activities as "structured" or "less-structured" based on categorization schemes from prior studies on child leisure time use. We assessed children's self-directed executive functioning using a well-established verbal fluency task, in which children generate members of a category and can decide on their own when to switch from one subcategory to another. The more time that children spent in less-structured activities, the better their self-directed executive functioning. The opposite was true of structured activities, which predicted poorer self-directed executive functioning. These relationships were robust (holding across increasingly strict classifications of structured and less-structured time) and specific (time use did not predict externally-driven executive functioning). We discuss implications, caveats, and ways in which potential interpretations can be distinguished in future work, to advance an understanding of this fundamental aspect of growing up.

  2. Fermion Systems in Discrete Space-Time Exemplifying the Spontaneous Generation of a Causal Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diethert, A.; Finster, F.; Schiefeneder, D.

    As toy models for space-time at the Planck scale, we consider examples of fermion systems in discrete space-time which are composed of one or two particles defined on two up to nine space-time points. We study the self-organization of the particles as described by a variational principle both analytically and numerically. We find an effect of spontaneous symmetry breaking which leads to the emergence of a discrete causal structure.

  3. Impact of insufficient energy content in the design time history on the structure response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    In the design of nuclear power plants, it is often desirable to use the time history method in the soil-structure interaction analysis to determine the plant floor response to seismic loads. Because many design criteria are specified in terms of design response spectra, the artificial time history needs to be generated under the requirement that the response spectra of the artificial history should envelop the given design response spectra. However, recent studies indicate that the artificial time history used in the plant design may have insufficient energy in the frequency range of interest, even though the response spectra of the design time history closely envelop the design response spectra. This paper presents an investigation of the effects of the insufficient energy content in the design time history on the response of the soil-structure system. Numerical studies were carried out. Both the real earthquake records and the artificial time histories were used as the input motions in a simple lumped-mass soil-structure interaction model. The results obtained from this study provide a better understanding of the effects of the insufficient energy content in the design time history on the structural response

  4. A time reversal damage imaging method for structure health monitoring using Lamb waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hai-Yan; Cao Ya-Ping; Sun Xiu-Li; Chen Xian-Hua; Yu Jian-Bo

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the Lamb wave imaging method combining time reversal for health monitoring of a metallic plate structure. The temporal focusing effect of the time reversal Lamb waves is investigated theoretically. It demonstrates that the focusing effect is related to the frequency dependency of the time reversal operation. Numerical simulations are conducted to study the time reversal behaviour of Lamb wave modes under broadband and narrowband excitations. The results show that the reconstructed time reversed wave exhibits close similarity to the reversed narrowband tone burst signal validating the theoretical model. To enhance the similarity, the cycle number of the excited signal should be increased. Experiments combining finite element model are then conducted to study the imaging method in the presence of damage like hole in the plate structure. In this work, the time reversal technique is used for the recompression of Lamb wave signals. Damage imaging results with time reversal using broadband and narrowband excitations are compared to those without time reversal. It suggests that the narrowband excitation combined time reversal can locate and determine the size of structural damage more precisely, but the cycle number of the excited signal should be chosen reasonably

  5. DOES MARKET TIMING DRIVE CAPITAL STRUCTURE? EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE FROM AN EMERGING MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Çelik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to test how equity market timing affects capital structure from the perspective of IPO (Initial Public Offering event in ISE for the period between 1999-2008. Our dataset comprises of all firms (75 firms that went public from the period of January 1999 to December 2008 in Turkey that are available in ISE database. We analyse the market timing theory by applying cross sectional regression method. For this purpose, first, we test the impact of market timing on the amount of equity issued by IPO firms. Second we examine the impact of market timing on capital structure. We conclude that market timing theory is not valid for Turkey.

  6. SLStudio: Open-source framework for real-time structured light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilm, Jakob; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    that this software makes real-time 3D scene capture more widely accessible and serves as a foundation for new structured light scanners operating in real-time, e.g. 20 depth images per second and more. The use cases for such scanners are plentyfull, however due to the computational constraints, all public......An open-source framework for real-time structured light is presented. It is called “SLStudio”, and enables real-time capture of metric depth images. The framework is modular, and extensible to support new algorithms for scene encoding/decoding, triangulation, and aquisition hardware. It is the aim...... implementations so far are limited to offline processing. With “SLStudio”, we are making a platform available which enables researchers from many different fields to build application specific real time 3D scanners. The software is hosted at http://compute.dtu.dk/~jakw/slstudio....

  7. Time-domain representation of frequency dependent inertial forces on offshore structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2013-01-01

    dependence is then approximated by a rational function, corresponding to a set of ordinary differential equations in the time domain. The MacCamy-Fuchs solution leads to a representation of the inertial force coefficient as a complex function with argument mainly corresponding to a 'phase lead', in contrast...... history of the inertial force is determined by processing the stable part of the transformation by a forward time integration, followed by an integration in the negative time-direction to obtain the final inertial force time history. The differential equations of the local inertial force at a cross......The inertial wave force on a vertical cylinder decreases with decreasing wave length, when the wave length is less than about six times the diameter of the diameter of the cylinder. In structures with a largediameter component like mono-towers the resonance frequency of the structure is typically...

  8. Association of time structures of solar bursts at millimetric waves and at metric waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawant, H.S.; Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Costa, J.E.R.; Zlobec, P.; Messerotti, M.; Fornasari, L.

    Due to the lack of simultaneous high sensitivity/time resolution observations at mm-lambda, cm-lambda and m-lambda a program on such investigations has been carried out with data obtained by INPE at Itapetinga and by the Astronomical Observatory of Trieste. Preliminary results obtained by comparing mm-wave burst structures with 408, 327 and 237 MHz indicate that i) for majority of major time structures (time scales of the order of 1 sec) observed at 22 GHz bursts, corresponding type III bursts have been observed at 237 Mhz, however ii) start times at mm-lambda and m-lambda are not often coincident at two wavelengths. These observations favour the hypothesis of (a) time dependent acceleration of energetic electrons and (b) burst emission is the response to a multiple injection of energetic electrons. (Author) [pt

  9. Impact of insufficient energy content in the design time history on the structure response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    In the design of nuclear power plants, it is often desirable to use the time history method in the soil-structure interaction analysis to determine the plant floor response to seismic loads. Because many design criteria are specified in terms of design response spectra, the artificial time history needs to be generated under the requirement that the response spectra of the artificial history should envelop the given design response spectra. However, recent studies indicate that the artificial time history used in the plant design may have insufficient energy in the frequency range of interest, even though the response spectra of the design time history closely envelop the design response spectra. Therefore, the proposed changes in the NRC Standard Review Plan requires that when a single time history is used in the seismic design, it must satisfy requirements for both response spectra enveloping and matching a power spectra density (PSD) function in the frequency range of interest. The use of multiple artificial time histories (at least five time histories) in the plant design is also suggested in the new Standard Review Plan. This paper presents an investigation of the effects of the insufficient energy content in the design time history on the response of the soil-structure system. Numerical studies were carried out. Both the real earthquake records and the artificial time histories were used as the input motions in a simple lumped-mass soil-structure interaction model. The results obtained from this study provide a better understanding of the effects of the insufficient energy content in the design time history on the structural response. 5 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  10. A Time Series Analysis to Asymmetric Marketing Competition Within a Market Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco F. R. Ramos

    1996-01-01

    As a complementary to the existing studies of competitive market structure analysis, the present paper proposed a time series methodology to provide a more detailed picture of marketing competition in relation to competitive market structure. Two major hypotheses were tested as part of this project. First, it was found that some significant cross- lead and lag effects of marketing variables on sales between brands existed even between differents submarkets. second, it was found that high qual...

  11. Fast and non-destructive pore structure analysis using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Markl, Daniel; Bawuah, Prince; Ridgway, Cathy; van den Ban, Sander; Goodwin, Daniel J; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Gane, Patrick; Peiponen, Kai-Erik; Zeitler, Jochen Axel

    2018-01-01

    Pharmaceutical tablets are typically manufactured by the uni-axial compaction of powder that is confined radially by a rigid die. The directional nature of the compaction process yields not only anisotropic mechanical properties (e.g. tensile strength) but also directional properties of the pore structure in the porous compact. This study derives a new quantitative parameter, $S_a$, to describe the anisotropy in pore structure of pharmaceutical tablets based on terahertz time-domain spectrosc...

  12. Real-time vibration-based structural damage detection using one-dimensional convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeljaber, Osama; Avci, Onur; Kiranyaz, Serkan; Gabbouj, Moncef; Inman, Daniel J.

    2017-02-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) and vibration-based structural damage detection have been a continuous interest for civil, mechanical and aerospace engineers over the decades. Early and meticulous damage detection has always been one of the principal objectives of SHM applications. The performance of a classical damage detection system predominantly depends on the choice of the features and the classifier. While the fixed and hand-crafted features may either be a sub-optimal choice for a particular structure or fail to achieve the same level of performance on another structure, they usually require a large computation power which may hinder their usage for real-time structural damage detection. This paper presents a novel, fast and accurate structural damage detection system using 1D Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) that has an inherent adaptive design to fuse both feature extraction and classification blocks into a single and compact learning body. The proposed method performs vibration-based damage detection and localization of the damage in real-time. The advantage of this approach is its ability to extract optimal damage-sensitive features automatically from the raw acceleration signals. Large-scale experiments conducted on a grandstand simulator revealed an outstanding performance and verified the computational efficiency of the proposed real-time damage detection method.

  13. Cosmological special relativity the large scale structure of space, time and velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Carmeli, Moshe

    1997-01-01

    This book deals with special relativity theory and its application to cosmology. It presents Einstein's theory of space and time in detail, and describes the large scale structure of space, time and velocity as a new cosmological special relativity. A cosmological Lorentz-like transformation, which relates events at different cosmic times, is derived and applied. A new law of addition of cosmic times is obtained, and the inflation of the space at the early universe is derived, both from the cosmological transformation. The book will be of interest to cosmologists, astrophysicists, theoretical

  14. Cosmological special relativity the large scale structure of space, time and velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Carmeli, Moshe

    2002-01-01

    This book presents Einstein's theory of space and time in detail, and describes the large-scale structure of space, time and velocity as a new cosmological special relativity. A cosmological Lorentz-like transformation, which relates events at different cosmic times, is derived and applied. A new law of addition of cosmic times is obtained, and the inflation of the space at the early universe is derived, both from the cosmological transformation. The relationship between cosmic velocity, acceleration and distances is given. In the appendices gravitation is added in the form of a cosmological g

  15. Time-Dependent Thermally-Driven Interfacial Flows in Multilayered Fluid Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Hariri, Hossein; Borhan, A.

    1996-01-01

    A computational study of thermally-driven convection in multilayered fluid structures will be performed to examine the effect of interactions among deformable fluid-fluid interfaces on the structure of time-dependent flow in these systems. Multilayered fluid structures in two models configurations will be considered: the differentially heated rectangular cavity with a free surface, and the encapsulated cylindrical liquid bridge. An extension of a numerical method developed as part of our recent NASA Fluid Physics grant will be used to account for finite deformations of fluid-fluid interfaces.

  16. The speed of metacognition: taking time to get to know one's structural knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealor, Andy D; Dienes, Zoltan

    2013-03-01

    The time course of different metacognitive experiences of knowledge was investigated using artificial grammar learning. Experiment 1 revealed that when participants are aware of the basis of their judgments (conscious structural knowledge) decisions are made most rapidly, followed by decisions made with conscious judgment but without conscious knowledge of underlying structure (unconscious structural knowledge), and guess responses (unconscious judgment knowledge) were made most slowly, even when controlling for differences in confidence and accuracy. In experiment 2, short response deadlines decreased the accuracy of unconscious but not conscious structural knowledge. Conversely, the deadline decreased the proportion of conscious structural knowledge in favour of guessing. Unconscious structural knowledge can be applied rapidly but becomes more reliable with additional metacognitive processing time whereas conscious structural knowledge is an all-or-nothing response that cannot always be applied rapidly. These dissociations corroborate quite separate theories of recognition (dual-process) and metacognition (higher order thought and cross-order integration). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Action detection by double hierarchical multi-structure space-time statistical matching model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Zhu, Junwei; Cui, Yiyin; Bai, Lianfa; Yue, Jiang

    2018-03-01

    Aimed at the complex information in videos and low detection efficiency, an actions detection model based on neighboring Gaussian structure and 3D LARK features is put forward. We exploit a double hierarchical multi-structure space-time statistical matching model (DMSM) in temporal action localization. First, a neighboring Gaussian structure is presented to describe the multi-scale structural relationship. Then, a space-time statistical matching method is proposed to achieve two similarity matrices on both large and small scales, which combines double hierarchical structural constraints in model by both the neighboring Gaussian structure and the 3D LARK local structure. Finally, the double hierarchical similarity is fused and analyzed to detect actions. Besides, the multi-scale composite template extends the model application into multi-view. Experimental results of DMSM on the complex visual tracker benchmark data sets and THUMOS 2014 data sets show the promising performance. Compared with other state-of-the-art algorithm, DMSM achieves superior performances.

  18. Some consequences of a non-commutative space-time structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilela Mendes, R.

    2005-01-01

    The existence of a fundamental length (or fundamental time) has been conjectured in many contexts. Here we discuss some consequences of a fundamental constant of this type, which emerges as a consequence of deformation-stability considerations leading to a non-commutative space-time structure. This mathematically well defined structure is sufficiently constrained to allow for unambiguous experimental predictions. In particular we discuss the phase-space volume modifications and their relevance for the calculation of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min sphere. The (small) corrections to the spectrum of the Coulomb problem are also computed. (orig.)

  19. The effect warming time of mechanical properties and structural phase aluminum alloy nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husna Al Hasa, M.; Anwar Muchsin

    2011-01-01

    Ferrous aluminum alloys as fuel cladding will experience the process of heat treatment above the recrystallization temperature. Temperature and time of heat treatment will affect the nature of the metal. Heating time allows will affect change in mechanical properties, thermal and structure of the metal phase. This study aims to determine the effect of time of heat treatment on mechanical properties and phase metal alloys. Testing the mechanical properties of materials, especially violence done by the method of Vickers. Observation of microstructural changes made by metallographic-optical and phase structure were analyzed Based on the x-ray diffraction patterns Elemental analysis phase alloy compounds made by EDS-SEM. Test results show the nature of violence AlFeNiMg alloy by heating at 500°C with a warm-up time 1 hour, 2 hours and 3 hours respectively decreased range 94.4 HV, 87.6 HV and 85.1 HV. The nature of violence AlFeNi alloy showed a decrease in line with the longer heating time. Metallographic-optical observations show the microstructural changes with increasing heating time. Microstructure shows the longer the heating time trend equi axial shaped grain structure of growing and the results showed a trend analyst diffraction pattern formation and phase θ α phase (FeAl3) in the alloy. (author)

  20. Structural strength assessment of the reconstructed road structure in terms of the loading time and yield criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Grzegorz; Iwański, Marek

    2018-05-01

    This article reports the results of numerical simulations of the stress-strain states in the rebuilt road structure compared to the solutions contained in the Polish Catalogue, with the true characteristics of the layer materials taken into account. In the case analysed, a cold-recycled base layer with foamed bitumen as a recycling agent was used. The presented analysis is complementary to the mandatory in Poland procedure of mechanistic pavement design based on a linear elastic model. The temperature distribution in the road structure was analysed at the reference temperature of 40°C on the asphalt layer surface. The loading time was included in the computer simulations through the use of the classic generalized Maxwell model and thus the stiffness-time history of the layers had to be determined. For this purpose, the dynamic modulus E* tests of the loading time frequency from 0.1 Hz to 20 Hz were carried out, and the yield point was modelled using the Coulomb-Mohr failure criterion calculated on the basis of triaxial compression tests. The analytical solution to the problem was found with ABAQUS. The results demonstrate that the high temperature of asphalt layers and long loading time noticeably reduces the stiffness modulus in those layers. That reduction changes the principal stress levels, which significantly influences the shear stress both in the recycled base layer and in the subgrade soil. Should the yield point be exceeded rapidly in the recycled layer, the horizontal stresses in the asphalt layers will increase and adversely affect the durability of the reconstructed road pavement structure, especially in the zones of slow heavy vehicle traffic.

  1. Structured Feedback Training for Time-Out: Efficacy and Efficiency in Comparison to a Didactic Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Scott A; Blumberg, Sean; Browning, Megan

    2017-09-01

    Although time-out has been demonstrated to be effective across multiple settings, little research exists on effective methods for training others to implement time-out. The present set of studies is an exploratory analysis of a structured feedback method for training time-out using repeated role-plays. The three studies examined (a) a between-subjects comparison to more a traditional didactic/video modeling method of time-out training, (b) a within-subjects comparison to traditional didactic/video modeling training for another skill, and (c) the impact of structured feedback training on in-home time-out implementation. Though findings are only preliminary and more research is needed, the structured feedback method appears across studies to be an efficient, effective method that demonstrates good maintenance of skill up to 3 months post training. Findings suggest, though do not confirm, a benefit of the structured feedback method over a more traditional didactic/video training model. Implications and further research on the method are discussed.

  2. The Time Structure of Hadronic Showers in Highly Granular Calorimeters with Tungsten and Steel Absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Chefdeville, M.; Drancourt, C.; Gaglione, R.; Geffroy, N.; Karyotakis, Y.; Koletsou, I.; Prast, J.; Vouters, G.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Baldolemar, E.; Li, J.; Park, S.T.; Sosebee, M.; White, A.P.; Yu, J.; Eigen, G.; Thomson, M.A.; Ward, D.R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Arfaoui, A.; Benoit, M.; Dannheim, D.; Elsener, K.; Folger, G.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Killenberg, M.; Klempt, W.; van der Kraaij, E.; Linssen, L.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Münnich, A.; Poss, S.; Ribon, A.; Roloff, P.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Sicking, E.; Strube, J.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Carloganu, C.; Gay, P.; Manen, S.; Royer, L.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Ebrahimi, A.; Falley, G.; Feege, N.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terwort, M.; Fagot, A.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Marchesini, I.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Harion, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Chang, S.; Khan, A.; Kim, D.H.; Kong, D.J.; Oh, Y.D.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Wilson, G.W.; Kawagoe, K.; Miyazaki, Y.; Sudo, Y.; Ueno, H.; Yoshioka, T.; Dauncey, P.D.; Cortina Gil, E.; Mannai, S.; Baulieu, G.; Calabria, P.; Caponetto, L.; Combaret, C.; Della Negra, R.; Ete, R.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J-C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Tromeur, W.; Vander Donckt, M.; Zoccarato, Y.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Corriveau, F.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Epifantsev, A.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kozlov, V.; Soloviev, Y.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Ilyin, A.; Kantserov, V.; Kaplin, V.; Popova, E.; Tikhomirov, V.; Gabriel, M.; Kiesling, C.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Weuste, L.; Amjad, M.S.; Bonis, J.; Conforti di Lorenzo, S.; Cornebise, P.; Fleury, J.; Frisson, T.; van der Kolk, N.; Richard, F.; Pöschl, R.; Rouene, J.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Becheva, E.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J-C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Guliyev, E.; Haddad, Y.; Magniette, F.; Ruan, M.; Tran, T.H.; Videau, H.; Callier, S.; Dulucq, F.; Martin-Chassard, G.; de la Taille, Ch.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Zacek, J.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Belhorma, B.; Ghazlane, H.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Uozumi, S.; Chai, J.S.; Song, H.S.; Lee, S.H.; Götze, M.; Sauer, J.; Weber, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic time structure of hadronic showers influences the timing capability and the required integration time of hadronic calorimeters in particle physics experiments, and depends on the active medium and on the absorber of the calorimeter. With the CALICE T3B experiment, a setup of 15 small plastic scintillator tiles read out with Silicon Photomultipliers, the time structure of showers is measured on a statistical basis with high spatial and temporal resolution in sampling calorimeters with tungsten and steel absorbers. The results are compared to GEANT4 (version 9.4 patch 03) simulations with different hadronic physics models. These comparisons demonstrate the importance of using high precision treatment of low-energy neutrons for tungsten absorbers, while an overall good agreement between data and simulations for all considered models is observed for steel.

  3. Capital Structure and Diversification Strategies - A Study of Swedish Real Estate Companies Over Time

    OpenAIRE

    Hertéus, Robin; Hilmgård, Simon

    2016-01-01

    This thesis’ aim is to study four Swedish real estate companies between the years 2006-2015 to see whether their capital structure and investment strategies have changed over the years. The data upon which the thesis is based, is gathered from the four companies’ annual reports. These years are of interest due to the changing economic environment, both in Sweden and the world, during this time period. The time period includes one financial crisis and a never before experienced interest rate e...

  4. Ultrafast Structural Dynamics in InSb Probed by Time-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, A.H.; Shank, C.V.; Chin, A.H.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Shank, C.V.; Glover, T.E.; Leemans, W.P.; Balling, P.

    1999-01-01

    Ultrafast structural dynamics in laser-perturbed InSb are studied using time-resolved x-ray diffraction with a novel femtosecond x-ray source. We report the first observation of a delay in the onset of lattice expansion, which we attribute to energy relaxation processes and lattice strain propagation. In addition, we observe direct indications of ultrafast disordering on a subpicosecond time scale. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  5. Relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions: Zone of reactions and space-time structure of fireball

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anchishkin, D.; Muskeyev, A.; Yezhov, S.

    2010-01-01

    A zone of reactions is determined and then exploited as a tool in studying the space-time structure of an interacting system formed in a collision of relativistic nuclei. The time dependence of the reaction rates integrated over spatial coordinates is also considered. Evaluations are made with the help of the microscopic transport model UrQMD. The relation of the boundaries of different zones of reactions and the hypersurfaces of sharp chemical and kinetic freeze-outs is discussed.

  6. Space-time structure of particle production in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsuka, Naohiko; Ohnishi, Akira [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan); Nara, Yasushi; Maruyama, Tomoyuki

    1998-07-01

    Space-Time structure of freeze-out of produced particles in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied in the framework of two different cascade models, either with or without higher baryonic resonances. While higher excited baryonic resonances do not influence the spatial source size of freeze-out point, the freeze-out time distribution is shifted to be later by these resonances. (author)

  7. Real time nanoscale structural evaluation of gold structures on Si (100) surface using in-situ transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rath, A.; Juluri, R. R.; Satyam, P. V.

    2014-01-01

    Transport behavior of gold nanostructures on Si(100) substrate during annealing under high vacuum has been investigated using in-situ real time transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A comparative study has been done on the morphological changes due to annealing under different vacuum environments. Au thin films of thickness ∼2.0 nm were deposited on native oxide covered silicon substrate by using thermal evaporation system. In-situ real time TEM measurements at 850 °C showed the isotropic growth of rectangular/square shaped gold-silicon alloy structures. During the growth, it is observed that the alloying occurs in liquid phase followed by transformation into the rectangular shapes. For similar system, ex-situ annealing in low vacuum (10 −2 millibars) at 850 °C showed the spherical gold nanostructures with no Au-Si alloy formation. Under low vacuum annealing conditions, the rate of formation of the oxide layer dominates the oxide desorption rate, resulting in the creation of a barrier layer between Au and Si, which restricts the inter diffusion of Au in to Si. This work demonstrates the important role of interfacial oxide layer on the growth of nanoscale Au-Si alloy structures during the initial growth. The time dependent TEM images are presented to offer a direct insight into the fundamental dynamics of the sintering process at the nanoscale

  8. Gear fault diagnosis based on the structured sparsity time-frequency analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ruobin; Yang, Zhibo; Chen, Xuefeng; Tian, Shaohua; Xie, Yong

    2018-03-01

    Over the last decade, sparse representation has become a powerful paradigm in mechanical fault diagnosis due to its excellent capability and the high flexibility for complex signal description. The structured sparsity time-frequency analysis (SSTFA) is a novel signal processing method, which utilizes mixed-norm priors on time-frequency coefficients to obtain a fine match for the structure of signals. In order to extract the transient feature from gear vibration signals, a gear fault diagnosis method based on SSTFA is proposed in this work. The steady modulation components and impulsive components of the defective gear vibration signals can be extracted simultaneously by choosing different time-frequency neighborhood and generalized thresholding operators. Besides, the time-frequency distribution with high resolution is obtained by piling different components in the same diagram. The diagnostic conclusion can be made according to the envelope spectrum of the impulsive components or by the periodicity of impulses. The effectiveness of the method is verified by numerical simulations, and the vibration signals registered from a gearbox fault simulator and a wind turbine. To validate the efficiency of the presented methodology, comparisons are made among some state-of-the-art vibration separation methods and the traditional time-frequency analysis methods. The comparisons show that the proposed method possesses advantages in separating feature signals under strong noise and accounting for the inner time-frequency structure of the gear vibration signals.

  9. Using machine learning to identify structural breaks in single-group interrupted time series designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Ariel; Yarnold, Paul R

    2016-12-01

    Single-group interrupted time series analysis (ITSA) is a popular evaluation methodology in which a single unit of observation is being studied, the outcome variable is serially ordered as a time series and the intervention is expected to 'interrupt' the level and/or trend of the time series, subsequent to its introduction. Given that the internal validity of the design rests on the premise that the interruption in the time series is associated with the introduction of the treatment, treatment effects may seem less plausible if a parallel trend already exists in the time series prior to the actual intervention. Thus, sensitivity analyses should focus on detecting structural breaks in the time series before the intervention. In this paper, we introduce a machine-learning algorithm called optimal discriminant analysis (ODA) as an approach to determine if structural breaks can be identified in years prior to the initiation of the intervention, using data from California's 1988 voter-initiated Proposition 99 to reduce smoking rates. The ODA analysis indicates that numerous structural breaks occurred prior to the actual initiation of Proposition 99 in 1989, including perfect structural breaks in 1983 and 1985, thereby casting doubt on the validity of treatment effects estimated for the actual intervention when using a single-group ITSA design. Given the widespread use of ITSA for evaluating observational data and the increasing use of machine-learning techniques in traditional research, we recommend that structural break sensitivity analysis is routinely incorporated in all research using the single-group ITSA design. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Long-term real-time structural health monitoring using wireless smart sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Shinae; Mensah-Bonsu, Priscilla O.; Li, Jingcheng; Dahal, Sushil

    2013-04-01

    Improving the safety and security of civil infrastructure has become a critical issue for decades since it plays a central role in the economics and politics of a modern society. Structural health monitoring of civil infrastructure using wireless smart sensor network has emerged as a promising solution recently to increase structural reliability, enhance inspection quality, and reduce maintenance costs. Though hardware and software framework are well prepared for wireless smart sensors, the long-term real-time health monitoring strategy are still not available due to the lack of systematic interface. In this paper, the Imote2 smart sensor platform is employed, and a graphical user interface for the long-term real-time structural health monitoring has been developed based on Matlab for the Imote2 platform. This computer-aided engineering platform enables the control, visualization of measured data as well as safety alarm feature based on modal property fluctuation. A new decision making strategy to check the safety is also developed and integrated in this software. Laboratory validation of the computer aided engineering platform for the Imote2 on a truss bridge and a building structure has shown the potential of the interface for long-term real-time structural health monitoring.

  11. Structure and dating errors in the geologic time scale and periodicity in mass extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    Structure in the geologic time scale reflects a partly paleontological origin. As a result, ages of Cenozoic and Mesozoic stage boundaries exhibit a weak 28-Myr periodicity that is similar to the strong 26-Myr periodicity detected in mass extinctions of marine life by Raup and Sepkoski. Radiometric dating errors in the geologic time scale, to which the mass extinctions are stratigraphically tied, do not necessarily lessen the likelihood of a significant periodicity in mass extinctions, but do spread the acceptable values of the period over the range 25-27 Myr for the Harland et al. time scale or 25-30 Myr for the DNAG time scale. If the Odin time scale is adopted, acceptable periods fall between 24 and 33 Myr, but are not robust against dating errors. Some indirect evidence from independently-dated flood-basalt volcanic horizons tends to favor the Odin time scale.

  12. Bus Travel Time Deviation Analysis Using Automatic Vehicle Location Data and Structural Equation Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Gong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the influences of causes of unreliability and bus schedule recovery phenomenon on microscopic segment-level travel time variance, this study adopts Structural Equation Modeling (SEM to specify, estimate, and measure the theoretical proposed models. The SEM model establishes and verifies hypotheses for interrelationships among travel time deviations, departure delays, segment lengths, dwell times, and number of traffic signals and access connections. The finally accepted model demonstrates excellent fitness. Most of the hypotheses are supported by the sample dataset from bus Automatic Vehicle Location system. The SEM model confirms the bus schedule recovery phenomenon. The departure delays at bus terminals and upstream travel time deviations indeed have negative impacts on travel time fluctuation of buses en route. Meanwhile, the segment length directly and negatively impacts travel time variability and inversely positively contributes to the schedule recovery process; this exogenous variable also indirectly and positively influences travel times through the existence of signalized intersections and access connections. This study offers a rational approach to analyzing travel time deviation feature. The SEM model structure and estimation results facilitate the understanding of bus service performance characteristics and provide several implications for bus service planning, management, and operation.

  13. How to defeat Wüthrich's abysmal embarrassment argument against space-time structuralism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.A. Muller (Archibald)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIn his award-winning contribution to the biannual PSA conference at Pittsburgh in 2008, Christian Wüthrich mounted an argument against structuralism about spacetime in the context of the general theory of relativity (GTR), to the effect that structuralists cannot discern space-time

  14. The quiet time structure of energetic (35--560 keV) radiation belt electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, L.R.; Williams, D.J.

    1975-01-01

    Detailed Explorer 45 equatorial observations of the quiet time structure of radiation belt electrons (35--560 keV) for 1.7approximately-less-thanLapproximately-less-than5.2 are presented. Throughout the slot region and outer regions of the plasmasphere the observed pitch angle distributions are found to agree with those expected from resonant interactions with the plasmaspheric whistler mode wave band. Coulomb collisions become the dominant loss mechanism within the inner zone. The overall two-zone structure of the observed radial profiles is found to agree with the equilibrium structure expected to result from a balance between pitch angle scattering losses and radial diffusion from an average outer zone source. This agreement suggests that the dominant quiet time source and loss mechanisms have been identified and evaluated for energetic radiation belt electrons within the plasmasphere. In the outer regions of the plasmasphere (Lapprox.5) the equilibrium structure is observed to be modified by daily flux variations associated with changes in the level of magnetic activity that occur even during relatively quiet times. Within the inner region of the plasmasphere (Lapproximately-less-than3.5), electron fluxes are decoupled from these magnetic activity variations by the long time scales (>10 days) required for pitch angle and radial diffusion. Consequently, fluxes of these electrons are observed to remain nearly constant at equilibrium levels throughout the quiet periods examined

  15. Real-time monitoring and structural control of a wind turbine using a rocking system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caterino, Nicola; Spizzuoco, Mariacristina; Georgakis, Christos T.

    2016-01-01

    The design of a semi-active (SA) control system to mitigate wind induced structural demand to high wind turbine towers is discussed herein. A variable restraint at the base, able to modify in real time its mechanical properties according to the instantaneous response of the tower, is proposed...

  16. Road safety forecasts in five European countries using structural time series models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Constantinos; Papadimitriou, Eleonora; Yannis, George

    2014-01-01

    Modeling road safety development is a complex task and needs to consider both the quantifiable impact of specific parameters as well as the underlying trends that cannot always be measured or observed. The objective of this research is to apply structural time series models for obtaining reliable medium- to long-term forecasts of road traffic fatality risk using data from 5 countries with different characteristics from all over Europe (Cyprus, Greece, Hungary, Norway, and Switzerland). Two structural time series models are considered: (1) the local linear trend model and the (2) latent risk time series model. Furthermore, a structured decision tree for the selection of the applicable model for each situation (developed within the Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis [DaCoTA] research project, cofunded by the European Commission) is outlined. First, the fatality and exposure data that are used for the development of the models are presented and explored. Then, the modeling process is presented, including the model selection process, introduction of intervention variables, and development of mobility scenarios. The forecasts using the developed models appear to be realistic and within acceptable confidence intervals. The proposed methodology is proved to be very efficient for handling different cases of data availability and quality, providing an appropriate alternative from the family of structural time series models in each country. A concluding section providing perspectives and directions for future research is presented.

  17. Simulating population recovery of an aquatic isopod: Effects of timing of stress and landscape structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galic, N.; Baveco, H.; Hengeveld, G.M.; Thorbeck, P.; Bruns, E.; Brink, P.

    2012-01-01

    In agroecosystems, organisms may regularly be exposed to anthropogenic stressors, e.g. pesticides. Species' sensitivity to stress depends on toxicity, life-history, and landscape structure. We developed an individual-based model of an isopod, Asellus aquaticus, to explore how timing of stress events

  18. Study of stratified dielectric slab medium structures using pseudo-spectral time domain (PSTD) algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, M.S.; Lu, Y.; Chen, Y.

    2005-01-01

    -layer structures are analyzed. Results show that this method matches satisfactorily the Nyquist sampling theorem in terms of spatial discretization. By comparing the given results, it is found that the PSTD method outperforms the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method in general, especially in terms...

  19. Real-Time Probing of Structural Dynamics by Interaction between Chromophores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Rasmus Y.; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Sølling, Theis Ivan

    2011-01-01

    We present an investigation of structural dynamics in excited-state cations probed in real-time by femtosecond timeresolved ion photofragmentation spectroscopy. From photoelectron spectroscopy data on 1,3-dibromopropane we conclude that the pump pulse ionizes the molecule, populating an excited...

  20. Energy-Aware Scheduling of FIR Filter Structures using a Timed Automata Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wognsen, Erik Ramsgaard; Hansen, Rene Rydhof; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2016-01-01

    structures where we initially derive data flow graphs and precedence graphs using the Synchronous Data Flow (SDF) notation. Based on actual measurements on the Altera Cyclone IV FPGA, we derive power and timing estimates for addition and multiplication, including idling power consumption. We next model...

  1. Structure-activity relationships of heterogeneous catalysts from time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ressler, T.; Jentoft, R.E.; Wienold, J.; Girgsdies, F.; Neisius, T.; Timpe, O.

    2003-01-01

    Knowing the composition and the evolution of the bulk structure of a heterogeneous catalyst under working conditions (in situ) is a pre-requisite for understanding structure-activity relationships. X-ray absorption spectroscopy can be employed to study a catalytically active material in situ. In addition to steady-state investigations, the technique permits experiments with a time-resolution in the sub-second range to elucidate the solid-state kinetics of the reactions involved. Combined with mass spectrometry, the evolution of the short-range order structure of a heterogeneous catalyst, the average valence of the constituent metals, and the phase composition can be obtained. Here we present results obtained from time-resolved studies on the reduction of MoO 3 in propene and in propene and oxygen

  2. Dependency structure and scaling properties of financial time series are related.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Raffaello; Di Matteo, T; Aste, Tomaso

    2014-04-04

    We report evidence of a deep interplay between cross-correlations hierarchical properties and multifractality of New York Stock Exchange daily stock returns. The degree of multifractality displayed by different stocks is found to be positively correlated to their depth in the hierarchy of cross-correlations. We propose a dynamical model that reproduces this observation along with an array of other empirical properties. The structure of this model is such that the hierarchical structure of heterogeneous risks plays a crucial role in the time evolution of the correlation matrix, providing an interpretation to the mechanism behind the interplay between cross-correlation and multifractality in financial markets, where the degree of multifractality of stocks is associated to their hierarchical positioning in the cross-correlation structure. Empirical observations reported in this paper present a new perspective towards the merging of univariate multi scaling and multivariate cross-correlation properties of financial time series.

  3. Investigation of interfacial wave structure using time-series analysis techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayanti, S.; Hewitt, G.F.; Cliffe, K.A.

    1990-09-01

    The report presents an investigation into the interfacial structure in horizontal annular flow using spectral and time-series analysis techniques. Film thickness measured using conductance probes shows an interesting transition in wave pattern from a continuous low-frequency wave pattern to an intermittent, high-frequency one. From the autospectral density function of the film thickness, it appears that this transition is caused by the breaking up of long waves into smaller ones. To investigate the possibility of the wave structure being represented as a low order chaotic system, phase portraits of the time series were constructed using the technique developed by Broomhead and co-workers (1986, 1987 and 1989). These showed a banded structure when waves of relatively high frequency were filtered out. Although these results are encouraging, further work is needed to characterise the attractor. (Author)

  4. Multisource least-squares reverse-time migration with structure-oriented filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jing-Wen; Li, Zhen-Chun; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Min; Liu, Xue-Tong

    2016-09-01

    The technology of simultaneous-source acquisition of seismic data excited by several sources can significantly improve the data collection efficiency. However, direct imaging of simultaneous-source data or blended data may introduce crosstalk noise and affect the imaging quality. To address this problem, we introduce a structure-oriented filtering operator as preconditioner into the multisource least-squares reverse-time migration (LSRTM). The structure-oriented filtering operator is a nonstationary filter along structural trends that suppresses crosstalk noise while maintaining structural information. The proposed method uses the conjugate-gradient method to minimize the mismatch between predicted and observed data, while effectively attenuating the interference noise caused by exciting several sources simultaneously. Numerical experiments using synthetic data suggest that the proposed method can suppress the crosstalk noise and produce highly accurate images.

  5. Effect of milling time on the structure, particle size, and morphology of montmorillonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abareshi, M.

    2017-01-01

    In the current research, effect of milling on the structure, particle size and morphology of montmorillonite was investigated. For this purpose, the montmorillonite was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Then the montmorillonite was milled using high energy planetary ball mill at different milling times (1-60 hours). After that, the structure, particle size and morphology of all samples were investigated by XRD, FTIR, SEM, and transmission electron microscopy. Results showed that the ball milling causes the particle size reduction of clay and separation of the clay layers. Moreover, ball milling increases the overall structural disorder and transforms the crystalline structure into an amorphous phase. Also, the morphology of clay particle changes from layered to aggregates of almost rounded particles after 60 hours of milling.

  6. Multi-frequency complex network from time series for uncovering oil-water flow structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Yang, Yu-Xuan; Fang, Peng-Cheng; Jin, Ning-De; Xia, Cheng-Yi; Hu, Li-Dan

    2015-02-04

    Uncovering complex oil-water flow structure represents a challenge in diverse scientific disciplines. This challenge stimulates us to develop a new distributed conductance sensor for measuring local flow signals at different positions and then propose a novel approach based on multi-frequency complex network to uncover the flow structures from experimental multivariate measurements. In particular, based on the Fast Fourier transform, we demonstrate how to derive multi-frequency complex network from multivariate time series. We construct complex networks at different frequencies and then detect community structures. Our results indicate that the community structures faithfully represent the structural features of oil-water flow patterns. Furthermore, we investigate the network statistic at different frequencies for each derived network and find that the frequency clustering coefficient enables to uncover the evolution of flow patterns and yield deep insights into the formation of flow structures. Current results present a first step towards a network visualization of complex flow patterns from a community structure perspective.

  7. Time-Dependent Variations in Structure of Sheep Wool Irradiated by Electron Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Hanzlíková

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wool scoured in tap water with no special degreasing and containing a balanced humidity responding to usual laboratory conditions was irradiated by accelerated electron beam in the range of 0–350 kGy dose. Time variations of the wool structure were measured using FTIR, Raman, and EPR spectroscopy. The aim was to determine whether preexposure treatment of the wool, as well as postexposure time, affects the properties of the irradiated wool. Reactive products such as S-sulfonate, cystine monoxide, cystine dioxide, cysteic acid, disulphides, and carboxylates displayed a considerable fluctuation in quantity depending on both the absorbed dose and time. Mutual transformations of S-oxidized products into cysteic acid appeared to be faster than those in dry and degreased wool assuming that the present humidity inside the fibres is decisive as an oxygen source. EPR results indicated a longer lifetime for free radicals induced by lower doses compared with the radicals generated by higher ones. The pattern of the conformational composition of the secondary structure (α-helix, β-sheet, random, and residual conformations also showed a large variability depending on absorbed dose as well as postexposure time. The most stable secondary structure was observed in nonirradiated wool but even this showed a small but observable change after a longer time, too.

  8. Testing the structure of earthquake networks from multivariate time series of successive main shocks in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorozoglou, D.; Kugiumtzis, D.; Papadimitriou, E.

    2018-06-01

    The seismic hazard assessment in the area of Greece is attempted by studying the earthquake network structure, such as small-world and random. In this network, a node represents a seismic zone in the study area and a connection between two nodes is given by the correlation of the seismic activity of two zones. To investigate the network structure, and particularly the small-world property, the earthquake correlation network is compared with randomized ones. Simulations on multivariate time series of different length and number of variables show that for the construction of randomized networks the method randomizing the time series performs better than methods randomizing directly the original network connections. Based on the appropriate randomization method, the network approach is applied to time series of earthquakes that occurred between main shocks in the territory of Greece spanning the period 1999-2015. The characterization of networks on sliding time windows revealed that small-world structure emerges in the last time interval, shortly before the main shock.

  9. Flexible structure control experiments using a real-time workstation for computer-aided control engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieber, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    A Real-Time Workstation for Computer-Aided Control Engineering has been developed jointly by the Communications Research Centre (CRC) and Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (RUB), West Germany. The system is presently used for the development and experimental verification of control techniques for large space systems with significant structural flexibility. The Real-Time Workstation essentially is an implementation of RUB's extensive Computer-Aided Control Engineering package KEDDC on an INTEL micro-computer running under the RMS real-time operating system. The portable system supports system identification, analysis, control design and simulation, as well as the immediate implementation and test of control systems. The Real-Time Workstation is currently being used by CRC to study control/structure interaction on a ground-based structure called DAISY, whose design was inspired by a reflector antenna. DAISY emulates the dynamics of a large flexible spacecraft with the following characteristics: rigid body modes, many clustered vibration modes with low frequencies and extremely low damping. The Real-Time Workstation was found to be a very powerful tool for experimental studies, supporting control design and simulation, and conducting and evaluating tests withn one integrated environment.

  10. GOOD AND EVIL AS VECTORS OF FREE WILL IN THE STRUCTURE OF ANTHROPIC TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Khanzhy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The work is aimed at comprehending good and evil as vectors of free will in the structure of anthropic time. Methodology. The study is based on: 1 the general theory of systems (A. I. Uyomov, A. Yu. Tsofnas, L. N. Terentyeva – while justifying the possibility of representing the anthropic time as a system in general; 2 synergetics – while considering the anthropic time as a complex self-organizing system; 3 the concept of «а whole in a whole» (I. V. Yershova-Babenko – while identifying the optimal principle of correlation of the time units, taking into attention their ethical multi-vectority. Originality. In the context of the reconstruction of the concept of anthropic time: 1 the authors revealed ethical vectors of expansion of free will as the driving principle of human temporality (the vectors of «freedom for good» and «freedom for evil»; 2 the authors justified the optimality of using the principle of complementarity in solving the problem of harmonizing the coexistence of units of anthropic time («matryoshkas of time». Conclusion. 1 In a line with the tradition of anthropologization of the problem of good and evil, these intentions of human activity are interpreted as vectors of free will in the structure of anthropic time; 2 the paper represented anthropic time as a system in general (based on the general theory of systems and as a complex self-organizing system in particular (based on a synergetic methodology; 3 constituting of the system of anthropic time by the existential-actionable concept allowed to overcome the position of the one-vectored time, i.e.to reveal the ethical binarity of the anthropic time vectors prepared by the duality of expansion of free will as its driving principle; 4 formulation of the problem of discrepancy between the intentions of different temporal systems showed the optimality of the complementarity principle in solving the question how to harmonize the relations of anthropic time

  11. Applications of hybrid time-frequency methods in nonlinear structural dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Politopoulos, I.; Piteau, Ph.; Borsoi, L.; Antunes, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study on methods which may be used to compute the nonlinear response of systems whose linear properties are determined in the frequency or Laplace domain. Typically, this kind of situation may arise in soil-structure and fluid-structure interaction problems. In particular three methods are investigated: (a) the hybrid time-frequency method, (b) the computation of the convolution integral which requires an inverse Fourier or Laplace transform of the system's transfer function, and (c) the identification of an equivalent system defined in the time domain which may be solved with classical time integration methods. These methods are illustrated by their application to some simple, one degree of freedom, non-linear systems and their advantages and drawbacks are highlighted. (authors)

  12. Structural and Optical Properties of Chemical Bath Deposited Silver Oxide Thin Films: Role of Deposition Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Nwanya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver oxide thin films were deposited on glass substrates at a temperature of 50°C by chemical bath deposition technique under different deposition times using pure AgNO3 precursor and triethanolamine as the complexing agent. The chemical analysis based on EDX technique shows the presence of Ag and O at the appropriate energy levels. The morphological features obtained from SEM showed that the AgxO structures varied as the deposition time changes. The X-ray diffraction showed the peaks of Ag2O and AgO in the structure. The direct band gap and the refractive index increased as the deposition time increased and was in the range of 1.64–1.95 eV and 1.02–2.07, respectively. The values of the band gap and refractive index obtained indicate possible applications in photovoltaic and photothermal systems.

  13. Modelling Conditional and Unconditional Heteroskedasticity with Smoothly Time-Varying Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amado, Christina; Teräsvirta, Timo

    multiplier type misspecification tests. Finite-sample properties of these procedures and tests are examined by simulation. An empirical application to daily stock returns and another one to daily exchange rate returns illustrate the functioning and properties of our modelling strategy in practice......In this paper, we propose two parametric alternatives to the standard GARCH model. They allow the conditional variance to have a smooth time-varying structure of either ad- ditive or multiplicative type. The suggested parameterizations describe both nonlinearity and structural change...... in the conditional and unconditional variances where the transition between regimes over time is smooth. A modelling strategy for these new time-varying parameter GARCH models is developed. It relies on a sequence of Lagrange multiplier tests, and the adequacy of the estimated models is investigated by Lagrange...

  14. Computer modelling of structures with account of the construction stages and the time dependent material properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traykov Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical studies are performed on computer models taking into account the stages of construction and time dependent material properties defined in two forms. A 2D model of three storey two spans frame is created. The first form deals with material defined in the usual design practice way - without taking into account the time dependent properties of the concrete. The second form creep and shrinkage of the concrete are taken into account. Displacements and internal forces in specific elements and sections are reported. The influence of the time dependent material properties on the displacement and the internal forces in the main structural elements is tracked down. The results corresponding to the two forms of material definition are compared together as well as with the results obtained by the usual design calculations. Conclusions on the influence of the concrete creep and shrinkage during the construction towards structural behaviour are made.

  15. Phase-shifting Real-time Holographic Microscopy applied in micro-structures surface analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, I V; Gesualdi, M R R; Muramatsu, M; Ricardo, J

    2011-01-01

    The microscopic real-time analysis of micro structured materials is of great importance in various domains of science and technology. For other hand, the holographic interferometry comprises a group of powerful optical methods for non-destructive testing in surface analysis. The holographic microscopy uses the holographic interferometric techniques to obtain quantitative intensity and phase information of the optical waves by microscopic systems. With the development of CCD cameras, computers (hardware and software), and new materials for holographic recording, these techniques can be used to replace the classical form of registration and became promising tools in surface analysis. In this work, we developed a prototype of Photorefractive and Digital Holographic Microscope for real-time analysis of micro-structured systems based on the phase-shifting real-time holographic interferometry techniques. Using this apparatus, we are made analysis of shapes and surfaces to obtain the phase maps and the 3D profiles of some samples.

  16. Time synchronization of a wired sensor network for structural health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Ken-ichiro; Mita, Akira

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces a time synchronization system for wired smart sensor networks to be applied to the structural health monitoring of gigantic structures. The jitter of sensor nodes in the wired network depends on the wire length between the origin and the destination of the time synchronization signals. The proposed system can theoretically achieve the accuracy to limit the jitter of sensors within 34 ns by adjusting the timing depending on the wire length, and experimentally showed the jitter of 190 m separation to be within 25 ns. The proposed system uses local area network (LAN) cables and does not require additional cabling for synchronization. Thus the proposed synchronization system can be embedded in the sensor network with minimal cost

  17. Multiscale Poincaré plots for visualizing the structure of heartbeat time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Teresa S; Mariani, Sara; Burykin, Anton; Rodrigues, Filipa; Silva, Tiago F; Goldberger, Ary L

    2016-02-09

    Poincaré delay maps are widely used in the analysis of cardiac interbeat interval (RR) dynamics. To facilitate visualization of the structure of these time series, we introduce multiscale Poincaré (MSP) plots. Starting with the original RR time series, the method employs a coarse-graining procedure to create a family of time series, each of which represents the system's dynamics in a different time scale. Next, the Poincaré plots are constructed for the original and the coarse-grained time series. Finally, as an optional adjunct, color can be added to each point to represent its normalized frequency. We illustrate the MSP method on simulated Gaussian white and 1/f noise time series. The MSP plots of 1/f noise time series reveal relative conservation of the phase space area over multiple time scales, while those of white noise show a marked reduction in area. We also show how MSP plots can be used to illustrate the loss of complexity when heartbeat time series from healthy subjects are compared with those from patients with chronic (congestive) heart failure syndrome or with atrial fibrillation. This generalized multiscale approach to Poincaré plots may be useful in visualizing other types of time series.

  18. Nonlinear time-domain soil–structure interaction analysis of embedded reactor structures subjected to earthquake loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solberg, Jerome M., E-mail: solberg2@llnl.gov [Methods Development Group, Lawrence Livermore Nat’l Lab, P.O. Box 808, Mailstop L-125, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Hossain, Quazi, E-mail: hossain1@llnl.gov [Structural and Applied Mechanics Group, Lawrence Livermore Nat’l Lab, P.O. Box 808, Mailstop L-129, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Mseis, George, E-mail: george.mseis@gmail.com [Structural and Applied Mechanics Group, Lawrence Livermore Nat’l Lab, P.O. Box 808, Mailstop L-129, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Highlights: • Derived modified version of Bielak’s SSI method for nonlinear time-domain analysis. • Utilized a Ramberg–Osgood material with parameters that can be fit to EPRI data. • Matched vertically propagating shear wave results from CARES. • Applied this technique to a representative SMR, compared well with SASSI. • The technique is extensible to other material models and nonlinear effects. - Abstract: A generalized time-domain method for soil–structure interaction analysis is developed, based upon an extension of the work of the domain reduction method of Bielak et al. The methodology is combined with the use of a simple hysteretic soil model based upon the Ramberg–Osgood formulation and applied to a notional Small Modular Reactor. These benchmark results compare well (with some caveats) with those obtained by using the industry-standard frequency-domain code SASSI. The methodology provides a path forward for investigation of other sources of nonlinearity, including those associated with the use of more physically-realistic material models incorporating pore-pressure effects, gap opening/closing, the effect of nonlinear structural elements, and 3D seismic inputs.

  19. Time-Sliced Perturbation Theory for Large Scale Structure I: General Formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Blas, Diego; Ivanov, Mikhail M.; Sibiryakov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We present a new analytic approach to describe large scale structure formation in the mildly non-linear regime. The central object of the method is the time-dependent probability distribution function generating correlators of the cosmological observables at a given moment of time. Expanding the distribution function around the Gaussian weight we formulate a perturbative technique to calculate non-linear corrections to cosmological correlators, similar to the diagrammatic expansion in a three-dimensional Euclidean quantum field theory, with time playing the role of an external parameter. For the physically relevant case of cold dark matter in an Einstein--de Sitter universe, the time evolution of the distribution function can be found exactly and is encapsulated by a time-dependent coupling constant controlling the perturbative expansion. We show that all building blocks of the expansion are free from spurious infrared enhanced contributions that plague the standard cosmological perturbation theory. This pave...

  20. Influence of container structures and content solutions on dispensing time of ophthalmic solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Yoshikawa

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Keiji Yoshikawa1, Hiroshi Yamada21Yoshikawa Eye Clinic, Tokyo, Japan; 2Santen Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Osaka, JapanPurpose: To investigate the influence of container structures and content solutions on the time of dispensing from eye dropper bottles.Methods: Eye dropper bottle models, solution models (filtrate water/surfactant solution and a dispensing time measuring apparatus were prepared to measure the dispensing time.Results: With filtrate water and pressure thrust load of 0.3 MPa, the dispensing time significantly increased from 1.1 ± 0.5 seconds to 4.6 ± 1.1 seconds depending on the decrease of inner aperture diameters from 0.4 mm to 0.2 mm (P < 0.0001. When using the bottle models with inner aperture diameters of 0.4 mm or larger, the dispensing time became constant. The dispensing time using surfactant solution showed the same tendency as above. When pressure thrust load was large (0.07 MPa, the solution flew out continuously with inner aperture diameters of 0.4 mm or larger and the dispensing time could not be measured. The inner aperture diameter most strongly explained the variation of the dispensing time in both the content solutions in the multiple linear regression analysis (filtrate water: 46%, R2 = 0.462, surfactant solution: 56%, R2 = 0.563.Conclusions: Among content solutions and container structures, the dispensing time was mostly influenced by the diameter of the inner aperture of bottles.Keywords: dispensing time, model eye dropper bottle, model ophthalmic solution, nozzle internal space volume, nozzle inner aperture diameter

  1. A near-infrared, optical, and ultraviolet polarimetric and timing investigation of complex equatorial dusty structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, F.; Rojas Lobos, P. A.; Hameury, J. M.; Goosmann, R. W.

    2018-05-01

    Context. From stars to active galactic nuclei, many astrophysical systems are surrounded by an equatorial distribution of dusty material that is, in a number of cases, spatially unresolved even with cutting edge facilities. Aims: In this paper, we investigate if and how one can determine the unresolved and heterogeneous morphology of dust distribution around a central bright source using time-resolved polarimetric observations. Methods: We used polarized radiative transfer simulations to study a sample of circumnuclear dusty morphologies. We explored a grid of geometrically variable models that are uniform, fragmented, and density stratified in the near-infrared, optical, and ultraviolet bands, and we present their distinctive time-dependent polarimetric signatures. Results: As expected, varying the structure of the obscuring equatorial disk has a deep impact on the inclination-dependent flux, polarization degree and angle, and time lags we observe. We find that stratified media are distinguishable by time-resolved polarimetric observations, and that the expected polarization is much higher in the infrared band than in the ultraviolet. However, because of the physical scales imposed by dust sublimation, the average time lags of months to years between the total and polarized fluxes are important; these time lags lengthens the observational campaigns necessary to break more sophisticated, and therefore also more degenerated, models. In the ultraviolet band, time lags are slightly shorter than in the infrared or optical bands, and, coupled to lower diluting starlight fluxes, time-resolved polarimetry in the UV appears more promising for future campaigns. Conclusions: Equatorial dusty disks differ in terms of inclination-dependent photometric, polarimetric, and timing observables, but only the coupling of these different markers can lead to inclination-independent constraints on the unresolved structures. Even though it is complex and time consuming, polarized

  2. Real-time strategy video game experience and structural connectivity - A diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Natalia; Shi, Feng; Magnuski, Mikolaj; Skorko, Maciek; Dobrowolski, Pawel; Kossowski, Bartosz; Marchewka, Artur; Bielecki, Maksymilian; Kossut, Malgorzata; Brzezicka, Aneta

    2018-06-20

    Experienced video game players exhibit superior performance in visuospatial cognition when compared to non-players. However, very little is known about the relation between video game experience and structural brain plasticity. To address this issue, a direct comparison of the white matter brain structure in RTS (real time strategy) video game players (VGPs) and non-players (NVGPs) was performed. We hypothesized that RTS experience can enhance connectivity within and between occipital and parietal regions, as these regions are likely to be involved in the spatial and visual abilities that are trained while playing RTS games. The possible influence of long-term RTS game play experience on brain structural connections was investigated using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and a region of interest (ROI) approach in order to describe the experience-related plasticity of white matter. Our results revealed significantly more total white matter connections between occipital and parietal areas and within occipital areas in RTS players compared to NVGPs. Additionally, the RTS group had an altered topological organization of their structural network, expressed in local efficiency within the occipito-parietal subnetwork. Furthermore, the positive association between network metrics and time spent playing RTS games suggests a close relationship between extensive, long-term RTS game play and neuroplastic changes. These results indicate that long-term and extensive RTS game experience induces alterations along axons that link structures of the occipito-parietal loop involved in spatial and visual processing. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Spike Train Auto-Structure Impacts Post-Synaptic Firing and Timing-Based Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Bertram; Castellano, Marta; Vicente, Raul; Pipa, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Cortical neurons are typically driven by several thousand synapses. The precise spatiotemporal pattern formed by these inputs can modulate the response of a post-synaptic cell. In this work, we explore how the temporal structure of pre-synaptic inhibitory and excitatory inputs impact the post-synaptic firing of a conductance-based integrate and fire neuron. Both the excitatory and inhibitory input was modeled by renewal gamma processes with varying shape factors for modeling regular and temporally random Poisson activity. We demonstrate that the temporal structure of mutually independent inputs affects the post-synaptic firing, while the strength of the effect depends on the firing rates of both the excitatory and inhibitory inputs. In a second step, we explore the effect of temporal structure of mutually independent inputs on a simple version of Hebbian learning, i.e., hard bound spike-timing-dependent plasticity. We explore both the equilibrium weight distribution and the speed of the transient weight dynamics for different mutually independent gamma processes. We find that both the equilibrium distribution of the synaptic weights and the speed of synaptic changes are modulated by the temporal structure of the input. Finally, we highlight that the sensitivity of both the post-synaptic firing as well as the spike-timing-dependent plasticity on the auto-structure of the input of a neuron could be used to modulate the learning rate of synaptic modification. PMID:22203800

  4. Influence of reaction time on the structure of polyaniline synthesized on a pre-pilot scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alice Carvalho Mazzeu

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this work is to follow the structural variations of polyaniline (PAni obtained by chemical oxidation on a pre-pilot scale, with different reaction times. Synthesis of PAni is well known, but when it is carried out on a pre-pilot scale, several factors can lead to structural changes and understanding these changes is important to improve controls on the synthesis process. The polymers formed were characterized by spectroscopic techniques (Raman spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared - FTIR and UV-Visible. Degree of oxidation and yield were calculated for each reaction time. The analysis by FTIR, the calculated degree of oxidation and the yield showed significant changes in polymer structure at reaction times of 65 and 80 min. This result was attributed to the excessive oxidation of PAni, with the breaking of its polymer chain. The changes observed in the structure of PAni gave subsidies to the optimization of the process of obtaining polyaniline by chemical synthesis.

  5. Mean first passage time for random walk on dual structure of dendrimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Guan, Jihong; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2014-12-01

    The random walk approach has recently been widely employed to study the relations between the underlying structure and dynamic of complex systems. The mean first-passage time (MFPT) for random walks is a key index to evaluate the transport efficiency in a given system. In this paper we study analytically the MFPT in a dual structure of dendrimer network, Husimi cactus, which has different application background and different structure (contains loops) from dendrimer. By making use of the iterative construction, we explicitly determine both the partial mean first-passage time (PMFT, the average of MFPTs to a given target) and the global mean first-passage time (GMFT, the average of MFPTs over all couples of nodes) on Husimi cactus. The obtained closed-form results show that PMFPT and EMFPT follow different scaling with the network order, suggesting that the target location has essential influence on the transport efficiency. Finally, the impact that loop structure could bring is analyzed and discussed.

  6. Nonlinear Time Domain Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) Deep Soil Site Methodology Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, Robert Edward; Coleman, Justin Leigh

    2015-01-01

    Currently the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear industry perform seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis using equivalent linear numerical analysis tools. For lower levels of ground motion, these tools should produce reasonable in-structure response values for evaluation of existing and new facilities. For larger levels of ground motion these tools likely overestimate the in-structure response (and therefore structural demand) since they do not consider geometric nonlinearities (such as gaping and sliding between the soil and structure) and are limited in the ability to model nonlinear soil behavior. The current equivalent linear SSI (SASSI) analysis approach either joins the soil and structure together in both tension and compression or releases the soil from the structure for both tension and compression. It also makes linear approximations for material nonlinearities and generalizes energy absorption with viscous damping. This produces the potential for inaccurately establishing where the structural concerns exist and/or inaccurately establishing the amplitude of the in-structure responses. Seismic hazard curves at nuclear facilities have continued to increase over the years as more information has been developed on seismic sources (i.e. faults), additional information gathered on seismic events, and additional research performed to determine local site effects. Seismic hazard curves are used to develop design basis earthquakes (DBE) that are used to evaluate nuclear facility response. As the seismic hazard curves increase, the input ground motions (DBE's) used to numerically evaluation nuclear facility response increase causing larger in-structure response. As ground motions increase so does the importance of including nonlinear effects in numerical SSI models. To include material nonlinearity in the soil and geometric nonlinearity using contact (gaping and sliding) it is necessary to develop a nonlinear time domain methodology. This

  7. Tunable elastic parity-time symmetric structure based on the shunted piezoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhilin; Assouar, Badreddine

    2018-02-01

    We theoretically and numerically report on the tunable elastic Parity-Time (PT) symmetric structure based on shunted piezoelectric units. We show that the elastic loss and gain can be archived in piezoelectric materials when they are shunted by external circuits containing positive and negative resistances. We present and discuss, as an example, the strongly dependent relationship between the exceptional points of a three-layered system and the impedance of their external shunted circuit. The achieved results evidence that the PT symmetric structures based on this proposed concept can actively be tuned without any change of their geometric configurations.

  8. Discrete integration of continuous Kalman filtering equations for time invariant second-order structural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K. C.; Belvin, W. Keith

    1990-01-01

    A general form for the first-order representation of the continuous second-order linear structural-dynamics equations is introduced to derive a corresponding form of first-order continuous Kalman filtering equations. Time integration of the resulting equations is carried out via a set of linear multistep integration formulas. It is shown that a judicious combined selection of computational paths and the undetermined matrices introduced in the general form of the first-order linear structural systems leads to a class of second-order discrete Kalman filtering equations involving only symmetric sparse N x N solution matrices.

  9. Time-domain soil-structure interaction analysis of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, Justin L.; Bolisetti, Chandrakanth; Whittaker, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulation 10 CFR Part 50 Appendix S requires consideration of soil-structure interaction (SSI) in nuclear power plant (NPP) analysis and design. Soil-structure interaction analysis for NPPs is routinely carried out using guidance provided in the ASCE Standard 4-98 titled “Seismic Analysis of Safety-Related Nuclear Structures and Commentary”. This Standard, which is currently under revision, provides guidance on linear seismic soil-structure-interaction (SSI) analysis of nuclear facilities using deterministic and probabilistic methods. A new appendix has been added to the forthcoming edition of ASCE Standard 4 to provide guidance for time-domain, nonlinear SSI (NLSSI) analysis. Nonlinear SSI analysis will be needed to simulate material nonlinearity in soil and/or structure, static and dynamic soil pressure effects on deeply embedded structures, local soil failure at the foundation-soil interface, nonlinear coupling of soil and pore fluid, uplift or sliding of the foundation, nonlinear effects of gaps between the surrounding soil and the embedded structure and seismic isolation systems, none of which can be addressed explicitly at present. Appendix B of ASCE Standard 4 provides general guidance for NLSSI analysis but will not provide a methodology for performing the analysis. This paper provides a description of an NLSSI methodology developed for application to nuclear facilities, including NPPs. This methodology is described as series of sequential steps to produce reasonable results using any time-domain numerical code. These steps require some numerical capabilities, such as nonlinear soil constitutive models, which are also described in the paper.

  10. Near Real Time Structural Health Monitoring with Multiple Sensors in a Cloud Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Y.; Todd, M.; Kuester, F.; Goldberg, D.; Lo, E.; Maher, R.

    2017-12-01

    A repeated near real time 3-D digital surrogate representation of critical engineered structures can be used to provide actionable data on subtle time-varying displacements in support of disaster resiliency. We describe a damage monitoring system of optimally-integrated complementary sensors, including Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers coupled with the GNSS (seismogeodesy), light multi-rotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) equipped with high-resolution digital cameras and GNSS/IMU, and ground-based Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR). The seismogeodetic system provides point measurements of static and dynamic displacements and seismic velocities of the structure. The GNSS ties the UAV and LIDAR imagery to an absolute reference frame with respect to survey stations in the vicinity of the structure to isolate the building response to ground motions. The GNSS/IMU can also estimate the trajectory of the UAV with respect to the absolute reference frame. With these constraints, multiple UAVs and LIDAR images can provide 4-D displacements of thousands of points on the structure. The UAV systematically circumnavigates the target structure, collecting high-resolution image data, while the ground LIDAR scans the structure from different perspectives to create a detailed baseline 3-D reference model. UAV- and LIDAR-based imaging can subsequently be repeated after extreme events, or after long time intervals, to assess before and after conditions. The unique challenge is that disaster environments are often highly dynamic, resulting in rapidly evolving, spatio-temporal data assets with the need for near real time access to the available data and the tools to translate these data into decisions. The seismogeodetic analysis has already been demonstrated in the NASA AIST Managed Cloud Environment (AMCE) designed to manage large NASA Earth Observation data projects on Amazon Web Services (AWS). The Cloud provides

  11. Time-Resolved Soft X-ray Diffraction Reveals Transient Structural Distortions of Ternary Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Mann

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Home-based soft X-ray time-resolved scattering experiments with nanosecond time resolution (10 ns and nanometer spatial resolution were carried out at a table top soft X-ray plasma source (2.2–5.2 nm. The investigated system was the lyotropic liquid crystal C16E7/paraffin/glycerol/formamide/IR 5. Usually, major changes in physical, chemical, and/or optical properties of the sample occur as a result of structural changes and shrinking morphology. Here, these effects occur as a consequence of the energy absorption in the sample upon optical laser excitation in the IR regime. The liquid crystal shows changes in the structural response within few hundred nanoseconds showing a time decay of 182 ns. A decrease of the Bragg peak diffracted intensity of 30% and a coherent macroscopic movement of the Bragg reflection are found as a response to the optical pump. The Bragg reflection movement is established to be isotropic and diffusion controlled (1 μs. Structural processes are analyzed in the Patterson analysis framework of the time-varying diffraction peaks revealing that the inter-lamellar distance increases by 2.7 Å resulting in an elongation of the coherently expanding lamella crystallite. The present studies emphasize the possibility of applying TR-SXRD techniques for studying the mechanical dynamics of nanosystems.

  12. Using time series structural characteristics to analyze grain prices in food insecure countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Frank; Funk, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Two components of food security monitoring are accurate forecasts of local grain prices and the ability to identify unusual price behavior. We evaluated a method that can both facilitate forecasts of cross-country grain price data and identify dissimilarities in price behavior across multiple markets. This method, characteristic based clustering (CBC), identifies similarities in multiple time series based on structural characteristics in the data. Here, we conducted a simulation experiment to determine if CBC can be used to improve the accuracy of maize price forecasts. We then compared forecast accuracies among clustered and non-clustered price series over a rolling time horizon. We found that the accuracy of forecasts on clusters of time series were equal to or worse than forecasts based on individual time series. However, in the following experiment we found that CBC was still useful for price analysis. We used the clusters to explore the similarity of price behavior among Kenyan maize markets. We found that price behavior in the isolated markets of Mandera and Marsabit has become increasingly dissimilar from markets in other Kenyan cities, and that these dissimilarities could not be explained solely by geographic distance. The structural isolation of Mandera and Marsabit that we find in this paper is supported by field studies on food security and market integration in Kenya. Our results suggest that a market with a unique price series (as measured by structural characteristics that differ from neighboring markets) may lack market integration and food security.

  13. Tracking the Reorganization of Module Structure in Time-Varying Weighted Brain Functional Connectivity Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christoph; Piper, Diana; Pester, Britta; Mierau, Andreas; Witte, Herbert

    2018-05-01

    Identification of module structure in brain functional networks is a promising way to obtain novel insights into neural information processing, as modules correspond to delineated brain regions in which interactions are strongly increased. Tracking of network modules in time-varying brain functional networks is not yet commonly considered in neuroscience despite its potential for gaining an understanding of the time evolution of functional interaction patterns and associated changing degrees of functional segregation and integration. We introduce a general computational framework for extracting consensus partitions from defined time windows in sequences of weighted directed edge-complete networks and show how the temporal reorganization of the module structure can be tracked and visualized. Part of the framework is a new approach for computing edge weight thresholds for individual networks based on multiobjective optimization of module structure quality criteria as well as an approach for matching modules across time steps. By testing our framework using synthetic network sequences and applying it to brain functional networks computed from electroencephalographic recordings of healthy subjects that were exposed to a major balance perturbation, we demonstrate the framework's potential for gaining meaningful insights into dynamic brain function in the form of evolving network modules. The precise chronology of the neural processing inferred with our framework and its interpretation helps to improve the currently incomplete understanding of the cortical contribution for the compensation of such balance perturbations.

  14. The Seismic Reliability of Offshore Structures Based on Nonlinear Time History Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Mahmood; Karimiyani, Somayyeh; Ghafooripour, Amin; Jabbarzadeh, Mohammad Javad

    2008-01-01

    Regarding the past earthquakes damages to offshore structures, as vital structures in the oil and gas industries, it is important that their seismic design is performed by very high reliability. Accepting the Nonlinear Time History Analyses (NLTHA) as the most reliable seismic analysis method, in this paper an offshore platform of jacket type with the height of 304 feet, having a deck of 96 feet by 94 feet, and weighing 290 million pounds has been studied. At first, some Push-Over Analyses (POA) have been preformed to recognize the more critical members of the jacket, based on the range of their plastic deformations. Then NLTHA have been performed by using the 3-components accelerograms of 100 earthquakes, covering a wide range of frequency content, and normalized to three Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) levels of 0.3 g, 0.65 g, and 1.0 g. By using the results of NLTHA the damage and rupture probabilities of critical member have been studied to assess the reliability of the jacket structure. Regarding that different structural members of the jacket have different effects on the stability of the platform, an ''importance factor'' has been considered for each critical member based on its location and orientation in the structure, and then the reliability of the whole structure has been obtained by combining the reliability of the critical members, each having its specific importance factor

  15. Temporal variation in bat-fruit interactions: Foraging strategies influence network structure over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Mesa, Natalya; Montoya-Bustamante, Sebastián; Murillo-García, Oscar E.

    2017-11-01

    Mutualistic interactions, such as seed dispersal, are important for the maintenance of structure and stability of tropical communities. However, there is a lack of information about spatial and temporal variation in plant-animal interaction networks. Thus, our goal was to assess the effect of bat's foraging strategies on temporal variation in the structure and robustness of bat-fruit networks in both a dry and a rain tropical forest. We evaluated monthly variation in bat-fruit networks by using seven structure metrics: network size, average path length, nestedness, modularity, complementary specialization, normalized degree and betweenness centrality. Seed dispersal networks showed variations in size, species composition and modularity; did not present nested structures and their complementary specialization was high compared to other studies. Both networks presented short path lengths, and a constantly high robustness, despite their monthly variations. Sedentary bat species were recorded during all the study periods and occupied more central positions than nomadic species. We conclude that foraging strategies are important structuring factors that affect the dynamic of networks by determining the functional roles of frugivorous bats over time; thus sedentary bats are more important than nomadic species for the maintenance of the network structure, and their conservation is a must.

  16. Structure versus time in the evolutionary diversification of avian carotenoid metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Erin S; Badyaev, Alexander V

    2018-05-01

    Historical associations of genes and proteins are thought to delineate pathways available to subsequent evolution; however, the effects of past functional involvements on contemporary evolution are rarely quantified. Here, we examined the extent to which the structure of a carotenoid enzymatic network persists in avian evolution. Specifically, we tested whether the evolution of carotenoid networks was most concordant with phylogenetically structured expansion from core reactions of common ancestors or with subsampling of biochemical pathway modules from an ancestral network. We compared structural and historical associations in 467 carotenoid networks of extant and ancestral species and uncovered the overwhelming effect of pre-existing metabolic network structure on carotenoid diversification over the last 50 million years of avian evolution. Over evolutionary time, birds repeatedly subsampled and recombined conserved biochemical modules, which likely maintained the overall structure of the carotenoid metabolic network during avian evolution. These findings explain the recurrent convergence of evolutionary distant species in carotenoid metabolism and weak phylogenetic signal in avian carotenoid evolution. Remarkable retention of an ancient metabolic structure throughout extensive and prolonged ecological diversification in avian carotenoid metabolism illustrates a fundamental requirement of organismal evolution - historical continuity of a deterministic network that links past and present functional associations of its components. © 2018 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2018 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  17. Trend Estimation and Regression Analysis in Climatological Time Series: An Application of Structural Time Series Models and the Kalman Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, H.; Molenaar, J.

    1995-05-01

    The detection of trends in climatological data has become central to the discussion on climate change due to the enhanced greenhouse effect. To prove detection, a method is needed (i) to make inferences on significant rises or declines in trends, (ii) to take into account natural variability in climate series, and (iii) to compare output from GCMs with the trends in observed climate data. To meet these requirements, flexible mathematical tools are needed. A structural time series model is proposed with which a stochastic trend, a deterministic trend, and regression coefficients can be estimated simultaneously. The stochastic trend component is described using the class of ARIMA models. The regression component is assumed to be linear. However, the regression coefficients corresponding with the explanatory variables may be time dependent to validate this assumption. The mathematical technique used to estimate this trend-regression model is the Kaiman filter. The main features of the filter are discussed.Examples of trend estimation are given using annual mean temperatures at a single station in the Netherlands (1706-1990) and annual mean temperatures at Northern Hemisphere land stations (1851-1990). The inclusion of explanatory variables is shown by regressing the latter temperature series on four variables: Southern Oscillation index (SOI), volcanic dust index (VDI), sunspot numbers (SSN), and a simulated temperature signal, induced by increasing greenhouse gases (GHG). In all analyses, the influence of SSN on global temperatures is found to be negligible. The correlations between temperatures and SOI and VDI appear to be negative. For SOI, this correlation is significant, but for VDI it is not, probably because of a lack of volcanic eruptions during the sample period. The relation between temperatures and GHG is positive, which is in agreement with the hypothesis of a warming climate because of increasing levels of greenhouse gases. The prediction performance of

  18. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian structures in an integrable hierarchy and space–time duality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avan, Jean; Caudrelier, Vincent; Doikou, Anastasia; Kundu, Anjan

    2016-01-01

    We define and illustrate the novel notion of dual integrable hierarchies, on the example of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) hierarchy. For each integrable nonlinear evolution equation (NLEE) in the hierarchy, dual integrable structures are characterized by the fact that the zero-curvature representation of the NLEE can be realized by two Hamiltonian formulations stemming from two distinct choices of the configuration space, yielding two inequivalent Poisson structures on the corresponding phase space and two distinct Hamiltonians. This is fundamentally different from the standard bi-Hamiltonian or generally multitime structure. The first formulation chooses purely space-dependent fields as configuration space; it yields the standard Poisson structure for NLS. The other one is new: it chooses purely time-dependent fields as configuration space and yields a different Poisson structure at each level of the hierarchy. The corresponding NLEE becomes a space evolution equation. We emphasize the role of the Lagrangian formulation as a unifying framework for deriving both Poisson structures, using ideas from covariant field theory. One of our main results is to show that the two matrices of the Lax pair satisfy the same form of ultralocal Poisson algebra (up to a sign) characterized by an r-matrix structure, whereas traditionally only one of them is involved in the classical r-matrix method. We construct explicit dual hierarchies of Hamiltonians, and Lax representations of the triggered dynamics, from the monodromy matrices of either Lax matrix. An appealing procedure to build a multi-dimensional lattice of Lax pair, through successive uses of the dual Poisson structures, is briefly introduced.

  19. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian structures in an integrable hierarchy and space–time duality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avan, Jean, E-mail: Jean.Avan@u-cergy.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Modélisation (CNRS UMR 8089), Université de Cergy-Pontoise, F-95302 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Caudrelier, Vincent, E-mail: v.caudrelier@city.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, City University London, Northampton Square, EC1V 0HB London (United Kingdom); Doikou, Anastasia, E-mail: A.Doikou@hw.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, Heriot-Watt University, EH14 4AS, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Kundu, Anjan, E-mail: Anjan.Kundu@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Theory Division, Kolkata (India)

    2016-01-15

    We define and illustrate the novel notion of dual integrable hierarchies, on the example of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) hierarchy. For each integrable nonlinear evolution equation (NLEE) in the hierarchy, dual integrable structures are characterized by the fact that the zero-curvature representation of the NLEE can be realized by two Hamiltonian formulations stemming from two distinct choices of the configuration space, yielding two inequivalent Poisson structures on the corresponding phase space and two distinct Hamiltonians. This is fundamentally different from the standard bi-Hamiltonian or generally multitime structure. The first formulation chooses purely space-dependent fields as configuration space; it yields the standard Poisson structure for NLS. The other one is new: it chooses purely time-dependent fields as configuration space and yields a different Poisson structure at each level of the hierarchy. The corresponding NLEE becomes a space evolution equation. We emphasize the role of the Lagrangian formulation as a unifying framework for deriving both Poisson structures, using ideas from covariant field theory. One of our main results is to show that the two matrices of the Lax pair satisfy the same form of ultralocal Poisson algebra (up to a sign) characterized by an r-matrix structure, whereas traditionally only one of them is involved in the classical r-matrix method. We construct explicit dual hierarchies of Hamiltonians, and Lax representations of the triggered dynamics, from the monodromy matrices of either Lax matrix. An appealing procedure to build a multi-dimensional lattice of Lax pair, through successive uses of the dual Poisson structures, is briefly introduced.

  20. Modeling molecule-plasmon interactions using quantized radiation fields within time-dependent electronic structure theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Daniel R.; DePrince, A. Eugene, E-mail: deprince@chem.fsu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4390 (United States)

    2015-12-07

    We present a combined cavity quantum electrodynamics/ab initio electronic structure approach for simulating plasmon-molecule interactions in the time domain. The simple Jaynes-Cummings-type model Hamiltonian typically utilized in such simulations is replaced with one in which the molecular component of the coupled system is treated in a fully ab initio way, resulting in a computationally efficient description of general plasmon-molecule interactions. Mutual polarization effects are easily incorporated within a standard ground-state Hartree-Fock computation, and time-dependent simulations carry the same formal computational scaling as real-time time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory. As a proof of principle, we apply this generalized method to the emergence of a Fano-like resonance in coupled molecule-plasmon systems; this feature is quite sensitive to the nanoparticle-molecule separation and the orientation of the molecule relative to the polarization of the external electric field.

  1. Write/erase time of nanoseconds in quantum dot based memory structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowozin, Tobias; Marent, Andreas; Geller, Martin; Bimberg, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a novel charge-storage memory concept based on III-V semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) which has a number of fundamental advantages over conventional Si/SiO 2 floating gate memories (Flash): material-tunable and voltage-tunable barriers for improved intrinsic speed and/or storage time and high endurance. To investigate the potential of this new memory concept we have determined intrinsic write/erase times in memory structures based on InAs/GaAs and GaSb/GaAs QDs using capacitance-voltage spectroscopy. We measured a write time below 15 ns independent of the localization energy (i.e. the storage time) of the QDs. This write time is more than three orders of magnitude faster than in a Flash cell and already below the write time of a dynamic random access memory (DRAM). The erase time was determined to be 42 ns for InAs/GaAs QDs and 1.5 ms for GaSb/GaAs QDs for applied electric fields of 166 kV/cm and 206 kV/cm, respectively. From these results we derive an erase time of 1 ns in GaSb QDs for an electric field of 330 kV/cm

  2. Infrared absorption, multiphonon processes and time reversal effect on Si and Ge band structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunert, H.W.; Machatine, A.G.J.; Malherbe, J.B.; Barnas, J.; Hoffmann, A.; Wagner, M.R.

    2008-01-01

    We have examined the effect of Time Reversal Symmetry (TRS) on vibrational modes and on the electronic band structure of Si and Ge. Most of the primary non-interacting modes are not affected by TRS. Only phonons originating from high symmetry lines S and A of the Brillouin Zone (BZ) indicate extra degeneracy. Selection rules for some two and three phonons originating from high symmetry lines are determined. The states of electrons and holes described by electronic band structure due to spin-inclusion are assigned by spinor representations of the double space group. Inclusion of the TRS into the band structure results in extra degeneracy of electrons and holes, and therefore optical selection rules suppose to be modified

  3. The Time Structure of Hadronic Showers in Calorimeters with Scintillator and with Gas Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Szalay, Marco

    2015-02-13

    Hadronic showers are characterized by a rich particle structure in the spatial as well as in the time domain. The prompt component comes from relativistic fragments that deposit energy at the ns scale, while late components are associated predominantly with neutrons in the cascade. To measure the impact of these late components, two experiments, based on gaseous and plastic active layers with steel and tungsten absorbers, were set up. The different choice for the material of the active layers produces distinct responses to neutrons, and consequently to late energy depositions. After discussing the technical aspects of these systems, we present a comparison of the signals, read out with fast digitizers with deep buffers, and provide detailed information of the time structure of hadronic showers over a long sampling window.

  4. Implicit leadership theories in applied settings: factor structure, generalizability, and stability over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epitropaki, Olga; Martin, Robin

    2004-04-01

    The present empirical investigation had a 3-fold purpose: (a) to cross-validate L. R. Offermann, J. K. Kennedy, and P. W. Wirtz's (1994) scale of Implicit Leadership Theories (ILTs) in several organizational settings and to further provide a shorter scale of ILTs in organizations; (b) to assess the generalizability of ILTs across different employee groups, and (c) to evaluate ILTs' change over time. Two independent samples were used for the scale validation (N1 = 500 and N2 = 439). A 6-factor structure (Sensitivity, Intelligence, Dedication, Dynamism, Tyranny, and Masculinity) was found to most accurately represent ELTs in organizational settings. Regarding the generalizability of ILTs, although the 6-factor structure was consistent across different employee groups, there was only partial support for total factorial invariance. Finally, evaluation of gamma, beta, and alpha change provided support for ILTs' stability over time.

  5. An active robot vision system for real-time 3-D structure recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juvin, D. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Electronique et d`Instrumentation Nucleaire; Boukir, S.; Chaumette, F.; Bouthemy, P. [Rennes-1 Univ., 35 (France)

    1993-10-01

    This paper presents an active approach for the task of computing the 3-D structure of a nuclear plant environment from an image sequence, more precisely the recovery of the 3-D structure of cylindrical objects. Active vision is considered by computing adequate camera motions using image-based control laws. This approach requires a real-time tracking of the limbs of the cylinders. Therefore, an original matching approach, which relies on an algorithm for determining moving edges, is proposed. This method is distinguished by its robustness and its easiness to implement. This method has been implemented on a parallel image processing board and real-time performance has been achieved. The whole scheme has been successfully validated in an experimental set-up.

  6. Direct and real time probe of photoinduced structure transition in colossal magnetoresistive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Junjie [Physics Department, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Wang, Xuan [Institute of physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhou, Haidong [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Zhou, Jun; Cao, Jianming, E-mail: jcao@magnet.fsu.edu [Physics Department, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Cheng, J. G. [Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2016-07-25

    We report a direct and real time measurement of photoinduced structure phase transition in single crystal La{sub 0.84}Sr{sub 0.16}MnO{sub 3} using femtosecond electron diffraction. The melting of orthorhombic lattice ordering under femtosecond optical excitation is found involving two distinct processes with different time scales, an initial fast melting of orthorhombic phase in about 4 ps and a subsequent slower transformation in 90 ps and longer timescales. The fast process is designated as the initial melting of orthorhombic phase induced by the Mn-O bond change that is most likely driven by the quenching of the dynamic Jahn-Teller distortion following the photo-excitation. The slow process is attributed to the growing of newly formed structure domain from the photo-excited sites to the neighboring non-excited orthorhombic sites.

  7. An active robot vision system for real-time 3-D structure recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juvin, D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an active approach for the task of computing the 3-D structure of a nuclear plant environment from an image sequence, more precisely the recovery of the 3-D structure of cylindrical objects. Active vision is considered by computing adequate camera motions using image-based control laws. This approach requires a real-time tracking of the limbs of the cylinders. Therefore, an original matching approach, which relies on an algorithm for determining moving edges, is proposed. This method is distinguished by its robustness and its easiness to implement. This method has been implemented on a parallel image processing board and real-time performance has been achieved. The whole scheme has been successfully validated in an experimental set-up

  8. Effects of annealing time on the structure, morphology, and stress of gold–chromium bilayer film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hong; Wang Hu; Huang Hao-Peng; Jin Yun-Xia; Kong Fang-Yu; Cui Yun

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a 200-nm-thick gold film with a 10-nm-thick chromium layer used as an adhesive layer is fabricated on fused silica by the electron beam evaporation method. The effects of annealing time at 300 °C on the structure, morphology and stress of the film are studied. We find that chromium could diffuse to the surface of the film by formatting a solid solution with gold during annealing. Meanwhile, chromium is oxidized on the surface and diffused downward along the grain grooves in the gold film. The various operant mechanisms that change the residual stresses of gold films for different annealing times are discussed. (paper)

  9. The relations among child quality, family structure, and the value of the mother's time in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppel, K

    1982-10-01

    A model of the determinants of child quality and of the value of a woman's time is developed and tested using data from the Malaysian Family Life Survey of 1976-1977. Child quality is measured by educational attainment; factors influencing the value of the mother's time include size and age composition of household, family income, education, and hours worked. The results indicate that size and age composition of household affect a woman's asking wage. However, more data are needed before the effects of family structure on schooling can be measured with confidence.

  10. Time variation in the reaction-zone structure of two-phase spray detonations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, T. H.; Nicholls, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    A detailed theoretical analysis of the time-varying detonation structure in a monodisperse spray is presented. The theory identifies experimentally observed reaction-zone overpressures as deriving from blast waves formed therein by the explosive ignition of the spray droplets, and follows in time the motion, change in strength, and interactions of these blast waves with one another, and with the leading shock. The results are compared with experimental data by modeling the motion of a finite-size circular pressure transducer through the theoretical data field in an x-t space.

  11. Discrete-time Calogero-Moser system and Lagrangian 1-form structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo-Kong, Sikarin; Lobb, Sarah; Nijhoff, Frank

    2011-01-01

    We study the Lagrange formalism of the (rational) Calogero-Moser (CM) system, both in discrete time and continuous time, as a first example of a Lagrangian 1-form structure in the sense of the recent paper (Lobb and Nijhoff 2009 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor.42 454013). The discrete-time model of the CM system was established some time ago arising as a pole reduction of a semi-discrete version of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation, and was shown to lead to an exactly integrable correspondence (multivalued map). In this paper, we present the full KP solution based on the commutativity of the discrete-time flows in the two discrete KP variables. The compatibility of the corresponding Lax matrices is shown to lead directly to the relevant closure relation on the level of the Lagrangians. Performing successive continuum limits on both the level of the KP equation and the level of the CM system, we establish the proper Lagrangian 1-form structure for the continuum case of the CM model. We use the example of the three-particle case to elucidate the implementation of the novel least-action principle, which was presented in Lobb and Nijhoff (2009), for the simpler case of Lagrangian 1-forms. (paper)

  12. Time-sliced perturbation theory for large scale structure I: general formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blas, Diego; Garny, Mathias; Sibiryakov, Sergey [Theory Division, CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Ivanov, Mikhail M., E-mail: diego.blas@cern.ch, E-mail: mathias.garny@cern.ch, E-mail: mikhail.ivanov@cern.ch, E-mail: sergey.sibiryakov@cern.ch [FSB/ITP/LPPC, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    We present a new analytic approach to describe large scale structure formation in the mildly non-linear regime. The central object of the method is the time-dependent probability distribution function generating correlators of the cosmological observables at a given moment of time. Expanding the distribution function around the Gaussian weight we formulate a perturbative technique to calculate non-linear corrections to cosmological correlators, similar to the diagrammatic expansion in a three-dimensional Euclidean quantum field theory, with time playing the role of an external parameter. For the physically relevant case of cold dark matter in an Einstein-de Sitter universe, the time evolution of the distribution function can be found exactly and is encapsulated by a time-dependent coupling constant controlling the perturbative expansion. We show that all building blocks of the expansion are free from spurious infrared enhanced contributions that plague the standard cosmological perturbation theory. This paves the way towards the systematic resummation of infrared effects in large scale structure formation. We also argue that the approach proposed here provides a natural framework to account for the influence of short-scale dynamics on larger scales along the lines of effective field theory.

  13. Seismic Monitoring To Assess Performance Of Structures In Near-Real Time: Recent Progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celebi, Mehmet

    2008-01-01

    Earlier papers have described how observed data from classical accelerometers deployed in structures or from differential GPS with high sampling ratios deployed at roofs of tall buildings can be configured to establish seismic health monitoring of structures. In these configurations, drift ratios 1 are the main parametric indicator of damage condition of a structure or component of a structure.Real-time measurement of displacements are acquired either by double integration of accelerometer time-series data, or by directly using GPS. Recorded sensor data is then related to the performance level of a building. Performance-based design method stipulates that for a building the amplitude of relative displacement of the roof of a building (with respect to its base) indicates its performance.Usually, drift ratio is computed using relative displacement between two consecutive floors. When accelerometers are used, a specific software is used to compute displacements and drift ratios in realtime by double integration of accelerometer data from several floors. However, GPS-measured relative displacements are limited to being acquired only at the roof with respect to its reference base. Thus, computed drift ratio is the average drift ratio for the whole building. Until recently, the validity of measurements using GPS was limited to long-period structures (T>1 s) because GPS systems readily available were limited to 10-20 samples per seconds (sps) capability. However, presently, up to 50 sps differential GPS systems are available on the market and have been successfully used to monitor drift ratios [1,2]--thus enabling future usefulness of GPS to all types of structures. Several levels of threshold drift ratios can be postulated in order to make decisions for inspections and/or occupancy.Experience with data acquired from both accelerometers and GPS deployments indicates that they are reliable and provide pragmatic alternatives to alert the owners and other authorized parties

  14. Time and Space Efficient Algorithms for Two-Party Authenticated Data Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamanthou, Charalampos; Tamassia, Roberto

    Authentication is increasingly relevant to data management. Data is being outsourced to untrusted servers and clients want to securely update and query their data. For example, in database outsourcing, a client's database is stored and maintained by an untrusted server. Also, in simple storage systems, clients can store very large amounts of data but at the same time, they want to assure their integrity when they retrieve them. In this paper, we present a model and protocol for two-party authentication of data structures. Namely, a client outsources its data structure and verifies that the answers to the queries have not been tampered with. We provide efficient algorithms to securely outsource a skip list with logarithmic time overhead at the server and client and logarithmic communication cost, thus providing an efficient authentication primitive for outsourced data, both structured (e.g., relational databases) and semi-structured (e.g., XML documents). In our technique, the client stores only a constant amount of space, which is optimal. Our two-party authentication framework can be deployed on top of existing storage applications, thus providing an efficient authentication service. Finally, we present experimental results that demonstrate the practical efficiency and scalability of our scheme.

  15. Identification of time-varying structural dynamic systems - An artificial intelligence approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, B. J.; Hanagud, S.

    1992-01-01

    An application of the artificial intelligence-derived methodologies of heuristic search and object-oriented programming to the problem of identifying the form of the model and the associated parameters of a time-varying structural dynamic system is presented in this paper. Possible model variations due to changes in boundary conditions or configurations of a structure are organized into a taxonomy of models, and a variant of best-first search is used to identify the model whose simulated response best matches that of the current physical structure. Simulated model responses are verified experimentally. An output-error approach is used in a discontinuous model space, and an equation-error approach is used in the parameter space. The advantages of the AI methods used, compared with conventional programming techniques for implementing knowledge structuring and inheritance, are discussed. Convergence conditions and example problems have been discussed. In the example problem, both the time-varying model and its new parameters have been identified when changes occur.

  16. Scaling of the first-passage time of biased diffusion on hierarchical comb structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Zhifang; Tao Ruibao.

    1989-12-01

    Biased diffusion on hierarchical comb structures is studied within an exact renormalization group scheme. The scaling exponents of the moments of the first-passage time for random walks are obtained. It is found that the scaling properties of the diffusion depend only on the direction of bias. In this particular case, the presence of bias may give rise to a new multifractality. (author). 7 refs, 2 figs

  17. Time-Varying Estimation of Crop Insurance Program in Altering North Dakota Farm Economic Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman, Jane A.; Shaik, Saleem

    2009-01-01

    This study examines how federal farm policies, specifically crop insurance, have affected the farm economic structure of North Dakota’s agriculture sector. The system of derived input demand equations is estimated to quantify the changes in North Dakota farmers’ input use when they purchase crop insurance. Further, the cumulative rolling regression technique is applied to capture the varying effects of the farm policies over time. Empirical results from the system of input demand functions in...

  18. rpsftm: An R package for rank preserving structural failure time models

    OpenAIRE

    Allison, A.; White, I. R.; Bond, S.

    2017-01-01

    Treatment switching in a randomised controlled trial occurs when participants change from their randomised treatment to the other trial treatment during the study. Failure to account for treatment switching in the analysis (i.e. by performing a standard intention-to-treat analysis) can lead to biased estimates of treatment efficacy. The rank preserving structural failure time model (RPSFTM) is a method used to adjust for treatment switching in trials with survival outcomes. The RPSFTM is due ...

  19. A finite element method for a time dependence soil-structure interactions calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, X.M.; Gantenbein, F.; Petit, M.

    1989-01-01

    The method which is proposed is based on a finite element modelisation for the soil and the structure and a time history calculation. It has been developed for plane and axisymmetric geometries. The principle of this method will be presented, then applications will be given, first to a linear calculation for which results will be compared to those obtained by standard methods. Then results for a non linear behavior will be described [fr

  20. Exploring space-time structure of human mobility in urban space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J. B.; Yuan, J.; Wang, Y.; Si, H. B.; Shan, X. M.

    2011-03-01

    Understanding of human mobility in urban space benefits the planning and provision of municipal facilities and services. Due to the high penetration of cell phones, mobile cellular networks provide information for urban dynamics with a large spatial extent and continuous temporal coverage in comparison with traditional approaches. The original data investigated in this paper were collected by cellular networks in a southern city of China, recording the population distribution by dividing the city into thousands of pixels. The space-time structure of urban dynamics is explored by applying Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to the original data, from temporal and spatial perspectives between which there is a dual relation. Based on the results of the analysis, we have discovered four underlying rules of urban dynamics: low intrinsic dimensionality, three categories of common patterns, dominance of periodic trends, and temporal stability. It implies that the space-time structure can be captured well by remarkably few temporal or spatial predictable periodic patterns, and the structure unearthed by PCA evolves stably over time. All these features play a critical role in the applications of forecasting and anomaly detection.

  1. The effect of time synchronization of wireless sensors on the modal analysis of structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, V; Sazonov, E; Fowler, K

    2008-01-01

    Driven by the need to reduce the installation cost and maintenance cost of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems, wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are becoming increasingly popular. Perfect time synchronization amongst the wireless sensors is a key factor enabling the use of low-cost, low-power WSNs for structural health monitoring applications based on output-only modal analysis of structures. In this paper we present a theoretical framework for analysis of the impact created by time delays in the measured system response on the reconstruction of mode shapes using the popular frequency domain decomposition (FDD) technique. This methodology directly estimates the change in mode shape values based on sensor synchronicity. We confirm the proposed theoretical model by experimental validation in modal identification experiments performed on an aluminum beam. The experimental validation was performed using a wireless intelligent sensor and actuator network (WISAN) which allows for close time synchronization between sensors (0.6–10 µs in the tested configuration) and guarantees lossless data delivery under normal conditions. The experimental results closely match theoretical predictions and show that even very small delays in output response impact the mode shapes

  2. Experimental and Empirical Time to Corrosion of Reinforced Concrete Structures under Different Curing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Abouhussien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete structures, especially those in marine environments, are commonly subjected to high concentrations of chlorides, which eventually leads to corrosion of the embedded reinforcing steel. The total time to corrosion of such structures may be divided into three stages: corrosion initiation, cracking, and damage periods. This paper evaluates, both empirically and experimentally, the expected time to corrosion of reinforced concrete structures. The tested reinforced concrete samples were subjected to ten alternative curing techniques, including hot, cold, and normal temperatures, prior to testing. The corrosion initiation, cracking, and damage periods in this investigation were experimentally monitored by an accelerated corrosion test performed on reinforced concrete samples. Alternatively, the corrosion initiation time for counterpart samples was empirically predicted using Fick’s second law of diffusion for comparison. The results showed that the corrosion initiation periods obtained experimentally were comparable to those obtained empirically. The corrosion initiation was found to occur at the first jump of the current measurement in the accelerated corrosion test which matched the half-cell potential reading of around −350 mV.

  3. Time-resolved pump-probe X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy of Gaq3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicke, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Gallium(tris-8-hydroxyquinoline) (Gaq 3 ) belongs to a class of metal organic compounds, used as electron transport layer and emissive layer in organic light emitting diodes. Many research activities have concentrated on the optical and electronic properties, especially of the homologue molecule aluminum(tris-8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq 3 ). Knowledge of the first excited state S 1 structure of these molecules could provide deeper insight into the processes involved into the operation of electronic devices, such as OLEDs and, hence, it could further improve their efficiency and optical properties. Until now the excited state structure could not be determined experimentally. Most of the information about this structure mainly arises from theoretical calculations. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy is a well developed technique to determine both, the electronic and the geometric properties of a sample. The connection of ultrashort pulsed X-ray sources with a pulsed laser system offers the possibility to use XAFS as a tool for studying the transient changes of a sample induced by a laser pulse. In the framework of this thesis a new setup for time-resolved pump-probe X-ray absorption spectroscopy at PETRA III beamline P11 was developed for measuring samples in liquid form. In this setup the sample is pumped into its photo-excited state by a femtosecond laser pump pulse with 343 nm wavelength and after a certain time delay probed by an X-ray probe pulse. In this way the first excited singlet state S 1 of Gaq 3 dissolved in benzyl alcohol was analyzed. A structural model for the excited state structure of the Gaq 3 molecule based on the several times reproduced results of the XAFS experiments is proposed. According to this model it was found that the Ga-N A bond length is elongated, while the Ga-O A bond length is shortened upon photoexcitation. The dynamics of the structural changes were not the focus of this thesis. Nevertheless the excited state lifetime

  4. Time profiles and pulse structure of bright, long gamma-ray bursts using BATSE TTS data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.; Bloom, E.; Scargle, J.

    1996-04-01

    The time profiles of many gamma-ray bursts observed by BATSE consist of distinct pulses, which offer the possibility of characterizing the temporal structure of these bursts using a relatively small set of pulse-shape parameters. This pulse analysis has previously been performed on some bright, long bursts using binned data, and on some short bursts using BATSE Time-Tagged Event (TTE) data. The BATSE Time- to-Spill (TTS) burst data records the times required to accumulate a fixed number of photons, giving variable time resolution. The spill times recorded in the TTS data behave as a gamma distribution. We have developed an interactive pulse-fitting program using the pulse model of Norris et al. and a maximum-likelihood fitting algorithm to the gamma distribution of the spill times. We then used this program to analyze a number of bright, long bursts for which TTS data is available. We present statistical information on the attributes of pulses comprising these bursts

  5. Uncertainty in Earthquake Source Imaging Due to Variations in Source Time Function and Earth Structure

    KAUST Repository

    Razafindrakoto, H. N. T.

    2014-03-25

    One way to improve the accuracy and reliability of kinematic earthquake source imaging is to investigate the origin of uncertainty and to minimize their effects. The difficulties in kinematic source inversion arise from the nonlinearity of the problem, nonunique choices in the parameterization, and observational errors. We analyze particularly the uncertainty related to the choice of the source time function (STF) and the variability in Earth structure. We consider a synthetic data set generated from a spontaneous dynamic rupture calculation. Using Bayesian inference, we map the solution space of peak slip rate, rupture time, and rise time to characterize the kinematic rupture in terms of posterior density functions. Our test to investigate the effect of the choice of STF reveals that all three tested STFs (isosceles triangle, regularized Yoffe with acceleration time of 0.1 and 0.3 s) retrieve the patch of high slip and slip rate around the hypocenter. However, the use of an isosceles triangle as STF artificially accelerates the rupture to propagate faster than the target solution. It additionally generates an artificial linear correlation between rupture onset time and rise time. These appear to compensate for the dynamic source effects that are not included in the symmetric triangular STF. The exact rise time for the tested STFs is difficult to resolve due to the small amount of radiated seismic moment in the tail of STF. To highlight the effect of Earth structure variability, we perform inversions including the uncertainty in the wavespeed only, and variability in both wavespeed and layer depth. We find that little difference is noticeable between the resulting rupture model uncertainties from these two parameterizations. Both significantly broaden the posterior densities and cause faster rupture propagation particularly near the hypocenter due to the major velocity change at the depth where the fault is located.

  6. Uncertainty in Earthquake Source Imaging Due to Variations in Source Time Function and Earth Structure

    KAUST Repository

    Razafindrakoto, H. N. T.; Mai, Paul Martin

    2014-01-01

    One way to improve the accuracy and reliability of kinematic earthquake source imaging is to investigate the origin of uncertainty and to minimize their effects. The difficulties in kinematic source inversion arise from the nonlinearity of the problem, nonunique choices in the parameterization, and observational errors. We analyze particularly the uncertainty related to the choice of the source time function (STF) and the variability in Earth structure. We consider a synthetic data set generated from a spontaneous dynamic rupture calculation. Using Bayesian inference, we map the solution space of peak slip rate, rupture time, and rise time to characterize the kinematic rupture in terms of posterior density functions. Our test to investigate the effect of the choice of STF reveals that all three tested STFs (isosceles triangle, regularized Yoffe with acceleration time of 0.1 and 0.3 s) retrieve the patch of high slip and slip rate around the hypocenter. However, the use of an isosceles triangle as STF artificially accelerates the rupture to propagate faster than the target solution. It additionally generates an artificial linear correlation between rupture onset time and rise time. These appear to compensate for the dynamic source effects that are not included in the symmetric triangular STF. The exact rise time for the tested STFs is difficult to resolve due to the small amount of radiated seismic moment in the tail of STF. To highlight the effect of Earth structure variability, we perform inversions including the uncertainty in the wavespeed only, and variability in both wavespeed and layer depth. We find that little difference is noticeable between the resulting rupture model uncertainties from these two parameterizations. Both significantly broaden the posterior densities and cause faster rupture propagation particularly near the hypocenter due to the major velocity change at the depth where the fault is located.

  7. Fathers' Involvement with Their Preschool-Age Children: How Fathers Spend Time with Their Children in Different Family Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halme, Nina; Astedt-Kurki, Paivi; Tarkka, Marja-Terttu

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how fathers (n = 263) spent time with their preschool-age children and to compare it in different family structures. Data were gathered by structured questionnaires. The instrument included five categories of variables for the time spent: the quantity of time, physical activities, fathers' attitude towards…

  8. The time structure of hadronic showers in calorimeters with gas and scintillator readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goecke, Philipp [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Collaboration: CALICE-D-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The focus of the CALICE collaboration is R and D of highly granular calorimeters. One of the possible applications is in a future TeV-scale linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider for precision SM studies and for direct and indirect the search of new physics. For the hadronic sampling calorimeters subsystem, several absorbers and active material technologies are being investigated. In this frame, two similar experiments have been conducted to study the time structure of hadronic showers: FastRPC uses resistive plate chambers technology for the active layers whereas T3B is based on scintillating tiles coupled to SiPMs. The high sampling frequency of the readout, coupled to deep memory buffers, allows to carefully investigate the intrinsic time structure of hadronic showers with its prompt and delayed components. This study presents a detailed GEANT4 Montecarlo simulation of the FastRPC and T3B setups. It is aimed to reproduce test beam data acquired at CERN SPS where the setups were installed after 5λ of instrumented tungsten-based calorimeter prototypes. The main focus of the simulation lies on the physical processes involved in the time development of an hadronic showers, to asses the discrepancy that emerged in data for the two setups in the intermediate time range of 10 - 50 ns of shower development that can be explained with the neutron interactions in the medium.

  9. Estimating evolutionary rates using time-structured data: a general comparison of phylogenetic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchêne, Sebastián; Geoghegan, Jemma L; Holmes, Edward C; Ho, Simon Y W

    2016-11-15

    In rapidly evolving pathogens, including viruses and some bacteria, genetic change can accumulate over short time-frames. Accordingly, their sampling times can be used to calibrate molecular clocks, allowing estimation of evolutionary rates. Methods for estimating rates from time-structured data vary in how they treat phylogenetic uncertainty and rate variation among lineages. We compiled 81 virus data sets and estimated nucleotide substitution rates using root-to-tip regression, least-squares dating and Bayesian inference. Although estimates from these three methods were often congruent, this largely relied on the choice of clock model. In particular, relaxed-clock models tended to produce higher rate estimates than methods that assume constant rates. Discrepancies in rate estimates were also associated with high among-lineage rate variation, and phylogenetic and temporal clustering. These results provide insights into the factors that affect the reliability of rate estimates from time-structured sequence data, emphasizing the importance of clock-model testing. sduchene@unimelb.edu.au or garzonsebastian@hotmail.comSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Impact localization on composite structures using time difference and MUSIC approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yongteng; Xiang, Jiawei

    2017-05-01

    1-D uniform linear array (ULA) has the shortcoming of the half-plane mirror effect, which does not allow discriminating between a target placed above the array and a target placed below the array. This paper presents time difference (TD) and multiple signal classification (MUSIC) based omni-directional impact localization on a large stiffened composite structure using improved linear array, which is able to perform omni-directional 360° localization. This array contains 2M+3 PZT sensors, where 2M+1 PZT sensors are arranged as a uniform linear array, and the other two PZT sensors are placed above and below the array. Firstly, the arrival times of impact signals observed by the other two sensors are determined using the wavelet transform. Compared with each other, the direction range of impact source can be decided in general, 0°to 180° or 180°to 360°. And then, two dimensional multiple signal classification (2D-MUSIC) based spatial spectrum formula using the uniform linear array is applied for impact localization by the general direction range. When the arrival times of impact signals observed by upper PZT is equal to that of lower PZT, the direction can be located in x axis (0°or 180°). And time difference based MUSIC method is present to locate impact position. To verify the proposed approach, the proposed approach is applied to a composite structure. The localization results are in good agreement with the actual impact occurring positions.

  11. Fast and non-destructive pore structure analysis using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markl, Daniel; Bawuah, Prince; Ridgway, Cathy; van den Ban, Sander; Goodwin, Daniel J; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Gane, Patrick; Peiponen, Kai-Erik; Zeitler, J Axel

    2018-02-15

    Pharmaceutical tablets are typically manufactured by the uni-axial compaction of powder that is confined radially by a rigid die. The directional nature of the compaction process yields not only anisotropic mechanical properties (e.g. tensile strength) but also directional properties of the pore structure in the porous compact. This study derives a new quantitative parameter, S a , to describe the anisotropy in pore structure of pharmaceutical tablets based on terahertz time-domain spectroscopy measurements. The S a parameter analysis was applied to three different data sets including tablets with only one excipient (functionalised calcium carbonate), samples with one excipient (microcrystalline cellulose) and one drug (indomethacin), and a complex formulation (granulated product comprising several excipients and one drug). The overall porosity, tablet thickness, initial particle size distribution as well as the granule density were all found to affect the significant structural anisotropies that were observed in all investigated tablets. The S a parameter provides new insights into the microstructure of a tablet and its potential was particularly demonstrated for the analysis of formulations comprising several components. The results clearly indicate that material attributes, such as particle size and granule density, cause a change of the pore structure, which, therefore, directly impacts the liquid imbibition that is part of the disintegration process. We show, for the first time, how the granule density impacts the pore structure, which will also affect the performance of the tablet. It is thus of great importance to gain a better understanding of the relationship of the physical properties of material attributes (e.g. intragranular porosity, particle shape), the compaction process and the microstructure of the finished product. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Learning of pitch and time structures in an artificial grammar setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Jon B; Stevens, Catherine J; Jones, Mari Riess; Tillmann, Barbara

    2018-04-12

    Despite the empirical evidence for the power of the cognitive capacity of implicit learning of structures and regularities in several modalities and materials, it remains controversial whether implicit learning extends to the learning of temporal structures and regularities. We investigated whether (a) an artificial grammar can be learned equally well when expressed in duration sequences as when expressed in pitch sequences, (b) learning of the artificial grammar in either duration or pitch (as the primary dimension) sequences can be influenced by the properties of the secondary dimension (invariant vs. randomized), and (c) learning can be boosted when the artificial grammar is expressed in both pitch and duration. After an exposure phase with grammatical sequences, learning in a subsequent test phase was assessed in a grammaticality judgment task. Participants in both the pitch and duration conditions showed incidental (not fully implicit) learning of the artificial grammar when the secondary dimension was invariant, but randomizing the pitch sequence prevented learning of the artificial grammar in duration sequences. Expressing the artificial grammar in both pitch and duration resulted in disproportionately better performance, suggesting an interaction between the learning of pitch and temporal structure. The findings are relevant to research investigating the learning of temporal structures and the learning of structures presented simultaneously in 2 dimensions (e.g., space and time, space and objects). By investigating learning, the findings provide further insight into the potential specificity of pitch and time processing, and their integrated versus independent processing, as previously debated in music cognition research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Time Delayed Stage-Structured Predator-Prey Model with Birth Pulse and Pest Control Tactics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Normally, chemical pesticides kill not only pests but also their natural enemies. In order to better control the pests, two-time delayed stage-structured predator-prey models with birth pulse and pest control tactics are proposed and analyzed by using impulsive differential equations in present work. The stability threshold conditions for the mature prey-eradication periodic solutions of two models are derived, respectively. The effects of key parameters including killing efficiency rate, pulse period, the maximum birth effort per unit of time of natural enemy, and maturation time of prey on the threshold values are discussed in more detail. By comparing the two threshold values of mature prey-extinction, we provide the fact that the second control tactic is more effective than the first control method.

  14. Time domain calculation of connector loads of a very large floating structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jiayang; Wu, Jie; Qi, Enrong; Guan, Yifeng; Yuan, Yubo

    2015-06-01

    Loads generated after an air crash, ship collision, and other accidents may destroy very large floating structures (VLFSs) and create additional connector loads. In this study, the combined effects of ship collision and wave loads are considered to establish motion differential equations for a multi-body VLFS. A time domain calculation method is proposed to calculate the connector load of the VLFS in waves. The Longuet-Higgins model is employed to simulate the stochastic wave load. Fluid force and hydrodynamic coefficient are obtained with DNV Sesam software. The motion differential equation is calculated by applying the time domain method when the frequency domain hydrodynamic coefficient is converted into the memory function of the motion differential equation of the time domain. As a result of the combined action of wave and impact loads, high-frequency oscillation is observed in the time history curve of the connector load. At wave directions of 0° and 75°, the regularities of the time history curves of the connector loads in different directions are similar and the connector loads of C1 and C2 in the X direction are the largest. The oscillation load is observed in the connector in the Y direction at a wave direction of 75° and not at 0°. This paper presents a time domain calculation method of connector load to provide a certain reference function for the future development of Chinese VLFS

  15. Real time 3D structural and Doppler OCT imaging on graphics processing units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylwestrzak, Marcin; Szlag, Daniel; Szkulmowski, Maciej; Gorczyńska, Iwona; Bukowska, Danuta; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Targowski, Piotr

    2013-03-01

    In this report the application of graphics processing unit (GPU) programming for real-time 3D Fourier domain Optical Coherence Tomography (FdOCT) imaging with implementation of Doppler algorithms for visualization of the flows in capillary vessels is presented. Generally, the time of the data processing of the FdOCT data on the main processor of the computer (CPU) constitute a main limitation for real-time imaging. Employing additional algorithms, such as Doppler OCT analysis, makes this processing even more time consuming. Lately developed GPUs, which offers a very high computational power, give a solution to this problem. Taking advantages of them for massively parallel data processing, allow for real-time imaging in FdOCT. The presented software for structural and Doppler OCT allow for the whole processing with visualization of 2D data consisting of 2000 A-scans generated from 2048 pixels spectra with frame rate about 120 fps. The 3D imaging in the same mode of the volume data build of 220 × 100 A-scans is performed at a rate of about 8 frames per second. In this paper a software architecture, organization of the threads and optimization applied is shown. For illustration the screen shots recorded during real time imaging of the phantom (homogeneous water solution of Intralipid in glass capillary) and the human eye in-vivo is presented.

  16. A study on structural changes in protein by time-division type Laue method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Hideki

    1995-01-01

    In order to know the physiological roles of proteins, it is important to investigate the intermediate states of their structural changes. The sizes of proteins are generally several tens angstrom(A). Considering the resolution, only x-ray crystal analysis can be used in practice for the investigation of the mechanism of protein structural changes, though NMR is applicable only for small-sized proteins. However, x-ray analysis is not so suitable for analysis of their intermediate states. Thus, the author paid attention to the time-division type Laue method for the study of hemoglobin (Hb). Laser-flash induces to release carbonmonooxide (CO) from carboxyhemoglobin (Hb(CO) 4 ). Therefore, if an appropriate length of x-ray pulse (∼100 picosec) is available, the processes in the period from cleavage of the bond between a ligand (O 2 , CO or NO) and Hb to recombination of them might be monitored. Using DNA recombination and chemical modification techniques, recombinant Hb, of which T structure is stable was produced. An investigation on the conditions which allow to release CO from the Hb is undertaken using a single crystal of this Hb. The experimental systems applicable to time-division type Laue method are some protein molecules participating in chemical reactions inducible by light absorption, the electron-transfer system excited by light and so on. (M.N.)

  17. A study on structural changes in protein by time-division type Laue method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Hideki [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering Science

    1995-11-01

    In order to know the physiological roles of proteins, it is important to investigate the intermediate states of their structural changes. The sizes of proteins are generally several tens angstrom(A). Considering the resolution, only x-ray crystal analysis can be used in practice for the investigation of the mechanism of protein structural changes, though NMR is applicable only for small-sized proteins. However, x-ray analysis is not so suitable for analysis of their intermediate states. Thus, the author paid attention to the time-division type Laue method for the study of hemoglobin (Hb). Laser-flash induces to release carbonmonooxide (CO) from carboxyhemoglobin (Hb(CO){sub 4}). Therefore, if an appropriate length of x-ray pulse ({approx}100 picosec) is available, the processes in the period from cleavage of the bond between a ligand (O{sub 2}, CO or NO) and Hb to recombination of them might be monitored. Using DNA recombination and chemical modification techniques, recombinant Hb, of which T structure is stable was produced. An investigation on the conditions which allow to release CO from the Hb is undertaken using a single crystal of this Hb. The experimental systems applicable to time-division type Laue method are some protein molecules participating in chemical reactions inducible by light absorption, the electron-transfer system excited by light and so on. (M.N.)

  18. Optimizing the De-Noise Neural Network Model for GPS Time-Series Monitoring of Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosbeh R. Kaloop

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Global Positioning System (GPS is recently used widely in structures and other applications. Notwithstanding, the GPS accuracy still suffers from the errors afflicting the measurements, particularly the short-period displacement of structural components. Previously, the multi filter method is utilized to remove the displacement errors. This paper aims at using a novel application for the neural network prediction models to improve the GPS monitoring time series data. Four prediction models for the learning algorithms are applied and used with neural network solutions: back-propagation, Cascade-forward back-propagation, adaptive filter and extended Kalman filter, to estimate which model can be recommended. The noise simulation and bridge’s short-period GPS of the monitoring displacement component of one Hz sampling frequency are used to validate the four models and the previous method. The results show that the Adaptive neural networks filter is suggested for de-noising the observations, specifically for the GPS displacement components of structures. Also, this model is expected to have significant influence on the design of structures in the low frequency responses and measurements’ contents.

  19. On structural reliability under time-varying multi-parameter loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augusti, G.

    1975-01-01

    Special attention will be paid to the superimposition of loads of different origin and characteristics (e.g. long-term loads like the furniture and usual occupancy load in a building and short-term loads like explosions, earthquakes, storms, etc.): it will be recognized that a single procedure for all cases does not appear practical, and that, within a general framework special method must be devised according to the type of loads and structural responses. For instance, the superimposition of impulsive loads must be studied with reference to the response time of the structure. It will be shown that usually, the statistics of extreme values are not sufficient for a correct study of superimposition: the instantaneous probability distributions of the load intensities are also required. The results obtained with respect to the loads can be joined with previous results by Augusti and Baratta (see e.g. SMiRT-2 paper M7/8) on structural strength, for the evaluation of the probability of success (i.e. the reliability) of a structural design

  20. Structure of xanthan gum and cell ultrastructure at different times of alkali stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvielmo, Márcia de Mello; Borges, Caroline Dellinghausen; Toyama, Daniela de Oliveira; Vendruscolo, Claire Tondo; Scamparini, Adilma Regina Pippa

    2016-01-01

    The effect of alkali stress on the yield, viscosity, gum structure, and cell ultrastructure of xanthan gum was evaluated at the end of fermentation process of xanthan production by Xanthomonas campestris pv. manihotis 280-95. Although greater xanthan production was observed after a 24h-alkali stress process, a lower viscosity was observed when compared to the alkali stress-free gum, regardless of the alkali stress time. However, this outcome is not conclusive as further studies on gum purification are required to remove excess sodium, verify the efficiency loss and the consequent increase in the polymer viscosity. Alkali stress altered the structure of xanthan gum from a polygon-like shape to a star-like form. At the end of the fermentation, early structural changes in the bacterium were observed. After alkali stress, marked structural differences were observed in the cells. A more vacuolated cytoplasm and discontinuities in the membrane cells evidenced the cell lysis. Xanthan was observed in the form of concentric circles instead of agglomerates as observed prior to the alkali stress. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigation of Time Series Representations and Similarity Measures for Structural Damage Pattern Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjia Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the time series representation methods and similarity measures for sensor data feature extraction and structural damage pattern recognition. Both model-based time series representation and dimensionality reduction methods are studied to compare the effectiveness of feature extraction for damage pattern recognition. The evaluation of feature extraction methods is performed by examining the separation of feature vectors among different damage patterns and the pattern recognition success rate. In addition, the impact of similarity measures on the pattern recognition success rate and the metrics for damage localization are also investigated. The test data used in this study are from the System Identification to Monitor Civil Engineering Structures (SIMCES Z24 Bridge damage detection tests, a rigorous instrumentation campaign that recorded the dynamic performance of a concrete box-girder bridge under progressively increasing damage scenarios. A number of progressive damage test case datasets and damage test data with different damage modalities are used. The simulation results show that both time series representation methods and similarity measures have significant impact on the pattern recognition success rate.

  2. Comparison between time-step-integration and probabilistic methods in seismic analysis of a linear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneeberger, B.; Breuleux, R.

    1977-01-01

    Assuming that earthquake ground motion is a stationary time function, the seismic analysis of a linear structure can be done by probailistic methods using the 'power spectral density function' (PSD), instead of applying the more traditional time-step-integration using earthquake time histories (TH). A given structure was analysed both by PSD and TH methods computing and comparing 'floor response spectra'. The analysis using TH was performed for two different TH and different frequency intervals for the 'floor-response-spectra'. The analysis using PSD first produced PSD functions of the responses of the floors and these were then converted into 'foor-response-spectra'. Plots of the resulting 'floor-response-spectra' show: (1) The agreement of TH and PSD results is quite close. (2) The curves produced by PSD are much smoother than those produced by TH and mostly form an enelope of the latter. (3) The curves produced by TH are quite jagged with the location and magnitude of the peaks depending on the choice of frequencies at which the 'floor-response-spectra' were evaluated and on the choice of TH. (Auth.)

  3. Detecting Changes in Forest Structure over Time with Bi-Temporal Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Melkas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Changes to stems caused by natural forces and timber harvesting constitute an essential input for many forestry-related applications and ecological studies, especially forestry inventories based on the use of permanent sample plots. Conventional field measurement is widely acknowledged as being time-consuming and labor-intensive. More automated and efficient alternatives or supportive methods are needed. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS has been demonstrated to be a promising method in forestry field inventories. Nevertheless, the applicability of TLS in recording changes in the structure of forest plots has not been studied in detail. This paper presents a fully automated method for detecting changes in forest structure over time using bi-temporal TLS data. The developed method was tested on five densely populated forest plots including 137 trees and 50 harvested trees in point clouds. The present study demonstrated that 90 percent of tree stem changes could be automatically located from single-scan TLS data. These changes accounted for 92 percent of the changed basal area. The results indicate that the processing of TLS data collected at different times to detect tree stem changes can be fully automated.

  4. Investigation of Time Series Representations and Similarity Measures for Structural Damage Pattern Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, R. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the time series representation methods and similarity measures for sensor data feature extraction and structural damage pattern recognition. Both model-based time series representation and dimensionality reduction methods are studied to compare the effectiveness of feature extraction for damage pattern recognition. The evaluation of feature extraction methods is performed by examining the separation of feature vectors among different damage patterns and the pattern recognition success rate. In addition, the impact of similarity measures on the pattern recognition success rate and the metrics for damage localization are also investigated. The test data used in this study are from the System Identification to Monitor Civil Engineering Structures (SIMCES) Z24 Bridge damage detection tests, a rigorous instrumentation campaign that recorded the dynamic performance of a concrete box-girder bridge under progressively increasing damage scenarios. A number of progressive damage test case datasets and damage test data with different damage modalities are used. The simulation results show that both time series representation methods and similarity measures have significant impact on the pattern recognition success rate. PMID:24191136

  5. Use of Time- and Frequency-Domain Approaches for Damage Detection in Civil Engineering Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. H. Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to apply both time- and frequency-domain-based approaches on real-life civil engineering structures and to assess their capability for damage detection. The methodology is based on Principal Component Analysis of the Hankel matrix built from output-only measurements and of Frequency Response Functions. Damage detection is performed using the concept of subspace angles between a current (possibly damaged state and a reference (undamaged state. The first structure is the Champangshiehl Bridge located in Luxembourg. Several damage levels were intentionally created by cutting a growing number of prestressed tendons and vibration data were acquired by the University of Luxembourg for each damaged state. The second example consists in reinforced and prestressed concrete panels. Successive damages were introduced in the panels by loading heavy weights and by cutting steel wires. The illustrations show different consequences in damage identification by the considered techniques.

  6. The structuring process of the macroparasite community of an experimental population of cichlasoma urophthalmus through time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Martinez; Kennedy; Aguirre-Macedo

    1998-09-01

    The structuring process of the macroparasite community of caged Cichlasoma urophthalmus was studied over time using sentinel fish. Three thousand uninfected cichlids were stocked in floating cages introduced into a quarry in which a wild population of the same species was present. Caged and wild cichlids were sampled monthly over 6 and 7 months, respectively. Seventeen macroparasite species were found in the wild C. urophthalmus population, ten of which were detected in the caged population after 6 months. Early infections were by those species that were more frequent and abundant in the wild population, while helminths with a low prevalence and abundance in the wild appeared later in the caged fish population. The results suggested that the structuring process of the macroparasite community of caged C. urophthalmus followed a predictable pattern, in which those species that were most frequent and abundant in the wild were the first to establish in sentinel fish.

  7. On using moving windows in finite element time domain simulation for long accelerator structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, L.-Q.; Candel, Arno; Ng, Cho; Ko, Kwok

    2010-01-01

    A finite element moving window technique is developed to simulate the propagation of electromagnetic waves induced by the transit of a charged particle beam inside large and long structures. The window moving along with the beam in the computational domain adopts high-order finite element basis functions through p refinement and/or a high-resolution mesh through h refinement so that a sufficient accuracy is attained with substantially reduced computational costs. Algorithms to transfer discretized fields from one mesh to another, which are the keys to implementing a moving window in a finite element unstructured mesh, are presented. Numerical experiments are carried out using the moving window technique to compute short-range wakefields in long accelerator structures. The results are compared with those obtained from the normal finite element time domain (FETD) method and the advantages of using the moving window technique are discussed.

  8. Stochastic models for structured populations scaling limits and long time behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Meleard, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution, several probabilistic tools to study population dynamics are developed. The focus is on scaling limits of qualitatively different stochastic individual based models and the long time behavior of some classes of limiting processes. Structured population dynamics are modeled by measure-valued processes describing the individual behaviors and taking into account the demographic and mutational parameters, and possible interactions between individuals. Many quantitative parameters appear in these models and several relevant normalizations are considered, leading  to infinite-dimensional deterministic or stochastic large-population approximations. Biologically relevant questions are considered, such as extinction criteria, the effect of large birth events, the impact of  environmental catastrophes, the mutation-selection trade-off, recovery criteria in parasite infections, genealogical properties of a sample of individuals. These notes originated from a lecture series on Structured P...

  9. Improvement of training set structure in fusion data cleaning using Time-Domain Global Similarity method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.; Lan, T.; Qin, H.

    2017-01-01

    Traditional data cleaning identifies dirty data by classifying original data sequences, which is a class-imbalanced problem since the proportion of incorrect data is much less than the proportion of correct ones for most diagnostic systems in Magnetic Confinement Fusion (MCF) devices. When using machine learning algorithms to classify diagnostic data based on class-imbalanced training set, most classifiers are biased towards the major class and show very poor classification rates on the minor class. By transforming the direct classification problem about original data sequences into a classification problem about the physical similarity between data sequences, the class-balanced effect of Time-Domain Global Similarity (TDGS) method on training set structure is investigated in this paper. Meanwhile, the impact of improved training set structure on data cleaning performance of TDGS method is demonstrated with an application example in EAST POlarimetry-INTerferometry (POINT) system.

  10. Effect of process time on structural and tribological properties of ferritic plasma nitrocarburized AISI 4140 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakan, Mehmet; Alsaran, Akguen; Celik, Ayhan

    2004-06-15

    AISI 4140 steel was plasma nitrocarburized at a gas mixture of 49%N{sub 2} + 49%H{sub 2} + 2%CO{sub 2}, for different process times (1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 h), at a temperature of 570 deg. C. The structural, mechanical and tribological properties of nitrocarburized steel were analyzed using a X-ray diffraction, microhardness tester, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy and pin-on-disk tribotester. The results have shown that the compound layer was composed of the {epsilon} and {gamma} iron carbonitrides. In addition, the compound layer included pores having a columnar structure. These pores are open to the surface. The nitrocarburizing process increases surface hardness, roughness and friction coefficient. The wear rate improves after plasma nitrocarburizing, and decreases with increasing surface hardness.

  11. Effect of process time on structural and tribological properties of ferritic plasma nitrocarburized AISI 4140 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakan, Mehmet; Alsaran, Akguen; Celik, Ayhan

    2004-01-01

    AISI 4140 steel was plasma nitrocarburized at a gas mixture of 49%N 2 + 49%H 2 + 2%CO 2 , for different process times (1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 h), at a temperature of 570 deg. C. The structural, mechanical and tribological properties of nitrocarburized steel were analyzed using a X-ray diffraction, microhardness tester, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy and pin-on-disk tribotester. The results have shown that the compound layer was composed of the ε and γ iron carbonitrides. In addition, the compound layer included pores having a columnar structure. These pores are open to the surface. The nitrocarburizing process increases surface hardness, roughness and friction coefficient. The wear rate improves after plasma nitrocarburizing, and decreases with increasing surface hardness

  12. Wireless and real-time structural damage detection: A novel decentralized method for wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Onur; Abdeljaber, Osama; Kiranyaz, Serkan; Hussein, Mohammed; Inman, Daniel J.

    2018-06-01

    Being an alternative to conventional wired sensors, wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are extensively used in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) applications. Most of the Structural Damage Detection (SDD) approaches available in the SHM literature are centralized as they require transferring data from all sensors within the network to a single processing unit to evaluate the structural condition. These methods are found predominantly feasible for wired SHM systems; however, transmission and synchronization of huge data sets in WSNs has been found to be arduous. As such, the application of centralized methods with WSNs has been a challenge for engineers. In this paper, the authors are presenting a novel application of 1D Convolutional Neural Networks (1D CNNs) on WSNs for SDD purposes. The SDD is successfully performed completely wireless and real-time under ambient conditions. As a result of this, a decentralized damage detection method suitable for wireless SHM systems is proposed. The proposed method is based on 1D CNNs and it involves training an individual 1D CNN for each wireless sensor in the network in a format where each CNN is assigned to process the locally-available data only, eliminating the need for data transmission and synchronization. The proposed damage detection method operates directly on the raw ambient vibration condition signals without any filtering or preprocessing. Moreover, the proposed approach requires minimal computational time and power since 1D CNNs merge both feature extraction and classification tasks into a single learning block. This ability is prevailingly cost-effective and evidently practical in WSNs considering the hardware systems have been occasionally reported to suffer from limited power supply in these networks. To display the capability and verify the success of the proposed method, large-scale experiments conducted on a laboratory structure equipped with a state-of-the-art WSN are reported.

  13. Analytical model for time to cover cracking in RC structures due to rebar corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhargava, Kapilesh; Ghosh, A.K.; Mori, Yasuhiro; Ramanujam, S.

    2006-01-01

    The structural degradation of concrete structures due to reinforcement corrosion is a major worldwide problem. Reinforcement corrosion causes a volume increase due to the oxidation of metallic iron, which is mainly responsible for exerting the expansive radial pressure at the steel-concrete interface and development of hoop tensile stresses in the surrounding concrete. Cracking occurs, once the maximum hoop tensile stress exceeds the tensile strength of the concrete. The cracking begins at the steel-concrete interface and propagates outwards and eventually results in the thorough cracking of the cover concrete and this would indicate the loss of service life for the corrosion affected structures. An analytical model is proposed to predict the time required for cover cracking and the weight loss of reinforcing bar in corrosion affected reinforced concrete structures. The modelling aspects of the residual strength of cracked concrete and the stiffness contribution from the combination of reinforcement and expansive corrosion products have also been incorporated in the model. The problem is modeled as a boundary value problem and the governing equations are expressed in terms of the radial displacement. The analytical solutions are presented considering a simple two-zone model for the cover concrete, viz. cracked or uncracked. Reasonable estimation of the various parameters in the model related to the composition and properties of expansive corrosion products based on the available published experimental data has also been discussed. The performance of the proposed corrosion cracking model is then investigated through its ability to reproduce available experimental trends. Reasonably good agreement between experimental results and the analytical predictions has been obtained. It has also been found that tensile strength and initial tangent modulus of cover concrete, annual mean corrosion rate and modulus of elasticity of reinforcement plus corrosion products combined

  14. Time Series of Tropical-Forest Structure from TanDEM-X, Transformed to Time Series of Biomass by MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treuhaft, R. N.; Baccini, A.; Goncalves, F. G.; Lei, Y.; Keller, M.; Walker, W. S.

    2017-12-01

    Tropical forests account for about 50% of the world's forested biomass, and play a critical role in the control of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Large-scale (1000's of km) changes in forest structure and biomass bear on global carbon source-sink dynamics, while small-scale (phase-height observation, we show forest phase-height time series from the TanDEM-X radar interferometer at X-band (3 cm), taken with monthly and sub-hectare temporal and spatial resolution, respectively. The measurements were taken with more than 30 TanDEM-X passes over Tapajós National Forest in the Brazilian Amazon between 2011 and 2014. The transformation of phase-height rates into aboveground biomass (AGB) rates is based on the idea that the change in AGB due to a change in phase-height depends on the plot's AGB. Plots with higher AGB will produce more AGB for a given increase in height or phase-height. Postulating a power-law dependence of plot-level mass density on physical height, we previously found that the best conversion factors for transforming phase-height rate to AGB rate were indeed dependent on AGB. For 78 plots, we demonstrated AGB rates from InSAR phase-height rates using AGB from field measurements. For regional modeling of the Amazon Basin, field measurements of AGB, to specify the conversion factors, is impractical. Conversion factors from InSAR phase-height rate to AGB rate in this talk will be based on AGB derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). AGB measurement from MODIS is based on the spectral reflectance of 7 bands from the visible to short wave infrared, and auxiliary metrics describing the variance in reflectance. The mapping of MODIS reflectance to AGB is enabled by training a machine learning algorithm with lidar-derived AGB data, which are in turn trained by field measurements for small areas. The performance of TanDEM-X AGB rate from MODIS-derived conversion factors will be compared to that derived from field-based conversion

  15. Comparisons between two wavelet functions in extracting coherent structures from solar wind time series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolzani, M.J.A.; Guarnieri, F.L.; Vieira, Paulo Cesar

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, wavelet analysis of turbulent flows have become increasingly popular. However, the study of geometric characteristics from wavelet functions is still poorly explored. In this work we compare the performance of two wavelet functions in extracting the coherent structures from solar wind velocity time series. The data series are from years 1996 to 2002 (except 1998 and 1999). The wavelet algorithm decomposes the annual time-series in two components: the coherent part and non-coherent one, using the daubechies-4 and haar wavelet function. The threshold assumed is based on a percentage of maximum variance found in each dyadic scale. After the extracting procedure, we applied the power spectral density on the original time series and coherent time series to obtain spectral indices. The results from spectral indices show higher values for the coherent part obtained by daubechies-4 than those obtained by the haar wavelet function. Using the kurtosis statistical parameter, on coherent and non-coherent time series, it was possible to conjecture that the differences found between two wavelet functions may be associated with their geometric forms. (author)

  16. Temporal event structure and timing in schizophrenia: preserved binding in a longer "now".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Brice; Giersch, Anne; Huron, Caroline; van Wassenhove, Virginie

    2013-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia experience a loss of temporal continuity or subjective fragmentation along the temporal dimension. Here, we develop the hypothesis that impaired temporal awareness results from a perturbed structuring of events in time-i.e., canonical neural dynamics. To address this, 26 patients and their matched controls took part in two psychophysical studies using desynchronized audiovisual speech. Two tasks were used and compared: first, an identification task testing for multisensory binding impairments in which participants reported what they heard while looking at a speaker's face; in a second task, we tested the perceived simultaneity of the same audiovisual speech stimuli. In both tasks, we used McGurk fusion and combination that are classic ecologically valid multisensory illusions. First, and contrary to previous reports, our results show that patients do not significantly differ from controls in their rate of illusory reports. Second, the illusory reports of patients in the identification task were more sensitive to audiovisual speech desynchronies than those of controls. Third, and surprisingly, patients considered audiovisual speech to be synchronized for longer delays than controls. As such, the temporal tolerance profile observed in a temporal judgement task was less of a predictor for sensory binding in schizophrenia than for that obtained in controls. We interpret our results as an impairment of temporal event structuring in schizophrenia which does not specifically affect sensory binding operations but rather, the explicit access to timing information associated here with audiovisual speech processing. Our findings are discussed in the context of curent neurophysiological frameworks for the binding and the structuring of sensory events in time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The showerfront time-structure of ''anomalous muon'' events associated with Hercules X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandreas, D.E.; Allen, R.C.; Biller, S.D.; Dion, G.M.; Lu, X-Q.; Vishwanath, P.R.; Yodh, G.B.; Berley, D.; Chang, C.Y.; Dingus, B.L.; Dion, C.; Goodman, J.A.; Gupta, S.K.; Haines, T.J.; Kwok, P.W.; Stark, M.J.; Burman, R.L.; Hoffman, C.M.; Lloyd-Evans, J.; Nagle, D.E.; Potter, M.E.; Sandberg, V.D.; Zhang, W.P.; Cady, D.R.; Ellsworth, R.W.; Krakauer, D.A.; Talaga, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    The 11 ''in-phase'' source events from the 1986 muon-rich bursts associated with Hercules X-1 (previously reported by this group) have been studied for indications of further anomalous behavior. The most significant effect observed resulted from an analysis of the showerfront time-structures of these events. This analysis was then applied a priori to the rest of the source day, where an additional ∼9 signal events are expected to remain. The same effect was observed at a chance probability level of ∼0.1%. 1 ref., 7 figs

  18. Software of structure experiMents in a neutron time-of-flight diffractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balagurov, A.M.; Dlouga, M.; Zlokazov, V.B.; Mironova, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    A set of programs is discussed to be used in diffraction experiment in a neutron time-of-flight diffractometer. The DIFRAT program, which processes spectra of poly and monocrystals, locates all spectrum maxima and assesses their width on the basis of given experimental data and elementary cell parameters. Accurate location of maxima, evaluation of their area and width is done by the IREAK program. The most important feature of this program is a capability to set an experimental model of maxima patterns. The EXPDAT program is developed to investigate structural characteristics of a sample. It calculates corrections for absorbtion and extinction

  19. Semiparametric Bayesian analysis of accelerated failure time models with cluster structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaonan; Xu, Xinyi; Shen, Junshan

    2017-11-10

    In this paper, we develop a Bayesian semiparametric accelerated failure time model for survival data with cluster structures. Our model allows distributional heterogeneity across clusters and accommodates their relationships through a density ratio approach. Moreover, a nonparametric mixture of Dirichlet processes prior is placed on the baseline distribution to yield full distributional flexibility. We illustrate through simulations that our model can greatly improve estimation accuracy by effectively pooling information from multiple clusters, while taking into account the heterogeneity in their random error distributions. We also demonstrate the implementation of our method using analysis of Mayo Clinic Trial in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Analysis of the time structure of synchronization in multidimensional chaotic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarenko, A. V., E-mail: avm.science@mail.ru [Constructive Cybernetics Research Group (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-15

    A new approach is proposed to the integrated analysis of the time structure of synchronization of multidimensional chaotic systems. The method allows one to diagnose and quantitatively evaluate the intermittency characteristics during synchronization of chaotic oscillations in the T-synchronization mode. A system of two identical logistic mappings with unidirectional coupling that operate in the developed chaos regime is analyzed. It is shown that the widely used approach, in which only synchronization patterns are subjected to analysis while desynchronization areas are considered as a background signal and removed from analysis, should be regarded as methodologically incomplete.

  1. Analysis of the time structure of synchronization in multidimensional chaotic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarenko, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    A new approach is proposed to the integrated analysis of the time structure of synchronization of multidimensional chaotic systems. The method allows one to diagnose and quantitatively evaluate the intermittency characteristics during synchronization of chaotic oscillations in the T-synchronization mode. A system of two identical logistic mappings with unidirectional coupling that operate in the developed chaos regime is analyzed. It is shown that the widely used approach, in which only synchronization patterns are subjected to analysis while desynchronization areas are considered as a background signal and removed from analysis, should be regarded as methodologically incomplete

  2. Trans-acting RNAs as molecular probes for monitoring time-dependent structural change of an RNA complex adapting two structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yuri; Furuta, Hiroyuki; Ikawa, Yoshiya

    2011-03-01

    As dynamic structural changes are pivotal for the functions of some classes of RNA molecule, it is important to develop methods to monitor structural changes in RNA in a time-dependent manner without chemical modification. Based on previous reports that trans-acting RNAs can be used as probes for analysis and control of 3D structures of target RNAs, we applied this method to monitor time-dependent structural changes in RNA. We designed and performed a proof-of-principle study using a simple model RNA complex that adopts two different structures as a target. The time-dependent structural changes in the target RNA were successfully monitored using two trans-acting RNAs, which stably form a ternary complex with the bimolecular target RNA and act as a catalyst to join two RNA fragments of the target complex, respectively. Copyright © 2010 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Network Structure, Competition and Memory Time on Social Spreading Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, James P.; O'Sullivan, Kevin P.; Baños, Raquel A.; Moreno, Yamir

    2016-04-01

    Online social media has greatly affected the way in which we communicate with each other. However, little is known about what fundamental mechanisms drive dynamical information flow in online social systems. Here, we introduce a generative model for online sharing behavior that is analytically tractable and that can reproduce several characteristics of empirical micro-blogging data on hashtag usage, such as (time-dependent) heavy-tailed distributions of meme popularity. The presented framework constitutes a null model for social spreading phenomena that, in contrast to purely empirical studies or simulation-based models, clearly distinguishes the roles of two distinct factors affecting meme popularity: the memory time of users and the connectivity structure of the social network.

  4. Effect of anomalous transport coefficients on the thermal structure of the storm time auroral ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontheim, E.G.; Ong, R.S.B.; Roble, R.G.; Mayr, H.G.; Hoegy, W.H.; Baron, M.J.; Wickwar, V.B.

    1978-01-01

    By analyzing an observed storm time auroral electron temperature profile it is shown that anomalous transport effects strongly influence the thermal structure of the disturbed auroral ionosphere. Such anomalous transport effects are a consequence of plasma turbulence, the existence of which has been established by a large number of observations in the auroral ionosphere. The electron and composite ion energy equations are solved with anomalous electron thermal conductivity and parallel electrical resistivity coefficients. The solutions are parameterized with respect to a phenomenological altitude-dependent anomaly coefficient A and are compared with an observed storm time electron temperature profile above Chatanika. The calculated temperature profile for the classical case (A=1)disagrees considerably with the measured profile over most of the altitude range up to 450km. It is shown that an anomaly coefficient with a sharp peak of the order of 10 4 centered aroung the F 2 peak is consistent with observations

  5. Effects of Network Structure, Competition and Memory Time on Social Spreading Phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Gleeson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Online social media has greatly affected the way in which we communicate with each other. However, little is known about what fundamental mechanisms drive dynamical information flow in online social systems. Here, we introduce a generative model for online sharing behavior that is analytically tractable and that can reproduce several characteristics of empirical micro-blogging data on hashtag usage, such as (time-dependent heavy-tailed distributions of meme popularity. The presented framework constitutes a null model for social spreading phenomena that, in contrast to purely empirical studies or simulation-based models, clearly distinguishes the roles of two distinct factors affecting meme popularity: the memory time of users and the connectivity structure of the social network.

  6. Structural nested mean models for assessing time-varying effect moderation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, Daniel; Ten Have, Thomas; Murphy, Susan A

    2010-03-01

    This article considers the problem of assessing causal effect moderation in longitudinal settings in which treatment (or exposure) is time varying and so are the covariates said to moderate its effect. Intermediate causal effects that describe time-varying causal effects of treatment conditional on past covariate history are introduced and considered as part of Robins' structural nested mean model. Two estimators of the intermediate causal effects, and their standard errors, are presented and discussed: The first is a proposed two-stage regression estimator. The second is Robins' G-estimator. The results of a small simulation study that begins to shed light on the small versus large sample performance of the estimators, and on the bias-variance trade-off between the two estimators are presented. The methodology is illustrated using longitudinal data from a depression study.

  7. Time-resolved pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry probes gaseous proteins structural kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-01-01

    A pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) method has been developed for rapid monitoring of the exchange kinetics of protein ions with D2O a few milliseconds after electrospray ionization (ESI). The stepwise gradual evolution of HDX of multiply charged protein ions was monitored using the pulsed HDX mass spectrometry technique. Upon introducing a very short pulse of D2O (in the μs to ms time scale) into the linear ion trap (LIT) of a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer, bimodal distributions were detected for the ions of cytochrome c and ubiquitin. Mechanistic details of HDX reactions for ubiquitin and cytochrome c in the gas phase were uncovered and the structural transitions were followed by analyzing the kinetics of HDX.

  8. Impact of population structure, effective bottleneck time, and allele frequency on linkage disequilibrium maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihua; Collins, Andrew; Gibson, Jane; Tapper, William J; Hunt, Sarah; Deloukas, Panos; Bentley, David R; Morton, Newton E

    2004-12-28

    Genetic maps in linkage disequilibrium (LD) units play the same role for association mapping as maps in centimorgans provide at much lower resolution for linkage mapping. Association mapping of genes determining disease susceptibility and other phenotypes is based on the theory of LD, here applied to relations with three phenomena. To test the theory, markers at high density along a 10-Mb continuous segment of chromosome 20q were studied in African-American, Asian, and Caucasian samples. Population structure, whether created by pooling samples from divergent populations or by the mating pattern in a mixed population, is accurately bioassayed from genotype frequencies. The effective bottleneck time for Eurasians is substantially less than for migration out of Africa, reflecting later bottlenecks. The classical dependence of allele frequency on mutation age does not hold for the generally shorter time span of inbreeding and LD. Limitation of the classical theory to mutation age justifies the assumption of constant time in a LD map, except for alleles that were rare at the effective bottleneck time or have arisen since. This assumption is derived from the Malecot model and verified in all samples. Tested measures of relative efficiency, support intervals, and localization error determine the operating characteristics of LD maps that are applicable to every sexually reproducing species, with implications for association mapping, high-resolution linkage maps, evolutionary inference, and identification of recombinogenic sequences.

  9. Multiscaling for systems with a broad continuum of characteristic lengths and times: Structural transitions in nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankavich, S; Ortoleva, P

    2010-06-01

    The multiscale approach to N-body systems is generalized to address the broad continuum of long time and length scales associated with collective behaviors. A technique is developed based on the concept of an uncountable set of time variables and of order parameters (OPs) specifying major features of the system. We adopt this perspective as a natural extension of the commonly used discrete set of time scales and OPs which is practical when only a few, widely separated scales exist. The existence of a gap in the spectrum of time scales for such a system (under quasiequilibrium conditions) is used to introduce a continuous scaling and perform a multiscale analysis of the Liouville equation. A functional-differential Smoluchowski equation is derived for the stochastic dynamics of the continuum of Fourier component OPs. A continuum of spatially nonlocal Langevin equations for the OPs is also derived. The theory is demonstrated via the analysis of structural transitions in a composite material, as occurs for viral capsids and molecular circuits.

  10. The family and family structure classification redefined for the current times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The family is a basic unit of study in many medical and social science disciplines. Definitions of family have varied from country to country, and also within country. Because of this and the changing realities of the current times, there is a felt need for redefining the family and the common family structure types, for the purpose of study of the family as a factor in health and other variables of interest. A redefinition of a ′′family′′ has been proposed and various nuances of the definition are also discussed in detail. A classification scheme for the various types of family has also been put forward. A few exceptional case scenarios have been envisaged and their classification as per the new scheme is discussed, in a bid to clarify the classification scheme further. The proposed scheme should prove to be of use across various countries and cultures, for broadly classifying the family structure. The unique scenarios of particular cultures can be taken into account by defining region or culture-specific subtypes of the overall types of family structure.

  11. Revisiting Factors Associated With Screen Time Media Use: A Structural Study Among School-Aged Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngantcha, Marcus; Janssen, Eric; Godeau, Emmanuelle; Ehlinger, Virginie; Le-Nezet, Olivier; Beck, François; Spilka, Stanislas

    2018-06-01

    Screen-based media overuse has been related to harmful consequences especially among children and adolescents. Given their complex interrelationships, predictors of screen time (ST) should be analyzed simultaneously rather than individually to avoid incomplete conclusions. Structural equation models were conducted to examine associations between media ST (television, video games, and computers) along with harmful consequences in adolescents' well-being, such as underweight and overweight, depression, and school failure. Predictors included individual (gender, age, and physical activity), family (structure and socioeconomic background), and substance use variables. We used the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey organized in 2014, including eighth- and ninth-grade students living in France (N = 3720). Students reported spending 3 hours per day in front of each media. Spending more than 2 hours behind each of those 3 media was associated with lower life satisfaction, less physical activity, active school bullying, and grade repetition. Socioeconomic status was the most important predictor of ST, whereas regular substance uses showed modest associations. The main implication of our findings is to sensitize parents and stakeholders about the limitation of ST, including their own use that adolescents are likely to mimic. Alternative measures such as off-line time should be encouraged.

  12. Massively Parallel and Scalable Implicit Time Integration Algorithms for Structural Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Charbel

    1997-01-01

    Explicit codes are often used to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of large-scale structural systems, even for low frequency response, because the storage and CPU requirements entailed by the repeated factorizations traditionally found in implicit codes rapidly overwhelm the available computing resources. With the advent of parallel processing, this trend is accelerating because of the following additional facts: (a) explicit schemes are easier to parallelize than implicit ones, and (b) explicit schemes induce short range interprocessor communications that are relatively inexpensive, while the factorization methods used in most implicit schemes induce long range interprocessor communications that often ruin the sought-after speed-up. However, the time step restriction imposed by the Courant stability condition on all explicit schemes cannot yet be offset by the speed of the currently available parallel hardware. Therefore, it is essential to develop efficient alternatives to direct methods that are also amenable to massively parallel processing because implicit codes using unconditionally stable time-integration algorithms are computationally more efficient when simulating the low-frequency dynamics of aerospace structures.

  13. On structural reliability under time-varying multi-parameter loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augusti, G.

    1975-01-01

    This paper intends to be a contribution towards the formulation of a procedure for the solution of the title problem that is at the same time correct and not too cumbersome for practical application. The problem is examined in detail and a number of possible alternative approaches to the solution discussed. Special attention is paid to the superimposition of loads of different origin and characteristics (e.g. long-term loads like the furniture and usual occupancy load in a building, and short-term loads like explosions, earthquakes, storms, etc.): it is recognized that a single procedure for all cases does not appear practical, and that, within a general framework, special methods must be devised according to the type of loads and structural responses. For instance, the superimposition of impulsive loads must be studied with reference to the response time of the structure. It is shown that usually, the statistics of extreme values are not sufficient for a correct study of superimposition: the instantaneous probability distributions of the load intensities are also required. (Auth.)

  14. Observing microscopic structures of a relativistic object using a time-stretch strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, E.; Evain, C.; Le Parquier, M.; Szwaj, C.; Bielawski, S.; Manceron, L.; Brubach, J.-B.; Tordeux, M.-A.; Ricaud, J.-P.; Cassinari, L.; Labat, M.; Couprie, M.-E.; Roy, P.

    2015-05-01

    Emission of light by a single electron moving on a curved trajectory (synchrotron radiation) is one of the most well-known fundamental radiation phenomena. However experimental situations are more complex as they involve many electrons, each being exposed to the radiation of its neighbors. This interaction has dramatic consequences, one of the most spectacular being the spontaneous formation of spatial structures inside electrons bunches. This fundamental effect is actively studied as it represents one of the most fundamental limitations in electron accelerators, and at the same time a source of intense terahertz radiation (Coherent Synchrotron Radiation, or CSR). Here we demonstrate the possibility to directly observe the electron bunch microstructures with subpicosecond resolution, in a storage ring accelerator. The principle is to monitor the terahertz pulses emitted by the structures, using a strategy from photonics, time-stretch, consisting in slowing-down the phenomena before recording. This opens the way to unpreceeded possibilities for analyzing and mastering new generation high power coherent synchrotron sources.

  15. What could the LHC teach us on the structure of space-time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triantaphyllou George

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Collision energies of proton beams now available at the LHC increase the probability of discovering the inner works of the Brout-Englert-Higgs (BEH mechanism within the foreseeable future. Nevertheless, they are still several orders of magnitude below the scale where a possible non-trivial structure of space-time would be detectable. Apart from remaining completely silent on the issue of the fundamental nature of elementary particles and the space in which they propagate, one may try to speculate on this matter by carefully extrapolating existing scientific methods and knowledge to Planck energies. In this talk, an effort is made to logically link some potential discoveries at the LHC with specific space-time structures. Since such links are inevitably weak due to the huge energy hierarchy between the electro-weak and the Planck scales, our goal does not exceed a mere presentation of naturalness and self-consistency arguments in favor of some of the possible outcomes, placing particular emphasis on the scenario of the mirror world.

  16. Time-dependent bow shocks and the condensation structure of Herbig-Haro objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raga, A.C.; Bohm, K.H.

    1987-01-01

    Some Herbig-Haro objects show a structure which appears to look like a bow shock, but also show a number of condensations superposed on this bow-shaped structure. In the case of HH 1 and HH 2 considerably different proper motions have been measured for the individual condensations. It is, however, very hard to explain why the condensations remain so close to each other if they are indeed separate entities. In this paper it is shown that an interpretation of the whole Herbig-Haro object as a single, time-dependent bow shock provides a natural explanation for the occurrence of condensations (which in numerical calculations appear to be associated with thermal instabilities in the postshock flow) with different proper motions. To this effect, time-dependent, axisymmetric, nonadiabatic bow shock models have been developed from which predictions were obtained for spatially resolved H-alpha intensity maps, and then these predictions are compared qualitatively with observations of a few Herbig-Haro objects. 57 references

  17. Structure of the gravitational field at spatial infinity. II. Asymptotically Minkowskian space--times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persides, S.

    1980-01-01

    A new formulation is established for the study of the asymptotic structure at spatial infinity of asymptotically Minkowskian space--times. First, the concept of an asymptotically simple space--time at spatial infinity is defined. This is a (physical) space--time (M,g) which can be imbedded in an unphysical space--time (M,g) with a boundary S, a C/sup infinity/ metric g and a C/sup infinity/ scalar field Ω such that Ω=0 on S, Ω>0 on M-S, and g/sup munu/ + g/sup mulambda/ g/sup nurho/ Ω/sub vertical-barlambda/ Ω/sub vertical-barrho/=Ω -2 g/sup murho/ +Ω -4 g/sup mulambda/ g/sup nurho/ Ω/sub ;/lambda Ω/sub ;/rho on M. Then an almost asymptotically flat space--time (AAFS) is defined as an asymptotically simple space--time for which S is isometric to the unit timelike hyperboloid and g/sup munu/ Ω/sub vertical-barmu/ Ω/sub vertical-barnu/ =Ω -4 g/sup munu/ Ω/sub ;/μΩ/sub ;/ν=-1 on S. Equivalent definitions are given in terms of the existence of coordinate systems in which g/sub munu/ or g/sub munu/ have simple explicitly given forms. The group of asymptotic symmetries of (M,g) is studied and is found to be isomorphic to the Lorentz group. The asymptotic behavior of an AAFS is studied. It is proven that the conformal metric g/sub munu/=Ω 2 g/sub munu/ gives C/sup lambdamurhonu/=0, Ω -1 C/sup lambdamurhonu/ Ω/sub ;/μ =0, Ω -2 C/sup lambdamurhonu/ Ω/sub ;/μ Ω/sub ;/ν=0 on S

  18. Time-varying parameter models for catchments with land use change: the importance of model structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathiraja, Sahani; Anghileri, Daniela; Burlando, Paolo; Sharma, Ashish; Marshall, Lucy; Moradkhani, Hamid

    2018-05-01

    Rapid population and economic growth in Southeast Asia has been accompanied by extensive land use change with consequent impacts on catchment hydrology. Modeling methodologies capable of handling changing land use conditions are therefore becoming ever more important and are receiving increasing attention from hydrologists. A recently developed data-assimilation-based framework that allows model parameters to vary through time in response to signals of change in observations is considered for a medium-sized catchment (2880 km2) in northern Vietnam experiencing substantial but gradual land cover change. We investigate the efficacy of the method as well as the importance of the chosen model structure in ensuring the success of a time-varying parameter method. The method was used with two lumped daily conceptual models (HBV and HyMOD) that gave good-quality streamflow predictions during pre-change conditions. Although both time-varying parameter models gave improved streamflow predictions under changed conditions compared to the time-invariant parameter model, persistent biases for low flows were apparent in the HyMOD case. It was found that HyMOD was not suited to representing the modified baseflow conditions, resulting in extreme and unrealistic time-varying parameter estimates. This work shows that the chosen model can be critical for ensuring the time-varying parameter framework successfully models streamflow under changing land cover conditions. It can also be used to determine whether land cover changes (and not just meteorological factors) contribute to the observed hydrologic changes in retrospective studies where the lack of a paired control catchment precludes such an assessment.

  19. Time-varying parameter models for catchments with land use change: the importance of model structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pathiraja

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Rapid population and economic growth in Southeast Asia has been accompanied by extensive land use change with consequent impacts on catchment hydrology. Modeling methodologies capable of handling changing land use conditions are therefore becoming ever more important and are receiving increasing attention from hydrologists. A recently developed data-assimilation-based framework that allows model parameters to vary through time in response to signals of change in observations is considered for a medium-sized catchment (2880 km2 in northern Vietnam experiencing substantial but gradual land cover change. We investigate the efficacy of the method as well as the importance of the chosen model structure in ensuring the success of a time-varying parameter method. The method was used with two lumped daily conceptual models (HBV and HyMOD that gave good-quality streamflow predictions during pre-change conditions. Although both time-varying parameter models gave improved streamflow predictions under changed conditions compared to the time-invariant parameter model, persistent biases for low flows were apparent in the HyMOD case. It was found that HyMOD was not suited to representing the modified baseflow conditions, resulting in extreme and unrealistic time-varying parameter estimates. This work shows that the chosen model can be critical for ensuring the time-varying parameter framework successfully models streamflow under changing land cover conditions. It can also be used to determine whether land cover changes (and not just meteorological factors contribute to the observed hydrologic changes in retrospective studies where the lack of a paired control catchment precludes such an assessment.

  20. Structural Analysis of time in “Derakhte Anjir Maabed” novel based on Gennetes theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safieh Tavakkoli Moghaddam

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Time is one of the important elements of the story that Genette surveys, emphasizing on its importance, and narrative structure of the story in the frame of concepts order, duration and frequency. Current study is a survey with modeling of Genette theory, the lastest novel by Ahmad Mahmoud with analytical-descriptive method. This survey shows the narrative stating author associated with the movement of events in time and he has could show with overcoming of element of time new techniques of writing story in his works. In “Derakhte Anjir Maabed” novel such as modern novels, the plot begins from the middle story and author from beginning throuth mental associations of characters, disrupts the logical order of events and makes narrative indirect. The central association of narrative in style of the stream of consciousness stories, in addition to breaking time borders, leads to the early realist narrative toward the imajinary and surrealistic fiction. More associations have a semi-conscious state or unconscious and appear to form improvisational through expression one word or similarity of position and sometimes are near into the realm of interior monologue or surrealism. Reapeted Heteradiegetic Analepsis associated with function refers to last person, resolves text complexity and reopens story nodes. Because of the special structure of story that insists on Analepsis, see less Prolepsis and Prolepsis appears only in scope of expression in the wishes of persons story and their idealism. Function of prolepsis is creating a kind of suspense in story and speeding up the narrative text. Analysis of the Duration in "Derakhte Anjir Maabed" expresses this point that author with narrative ten-year time span in thousands of pages, speedily continues the tale especially in past time. The general duration of the story is 3/6. The author anywhere sees necessary speeding up in narrative with summary, some times in detail to events and turned to scene and

  1. Influence of crystallization time on structural and morphological characteristics the precursor of zeolite MCM-22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, A.S.; Lima, L.A.; Sousa, B.V.; Santos, Everton R.F. dos; Rodrigues, M.G.F.

    2009-01-01

    The zeolite MCM-22 has been studied extensively as a promising catalyst because of the high thermal stability and high activity for acid catalysis and selectivity of molecular shape. The synthesis of MCM-22 is carried out by hydrothermal treatment and long times required for complete crystallization gradual growth of crystals of 10-14 days for the synthesis of static. This work aims to synthesize the precursor of zeolite MCM-22 using the method of hydrothermal synthesis with a reduction in crystallization time of 8 and 9 days. The precursor of zeolite MCM-22 was obtained using sources of silica, soda, deionized water and the director of structures hexametilenoimina (HMI). The samples were synthesized at 150° C for 8 to 9 days, with the following molar composition: 0.511 SiO 2 : 0.039 NaOH: 0.024 Al 2 O 3 : 23.06 H 2 O and subjected to characterizations by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy ( SEM) and energy dispersive (EDX). According to tests carried out showed that the hydrothermal treatment used to synthesize the precursor of zeolite MCM-22 was effective during times of crystallization of 8 and 9 days. The results for the micrographs showed that the samples consist of clusters and / or aggregates of small crystals. (author)

  2. rpsftm: An R Package for Rank Preserving Structural Failure Time Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Annabel; White, Ian R; Bond, Simon

    2017-12-04

    Treatment switching in a randomised controlled trial occurs when participants change from their randomised treatment to the other trial treatment during the study. Failure to account for treatment switching in the analysis (i.e. by performing a standard intention-to-treat analysis) can lead to biased estimates of treatment efficacy. The rank preserving structural failure time model (RPSFTM) is a method used to adjust for treatment switching in trials with survival outcomes. The RPSFTM is due to Robins and Tsiatis (1991) and has been developed by White et al. (1997, 1999). The method is randomisation based and uses only the randomised treatment group, observed event times, and treatment history in order to estimate a causal treatment effect. The treatment effect, ψ , is estimated by balancing counter-factual event times (that would be observed if no treatment were received) between treatment groups. G-estimation is used to find the value of ψ such that a test statistic Z ( ψ ) = 0. This is usually the test statistic used in the intention-to-treat analysis, for example, the log rank test statistic. We present an R package that implements the method of rpsftm.

  3. Prediction of traffic-related nitrogen oxides concentrations using Structural Time-Series models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Anneka Ruth; Ghosh, Bidisha; Broderick, Brian

    2011-09-01

    Ambient air quality monitoring, modeling and compliance to the standards set by European Union (EU) directives and World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines are required to ensure the protection of human and environmental health. Congested urban areas are most susceptible to traffic-related air pollution which is the most problematic source of air pollution in Ireland. Long-term continuous real-time monitoring of ambient air quality at such urban centers is essential but often not realistic due to financial and operational constraints. Hence, the development of a resource-conservative ambient air quality monitoring technique is essential to ensure compliance with the threshold values set by the standards. As an intelligent and advanced statistical methodology, a Structural Time Series (STS) based approach has been introduced in this paper to develop a parsimonious and computationally simple air quality model. In STS methodology, the different components of a time-series dataset such as the trend, seasonal, cyclical and calendar variations can be modeled separately. To test the effectiveness of the proposed modeling strategy, average hourly concentrations of nitrogen dioxide and nitrogen oxides from a congested urban arterial in Dublin city center were modeled using STS methodology. The prediction error estimates from the developed air quality model indicate that the STS model can be a useful tool in predicting nitrogen dioxide and nitrogen oxides concentrations in urban areas and will be particularly useful in situations where the information on external variables such as meteorology or traffic volume is not available.

  4. Bacterial diversity and community structure in lettuce soil are shifted by cultivation time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiqian; Chang, Qing; Guo, Xu; Yi, Xinxin

    2017-08-01

    Compared with cereal production, vegetable production usually requires a greater degree of management and larger input of nutrients and irrigation, but these systems are not sustainable in the long term. This study aimed to what extent lettuce determine the bacterial community composition in the soil, during lettuce cultivation, pesticides and fertilizers were not apply to soil. Soil samples were collected from depths of 0-20cm and 20-40cm. A highthroughput sequencing approach was employed to investigate bacterial communities in lettuce-cultivated soil samples in a time-dependent manner. The dominant bacteria in the lettuce soil samples were mainly Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Nitrospirae, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, Planctomycetes, Gemmatimo nadetes, Cyanobacteria. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum in the 6 soil samples. The relative abundance of Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia and Cyanobacteria decreased through time of lettuce cultivation, but the relative abundance of Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes and Nitrospirae increased over time. In the 0-20cm depth group and the 20-40cm depth soil, a similar pattern was observed that the percentage number of only shared OTUs between the early and late stage was lower than that between the early and middle stage soil, the result showed that lettuce growth can affect structure of soil bacterial communities.

  5. Time domain numerical calculations of the short electron bunch wakefields in resistive structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsakanian, Andranik

    2010-10-15

    The acceleration of electron bunches with very small longitudinal and transverse phase space volume is one of the most actual challenges for the future International Linear Collider and high brightness X-Ray Free Electron Lasers. The exact knowledge on the wake fields generated by the ultra-short electron bunches during its interaction with surrounding structures is a very important issue to prevent the beam quality degradation and to optimize the facility performance. The high accuracy time domain numerical calculations play the decisive role in correct evaluation of the wake fields in advanced accelerators. The thesis is devoted to the development of a new longitudinally dispersion-free 3D hybrid numerical scheme in time domain for wake field calculation of ultra short bunches in structures with walls of finite conductivity. The basic approaches used in the thesis to solve the problem are the following. For materials with high but finite conductivity the model of the plane wave reflection from a conducting half-space is used. It is shown that in the conductive half-space the field components perpendicular to the interface can be neglected. The electric tangential component on the surface contributes to the tangential magnetic field in the lossless area just before the boundary layer. For high conducting media, the task is reduced to 1D electromagnetic problem in metal and the so-called 1D conducting line model can be applied instead of a full 3D space description. Further, a TE/TM (''transverse electric - transverse magnetic'') splitting implicit numerical scheme along with 1D conducting line model is applied to develop a new longitudinally dispersion-free hybrid numerical scheme in the time domain. The stability of the new hybrid numerical scheme in vacuum, conductor and bound cell is studied. The convergence of the new scheme is analyzed by comparison with the well-known analytical solutions. The wakefield calculations for a number of

  6. Structure and function of proteins investigated by crystallographic and spectroscopic time-resolved methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwar, Namrta

    Biomolecules play an essential role in performing the necessary functions for life. The goal of this thesis is to contribute to an understanding of how biological systems work on the molecular level. We used two biological systems, beef liver catalase (BLC) and photoactive yellow protein (PYP). BLC is a metalloprotein that protects living cells from the harmful effects of reactive oxygen species by converting H2O2 into water and oxygen. By binding nitric oxide (NO) to the catalase, a complex was generated that mimics the Cat-H2O2 adduct, a crucial intermediate in the reaction promoted by the catalase. The Cat-NO complex is obtained by using a convenient NO generator (1-(N,N-diethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate). Concentrations up to 100˜200 mM are reached by using a specially designed glass cavity. With this glass apparatus and DEANO, sufficient NO occupation is achieved and structure determination of the catalase with NO bound to the heme iron becomes possible. Structural changes upon NO binding are minute. NO has a slightly bent geometry with respect to the heme normal, which results in a substantial overlap of the NO orbitals with the iron-porphyrin molecular orbitals. From the structure of the iron-NO complex, conclusions on the electronic properties of the heme iron can be drawn that ultimately lead to an insight into the catalytic properties of this enzyme. Enzyme kinetics is affected by additional parameters such as temperature and pH. Additionally, in crystallography, the absorbed X-ray dose may impair protein function. To address the effect of these parameters, we performed time-resolved crystallographic experiments on a model system, PYP. By collecting multiple time-series on PYP at increasing X-ray dose levels, we determined a kinetic dose limit up to which kinetically meaningful X-ray data sets can be collected. From this, we conclude that comprehensive time-series spanning up to 12 orders of magnitude in time can be collected from a single PYP

  7. Amyloid–β peptides time-dependent structural modifications: AFM and voltammetric characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enache, Teodor Adrian; Chiorcea-Paquim, Ana-Maria; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria, E-mail: brett@ci.uc.pt

    2016-07-05

    The human amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, Aβ{sub 1-40} and Aβ{sub 1-42}, structural modifications, from soluble monomers to fully formed fibrils through intermediate structures, were investigated, and the results were compared with those obtained for the inverse Aβ{sub 40-1} and Aβ{sub 42-1}, mutant Aβ{sub 1-40}Phe{sup 10} and Aβ{sub 1-40}Nle{sup 35}, and rat Aβ{sub 1-40}Rat peptide sequences. The aggregation was followed at a slow rate, in chloride free media and room temperature, and revealed to be a sequence-structure process, dependent on the physicochemical properties of each Aβ peptide isoforms, and occurring at different rates and by different pathways. The fibrilization process was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), via changes in the adsorption morphology from: (i) initially random coiled structures of ∼0.6 nm height, corresponding to the Aβ peptide monomers in random coil or in α-helix conformations, to (ii) aggregates and protofibrils of 1.5–6.0 nm height and (iii) two types of fibrils, corresponding to the Aβ peptide in a β-sheet configuration. The reactivity of the carbon electrode surface was considered. The hydrophobic surface induced rapid changes of the Aβ peptide conformations, and differences between the adsorbed fibrils, formed at the carbon surface (beaded, thin, <2.0 nm height) or in solution (long, smooth, thick, >2.0 nm height), were detected. Differential pulse voltammetry showed that, according to their primary structure, the Aβ peptides undergo oxidation in one or two steps, the first step corresponding to the tyrosine amino acids oxidation, and the second one to the histidine and methionine amino acids oxidation. The fibrilization process was electrochemically detected via the decrease of the Aβ peptide oxidation peak currents that occurred in a time dependent manner. - Highlights: • The Aβ peptide fibrilization process was followed by AFM and DP voltammetry. • The human Aβ{sub 1-40} and Aβ{sub 1

  8. Energy Savings in Cellular Networks Based on Space-Time Structure of Traffic Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingbo; Wang, Yue; Yuan, Jian; Shan, Xiuming

    Since most of energy consumed by the telecommunication infrastructure is due to the Base Transceiver Station (BTS), switching off BTSs when traffic load is low has been recognized as an effective way of saving energy. In this letter, an energy saving scheme is proposed to minimize the number of active BTSs based on the space-time structure of traffic loads as determined by principal component analysis. Compared to existing methods, our approach models traffic loads more accurately, and has a much smaller input size. As it is implemented in an off-line manner, our scheme also avoids excessive communications and computing overheads. Simulation results show that the proposed method has a comparable performance in energy savings.

  9. Robust distributed model predictive control of linear systems with structured time-varying uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Langwen; Xie, Wei; Wang, Jingcheng

    2017-11-01

    In this work, synthesis of robust distributed model predictive control (MPC) is presented for a class of linear systems subject to structured time-varying uncertainties. By decomposing a global system into smaller dimensional subsystems, a set of distributed MPC controllers, instead of a centralised controller, are designed. To ensure the robust stability of the closed-loop system with respect to model uncertainties, distributed state feedback laws are obtained by solving a min-max optimisation problem. The design of robust distributed MPC is then transformed into solving a minimisation optimisation problem with linear matrix inequality constraints. An iterative online algorithm with adjustable maximum iteration is proposed to coordinate the distributed controllers to achieve a global performance. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed robust distributed MPC algorithm.

  10. Servo-controlling structure of five-axis CNC system for real-time NURBS interpolating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liangji; Guo, Guangsong; Li, Huiying

    2017-07-01

    NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline) is widely used in CAD/CAM (Computer-Aided Design / Computer-Aided Manufacturing) to represent sculptured curves or surfaces. In this paper, we develop a 5-axis NURBS real-time interpolator and realize it in our developing CNC(Computer Numerical Control) system. At first, we use two NURBS curves to represent tool-tip and tool-axis path respectively. According to feedrate and Taylor series extension, servo-controlling signals of 5 axes are obtained for each interpolating cycle. Then, generation procedure of NC(Numerical Control) code with the presented method is introduced and the method how to integrate the interpolator into our developing CNC system is given. And also, the servo-controlling structure of the CNC system is introduced. Through the illustration, it has been indicated that the proposed method can enhance the machining accuracy and the spline interpolator is feasible for 5-axis CNC system.

  11. Structure and dynamics of olefin radical cation aggregates. Time-resolved fluorescence detected magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desrosiers, M.F.; Trifunac, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The time-resolved EPR spectra and thus the structure and dynamics of transient hydrocarbon radical cations are obtained by the pulse radiolysis-fluorescence detected magnetic resonance (FDMR) technique. Here the authors report the observation of short-lived radical cations from olefins. FDMR-EPR spectra of radical cations from tetramethylethylene and cyclohexadiene are illustrated. The olefin radical cations, FDMR spectra are concentration-dependent, since dimerization with neutral molecules takes place at higher (>10 -2 M) olefin concentration. Rate constants for the dimerization reaction are derived and the effect of solvent viscosity on aggregate formation is demonstrated. By monitoring the further reactions of dimer cations the authors have obtained EPR evidence for previously unobserved higher-order (multimer) radical cation aggregates of olefins. 16 references, 5 figures

  12. Attosecond time-energy structure of X-ray free-electron laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, N.; Hartmann, G.; Heider, R.; Wagner, M. S.; Ilchen, M.; Buck, J.; Lindahl, A. O.; Benko, C.; Grünert, J.; Krzywinski, J.; Liu, J.; Lutman, A. A.; Marinelli, A.; Maxwell, T.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Moeller, S. P.; Planas, M.; Robinson, J.; Kazansky, A. K.; Kabachnik, N. M.; Viefhaus, J.; Feurer, T.; Kienberger, R.; Coffee, R. N.; Helml, W.

    2018-04-01

    The time-energy information of ultrashort X-ray free-electron laser pulses generated by the Linac Coherent Light Source is measured with attosecond resolution via angular streaking of neon 1s photoelectrons. The X-ray pulses promote electrons from the neon core level into an ionization continuum, where they are dressed with the electric field of a circularly polarized infrared laser. This induces characteristic modulations of the resulting photoelectron energy and angular distribution. From these modulations we recover the single-shot attosecond intensity structure and chirp of arbitrary X-ray pulses based on self-amplified spontaneous emission, which have eluded direct measurement so far. We characterize individual attosecond pulses, including their instantaneous frequency, and identify double pulses with well-defined delays and spectral properties, thus paving the way for X-ray pump/X-ray probe attosecond free-electron laser science.

  13. Stringy models of modified gravity: space-time defects and structure formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavromatos, Nick E.; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Yusaf, Muhammad Furqaan

    2013-01-01

    Starting from microscopic models of space-time foam, based on brane universes propagating in bulk space-times populated by D0-brane defects (''D-particles''), we arrive at effective actions used by a low-energy observer on the brane world to describe his/her observations of the Universe. These actions include, apart from the metric tensor field, also scalar (dilaton) and vector fields, the latter describing the interactions of low-energy matter on the brane world with the recoiling point-like space-time defect (D-particle). The vector field is proportional to the recoil velocity of the D-particle and as such it satisfies a certain constraint. The vector breaks locally Lorentz invariance, which however is assumed to be conserved on average in a space-time foam situation, involving the interaction of matter with populations of D-particle defects. In this paper we clarify the role of fluctuations of the vector field on structure formation and galactic growth. In particular we demonstrate that, already at the end of the radiation era, the (constrained) vector field associated with the recoil of the defects provides the seeds for a growing mode in the evolution of the Universe. Such a growing mode survives during the matter dominated era, provided the variance of the D-particle recoil velocities on the brane is larger than a critical value. We note that in this model, as a result of specific properties of D-brane dynamics in the bulk, there is no issue of overclosing the brane Universe for large defect densities. Thus, in these models, the presence of defects may be associated with large-structure formation. Although our string inspired models do have (conventional, from a particle physics point of view) dark matter components, nevertheless it is interesting that the role of ''extra'' dark matter is also provided by the population of massive defects. This is consistent with the weakly interacting character of the D-particle defects, which predominantly interact only

  14. Investigating the link between fish community structure and environmental state in deep-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibert, E. C.

    2017-12-01

    In the modern ocean, a bottom-up ecological viewpoint posits that the composition of plankton communities is often a function of ambient oceanographic conditions, including nutrient concentrations and water temperature. Thus, certain plankton species or communities can be associated with specific oceanographic conditions, giving them potential as carriers of paleoceanographic information. Furthermore, consumer groups, such as fish, depend on the structure and composition of these plankton, and therefore different plankton communities will support different types of fish. In addition, fish have their own physiological constraints for surviving in particular environments, such as oxygen demand, and metabolic rate, causing certain clades to be selectively associated with different water mass characteristics. Thus, the relative or absolute abundances of different fish species or groups could shed light on shifting oxygen concentrations, temperature, or primary productivity in the past. To assess whether fish communities have sufficient environmental control to provide paleoceanographic insights, I use a variety of morphological, phylogenetic, and ecological statistical approaches, to correlate modern fish communities from around the world with environmental variables. I then apply these principles to a series of ichthyolith assemblages from the Cretaceous and Cenozoic, across both space and time, to assess whether fish community composition, abundance, or other characteristics can be predictive of ocean temperature or export productivity. I find that while the abundance of fish fossils in deep-sea cores is often, though not always, correlated with certain export production and temperature proxies, community composition appears to vary independently of these variables on long timescales, driven more by evolutionary processes. However, there are distinct differences in contemporary communities in different locations, suggesting that there is potential in using fish

  15. Family structure, parent-child conversation time and substance use among Chinese adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mak Kwok-Kei

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The family plays a vital role in shaping adolescent behaviours. The present study investigated the associations between family structure and substance use among Hong Kong Chinese adolescents. Methods A total of 32,961 Form 1 to 5 (grade 7-12 in the US Hong Kong students participated in the Youth Smoking Survey in 2003-4. An anonymous questionnaire was used to obtain information about family structure, daily duration of parent-child conversation, smoking, alcohol drinking and drug use. Logistic regression was used to calculate the adjusted odds ratios (OR for each substance use by family structure. Results Adjusting for sex, age, type of housing, parental smoking and school, adolescents from non-intact families were significantly more likely to be current smokers (OR = 1.62, weekly drinkers (OR = 1.72 and ever drug users (OR = 1.72, with significant linear increases in ORs from maternal, paternal to no-parent families compared with intact families. Furthermore, current smoking (OR = 1.41 and weekly drinking (OR = 1.46 were significantly more common among adolescents from paternal than maternal families. After adjusting for parent-child conversation time, the ORs for non-intact families remained significant compared with intact families, but the paternal-maternal differences were no longer significant. Conclusions Non-intact families were associated with substance use among Hong Kong Chinese adolescents. The apparently stronger associations with substance use in paternal than maternal families were probably mediated by the poorer communication with the father.

  16. Rethinking policy perspectives on childhood stunting: time to formulate a structural and multifactorial strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, S V; Mejía-Guevara, Iván; Krishna, Aditi

    2016-05-01

    Stunting and chronic undernutrition among children in South Asia remain a major unresolved global health issue. There are compelling intrinsic and moral reasons to ensure that children attain their optimal growth potential facilitated via promotion of healthy living conditions. Investments in efforts to ensure that children's growth is not faltered also have substantial instrumental benefits in terms of cognitive and economic development. Using the case of India, we critique three prevailing approaches to reducing undernutrition among children: an over-reliance on macroeconomic growth as a potent policy instrument, a disproportionate focus on interpreting undernutrition as a demand-side problem and an over-reliance on unintegrated single-factorial (one at a time) approaches to policy and research. Using existing evidence, we develop a case for support-led policy approach with a focus on integrated and structural factors to addressing the problem of undernutrition among children in India. Key messages Eliminating child undernutrition is important from an intrinsic perspective and offers considerable instrumental benefits to individual and society. Evidence suggests that an exclusive reliance on a growth-mediated strategy to eliminate stunting needs to be reconsidered, suggesting the need for a substantial support-led strategy. Interpreting and addressing undernutrition as a demand-side problem with proximal single-factorial interventions is futile. There is an urgent need to develop interventions that address the broader structural and upstream causes of child undernutrition. © 2016 The Authors. Maternal & Child Nutrition published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. A real-time all-atom structural search engine for proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gabriel; Hannigan, Brett; DeGrado, William F

    2014-07-01

    Protein designers use a wide variety of software tools for de novo design, yet their repertoire still lacks a fast and interactive all-atom search engine. To solve this, we have built the Suns program: a real-time, atomic search engine integrated into the PyMOL molecular visualization system. Users build atomic-level structural search queries within PyMOL and receive a stream of search results aligned to their query within a few seconds. This instant feedback cycle enables a new "designability"-inspired approach to protein design where the designer searches for and interactively incorporates native-like fragments from proven protein structures. We demonstrate the use of Suns to interactively build protein motifs, tertiary interactions, and to identify scaffolds compatible with hot-spot residues. The official web site and installer are located at http://www.degradolab.org/suns/ and the source code is hosted at https://github.com/godotgildor/Suns (PyMOL plugin, BSD license), https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-cmd (command line client, BSD license), and https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-search (search engine server, GPLv2 license).

  18. Predicting complex syntactic structure in real time: Processing of negative sentences in Russian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanina, Nina

    2017-11-01

    In Russian negative sentences the verb's direct object may appear either in the accusative case, which is licensed by the verb (as is common cross-linguistically), or in the genitive case, which is licensed by the negation (Russian-specific "genitive-of-negation" phenomenon). Such sentences were used to investigate whether case marking is employed for anticipating syntactic structure, and whether lexical heads other than the verb can be predicted on the basis of a case-marked noun phrase. Experiment 1, a completion task, confirmed that genitive-of-negation is part of Russian speakers' active grammatical repertoire. In Experiments 2 and 3, the genitive/accusative case manipulation on the preverbal object led to shorter reading times at the negation and verb in the genitive versus accusative condition. Furthermore, Experiment 3 manipulated linear order of the direct object and the negated verb in order to distinguish whether the abovementioned facilitatory effect was predictive or integrative in nature, and concluded that the parser actively predicts a verb and (otherwise optional) negation on the basis of a preceding genitive-marked object. Similarly to a head-final language, case-marking information on preverbal noun phrases (NPs) is used by the parser to enable incremental structure building in a free-word-order language such as Russian.

  19. Detecting closing delaminations in laminated composite plates using nonlinear structural intensity and time reversal mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamberti, Alfredo; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Closing delaminations in composite laminated structures exhibit a nonlinear dynamic response when excited by high frequency elastic waves. The contact acoustic nonlinear effects taking place at the damage interface act as a mechanism of energy redistribution from the driving frequency to the nonlinear harmonic frequencies. In this paper, we extend the concept of nonlinear structural intensity (NSI) to the analysis of closing delaminations in composite laminated plates. NSI is calculated using a method based on a combination of finite element and finite difference techniques, which is suitable for processing both numerical and experimental data. NSI is proven to be an effective metric to identify the presence and location of closing delaminations. The highly directional nature of orthotropic composites results in vibrational energy propagating in a different direction from that of the initial elastic wave. This aspect reduces the ability to effectively interrogate the damage and, therefore, the sensitivity to the damage. The time reversal mirror technique is explored as a possible approach to overcome the effect of the material directionality and increase the ability to interrogate the damage. Numerical simulations show that this technique is able to overcome the material directionality and to drastically enhance the ability to interrogate the damage. (paper)

  20. Structure analysis of bubble driven flow by time-resolved PIV and POD techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Dong; Yi, Seung Jae; Kim, Jong Wook; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the recirculation flow motion and turbulence characteristics of liquid flow driven by air bubble stream in a rectangular water tank are studied. The time-resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique is adopted for the quantitative visualization and analysis. 532nm Diode CW laser is used for illumination and orange fluorescent (λex = 540nm, λem = 584nm) particle images are acquired by a 1280X1024 high-speed camera. To obtain clean particle images, 545nm long pass optical filter and an image intensifier are employed and the flow rate of compressed air is 3/min at 0.5MPa. The recirculation and mixing flow field is further investigated by timeresolved Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) analysis technique. It is observed that the large scale recirculation resulting from the interaction between rising bubble stream and side wall is the most dominant flow structure and there are small scale vortical structures moving along with the large scale recirculation flow. It is also verified that the sum of 20 modes of velocity field has about 67.4% of total turbulent energy

  1. Bryophyte species richness on retention aspens recovers in time but community structure does not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldén, Anna; Ovaskainen, Otso; Kotiaho, Janne S; Laaka-Lindberg, Sanna; Halme, Panu

    2014-01-01

    Green-tree retention is a forest management method in which some living trees are left on a logged area. The aim is to offer 'lifeboats' to support species immediately after logging and to provide microhabitats during and after forest re-establishment. Several studies have shown immediate decline in bryophyte diversity after retention logging and thus questioned the effectiveness of this method, but longer term studies are lacking. Here we studied the epiphytic bryophytes on European aspen (Populus tremula L.) retention trees along a 30-year chronosequence. We compared the bryophyte flora of 102 'retention aspens' on 14 differently aged retention sites with 102 'conservation aspens' on 14 differently aged conservation sites. We used a Bayesian community-level modelling approach to estimate the changes in bryophyte species richness, abundance (area covered) and community structure during 30 years after logging. Using the fitted model, we estimated that two years after logging both species richness and abundance of bryophytes declined, but during the following 20-30 years both recovered to the level of conservation aspens. However, logging-induced changes in bryophyte community structure did not fully recover over the same time period. Liverwort species showed some or low potential to benefit from lifeboating and high potential to re-colonise as time since logging increases. Most moss species responded similarly, but two cushion-forming mosses benefited from the logging disturbance while several weft- or mat-forming mosses declined and did not re-colonise in 20-30 years. We conclude that retention trees do not function as equally effective lifeboats for all bryophyte species but are successful in providing suitable habitats for many species in the long-term. To be most effective, retention cuts should be located adjacent to conservation sites, which may function as sources of re-colonisation and support the populations of species that require old-growth forests.

  2. Bryophyte species richness on retention aspens recovers in time but community structure does not.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Oldén

    Full Text Available Green-tree retention is a forest management method in which some living trees are left on a logged area. The aim is to offer 'lifeboats' to support species immediately after logging and to provide microhabitats during and after forest re-establishment. Several studies have shown immediate decline in bryophyte diversity after retention logging and thus questioned the effectiveness of this method, but longer term studies are lacking. Here we studied the epiphytic bryophytes on European aspen (Populus tremula L. retention trees along a 30-year chronosequence. We compared the bryophyte flora of 102 'retention aspens' on 14 differently aged retention sites with 102 'conservation aspens' on 14 differently aged conservation sites. We used a Bayesian community-level modelling approach to estimate the changes in bryophyte species richness, abundance (area covered and community structure during 30 years after logging. Using the fitted model, we estimated that two years after logging both species richness and abundance of bryophytes declined, but during the following 20-30 years both recovered to the level of conservation aspens. However, logging-induced changes in bryophyte community structure did not fully recover over the same time period. Liverwort species showed some or low potential to benefit from lifeboating and high potential to re-colonise as time since logging increases. Most moss species responded similarly, but two cushion-forming mosses benefited from the logging disturbance while several weft- or mat-forming mosses declined and did not re-colonise in 20-30 years. We conclude that retention trees do not function as equally effective lifeboats for all bryophyte species but are successful in providing suitable habitats for many species in the long-term. To be most effective, retention cuts should be located adjacent to conservation sites, which may function as sources of re-colonisation and support the populations of species that require old

  3. A search for fine structure of the time-of-flight spectrum of the fission neutrons of 252Cf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scobie, J.; Scott, R.D.; Feather, N.; Vass, D.G.

    1977-01-01

    A standard time-of-flight arrangement, in which start pulses were supplied by fission fragments and stop pulses by neutrons, has been employed in an attempt to check recent claims of the existence of fine structures in the time-of-flight spectrum of the fission neutrons of 252 Cf. This structure, in the form of spikes with tails towards longer times, has been attributed to the emission of neutrons of short delay (with half-lives of a few to a hundred or so nanoseconds) in the fission process. It has not been possible to find any convincing evidence for the existence of such structure. (author)

  4. Understanding characteristics in multivariate traffic flow time series from complex network structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ying; Zhang, Shen; Tang, Jinjun; Wang, Xiaofei

    2017-07-01

    Discovering dynamic characteristics in traffic flow is the significant step to design effective traffic managing and controlling strategy for relieving traffic congestion in urban cities. A new method based on complex network theory is proposed to study multivariate traffic flow time series. The data were collected from loop detectors on freeway during a year. In order to construct complex network from original traffic flow, a weighted Froenius norm is adopt to estimate similarity between multivariate time series, and Principal Component Analysis is implemented to determine the weights. We discuss how to select optimal critical threshold for networks at different hour in term of cumulative probability distribution of degree. Furthermore, two statistical properties of networks: normalized network structure entropy and cumulative probability of degree, are utilized to explore hourly variation in traffic flow. The results demonstrate these two statistical quantities express similar pattern to traffic flow parameters with morning and evening peak hours. Accordingly, we detect three traffic states: trough, peak and transitional hours, according to the correlation between two aforementioned properties. The classifying results of states can actually represent hourly fluctuation in traffic flow by analyzing annual average hourly values of traffic volume, occupancy and speed in corresponding hours.

  5. A multi-decade time series of kelp forest community structure at San Nicolas Island, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kenner, Michael C.; Estes, James A.; Tinker, M. Tim; Bodkin, James L.; Cowen, Robert K.; Harrold, Christopher; Novak, Mark; Rassweiler, Andrew; Reed, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    San Nicolas Island is surrounded by broad areas of shallow subtidal habitat, characterized by dynamic kelp forest communities that undergo dramatic and abrupt shifts in community composition. Although these reefs are fished, the physical isolation of the island means that they receive less impact from human activities than most reefs in Southern California, making San Nicolas an ideal place to evaluate alternative theories about the dynamics of these communities. Here we present monitoring data from seven sampling stations surrounding the island, including data on fish, invertebrate, and algal abundance. These data are unusual among subtidal monitoring data sets in that they combine relatively frequent sampling (twice per year) with an exceptionally long time series (since 1980). Other outstanding qualities of the data set are the high taxonomic resolution captured and the monitoring of permanent quadrats and swaths where the history of the community structure at specific locations has been recorded through time. Finally, the data span a period that includes two of the strongest ENSO events on record, a major shift in the Pacific decadal oscillation, and the reintroduction of sea otters to the island in 1987 after at least 150 years of absence. These events provide opportunities to evaluate the effects of bottom-up forcing, top-down control, and physical disturbance on shallow rocky reef communities.

  6. A Hilbert transform method for parameter identification of time-varying structures with observer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zuo-Cai; Ren, Wei-Xin; Chen, Gen-Da

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a recursive Hilbert transform method for the time-varying property identification of large-scale shear-type buildings with limited sensor deployments. An observer technique is introduced to estimate the building responses from limited available measurements. For an n-story shear-type building with l measurements (l ≤ n), the responses of other stories without measurements can be estimated based on the first r mode shapes (r ≤ l) as-built conditions and l measurements. Both the measured responses and evaluated responses and their Hilbert transforms are then used to track any variation of structural parameters of a multi-story building over time. Given floor masses, both the stiffness and damping coefficients of the building are identified one-by-one from the top to the bottom story. When variations of parameters are detected, a new developed branch-and-bound technique can be used to update the first r mode shapes with the identified parameters. A 60-story shear building with abruptly varying stiffness at different floors is simulated as an example. The numerical results indicate that the proposed method can detect variations of the parameters of large-scale shear-type buildings with limited sensor deployments at appropriate locations. (paper)

  7. Modeling microbial community structure and functional diversity across time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Peter E; Gibbons, Sean M; Gilbert, Jack A

    2012-07-01

    Microbial communities exhibit exquisitely complex structure. Many aspects of this complexity, from the number of species to the total number of interactions, are currently very difficult to examine directly. However, extraordinary efforts are being made to make these systems accessible to scientific investigation. While recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have improved accessibility to the taxonomic and functional diversity of complex communities, monitoring the dynamics of these systems over time and space - using appropriate experimental design - is still expensive. Fortunately, modeling can be used as a lens to focus low-resolution observations of community dynamics to enable mathematical abstractions of functional and taxonomic dynamics across space and time. Here, we review the approaches for modeling bacterial diversity at both the very large and the very small scales at which microbial systems interact with their environments. We show that modeling can help to connect biogeochemical processes to specific microbial metabolic pathways. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Time line cell tracking for the approximation of lagrangian coherent structures with subgrid accuracy

    KAUST Repository

    Kuhn, Alexander

    2013-12-05

    Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) have become a widespread and powerful method to describe dynamic motion patterns in time-dependent flow fields. The standard way to extract LCS is to compute height ridges in the finite-time Lyapunov exponent field. In this work, we present an alternative method to approximate Lagrangian features for 2D unsteady flow fields that achieve subgrid accuracy without additional particle sampling. We obtain this by a geometric reconstruction of the flow map using additional material constraints for the available samples. In comparison to the standard method, this allows for a more accurate global approximation of LCS on sparse grids and for long integration intervals. The proposed algorithm works directly on a set of given particle trajectories and without additional flow map derivatives. We demonstrate its application for a set of computational fluid dynamic examples, as well as trajectories acquired by Lagrangian methods, and discuss its benefits and limitations. © 2013 The Authors Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Distributed electrical time domain reflectometry (ETDR) structural sensors: design models and proof-of-concept experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stastny, Jeffrey A.; Rogers, Craig A.; Liang, Chen

    1993-07-01

    A parametric design model has been created to optimize the sensitivity of the sensing cable in a distributed sensing system. The system consists of electrical time domain reflectometry (ETDR) signal processing equipment and specially designed sensing cables. The ETDR equipment sends a high-frequency electric pulse (in the giga hertz range) along the sensing cable. Some portion of the electric pulse will be reflected back to the ETDR equipment as a result of the variation of the cable impedance. The electric impedance variation in the sensing cable can be related to its mechanical deformation, such as cable elongation (change in the resistance), shear deformation (change in the capacitance), corrosion of the cable or the materials around the cable (change in inductance and capacitance), etc. The time delay, amplitude, and shape of the reflected pulse provides the means to locate, determine the magnitude, and indicate the nature of the change in the electrical impedance, which is then related to the distributed structural deformation. The sensing cables are an essential part of the health-monitoring system. By using the parametric design model, the optimum cable parameters can be determined for specific deformation. Proof-of-concept experiments also are presented in the paper to demonstrate the utility of an electrical TDR system in distributed sensing applications.

  10. Time Delay Between Dst Index and Magnetic Storm Related Structure in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Fainberg, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Benson et al. (2015, this volume) selected 10 large magnetic storms, with associated Dst minimum values less than or equal to -100 nT, for which high-latitude topside ionospheric electron density profiles are available from topside-sounder satellites. For these 10 storms, we performed a superposition of Dst and interplanetary parameters B, v, N(sub p) and T(sub p). We have found that two interplanetary parameters, namely B and v, are sufficient to reproduce Dst with correlation coefficient cc approximately 0.96 provided that the interplanetary parameter times are taken 0.15 days earlier than the associated Dst times. Thus we have found which part of the solar wind is responsible for each phase of the magnetic storm. This result is also verified for individual storms as well. The total duration of SRS (storm related structure in the solar wind) is 4 - 5 days which is the same as the associated Dst interval of the magnetic storm.

  11. Changes in the Fine Structure of Stochastic Distributions as a Consequence of Space-Time Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shnoll S. E.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a survey of the fine structure stochastic distributions in measurements obtained by me over 50 years. It is shown: (1 The forms of the histograms obtained at each geographic point (at each given moment of time are similar with high probability, even if we register phenomena of completely different nature --- from biochemical reactions to the noise in a gravitational antenna, or alpha-decay. (2 The forms of the histograms change with time. The iterations of the same form have the periods of the stellar day (1.436 min, the solar day (1.440 min, the calendar year (365 solar days, and the sidereal year (365 solar days plus 6 hours and 9 min. (3 At the same instants of the local time, at different geographic points, the forms of the histograms are the same, with high probability. (4 The forms of the histograms depend on the locations of the Moon and the Sun with respect to the horizon. (5 All the facts are proof of the dependance of the form of the histograms on the location of the measured objects with respect to stars, the Sun, and the Moon. (6 At the instants of New Moon and the maxima of solar eclipses there are specific forms of the histograms. (7 It is probable that the observed correlations are not connected to flow power changes (the changes of the gravity force --- we did not find the appropriate periods in changes in histogram form. (8 A sharp anisotropy of space was discovered, registered by alpha-decay detectors armed with collimators. Observations at 54 North (the collimator was pointed at the Pole Star showed no day-long periods, as was also the case for observations at 82 North, near the Pole. Histograms obtained by observations with an Easterly-directed collimator were determined every 718 minutes (half stellar day and with observations using a Westerly-directed collimator. (9 Collimators rotating counter-clockwise, in parallel with the celestial equator, gave the probability of changes in histograms as the number of the

  12. Changes in the Fine Structure of Stochastic Distributions as a Consequence of Space-Time Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shnoll S. E.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a survey of the fine structure stochastic distributions in measurements obtained by me over 50 years. It is shown: (1 The forms of the histograms obtained at each geographic point (at each given moment of time are similar with high probability, even if we register phenomena of completely different nature — from biochemical reactions to the noise in a gravitational antenna, or α-decay. (2 The forms of the histograms change with time. The iterations of the same form have the periods of the stellar day (1.436 min, the solar day (1.440 min, the calendar year (365 solar days, and the sidereal year (365 solar days plus 6 hours and 9 min. (3 At the same instants of the local time, at different geographic points, the forms of the histograms are the same, with high probability. (4 The forms of the histograms depend on the locations of the Moon and the Sun with respect to the horizon. (5 All the facts are proof of the dependance of the form of the histograms on the location of the measured objects with respect to stars, the Sun, and the Moon. (6 At the instants of New Moon and the maxima of solar eclipses there are specific forms of the histograms. (7 It is probable that the observed correlations are not connected to flow power changes (the changes of the gravity force — we did not find the appropriate periods in changes in histogram form. (8 A sharp anisotropy of space was discovered, registered by α-decay detectors armed with collimators. Observations at 54◦ North (the collimator was pointed at the Pole Star showed no day-long periods, as was also the case for observations at 82◦ North, near the Pole. Histograms obtained by observations with an Easterly-directed collimator were determined every 718 minutes (half stellar day and with observations using a Westerly-directed collimator. (9 Collimators rotating counter-clockwise, in parallel with the celestial equator, gave the probability of changes in histograms as the number of the

  13. Efficient scattering of electrons below few keV by Time Domain Structures around injection fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasko, I.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F.; Artemyev, A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.

    2016-12-01

    Van Allen Probes observations show an abundance of non-linear large-amplitude electrostatic spikes around injection fronts in the outer radiation belt. These spikes referred to as Time Domain Structures (TDS) include electron holes, double layers and more complicated solitary waves. The electron scattering driven by TDS may not be evaluated via the standard quasi-linear theory, since TDS are in principle non-linear plasma modes. In this paper we analyze the scattering of electrons by three-dimensional TDS (with non-negligible perpendicular electric field) around injection fronts. We derive the analytical formulas describing the local scattering by single TDS and show that the most efficiently scattered electrons are those in the first cyclotron resonance (electrons crossing TDS on a time scale comparable with their gyroperiod). The analytical formulas are verified via the test-particle simulation. We compute the bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients and demonstrate their dependence on the TDS spatial distribution, individual TDS parameters and L shell. We show that TDS are able to provide the pitch-angle scattering of <5 keV electrons at rate 10-2-10-4 s-1 and, thus, can be responsible for driving loss of electrons out of injections fronts on a time scale from few minutes to few hours. TDS can be, thus, responsible for driving diffuse aurora precipitations conjugated to injection fronts. We show that the pitch-angle scattering rates driven by TDS are comparable with those due to chorus waves and exceed those due to electron cyclotron harmonics. For injections fronts with no significant wave activity in the frequency range corresponding to chorus waves, TDS can be even dominant mechanism for losses of below few keV electrons.

  14. The time structure of the EAS muon component observed in the KASCADE experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brancus, I.M.; Badea, A.F.; Duma, M.; Vulpescu, B.; Rebel, H.; Haeusler, R.; Mathes, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    The determination of the chemical composition in the energy range of 10 15 eV is the scientific goal of the KASCADE (Karlsruhe Shower Core and Array Detector) experiment. Under this aspect, the temporal structure of the muon component of extended air showers (EAS) is of great interest for a detailed understanding of the EAS features, since the muon arrival time distribution maps the longitudinal EAS development via the time-of-flight of muons produced in large atmospheric heights and shows effects for mass discrimination of the EAS primaries. Using the muon detection and timing facilities of the KASCADE Central Detector, in particular the 'trigger' layer of 456 scintillation detectors and the position-sensitive large-area multiwire proportional chambers, installed under the hadron calorimeter, the muon arrival time distributions (E μ ≥ 2 GeV) registered relative to the arrival of the foremost muons have been measured. Their dependence on various shower quantities, the distance from the shower center R μ , the zenith angle Θ of shower incidence and muon shower content N μ tr (which is an identifier of the primary energy), have been studied. We characterize the single arrival time distribution by various different moments: the median Δτ 0.50 , the 1 st and the 3 rd quartiles (Δτ 0.25 and Δτ 0.75 ) which express different features of the distributions. The dependence of the measured median distributions on the distance from the shower center for a restricted Θ-range and averaged over the observed shower size spectrum is presented. The shapes can be approximated by a gamma probability distribution function. There are also displayed the mean values (Δτ 0.50 ) and the dispersion σ 0.50 of the median distributions, whose R μ -variations represent the (median) profile on the EAS muon disc. The theoretical interpretation of this kind of experimental results on the basis of Monte Carlo simulations of the EAS development is under progress. (authors)

  15. A direct solution procedure for calculating time-varying stresses in structural systems by the principles of variational calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanou, G.D.

    1975-01-01

    The calculation of time-dependent stresses in structural systems operating at elevated temperatures with temperature gradients is discussed. The proposed method described in this report is of a direct formulation technique and

  16. Smoothing of the Time Structure of Slowly Extracted Beam From Synchrotron by RF-Knock-out Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloshnyuk, A.V.; Bezshyjko, O.A.; Dolinskiy, A.V.; Dolinskij, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    Results of the study are presented in work on smoothing of the time structure of the bunch, slowly extracted from synchrotron. The numerical algorithm has been designed for study of the influence of the radio-frequency field of the resonator on time structure of the bunch. The numerical algorithm is based on method Monte-Carlo, where particles in the beam have been extracted by means of slow moving to the third-order resonance conditions. Characteristics of the time structure are vastly smoothed when synchrotron oscillations have been used as first experiments showed. Theoretical motivation of the reasons, influencing upon time structure of the slowly extracted beam is explained in given work

  17. Short-Time Structural Stability of Compressible Vortex Sheets with Surface Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Ben

    2016-11-01

    Assume we start with an initial vortex-sheet configuration which consists of two inviscid fluids with density bounded below flowing smoothly past each other, where a strictly positive fixed coefficient of surface tension produces a surface tension force across the common interface, balanced by the pressure jump. We model the fluids by the compressible Euler equations in three space dimensions with a very general equation of state relating the pressure, entropy and density such that the sound speed is positive. We prove that, for a short time, there exists a unique solution of the equations with the same structure. The mathematical approach consists of introducing a carefully chosen artificial viscosity-type regularisation which allows one to linearise the system so as to obtain a collection of transport equations for the entropy, pressure and curl together with a parabolic-type equation for the velocity which becomes fairly standard after rotating the velocity according to the interface normal. We prove a high order energy estimate for the non-linear equations that is independent of the artificial viscosity parameter which allows us to send it to zero. This approach loosely follows that introduced by Shkoller et al. in the setting of a compressible liquid-vacuum interface. Although already considered by Coutand et al. [10] and Lindblad [17], we also make some brief comments on the case of a compressible liquid-vacuum interface, which is obtained from the vortex sheets problem by replacing one of the fluids by vacuum, where it is possible to obtain a structural stability result even without surface tension.

  18. Augmented real-time navigation with critical structure proximity alerts for endoscopic skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Benjamin J; Daly, Michael J; Chan, Harley; Vescan, Allan; Witterick, Ian J; Irish, Jonathan C

    2014-04-01

    Image-guided surgery (IGS) systems are frequently utilized during cranial base surgery to aid in orientation and facilitate targeted surgery. We wished to assess the performance of our recently developed localized intraoperative virtual endoscopy (LIVE)-IGS prototype in a preclinical setting prior to deployment in the operating room. This system combines real-time ablative instrument tracking, critical structure proximity alerts, three-dimensional virtual endoscopic views, and intraoperative cone-beam computed tomographic image updates. Randomized-controlled trial plus qualitative analysis. Skull base procedures were performed on 14 cadaver specimens by seven fellowship-trained skull base surgeons. Each subject performed two endoscopic transclival approaches; one with LIVE-IGS and one using a conventional IGS system in random order. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) scores were documented for each dissection, and a semistructured interview was recorded for qualitative assessment. The NASA-TLX scores for mental demand, effort, and frustration were significantly reduced with the LIVE-IGS system in comparison to conventional navigation (P < .05). The system interface was judged to be intuitive and most useful when there was a combination of high spatial demand, reduced or absent surface landmarks, and proximity to critical structures. The development of auditory icons for proximity alerts during the trial better informed the surgeon while limiting distraction. The LIVE-IGS system provided accurate, intuitive, and dynamic feedback to the operating surgeon. Further refinements to proximity alerts and visualization settings will enhance orientation while limiting distraction. The system is currently being deployed in a prospective clinical trial in skull base surgery. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Elastic-plastic-creep response of structures under composite time history of loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zudans, Z.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to derive the theory, to develop efficient numerical techniques accounting for plasticity, creep and overall equilibrium, to describe the overall structure of the resulting computer program, and to demonstrate the capability of this analysis on a real structure. Classical plasticity theory is used to develop a novel method based on the concept of 'plastic stress' for consideration of inelastic behavior. It is shown that materials stres-strain curves can be followed to any desired degree of accuracy both for isotropic and kinematic hardening. It is further shown that for kinematic hardening it is necessary to base the incremental change on the state corresponding to the mean of the initial and the final states in order to satisfy the yield condition at the final state. The equation of state and strain hardening is used to describe the creep behavior. A novel numerical technique to describe a complex load history is developed by using time as a parameter, history breakpoint determination by scanning of various load vectors and by linear interpolation between any two breakpoints in the load history. The 'plastic stress' load vector concept is utilized with iteration and extrapolation to converge to the equilibrium states with simultaneous satisfaction of the stress-strain relations for each of the iterated states. The essential features of the computer program DYPLAS-FSH, based on the theory and techniques described above, and a postprocessor program POR-FSH, based on RDT F9-5T for ratcheting and fatigue evaluation, are identified and discussed. These computer programs are used to analyse the ellipsoidal pressure vessel head of the intermediate heat exchanger of EBR-II, penetrated by two closely spaced non-radial nozzles, subjected to four consecutive composite cycles of complex mechanical and thermal loads

  20. Leisure activities are linked to mental health benefits by providing time structure: comparing employed, unemployed and homemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, William K; Geiger, Ashley M; Wolf, Jutta M

    2017-01-01

    Unemployment has consistently been linked to negative mental health outcomes, emphasising the need to characterise the underlying mechanisms. The current study aimed at testing whether compared with other employment groups, fewer leisure activities observed in unemployment may contribute to elevated risk for negative mental health via loss of time structure. Depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression), leisure activities (exercise, self-focused, social), and time structure (Time Structure Questionnaire (TSQ)) were assessed cross-sectionally in 406 participants (unemployed=155, employed=140, homemakers=111) recruited through Amazon Mechanical Turk. Controlling for gender and age, structural equation modelling revealed time structure partially (employed, homemakers) and fully (unemployed) mediated the relationship between leisure activities and depressive symptoms. With the exception of differential effects for structured routines, all other TSQ factors (sense of purpose, present orientation, effective organisation and persistence) contributed significantly to all models. These findings support the idea that especially for the unemployed, leisure activities impose their mental health benefits through increasing individuals' perception of spending their time effectively. Social leisure activities that provide a sense of daily structure may thereby be a particularly promising low-cost intervention to improve mental health in this population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Time-dependent chemo-electro-mechanical behavior of hydrogel-based structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichsenring, Peter; Wallmersperger, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Charged hydrogels are ionic polymer gels and belong to the class of smart materials. These gels are multiphasic materials which consist of a solid phase, a fluid phase and an ionic phase. Due to the presence of bound charges these materials are stimuli-responsive to electrical or chemical loads. The application of electrical or chemical stimuli as well as mechanical loads lead to a viscoelastic response. On the macroscopic scale, the response is governed by a local reversible release or absorption of water which, in turn, leads to a local decrease or increase of mass and a respective volume change. Furthermore, the chemo-electro-mechanical equilibrium of a hydrogel depends on the chemical composition of the gel and the surrounding solution bath. Due to the presence of bound charges in the hydrogel, this system can be understood as an osmotic cell where differences in the concentration of mobile ions in the gel and solution domain lead to an osmotic pressure difference. In the present work, a continuum-based numerical model is presented in order to describe the time-dependent swelling behavior of hydrogels. The numerical model is based on the Theory of Porous Media and captures the fluid-solid, fluid-ion and ion-ion interactions. As a direct consequence of the chemo-electro-mechanical equilibrium, the corresponding boundary conditions are defined following the equilibrium conditions. For the interaction of the hydrogel with surrounding mechanical structures, also respective jump condtions are formulated. Finaly, numerical results of the time-dependent behavior of a hydrogel-based chemo-sensor will be presented.

  2. Structured printed referral letter (form letter; saves time and improves communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.P.J.C. Ramanayake

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Referral of patients to hospitals, specialists and other institutions is an essential part of primary health care. Patients are referred to specialists when investigation or therapeutic options are exhausted in primary care or when opinion or advice is needed from them. Referral has considerable implications for patients, health care system and health care costs. Good communication between primary and secondary care is essential for the smooth running of any health care system. Referral and reply letters are the sole means of communication between doctors most of the time and breakdown in communication could lead to poor continuity of care, delayed diagnoses, polypharmacy, increased litigation risk and unnecessary testing. A referral letter also helps to avoid patient dissatisfaction and loss of confidence in family physician. Studies of referral letters have reported that specialists are dissatisfied with their quality and content. Inclusion of letter writing skills in the medical curriculum, peer assessment and feedback have shown to improve the quality of referral letters. . Form letters have shown to enhance information content and communication in referral process. In Sri Lanka referral letters are usually hand written and frequent complaints are that these letters do not contain adequate information and retrieval of information is a problem due to poor legibility and clarity. Sometimes Primary care doctors refer patients to hospitals and specialists with only verbal instructions. To address these short comings this form letter was introduced. Based on the guidelines and systematic review of published articles, items of information to be included were decided. Printed forms of the letter are kept in the practice and the doctor has to just fill up relevant information under each heading. The objectives of introducing this structured referral letter was to improve the quality and standard of referral letters and save time for both general

  3. Structural integrity of callosal midbody influences intermanual transfer in a motor reaction-time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonzano, Laura; Tacchino, Andrea; Roccatagliata, Luca; Mancardi, Giovanni Luigi; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Bove, Marco

    2011-02-01

    Training one hand on a motor task results in performance improvements in the other hand, also when stimuli are randomly presented (nonspecific transfer). Corpus callosum (CC) is the main structure involved in interhemispheric information transfer; CC pathology occurs in patients with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and is related to altered performance of tasks requiring interhemispheric transfer of sensorimotor information. To investigate the role of CC in nonspecific transfer during a pure motor reaction-time task, we combined motor behavior with diffusion tensor imaging analysis in PwMS. Twenty-two PwMS and 10 controls, all right-handed, were asked to respond to random stimuli with appropriate finger opposition movements with the right (learning) and then the left (transfer) hand. PwMS were able to improve motor performance reducing response times with practice with a trend similar to controls and preserved the ability to transfer the acquired motor information from the learning to the transfer hand. A higher variability in the transfer process, indicated by a significantly larger standard deviation of mean nonspecific transfer, was found in the PwMS group with respect to the control group, suggesting the presence of subtle impairments in interhemispheric communication in some patients. Then, we correlated the amount of nonspecific transfer with mean fractional anisotropy (FA) values, indicative of microstructural damage, obtained in five CC subregions identified on PwMS's FA maps. A significant correlation was found only in the subregion including posterior midbody (Pearson's r = 0.74, P = 0.003), which thus seems to be essential for the interhemispheric transfer of information related to pure sensorimotor tasks. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Rock Slope Monitoring from 4D Time-Lapse Structure from Motion Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromer, Ryan; Abellan, Antonio; Chyz, Alex; Hutchinson, Jean

    2017-04-01

    Structure from Motion (SfM) photogrammetry has become an important tool for studying earth surface processes because of its flexibility, ease of use, low cost and its capability of producing high quality 3-D surface models. A major benefit of SfM is that model accuracy is fit for purpose and surveys can be designed to meet a large range of spatial and temporal scales. In the Earth sciences, research in time-lapse SfM photogrammetry or videogrammetry is an area that is difficult to undertake due to complexities in acquiring, processing and managing large 4D datasets and represents an area with significant advancement potential (Eltner et al. 2016). In this study, we investigate the potential of 4D time-lapse SfM to monitor unstable rock slopes. We tested an array of statically mounted cameras collecting time-lapse photos of a limestone rock slope located along a highway in Canada. Our setup consisted of 8 DSLR cameras with 50 mm prime lenses spaced 2-3 m apart at a distance of 10 m from the slope. The portion of the rock slope monitored was 20 m wide and 6 m high. We collected data in four phases, each having 50 photographs taken simultaneously by each camera. The first phase of photographs was taken of the stable slope. In each successive phase, we gradually moved small, discrete blocks within the rock slope by 5-15 mm, simulating pre-failure deformation of rockfall. During the last phase we also removed discrete rock blocks, simulating rockfall. We used Agisoft Photoscan's 4D processing functionality and timeline tools to create 3D point clouds from the time-lapse photographs. These tools have the benefit of attaining better accuracy photo alignments as a greater number of photos are used. For change detection, we used the 4D filtering and calibration technique proposed by Kromer et al. (2015), which takes advantage of high degrees of spatial and temporal point redundancy to decrease measurement uncertainty. Preliminary results show that it is possible to attain

  5. Persistence versus extinction for a class of discrete-time structured population models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wen; Smith, Hal L; Thieme, Horst R

    2016-03-01

    We provide sharp conditions distinguishing persistence and extinction for a class of discrete-time dynamical systems on the positive cone of an ordered Banach space generated by a map which is the sum of a positive linear contraction A and a nonlinear perturbation G that is compact and differentiable at zero in the direction of the cone. Such maps arise as year-to-year projections of population age, stage, or size-structure distributions in population biology where typically A has to do with survival and individual development and G captures the effects of reproduction. The threshold distinguishing persistence and extinction is the principal eigenvalue of (II−A)(−1)G'(0) provided by the Krein-Rutman Theorem, and persistence is described in terms of associated eigenfunctionals. Our results significantly extend earlier persistence results of the last two authors which required more restrictive conditions on G. They are illustrated by application of the results to a plant model with a seed bank.

  6. Real-time deformations of organ based on structural mechanics for surgical simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Tagaya, Masashi; Tamura, Nobuhiko; Tsumura, Norimichi; Miyake, Yoichi

    2006-03-01

    This research proposes the deformation model of organs for the development of the medical training system using Virtual Reality (VR) technology. First, the proposed model calculates the strains of coordinate axis. Secondly, the deformation is obtained by mapping the coordinate of the object to the strained coordinate. We assume the beams in the coordinate space to calculate the strain of the coordinate axis. The forces acting on the object are converted to the forces applied to the beams. The bend and the twist of the beams are calculated based on the theory of structural mechanics. The bend is derived by the finite element method. We propose two deformation methods which differ in the position of the beams in the coordinate space. One method locates the beams along the three orthogonal axes (x, y, z). Another method locates the beam in the area where the deformation is large. In addition, the strain of the coordinate axis is attenuated in proportion to the distance from the point of action to consider the attenuation of the stress which is a viscoelastic feature of the organs. The proposed model needs less computational cost compared to the conventional deformation method since our model does not need to divide the object into the elasticity element. The proposed model was implemented in the laparoscopic surgery training system, and a real-time deformation can be realized.

  7. Recursive solution for dynamic response of one-dimensional structures with time-dependent boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abadi, Mohammad Tahaye

    2015-01-01

    A recursive solution method is derived for the transient response of one-dimensional structures subjected to the general form of time dependent boundary conditions. Unlike previous solution methods that assumed the separation of variables, the present method involves formulating and solving the dynamic problems using the summation of two single-argument functions satisfying the motion equation. Based on boundary and initial conditions, a recursive procedure is derived to determine the single-argument functions. Such a procedure is applied to the general form of boundary conditions, and an analytical solution is derived by solving the recursive equation. The present solution method is implemented for base excitation problems, and the results are compared with those of the previous analytical solution and the Finite element (FE) analysis. The FE results converge to the present analytical solution, although considerable error is found in predicting a solution method on the basis of the separation of variables. The present analytical solution predicts the transient response for wave propagation problems in broadband excitation frequencies.

  8. Recursive solution for dynamic response of one-dimensional structures with time-dependent boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abadi, Mohammad Tahaye [Aerospace Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A recursive solution method is derived for the transient response of one-dimensional structures subjected to the general form of time dependent boundary conditions. Unlike previous solution methods that assumed the separation of variables, the present method involves formulating and solving the dynamic problems using the summation of two single-argument functions satisfying the motion equation. Based on boundary and initial conditions, a recursive procedure is derived to determine the single-argument functions. Such a procedure is applied to the general form of boundary conditions, and an analytical solution is derived by solving the recursive equation. The present solution method is implemented for base excitation problems, and the results are compared with those of the previous analytical solution and the Finite element (FE) analysis. The FE results converge to the present analytical solution, although considerable error is found in predicting a solution method on the basis of the separation of variables. The present analytical solution predicts the transient response for wave propagation problems in broadband excitation frequencies.

  9. Interpretive Structural Modeling Of Implementation Enablers For Just In Time In ICPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Upadhye

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Indian Corrugated Packaging Industries (ICPI have built up tough competition among the industries in terms of product cost, quality, product delivery, flexibility, and finally customer’s demand. As their customers, mostly OEMs are asking Just in Time deliveries, ICPI must implement JIT in their system. The term "JIT” as, it denotes a system that utilizes less, in terms of all inputs, to create the same outputs as those created by a traditional mass production system, while contributing increased varieties for the end customer. (Womack et al. 1990 "JIT" focuses on abolishing or reducing Muda (“Muda", the Japanese word for waste and on maximizing or fully utilizing activities that add value from the customer's perspective. There is lack of awareness in identifying the right enablers of JIT implementation. Therefore, this study has tried to find out the enablers from the literature review and expert’s opinions from corrugated packaging industries and developed the relationship matrix to see the driving power and dependence between them. In this study, modeling has been done in order to know the interrelationships between the enablers with the help of Interpretive Structural Modeling and Cross Impact Matrix Multiplication Applied to Classification (MICMAC analysis for the performance of Indian corrugated packaging industries.

  10. An improved energy conserving implicit time integration algorithm for nonlinear dynamic structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haug, E.; Rouvray, A.L. de; Nguyen, Q.S.

    1977-01-01

    This study proposes a general nonlinear algorithm stability criterion; it introduces a nonlinear algorithm, easily implemented in existing incremental/iterative codes, and it applies the new scheme beneficially to problems of linear elastic dynamic snap buckling. Based on the concept of energy conservation, the paper outlines an algorithm which degenerates into the trapezoidal rule, if applied to linear systems. The new algorithm conserves energy in systems having elastic potentials up to the fourth order in the displacements. This is true in the important case of nonlinear total Lagrange formulations where linear elastic material properties are substituted. The scheme is easily implemented in existing incremental-iterative codes with provisions for stiffness reformation and containing the basic Newmark scheme. Numerical analyses of dynamic stability can be dramatically sensitive to amplitude errors, because damping algorithms may mask, and overestimating schemes may numerically trigger, the physical instability. The newly proposed scheme has been applied with larger time steps and less cost to the dynamic snap buckling of simple one and multi degree-of-freedom structures for various initial conditions

  11. Electricity consumption-GDP nexus in Pakistan: A structural time series analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javid, Muhammad; Qayyum, Abdul

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the relationships among electricity consumption, real economic activity, real price of electricity and the UEDT (underlying energy demand trend) at the aggregate and sectoral levels, namely, for the residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural sectors. To achieve this goal, an electricity demand function for Pakistan is estimated by applying the structural time series technique to annual data for the period from 1972 to 2012. In addition to identifying the size and significance of the price and income elasticities, this technique also uncovers UEDT for the whole economy as well as for sub-sectors. The results suggest that the nature of the trend is not linear and deterministic but stochastic in form. The UEDT for the electricity usage of the commercial, agricultural and residential sectors shows an upward slope. This upward slope of the UEDT suggests that either energy efficient equipment has not been introduced in these sectors or any energy efficiency improvements due to technical progress is outweighed by other exogenous factors. - Highlights: • Electricity demand function is estimated by applying the STSM approach. • The results suggest that nature of trend is stochastic in form. • Low price elasticity reflects weak link between the electricity price and demand. • Low price elasticity implies that demand did not react to changes in price

  12. Statistical inference approach to structural reconstruction of complex networks from binary time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chuang; Chen, Han-Shuang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2018-02-01

    Complex networks hosting binary-state dynamics arise in a variety of contexts. In spite of previous works, to fully reconstruct the network structure from observed binary data remains challenging. We articulate a statistical inference based approach to this problem. In particular, exploiting the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm, we develop a method to ascertain the neighbors of any node in the network based solely on binary data, thereby recovering the full topology of the network. A key ingredient of our method is the maximum-likelihood estimation of the probabilities associated with actual or nonexistent links, and we show that the EM algorithm can distinguish the two kinds of probability values without any ambiguity, insofar as the length of the available binary time series is reasonably long. Our method does not require any a priori knowledge of the detailed dynamical processes, is parameter-free, and is capable of accurate reconstruction even in the presence of noise. We demonstrate the method using combinations of distinct types of binary dynamical processes and network topologies, and provide a physical understanding of the underlying reconstruction mechanism. Our statistical inference based reconstruction method contributes an additional piece to the rapidly expanding "toolbox" of data based reverse engineering of complex networked systems.

  13. Difference structures from time-resolved small-angle and wide-angle x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepal, Prakash; Saldin, D. K.

    2018-05-01

    Time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering/wide-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) is capable of recovering difference structures directly from difference SAXS/WAXS curves. It does so by means of the theory described here because the structural changes in pump-probe detection in a typical time-resolved experiment are generally small enough to be confined to a single residue or group in close proximity which is identified by a method akin to the difference Fourier method of time-resolved crystallography. If it is assumed, as is usual with time-resolved structures, that the moved atoms lie within the residue, the 100-fold reduction in the search space (assuming a typical protein has about 100 residues) allows the exaction of the structure by a simulated annealing algorithm with a huge reduction in computing time and leads to a greater resolution by varying the positions of atoms only within that residue. This reduction in the number of potential moved atoms allows us to identify the actual motions of the individual atoms. In the case of a crystal, time-resolved calculations are normally performed using the difference Fourier method, which is, of course, not directly applicable to SAXS/WAXS. The method developed in this paper may be thought of as a substitute for that method which allows SAXS/WAXS (and hence disordered molecules) to also be used for time-resolved structural work.

  14. Determining the structural relaxation times deep in the glassy state of the pharmaceutical Telmisartan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrjanowicz, K; Paluch, M [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Ngai, K L [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5320 (United States)

    2010-03-31

    By using the dielectric relaxation method proposed recently by Casalini and Roland (2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 035701), we were able to determine the structural alpha-relaxation times deep in the glassy state of the pharmaceutical, Telmisartan. Normally, deep in the glassy state tau{sub a}lpha is so long that it cannot be measured but tau{sub b}eta, which is usually much shorter, can be directly determined. The method basically takes advantage of the connection between the alpha-relaxation and the secondary beta-relaxation of the Johari-Goldstein kind, including a relation between their relaxation times tau{sub a}lpha and tau{sub b}eta, respectively. Thus, tau{sub a}lpha of Telmisartan were determined by monitoring the change of the dielectric beta-loss, epsilon'', with physical aging time at temperatures well below the vitrification temperature. The values of tau{sub a}lpha were compared with those expected by the coupling model (CM). Unequivocal comparison cannot be made in the case of Telmisartan because its beta-loss peak is extremely broad, and the CM predicts only an order of magnitude agreement between the primitive relaxation frequency and the beta-peak frequency. We also made an attempt to analyze all isothermal and aging susceptibility data after transformation into the electric modulus representation. The tau{sub a}lpha found in the glass state by using the method of Casalini and Roland in the modulus representation are similar to those obtained in the susceptibility representation. However, it is remarkable that the stretching parameter beta{sub KWWM} = 0.51 in the electric modulus representation gives more precise fits to the aging data than in the susceptibility representation with beta{sub KWW} = 0.61. Our results suggest that the electric modulus representation may be useful as an alternative to analyze aging data, especially in the case of highly polar glassformers having a large ratio of low frequency and high frequency dielectric

  15. Three-dimensional crustal structure for the Mendocino Triple Junction region from local earthquake travel times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdonck, D.; Zandt, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-10

    The large-scale, three-dimensional geometry of the Mendocino Triple Junction at Cape Mendocino, California, was investigated by inverting nearly 19,000 P wave arrival times from over 1400 local earthquakes to estimate the three-dimensional velocity structure and hypocentral parameters. A velocity grid 175 km (N-S) by 125 km (E-W) centered near Garberville, California, was constructed with 25 km horizontal and 5 km vertical node spacing. The model was well resolved near Cape Mendocino, where the earthquakes and stations are concentrated. At about 40.6{degrees}N latitude a high-velocity gradient between 6.5 and 7.5 km/s dips gently to the south and east from about 15 km depth near the coast. Relocated hypocenters concentrate below this high gradient which the authors interpret as the oceanic crust of the subducted Gorda Plate. Therefore the depth to the top of the Gorda Plate near Cape Mendocino is interpreted to be {approximately} 15 km. The Gorda Plate appears intact and dipping {approximately}8{degrees} eastward due to subduction and flexing downward 6{degrees}-12{degrees} to the south. Both hypocenters and velocity structure suggest that the southern edge of the plate intersects the coastline at 40.3{degrees}N latitude and maintains a linear trend 15{degrees} south of east to at least 123{degrees}W longitude. The top of a large low-velocity region at 20-30 km depth extends about 50 km N-S and 75 km E-W (roughly between Garberville and Covelo) and is located above and south of the southern edge of the Gorda Plate. The authors interpret this low velocity area to be locally thickened crust (8-10 km) due to either local compressional forces associated with north-south compression caused by the northward impingement of the rigid Pacific Plate or by underthrusting of the base of the accretionary subduction complex at the southern terminous of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. 66 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Local time variations of the middle atmosphere of Venus: Solar-related structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasova, L.; Khatountsev, I. V.; Ignatiev, N. I.; Moroz, V. I.

    Three-dimensional fields (latitude — altitude — local time) of temperature and aerosol in the upper clouds, obtained from the Venera-15 IR spectrometry data, were studied to search for the solar-related structures. The temperature variation at the isobaric levels vs. solar longitude was presented as a superposition of the cosines with periods of 1, 1/2, 1/3 and 1/4 Venusian days. At low latitudes the diurnal tidal component reaches a maximum above 0.2 mb (92km) level. At high latitudes it dominates at P> 50 mb (68 km) in the cold collar, being roughly twice as much as the semidiurnal one and passing through the maximum of 13 K at 400 mb (57 km). The semidiurnal tidal amplitude exceeds the diurnal one below 90 km (where its maximum locates near 83 km), and also in the upper clouds, above 58 km. At low latitudes the 1/3 days component predominates at 10 - 50 mb (68-76 km). In the upper clouds, where most of the solar energy, absorbed in the middle atmosphere, deposits, all four tidal components, including wavenumbers 3 and 4, have significant amplitudes. A position of the upper boundary of the clouds depends on local time in such a way that the lowest height of the clouds is observed in the morning at all selected latitude ranges. At low latitudes the highest position of the upper boundary of the clouds (at 1218 cm -1) is found at 8 - 9 PM, whereas the lowest one is near the morning terminator. At high latitudes the lowest position of the upper boundary of the clouds shifts towards the dayside being at 10:30 AM at 75° in the cold collar and the highest one shifts to 4 PM. The zonal mean altitude of the upper boundary of the clouds decreases from 69 km at 15° to 59 km at 75°. The diurnal tidal component has the highest amplitude in the cold collar (1.5 km). At low latitudes both amplitudes, diurnal and semidiurnal, reach the values 0.8 - 1 km.

  17. Market-based control strategy for long-span structures considering the multi-time delay issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongnan; Song, Jianzhu; Li, Gang

    2017-01-01

    To solve the different time delays that exist in the control device installed on spatial structures, in this study, discrete analysis using a 2 N precise algorithm was selected to solve the multi-time-delay issue for long-span structures based on the market-based control (MBC) method. The concept of interval mixed energy was introduced from computational structural mechanics and optimal control research areas, and it translates the design of the MBC multi-time-delay controller into a solution for the segment matrix. This approach transforms the serial algorithm in time to parallel computing in space, greatly improving the solving efficiency and numerical stability. The designed controller is able to consider the issue of time delay with a linear controlling force combination and is especially effective for large time-delay conditions. A numerical example of a long-span structure was selected to demonstrate the effectiveness of the presented controller, and the time delay was found to have a significant impact on the results.

  18. Characterization of high-power RF structures using time-domain field codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, C.C.; DeFord, J.F.; Swatloski, T.L.

    1992-01-01

    We have modeled gyrotron windows and gyrotron amplifier sever structures for TE modes in the 100--150 GHz range and have computed the reflection and transmission characteristics from the field data. Good agreement with frequency domain codes and analytic analysis have been obtained for some simple geometries. We present results for realistic structures with lousy coatings and describe implementation of microwave diagnostics

  19. Asymptotic structure of space-time with a positive cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesavan, Aruna

    In general relativity a satisfactory framework for describing isolated systems exists when the cosmological constant Lambda is zero. The detailed analysis of the asymptotic structure of the gravitational field, which constitutes the framework of asymptotic flatness, lays the foundation for research in diverse areas in gravitational science. However, the framework is incomplete in two respects. First, asymptotic flatness provides well-defined expressions for physical observables such as energy and momentum as 'charges' of asymptotic symmetries at null infinity, [special character omitted] +. But the asymptotic symmetry group, called the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs group is infinite-dimensional and a tensorial expression for the 'charge' integral of an arbitrary BMS element is missing. We address this issue by providing a charge formula which is a 2-sphere integral over fields local to the 2-sphere and refers to no extraneous structure. The second, and more significant shortcoming is that observations have established that Lambda is not zero but positive in our universe. Can the framework describing isolated systems and their gravitational radiation be extended to incorporate this fact? In this dissertation we show that, unfortunately, the standard framework does not extend from the Lambda = 0 case to the Lambda > 0 case in a physically useful manner. In particular, we do not have an invariant notion of gravitational waves in the non-linear regime, nor an analog of the Bondi 'news tensor', nor positive energy theorems. In addition, we argue that the stronger boundary condition of conformal flatness of intrinsic metric on [special character omitted]+, which reduces the asymptotic symmetry group from Diff([special character omitted]) to the de Sitter group, is insufficient to characterize gravitational fluxes and is physically unreasonable. To obtain guidance for the full non-linear theory with Lambda > 0, linearized gravitational waves in de Sitter space-time are analyzed in

  20. Evaluating the coefficient of thermal expansion using time periods of minimal thermal gradient for a temperature driven structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, J.; Abdel-Jaber, H.; Yarnold, M.; Glisic, B.

    2017-04-01

    Structural Health Monitoring aims to characterize the performance of a structure from a combination of recorded sensor data and analytic techniques. Many methods are concerned with quantifying the elastic response of the structure, treating temperature changes as noise in the analysis. While these elastic profiles do demonstrate a portion of structural behavior, thermal loads on a structure can induce comparable strains to elastic loads. Understanding this relationship between the temperature of the structure and the resultant strain and displacement can provide in depth knowledge of the structural condition. A necessary parameter for this form of analysis is the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE). The CTE of a material relates the amount of expansion or contraction a material undergoes per degree change in temperature, and can be determined from temperature-strain relationship given that the thermal strain can be isolated. Many times with concrete, the actual amount of expansion with temperature in situ varies from the given values for the CTE due to thermally generated elastic strain, which complicates evaluation of the CTE. To accurately characterize the relationship between temperature and strain on a structure, the actual thermal behavior of the structure needs to be analyzed. This rate can vary for different parts of a structure, depending on boundary conditions. In a case of unrestrained structures, the strain in the structure should be linearly related to the temperature change. Thermal gradients in a structure can affect this relationship, as they induce curvature and deplanations in the cross section. This paper proposes a method that addresses these challenges in evaluating the CTE.

  1. People, Place, and Time: How Structural Fieldwork Helps World-Systems Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul K. Gellert

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most insightful work in the political economy of the world-system area has been produced by researchers whose extensive fieldwork offers them deep familiarity with people and locales. Few other methods are as useful to understand the impacts of structural change on daily life and the ways agents resist, alter, and shape emerging structures. Yet such structural fieldwork is marginalized by the over-reliance of pedagogical materials on social constructionist, social psychological, or interactionist perspectives and also in world-systems research and writing by the privileging of long durée historical or quantitative cross-national methods. This paper introduces the concept of structural fieldwork to describe a qualitative field methodology in which the researcher is self-consciously guided by considerations emerging out of macro-sociological theories. We identify four advantages of structural fieldwork: the illumination of power’s multiple dimensions; examination of agency and its boundaries or limitations within broad political and economic structures; attention to nuances of change and durability, spatial and temporal specificities, and processes of change and durability; and challenging and extending social theory. These advantages are illustrated in select examples from existing literature and by discussion of the two author’s fieldwork-based research. The paper concludes that explicit attention to fieldwork may strengthen political economy and world-systems research and also de-marginalize political economy informed by structural fieldwork.

  2. Resistivity structures imaging using time-domain electromagnetic data; TDEM ho ni yoru chika hiteiko kozo no imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, K [Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan). School of Science and Engineering; Endo, M [Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    The kernel function for transient vertical magnetic dipole was defined for semi-infinite uniform medium, and the 1-D imaging algorithm by TDEM (time-domain electromagnetic) method was developed for underground resistivity structure. Electromagnetic migration method directly images sectional resistivity profiles from the data observed by frequency-domain MT method, and determines underground resistivity profiles by integral equation of MT field using the concept of return travel time in reflection seismic exploration. The method reported in this paper is also one of the EM migration methods. The imaging algorithm of 2-D resistivity structure was developed by correcting 1-D imaging in consideration of the effect of 2-D anomaly on 1-D imaging (the resistivity of anomaly can be obtained from the resistivity contrast between anomaly and medium). The conventional methods require enormous forward computation, while this method can obtain underground resistivity structure in extremely short computation time, resulting in superior practicability. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Guided Waves in Structures for SHM The Time - domain Spectral Element Method

    CERN Document Server

    Ostachowicz, Wieslaw; Krawczuk, Marek; Zak, Arkadiusz

    2011-01-01

    Presents the state of the art in the modelling, analysis and experimental investigation of elastic wave propagation using a technique of rapidly increasing interest and development Addressing an important issue in the field of guided-wave-based damage identification and structural health monitoring,Guided Waves in Structures for SHM presents the modelling, analysis and experimental investigation of elastic wave propagation in engineering structures made of isotropic or composite materials. The authors begin by summarising present-day knowledge on elastic wave propagation in solids, focusing on

  4. Micromachined silicon acoustic delay line with improved structural stability and acoustic directivity for real-time photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young; Kumar, Akhil; Xu, Song; Zou, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that micromachined silicon acoustic delay lines can provide a promising solution to achieve real-time photoacoustic tomography without the need for complex transducer arrays and data acquisition electronics. However, as its length increases to provide longer delay time, the delay line becomes more vulnerable to structural instability due to reduced mechanical stiffness. In addition, the small cross-section area of the delay line results in a large acoustic acceptance angle and therefore poor directivity. To address these two issues, this paper reports the design, fabrication, and testing of a new silicon acoustic delay line enhanced with 3D printed polymer micro linker structures. First, mechanical deformation of the silicon acoustic delay line (with and without linker structures) under gravity was simulated by using finite element method. Second, the acoustic crosstalk and acoustic attenuation caused by the polymer micro linker structures were evaluated with both numerical simulation and ultrasound transmission testing. The result shows that the use of the polymer micro linker structures significantly improves the structural stability of the silicon acoustic delay lines without creating additional acoustic attenuation and crosstalk. In addition, a new tapered design for the input terminal of the delay line was also investigate to improve its acoustic directivity by reducing the acoustic acceptance angle. These two improvements are expected to provide an effective solution to eliminate current limitations on the achievable acoustic delay time and out-of-plane imaging resolution of micromachined silicon acoustic delay line arrays.

  5. Real-Time X-Ray Inspection of Composite Aircraft Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patricelli, F

    1978-01-01

    ...) for detection of defects, damage, and repair verification. The program included inspection of composite aircraft structural samples in the laboratory and an on site demonstration of RTR at the Naval Air Rework Facility (NARF...

  6. Real-Time Probabilistic Structural Health Management Using Machine Learning and GPU Computing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project seeks to deliver an ultra-efficient, high-fidelity structural health management (SHM) framework using machine learning and graphics processing...

  7. Elastic-plastic-creep response of structures under composite time history of loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zudans, Z.

    1975-01-01

    High temperature nuclear reactor components are subject to a complex history of thermal and mechanical loading cycles. To evaluate the adequacy of such components, detailed information on the accumulated inelastic strains and strain cycling is required. This work derives the theory, develops efficient numerical techniques accounting for plasticity, creep and overall equilibrium, describes the overall structure of the resulting computer program, and demonstrates the capability of this analysis on a real structure. (Auth.)

  8. Characterization of high-power RF structures using time-domain field codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, C.C.; DeFord, J.F.; Swatloski, T.L.

    1992-01-01

    We have modeled gyrotron windows and gyrotron amplifier sever structures for TE modes in the 100-150 GHz range and have computed the reflection and transmission characteristics from the field data. Good agreement with frequency domain codes and analytic analysis have been obtained for some simple geometries. We present results for realistic structures with lossy coatings and describe implementation of microwave diagnostics. (Author) 5 figs., 7 refs

  9. Toward Unified Correction of Regional Phases for Amplitude and Travel Time Effects of Heterogeneous Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-04

    particularly for higher frequencies, being evident for all structures with a positive gradient in the 1D flat earth structure. Comparison of the...reflected from the underside of the Moho discontinuity. Sereno and Given [1990] studied Pn waves in flat and spherical earth models and found that Earth’s...The earth flattening transform (EFT) is used to convert the spherical earth into a flat earth . A factor of 1/sqrt(r) is used to transfer the

  10. Feasibility Study of the Electromagnetic Damper for Cable Structures Using Real-Time Hybrid Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ho-Yeon; Kim, In-Ho; Jung, Hyung-Jo

    2017-10-31

    Cable structure is a major component of long-span bridges, such as cable-stayed and suspension bridges, and it transfers the main loads of bridges to the pylons. As these cable structures are exposed to continuous external loads, such as vehicle and wind loads, vibration control and continuous monitoring of the cable are required. In this study, an electromagnetic (EM) damper was designed and fabricated for vibration control and monitoring of the cable structure. EM dampers, also called regenerative dampers, consist of permanent magnets and coils. The electromagnetic force due to the relative motion between the coil and the permanent magnet can be used to control the vibration of the structure. The electrical energy can be used as a power source for the monitoring system. The effects of the design parameters of the damper were numerically analyzed and the damper was fabricated. The characteristics of the damper were analyzed with various external load changes. Finally, the vibration-control and energy-harvesting performances of the cable structure were evaluated through a hybrid simulation. The vibration-control and energy-harvesting performances for various loads were analyzed and the applicability to the cable structure of the EM damper was evaluated.

  11. Real time sensing of structural glass fiber reinforced composites by using embedded PVA - carbon nanotube fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marioli-Riga Z.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl alcohol - carbon nanotube (PVA-CNT fibers had been embedded to glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP for the structural health monitoring of the composite material. The addition of the conductive PVA-CNT fiber to the nonconductive GFRP material aimed to enhance its sensing ability by means of the electrical resistance measurement method. The test specimen’s response to mechanical load and the in situ PVA-CNT fiber’s electrical resistance measurements were correlated for sensing and damage monitoring purposes. The embedded PVA-CNT fiber worked as a sensor in GFRP coupons in tensile loadings. Sensing ability of the PVA-CNT fibers was also demonstrated on an integral composite structure. PVA-CNT fiber near the fracture area of the structure recorded very high values when essential damage occurred to the structure. A finite element model of the same structure was developed to predict axial strains at locations of the integral composite structure where the fibers were embedded. The predicted FEA strains were correlated with the experimental measurements from the PVA-CNT fibers. Calculated and experimental values were in good agreement, thus enabling PVA-CNT fibers to be used as strain sensors.

  12. Feasibility Study of the Electromagnetic Damper for Cable Structures Using Real-Time Hybrid Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Yeon Jung

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cable structure is a major component of long-span bridges, such as cable-stayed and suspension bridges, and it transfers the main loads of bridges to the pylons. As these cable structures are exposed to continuous external loads, such as vehicle and wind loads, vibration control and continuous monitoring of the cable are required. In this study, an electromagnetic (EM damper was designed and fabricated for vibration control and monitoring of the cable structure. EM dampers, also called regenerative dampers, consist of permanent magnets and coils. The electromagnetic force due to the relative motion between the coil and the permanent magnet can be used to control the vibration of the structure. The electrical energy can be used as a power source for the monitoring system. The effects of the design parameters of the damper were numerically analyzed and the damper was fabricated. The characteristics of the damper were analyzed with various external load changes. Finally, the vibration-control and energy-harvesting performances of the cable structure were evaluated through a hybrid simulation. The vibration-control and energy-harvesting performances for various loads were analyzed and the applicability to the cable structure of the EM damper was evaluated.

  13. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the probe fluorescence in the study of human blood protein dynamic structure on SR beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobretsov, G.E.; Kurek, N.K.; Syrejshchikova, T.I.; Yakimenko, M.N.; Clarke, D.T.; Jones, G.R.; Munro, I.H.

    2000-01-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopy on the SRS of the Daresbury Laboratory was used for the study of the human serum lipoproteins and human blood albumins with fluorescent probes K-37 and K-35, developed in Russia. The probe K-37 was found sensitive to the difference in dynamic properties of the lipid objects. Two sets of the parameters were used for the description of lipid dynamic structure: (1) time-resolved fluorescence spectra and (2) time-resolved fluorescence depolarization as a function of rotational mobility of lipid molecules. Each measured dynamic parameter reflected the monotonous changes of dynamic properties in the range: lipid spheres-very low density lipoproteins-low density lipoproteins-high density lipoproteins-phospholipid liposomes. The range is characterized by the increase of the ratio polar/ nonpolar lipids. Thus, time-resolved fluorescence could be used to detect some structural modifications in lipoproteins related to atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular diseases development

  14. Effect of sintering time on the orthorhombic structure and positron lifetime in YBa2Cu3O7-δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhenping; Zhang Jincang; Li Xigui

    2002-01-01

    The effects of sintering time on the orthorhombic structure and positron lifetime parameter in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ have been studied by XRD, SEM and the positron experiments. It is found that on the condition of 950 degree C/12-72 h, the positron experiment has good stability and reliability. This experiment indicates that the longer sintering time is needed to prepare Y-123 samples

  15. Time-varying effect moderation using the structural nested mean model: estimation using inverse-weighted regression with residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, Daniel; Griffin, Beth Ann; McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Ramchand, Rajeev; Yuen, Robert A.; Murphy, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    This article considers the problem of examining time-varying causal effect moderation using observational, longitudinal data in which treatment, candidate moderators, and possible confounders are time varying. The structural nested mean model (SNMM) is used to specify the moderated time-varying causal effects of interest in a conditional mean model for a continuous response given time-varying treatments and moderators. We present an easy-to-use estimator of the SNMM that combines an existing regression-with-residuals (RR) approach with an inverse-probability-of-treatment weighting (IPTW) strategy. The RR approach has been shown to identify the moderated time-varying causal effects if the time-varying moderators are also the sole time-varying confounders. The proposed IPTW+RR approach provides estimators of the moderated time-varying causal effects in the SNMM in the presence of an additional, auxiliary set of known and measured time-varying confounders. We use a small simulation experiment to compare IPTW+RR versus the traditional regression approach and to compare small and large sample properties of asymptotic versus bootstrap estimators of the standard errors for the IPTW+RR approach. This article clarifies the distinction between time-varying moderators and time-varying confounders. We illustrate the methodology in a case study to assess if time-varying substance use moderates treatment effects on future substance use. PMID:23873437

  16. Inferring the Clonal Structure of Viral Populations from Time Series Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatien F Chedom

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA virus populations will undergo processes of mutation and selection resulting in a mixed population of viral particles. High throughput sequencing of a viral population subsequently contains a mixed signal of the underlying clones. We would like to identify the underlying evolutionary structures. We utilize two sources of information to attempt this; within segment linkage information, and mutation prevalence. We demonstrate that clone haplotypes, their prevalence, and maximum parsimony reticulate evolutionary structures can be identified, although the solutions may not be unique, even for complete sets of information. This is applied to a chain of influenza infection, where we infer evolutionary structures, including reassortment, and demonstrate some of the difficulties of interpretation that arise from deep sequencing due to artifacts such as template switching during PCR amplification.

  17. A 3D moisture-stress FEM analysis for time dependent problems in timber structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortino, Stefania; Mirianon, Florian; Toratti, Tomi

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents a 3D moisture-stress numerical analysis for timber structures under variable humidity and load conditions. An orthotropic viscoelastic-mechanosorptive material model is specialized on the basis of previous models. Both the constitutive model and the equations needed to describe the moisture flow across the structure are implemented into user subroutines of the Abaqus finite element code and a coupled moisture-stress analysis is performed for several types of mechanical loads and moisture changes. The presented computational approach is validated by analyzing some wood tests described in the literature and comparing the computational results with the reported experimental data.

  18. Nonlinear Localized Dissipative Structures for Long-Time Solution of Wave Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    are described in this chapter. These details are required to compute interference. WC can be used to generate constant arrival time ( Eikonal phase...complicated using Eikonal schemes. Some recent developments in Eikonal methods [2] can treat multiple arrival times but, these methods require extra

  19. Electronic structure and time-dependent description of rotational predissociation of LiH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasik, P.; Sienkiewicz, J. E.; Domsta, J.

    2017-01-01

    parameters and the experimental ones. The dynamics of the rotational predissociation process of the 11Π state were studied by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The classical experiment of Velasco [Can. J. Phys., 1957, 35, 1204] on dissociation in the 11Π state is explained for the first time...

  20. A new time-varying harmonic decomposition structure based on recursive hanning window

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, C.H.; Silva, L.R.M.; Duque, C.A.; Cerqueira, A.S.; Teixeira, E.C.; Ribeiro, P.F.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of power quality phenomena under time-varying conditions has become an important subject as the complexity of the grid increases. As a consequence, several methods have been developed/applied also to study power quality parameters during transient conditions such as time-frequency methods.

  1. Time-Dependent Structural Alteration of Rituximab Analyzed by LC/TOF-MS after a Systemic Administration to Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Otani

    Full Text Available Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs have heterogeneities in their structures. Multiple studies have reported that the variety of post-translational modifications could affect the pharmacokinetic profiles or pharmacological potencies of therapeutic mAbs. Taking into the account that the structural modification of mAbs would affect the efficacy, it is worth investigating the structural alteration of therapeutic mAbs in the blood and the relationship between their structures and pharmacological effects. Herein, we have developed the method to isolate rituximab from plasma in which endogenous IgGs interfere the detection of rituximab, and successfully developed the analytical method with a liquid chromatograph time-of-flight mass spectrometer to detect the structure of rituximab in plasma with errors less than 30 parts per millions. Eight types of carbohydrate chains in rituximab were detected by this method. Interestingly, time-dependent changes in carbohydrate chains such as AAF (G2F and GnGn (G0 were observed in rats, although the amino acids were stable. Additionally, these structural changes were observed via incubation in plasma as in the rat experiment, suggesting that a certain type of enzyme in plasma caused the alterations of the carbohydrate chains. The present analytical methods could clarify the actual pharmacokinetics of therapeutic mAbs, and help to evaluate the interindividual variations in pharmacokinetics and efficacy.

  2. Arid landscape dynamics along a precipitation gradient: addressing vegetation - landscape structure - resource interactions at different time scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buis, E.

    2008-01-01

    This research is entitled ‘Arid landscape dynamics along a precipitation gradient: addressing
    vegetation – landscape structure – resource interactions at different time scales’ with as subtitle
    ‘A case study for the Northern Negev Desert of Israel’. Landscape dynamics describes the

  3. The Structural Relationship between Out-of-School Time Enrichment and Black Student Participation in Advanced Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jamaal; Young, Jemimah

    2018-01-01

    The researchers tested a model of the structural relationship between Black student engagement in out-of-school time (OST) science enrichment and participation in advanced science courses in high school. The participants in the sample were Black students (N = 3,173) who participated in the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009/2012. The student…

  4. Training and learning robotic surgery, time for a more structured approach: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, H. W. R.; Wolswijk, R.; Zweemer, R. P.; Schijven, M. P.; Verheijen, R. H. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery is growing rapidly and there is an increasing need for a structured approach to train future robotic surgeons. Objectives To review the literature on training and learning strategies for robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery. Search strategy A

  5. Start Time and Duration Distribution Estimation in Semi-Structured Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wombacher, Andreas; Iacob, Maria Eugenia

    Semi-structured processes are business workflows, where the execution of the workflow is not completely controlled by a workflow engine, i.e., an implementation of a formal workflow model. Examples are workflows where actors potentially have interaction with customers reporting the result of the

  6. Start time and duration distribution estimation in semi-structured processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wombacher, Andreas; Iacob, Maria Eugenia

    Semi-structured processes are business workflows, where the execution of the workflow is not completely controlled by a workflow engine, i.e., an implementation of a formal workflow model. Examples are workflows where actors potentially have interaction with customers reporting the result of the

  7. Comments on "Testing for nonlinear structure and chaos in economic time series"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommes, C.H.; Manzan, S.

    2006-01-01

    This short paper is a comment on "Univariate tests for nonlinear structure" by Catherine Kyrtsou and Apostolos Serletis. We summarize their main results and discuss some of their conclusions concerning the role of outliers and noisy chaos. In particular, we include some new simulations to

  8. The Impact of Structured Activities among Palestinian Children in a Time of Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughry, Maryanne; Ager, Alastair; Flouri, Eirini; Khamis, Vivian; Afana, Abdel Hamid; Qouta, Samir

    2006-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence of the impact on children's well-being of exposure to political conflict in such settings as the Palestinian territories. This study examined the impact of child-focused interventions involving structured activities, supported by provision of equipment and training of facilitators. The focus of interventions…

  9. Statistical properties of travel time measurements and the structure of the Earth's mantle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röhm, A.H.E.

    1999-01-01

    The Earth's deep interior is sampled daily by waves originating from earthquakes. Different types of waves gather information along various paths of propagation. Each seismogram recorded by one of the several hundred seismological stations is full of clues about the structure of the Earth.

  10. Structural damage detection in wind turbine blades based on time series representations of dynamic responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoell, Simon; Omenzetter, Piotr

    2015-03-01

    The development of large wind turbines that enable to harvest energy more efficiently is a consequence of the increasing demand for renewables in the world. To optimize the potential energy output, light and flexible wind turbine blades (WTBs) are designed. However, the higher flexibilities and lower buckling capacities adversely affect the long-term safety and reliability of WTBs, and thus the increased operation and maintenance costs reduce the expected revenue. Effective structural health monitoring techniques can help to counteract this by limiting inspection efforts and avoiding unplanned maintenance actions. Vibration-based methods deserve high attention due to the moderate instrumentation efforts and the applicability for in-service measurements. The present paper proposes the use of cross-correlations (CCs) of acceleration responses between sensors at different locations for structural damage detection in WTBs. CCs were in the past successfully applied for damage detection in numerical and experimental beam structures while utilizing only single lags between the signals. The present approach uses vectors of CC coefficients for multiple lags between measurements of two selected sensors taken from multiple possible combinations of sensors. To reduce the dimensionality of the damage sensitive feature (DSF) vectors, principal component analysis is performed. The optimal number of principal components (PCs) is chosen with respect to a statistical threshold. Finally, the detection phase uses the selected PCs of the healthy structure to calculate scores from a current DSF vector, where statistical hypothesis testing is performed for making a decision about the current structural state. The method is applied to laboratory experiments conducted on a small WTB with non-destructive damage scenarios.

  11. Time-domain simulations for metallic nano-structures - a Krylov-subspace approach beyond the limitations of FDTD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Michael [Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe School of Optics and Photonics (KSOP), Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Niegemann, Jens; Tkeshelashvili, Lasha; Busch, Kurt [Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); DFG Forschungszentrum Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe School of Optics and Photonics (KSOP), Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Numerical simulations of metallic nano-structures are crucial for the efficient design of plasmonic devices. Conventional time-domain solvers such as FDTD introduce large numerical errors especially at metallic surfaces. Our approach combines a discontinuous Galerkin method on an adaptive mesh for the spatial discretisation with a Krylov-subspace technique for the time-stepping procedure. Thus, the higher-order accuracy in both time and space is supported by unconditional stability. As illustrative examples, we compare numerical results obtained with our method against analytical reference solutions and results from FDTD calculations.

  12. Proton-proton intensity interferometry: Space-time structure of the emitting zone in Ni+Ni collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolija, M.; Cindro, N.; Shapira, D.

    1995-01-01

    A brief description is given of the Hanbury-Brown-Twiss effect method for determining the space-time structure of the proton-emitting source in a nucleus-nucleus collision. In this context a measurement of exclusive p-p correlations from 58 Ni+ 58 Ni at 850 MeV is analyzed. The data served to study the directional dependence of the p-p correlation function and, for the first time, extract separately the source size and the particle-emission time

  13. Micro-structural evolution and biomineralization behavior of carbon nanofiber/bioactive glass composites induced by precursor aging time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaolong; Tang, Tianhong; Cheng, Dan; Zhang, Cuihua; Zhang, Ran; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2015-12-01

    Bioactive glass (BG)-containing carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are promising orthopaedic biomaterials. Herein, CNF composites were produced from electrospinning of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/BG sol-gel precursor solution, followed by carbonization. Choosing 58S-type BG (mol%: 58.0% SiO2-26.3% CaO-15.7% P2O5) as the model, micro-structural evolution of CNF/BG composites was systematically evaluated in relating to aging times of BG precursor solution. With aging time prolonging, BG precursors underwent morphological changes from small sol clusters with loosely and randomly branched structure to highly crosslinked Si-network structure, showing continuous increase in solution viscosity. BG precursor solution with low viscosity could mix well with PAN solution, resulting in CNF composite with homogeneously distributed BG component. Whereas, BG precursor gel with densely crosslinked Si-network structure led to uneven distribution of BG component along final CNFs due to its significant phase separation from PAN component. Meanwhile, BG nanoparticles in CNFs demonstrated micro-structural evolution that they transited from weak to strong crystal state along with longer aging time. Biomineralization in simulated body fluid and in vitro osteoblasts proliferation were then applied to determine the bioactivity of CNF/BG composites. CNF/BG composites prepared from shorter aging time could induce both faster apatite deposition and cell proliferation rate. It was suggested weakly crystallized BG nanoparticles along CNFs dissolved fast and was able to provide numerous nucleation sites for apatite deposition, which also favored the proliferation of osteoblasts cells. Aging time could thus be a useful tool to regulate the biological features of CNF/BG composites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of Modal Travel Time Variability Due to Mesoscale Ocean Structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Amy

    1997-01-01

    .... First, for an open ocean environment away from strong boundary currents, the effects of randomly phased linear baroclinic Rossby waves on acoustic travel time are shown to produce a variable overall...

  15. Time integration in the code Zgoubi and external usage of PTC's structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forest, Etienne; Meot, F.

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this note is to describe Zgoubi's integrator and to describe some pitfalls for time based integration when used in accelerators. We show why the convergence rate of an integrator can be affected by an improper treatment at the boundary when time is used as the integration variable. We also point out how the code PTC can be used as a container by other tracking engine. This work is not completed as far as incorporation of Zgoubi is concerned. (authors)

  16. Elastic-plastic creep response of structures under composite time history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zudans, Z [Franklin Inst. Research Labs., Philadelphia, Pa. (USA)

    1975-12-01

    High temperature nuclear reactor components are subject to a complex history of thermal and mechanical loading cycles. To evaluate the adequacy of such components, detailed information on the accumulated inelastic strains and strain cycling is required. This paper presents the theory, describes efficient numerical techniques accounting for plasticity, creep and overall equilibrium, describes the overall structure of the resulting computer program, and demonstrates the capability of the analysis method on a real three-dimensional structure. The new results of this work are the efficient handling of an arbitrary load history, introduction of the 'plastic stress' concept for inelastic computation, novel implementation of classical plasticity with recognition of incrementation conditions for the kinematic hardening, use of the load incrementation algorithm based on the 'plastic stress' concept, and development of a computer code capable of solving practical three-dimensional problems.

  17. The nano-structured battery plays extra time; La batterie nanostructuree joue les prolongations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deroin, Ph.

    2005-06-01

    The Bell Labs of Lucent Technologies and the laboratories of mPhase company (Connecticut, USA) have developed a new architecture of battery cell based on nano-structured material which should lead to a 15 to 20 years lifetime without any significant discharge. In this structure, the electrolyte (zinc and ammonium chlorides) and the electrodes (Zn, MnO{sub 2}) are not in contact as long as the battery is not activated. A fluorocarbon hydrophobic coating (the 'nano-metric grass') ensures the separation between electrolyte and electrodes. This hydrophobic effect can be instantaneously cancelled by an electric pulse which provokes an electro-wetting effect allowing the migration of the electrolyte towards the electrodes. Short paper. (J.S.)

  18. Elastic-plastic creep response of structures under composite time history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zudans, Z.

    1975-01-01

    High temperature nuclear reactor components are subject to a complex history of thermal and mechanical loading cycles. To evaluate the adequacy of such components, detailed information on the accumulated inelastic strains and strain cycling is required. This paper presents the theory, describes efficient numerical techniques accounting for plasticity, creep and overall equilibrium, describes the overall structure of the resulting computer program, and demonstrates the capability of the analysis method on a real three-dimensional structure. The new results of this work are the efficient handling of an arbitrary load history, introduction of the 'plastic stress' concept for inelastic computation, novel implementation of classical plasticity with recognition of incrementation conditions for the kinematic hardening, use of the load incrementation algorithm based on the 'plastic stress' concept, and development of a computer code capable of solving practical three-dimensional problems. (Auth.)

  19. Dynamics of a physiologically structured population in a time-varying environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilmann, Irene Louise Torpe; Starke, Jens; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2016-01-01

    Physiologically structured population models have become a valuable tool to model the dynamics of populations. In a stationary environment such models can exhibit equilibrium solutions as well as periodic solutions. However, for many organisms the environment is not stationary, but varies more...... or less regularly. In order to understand the interaction between an external environmental forcing and the internal dynamics in a population, we examine the response of a physiologically structured population model to a periodic variation in the food resource. We explore the addition of forcing in two...... cases: (A) where the population dynamics is in equilibrium in a stationary environment, and (B) where the population dynamics exhibits a periodic solution in a stationary environment. When forcing is applied in case A, the solutions are mainly periodic. In case B the forcing signal interacts...

  20. Effects of Training Structure and the Passage of Time on Trained and Derived Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Eilifsen, Christoffer; Arntzen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Conditional discriminations established using a linear series training structure were shown in a previous study to be intact when unreinforced trials assessing such performance were presented interspersed among stimulus equivalence test trials. Experimenter-defined correct performance on these trials was seen both for participants responding in accordance with stimulus equivalence and for some participants who did not. The goal of the current study was to investigate the status of previously ...

  1. A Time-Domain Structural Damage Detection Method Based on Improved Multiparticle Swarm Coevolution Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Fei Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimization techniques have been applied to structural health monitoring and damage detection of civil infrastructures for two decades. The standard particle swarm optimization (PSO is easy to fall into the local optimum and such deficiency also exists in the multiparticle swarm coevolution optimization (MPSCO. This paper presents an improved MPSCO algorithm (IMPSCO firstly and then integrates it with Newmark’s algorithm to localize and quantify the structural damage by using the damage threshold proposed. To validate the proposed method, a numerical simulation and an experimental study of a seven-story steel frame were employed finally, and a comparison was made between the proposed method and the genetic algorithm (GA. The results show threefold: (1 the proposed method not only is capable of localization and quantification of damage, but also has good noise-tolerance; (2 the damage location can be accurately detected using the damage threshold proposed in this paper; and (3 compared with the GA, the IMPSCO algorithm is more efficient and accurate for damage detection problems in general. This implies that the proposed method is applicable and effective in the community of damage detection and structural health monitoring.

  2. The impact of divergence time on the nature of population structure: an example from Iceland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkes L Price

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The Icelandic population has been sampled in many disease association studies, providing a strong motivation to understand the structure of this population and its ramifications for disease gene mapping. Previous work using 40 microsatellites showed that the Icelandic population is relatively homogeneous, but exhibits subtle population structure that can bias disease association statistics. Here, we show that regional geographic ancestries of individuals from Iceland can be distinguished using 292,289 autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. We further show that subpopulation differences are due to genetic drift since the settlement of Iceland 1100 years ago, and not to varying contributions from different ancestral populations. A consequence of the recent origin of Icelandic population structure is that allele frequency differences follow a null distribution devoid of outliers, so that the risk of false positive associations due to stratification is minimal. Our results highlight an important distinction between population differences attributable to recent drift and those arising from more ancient divergence, which has implications both for association studies and for efforts to detect natural selection using population differentiation.

  3. A quick seismic assessment method for jacket type offshore structures by combining push-over and nonlinear time history analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimiyan, S.; Hosseini, M. [International Inst. of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimiyan, M. [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Earthquake Eng. Dept., School of Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Several offshore structures are located in seismic regions. In order to upgrade their seismic behaviour, their seismic vulnerability must be evaluated. It is thought that the most reliable type of analysis for seismic evaluation is nonlinear time history analysis (NLTHA), however, it is known to be a very time consuming method. This paper presented a quick procedure by combining the push over analysis (POA) and the NLTHA. The paper discussed both methods in detail. In order to identify the more critical members of the structure, based on the range of their plastic deformations, some POA were first performed. The NLTHA was then performed, focusing on the critical members, to obtain their vulnerability with higher reliability. An offshore structure of jacket type, installed in the Lavan oil field in the Persian Gulf in 1970, was also considered in order to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method. It was concluded from the numerical results that combining POA and NLTHA was a quick and reliable seismic evaluation method. The results demonstrated that although the vulnerability of the jacket structure was not very high, the level of damage was not the same for different members, and was dependent on their location in the structure and also its geometric orientation and load bearing situation. 6 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  4. Safety assessment and life time management of nuclear power plants: from reasonable design to reliable structural health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savov, K.

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays the safety of Nuclear Power Plants is becoming more and more significant. Therefore consideration of severe accidents shall be included in both design and operating process of Nuclear Power Plants. In particular ground motion forms one of the important natural hazards. For structural analysis both linear-elastic and non-linear methods are specified by the engineering codes for earthquake resistance design. However, time history analysis is required for investigation of non-linear structural behaviour. Moreover, non-linearities are often caused by the presence of damage. This can be detected by means of structural health monitoring and subsequently system identification. In this paper the advantages of both dynamic time history analysis and damage detection by means of wavelet analysis are discussed. First, the non-linear behaviour of a frame structure due to an artificial earthquake motion is analyzed. A comparison to non-time history techniques is performed as well. Next, failure sources are simulated in the system and then detected by means of a novel wavelet approach. (author)

  5. Structure of the Einstein tensor for class-1 embedded space time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, J [Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas

    1976-04-11

    Continuing previous work, some features of the flat embedding theory of class-1 curved space-time are further discussed. In the two-metric formalism provided by the embedding approach the Gauss tensor obtains as the flat-covariant gradient of a fundamental vector potential. The Einstein tensor is then examined in terms of the Gauss tensor. It is proved that the Einstein tensor is divergence free in flat space-time, i.e. a true Lorentz-covariant conservation law for the Einstein tensor is shown to hold. The form of the Einstein tensor in flat space-time also appears as a canonical energy-momentum tensor of the vector potential. The corresponding Lagrangian density, however, does not provide us with a set of field equations for the fundamental vector potential; indeed, the Euler-Lagrange ''equations'' collapse to a useless identity, while the Lagrangian density has the form of a flat divergence.

  6. Derivation of time dependent design-values for SNR 300 structural material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, H.; Breitling, H.; de Heesen, E.

    1976-01-01

    Time-dependent design values were derived from long-term creep rupture data for steel X 6 CrNi 1811 in the unwelded and welded condition. The design values had to satisfy the ASME CC 1592 criterea with respect to creep rupture strength, time to reach 1% strain and transition to tertiary creep as well as the requirement of German regulatory rules to properly account for weld bahaviour. For the evaluation and extrapolation 2 proven computer programmes were used. The design data derived under consideration of weld joints show relative good agreement with the values of ASME CC 1592. Consideration of welds leads to lower design values above 550 0 C and 5x10 3 h with the difference between rolled and weld material becoming larger with increasing time and temperature. (author)

  7. Geostatistical Spatio-Time model of crime in el Salvador: Structural and Predictive Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welman Rosa Alvarado

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Today, to study a geospatial and spatio-temporal phenomena requires searching statistical tools that enable the analysis of the dependency of space, time and interactions. The science that studies this kind of subjects is the Geoestatics which the goal is to predict spatial phenomenon. This science is considered the base for modeling phenomena that involves interactions between space and time. In the past 10 years, the Geostatistic had seen a great development in areas like the geology, soils, remote sensing, epidemiology, agriculture, ecology, economy, etc. In this research, the geostatistic had been apply to build a predictive map about crime in El Salvador; for that the variability of space and time together is studied to generate crime scenarios: crime hot spots are determined, crime vulnerable groups are identified, to improve political decisions and facilitate to decision makers about the insecurity in the country.

  8. Time needed to board an airplane: a power law and the structure behind it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frette, Vidar; Hemmer, Per C

    2012-01-01

    A simple model for the boarding of an airplane is studied. Passengers have reserved seats but enter the airplane in arbitrary order. Queues are formed along the aisle, as some passengers have to wait to reach the seats for which they have reservation. We label a passenger by the number of his or her reserved seat. In most cases the boarding process is much slower than for the optimal situation, where passenger and seat orders are identical. We study this dynamical system by calculating the average boarding time when all permutations of N passengers are given equal weight. To first order, the boarding time for a given permutation (ordering) of the passengers is given by the number s of sequences of monotonically increasing values in the permutation. We show that the distribution of s is symmetric on [1,N], which leads to an average boarding time (N+1)/2. We have found an exact expression for s and have shown that the full distribution of s approaches a normal distribution as N increases. However, there are significant corrections to the first-order results, due to certain correlations between passenger ordering and the substrate (seat ordering). This occurs for some cases in which the sequence of the seats is partially mirrored in the passenger ordering. These cases with correlations have a boarding time that is lower than predicted by the first-order results. The large number of cases with reduced boarding times have been classified. We also give some indicative results on the geometry of the correlations, with sorting into geometry groups. With increasing N, both the number of correlation types and the number of cases belonging to each type increase rapidly. Using enumeration we find that as a result of these correlations the average boarding time behaves like N(α), with α≃0.69, as compared with α=1.0 for the first-order approximation. © 2012 American Physical Society

  9. A novel self-supporting GEM-based amplification structure for a time projection chamber at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Ties; Diener, Ralf; Rosemann, Christoph; Steder, Lea

    2012-11-15

    In this paper, a new self-supporting way to mount Gas Electron Multipliers is presented. It has been developed to provide a method to cover large readout areas while ensuring the flatness of the foils and keeping the amount of dead material minimal. The structure has been tested in a Time Projection Chamber prototype, using cosmic muon tracks. The impact of the mounting structure on the track reconstruction and the single point resolution is quantified and its impact on the tracking efficiency and dE/dx measurements is estimated.

  10. Parametric output-only identification of time-varying structures using a kernel recursive extended least squares TARMA approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhi-Sai; Liu, Li; Zhou, Si-Da; Yu, Lei; Naets, Frank; Heylen, Ward; Desmet, Wim

    2018-01-01

    The problem of parametric output-only identification of time-varying structures in a recursive manner is considered. A kernelized time-dependent autoregressive moving average (TARMA) model is proposed by expanding the time-varying model parameters onto the basis set of kernel functions in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. An exponentially weighted kernel recursive extended least squares TARMA identification scheme is proposed, and a sliding-window technique is subsequently applied to fix the computational complexity for each consecutive update, allowing the method to operate online in time-varying environments. The proposed sliding-window exponentially weighted kernel recursive extended least squares TARMA method is employed for the identification of a laboratory time-varying structure consisting of a simply supported beam and a moving mass sliding on it. The proposed method is comparatively assessed against an existing recursive pseudo-linear regression TARMA method via Monte Carlo experiments and shown to be capable of accurately tracking the time-varying dynamics. Furthermore, the comparisons demonstrate the superior achievable accuracy, lower computational complexity and enhanced online identification capability of the proposed kernel recursive extended least squares TARMA approach.

  11. Influence of time-periodic potentials on electronic transport in double-well structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun-Lei, Li; Yan, Xu

    2010-01-01

    Within the framework of the Floquet theorem, we have investigated single-electron photon-assisted tunneling in a double-well system using the transfer matrix technique. The transmission probability displays satellite peaks on both sides of the main resonance peaks and these satellite peaks originate from emission or absorption photons. The single-electron resonance tunneling can be controlled through changing the applied harmonically potential positions, such as driven potential in wells, in barriers, or in whole double-well systems. This advantage should be useful in the optimization of the parameters of a transmission device. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  12. Sampled-data-based vibration control for structural systems with finite-time state constraint and sensor outage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Falu; Liu, Mingxin; Mao, Weijie; Ding, Yuanchun; Liu, Feifei

    2018-05-10

    The problem of sampled-data-based vibration control for structural systems with finite-time state constraint and sensor outage is investigated in this paper. The objective of designing controllers is to guarantee the stability and anti-disturbance performance of the closed-loop systems while some sensor outages happen. Firstly, based on matrix transformation, the state-space model of structural systems with sensor outages and uncertainties appearing in the mass, damping and stiffness matrices is established. Secondly, by considering most of those earthquakes or strong winds happen in a very short time, and it is often the peak values make the structures damaged, the finite-time stability analysis method is introduced to constrain the state responses in a given time interval, and the H-infinity stability is adopted in the controller design to make sure that the closed-loop system has a prescribed level of disturbance attenuation performance during the whole control process. Furthermore, all stabilization conditions are expressed in the forms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), whose feasibility can be easily checked by using the LMI Toolbox. Finally, numerical examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed theorems. Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. K-causal structure of space-time in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Department of Mathematics, St. Francis De Sales College, Nagpur 440 006, India. 2Department of Mathematics ... From the physical point of view, concept of causalities embodies the concept of time evolution, finite .... A K-causal open set O ⊆ V is globally hyperbolic iff for every pair of points p, q ∈ O, the interval K(p, ...

  14. Higher Education Institution Leaders' Identity Constructions in Times of Changing Structures and Legislation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigerstedt, Christa

    2016-01-01

    The focus in this paper is on the leadership of higher education institutions (HEI) in Finland and more specifically on the rector's leadership. The higher education sector is undergoing many changes and has been so for a long time. How, then, do the current changes become visible from a leadership perspective? The leadership discourse is here…

  15. Characterization of the microbunch time structure of proton pencil beams at a clinical treatment facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzoldt, J; Roemer, K E; Enghardt, W; Fiedler, F; Golnik, C; Hueso-González, F; Helmbrecht, S; Kormoll, T; Rohling, H; Smeets, J; Werner, T; Pausch, G

    2016-03-21

    Proton therapy is an advantageous treatment modality compared to conventional radiotherapy. In contrast to photons, charged particles have a finite range and can thus spare organs at risk. Additionally, the increased ionization density in the so-called Bragg peak close to the particle range can be utilized for maximum dose deposition in the tumour volume. Unfortunately, the accuracy of the therapy can be affected by range uncertainties, which have to be covered by additional safety margins around the treatment volume. A real-time range and dose verification is therefore highly desired and would be key to exploit the major advantages of proton therapy. Prompt gamma rays, produced in nuclear reactions between projectile and target nuclei, can be used to measure the proton's range. The prompt gamma-ray timing (PGT) method aims at obtaining this information by determining the gamma-ray emission time along the proton path using a conventional time-of-flight detector setup. First tests at a clinical accelerator have shown the feasibility to observe range shifts of about 5 mm at clinically relevant doses. However, PGT spectra are smeared out by the bunch time spread. Additionally, accelerator related proton bunch drifts against the radio frequency have been detected, preventing a potential range verification. At OncoRay, first experiments using a proton bunch monitor (PBM) at a clinical pencil beam have been conducted. Elastic proton scattering at a hydrogen-containing foil could be utilized to create a coincident proton-proton signal in two identical PBMs. The selection of coincident events helped to suppress uncorrelated background. The PBM setup was used as time reference for a PGT detector to correct for potential bunch drifts. Furthermore, the corrected PGT data were used to image an inhomogeneous phantom. In a further systematic measurement campaign, the bunch time spread and the proton transmission rate were measured for several beam energies between 69 and 225 Me

  16. Imprints of the quasar structure in time-delay light curves: Microlensing-aided reverberation mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluse, D.; Tewes, M.

    2014-11-01

    The advent of large area photometric surveys has raised a great deal of interest in the possibility of using broadband photometric data, instead of spectra, to measure the size of the broad line region of active galactic nuclei. We describe here a new method that uses time-delay lensed quasars where one or several images are affected by microlensing due to stars in the lensing galaxy. Because microlensing decreases (or increases) the flux of the continuum compared to the broad line region, it changes the contrast between these two emission components. We show that this effect can be used to effectively disentangle the intrinsic variability of those two regions, offering the opportunity to perform reverberation mapping based on single-band photometric data. Based on simulated light curves generated using a damped random walk model of quasar variability, we show that measurement of the size of the broad line region can be achieved using this method, provided one spectrum has been obtained independently during the monitoring. This method is complementary to photometric reverberation mapping and could also be extended to multi-band data. Because the effect described above produces a variability pattern in difference light curves between pairs of lensed images that is correlated with the time-lagged continuum variability, it can potentially produce systematic errors in measurement of time delays between pairs of lensed images. Simple simulations indicate that time-delay measurement techniques that use a sufficiently flexible model for the extrinsic variability are not affected by this effect and produce accurate time delays.

  17. Sandwich node architecture for agile wireless sensor networks for real-time structural health monitoring applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi; Pakzad, Shamim; Cheng, Liang

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, wireless sensor network (WSN), as a powerful tool, has been widely applied to structural health monitoring (SHM) due to its low cost of deployment. Several commercial hardware platforms of wireless sensor networks (WSN) have been developed and used for structural monitoring applications [1,2]. A typical design of a node includes a sensor board and a mote connected to it. Sensing units, analog filters and analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) are integrated on the sensor board and the mote consists of a microcontroller and a wireless transceiver. Generally, there are a set of sensor boards compatible with the same model of mote and the selection of the sensor board depends on the specific applications. A WSN system based on this node lacks the capability of interrupting its scheduled task to start a higher priority task. This shortcoming is rooted in the hardware architecture of the node. The proposed sandwich-node architecture is designed to remedy the shortcomings of the existing one for task preemption. A sandwich node is composed of a sensor board and two motes. The first mote is dedicated to managing the sensor board and processing acquired data. The second mote controls the first mote via commands. A prototype has been implemented using Imote2 and verified by an emulation in which one mote is triggered by a remote base station and then preempts the running task at the other mote for handling an emergency event.

  18. Late-time structure of the Bunch-Davies de Sitter wavefunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anninos, Dionysios [Stanford Institute of Theoretical Physics, Stanford University, Stanford (United States); Anous, Tarek [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States); Freedman, Daniel Z. [Stanford Institute of Theoretical Physics, Stanford University, Stanford (United States); Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States); Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States); Konstantinidis, George [Stanford Institute of Theoretical Physics, Stanford University, Stanford (United States)

    2015-11-30

    We examine the late time behavior of the Bunch-Davies wavefunction for interacting light fields in a de Sitter background. We use perturbative techniques developed in the framework of AdS/CFT, and analytically continue to compute tree and loop level contributions to the Bunch-Davies wavefunction. We consider self-interacting scalars of general mass, but focus especially on the massless and conformally coupled cases. We show that certain contributions grow logarithmically in conformal time both at tree and loop level. We also consider gauge fields and gravitons. The four-dimensional Fefferman-Graham expansion of classical asymptotically de Sitter solutions is used to show that the wavefunction contains no logarithmic growth in the pure graviton sector at tree level. Finally, assuming a holographic relation between the wavefunction and the partition function of a conformal field theory, we interpret the logarithmic growths in the language of conformal field theory.

  19. Effect of treadmill versus overground running on the structure of variability of stride timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Timothy R; Noakes, Timothy D; McGregor, Stephen J

    2014-04-01

    Gait timing dynamics of treadmill and overground running were compared. Nine trained runners ran treadmill and track trials at 80, 100, and 120% of preferred pace for 8 min. each. Stride time series were generated for each trial. To each series, detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), power spectral density (PSD), and multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis were applied to infer the regime of control along the randomness-regularity axis. Compared to overground running, treadmill running exhibited a higher DFA and PSD scaling exponent, as well as lower entropy at non-preferred speeds. This indicates a more ordered control for treadmill running, especially at non-preferred speeds. The results suggest that the treadmill itself brings about greater constraints and requires increased voluntary control. Thus, the quantification of treadmill running gait dynamics does not necessarily reflect movement in overground settings.

  20. Multiscale Space-Time Computational Methods for Fluid-Structure Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-13

    thermo-fluid analysis of a ground vehicle and its tires ST-SI Computational Analysis of a Vertical - Axis Wind Turbine We have successfully...of a vertical - axis wind turbine . Multiscale Compressible-Flow Computation with Particle Tracking We have successfully tested the multiscale...Tezduyar, Spenser McIntyre, Nikolay Kostov, Ryan Kolesar, Casey Habluetzel. Space–time VMS computation of wind - turbine rotor and tower aerodynamics

  1. Estimating time-based instantaneous total mortality rate based on the age-structured abundance index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingbin; Jiao, Yan

    2015-05-01

    The instantaneous total mortality rate ( Z) of a fish population is one of the important parameters in fisheries stock assessment. The estimation of Z is crucial to fish population dynamics analysis, abundance and catch forecast, and fisheries management. A catch curve-based method for estimating time-based Z and its change trend from catch per unit effort (CPUE) data of multiple cohorts is developed. Unlike the traditional catch-curve method, the method developed here does not need the assumption of constant Z throughout the time, but the Z values in n continuous years are assumed constant, and then the Z values in different n continuous years are estimated using the age-based CPUE data within these years. The results of the simulation analyses show that the trends of the estimated time-based Z are consistent with the trends of the true Z, and the estimated rates of change from this approach are close to the true change rates (the relative differences between the change rates of the estimated Z and the true Z are smaller than 10%). Variations of both Z and recruitment can affect the estimates of Z value and the trend of Z. The most appropriate value of n can be different given the effects of different factors. Therefore, the appropriate value of n for different fisheries should be determined through a simulation analysis as we demonstrated in this study. Further analyses suggested that selectivity and age estimation are also two factors that can affect the estimated Z values if there is error in either of them, but the estimated change rates of Z are still close to the true change rates. We also applied this approach to the Atlantic cod ( Gadus morhua) fishery of eastern Newfoundland and Labrador from 1983 to 1997, and obtained reasonable estimates of time-based Z.

  2. Details Matter: Noise and Model Structure Set the Relationship between Cell Size and Cell Cycle Timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Barber

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Organisms across all domains of life regulate the size of their cells. However, the means by which this is done is poorly understood. We study two abstracted “molecular” models for size regulation: inhibitor dilution and initiator accumulation. We apply the models to two settings: bacteria like Escherichia coli, that grow fully before they set a division plane and divide into two equally sized cells, and cells that form a bud early in the cell division cycle, confine new growth to that bud, and divide at the connection between that bud and the mother cell, like the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In budding cells, delaying cell division until buds reach the same size as their mother leads to very weak size control, with average cell size and standard deviation of cell size increasing over time and saturating up to 100-fold higher than those values for cells that divide when the bud is still substantially smaller than its mother. In budding yeast, both inhibitor dilution or initiator accumulation models are consistent with the observation that the daughters of diploid cells add a constant volume before they divide. This “adder” behavior has also been observed in bacteria. We find that in bacteria an inhibitor dilution model produces adder correlations that are not robust to noise in the timing of DNA replication initiation or in the timing from initiation of DNA replication to cell division (the C+D period. In contrast, in bacteria an initiator accumulation model yields robust adder correlations in the regime where noise in the timing of DNA replication initiation is much greater than noise in the C + D period, as reported previously (Ho and Amir, 2015. In bacteria, division into two equally sized cells does not broaden the size distribution.

  3. Structure and Randomness of Continuous-Time, Discrete-Event Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzen, Sarah E.; Crutchfield, James P.

    2017-10-01

    Loosely speaking, the Shannon entropy rate is used to gauge a stochastic process' intrinsic randomness; the statistical complexity gives the cost of predicting the process. We calculate, for the first time, the entropy rate and statistical complexity of stochastic processes generated by finite unifilar hidden semi-Markov models—memoryful, state-dependent versions of renewal processes. Calculating these quantities requires introducing novel mathematical objects (ɛ -machines of hidden semi-Markov processes) and new information-theoretic methods to stochastic processes.

  4. Mixing times towards demographic equilibrium in insect populations with temperature variable age structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damos, Petros

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we use entropy related mixing rate modules to measure the effects of temperature on insect population stability and demographic breakdown. The uncertainty in the age of the mother of a randomly chosen newborn, and how it is moved after a finite act of time steps, is modeled using a stochastic transformation of the Leslie matrix. Age classes are represented as a cycle graph and its transitions towards the stable age distribution are brought forth as an exact Markov chain. The dynamics of divergence, from a non equilibrium state towards equilibrium, are evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy. Moreover, Kullback-Leibler distance is applied as information-theoretic measure to estimate exact mixing times of age transitions probabilities towards equilibrium. Using empirically data, we show that on the initial conditions and simulated projection's trough time, that population entropy can effectively be applied to detect demographic variability towards equilibrium under different temperature conditions. Changes in entropy are correlated with the fluctuations of the insect population decay rates (i.e. demographic stability towards equilibrium). Moreover, shorter mixing times are directly linked to lower entropy rates and vice versa. This may be linked to the properties of the insect model system, which in contrast to warm blooded animals has the ability to greatly change its metabolic and demographic rates. Moreover, population entropy and the related distance measures that are applied, provide a means to measure these rates. The current results and model projections provide clear biological evidence why dynamic population entropy may be useful to measure population stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comment on "Time needed to board an airplane: a power law and the structure behind it".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Noam

    2012-08-01

    Frette and Hemmer [Phys. Rev. E 85, 011130 (2012)] recently showed that for a simple model for the boarding of an airplane, the mean time to board scales as a power law with the number of passengers N and the exponent is less than 1. They note that this scaling leads to the prediction that the "back-to-front" strategy, where passengers are divided into groups from contiguous ranges of rows and each group is allowed to board in turn from back to front once the previous group has found their seats, has a longer boarding time than would a single group. Here I extend their results to a larger number of passengers using a sampling approach and explore a scenario where the queue is presorted into groups from back to front, but allowed to enter the plane as soon as they can. I show that the power law dependence on passenger numbers is different for large N and that there is a boarding time reduction for presorted groups, with a power law dependence on the number of presorted groups.

  6. Investigating the factorial structure and availability of work time control in a representative sample of the Swedish working population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Sophie C; Kecklund, Göran; Tucker, Philip; Leineweber, Constanze

    2016-05-01

    Past research has often neglected the sub-dimensions of work time control (WTC). Moreover, differences in levels of WTC with respect to work and demographic characteristics have not yet been examined in a representative sample. We investigated these matters in a recent sample of the Swedish working population. The study was based on the 2014 data collection of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health. We assessed the structure of the WTC measure using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Differences in WTC by work and demographic characteristics were examined with independent samplet-tests, one-way ANOVAs and gender-stratified logistic regressions. Best model fit was found for a two-factor structure that distinguished between control over daily hours and control over time off (root mean square error of approximation = 0.06; 95% CI 0.04 to 0.09; Comparative Fit Index (CFI) = 0.99). Women, shift and public-sector workers reported lower control in relation to both factors. Age showed small associations with WTC, while a stronger link was suggested for civil status and family situation. Night, roster and rotating shift work seemed to be the most influential factors on reporting low control over daily hours and time off. Our data confirm the two-dimensional structure underlying WTC, namely the components 'control over daily hours' and 'control over time off'. Women, public-sector and shift workers reported lower levels of control. Future research should examine the public health implications of WTC, in particular whether increased control over daily hours and time off can reduce health problems associated with difficult working-time arrangements. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  7. Effects of time delays on stability and Hopf bifurcation in a fractional ring-structured network with arbitrary neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chengdai; Cao, Jinde; Xiao, Min; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Hayat, Tasawar

    2018-04-01

    This paper is comprehensively concerned with the dynamics of a class of high-dimension fractional ring-structured neural networks with multiple time delays. Based on the associated characteristic equation, the sum of time delays is regarded as the bifurcation parameter, and some explicit conditions for describing delay-dependent stability and emergence of Hopf bifurcation of such networks are derived. It reveals that the stability and bifurcation heavily relies on the sum of time delays for the proposed networks, and the stability performance of such networks can be markedly improved by selecting carefully the sum of time delays. Moreover, it is further displayed that both the order and the number of neurons can extremely influence the stability and bifurcation of such networks. The obtained criteria enormously generalize and improve the existing work. Finally, numerical examples are presented to verify the efficiency of the theoretical results.

  8. COMPARISON OF SOLAR SURFACE FLOWS INFERRED FROM TIME-DISTANCE HELIOSEISMOLOGY AND COHERENT STRUCTURE TRACKING USING HMI/SDO OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Švanda, Michal; Roudier, Thierry; Rieutord, Michel; Burston, Raymond; Gizon, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    We compare measurements of horizontal flows on the surface of the Sun using helioseismic time-distance inversions and coherent structure tracking of solar granules. Tracking provides two-dimensional horizontal flows on the solar surface, whereas the time-distance inversions estimate the full three-dimensional velocity flows in the shallow near-surface layers. Both techniques use Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager observations as input. We find good correlations between the various measurements resulting from the two techniques. Further, we find a good agreement between these measurements and the time-averaged Doppler line-of-sight velocity, and also perform sanity checks on the vertical flow that resulted from the three-dimensional time-distance inversion.

  9. Tomographic reconstruction of melanin structures of optical coherence tomography via the finite-difference time-domain simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Hao; Wang, Shiang-Jiu; Tseng, Snow H.

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides high resolution, cross-sectional image of internal microstructure of biological tissue. We use the Finite-Difference Time-Domain method (FDTD) to analyze the data acquired by OCT, which can help us reconstruct the refractive index of the biological tissue. We calculate the refractive index tomography and try to match the simulation with the data acquired by OCT. Specifically, we try to reconstruct the structure of melanin, which has complex refractive indices and is the key component of human pigment system. The results indicate that better reconstruction can be achieved for homogenous sample, whereas the reconstruction is degraded for samples with fine structure or with complex interface. Simulation reconstruction shows structures of the Melanin that may be useful for biomedical optics applications.

  10. Time Allocation in Social Networks: Correlation Between Social Structure and Human Communication Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miritello, Giovanna; Lara, Rubén; Moro, Esteban

    Recent research has shown the deep impact of the dynamics of human interactions (or temporal social networks) on the spreading of information, opinion formation, etc. In general, the bursty nature of human interactions lowers the interaction between people to the extent that both the speed and reach of information diffusion are diminished. Using a large database of 20 million users of mobile phone calls we show evidence this effect is not homogeneous in the social network but in fact, there is a large correlation between this effect and the social topological structure around a given individual. In particular, we show that social relations of hubs in a network are relatively weaker from the dynamical point than those that are poorer connected in the information diffusion process. Our results show the importance of the temporal patterns of communication when analyzing and modeling dynamical process on social networks.

  11. Factor structure of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms in trauma-exposed adolescents: Examining stability across time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Cao, Xing; Cao, Chengqi; Fang, Ruojiao; Yang, Haibo; Elhai, Jon D

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the latent structure of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms using two-wave longitudinal data collected from a sample of adolescents exposed to an explosion accident. Two waves of surveys were conducted approximately 3 and 8 months after the accident, respectively. A total of 836 students completed the baseline survey, and 762 students completed the follow-up survey. The results of confirmatory factor analyses(CFA) indicated that a seven-factor hybrid model composed of intrusion, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behaviors, anxious arousal and dysphoric arousal factors yielded significantly better data fit at both waves than the other models including the DSM-5 four-factor model, the six-factor anhedonia and externalizing behaviors models. Furthermore, the results of CFA invariance tests supported the longitudinal invariance of the model. Implications and limitations in terms of these results are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. MAPS OF EVOLVING CLOUD STRUCTURES IN LUHMAN 16AB FROM HST TIME-RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karalidi, Theodora; Apai, Dániel [Steward Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Marley, Mark S. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS-245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Buenzli, Esther, E-mail: tkaralidi@email.arizona.edu [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zürich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 27, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-07-10

    WISE J104915.57-531906.1 is the nearest brown dwarf binary to our solar system, consisting of two brown dwarfs in the L / T transition: Luhman 16A and B. In this paper, we present the first map of Luhman 16A, and maps of Luhman 16B for two epochs. Our maps were created by applying Aeolus , a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo code that maps the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) structure of brown dwarf and other ultracool atmospheres, to light curves of Luhman 16A and B using the Hubble Space Telescope ’s G141 and G102 grisms. Aeolus retrieved three or four spots in the TOA of Luhman 16A and B, with a surface coverage of 19%–32% (depending on an assumed rotational period of 5 hr or 8 hr) or 21%–38.5% (depending on the observational epoch), respectively. The brightness temperature of the spots of the best-fit models was ∼200 K hotter than the background TOA. We compared our Luhman 16B map with the only previously published map. Interestingly, our map contained a large TOA spot that was cooler (Δ T ∼ 51 K) than the background, which lay at low latitudes, in agreement with the previous Luhman 16B map. Finally, we report the detection of a feature reappearing in Luhman 16B light curves that are separated by tens of hundreds of rotations from each other. We speculate that this feature is related to TOA structures of Luhman 16B.

  13. A paperless course on structural engineering programming: investing in educational technology in the times of the Greek financial recession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sextos, Anastasios G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the structure of an undergraduate course entitled 'programming techniques and the use of specialised software in structural engineering' which is offered to the fifth (final) year students of the Civil Engineering Department of Aristotle University Thessaloniki in Greece. The aim of this course is to demonstrate the use of new information technologies in the field of structural engineering and to teach modern programming and finite element simulation techniques that the students can in turn apply in both research and everyday design of structures. The course also focuses on the physical interpretation of structural engineering problems, in a way that the students become familiar with the concept of computational tools without losing perspective from the engineering problem studied. For this purpose, a wide variety of structural engineering problems are studied in class, involving structural statics, dynamics, earthquake engineering, design of reinforced concrete and steel structures as well as data and information management. The main novelty of the course is that it is taught and examined solely in the computer laboratory ensuring that each student can accomplish the prescribed 'hands-on' training on a dedicated computer, strictly on a 1:1 student over hardware ratio. Significant effort has also been put so that modern educational techniques and tools are utilised to offer the course in an essentially paperless mode. This involves electronic educational material, video tutorials, student information in real time and exams given and assessed electronically through an ad hoc developed, personalised, electronic system. The positive feedback received from the students reveals that the concept of a paperless course is not only applicable in real academic conditions but is also a promising approach that significantly increases student productivity and engagement. The question, however, is whether such an investment in educational technology is indeed

  14. Statistical time series methods for damage diagnosis in a scale aircraft skeleton structure: loosened bolts damage scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsaftopoulos, Fotis P; Fassois, Spilios D

    2011-01-01

    A comparative assessment of several vibration based statistical time series methods for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is presented via their application to a scale aircraft skeleton laboratory structure. A brief overview of the methods, which are either scalar or vector type, non-parametric or parametric, and pertain to either the response-only or excitation-response cases, is provided. Damage diagnosis, including both the detection and identification subproblems, is tackled via scalar or vector vibration signals. The methods' effectiveness is assessed via repeated experiments under various damage scenarios, with each scenario corresponding to the loosening of one or more selected bolts. The results of the study confirm the 'global' damage detection capability and effectiveness of statistical time series methods for SHM.

  15. Real-time measurement of dynamic structure for Pd-D system in heavy-water electrolysis cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jun; Zeng Xianxin; Yang Jilian; Zhang Baisheng; Ruan Jinghui

    1993-01-01

    The real-time dynamic structure of Pd-D system in D 2 O electrolysis cell is measured on neutron powder diffractometer in CIAE. Diffraction patterns in 2 θ range of 34 degree-95 degree are obtained under the conditions of electrolysing for 0, 3 and 48 A ·h respectively, and the gradual transition of Pd-D system from α-phase to β-phase is observed. The real-time measurements of β peak of (220) reflection show that intensity of β peak almost reaches the saturation point after electrolysing for 0.65 A · h and increases slowly with further electrolysis afterwards

  16. A modified precise integration method based on Magnus expansion for transient response analysis of time varying dynamical structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Cong; Ren, Xingmin; Yang, Yongfeng; Deng, Wangqun

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a precise and efficacious methodology for manifesting forced vibration response with respect to the time-variant linear rotational structure subjected to unbalanced excitation. A modified algorithm based on time step precise integration method and Magnus expansion is developed for instantaneous dynamic problems. The iterative solution is achieved by the ideology of transition and dimensional increment matrix. Numerical examples on a typical accelerating rotation system considering gyroscopic moment and mass unbalance force comparatively demonstrate the validity, effectiveness and accuracy with Newmark-β method. It is shown that the proposed algorithm has high accuracy without loss efficiency.

  17. Real time, high resolution studies of protein adsorption and structure at the solid-liquid interface using dual polarization interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, Neville J; Peel, Louise L; Swann, Marcus J; Cross, Graham H; Reeves, Andrew; Brand, Stuart; Lu, Jian R

    2004-01-01

    A novel method for the analysis of thin biological films, called dual polarization interferometry (DPI), is described. This high resolution (<1 A), laboratory-based technique allows the thickness and refractive index (density) of biological molecules adsorbing or reacting at the solid-liquid interface to be measured in real time (up to 10 measurements per second). Results from the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on to a silicon oxynitride chip surface are presented to demonstrate how time dependent molecular behaviour can be examined using DPI. Mechanistic and structural information relating to the adsorption process is obtained as a function of the solution pH

  18. Turbulence modification in bubbly upward pipe flow. Extraction of time resolved turbulent microscopic structure by high speed PIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Koki; Minato, Daiju; Sato, Yohei; Hishida, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to obtain detailed information on the effects of bubbles on modification of turbulent structure by time-series measurements using a high speed time-resolved PIV. The experiments were carried out in a fully-developed vertical pipe with upflow of water at the Reynolds number of 9700 and the void fraction of 0.5%. It is observed that turbulence production was decreased and the dissipation rate was enhanced in the whole domain. We analyzed the effects of bubbles on modification of the energy cascade process from power spectra of velocity fluctuation of the continuous phase. (author)

  19. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with energetic cluster ion impact ionization for highly sensitive chemical structure characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, K., E-mail: k.hirata@aist.go.jp [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Saitoh, Y.; Chiba, A.; Yamada, K.; Narumi, K. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gumma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Energetic cluster ions with energies of the order of sub MeV or greater were applied to time-of-flight (TOF) secondary ion (SI) mass spectrometry. This gave various advantages including enhancement of SIs required for chemical structure characterization and prevention of charging effects in SI mass spectra for organic targets. We report some characteristic features of TOF SI mass spectrometry using energetic cluster ion impact ionization and discuss two future applications of it.

  20. How does landscape structure influence catchment transit time across different geomorphic provinces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, D.; Seibert, J.; McGuire, K.J.; Laudon, H.; Burns, Douglas A.; Dunn, S.M.; Soulsby, C.

    2009-01-01

    Despite an increasing number of empirical investigations of catchment transit times (TTs), virtually all are based on individual catchments and there are few attempts to synthesize understanding across different geographical regions. Uniquely, this paper examines data from 55 catchments in five geomorphic provinces in northern temperate regions (Scotland, United States of America and Sweden). The objective is to understand how the role of catchment topography as a control on the TTs differs in contrasting geographical settings. Catchment inverse transit time proxies (ITTPs) were inferred by a simple metric of isotopic tracer damping, using the ratio of standard deviation of ??18O in streamwater to the standard deviation of ??18O in precipitation. Quantitative landscape analysis was undertaken to characterize the catchments according to hydrologically relevant topographic indices that could be readily determined from a digital terrain model (DTM). The nature of topographic controls on transit times varied markedly in different geomorphic regions. In steeper montane regions, there are stronger gravitational influences on hydraulic gradients and TTs tend to be lower in the steepest catchments. In provinces where terrain is more subdued, direct topographic control weakened; in particular, where flatter areas with less permeable soils give rise to overland flow and lower TTs. The steeper slopes within this flatter terrain appear to have a greater coverage of freely draining soils, which increase sub-surface flow, therefore increasing TTs. Quantitative landscape analysis proved a useful tool for intercatchment comparison. However, the critical influence of sub-surface permeability and connectivity may limit the transferability of predictive tools of hydrological function based on topographic parameters alone. Copyright ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Revised Robertson's test theory of special relativity: space-time structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, J.G.; Torr, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    The experimental testing of the Lorentz transformations is based on a family of sets of coordinate transformations that do not comply in general with the principle of equivalence of the inertial frames. The Lorentz and Galilean sets of transformations are the only member sets of the family that satisfy this principle. In the neighborhood of regular points of space-time, all members in the family are assumed to comply with local homogeneity of space-time and isotropy of space in at least one free-falling elevator, to be denoted as Robertson's ab initio rest frame (H.P. Robertson, Rev. Mod. Phys. 21, 378 (1949)). Without any further assumptions, it is shown that Robertson's rest frame becomes a preferred frame for all member sets of the Robertson family except for, again, Galilean and Einstein's relativities. If one now assumes the validity of Maxwell-Lorentz electrodynamics in the preferred frame, a different electrodynamics spontaneously emerges for each set of transformations. The flat space-time of relativity retains its relevance, which permits an obvious generalization, in a Robertson context, of Dirac's theory of the electron and Einstein's gravitation. The family of theories thus obtained constitutes a covering theory of relativistic physics. A technique is developed to move back and forth between Einstein's relativity and the different members of the family of theories. It permits great simplifications in the analysis of relativistic experiments with relevant ''Robertson's subfamilies.'' It is shown how to adapt the Clifford algebra version of standard physics for use with the covering theory and, in particular, with the covering Dirac theory

  2. Space-time structure of neutron and X-ray sources in a plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, W.H.; Nardi, V.; Prior, W.

    1977-01-01

    Systematic measurements with paraffin collimators of the neutron emission intensity have been completed on a plasma focus with a 15-20 kV capacitor bank (hollow centre electrode; discharge period T approximately 8 μs; D 2 filling at 4-8 torr). The space resolution was 1 cm or better. These data indicate that at least 70% of the total neutron yield originates within hot-plasma regions where electron beams and high-energy D beams (approximately > 0.1-1 MeV) are produced. The neutron source is composed of several (approximately > 1-10) space-localized sources of different intensity, each with a duration approximately less than 5 ns (FWHM). Localized neutron sources and hard (approximately > 100 keV) X-ray sources have the same time multiplicity and are usually distributed in two groups over a time interval 40-400 ns long. By the mode of operation used by the authors one group of localized sources (Burst II) is observed 200-400 ns after the other group (Burst I) and its space distribution is broader than for Burst I. The maximum intensity of a localized source of neutrons in Burst I is much higher than the maximum intensity in Burst II. Secondary reactions T(D,n) 4 He (from the tritium produced only by primary reactions in the same discharge; no tritium was used in filling the discharge chamber) are observed in a time coincidence with the strongest D-D neutron pulse of Burst I. The neutron signal from a localized source with high intensity has a relatively long tail of small amplitude (area tail approximately less than 0.2 X area peak). This tail can be generated by the D-D reactions of the unconfined part of an ion beam in the cold plasma. Complete elimination of scattered neutrons on the detector was achieved in these measurements. (author)

  3. Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction in Transmission Mode for Mapping Crystal Grain Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cereser, Alberto; Strobl, Markus; Hall, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    constituting the material. This article presents a new non-destructive 3D technique to study centimeter-sized bulk samples with a spatial resolution of hundred micrometers: time-of-flight three-dimensional neutron diffraction (ToF 3DND). Compared to existing analogous X-ray diffraction techniques, ToF 3DND......-of-flight neutron beamline. The technique was developed and tested with data collected at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Complex (J-PARC) for an iron sample. We successfully reconstructed the shape of 108 grains and developed an indexing procedure...

  4. Spectrally Efficient OFDMA Lattice Structure via Toroidal Waveforms on the Time-Frequency Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Aldirmaz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the performance of frequency division multiplexed (FDM signals, where multiple orthogonal Hermite-Gaussian carriers are used to increase the bandwidth efficiency. Multiple Hermite-Gaussian functions are modulated by a data set as a multicarrier modulation scheme in a single time-frequency region constituting toroidal waveform in a rectangular OFDMA system. The proposed work outperforms in the sense of bandwidth efficiency compared to the transmission scheme where only single Gaussian pulses are used as the transmission base. We investigate theoretical and simulation results of the proposed methods.

  5. A Continuous-Time Agency Model of Optimal Contracting and Capital Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Peter M. DeMarzo; Yuliy Sannikov

    2004-01-01

    We consider a principal-agent model in which the agent needs to raise capital from the principal to finance a project. Our model is based on DeMarzo and Fishman (2003), except that the agent's cash flows are given by a Brownian motion with drift in continuous time. The difficulty in writing an appropriate financial contract in this setting is that the agent can conceal and divert cash flows for his own consumption rather than pay back the principal. Alternatively, the agent may reduce the mea...

  6. Quantitative analysis of diet structure by real-time PCR, reveals different feeding patterns by two dominant grasshopper species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xunbing; Wu, Huihui; McNeill, Mark Richard; Qin, Xinghu; Ma, Jingchuan; Tu, Xiongbing; Cao, Guangchun; Wang, Guangjun; Nong, Xiangqun; Zhang, Zehua

    2016-01-01

    Studies on grasshopper diets have historically employed a range of methodologies, each with certain advantages and disadvantages. For example, some methodologies are qualitative instead of quantitative. Others require long experimental periods or examine population-level effects, only. In this study, we used real-time PCR to examine diets of individual grasshoppers. The method has the advantage of being both fast and quantitative. Using two grasshopper species, Oedaleus asiaticus and Dasyhippus barbipes, we designed ITS primer sequences for their three main host plants, Stipa krylovii, Leymus chinensis and Cleistogenes squarrosa and used real-time PCR method to test diet structure both qualitatively and quantitatively. The lowest detection efficiency of the three grass species was ~80% with a strong correlation between actual and PCR-measured food intake. We found that Oedaleus asiaticus maintained an unchanged diet structure across grasslands with different grass communities. By comparison, Dasyhippus barbipes changed its diet structure. These results revealed why O. asiaticus distribution is mainly confined to Stipa-dominated grassland, and D. barbipes is more widely distributed across Inner Mongolia. Overall, real-time PCR was shown to be a useful tool for investigating grasshopper diets, which in turn offers some insight into grasshopper distributions and improved pest management. PMID:27562455

  7. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, Il Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Freeland, John W.; Evans, Paul G.; Wen, Haidan

    2016-02-01

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase separated regions. The ability to simultaneously track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of-the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiated at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, and is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. The direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems.

  8. Effect of ball-milling time on the structural characteristics of biomedical porous Ti-Sn-Nb alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nouri, Alireza, E-mail: alireza_nouri@yahoo.com [CQM-Centro de Quimica da Madeira, MMRG, Universidade da Madeira, Campus Universitario da Penteada, 9000-390 Funchal (Portugal); Institute for Technology Research and Innovation, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3217 (Australia); Hodgson, Peter D. [Institute for Technology Research and Innovation, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3217 (Australia); Wen Cuie [IRIS, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, 543-454 Burwood Road, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 Australia (Australia)

    2011-07-20

    The structural characteristics of biomedical porous materials are crucial for bone tissue to grow into a porous structure and can also influence the fixation and remodeling between the implant and the human tissues. The current study has been investigating the effect of the ball-milling variable of time on the structural characteristics and pore morphology of a biomedical porous Ti-16Sn-4Nb (wt.%) alloy. The alloy was synthesized using high-energy ball milling for different periods of time, and the porous Ti-16Sn-4Nb alloy was fabricated by using a space holder sintering process. The resultant powder particles, bulk, and porous samples were characterized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), laser particle-size analyzer, chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and the Vickers hardness test. The results indicated that the inner pore surface, pore wall architecture, degree of porosity, pore size and the inter-pore connectivity of the sintered porous alloy are all considerably affected by ball-milling time.

  9. Multivariate pattern analysis of MEG and EEG: A comparison of representational structure in time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichy, Radoslaw Martin; Pantazis, Dimitrios

    2017-09-01

    Multivariate pattern analysis of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) data can reveal the rapid neural dynamics underlying cognition. However, MEG and EEG have systematic differences in sampling neural activity. This poses the question to which degree such measurement differences consistently bias the results of multivariate analysis applied to MEG and EEG activation patterns. To investigate, we conducted a concurrent MEG/EEG study while participants viewed images of everyday objects. We applied multivariate classification analyses to MEG and EEG data, and compared the resulting time courses to each other, and to fMRI data for an independent evaluation in space. We found that both MEG and EEG revealed the millisecond spatio-temporal dynamics of visual processing with largely equivalent results. Beyond yielding convergent results, we found that MEG and EEG also captured partly unique aspects of visual representations. Those unique components emerged earlier in time for MEG than for EEG. Identifying the sources of those unique components with fMRI, we found the locus for both MEG and EEG in high-level visual cortex, and in addition for MEG in low-level visual cortex. Together, our results show that multivariate analyses of MEG and EEG data offer a convergent and complimentary view on neural processing, and motivate the wider adoption of these methods in both MEG and EEG research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bacterial Diversity and Community Structure in Korean Ginseng Field Soil Are Shifted by Cultivation Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Lan; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Hoang, Van-An; Subramaniyam, Sathiyamoorthy; Kang, Jong-Pyo; Kang, Chang Ho; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Traditional molecular methods have been used to examine bacterial communities in ginseng-cultivated soil samples in a time-dependent manner. Despite these efforts, our understanding of the bacterial community is still inadequate. Therefore, in this study, a high-throughput sequencing approach was employed to investigate bacterial diversity in various ginseng field soil samples over cultivation times of 2, 4, and 6 years in the first and second rounds of cultivation. We used non-cultivated soil samples to perform a comparative study. Moreover, this study assessed changes in the bacterial community associated with soil depth and the health state of the ginseng. Bacterial richness decreased through years of cultivation. This study detected differences in relative abundance of bacterial populations between the first and second rounds of cultivation, years of cultivation, and health states of ginseng. These bacterial populations were mainly distributed in the classes Acidobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Sphingobacteria. In addition, we found that pH, available phosphorus, and exchangeable Ca+ seemed to have high correlations with bacterial class in ginseng cultivated soil.

  11. Excited-state structure and electronic dephasing time of Nile blue from absolute resonance Raman intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, Mary K.; Mathies, Richard A.

    1992-06-01

    Absolute resonance Raman cross sections are measured for Nile blue 690 perchlorate dissolved in ethylene glycol with excitation at 514, 531, and 568 nm. These values and the absorption spectrum are modeled using a time-dependent wave packet formalism. The excited-state equilibrium geometry changes are quantitated for 40 resonance Raman active modes, seven of which (590, 1141, 1351, 1429, 1492, 1544, and 1640 cm-1 ) carry 70% of the total resonance Raman intensity. This demonstrates that in addition to the prominent 590 and 1640 cm-1 modes, a large number of vibrational degrees of freedom are Franck-Condon coupled to the electronic transition. After exposure of the explicit vibrational progressions, the residual absorption linewidth is separated into its homogeneous [350 cm-1 half-width at half-maximum (HWHM)] and inhomogeneous (313 cm-1 HWHM) components through an analysis of the absolute Raman cross sections. The value of the electronic dephasing time derived from this study (25 fs) compares well to previously published results. These data should be valuable in multimode modeling of femtosecond experiments on Nile blue.

  12. Hybrid time-variant reliability estimation for active control structures under aleatory and epistemic uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Xiong, Chuang; Wang, Xiaojun; Li, Yunlong; Xu, Menghui

    2018-04-01

    Considering that multi-source uncertainties from inherent nature as well as the external environment are unavoidable and severely affect the controller performance, the dynamic safety assessment with high confidence is of great significance for scientists and engineers. In view of this, the uncertainty quantification analysis and time-variant reliability estimation corresponding to the closed-loop control problems are conducted in this study under a mixture of random, interval, and convex uncertainties. By combining the state-space transformation and the natural set expansion, the boundary laws of controlled response histories are first confirmed with specific implementation of random items. For nonlinear cases, the collocation set methodology and fourth Rounge-Kutta algorithm are introduced as well. Enlightened by the first-passage model in random process theory as well as by the static probabilistic reliability ideas, a new definition of the hybrid time-variant reliability measurement is provided for the vibration control systems and the related solution details are further expounded. Two engineering examples are eventually presented to demonstrate the validity and applicability of the methodology developed.

  13. Timing of water plume eruptions on Enceladus explained by interior viscosity structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Běhounková, Marie; Tobie, Gabriel; Čadek, Ondřej; Choblet, Gaël; Porco, Carolyn; Nimmo, Francis

    2015-08-01

    At the south pole of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus, eruptions of water vapour and ice emanate from warm tectonic ridges. Observations in the infrared and visible spectra have shown an orbital modulation of the plume brightness, which suggests that the eruption activity is influenced by tidal forces. However, the observed activity seems to be delayed by several hours with respect to predictions based on simple tidal models. Here we simulate the viscoelastic tidal response of Enceladus with a full three-dimensional numerical model and show that the delay in eruption activity may be a natural consequence of the viscosity structure in the south-polar region and the size of the putative subsurface ocean. By systematically comparing simulations of variations in normal stress along faults with plume brightness data, we show that the observed activity is reproduced for two classes of interior models with contrasting thermal histories: a low-viscosity convective region above a polar sea extending about 45°-60° from the south pole at a depth below the surface as small as 30 km, or a convecting ice shell of 60-70 km in thickness above a global ocean. Our analysis further shows that the eruption activity is controlled by the average normal stress applied across the cracks, thus providing a constraint on the eruption mechanism.

  14. Improving residents' handovers through just-in-time training for structured communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, Liam; Amin, Aditi; Boyington, Curtiss; Ao, Peter; Frolova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    In a recent quality assurance project we learned that nearly half of the handovers we examined were characterized as unsatisfactory by our residents, who provided examples in which their anxiety had been piqued and patient care had been affected. These reports substantiated a growing body of literature on the relationship between the quality of handover and the quality of patient care, so we sought to improve the quality and consistency of the in-hosptial handovers undertaken by our internal medicine residents. Senior residents attended morning report for three consecutive month long blocks and evaluated the quality of the handovers using an observational protocol comprised of 16 aspects of effective handover. During the first block, the resident observed a median of eight of the 16 practices occurring across the 46 handovers, and a large amount of variability. At the beginning of the subsequent block we presented a concise introduction to a structured handover procedure (SBARR). The median quality of the subsequent 33 handovers rose to 11, and the variability decreased considerably. In the next block we refined the SBARR orientation to focus on the errors observed in the previous blocks, and the improvement in the quality and variability was sustained. The minor change, which requires few resources to sustain, had a favourable impact on the quality of our residents' in-hospital handovers.

  15. Analysis of the phenomena associated with structural damage using real time vibration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Peyrano, O; Cismondi, L; Damiani, H; Torres, E

    2004-01-01

    It is of interest to have analytical methodologies available for the dynamic behavior of large mechanical structures like those in thermal cycle systems of nuclear power plants or in transport systems during the experimental stage prior to their construction, as happens in aeronautics, where prototypes are tested in experimental banks on a scale of 1 to 1. The same does not occur with systems for the generation of electrical energy such as a nuclear power plant or in ships, competition automobiles, railway systems, etc. Not because of the technical impossibility but because of the high costs involved. This work aims to implement a technology based on the analysis of the vibrations to obtain a profile of the modal dynamic response and its influence on the critical components of the mechanisms with the particularity of detecting the preventive location of the component that may suffer a potential damage. The Vibrations Analysis Laboratory has resolved different cases in the Embalse Nuclear Plant, in the Atucha Nuclear Plant, in the Heavy Water Industrial Plant, in the automobile industry and in other industrial areas (CW)

  16. Time-dependent of characteristics of Cu/CuS/n-GaAs/In structure produced by SILAR method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sağlam, M.; Güzeldir, B., E-mail: msaglam@atauni.edu.tr

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • The CuS thin film used at Cu/n-GaAs structure is grown by SILAR method. • There has been no report on ageing of characteristics of this junction in the literature. • The properties of Cu/CuS/n-GaAs/In structure are examined with different methods. • It has been shown that Cu/CuS/n-GaAs/In structure has a stable interface. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to explain effects of the ageing on the electrical properties of Cu/n-GaAs Shottky barrier diode with Copper Sulphide (CuS) interfacial layer. CuS thin films are deposited on n-type GaAs substrate by Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction (SILAR) method at room temperature. The structural and the morphological properties of the films have been carried out by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques. The XRD analysis of as-grown films showed the single-phase covellite, with hexagonal crystal structure built around two preferred orientations corresponding to (102) and (108) atomic planes. The ageing effects on the electrical properties of Cu/CuS/n-GaAs/In structure have been investigated. The current–voltage (I–V) measurements at room temperature have been carried out to study the change in electrical characteristics of the devices as a function of ageing time. The main electrical parameters, such as ideality factor (n), barrier height (Φ{sub b}), series resistance (R{sub s}), leakage current (I{sub 0}), and interface states (N{sub ss}) for this structure have been calculated. The results show that the main electrical parameters of device remained virtually unchanged.

  17. Time-dependent of characteristics of Cu/CuS/n-GaAs/In structure produced by SILAR method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sağlam, M.; Güzeldir, B.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The CuS thin film used at Cu/n-GaAs structure is grown by SILAR method. • There has been no report on ageing of characteristics of this junction in the literature. • The properties of Cu/CuS/n-GaAs/In structure are examined with different methods. • It has been shown that Cu/CuS/n-GaAs/In structure has a stable interface. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to explain effects of the ageing on the electrical properties of Cu/n-GaAs Shottky barrier diode with Copper Sulphide (CuS) interfacial layer. CuS thin films are deposited on n-type GaAs substrate by Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction (SILAR) method at room temperature. The structural and the morphological properties of the films have been carried out by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques. The XRD analysis of as-grown films showed the single-phase covellite, with hexagonal crystal structure built around two preferred orientations corresponding to (102) and (108) atomic planes. The ageing effects on the electrical properties of Cu/CuS/n-GaAs/In structure have been investigated. The current–voltage (I–V) measurements at room temperature have been carried out to study the change in electrical characteristics of the devices as a function of ageing time. The main electrical parameters, such as ideality factor (n), barrier height (Φ_b), series resistance (R_s), leakage current (I_0), and interface states (N_s_s) for this structure have been calculated. The results show that the main electrical parameters of device remained virtually unchanged.

  18. Emergence of a common generalized synchronization manifold in network motifs of structurally different time-delay systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh, R.; Senthilkumar, D.V.; Lakshmanan, M.; Kurths, J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We have identified that a common generalized synchronization manifold exist for symmetrically coupled structurally different time-delay systems with different orders. • We have provided a theoretical formulation for the existence of a common generalized synchronization manifold based on the auxiliary system approach. • We have pointed out the existence of a transition from partial to global generalized synchronization. • We have corroborated our results using the maximal transverse Lyapunov exponent, correlation coefficient, mutual false nearest neighbor method. - Abstract: We point out the existence of a transition from partial to global generalized synchronization (GS) in symmetrically coupled structurally different time-delay systems of different orders using the auxiliary system approach and the mutual false nearest neighbor method. The present authors have recently reported that there exists a common GS manifold even in an ensemble of structurally nonidentical scalar time-delay systems with different fractal dimensions and shown that GS occurs simultaneously with phase synchronization (PS). In this paper we confirm that the above result is not confined just to scalar one-dimensional time-delay systems alone but there exists a similar type of transition even in the case of time-delay systems with different orders. We calculate the maximal transverse Lyapunov exponent to evaluate the asymptotic stability of the complete synchronization manifold of each of the main and the corresponding auxiliary systems, which in turn ensures the stability of the GS manifold between the main systems. Further we estimate the correlation coefficient and the correlation of probability of recurrence to establish the relation between GS and PS. We also calculate the mutual false nearest neighbor parameter which doubly confirms the occurrence of the global GS manifold.

  19. Time of Growth Dependent of ZnO-Nanorods by Self-Assembly Methods and its Structural Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprilia, A.; Bahtiar, A.; Safriani, L.; Ayunita, C. C.; Afifah, N.; Syakir, N.; Risdiana; Saragi, T.; Hidayat, S.; Fitrilawati; Siregar, R. E.

    2017-05-01

    ZnO-nanorods (ZnO-Nrs) have been successfully prepared on glass substrate using self-assembly method by varying deposition time. Zn acetate dehydrate and 2-methoxyethanol was used as raw material and solvent respectively (for ZnO seed layer preparation), meanwhile Zn nitrate hexahydrate and hexametylenetetramine (HMTA) dissolved in deionized water used as solution growth of ZnO-Nanorods (ZnO-Nrs). In this work, deposition times of ZnO-Nrs were varied by 120 min, 150 min, 180 min and 210 minutes at 100°C of annealing temperature. In order to investigate the physical properties of resulting ZnO, several measurements such as x-ray diffraction (XRD), ultra-violet visible spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were carried out. Based on ZnO nanorods SEM image with varying time depositions, seems that increasing deposition time the nanorod size decrease but when the time reach 210 min, the average size of nanorods turned back increase. From XRD measurement, the average grain size and lattice constant (c) which is assemble the nanorod structure and lattice constant (c) was determined by Debye-Scherrer formula and Bragg law’s respectively. The growth process of ZnO nanorod by 180 min time deposition was known as an appropriate time to produce ZnO nanorods with high crystal quality due to sharp peak intensity of XRD spectrum.

  20. Synthesis of ferrofluids based on cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: Influence of reaction time on structural, morphological and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amirabadizadeh, Ahmad; Salighe, Zohre; Sarhaddi, Reza, E-mail: reza.sarhaddi@birjand.ac.ir; Lotfollahi, Zahra

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Ferrofluids based on cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation method. • The crystallite and particle size of cobalt ferrite can be controlled effectively by reaction time. • The ferrofluids have lower values of saturation magnetization and coercivity as compared to nanoparticles. • By increasing the size of nanoparticles, the narrower and sharper spikes of ferrofluids are formed. - Abstract: In this work, for first time the ferrofluids based on the cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were prepared by the co-precipitation method at different reaction times (0.5–6.5 h). Crystal structure, morphology and magnetic properties of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles and the ferrofluids based on the nanoparticles were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The XRD patterns of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles synthesized at different reaction times indicated that all samples are single phase in accordance with inverse cubic spinel structure with space group Fd-3m, and no impurity phase was observed. By increasing the reaction time to 3.5 h, the lattice parameter and the average crystallites size increased and then afterwards decreased by increasing the reaction time. The microscopic studies indicated the formation of nanosized particles with nearly spherical in shape, whereas the average particle size for all samples is found to be less than 50 nm. The results of VSM also showed that the saturation magnetization and coercivity field of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles and the ferrofluids were influenced by reaction time, whereas the ferrofluids have lower values of magnetic parameters than that of nanoparticles.

  1. Time-Dependent Wetting Behavior of PDMS Surfaces with Bio-Inspired, Hierarchical Structures

    KAUST Repository

    Mishra, Himanshu; Schrader, Alex M.; Lee, Dong Woog; Gallo, Adair; Chen, Szu-Ying; Kaufman, Yair; Das, Saurabh; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2015-01-01

    Wetting of rough surfaces involves time-dependent effects, such as surface deformations, non-uniform filling of surface pores within or outside the contact area, and surface chemistries, but the detailed impact of these phenomena on wetting is not entirely clear. Understanding these effects is crucial for designing coatings for a wide range of applications, such as membrane-based oil-water separation and desalination, waterproof linings/windows for automobiles, aircrafts, and naval vessels, and antibiofouling. Herein, we report on time-dependent contact angles of water droplets on a rough polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface that cannot be completely described by the conventional Cassie-Baxter or Wenzel models or the recently proposed Cassie-impregnated model. Shells of sand dollars (Dendraster excentricus) were used as lithography-free, robust templates to produce rough PDMS surfaces with hierarchical, periodic features ranging from 10-7-10-4 m. Under saturated vapor conditions, we found that in the short-term (<1 min), the contact angle of a sessile water droplet on the templated PDMS, θSDT = 140° ± 3°, was accurately described by the Cassie-Baxter model (predicted θSDT = 137°); however, after 90 min, θSDT fell to 110°. Fluorescent confocal microscopy confirmed that the initial reduction in θSDT to 110° (the Wenzel limit) was primarily a Cassie-Baxter to Wenzel transition during which pores within the contact area filled gradually, and more rapidly for ethanol-water mixtures. After 90 min, the contact line of the water droplet became pinned, perhaps caused by viscoelastic deformation of the PDMS around the contact line, and a significant volume of water began to flow from the droplet to pores outside the contact region, causing θSDT to decrease to 65° over 48 h on the rough surface. The system we present here to explore the concept of contact angle time dependence (dynamics) and modeling of natural surfaces provides insights into the design and

  2. Time-Dependent Wetting Behavior of PDMS Surfaces with Bio-Inspired, Hierarchical Structures

    KAUST Repository

    Mishra, Himanshu

    2015-12-28

    Wetting of rough surfaces involves time-dependent effects, such as surface deformations, non-uniform filling of surface pores within or outside the contact area, and surface chemistries, but the detailed impact of these phenomena on wetting is not entirely clear. Understanding these effects is crucial for designing coatings for a wide range of applications, such as membrane-based oil-water separation and desalination, waterproof linings/windows for automobiles, aircrafts, and naval vessels, and antibiofouling. Herein, we report on time-dependent contact angles of water droplets on a rough polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface that cannot be completely described by the conventional Cassie-Baxter or Wenzel models or the recently proposed Cassie-impregnated model. Shells of sand dollars (Dendraster excentricus) were used as lithography-free, robust templates to produce rough PDMS surfaces with hierarchical, periodic features ranging from 10-7-10-4 m. Under saturated vapor conditions, we found that in the short-term (<1 min), the contact angle of a sessile water droplet on the templated PDMS, θSDT = 140° ± 3°, was accurately described by the Cassie-Baxter model (predicted θSDT = 137°); however, after 90 min, θSDT fell to 110°. Fluorescent confocal microscopy confirmed that the initial reduction in θSDT to 110° (the Wenzel limit) was primarily a Cassie-Baxter to Wenzel transition during which pores within the contact area filled gradually, and more rapidly for ethanol-water mixtures. After 90 min, the contact line of the water droplet became pinned, perhaps caused by viscoelastic deformation of the PDMS around the contact line, and a significant volume of water began to flow from the droplet to pores outside the contact region, causing θSDT to decrease to 65° over 48 h on the rough surface. The system we present here to explore the concept of contact angle time dependence (dynamics) and modeling of natural surfaces provides insights into the design and

  3. Time Structure of Particle Production in the Merit High-Power Target Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Efthymiopoulos, I; Palm, M; Lettry, J; Haug, F; Pereira, H; Pernegger, H; Steerenberg, R; Grudiev, A; Kirk, H G; Park, H; Tsang, T; Mokhov, N; Striganov, S; Carroll, A J; Graves, V B; Spampinato, P T; McDonald, K T; Bennett, J R J; Caretta, O; Loveridge, P

    2010-01-01

    The MERIT experiment is a proof-of-principle test of a target system for high power proton beam to be used as front-end for a neutrino factory complex or amuon collider. The experiment took data in autumn 2007 with the fast extracted beam from the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) to a maximum intensity of about 30 × 1012 protons per pulse. We report results from the portion of the MERIT experiment in which separated beam pulses were delivered to a free mercury jet target with time intervals between pulses varying from 2 to 700 μs. The analysis is based on the responses of particle detectors placed along side and downstream of the target.

  4. Late-time structure of the Bunch-Davies FRW wavefunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, George; Mahajan, Raghu; Shaghoulian, Edgar

    2016-10-01

    In this short note we organize a perturbation theory for the Bunch-Davies wavefunction in flat, accelerating cosmologies. The calculational technique avoids the in-in formalism and instead uses an analytic continuation from Euclidean signature. We will consider both massless and conformally coupled self-interacting scalars. These calculations explicitly illustrate two facts. The first is that IR divergences get sharper as the acceleration slows. The second is that UV-divergent contact terms in the Euclidean computation can contribute to the absolute value of the wavefunction in Lorentzian signature. Here UV divergent refers to terms involving inverse powers of the radial cutoff in the Euclidean computation. In Lorentzian signature such terms encode physical time dependence of the wavefunction.

  5. Inflation persistence in central and southeastern Europe: Evidence from univariate and structural time series approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Zorica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to measure inflation persistence in the following countries of Central and Southeastern Europe: Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Poland, Hungary, Romania and Serbia. The study sample covers monthly data from January, 1995 to May, 2010 for Poland, Hungary and Slovakia, from January 1994 to May, 2010 for the Czech Republic, and from January, 2002 to June 2010 for Romania. The shortest sample used, from January, 2003 to September, 2010, was for Serbia and is due to the late start in the transition process. The results of this study enriched the existing ones on this topic by extending the sample period to cover even the recent years of relatively higher inflation rates and by including Romania and Serbia, which were not previously considered. The study led to two main findings: first, inflation of moderate to high magnitude persistence in Hungary, Poland, Romania and Serbia, and inflation of smaller order persistence in Slovakia and the Czech Republic was detected within the Markov switching model approach. In addition, the changes in inflation persistence often correspond to changes in variability and mean of inflation. Second, New Keynesian Phillips Curve represents a valid structural approach to describe the inflation dynamics in this region. In all the six cases studied, weights on backward and forward looking behaviors were significant, while the impact of the driving variable was insignificant only once. It is found that significant influence of the economic driving variable can be captured by real gross wage inflation and real broad money growth. The estimates show that the backward-looking term plays an important role in determining the inflation dynamics. Similar conclusions are drawn by using quarterly data in econometric estimations for the selected countries.

  6. Pre-Big Bang, space-time structure, asymptotic Universe. Spinorial space-time and a new approach to Friedmann-like equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Mestres, Luis

    2014-04-01

    Planck and other recent data in Cosmology and Particle Physics can open the way to controversial analyses concerning the early Universe and its possible ultimate origin. Alternatives to standard cosmology include pre-Big Bang approaches, new space-time geometries and new ultimate constituents of matter. Basic issues related to a possible new cosmology along these lines clearly deserve further exploration. The Planck collaboration reports an age of the Universe t close to 13.8 Gyr and a present ratio H between relative speeds and distances at cosmic scale around 67.3 km/s/Mpc. The product of these two measured quantities is then slightly below 1 (about 0.95), while it can be exactly 1 in the absence of matter and cosmological constant in patterns based on the spinorial space-time we have considered in previous papers. In this description of space-time we first suggested in 1996-97, the cosmic time t is given by the modulus of a SU(2) spinor and the Lundmark-Lemaître-Hubble (LLH) expansion law turns out to be of purely geometric origin previous to any introduction of standard matter and relativity. Such a fundamental geometry, inspired by the role of half-integer spin in Particle Physics, may reflect an equilibrium between the dynamics of the ultimate constituents of matter and the deep structure of space and time. Taking into account the observed cosmic acceleration, the present situation suggests that the value of 1 can be a natural asymptotic limit for the product H t in the long-term evolution of our Universe up to possible small corrections. In the presence of a spinorial space-time geometry, no ad hoc combination of dark matter and dark energy would in any case be needed to get an acceptable value of H and an evolution of the Universe compatible with observation. The use of a spinorial space-time naturally leads to unconventional properties for the space curvature term in Friedmann-like equations. It therefore suggests a major modification of the standard

  7. Gaussian Mixture Random Coefficient model based framework for SHM in structures with time-dependent dynamics under uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendaño-Valencia, Luis David; Fassois, Spilios D.

    2017-12-01

    The problem of vibration-based damage diagnosis in structures characterized by time-dependent dynamics under significant environmental and/or operational uncertainty is considered. A stochastic framework consisting of a Gaussian Mixture Random Coefficient model of the uncertain time-dependent dynamics under each structural health state, proper estimation methods, and Bayesian or minimum distance type decision making, is postulated. The Random Coefficient (RC) time-dependent stochastic model with coefficients following a multivariate Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) allows for significant flexibility in uncertainty representation. Certain of the model parameters are estimated via a simple procedure which is founded on the related Multiple Model (MM) concept, while the GMM weights are explicitly estimated for optimizing damage diagnostic performance. The postulated framework is demonstrated via damage detection in a simple simulated model of a quarter-car active suspension with time-dependent dynamics and considerable uncertainty on the payload. Comparisons with a simpler Gaussian RC model based method are also presented, with the postulated framework shown to be capable of offering considerable improvement in diagnostic performance.

  8. A novel MEMS inertial switch with a reinforcing rib structure and electrostatic power assist to prolong the contact time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Wang, Yan; Yang, Zhuoqing; Ding, Guifu; Zhao, Xiaolin; Wang, Hong

    2018-03-01

    The MEMS inertial switch is widely used in various industries owing to its advantage of small size, high integration, low power consumption and low costs, especially in the timing of Internet of things, such as toys, handheld devices, accessories and vibration testing. This paper provided a novel inertial switch with a reinforcing rib structure and electrostatic power assist. The designed inertial switch can reduce the complexity of the post-processing circuit and broaden its application prospect. The continuous electrostatic force can extend the contact time of the designed inertia switch before the leakage of electricity ends. The moving electrode with a reinforcing rib structure can effectively restrain the bending of the lower surface of moving electrode caused by residual stress. The array-type fixed electrode can ensure stable contact between the electrodes when the device is sensitive to external shocks. The dynamic displacement-time curve can be simulated by the COMSOL finite element simulation software. The laminated plating process is used to produce the designed inertial switch and the drop hammer acceleration monitoring system is used to test the fabricated device. The results indicate that, compared with the traditional design, the bouncing phenomenon can be prevented and extend the contact time to 336μs.

  9. The texture, structure and nutrient availability of artificial soil on cut slopes restored with OSSS - Influence of restoration time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiyu; Chen, Jiao; Ai, Xiaoyan; Li, Ruirui; Ai, Yingwei; Li, Wei

    2017-09-15

    Outside soil spray seeding (OSSS) is widely used to restore cut slopes in southwest of China, and artificial soil is often sprayed onto cut slopes to establish a soil layer for revegetation. The stability of artificial soil layer and its supply of water and nutrients for plants is crucial for successful restoration. To evaluate the long-term effectiveness of OSSS, the texture, structure and nutrient availability of artificial soil were studied, various soil samples were obtained from three cut slopes with different restoration time (restored with OSSS in 1996, 2003 and 2007 respectively) and one natural developed slope (NS). The properties measured including soil particle size distribution (PSD), texture, fractal dimension of PSD (D m ), the bias (C S ) and peak convex (C E ) coefficients of aggregate size distribution, structure failure rate, bulk density, moisture, pH, soil organic carbon (SOC), calcium carbonate content, Available nitrogen (N A ), Available phosphorus (P A ), and Available potassium (K A ). The results showed that different restoration time resulted in significant differences in soil PSD, D m , C S , C E , structure failure rate, bulk density, moisture, pH, N A , and K A . And these properties improved with increasing restoration age. However, there is still a huge disparity in soil texture, structure, and the availability of nutrients and moisture between the cut slopes and NS over a restoration period of up to 17 years, and this is caused by the little fine particles and the lack of slow release fertilizers and organic fertilizers in the artificial soil, resulting in poorer soil structure stability, retention and availability of moisture and nutrients on the cut slopes. Overall, the OSSS technique shows a long-term effectiveness in southwest of China, but there is still room for improvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of Just in Time Maintenance of Reinforced Concrete Bridge Structures based on Real Historical Data Deterioration Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu-Tair A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is the backbone of any developed economy. Concrete can suffer from a large number of deleterious effects including physical, chemical and biological causes. Large owning bridge structures organizations are facing very serious questions when asking for maintenance budgets. The questions range from needing to justify the need for the work, its urgency, to also have to predict or show the consequences of delayed rehabilitation of a particular structure. There is therefore a need for a probabilistic model that can estimate the range of service lives of bridge populations and also the likelihood of level of deteriorations it can reached for every incremental time interval. A model was developed for such estimation based on statistical data from actual inspection records of a large reinforced concrete bridge portfolio. The method used both deterministic and stochastic methods to predict the service life of a bridge, using these service lives in combination with the just in time (JIT principle of management would enable maintenance managers to justify the need for action and the budgets needed, to intervene at the optimum time in the life of the structure and that of the deterioration. The paper will report on the model which is based on a large database of deterioration records of concrete bridges covering a period of over 60 years and include data from over 400 bridge structures. The paper will also illustrate how the service life model was developed and how these service lives combined with the JIT can be used to effectively allocate resources and use them to keep a major infrastructure asset moving with little disruption to the transport system and its users.

  11. Constraints on the crustal structure beneath the Sinai subplate, SE Mediterranean, from analysis of local and regional travel times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed K. Salah

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Sinai Peninsula has been recognized as a subplate of the African Plate located at the triple junction of the Gulf of Suez rift, the Dead Sea Transform fault, and the Red Sea rift. The upper and lower crustal structures of this tectonically active, rapidly developing region are yet poorly understood because of many limitations. For this reason, a set of P- and S-wave travel times recorded at 14 seismic stations belonging to the Egyptian National Seismographic Network (ENSN from 111 local and regional events are analyzed to investigate the crustal structures and the locations of the seismogenic zones beneath central and southern Sinai. Because the velocity model used for routine earthquake location by ENSN is one-dimensional, the travel-time residuals will show lateral heterogeneity of the velocity structures and unmodeled vertical structures. Seismic activity is strong along the eastern and southern borders of the study area but low to moderate along the northern boundary and the Gulf of Suez to the west. The crustal Vp/Vs ratio is 1.74 from shallow (depth ≤ 10 km earthquakes and 1.76 from deeper (depth > 10 km crustal events. The majority of the regional and local travel-time residuals are positive relative to the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM, implying that the seismic stations are located above widely distributed, tectonically-induced low-velocity zones. These low-velocity zones are mostly related to the local crustal faults affecting the sedimentary section and the basement complex as well as the rifting processes prevailing in the northern Red Sea region and the ascending of hot mantle materials along crustal fractures. The delineation of these low-velocity zones and the locations of big crustal earthquakes enable the identification of areas prone to intense seismotectonic activities, which should be excluded from major future development projects and large constructions in central and southern Sinai.

  12. Role of short-time acoustic temporal fine structure cues in sentence recognition for normal-hearing listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Limin; Xu, Li

    2018-02-01

    Short-time processing was employed to manipulate the amplitude, bandwidth, and temporal fine structure (TFS) in sentences. Fifty-two native-English-speaking, normal-hearing listeners participated in four sentence-recognition experiments. Results showed that recovered envelope (E) played an important role in speech recognition when the bandwidth was > 1 equivalent rectangular bandwidth. Removing TFS drastically reduced sentence recognition. Preserving TFS greatly improved sentence recognition when amplitude information was available at a rate ≥ 10 Hz (i.e., time segment ≤ 100 ms). Therefore, the short-time TFS facilitates speech perception together with the recovered E and works with the coarse amplitude cues to provide useful information for speech recognition.

  13. Fault zone structure determined through the analysis of earthquake arrival times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelini, A.

    1991-10-01

    This thesis develops and applies a technique for the simultaneous determination of P and S wave velocity models and hypocenters from a set of arrival times. The velocity models are parameterized in terms of cubic B-splines basis functions which permit the retrieval of smooth models that can be used directly for generation of synthetic seismograms using the ray method. In addition, this type of smoothing limits the rise of instabilities related to the poor resolving power of the data. V{sub P}/V{sub S} ratios calculated from P and S models display generally instabilities related to the different ray-coverages of compressional and shear waves. However, V{sub P}/V{sub S} ratios are important for correct identification of rock types and this study introduces a new methodology based on adding some coupling (i.e., proportionality) between P and S models which stabilizes the V{sub P}/V{sub S} models around some average preset value determined from the data. Tests of the technique with synthetic data show that this additional coupling regularizes effectively the resulting models.

  14. Fault zone structure determined through the analysis of earthquake arrival times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelini, Alberto [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-10-01

    This thesis develops and applies a technique for the simultaneous determination of P and S wave velocity models and hypocenters from a set of arrival times. The velocity models are parameterized in terms of cubic B-splines basis functions which permit the retrieval of smooth models that can be used directly for generation of synthetic seismograms using the ray method. In addition, this type of smoothing limits the rise of instabilities related to the poor resolving power of the data. VP/VS ratios calculated from P and S models display generally instabilities related to the different ray-coverages of compressional and shear waves. However, VP/VS ratios are important for correct identification of rock types and this study introduces a new methodology based on adding some coupling (i.e., proportionality) between P and S models which stabilizes the VP/VS models around some average preset value determined from the data. Tests of the technique with synthetic data show that this additional coupling regularizes effectively the resulting models.

  15. Gist in time: Scene semantics and structure enhance recall of searched objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephs, Emilie L; Draschkow, Dejan; Wolfe, Jeremy M; Võ, Melissa L-H

    2016-09-01

    Previous work has shown that recall of objects that are incidentally encountered as targets in visual search is better than recall of objects that have been intentionally memorized (Draschkow, Wolfe, & Võ, 2014). However, this counter-intuitive result is not seen when these tasks are performed with non-scene stimuli. The goal of the current paper is to determine what features of search in a scene contribute to higher recall rates when compared to a memorization task. In each of four experiments, we compare the free recall rate for target objects following a search to the rate following a memorization task. Across the experiments, the stimuli include progressively more scene-related information. Experiment 1 provides the spatial relations between objects. Experiment 2 adds relative size and depth of objects. Experiments 3 and 4 include scene layout and semantic information. We find that search leads to better recall than explicit memorization in cases where scene layout and semantic information are present, as long as the participant has ample time (2500ms) to integrate this information with knowledge about the target object (Exp. 4). These results suggest that the integration of scene and target information not only leads to more efficient search, but can also contribute to stronger memory representations than intentional memorization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanical reliability of structures subjected to time-variant physical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, Celine

    1999-01-01

    This work deals with two-phase critical flows in order to improve the way to dimension safety systems. It brings a numerical, physical and experimental contribution. We emphasized the importance to validate separately the numerical method and the physical model. Reference numerical solutions, assimilated to quasi-analytical solutions, were elaborated for a stationary one-dimensional restriction. They allowed to validate in space non stationary numerical schemes converged in time and constitute space convergence indicator (2 schemes validated). With this reliable numerical solution, we studied the physical model. The potential of a particular existing dispersed flow model has been validated thanks to experimental data. The validity domain of such a model is inevitably reduced. During this study, particular behaviors have been exhibited like the pseudo-critical nature of flow with a relaxation process, the non characteristic properties/nature of critical parameters where disequilibrium is largely reduced or the predominance of pressure due to interfacial transfers. The multidimensional aspect has been studied. A data base included local parameters corresponding to a simplify geometry has been constituted. The flow impact on the disk has been characterized and multidimensional effects identified. These effects form an additional step to the validation of multidimensional physical models. (author) [fr

  17. Major episodes of geologic change - Correlations, time structure and possible causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampino, Michael R.; Caldeira, Ken

    1993-01-01

    Published data sets of major geologic events of the past about 250 Myr (extinction events, sea-level lows, continental flood-basalt eruptions, mountain-building events, abrupt changes in sea-floor spreading, ocean-anoxic and blackshale events and the largest evaporite deposits) have been synthesized (with estimated errors). These events show evidence for a statistically significant periodic component with an underlying periodicity, formally equal to 26.6 Myr, and a recent maximum, close to the present time. The cycle may not be strictly periodic, but a periodicity of about 30 Myr is robust to probable errors in dating of the geologic events. The intervals of geologic change seem to involve jumps in sea-floor spreading associated with episodic continental rifting, volcanism, enhanced orogeny, global sea-level changes and fluctuations in climate. The period may represent a purely internal earth-pulsation, but evidence of planetesimal impacts at several extinction boundaries, and a possible underlying cycle of 28-36 Myr in crater ages, suggests that highly energetic impacts may be affecting global tectonics. A cyclic increase in the flux of planetesimals might result from the passage of the Solar System through the central plane of the Milky Way Galaxy - an event with a periodicity and mean phasing similar to that detected in the geologic changes.

  18. Real-time imaging, spectroscopy, and structural investigation of cathodic plasma electrolytic oxidation of molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojadinović, Stevan, E-mail: sstevan@ff.bg.ac.rs; Tadić, Nenad; Šišović, Nikola M.; Vasilić, Rastko [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-06-21

    In this paper, the results of the investigation of cathodic plasma electrolytic oxidation (CPEO) of molybdenum at 160 V in a mixed solution of borax, water, and ethylene glycol are presented. Real-time imaging and optical emission spectroscopy were used for the characterization of the CPEO. During the process, vapor envelope is formed around the cathode and strong electric field within the envelope caused the generation of plasma discharges. The spectral line shape analysis of hydrogen Balmer line H{sub β} (486.13 nm) shows that plasma discharges are characterized by the electron number density of about 1.4 × 10{sup 21 }m{sup −3}. The electron temperature of 15 000 K was estimated by measuring molybdenum atomic lines intensity. Surface morphology, chemical, and phase composition of coatings formed by CPEO were characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. The elemental components of CPEO coatings are Mo and O and the predominant crystalline form is MoO{sub 3}.

  19. Effect of impregnation pressure and time on the porosity, structure and properties of polyacrylonitrile-fiber based carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopalan, Ramani, E-mail: rvg@barc.gov.in [Powder Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Roy, Mainak, E-mail: mainak73@barc.gov.in [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Thomas, Susy [High Pressure Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Patra, A.K. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sathiyamoorthy, D. [Powder Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Tyagi, A.K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-02-15

    Carbon–carbon composites may find applications in critical parts of advanced nuclear reactors. A series of carbon–carbon composites were prepared using polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based carbon fibers. The materials were densified by impregnating two-dimensional (2D) preforms with liquid phenol formaldehyde resin at different pressures and for different periods of time and then carbonizing those by slowly heating at 1000 °C. Effects of the processing parameters on the structure of the composites were extensively studied. The study showed conclusively that open porosity decreased with increasing impregnation pressure, whereas impregnation time had lesser effect. Matrix–resin bonding also improved at higher pressure. d{sub 002} spacing decreased and ordering along c-axis increased with concomitant increase in sp{sup 2}-carbon fraction at higher impregnation pressures. The fiber reinforced composites exhibited short range ordering of carbon atoms and satisfied structural conditions (d{sub 002} values) of amorphous carbon according to the turbostratic model for non-graphitic carbon materials. The composites had pellet-density of ∼85% of the theoretical value, low thermal expansion and negligible neutron-poisoning. They maintained structural integrity and retained disordered nature even on heat-treatment at ca. 1800 °C.

  20. Altered time structure of neuro-endocrine-immune system function in lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carughi Stefano

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The onset and the development of neoplastic disease may be influenced by many physiological, biological and immunological factors. The nervous, endocrine and immune system might act as an integrated unit to mantain body defense against this pathological process and reciprocal influences have been evidenced among hypothalamus, pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, pineal gland and immune system. In this study we evaluated differences among healthy subjects and subjects suffering from lung cancer in the 24-hour secretory profile of melatonin, cortisol, TRH, TSH, FT4, GH, IGF-1 and IL-2 and circadian variations of lymphocyte subpopulations. Methods In ten healthy male volunteers (age range 45-66 and ten male patients with untreated non small cell lung cancer (age range 46-65 we measured melatonin, cortisol, TRH, TSH, FT4, GH, IGF-1 and IL-2 serum levels and percentages of lymphocyte subpopulations on blood samples collected every four hours for 24 hours. One-way ANOVA between the timepoints for each variable and each group was performed to look for a time-effect, the presence of circadian rhythmicity was evaluated, MESOR, amplitude and acrophase values, mean diurnal levels and mean nocturnal levels were compared. Results A clear circadian rhythm was validated in the control group for hormone serum level and for lymphocyte subsets variation. Melatonin, TRH, TSH, GH, CD3, CD4, HLA-DR, CD20 and CD25 expressing cells presented circadian rhythmicity with acrophase during the night. Cortisol, CD8, CD8bright, CD8dim, CD16, TcRδ1 and δTcS1 presented circadian rhythmicity with acrophase in the morning/at noon. FT4, IGF-1 and IL-2 variation did not show circadian rhythmicity. In lung cancer patients cortisol, TRH, TSH and GH serum level and all the lymphocyte subsubsets variation (except for CD4 showed loss of circadian rhythmicity. MESOR of cortisol, TRH, GH, IL-2 and CD16 was increased, whereas MESOR of TSH, IGF-1, CD8, CD8bright, TcRδ1 and

  1. almaBTE : A solver of the space-time dependent Boltzmann transport equation for phonons in structured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrete, Jesús; Vermeersch, Bjorn; Katre, Ankita; van Roekeghem, Ambroise; Wang, Tao; Madsen, Georg K. H.; Mingo, Natalio

    2017-11-01

    almaBTE is a software package that solves the space- and time-dependent Boltzmann transport equation for phonons, using only ab-initio calculated quantities as inputs. The program can predictively tackle phonon transport in bulk crystals and alloys, thin films, superlattices, and multiscale structures with size features in the nm- μm range. Among many other quantities, the program can output thermal conductances and effective thermal conductivities, space-resolved average temperature profiles, and heat-current distributions resolved in frequency and space. Its first-principles character makes almaBTE especially well suited to investigate novel materials and structures. This article gives an overview of the program structure and presents illustrative examples for some of its uses. PROGRAM SUMMARY Program Title:almaBTE Program Files doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/8tfzwgtp73.1 Licensing provisions: Apache License, version 2.0 Programming language: C++ External routines/libraries: BOOST, MPI, Eigen, HDF5, spglib Nature of problem: Calculation of temperature profiles, thermal flux distributions and effective thermal conductivities in structured systems where heat is carried by phonons Solution method: Solution of linearized phonon Boltzmann transport equation, Variance-reduced Monte Carlo

  2. Time-Domain Three Dimensional BE-FE Method for Transient Response of Floating Structures Under Unsteady Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. S. Ismail

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents a direct time-domain three dimensional (3D numerical procedure to simulate the transient response of very large floating structures (VLFS subjected to unsteady external loads as well as moving mass. The proposed procedure employs the Boundary Element and Finite Element methods (FEM-BEM. The floating structure and the surrounding fluid are discretized by 4-node isoparametric finite elements (FE and by 4-node constant boundary elements (BE, respectively. Structural analysis is based on Mindlin's plate theory. The equation of motion is constructed taking into account the effect of inertia loading due to the moving mass. In order to obtain the hydrodynamic forces (added mass and radiation damping, the coupled natural frequencies are first obtained by an iterative method, since hydrodynamic forces become frequency-dependent. Then the Newark integration method is employed to solve the equation of motion for structural system. In order to prove the validity of the present method, a FORTRAN program is developed and numerical examples are carried out to compare its results with those of published experimental results of a scale model of VLFS under a weight drop and airplane landing and takeoff in still water condition. The comparisons show very good agreement.

  3. Effects of soil–structure interaction on real time dynamic response of offshore wind turbines on monopiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, M.; Zania, Varvara; Andersen, L.V.

    2014-01-01

    , a computationally efficient modelling approach of including the dynamic soil–structure interaction into aeroelastic codes is presented with focus on monopile foundations. Semi-analytical frequency-domain solutions are applied to evaluate the dynamic impedance functions of the soil–pile system at a number...... of discrete frequencies. Based on a general and very stable fitting algorithm, a consistent lumped-parameter model of optimal order is calibrated to the impedance functions and implemented into the aeroelastic nonlinear multi-body code HAWC2 to facilitate the time domain analysis of a wind turbine under...... normal operating mode. The aeroelastic response is evaluated for three different foundation conditions, i.e. apparent fixity length, the consistent lumped-parameter model and fixed support at the seabed. The effect of soil–structure interaction is shown to be critical for the design, estimated in terms...

  4. Dwell-time effect on the synthesis of a nano-structured material in water by using Ni wire explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Gyu Sub; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Cho, Yong Sub; Paek, Kwang Hyun; Joo, Won Tae

    2014-01-01

    Nickel nano-structured materials are synthesized by using a wire explosion in water. Based on an analysis of each step of the wire explosion, we propose insufficient energy deposition before a plasma restrike as the cause for the inclusion of coarse particles in the wire-explosion product. We confirmed that more energy, in excess of 30%, could be deposited by increasing the dwell time, which resulted from a compression of vapor by the surrounding water and from suppression of plasma restrikes. Because of an increased energy loss into the surrounding water, the specific energy increased by two-fold compared to a gas atmosphere. The synthesized nano-structured nickel showed a uniform particle size of 20 nm with a few coarse particles that were mainly metallic nickel with a little oxide and hydroxide phases. The possibility for large-volume production through a continuous explosion of 300 shots was confirmed.

  5. Singularity Structure Analysis of the Higher-Dimensional Time-Gated Manakov System: Periodic Excitations and Elastic Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuetche, Victor Kamgang; Bouetou, Thomas Bouetou; Kofane, Timoleon Crepin

    2010-12-01

    We investigate the singularity structure analysis of the higher-dimensional time-gated Manakov system referring to the (2+1)-dimensional coupled nonlinear Schroedinger (CNLS) equations, and we show that these equations are Painleve-integrable. By means of the Weiss et al.'s methodology, we show the arbitrariness of the expansion coefficients and the consistency of the truncation corresponding to a special Baecklund transformation (BT) of these CNLS equations. In the wake of such transformation, following the Hirota's formalism, we derive a one-soliton solution. Besides, by using the Zakharov-Shabat (ZS) scheme which provides a general Lax-representation of an evolution system, we show that the (2+1)-dimensional CNLS system under interests is completely integrable. Furthermore, using the arbitrariness of the above coefficients, we unearth and investigate a typical spectrum of periodic coherent structures while depicting elastic interactions amongst such patterns. (author)

  6. Finite-Difference Time-Domain Simulation of Light Propagation in 2D Periodic and Quasi-Periodic Photonic Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Dadashzadeh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-short pulse is a promising technology for achieving ultra-high data rate transmission which is required to follow the increased demand of data transport over an optical communication system. Therefore, the propagation of such type of pulses and the effects that it may suffer during its transmission through an optical waveguide has received a great deal of attention in the recent years. We provide an overview of recent theoretical developments in a numerical modeling of Maxwell's equations to analyze the propagation of short laser pulses in photonic structures. The process of short light pulse propagation through 2D periodic and quasi-periodic photonic structures is simulated based on Finite-Difference Time-Domain calculations of Maxwell’s equations.

  7. Fatigue characteristics of high strength fire resistance steel for frame structure and time-frequency analysis its acoustic emission signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Nam, Ki Woo; Kang, Chang Young

    2000-01-01

    Demand for now nondestructive evaluation are growing to detect fatigue crack growth behavior to predict long term performance of materials and structure in aggressive environments, especially when they are in non-visible area. Acoustic emission technique is well suited to these problems and has drawn a keen interests because of its dynamic detection ability, extreme sensitivity and location of growing defects. In this study, we analysed acoustic emission signals obtained in fatigue and tensile test of high strength fire resistance steel for frame structure with time-frequency analysis methods. The main frequency range is different in the noise and the fatigue crack propagation. It could be classified that it were also generated by composite fracture mechanics of cleavage, dimple, inclusion separation etc

  8. Improvements of the beam timing structure during a slow extraction from the 70 GeV IFVE accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, V.K.; Levin, A.V.; Mojzhes, L.L.; Myznikov, K.P.; Tatarenko, V.M.; Fedotov, Yu.S.

    1977-01-01

    To improve the density uniformity of an extracted beam in the slow extraction system of the IFVE accelerator a correlation analysis of a timing structure of a proton beam is developed. A passive filter for a power supply system of an annular electromagnet is reconstructed by introduction of a double-loop circuit to reduce pulsations of 600 Hz main frequency and higher harmonics. To suppress accelerator field pulsations of subharmonic components from 50 to 300 Hz an active filter was introduced, where high Q qualities band filters were inserted. Using the above methods of pulsation suppression permits to improve the density uniformity of the extracted beam

  9. Parametric control of structural vibrations and sound radiation by fast time-space variation of distributed stiffness parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krylov, V.I.; Sorokin, S.V.

    1998-01-01

    The dynamics of a Euler-Bernoulli beam with a time-and-space dependent bending stiffness is studied. The , problem is considered in connection with the application of noise control using smart structures. It is shown that a control for the vibrations of the beam can be achieved by varying the bending stiffness. The technique of direct separation of fast and slow motion coupled with a Green's function method is used to analyze the dynamics of the beam with high-frequency modulation of the stiffness

  10. Deep structure of Pyrenees range (SW Europe) imaged by joint inversion of gravity and teleseismic delay time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufréchou, G.; Tiberi, C.; Martin, R.; Bonvalot, S.; Chevrot, S.; Seoane, L.

    2018-04-01

    We present a new model of the lithosphere and asthenosphere structure down to 300 km depth beneath the Pyrenees from the joint inversion of recent gravity and teleseismic data. Unlike previous studies, crustal correction were not applied on teleseismic data in order (i) to preserve the consistency between gravity data, which are mainly sensitive to the density structure of the crust.lithosphere, and travel time data, and (ii) to avoid the introduction of biases resulting from crustal reductions. The density model down to 100 km depth is preferentially used here to discuss the lithospheric structure of the Pyrenees, whereas the asthenospheric structure from 100 km to 300 km depth is discussed from our velocity model. The absence of a high density anomaly in our model between 30-100 km depth (except the Labourd density anomaly) in the northern part of the Pyrenees seems to preclude eclogitization of the subducted Iberian crust at the scale of the entire Pyrenean range. Local eclogitization of the deep Pyrenean crust beneath the western part of the Axial Zone (West of Andorra) associated with the positive Central density anomaly is proposed. The Pyrenean lithosphere in density and velocity models appears segmented from East to West. No clear relation between the along-strike segmentation and mapped major faults is visible in our models. The Pyrenees' lithosphere segments are associated to different seismicity pattern in the Pyrenees suggesting a possible relation between the deep structure of the Pyrenees and its seismicity in the upper crust. The concentration of earthquakes localized just straight up the Central density anomaly can result of the subsidence and/or delamination of an eclogitized Pyrenean deep root. The velocity model in the asthenosphere is similar to previous studies. The absence of a high-velocity anomaly in the upper mantle and transition zone (i.e. 125 to 225 km depth) seems to preclude the presence of a detached oceanic lithosphere beneath the

  11. A Validation Study of the Rank-Preserving Structural Failure Time Model: Confidence Intervals and Unique, Multiple, and Erroneous Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwens, Mario; Hauch, Ole; Franzén, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    The rank-preserving structural failure time model (RPSFTM) is used for health technology assessment submissions to adjust for switching patients from reference to investigational treatment in cancer trials. It uses counterfactual survival (survival when only reference treatment would have been used) and assumes that, at randomization, the counterfactual survival distribution for the investigational and reference arms is identical. Previous validation reports have assumed that patients in the investigational treatment arm stay on therapy throughout the study period. To evaluate the validity of the RPSFTM at various levels of crossover in situations in which patients are taken off the investigational drug in the investigational arm. The RPSFTM was applied to simulated datasets differing in percentage of patients switching, time of switching, underlying acceleration factor, and number of patients, using exponential distributions for the time on investigational and reference treatment. There were multiple scenarios in which two solutions were found: one corresponding to identical counterfactual distributions, and the other to two different crossing counterfactual distributions. The same was found for the hazard ratio (HR). Unique solutions were observed only when switching patients were on investigational treatment for <40% of the time that patients in the investigational arm were on treatment. Distributions other than exponential could have been used for time on treatment. An HR equal to 1 is a necessary but not always sufficient condition to indicate acceleration factors associated with equal counterfactual survival. Further assessment to distinguish crossing counterfactual curves from equal counterfactual curves is especially needed when the time that switchers stay on investigational treatment is relatively long compared to the time direct starters stay on investigational treatment.

  12. Spatial and temporal changes in the structure of groundwater nitrate concentration time series (1935 1999) as demonstrated by autoregressive modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. L.; Smart, P. L.

    2005-08-01

    Autoregressive modelling is used to investigate the internal structure of long-term (1935-1999) records of nitrate concentration for five karst springs in the Mendip Hills. There is a significant short term (1-2 months) positive autocorrelation at three of the five springs due to the availability of sufficient nitrate within the soil store to maintain concentrations in winter recharge for several months. The absence of short term (1-2 months) positive autocorrelation in the other two springs is due to the marked contrast in land use between the limestone and swallet parts of the catchment, rapid concentrated recharge from the latter causing short term switching in the dominant water source at the spring and thus fluctuating nitrate concentrations. Significant negative autocorrelation is evident at lags varying from 4 to 7 months through to 14-22 months for individual springs, with positive autocorrelation at 19-20 months at one site. This variable timing is explained by moderation of the exhaustion effect in the soil by groundwater storage, which gives longer residence times in large catchments and those with a dominance of diffuse flow. The lags derived from autoregressive modelling may therefore provide an indication of average groundwater residence times. Significant differences in the structure of the autocorrelation function for successive 10-year periods are evident at Cheddar Spring, and are explained by the effect the ploughing up of grasslands during the Second World War and increased fertiliser usage on available nitrogen in the soil store. This effect is moderated by the influence of summer temperatures on rates of mineralization, and of both summer and winter rainfall on the timing and magnitude of nitrate leaching. The pattern of nitrate leaching also appears to have been perturbed by the 1976 drought.

  13. Structuralism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piaget, Jean

    Provided is an overview of the analytical method known as structuralism. The first chapter discusses the three key components of the concept of a structure: the view of a system as a whole instead of so many parts; the study of the transformations in the system; and the fact that these transformations never lead beyond the system but always…

  14. Structured functional assessments in general practice increased the use of part-time sick leave: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterås, Nina; Gulbrandsen, Pål; Kann, Inger Cathrine; Brage, Søren

    2010-03-01

    A method for structured functional assessments of persons with long-term sick leave was implemented in a cluster randomised controlled trial in general practice. The aim was to analyse intervention effects on general practitioner (GP) sick-listing practice and patient sick leave. 57 GPs were randomly assigned to an intervention or a control group. The intervention group GPs learned the method at a 1-day workshop including teamwork and role-playing. The control group GPs were requested to assess functional ability as usual during the 8 months intervention period in 2005. Outcome measures included duration of patient sick leave episodes, GP prescription of part-time sick leave, active sick leave, and vocational rehabilitation. This data was extracted from a national register. The GPs in the intervention group prescribed part-time sick leave more often (p part-time and less active sick leave compared to the control group GPs. As a result, more intervention GP patients returned to part-time work compared to control GP patients. No intervention effect was seen on duration of patient sick leave episodes or on prescription of vocational rehabilitation.

  15. Influence of growth time on crystalline structure, morphologic and optical properties of In2O3 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaf, A.; Bouhdjar, A.; Saidi, H.; Benkhetta, Y.; Bendjedidi, H.; Nouadji, M.; Lehraki, N.

    2015-01-01

    Indium oxide (In 2 O 3 ) thin films are successfully deposited on glass substrate at different deposition timings by ultrasonic spray technique using Indium chloride (InCl 3 ) material source witch is prepared with dissolvent Ethanol (C 2 H 5 -OH), the physical properties of these films are characterized by XRD, MEB,UV-visible. XRD analysis revealed that the films are polycrystalline in nature having centered cubic crystal structure and symmetry space group I2 1 3 with a preferred grain orientation along to (222) plane when the deposition time changes from 4 to 10 min but after t = 10 min, especially when t = 13 min we found that the majority of grains preferred the plane (400). The maximum value of grain size D = 61,51 nm is attained for In 2 O 3 films grown at t =10 min. the average transmittance is about 72%, The optical gap energy is found to decrease from 3.8 to 3.66 eV with growth time Increased from 4 to 10 min but after t = 10 min the value of E g will increase to 3.72 eV. A systematic study on the influence of growth time on the properties of In 2 O 3 thin films deposited by ultrasonic spray at 400 °C has been reported

  16. Influence of growth time on crystalline structure, morphologic and optical properties of In2O3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaf, A.; Bouhdjar, A.; Saidi, H.; Benkhetta, Y.; Bendjedidi, H.; Nouadji, M.; Lehraki, N.

    2015-03-01

    Indium oxide (In2O3) thin films are successfully deposited on glass substrate at different deposition timings by ultrasonic spray technique using Indium chloride (InCl3) material source witch is prepared with dissolvent Ethanol (C2H5-OH), the physical properties of these films are characterized by XRD, MEB,UV-visible. XRD analysis revealed that the films are polycrystalline in nature having centered cubic crystal structure and symmetry space group I213 with a preferred grain orientation along to (222) plane when the deposition time changes from 4 to 10 min but after t = 10 min, especially when t = 13 min we found that the majority of grains preferred the plane (400). The maximum value of grain size D = 61,51 nm is attained for In2O3 films grown at t =10 min. the average transmittance is about 72%, The optical gap energy is found to decrease from 3.8 to 3.66 eV with growth time Increased from 4 to 10 min but after t = 10 min the value of Eg will increase to 3.72 eV. A systematic study on the influence of growth time on the properties of In2O3 thin films deposited by ultrasonic spray at 400 °C has been reported.

  17. Effects of Time-Compressed Speech Training on Multiple Functional and Structural Neural Mechanisms Involving the Left Superior Temporal Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Tsukasa; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Motoki, Kosuke; Jeong, Hyeonjeong; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Nouchi, Rui; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Sakaki, Kohei; Sasaki, Yukako; Magistro, Daniele; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2018-01-01

    Time-compressed speech is an artificial form of rapidly presented speech. Training with time-compressed speech (TCSSL) in a second language leads to adaptation toward TCSSL. Here, we newly investigated the effects of 4 weeks of training with TCSSL on diverse cognitive functions and neural systems using the fractional amplitude of spontaneous low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF), resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) with the left superior temporal gyrus (STG), fractional anisotropy (FA), and regional gray matter volume (rGMV) of young adults by magnetic resonance imaging. There were no significant differences in change of performance of measures of cognitive functions or second language skills after training with TCSSL compared with that of the active control group. However, compared with the active control group, training with TCSSL was associated with increased fALFF, RSFC, and FA and decreased rGMV involving areas in the left STG. These results lacked evidence of a far transfer effect of time-compressed speech training on a wide range of cognitive functions and second language skills in young adults. However, these results demonstrated effects of time-compressed speech training on gray and white matter structures as well as on resting-state intrinsic activity and connectivity involving the left STG, which plays a key role in listening comprehension.

  18. A new capacitive long-range displacement nanometer sensor with differential sensing structure based on time-grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhicheng; Peng, Kai; Liu, Xiaokang; Pu, Hongji; Chen, Ziran

    2018-05-01

    High-precision displacement sensors, which can measure large displacements with nanometer resolution, are key components in many ultra-precision fabrication machines. In this paper, a new capacitive nanometer displacement sensor with differential sensing structure is proposed for long-range linear displacement measurements based on an approach denoted time grating. Analytical models established using electric field coupling theory and an area integral method indicate that common-mode interference will result in a first-harmonic error in the measurement results. To reduce the common-mode interference, the proposed sensor design employs a differential sensing structure, which adopts a second group of induction electrodes spatially separated from the first group of induction electrodes by a half-pitch length. Experimental results based on a prototype sensor demonstrate that the measurement accuracy and the stability of the sensor are substantially improved after adopting the differential sensing structure. Finally, a prototype sensor achieves a measurement accuracy of  ±200 nm over the full 200 mm measurement range of the sensor.

  19. Seeing with the nano-eye: accessing structure, function, and dynamics of matter on its natural length and time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschke, Markus

    2015-03-01

    To understand and ultimately control the properties of most functional materials, from molecular soft-matter to quantum materials, requires access to the structure, coupling, and dynamics on the elementary time and length scales that define the microscopic interactions in these materials. To gain the desired nanometer spatial resolution with simultaneous spectroscopic specificity we combine scanning probe microscopy with different optical, including coherent, nonlinear, and ultrafast spectroscopies. The underlying near-field interaction mediated by the atomic-force or scanning tunneling microscope tip provides the desired deep-sub wavelength nano-focusing enabling few-nm spatial resolution. I will introduce our generalization of the approach in terms of the near-field impedance matching to a quantum system based on special optical antenna-tip designs. The resulting enhanced and qualitatively new forms of light-matter interaction enable measurements of quantum dynamics in an interacting environment or to image the electromagnetic local density of states of thermal radiation. Other applications include the inter-molecular coupling and dynamics in soft-matter hetero-structures, surface plasmon interferometry as a probe of electronic structure and dynamics in graphene, and quantum phase transitions in correlated electron materials. These examples highlight the general applicability of the new near-field microscopy approach, complementing emergent X-ray and electron imaging tools, aiming towards the ultimate goal of probing matter on its most elementary spatio-temporal level.

  20. Plant traits correlated with generation time directly affect inbreeding depression and mating system and indirectly genetic structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Olivier J

    2009-07-01

    differences in stature, as proposed earlier, but rather to differences in generation time. Conclusion Plant traits correlated with generation time affect both inbreeding depression and mating system. These in turn modify genetic drift and gene flow and ultimately genetic structure.