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Sample records for time reversal mirror

  1. Non-linear ultrasonic time-reversal mirrors in NDT

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Převorovský, Zdeněk

    -, č. 4 (2012), s. 4-4 [World Conference on Nondestructive Testing /18./. 16.4.2012-20.4.2012, Durban] R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI1/274; GA MPO(CZ) FR-T1/198; GA ČR(CZ) GAP104/10/1430 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : non-linear ime reversal mirror * ultrasonic techniques * ESAM Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://www.academia-ndt.org/Downloads/AcademiaNews4.pdf

  2. High-resolution and super stacking of time-reversal mirrors in locating seismic sources

    KAUST Repository

    Cao, Weiping

    2011-07-08

    Time reversal mirrors can be used to backpropagate and refocus incident wavefields to their actual source location, with the subsequent benefits of imaging with high-resolution and super-stacking properties. These benefits of time reversal mirrors have been previously verified with computer simulations and laboratory experiments but not with exploration-scale seismic data. We now demonstrate the high-resolution and the super-stacking properties in locating seismic sources with field seismic data that include multiple scattering. Tests on both synthetic data and field data show that a time reversal mirror has the potential to exceed the Rayleigh resolution limit by factors of 4 or more. Results also show that a time reversal mirror has a significant resilience to strong Gaussian noise and that accurate imaging of source locations from passive seismic data can be accomplished with traces having signal-to-noise ratios as low as 0.001. Synthetic tests also demonstrate that time reversal mirrors can sometimes enhance the signal by a factor proportional to the square root of the product of the number of traces, denoted as N and the number of events in the traces. This enhancement property is denoted as super-stacking and greatly exceeds the classical signal-to-noise enhancement factor of. High-resolution and super-stacking are properties also enjoyed by seismic interferometry and reverse-time migration with the exact velocity model. © 2011 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  3. Time reversal mirror and perfect inverse filter in a microscopic model for sound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Hernán L.; Danieli, Ernesto P.; Pastawski, Horacio M.

    2007-09-01

    Time reversal of quantum dynamics can be achieved by a global change of the Hamiltonian sign (a hasty Loschmidt daemon), as in the Loschmidt Echo experiments in NMR, or by a local but persistent procedure (a stubborn daemon) as in the time reversal mirror (TRM) used in ultrasound acoustics. While the first is limited by chaos and disorder, the last procedure seems to benefit from it. As a first step to quantify such stability we develop a procedure, the perfect inverse filter (PIF), that accounts for memory effects, and we apply it to a system of coupled oscillators. In order to ensure a numerical many-body dynamics intrinsically reversible, we develop an algorithm, the pair partitioning, based on the Trotter strategy used for quantum dynamics. We analyze situations where the PIF gives substantial improvements over the TRM.

  4. Two applications of time reversal mirrors: seismic radio and seismic radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafy, Sherif M; Schuster, Gerard T

    2011-10-01

    Two seismic applications of time reversal mirrors (TRMs) are introduced and tested with field experiments. The first one is sending, receiving, and decoding coded messages similar to a radio except seismic waves are used. The second one is, similar to radar surveillance, detecting and tracking a moving object(s) in a remote area, including the determination of the objects speed of movement. Both applications require the prior recording of calibration Green's functions in the area of interest. This reference Green's function will be used as a codebook to decrypt the coded message in the first application and as a moving sensor for the second application. Field tests show that seismic radar can detect the moving coordinates (x(t), y(t), z(t)) of a person running through a calibration site. This information also allows for a calculation of his velocity as a function of location. Results with the seismic radio are successful in seismically detecting and decoding coded pulses produced by a hammer. Both seismic radio and radar are highly robust to signals in high noise environments due to the super-stacking property of TRMs. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  5. Two applications of time reversal mirrors: Seismic radio and seismic radar

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2011-07-08

    Two seismic applications of time reversal mirrors (TRMs) are introduced and tested with field experiments. The first one is sending, receiving, and decoding coded messages similar to a radio except seismic waves are used. The second one is, similar to radar surveillance, detecting and tracking a moving object(s) in a remote area, including the determination of the objects speed of movement. Both applications require the prior recording of calibrationGreen’s functions in the area of interest. This reference Green’s function will be used as a codebook to decrypt the coded message in the first application and as a moving sensor for the second application. Field tests show that seismicradar can detect the moving coordinates ( x(t), y(t), z(t)) of a person running through a calibration site. This information also allows for a calculation of his velocity as a function of location. Results with the seismic radio are successful in seismically detecting and decoding coded pulses produced by a hammer. Both seismic radio and radar are highly robust to signals in high noise environments due to the super-stacking property of TRMs.

  6. Physics of field reversed mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.

    1978-01-01

    Since the earliest days of fusion research it has been hoped that diamagnetic currents flowing in a plasma could be used to help confine the plasma. Recently this hope has been strengthened both by theoretical advances and by experimental results made possible by technological developments. On the theoretical front analytical treatments and computer simulation studies have demonstrated equilibrium solutions existing both in the fluid limit and in the large-orbit limit. Progress has also been made in determining the conditions required for the stability of field-reversed entities. It appears that configurations of the general form of fat doughnuts, possibly elongated to napkin-ring form, represent stable states. Building on previous experimental work, several investigators have been able to create field-reversed states. One method, based on the ASTRON idea of Christofilos, traps an intense relativistic electron beams (REB) to create a field-reversing current ring. Other approaches use either the reversed field theta pinch technique or REB pulses to create field-reversing diamagnetic currents in a long cylindrical plasma. In the former method, millisecond-long field-reversing electron rings have been achieved; in the latter method field-reversed plasma states lasting 30 to 50 microseconds have been achieved. Another approach under investigation is the Field Reversed Mirror (FRM) created by the tangential injection of high current neutral beams. Plasma states that approach field reversal have been achieved by this technique

  7. Tandem mirror and field-reversed mirror experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coensgen, F.H.; Simonen, T.C.; Turner, W.C.

    1979-08-21

    This paper is largely devoted to tandem mirror and field-reversed mirror experiments at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), and briefly summarizes results of experiments in which field-reversal has been achieved. In the tandem experiment, high-energy, high-density plasmas (nearly identical to 2XIIB plasmas) are located at each end of a solenoid where plasma ions are electrostatically confined by the high positive poentials arising in the end plug plasma. End plug ions are magnetically confined, and electrons are electrostatically confined by the overall positive potential of the system. The field-reversed mirror reactor consists of several small field-reversed mirror plasmas linked together for economic reasons. In the LLL Beta II experiment, generation of a field-reversed plasma ring will be investigated using a high-energy plasma gun with a transverse radial magnetic field. This plasma will be further heated and sustained by injection of intense, high-energy neutral beams.

  8. A Numerical Investigation of the Time Reversal Mirror Technique for Trans-skull Brain Cancer Ultrasound Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zahedmanesh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The medical applications of ultrasound on human brain are highly limited by the phase and amplitude aberrations induced by the heterogeneities of the skull. However, it has been shown that time reversing coupled with amplitude compensation can overcome these aberrations. In this work, a model for 2D simulation of the time reversal mirror technique is proposed to study the possibility of targeting any point within the brain without the need for craniotomy and to calculate the acoustic pressure field and the resulting temperature distribution within the skull and brain during a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU transcranial therapy. Materials and Methods: To overcome the sensitivity of the wave pattern to the heterogeneous geometry of the skull, a real MRI derived 2D model is constructed. The model should include the real geometry of brain and skull. The model should also include the couplant medium which has the responsibility of coupling the transducer to the skull for the penetration of ultrasound. The clinical substance used as the couplant is water. The acoustic and thermal parameters are derived from the references. Next, the wave propagation through the skull is computed based on the Helmholtz equation, with a 2D finite element analysis. The acoustic simulation is combined with a 2D thermal diffusion analysis based on Pennes Bioheat equation and the temperature elevation inside the skull and brain is computed. The numerical simulations were performed using the FEMLAB 3.2 software on a PC having 8 GB RAM and a 2.4 MHz dual CPU. Results: It is seen that the ultrasonic waves are exactly focalized at the location where the hydrophone has been previously implanted. There is no penetration into the sinuses and the waves are reflected from their surface because of the high discrepancy between the speed of sound in bone and air.  Under the focal pressure of 2.5 MPa and after 4 seconds of sonication the temperature at the focus

  9. Time-reversal acoustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Mathias [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique, Ecole Superieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielle de la Ville de Paris, Universite Denis Diderot, UMR CNRS 7587, 10 Rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France)], E-mail: mathias.fink@espci.fr

    2008-10-15

    Time-reversal mirrors (TRMs) refocus an incident acoustic field to the position of the original source regardless of the complexity of the propagation medium. TRM's have now been implemented in a variety of physical scenarios from MHz ultrasonics with order centimeter aperture size to hundreds/thousands of Hz in ocean acoustics with order hundred meter aperture size. Common to this broad range of scales is a remarkable robustness exemplified by observations at all scales that the more complex the medium between the probe source and the TRM, the sharper the focus. The relation between the medium complexity and the size of the focal spot is studied in this paper. It is certainly the most exciting property of TRM compared to standard focusing devices. A TRM acts as an antenna that uses complex environments to appears wider than it is, resulting for a broadband pulse in a refocusing quality that does not depend of the TRM aperture. In this paper, we investigate the time-reversal approach in various media of increasing complexity and we discuss the link existing between time-reversal approach and local helioseismology where Green's functions can be extracted from diffusive noise.

  10. Maintenance of a multi-cell field reversed mirror reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neef, W.S. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The Field Reversed Mirror Reactor is composed of a horizontal linear chain of cells, each of which requires neutral beam injection. Blanket replacement is achieved by lifting one complete cell module from the reactor and replacing it with a preassembled and tested identical module. Ioffe bar connectors eliminate redundant bus bars. Asymmetric cell design simplifies magnet construction and reduces replacement time. A tapered cylindrical coolant distributor simplifies blanket removal. An evacuated housing surrounds the reactor reducing cell-to-cell sealing problems related to maintenance. Remote couplings are used for coolant and accessories. Hot-cell location and design permits immediate reconditioning or storage of replacement cells

  11. Twisted speckle entities inside wave-front reversal mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okulov, A. Yu

    2009-01-01

    The previously unknown property of the optical speckle pattern reported. The interference of a speckle with the counterpropagating phase-conjugated (PC) speckle wave produces a randomly distributed ensemble of a twisted entities (ropes) surrounding optical vortex lines. These entities appear in a wide range of a randomly chosen speckle parameters inside the phase-conjugating mirrors regardless to an internal physical mechanism of the wave-front reversal. These numerically generated interference patterns are relevant to the Brillouin PC mirrors and to a four-wave mixing PC mirrors based upon laser trapped ultracold atomic cloud.

  12. Conceptual design of the field-reversed mirror reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, G.A.; Condit, W.C.; Devoto, R.S.; Fink, J.H.; Hanson, J.D.; Neef, W.S.; Smith, A.C. Jr.

    1978-05-19

    For this reactor a reference case conceptual design was developed in some detail. The parameters of the design result partly from somewhat arbitrary physics assumptions and partly from optimization procedures. Two of the assumptions--that only 10% of the alpha-particle energy is deposited in the plasma and that particle confinement scales with the ion-ion collision time--may prove to be overly conservative. A number of possible start-up scenarios for the field-reversed plasmas were considered, but the choice of a specific start-up method for the conceptual design was deferred, pending experimental demonstration of one or more of the schemes in a mirror machine. Basic to our plasma model is the assumption that, once created, the plasma can be stably maintained by injection of a neutral-beam current sufficient to balance the particle-loss rate. The reference design is a multicell configuration with 11 field-reversed toroidal plasma layers arranged along the horizontal axis of a long-superconducting solenoid. Each plasma layer requires the injection of 3.6 MW of 200-keV deuterium and tritium, and produces 20 MW of fusion power. The reactor has a net electric output of 74 MWe. The preliminary estimate for the direct capital cost of the reference design is $1200/kWe. A balance-of-plant study is now underway and will result in a more accurate cost estimate.

  13. Time reversal communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, James V.; Meyer, Alan W.

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  14. Underwater Time Service and Synchronization Based on Time Reversal Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hao; Wang, Hai-bin; Aissa-El-Bey, Abdeldjalil; Pyndiah, Ramesh

    2010-09-01

    Real time service and synchronization are very important to many underwater systems. But the time service and synchronization in existence cannot work well due to the multi-path propagation and random phase fluctuation of signals in the ocean channel. The time reversal mirror technique can realize energy concentration through self-matching of the ocean channel and has very good spatial and temporal focusing properties. Based on the TRM technique, we present the Time Reversal Mirror Real Time service and synchronization (TRMRT) method which can bypass the processing of multi-path on the server side and reduce multi-path contamination on the client side. So TRMRT can improve the accuracy of time service. Furthermore, as an efficient and precise method of time service, TRMRT could be widely used in underwater exploration activities and underwater navigation and positioning systems.

  15. Status of time reversal invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henley, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    Time Reversal Invariance is introduced, and theories for its violation are reviewed. The present experimental and theoretical status of Time Reversal Invariance and tests thereof will be presented. Possible future tests will be discussed

  16. Mirror-Reversal of a Face is Perceived as Expressing Emotions More Intensely

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Asthana

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined hemispatial bias in a free-viewing condition of the judgement of facial expressions of emotions. Right-handed male subjects were asked to judge the intensity, in terms of expressiveness, of facial emotion in normal and mirror-reversed orientations. Expressions in mirror-reversed orientation were perceived as more intense than in normal orientation.

  17. Time reversal and holography with spacetime transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacot, Vincent; Labousse, Matthieu; Eddi, Antonin; Fink, Mathias; Fort, Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    Wave control is usually performed by spatially engineering the properties of a medium. Because time and space play similar roles in wave propagation, manipulating time boundaries provides a complementary approach. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the relevance of this concept by introducing instantaneous time mirrors. We show with water waves that a sudden change of the effective gravity generates time-reversed waves that refocus at the source. We generalize this concept for all kinds of waves, introducing a universal framework which explains the effect of any time disruption on wave propagation. We show that sudden changes of the medium properties generate instant wave sources that emerge instantaneously from the entire space at the time disruption. The time-reversed waves originate from these `Cauchy sources’, which are the counterpart of Huygens virtual sources on a time boundary. It allows us to revisit the holographic method and introduce a new approach for wave control.

  18. Study of fusion product effects in field-reversed mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driemeyer, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of fusion products (fps) on Field-Reversed Mirror (FRM) reactor concepts has been evaluated through the development of two new computer models. The first code (MCFRM) treats fps as test particles in a fixed background plasma, which is represented as a fluid. MCFRM includes a Monte Carlo treatment of Coulomb scattering and thus provides an accurate treatment of fp behavior even at lower energies where pitch-angle scattering becomes important. The second code (FRMOD) is a steady-state, globally averaged, two-fluid (ion and electron), point model of the FRM plasma that incorporates fp heating and ash buildup values which are consistent with the MCFRM calculations. These codes have been used extensively in the development of an advanced-fuel FRM reactor design (SAFFIRE). A Catalyzed-D version of the plant is also discussed along with an investigation of the steady-state energy distribution of fps in the FRM. User guides for the two computer codes are also included

  19. Transport and equilibrium in field-reversed mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, J.K.

    1982-09-01

    Two plasma models relevant to compact torus research have been developed to study transport and equilibrium in field reversed mirrors. In the first model for small Larmor radius and large collision frequency, the plasma is described as an adiabatic hydromagnetic fluid. In the second model for large Larmor radius and small collision frequency, a kinetic theory description has been developed. Various aspects of the two models have been studied in five computer codes ADB, AV, NEO, OHK, RES. The ADB code computes two dimensional equilibrium and one dimensional transport in a flux coordinate. The AV code calculates orbit average integrals in a harmonic oscillator potential. The NEO code follows particle trajectories in a Hill's vortex magnetic field to study stochasticity, invariants of the motion, and orbit average formulas. The OHK code displays analytic psi(r), B/sub Z/(r), phi(r), E/sub r/(r) formulas developed for the kinetic theory description. The RES code calculates resonance curves to consider overlap regions relevant to stochastic orbit behavior.

  20. Seismic radio by reverse time mirrors

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2010-10-17

    We present the theory and one field example of using seismic waves to send and receive coded messages. The method requires the recording of one calibration shot gather that will be used to decode the message. Coded messages can be send with a system similar to Baudot code. One field test is recorded in Tucson, AZ., USA, where we send and received 3‐short messages. One possible application of this method is to send coded messages from trapped miners to the surface. Advantages of this method are; no velocity model is required, easy and fast to use.

  1. Nonlinear Time Reversal Ultrasonic Pseudo-Tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Krofta, Josef; Převorovský, David

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2008), s. 1-13 ISSN 1435-4934. [NDT in Progress. Praha, 05.11.2007-07.11.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/07/1393; GA MPO FT-TA/026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : defect detection * nonlinear ultrasonic spectroscopy * time reversal mirror Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://www.ndt.net/search/docs.php3?showForm=off&edit=1&MainSource=53&AuthorID=2812

  2. Suppression of Mirror Generalization for Reversible Letters: Evidence from Masked Priming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea, Manuel; Moret-Tatay, Carmen; Panadero, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Readers of the Roman script must "unlearn" some forms of mirror generalization when processing printed stimuli (i.e., herb and herd are different words). Here we examine whether the suppression of mirror generalization is a process that affects all letters or whether it mostly affects reversible letters (i.e., b/d). Three masked priming lexical…

  3. Time reversal technique for gas leakage detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, A O; Polovinka, Yu A

    2015-04-01

    The acoustic remote sensing of subsea gas leakage traditionally uses sonars as active acoustic sensors and hydrophones picking up the sound generated by a leak as passive sensors. When gas leaks occur underwater, bubbles are produced and emit sound at frequencies intimately related to their sizes. The experimental implementation of an acoustic time-reversal mirror (TRM) is now well established in underwater acoustics. In the basic TRM experiment, a probe source emits a pulse that is received on an array of sensors, time reversed, and re-emitted. After time reversal, the resulting field focuses back at the probe position. In this study, a method for enhancing operation of the passive receiving system has been proposed by using it in the regime of TRM. Two factors, the local character of the acoustic emission signal caused by the leakage and a resonant nature of the bubble radiation at their birth, make particularly effective scattering with the conjugate wave (CW). Analytical calculations are performed for the scattering of CW wave on a single bubble when CW is formed by bubble birthing wail received on an array, time reversed, and re-emitted. The quality of leakage detection depends on the spatio-temporal distribution of ambient noise.

  4. Time-reversal waves and super resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, M [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique, Ecole Suprieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielle de la Ville de Paris, Universit Denis Diderot, UMR CNRS 7587, 10 Rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France)], E-mail: mathias.fink@espci.fr

    2008-07-15

    Time-reversal mirrors (TRMs) refocus an incident acoustic field to the position of the original source regardless of the complexity of the propagation medium. TRM's have now been implemented in a variety of physical scenarios from MHz ultrasonics with order centimeter aperture size to hundreds/thousands of Hz in ocean acoustics with order hundred meter aperture size. Common to this broad range of scales is a remarkable robustness exemplified by observations at all scales that the more complex the medium between the probe source and the TRM, the sharper the focus. The relation between the medium complexity and the size of the focal spot is studied in this paper. It is certainly the most exciting property of TRM compared to standard focusing devices. A TRM acts as an antenna that uses complex environments to appears wider than it is, resulting for a broadband pulse in a refocusing quality that does not depend of the TRM aperture. In this paper, we investigate the time-reversal approach in various media of increasing complexity We will also demonstrated that time-reversal focusing opens completely new approaches to super-resolution. We will show that in medium made of random distribution of sub-wavelength scatterers, a time-reversed wave field interacts with the random medium to regenerate not only the propagating but also the evanescent waves required to refocus below the diffraction limit. Finally, we will discuss the link existing between time-reversal approaches and new imaging methods recently developed where Green's functions of complex media can be extracted from diffusive noise by cross-correlating the recordings of a diffuse random wave field.

  5. Mirroring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Charlotte; Wegener, Gregers

    2016-01-01

    and metaphorical value of mirroring for creativity theory across two different research fields — neuroscience and learning. We engage in a mutual (possibly creative) exploration of mirroring from ‘mirror neurons’ to mirroring in social learning theory. One of the most fascinating aspects of mirroring...... as a neurobiological and as a learning phenomenon is that it points to the embodied and unconscious aspects of social interaction. Thus, mirroring should not be reduced to the non-creative, mechanical repetition of the original, outstanding creativity. To mirror is a human capability built into our capacity to create...

  6. Laser with a wavefront reversal mirror in the free-running mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucherov, Iu.I.; Lesnik, S.A.; Soskin, M.S.; Khizhniak, A.I.

    1984-10-01

    Experiments are reported in which free-running lasing has been achieved in a laser with a wavefront reversal mirror using forward four-wave mixing. The optical scheme of the laser and the lasing process are discussed and radiation oscillograms are presented.

  7. Use of coaxial plasma guns to start up field-reversed-mirror reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.C. Jr.; Carlson, G.A.; Eddleman, J.L.; Hartman, C.W.; Neef, W.S. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Application of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun for start-up of a field-reversed-mirror reactor is considered. The design is based on preliminary scaling laws and is compared to the design of the start-up gun used in the Beta II experiment

  8. The moving-ring field-reversed mirror prototype reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. C., Jr.; Carlson, G. A.; Fleischmann, H. H.; Grossman, W., Jr.; Kammash, T.; Schultz, K. R.; Woodall, D. M.

    1981-03-01

    A prototype fusion reactor was designed based on magnetic field reversed plasma confinement. A set of physics, technology, and mechanical design criteria were developed in order to make this concept attractive. Six major criteria guide the commercial prototype design. The prototype must: (1) produce net electricity decisively P sub net 70% of P sub gross; (2) scale to an economical commercial plant and have small physical size; (3) have all features required of a correcial upgrade plant (H-3 breeding, etc.); (4) minimize exotic technology and maintenance complexity; (5) promise significantly lower safety hazards than fission plants (environmentally and socially acceptable); and (6) be modular in design to permit repetitive production of components.

  9. Remote Whispering Applying Time Reversal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Brian Eric [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-16

    The purpose of this project was to explore the use of time reversal technologies as a means for communication to a targeted individual or location. The idea is to have the privacy of whispering in one’s ear, but to do this remotely from loudspeakers not located near the target. Applications of this work include communicating with hostages and survivors in rescue operations, communicating imaging and operational conditions in deep drilling operations, monitoring storage of spent nuclear fuel in storage casks without wires, or clandestine activities requiring signaling between specific points. This technology provides a solution in any application where wires and radio communications are not possible or not desired. It also may be configured to self calibrate on a regular basis to adjust for changing conditions. These communications allow two people to converse with one another in real time, converse in an inaudible frequency range or medium (i.e. using ultrasonic frequencies and/or sending vibrations through a structure), or send information for a system to interpret (even allowing remote control of a system using sound). The time reversal process allows one to focus energy to a specific location in space and to send a clean transmission of a selected signal only to that location. In order for the time reversal process to work, a calibration signal must be obtained. This signal may be obtained experimentally using an impulsive sound, a known chirp signal, or other known signals. It may also be determined from a numerical model of a known environment in which the focusing is desired or from passive listening over time to ambient noise.

  10. Field-reversed mirror as a D-T power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condit, W.C.; Carlson, G.A.; Devoto, R.S.; Doggett, J.; Neef, W.

    1976-09-24

    The Field-Reversed-Mirror is a plasma confinement scheme which uses the diamagnetic current of the D-T fuel plasma to convert the open field pattern of a conventional mirror machine into a closed-field pattern with plasma confinement properties which are expected to be considerably improved. If realized, this improvement in confinement will considerably improve the energy gain of the mirror reactor, and result in a reduction in the cost of producing energy. The Field Reversed Mirror device is described and compared with earlier field-reversed configurations, and the overall energy and particle balance relations are given. Based on this, preliminary engineering design calculations of the major components of an FRM reactor are presented. We find that the engineering design leads to simple structures for which reasonably accurate cost estimates are easy to make (circular coils, cylindrical vacuum tanks, etc.). A cost optimization has been performed, and the optimum DT reactor is found to have a fusion output of 23 MW/cell from a plasma radius 5 cm, length 15 cm, in a field of roughly 10 Tesla.

  11. Non-linear time reversal ultrasonic pseudo-tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Vejvodová, Šárka; Krofta, Josef; Převorovský, David

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, 3/4 (2011), s. 206-213 ISSN 1741-8410. [NDT in Progress. Praha, 05.11.2007-07.11.2007] R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI1/274 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : NDT * nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy * time reversal mirrors * ultrasonic pseudo-tomography Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://www.inderscience.com/offer.php?id=43216

  12. Production of field-reversed mirror plasma with a coaxial plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, C.W.; Shearer, J.W.

    The use of a coaxial plasma gun to produce a plasma ring which is directed into a magnetic field so as to form a field-reversed plasma confined in a magnetic mirror. Plasma thus produced may be used as a target for subsequent neutral beam injection or other similarly produced and projected plasma rings or for direct fusion energy release in a pulsed mode.

  13. Field-reversal experiments in the mirror fusion test facility (MFTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, J.W.; Condit, W.C.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed consideration of several aspects of a field-reversal experiment was begun in the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF): Model calculations have provided some plausible parameters for a field-reversed deuterium plasma in the MFTF, and a buildup calculation indicates that the MFTF neutral-beam system is marginally sufficient to achieve field reversal by neutral injection alone. However, the many uncertainties indicate the need for further research and development on alternate buildup methods. A discussion of experimental objectives is presented and important diagnostics are listed. The range of parameter space accessible with the MFTF magnet design is explored, and we find that with proper aiming of the neutral beams, meaningful experiments can be performed to advance toward these objectives. Finally, it is pointed out that if we achieve enhanced n tau confinement by means of field reversal, then quasi-steady-state operation of MFTF is conceivable

  14. Elastic least-squares reverse time migration

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Zongcai

    2016-09-06

    Elastic least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) is used to invert synthetic particle-velocity data and crosswell pressure field data. The migration images consist of both the P- and Svelocity perturbation images. Numerical tests on synthetic and field data illustrate the advantages of elastic LSRTM over elastic reverse time migration (RTM). In addition, elastic LSRTM images are better focused and have better reflector continuity than do the acoustic LSRTM images.

  15. Time reversibility, computer simulation, and chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Hoover, William Graham

    1999-01-01

    A small army of physicists, chemists, mathematicians, and engineers has joined forces to attack a classic problem, the "reversibility paradox", with modern tools. This book describes their work from the perspective of computer simulation, emphasizing the author's approach to the problem of understanding the compatibility, and even inevitability, of the irreversible second law of thermodynamics with an underlying time-reversible mechanics. Computer simulation has made it possible to probe reversibility from a variety of directions and "chaos theory" or "nonlinear dynamics" has supplied a useful

  16. Study of Time Reversal in Complex Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-02

    CSC Hive cluster. Finally we wish to acknowledge Rena Zieve and the others associated with the UC Davis REU program in physics, funded under NSF...Flower process. Again by symmetry, finding the maximum of Ξ requires finding a point that lies on the boundary of the product space of the simplices...parallel on the UC Davis CSC Hive cluster. Each -machine was time-reversed and categorized as reversible, finitely irreversible, or infinitely

  17. Time reversibility, computer simulation, algorithms, chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Hoover, William Graham

    2012-01-01

    A small army of physicists, chemists, mathematicians, and engineers has joined forces to attack a classic problem, the "reversibility paradox", with modern tools. This book describes their work from the perspective of computer simulation, emphasizing the author's approach to the problem of understanding the compatibility, and even inevitability, of the irreversible second law of thermodynamics with an underlying time-reversible mechanics. Computer simulation has made it possible to probe reversibility from a variety of directions and "chaos theory" or "nonlinear dynamics" has supplied a useful vocabulary and a set of concepts, which allow a fuller explanation of irreversibility than that available to Boltzmann or to Green, Kubo and Onsager. Clear illustration of concepts is emphasized throughout, and reinforced with a glossary of technical terms from the specialized fields which have been combined here to focus on a common theme. The book begins with a discussion, contrasting the idealized reversibility of ba...

  18. Time reversal signal processing for communication.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Derek P.; Jacklin, Neil; Punnoose, Ratish J.; Counsil, David T.

    2011-09-01

    Time-reversal is a wave focusing technique that makes use of the reciprocity of wireless propagation channels. It works particularly well in a cluttered environment with associated multipath reflection. This technique uses the multipath in the environment to increase focusing ability. Time-reversal can also be used to null signals, either to reduce unintentional interference or to prevent eavesdropping. It does not require controlled geometric placement of the transmit antennas. Unlike existing techniques it can work without line-of-sight. We have explored the performance of time-reversal focusing in a variety of simulated environments. We have also developed new algorithms to simultaneously focus at a location while nulling at an eavesdropper location. We have experimentally verified these techniques in a realistic cluttered environment.

  19. Energy drift in reversible time integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLachlan, R I; Perlmutter, M

    2004-01-01

    Energy drift is commonly observed in reversible integrations of systems of molecular dynamics. We show that this drift can be modelled as a diffusion and that the typical energy error after time T is O(√T). (letter to the editor)

  20. Time-reversal asymmetry in financial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, X. F.; Chen, T. T.; Zheng, B.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the large-fluctuation dynamics in financial markets, based on the minute-to-minute and daily data of the Chinese Indices and the German DAX. The dynamic relaxation both before and after the large fluctuations is characterized by a power law, and the exponents p± usually vary with the strength of the large fluctuations. The large-fluctuation dynamics is time-reversal symmetric at the time scale in minutes, while asymmetric at the daily time scale. Careful analysis reveals that the time-reversal asymmetry is mainly induced by external forces. It is also the external forces which drive the financial system to a non-stationary state. Different characteristics of the Chinese and German stock markets are uncovered.

  1. Null tests of time-reversal invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conzett, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    Because null tests of parity conservation exist in nuclear and particle reactions, it has been possible to measure very precisely the (weak-interaction) parity nonconserving contribution to the process. There is, however, a proof of the nonexistence of a comparable null test of time-reversal invariance. As a result, reaction tests of T symmetry have, at best, achieved precisions several orders of magnitude below that of the tests of P symmetry. Since transmission experiments are not included in the nonexistence proof, the existing formalism used to describe spin observables in neutron transmission experiments has been expanded to include explicitly the target spin. Through this formalism, the time-reversal-violating (and parity nonconserving) forward scattering amplitudes are identified, along with the corresponding spin observables. It is noted that new and more precise tests of T symmetry are provided in transmission experiments, and that such investigations are applicable more generally in nuclear and particle physics

  2. Parity and time reversal violation in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelberger, E.G.; Washington Univ., Seattle

    1987-01-01

    The current status of investigations into parity (P) and time-reversal (T) violation in nuclei is considered. Nuclear P-violation is an expected consequence of the standard model. It has been observed in a wide variety of nuclei (from A=2, to A∼ 200) by using a wide variety of reactions (reactions induced by polarized neutrons and polarized protons, γ-decay, α-decay, and (α, γ) reactions)

  3. Focusing over Optical Fiber Using Time Reversal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piels, Molly; Porto da Silva, Edson; Estaran Tolosa, Jose Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A time-reversal array in multimode fiber is proposed for lossless remotely controlled switching using passive optical splitters. The signal to be transmitted is digitally pre-distorted so that it is routed through the physical layer in order to arrive at only one receiver in an array. System...... performance in the presence of additive white gaussian noise, modal group delay, and timing error is investigated numerically for single-mode and 10-mode fiber. Focusing using a two-transmitter array and 44 km of single- mode fiber is demonstrated experimentally for 3 GBd QPSK signals with a bit error rate...

  4. Nonlinear Time Reversal Tomography of Structural Defects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vejvodová, Šárka; Převorovský, Zdeněk; Dos Santos, S.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2009), 045003-045010 ISSN N. [ICNEM /14/. Lisabon, 01.06.2009 - 06.06.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/07/1393; GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI1/198 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) * DORT method * time reversal (TR) Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://scitation.aip.org/getabs/servlet/GetabsServlet?prog=normal&id=PMARCW000003000001045003000001&idtype=cvips&gifs=yes

  5. Some factors affecting time reversal signal reconstruction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Kober, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 70, September (2015), s. 604-608 ISSN 1875-3892. [ICU International Congress on Ultrasonics 2015. Metz, 10.05.2015-15.05.2015] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : nondestructive testing * time reversal signal processing * ultrasonic source reconstruction * acoustic emission * coda wave interferometry Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://ac.els-cdn.com/S1875389215007762/1-s2.0-S1875389215007762-main.pdf?_tid=1513a4a2-9e5b-11e5-9693-00000aab0f27&acdnat=1449655153_455a4e32a1135236d0796c3f973ff58e

  6. Stability of non-time-reversible phonobreathers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas, J [Grupo de Fisica No Lineal, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Escuela Politecnica Superior, Universidad de Sevilla, Virgen de Africa 7, 41011 Sevilla (Spain); Archilla, J F R [Grupo de Fisica No Lineal, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Escuela Tecnica Superior de IngenierIa Informatica, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes, s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Romero, F R, E-mail: jcuevas@us.es [Grupo de Fisica No Lineal, Area de Fisica Teorica, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes, s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)

    2011-01-21

    Non-time-reversible phonobreathers are nonlinear waves that can transport energy in coupled oscillator chains by means of a phase torsion mechanism. In this paper, the stability properties of these structures have been considered. An analytical study has been performed for low-coupling solutions based upon the so-called multibreather stability theorem previously developed by some of the authors (Archilla et al 2003 Physica D 180 235). A numerical analysis confirms the analytical predictions and gives a detailed picture of the existence and stability properties for arbitrary frequency and coupling.

  7. Time reversal invariance in polarized neutron decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasserman, Eric G. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1994-03-01

    An experiment to measure the time reversal invariance violating (T-violating) triple correlation (D) in the decay of free polarized neutrons has been developed. The detector design incorporates a detector geometry that provides a significant improvement in the sensitivity over that used in the most sensitive of previous experiments. A prototype detector was tested in measurements with a cold neutron beam. Data resulting from the tests are presented. A detailed calculation of systematic effects has been performed and new diagnostic techniques that allow these effects to be measured have been developed. As the result of this work, a new experiment is under way that will improve the sensitivity to D to 3 x 10-4 or better. With higher neutron flux a statistical sensitivity of the order 3 x 10-5 is ultimately expected. The decay of free polarized neutrons (n → p + e + $\\bar{v}$e) is used to search for T-violation by measuring the triple correlation of the neutron spin polarization, and the electron and proton momenta (σn • pp x pe). This correlation changes sign under reversal of the motion. Since final state effects in neutron decay are small, a nonzero coefficient, D, of this correlation indicates the violation of time reversal invariance. D is measured by comparing the numbers of coincidences in electron and proton detectors arranged symmetrically about a longitudinally polarized neutron beam. Particular care must be taken to eliminate residual asymmetries in the detectors or beam as these can lead to significant false effects. The Standard Model predicts negligible T-violating effects in neutron decay. Extensions to the Standard Model include new interactions some of which include CP-violating components. Some of these make first order contributions to D.

  8. Time reversal invariance in polarized neutron decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, E.G.

    1994-03-01

    An experiment to measure the time reversal invariance violating (T-violating) triple correlation (D) in the decay of free polarized neutrons has been developed. The detector design incorporates a detector geometry that provides a significant improvement in the sensitivity over that used in the most sensitive of previous experiments. A prototype detector was tested in measurements with a cold neutron beam. Data resulting from the tests are presented. A detailed calculation of systematic effects has been performed and new diagnostic techniques that allow these effects to be measured have been developed. As the result of this work, a new experiment is under way that will improve the sensitivity to D to 3 x 10 -4 or better. With higher neutron flux a statistical sensitivity of the order 3 x 10 -5 is ultimately expected. The decay of free polarized neutrons (n → p + e + bar v e ) is used to search for T-violation by measuring the triple correlation of the neutron spin polarization, and the electron and proton momenta (σ n · p p x p e ). This correlation changes sign under reversal of the motion. Since final state effects in neutron decay are small, a nonzero coefficient, D, of this correlation indicates the violation of time reversal invariance. D is measured by comparing the numbers of coincidences in electron and proton detectors arranged symmetrically about a longitudinally polarized neutron beam. Particular care must be taken to eliminate residual asymmetries in the detectors or beam as these can lead to significant false effects. The Standard Model predicts negligible T-violating effects in neutron decay. Extensions to the Standard Model include new interactions some of which include CP-violating components. Some of these make first order contributions to D

  9. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Conceptual design studies were made of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror-confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid and a small pilot-plant hybrid based on standard mirror confinement. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000-MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single-cell pilot plant

  10. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Moir, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    We have carried out conceptual design studies of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fission fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid based on standard mirror confinement, and also a small pilot plant hybrid. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000 MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single cell pilot plant

  11. Time-reversal and Bayesian inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debski, Wojciech

    2017-04-01

    Probabilistic inversion technique is superior to the classical optimization-based approach in all but one aspects. It requires quite exhaustive computations which prohibit its use in huge size inverse problems like global seismic tomography or waveform inversion to name a few. The advantages of the approach are, however, so appealing that there is an ongoing continuous afford to make the large inverse task as mentioned above manageable with the probabilistic inverse approach. One of the perspective possibility to achieve this goal relays on exploring the internal symmetry of the seismological modeling problems in hand - a time reversal and reciprocity invariance. This two basic properties of the elastic wave equation when incorporating into the probabilistic inversion schemata open a new horizons for Bayesian inversion. In this presentation we discuss the time reversal symmetry property, its mathematical aspects and propose how to combine it with the probabilistic inverse theory into a compact, fast inversion algorithm. We illustrate the proposed idea with the newly developed location algorithm TRMLOC and discuss its efficiency when applied to mining induced seismic data.

  12. Elastic least-squares reverse time migration

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Zongcai

    2017-03-08

    We use elastic least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) to invert for the reflectivity images of P- and S-wave impedances. Elastic LSRTMsolves the linearized elastic-wave equations for forward modeling and the adjoint equations for backpropagating the residual wavefield at each iteration. Numerical tests on synthetic data and field data reveal the advantages of elastic LSRTM over elastic reverse time migration (RTM) and acoustic LSRTM. For our examples, the elastic LSRTM images have better resolution and amplitude balancing, fewer artifacts, and less crosstalk compared with the elastic RTM images. The images are also better focused and have better reflector continuity for steeply dipping events compared to the acoustic LSRTM images. Similar to conventional leastsquares migration, elastic LSRTM also requires an accurate estimation of the P- and S-wave migration velocity models. However, the problem remains that, when there are moderate errors in the velocity model and strong multiples, LSRTMwill produce migration noise stronger than that seen in the RTM images.

  13. Efficient reverse time migration with amplitude encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiangtao; Wang, Huazhong; Zhao, Lei; Shao, Yu; Wang, Meixia; Osen, Are

    2015-08-01

    Reverse time migration (RTM) is an accurate seismic imaging method for imaging the complex subsurface structure. Traditional common shot RTM suffers from low efficiency due to the large number of single shot gathers, especially for marine seismic data. Phase encoding is commonly used to reduce the computational cost of RTM. Phase encoding in the frequency domain is usually related to time shift in the time domain. Therefore, phase-encoding-based RTM needs time padding to avoid information loss which degrades the efficiency of the time-domain wavefield extrapolator. In this paper, an efficient time-domain RTM scheme based on the amplitude encoding is proposed. This scheme uses the orthogonal cosine basis as the encoding function, which has similar physical meaning to plane wave encoding (i.e. plane-wave components with different surface shooting angles). The proposed scheme can generate a qualified imaging result as well as common shot RTM but with less computational cost. Since this scheme does not need time padding, it is more efficient than the phase encoding schemes and can be conveniently implemented in the time domain. Numerical examples on the Sigsbee2a synthetic dataset demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  14. Multiples least-squares reverse time migration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Dongliang

    2013-01-01

    To enhance the image quality, we propose multiples least-squares reverse time migration (MLSRTM) that transforms each hydrophone into a virtual point source with a time history equal to that of the recorded data. Since each recorded trace is treated as a virtual source, knowledge of the source wavelet is not required. Numerical tests on synthetic data for the Sigsbee2B model and field data from Gulf of Mexico show that MLSRTM can improve the image quality by removing artifacts, balancing amplitudes, and suppressing crosstalk compared to standard migration of the free-surface multiples. The potential liability of this method is that multiples require several roundtrips between the reflector and the free surface, so that high frequencies in the multiples are attenuated compared to the primary reflections. This can lead to lower resolution in the migration image compared to that computed from primaries.

  15. Compact neutron imaging system using axisymmetric mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaykovich, Boris; Moncton, David E; Gubarev, Mikhail V; Ramsey, Brian D; Engelhaupt, Darell E

    2014-05-27

    A dispersed release of neutrons is generated from a source. A portion of this dispersed neutron release is reflected by surfaces of a plurality of nested, axisymmetric mirrors in at least an inner mirror layer and an outer mirror layer, wherein the neutrons reflected by the inner mirror layer are incident on at least one mirror surface of the inner mirror layer N times, wherein N is an integer, and wherein neutrons reflected by the outer mirror are incident on a plurality of mirror surfaces of the outer layer N+i times, where i is a positive integer, to redirect the neutrons toward a target. The mirrors can be formed by a periodically reversed pulsed-plating process.

  16. Time Reversal for Ultra-wideband (UWB) Sensor Networking

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calderon, Martha A; Qiu, Robert C

    2007-01-01

    This report organized into six chapters. It addresses coupling effects, an analysis of the virtual array, single-user and multi-user time reversal UWB-MIMO system performance, and a comparison with time reversal UWB-MISO...

  17. Manipulation of visual biofeedback during gait with a time delayed adaptive Virtual Mirror Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background A mirror placed in the mid-sagittal plane of the body has been used to reduce phantom limb pain and improve movement function in medical conditions characterised by asymmetrical movement control. The mirrored illusion of unimpaired limb movement during gait might enhance the effect, but a physical mirror is only capable of showing parallel movement of limbs in real time typically while sitting. We aimed to overcome the limitations of physical mirrors by developing and evaluating a Virtual Mirror Box which delays the mirrored image of limbs during gait to ensure temporal congruency with the impaired physical limb. Methods An application was developed in the CAREN system’s D-Flow software which mirrors selected limbs recorded by real-time motion capture to the contralateral side. To achieve phase shifted movement of limbs during gait, the mirrored virtual limbs are also delayed by a continuously calculated amount derived from past gait events. In order to accommodate non-normal proportions and offsets of pathological gait, the movements are morphed so that the physical and virtual contact events match on the mirrored side. Our method was tested with a trans-femoral amputee walking on a treadmill using his artificial limb. Joint angles of the elbow and knee were compared between the intact and mirrored side using cross correlation, root mean squared difference and correlation coefficients. Results The time delayed adaptive virtual mirror box produced a symmetrical looking gait of the avatar coupled with a reduction of the difference between the intact and virtual knee and elbow angles (10.86° and 5.34° reduced to 4.99° and 2.54° respectively). Dynamic morphing of the delay caused a non-significant change of toe-off events when compared to delaying by 50% of the previous gait cycle, as opposed to the initial contact events which showed a practically negligible but statistically significant increase (p Virtual Mirror Box has extended its use to

  18. Test of time reversal symmetry with resonance neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of searching for time-reversal symmetry violation in the scattering of epithermal neutrons from nuclei is discussed. Sources of both statistical and systematic errors are reviewed. A qualitative assessment of the size of the time reversal is made and a schematic design of an experiment to test time reversal symmetry is presented. (DWL) 10 refs., 1 fig

  19. Balance control interferes with the tracing performance of a pattern with mirror-reversed vision in older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Léandre Gagné; Simoneau, Martin; Tessier, Jean-François; Billot, Maxime; Blouin, Jean; Teasdale, Normand

    2014-04-01

    When tracing a template with mirror-reversed vision (or distorted vision), the sensory information arising from the movement does not match the expected sensory consequences. In such situations, participants have to learn a new visuomotor mapping in order to trace the template with an accuracy and speed approaching that observed when tracing with direct vision. There are several suggestions that such visuomotor learning requires lowering the gain of the proprioceptive inputs. Generally, subjects learn this task in a seated condition offering a stable postural platform. Adapting to the new visuomotor relationship in a standing condition could add complexity and even hinder sensorimotor adaptation because balance control and processing of additional information typically interfere with each other. To examine this possibility, older individuals and young adults (on average, 70 and 22 years of age, respectively) were assigned to groups that trained to trace a shape with mirror-reversed vision in a seated or a standing condition for two sessions. For a third session, the seated groups (young and elderly) transferred to the standing condition while the standing groups continued to perform the tracing task while standing. This procedure allowed comparing the tracing performance of all groups (with the same amount of practice) in a standing condition. The standing groups also did a fourth session in a seated condition. Results show that older participants initially exposed to the standing condition were much slower to trace the template than all other groups (including the older group that performed the tracing task while seated). This slowness did not result from a baseline general slowness but from a genuine interference between balance control and the visuomotor conflict resulting from tracing the pattern with mirror-reversed vision. Besides, the Standing-Old participants that transferred to a seated condition in the fourth session immediately improved their tracing by

  20. The Two-Time Interpretation and Macroscopic Time-Reversibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakir Aharonov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The two-state vector formalism motivates a time-symmetric interpretation of quantum mechanics that entails a resolution of the measurement problem. We revisit a post-selection-assisted collapse model previously suggested by us, claiming that unlike the thermodynamic arrow of time, it can lead to reversible dynamics at the macroscopic level. In addition, the proposed scheme enables us to characterize the classical-quantum boundary. We discuss the limitations of this approach and its broad implications for other areas of physics.

  1. Multisource Least-squares Reverse Time Migration

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wei

    2012-12-01

    Least-squares migration has been shown to be able to produce high quality migration images, but its computational cost is considered to be too high for practical imaging. In this dissertation, a multisource least-squares reverse time migration algorithm (LSRTM) is proposed to increase by up to 10 times the computational efficiency by utilizing the blended sources processing technique. There are three main chapters in this dissertation. In Chapter 2, the multisource LSRTM algorithm is implemented with random time-shift and random source polarity encoding functions. Numerical tests on the 2D HESS VTI data show that the multisource LSRTM algorithm suppresses migration artifacts, balances the amplitudes, improves image resolution, and reduces crosstalk noise associated with the blended shot gathers. For this example, multisource LSRTM is about three times faster than the conventional RTM method. For the 3D example of the SEG/EAGE salt model, with comparable computational cost, multisource LSRTM produces images with more accurate amplitudes, better spatial resolution, and fewer migration artifacts compared to conventional RTM. The empirical results suggest that the multisource LSRTM can produce more accurate reflectivity images than conventional RTM does with similar or less computational cost. The caveat is that LSRTM image is sensitive to large errors in the migration velocity model. In Chapter 3, the multisource LSRTM algorithm is implemented with frequency selection encoding strategy and applied to marine streamer data, for which traditional random encoding functions are not applicable. The frequency-selection encoding functions are delta functions in the frequency domain, so that all the encoded shots have unique non-overlapping frequency content. Therefore, the receivers can distinguish the wavefield from each shot according to the frequencies. With the frequency-selection encoding method, the computational efficiency of LSRTM is increased so that its cost is

  2. Looking forward to safer HGVs: The impact of mirrors on driver reaction times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mole, Callum David; Wilkie, Richard McGilchrist

    2017-10-01

    Heavy Goods Vehicle (HGV) collisions are responsible for a disproportionate number of urban vulnerable road user casualties (VRU - cyclists and pedestrians). Blind-spots to the front and side of HGVs can make it difficult (sometimes impossible) to detect close proximity VRUs and may be the cause of some collisions. The current solution to this problem is to provide additional mirrors that can allow the driver to see into the blind-spots. However, keeping track of many mirrors requires frequent off-road glances which can be difficult to execute during demanding driving situations. One suggestion is that driving safety could be improved by redesigning cabs in order to reduce/remove blind-spot regions, with the aim of reducing the need for mirrors, and increasing detection rates (and thereby reducing collisions). To examine whether mirrors delay driver responses we created a series of simulated driving tasks and tested regular car drivers and expert HGV drivers. First we measured baseline reaction times to objects appearing when not driving ('Parked'). Participants then repeated the task whilst driving through a simulated town (primary driving tasks were steering, braking, and following directional signs): driving slowed reaction times to objects visible in mirrors but not to objects visible through the front windscreen. In a second experiment cognitive load was increased, this slowed RTs overall but did not alter the pattern of responses across windows and mirrors. Crucially, we demonstrate that the distribution of mirror RTs can be captured simply by the mirror's spatial position (eccentricity). These findings provide robust evidence that drivers are slower reacting to objects only visible in eccentric mirrors compared to direct viewing through the front windscreen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Tests of time reversal in neutron-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments to test time-reversal invariance are discussed. The experiments are based on observables constructed from the momentum and spin vectors of epithermal neutrons and from the spin of an aligned or polarized target. It is shown that the proposed tests are detailed balance tests of time-reversal invariance. The status of the experiments is briefly reviewed

  4. Tests of time reversal in neutron-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments to test time-reversal invariance are discussed. The experiments are based on observables constructed from the momentum and spin vectors of epithermal neutrons and from the spin of an aligned or polarized target. It is shown that the proposed tests are detailed balance tests of time-reversal invariance. The status of the experiments is briefly reviewed

  5. Timing mirror structures observed by Cluster with a magnetosheath flow model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Génot

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of structures associated with mirror modes during their flow in the Earth's magnetosheath is studied. The fact that the related magnetic fluctuations can take distinct shapes, from deep holes to high peaks, has been assessed in previous works on the observational, modeling and numerical points of view. In this paper we present an analytical model for the flow lines and velocity magnitude inside the magnetosheath. This model is used to interpret almost 10 years of Cluster observations of mirror structures: by back tracking each isolated observation to the shock, the "age", or flow time, of these structures is determined together with the geometry of the shock. Using this flow time the evolutionary path of the structures may be studied with respect to different quantities: the distance to mirror threshold, the amplitude of mirror fluctuations and the skewness of the magnetic amplitude distribution as a marker of the shape of the structures. These behaviours are confronted to numerical simulations which confirm the dynamical perspective gained from the association of the statistical analysis and the analytical model: magnetic peaks are mostly formed just behind the shock and are quickly overwhelmed by magnetic holes as the plasma conditions get more mirror stable. The amplitude of the fluctuations are found to saturate before the skewness vanishes, i.e. when both structures quantitatively balance each other, which typically occurs after a flow time of 100–200 s in the Earth's magnetosheath. Comparison with other astrophysical contexts is discussed.

  6. Effects of action observation on corticospinal excitability: Muscle specificity, direction, and timing of the mirror response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naish, Katherine R; Houston-Price, Carmel; Bremner, Andrew J; Holmes, Nicholas P

    2014-11-01

    Many human behaviours and pathologies have been attributed to the putative mirror neuron system, a neural system that is active during both the observation and execution of actions. While there are now a very large number of papers on the mirror neuron system, variations in the methods and analyses employed by researchers mean that the basic characteristics of the mirror response are not clear. This review focuses on three important aspects of the mirror response, as measured by modulations in corticospinal excitability: (1) muscle specificity; (2) direction; and (3) timing of modulation. We focus mainly on electromyographic (EMG) data gathered following single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), because this method provides precise information regarding these three aspects of the response. Data from paired-pulse TMS paradigms and peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) are also considered when we discuss the possible mechanisms underlying the mirror response. In this systematic review of the literature, we examine the findings of 85 TMS and PNS studies of the human mirror response, and consider the limitations and advantages of the different methodological approaches these have adopted in relation to discrepancies between their findings. We conclude by proposing a testable model of how action observation modulates corticospinal excitability in humans. Specifically, we propose that action observation elicits an early, non-specific facilitation of corticospinal excitability (at around 90ms from action onset), followed by a later modulation of activity specific to the muscles involved in the observed action (from around 200ms). Testing this model will greatly advance our understanding of the mirror mechanism and provide a more stable grounding on which to base inferences about its role in human behaviour. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Mirror Neurons Modeled Through Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity are Affected by Channelopathies Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Gabriela; da Silva, Samuel F Faria; de Souza, Fabio M Simoes

    2017-11-28

    Mirror neurons fire action potentials both when the agent performs a certain behavior and watches someone performing a similar action. Here, we present an original mirror neuron model based on the spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) between two morpho-electrical models of neocortical pyramidal neurons. Both neurons fired spontaneously with basal firing rate that follows a Poisson distribution, and the STDP between them was modeled by the triplet algorithm. Our simulation results demonstrated that STDP is sufficient for the rise of mirror neuron function between the pairs of neocortical neurons. This is a proof of concept that pairs of neocortical neurons associating sensory inputs to motor outputs could operate like mirror neurons. In addition, we used the mirror neuron model to investigate whether channelopathies associated with autism spectrum disorder could impair the modeled mirror function. Our simulation results showed that impaired hyperpolarization-activated cationic currents (Ih) affected the mirror function between the pairs of neocortical neurons coupled by STDP.

  8. Reversal of Hartmann's procedure following acute diverticulitis: is timing everything?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fleming, Fergal J

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients who undergo a Hartmann\\'s procedure may not be offered a reversal due to concerns over the morbidity of the second procedure. The aims of this study were to examine the morbidity post reversal of Hartmann\\'s procedure. METHODS: Patients who underwent a Hartmann\\'s procedure for acute diverticulitis (Hinchey 3 or 4) between 1995 and 2006 were studied. Clinical factors including patient comorbidities were analysed to elucidate what preoperative factors were associated with complications following reversal of Hartmann\\'s procedure. RESULTS: One hundred and ten patients were included. Median age was 70 years and 56% of the cohort were male (n = 61). The mortality and morbidity rate for the acute presentation was 7.3% (n = 8) and 34% (n = 37) respectively. Seventy six patients (69%) underwent a reversal at a median of 7 months (range 3-22 months) post-Hartmann\\'s procedure. The complication rate in the reversal group was 25% (n = 18). A history of current smoking (p = 0.004), increasing time to reversal (p = 0.04) and low preoperative albumin (p = 0.003) were all associated with complications following reversal. CONCLUSIONS: Reversal of Hartmann\\'s procedure can be offered to appropriately selected patients though with a significant (25%) morbidity rate. The identification of potential modifiable factors such as current smoking, prolonged time to reversal and low preoperative albumin may allow optimisation of such patients preoperatively.

  9. Time complexity of tape reduction for reversible Turing machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Holger Bock

    2012-01-01

    in reversible computing theory are about multitape machines with two or more tapes, but it is non-obvious what these results imply for reversible complexity theory. Here, we study how the time complexity of multitape RTMs behaves under reductions to one and two tapes. For deterministic Turing machines...

  10. Can Time Reversal be tested in ternary fission?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goennenwein, F.; Jesinger, P.; Koetzle, A.; Mutterer, M.; Kalben, J. von; Trzaska, W.H.; Petrov, G.A.; Gagarski, A.M.; Danilyan, G.; Pavlov, V.S.; Nesvizhevsky, V.; Zimmer, O.

    2000-01-01

    Ternary fission of 233 U and 235 U induced by cold polarized neutrons has been investigated. Several correlations between neutron spin and the momenta of fission fragments and ternary particles were analyzed. These correlations are probing time reversal invariance, parity non-conservation and left-right asymmetries. Results for all three correlations from the reaction 233 U(n,f) are presented. Especially the outcome in the searches for time reversal correlations and left-right asymmetries is unexpected. A huge effect observed formally as a violation of time reversal is most probably simulated by specific properties of the emission mechanism for ternary particles

  11. Reverse time migration by Krylov subspace reduced order modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basir, Hadi Mahdavi; Javaherian, Abdolrahim; Shomali, Zaher Hossein; Firouz-Abadi, Roohollah Dehghani; Gholamy, Shaban Ali

    2018-04-01

    Imaging is a key step in seismic data processing. To date, a myriad of advanced pre-stack depth migration approaches have been developed; however, reverse time migration (RTM) is still considered as the high-end imaging algorithm. The main limitations associated with the performance cost of reverse time migration are the intensive computation of the forward and backward simulations, time consumption, and memory allocation related to imaging condition. Based on the reduced order modeling, we proposed an algorithm, which can be adapted to all the aforementioned factors. Our proposed method benefit from Krylov subspaces method to compute certain mode shapes of the velocity model computed by as an orthogonal base of reduced order modeling. Reverse time migration by reduced order modeling is helpful concerning the highly parallel computation and strongly reduces the memory requirement of reverse time migration. The synthetic model results showed that suggested method can decrease the computational costs of reverse time migration by several orders of magnitudes, compared with reverse time migration by finite element method.

  12. Analysis of the Time Reversible Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Lin; Lu, Jianfeng; Shao, Sihong

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the time reversible Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (TRBOMD) scheme, which preserves the time reversibility of the Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics even with non-convergent self-consistent field iteration. In the linear response regime, we derive the stability condition as well as the accuracy of TRBOMD for computing physical properties such as the phonon frequency obtained from the molecular dynamic simulation. We connect and compare TRBOMD with the Car-Parrinello molecular...

  13. DSP-Based Focusing over Optical Fiber Using Time Reversal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piels, Molly; Porto da Silva, Edson; Estaran Tolosa, Jose Manuel

    2014-01-01

    A time-reversal array in multimode fiber is proposed for lossless switching using passive optical splitters. Numerical investigations are performed, and a two-transmitter array that routes a 3GBd QPSK signal through the physical layer is demonstrated experimentally.......A time-reversal array in multimode fiber is proposed for lossless switching using passive optical splitters. Numerical investigations are performed, and a two-transmitter array that routes a 3GBd QPSK signal through the physical layer is demonstrated experimentally....

  14. Violation of time reversal symmetry in compound nucleus reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, E.G.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis the author presents a general formulation for the description of time-reversal violation in compound-nucleus reactions on the base of the S matrix and calculates an expression describing this violation by means of the statistical model of Bose, Harney, and Weidenmueller (1986). The result is applied to the compound-nucleus 28 Si for which a time-reversal parameter has been explicitely calculated. (HSI)

  15. Dwell time algorithm for multi-mode optimization in manufacturing large optical mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenyu

    2014-08-01

    CCOS (Computer Controlled Optical Surfacing) is one of the most important method to manufacture optical surface. By controlling the dwell time of a polishing tool on the mirror we can get the desired material removal. As the optical surface becoming larger, traditional CCOS method can't meet the demand that manufacturing the mirror in higher efficiency and precision. This paper presents a new method using multi-mode optimization. By calculate the dwell time map of different tool in one optimization cycle, the larger tool and the small one have complementary advantages and obtain a global optimization for multi tool and multi-processing cycles. To calculate the dwell time of different tool at the same time we use multi-mode dwell time algorithm that based on matrix calculation. With this algorithm we did simulation experiment, the result shows using multi-mode optimization algorithm can improve the efficiency maintaining good precision.

  16. Time-reversal symmetry breaking in quantum billiards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Florian

    2009-01-01

    The present doctoral thesis describes experimentally measured properties of the resonance spectra of flat microwave billiards with partially broken timereversal invariance induced by an embedded magnetized ferrite. A vector network analyzer determines the complex scattering matrix elements. The data is interpreted in terms of the scattering formalism developed in nuclear physics. At low excitation frequencies the scattering matrix displays isolated resonances. At these the effect of the ferrite on isolated resonances (singlets) and pairs of nearly degenerate resonances (doublets) is investigated. The hallmark of time-reversal symmetry breaking is the violation of reciprocity, i.e. of the symmetry of the scattering matrix. One finds that reciprocity holds in singlets; it is violated in doublets. This is modeled by an effective Hamiltonian of the resonator. A comparison of the model to the data yields time-reversal symmetry breaking matrix elements in the order of the level spacing. Their dependence on the magnetization of the ferrite is understood in terms of its magnetic properties. At higher excitation frequencies the resonances overlap and the scattering matrix elements fluctuate irregularly (Ericson fluctuations). They are analyzed in terms of correlation functions. The data are compared to three models based on random matrix theory. The model by Verbaarschot, Weidenmueller and Zirnbauer describes time-reversal invariant scattering processes. The one by Fyodorov, Savin and Sommers achieves the same for systems with complete time-reversal symmetry breaking. An extended model has been developed that accounts for partial breaking of time-reversal invariance. This extended model is in general agreement with the data, while the applicability of the other two models is limited. The cross-correlation function between forward and backward reactions determines the time-reversal symmetry breaking matrix elements of the Hamiltonian to up to 0.3 mean level spacings. Finally

  17. Time-reversal symmetry breaking in quantum billiards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Florian

    2009-01-26

    The present doctoral thesis describes experimentally measured properties of the resonance spectra of flat microwave billiards with partially broken timereversal invariance induced by an embedded magnetized ferrite. A vector network analyzer determines the complex scattering matrix elements. The data is interpreted in terms of the scattering formalism developed in nuclear physics. At low excitation frequencies the scattering matrix displays isolated resonances. At these the effect of the ferrite on isolated resonances (singlets) and pairs of nearly degenerate resonances (doublets) is investigated. The hallmark of time-reversal symmetry breaking is the violation of reciprocity, i.e. of the symmetry of the scattering matrix. One finds that reciprocity holds in singlets; it is violated in doublets. This is modeled by an effective Hamiltonian of the resonator. A comparison of the model to the data yields time-reversal symmetry breaking matrix elements in the order of the level spacing. Their dependence on the magnetization of the ferrite is understood in terms of its magnetic properties. At higher excitation frequencies the resonances overlap and the scattering matrix elements fluctuate irregularly (Ericson fluctuations). They are analyzed in terms of correlation functions. The data are compared to three models based on random matrix theory. The model by Verbaarschot, Weidenmueller and Zirnbauer describes time-reversal invariant scattering processes. The one by Fyodorov, Savin and Sommers achieves the same for systems with complete time-reversal symmetry breaking. An extended model has been developed that accounts for partial breaking of time-reversal invariance. This extended model is in general agreement with the data, while the applicability of the other two models is limited. The cross-correlation function between forward and backward reactions determines the time-reversal symmetry breaking matrix elements of the Hamiltonian to up to 0.3 mean level spacings. Finally

  18. Estimate of Passive Time Reversal Communication Performance in Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunhyo Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Time reversal processes have been used to improve communication performance in the severe underwater communication environment characterized by significant multipath channels by reducing inter-symbol interference and increasing signal-to-noise ratio. In general, the performance of the time reversal is strongly related to the behavior of the q -function, which is estimated by a sum of the autocorrelation of the channel impulse response for each channel in the receiver array. The q -function depends on the complexity of the communication channel, the number of channel elements and their spacing. A q -function with a high side-lobe level and a main-lobe width wider than the symbol duration creates a residual ISI (inter-symbol interference, which makes communication difficult even after time reversal is applied. In this paper, we propose a new parameter, E q , to describe the performance of time reversal communication. E q is an estimate of how much of the q -function lies within one symbol duration. The values of E q were estimated using communication data acquired at two different sites: one in which the sound speed ratio of sediment to water was less than unity and one where the ratio was higher than unity. Finally, the parameter E q was compared to the bit error rate and the output signal-to-noise ratio obtained after the time reversal operation. The results show that these parameters are strongly correlated to the parameter E q .

  19. Computational Time Reversal for NDT Applications Using Experimental Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopatin, Craig; Rabinovich, Daniel; Givoli, D.; Turkel, Eli

    2017-01-01

    A model-based non destructive testing (NDT) method is proposed for damage identification in elastic structures, incorporating computational time reversal (TR) analysis. Identification is performed by advancing elastic wave signals, measured at discrete sensor locations, backward in time. In

  20. Time reversal imaging, Inverse problems and Adjoint Tomography}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagner, J.; Larmat, C. S.; Capdeville, Y.; Kawakatsu, H.; Fink, M.

    2010-12-01

    With the increasing power of computers and numerical techniques (such as spectral element methods), it is possible to address a new class of seismological problems. The propagation of seismic waves in heterogeneous media is simulated more and more accurately and new applications developed, in particular time reversal methods and adjoint tomography in the three-dimensional Earth. Since the pioneering work of J. Claerbout, theorized by A. Tarantola, many similarities were found between time-reversal methods, cross-correlations techniques, inverse problems and adjoint tomography. By using normal mode theory, we generalize the scalar approach of Draeger and Fink (1999) and Lobkis and Weaver (2001) to the 3D- elastic Earth, for theoretically understanding time-reversal method on global scale. It is shown how to relate time-reversal methods on one hand, with auto-correlations of seismograms for source imaging and on the other hand, with cross-correlations between receivers for structural imaging and retrieving Green function. Time-reversal methods were successfully applied in the past to acoustic waves in many fields such as medical imaging, underwater acoustics, non destructive testing and to seismic waves in seismology for earthquake imaging. In the case of source imaging, time reversal techniques make it possible an automatic location in time and space as well as the retrieval of focal mechanism of earthquakes or unknown environmental sources . We present here some applications at the global scale of these techniques on synthetic tests and on real data, such as Sumatra-Andaman (Dec. 2004), Haiti (Jan. 2010), as well as glacial earthquakes and seismic hum.

  1. Eddy Viscosity for Time Reversing Waves in a Dissipative Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Josselin; Nachbin, André

    2004-10-01

    We present new results for the time reversal of weakly nonlinear pulses traveling in a random dissipative environment. Also we describe a new theory for calculating the eddy viscosity for weakly nonlinear waves propagating over a random surface. The turbulent viscosity is calculated from first principles, namely, without imposing any stress-strain hypothesis. A viscous shallow water model is considered and its effective viscosity characterized. We also show that weakly nonlinear waves can still be time reversed under weak dissipation. Incoherently scattered signals are recompressed, both for time reversal in transmission as well as in reflection. Under the weakly nonlinear, weakly dissipative regime, dissipation only affects the refocused pulse profile regarding its amplitude, but its shape is not corrupted. Numerical experiments are presented.

  2. Ericson fluctuations, detailed balance and time-reversal invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harney, H.L.; Huepper, A.; Richter, A.

    1990-01-01

    Precise detailed balance experiments of fluctuating nuclear reaction cross sections in the Ericson regime provide stringent tests of time reversal invariance in the strong interaction. The interpretation of these experiments requires a statistical theory that describes the interplay of experimental errors and a possible time reversal symmetry breaking amplitude. Such a theory is developed here under the assumption of gaussian probability distributions for both of them. The theory is applied to reanalyze the two detailed balance experiments using the reactions 24 Mg+α↔ 27 Al+p at different energies. The theory allows a combined analysis of both experiments. One finds that the relative strength of a possible time reversal symmetry breaking amplitude is ξ -3 with 80% confidence. (orig.)

  3. Subtleties in the BABAR measurement of time-reversal violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efrati, Aielet

    2015-01-01

    A first measurement of time-reversal (T) asymmetries that are not also CP asymmetries has been recently achieved by the B A B AR collaboration. In this talk, which follows the work done in Ref. [1], I discuss the subtleties of this measurement in the presence of direct CP violation, CPT violation, wrong strangeness decays and wrong sign semi-leptonic decays. In particular, I explain why, in order to identify the measured asymmetries with time-reversal violation, one needs to assume (i) the absence of wrong strangeness decays or of CPT violation in strangeness changing decays, and (ii) the absence of wrong sign decays. (paper)

  4. Magnetic mirror fusion: status and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, R.F.

    1980-02-11

    Two improved mirror systems, the tandem mirror (TM) and the field-reversed mirror (FRM) are being intensively studied. The twin practical aims of these studies: to improve the economic prospects for mirror fusion power plants and to reduce the size and/or complexity of such plants relative to earlier approaches to magnetic fusion. While at the present time the program emphasis is still strongly oriented toward answering scientific questions, the emphasis is shifting as the data accumulates and as larger facilities - ones with a heavy technological and engineering orientation - are being prepared. The experimental and theoretical progress that led to the new look in mirror fusion research is briefly reviewed, the new TM and the FRM ideas are outlined, and the projected future course of mirror fusion research is discussed.

  5. Magnetic mirror fusion: status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    Two improved mirror systems, the tandem mirror (TM) and the field-reversed mirror (FRM) are being intensively studied. The twin practical aims of these studies: to improve the economic prospects for mirror fusion power plants and to reduce the size and/or complexity of such plants relative to earlier approaches to magnetic fusion. While at the present time the program emphasis is still strongly oriented toward answering scientific questions, the emphasis is shifting as the data accumulates and as larger facilities - ones with a heavy technological and engineering orientation - are being prepared. The experimental and theoretical progress that led to the new look in mirror fusion research is briefly reviewed, the new TM and the FRM ideas are outlined, and the projected future course of mirror fusion research is discussed

  6. Development of manufacture of mirror glass substrate for x-ray timing and polarization observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhenbo; Ge, Bing; Jin, Xin; Liu, Na; Liao, Yingyu; Ma, Bin; Bai, Yuhong; Wang, Zhanshan

    2016-07-01

    In China, X-ray timing and polarization (XTP) observatory will have a collection area of 9,000 cm2 at 2 6 keV. The observatory consists of five identical hard X-ray telescopes and ten identical soft X-ray telescopes. The angular resolution is about 1 arcminute of HPD (half-power diameter). Each telescope consists of a large number of mirror segments precisely assembled together. Our development of the mirror glass substrate is presented in this manuscript. These substrates are produced by slumping commercially available thin glass sheets. Here, we report on our work of manufacturing these substrates. The optimization of the slumping procedure is described and optimal procedure parameters are reported. The figure error of slumped glass substrates was measured by a laser scanner and an interferometer with CGH. The measurement demonstrated that the figure error is lower enough for the construction of XTP telescopes.

  7. A compact time-of-flight mass-spectrometer with electrostatic mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilken, B.; Stuedemann, W.

    1984-01-01

    A compact low-weight time-of-flight/solid state detector ion mass-spectrometer is described in detail. The two time-zero detectors for the TOF-measurement use secondary electron emission and microchannelplates. A symmetric dual electrostatic mirror is used to deflect both the 'START' and 'STOP' electrons by 90 0 . The crosstalk in the mirror system is measured as a function of the potential applied to the center grid. It is found that 'START' electrons dominate the 'STOP' rate for mirror voltages 0 0 . The primary source for this contamination are backscattered electrons. For Usub(CG) exceeding a critical limit the isolation between the 'START' and 'STOP' system is sufficient. Characteristic background signatures in the two-dimensional pulse height distribution of such a mass-spectrometer are discussed. With some limitations molecular particles can be identified even on an event by event basis. The described TOF spectrometer has particular advantages for ion composition measurements in space plasma research. (orig.)

  8. How to reverse time in stochastic particle tracking models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro

    2011-01-01

    . This paper demonstrates that when turbulent dispersal is taken into account, such backtracking can be done in different ways, which have different justifications and which may yield quite different results. We discuss three methods for reversing time: First, following the streamlines backwards while letting...

  9. Transducer frequency response variations investigated by time reversal calibration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kober, Jan; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 2 (2016), A16-A16 ISSN 1213-3825. [Europen Conference on Acoustic Emission Testing /32./. 07.09.2016-09.09.2016, Praha] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : calibration * time reversal * transducer * frequency response Subject RIV: BI - Acoustic s

  10. Parity- and Time-Reversal-Violating Moments of Light Nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, Jordy de

    2012-01-01

    I present the calculation of parity- and time-reversal-violating moments of the nucleon and light nuclei, originating from the QCD term and eective dimension-six operators. By applying chiral eective eld theory these calculations are performed in a unied framework. I argue that measurements of a few

  11. Time-reversal symmetry breaking by ac field: Effect of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    possesses an interesting dualism: the periodic ac fields that are least effective in suppress- ing conductance fluctuations by dephasing, turn out to be the most effective in breaking the time-reversal symmetry. An important exception is the periodic ac field that is anti- symmetric with respect to a shift by a half-period τ/2.

  12. Time-reversal symmetry breaking by ac field: Effect of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Time-reversal symmetry breaking by ac field: Effect of commensurability in the frequency domain. V E KRAVTSOV. Present address: The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, P.O. Box 586, 34100. Trieste, Italy. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, 2 Kosygina Street, 117940 Moscow, Russia.

  13. Wave-Based Turing Machine: Time Reversal and Information Erasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrard, S.; Fort, E.; Couder, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The investigation of dynamical systems has revealed a deep-rooted difference between waves and objects regarding temporal reversibility and particlelike objects. In nondissipative chaos, the dynamic of waves always remains time reversible, unlike that of particles. Here, we explore the dynamics of a wave-particle entity. It consists in a drop bouncing on a vibrated liquid bath, self-propelled and piloted by the surface waves it generates. This walker, in which there is an information exchange between the particle and the wave, can be analyzed in terms of a Turing machine with waves as the information repository. The experiments reveal that in this system, the drop can read information backwards while erasing it. The drop can thus backtrack on its previous trajectory. A transient temporal reversibility, restricted to the drop motion, is obtained in spite of the system being both dissipative and chaotic.

  14. Real-time video codec using reversible wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gen Dow; Chiang, David J.; Huang, Yi-En; Cheng, Allen

    2003-04-01

    This paper describes the hardware implementation of a real-time video codec using reversible Wavelets. The TechSoft (TS) real-time video system employs the Wavelet differencing for the inter-frame compression based on the independent Embedded Block Coding with Optimized Truncation (EBCOT) of the embedded bit stream. This high performance scalable image compression using EBCOT has been selected as part of the ISO new image compression standard, JPEG2000. The TS real-time video system can process up to 30 frames per second (fps) of the DVD format. In addition, audio signals are also processed by the same design for the cost reduction. Reversible Wavelets are used not only for the cost reduction, but also for the lossless applications. Design and implementation issues of the TS real-time video system are discussed.

  15. Reversing the irreversible: From limit cycles to emergent time symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortês, Marina; Smolin, Lee

    2018-01-01

    In 1979 Penrose hypothesized that the arrows of time are explained by the hypothesis that the fundamental laws are time irreversible [R. Penrose, in General Relativity: An Einstein Centenary Survey (1979)]. That is, our reversible laws, such as the standard model and general relativity are effective, and emerge from an underlying fundamental theory which is time irreversible. In [M. Cortês and L. Smolin, Phys. Rev. D 90, 084007 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.90.084007; 90, 044035 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.90.044035; 93, 084039 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevD.93.084039] we put forward a research program aiming at realizing just this. The aim is to find a fundamental description of physics above the Planck scale, based on irreversible laws, from which will emerge the apparently reversible dynamics we observe on intermediate scales. Here we continue that program and note that a class of discrete dynamical systems are known to exhibit this very property: they have an underlying discrete irreversible evolution, but in the long term exhibit the properties of a time reversible system, in the form of limit cycles. We connect this to our original model proposal in [M. Cortês and L. Smolin, Phys. Rev. D 90, 084007 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.90.084007], and show that the behaviors obtained there can be explained in terms of the same phenomenon: the attraction of the system to a basin of limit cycles, where the dynamics appears to be time reversible. Further than that, we show that our original models exhibit the very same feature: the emergence of quasiparticle excitations obtained in the earlier work in the space-time description is an expression of the system's convergence to limit cycles when seen in the causal set description.

  16. Constraints on a parity-even/time-reversal-odd interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oers, Willem T.H. van

    2000-01-01

    Time-Reversal-Invariance non-conservation has for the first time been unequivocally demonstrated in a direct measurement, one of the results of the CPLEAR experiment. What is the situation then with regard to time-reversal-invariance non-conservation in systems other than the neutral kaon system? Two classes of tests of time-reversal-invariance need to be distinguished: the first one deals with parity violating (P-odd)/time-reversal-invariance non-conserving (T-odd) interactions, while the second one deals with P-even/T-odd interactions (assuming CPT conservation this implies C-conjugation non-conservation). Limits on a P-odd/T-odd interaction follow from measurements of the electric dipole moment of the neutron. This in turn provides a limit on a P-odd/T-odd pion-nucleon coupling constant which is 10 -4 times the weak interaction strength. Limits on a P-even/T-odd interaction are much less stringent. The better constraint stems also from the measurement of the electric dipole moment of the neutron. Of all the other tests, measurements of charge-symmetry breaking in neutron-proton elastic scattering provide the next better constraint. The latter experiments were performed at TRIUMF (at 477 and 347 MeV) and at IUCF (at 183 MeV). Weak decay experiments (the transverse polarization of the muon in K + →π 0 μ + ν μ and the transverse polarization of the positrons in polarized muon decay) have the potential to provide comparable or possibly better constraints

  17. Demonstration of a linear optical true-time delay device by use of a microelectromechanical mirror array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Amber; Anderson, Betty Lise

    2003-03-01

    We present the design and proof-of-concept demonstration of an optical device capable of producing true-time delay(s) (TTD)(s) for phased array antennas. This TTD device uses a free-space approach consisting of a single microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) mirror array in a multiple reflection spherical mirror configuration based on the White cell. Divergence is avoided by periodic refocusing by the mirrors. By using the MEMS mirror to switch between paths of different lengths, time delays are generated. Six different delays in 1-ns increments were demonstrated by using the Texas Instruments Digital Micromirror Device® as the switching element. Losses of 1.6 to 5.2 dB per bounce and crosstalk of -27 dB were also measured, both resulting primarily from diffraction from holes in each pixel and the inter-pixel gaps of the MEMS.

  18. Testing the causality of Hawkes processes with time reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordi, Marcus; Challet, Damien; Muni Toke, Ioane

    2018-03-01

    We show that univariate and symmetric multivariate Hawkes processes are only weakly causal: the true log-likelihoods of real and reversed event time vectors are almost equal, thus parameter estimation via maximum likelihood only weakly depends on the direction of the arrow of time. In ideal (synthetic) conditions, tests of goodness of parametric fit unambiguously reject backward event times, which implies that inferring kernels from time-symmetric quantities, such as the autocovariance of the event rate, only rarely produce statistically significant fits. Finally, we find that fitting financial data with many-parameter kernels may yield significant fits for both arrows of time for the same event time vector, sometimes favouring the backward time direction. This goes to show that a significant fit of Hawkes processes to real data with flexible kernels does not imply a definite arrow of time unless one tests it.

  19. Mirror machine reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Moir, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    Recent mirror reactor conceptual design studies are described. Considered in detail is the design of ''standard'' Yin-Yang fusion power reactors with classical and enhanced confinement. It is shown that to be economically competitive with estimates for other future energy sources, mirror reactors require a considerable increase in Q, or major design simplifications, or preferably both. These improvements may require a departure from the ''standard'' configuration. Two attractive possibilities, both of which would use much of the same physics and technology as the ''standard'' mirror, are the field reversed mirror and the end-stoppered mirror

  20. Time reversal signal processing in acoustic emission testing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Krofta, Josef; Kober, Jan; Dvořáková, Zuzana; Chlada, Milan; Dos Santos, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 12 (2014) ISSN 1435-4934. [European Conference on Non-Destructive Testing (ECNDT 2014) /11./. Praha, 06.10.2014-10.10.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : acoustic emission (AE) * ultrasonic testing (UT) * signal processing * source location * time reversal acoustic s * acoustic emission * signal processing and transfer Subject RIV: BI - Acoustic s http://www.ndt.net/events/ECNDT2014/app/content/Slides/637_Prevorovsky.pdf

  1. Parity and time-reversal non-conservation in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, B.W.

    1984-08-01

    We examine the implications of parity and time-reversal non-conservation for atomic physics. We conclude that a determination of Q/sub W//N to 10% would give an indirect determination of M/sub Z/ competitive with that available from high-energy physics, limits on the electric dipole moments of neutrons and electrons give non-trivial constraints on model building of CP non-conservation

  2. Anisotropy signature in extended images from reverse-time migration

    KAUST Repository

    Sava, Paul

    2012-11-04

    Reverse-time migration can accurately image complex geologic structures in anisotropic media. Extended images at selected locations in the earth, i.e. at common-image-point gathers (CIPs), carry enough information to characterize the angle-dependent illumination and to provide measurements for migration velocity analysis. Furthermore, inaccurate anisotropy leaves a distinctive signature in CIPs, which can be used to evaluate anisotropy through techniques similar to the ones used in conventional wavefield tomography.

  3. Time reversal symmetry breaking effects in resonant nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feshbach, H.; Hussein, M.S.; Kerman, A.K.

    1995-01-01

    We incorporate time reversal symmetry breaking (TRSB) effects into the theory of compound nuclear reactions. We show that the only meaningful test of TRSB in the overlapping resonances regime is through the study of cross-section correlations. The effect is channel-dependent. In the isolated resonance regime, we employ K-matrix theory to show the impact of TRSB using the fact that when only one eigen-channel participates in populating and depopulating the compound resonance. (orig.)

  4. Test of time reversal invariance in oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, N.K.

    1976-01-01

    An experiment was performed to test time reversal invariance by looking at the linear polarization of the mixed E2 and M1 122 keV gamma rays emitted from oriented 57 Co nuclei. Nuclear orientation is achieved with a high magnetic field (the 288 KG hyperfine field of 57 Co in iron lattice) and a low temperature (16.5 to 18 mK with a 3 He-- 4 He dilution refrigerator). Time reversal noninvariance would show up as a linear polarization term in the angular distributions of the form (J VECTOR.k Vector x E VECTOR)(J VECTOR.k Vector)(J VECTOR.E VECTOR) which is proportional to sin eta, where k vector is the propagation vector, E VECTOR the linear polarization vector, J VECTOR the orientation vector, sin eta = Im([E2]/[M1])/(parallel[E2]/[M1]parallel) of the 122 keV gamma ray. The linear polarization term is detected with a Compton polarimeter using an Al scatterer and NaI(Tl) detectors. The result is sin eta = (-3.1 +- 6.5) x 10 -4 , consistent with time reversal invariance

  5. Time domain analysis of superradiant instability for the charged stringy black hole–mirror system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that the charged stringy black holes are stable under the perturbations of massive charged scalar fields. However, superradiant instability can be generated by adding the mirror-like boundary condition to the composed system of charged stringy black hole and scalar field. The unstable boxed quasinormal modes have been calculated by using both analytical and numerical methods. In this paper, we further provide a time domain analysis by performing a long time evolution of charged scalar field configuration in the background of the charged stringy black hole with the mirror-like boundary condition imposed. We have used the ingoing Eddington–Finkelstein coordinates to derive the evolution equation, and adopted Pseudo-spectral method and the forth-order Runge–Kutta method to evolve the scalar field with the initial Gaussian wave packet. It is shown by our numerical scheme that Fourier transforming the evolution data coincides well with the unstable modes computed from frequency domain analysis. The existence of the rapid growth mode makes the charged stringy black hole a good test ground to study the nonlinear development of superradiant instability.

  6. Prolonged and tunable residence time using reversible covalent kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, J Michael; McFarland, Jesse M; Paavilainen, Ville O; Bisconte, Angelina; Tam, Danny; Phan, Vernon T; Romanov, Sergei; Finkle, David; Shu, Jin; Patel, Vaishali; Ton, Tony; Li, Xiaoyan; Loughhead, David G; Nunn, Philip A; Karr, Dane E; Gerritsen, Mary E; Funk, Jens Oliver; Owens, Timothy D; Verner, Erik; Brameld, Ken A; Hill, Ronald J; Goldstein, David M; Taunton, Jack

    2015-07-01

    Drugs with prolonged on-target residence times often show superior efficacy, yet general strategies for optimizing drug-target residence time are lacking. Here we made progress toward this elusive goal by targeting a noncatalytic cysteine in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) with reversible covalent inhibitors. Using an inverted orientation of the cysteine-reactive cyanoacrylamide electrophile, we identified potent and selective BTK inhibitors that demonstrated biochemical residence times spanning from minutes to 7 d. An inverted cyanoacrylamide with prolonged residence time in vivo remained bound to BTK for more than 18 h after clearance from the circulation. The inverted cyanoacrylamide strategy was further used to discover fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) kinase inhibitors with residence times of several days, demonstrating the generalizability of the approach. Targeting of noncatalytic cysteines with inverted cyanoacrylamides may serve as a broadly applicable platform that facilitates 'residence time by design', the ability to modulate and improve the duration of target engagement in vivo.

  7. Dual cascade time-of-flight mass spectrometer basing on electrostatic mirrors with two dimensional fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glikman, L. G.; Goloskokov, Yu. V.; Karetskaya, S.P.; Mit', A.G.

    1999-01-01

    In the report [1] we have suggested the scheme of time-of-flight spectrometer containing two electrostatic mirrors with two dimensional field that doesn't depend on one of the Cartesian coordinates). In the articles [2,3] there have been found conditions for obtaining high quality of time-of-flight and spatial focusing. One of basic advantages of this scheme - is availability of intermediate stigmatic image. In the plane where this image is it's possible to place controlled diaphragm that limits ion scatter along the energy if the scatter is too large. With the help of this diaphragm at the spectrometer you can register mass spectrum with the selected energy. Good focusing quality allows reducing of initial ion energy by this increasing the time of their flight and thus analyzers resolving ability. Ion source and receiver are spaced at rather a long distances. This can be useful to solve some practical tasks

  8. Time Reversal for Ultra-wideband (UWB) Sensor Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-31

    spatial focusing is demonstrated. In [58], it is found that the number of taps in an MMSE equalizer can be reduced and an improvement of performance...and N(t) is the number of multipath components. If the channel is assumed to be static over an interval of interest, the time- invariant model can be...technology. USA: Wiley, 2004. [58] T. Strohmer, M. Emami, J. Hansen, G. Papanicolaou, and A. Paulraj, “Appli- cation of Time-Reversal with MMSE Equalizer

  9. Anti-Aliasing filter for reverse-time migration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhan, Ge

    2012-01-01

    We develop an anti-aliasing filter for reverse-time migration (RTM). It is similar to the traditional anti-aliasing filter used for Kirchhoff migration in that it low-pass filters the migration operator so that the dominant wavelength in the operator is greater than two times the trace sampling interval, except it is applied to both primary and multiple reflection events. Instead of applying this filter to the data in the traditional RTM operation, we apply the anti-aliasing filter to the generalized diffraction-stack migration operator. This gives the same migration image as computed by anti-aliased RTM. Download

  10. Diffuse mirrors: 3D reconstruction from diffuse indirect illumination using inexpensive time-of-flight sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-06-01

    The functional difference between a diffuse wall and a mirror is well understood: one scatters back into all directions, and the other one preserves the directionality of reflected light. The temporal structure of the light, however, is left intact by both: assuming simple surface reflection, photons that arrive first are reflected first. In this paper, we exploit this insight to recover objects outside the line of sight from second-order diffuse reflections, effectively turning walls into mirrors. We formulate the reconstruction task as a linear inverse problem on the transient response of a scene, which we acquire using an affordable setup consisting of a modulated light source and a time-of-flight image sensor. By exploiting sparsity in the reconstruction domain, we achieve resolutions in the order of a few centimeters for object shape (depth and laterally) and albedo. Our method is robust to ambient light and works for large room-sized scenes. It is drastically faster and less expensive than previous approaches using femtosecond lasers and streak cameras, and does not require any moving parts.

  11. Time-reversal invariance in multiple collisions between coupled masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, F.S.

    1989-01-01

    The time evolution of two mechanical oscillators coupled by a spring can (but need not) exhibit an instant t = 2t' when the initial conditions at t = 0 have been exactly restored. When that is the case, then at t = t' energy and momentum have been exchanged exactly as in an elastic collision between two free particles, and the evolution of the system from t = t' to 2t' is related to that from 0 to t' by time-reversal invariance. A similar ''simulation of elastic scattering'' at t = t' can occur for two free particles coupled via collisions with an intermediary mass that bounces back and forth between the two particles provided the intermediary is left at rest at t = t'. Examined here is the time evolution of the exchange of momentum and energy for these two examples, determining the values of the coupling spring constant (or mass value) of the intermediating spring (or mass) needed to simulate single elastic scattering between free particles, and looking at the manifestation of time-reversal invariance

  12. Improving Passive Time Reversal Underwater Acoustic Communications Using Subarray Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengbing He

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Multichannel receivers are usually employed in high-rate underwater acoustic communication to achieve spatial diversity. In the context of multichannel underwater acoustic communications, passive time reversal (TR combined with a single-channel adaptive decision feedback equalizer (TR-DFE is a low-complexity solution to achieve both spatial and temporal focusing. In this paper, we present a novel receiver structure to combine passive time reversal with a low-order multichannel adaptive decision feedback equalizer (TR-MC-DFE to improve the performance of the conventional TR-DFE. First, the proposed method divides the whole received array into several subarrays. Second, we conduct passive time reversal processing in each subarray. Third, the multiple subarray outputs are equalized with a low-order multichannel DFE. We also investigated different channel estimation methods, including least squares (LS, orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP, and improved proportionate normalized least mean squares (IPNLMS. The bit error rate (BER and output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR performances of the receiver algorithms are evaluated using simulation and real data collected in a lake experiment. The source-receiver range is 7.4 km, and the data rate with quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK signal is 8 kbits/s. The uncoded BER of the single input multiple output (SIMO systems varies between 1 × 10 − 1 and 2 × 10 − 2 for the conventional TR-DFE, and between 1 × 10 − 2 and 1 × 10 − 3 for the proposed TR-MC-DFE when eight hydrophones are utilized. Compared to conventional TR-DFE, the average output SNR of the experimental data is enhanced by 3 dB.

  13. Sparse least-squares reverse time migration using seislets

    KAUST Repository

    Dutta, Gaurav

    2015-08-19

    We propose sparse least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) using seislets as a basis for the reflectivity distribution. This basis is used along with a dip-constrained preconditioner that emphasizes image updates only along prominent dips during the iterations. These dips can be estimated from the standard migration image or from the gradient using plane-wave destruction filters or structural tensors. Numerical tests on synthetic datasets demonstrate the benefits of this method for mitigation of aliasing artifacts and crosstalk noise in multisource least-squares migration.

  14. Reverse time migration of multiples for OBS data

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Dongliang

    2014-08-05

    Reverse time migration of multiples (RTMM) is applied to OBS data with sparse receiver spacing. RTMM for OBS data unlike a marine streamer acquisition is implemented in the common receiver gathers (CRG) and provides a wider and denser illumination for each CRG than the conventional RTM of primaries. Hence, while the the conventional RTM image contains strong aliasing artifacts due to a sparser receiver interval, the RTMM image suffers from this artifacts less. This benefit of RTMM is demonstrated with numerical test on the Marmousi model for sparsely sampled OBS data.

  15. The effect of transducer directivity on time reversal focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian E; Clemens, Miles; Willardson, Matthew L

    2017-07-01

    This letter explores the effect of the directivity of a source on time reversal acoustic focusing of energy. A single loudspeaker produces an airborne focus of sound in a reverberation chamber and in a classroom. Individual foci are created at microphone positions that surround the loudspeaker. The primary axis of the loudspeaker is then rotated and experiments are repeated to average out the room response. Focal amplitude, temporal quality of the foci, and spatial focusing quality are compared to determine the optimal angle to aim a directional source axis relative to the desired focal position.

  16. Plane-wave least-squares reverse-time migration

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wei

    2013-06-03

    A plane-wave least-squares reverse-time migration (LSRTM) is formulated with a new parameterization, where the migration image of each shot gather is updated separately and an ensemble of prestack images is produced along with common image gathers. The merits of plane-wave prestack LSRTM are the following: (1) plane-wave prestack LSRTM can sometimes offer stable convergence even when the migration velocity has bulk errors of up to 5%; (2) to significantly reduce computation cost, linear phase-shift encoding is applied to hundreds of shot gathers to produce dozens of plane waves. Unlike phase-shift encoding with random time shifts applied to each shot gather, plane-wave encoding can be effectively applied to data with a marine streamer geometry. (3) Plane-wave prestack LSRTM can provide higher-quality images than standard reverse-time migration. Numerical tests on the Marmousi2 model and a marine field data set are performed to illustrate the benefits of plane-wave LSRTM. Empirical results show that LSRTM in the plane-wave domain, compared to standard reversetime migration, produces images efficiently with fewer artifacts and better spatial resolution. Moreover, the prestack image ensemble accommodates more unknowns to makes it more robust than conventional least-squares migration in the presence of migration velocity errors. © 2013 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  17. Electromagnetic time reversal focusing of near field waves in metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabalko, Matthew J.; Sample, Alanson P.

    2016-12-01

    Precise control of electromagnetic energy on a deeply subwavelength scale in the near field regime is a fundamentally challenging problem. In this letter we demonstrate the selective focusing of electromagnetic energy via the electromagnetic time reversal in the near field of a metamaterial. Our analysis begins with fundamental mathematics, and then is extended to the experimental realm where focusing in space and time of the magnetic fields in the near field of a 1-Dimensional metamaterial is shown. Under time reversal focusing, peak instantaneous fields at receiver locations are at minimum ˜200% greater than other receivers. We then leverage the strong selective focusing capabilities of the system to show individual and selective powering of light emitting diodes connected to coil receivers placed in the near field of the metamaterial. Our results show the possibility of improving display technologies, near field imaging systems, increasing channel capacity of near field communication systems, and obtaining a greater control of energy delivery in wireless power transfer systems.

  18. Multi-source least-squares reverse time migration

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wei

    2012-06-15

    Least-squares migration has been shown to improve image quality compared to the conventional migration method, but its computational cost is often too high to be practical. In this paper, we develop two numerical schemes to implement least-squares migration with the reverse time migration method and the blended source processing technique to increase computation efficiency. By iterative migration of supergathers, which consist in a sum of many phase-encoded shots, the image quality is enhanced and the crosstalk noise associated with the encoded shots is reduced. Numerical tests on 2D HESS VTI data show that the multisource least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) algorithm suppresses migration artefacts, balances the amplitudes, improves image resolution and reduces crosstalk noise associated with the blended shot gathers. For this example, the multisource LSRTM is about three times faster than the conventional RTM method. For the 3D example of the SEG/EAGE salt model, with a comparable computational cost, multisource LSRTM produces images with more accurate amplitudes, better spatial resolution and fewer migration artefacts compared to conventional RTM. The empirical results suggest that multisource LSRTM can produce more accurate reflectivity images than conventional RTM does with a similar or less computational cost. The caveat is that the LSRTM image is sensitive to large errors in the migration velocity model. © 2012 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  19. Least-squares reverse time migration of multiples

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Dongliang

    2013-12-06

    The theory of least-squares reverse time migration of multiples (RTMM) is presented. In this method, least squares migration (LSM) is used to image free-surface multiples where the recorded traces are used as the time histories of the virtual sources at the hydrophones and the surface-related multiples are the observed data. For a single source, the entire free-surface becomes an extended virtual source where the downgoing free-surface multiples more fully illuminate the subsurface compared to the primaries. Since each recorded trace is treated as the time history of a virtual source, knowledge of the source wavelet is not required and the ringy time series for each source is automatically deconvolved. If the multiples can be perfectly separated from the primaries, numerical tests on synthetic data for the Sigsbee2B and Marmousi2 models show that least-squares reverse time migration of multiples (LSRTMM) can significantly improve the image quality compared to RTMM or standard reverse time migration (RTM) of primaries. However, if there is imperfect separation and the multiples are strongly interfering with the primaries then LSRTMM images show no significant advantage over the primary migration images. In some cases, they can be of worse quality. Applying LSRTMM to Gulf of Mexico data shows higher signal-to-noise imaging of the salt bottom and top compared to standard RTM images. This is likely attributed to the fact that the target body is just below the sea bed so that the deep water multiples do not have strong interference with the primaries. Migrating a sparsely sampled version of the Marmousi2 ocean bottom seismic data shows that LSM of primaries and LSRTMM provides significantly better imaging than standard RTM. A potential liability of LSRTMM is that multiples require several round trips between the reflector and the free surface, so that high frequencies in the multiples suffer greater attenuation compared to the primary reflections. This can lead to lower

  20. Time reversal invariance - a test in free neutron decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lising, Laura Jean [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Time reversal invariance violation plays only a small role in the Standard Model, and the existence of a T-violating effect above the predicted level would be an indication of new physics. A sensitive probe of this symmetry in the weak interaction is the measurement of the T-violating ''D''-correlation in the decay of free neutrons. The triple-correlation Dσn∙pe x pv involves three kinematic variables, the neutron spin, electron momentu, and neutrino (or proton) momentum, and changes sign under time reversal. This experiment detects the decay products of a polarized cold neutron beam with an octagonal array of scintillation and solid-state detectors. Data from first run at NIST's Cold Neutron Research Facility give a D-coefficient of -0.1 ± 1.3(stat.) ± 0.7(syst) x 10-3 This measurement has the greatest bearing on extensions to the Standard model that incorporate leptoquarks, although exotic fermion and lift-right symmetric models also allow a D as large as the present limit.

  1. Topological Field Theory of Time-Reversal Invariant Insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; Hughes, Taylor; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    We show that the fundamental time reversal invariant (TRI) insulator exists in 4 + 1 dimensions, where the effective field theory is described by the 4 + 1 dimensional Chern-Simons theory and the topological properties of the electronic structure is classified by the second Chern number. These topological properties are the natural generalizations of the time reversal breaking (TRB) quantum Hall insulator in 2 + 1 dimensions. The TRI quantum spin Hall insulator in 2 + 1 dimensions and the topological insulator in 3 + 1 dimension can be obtained as descendants from the fundamental TRI insulator in 4 + 1 dimensions through a dimensional reduction procedure. The effective topological field theory, and the Z{sub 2} topological classification for the TRI insulators in 2+1 and 3+1 dimensions are naturally obtained from this procedure. All physically measurable topological response functions of the TRI insulators are completely described by the effective topological field theory. Our effective topological field theory predicts a number of novel and measurable phenomena, the most striking of which is the topological magneto-electric effect, where an electric field generates a magnetic field in the same direction, with an universal constant of proportionality quantized in odd multiples of the fine structure constant {alpha} = e{sup 2}/hc. Finally, we present a general classification of all topological insulators in various dimensions, and describe them in terms of a unified topological Chern-Simons field theory in phase space.

  2. Plane-wave Least-squares Reverse Time Migration

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wei

    2012-11-04

    Least-squares reverse time migration is formulated with a new parameterization, where the migration image of each shot is updated separately and a prestack image is produced with common image gathers. The advantage is that it can offer stable convergence for least-squares migration even when the migration velocity is not completely accurate. To significantly reduce computation cost, linear phase shift encoding is applied to hundreds of shot gathers to produce dozens of planes waves. A regularization term which penalizes the image difference between nearby angles are used to keep the prestack image consistent through all the angles. Numerical tests on a marine dataset is performed to illustrate the advantages of least-squares reverse time migration in the plane-wave domain. Through iterations of least-squares migration, the migration artifacts are reduced and the image resolution is improved. Empirical results suggest that the LSRTM in plane wave domain is an efficient method to improve the image quality and produce common image gathers.

  3. Can time reversal invariance be tested in ternary fission?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesinger, P.; Koetzle, A.; Goennenwein, F.; Schmidt, K.; Gagarski, A. M.; Petrov, G. A.; Petrova, V. I.; Danilyan, G.; Pavlov, V. S.; Chvatchkin, V. B.; Mutterer, M.; Neumaier, S. R.; Nesvizhevsky, V.; Zimmer, O.; Geltenbort, P.; Korobkina, K.

    1998-01-01

    Already several years ago the idea has been put forward that a reaction well suited for tests of Time Reversal Invariance (TRI) might be ternary fission [1][2]. In ternary fission, besides the two main fission fragments, a third (usually light) charged particle is emitted. For a test of TRI a triple correlation has to be studied involving on one hand the momenta of a fission fragment p f and the ternary particle p t , and on the other hand e.g. the spin of the neutron inducing fission s. The correlation coefficient B=s·[p f xp t ] for the respective unit vectors s, p f and p t reverses sign upon time reversal and a non-vanishing expectation value for B could possibly be due to TRI being violated. However, final state interactions could equally well lead to a non-zero B with TRI being perfectly conserved. A first experiment of this type has been performed in early 1998 at the ILL. Placing fragment and ternary particle detectors at right angles both relative to each other and relative to a longitudinally polarized neutron beam, the observable B assumes the values B=±1. For a fixed set of detectors the sign of B is reversed upon flipping the neutron spin. The expected count rates for the two spin orientations are N=N 0 ·(1±D) with N 0 the count rate for an unpolarized beam. The asymmetry D measures the expectation value of the observable B. The reaction chosen was 233 U(n,f). An unexpectedly large correlation coefficient passing all tests of fake asymmetries was observed. From the raw data the expectation value for B is D=-(2.35±0.05)·10 -3 with the sign corresponding to light fragments. Corrections for finite solid angles subtended by the detectors are not included in the above figure. The corrections will further increase the correlation coefficient. At the moment the mere size of D is believed to rule out a failure of TRI as the origin of the effect. But even a less spectacular interpretation--which as yet is not available--should give a detailed and quite

  4. Parity and time-reversal violation in nuclei and atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelberger, E.G.

    1986-01-01

    Two topics are briefly reviewed: the parity (P)-violating NN interaction and the time-reversal (T) and P-violating electric moments (EDM's) of atoms. The ΔI = 1 P-violating NN amplitude dominated by weak π +- exchange is found to be appreciably smaller than bag-model predictions. This may be a dynamical symmetry of flavor-conserving hadronic weak processes reminiscent of the ΔI = 1/2 rule in flavor-changing decays. General principles of experimental searches for atomic EDM's are discussed. Atomic EDM's are sensitive to electronic or nuclear EDM's and to a P-and-T-violating electron-quark interaction. Even though the experimental precision is still ∼10 4 times worse than counting statistics, the recent results have reached a sensitivity to nuclear EDM's which rivals that of the neutron EDM data. Further significant improvements can be expected

  5. Predominance of lateral over vertical mirror errors in reading: A case for neuronal recycling and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahr, Emmanuel; Houdé, Olivier; Borst, Grégoire

    2017-08-01

    We investigated whether lateral mirror errors could be more prevalent than vertical mirror errors (e.g., p/q vs. p/b confusions) because mirror generalization is harder to inhibit for the discrimination of a reversible letter and its lateral than its vertical mirror-image counterpart. Expert adult readers performed a negative priming task in which they determined on the prime whether two letters and on the probe whether two objects facing opposite directions were identical. We found in both experiments longer response times for objects facing opposite lateral orientations preceded by a reversible letter and its lateral mirror-image counterpart (e.g., p/q) than preceded by perceptually matched non-reversible letters (e.g., g/j). No negative priming effect was observed when objects that were vertical (Experiment 1 & 2) or lateral (Experiment 2) mirror images of each other were preceded by a letter and its vertical mirror-image counterpart (e.g. p/b). Finally, we observed longer response times for objects that were lateral mirror images of each other after lateral than after vertical reversible letters. These results suggest that lateral mirror errors are more prevalent than vertical ones because mirror generalization might be stronger and thus more difficult to inhibit in the context of the former than the latter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Least-squares reverse time migration with radon preconditioning

    KAUST Repository

    Dutta, Gaurav

    2016-09-06

    We present a least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) method using Radon preconditioning to regularize noisy or severely undersampled data. A high resolution local radon transform is used as a change of basis for the reflectivity and sparseness constraints are applied to the inverted reflectivity in the transform domain. This reflects the prior that for each location of the subsurface the number of geological dips is limited. The forward and the adjoint mapping of the reflectivity to the local Radon domain and back are done through 3D Fourier-based discrete Radon transform operators. The sparseness is enforced by applying weights to the Radon domain components which either vary with the amplitudes of the local dips or are thresholded at given quantiles. Numerical tests on synthetic and field data validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in producing images with improved SNR and reduced aliasing artifacts when compared with standard RTM or LSRTM.

  7. Reverse time migration in tilted transversely isotropic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Linbing; Rector III, James W.; Hoversten, G. Michael

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a reverse time migration (RTM) method for the migration of shot records in tilted transversely isotropic (TTI) media. It is based on the tilted TI acoustic wave equation that was derived from the dispersion relation. The RTM is a full depth migration allowing for velocity to vary laterally as well as vertically and has no dip limitations. The wave equation is solved by a tenth-order finite difference scheme. Using 2D numerical models, we demonstrate that ignoring the tilt angle will introduce both lateral and vertical shifts in imaging. The shifts can be larger than 0.5 wavelength in the vertical direction and 1.5 wavelength in the lateral direction.

  8. Insensitivity in some tests of time-reversal invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conzett, H.E.

    1984-01-01

    Among the various tests of time-reversal invariance (TRI), the polarization-analyzing power theorem has the virtue that it follows directly from TRI. The theorem states that the spin-polarization (P) of a final-state particle in a (binary) nuclear reaction is equal to the analyzing power (A) for that polarized particle incident in the inverse reaction. Since elastic scattering is its own inverse process, until recently it has been used in essentially all of the tests of TRI that use the polarization-analyzing power equality. It is now clear that all of these previous P-A comparisons fail as adequate tests of TRI either because of a lack of sensitivity to T-symmetry violation or a lack of experimental precision

  9. Single-molecule stochastic times in a reversible bimolecular reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Peter; Valleriani, Angelo

    2012-08-28

    In this work, we consider the reversible reaction between reactants of species A and B to form the product C. We consider this reaction as a prototype of many pseudobiomolecular reactions in biology, such as for instance molecular motors. We derive the exact probability density for the stochastic waiting time that a molecule of species A needs until the reaction with a molecule of species B takes place. We perform this computation taking fully into account the stochastic fluctuations in the number of molecules of species B. We show that at low numbers of participating molecules, the exact probability density differs from the exponential density derived by assuming the law of mass action. Finally, we discuss the condition of detailed balance in the exact stochastic and in the approximate treatment.

  10. Topological Mirror Insulators in One Dimension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lau, Alexander; Brink, Jeroen van den; Ortix, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the existence of topological insulators in one dimension protected by mirror and time-reversal symmetries. They are characterized by a nontrivial $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ topological invariant defined in terms of the "partial" polarizations, which we show to be quantized in presence of a 1D

  11. Concerning tests of time-reversal invariance via the polarization-analyzing power equality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conzett, H.E.

    1982-01-01

    Previous tests of time-reversal invariance via comparisons of polarizations and analyzing powers in nuclear scattering have been examined. It is found that all of these comparisons fail as adequate tests of time-reversal invariance either because of a lack of experimental precision or the lack of sensitivity to any time-reversal symmetry violation

  12. Probing the dynamics of plasma mirrors on the attosecond time scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thaury, C.; Quérée, F.; George, H.; Loch, R.A.; Geindre, J.P.; Monot, P.; Martin, Ph.; Corkum, Paul; Silvestri, Sandro; Nelson, Keith A.; Riedle, Eberhard; Schoenlein, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that the generation of high-order harmonics (HHG) of a laser on plasma mirrors preserves the coherence of the laser. We then exploit this coherence to study the dynamics of the plasma electrons.

  13. Challenging Cognitive Control by Mirrored Stimuli in Working Memory Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wirth

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive conflict has often been investigated by placing automatic processing originating from learned associations in competition with instructed task demands. Here we explore whether mirror generalization as a congenital mechanism can be employed to create cognitive conflict. Past research suggests that the visual system automatically generates an invariant representation of visual objects and their mirrored counterparts (i.e., mirror generalization, and especially so for lateral reversals (e.g., a cup seen from the left side vs. right side. Prior work suggests that mirror generalization can be reduced or even overcome by learning (i.e., for those visual objects for which it is not appropriate, such as letters d and b. We, therefore, minimized prior practice on resolving conflicts involving mirror generalization by using kanji stimuli as non-verbal and unfamiliar material. In a 1-back task, participants had to check a stream of kanji stimuli for identical repetitions and avoid miss-categorizing mirror reversed stimuli as exact repetitions. Consistent with previous work, lateral reversals led to profound slowing of reaction times and lower accuracy in Experiment 1. Yet, different from previous reports suggesting that lateral reversals lead to stronger conflict, similar slowing for vertical and horizontal mirror transformations was observed in Experiment 2. Taken together, the results suggest that transformations of visual stimuli can be employed to challenge cognitive control in the 1-back task.

  14. Optical Time Reversal from Time-Dependent Epsilon-Near-Zero Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzoli, Stefano; Bruno, Vincenzo; DeVault, Clayton; Roger, Thomas; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Ferrera, Marcello; Clerici, Matteo; Dubietis, Audrius; Faccio, Daniele

    2018-01-01

    Materials with a spatially uniform but temporally varying optical response have applications ranging from magnetic field-free optical isolators to fundamental studies of quantum field theories. However, these effects typically become relevant only for time variations oscillating at optical frequencies, thus presenting a significant hurdle that severely limits the realization of such conditions. Here we present a thin-film material with a permittivity that pulsates (uniformly in space) at optical frequencies and realizes a time-reversing medium of the form originally proposed by Pendry [Science 322, 71 (2008), 10.1126/science.1162087]. We use an optically pumped, 500 nm thick film of epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) material based on Al-doped zinc oxide. An incident probe beam is both negatively refracted and time reversed through a reflected phase-conjugated beam. As a result of the high nonlinearity and the refractive index that is close to zero, the ENZ film leads to time reversed beams (simultaneous negative refraction and phase conjugation) with near-unit efficiency and greater-than-unit internal conversion efficiency. The ENZ platform therefore presents the time-reversal features required, e.g., for efficient subwavelength imaging, all-optical isolators and fundamental quantum field theory studies.

  15. Imaging Method Based on Time Reversal Channel Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional time reversal imaging (TRI method builds imaging function by using the maximal value of signal amplitude. In this circumstance, some remote targets are missed (near-far problem or low resolution is obtained in lossy and/or dispersive media, and too many transceivers are employed to locate targets, which increases the complexity and cost of system. To solve these problems, a novel TRI algorithm is presented in this paper. In order to achieve a high resolution, the signal amplitude corresponding to focal time observed at target position is used to reconstruct the target image. For disposing near-far problem and suppressing spurious images, combining with cross-correlation property and amplitude compensation, channel compensation function (CCF is introduced. Moreover, the complexity and cost of system are reduced by employing only five transceivers to detect four targets whose number is close to that of transceivers. For the sake of demonstrating the practicability of the proposed analytical framework, the numerical experiments are actualized in both nondispersive-lossless (NDL media and dispersive-conductive (DPC media. Results show that the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of conventional TRI algorithm even under few echo signals.

  16. Preliminary discussion on extubation time of silicone reverse-intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Jun Tao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the effective and complications rate of silicone reverse-intubation in treating chronic dacryocystitis with different extubation time after surgery. METHODS: From December 2009 to December 2012, 56 patients(60 eyeswith chronic dacryocystitis were studied. Silicone tube was placed for 1.5 months(group Aor more than 3 months(group B, and the follow-up was 6 months after extubation. RESULTS: All eyes were successfully placed silicone tube. In group A(32 eyes, all lacrimal passage were unobstructed after extubation, after 6 months of postextubation, 21 eyes were cured(66%, 6 eyes were improved(19%, 5 eyes were failed(16%, the overall successful rate was 84%. In group B(28 eyes, 27 eyes of lacrimal passage were unobstructed after extubation, after 6 months of postextubation, 16 eyes were cured(57%, 5 eyes were improved(18%, 7 eyes were failed(25%, the overall successful rate was 75%. The difference between two groups had not statistically significance(P>0.05. Two eyes in group A and 5 eyes in group B had complications with no statistically significance(P>0.05.CONCLUSION: With the time of silicone tube in lacrimal passages before extubation, 1.5 months or more than 3 months, the effective rate were similar, the granulation tissue proliferation is less in the former group.

  17. Anisotropy signature in reverse-time migration extended images

    KAUST Repository

    Sava, Paul C.

    2014-11-04

    Reverse-time migration can accurately image complex geologic structures in anisotropic media. Extended images at selected locations in the Earth, i.e., at common-image-point gathers, carry rich information to characterize the angle-dependent illumination and to provide measurements for migration velocity analysis. However, characterizing the anisotropy influence on such extended images is a challenge. Extended common-image-point gathers are cheap to evaluate since they sample the image at sparse locations indicated by the presence of strong reflectors. Such gathers are also sensitive to velocity error that manifests itself through moveout as a function of space and time lags. Furthermore, inaccurate anisotropy leaves a distinctive signature in common-image-point gathers, which can be used to evaluate anisotropy through techniques similar to the ones used in conventional wavefield tomography. It specifically admits a V-shaped residual moveout with the slope of the "V" flanks depending on the anisotropic parameter η regardless of the complexity of the velocity model. It reflects the fourth-order nature of the anisotropy influence on moveout as it manifests itself in this distinct signature in extended images after handling the velocity properly in the imaging process. Synthetic and real data observations support this assertion.

  18. Time-reversed lasing in the terahertz range and its preliminary study in sensor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yun, E-mail: shenyunoptics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Liu, Huaqing [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Deng, Xiaohua [Institute of Space Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wang, Guoping [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2017-02-05

    Time-reversed lasing in a uniform slab and a grating structure are investigated in the terahertz range. The results show that both the uniform slab and grating can support terahertz time-reversed lasing. Nevertheless, due to the tunable effective refractive index, the grating structure can not only exhibit time-reversed lasing more effectively and flexibly than a uniform slab, but also can realize significant absorption in a broader operating frequency range. Furthermore, applications of terahertz time-reversed lasing for novel concentration/thickness sensors are preliminarily studied in a single-channel coherent perfect absorber system. - Highlights: • Time-reversed lasing are investigated in the terahertz range. • The grating structure exhibit time-reversed lasing more effectively and flexibly than a uniform slab. • THz time-reversed lasing for novel concentration/thickness sensors are studied.

  19. Elastic Reverse Time Migration (RTM) From Surface Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Naveed; Chen, Xiaofei

    2017-04-01

    Seismic Migration is a promising data processing technique to construct subsurface images by projecting the recorded seismic data at surface back to their origins. There are numerous Migration methods. Among them, Reverse Time Migration (RTM) is considered a robust and standard imaging technology in present day exploration industry as well as in academic research field because of its superior performance compared to traditional migration methods. Although RTM is extensive computing and time consuming but it can efficiently handle the complex geology, highly dipping reflectors and strong lateral velocity variation all together. RTM takes data recorded at the surface as a boundary condition and propagates the data backwards in time until the imaging condition is met. It can use the same modeling algorithm that we use for forward modeling. The classical seismic exploration theory assumes flat surface which is almost impossible in practice for land data. So irregular surface topography has to be considered in simulation of seismic wave propagation, which is not always a straightforward undertaking. In this study, Curved grid finite difference method (CG-FDM) is adapted to model elastic seismic wave propagation to investigate the effect of surface topography on RTM results and explore its advantages and limitations with synthetic data experiments by using Foothill model with topography as the true model. We focus on elastic wave propagation rather than acoustic wave because earth actually behaves as an elastic body. Our results strongly emphasize on the fact that irregular surface topography must be considered for modeling of seismic wave propagation to get better subsurface images specially in mountainous scenario and suggest practitioners to properly handled the geometry of data acquired on irregular topographic surface in their imaging algorithms.

  20. Time Reversal Acoustic Communication Using Filtered Multitone Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lin; Chen, Baowei; Li, Haisen; Zhou, Tian; Li, Ruo

    2015-01-01

    The multipath spread in underwater acoustic channels is severe and, therefore, when the symbol rate of the time reversal (TR) acoustic communication using single-carrier (SC) modulation is high, the large intersymbol interference (ISI) span caused by multipath reduces the performance of the TR process and needs to be removed using the long adaptive equalizer as the post-processor. In this paper, a TR acoustic communication method using filtered multitone (FMT) modulation is proposed in order to reduce the residual ISI in the processed signal using TR. In the proposed method, FMT modulation is exploited to modulate information symbols onto separate subcarriers with high spectral containment and TR technique, as well as adaptive equalization is adopted at the receiver to suppress ISI and noise. The performance of the proposed method is assessed through simulation and real data from a trial in an experimental pool. The proposed method was compared with the TR acoustic communication using SC modulation with the same spectral efficiency. Results demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the performance of the TR process and reduce the computational complexity of adaptive equalization for post-process. PMID:26393586

  1. Reverse time migration of prism waves for salt flank delineation

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wei

    2013-09-22

    In this paper, we present a new reverse time migration method for imaging salt flanks with prism wave reflections. It consists of four steps: (1) migrating the seismic data with conventional RTM to give the RTM image; (2) using the RTM image as a reflectivity model to simulate source-side reflections with the Born approximation; (3) zero-lag correlation of the source-side reflection wavefields and receiver-side wavefields to produce the prism wave migration image; and (4) repeating steps 2 and 3 for the receiver-side reflections. An advantage of this method is that there is no need to pick the horizontal reflectors prior to migration of the prism waves. It also separately images the vertical structures at a different step to reduce crosstalk interference. The disadvantage of prism wave migration algorithm is that its computational cost is twice that of conventional RTM. The empirical results with a salt model suggest that prism wave migration can be an effective method for salt flank delineation in the absence of diving waves.

  2. Pseudospectral reverse time migration based on wavefield decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zengli; Liu, Jianjun; Xu, Feng; Li, Yongzhang

    2017-05-01

    The accuracy of seismic numerical simulations and the effectiveness of imaging conditions are important in reverse time migration studies. Using the pseudospectral method, the precision of the calculated spatial derivative of the seismic wavefield can be improved, increasing the vertical resolution of images. Low-frequency background noise, generated by the zero-lag cross-correlation of mismatched forward-propagated and backward-propagated wavefields at the impedance interfaces, can be eliminated effectively by using the imaging condition based on the wavefield decomposition technique. The computation complexity can be reduced when imaging is performed in the frequency domain. Since the Fourier transformation in the z-axis may be derived directly as one of the intermediate results of the spatial derivative calculation, the computation load of the wavefield decomposition can be reduced, improving the computation efficiency of imaging. Comparison of the results for a pulse response in a constant-velocity medium indicates that, compared with the finite difference method, the peak frequency of the Ricker wavelet can be increased by 10-15 Hz for avoiding spatial numerical dispersion, when the second-order spatial derivative of the seismic wavefield is obtained using the pseudospectral method. The results for the SEG/EAGE and Sigsbee2b models show that the signal-to-noise ratio of the profile and the imaging quality of the boundaries of the salt dome migrated using the pseudospectral method are better than those obtained using the finite difference method.

  3. Time-reversal of electromagnetic scattering for small scatterer classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J Torquil; Berryman, James G

    2012-01-01

    Time-reversal operators, or the alternatively labelled, but equivalent, multistatic response matrix methods, are used to show how to determine the number of scatterers present in an electromagnetic scattering scenario that might be typical of UneXploded Ordinance (UXO) detection, classification and removal applications. Because the nature of the target UXO application differs from that of many other common inversion problems, emphasis is placed here on classification and enumeration rather than on detailed imaging. The main technical issues necessarily revolve around showing that it is possible to find a sufficient number of constraints via multiple measurements (i.e. using several distinct views at the target site) to solve the enumeration problem. The main results show that five measurements with antenna pairs are generally adequate to solve the classification and enumeration problems. However, these results also demonstrate a need for decreasing noise levels in the multistatic matrix as the number n of scatterers increases for the intended practical applications of the method. (paper)

  4. Multiple time-reversed guide-sources in shallow water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaumond, Charles F.; Fromm, David M.; Lingevitch, Joseph F.; Gauss, Roger C.; Menis, Richard

    2003-10-01

    Detection in a monostatic, broadband, active sonar system in shallow water is degraded by propagation-induced spreading. The detection improvement from multiple spatially separated guide sources (GSs) is presented as a method to mitigate this degradation. The improvement of detection by using information in a set of one-way transmissions from a variety of positions is shown using sea data. The experimental area is south of the Hudson Canyon off the coast of New Jersey. The data were taken using five elements of a time-reversing VLA. The five elements were contiguous and at midwater depth. The target and guide source was an echo repeater positioned at various ranges and at middepth. The transmitted signals were 3.0- to 3.5-kHz LFMs. The data are analyzed to show the amount of information present in the collection, a baseline probability of detection (PD) not using the collection of GS signals, the improvement in PD from the use of various sets of GS signals. The dependence of the improvement as a function of range is also shown. [The authors acknowledge support from Dr. Jeffrey Simmen, ONR321OS, and the chief scientist Dr. Charles Holland. Work supported by ONR.

  5. Search for time reversal violation in neutron decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorel, P.

    2006-06-01

    The topic of this thesis is the implementation of an experimental setup designed to measure the R- and N-parameters in polarized neutron decay, together with the data analysis. Four observables are necessary for this measurement: the neutron polarization, the electron momentum and both transverse components of the electron polarization. These last two are measured using a Mott polarimeter. The other observables are determined using the same detectors. The precision to be reached on the R-parameter is 0.5%. A non zero value would sign a time reversal invariance violation and therefore would be a hint of physics beyond the Standard Model. This document presents the work done to prepare and optimize the experimental setup before the data acquisition run performed in 2004. Particular care was taken on the scintillator walls, used to trigger the acquisition and measure the electron energy. The second part concerns the implementation of methods to extract R and N from the data, and the study of the background recorded simultaneously. (author)

  6. An elegant miRror: microRNAs in stem cells, developmental timing and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, Rachael A; Slack, Frank J

    2009-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) were first discovered in genetic screens for regulators of developmental timing in the stem-cell-like seam cell lineage in Caenorhabditis elegans. As members of the heterochronic pathway, the lin-4 and let-7 miRNAs are required in the seam cells for the correct progression of stage-specific events and to ensure that cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation occur at the correct time. Other heterochronic genes such as lin-28 and lin-41 are direct targets of the lin-4 and let-7 miRNAs. Recent findings on the functions of the let-7 and lin-4/mir-125 miRNA families and lin-28 and lin-41 orthologs from a variety of organisms suggest that core elements of the heterochronic pathway are retained in mammalian stem cells and development. In particular, these genes appear to form bistable switches via double-negative feedback loops in both nematode and mammalian stem cell development, the functional relevance of which is finally becoming clear. let-7 inhibits stem cell self-renewal in both normal and cancer stem cells of the breast and acts as a tumor suppressor in lung and breast cancer. let-7 also promotes terminal differentiation at the larval to adult transition in both nematode stem cells and fly wing imaginal discs and inhibits proliferation of human lung and liver cancer cells. Conversely, LIN-28 is a highly specific embryonic stem cell marker and is one of four "stemness" factors used to reprogram adult fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells; furthermore, lin-28 is oncogenic in hepatocellular carcinomas. Therefore, a core module of heterochronic genes--lin-28, lin-41, let-7, and lin-4/mir-125-acts as an ancient regulatory switch for differentiation in stem cells (and in some cancers), illustrating that nematode seam cells mirror miRNA regulatory networks in mammalian stem cells during both normal development and cancer.

  7. Progress in mirror machine research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.; Coensgen, F.H.

    1979-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Program in the US is now focused on two concepts that can obtain high values of the power gain factor Q. These are the tandem mirror and field reversed mirror concepts. A new facility called TMX has been constructed to test the principles of the tandem mirror. A further attempt to create field reversal is being carried out in the 2XIIB facility (renamed Beta II) with neutral beam injection into a reversed-field target plasma to be created by a magnetized coaxial gun. During the next 5 years, the main mirror facilities in the US will be the TMX, Beta II, and a large mirror device called MFTF scheduled to operate by 1982. The program based on these facilities will be outlined and initial experimental results from TMX will be discussed

  8. Virtual Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The multiple-reflection photograph in Fig. 1 was taken in an elevator on board the cruise ship Norwegian Jade in March 2008. Three of the four walls of the elevator were mirrored, allowing me to see the combination of two standard arrangements of plane mirrors: two mirrors set at 90 degrees to each other and two parallel mirrors. Optical phenomena…

  9. Constraint on time-reversal tests in fully chaotic nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, E.D.

    1994-01-01

    In tests exploiting the unique sensitivity of a fully chaotic system like the compound nucleus, the possibility exists that unknown resonance parameters and interaction matrix elements taken on values which preclude the observation of a violation of time-reversal invariance independent of the strength of the time-reversal noninvariant interaction. A nontrivial constraint on time-reversal tests is implied, namely, that the observable has to be sampled a minimum number of times M min where M min >3. Several experiments purporting to be tests of time reversal do not satisfy this condition

  10. TIME EVOLUTION OF THE REVERSE SHOCK IN SN 1006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank Winkler, P.; Hamilton, Andrew J. S.; Long, Knox S.; Fesen, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    The Schweizer-Middleditch star, located behind the SN 1006 remnant and near its center in projection, provides the opportunity to study cold, expanding ejecta within the SN 1006 shell through UV absorption. Especially notable is an extremely sharp red edge to the Si II 1260 Å feature, which stems from the fastest moving ejecta on the far side of the SN 1006 shell—material that is just encountering the reverse shock. Comparing Hubble Space Telescope far-UV spectra obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph in 2010 and with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph in 1999, we have measured the change in this feature over the intervening 10.5 year baseline. We find that the sharp red edge of the Si II feature has shifted blueward by 0.19 ± 0.05 #Angstrom#, which means that the material hitting the reverse shock in 2010 was moving slower by 44 ± 11 km s –1 than the material that was hitting it in 1999, a change corresponding to –4.2 ± 1.0 km s –1 yr –1 . This is the first observational confirmation of a long-predicted dynamic effect for a reverse shock: that the shock will work its way inward through expanding supernova ejecta and encounter ever-slower material as it proceeds. We also find that the column density of shocked Si II (material that has passed through the reverse shock) has decreased by 7% ± 2% over the 10 year period. The decrease could indicate that in this direction the reverse shock has been plowing through a dense clump of Si, leading to pressure and density transients.

  11. Factors affecting timing of closure and non-reversal of temporary ileostomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sier, M F; van Gelder, L; Ubbink, D T; Bemelman, W A; Oostenbroek, R J

    2015-09-01

    Although stoma closure is considered a simple surgical intervention, the interval between construction and reversal is often prolonged, and some ileostomies may never be reversed. We evaluated possible predictors for non-reversal and prolonged interval between construction and reversal. In a cohort study of ileostomy patients treated in a large teaching hospital, we collected data from the surgical complication and enterostomal therapists' registries between January 2001 and December 2011. Parameters responsible for morbidity, mortality, length of stay and time interval between construction and reversal were analysed. Of 485 intentionally temporary ileostomies, 359 were reversed after a median of 5.6 months (IQR 3.8-8.9 months), while 126 (26%) remained permanent. End ileostomy and intra-abdominal abscess independently delayed reversal. Age, end ileostomy, higher body mass index and preoperative radiotherapy were independent factors for non-reversal. Median duration of hospitalisation for reversal was 7.0 days (5-13 days). Morbidity and mortality were 31 and 0.9%, respectively. In 20 patients (5.5%), re-ileostomy was necessary. A substantial number of ileostomies that are intended to be temporary will never be reversed. If reversed, the interval between construction and reversal is longer than anticipated, while morbidity after reversal and duration of hospitalisation are considerable. Besides a temporary ileostomy, there are two other options: no diversion or a permanent colostomy. Shared decision-making is to be preferred in these situations.

  12. Plasma confinement apparatus using solenoidal and mirror coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.; Condit, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    A plasma confinement apparatus is described, wherein multiple magnetic mirror cells are linked by magnetic field lines inside of a solenoid with the mirroring regions for adjacent magnetic mirror cells each formed by a separate mirror coil inside of the solenoid. The magnetic mirror cells may be field reversed

  13. Test of time-reversal invariance in proton-deuteron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eversheim, P.D.

    1993-01-01

    A null test of time-reversal invariance is discussed that allows for a precision of 10 -6 . The parity conserving time-reversal violating observable is the total cross-section asymmetry A y,xz . The measurement is planned as an internal target transmission experiment at the cooler synchrotron COSY-Juelich. (author). 20 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  14. Time-Reversal MUSIC Imaging with Time-Domain Gating Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heedong; Ogawa, Yasutaka; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Ohgane, Takeo

    A time-reversal (TR) approach with multiple signal classification (MUSIC) provides super-resolution for detection and localization using multistatic data collected from an array antenna system. The theory of TR-MUSIC assumes that the number of antenna elements is greater than that of scatterers (targets). Furthermore, it requires many sets of frequency-domain data (snapshots) in seriously noisy environments. Unfortunately, these conditions are not practical for real environments due to the restriction of a reasonable antenna structure as well as limited measurement time. We propose an approach that treats both noise reduction and relaxation of the transceiver restriction by using a time-domain gating technique accompanied with the Fourier transform before applying the TR-MUSIC imaging algorithm. Instead of utilizing the conventional multistatic data matrix (MDM), we employ a modified MDM obtained from the gating technique. The resulting imaging functions yield more reliable images with only a few snapshots regardless of the limitation of the antenna arrays.

  15. Time Reversal Reconstruction Algorithm Based on PSO Optimized SVM Interpolation for Photoacoustic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjian Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic imaging is an innovative imaging technique to image biomedical tissues. The time reversal reconstruction algorithm in which a numerical model of the acoustic forward problem is run backwards in time is widely used. In the paper, a time reversal reconstruction algorithm based on particle swarm optimization (PSO optimized support vector machine (SVM interpolation method is proposed for photoacoustics imaging. Numerical results show that the reconstructed images of the proposed algorithm are more accurate than those of the nearest neighbor interpolation, linear interpolation, and cubic convolution interpolation based time reversal algorithm, which can provide higher imaging quality by using significantly fewer measurement positions or scanning times.

  16. Einstein's Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; Skeparovski, Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    Reflection of light from a plane mirror in uniform rectilinear motion is a century-old problem, intimately related to the foundations of special relativity. The problem was first investigated by Einstein in his famous 1905 paper by using the Lorentz transformations to switch from the mirror's rest frame to the frame where the mirror moves at a…

  17. Nonlinear Time Reversal Acoustic Method of Friction Stir Weld Assessment, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of the project is demonstration of the feasibility of Friction Stir Weld (FSW) assessment by novel Nonlinear Time Reversal Acoustic (TRA) method. Time...

  18. Role of echocardiography in reducing shock reversal time in pediatric septic shock: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. EL‐Nawawy

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Serial echocardiography provided crucial data for early recognition of septic myocardial dysfunction and hypovolemia that was not apparent on clinical assessment, allowing a timely management and resulting in shock reversal time reduction among children with septic shock.

  19. Time reversal invariance for a nonlinear scatterer exhibiting contact acoustic nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanloeuil, Philippe; Rose, L. R. Francis; Veidt, Martin; Wang, Chun H.

    2018-03-01

    The time reversal invariance of an ultrasonic plane wave interacting with a contact interface characterized by a unilateral contact law is investigated analytically and numerically. It is shown analytically that despite the contact nonlinearity, the re-emission of a time reversed version of the reflected and transmitted waves can perfectly recover the original pulse shape, thereby demonstrating time reversal invariance for this type of contact acoustic nonlinearity. With the aid of finite element modelling, the time-reversal analysis is extended to finite-size nonlinear scatterers such as closed cracks. The results show that time reversal invariance holds provided that all the additional frequencies generated during the forward propagation, such as higher harmonics, sub-harmonics and zero-frequency component, are fully included in the retro-propagation. If the scattered waves are frequency filtered during receiving or transmitting, such as through the use of narrowband transducers, the recombination of the time-reversed waves will not exactly recover the original incident wave. This discrepancy due to incomplete time invariance can be exploited as a new method for characterizing damage by defining damage indices that quantify the departure from time reversal invariance. The sensitivity of these damage indices for various crack lengths and contact stress levels is investigated computationally, indicating some advantages of this narrowband approach relative to the more conventional measurement of higher harmonic amplitude, which requires broadband transducers.

  20. Real-time wavefront correction system using a zonal deformable mirror and a Hartmann sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, J.T.; Bliss, E.S.; Long, T.W.; Orham, E.L.; Presta, R.W.; Swift, C.D.; Ward, R.S.

    1991-07-01

    We have developed an adaptive optics system that corrects up to five waves of 2nd-order and 3rd-order aberrations in a high-power laser beam to less than 1/10th wave RMS. The wavefront sensor is a Hartmann sensor with discrete lenses and position-sensitive photodiodes; the deformable mirror uses piezoelectric actuators with feedback from strain gauges bonded to the stacks. The controller hardware uses a VME bus. The system removes thermally induced aberrations generated in the master-oscillator-power-amplifier chains of a dye laser, as well as aberrations generated in beam combiners and vacuum isolation windows for average output powers exceeding 1 kW. The system bandwidth is 1 Hz, but higher bandwidths are easily attainable

  1. The brief time-reversibility of the local Lyapunov exponents for a small chaotic Hamiltonian system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldner, Franz; Hoover, William G.; Hoover, Carol G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •We consider the local Lyapunov spectrum for a four-dimensional Hamilton system. •Its stable periodic motion can be reversed for long times. •In the chaotic motion, time reversal occurs only for a short time. •Perturbations will change this short unstable case into a different stable case. •These observations might relate chaos to the Second Law of Thermodynamics. - Abstract: We consider the local (instantaneous) Lyapunov spectrum for a four-dimensional Hamiltonian system. Its stable periodic motion can be reversed for long times. Its unstable chaotic motion, with two symmetric pairs of exponents, cannot. In the latter case reversal occurs for more than a thousand fourth-order Runge–Kutta time steps, followed by a transition to a new set of paired Lyapunov exponents, unrelated to those seen in the forward time direction. The relation of the observed chaotic dynamics to the Second Law of Thermodynamics is discussed

  2. Time-reversal acoustics and ultrasound-assisted convection-enhanced drug delivery to the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Olbricht, William; Sistla, Manjari; Ghandi, Gaurav; Lewis, George; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2013-01-01

    Time-reversal acoustics is an effective way of focusing ultrasound deep inside heterogeneous media such as biological tissues. Convection-enhanced delivery is a method of delivering drugs into the brain by infusing them directly into the brain interstitium. These two technologies are combined in a focusing system that uses a “smart needle” to simultaneously infuse fluid into the brain and provide the necessary feedback for focusing ultrasound using time-reversal acoustics. The effects of time...

  3. Attenuation compensation in least-squares reverse time migration using the visco-acoustic wave equation

    KAUST Repository

    Dutta, Gaurav

    2013-08-20

    Attenuation leads to distortion of amplitude and phase of seismic waves propagating inside the earth. Conventional acoustic and least-squares reverse time migration do not account for this distortion which leads to defocusing of migration images in highly attenuative geological environments. To account for this distortion, we propose to use the visco-acoustic wave equation for least-squares reverse time migration. Numerical tests on synthetic data show that least-squares reverse time migration with the visco-acoustic wave equation corrects for this distortion and produces images with better balanced amplitudes compared to the conventional approach. © 2013 SEG.

  4. Universality class of XY-like spin glasses lacking time-reversal symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gingras, M.J.P.

    1991-01-01

    XY-like spin-glass models without time-reversal symmetry are considered, with attention focused on the gauge glass and the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya XY spin glass. A mean-field approximation of the replicated Ginzburg-Landau free energy of these models is used to show that, due to the lack of time-reversal symmetry, these models have two soft (massless) modes at the transition. A consequence of this result is that all XY-like spin glasses lacking time-reversal symmetry belong to the same universality class, but which is a different one from that found for Ising and isotropic vector spin glasses

  5. Time reversal in polarized neutron decay: the emiT experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, G L; Anaya, J M; Bowles, T J; Chupp, T E; Coulter, K P; Dewey, M S; Freedman, S J; Fujikawa, B K; García, A; Greene, G L; Hwang, S R; Lising, L J; Mumm, H P; Nico, J S; Robertson, R G H; Steiger, T D; Teasdale, W A; Thompson, A K; Wasserman, E G; Wietfeldt, F E; Wilkerson, J F

    2000-01-01

    The standard electro-weak model predicts negligible violation of time-reversal invariance in light quark processes. We report on an experimental test of time-reversal invariance in the beta decay of polarized neutrons as a search for physics beyond the standard model. The emiT collaboration has measured the time-reversal-violating triple-correlation in neutron beta decay between the neutron spin, electron momentum, and neutrino momentum often referred to as the D coefficient. The first run of the experiment produced 14 million events which are currently being analyzed. However, a second run with improved detectors should provide greater statistical precision and reduced systematic uncertainties.

  6. The criterion for time symmetry of probabilistic theories and the reversibility of quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holster, A T

    2003-01-01

    Physicists routinely claim that the fundamental laws of physics are 'time symmetric' or 'time reversal invariant' or 'reversible'. In particular, it is claimed that the theory of quantum mechanics is time symmetric. But it is shown in this paper that the orthodox analysis suffers from a fatal conceptual error, because the logical criterion for judging the time symmetry of probabilistic theories has been incorrectly formulated. The correct criterion requires symmetry between future-directed laws and past-directed laws. This criterion is formulated and proved in detail. The orthodox claim that quantum mechanics is reversible is re-evaluated. The property demonstrated in the orthodox analysis is shown to be quite distinct from time reversal invariance. The view of Satosi Watanabe that quantum mechanics is time asymmetric is verified, as well as his view that this feature does not merely show a de facto or 'contingent' asymmetry, as commonly supposed, but implies a genuine failure of time reversal invariance of the laws of quantum mechanics. The laws of quantum mechanics would be incompatible with a time-reversed version of our universe

  7. Comparison of source moment tensor recovered by diffraction stacking migration and source time reversal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.; Zhang, W.

    2017-12-01

    Diffraction stacking migration is an automatic location methods and widely used in microseismic monitoring of the hydraulic fracturing. It utilizes the stacking of thousands waveform to enhance signal-to-noise ratio of weak events. For surface monitoring, the diffraction stacking method is suffered from polarity reverse among receivers due to radiation pattern of moment source. Joint determination of location and source mechanism has been proposed to overcome the polarity problem but needs significantly increased computational calculations. As an effective method to recover source moment tensor, time reversal imaging based on wave equation can locate microseismic event by using interferometry on the image to extract source position. However, the time reversal imaging is very time consuming compared to the diffraction stacking location because of wave-equation simulation.In this study, we compare the image from diffraction stacking and time reversal imaging to check if the diffraction stacking can obtain similar moment tensor as time reversal imaging. We found that image produced by taking the largest imaging value at each point along time axis does not exhibit the radiation pattern, while with the same level of calculation efficiency, the image produced for each trial origin time can generate radiation pattern similar to time reversal imaging procedure. Thus it is potential to locate the source position by the diffraction stacking method for general moment tensor sources.

  8. The imaginary-time path integral and non-time-reversal-invariant saddle points of the Euclidean action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, I.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss new bounce-like (but non-time-reversal-invariant) solutions to Euclidean equations of motion, which we dub boomerons. In the Euclidean path integral approach to quantum theories, boomerons make an imaginary contribution to the vacuum energy. The fake vacuum instability can be removed by cancelling boomeron contributions against contributions from time reversed boomerons (anti-boomerons). The cancellation rests on a sign choice whose significance is not completely understood in the path integral method. (orig.)

  9. Time Reversal Acoustic Structural Health Monitoring Using Array of Embedded Sensors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Time Reversal Acoustic (TRA) structural health monitoring with an embedded sensor array represents a new approach to in-situ nondestructive evaluation of air-space...

  10. Time Reversed Electromagnetics as a Novel Method for Wireless Power Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challa, Anu; Anlage, Steven M.; Tesla Team

    Taking advantage of ray-chaotic enclosures, time reversal has been shown to securely transmit information via short-wavelength waves between two points, yielding noise at all other sites. In this presentation, we propose a method to adapt the signal-focusing technique to electromagnetic signals in order to transmit energy to portable devices. Relying only on the time-reversal invariance properties of waves, the technique is unencumbered by the inversely-proportional-to-distance path loss or precise orientation requirements of its predecessors, making it attractive for power transfer applications. We inject a short microwave pulse into a complex, wave-chaotic chamber and collect the resulting long time-domain signal at a designated transceiver. The signal is then time reversed and emitted from the collection site, collapsing as a time-reversed replica of the initial pulse at the injection site. When amplified, this reconstruction is robust, as measured through metrics of peak-to-peak voltage and energy transfer ratio. We experimentally demonstrate that time reversed collapse can be made on a moving target, and propose a way to selectively target devices through nonlinear time-reversal. University of Maryland Gemstone Team TESLA: Frank Cangialosi, Anu Challa, Tim Furman, Tyler Grover, Patrick Healey, Ben Philip, Brett Potter, Scott Roman, Andrew Simon, Liangcheng Tao, Alex Tabatabai.

  11. Present status of time-reversal invariance in the nuclear interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, A.

    1975-01-01

    The situation on the experimental investigations of time-reversal invariance (T) in the weak, electromagnetic, and strong interactions is discussed and results of low energy experiments which are of high precision are presented. Particular emphasis is given on tests of T in the strong interactions. Time-reversibility violation is considered in polarization tests of elastic scattering and in detailed balance tests in the case of isolated and overlapping nuclear resonances. Preliminary results for an improved detailed balance experiment in the reactions 27 Al+p reversible 24 Mg+α are given. (Auth.)

  12. High-Resolution Over-the-Horizon Radar Using Time Reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-07

    SUBTITLE 6. AUTHOR(S) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR / MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S)9...reversal operator) [21], the MUltiple-SIgnal-Classification ( MUSIC ) algorithm [22], etc. However, besides extensive computation, these methods require a...measurements are performed in the time-domain in an all-digital manner, unlike most of other time reversal experiments done in frequency domain with the

  13. Test of time-reversal invariance in proton-deuteron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eversheim, P.D.; Hinterberger, F.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Jahn, R.; Ernst, J.; Kretschmer, W.; Paetz gen. Schieck, H.; Conzett, H.E.

    1995-01-01

    A novel (P-even, T-odd) null test of time-reversal invariance is discussed that allows for a accuracy of 10 -6 . The parity conserving time-reversal violating observable is the total cross-section asymmetry A y,xz of proton-deuteron scattering. The measurement is planned as an internal target transmission experiment at the cooler synchrotron COSY-Juelich

  14. Testing P-even time reversal invariance with MeV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, C.R.; Haase, D.G.; Keith, C.D.; Seely, M.L.; Huffman, P.R.; Roberson, N.R.; Wilburn, W.S.

    1995-01-01

    A new measurement of the parity-conserving, time reversal noninvariant (PC TRNI) fivefold correlation has been performed at TUNL, using 6.7 MeV polarized neutrons and a cryogenically aligned holmium target. The PC TRNI spin correlation coefficient A 5 is measured to be (1.1±2.3)x10 -5 , consistent with time reversal invariance. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  15. Inferring the Presence of Reverse Proxies Through Timing Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Predictive Value RFC Request For Comments RTT Round Trip Time US United States TCP Transmission Control Protocol TN True Negative TP True Positive TSO... Request For Comments ( RFC ) 793 [7]. It is a connection- oriented protocol, meaning a client and server must exchange Layer 4 information in order to...reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including

  16. Time reversal violating nuclear polarizability and atomic electric dipole moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginges, J.S.M.; Flambaum, V.V.; Mititelu, G.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: We propose a nuclear mechanism which can induce an atomic electric dipole moment (EDM). The interaction of external electric E and magnetic H fields with nuclear electric and magnetic dipole moments, d and ,u, gives rise to an energy shift, U= -β ik E i H k , where β ik is the nuclear polarizability. Parity and time invariance violating (P,T-odd) nuclear forces generate a mixed P,T-odd nuclear polarizability, whereψ 0 and ψ n are P,T-odd perturbed ground and excited nuclear states, respectively. In the case of a heavy spherical nucleus with a single unpaired nucleon, the perturbed wavefunctions are U = -β ik E i H k , where ξis a constant proportional to the strength of the nuclear P,T-odd interaction, σ is the nuclear spin operator, and ψ n is an unperturbed wavefunction. There are both scalar and tensor contributions to the nuclear P,T-odd polarizability. An atomic EDM is induced by the interaction of the fields of an unpaired electron in an atom with the P,T-odd perturbed atomic nucleus. An estimate for the value of this EDM has been made. The measurements of atomic EDMs can provide information about P,T-odd nuclear forces and test models of CP-violation

  17. Cryogenic Active Mirrors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This effort seeks to develop active mirrors that can correct for thermally-induced figure deformations upon cooling from room-temperature at the time of manufacture,...

  18. Magic Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Allan

    2011-01-01

    "Magic mirrors" were so named because, when they were positioned to throw a reflected patch of sunlight on a nearby wall, this area contained an outline of a design cast on the back of the (bronze) mirror. Investigations begun in the 19th century showed that this was a response to heavy localized pressures exerted on the face of the thin mirror…

  19. Pulsed-laser time-resolved thermal mirror technique in low-absorbance homogeneous linear elastic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasievicz, Gustavo V B; Astrath, Nelson G C; Malacarne, Luis C; Herculano, Leandro S; Zanuto, Vitor S; Baesso, Mauro L; Bialkowski, Stephen E

    2013-10-01

    A theoretical model for a time-resolved photothermal mirror technique using pulsed-laser excitation was developed for low absorption samples. Analytical solutions to the temperature and thermoelastic deformation equations are found for three characteristic pulse profiles and are compared to finite element analysis methods results for finite samples. An analytical expression for the intensity of the center of a continuous probe laser at the detector plane is derived using the Fresnel diffraction theory, which allows modeling of experimental results. Experiments are performed in optical glasses, and the models are fitted to the data. The parameters of the fit are in good agreement with previous literature data for absorption, thermal diffusion, and thermal expansion of the materials tested. The combined modeling and experimental techniques are shown to be useful for quantitative determination of the physical properties of low absorption homogeneous linear elastic material samples.

  20. Comparison of statistical accuracy between the 'direct' and the 'reverse' time-of-flight techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryashev, V.A.; Hartung, U.

    1992-01-01

    The statistical accuracy between two neutron time-of-flight (TOF) diffraction techniques, the classic 'forward' TOF and the 'reverse' TOF technique, are compared. This problem is discussed in dependence on the diffracted spectrum, the background and some special device parameters. In general the 'reverse' TOF method yields better statistics in the spectrum's range above the medium channel content; by the classic TOF method this is achieved in the lower area. For that reason, the reverse TOF measurement is especially recommendable for structure problems and the forward TOF technique for studying the background (e.g. the inelastic scattered portion). (orig.)

  1. Einstein's Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; Skeparovski, Aleksandar

    2008-10-01

    Reflection of light from a plane mirror in uniform rectilinear motion is a century-old problem, intimately related to the foundations of special relativity.1-4 The problem was first investigated by Einstein in his famous 1905 paper by using the Lorentz transformations to switch from the mirror's rest frame to the frame where the mirror moves at a constant velocity.5 Einstein showed an intriguing fact that the usual law of reflection would not hold in the case of a uniformly moving mirror, that is, the angles of incidence and reflection of the light would not equal each other. Later on, it has been shown that the law of reflection at a moving mirror can be obtained in various alternative ways,6-10 but none of them seems suitable for bringing this interesting subject into the high school classroom.

  2. Mirror symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Voisin, Claire

    1999-01-01

    This is the English translation of Professor Voisin's book reflecting the discovery of the mirror symmetry phenomenon. The first chapter is devoted to the geometry of Calabi-Yau manifolds, and the second describes, as motivation, the ideas from quantum field theory that led to the discovery of mirror symmetry. The other chapters deal with more specialized aspects of the subject: the work of Candelas, de la Ossa, Greene, and Parkes, based on the fact that under the mirror symmetry hypothesis, the variation of Hodge structure of a Calabi-Yau threefold determines the Gromov-Witten invariants of its mirror; Batyrev's construction, which exhibits the mirror symmetry phenomenon between hypersurfaces of toric Fano varieties, after a combinatorial classification of the latter; the mathematical construction of the Gromov-Witten potential, and the proof of its crucial property (that it satisfies the WDVV equation), which makes it possible to construct a flat connection underlying a variation of Hodge structure in the ...

  3. Real-time high-speed motion blur compensation system based on back-and-forth motion control of galvanometer mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Takanoshin; Ishikawa, Masatoshi

    2015-12-14

    We developed a novel real-time motion blur compensation system for the blur caused by high-speed one-dimensional motion between a camera and a target. The system consists of a galvanometer mirror and a high-speed color camera, without the need for any additional sensors. We controlled the galvanometer mirror with continuous back-and-forth oscillating motion synchronized to a high-speed camera. The angular speed of the mirror is given in real time within 10 ms based on the concept of background tracking and rapid raw Bayer block matching. Experiments demonstrated that our system captures motion-invariant images of objects moving at speeds up to 30 km/h.

  4. Modelling and Comparative Performance Analysis of a Time-Reversed UWB System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popovski K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of multipath propagation lead to a significant decrease in system performance in most of the proposed ultra-wideband communication systems. A time-reversed system utilises the multipath channel impulse response to decrease receiver complexity, through a prefiltering at the transmitter. This paper discusses the modelling and comparative performance of a UWB system utilising time-reversed communications. System equations are presented, together with a semianalytical formulation on the level of intersymbol interference and multiuser interference. The standardised IEEE 802.15.3a channel model is applied, and the estimated error performance is compared through simulation with the performance of both time-hopped time-reversed and RAKE-based UWB systems.

  5. Application of reverse transcription-PCR and real-time PCR in nanotoxicity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yiqun; Wan, Rong; Zhang, Qunwei

    2012-01-01

    Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is a relatively simple and inexpensive technique to determine the expression level of target genes and is widely used in biomedical science research including nanotoxicology studies for semiquantitative analysis. Real-time PCR allows for the detection of PCR amplification in the exponential growth phase of the reaction and is much more quantitative than traditional RT-PCR. Although a number of kits and reagents for RT-PCR and real-time PCR are commercially available, the basic principles are the same. Here, we describe the procedures for total RNA isolation by using TRI Reagent, for reverse transcription (RT) by M-MLV reverse transcriptase, and for PCR by GoTaq(®) DNA Polymerase. And real-time PCR will be performed on an iQ5 multicolor real-time PCR detection system by using iQ™ SYBR Green Supermix.

  6. Time reversibility of a Lamb wave for damage detection in a metallic plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poddar, B; Kumar, A; Mitra, M; Mujumdar, P M

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, an experimental study has been carried out to develop a baseline-free damage detection technique using the time reversibility of a Lamb wave. The experiments have been carried out on a metallic plate. Time reversibility is the process in which a response signal recorded at a receiver location is reversed in time and transmitted back through the receiver to the original transmitter location. In the absence of any defect or damage in the path between the transmitter–receiver locations, theoretically the signal received back at the original transmitter location (reconstructed signal) is identical to the original input signal. The initial part of the present work is aimed at understanding the time reversibility of a Lamb wave in an undamaged metallic plate. This involves a thorough study of different parameters such as frequency, pulse frequency band width, transducer size and the effects of tuning these parameters on the quality of a reconstructed input signal. This paper also suggests a method to mitigate the effects of the frequency dependent attenuation of Lamb wave modes (amplitude dispersion) and thus achieve better reconstruction for an undamaged plate. Finally, the time reversal process (TRP) is used to detect damage in an aluminium plate without using any information from the undamaged structure. A block mass, a notch and an area of surface erosion are considered as representative of different types of damage. The results obtained show that the effect of damage on TRP is significant, contrary to the results reported earlier

  7. First passage of time-reversible spectrally negative Markov additive processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanovs, J.; Mandjes, M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the first passage process of a spectrally negative Markov additive process (MAP). The focus is on the background Markov chain at the times of the first passage. This process is a Markov chain itself with a transition rate matrix Λ. Assuming time reversibility, we show that all the

  8. On the record process of time-reversible spectrally-negative Markov additive processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Ivanovs; M.R.H. Mandjes (Michel)

    2009-01-01

    htmlabstractWe study the record process of a spectrally-negative Markov additive process (MAP). Assuming time-reversibility, a number of key quantities can be given explicitly. It is shown how these key quantities can be used when analyzing the distribution of the all-time maximum attained by MAPs

  9. Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedqvist, Anders; Rachlew-Källne, Elisabeth

    1998-09-01

    Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy has been used to investigate the effects of impurities in a reversed field pinch operating with a resistive shell. Results of electron temperature, impurity ion densities, particle confinement time and 0741-3335/40/9/004/img1 together with a description of the interpretation and the equipment are presented.

  10. LLL mirror fusion program: summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    During 1976, new Mirror Program plans have been laid out to take into account the significant advances during the last 18 months. The program is now focused on two new mirror concepts, field reversal and the tandem mirror, that can obtain high Q, defined as the ratio of fusion power output to the neutral-beam power injected to sustain the reaction. Theoretically, both concepts can attain Q = 5 or more, as compared to Q = 1 in previous mirror designs. Experimental planning for the next 5 years is complete in broad outline, and we are turning attention to what additional steps are necessary to reach our long-range goal of an experimental mirror reactor operating by 1990. Highlights of the events that have led to the above circumstance are listed, and experimental program plans are outlined

  11. Time-reversal acoustics and ultrasound-assisted convection-enhanced drug delivery to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbricht, William; Sistla, Manjari; Ghandi, Gaurav; Lewis, George; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2013-08-01

    Time-reversal acoustics is an effective way of focusing ultrasound deep inside heterogeneous media such as biological tissues. Convection-enhanced delivery is a method of delivering drugs into the brain by infusing them directly into the brain interstitium. These two technologies are combined in a focusing system that uses a "smart needle" to simultaneously infuse fluid into the brain and provide the necessary feedback for focusing ultrasound using time-reversal acoustics. The effects of time-reversal acoustics-focused ultrasound on the spatial distribution of infused low- and high-molecular weight tracer molecules are examined in live, anesthetized rats. Results show that exposing the rat brain to focused ultrasound significantly increases the penetration of infused compounds into the brain. The addition of stabilized microbubbles enhances the effect of ultrasound exposure.

  12. Suppression of tissue harmonics for pulse-inversion contrast imaging using time reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Olivier; Aubry, Jean-François; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tanter, Mickael; Fink, Mathias

    2008-10-07

    Pulse-inversion (PI) sequences are sensitive to the nonlinear echoes from microbubbles allowing an improvement in the blood-to-tissue contrast. However, at larger mechanical indices, this contrast is reduced by harmonics produced during nonlinear propagation. A method for tissue harmonics cancellation exploiting time reversal is experimentally implemented using a 128-channel 12-bit emitter receiver. The probe calibration is performed by acquiring the nonlinear echo of a wire in water. These distorted pulses are time-reversed, optimized and used for the PI imaging of a tissue phantom. Compared to normal (straight) pulses, the time-reversed distorted pulses reduced the tissue signal in PI by 11 dB. The second harmonic signals from microbubbles flowing in a wall-less vessel were unaffected by the correction. This technique can thus increase the blood-to-tissue contrast ratio while keeping the pressure and the number of pulses constant.

  13. Time-reversal-symmetry breaking in circuit-QED-based photon lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jens; Houck, Andrew A.; Hur, Karyn Le; Girvin, S. M.

    2010-10-01

    Breaking time-reversal symmetry is a prerequisite for accessing certain interesting many-body states such as fractional quantum Hall states. For polaritons, charge neutrality prevents magnetic fields from providing a direct symmetry-breaking mechanism and, similar to the situation in ultracold atomic gases, an effective magnetic field has to be synthesized. We show that in the circuit-QED architecture, this can be achieved by inserting simple superconducting circuits into the resonator junctions. In the presence of such coupling elements, constant parallel magnetic and electric fields suffice to break time-reversal symmetry. We support these theoretical predictions with numerical simulations for realistic sample parameters, specify general conditions under which time reversal is broken, and discuss the application to chiral Fock-state transfer, an on-chip circulator, and tunable band structure for the Kagome lattice.

  14. Suppression of tissue harmonics for pulse-inversion contrast imaging using time reversal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couture, Olivier; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tanter, Mickael; Fink, Mathias [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique, ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France)], E-mail: olicou@gmail.com

    2008-10-07

    Pulse-inversion (PI) sequences are sensitive to the nonlinear echoes from microbubbles allowing an improvement in the blood-to-tissue contrast. However, at larger mechanical indices, this contrast is reduced by harmonics produced during nonlinear propagation. A method for tissue harmonics cancellation exploiting time reversal is experimentally implemented using a 128-channel 12-bit emitter receiver. The probe calibration is performed by acquiring the nonlinear echo of a wire in water. These distorted pulses are time-reversed, optimized and used for the PI imaging of a tissue phantom. Compared to normal (straight) pulses, the time-reversed distorted pulses reduced the tissue signal in PI by 11 dB. The second harmonic signals from microbubbles flowing in a wall-less vessel were unaffected by the correction. This technique can thus increase the blood-to-tissue contrast ratio while keeping the pressure and the number of pulses constant.

  15. Comparison between approximate entropy, correntropy and time reversibility: application to uterine electromyogram signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mahmoud; Terrien, Jérémy; Marque, Catherine; Karlsson, Brynjar

    2011-10-01

    Detection of nonlinearity should be the first step before any analysis of nonlinearity or nonlinear behavior in biological signal. The question is which method should be used in each case and which one can best respect the different characteristics of the signals under investigation. In this paper we compare three methods widely used in nonlinearity detection: approximate entropy, correntropy and time reversibility. The false alarm rates with the numbers of surrogates for the three methods were computed on linear, nonlinear stationary and nonlinear nonstationary signals. The results indicate the superiority of time reversibility over the other methods for detecting linearity and nonlinearity in different signal types. The application of time reversibility on uterine electromyographic signal showed very good performance in classifying pregnancy and labor signals. Copyright © 2011 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Emergence of Dirac points in Photonic Crystals with Mirror Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wen-Yu; Chan, C. T.

    2015-01-01

    We show that Dirac points can emerge in photonic crystals possessing mirror symmetry when band gap closes. The mechanism of generating Dirac points is discussed in a two-dimensional photonic square lattice, in which four Dirac points split out naturally after the touching of two bands with different parity. The emergence of such nodal points, characterized by vortex structure in momentum space, is attributed to the unavoidable band crossing protected by mirror symmetry. The Dirac nodes can be unbuckled through breaking the mirror symmetry and a photonic analog of Chern insulator can be achieved through time reversal symmetry breaking. Breaking time reversal symmetry can lead to unidirectional helical edge states and breaking mirror symmetry can reduce the band gap to amplify the finite size effect, providing ways to engineer helical edge states. PMID:25640993

  17. Remote servicing features of two new mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neef, W.S. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Several general approaches to remote servicing are briefly described for the LLL Field Reversed Mirror and Tandem Mirror Fusion reactors. Remote servicing system design considerations for the blanket module are briefly discussed

  18. A time reversal transmission approach for multi-user UWB communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tuan Hung; Kovacs Z., Istvan; Eggers, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we propose and evaluate the performance of the time reversal technique in impulse radio UWB communications. The evaluation was based on measured channel impulse responses in the UWB frequency band of 3 to 5 GHz of a 4x1 MISO system with both vertical and horizontal polarization...... at the receiver. The results show that there is a great potential in combining time reversal and UWB technique with respect to both reducing the receiver complexity and improving the system performance. Simultaneous communication is illustrated with 5 users with a BER of less than $10^{-3}$ at an average SNR...

  19. Time-reversal focusing of an expanding soliton gas in disordered replicas

    KAUST Repository

    Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2011-05-31

    We investigate the properties of time reversibility of a soliton gas, originating from a dispersive regularization of a shock wave, as it propagates in a strongly disordered environment. An original approach combining information measures and spin glass theory shows that time-reversal focusing occurs for different replicas of the disorder in forward and backward propagation, provided the disorder varies on a length scale much shorter than the width of the soliton constituents. The analysis is performed by starting from a new class of reflectionless potentials, which describe the most general form of an expanding soliton gas of the defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  20. Polarized neutron source and detectors for the TUNL parity-even test of time reversal invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffman, P.R.; Roberson, N.R.; Wilburn, W.S.

    1995-01-01

    The development and implementation of a 10 MHz neutron production target and detector system are presented. The system has been used in a test of parity-even time reversal invariance in neutron transmission through an aligned target. Neutrons were produced via the D(d,n) 3 He reaction using a liquid nitrogen cooled deuterium gas cell. The cryogenic cell required temperature stabilization for minimization of systematic effects. Two four-detector arrays of neutron detectors were developed for 0 degrees transmission measurements and flux monitoring. The system allowed transmission asymmetries to be measured to accuracies better than 10 -6 in a parity-conserving test of time reversal invariance

  1. Steps toward increasing Q in mirror systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments such as the 2XIIB experiment at Livermore have established the ability of mirror systems to confine high temperature, high density plasmas at central beta values exceeding unity. Given these results the next tasks for the mirror approach are to explore means for increasing the energy gain factor Q and to scale up the plasma volume, both of these requirements deriving from economic constraints. This report discusses means for increasng Q, including recent improvements in the tandem mirror concept and design studies of the field-reversed mirror in the context of upcoming and proposed scaled-up mirror experiments

  2. An elegant miRror: microRNAs in stem cells, developmental timing and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nimmo, Rachael A.; Slack, Frank J.

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) were first discovered in genetic screens for regulators of developmental timing in the stem-cell-like seam cell lineage in Caenorhabditis elegans. As members of the heterochronic pathway, the lin-4 and let-7 miRNAs are required in the seam cells for the correct progression of stage-specific events and to ensure that cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation occur at the correct time. Other heterochronic genes such as lin-28 and lin-41 are direct targets of the lin-4 and ...

  3. River, escape, clock, material, mirror: the height of fiction television series in the labyrinth of time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Lozano Maneiro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available TV series during the last decades have achieved a narrative maturity as well as a visual perfection which demand to be linked with the authorial tradition that has been usually just granted to film. If, on the one hand it is imperative to integrate its contribution to the centenary heritage of audiovisual fiction, on the other hand it is necessary to review its contribution in light of Cultural History, Literary Theory and Film Aesthetics, applying the series and serials the analytical tools credited through the thoughtful effort that, while going back to the ancient Greeks, encompass the current developments of formal analysis and creation preceptive. From this broad perspective applied to contemporary fiction series and serials the time conception analysis is undertaken. The two capital paradigms, the linear one and the iterative one, are placed into resonance with the narrative tradition to chart the modern genealogy of the different ways of serial storytelling and its contemporary variants. The new paradigms of textual expansion call into question the axioms currently ascribed to time management on film and ask for new premises liable to be applied to the time analysis of the new audiovisual fiction regarding to novel adaptations and biopics. From there, the analysis can be extended to the storytelling models which, while are deeply rooted on the cultural tradition, move towards innovative paradigms built on the tension between story and drama in contemporary fiction made for television. Nevertheless the most relevant fact about the time distension is may be the emergence of new ways to address narrative rhythm which confer to audiovisual storytelling the textual thickness and the sense of psychological durée that have been traditionally considered as belonging exclusively to novel.

  4. Mirror, mirror on the wall

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    RICH 2, one of the two Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors of the LHCb experiment, is being prepared to join the other detector elements ready for the first proton-proton collisions at LHC. The mirrors of the RICH2 detector are meticulously assembled in a clean room.In a large dark room, men in white move around an immense structure some 7 metres high, 10 metres wide and nearly 2.5 metres deep. Apparently effortlessly, they are installing the two large high-precision spherical mirrors. These mirrors will focus Cherenkov light, created by the charged particles that will traverse this detector, onto the photon detectors. Each spherical mirror wall is made up of facets like a fly's eye. Twenty-eight individual thin glass mirrors will all point to the same point in space to within a few micro-radians. The development of these mirrors has been technically demanding : Ideally they should be massless, sturdy, precise and have high reflectivity. In practice, though not massless, they are made from a mere 6 mm thin gl...

  5. Negative Reflecting Meta-Mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui; Li, Dong; Gao, Dongxing; Zhang, Aofang; Hu, Bowei; Yang, Pei; Lei, Zhenya; Li, Jiacheng

    2017-07-18

    Using the gradient phase discontinuities that meta-mirrors provide, we show that the incident wave can be reflected anomalously with a broad angle range of negative reflections. Such reversed behaviors promote the immediate applications for the planar meta-mirrors to steer the signals more arbitrarily and the convex meta-mirrors to focus and collimate electromagnetic fields. We practically implement these negative reflecting meta-mirrors through an arrangement of subwavelength ring patches and generate the desired phase distribution by also considering the incident angle. Finally, the experiments are carried out to verify the functionality of the convex meta-mirror firstly, and the performances of the planar meta-mirror are also tested by further building up a dual reflector system with the demonstration of obtaining the plane wave from the convex meta-mirror and then having the well collimated beam negative reflected by the planar meta-mirror. The proposed design should be readily applicable to a wide range of electromagnetic problems, especially for devising smart planar illusion devices, and highly directive antennas mounting on convex surfaces of various platforms.

  6. Time course of air hunger mirrors the biphasic ventilatory response to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, S H; Banzett, R B; Butler, J P

    2004-12-01

    Determining response dynamics of hypoxic air hunger may provide information of use in clinical practice and will improve understanding of basic dyspnea mechanisms. It is hypothesized that air hunger arises from projection of reflex brain stem ventilatory drive ("corollary discharge") to forebrain centers. If perceptual response dynamics are unmodified by events between brain stem and cortical awareness, this hypothesis predicts that air hunger will exactly track ventilatory response. Thus, during sustained hypoxia, initial increase in air hunger would be followed by a progressive decline reflecting biphasic reflex ventilatory drive. To test this prediction, we applied a sharp-onset 20-min step of normocapnic hypoxia and compared dynamic response characteristics of air hunger with that of ventilation in 10 healthy subjects. Air hunger was measured during mechanical ventilation (minute ventilation = 9 +/- 1.4 l/min; end-tidal Pco(2) = 37 +/- 2 Torr; end-tidal Po(2) = 45 +/- 7 Torr); ventilatory response was measured during separate free-breathing trials in the same subjects. Discomfort caused by "urge to breathe" was rated every 30 s on a visual analog scale. Both ventilatory and air hunger responses were modeled as delayed double exponentials corresponding to a simple linear first-order response but with a separate first-order adaptation. These models provided adequate fits to both ventilatory and air hunger data (r(2) = 0.88 and 0.66). Mean time constant and time-to-peak response for the average perceptual response (0.36 min(-1) and 3.3 min, respectively) closely matched corresponding values for the average ventilatory response (0.39 min(-1) and 3.1 min). Air hunger response to sustained hypoxia tracked ventilatory drive with a delay of approximately 30 s. Our data provide further support for the corollary discharge hypothesis for air hunger.

  7. Majorana bound states in two-channel time-reversal-symmetric nanowire systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaidamauskas, Erikas; Paaske, Jens; Flensberg, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    We consider time-reversal-symmetric two-channel semiconducting quantum wires proximity coupled to a conventional s-wave superconductor. We analyze the requirements for a non-trivial topological phase, and find that necessary conditions are 1) the determinant of the pairing matrix in channel space...

  8. Optimal One Bit Time Reversal For UWB Impulse Radio In Multi-User Wireless Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Hung Tuan

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, with the purpose of further reducing the complexity of the system, while keeping its temporal and spatial focusing performance, we investigate the possibility of using optimal one bit time reversal (TR) system for impulse radio ultra wideband multi-user wireless communications...

  9. Time-reversal-invariant topological superfluids in Bose-Fermi mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Jonatan Melkaer; Wu, Zhigang; Bruun, G. M.

    2017-01-01

    A mixed dimensional system of fermions in two layers immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) is shown to be a promising setup to realize topological superfluids with time-reversal symmetry (TRS). The induced interaction between the fermions mediated by the BEC gives rise to a competition bet...

  10. On valuing patches: estimating contributions to metapopulation growth with reverse-time capture-recapture modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamie S. Sanderlin; Peter M. Waser; James E. Hines; James D. Nichols

    2012-01-01

    Metapopulation ecology has historically been rich in theory, yet analytical approaches for inferring demographic relationships among local populations have been few. We show how reverse-time multi-state capture­recapture models can be used to estimate the importance of local recruitment and interpopulation dispersal to metapopulation growth. We use 'contribution...

  11. The invariance of classical electromagnetism under Charge-conjugation, Parity and Time-reversal (CPT) transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    The invariance of classical electromagnetism under charge-conjugation, parity, and time-reversal (CPT) is studied by considering the motion of a charged particle in electric and magnetic fields. Upon applying CPT transformations to various physical quantities and noting that the motion still behaves physically demonstrates invariance.

  12. O(1)-Time Unsorting by Prefix-Reversals in a Boustrophedon Linked List

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Aaron

    Conventional wisdom suggests that O(k)-time is required to reverse a substring of length k. To reduce this time complexity, a simple and unorthodox data structure is introduced. A boustrophedon linked list is a doubly-linked list, except that each node does not differentiate between its backward and forward pointers. This lack of information allows substrings of any length to be reversed in O(1)-time. This advantage is used to efficiently unsort permutations using prefix-reversals. More specifically, this paper presents two algorithms that visit each successive permutations of = {1,2,...,n} in worst-case O(1)-time (i.e. loopless). The first visits the permutations using a prefix-reversal Gray code due to Zaks [22], while the second visits the permutations in co-lexicographic order. As an added challenge, both algorithms are non-probing since they rearrange the data structure without querying its values. To accomplish this feat, the algorithms are based on two integer sequences: A055881 in the OEIS [17] and an unnamed sequence.

  13. Evaluation of massive MIMO systems using time-reversal beamforming technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbeutcha, Marie; Fan, Wei; Hejselbæk, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of a massive MIMO system using the time-reversal beamforming technique. The massive MIMO channels are simulated with ray-tracing at 3.5 GHz with a 200 MHz-bandwidth. We use a 64-element uniform cylindrical array as base station (BS) and we equip two...

  14. β-Decay and the electric dipole moment: Searches for time-reversal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... -Decay and the electric dipole moment: Searches for time-reversal violation in radioactive nuclei and atoms. H W Wilschut U Dammalapati D J Van Der Hoek K Jungmann W Kruithof C J G Onderwater B Santra P D Shidling L Willmann. Physics with Radioactive Ion Beams Volume 75 Issue 1 July 2010 pp ...

  15. Effective Lagrangians and parity-conserving time-reversal violation at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, J.; Frampton, P.H.; Springer, R.P.

    1996-01-01

    Using effective Lagrangians, we argue that any time-reversal-violating but parity-conserving effects are too small to be observed in flavor-conserving nuclear processes without dramatic improvement in experimental accuracy. In the process we discuss other arguments that have appeared in the literature. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  16. β-Decay and the electric dipole moment: Searches for time-reversal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the explanation of time-reversal violation (TRV) in heavy mesons. It also implies that. TRV is immeasurably small in normal nuclear matter. However, unifying models beyond the Standard Model predict TRV to be within reach of measurement in nuclei and atoms, thus opening an important window to search for new physics.

  17. Experimental study of time-reversal invariance in neutron-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaparov, E.I.; Shimizu, H.M.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental approaches for the test of time-reversal invariance in neutron-nucleus interactions are reviewed. Possible transmission experiments with polarized neutron beams and polarized or aligned targets are discussed as well as neutron capture experiments with unpolarized resonance neutrons. 102 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Numerical investigation on the effects of acceleration reversal times in Rayleigh-Taylor Instability with multiple reversals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Zachary; Aslangil, Denis; Banerjee, Arindam; Lawrie, Andrew G. W.

    2017-11-01

    An implicit large eddy simulation (ILES) code, MOBILE, is used to explore the growth rate of the mixing layer width of the acceleration-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) under variable acceleration histories. The sets of computations performed consist of a series of accel-decel-accel (ADA) cases in addition to baseline constant acceleration and accel-decel (AD) cases. The ADA cases are a series of varied times for the second acceleration reversal (t2) and show drastic differences in the growth rates. Upon the deceleration phase, the kinetic energy of the flow is shifted into internal wavelike patterns. These waves are evidenced by the examined differences in growth rate in the second acceleration phase for the set of ADA cases. Here, we investigate global parameters that include mixing width, growth rates and the anisotropy tensor for the kinetic energy to better understand the behavior of the growth during the re-acceleration period. Authors acknowledge financial support from DOE-SSAA (DE-NA0003195) and NSF CAREER (#1453056) awards.

  19. Learning-related changes of brain activation in the visual ventral stream: an fMRI study of mirror reading skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki-Kawai, Hiroko; Tsukiura, Takashi; Mochizuki, Satoshi; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2006-11-29

    A previous neuroimaging study has indicated that the visual dorsal stream may contribute to accurate reading of mirror-reversed words. However, the role of the visual ventral stream in the learning of mirror reading skill remains ambiguous. In the present fMRI study, we investigated learning-related changes in brain activation in the visual ventral stream in a mirror reading task. Subjects participated in three successive runs of the mirror reading task, in each of which they were asked to read mirror-reversed words and normal words as accurately and as quickly as possible. The behavioral data for the mirror reading condition showed significant improvement in reaction time but not in performance accuracy across the three runs. The activation data showed different learning-associated patterns related to the right and left visual ventral streams. On the right side, activity related to the reading of mirror stimuli was significantly greater than that related to normal stimuli in the first run only, whereas on the left side it was greater in all runs. Additional correlation analysis between response time data and percentage signal changes only in the mirror reading condition showed significant correlation on the right visual ventral stream in the first run only, whereas that on the left visual ventral stream was found only in the third run. The dissociable response between the right and left visual ventral streams may reflect learning-related changes in reading strategy and may be critical in improving the speed of reading mirror-reversed words.

  20. Quantifying the stationarity and time reversibility of the nucleotide substitution process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squartini, Federico; Arndt, Peter F

    2008-12-01

    Markov models describing the evolution of the nucleotide substitution process, widely used in phylogeny reconstruction, usually assume the hypotheses of stationarity and time reversibility. Although these models give meaningful results when applied to biological data, it is not clear if the 2 assumptions mentioned above hold and, if not, how much sequence evolution processes deviate from them. To this aim, we introduce 2 sets of indices that can be calculated from the nucleotide distribution and the substitution rates. The stationarity indices (STIs) can be used to test the validity of the equilibrium assumption. The irreversibility indices (IRIs) are derived from the Kolmogorov cycle conditions for time reversibility and quantify the degree of nontime reversibility of a process. We have computed STIs and IRIs for the evolutionary process of 2 lineages, Drosophila simulans and Homo sapiens. In the latter case, we use a modified form of the indices that takes into account the CpG decay process. In both cases, we find statistically significant deviations from the ideal case of a process that has reached stationarity and is time reversible.

  1. Concurrent schedules: discriminating reinforcer-ratio reversals at a fixed time after the previous reinforcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Sarah; Elliffe, Douglas; Davison, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Six pigeons worked on concurrent exponential variable-interval schedules in which the relative frequency of food deliveries for responding on the two alternatives reversed at a fixed time after each food delivery. Across conditions, the point of food-ratio reversal was varied from 10 s to 30 s, and the overall reinforcer rate was varied from 1.33 to 4 per minute. The effect of rate of food delivery and food-ratio-reversal time on choice and response rates was small. In all conditions, postfood choice was toward the locally richer key, regardless of the last-food location. Unlike the local food ratio which changed in a stepwise fashion, local choice changed according to a decelerating monotonic function, becoming substantially less extreme than the local food ratio soon after food delivery. This deviation in choice appeared to result from the birds' inaccurate discrimination of the time of food deliveries; local choice was described well by a model that assumed that log response ratios matched food ratios that were redistributed across surrounding time bins with mean time t and a constant coefficient of variation. We suggest that local choice is controlled by the likely availability of food in time, and that choice matches the discriminated log of the ratio of food rates across time since the last food delivery. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  2. New results for time reversed symplectic dynamic systems and quadratic functionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Simon Hilscher

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we examine time scale symplectic (or Hamiltonian systems and the associated quadratic functionals which contain a forward shift in the time variable. Such systems and functionals have a close connection to Jacobi systems for calculus of variations and optimal control problems on time scales. Our results, among which we consider the Reid roundabout theorem, generalize the corresponding classical theory for time reversed discrete symplectic systems, as well as they complete the recently developed theory of time scale symplectic systems.

  3. [Mirror neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons were recently discovered in frontal brain areas of the monkey. They are activated when the animal makes a specific movement, but also when the animal observes the same movement in another animal. Some of them also respond to the emotional expression of other animals of the same species. These mirror neurons have also been found in humans. They respond to or "reflect" actions of other individuals in the brain and are thought to represent the basis for imitation and empathy and hence the neurobiological substrate for "theory of mind", the potential origin of language and the so-called moral instinct.

  4. Test of feasibility of a novel high precision test of time reversal invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, Deepak

    2007-01-01

    The first results of a feasibility test of a novel high precision test of time reversal invariance are reported. The Time Reversal Invariance test at COSY (TRIC) was planned to measure the time reversal violating observable A y,xz with an accuracy of 10 -6 in proton-deuteron (p-d) scattering. A novel technique for measuring total cross sections is introduced and the achievable precision of this measuring technique is tested. The correlation coefficient A y,y in p-d scattering fakes a time-reversal violating effect. This work reports the feasibility test of the novel method in the measurement of A y,y in p-p scattering. The first step in the experimental design was the development of a hard real-time data acquisition system. To meet stringent latency requirements, the capabilities of Windows XP had to be augmented with a real-time subsystem. The remote control feature of the data acquisition enables users to operate it from any place via an internet connection. The data acquisition proved its reliability in several beam times without any failures. The analysis of the data showed the presence of 1/f noise which substantially limits the quality of our measurements. The origin of 1/f noise was traced and found to be the Barkhausen noise from the ferrite core of the beam current transformer (BCT). A global weighted fitting technique based on a modified Wiener-Khinchin method was developed and used to suppress the influence of 1/f noise, which increased the error bar of the results by a factor 3. This is the only deviation from our expectations. The results are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  5. Test of feasibility of a novel high precision test of time reversal invariance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuel, Deepak

    2007-07-01

    The first results of a feasibility test of a novel high precision test of time reversal invariance are reported. The Time Reversal Invariance test at COSY (TRIC) was planned to measure the time reversal violating observable A{sub y,xz} with an accuracy of 10{sup -6} in proton-deuteron (p-d) scattering. A novel technique for measuring total cross sections is introduced and the achievable precision of this measuring technique is tested. The correlation coefficient A{sub y,y} in p-d scattering fakes a time-reversal violating effect. This work reports the feasibility test of the novel method in the measurement of A{sub y,y} in p-p scattering. The first step in the experimental design was the development of a hard real-time data acquisition system. To meet stringent latency requirements, the capabilities of Windows XP had to be augmented with a real-time subsystem. The remote control feature of the data acquisition enables users to operate it from any place via an internet connection. The data acquisition proved its reliability in several beam times without any failures. The analysis of the data showed the presence of 1/f noise which substantially limits the quality of our measurements. The origin of 1/f noise was traced and found to be the Barkhausen noise from the ferrite core of the beam current transformer (BCT). A global weighted fitting technique based on a modified Wiener-Khinchin method was developed and used to suppress the influence of 1/f noise, which increased the error bar of the results by a factor 3. This is the only deviation from our expectations. The results are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  6. Constraints of a parity-conserving/time-reversal-non-conserving interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oers, Willem T.H. van

    2002-01-01

    Time-Reversal-Invariance non-conservation has for the first time been unequivocally demonstrated in a direct measurement at CPLEAR. One then can ask the question: What about tests of time-reversal-invariance in systems other than the kaon system? Tests of time-reversal-invariance can be distinguished as belonging to two classes: the first one deals with time-reversal-invariance-non-conserving (T-odd)/parity violating (P-odd) interactions, while the second one deals with T-odd/P-even interactions (assuming CPT conservation this implies C-conjugation non-conservation). Limits on a T-odd/P-odd interaction follow from measurements of the electric dipole moment of the neutron ( -26 e.cm [95% C.L.]). It provides a limit on a T-odd/P-odd pion-nucleon coupling constant which is less than 10 -4 times the weak interaction strength. Experimental limits on a T-odd/P-even interaction are much less stringent. Following the standard approach of describing the nucleon-nucleon interaction in terms of meson exchanges, it can be shown that only charged ρ-meson exchange and A 1 -meson exchange can lead to a T-odd/P-even interaction. The better constraints stem from measurements of the electric dipole moment of the neutron and from measurements of charge-symmetry breaking in neutron-proton elastic scattering. The latter experiments were executed at TRIUMF (497 and 347 MeV) and at IUCF (183 MeV). All other experiments, like detailed balance experiments, polarization - analyzing power difference determinations, and five-fold correlation experiments with polarized incident nucleons and aligned nuclear targets, have been shown to be at least an order to magnitude less sensitive. Is there room for further experimentation?

  7. Conicoid Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano, Diego J.; Hawkins, Lawrence C.

    2011-01-01

    The first-order equation relating object and image location for a mirror of arbitrary conic-sectional shape is derived. It is also shown that the parabolic reflecting surface is the only one free of aberration and only in the limiting case of distant sources. (Contains 3 figures.)

  8. Mirror Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Richard L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a method of making a mirror support comprising a composite, the composite comprising a plurality of carbon nanotubes, wherein at least two of the plurality of carbon nanotubes are bonded to each other through a bridging moiety bound to each of the two carbon nanotubes, and a laminate comprising the composite.

  9. Time reversal for photoacoustic tomography based on the wave equation of Nachman, Smith, and Waag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowar, Richard

    2014-02-01

    One goal of photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is to estimate an initial pressure function φ from pressure data measured at a boundary surrounding the object of interest. This paper is concerned with a time reversal method for PAT that is based on the dissipative wave equation of Nachman, Smith, and Waag [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 88, 1584 (1990), 10.1121/1.400317]. This equation is a correction of the thermoviscous wave equation such that its solution has a finite wave front speed and, in contrast, it can model several relaxation processes. In this sense, it is more accurate than the thermoviscous wave equation. For simplicity, we focus on the case of one relaxation process. We derive an exact formula for the time reversal image I, which depends on the relaxation time τ1 and the compressibility κ1 of the dissipative medium, and show I (τ1,κ1)→φ for κ1→0. This implies that I =φ holds in the dissipation-free case and that I is similar to φ for sufficiently small compressibility κ1. Moreover, we show for tissue similar to water that the small wave number approximation I0 of the time reversal image satisfies I0=η0*xφ with accent="true">η̂0(|k|)≈const. for |k|≪1/c0τ1, where φ denotes the initial pressure function. For such tissue, our theoretical analysis and numerical simulations show that the time reversal image I is very similar to the initial pressure function φ and that a resolution of σ ≈0.036mm is feasible (for exact measurement data).

  10. Time reversal odd fragmentation functions in semi-inclusive deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulders, P.J. [National Inst. for Nuclear Physics and High Energy Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Levelt, J. [Univ. of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    1994-04-01

    In semi-inclusive scattering of polarized leptons from unpolarized hadrons, one can measure a time reversal odd structure function. It shows up as a sin({phi}) asymmetry of the produced hadrons. This asymmetry can be expressed as the product of a twist-three {open_quotes}hadron {r_arrow} quark{close_quotes} profile function and a time reversal odd twist-two {open_quotes}quark {r_arrow} hadron{close_quotes} fragmentation function. This fragmentation function can only be measured for nonzero transverse momenta of the produced hadron. Its appearance is a consequence of final state interactions between the produced hadron and the rest of the final state.

  11. Time-reversal symmetry breaking superconductivity in the coexistence phase with magnetism in Fe pnictides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Alberto; Fernandes, Rafael M; Chubukov, Andrey V

    2014-10-17

    We argue that superconductivity in the coexistence region with spin-density-wave (SDW) order in weakly doped Fe pnictides erdiffers qualitatively from the ordinary s(+-) state outside the coexistence region as it develops an additional gap component which is a mixture of intrapocket singlet (s(++)) and interpocket spin-triplet pairings (the t state). The coupling constant for the t channel is proportional to the SDW order and involves interactions that do not contribute to superconductivity outside of the SDW region. We argue that the s(+-)- and t-type superconducting orders coexist at low temperatures, and the relative phase between the two is, in general, different from 0 or π, manifesting explicitly the breaking of the time-reversal symmetry promoted by long-range SDW order. We argue that time reversal may get broken even before true superconductivity develops.

  12. Non-Abelian parafermions in time-reversal-invariant interacting helical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Christoph P.; Tiwari, Rakesh P.; Meng, Tobias; Schmidt, Thomas L.

    2015-02-01

    The interplay between bulk spin-orbit coupling and electron-electron interactions produces umklapp scattering in the helical edge states of a two-dimensional topological insulator. If the chemical potential is at the Dirac point, umklapp scattering can open a gap in the edge state spectrum even if the system is time-reversal invariant. We determine the zero-energy bound states at the interfaces between a section of a helical liquid which is gapped out by the superconducting proximity effect and a section gapped out by umklapp scattering. We show that these interfaces pin charges which are multiples of e /2 , giving rise to a Josephson current with 8 π periodicity. Moreover, the bound states, which are protected by time-reversal symmetry, are fourfold degenerate and can be described as Z4 parafermions. We determine their braiding statistics and show how braiding can be implemented in topological insulator systems.

  13. Study of parity and time reversal violation in neutron-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, Yi-Fen; Bowman, J.D.; Frankle, C.M.; Crawford, B.E.

    1994-01-01

    The parity and time-reversal symmetries can be studies in neutron-nucleus interactions. Parity non-conserving asymmetries have been observed for many p-wave resonances in a compound nucleus and measurements were performed on several nuclei in the mass region of A∼100 and A∼230. The statistical model of the compound nucleus provides a theoretical basis for extracting mean-squared matrix elements from the experimental asymmetry data, and for interpreting the mean-squared matrix elements. The constraints on the weak meson-exchange couplings calculated from the compound-nucleus asymmetry data agree qualitatively with the results from few-body and light-nuclei experiments. The tests of time-reversal invariance in various experiments using thermal, epithermal and MeV neutrons are being developed

  14. Acoustic wave focusing in complex media using Nonlinear Time Reversal coded signal processing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dos Santos, S.; Dvořáková, Zuzana; Lints, M.; Kůs, V.; Salupere, A.; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 12 (2014) ISSN 1435-4934. [European Conference on Non-Destructive Testing (ECNDT 2014) /11./. Praha, 06.10.2014-10.10.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : ultrasonic testing (UT) * signal processing * TR- NEWS * nonlinear time reversal * NDT * nonlinear acoustics Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://www.ndt.net/events/ECNDT2014/ app /content/Slides/590_DosSantos_Rev1.pdf

  15. Square root of gerbe holonomy and invariants of time-reversal-symmetric topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawȩdzki, Krzysztof

    2017-10-01

    The Feynman amplitudes with the two-dimensional Wess-Zumino action functional have a geometric interpretation as bundle gerbe holonomy. We present details of the construction of a distinguished square root of such holonomy and of a related 3 d-index and briefly recall the application of those to the building of topological invariants for time-reversal-symmetric two- and three-dimensional crystals, both static and periodically forced.

  16. Characterization of fractures in a carbonate reservoir using walkaway VSP reverse time migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takam Takougang, E. M.; Bouzidi, Y.

    2017-12-01

    We present a case study of fracture characterization in a carbonate reservoir from an Abu Dhabi oil field, using reverse time migration of walkaway VSP data. The data were acquired offshore, in a deviated borehole, with an angle of deviation varying between 0 and 24 degree from the vertical direction. The line had a total length of 9 km with the receivers in the borehole located half-way down. Reverse time migration of the up-going wavefield was used to form a high resolution seismic image for interpretation. The reverse time migration scheme was based on a high-order finite-difference solution to the two-way acoustic wave equation. The seismic depth images of the subsurface were formed by the correlation of the forward propagation and the backward propagation of the acoustic wavefields. The velocity model for reverse time migration was derived by full waveform tomography, using the frequencies 4 to 50 Hz. Fractures were extracted from the seismic image using a workflow based on advance seismic attributes (deep steered attribute, similarity attribute) and the Hough's transform. After filtering the data to minimize any frequency related noise, dip-steered sections that contain seismic dips were computed. Similarity attribute were obtained using the previously computed deep steered attribute, and enabled us to extract features such as subtle faults and fractures. The Hough transform was then used to characterize the linear features (fractures and faults) from the similarity attribute. Based on the rose diagram of the orientation of fractures, it appears that the azimuth of the most characteristic strike direction is approximately 5 degree i.e. roughly north-south while that of the second most characteristic strike direction is approximately 20 degree. A few lines are strongly separated from the previous strike directions and are characterize with an azimuth of approximately 95 degree i.e. almost perpendicular. This implies that the development of fractures in the

  17. Can we Relate Time-Reversal Violation to New Physics Processes in Weak Hadronic Decays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajaltouni, Z. J.; di Salvo, E.

    2013-03-01

    This review paper stresses the possible connection between time-reversal violation and new physics processes beyond the standard model. In particular, this violation is proposed as an alternative to CP violation in the search for such unkown processes. Emphasis is put on the weak decays of heavy hadrons, especially beauty ones. Specific methods for extracting useful parameters from experimental data are elaborated in order to test TR symmetry. These methods could be used successfully in the analysis of the LHC data.

  18. Nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy in symbiosis with time reversal for localization of defects: TR-NEWS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dos Santos, S.; Vejvodová, Šárka; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 2 (2009), s. 14-14 ISSN 1213-3825. [NDT in PROGRESS. 12.11.2009-14.11.2009, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/07/1393; GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI1/274 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) * ESAM * time reversal (TR) * TR-NEWS imaging * tomography * DORT Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  19. What do mirror neurons mirror?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uithol, S.; Rooij, I.J.E.I. van; Bekkering, H.; Haselager, W.F.G.

    2011-01-01

    Single cell recordings in monkeys provide strong evidence for an important role of the motor system in action understanding. This evidence is backed up by data from studies of the (human) mirror neuron system using neuroimaging or TMS techniques, and behavioral experiments. Although the data

  20. Polar Kerr effect studies of time reversal symmetry breaking states in heavy fermion superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schemm, E.R., E-mail: eschemm@alumni.stanford.edu [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Levenson-Falk, E.M. [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kapitulnik, A. [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute of Energy and Materials Science, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Polar Kerr effect (PKE) probes broken time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in superconductors. • Absence of PKE below Tc in CeCoIn{sub 5} is consistent with dx2-y2 order parameter symmetry. • PKE in the B phase of the multiphase superconductor UPt3 agrees with an E2u model. • Data on URu2Si2 show broken TRS and additional structure in the superconducting state. - Abstract: The connection between chiral superconductivity and topological order has emerged as an active direction in research as more instances of both have been identified in condensed matter systems. With the notable exception of {sup 3}He-B, all of the known or suspected chiral – that is to say time-reversal symmetry-breaking (TRSB) – superfluids arise in heavy fermion superconductors, although the vast majority of heavy fermion superconductors preserve time-reversal symmetry. Here we review recent experimental efforts to identify TRSB states in heavy fermion systems via measurement of polar Kerr effect, which is a direct consequence of TRSB.

  1. Experimental angular correlation test of time reversal invariance in neon 19 β decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a new test of time reversal invariance in 19 Ne nuclear β decay are reported. The triple angular correlation was investigated by observing the decay of polarized 19 Ne. This correlation, whose amplitude is given by the R coefficient, should be zero if time reversal is a good symmetry, neglecting final state interactions. 19 Ne was produced on line through the reaction 19 F(p,n) 19 Ne with 12 MeV protons from the Princeton Cyclotron. The sample was polarized through an atomic beam method and the beta polarimetry was performed with four identical Mott scattering polarimeters. The upper limit for the R coefficient, is 0.079 +/- 0.053 marginally consistent with time reversal invariance. This first measurement of this correlation in nuclear β decay puts a corresponding limit on the value of Im (C/sub S/C/sub A/*) of 0.192 +/- 0.128. The quoted errors are purely statistical, one standard deviation errors. The principal systematic errors, both due to final state electromagnetic interactions and instrumental limitations are discussed. The possibilities for improvements in this experiment, principally in the area of more efficient methods of polarizing 19 Ne, which could improve the result by as much as two orders of magnitude, are discussed

  2. Mirror systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.R.

    1985-12-01

    The physics of VUV and x-ray reflection is reviewed. The main functions of mirrors in synchrotron beamlines are stated briefly and include deflection, filtration, power absorption, formation of a real image of the source, focusing, and collimation. Methods of fabrication of optical surfaces are described. Types of imperfections are discussed, including, aberrations, surface figure inaccuracy, roughness, and degradation due to use. Calculation of the photon beam thermal load, including computer modelling, is considered. 50 refs., 7 figs

  3. Position-dependent radiative transfer as a tool for studying Anderson localization: Delay time, time-reversal and coherent backscattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tiggelen, B. A.; Skipetrov, S. E.; Page, J. H.

    2017-05-01

    Previous work has established that the localized regime of wave transport in open media is characterized by a position-dependent diffusion coefficient. In this work we study how the concept of position-dependent diffusion affects the delay time, the transverse confinement, the coherent backscattering, and the time reversal of waves. Definitions of energy transport velocity of localized waves are proposed. We start with a phenomenological model of radiative transfer and then present a novel perturbational approach based on the self-consistent theory of localization. The latter allows us to obtain results relevant for realistic experiments in disordered quasi-1D wave guides and 3D slabs.

  4. Impairments in timing, temporal memory, and reversal learning linked to neurotoxic regimens of methamphetamine intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ruey-Kuang; Etchegaray, Mikel; Meck, Warren H

    2007-12-01

    Methamphetamine intoxication has long-term consequences on dopaminergic function and corticostriatal-mediated behaviors in humans and other animals. In order to determine the potential impact on timing and temporal memory, we examined methamphetamine dose regimens that have been linked to neurotoxicity in adult (8 months) male rats. Rats that were given repetitive, high-dose methamphetamine (3.0 mg/kg ip x 4 injections/2 h) or saline injections were trained on a 2-s vs 8-s bisection procedure using auditory and visual signal durations. Following the high-dose regimen, baseline timing performance was reestablished prior to the rats' receiving reversal training in which the spatial/temporal mapping of the anchor durations (2 s and 8 s) to response options (left or right lever) was reversed. Low-dose methamphetamine (0.5 mg/kg ip) or saline injections were subsequently used to evaluate the effectiveness of the neurotoxic doses in terms of modifying the horizontal leftward shifts associated with increases in clock speed. Overall, the results indicate that MAP intoxication leads to reduced auditory/visual differences in clock speed, deficits in reversal learning, distortions in temporal memory, and lowered dopaminergic regulation of clock speed consistent with damage to prefrontal cortex and corticostriatal circuitry.

  5. Surface micromachined scanning mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Kent Erik

    1992-01-01

    Both aluminum cantilever and torsional scanning mirrors have been fabricated and their static and dynamic properties are studied experimentally and theoretically. The experiments showed resonance frequencies in the range of 163 k-Hz - 632 kHz for cantilever beams with Q values between 5 and 11....... Torsional mirrors showed resonance frequencies in the range of 410 kHz - 667 kHz with Q values of 10 - 17. All measurements performed at atmospheric pressure. Both types of mechanical structures were deflected electrostatically at large angles (± 5°) more than 1011 times without breaking and without any...

  6. Introduction: Mirrors of Passing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seebach, Sophie Hooge; Willerslev, Rane

    Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book, we explore how the world of the dead and the world of the living can intersect; how time and materiality shifts and changes depending on who experiences it. These revelations, based on fiction, provide a mirror through which the reader can experience the varied chapters...

  7. Factors affecting timing of closure and non-reversal of temporary ileostomies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sier, M. F.; van Gelder, L.; Ubbink, D. T.; Bemelman, W. A.; Oostenbroek, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Although stoma closure is considered a simple surgical intervention, the interval between construction and reversal is often prolonged, and some ileostomies may never be reversed. We evaluated possible predictors for non-reversal and prolonged interval between construction and reversal. In a cohort

  8. Electromagnetic Time-Reversal Imaging and Tracking Techniques for Inverse Scattering and Wireless Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouda, Ahmed E.

    Time-reversal (TR) was originated in acoustics as a technique for re-focusing waves around their source location. Under certain conditions, the wave equation is invariant under TR, therefore, waves emanated from a source or scattered from a passive target, and recorded by a transceivers array, will retrace their forward path and automatically focus at the source/target location if back propagated in a time-reversed (last-in first-out) fashion from that array. Focusing resolution of time-reversed back propagation in rich scattering environments beats that in free space, yielding what is known as 'superresolution'. Moreover, under ultrawideband (UWB) operation, TR exhibits the distinctive property of 'statistical stability', which makes it an attractive technique for imaging in disordered media whose characteristics are not known deterministically (random media). Over the past few years, TR has been exploited in a variety of electromagnetic sensing and imaging applications such as ground penetrating radar, breast cancer detection, nondestructive testing, and through-wall imaging. In addition, TR has been extensively applied in UWB wireless communication providing myriad of advantages including reduced receiver complexity, power saving, increased system capacity, and enhanced information secrecy. In this work, we introduce new TR-based signal processing techniques for imaging, tracking, and communicating with targets/users embedded in rich scattering environments. We start by demonstrating, both numerically and experimentally, the statistical stability of UWB TR imaging in inhomogeneous random media, under different combinations of random medium parameters and interrogating signal properties. We examine conditions under which frequency decorrelation in random media provides a more effective 'self-averaging' and therefore better statistical stability. Then, we devise a technique for detecting and tracking multiple moving targets in cluttered environments based on

  9. First passage times for multiple particles with reversible target-binding kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the first passage problem for multiple particles that diffuse towards a target, partially adsorb there, and then desorb after a finite exponentially distributed residence time. We search for the first time when m particles undergoing such reversible target-binding kinetics are found simultaneously on the target that may trigger an irreversible chemical reaction or a biophysical event. Even if the particles are independent, the finite residence time on the target yields an intricate temporal coupling between particles. We compute analytically the mean first passage time (MFPT) for two independent particles by mapping the original problem to higher-dimensional surface-mediated diffusion and solving the coupled partial differential equations. The respective effects of the adsorption and desorption rates on the MFPT are revealed and discussed.

  10. A Robust Pre-Filter and Power Loading Design for Time Reversal UWB Systems over Time-Correlated MIMO Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Alizadeh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Conventional Time Reversal (TR technique suffers from performance degradation in time varying Multiple-Input Multiple-Output Ultra-Wideband (MIMO-UWB systems due to outdating Channel State Information (CSI over time progressions. That is, the outdated CSI degrades the TR performance significantly in time varying channels. The correlation property of time correlated channels can improve the TR performance against other traditional TR designs. Based on this property, at first, we propose a robust TR-MIMO-UWB system design for a time-varying channel in which the CSI is updated only at the beginning of each block of data where the CSI is assumed to be known. As the channel varies over time, pre-processor blindly pre-equalizes the channel during the next symbol time by using the correlation property. Then, a novel recursive power allocation strategy is derived over time-correlated time-varying TR-MIMO-UWB channels. We show that the proposed power loading technique, considerably improves the BER performance of TR-MIMO-UWB system in imperfect CSI with robust pre-filter. The proposed algorithms lead to a cost-efficient CSI updating procedure for the TR optimization. Simulation results are provided to confirm the new design performance against traditional method.

  11. Testing for microscopic reversibility in the gating of maxi K+ channels using two-dimensional dwell-time distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, L; Magleby, K L

    1994-07-01

    An assumption usually made when developing kinetic models for the gating of ion channels is that the transitions among the various states involved in the gating obey microscopic reversibility. If this assumption is incorrect, then the models and estimated rate constants made with the assumption would be in error. This paper examines whether the gating of a large conductance Ca-activated K+ channel in skeletal muscle is consistent with microscopic reversibility. If microscopic reversibility is obeyed, then the number of forward and backward transitions per unit time for each individual reaction step will, on average, be identical and, consequently, the gating must show time reversibility. To look for time reversibility, two-dimensional dwell-time distributions of the durations of open and closed intervals were obtained from single-channel current records analyzed in the forward and in the backward directions. Two-dimensional dwell-time distributions of pairs of open intervals and of pairs of closed intervals were also analyzed to extend the resolution of the method to special circumstances in which intervals from different closed (or open) states might have similar durations. No significant differences were observed between the forward and backward analysis of the two-dimensional dwell-time distributions, suggesting time reversibility. Thus, we find no evidence to indicate that the gating of the maxi K+ channel violates microscopic reversibility.

  12. Demonstrating trend reversal of groundwater quality in relation to time of recharge determined by 3H/3He

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.; Broers, H.P.; Grift, B. van der; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2007-01-01

    Recent EU legislation is directed to reverse the upward trends in the concentrations of agricultural pollutants in groundwater. However, uncertainty of the groundwater travel time towards the screens of the groundwater quality monitoring networks complicates the demonstration of trend reversal. We

  13. New development for the reverse time of flight analysis of spectra measured using Fourier Diffractometer Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Maayouf, R M A

    2002-01-01

    The present work introduces a new design to replace the (Finnish make) reverse time of flight (RTOF) analyzer used for the Fourier diffractometer facilities. The new design applies a data acquisition system, a special interface card and software program installed in a PC computer, to perform the cross-correlation functions between signals received from the chopper-decoder and detector. It has been found from test measurements performed with the Cairo Fourier diffractometer facility (CFDF) and the similar high resolution one at JINR (Dubna-Russia) that the new design can successfully replace the Finnish make RTOF analyzer.

  14. Search for Time Reversal Violation in Neutron Decay: A Measurement of the Transverse Polarization of Electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodek, K.; Kaczmarek, A.; Kistryn, St.; Kuzniak, M.; Zejma, J.; Pulut, J.; Kirch, K.; Bialek, A.; Kozela, A.; Ban, G.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Gorel, P.; Beck, M.; Lindroth, A.; Severijns, N.; Stephan, E.; Czarnecki, A.

    2006-01-01

    A non-zero value of the R-correlation coefficient due to the e - polarization component, perpendicular to the plane spanned by the spin of the decaying neutron and the electron momentum, would signal a violation of time reversal symmetry and thus physics beyond the Standard Model. The value of the N-correlation coefficient, given by the transverse e - polarization component within that plane, is expected to be finite. The measurement of N serves as an important systematic check of the apparatus for the R-measurement. The first phase of data taking has been completed. Preliminary results from a limited data sample show no deviations from the Standard Model predictions

  15. In situ calibration of acoustic emission transducers by time reversal method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kober, Jan; Převorovský, Zdeněk; Chlada, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 240, April (2016), s. 50-56 ISSN 0924-4247 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : time reversed acoustics * calibration * in situ * acoustic emission Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 2.499, year: 2016 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0924424716300334/1-s2.0-S0924424716300334-main.pdf?_tid=0acf4736-ef6d-11e5-b826-00000aacb362&acdnat=1458568911_1c21eda9762b905a684ff939463ef3fe

  16. Mesoscopic fluctuations in disordered superconductors with broken time-reversal symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Shinsei; Furusaki, Akira; Ludwig, Andreas; Mudry, Christopher

    2005-03-01

    The mesoscopic regime in the problem of Anderson localization is a scaling regime in which disorder effects remain weak. It can be realized in quasi-one and higher dimensional systems. Fluctuations in the global density of states, the local density of states, as well as in the conductance were first studied for conventional metals in the pioneering works of Stone and Lee on the one hand, and Altshuler, Kravtsov, and Lerner, on the other hand. Here we extend the analysis of the conductance fluctuations by Altshuler, Kravtsov, and Lerner to dirty superconductors with broken time-reversal symmetry in near two spatial dimensions.

  17. Noncolocated Time-Reversal MUSIC: High-SNR Distribution of Null Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuonzo, Domenico; Rossi, Pierluigi Salvo

    2017-04-01

    We derive the asymptotic distribution of the null spectrum of the well-known Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC) in its computational Time-Reversal (TR) form. The result pertains to a single-frequency non-colocated multistatic scenario and several TR-MUSIC variants are here investigated. The analysis builds upon the 1st-order perturbation of the singular value decomposition and allows a simple characterization of null-spectrum moments (up to the 2nd order). This enables a comparison in terms of spectrums stability. Finally, a numerical analysis is provided to confirm the theoretical findings.

  18. Stress corrosion crack depth investigation using the time reversed elastic nonlinearity diagnostic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian E; Pieczonka, Lukasz; Remillieux, Marcel C; Ulrich, Timothy J; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2017-01-01

    Evidence of the ability to probe depth information of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) are presented using the time reversed elastic nonlinearity diagnostic (TREND). Depth estimation of SCC is important to determine when a stainless steel canister has been breached. TREND is a method to focus elastic energy to a point in space in order to probe that point for damage and its' depth penetration is used here to study depth information about SCC. High frequencies are used to probe near the surface, while low frequencies are used to probe deeper into a stainless steel section of a cylinder.

  19. Measuring the spin Chern number in time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dan-Wei, E-mail: zdanwei@126.com [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, SPTE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Cao, Shuai, E-mail: shuaicao2004@163.com [Department of Applied Physics, College of Electronic Engineering, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 China (China)

    2016-10-14

    We propose an experimental scheme to directly measure the spin Chern number of the time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter model in optical lattices. We first show that this model can be realized by using ultracold Fermi atoms with two pseudo-spin states encoded by the internal Zeeman states in a square optical lattice and the corresponding topological Bloch bands are characterized by the spin Chern number. We then propose and numerically demonstrate that this topological invariant can be extracted from the shift of the hybrid Wannier center in the optical lattice. By spin-resolved in situ detection of the atomic densities along the transverse direction combined with time-of-flight measurement along another spatial direction, the spin Chern number in this system is directly measured. - Highlights: • The cold-atom optical-lattice scheme for realizing the time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter model is proposed. • The intrinsic spin Chern number related to the hybrid Wannier center in the optical lattice is investigated. • Direct measurement of the spin Chern number in the proposed system is theoretically demonstrated.

  20. Flow rate estimation using acoustic field distortions caused by turbulent flows: time-reversal approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, A L; Perez, N; Adamowski, J C, E-mail: zimmer09@gmail.com [Department of Mechatronics and Mechanical Systems Engineering, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, 05508-10 (Brazil)

    2011-05-01

    A new acoustic technique for flow rate estimation is proposed here. This technique is based on the traditional ultrasonic cross-correlation flow meter, but instead of using a continuous wave or pulse trains in each transmitter-receiver pair, the acoustic time-reversal technique is applied. The system relies on the principle that a turbulent flow with multiple vortices will cause random distortions in a given acoustic field; hence, analyzing this noise caused in the ultrasound signal by the turbulence over time allows a 'signature' or 'tag' of the flow to be defined. In other words, the vortices modify the frequency response function of the flowing system uniquely, since the distortion is assumed to be random. The use of the time-reversal procedure in the cross-correlation flow meter provides improvements in several aspects: it simplifies the signal processing needed after the reception of the signals, avoiding the use of a demodulator to obtain the signature of the vortex; the signal is focused at the position of the reception transducer and; the sensitivity is also increased because the wave travels twice in the acoustic channel. The method is theoretically discussed showing its limitations and improvements. Experimental results in a laboratory water tank are also presented.

  1. Testing supersymmetry in weak decays by means of time reversal invariance

    CERN Document Server

    Christova, E C

    1993-01-01

    The minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model allows for some of the coupling strengths to be complex parameters. The presence of such imaginary phases can lead to violations of time reversal invariance, which can be tested if correlations in products of an odd number of polarizations and momenta are measured and found to be different from zero. As an example, we consider the triple product $\\mbox{\\bf J} \\cdot \\left(\\mbox{\\bf p}_1 \\times \\mbox{\\bf p}_ {2} \\right)$ in the $\\beta$-decay of the neutron, of the $\\Sigma^-$, and in the decay $K^{+}_{3\\mu}$. For these low-energy decays, we find that the present experimental precision is not enough to provide useful bounds on combinations of such phases and the masses of the supersymmetric particles. At higher energies, the same time reversal violating correlation in the semileptonic decay of the $t$ quark is of the order of $\\alpha_s/\\pi$, made bigger by the large mass of the decaying quark.

  2. A Current-Mode Detector for Use in NOPTREX Time Reversal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaper, Danielle; Noptrex Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Searches for new sources of time reversal (T) violation are one of the highest intellectual priorities in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics. The Neutron Optics Time Reversal Experiment (NOPTREX) Collaboration aims to conduct a sensitive null-test search for T-violation in polarized neutron transmission through a polarized nuclear target which possesses low-energy p-wave resonances. We are developing a low-noise current-mode neutron detector with near-unit efficiency and fast time response to resolve the resonance shapes. This talk will discuss the design of the detector as well as test measurements taken on indium and tantalum resonances at the NOBORU test beam at the Japan Proton Accelerator Complex (J-PARC) in June 2017 using a set of prototypical detectors, analog electronics, and data acquisition module. We will also briefly discuss plans for an experiment at LANSCE to measure the P-odd asymmetry in the 0.734 eV p-wave resonance in 139La to 1. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Award Number DE-SC-0014622. We would also like to acknowledge support by the NSF GRFP under Grant 1247392.

  3. Analytical reverse time migration: An innovation in imaging of infrastructures using ultrasonic shear waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadollahi, Aziz; Khazanovich, Lev

    2018-04-11

    The emergence of ultrasonic dry point contact (DPC) transducers that emit horizontal shear waves has enabled efficient collection of high-quality data in the context of a nondestructive evaluation of concrete structures. This offers an opportunity to improve the quality of evaluation by adapting advanced imaging techniques. Reverse time migration (RTM) is a simulation-based reconstruction technique that offers advantages over conventional methods, such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique. RTM is capable of imaging boundaries and interfaces with steep slopes and the bottom boundaries of inclusions and defects. However, this imaging technique requires a massive amount of memory and its computation cost is high. In this study, both bottlenecks of the RTM are resolved when shear transducers are used for data acquisition. An analytical approach was developed to obtain the source and receiver wavefields needed for imaging using reverse time migration. It is shown that the proposed analytical approach not only eliminates the high memory demand, but also drastically reduces the computation time from days to minutes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The double-slit experiment and the time-reversed fire alarm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halabi, T.

    2010-01-01

    When both slits of the double-slit experiment are open, closing one paradoxically increases the detection rate at some points on the detection screen. Feynman famously warned that temptation to understand such a puzzling feature only draws into blind alleys. Nevertheless, we gain insight into this feature by drawing an analogy between the double-slit experiment and a time-reversed fire alarm. Much as closing the slit increases probability of a future detection, ruling out fire drill scenarios, having heard the fire alarm, increases probability of a past fire (using Bayesian inference). Classically, Bayesian inference is associated with computing probabilities of past events. We therefore identify this feature of the double-slit experiment with a time-reversed thermodynamic arrow. We believe that much of the enigma of quantum mechanics is simply due to some variation of time's arrow. In further support of this, we employ a plausible formulation of the thermodynamic arrow to derive an uncertainty in classical mechanics that is reminiscent of quantum uncertainty.

  5. [Mirror therapy in hemiplegic patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisalde-Rodríguez, María Elena; Garcia-Fernández, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Mirror therapy is a relatively new intervention, every time more used and with easy access for the rehabilitation treatment of stroke patient. The patient moves the unaffected limb in front of a mirror watching the reflection of that move as if he was moving de affected limb. To analyze the effectiveness of mirror therapy in the sensorimotor function, hemineglect and activities of daily living of stroke patients. We defined a strategy of bibliography search in Medline, EMBASE, PEDro y Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) looking for randomised controlled trials (RCT) conducted with hemiplegic patients considering mirror therapy as the main rehabilitation intervention. Seven trials met the inclusion criteria with medium-high methodological quality. Most of them evaluate the mirror therapy effect on motor outcomes showing significant improvements. Three of this RCTs evaluate the effect of mirror therapy on the hemineglect with positive result. A combination of mirror therapy with conventional rehabilitation obtained significant improvements mainly in motor function but not that much on sensory function and functional performance. About the effect of mirror therapy on hemineglect, there are significant improvements but supported only with a few RCTs with small sample sizes producing promising but inconclusive results.

  6. First direct observation of time-reversal non-invariance in the neutral-kaon system

    CERN Document Server

    Angelopoulos, Angelos; Aslanides, Elie; Backenstoss, Gerhard; Bargassa, P; Behnke, O; Benelli, A; Bertin, V; Blanc, F; Bloch, P; Carlson, P J; Carroll, M; Cawley, E; Chertok, M B; Danielsson, M; Dejardin, M; Derré, J; Ealet, A; Eleftheriadis, C; Faravel, L; Fetscher, W; Fidecaro, Maria; Filipcic, A; Francis, D; Fry, J; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Gerber, H J; Go, A; Haselden, A; Hayman, P J; Henry-Coüannier, F; Hollander, R W; Jon-And, K; Kettle, P R; Kokkas, P; Kreuger, R; Le Gac, R; Leimgruber, F; Mandic, I; Manthos, N; Marel, Gérard; Mikuz, M; Miller, J; Montanet, François; Müller, A; Nakada, Tatsuya; Pagels, B; Papadopoulos, I M; Pavlopoulos, P; Polivka, G; Rickenbach, R; Roberts, B L; Ruf, T; Santoni, C; Schäfer, M; Schaller, L A; Schietinger, T; Schopper, A; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thibault, C; Touchard, F; Touramanis, C; van Eijk, C W E; Vlachos, S; Weber, P; Wigger, O; Wolter, M; Zavrtanik, D; Zimmerman, D

    1998-01-01

    We report on the first observation of time-reversal symmetry violation through a comparison of the probabilities of $\\bar{K}^0$ transforming into $K^0$ and $K^0$ into $\\bar{K}^0$ as a function of the neutral-kaon eigentime $t$. The comparison is based on the analysis of the neutral-kaon semileptonic decays recorded in the CPLEAR experiment. There, the strangeness of the neutral kaon at time $t=0$ was tagged by the kaon charge in the reaction $p\\bar{p} \\rightarrow K^{\\pm} \\pi^{\\mp} K^0(\\bar{K}^0)$ at rest, whereas the strangeness of the kaon at the decay time $t=\\tau$ was tagged by the lepton charge in the final state. An average decay-rate asymmetry \\begin{equation*} \\langle^{R(\\bar{K}^0_{t=0} \\to e^+\\pi^-\

  7. Lateral Casimir-Polder forces by breaking time-reversal symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Weernink, Ricardo R. Q. P. T.; Barcellona, Pablo; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2018-03-01

    We examine the lateral Casimir-Polder force acting on a circular rotating emitter near a dielectric plane surface. As the circular motion breaks time-reversal symmetry, the spontaneous emission in a direction parallel to the surface is in general anisotropic. We show that a lateral force arises which can be interpreted as a recoil force because of this asymmetric emission. The force is an oscillating function of the distance between the emitter and the surface, and the lossy character of the dielectric strongly influences the results in the near-field regime. The force exhibits also a population-induced dynamics, decaying exponentially with respect to time on time scales of the inverse of the spontaneous decay rate. We propose that this effect could be detected measuring the velocity acquired by the emitter, following different cycles of excitation and spontaneous decay. Our results are expressed in terms of the Green's tensor and can therefore easily be applied to more complex geometries.

  8. Application of time-reversal-based processing techniques to enhance detection of GPR targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Vinicius Rafael N.; Teixeira, Fernando L.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we analyze the performance of time-reversal (TR) techniques in conjunction with various Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) pre-processing methods aimed at improving detection of subsurface targets. TR techniques were first developed for ultrasound applications and, by exploiting the invariance of the wave equation under time reversal, can yield features such as superresolution and statistical stability. The TR method was examined here using both synthetic and actual GPR field data under four different pre-processing strategies on the raw data, namely: mean background removal, eigenvalue background removal, a sliding-window space-frequency technique, and a noise-robust spatial differentiator along the scan direction. Depending on the acquisition mode, it was possible to determine with good precision the position and depth of the studied targets as well as, in some cases, to differentiate the targets from nearby clutter such as localized geological anomalies. The proposed methodology has the potential to be useful when applied to GPR data for the detection of buried targets.

  9. Microseismic reverse time migration with a multi-cross-correlation staining algorithm for fracture imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Congcong; Jia, Xiaofeng; Liu, Shishuo; Zhang, Jie

    2018-02-01

    Accurate characterization of hydraulic fracturing zones is currently becoming increasingly important in production optimization, since hydraulic fracturing may increase the porosity and permeability of the reservoir significantly. Recently, the feasibility of the reverse time migration (RTM) method has been studied for the application in imaging fractures during borehole microseismic monitoring. However, strong low-frequency migration noise, poorly illuminated areas, and the low signal to noise ratio (SNR) data can degrade the imaging results. To improve the quality of the images, we propose a multi-cross-correlation staining algorithm to incorporate into the microseismic reverse time migration for imaging fractures using scattered data. Under the modified RTM method, our results are revealed in two images: one is the improved RTM image using the multi-cross-correlation condition, and the other is an image of the target region using the generalized staining algorithm. The numerical examples show that, compared with the conventional RTM, our method can significantly improve the spatial resolution of images, especially for the image of target region.

  10. Thermoelectrics of Interacting Nanosystems—Exploiting Superselection Instead of Time-Reversal Symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Schulenborg

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermoelectric transport is traditionally analyzed using relations imposed by time-reversal symmetry, ranging from Onsager’s results to fluctuation relations in counting statistics. In this paper, we show that a recently discovered duality relation for fermionic systems—deriving from the fundamental fermion-parity superselection principle of quantum many-particle systems—provides new insights into thermoelectric transport. Using a master equation, we analyze the stationary charge and heat currents through a weakly coupled, but strongly interacting single-level quantum dot subject to electrical and thermal bias. In linear transport, the fermion-parity duality shows that features of thermoelectric response coefficients are actually dominated by the average and fluctuations of the charge in a dual quantum dot system, governed by attractive instead of repulsive electron-electron interaction. In the nonlinear regime, the duality furthermore relates most transport coefficients to much better understood equilibrium quantities. Finally, we naturally identify the fermion-parity as the part of the Coulomb interaction relevant for both the linear and nonlinear Fourier heat. Altogether, our findings hence reveal that next to time-reversal, the duality imposes equally important symmetry restrictions on thermoelectric transport. As such, it is also expected to simplify computations and clarify the physical understanding for more complex systems than the simplest relevant interacting nanostructure model studied here.

  11. Imaging Faults with Reverse-Time Migration for Geothermal Exploration at Jemez Pueblo in New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albrecht, Michael [TBA Power; Kaufman, Greg [Jemez Purblo; Kelley, Shari [NM Bureau of Geology and Mineral Researces; Rehfeldt, Kenneth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Zhifu [EES-17 visitor

    2011-01-01

    The fault zones at Jemez Pueblo may dominate the flow paths of hot water, or confine the boundaries of the geothermal reservoir. Therefore, it is crucial to image the geometry of these fault zones for geothermal exploration in the area. We use reverse-time migration with a separation imaging condition to image the faults at Jemez Pueblo. A finite-difference full-wave equation method with a perfectly-matching-layer absorbing boundary condition is used for backward propagation of seismic reflection data from receivers and forward propagation of wavefields from sources. In the imaging region, the wavefields are separated into the upgoing and downgoing waves, and leftgoing and rightgoing waves. The upgoing and downgoing waves are used to obtain the downward-looking image, and the leftgoing and rightgoing waves are used to form the left-looking image and right-looking image from sources. The left-looking and right-looking images are normally weaker than the downward-looking image because the reflections from the fault zones are much weaker than those from sedimentary layers, but these migration results contain the images of the faults. We apply our reverse-time migration with a wavefield separation imaging condition to seismic data acquired at Jemez Pueblo, and our preliminary results reveal many faults in the area.

  12. Deterministic time-reversible thermostats: chaos, ergodicity, and the zeroth law of thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Puneet Kumar; Sprott, Julien Clinton; Hoover, William Graham; Griswold Hoover, Carol

    2015-09-01

    The relative stability and ergodicity of deterministic time-reversible thermostats, both singly and in coupled pairs, are assessed through their Lyapunov spectra. Five types of thermostat are coupled to one another through a single Hooke's-law harmonic spring. The resulting dynamics shows that three specific thermostat types, Hoover-Holian, Ju-Bulgac, and Martyna-Klein-Tuckerman, have very similar Lyapunov spectra in their equilibrium four-dimensional phase spaces and when coupled in equilibrium or nonequilibrium pairs. All three of these oscillator-based thermostats are shown to be ergodic, with smooth analytic Gaussian distributions in their extended phase spaces (coordinate, momentum, and two control variables). Evidently these three ergodic and time-reversible thermostat types are particularly useful as statistical-mechanical thermometers and thermostats. Each of them generates Gibbs' universal canonical distribution internally as well as for systems to which they are coupled. Thus they obey the zeroth law of thermodynamics, as a good heat bath should. They also provide dissipative heat flow with relatively small nonlinearity when two or more such temperature baths interact and provide useful deterministic replacements for the stochastic Langevin equation.

  13. The time-reversal- and parity-violating nuclear potential in chiral effective theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, C.M. [Instituto de Matematica, Estatistica e Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Campus Carreiros, PO Box 474, 96201-900 Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Mereghetti, E., E-mail: emanuele@physics.arizona.edu [Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Vries, J. de [KVI, Theory Group, University of Groningen, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); Kolck, U. van [Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    We derive the parity- and time-reversal-violating nuclear interactions stemming from the QCD {theta}{sup Macron} term and quark/gluon operators of effective dimension 6: quark electric dipole moments, quark and gluon chromo-electric dipole moments, and two four-quark operators. We work in the framework of two-flavor chiral perturbation theory, where a systematic expansion is possible. The different chiral-transformation properties of the sources of time-reversal violation lead to different hadronic interactions. For all sources considered the leading-order potential involves known one-pion exchange, but its specific form and the relative importance of short-range interactions depend on the source. For the {theta}{sup Macron} term, the leading potential is solely given by one-pion exchange, which does not contribute to the deuteron electric dipole moment. In subleading order, a new two-pion-exchange potential is obtained. Its short-range component is indistinguishable from one of two undetermined contact interactions that appear at the same order and represent effects of heavier mesons and other short-range QCD dynamics. One-pion-exchange corrections at this order are discussed as well.

  14. Signatures of a time-reversal symmetric Weyl semimetal with only four Weyl points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belopolski, Ilya; Yu, Peng; Sanchez, Daniel S; Ishida, Yukiaki; Chang, Tay-Rong; Zhang, Songtian S; Xu, Su-Yang; Zheng, Hao; Chang, Guoqing; Bian, Guang; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Kondo, Takeshi; Lin, Hsin; Liu, Zheng; Shin, Shik; Hasan, M Zahid

    2017-10-16

    Through intense research on Weyl semimetals during the past few years, we have come to appreciate that typical Weyl semimetals host many Weyl points. Nonetheless, the minimum nonzero number of Weyl points allowed in a time-reversal invariant Weyl semimetal is four. Realizing such a system is of fundamental interest and may simplify transport experiments. Recently, it was predicted that TaIrTe 4 realizes a minimal Weyl semimetal. However, the Weyl points and Fermi arcs live entirely above the Fermi level, making them inaccessible to conventional angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Here, we use pump-probe ARPES to directly access the band structure above the Fermi level in TaIrTe 4 . We observe signatures of Weyl points and topological Fermi arcs. Combined with ab initio calculation, our results show that TaIrTe 4 is a Weyl semimetal with the minimum number of four Weyl points. Our work provides a simpler platform for accessing exotic transport phenomena arising in Weyl semimetals.Weyl semimetals are interesting because they are characterized by topological invariants, but specific examples discovered to date tend to have complicated band structures with many Weyl points. Here, the authors show that TaIrTe 4 has only four Weyl points, the minimal number required by time-reversal symmetry.

  15. Attenuation compensation for least-squares reverse time migration using the viscoacoustic-wave equation

    KAUST Repository

    Dutta, Gaurav

    2014-10-01

    Strong subsurface attenuation leads to distortion of amplitudes and phases of seismic waves propagating inside the earth. Conventional acoustic reverse time migration (RTM) and least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) do not account for this distortion, which can lead to defocusing of migration images in highly attenuative geologic environments. To correct for this distortion, we used a linearized inversion method, denoted as Qp-LSRTM. During the leastsquares iterations, we used a linearized viscoacoustic modeling operator for forward modeling. The adjoint equations were derived using the adjoint-state method for back propagating the residual wavefields. The merit of this approach compared with conventional RTM and LSRTM was that Qp-LSRTM compensated for the amplitude loss due to attenuation and could produce images with better balanced amplitudes and more resolution below highly attenuative layers. Numerical tests on synthetic and field data illustrated the advantages of Qp-LSRTM over RTM and LSRTM when the recorded data had strong attenuation effects. Similar to standard LSRTM, the sensitivity tests for background velocity and Qp errors revealed that the liability of this method is the requirement for smooth and accurate migration velocity and attenuation models.

  16. The influence of reading expertise in mirror-letter perception: Evidence from beginning and expert readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duñabeitia, Jon Andoni; Dimitropoulou, María; Estévez, Adelina; Carreiras, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The visual word recognition system recruits neuronal systems originally developed for object perception which are characterized by orientation insensitivity to mirror reversals. It has been proposed that during reading acquisition beginning readers have to “unlearn” this natural tolerance to mirror reversals in order to efficiently discriminate letters and words. Therefore, it is supposed that this unlearning process takes place in a gradual way and that reading expertise modulates mirror-letter discrimination. However, to date no supporting evidence for this has been obtained. We present data from an eye-movement study that investigated the degree of sensitivity to mirror-letters in a group of beginning readers and a group of expert readers. Participants had to decide which of the two strings presented on a screen corresponded to an auditorily presented word. Visual displays always included the correct target word and one distractor word. Results showed that those distractors that were the same as the target word except for the mirror lateralization of two internal letters attracted participants’ attention more than distractors created by replacement of two internal letters. Interestingly, the time course of the effects was found to be different for the two groups, with beginning readers showing a greater tolerance (decreased sensitivity) to mirror-letters than expert readers. Implications of these findings are discussed within the framework of preceding evidence showing how reading expertise modulates letter identification. PMID:24273596

  17. X-ray beam-shaping via deformable mirrors: Analytical computation of the required mirror profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiga, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.spiga@brera.inaf.it [INAF/Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807, Merate (Italy); Raimondi, Lorenzo; Svetina, Cristian [Sincrotrone Trieste ScpA, S.S. 14 km 163.5 in Area Science Park, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Zangrando, Marco [Sincrotrone Trieste ScpA, S.S. 14 km 163.5 in Area Science Park, 34149 Trieste (Italy); IOM-CNR, S.S. 14 km 163.5 in Area Science Park, 34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2013-05-11

    X-ray mirrors with high focusing performances are in use in both mirror modules for X-ray telescopes and in synchrotron and FEL (Free Electron Laser) beamlines. A degradation of the focus sharpness arises in general from geometrical deformations and surface roughness, the former usually described by geometrical optics and the latter by physical optics. In general, technological developments are aimed at a very tight focusing, which requires the mirror profile to comply with the nominal shape as much as possible and to keep the roughness at a negligible level. However, a deliberate deformation of the mirror can be made to endow the focus with a desired size and distribution, via piezo actuators as done at the EIS-TIMEX beamline of FERMI@Elettra. The resulting profile can be characterized with a Long Trace Profilometer and correlated with the expected optical quality via a wavefront propagation code. However, if the roughness contribution can be neglected, the computation can be performed via a ray-tracing routine, and, under opportune assumptions, the focal spot profile (the Point Spread Function, PSF) can even be predicted analytically. The advantage of this approach is that the analytical relation can be reversed; i.e., from the desired PSF the required mirror profile can be computed easily, thereby avoiding the use of complex and time-consuming numerical codes. The method can also be suited in the case of spatially inhomogeneous beam intensities, as commonly experienced at synchrotrons and FELs. In this work we expose the analytical method and the application to the beam shaping problem.

  18. X-ray beam-shaping via deformable mirrors: Analytical computation of the required mirror profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiga, Daniele; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Svetina, Cristian; Zangrando, Marco

    2013-01-01

    X-ray mirrors with high focusing performances are in use in both mirror modules for X-ray telescopes and in synchrotron and FEL (Free Electron Laser) beamlines. A degradation of the focus sharpness arises in general from geometrical deformations and surface roughness, the former usually described by geometrical optics and the latter by physical optics. In general, technological developments are aimed at a very tight focusing, which requires the mirror profile to comply with the nominal shape as much as possible and to keep the roughness at a negligible level. However, a deliberate deformation of the mirror can be made to endow the focus with a desired size and distribution, via piezo actuators as done at the EIS-TIMEX beamline of FERMI@Elettra. The resulting profile can be characterized with a Long Trace Profilometer and correlated with the expected optical quality via a wavefront propagation code. However, if the roughness contribution can be neglected, the computation can be performed via a ray-tracing routine, and, under opportune assumptions, the focal spot profile (the Point Spread Function, PSF) can even be predicted analytically. The advantage of this approach is that the analytical relation can be reversed; i.e., from the desired PSF the required mirror profile can be computed easily, thereby avoiding the use of complex and time-consuming numerical codes. The method can also be suited in the case of spatially inhomogeneous beam intensities, as commonly experienced at synchrotrons and FELs. In this work we expose the analytical method and the application to the beam shaping problem

  19. Anomalous transport in mirror systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    As now being explored for fusion applications confinement systems based on the mirror principle embody two kinds of plasma regimes. These two regimes are: (a) high-beta plasmas, stabilized against MHD and other low frequency plasma instabilities by magnetic-well fields, but characterized by non-Maxwellian ion distributions; (b) near-Maxwellian plasmas, confined electrostatically (as in the tandem mirror) or in a field-reversed region within the mirror cell. Common to both situations are the questions of anomalous transport owing to high frequency instabilities in the non-maxwellian portions of the plasmas. This report will summarize the status of theory and of experimental data bearing on these questions, with particular reference to the high temperature regimes of interest for fusion power

  20. Fractional Spin and Josephson Effect in Time-Reversal-Invariant Topological Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camjayi, Alberto; Arrachea, Liliana; Aligia, Armando; von Oppen, Felix

    2017-07-01

    Time-reversal-invariant topological superconducting (TRITOPS) wires are known to host a fractional spin ℏ/4 at their ends. We investigate how this fractional spin affects the Josephson current in a TRITOPS-quantum dot-TRITOPS Josephson junction, describing the wire in a model that can be tuned between a topological and a nontopological phase. We compute the equilibrium Josephson current of the full model by continuous-time Monte Carlo simulations and interpret the results within an effective low-energy theory. We show that in the topological phase, the 0-to-π transition is quenched via formation of a spin singlet from the quantum-dot spin and the fractional spins associated with the two adjacent topological superconductors.

  1. Digital Sequences and a Time Reversal-Based Impact Region Imaging and Localization Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Qian, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    To reduce time and cost of damage inspection, on-line impact monitoring of aircraft composite structures is needed. A digital monitor based on an array of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) is developed to record the impact region of impacts on-line. It is small in size, lightweight and has low power consumption, but there are two problems with the impact alarm region localization method of the digital monitor at the current stage. The first one is that the accuracy rate of the impact alarm region localization is low, especially on complex composite structures. The second problem is that the area of impact alarm region is large when a large scale structure is monitored and the number of PZTs is limited which increases the time and cost of damage inspections. To solve the two problems, an impact alarm region imaging and localization method based on digital sequences and time reversal is proposed. In this method, the frequency band of impact response signals is estimated based on the digital sequences first. Then, characteristic signals of impact response signals are constructed by sinusoidal modulation signals. Finally, the phase synthesis time reversal impact imaging method is adopted to obtain the impact region image. Depending on the image, an error ellipse is generated to give out the final impact alarm region. A validation experiment is implemented on a complex composite wing box of a real aircraft. The validation results show that the accuracy rate of impact alarm region localization is approximately 100%. The area of impact alarm region can be reduced and the number of PZTs needed to cover the same impact monitoring region is reduced by more than a half. PMID:24084123

  2. Digital sequences and a time reversal-based impact region imaging and localization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Qian, Weifeng

    2013-10-01

    To reduce time and cost of damage inspection, on-line impact monitoring of aircraft composite structures is needed. A digital monitor based on an array of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) is developed to record the impact region of impacts on-line. It is small in size, lightweight and has low power consumption, but there are two problems with the impact alarm region localization method of the digital monitor at the current stage. The first one is that the accuracy rate of the impact alarm region localization is low, especially on complex composite structures. The second problem is that the area of impact alarm region is large when a large scale structure is monitored and the number of PZTs is limited which increases the time and cost of damage inspections. To solve the two problems, an impact alarm region imaging and localization method based on digital sequences and time reversal is proposed. In this method, the frequency band of impact response signals is estimated based on the digital sequences first. Then, characteristic signals of impact response signals are constructed by sinusoidal modulation signals. Finally, the phase synthesis time reversal impact imaging method is adopted to obtain the impact region image. Depending on the image, an error ellipse is generated to give out the final impact alarm region. A validation experiment is implemented on a complex composite wing box of a real aircraft. The validation results show that the accuracy rate of impact alarm region localization is approximately 100%. The area of impact alarm region can be reduced and the number of PZTs needed to cover the same impact monitoring region is reduced by more than a half.

  3. Digital Sequences and a Time Reversal-Based Impact Region Imaging and Localization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifeng Qian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available To reduce time and cost of damage inspection, on-line impact monitoring of aircraft composite structures is needed. A digital monitor based on an array of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs is developed to record the impact region of impacts on-line. It is small in size, lightweight and has low power consumption, but there are two problems with the impact alarm region localization method of the digital monitor at the current stage. The first one is that the accuracy rate of the impact alarm region localization is low, especially on complex composite structures. The second problem is that the area of impact alarm region is large when a large scale structure is monitored and the number of PZTs is limited which increases the time and cost of damage inspections. To solve the two problems, an impact alarm region imaging and localization method based on digital sequences and time reversal is proposed. In this method, the frequency band of impact response signals is estimated based on the digital sequences first. Then, characteristic signals of impact response signals are constructed by sinusoidal modulation signals. Finally, the phase synthesis time reversal impact imaging method is adopted to obtain the impact region image. Depending on the image, an error ellipse is generated to give out the final impact alarm region. A validation experiment is implemented on a complex composite wing box of a real aircraft. The validation results show that the accuracy rate of impact alarm region localization is approximately 100%. The area of impact alarm region can be reduced and the number of PZTs needed to cover the same impact monitoring region is reduced by more than a half.

  4. Quantification of HIV GAG RNA using real time reverse transcriptase PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapshak, Paul; Duncan, Robert; McCoy, Clyde B; Page, J Bryan

    2005-01-01

    Quantification of HIV-1 is important to quantify risk for disease progression as well as for acquiring infection associated with drug abuse. Prior quantification methods include immune and enzymatic procedures, e.g., quantifying HIV-1 p24 protein by ELISA and the Reverse Transcriptase by enzymatic assay. Improved quantification of HIV-1 RNA and cDNA was established using PCR. This paper describes a real-time PCR technique using the Applied Biosystems 5700 Sequence Detection System and Taqman reverse transcriptase PCR. We initially standardized the PCR method using ribosomal-RNA to obtain relative quantification. Pure gag RNA was used for standard curves, controls, and to obtain absolute RNA quantification. Pure HIV gag RNA was produced by T7-directed transcription of the plasmid pWISP98-85. Detailed statistical analyses describe using absolute standard curves, and intraassay and interassay coefficients of variation to validate the methods. The presented method is highly reproducible and the assay's performance is comparable to prior assays. The assay is validated with an 8-log range down to 80 copies.

  5. Monitoring of Pre-Load on Rock Bolt Using Piezoceramic-Transducer Enabled Time Reversal Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Linsheng; Wang, Bo; Chen, Dongdong; Song, Gangbing

    2017-10-27

    Rock bolts ensure structural stability for tunnels and many other underground structures. The pre-load on a rock bolt plays an important role in the structural reinforcement and it is vital to monitor the pre-load status of rock bolts. In this paper, a rock bolt pre-load monitoring method based on the piezoceramic enabled time reversal method is proposed. A lead zirconate titanate (PZT) patch transducer, which works as an actuator to generate stress waves, is bonded onto the anchor plate of the rock bolt. A smart washer, which is fabricated by sandwiching a PZT patch between two metal rings, is installed between the hex nut and the anchor plate along the rock bolt. The smart washer functions as a sensor to detect the stress wave. With the increase of the pre-load values on the rock bolt, the effective contact surface area between the smart washer and the anchor plate, benefiting the stress wave propagation crossing the contact surface. With the help of time reversal technique, experimental results reveal that the magnitude of focused signal clearly increases with the increase of the pre-load on a rock bolt before the saturation which happens beyond a relatively high value of the pre-load. The proposed method provides an innovative and real time means to monitor the pre-load level of a rock bolt. By employing this method, the pre-load degradation process on a rock bolt can be clearly monitored. Please note that, currently, the proposed method applies to only new rock bolts, on which it is possible to install the PZT smart washer.

  6. Monitoring of Pre-Load on Rock Bolt Using Piezoceramic-Transducer Enabled Time Reversal Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linsheng Huo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rock bolts ensure structural stability for tunnels and many other underground structures. The pre-load on a rock bolt plays an important role in the structural reinforcement and it is vital to monitor the pre-load status of rock bolts. In this paper, a rock bolt pre-load monitoring method based on the piezoceramic enabled time reversal method is proposed. A lead zirconate titanate (PZT patch transducer, which works as an actuator to generate stress waves, is bonded onto the anchor plate of the rock bolt. A smart washer, which is fabricated by sandwiching a PZT patch between two metal rings, is installed between the hex nut and the anchor plate along the rock bolt. The smart washer functions as a sensor to detect the stress wave. With the increase of the pre-load values on the rock bolt, the effective contact surface area between the smart washer and the anchor plate, benefiting the stress wave propagation crossing the contact surface. With the help of time reversal technique, experimental results reveal that the magnitude of focused signal clearly increases with the increase of the pre-load on a rock bolt before the saturation which happens beyond a relatively high value of the pre-load. The proposed method provides an innovative and real time means to monitor the pre-load level of a rock bolt. By employing this method, the pre-load degradation process on a rock bolt can be clearly monitored. Please note that, currently, the proposed method applies to only new rock bolts, on which it is possible to install the PZT smart washer.

  7. Metamaterial mirrors in optoelectronic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Esfandyarpour, Majid

    2014-06-22

    The phase reversal that occurs when light is reflected from a metallic mirror produces a standing wave with reduced intensity near the reflective surface. This effect is highly undesirable in optoelectronic devices that use metal films as both electrical contacts and optical mirrors, because it dictates a minimum spacing between the metal and the underlying active semiconductor layers, therefore posing a fundamental limit to the overall thickness of the device. Here, we show that this challenge can be circumvented by using a metamaterial mirror whose reflection phase is tunable from that of a perfect electric mirror († = €) to that of a perfect magnetic mirror († = 0). This tunability in reflection phase can also be exploited to optimize the standing wave profile in planar devices to maximize light-matter interaction. Specifically, we show that light absorption and photocurrent generation in a sub-100 nm active semiconductor layer of a model solar cell can be enhanced by ∼20% over a broad spectral band. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  8. Common-image gathers in the offset domain from reverse-time migration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhan, Ge

    2014-04-01

    Kirchhoff migration is flexible to output common-image gathers (CIGs) in the offset domain by imaging data with different offsets separately. These CIGs supply important information for velocity model updates and amplitude-variation-with-offset (AVO) analysis. Reverse-time migration (RTM) offers more insights into complex geology than Kirchhoff migration by accurately describing wave propagation using the two-way wave equation. But, it has difficulty to produce offset domain CIGs like Kirchhoff migration. In this paper, we develop a method for obtaining offset domain CIGs from RTM. The method first computes the RTM operator of an offset gather, followed by a dot product of the operator and the offset data to form a common-offset RTM image. The offset domain CIGs are then achieved after separately migrating data with different offsets. We generate offset domain CIGs on both the Marmousi synthetic data and 2D Gulf of Mexico real data using this approach. © 2014.

  9. Superconductivity. Observation of broken time-reversal symmetry in the heavy-fermion superconductor UPt₃.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemm, E R; Gannon, W J; Wishne, C M; Halperin, W P; Kapitulnik, A

    2014-07-11

    Models of superconductivity in unconventional materials can be experimentally differentiated by the predictions they make for the symmetries of the superconducting order parameter. In the case of the heavy-fermion superconductor UPt3, a key question is whether its multiple superconducting phases preserve or break time-reversal symmetry (TRS). We tested for asymmetry in the phase shift between left and right circularly polarized light reflected from a single crystal of UPt3 at normal incidence and found that this so-called polar Kerr effect appears only below the lower of the two zero-field superconducting transition temperatures. Our results provide evidence for broken TRS in the low-temperature superconducting phase of UPt3, implying a complex two-component order parameter for superconductivity in this system. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Time Reversibility, Correlation Decay and the Steady State Fluctuation Relation for Dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis J. Evans

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Steady state fluctuation relations for nonequilibrium systems are under intense investigation because of their important practical implications in nanotechnology and biology. However the precise conditions under which they hold need clarification. Using the dissipation function, which is related to the entropy production of linear irreversible thermodynamics, we show time reversibility, ergodic consistency and a recently introduced form of correlation decay, called T-mixing, are sufficient conditions for steady state fluctuation relations to hold. Our results are not restricted to a particular model and show that the steady state fluctuation relation for the dissipation function holds near or far from equilibrium subject to these conditions. The dissipation function thus plays a comparable role in nonequilibrium systems to thermodynamic potentials in equilibrium systems.

  11. On the Performance of the Time Reversal SM-MIMO-UWB System on Correlated Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hieu Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of spatial correlation on the multi-input multi-output ultrawide band (MIMO-UWB system using the time reversal (TR technique is investigated. Thanks to TR, several data streams can be transmitted by using only one antenna in a system named virtual MIMO-TRUWB. Since the virtual MIMO-TR-UWB system is not affected by the transmit correlation, under the condition of the high spatial correlation, it outperforms the true MIMO-UWB system with multiple transmit antennas. The channel measurements are performed in short-range indoor environment, both line-of-sight and non-line-of-sight to verify the adopted correlated channel model.

  12. Ergodic time-reversible chaos for Gibbs' canonical oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, William Graham; Sprott, Julien Clinton; Patra, Puneet Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Nosé's pioneering 1984 work inspired a variety of time-reversible deterministic thermostats. Though several groups have developed successful doubly-thermostated models, single-thermostat models have failed to generate Gibbs' canonical distribution for the one-dimensional harmonic oscillator. A 2001 doubly-thermostated model, claimed to be ergodic, has a singly-thermostated version. Though neither of these models is ergodic this work has suggested a successful route toward singly-thermostated ergodicity. We illustrate both ergodicity and its lack for these models using phase-space cross sections and Lyapunov instability as diagnostic tools. - Highlights: • We develop cross-section and Lyapunov methods for diagnosing ergodicity. • We apply these methods to several thermostatted-oscillator problems. • We demonstrate the nonergodicity of previous work. • We find a novel family of ergodic thermostatted-oscillator problems.

  13. Non invasive transcostal focusing based on the decomposition of the time reversal operator: in vitro validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochard, Étienne; Prada, Claire; Aubry, Jean-François; Fink, Mathias

    2010-03-01

    Thermal ablation induced by high intensity focused ultrasound has produced promising clinical results to treat hepatocarcinoma and other liver tumors. However skin burns have been reported due to the high absorption of ultrasonic energy by the ribs. This study proposes a method to produce an acoustic field focusing on a chosen target while sparing the ribs, using the decomposition of the time-reversal operator (DORT method). The idea is to apply an excitation weight vector to the transducers array which is orthogonal to the subspace of emissions focusing on the ribs. The ratio of the energies absorbed at the focal point and on the ribs has been enhanced up to 100-fold as demonstrated by the measured specific absorption rates.

  14. Photoacoustic imaging in scattering media by combining a correlation matrix filter with a time reversal operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Wei; Tao, Chao; Liu, Xiaojun

    2017-09-18

    Acoustic scattering medium is a fundamental challenge for photoacoustic imaging. In this study, we reveal the different coherent properties of the scattering photoacoustic waves and the direct photoacoustic waves in a matrix form. Direct waves show a particular coherence on the antidiagonals of the matrix, whereas scattering waves do not. Based on this property, a correlation matrix filter combining with a time reversal operator is proposed to preserve the direct waves and recover the image behind a scattering layer. Both numerical simulations and photoacoustic imaging experiments demonstrate that the proposed approach effectively increases the image contrast and decreases the background speckles in a scattering medium. This study might improve the quality of photoacoustic imaging in an acoustic scattering environment and extend its applications.

  15. Time-reversal symmetry breaking hidden order in Sr2(Ir,Rh)O4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jaehong; Sidis, Yvan; Louat, Alex; Brouet, Véronique; Bourges, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Layered 5d transition iridium oxides, Sr2(Ir,Rh)O4, are described as unconventional Mott insulators with strong spin-orbit coupling. The undoped compound, Sr2IrO4, is a nearly ideal two-dimensional pseudospin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet, similarly to the insulating parent compound of high-temperature superconducting copper oxides. Using polarized neutron diffraction, we here report a hidden magnetic order in pure and doped Sr2(Ir,Rh)O4, distinct from the usual antiferromagnetic pseudospin ordering. We find that time-reversal symmetry is broken while the lattice translation invariance is preserved in the hidden order phase. The onset temperature matches that of the odd-parity hidden order recently highlighted using optical second-harmonic generation experiments. The novel magnetic order and broken symmetries can be explained by the loop-current model, previously predicted for the copper oxide superconductors.

  16. Time-reversal symmetry breaking in the noncentrosymmetric superconductor Re6Ti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D.; K. P., Sajilesh; Barker, J. A. T.; Paul, D. McK.; Hillier, A. D.; Singh, R. P.

    2018-03-01

    We have investigated the superconducting state of the noncentrosymmetric superconductor Re6Ti (Tc=6.0 K) using a muon-spin rotation/relaxation technique. The zero-field muon experiment shows the presence of spontaneous magnetic fields in the superconducting state, indicating time-reversal symmetry breaking (TRSB). However, the low-temperature transverse-field muon measurements suggest nodeless s -wave superconductivity. Similar results were also observed for Re6X (X =Zr , Hf) family of materials which indicates that the pairing symmetry does not depend on the spin-orbital coupling. Altogether, these studies suggest an unconventional nature (TRSB) of superconductivity is intrinsic to the Re6X family of compounds and paves the way for further studies of this family of materials.

  17. Fractional topological phases and broken time-reversal symmetry in strained graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Pouyan; Cayssol, Jérôme; Sheng, D N; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2012-06-29

    We show that strained or deformed honeycomb lattices are promising platforms to realize fractional topological quantum states in the absence of any magnetic field. The strain-induced pseudomagnetic fields are oppositely oriented in the two valleys and can be as large as 60-300 T as reported in recent experiments. For strained graphene at neutrality, a spin- or a valley-polarized state is predicted depending on the value of the on-site Coulomb interaction. At fractional filling, the unscreened Coulomb interaction leads to a valley-polarized fractional quantum Hall liquid which spontaneously breaks time-reversal symmetry. Motivated by artificial graphene systems, we consider tuning the short-range part of interactions and demonstrate that exotic valley symmetric states, including a valley fractional topological insulator and a spin triplet superconductor, can be stabilized by such interaction engineering.

  18. Acoustic Longitudinal Field NIF Optic Feature Detection Map Using Time-Reversal & MUSIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, S K

    2006-02-09

    We developed an ultrasonic longitudinal field time-reversal and MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) based detection algorithm for identifying and mapping flaws in fused silica NIF optics. The algorithm requires a fully multistatic data set, that is one with multiple, independently operated, spatially diverse transducers, each transmitter of which, in succession, launches a pulse into the optic and the scattered signal measured and recorded at every receiver. We have successfully localized engineered ''defects'' larger than 1 mm in an optic. We confirmed detection and localization of 3 mm and 5 mm features in experimental data, and a 0.5 mm in simulated data with sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio. We present the theory, experimental results, and simulated results.

  19. Incoherent dictionary learning for reducing crosstalk noise in least-squares reverse time migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Bai, Min

    2018-05-01

    We propose to apply a novel incoherent dictionary learning (IDL) algorithm for regularizing the least-squares inversion in seismic imaging. The IDL is proposed to overcome the drawback of traditional dictionary learning algorithm in losing partial texture information. Firstly, the noisy image is divided into overlapped image patches, and some random patches are extracted for dictionary learning. Then, we apply the IDL technology to minimize the coherency between atoms during dictionary learning. Finally, the sparse representation problem is solved by a sparse coding algorithm, and image is restored by those sparse coefficients. By reducing the correlation among atoms, it is possible to preserve most of the small-scale features in the image while removing much of the long-wavelength noise. The application of the IDL method to regularization of seismic images from least-squares reverse time migration shows successful performance.

  20. Unveiling a crystalline topological insulator in a Weyl semimetal with time-reversal symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, Liliana; Aligia, Armando A.

    2014-09-01

    We consider a natural generalization of the lattice model for a periodic array of two layers, A and B, of spinless electrons proposed by Fu [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 106802 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.106802] as a prototype for a crystalline insulator. This model has time-reversal symmetry and broken inversion symmetry. We show that when the intralayer next-nearest-neighbor hoppings t2a,a=A,B vanish, this model supports a Weyl semimetal phase for a wide range of the remaining model parameters. When the effect of t2a is considered, topological crystalline insulating phases take place within the Weyl semimetal one. By mapping to an effective Weyl Hamiltonian we derive some analytical results for the phase diagram as well as for the structure of the nodes in the spectrum of the Weyl semimetal.

  1. Time reversal invariance and the deformation effect for neutron resonances in aligned 165Ho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, C.R.; Haase, D.G.; Huffman, P.R.; Roberson, N.R.; Frankle, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron transmission tests of time reversal invariance on resonance have attracted considerable attention because of the large enhancement of symmetry violating observables. The P-even T-odd five fold correlation (FC) term s · (I x k)I · k is measured with an aligned target. We discuss how to identify suitable resonances in an aligned target by means of the deformation effect. We focus on neutron transmission through aligned 165 Ho, and consider the possibility of locating small d-wave admixtures in weak, predominantly s-wave resonances. We estimate the sensitivity of the FC test to α T , the ratio of the T-odd to T-even parts of the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction

  2. Advanced Mirror & Modelling Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Abplanalp, Laura; Maffett, Steven; Egerman, Robert; Eng, Ron; Arnold, William; Mosier, Gary; Blaurock, Carl

    2014-01-01

    The 2020 Decadal technology survey is starting in 2018. Technology on the shelf at that time will help guide selection to future low risk and low cost missions. The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) team has identified development priorities based on science goals and engineering requirements for Ultraviolet Optical near-Infrared (UVOIR) missions in order to contribute to the selection process. One key development identified was lightweight mirror fabrication and testing. A monolithic, stacked, deep core mirror was fused and replicated twice to achieve the desired radius of curvature. It was subsequently successfully polished and tested. A recently awarded second phase to the AMTD project will develop larger mirrors to demonstrate the lateral scaling of the deep core mirror technology. Another key development was rapid modeling for the mirror. One model focused on generating optical and structural model results in minutes instead of months. Many variables could be accounted for regarding the core, face plate and back structure details. A portion of a spacecraft model was also developed. The spacecraft model incorporated direct integration to transform optical path difference to Point Spread Function (PSF) and between PSF to modulation transfer function. The second phase to the project will take the results of the rapid mirror modeler and integrate them into the rapid spacecraft modeler.

  3. Prospects for Searching for Time-Reversal Violation In Pa-229

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaideep

    2017-09-01

    Certain pear-shaped nuclei are expected to have enhanced sensitivity to time-reversal and parity-violating interactions originating within the nuclear medium. In particular, Pa-229 is thought to be about 100,000 times more sensitive than Hg-199 which currently sets some of the most stringent limits for these types of interactions. Several challenges would first have to be addressed in order to take advantage of this discovery potential. First, there is not currently a significant source of Pa-229; however, there are plans to harvest Pa-229 from the FRIB beam dump. Second, the spin-5/2 nucleus of Pa-229 limits its coherence time while also making it sensitive to systematic effects related to local field gradients. On the other hand, this also gives Pa-229 an additional source of signal in the form of a magnetic quadrupole moment (MQM) which violates the same symmetries as an EDM but is not observable in spin-1/2 systems. Third, in order to compensate for the small atom numbers and short coherence times, the Pa-229 atoms would have to be probed with exceptionally large electric & magnetic fields that are only possible if Pa-229 is a part of a polar molecule or embedded inside of an optical crystal. I will present an our plans to test some of these concepts using stable Pr-141.

  4. An efficient higher-order PML in WLP-FDTD method for time reversed wave simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Kun; Shao, Wei; Ou, Haiyan; Wang, Bing-Zhong

    2016-09-01

    Derived from a stretched coordinate formulation, a higher-order complex frequency shifted (CFS) perfectly matched layer (PML) is proposed for the unconditionally stable finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method based on weighted Laguerre polynomials (WLPs). The higher-order PML is implemented with an auxiliary differential equation (ADE) approach. In order to further improve absorbing performance, the parameter values of stretching functions in the higher-order PML are optimized by the multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA). The optimal solutions can be chosen from the Pareto front for trading-off between two independent objectives. It is shown in a numerical test that the higher-order PML is efficient in terms of attenuating propagating waves and reducing late time reflections. Moreover, the higher-order PML can be placed very close to the wall when analyzing the channel characteristics of time reversal (TR) waves in a multipath indoor environment. Numerical examples of TR wave propagation demonstrate the availability of the proposed method.

  5. TR-BREATH: Time-Reversal Breathing Rate Estimation and Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Han, Yi; Chen, Yan; Lai, Hung-Quoc; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Beibei; Liu, K J Ray

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we introduce TR-BREATH, a time-reversal (TR)-based contact-free breathing monitoring system. It is capable of breathing detection and multiperson breathing rate estimation within a short period of time using off-the-shelf WiFi devices. The proposed system exploits the channel state information (CSI) to capture the miniature variations in the environment caused by breathing. To magnify the CSI variations, TR-BREATH projects CSIs into the TR resonating strength (TRRS) feature space and analyzes the TRRS by the Root-MUSIC and affinity propagation algorithms. Extensive experiment results indoor demonstrate a perfect detection rate of breathing. With only 10 s of measurement, a mean accuracy of can be obtained for single-person breathing rate estimation under the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) scenario. Furthermore, it achieves a mean accuracy of in breathing rate estimation for a dozen people under the line-of-sight scenario and a mean accuracy of in breathing rate estimation of nine people under the NLOS scenario, both with 63 s of measurement. Moreover, TR-BREATH can estimate the number of people with an error around 1. We also demonstrate that TR-BREATH is robust against packet loss and motions. With the prevailing of WiFi, TR-BREATH can be applied for in-home and real-time breathing monitoring.

  6. Decoupled equations for reverse time migration in tilted transversely isotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Zhan, Ge

    2012-03-01

    Conventional modeling and migration for tilted transversely isotropic (TTI) media may suffer from numerical instabilities and shear wave artifacts due to the coupling of the P-wave and SV-wave modes in the TTI coupled equations. Starting with the separated P- and SV-phase velocity expressions for vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) media, we extend these decoupled equations for modeling and reverse time migration (RTM) in acoustic TTI media. Compared with the TTI coupled equations published in the geophysical literature, the new TTI decoupled equations provide a more stable solution due to the complete separation of the P-wave and SV-wave modes. The pseudospectral method is the most convenient method to implement these equations due to the form of wavenumber expressions and has the added benefit of being highly accurate and thus avoiding numerical dispersion. The rapid expansion method (REM) in time is employed to produce a broad band numerically stable time evolution of the wavefields. Synthetic results validate the proposed TTI decoupled equations and show that modeling and RTM in TTI media with the decoupled equations remain numerically stable even for models with strong anisotropy and sharp contrasts. © 2012 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  7. Rapid expansion and pseudo spectral implementation for reverse time migration in VTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Pestana, Reynam C

    2012-04-24

    In isotropic media, we use the scalar acoustic wave equation to perform reverse time migration (RTM) of the recorded pressure wavefield data. In anisotropic media, P- and SV-waves are coupled, and the elastic wave equation should be used for RTM. For computational efficiency, a pseudo-acoustic wave equation is often used. This may be solved using a coupled system of second-order partial differential equations. We solve these using a pseudo spectral method and the rapid expansion method (REM) for the explicit time marching. This method generates a degenerate SV-wave in addition to the P-wave arrivals of interest. To avoid this problem, the elastic wave equation for vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) media can be split into separate wave equations for P- and SV-waves. These separate wave equations are stable, and they can be effectively used to model and migrate seismic data in VTI media where |ε- δ| is small. The artifact for the SV-wave has also been removed. The independent pseudo-differential wave equations can be solved one for each mode using the pseudo spectral method for the spatial derivatives and the REM for the explicit time advance of the wavefield. We show numerically stable and high-resolution modeling and RTM results for the pure P-wave mode in VTI media. © 2012 Sinopec Geophysical Research Institute.

  8. Time distribution of adsorption entropy of gases on heterogeneous surfaces by reversed-flow gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanos, Nicholas A; Kapolos, John; Gavril, Dimitrios; Bakaoukas, Nicholas; Loukopoulos, Vassilios; Koliadima, Athanasia; Karaiskakis, George

    2006-09-15

    The reversed-flow gas chromatography (RF-GC) technique has been applied to measure the adsorption entropy over time, when gaseous pentane is adsorbed on the surface of two solids (gamma-alumina and a silica supported rhodium catalyst) at 393.15 and 413.15K, respectively. Utilizing experimental chromatographic data, this novel methodology also permits the simultaneous measurement of the local adsorption energy, epsilon, local equilibrium adsorbed concentration, c(s)(*), and local adsorption isotherm, theta(p, T, epsilon) in a time resolved way. In contrast with other inverse gas chromatographic methods, which determine the standard entropy at zero surface coverage, the present method operates over a wide range of surface coverage taking into account not only the adsorbate-adsorbent interaction, but also the adsorbate-adsorbate interaction. One of the most interesting observations of the present work is the fact that the interaction of n-pentane is spontaneous on the Rh/SiO(2) catalyst for a very short time interval compared to that on gamma-Al(2)O(3). This can explain the different kinetic behavior of each particular gas-solid system, and it can be attributed to the fact that large amounts of n-C(5)H(12) are present on the active sites of the Rh/SiO(2) catalyst compared to those on gamma-Al(2)O(3), as the local equilibrium adsorbed concentration values, c(s)(*), indicate.

  9. Time course of reversed cardiac remodeling after pulmonary endarterectomy in patients with chronic pulmonary thromboembolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iino, Misako; Dymarkowski, Steven; Chaothawee, Lertlak; Bogaert, Jan [UZ Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Delcroix, Marion [UZ Leuven, Department of Pneumology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2008-04-15

    To evaluate the time course of reversed remodeling after pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension(CTPEH), we studied 22 patients (age: 60 {+-} 13 years) with MRI immediately before, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after PEA. MRI included assessment of biventricular function, aortic and pulmonary artery(PA) flow, and right ventricular (RV) overload using the ratio of RV-to-biventricular diameter. Except in one patient, who died 2 months post-surgery, clinical improvement occurred early after PEA (NYHA class: 3.3 {+-} 0.6 to 1.5 {+-} 0.8, p < 0.0001) with a decrease of systolic pulmonary artery pressures (79 {+-} 14 to 44 {+-} 14 mmHg, p < 0.0001). At 1 month post PEA, RV end-diastolic volumes decreased (198 {+-} 72 to 137 {+-} 59 ml, p < 0.0001), and the RV ejection fraction (EF) improved (31 {+-} 9 to 47 {+-} 10%, p < 0.0001). No further significant improvement in pulmonary pressures or RV function occurred at 3 months or 6 months. Although no significant change was found in LV volumes or function, aortic flow increased early after surgery. PEA had only a beneficial effect on right PA flow. RV overload decreased early after PEA (ratio RV-to-biventricular diameter: before: 0.67 {+-} 0.04, after: 0.54 {+-} 0.06, p < 0.0001), showing a good correlation with the improvement in RVEF (r = 0.7, P < 0.0001). In conclusion, reversed cardiac remodeling occurs early after PEA, to slow down after 1 month. At 6 months, cardiac remodeling is incomplete as witnessed by low-normal RV function and residually elevated PA pressures. (orig.)

  10. Mirror and (absence of) counter-mirror responses to action sounds measured with TMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticini, Luca F; Schütz-Bosbach, Simone; Waszak, Florian

    2017-11-01

    To what extent is the mirror neuron mechanism malleable to experience? The answer to this question can help characterising its ontogeny and its role in social cognition. Some suggest that it develops through sensorimotor associations congruent with our own actions. Others argue for its extreme volatility that will encode any sensorimotor association in the environment. Here, we added to this debate by exploring the effects of short goal-directed 'mirror' and 'counter-mirror' trainings (a 'mirror' training is defined as the first type of training encountered by the participants) on human auditory mirror motor-evoked potentials (MEPs). We recorded MEPs in response to two tones void of previous motor meaning, before and after mirror and counter-mirror trainings in which participants generated two tones of different pitch by performing free-choice button presses. The results showed that mirror MEPs, once established, were protected against an equivalent counter-mirror experience: they became manifest very rapidly and the same number of training trials that lead to the initial association did not suffice to reverse the MEP pattern. This steadiness of the association argues that, by serving direct-matching purposes, the mirror mechanism is a good solution for social cognition. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  11. Imaging Fracking Zones by Microseismic Reverse Time Migration for Downhole Microseismic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is an engineering tool to create fractures in order to better recover oil and gas from low permeability reservoirs. Because microseismic events are generally associated with fracturing development, microseismic monitoring has been used to evaluate the fracking process. Microseismic monitoring generally relies on locating microseismic events to understand the spatial distribution of fractures. For the multi-stage fracturing treatment, fractures created in former stages are strong scatterers in the medium and can induce strong scattering waves on the waveforms for microseismic events induced during later stages. In this study, we propose to take advantage of microseismic scattering waves to image fracking zones by using seismic reverse time migration method. For downhole microseismic monitoring that involves installing a string of seismic sensors in a borehole near the injection well, the observation geometry is actually similar to the VSP (vertical seismic profile) system. For this reason, we adapt the VSP migration method for the common shot gather to the common event gather. Microseismic reverse-time migration method involves solving wave equation both forward and backward in time for each microseismic event. At current stage, the microseismic RTM is based on 2D acoustic wave equation (Zhang and Sun, 2008), solved by the finite-difference method with PML absorbing boundary condition applied to suppress the reflections of artificial boundaries. Additionally, we use local wavefield decomposition instead of cross-correlation imaging condition to suppress the imaging noise. For testing the method, we create a synthetic dataset for a downhole microseismic monitoring system with multiple fracking stages. It shows that microseismic migration using individual event is able to clearly reveal the fracture zone. The shorter distance between fractures and the microseismic event the clearer the migration image is. By summing migration images for many

  12. Super-resolution imaging of low-frequency sound sources using a corrected monopole time reversal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Chuan-Xing; Li, Yong-Chang; Zhang, Yong-Bin; Xu, Liang

    2017-12-01

    A limitation of the monopole time reversal (MTR) method, which records and retransmits the monopole field only, is that the spatial resolution of the focus cannot be better than half a wavelength, and therefore it is not suitable for locating low-frequency sound sources. In this paper, the time-reversed pressure field obtained by the MTR method is first transformed into the wavenumber domain, and is then decomposed into a filter term that controls the spatial resolution of the focus and a source term that is related to the sound source and focusing plane. Subsequently, a correction is made to the time-reversed pressure field of the MTR method by replacing its filter with the filter for the time-reversed pressure gradient field of the dipole TR (DTR) method, a constant filter and an empirical filter, which makes it possible to include many more evanescent waves and obtain subwavelength focusing. Numerical simulation and experimental results show that compared to the original MTR method, the corrected one is able to dramatically improve the spatial resolution of the focus at low frequencies. It is also found that the constant filter is applicable when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is high (generally above 30 dB), the filter for the time-reversed pressure gradient field of the DTR method works stably even in the situation of low SNR, and the empirical filter performs best when the SNR is above 10 dB.

  13. Charged particle confinement in magnetic mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bora, D.; John, P.I.; Saxena, Y.C.; Varma, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    The behaviour of single charged particle trapped in a magnetic mirror has been investigated experimentally. The particle injected off axis and trapped in a magnetic mirror, leak out of the mirror with the leakage characterized by multiple decay times. The observed decay times are in good agreement with predictions of a ''wave mechanical like'' model by Varma, over a large range of relevant parameters. (author)

  14. Uncertainty Quantification of the Reverse Taylor Impact Test and Localized Asynchronous Space-Time Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subber, Waad; Salvadori, Alberto; Lee, Sangmin; Matous, Karel

    2017-06-01

    The reverse Taylor impact is a common experiment to investigate the dynamical response of materials at high strain rates. To better understand the physical phenomena and to provide a platform for code validation and Uncertainty Quantification (UQ), a co-designed simulation and experimental paradigm is investigated. For validation under uncertainty, quantities of interest (QOIs) within subregions of the computational domain are introduced. For such simulations where regions of interest can be identified, the computational cost for UQ can be reduced by confining the random variability within these regions of interest. This observation inspired us to develop an asynchronous space and time computational algorithm with localized UQ. In the region of interest, the high resolution space and time discretization schemes are used for a stochastic model. Apart from the region of interest, low spatial and temporal resolutions are allowed for a stochastic model with low dimensional representation of uncertainty. The model is exercised on the linear elastodynamics and shows a potential in reducing the UQ computational cost. Although, we consider wave prorogation in solid, the proposed framework is general and can be used for fluid flow problems as well. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (PSAAP-II).

  15. The detection of flaws in austenitic welds using the decomposition of the time-reversal operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Laura J; Mulholland, Anthony J; Tant, Katherine M M; Gachagan, Anthony; Harvey, Gerry; Bird, Colin

    2016-04-01

    The non-destructive testing of austenitic welds using ultrasound plays an important role in the assessment of the structural integrity of safety critical structures. The internal microstructure of these welds is highly scattering and can lead to the obscuration of defects when investigated by traditional imaging algorithms. This paper proposes an alternative objective method for the detection of flaws embedded in austenitic welds based on the singular value decomposition of the time-frequency domain response matrices. The distribution of the singular values is examined in the cases where a flaw exists and where there is no flaw present. A lower threshold on the singular values, specific to austenitic welds, is derived which, when exceeded, indicates the presence of a flaw. The detection criterion is successfully implemented on both synthetic and experimental data. The datasets arising from welds containing a flaw are further interrogated using the decomposition of the time-reversal operator (DORT) method and the total focusing method (TFM), and it is shown that images constructed via the DORT algorithm typically exhibit a higher signal-to-noise ratio than those constructed by the TFM algorithm.

  16. Microseismic imaging using Geometric-mean Reverse-Time Migration in Hydraulic Fracturing Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, J.; Ng, R.; Nakata, N.

    2017-12-01

    Unconventional oil and gas exploration techniques such as hydraulic fracturing are associated with microseismic events related to the generation and development of fractures. For example, hydraulic fracturing, which is popular in Southern Oklahoma, produces earthquakes that are greater than magnitude 2.0. Finding the accurate locations, and mechanisms, of these events provides important information of local stress conditions, fracture distribution, hazard assessment, and economical impact. The accurate source location is also important to separate fracking-induced and wastewater disposal induced seismicity. Here, we implement a wavefield-based imaging method called Geometric-mean Reverse-Time Migration (GmRTM), which takes the advantage of accurate microseismic location based on wavefield back projection. We apply GmRTM to microseismic data collected during hydraulic fracturing for imaging microseismic source locations, and potentially, fractures. Assuming an accurate velocity model, GmRTM can improve the spatial resolution of source locations compared to HypoDD or P/S travel-time based methods. We will discuss the results from GmRTM and HypoDD using this field dataset and synthetic data.

  17. A real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for detection and quantification of Vesiculovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Lavado Tolardo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vesiculoviruses (VSV are zoonotic viruses that cause vesicular stomatitis disease in cattle, horses and pigs, as well as sporadic human cases of acute febrile illness. Therefore, diagnosis of VSV infections by reliable laboratory techniques is important to allow a proper case management and implementation of strategies for the containment of virus spread. We show here a sensitive and reproducible real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR for detection and quantification of VSV. The assay was evaluated with arthropods and serum samples obtained from horses, cattle and patients with acute febrile disease. The real-time RT-PCR amplified the Piry, Carajas, Alagoas and Indiana Vesiculovirus at a melting temperature 81.02 ± 0.8ºC, and the sensitivity of assay was estimated in 10 RNA copies/mL to the Piry Vesiculovirus. The viral genome has been detected in samples of horses and cattle, but not detected in human sera or arthropods. Thus, this assay allows a preliminary differential diagnosis of VSV infections.

  18. Imaging of first-order surface-related multiples by reverse-time migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuejian; Liu, Yike; Hu, Hao; Li, Peng; Khan, Majid

    2017-02-01

    Surface-related multiples have been utilized in the reverse-time migration (RTM) procedures, and additional illumination for subsurface can be provided. Meanwhile, many cross-talks are generated from undesired interactions between forward- and backward-propagated seismic waves. In this paper, subsequent to analysing and categorizing these cross-talks, we propose RTM of first-order multiples to avoid most undesired interactions in RTM of all-order multiples, where only primaries are forward-propagated and crosscorrelated with the backward-propagated first-order multiples. With primaries and multiples separated during regular seismic data processing as the input data, first-order multiples can be obtained by a two-step scheme: (1) the dual-prediction of higher-order multiples; and (2) the adaptive subtraction of predicted higher-order multiples from all-order multiples within local offset-time windows. In numerical experiments, two synthetic and a marine field data sets are used, where different cross-talks generated by RTM of all-order multiples can be identified and the proposed RTM of first-order multiples can provide a very interpretable image with a few cross-talks.

  19. Time Reversal Migration for Passive Sources Using a Maximum Variance Imaging Condition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, H.

    2017-05-26

    The conventional time-reversal imaging approach for micro-seismic or passive source location is based on focusing the back-propagated wavefields from each recorded trace in a source image. It suffers from strong background noise and limited acquisition aperture, which may create unexpected artifacts and cause error in the source location. To overcome such a problem, we propose a new imaging condition for microseismic imaging, which is based on comparing the amplitude variance in certain windows, and use it to suppress the artifacts as well as find the right location for passive sources. Instead of simply searching for the maximum energy point in the back-propagated wavefield, we calculate the amplitude variances over a window moving in both space and time axis to create a highly resolved passive event image. The variance operation has negligible cost compared with the forward/backward modeling operations, which reveals that the maximum variance imaging condition is efficient and effective. We test our approach numerically on a simple three-layer model and on a piece of the Marmousi model as well, both of which have shown reasonably good results.

  20. 3D Multi‐source Least‐squares Reverse Time Migration

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wei

    2010-10-17

    We present the theory and numerical results for least‐squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) of phase‐encoded supergathers, where each supergather is the superposition of phased‐encoded shots. Three type of encoding functions are used in this study: random time shift, random source polarity and random source location selected from a pre‐designed table. Numerical tests for the 3D SEG/EAGE Overthrust model show that multi‐source LSRTM can suppress migration artifacts in the migration image and remove most of the crosstalk noise from multi‐source data. Empirical results suggest that multi‐source LSRTM can provide a noticeable increase in computational efficiency compared to standard RTM, when the CSGs in a supergather are modeled and migrated together with a finite‐difference simulator. If the phase‐encoding functions are dynamically changed after each iteration of LSRTM, the best images are obtained. The potential drawback is that the final results are very sensitive to the accuracy of the starting model.

  1. Echodentography based on nonlinear time reversal tomography: Ultrasonic nonlinear signature identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Serge Dos; Farova, Zuzana; Kus, Vaclav; Prevorovsky, Zdenek

    2012-05-01

    This paper examines possibilities of using Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy (NEWS) methods in dental investigations. Themain task consisted in imaging cracks or other degradation signatures located in dentin close to the Enamel-Dentine Junction (EDJ). NEWS approach was investigated experimentally with a new bi-modal acousto-optic set-up based on the chirp-coded nonlinear ultrasonic time reversal (TR) concepts. Complex internal structure of the tooth is analyzed by the TR-NEWS procedure adapted to tomography-like imaging of the tooth damages. Ultrasonic instrumentation with 10 MHz bandwidth has been set together including laser vibrometer used to detect responses of the tooth on its excitation carried out by a contact piezoelectric transducer. Bi-modal TR-NEWS images of the tooth were created before and after focusing, which resulted from the time compression. The polar B-scan of the tooth realized with TR-NEWS procedure is suggested to be applied as a new echodentography imaging.

  2. Developmental mirror-writing is paralleled by orientation recognition errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Robert D; Hillary, Keira; Brennan, Ailbhe; Lechowicz, Magdalena

    2018-03-02

    The writing attempts of children often feature mirror-reversals of individual letters. These reversals are thought to arise from an adaptive tendency to mirror-generalize. However, it is unclear whether mirror-writing is driven by mirror-generalisation of the visual letter forms, or of the actions for writing them. We report two studies of the relationship between mirror-writing and the ability to recognize whether a visually presented letter is in the correct orientation, amongst primary and preschool children learning to read and write in English. Children who produced more mirror-writing also made more orientation recognition errors, for uppercase (Study 1, n = 44) and lowercase letters (Study 2, n = 98), and these relationships remained significant when controlling for age. In both studies, the letters more often reversed in writing were also more prone to orientation recognition errors. Moreover, the rates of mirror-writing of different uppercase letters were closely similar between the dominant and non-dominant hands (Study 1). We also note that, in the recognition tasks, children were more likely to accept reversed letters as correct, than to reject correctly oriented letters, consistent with a tendency to mirror-generalize the visual letter forms. In every aspect, these results support a major role for visual representations in developmental mirror-writing.

  3. Detecting a subsurface cylinder by a Time Reversal MUSIC like method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimene, Raffaele; Dell'Aversano, Angela; Leone, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    In this contribution the problem of imaging a buried homogeneous circular cylinder is dealt with for a two-dimensional scalar geometry. Though the addressed geometry is extremely simple as compared to real world scenarios, it can be considered of interest for a classical GPR civil engineering applicative context: that is the subsurface prospecting of urban area in order to detect and locate buried utilities. A large body of methods for subsurface imaging have been presented in literature [1], ranging from migration algorithms to non-linear inverse scattering approaches. More recently, also spectral estimation methods, which benefit from sub-array data arrangement, have been proposed and compared in [2].Here a Time Reversal MUSIC (TRM) like method is employed. TRM has been initially conceived to detect point-like scatterers and then generalized to the case of extended scatterers [3]. In the latter case, no a priori information about the scatterers is exploited. However, utilities often can be schematized as circular cylinders. Here, we develop a TRM variant which use this information to properly tailor the steering vector while implementing TRM. Accordingly, instead of a spatial map [3], the imaging procedure returns the scatterer's parameters such as its center position, radius and dielectric permittivity. The study is developed by numerical simulations. First the free-space case is considered in order to more easily introduce the idea and the problem mathematical structure. Then the analysis is extended to the half-space case. In both situations a FDTD forward solver is used to generate the synthetic data. As usual in TRM, a multi-view/multi-static single-frequency configuration is considered and emphasis is put on the role played by the number of available sensors. Acknowledgement This work benefited from networking activities carried out within the EU funded COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar." [1] A. Randazzo and R

  4. On possibility of time reversal symmetry violation in neutrino elastic scattering on polarized electron target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobków, W.; Błaut, A.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper we indicate a possibility of utilizing the elastic scattering of Dirac low-energy (˜ 1 MeV) electron neutrinos (ν _es) on a polarized electron target (PET) in testing the time reversal symmetry violation (TRSV). We consider a scenario in which the incoming ν _e beam is a superposition of left chiral (LC) and right chiral (RC) states. LC ν _e interact mainly by the standard V-A and small admixture of non-standard scalar S_L, pseudoscalar P_L, tensor T_L interactions, while RC ones are only detected by the exotic V + A and S_R, P_R, T_R interactions. As a result of the superposition of the two chiralities the transverse components of ν e spin polarization (T-even and T-odd) may appear. We compute the differential cross section as a function of the recoil electron azimuthal angle and scattered electron energy, and show how the interference terms between standard V-A and exotic S_R, P_R, T_R couplings depend on the various angular correlations among the transversal ν _e spin polarization, the polarization of the electron target, the incoming neutrino momentum and the outgoing electron momentum in the limit of relativistic ν _e. We illustrate how the maximal value of recoil electrons azimuthal asymmetry and the asymmetry axis location of outgoing electrons depend on the azimuthal angle of the transversal component of the ν _e spin polarization, both for the time reversal symmetry conservation (TRSC) and TRSV. Next, we display that the electron energy spectrum and polar angle distribution of the recoil electrons are also sensitive to the interference terms between V-A and S_R, P_R, T_R couplings, proportional to the T-even and T-odd angular correlations among the transversal ν _e polarization, the electron polarization of the target, and the incoming ν _e momentum, respectively. We also discuss the possibility of testing the TRSV by observing the azimuthal asymmetry of outgoing electrons, using the PET without the impact of the transversal

  5. Kinetic Analysis of Parallel-Consecutive First-Order Reactions with a Reversible Step: Concentration-Time Integrals Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucientes, A. E.; de la Pena, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    The concentration-time integrals method has been used to solve kinetic equations of parallel-consecutive first-order reactions with a reversible step. This method involves the determination of the area under the curve for the concentration of a given species against time. Computer techniques are used to integrate experimental curves and the method…

  6. Optimal performance at arbitrary power of minimally nonlinear irreversible thermoelectric generators with broken time-reversal symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Liu, Wei; Li, Qianwen; Zhang, Lei; Bai, Long

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the performance at arbitrary power of minimally nonlinear irreversible thermoelectric generators (MNITGs) with broken time-reversal symmetry within linear irreversible thermodynamics, and the efficiency of MNITGs at arbitrary power is analytically derived. Furthermore, a universal bound on the efficiency of thermoelectric generators (TGs) with broken time-reversal symmetry and the arbitrary power is obtained. Some system-specific characteristics are discussed and uncovered. A large efficiency at arbitrary power can also be achieved via the cooperative mechanism between the system parameters. Our results indicate that the broken time-reversal symmetry provides the physically allowed degrees of freedom for tuning the performance of thermoelectric devices, and the physical trade-off region between the efficiency and the power output can also offer the appropriate space for optimizing the performance of TGs.

  7. Real-time modulation of visual feedback on human full-body movements in a virtual mirror: development and proof-of-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosink, Meyke; Robitaille, Nicolas; McFadyen, Bradford J; Hébert, Luc J; Jackson, Philip L; Bouyer, Laurent J; Mercier, Catherine

    2015-01-05

    Virtual reality (VR) provides interactive multimodal sensory stimuli and biofeedback, and can be a powerful tool for physical and cognitive rehabilitation. However, existing systems have generally not implemented realistic full-body avatars and/or a scaling of visual movement feedback. We developed a "virtual mirror" that displays a realistic full-body avatar that responds to full-body movements in all movement planes in real-time, and that allows for the scaling of visual feedback on movements in real-time. The primary objective of this proof-of-concept study was to assess the ability of healthy subjects to detect scaled feedback on trunk flexion movements. The "virtual mirror" was developed by integrating motion capture, virtual reality and projection systems. A protocol was developed to provide both augmented and reduced feedback on trunk flexion movements while sitting and standing. The task required reliance on both visual and proprioceptive feedback. The ability to detect scaled feedback was assessed in healthy subjects (n = 10) using a two-alternative forced choice paradigm. Additionally, immersion in the VR environment and task adherence (flexion angles, velocity, and fluency) were assessed. The ability to detect scaled feedback could be modelled using a sigmoid curve with a high goodness of fit (R2 range 89-98%). The point of subjective equivalence was not significantly different from 0 (i.e. not shifted), indicating an unbiased perception. The just noticeable difference was 0.035 ± 0.007, indicating that subjects were able to discriminate different scaling levels consistently. VR immersion was reported to be good, despite some perceived delays between movements and VR projections. Movement kinematic analysis confirmed task adherence. The new "virtual mirror" extends existing VR systems for motor and pain rehabilitation by enabling the use of realistic full-body avatars and scaled feedback. Proof-of-concept was demonstrated for the assessment of

  8. Time-reversed ultrasonically encoded optical focusing through highly scattering ex vivo human cataractous lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Shen, Yuecheng; Ruan, Haowen; Brodie, Frank L; Wong, Terence T W; Yang, Changhuei; Wang, Lihong V

    2018-01-01

    Normal development of the visual system in infants relies on clear images being projected onto the retina, which can be disrupted by lens opacity caused by congenital cataract. This disruption, if uncorrected in early life, results in amblyopia (permanently decreased vision even after removal of the cataract). Doctors are able to prevent amblyopia by removing the cataract during the first several weeks of life, but this surgery risks a host of complications, which can be equally visually disabling. Here, we investigated the feasibility of focusing light noninvasively through highly scattering cataractous lenses to stimulate the retina, thereby preventing amblyopia. This approach would allow the cataractous lens removal surgery to be delayed and hence greatly reduce the risk of complications from early surgery. Employing a wavefront shaping technique named time-reversed ultrasonically encoded optical focusing in reflection mode, we focused 532-nm light through a highly scattering ex vivo adult human cataractous lens. This work demonstrates a potential clinical application of wavefront shaping techniques. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  9. Least-squares reverse time migration in frequency domain using the adjoint-state method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Haoran; Chen, Shengchang; Wang, Huazhong

    2013-01-01

    A new scheme is presented to implement a least-squares frequency domain reverse time migration (LS-FRTM). This scheme expresses the gradient of the misfit function with respect to the model as the product of the conjugated Green's functions and the data residuals in the frequency domain based on the adjoint state method. In the 2D case, for each frequency all the Green's functions from the shots to the reflectors and from the reflectors to the receivers which depend on the background velocity can be calculated once using the lower/upper decomposition. The pseudo-Hessian matrix which is also expressed as a function of the Green's function is used as a substitute for the approximate Hessian to amplitude compensation for the gradient. Since the linearized inversion does not update the background velocity, the Green's function needs to be calculated only once. An iteration based LS-FRTM can be implemented with high efficiency. As examples supporting our assertion, we present the results obtained by applying our method to the 2D Marmousi model. (paper)

  10. Tunneling magnetoresistance in junctions composed of ferromagnets and time-reversal invariant topological superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Zhongbo; Wan, Shaolong

    2016-01-01

    Tunneling magnetoresistance between two ferrromagnets is an issue of fundamental importance in spintronics. In this work, we show that tunneling magnetoresistance can also emerge in junctions composed of ferromagnets and time-reversal invariant topological superconductors without spin-rotation symmetry. Here the physical origin is that when the spin-polarization direction of an injected electron from the ferromagnet lies in the same plane of the spin-polarization direction of Majorana zero modes, the electron will undergo a perfect spin-equal Andreev reflection, while injected electrons with other spin-polarization directions will be partially Andreev reflected and partially normal reflected, which consequently has a lower conductance, and therefore, the magnetoresistance effect emerges. Compared to conventional magnetic tunnel junctions, an unprecedented advantage of the junctions studied here is that arbitrary high tunneling magnetoresistance can be obtained even when the magnetization of the ferromagnets are weak and the insulating tunneling barriers are featureless. Our findings provide a new fascinating mechanism to obtain high tunneling magnetoresistance. (paper)

  11. Time-reversal symmetric work distributions for closed quantum dynamics in the histories framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Harry J. D.; Anders, Janet

    2017-06-01

    A central topic in the emerging field of quantum thermodynamics is the definition of thermodynamic work in the quantum regime. One widely used solution is to define work for a closed system undergoing non-equilibrium dynamics according to the two-point energy measurement scheme. However, due to the invasive nature of measurement the two-point quantum work probability distribution cannot describe the statistics of energy change from the perspective of the system alone. We here introduce the quantum histories framework as a method to characterise the thermodynamic properties of the unmeasured, closed dynamics. Constructing continuous power operator trajectories allows us to derive an alternative quantum work distribution for closed quantum dynamics that fulfils energy conservation and is time-reversal symmetric. This opens the possibility to compare the measured work with the unmeasured work, contrasting with the classical situation where measurement does not affect the work statistics. We find that the work distribution of the unmeasured dynamics leads to deviations from the classical Jarzynski equality and can have negative values highlighting distinctly non-classical features of quantum work.

  12. Least-squares reverse time migration of marine data with frequency-selection encoding

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wei

    2013-08-20

    The phase-encoding technique can sometimes increase the efficiency of the least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) by more than one order of magnitude. However, traditional random encoding functions require all the encoded shots to share the same receiver locations, thus limiting the usage to seismic surveys with a fixed spread geometry. We implement a frequency-selection encoding strategy that accommodates data with a marine streamer geometry. The encoding functions are delta functions in the frequency domain, so that all the en- coded shots have unique non-overlapping frequency content, and the receivers can distinguish the wavefield from each shot with a unique frequency band. Since the encoding functions are orthogonal to each other, there will be no crosstalk between different shots during modeling and migration. With the frequency-selection encoding method, the computational efficiency of LSRTM is increased so that its cost is compara- ble to conventional RTM for both the Marmousi2 model and a marine data set recorded in the Gulf of Mexico. With more iterations, the LSRTM image quality is further improved. We conclude that LSRTM with frequency-selection is an efficient migration method that can sometimes produce more focused images than conventional RTM.

  13. Least-squares reverse time migration of marine data with frequency-selection encoding

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wei

    2013-06-24

    The phase-encoding technique can sometimes increase the efficiency of the least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) by more than one order of magnitude. However, traditional random encoding functions require all the encoded shots to share the same receiver locations, thus limiting the usage to seismic surveys with a fixed spread geometry. We implement a frequency-selection encoding strategy that accommodates data with a marine streamer geometry. The encoding functions are delta functions in the frequency domain, so that all the encoded shots have unique nonoverlapping frequency content, and the receivers can distinguish the wavefield from each shot with a unique frequency band. Because the encoding functions are orthogonal to each other, there will be no crosstalk between different shots during modeling and migration. With the frequency-selection encoding method, the computational efficiency of LSRTM is increased so that its cost is comparable to conventional RTM for the Marmousi2 model and a marine data set recorded in the Gulf of Mexico. With more iterations, the LSRTM image quality is further improved by suppressing migration artifacts, balancing reflector amplitudes, and enhancing the spatial resolution. We conclude that LSRTM with frequency-selection is an efficient migration method that can sometimes produce more focused images than conventional RTM. © 2013 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  14. Time reversed test particle calculations at Titan, based on CAPS-IMS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebesi, Zsofia; Erdos, Geza; Szego, Karoly; Young, David T.

    2013-04-01

    We used the theoretical approach of Kobel and Flückiger (1994) to construct a magnetic environment model in the vicinity of Titan - with the exception of placing the bow shock (which is not present at Titan) into infinity. The model has 4 free parameters to calibrate the shape and orientation of the field. We investigate the CAPS-IMS Singles data to calculate/estimate the location of origin of the detected cold ions at Titan, and we also use the measurements of the onboard Magnetometer to set the parameters of the model magnetic field. A 4th order Runge-Kutta method is applied to calculate the test particle trajectories in a time reversed scenario, in the curved magnetic environment. Several different ion species can be tracked by the model along their possible trajectories, as a first approach we considered three particle groups (1, 2 and 16 amu ions). In this initial study we show the results for some thoroughly discussed flybys like TA, TB and T5, but we consider more recent tailside encounters as well. Reference: Kobel, E. and E.O. Flückiger, A model of the steady state magnetic field in the magnetosheath, JGR 99, Issue A12, 23617, 1994

  15. Time reversal optical tomography locates fluorescent targets in a turbid medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binlin; Cai, W.; Gayen, S. K.

    2013-03-01

    A fluorescence optical tomography approach that extends time reversal optical tomography (TROT) to locate fluorescent targets embedded in a turbid medium is introduced. It uses a multi-source illumination and multi-detector signal acquisition scheme, along with TR matrix formalism, and multiple signal classification (MUSIC) to construct pseudo-image of the targets. The samples consisted of a single or two small tubes filled with water solution of Indocyanine Green (ICG) dye as targets embedded in a 250 mm × 250 mm × 60 mm rectangular cell filled with Intralipid-20% suspension as the scattering medium. The ICG concentration was 1μM, and the Intralipid-20% concentration was adjusted to provide ~ 1-mm transport length for both excitation wavelength of 790 nm and fluorescence wavelength around 825 nm. The data matrix was constructed using the diffusely transmitted fluorescence signals for all scan positions, and the TR matrix was constructed by multiplying data matrix with its transpose. A pseudo spectrum was calculated using the signal subspace of the TR matrix. Tomographic images were generated using the pseudo spectrum. The peaks in the pseudo images provided locations of the target(s) with sub-millimeter accuracy. Concurrent transmission TROT measurements corroborated fluorescence-TROT findings. The results demonstrate that TROT is a fast approach that can be used to obtain accurate three-dimensional position information of fluorescence targets embedded deep inside a highly scattering medium, such as, a contrast-enhanced tumor in a human breast.

  16. Improving imaging quality using least-squares reverse time migration: application to data from Bohai basin

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Hao

    2017-07-07

    Least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) is a seismic imaging technique based on linear inversion, which usually aims to improve the quality of seismic image through removing the acquisition footprint, suppressing migration artifacts, and enhancing resolution. LSRTM has been shown to produce migration images with better quality than those computed by conventional migration. In this paper, our derivation of LSRTM approximates the near-incident reflection coefficient with the normal-incident reflection coefficient, which shows that the reflectivity term defined is related to the normal-incident reflection coefficient and the background velocity. With reflected data, LSRTM is mainly sensitive to impedance perturbations. According to an approximate relationship between them, we reformulate the perturbation related system into a reflection-coefficient related one. Then, we seek the inverted image through linearized iteration. In the proposed algorithm, we only need the migration velocity for LSRTM considering that the density changes gently when compared with migration velocity. To validate our algorithms, we first apply it to a synthetic case and then a field data set. Both applications illustrate that our imaging results are of good quality.

  17. Increasing The Electric Field For An Improved Search For Time-Reversal Violation Using Radium-225

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Adam

    2017-09-01

    Radium-225 atoms, because of their unusual pear-shaped nuclei, have an enhanced sensitivity to the violation of time reversal symmetry. A breakdown of this fundamental symmetry could help explain the apparent scarcity of antimatter in the Universe. Our goal is to improve the statistical sensitivity of an ongoing experiment that precisely measures the EDM of Radium-225. This can be done by increasing the electric field acting on the Radium atoms. We do this by increasing the voltage that can be reliably applied between two electrodes, and narrowing the gap between them. We use a varying high voltage system to condition the electrodes using incremental voltage ramp tests to achieve higher voltage potential differences. Using an adjustable gap mount to change the distance between the electrodes, specific metals for their composition, and a clean room procedure to keep particulates out of the system, we produce a higher and more stable electric field. Progress is marked by measurements of the leakage current between the electrodes during our incremental voltage ramp tests or emulated tests of the actual experiment, with low and constant current showing stability of the field. This project is supported by Michigan State University, and the US DOE, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  18. Time-reversed ultrasonically encoded optical focusing through highly scattering ex vivo human cataractous lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Shen, Yuecheng; Ruan, Haowen; Brodie, Frank L.; Wong, Terence T. W.; Yang, Changhuei; Wang, Lihong V.

    2018-01-01

    Normal development of the visual system in infants relies on clear images being projected onto the retina, which can be disrupted by lens opacity caused by congenital cataract. This disruption, if uncorrected in early life, results in amblyopia (permanently decreased vision even after removal of the cataract). Doctors are able to prevent amblyopia by removing the cataract during the first several weeks of life, but this surgery risks a host of complications, which can be equally visually disabling. Here, we investigated the feasibility of focusing light noninvasively through highly scattering cataractous lenses to stimulate the retina, thereby preventing amblyopia. This approach would allow the cataractous lens removal surgery to be delayed and hence greatly reduce the risk of complications from early surgery. Employing a wavefront shaping technique named time-reversed ultrasonically encoded optical focusing in reflection mode, we focused 532-nm light through a highly scattering ex vivo adult human cataractous lens. This work demonstrates a potential clinical application of wavefront shaping techniques.

  19. Theory of superconductivity with non-Hermitian and parity-time reversal symmetric Cooper pairing symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatak, Ananya; Das, Tanmoy

    2018-01-01

    Recently developed parity (P ) and time-reversal (T ) symmetric non-Hermitian systems govern a rich variety of new and characteristically distinct physical properties, which may or may not have a direct analog in their Hermitian counterparts. We study here a non-Hermitian, PT -symmetric superconducting Hamiltonian that possesses a real quasiparticle spectrum in the PT -unbroken region of the Brillouin zone. Within a single-band mean-field theory, we find that real quasiparticle energies are possible when the superconducting order parameter itself is either Hermitian or anti-Hermitian. Within the corresponding Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory, we find that several properties are characteristically distinct and novel in the non-Hermitian pairing case than its Hermitian counterpart. One of our significant findings is that while a Hermitian superconductor gives a second-order phase transition, the non-Hermitian one produces a robust first-order phase transition. The corresponding thermodynamic properties and the Meissner effect are also modified accordingly. Finally, we discuss how such a PT -symmetric pairing can emerge from an antisymmetric potential, such as the Dzyloshinskii-Moriya interaction, but with an external bath, or complex potential, among others.

  20. Time-reversed ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) focusing for deep-tissue optogenetic modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brake, Joshua; Ruan, Haowen; Robinson, J. Elliott; Liu, Yan; Gradinaru, Viviana; Yang, Changhuei

    2018-02-01

    The problem of optical scattering was long thought to fundamentally limit the depth at which light could be focused through turbid media such as fog or biological tissue. However, recent work in the field of wavefront shaping has demonstrated that by properly shaping the input light field, light can be noninvasively focused to desired locations deep inside scattering media. This has led to the development of several new techniques which have the potential to enhance the capabilities of existing optical tools in biomedicine. Unfortunately, extending these methods to living tissue has a number of challenges related to the requirements for noninvasive guidestar operation, speed, and focusing fidelity. Of existing wavefront shaping methods, time-reversed ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) focusing is well suited for applications in living tissue since it uses ultrasound as a guidestar which enables noninvasive operation and provides compatibility with optical phase conjugation for high-speed operation. In this paper, we will discuss the results of our recent work to apply TRUE focusing for optogenetic modulation, which enables enhanced optogenetic stimulation deep in tissue with a 4-fold spatial resolution improvement in 800-micron thick acute brain slices compared to conventional focusing, and summarize future directions to further extend the impact of wavefront shaping technologies in biomedicine.

  1. Odd-parity magnetoresistance in pyrochlore iridate thin films with broken time-reversal symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, T. C.; Kozuka, Y.; Uchida, M.; Tsukazaki, A.; Arima, T.; Kawasaki, M.

    2015-01-01

    A new class of materials termed topological insulators have been intensively investigated due to their unique Dirac surface state carrying dissipationless edge spin currents. Recently, it has been theoretically proposed that the three dimensional analogue of this type of band structure, the Weyl Semimetal phase, is materialized in pyrochlore oxides with strong spin-orbit coupling, accompanied by all-in-all-out spin ordering. Here, we report on the fabrication and magnetotransport of Eu2Ir2O7 single crystalline thin films. We reveal that one of the two degenerate all-in-all-out domain structures, which are connected by time-reversal operation, can be selectively formed by the polarity of the cooling magnetic field. Once formed, the domain is robust against an oppositely polarised magnetic field, as evidenced by an unusual odd field dependent term in the magnetoresistance and an anomalous term in the Hall resistance. Our findings pave the way for exploring the predicted novel quantum transport phenomenon at the surfaces/interfaces or magnetic domain walls of pyrochlore iridates. PMID:25959576

  2. Time-reversal symmetric work distributions for closed quantum dynamics in the histories framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Harry J D; Anders, Janet

    2017-01-01

    A central topic in the emerging field of quantum thermodynamics is the definition of thermodynamic work in the quantum regime. One widely used solution is to define work for a closed system undergoing non-equilibrium dynamics according to the two-point energy measurement scheme. However, due to the invasive nature of measurement the two-point quantum work probability distribution cannot describe the statistics of energy change from the perspective of the system alone. We here introduce the quantum histories framework as a method to characterise the thermodynamic properties of the unmeasured , closed dynamics. Constructing continuous power operator trajectories allows us to derive an alternative quantum work distribution for closed quantum dynamics that fulfils energy conservation and is time-reversal symmetric. This opens the possibility to compare the measured work with the unmeasured work, contrasting with the classical situation where measurement does not affect the work statistics. We find that the work distribution of the unmeasured dynamics leads to deviations from the classical Jarzynski equality and can have negative values highlighting distinctly non-classical features of quantum work. (fast track communication)

  3. Least-squares reverse time migration with local Radon-based preconditioning

    KAUST Repository

    Dutta, Gaurav

    2017-03-08

    Least-squares migration (LSM) can produce images with better balanced amplitudes and fewer artifacts than standard migration. The conventional objective function used for LSM minimizes the L2-norm of the data residual between the predicted and the observed data. However, for field-data applications in which the recorded data are noisy and undersampled, the conventional formulation of LSM fails to provide the desired uplift in the quality of the inverted image. We have developed a leastsquares reverse time migration (LSRTM) method using local Radon-based preconditioning to overcome the low signal-tonoise ratio (S/N) problem of noisy or severely undersampled data. A high-resolution local Radon transform of the reflectivity is used, and sparseness constraints are imposed on the inverted reflectivity in the local Radon domain. The sparseness constraint is that the inverted reflectivity is sparse in the Radon domain and each location of the subsurface is represented by a limited number of geologic dips. The forward and the inverse mapping of the reflectivity to the local Radon domain and vice versa is done through 3D Fourier-based discrete Radon transform operators. The weights for the preconditioning are chosen to be varying locally based on the relative amplitudes of the local dips or assigned using quantile measures. Numerical tests on synthetic and field data validate the effectiveness of our approach in producing images with good S/N and fewer aliasing artifacts when compared with standard RTM or standard LSRTM.

  4. Q-Least Squares Reverse Time Migration with Viscoacoustic Deblurring Filters

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yuqing

    2017-08-02

    Viscoacoustic least-squares reverse time migration (Q-LSRTM) linearly inverts for the subsurface reflectivity model from lossy data. Compared to the conventional migration methods, it can compensate for the amplitude loss in the migrated images because of the strong subsurface attenuation and can produce reflectors that are accurately positioned in depth. However, the adjoint Q propagators used for backward propagating the residual data are also attenuative. Thus, the inverted images from Q-LSRTM are often observed to have lower resolution when compared to the benchmark acoustic LSRTM images from acoustic data. To increase the resolution and accelerate the convergence of Q-LSRTM, we propose using viscoacoustic deblurring filters as a preconditioner for Q-LSRTM. These filters can be estimated by matching a simulated migration image to its reference reflectivity model. Numerical tests on synthetic and field data demonstrate that Q-LSRTM combined with viscoacoustic deblurring filters can produce images with higher resolution and more balanced amplitudes than images from acoustic RTM, acoustic LSRTM and Q-LSRTM when there is strong attenuation in the background medium. The proposed preconditioning method is also shown to improve the convergence rate of Q-LSRTM by more than 30 percent in some cases and significantly compensate for the lossy artifacts in RTM images.

  5. Conductance fluctuations in disordered superconductors with broken time-reversal symmetry near two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, S.; Furusaki, A.; Ludwig, A.W.W.; Mudry, C.

    2007-01-01

    We extend the analysis of the conductance fluctuations in disordered metals by Altshuler, Kravtsov, and Lerner (AKL) to disordered superconductors with broken time-reversal symmetry in d=(2+ε) dimensions (symmetry classes C and D of Altland and Zirnbauer). Using a perturbative renormalization group analysis of the corresponding non-linear sigma model (NLσM) we compute the anomalous scaling dimensions of the dominant scalar operators with 2s gradients to one-loop order. We show that, in analogy with the result of AKL for ordinary, metallic systems (Wigner-Dyson classes), an infinite number of high-gradient operators would become relevant (in the renormalization group sense) near two dimensions if contributions beyond one-loop order are ignored. We explore the possibility to compare, in symmetry class D, the ε=(2-d) expansion in d<2 with exact results in one dimension. The method we use to perform the one-loop renormalization analysis is valid for general symmetric spaces of Kaehler type, and suggests that this is a generic property of the perturbative treatment of NLσMs defined on Riemannian symmetric target spaces

  6. Nonuniversality in the spectral properties of time-reversal-invariant microwave networks and quantum graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Barbara; Yunko, Vitalii; Białous, Małgorzata; Bauch, Szymon; Ławniczak, Michał; Sirko, Leszek

    2017-05-01

    We present experimental and numerical results for the long-range fluctuation properties in the spectra of quantum graphs with chaotic classical dynamics and preserved time-reversal invariance. Such systems are generally believed to provide an ideal basis for the experimental study of problems originating from the field of quantum chaos and random matrix theory. Our objective is to demonstrate that this is true only for short-range fluctuation properties in the spectra, whereas the observation of deviations in the long-range fluctuations is typical for quantum graphs. This may be attributed to the unavoidable occurrence of short periodic orbits, which explore only the individual bonds forming a graph and thus do not sense the chaoticity of its dynamics. In order to corroborate our supposition, we performed numerous experimental and corresponding numerical studies of long-range fluctuations in terms of the number variance and the power spectrum. Furthermore, we evaluated length spectra and compared them to semiclassical ones obtained from the exact trace formula for quantum graphs.

  7. Universal reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Thompson, Rachel L.; Garver, Kyle A.; Hawley, Laura M.; Batts, William N.; Sprague, Laura; Sampson, Corie; Winton, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is an acute pathogen of salmonid fishes in North America, Europe and Asia and is reportable to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). Phylogenetic analysis has identified 5 major virus genogroups of IHNV worldwide, designated U, M, L, E and J; multiple subtypes also exist within those genogroups. Here, we report the development and validation of a universal IHNV reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR (RT-rPCR) assay targeting the IHNV nucleocapsid (N) gene. Properties of diagnostic sensitivity (DSe) and specificity (DSp) were defined using laboratory-challenged steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, and the new assay was compared to the OIE-accepted conventional PCR test and virus isolation in cell culture. The IHNV N gene RT-rPCR had 100% DSp and DSe and a higher estimated diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) than virus culture or conventional PCR. The RT-rPCR assay was highly repeatable within a laboratory and highly reproducible between laboratories. Field testing of the assay was conducted on a random sample of juvenile steelhead collected from a hatchery raceway experiencing an IHN epizootic. The RT-rPCR detected a greater number of positive samples than cell culture and there was 40% agreement between the 2 tests. Overall, the RT-rPCR assay was highly sensitive, specific, repeatable and reproducible and is suitable for use in a diagnostic setting.

  8. Elastic least-squares reverse time migration with velocities and density perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yingming; Li, Jinli; Huang, Jianping; Li, Zhenchun

    2018-02-01

    Elastic least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) based on the non-density-perturbation assumption can generate false-migrated interfaces caused by density variations. We perform an elastic LSRTM scheme with density variations for multicomponent seismic data to produce high-quality images in Vp, Vs and ρ components. However, the migrated images may suffer from crosstalk artefacts caused by P- and S-waves coupling in elastic LSRTM no matter what model parametrizations used. We have proposed an elastic LSRTM with density variations method based on wave modes separation to reduce these crosstalk artefacts by using P- and S-wave decoupled elastic velocity-stress equations to derive demigration equations and gradient formulae with respect to Vp, Vs and ρ. Numerical experiments with synthetic data demonstrate the capability and superiority of the proposed method. The imaging results suggest that our method promises imaging results with higher quality and has a faster residual convergence rate. Sensitivity analysis of migration velocity, migration density and stochastic noise verifies the robustness of the proposed method for field data.

  9. Reverse-time Migration in Tilted Transversely Isotropic Media with Decoupled Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Zhan, Ge

    2012-12-01

    Conventional modeling and migration for tilted transversely isotropic (TTI) media may suffer from numerical instabilities and shear wave artifacts due to the coupling of the P-wave and SV-wave modes in the TTI coupled equations. Starting with the separated P- and SV-phase velocity expressions for vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) media, I extend these decoupled equations for modeling and reverse-time migration (RTM) in acoustic TTI media. Compared with the TTI coupled equations published in the geophysical literature, the new TTI decoupled equations provide a more stable solution due to the complete separation of the P-wave and SV-wave modes. The pseudospectral (PS) method is the most convenient method to implement these equations due to the form of wavenumber expressions and has the added benefit of being highly accurate and thus avoiding numerical dispersion. The rapid expansion method (REM) in time is employed to produce a broad band numerically stable time evolution of the wavefields. Synthetic results validate the proposed TTI decoupled equations and show that modeling and RTM in TTI media with the decoupled P-wave equation remain numerically stable even for models with strong anisotropy and sharp contrasts. The most desirable feature of the TTI decoupled P-wave equation is that it is absolutely free of shear-wave artifacts and the consequent alleviation of numerical instabilities generally suffered by some systems of coupled equations. However, due to several forward-backward Fourier transforms in wavefield extrapolation at each time step, the computational cost is also high, and thereby hampers its prevalence. I hereby propose to use a hybrid pseudospectral and finite-difference (FD) scheme to solve the TTI decoupled P-wave equation. In the hybrid solution, most of the cost-consuming wavenumber terms in the equation are replaced by inexpensive FD operators, which in turn accelerates the computation and reduces the computational cost. To demonstrate the

  10. Cytogenetic and real-time quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analyses in pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guidong; Ogose, Akira; Kawashima, Hiroyuki; Umezu, Hajime; Hotta, Tetsuo; Tohyama, Tsuyoshi; Ariizumi, Takashi; Endo, Naoto

    2009-07-01

    Pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma (PRMS) is a rare variant of rhabdomyosarcoma that occurs mostly in adults. A few cytogenetic studies of PRMS have been reported, but no consistent specific chromosome aberrations were detected. We herein report a cytogenetic study of three cases of pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma using a conventional G-banded karyotyping analysis. The three cases appeared to exhibit an extremely complex karyotype with numeric and structural rearrangements. Although the three cases displayed several common aberrations, including -2, -4, -9, -13, -14, -15, -19, -21, add(X)(p11), add(1)(q11), add(7)(p11), and add(13)(p11), no recurrent characteristic chromosomal aberrations could be detected. In addition, among these cases and seven other cases of previously reported PRMS, the most frequent chromosomal alterations were -2, -13, -14, -15, -16, and -19. No obviously consistent structural alterations can be found in these 10 PRMS cases, however, thereby suggesting that it is difficult to confirm whether these complex karyotypes correlated with the diagnosis or clinical outcome in PRMS. In this study, we detected MyoD1 and myogenin gene transcripts at the mRNA level in four cases of PRMS together with other soft-tissue sarcomas, including seven cases of malignant fibrous hitiocytoma, five cases of liposacroma, and three cases of leiomyosacroma using a real-time quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. High-level expressions of MyoD1 and myogenin gene transcripts were determined in all cases of PRMS. In contrast, the other non-PRMS sarcomas showed either no expression or extremely weak expressions for both genes. Our findings suggest that the detections of MyoD1 and myogenin transcripts using real-time quantitative RT-PCR, combined with immunohistochemical stains, are extremely sensitive and useful for the diagnosis of PRMS.

  11. On-chip single-copy real-time reverse-transcription PCR in isolated picoliter droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, N R; Wheeler, E; Lee-Houghton, L; Watkins, N; Nasarabadi, S; Hebert, N; Leung, P; Arnold, D; Bailey, C; Colston, B

    2007-12-19

    The first lab-on-chip system for picoliter droplet generation and RNA isolation, followed by reverse transcription, and PCR amplification with real-time fluorescence detection in the trapped droplets has been developed. The system utilized a shearing T-junction in a fused silica device to generate a stream of monodisperse picoliter-scale droplets that were isolated from the microfluidic channel walls and each other by the oil phase carrier. An off-chip valving system stopped the droplets on-chip, allowing thermal cycling for reverse transcription and subsequent PCR amplification without droplet motion. This combination of the established real-time reverse transcription-PCR assay with digital microfluidics is ideal for isolating single-copy RNA and virions from a complex environment, and will be useful in viral discovery and gene-profiling applications.

  12. Full-waveform detection of non-impulsive seismic events based on time-reversal methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Ericka Alinne; Hjörleifsdóttir, Vala; Liu, Qinya

    2017-12-01

    We present a full-waveform detection method for non-impulsive seismic events, based on time-reversal principles. We use the strain Green's tensor as a matched filter, correlating it with continuous observed seismograms, to detect non-impulsive seismic events. We show that this is mathematically equivalent to an adjoint method for detecting earthquakes. We define the detection function, a scalar valued function, which depends on the stacked correlations for a group of stations. Event detections are given by the times at which the amplitude of the detection function exceeds a given value relative to the noise level. The method can make use of the whole seismic waveform or any combination of time-windows with different filters. It is expected to have an advantage compared to traditional detection methods for events that do not produce energetic and impulsive P waves, for example glacial events, landslides, volcanic events and transform-fault earthquakes for events which velocity structure along the path is relatively well known. Furthermore, the method has advantages over empirical Greens functions template matching methods, as it does not depend on records from previously detected events, and therefore is not limited to events occurring in similar regions and with similar focal mechanisms as these events. The method is not specific to any particular way of calculating the synthetic seismograms, and therefore complicated structural models can be used. This is particularly beneficial for intermediate size events that are registered on regional networks, for which the effect of lateral structure on the waveforms can be significant. To demonstrate the feasibility of the method, we apply it to two different areas located along the mid-oceanic ridge system west of Mexico where non-impulsive events have been reported. The first study area is between Clipperton and Siqueiros transform faults (9°N), during the time of two earthquake swarms, occurring in March 2012 and May

  13. Closeout Report - Search for Time Reversal Symmetry Violation with TREK at J-PARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohl, Michael [Hampton Univ., VA (United States)

    2015-04-15

    academic positions. Two former graduate students of the group have graduated and received their PhD degrees in nuclear physics (Dr. Anusha Liyanage and Dr. Ozgur Ates). In particular, this award has enabled Dr. Kohl to pursue the TREK project (Time Reversal Experiment with Kaons) at J-PARC, which he has been leading and advancing as International Spokesperson. Originally proposed as a search for time reversal symmetry violation [6], the project has evolved into a precision test of lepton flavor universality in the Standard Model along with sensitive searches for physics beyond the Standard Model through a possible discovery of new particles such as a sterile neutrino or a neutral gauge boson from the hidden sector in the mass region up to 300 MeV/c2 [7]. Experiment TREK/E36, first proposed in 2010, has been mounted between November 2014 and April 2015, and commissioning with beam has been started in April 2015, with production running anticipated in early summer and late fall 2015. It uses the apparatus from the previous KEK/E-246 experiment with partial upgrades to measure the ratio of decay widths of leptonic two-body decays of the charged kaon to µν and eν, respectively, which is highly sensitive to the ratio of electromagnetic charged lepton couplings and possible new physics processes that could differentiate between μ and e, hence breaking lepton flavor universality of the Standard Model. Through the searches for neutral massive particles, TREK/E36 can severely constrain any new physics scenarios designed to explain the proton radius puzzle [12, 13].

  14. Final Project Report: Imaging Fault Zones Using a Novel Elastic Reverse-Time Migration Imaging Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chen, Ting [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tan, Sirui [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lin, Youzuo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gao, Kai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-10

    Imaging fault zones and fractures is crucial for geothermal operators, providing important information for reservoir evaluation and management strategies. However, there are no existing techniques available for directly and clearly imaging fault zones, particularly for steeply dipping faults and fracture zones. In this project, we developed novel acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion methods for high-resolution velocity model building. In addition, we developed acoustic and elastic reverse-time migration methods for high-resolution subsurface imaging of complex subsurface structures and steeply-dipping fault/fracture zones. We first evaluated and verified the improved capabilities of our newly developed seismic inversion and migration imaging methods using synthetic seismic data. Our numerical tests verified that our new methods directly image subsurface fracture/fault zones using surface seismic reflection data. We then applied our novel seismic inversion and migration imaging methods to a field 3D surface seismic dataset acquired at the Soda Lake geothermal field using Vibroseis sources. Our migration images of the Soda Lake geothermal field obtained using our seismic inversion and migration imaging algorithms revealed several possible fault/fracture zones. AltaRock Energy, Inc. is working with Cyrq Energy, Inc. to refine the geologic interpretation at the Soda Lake geothermal field. Trenton Cladouhos, Senior Vice President R&D of AltaRock, was very interested in our imaging results of 3D surface seismic data from the Soda Lake geothermal field. He planed to perform detailed interpretation of our images in collaboration with James Faulds and Holly McLachlan of University of Nevada at Reno. Using our high-resolution seismic inversion and migration imaging results can help determine the optimal locations to drill wells for geothermal energy production and reduce the risk of geothermal exploration.

  15. Mirror Neurons and Mirror-Touch Synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkovski, Omer; Katzin, Naama; Salti, Moti

    2016-05-30

    Since mirror neurons were introduced to the neuroscientific community more than 20 years ago, they have become an elegant and intuitive account for different cognitive mechanisms (e.g., empathy, goal understanding) and conditions (e.g., autism spectrum disorders). Recently, mirror neurons were suggested to be the mechanism underlying a specific type of synesthesia. Mirror-touch synesthesia is a phenomenon in which individuals experience somatosensory sensations when seeing someone else being touched. Appealing as it is, careful delineation is required when applying this mechanism. Using the mirror-touch synesthesia case, we put forward theoretical and methodological issues that should be addressed before relying on the mirror-neurons account. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Time-controllable Nkcc1 knockdown replicates reversible hearing loss in postnatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Takahisa; Xu, Ming; Watanabe, Miho; Nabekura, Junichi; Higuchi, Taiga; Hori, Karin; Sato, Mitsuo P; Nin, Fumiaki; Hibino, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Kaoru; Masuda, Masatsugu; Tanaka, Kenji F

    2017-10-19

    Identification of the causal effects of specific proteins on recurrent and partially reversible hearing loss has been difficult because of the lack of an animal model that provides reversible gene knockdown. We have developed the transgenic mouse line Actin-tTS::Nkcc1 tetO/tetO for manipulatable expression of the cochlear K + circulation protein, NKCC1. Nkcc1 transcription was blocked by the binding of a tetracycline-dependent transcriptional silencer to the tetracycline operator sequences inserted upstream of the Nkcc1 translation initiation site. Administration of the tetracycline derivative doxycycline reversibly regulated Nkcc1 knockdown. Progeny from pregnant/lactating mothers fed doxycycline-free chow from embryonic day 0 showed strong suppression of Nkcc1 expression (~90% downregulation) and Nkcc1 null phenotypes at postnatal day 35 (P35). P35 transgenic mice from mothers fed doxycycline-free chow starting at P0 (delivery) showed weaker suppression of Nkcc1 expression (~70% downregulation) and less hearing loss with mild cochlear structural changes. Treatment of these mice at P35 with doxycycline for 2 weeks reactivated Nkcc1 transcription to control levels and improved hearing level at high frequency; i.e., these doxycycline-treated mice exhibited partially reversible hearing loss. Thus, development of the Actin-tTS::Nkcc1 tetO/tetO transgenic mouse line provides a mouse model for the study of variable hearing loss through reversible knockdown of Nkcc1.

  17. Validated RealTime reverse transcriptase PCR methods for the diagnosis and pathotyping of Eurasian H7 avian influenza viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slomka, M.J.; Pavlidis, T.; Coward, V.J.; Voermans, J.; Koch, G.; Hanna, A.; Banks, J.; Brown, I.H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Avian influenza (AI) caused by H7 AI viruses (AIVs) of both low pathogenicity (LP) and high pathogenicity (HP) are notifiable poultry diseases. Objectives Design and validate two RealTime reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (RRT PCRs) for Eurasian H7 AIV detection and

  18. Reverse transcriptase real-time PCR for detection and quantification of viable Campylobacter jejuni directly from poultry faecal samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bui, Thanh Xuan; Wolff, Anders; Madsen, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter spp. is the most common cause of bacterial diarrhoea in humans worldwide. Therefore, rapid and reliable methods fordetection and quantification of this pathogen are required. In this study, we have developed a reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR(RT-qPCR) for detection a...

  19. Validation of a real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR assay for the detection of H7 avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    A subtype specific H7 real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay developed by the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL) for the detection of H7 in North and South American wild aquatic birds and poultry was validated as a collaborative effort by the SEPRL and Na...

  20. Durable solar mirror films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, Mark B.; Henderson, Andrew J.; Hebrink, Timothy J.; Katare, Rajesh K.; Jing, Naiyong; North, Diane; Peterson, Eric M.

    2017-02-14

    The present disclosure generally relates to durable solar mirror films, methods of making durable solar mirror films, and constructions including durable solar mirror films. In one embodiment, the present disclosure relates to a solar mirror film comprising: a multilayer optical film layer including having a coefficient of hygroscopic expansion of less than about 30 ppm per percent relative humidity; and a reflective layer having a coefficient of hygroscopic expansion.

  1. Use of a Structured Mirrors Intervention Does Not Reduce Delirium Incidence But May Improve Factual Memory Encoding in Cardiac Surgical ICU Patients Aged Over 70 Years: A Pilot Time-Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Kimberly; Pontin, Megan; Sharples, Linda D; Fletcher, Paul; Dalgleish, Tim; Eden, Allaina; Jenkins, David P; Vuylsteke, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Post-operative delirium remains a significant problem, particularly in the older surgical patient. Previous evidence suggests that the provision of supplementary visual feedback about ones environment via the use of a mirror may positively impact on mental status and attention (core delirium diagnostic domains). We aimed to explore whether use of an evidence-based mirrors intervention could be effective in reducing delirium and improving post-operative outcomes such as factual memory encoding of the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) environment in older cardiac surgical patients. Methods: This was a pilot time-cluster randomized controlled trial at a 32-bed ICU, enrolling 223 patients aged 70 years and over, admitted to ICU after elective or urgent cardiac surgery from October 29, 2012 to June 23, 2013. The Mirrors Group received a structured mirrors intervention at set times (e.g., following change in mental status). The Usual Care Group received the standard care without mirrors. Primary outcome was ICU delirium incidence; secondary outcomes were ICU delirium days, ICU days with altered mental status or inattention, total length of ICU stay, physical mobilization (balance confidence) at ICU discharge, recall of factual and delusional ICU memories at 12 weeks, Health-Related Quality of Life at 12 weeks, and acceptability of the intervention. Results: The intervention was not associated with a significant reduction in ICU delirium incidence [Mirrors: 20/115 (17%); Usual Care: 17/108 (16%)] or duration [Mirrors: 1 (1-3); Usual Care: 2 (1-8)]. Use of the intervention on ICU was predictive of significantly higher recall of factual (but not delusional) items at 12 weeks after surgery ( p = 0.003) and acceptability was high, with clinicians using mirrors at 86% of all recorded hourly observations. The intervention did not significantly impact on other secondary outcomes. Conclusion: Use of a structured mirrors intervention on the post-operative ICU does not reduce

  2. Use of a structured mirrors intervention does not reduce delirium incidence but may improve factual memory encoding in cardiac surgical ICU patients aged over 70 years: a pilot time-cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Giraud

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postoperative delirium remains a significant problem, particularly in the older surgical patient. Previous evidence suggests that the provision of supplementary visual feedback about ones environment via the use of a mirror may positively impact on mental status and attention (core delirium diagnostic domains. We aimed to explore whether use of an evidence-based mirrors intervention could be effective in reducing delirium and improving postoperative outcomes such as factual memory encoding of the Intensive Care Unit (ICU environment in older cardiac surgical patients.Methods: This was a pilot time-cluster randomised controlled trial at a 32-bed ICU, enrolling 223 patients aged 70 years and over, admitted to ICU after elective or urgent cardiac surgery from 29 October 2012 to 23 June 2013. The Mirrors Group received a structured mirrors intervention at set times (e.g., following change in mental status. The Usual Care Group received the standard care without mirrors. Primary outcome was ICU delirium incidence; secondary outcomes were ICU delirium days, ICU days with altered mental status or inattention, total length of ICU stay, physical mobilisation (balance confidence at ICU discharge, recall of factual and delusional ICU memories at 12 weeks, Health-Related Quality of Life at 12 weeks, and acceptability of the intervention.Results: The intervention was not associated with a significant reduction in ICU delirium incidence Mirrors: 20/115 (17%; Usual Care: 17/108 (16% or duration Mirrors: 1 (1-3; Usual Care: 2 (1-8. Use of the intervention on ICU was predictive of significantly higher recall of factual (but not delusional items at 12 weeks after surgery (p=0.003 and acceptability was high, with clinicians using mirrors at 86% of all recorded hourly observations. The intervention did not significantly impact on other secondary outcomes.Conclusion: Use of a structured mirrors intervention on the postoperative ICU does not reduce

  3. Time Reversal of Arbitrary Photonic Temporal Modes via Nonlinear Optical Frequency Conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Raymer, Michael G; Reddy, Dileep V; van Enk, Steven J; McKinstrie, Colin J

    2017-01-01

    Single-photon wave packets can carry quantum information between nodes of a quantum network. An important general operation in photon-based quantum information systems is blind reversal of a photon's temporal wave-packet envelope, that is, the ability to reverse an envelope without knowing the temporal state of the photon. We present an all-optical means for doing so, using nonlinear-optical frequency conversion driven by a short pump pulse. This scheme allows for quantum operations such as a...

  4. P-odd component of time-reversal symmetry violation. Manifestation in nuclear processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchuvil'sky, Yu.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The problem of fundamental symmetries and the effects breaking them is one of the basic challenges of modern physics. There are grounds to assume that the major contributor to these effects is placed beyond the standard model. Nuclear processes are usable tests on T-even P-odd, T-odd P-even, and T-odd P-odd effects. The first type of them is rather well-studied. The possibilities to measure an effect of the second type seem to be poor in the discussed processes. At the same time search for time-reversal P-odd (PT-) symmetry violation offers promise for experimental investigation due to existence of nuclear enhancement effects analogous to T-even P-odd ones. An investigation of the effect in nuclear processes is considered as a promising source of the information which is complementary to that obtained in the framework of K- and B-meson experiments and measurements of the electric dipole moments of elementary particles and atoms. The matter is that the amplitudes specific for PT-symmetry violation in NN-interaction (isovector meson exchange amplitude for example) turn out to be essential or even dominating in the discussed case. In the present talk the results of the analysis of capability of the wide range of experimental schemes are presented. This analysis demonstrates the significant advantage of the scheme based on the measurement of linear polarization of gamma radiation of oriented (by an incident particle, or by a preceding alpha-decay, or by cryogenic means) sample. Indeed, the discussed approach, on the one hand, allows one to remove cumbersome coincident schemes and, on the other hand, the formalism of the approach is usually characterized by a relatively large spin factor in the relation connecting the correlation effect in a nucleus with the elementary amplitude. The estimations demonstrate that in appropriate cases the upper limit to the PT-violation effect of about 10 -3 of the observed P-odd effect in the same nucleus may be obtained. This

  5. Time resolved reversal of spin-spiral domains by an electric field in multiferroic MnWO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thielen, Philip; Hoffmann, Tim; Fiebig, Manfred [University Bonn, HISKP (Germany); Becker, Petra; Bohaty, Ladislav [Institut fuer Kristallographie, Universitaet Koeln (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The interaction of magnetic and ferroelectric order is intrinsically strong in spin-spiral multiferroics. Here the complex magnetic long range order breaks inversion symmetry and induces a spontaneous electric polarization. The interaction allows for switching of the magnetization by means of an applied electric field and is thus of great interest for possible applications. So far there exists little information on the time scale and dynamics of the actual switching process. Here we report time resolved measurements of the reversal of spin-spiral domains in multiferroic MnWO{sub 4} by optical second harmonic generation. Magnetic single-domain states are created by the application of an electric field. By reversing its polarity, a reversal of the magnetic domain state occurs. The time scale of the dynamic switching process is found to be in the ms region. Images of the domain-reversal process are obtained. The dynamic domain pattern differs substantially from that of quasi-statically switched multi domain structures.

  6. Mirror matter and primordial black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Nicole F.; Volkas, Raymond R.

    1998-01-01

    A consequence of the evaporation of primordial black holes in the early universe may be the generation of mirror matter. This would have implications with regard to dark matter, and the number of light particle species in equilibrium at the time of big bang nucleosynthesis. The possibilities for the production of mirror matter by this mechanism are explored.

  7. Evolution of the mirror approach to fusion: some conjectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    Some possible directions for the future evolution of the mirror approach to fusion are outlined, in the context of economically-motivated criteria. Speculations are given as to the potential advantages, economic and otherwise, of the use of axially-symmetric systems, operated in semi-collisional regimes of lower Q (fusion power balance ratio) than that projected for present-day tandem mirror designs. These regims include barely tandem modes, and ion-heated modes, in association with higher efficiency direct conversion. Another possible economically advantageous approach mentioned is the use of a tandem mirror plasma to stabilize a FRM (field-reversed mirror) plasma, with potential synergistic advantages

  8. Symmetry analysis of odd- and even-frequency superconducting gap symmetries for time-reversal symmetric interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geilhufe, R. Matthias; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2018-01-01

    Odd-frequency superconductivity describes a class of superconducting states where the superconducting gap is an odd function in relative time and Matsubara frequency. We present a group theoretical analysis based on the linearized gap equation in terms of Shubnikov groups of the second kind. By discussing systems with spin-orbit coupling and an interaction kernel which is symmetric under the reversal of relative time, we show that both even- and odd-frequency gaps are allowed to occur. Specific examples are discussed for the square lattice, the octahedral lattice, and the tetragonal lattice. For irreducible representations that are even under the reversal of relative time the common combinations of s - and d -wave spin singlet and p -wave spin triplet gaps are revealed, irreducible representations that are odd under reversal of relative time give rise to s - and d -wave spin triplet and p -wave spin singlet gaps. Furthermore, we discuss the construction of a generalized Ginzburg-Landau theory in terms of the associated irreducible representations. The result complements the established classification of superconducting states of matter.

  9. Implementation on Electronic Circuits and RTR Pragmatical Adaptive Synchronization: Time-Reversed Uncertain Dynamical Systems' Analysis and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yu Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We expose the chaotic attractors of time-reversed nonlinear system, further implement its behavior on electronic circuit, and apply the pragmatical asymptotically stability theory to strictly prove that the adaptive synchronization of given master and slave systems with uncertain parameters can be achieved. In this paper, the variety chaotic motions of time-reversed Lorentz system are investigated through Lyapunov exponents, phase portraits, and bifurcation diagrams. For further applying the complex signal in secure communication and file encryption, we construct the circuit to show the similar chaotic signal of time-reversed Lorentz system. In addition, pragmatical asymptotically stability theorem and an assumption of equal probability for ergodic initial conditions (Ge et al., 1999, Ge and Yu, 2000, and Matsushima, 1972 are proposed to strictly prove that adaptive control can be accomplished successfully. The current scheme of adaptive control—by traditional Lyapunov stability theorem and Barbalat lemma, which are used to prove the error vector—approaches zero, as time approaches infinity. However, the core question—why the estimated or given parameters also approach to the uncertain parameters—remains without answer. By the new stability theory, those estimated parameters can be proved approaching the uncertain values strictly, and the simulation results are shown in this paper.

  10. Speckle-scale focusing in the diffusive regime with time reversal of variance-encoded light (TROVE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judkewitz, Benjamin; Wang, Ying Min; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Mathy, Alexandre; Yang, Changhuei

    2013-04-01

    Focusing of light in the diffusive regime inside scattering media has long been considered impossible. Recently, this limitation has been overcome with time reversal of ultrasound-encoded light (TRUE), but the resolution of this approach is fundamentally limited by the large number of optical modes within the ultrasound focus. Here, we introduce a new approach, time reversal of variance-encoded light (TROVE), which demixes these spatial modes by variance encoding to break the resolution barrier imposed by the ultrasound. By encoding individual spatial modes inside the scattering sample with unique variances, we effectively uncouple the system resolution from the size of the ultrasound focus. This enables us to demonstrate optical focusing and imaging with diffuse light at an unprecedented, speckle-scale lateral resolution of ~5 µm.

  11. Speckle-scale focusing in the diffusive regime with time-reversal of variance-encoded light (TROVE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judkewitz, Benjamin; Wang, Ying Min; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Mathy, Alexandre; Yang, Changhuei

    2013-04-01

    Focusing of light in the diffusive regime inside scattering media has long been considered impossible. Recently, this limitation has been overcome with time reversal of ultrasound-encoded light (TRUE), but the resolution of this approach is fundamentally limited by the large number of optical modes within the ultrasound focus. Here, we introduce a new approach, time reversal of variance-encoded light (TROVE), which demixes these spatial modes by variance-encoding to break the resolution barrier imposed by the ultrasound. By encoding individual spatial modes inside the scattering sample with unique variances, we effectively uncouple the system resolution from the size of the ultrasound focus. This enables us to demonstrate optical focusing and imaging with diffuse light at unprecedented, speckle-scale lateral resolution of ~ 5 μm.

  12. Real-Time Reverse Transcription PCR as a Tool to Study Virulence Gene Regulation in Bacterial Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviv, Gili; Gal-Mor, Ohad

    2018-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is a highly sensitive and reliable method for detection and quantification of DNA. When combined with a prior stage of RNA reverse transcription to generate complementary DNA (cDNA), this is a powerful approach to determine and analyze gene transcriptional expression. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR has become the gold standard method in studying genes expression and virulence regulation under various genetic backgrounds (e.g., in the absence of regulators) or environmental conditions. Here we demonstrate the utilization of this approach to study the transcriptional regulation of the conjugation pilus of the Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis virulence plasmid (pESI).

  13. Test of parity-conserving time-reversal invariance using polarized neutrons and nuclear spin aligned holmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffman, P.R.; Roberson, N.R.; Wilburn, W.S.; Gould, C.R.; Haase, D.G.; Keith, C.D.; Raichle, B.W.; Seely, M.L.; Walston, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    A test of parity-conserving, time-reversal noninvariance (PC TRNI) has been performed in 5.9 MeV polarized neutron transmission through nuclear spin aligned holmium. The experiment searches for the T-violating fivefold correlation via a double modulation technique emdash flipping the neutron spin while rotating the alignment axis of the holmium. Relative cross sections for spin-up and spin-down neutrons are found to be equal to within 1.2x10 -5 (80% confidence). This is a two orders of magnitude improvement compared to traditional detailed balance studies of time reversal, and represents the most precise test of PC TRNI in a dynamical process, to our knowledge. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  14. A model-based time-reversal of left ventricular motion improves cardiac motion analysis using tagged MRI data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook Larry T

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial motion is an important observable for the assessment of heart condition. Accurate estimates of ventricular (LV wall motion are required for quantifying myocardial deformation and assessing local tissue function and viability. Harmonic Phase (HARP analysis was developed for measuring regional LV motion using tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI data. With current computer-aided postprocessing tools including HARP analysis, large motions experienced by myocardial tissue are, however, often intractable to measure. This paper addresses this issue and provides a solution to make such measurements possible. Methods To improve the estimation performance of large cardiac motions while analyzing tMRI data sets, we propose a two-step solution. The first step involves constructing a model to describe average systolic motion of the LV wall within a subject group. The second step involves time-reversal of the model applied as a spatial coordinate transformation to digitally relax the contracted LV wall in the experimental data of a single subject to the beginning of systole. Cardiac tMRI scans were performed on four healthy rats and used for developing the forward LV model. Algorithms were implemented for preprocessing the tMRI data, optimizing the model parameters and performing the HARP analysis. Slices from the midventricular level were then analyzed for all systolic phases. Results The time-reversal operation derived from the LV model accounted for the bulk portion of the myocardial motion, which was the average motion experienced within the overall subject population. In analyzing the individual tMRI data sets, removing this average with the time-reversal operation left small magnitude residual motion unique to the case. This remaining residual portion of the motion was estimated robustly using the HARP analysis. Conclusion Utilizing a combination of the forward LV model and its time reversal improves the performance of

  15. Surface hopping, transition state theory and decoherence. I. Scattering theory and time-reversibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amber; Herman, Michael F; Ouyang, Wenjun; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2015-10-07

    We provide an in-depth investigation of transmission coefficients as computed using the augmented-fewest switches surface hopping algorithm in the low energy regime. Empirically, microscopic reversibility is shown to hold approximately. Furthermore, we show that, in some circumstances, including decoherence on top of surface hopping calculations can help recover (as opposed to destroy) oscillations in the transmission coefficient as a function of energy; these oscillations can be studied analytically with semiclassical scattering theory. Finally, in the spirit of transition state theory, we also show that transmission coefficients can be calculated rather accurately starting from the curve crossing point and running trajectories forwards and backwards.

  16. Standard mirror fusion reactor design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    This report covers the work of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Division's reactor study group during FY 1976 on the standard mirror reactor. The ''standard'' mirror reactor is characterized as a steady state, neutral beam sustained, D-T fusioning plasma confined by a Yin-Yang magnetic mirror field. The physics parameters are obtained from the same physics model that explains the 2XIIB experiment. The model assumes that the drift cyclotron loss cone mode occurs on the boundary of the plasma, and that it is stabilized by warm plasma with negligible energy investment. The result of the study was a workable mirror fusion power plant, steady-state blanket removal made relatively simple by open-ended geometry, and no impurity problem due to the positive plasma potential. The Q (fusion power/injected beam power) turns out to be only 1.1 because of loss out the ends from Coulomb collisions, i.e., classical losses. This low Q resulted in 77% of the gross electrical power being used to power the injectors, thereby causing the net power cost to be high. The low Q stimulated an intensive search for Q-enhancement concepts, resulting in the LLL reactor design effort turning to the field reversal mirror and the tandem mirror, each having Q of order 5

  17. Comparison of extended mean-reversion and time series models for electricity spot price simulation considering negative prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keles, Dogan; Genoese, Massimo; Möst, Dominik; Fichtner, Wolf

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates different financial price and time series models, such as mean reversion, autoregressive moving average (ARMA), integrated ARMA (ARIMA) and general autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (GARCH) process, usually applied for electricity price simulations. However, as these models are developed to describe the stochastic behaviour of electricity prices, they are extended by a separate data treatment for the deterministic components (trend, daily, weekly and annual cycles) of electricity spot prices. Furthermore price jumps are considered and implemented within a regime-switching model. Since 2008 market design allows for negative prices at the European Energy Exchange, which also occurred for several hours in the last years. Up to now, only a few financial and time series approaches exist, which are able to capture negative prices. This paper presents a new approach incorporating negative prices. The evaluation of the different approaches presented points out that the mean reversion and the ARMA models deliver the lowest mean root square error between simulated and historical electricity spot prices gained from the European Energy Exchange. These models posses also lower mean average errors than GARCH models. Hence, they are more suitable to simulate well-fitting price paths. Furthermore it is shown that the daily structure of historical price curves is better captured applying ARMA or ARIMA processes instead of mean-reversion or GARCH models. Another important outcome of the paper is that the regime-switching approach and the consideration of negative prices via the new proposed approach lead to a significant improvement of the electricity price simulation. - Highlights: ► Considering negative prices improves the results of time-series and financial models for electricity prices. ► Regime-switching approach captures the jumps and base prices quite well. ► Removing and separate modelling of deterministic annual, weekly and daily

  18. The Influence of Reading Expertise in Mirror-Letter Perception: Evidence from Beginning and Expert Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunabeitia, Jon Andoni; Dimitropoulou, María; Estevez, Adelina; Carreiras, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The visual word recognition system recruits neuronal systems originally developed for object perception which are characterized by orientation insensitivity to mirror reversals. It has been proposed that during reading acquisition beginning readers have to "unlearn" this natural tolerance to mirror reversals in order to efficiently…

  19. PZT-Based Detection of Compactness of Concrete in Concrete Filled Steel Tube Using Time Reversal Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A smart aggregate-based approach is proposed for the concrete compactness detection of concrete filled steel tube (CFST columns. The piezoceramic-based smart aggregates (SAs were embedded in the predetermined locations prior to the casting of concrete columns to establish a wave-based smart sensing system for the concrete compactness detection purpose. To evaluate the efficiency of the developed approach, six specimens of the CFST columns with the rectangular cross-section were produced by placing some artificial defects during casting of concrete for simulating various uncompacted voids such as cavities, cracks, and debond. During the test, the time reversal technology was applied to rebuild the received signals and launch the reversed signals again by SAs, to overcome the issue of the lack of the prototype. Based on the proposed nonprototype, two indices of time reversibility (TR and symmetry (SYM were applied to relatively evaluate the level of concrete compactness in the range of the two SAs. The experimental results show that the developed method can effectively detect the compactness of concrete in CFST columns.

  20. Second-quantized mirror symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, Sergio; Strominger, A; Vafa, C

    1995-01-01

    We propose and give strong evidence for a duality relating Type II theories on Calabi-Yau spaces and heterotic strings on K3 \\times T^2, both of which have N=2 spacetime supersymmetry. Entries in the dictionary relating the dual theories are derived from an analysis of the soliton string worldsheet in the context of N=2 orbifolds of dual N=4 compactifications of Type II and heterotic strings. In particular we construct a pairing between Type II string theory on a self-mirror Calabi-Yau space X with h^{11}= h^{21}= 11 and a (4, 0) background of heterotic string theory on K3\\times T^2. Under the duality transformation the usual first-quantized mirror symmetry of X becomes a second-quantized mirror symmetry which determines nonperturbative quantum effects. This enables us to compute the exact quantum moduli space. Mirror symmetry of X implies that the low-energy N=2 gauge theory is finite, even at enhanced symmetry points. This prediction is verified by direct computation on the heterotic side. Other branches of...

  1. Current status and future prospect of space and time reversal symmetry violation on low energy neutron reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Yasuhiro

    1993-01-01

    In this report, the papers on symmetry violation under space reflection and time reversal and neutron spin, neutron spin rotation and P-violation, parity nonconservation in neutron capture reaction, some advantage of the search for CP-violation in neutron scattering, dynamic polarization of 139 La target, alexandrite laser for optical pumping, polarized 3 He system for T- and P-violation neutron experiments, control of neutron spin in T-violation neutron experiment, symmetry regarding time and space and angular distribution and angular correlation of radiation and particle beams, T-violation due to low temperature nuclear polarization and axion exploration using nuclear transition are collected. (K.I.)

  2. The Use of Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR for Assessing Estrogen Receptor and Estrogen-Responsive Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booze, Michelle L; Eyster, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), also known as quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), is a powerful tool for assessing gene transcription levels. The technique is especially useful for measuring estrogen receptor transcript levels as well as gene expression changes in response to estrogen stimulation as it is quick, accurate, robust, and allows the measurement of gene expression in a variety of tissues and cells. This chapter describes the protocols used for the real-time RT-PCR assay using hydrolysis (TaqMan-type) probes.

  3. Seven (and a half) reasons to believe in mirror matter: from neutrino puzzles to the inferred dark matter in the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foot, R.

    2001-02-01

    Parity and time reversal are obvious and plausible candidates for fundamental symmetries of nature. Hypothesising that these symmetries exist implies the existence of a new form of matter, called mirror matter. The mirror matter theory (or exact parity model) makes four main predictions: 1) Dark matter in the form of mirror matter should exist in the Universe (i.e. mirror galaxies, stars, planets, meteoroids...), 2) Maximal ordinary neutrino - mirror neutrino oscillations if neutrinos have mass, 3) Orthopositronium should have a shorter effective lifetime than predicted by QED (in 'vacuum' experiments) because of the effects of photon-mirror photon mixing and 4) Higgs production and decay rate should be 50% lower than in the standard model due to Higgs mirror - Higgs mixing (assuming that the separation of the Higgs masses is larger than their decay widths). At the present time there is strong experimental/observational evidence supporting the first three of these predictions, while the fourth one is not tested yet because the Higgs boson, predicted in the standard model of particle physics, is yet to be found. This experimental/observational evidence is rich and varied ranging from the atmospheric and solar neutrino deficits, MACHO gravitational microlensing events, strange properties of extra-solar planets, the existence of 'isolated' planets, orthopositronium lifetime anomaly, Tunguska and other strange 'meteor' events including perhaps, the origin of the moon. The purpose of this article is to provide a not too technical review of these ideas along with some new results

  4. The ''Kinetic Stabilizer'': A Simpler Tandem Mirror Confinement?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    In the search for better approaches to magnetic fusion it is important to keep in mind the lessons learned in the 50 years that fusion plasma confinement has been studied. One of the lessons learned is that ''closed'' and ''open'' fusion devices differ fundamentally with respect to an important property of their confinement, as follows: Without known exception closed systems such as the tokamak, the stellarator, or the reversed-field pinch, have been found to have their confinement times limited by non-classical, i.e., turbulence-related, processes, leading to the requirement that such systems must be scaled-up in dimensions to sizes much larger than would be the case in the absence of turbulence. By contrast, from the earliest days of fusion research, it has been demonstrated that open magnetic systems of the mirror variety can achieve confinement times close to that associated with classical, i.e., collisional, processes. While these good results have been obtained in both axially symmetric fields and in non-axisymmetric fields, the clearest cases have been those in which the confining fields are solenoidal and axially symmetric. These observations, i.e., of confinement not enhanced by turbulence, can be traced theoretically to such factors as the absence of parallel currents in the plasma, and to the constraints on particle drifts imposed by the adiabatic invariants governing particle confinement in axisymmetric open systems. In the past the MHD instability of axially symmetric open systems has been seen as a barrier to their use. However, theory predicts MHD-stable confinement is achievable if sufficient plasma is present in the ''good curvature'' regions outside the mirrors. This theory has been confirmed by experiments on the Gas Dynamic Trap mirror-based experiment at Novosibirsk, In this paper a new way of exploiting this stabilizing principle, involving creating a localized ''stabilizer plasma'' outside a mirror, will be discussed. To create this plasma

  5. Pair creation by a photon and the time-reversed process in a Robertson-Walker universe with time-symmetric expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotze, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    We investigate pair creation by a photon and the time-reversed process in a spatially flat Robertson-Walker universe. The time-dependent external gravitational field breaks time translation invariance and thus energy conservation. So the otherwise forbidden processes are expected to occur even as first-order processes of quantum electrodynamics. We evaluate the total decay probabilities for electron-positron pairs which are non-relativistic at Compton time and soft photons in a time-symmetrically expanding radiation-dominated Friedman universe. As a characteristic trait there appears an infrared divergence. Special attention is drawn to CPT non-invariance as a consequence of time evolution of the states. As is to be expected it does not occur in a totally time-symmetric situation. (orig.)

  6. Whole brain radiation-induced impairments in learning and memory are time-sensitive and reversible by systemic hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrington, Junie P; Csiszar, Anna; Mitschelen, Matthew; Lee, Yong Woo; Sonntag, William E

    2012-01-01

    Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is commonly used for treatment of primary and metastatic brain tumors; however, cognitive impairment occurs in 40-50% of brain tumor survivors. The etiology of the cognitive impairment following WBRT remains elusive. We recently reported that radiation-induced cerebrovascular rarefaction within hippocampal subregions could be completely reversed by systemic hypoxia. However, the effects of this intervention on learning and memory have not been reported. In this study, we assessed the time-course for WBRT-induced impairments in contextual and spatial learning and the capacity of systemic hypoxia to reverse WBRT-induced deficits in spatial memory. A clinical fractionated series of 4.5Gy WBRT was administered to mice twice weekly for 4 weeks, and after various periods of recovery, behavioral analyses were performed. To study the effects of systemic hypoxia, mice were subjected to 11% (hypoxia) or 21% oxygen (normoxia) for 28 days, initiated 1 month after the completion of WBRT. Our results indicate that WBRT induces a transient deficit in contextual learning, disruption of working memory, and progressive impairment of spatial learning. Additionally, systemic hypoxia completely reversed WBRT-induced impairments in learning and these behavioral effects as well as increased vessel density persisted for at least 2 months following hypoxia treatment. Our results provide critical support for the hypothesis that cerebrovascular rarefaction is a key component of cognitive impairment post-WBRT and indicate that processes of learning and memory, once thought to be permanently impaired after WBRT, can be restored.

  7. Time course and reversibility of changes in the gizzards of red knots alternately eating hard and soft food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekinga, A; Dietz, M W; Koolhaas, A; Piersma, T

    2001-06-01

    The ability to change organ size reversibly can be advantageous to birds that perform long migrations. During winter, red knots (Calidris canutus) feed on shellfish and carry a muscular gizzard that weighs 10% of their body mass. Gizzard size decreases when these birds eat soft foods, e.g. while breeding in the tundra. We studied the reversibility and time course of such changes using ultrasonography. Two groups of shellfish-adapted knots (N=9 and N=10) were fed alternately a hard and a soft food type. Diet switches elicited rapid reversible changes. Switches from hard to soft food induced decreases to 60% of initial gizzard mass within 8.5 days, while switches to hard food induced increases in gizzard mass to 147% within 6.2 days. A third group of knots (N=11), adapted to soft food for more than 1 year, initially had very small gizzards (25% of the mass of shellfish-adapted gizzards), but showed a similar capacity to increase gizzard size when fed shellfish. This is the first non-invasive study showing rapid digestive organ adjustments in non-domesticated birds.

  8. Corticospinal mirror neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraskov, A.; Philipp, R.; Waldert, S.; Vigneswaran, G.; Quallo, M. M.; Lemon, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the properties of neurons with mirror-like characteristics that were identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) and recorded in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and primary motor cortex (M1) of three macaque monkeys. We analysed the neurons’ discharge while the monkeys performed active grasp of either food or an object, and also while they observed an experimenter carrying out a similar range of grasps. A considerable proportion of tested PTNs showed clear mirror-like properties (52% F5 and 58% M1). Some PTNs exhibited ‘classical’ mirror neuron properties, increasing activity for both execution and observation, while others decreased their discharge during observation (‘suppression mirror-neurons’). These experiments not only demonstrate the existence of PTNs as mirror neurons in M1, but also reveal some interesting differences between M1 and F5 mirror PTNs. Although observation-related changes in the discharge of PTNs must reach the spinal cord and will include some direct projections to motoneurons supplying grasping muscles, there was no EMG activity in these muscles during action observation. We suggest that the mirror neuron system is involved in the withholding of unwanted movement during action observation. Mirror neurons are differentially recruited in the behaviour that switches rapidly between making your own movements and observing those of others. PMID:24778371

  9. Advanced Mirror Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2017-01-01

    The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project matures critical technologies required to enable ultra-stable 4-m-or-larger monolithic or segmented ultraviolet, optical, and infrared (UVOIR) space telescope primary-mirror assemblies for general astrophysics and ultra-high-contrast observations of exoplanets.

  10. Corticospinal mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraskov, A; Philipp, R; Waldert, S; Vigneswaran, G; Quallo, M M; Lemon, R N

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the properties of neurons with mirror-like characteristics that were identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) and recorded in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and primary motor cortex (M1) of three macaque monkeys. We analysed the neurons' discharge while the monkeys performed active grasp of either food or an object, and also while they observed an experimenter carrying out a similar range of grasps. A considerable proportion of tested PTNs showed clear mirror-like properties (52% F5 and 58% M1). Some PTNs exhibited 'classical' mirror neuron properties, increasing activity for both execution and observation, while others decreased their discharge during observation ('suppression mirror-neurons'). These experiments not only demonstrate the existence of PTNs as mirror neurons in M1, but also reveal some interesting differences between M1 and F5 mirror PTNs. Although observation-related changes in the discharge of PTNs must reach the spinal cord and will include some direct projections to motoneurons supplying grasping muscles, there was no EMG activity in these muscles during action observation. We suggest that the mirror neuron system is involved in the withholding of unwanted movement during action observation. Mirror neurons are differentially recruited in the behaviour that switches rapidly between making your own movements and observing those of others.

  11. Time-Reverse ODESSA. A 1D Exchange Experiment for Rotating Solids with Several Groups of Equivalent Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, D.; Zimmermann, H.; Tekely, P.; Poupko, R.; Luz, Z.

    1997-04-01

    A one-dimensional exchange experiment is proposed for magic-angle-spinning samples with several groups of equivalent nuclei undergoing internal exchange, such as pure reorientation, as opposed to mutual exchange. The method, which we term time-reverse ODESSA, is an extension of the recently proposed 1D ODESSA experiment for a single group of exchanging nuclei. When several different groups of spins are present, as is usually the case for carbon-13 in polymers and molecular crystals, the normal ODESSA spectrum yields phase-twisted spectra which are difficult to analyze quantitatively. This problem is solved in the time-reverse ODESSA experiment which yields pure absorption spectra for all families of side bands, as long as only internal exchange need be considered. The experiment consists of the usual three pulse sequence of 2D exchange,P1-t1-P2-τm-P3-t2(acquisition), except that the evolution time is fixed at half a rotation period,t1= TR/2, the mixing time is set to an odd number of half rotation periods, τm= (2G- 1)TR/2, and the acquisition starts att2= TR/2 after the detection pulse,P3. The method is demonstrated using the carbon-13 spectra of dimethyl sulfone and an enriched sample of tropolone, and is applied to the study of the π flip of the inner benzene ring of 1,4-diphenoxybenzene. The scope and limitations of the method are discussed.

  12. Generalized Magnetic Mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei

    2017-09-22

    We propose generalized magnetic mirrors that can be achieved by excitations of sole electric resonances. Conventional approaches to obtain magnetic mirrors rely heavily on exciting the fundamental magnetic dipoles, whereas here we reveal that, besides magnetic resonances, electric resonances of higher orders can be also employed to obtain highly efficient magnetic mirrors. Based on the electromagnetic duality, it is also shown that electric mirrors can be achieved by exciting magnetic resonances. We provide direct demonstrations of the generalized mirrors proposed in a simple system of a one-dimensional periodic array of all-dielectric wires, which may shed new light on many advanced fields of photonics related to resonant multipolar excitations and interferences.

  13. Veblen in Reverse: Evidence from the Multinational Time-Use Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershuny, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the historical change in the work-leisure balance using time-diary evidence. Much of the recent discussion of this balance in the developed world has focused on paid work alone. What follows takes a different approach, considering the balance of "all" work time (paid plus unpaid) against leisure time and observes a tendency…

  14. Near-threshold photoionization of hydrogenlike uranium studied in ion-atom collisions via the time-reversed process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöhlker, T; Ma, X; Ludziejewski, T; Beyer, H F; Bosch, F; Brinzanescu, O; Dunford, R W; Eichler, J; Hagmann, S; Ichihara, A; Kozhuharov, C; Krämer, A; Liesen, D; Mokler, P H; Stachura, Z; Swiat, P; Warczak, A

    2001-02-05

    Radiative electron capture, the time-reversed photoionization process occurring in ion-atom collisions, provides presently the only access to photoionization studies for very highly charged ions. By applying the deceleration mode of the ESR storage ring, we studied this process in low-energy collisions of bare uranium ions with low- Z target atoms. This technique allows us to extend the current information about photoionization to much lower energies than those accessible for neutral heavy elements in the direct reaction channel. The results prove that for high- Z systems, higher-order multipole contributions and magnetic corrections persist even at energies close to the threshold.

  15. Topological phases in a three-dimensional topological insulator with a time-reversal invariant external field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Xiaoyong; Ren, Xiaobin; Wang, Gangzhi; Peng, Jie

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the impact of a time-reversal invariant external field on the topological phases of a three-dimensional (3D) topological insulator. By taking the momentum k z as a parameter, we calculate the spin-Chern number analytically. It is shown that both the quantum spin Hall phase and the integer quantum Hall phase can be realized in our system. When the strength of the external field is varied, a series of topological phase transitions occurs with the closing of the energy gap or the spin-spectrum gap. In a tight-binding form, the surface modes are discussed numerically to confirm the analytically results. (paper)

  16. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finn, John M., E-mail: finn@lanl.gov [T-5, Applied Mathematics and Plasma Physics, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a “special divergence-free” (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  17. Construction and properties of a topological index for periodically driven time-reversal invariant 2D crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Carpentier

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We present mathematical details of the construction of a topological invariant for periodically driven two-dimensional lattice systems with time-reversal symmetry and quasienergy gaps, which was proposed recently by some of us. The invariant is represented by a gap-dependent Z2-valued index that is simply related to the Kane–Mele invariants of quasienergy bands but contains an extra information. As a byproduct, we prove new expressions for the two-dimensional Kane–Mele invariant relating the latter to Wess–Zumino amplitudes and the boundary gauge anomaly.

  18. Classical mirror symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Jinzenji, Masao

    2018-01-01

    This book furnishes a brief introduction to classical mirror symmetry, a term that denotes the process of computing Gromov–Witten invariants of a Calabi–Yau threefold by using the Picard–Fuchs differential equation of period integrals of its mirror Calabi–Yau threefold. The book concentrates on the best-known example, the quintic hypersurface in 4-dimensional projective space, and its mirror manifold. First, there is a brief review of the process of discovery of mirror symmetry and the striking result proposed in the celebrated paper by Candelas and his collaborators. Next, some elementary results of complex manifolds and Chern classes needed for study of mirror symmetry are explained. Then the topological sigma models, the A-model and the B-model, are introduced. The classical mirror symmetry hypothesis is explained as the equivalence between the correlation function of the A-model of a quintic hyper-surface and that of the B-model of its mirror manifold. On the B-model side, the process of construct...

  19. A time reversal algorithm in acoustic media with Dirac measure approximations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretin, Élie; Lucas, Carine; Privat, Yannick

    2018-04-01

    This article is devoted to the study of a photoacoustic tomography model, where one is led to consider the solution of the acoustic wave equation with a source term writing as a separated variables function in time and space, whose temporal component is in some sense close to the derivative of the Dirac distribution at t  =  0. This models a continuous wave laser illumination performed during a short interval of time. We introduce an algorithm for reconstructing the space component of the source term from the measure of the solution recorded by sensors during a time T all along the boundary of a connected bounded domain. It is based at the same time on the introduction of an auxiliary equivalent Cauchy problem allowing to derive explicit reconstruction formula and then to use of a deconvolution procedure. Numerical simulations illustrate our approach. Finally, this algorithm is also extended to elasticity wave systems.

  20. Mirror plasma apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A mirror plasma apparatus which utilizes shielding by arc discharge to form a blanket plasma and lithium walls to reduce neutron damage to the wall of the apparatus. An embodiment involves a rotating liquid lithium blanket for a tandem mirror plasma apparatus wherein the first wall of the central mirror cell is made of liquid lithium which is spun with angular velocity great enough to keep the liquid lithium against the first material wall, a blanket plasma preventing the lithium vapor from contaminating the plasma

  1. Nanolaminate deformable mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.; Olivier, Scot S.

    2009-04-14

    A deformable mirror formed out of two layers of a nanolaminate foil attached to a stiff substrate is introduced. Deformation is provided by an electrostatic force between two of the layers. The internal stiffness of the structure allows for high-spatial-frequency shapes. The nanolaminate foil of the present invention allows for a high-quality mirror surface. The device achieves high precision in the vertical direction by using foils with accurately controlled thicknesses, but does not require high precision in the lateral dimensions, allowing such mirrors to be fabricated using crude lithography techniques. Such techniques allow structures up to about the meter scale to be fabricated.

  2. Mesmerising mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-06-01

    Mirror neurons have been hailed as the key to understanding social cognition. I argue that three currents of thought-relating to evolution, atomism and telepathy-have magnified the perceived importance of mirror neurons. When they are understood to be a product of associative learning, rather than an adaptation for social cognition, mirror neurons are no longer mesmerising, but they continue to raise important questions about both the psychology of science and the neural bases of social cognition. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reversible changes in cell morphology due to cytoskeletal rearrangements measured in real-time by QCM-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymchenko, Nina; Nilebäck, Erik; Voinova, Marina V; Gold, Julie; Kasemo, Bengt; Svedhem, Sofia

    2012-12-01

    The mechanical properties and responses of cells to external stimuli (including drugs) are closely connected to important phenomena such as cell spreading, motility, activity, and potentially even differentiation. Here, reversible changes in the viscoelastic properties of surface-attached fibroblasts were induced by the cytoskeleton-perturbing agent cytochalasin D, and studied in real-time by the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) technique. QCM-D is a surface sensitive technique that measures changes in (dynamically coupled) mass and viscoelastic properties close to the sensor surface, within a distance into the cell that is usually only a fraction of its size. In this work, QCM-D was combined with light microscopy to study in situ cell attachment and spreading. Overtone-dependent changes of the QCM-D responses (frequency and dissipation shifts) were first recorded, as fibroblast cells attached to protein-coated sensors in a window equipped flow module. Then, as the cell layer had stabilised, morphological changes were induced in the cells by injecting cytochalasin D. This caused changes in the QCM-D signals that were reversible in the sense that they disappeared upon removal of cytochalasin D. These results are compared to other cell QCM-D studies. Our results stress the combination of QCM-D and light microscopy to help interpret QCM-D results obtained in cell assays and thus suggests a direction to develop the QCM-D technique as an even more useful tool for real-time cell studies.

  4. Plasma impact on diagnostic mirrors in JET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garcia-Carrasco

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Metallic mirrors will be essential components of all optical systems for plasma diagnosis in ITER. This contribution provides a comprehensive account on plasma impact on diagnostic mirrors in JET with the ITER-Like Wall. Specimens from the First Mirror Test and the lithium-beam diagnostic have been studied by spectrophotometry, ion beam analysis and electron microscopy. Test mirrors made of molybdenum were retrieved from the main chamber and the divertor after exposure to the 2013–2014 experimental campaign. In the main chamber, only mirrors located at the entrance of the carrier lost reflectivity (Be deposition, while those located deeper in the carrier were only slightly affected. The performance of mirrors in the JET divertor was strongly degraded by deposition of beryllium, tungsten and other species. Mirrors from the lithium-beam diagnostic have been studied for the first time. Gold coatings were severely damaged by intense arcing. As a consequence, material mixing of the gold layer with the stainless steel substrate occurred. Total reflectivity dropped from over 90% to less than 60%, i.e. to the level typical for stainless steel.

  5. [Mirror behaviors in dementia: the many mirror signs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghika, Joseph; Diéguez, Sebastian; Assal, Frédéric; Demonet, Jean-François

    2013-11-13

    Mirror behaviors in advanced dementia are: the mirror sign of Abely and Delmas, where the patient stares at his face (environment-driven behavior of Lhermitte); non recognition of the self in the mirror (autoprosopagnosia and/or delirious auto-Capgras); mirror agnosia of Ramachandran and Binkofski where the patient do not understand the concept of mirror and its use; the psychovisual reflex, or reflex pursuit of the eyes when passively moving a minrror in front of a patient (intact vision); mirror writing (procedural learning). We describe four demented patients with mirror behaviors assessing brain mechanisms of self recognition, social brain and mental and visuo-spatial manipulation of images and objects.

  6. Reversible Reaction-Based Fluorescent Probe for Real-Time Imaging of Glutathione Dynamics in Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianwei; Jiang, Xiqian; Zhang, Chengwei; MacKenzie, Kevin R; Stossi, Fabio; Palzkill, Timothy; Wang, Meng C; Wang, Jin

    2017-09-22

    We report a mitochondria-specific glutathione (GSH) probe-designated as Mito-RealThiol (MitoRT)-that can monitor in vivo real-time mitochondrial glutathione dynamics, and apply this probe to follow mitochondrial GSH dynamic changes in living cells for the first time. MitoRT can be utilized in confocal microscopy, super-resolution fluorescence imaging, and flow cytometry systems. Using MitoRT, we demonstrate that cells have a high priority to maintain the GSH level in mitochondria compared to the cytosol not only under normal growing conditions but also upon oxidative stress.

  7. Whole brain radiation-induced impairments in learning and memory are time-sensitive and reversible by systemic hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junie P Warrington

    Full Text Available Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT is commonly used for treatment of primary and metastatic brain tumors; however, cognitive impairment occurs in 40-50% of brain tumor survivors. The etiology of the cognitive impairment following WBRT remains elusive. We recently reported that radiation-induced cerebrovascular rarefaction within hippocampal subregions could be completely reversed by systemic hypoxia. However, the effects of this intervention on learning and memory have not been reported. In this study, we assessed the time-course for WBRT-induced impairments in contextual and spatial learning and the capacity of systemic hypoxia to reverse WBRT-induced deficits in spatial memory. A clinical fractionated series of 4.5Gy WBRT was administered to mice twice weekly for 4 weeks, and after various periods of recovery, behavioral analyses were performed. To study the effects of systemic hypoxia, mice were subjected to 11% (hypoxia or 21% oxygen (normoxia for 28 days, initiated 1 month after the completion of WBRT. Our results indicate that WBRT induces a transient deficit in contextual learning, disruption of working memory, and progressive impairment of spatial learning. Additionally, systemic hypoxia completely reversed WBRT-induced impairments in learning and these behavioral effects as well as increased vessel density persisted for at least 2 months following hypoxia treatment. Our results provide critical support for the hypothesis that cerebrovascular rarefaction is a key component of cognitive impairment post-WBRT and indicate that processes of learning and memory, once thought to be permanently impaired after WBRT, can be restored.

  8. Parity-even and time-reversal-odd neutron optical potential in spinning matter induced by gravitational torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A.N., E-mail: ivanov@kph.tuwien.ac.at [Atominstitut, Technische Universität Wien, Stadionallee 2, A-1020 Wien (Austria); Snow, W.M., E-mail: wsnow@indiana.edu [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    Recent theoretical work has shown that spin 1/2 particles moving through unpolarized matter which sources torsion fields experience a new type of parity-even and time-reversal-odd optical potential if the matter is spinning in the lab frame. This new type of optical potential can be sought experimentally using the helicity dependence of the total cross sections for longitudinally polarized neutrons moving through a rotating cylindrical target. In combination with recent experimental constraints on short-range P-odd, T-even torsion interactions derived from polarized neutron spin rotation in matter one can derive separate constraints on the time components of scalar and pseudoscalar torsion fields in matter. We estimate the sensitivity achievable in such an experiment and briefly outline some of the potential sources of systematic error to be considered in any future experimental search for this effect.

  9. QUANTIFICATION OF ENTEROVIRUS AND HEPATITIS A VIRUSES IN WELLS AND SPRINGS IN EAST TENNESSEE USING REAL-TIME REVERSE TRANSCIPTION PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project involves development, validation testing and application of a fast, efficient method of quantitatively measuring occurrence and concentration of common human viral pathogens, enterovirus and hepatitis A virus, in ground water samples using real-time reverse transcrip...

  10. Rapid expansion method (REM) for time‐stepping in reverse time migration (RTM)

    KAUST Repository

    Pestana, Reynam C.

    2009-01-01

    We show that the wave equation solution using a conventional finite‐difference scheme, derived commonly by the Taylor series approach, can be derived directly from the rapid expansion method (REM). After some mathematical manipulation we consider an analytical approximation for the Bessel function where we assume that the time step is sufficiently small. From this derivation we find that if we consider only the first two Chebyshev polynomials terms in the rapid expansion method we can obtain the second order time finite‐difference scheme that is frequently used in more conventional finite‐difference implementations. We then show that if we use more terms from the REM we can obtain a more accurate time integration of the wave field. Consequently, we have demonstrated that the REM is more accurate than the usual finite‐difference schemes and it provides a wave equation solution which allows us to march in large time steps without numerical dispersion and is numerically stable. We illustrate the method with post and pre stack migration results.

  11. Composite Material Mirror Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    In this photograph, the composite material mirror is tested in the X-Ray Calibration Facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The mirror test conducted was to check the ability to accurately model and predict the cryogenic performance of complex mirror systems, and the characterization of cryogenic dampening properties of beryllium. The JWST, a next generation successor to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), was named in honor of James W. Webb, NASA's second administrator, who led NASA in the early days of the fledgling Aerospace Agency. Scheduled for launch in 2010 aboard an expendable launch vehicle, the JWST will be able to look deeper into the universe than the HST because of the increased light-collecting power of its larger mirror and the extraordinary sensitivity of its instrument to infrared light.

  12. Mirror reactor surface study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A. L.; Damm, C. C.; Futch, A. H.; Hiskes, J. R.; Meisenheimer, R. G.; Moir, R. W.; Simonen, T. C.; Stallard, B. W.; Taylor, C. E.

    1976-09-01

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included.

  13. Mirror reactor surface study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, A.L.; Damm, C.C.; Futch, A.H.; Hiskes, J.R.; Meisenheimer, R.G.; Moir, R.W.; Simonen, T.C.; Stallard, B.W.; Taylor, C.E.

    1976-01-01

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included

  14. Mirror fermions and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senjanovic, G.; Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg

    1984-07-01

    Extended supersymmetry, Kaluza-Klein theory and family unification all suggest the existence of mirror fermions, with same quantum numbers but opposite helicities from ordinary fermions. The laboratory and especially cosmological implications of such particles are reviewed and summarized. (author)

  15. Manufacturing parabolic mirrors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1975-01-01

    The photo shows the construction of a vertical centrifuge mounted on an air cushion, with a precision of 1/10000 during rotation, used for the manufacture of very high=precision parabolic mirrors. (See Annual Report 1974.)

  16. GPU-accelerated Modeling and Element-free Reverse-time Migration with Gauss Points Partition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Z.; Jia, X.

    2014-12-01

    Element-free method (EFM) has been applied to seismic modeling and migration. Compared with finite element method (FEM) and finite difference method (FDM), it is much cheaper and more flexible because only the information of the nodes and the boundary of the study area are required in computation. In the EFM, the number of Gauss points should be consistent with the number of model nodes; otherwise the accuracy of the intermediate coefficient matrices would be harmed. Thus when we increase the nodes of velocity model in order to obtain higher resolution, we find that the size of the computer's memory will be a bottleneck. The original EFM can deal with at most 81×81 nodes in the case of 2G memory, as tested by Jia and Hu (2006). In order to solve the problem of storage and computation efficiency, we propose a concept of Gauss points partition (GPP), and utilize the GPUs to improve the computation efficiency. Considering the characteristics of the Gaussian points, the GPP method doesn't influence the propagation of seismic wave in the velocity model. To overcome the time-consuming computation of the stiffness matrix (K) and the mass matrix (M), we also use the GPUs in our computation program. We employ the compressed sparse row (CSR) format to compress the intermediate sparse matrices and try to simplify the operations by solving the linear equations with the CULA Sparse's Conjugate Gradient (CG) solver instead of the linear sparse solver 'PARDISO'. It is observed that our strategy can significantly reduce the computational time of K and Mcompared with the algorithm based on CPU. The model tested is Marmousi model. The length of the model is 7425m and the depth is 2990m. We discretize the model with 595x298 nodes, 300x300 Gauss cells and 3x3 Gauss points in each cell. In contrast to the computational time of the conventional EFM, the GPUs-GPP approach can substantially improve the efficiency. The speedup ratio of time consumption of computing K, M is 120 and the

  17. Corticospinal mirror neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kraskov, A.; Philipp, R.; Waldert, S.; Vigneswaran, G.; Quallo, M. M.; Lemon, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the properties of neurons with mirror-like characteristics that were identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) and recorded in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and primary motor cortex (M1) of three macaque monkeys. We analysed the neurons' discharge while the monkeys performed active grasp of either food or an object, and also while they observed an experimenter carrying out a similar range of grasps. A considerable proportion of tested PTNs showed clear mirror-like p...

  18. Geometry of mirror manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspinwall, P.S.; Luetken, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    We analyze the mirror manifold hypothesis in one and three dimensions using the simplest available representations of the N = 2 superconformal algebra. The symmetries of these tensor models can be divided out to give an explicit representation of the mirror, and we give a simple group theoretical algorithm for determining which symmetries should be used. We show that the mirror of a superconformal field theory does not always have a geometrical interpretation, but when it does, deformations of complex structure of one manifold are reflected in deformations of the Kaehler form of the mirror manifold, and we show how the large radius limit of a manifold corresponds to a large complex structure limit in the mirror manifold. The mirror of the Tian-Yau three generation model is constructed both as a conformal field theory and as an algebraic variety with Euler number six. The Hodge numbers of this manifolds are fixed, but the intersection numbes are highly ambiguous, presumably reflected a rich structure of multicritical points in the moduli space of the field theory. (orig.)

  19. Time-reversal symmetrization of spontaneous emission for quantum state transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Srikanth J.; Sundaresan, Neereja M.; Sadri, Darius; Liu, Yanbing; Gambetta, Jay M.; Yu, Terri; Girvin, S. M.; Houck, Andrew A.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the ability to control spontaneous emission from a superconducting qubit coupled to a cavity. The time domain profile of the emitted photon is shaped into a symmetric truncated exponential. The experiment is enabled by a qubit coupled to a cavity, with a coupling strength that can be tuned in tens of nanoseconds while maintaining a constant dressed state emission frequency. Symmetrization of the photonic wave packet will enable use of photons as flying qubits for transferring the quantum state between atoms in distant cavities.

  20. Wide-azimuth angle-domain imaging for anisotropic reverse-time migration

    KAUST Repository

    Sava, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Extended common-image-point gathers (CIP) constructed by wide-azimuth TI wave-equation migration contain all the necessary information for angle decomposition as a function of the reflection and azimuth angles at selected locations in the subsurface. The reflection and azimuth angles are derived from the extended images using analytic relations between the space-lag and time-lag extensions. This post-imaging decomposition requires only information which is already available at the time of migration, i.e. the model parameters and the tilt angles of the TI medium. The transformation amounts to a linear Radon transform applied to the CIPs obtained after the application of the extended imaging condition. If information about the reflector dip is available at the CIP locations, then only two components of the space-lag vectors are required, thus reducing computational cost and increasing the affordability of the method. This efficient angle decomposition method is suitable for wide-azimuth imaging in anisotropic media with arbitrary orientation of the symmetry plane. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  1. Prediction of retention time in reversed-phase liquid chromatography as a tool for steroid identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randazzo, Giuseppe Marco [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva and University of Lausanne, Geneva (Switzerland); Tonoli, David [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva and University of Lausanne, Geneva (Switzerland); Swiss Centre for Applied Human Toxicology (SCAHT), Universities of Basel and Geneva, Basel (Switzerland); Human Protein Sciences Department, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Hambye, Stephanie; Guillarme, Davy [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva and University of Lausanne, Geneva (Switzerland); Jeanneret, Fabienne [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva and University of Lausanne, Geneva (Switzerland); Swiss Centre for Applied Human Toxicology (SCAHT), Universities of Basel and Geneva, Basel (Switzerland); Human Protein Sciences Department, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Nurisso, Alessandra [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva and University of Lausanne, Geneva (Switzerland); Goracci, Laura [Department of Chemistry, Biology and Biotechnology, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Boccard, Julien [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva and University of Lausanne, Geneva (Switzerland); Rudaz, Serge, E-mail: serge.rudaz@unige.ch [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva and University of Lausanne, Geneva (Switzerland); Swiss Centre for Applied Human Toxicology (SCAHT), Universities of Basel and Geneva, Basel (Switzerland)

    2016-04-15

    The untargeted profiling of steroids constitutes a growing research field because of their importance as biomarkers of endocrine disruption. New technologies in analytical chemistry, such as ultra high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (MS), offer the possibility of a fast and sensitive analysis. Nevertheless, difficulties regarding steroid identification are encountered when considering isotopomeric steroids. Thus, the use of retention times is of great help for the unambiguous identification of steroids. In this context, starting from the linear solvent strength (LSS) theory, quantitative structure retention relationship (QSRR) models, based on a dataset composed of 91 endogenous steroids and VolSurf + descriptors combined with a new dedicated molecular fingerprint, were developed to predict retention times of steroid structures in any gradient mode conditions. Satisfactory performance was obtained during nested cross-validation with a predictive ability (Q{sup 2}) of 0.92. The generalisation ability of the model was further confirmed by an average error of 4.4% in external prediction. This allowed the list of candidates associated with identical monoisotopic masses to be strongly reduced, facilitating definitive steroid identification. - Highlights: • Difficulties regarding steroid identification are encountered when considering isotopomeric steroids. • Quantitative structure retention relationship (QSRR) models were developed from the linear solvent strength theory. • A dataset composed of 91 steroids and VolSurf + descriptors combined with a new dedicated molecular fingerprint, were used. • The list of candidates associated with identical monoisotopic masses was reduced, facilitating steroid identification.

  2. Prediction of retention time in reversed-phase liquid chromatography as a tool for steroid identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randazzo, Giuseppe Marco; Tonoli, David; Hambye, Stephanie; Guillarme, Davy; Jeanneret, Fabienne; Nurisso, Alessandra; Goracci, Laura; Boccard, Julien; Rudaz, Serge

    2016-01-01

    The untargeted profiling of steroids constitutes a growing research field because of their importance as biomarkers of endocrine disruption. New technologies in analytical chemistry, such as ultra high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (MS), offer the possibility of a fast and sensitive analysis. Nevertheless, difficulties regarding steroid identification are encountered when considering isotopomeric steroids. Thus, the use of retention times is of great help for the unambiguous identification of steroids. In this context, starting from the linear solvent strength (LSS) theory, quantitative structure retention relationship (QSRR) models, based on a dataset composed of 91 endogenous steroids and VolSurf + descriptors combined with a new dedicated molecular fingerprint, were developed to predict retention times of steroid structures in any gradient mode conditions. Satisfactory performance was obtained during nested cross-validation with a predictive ability (Q 2 ) of 0.92. The generalisation ability of the model was further confirmed by an average error of 4.4% in external prediction. This allowed the list of candidates associated with identical monoisotopic masses to be strongly reduced, facilitating definitive steroid identification. - Highlights: • Difficulties regarding steroid identification are encountered when considering isotopomeric steroids. • Quantitative structure retention relationship (QSRR) models were developed from the linear solvent strength theory. • A dataset composed of 91 steroids and VolSurf + descriptors combined with a new dedicated molecular fingerprint, were used. • The list of candidates associated with identical monoisotopic masses was reduced, facilitating steroid identification.

  3. Supersymmetric defect models and mirror symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hook, Anson; Kachru, Shamit; Torroba, Gonzalo

    2013-11-01

    We study supersymmetric field theories in three space-time dimensions doped by various configurations of electric charges or magnetic fluxes. These are supersymmetric avatars of impurity models. In the presence of additional sources such configurations are shown to preserve half of the supersymmetries. Mirror symmetry relates the two sets of configurations. We discuss the implications for impurity models in 3d NN = 4 QED with a single charged hypermultiplet (and its mirror, the theory of a free hypermultiplet) as well as 3d NN = 2 QED with one flavor and its dual, a supersymmetric Wilson-Fisher fixed point. Mirror symmetry allows us to find backreacted solutions for arbitrary arrays of defects in the IR limit of NN = 4 QED. Our analysis, complemented with appropriate string theory brane constructions, sheds light on various aspects of mirror symmetry, the map between particles and vortices and the emergence of ground state entropy in QED at finite density.

  4. Long time scale plasma dynamics driven by the double tearing mode in reversed shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Y.; Azumi, M.; Kishimoto, Y.; Leboeuf, J.N.

    2003-01-01

    The new nonlinear destabilization process is found in the nonlinear phase of the double tearing mode (DTM) by using the reduced MHD equations in a helical symmetry. The nonlinear destabilization causes the abrupt growth of DTM and subsequent collapse after long time scale evolution in the Rutherford-type regime. The nonlinear growth of the DTM is suddenly triggered, when the triangular deformation of magnetic islands with sharp current point at the x-point around the outer rational surface exceeds a certain value. Such structure deformation is accelerated during the nonlinear growth phase. Decreasing the resistivity increases the sharpness of the triangularity and the spontaneous growth rate in the abrupt growth phase is almost independent on the resistivity. Current point formation is also confirmed in the multi-helicity simulation, where the magnetic fields become stochastic between two rational surfaces. (author)

  5. Focusing of sound pulses using the time reversal technique on 100-km paths in a deep sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virovlyansky, A. L.; Kazarova, A. Yu.; Lyubavin, L. Ya.

    2012-11-01

    Numerical and analytical studies are performed on how unstable fluctuations of the parameters of the medium in a deep sea affect the focusing of sound pulses using the time reversal method. The simplest situation, when point sources and receivers are used for emission and reception, is considered. Pulse propagation in the direct and backward directions is numerically simulated by the parabolic equation method. Calculations are performed for sound signals with frequencies of several tens of hertz. It is shown that, in the presence of sound velocity fluctuations caused by random internal waves, noticeable attenuation of the field amplitude at the center of the focal spot can be observed beginning from distances of 200 to 400 km. As the central frequency of the pulsed signal increases, the effect of nonstationarity of the perturbation on the focusing is amplified. This phenomenon is explained qualitatively and quantitatively in the geometrical optics approximation.

  6. Photo control of transport properties in a disordered wire: Average conductance, conductance statistics, and time-reversal symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Takuya; Oka, Takashi; Demler, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the full conductance statistics of a disordered 1D wire under the application of light. We develop the transfer matrix method for periodically driven systems to analyze the conductance of a large system with small frequency of light, where coherent photon absorptions play an important role to determine not only the average but also the shape of conductance distributions. The average conductance under the application of light results from the competition between dynamic localization and effective dimension increase, and shows non-monotonic behavior as a function of driving amplitude. On the other hand, the shape of conductance distribution displays a crossover phenomena in the intermediate disorder strength; the application of light dramatically changes the distribution from log-normal to normal distributions. Furthermore, we propose that conductance of disordered systems can be controlled by engineering the shape, frequency and amplitude of light. Change of the shape of driving field controls the time-reversals symmetry and the disordered system shows analogous behavior as negative magneto-resistance known in static weak localization. A small change of frequency and amplitude of light leads to a large change of conductance, displaying giant opto-response. Our work advances the perspective to control the mean as well as the full conductance statistics by coherently driving disordered systems. - Highlights: ► We study conductance of disordered systems under the application of light. ► Full conductance distributions are obtained. ► A transfer matrix method is developed for driven systems. ► Conductances are dramatically modified upon the application of light. ► Time-reversal symmetry can also be controlled by light application.

  7. Reversible Inactivation of Rat Premotor Cortex Impairs Temporal Preparation, but not Inhibitory Control, During Simple Reaction-Time Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathaniel J; Horst, Nicole K; Liu, Benjamine; Caetano, Marcelo S; Laubach, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies by our lab and others have established a role for medial areas of the prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in the top-down control of action during simple reaction-time (RT) tasks. However, the neural circuits that allow mPFC to influence activity in the motor system have remained unclear. In the present study, we used a combination of tract-tracing and reversible inactivation methods to examine the role of a motor-related area in the rat frontal cortex, called the rostral forelimb area (RFA), in the top-down control of action. Neural tracing studies involved used electrical microstimulation to identify RFA and injections of biotinylated dextran amines (BDA) to map out connections of RFA with other parts of the frontal cortex. Connections were found between RFA and mPFC, the agranular insular cortex, and the primary motor cortex. Reversible inactivations using muscimol infusions into RFA increased response times and eliminated delay-dependent speeding, but did not increase premature responding. These results are markedly different from what is obtained when muscimol is infused into mPFC, which leads to excessive premature responding and a reduction of RTs to stimuli at short delays (Narayanan et al., 2006). We also tested animals during the RT task after inactivating the agranular insular cortex, which contains neurons that projects to and receives from RFA and mPFC, and found no effects on RT performance. Together, these studies suggest that RFA is a premotor region in the rat frontal cortex that competes with mPFC to control action selection. We suggest that RFA controls the threshold that is used to initiate responding and generates prepotent excitation over responding that is crucial for temporal preparation.

  8. Rapid detection of transmissible gastroenteritis virus in swine small intestine samples using real-time reverse transcription recombinase polymerase amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Wang, Jianchang; Zhang, Ruoxi; Liu, Libing; Shi, Ruihan; Han, Qingan; Yuan, Wanzhe

    2018-03-14

    A rapid and specific real-time reverse-transcription recombinase polymerase amplification assay (RT-RPA) was developed to detect the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) in this study. The primers and exo probe were designed to be specific for a portion of spike (S) gene conserved in TGEV, but absent in the closely related porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCV). The amplification was performed at 40 °C for 20 min. The assay could only detect the TGEV, and there was no cross-reaction with other pathogens tested. Using the in vitro transcribed TGEV RNA as template, the limit of detection of the developed RT-RPA was 100 copies per reaction. The assay performance was evaluated by testing 76 clinical samples by RT-RPA and a real-time RT-PCR. Fourteen samples were TGEV RNA positive in RT-RPA (18.4%, 14/76), which were also positive in the real-time RT-PCR. The diagnostic agreement between the two assays was 100% (76/76). The R 2 value of RT-RPA and real-time RT-PCR was 0.959 by linear regression analysis. The developed RT-RPA assay provides a useful alternative tool for rapid, simple and reliable detection of TGEV in resource-limited diagnostic laboratories and on-site facilities. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The use of reverse iontophoresis based surface plasmon resonance for the development of a noninvasive real time transdermal biomarker sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Niraj K.; Hwang, Yongsoon; Cameron, Brent D.

    2016-03-01

    Recent developments in the identification of biomarkers offer a potential means to facilitate early disease detection, gauge treatment in drug therapy clinical trials, and to assess the impact of fatigue and/or stress as related to human physical and cognitive performance. For practical implementation, however, real-time sensing and quantification of such physiological biomarkers is preferred. Some key aspects in this process are continuous sample collection and real time detection. Traditionally, blood is considered the gold standard for samples but frequent phlebotomy is painful and inconvenient. Other sources like saliva and passive sweat cannot be precisely controlled and are affected by other limitations. Some of these can be addressed by reverse iontophoresis which is a noninvasive technique capable of facilitating controlled transport of biomolecules up to 20kDa in size across the skin barrier by passing a low level current between two dermal electrodes. The samples collected at the electrode site can then be monitored at site or transported via a microfluidic channel towards a sensor. In the case reported here, the sensor is based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR), which is a label free, real time, and highly sensitive optical sensing technique. The real time SPR detection of targeted biomarkers is then achieved through the use of aptamer surface modification. In this experiment, extraction and detection of orexin A, a stress related biomarker, is used for demonstration purposes.

  10. The transcription analysis of duck enteritis virus UL49.5 gene using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meng; Jia, Renyong; Wang, Mingshu; Gao, Xinghong; Zhu, Dekang; Chen, Shun; Yin, Zhongqiong; Wang, Yin; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2013-10-01

    Duck enteritis virus (DEV) UL49.5 encoding glycoprotein N was a conserved gene. The transcription dynamic process of UL49.5 homologous genes in herpesviruses was reported. However, the transcription dynamic process of DEV UL49.5 gene has not yet been established. In this study, a real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (real-time qRT-PCR) assay was established to test the transcription dynamic process of DEV UL49.5 gene, and the recombinant plasmid pUCm-T/UL49.5 was constructed as the standard DNA. The samples prepared from DEV-infected (at different time points) and uninfected cell were detected and calculated. The results demonstrated that the real-time qRT-PCR assay was successfully established. The transcription product of DEV UL49.5 gene was first detected at 0.5 h post infection (p.i.), increased at 8 h p.i. and reached a peak at 60 h p.i. Our results illustrated that DEV UL49.5 gene could be regarded as a late gene. The transcription dynamic process of DEV UL49.5 gene may provide a significant clue for further studies of DEV UL49.5 gene.

  11. Physics of mirror systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.

    1982-05-01

    In recent years the emphasis in research on the magnetic mirror approach to fusion has been shifted to address what are essentially economically-motivated issues. The introduction of the Tandem Mirror idea solved in principal the problem of low Q (low fusion power gain) of mirror-based fusion systems. In order to optimize the tandem mirror idea from an economic standpoint, some important improvements have been suggested. These improvements include the thermal barrier idea of Baldwin and Logan and the axicell concept of Kesner. These new modifications introduce some special physics considerations. Among these are (1) The MHD stability properties of high energy electron components in the end cells; (2) The optimization of end-cell magnetic field configurations with the objective of minimizing equilibrium parallel currents; (3) The suppression of microstabilities by use of sloshing ion distributions. Following a brief outline of tandem mirror concepts, the above three topics are discussed, with illustrative examples taken from earlier work or from recent design studies

  12. Interplay of Coulomb interactions and disorder in three-dimensional quadratic band crossings without time-reversal symmetry and with unequal masses for conduction and valence bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Ipsita; Nandkishore, Rahul M.

    2018-03-01

    Coulomb interactions famously drive three-dimensional quadratic band crossing semimetals into a non-Fermi liquid phase of matter. In a previous work [Nandkishore and Parameswaran, Phys. Rev. B 95, 205106 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevB.95.205106], the effect of disorder on this non-Fermi liquid phase was investigated, assuming that the band structure was isotropic, assuming that the conduction and valence bands had the same band mass, and assuming that the disorder preserved exact time-reversal symmetry and statistical isotropy. It was shown that the non-Fermi liquid fixed point is unstable to disorder and that a runaway flow to strong disorder occurs. In this paper, we extend that analysis by relaxing the assumption of time-reversal symmetry and allowing the electron and hole masses to differ (but continuing to assume isotropy of the low energy band structure). We first incorporate time-reversal symmetry breaking disorder and demonstrate that there do not appear any new fixed points. Moreover, while the system continues to flow to strong disorder, time-reversal-symmetry-breaking disorder grows asymptotically more slowly than time-reversal-symmetry-preserving disorder, which we therefore expect should dominate the strong-coupling phase. We then allow for unequal electron and hole masses. We show that whereas asymmetry in the two masses is irrelevant in the clean system, it is relevant in the presence of disorder, such that the `effective masses' of the conduction and valence bands should become sharply distinct in the low-energy limit. We calculate the RG flow equations for the disordered interacting system with unequal band masses and demonstrate that the problem exhibits a runaway flow to strong disorder. Along the runaway flow, time-reversal-symmetry-preserving disorder grows asymptotically more rapidly than both time-reversal-symmetry-breaking disorder and the Coulomb interaction.

  13. Testing for microscopic reversibility in the gating of maxi K+ channels using two-dimensional dwell-time distributions.

    OpenAIRE

    Song, L; Magleby, K L

    1994-01-01

    An assumption usually made when developing kinetic models for the gating of ion channels is that the transitions among the various states involved in the gating obey microscopic reversibility. If this assumption is incorrect, then the models and estimated rate constants made with the assumption would be in error. This paper examines whether the gating of a large conductance Ca-activated K+ channel in skeletal muscle is consistent with microscopic reversibility. If microscopic reversibility is...

  14. A sensitive, reproducible, and economic real-time reverse transcription PCR detecting avian metapneumovirus subtypes A and B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzo, G; Drigo, M; Lupini, C; Catelli, E; Laconi, A; Listorti, V; Bonci, M; Naylor, C J; Martini, M; Cecchinato, M

    2014-06-01

    Use of real-time PCR is increasing in the diagnosis of infectious disease due to its sensitivity, specificity, and speed of detection. These characteristics make it particularly suited for the diagnosis of viral infections, like avian metapneumovirus (AMPV), for which effective control benefits from continuously updated knowledge of the epidemiological situation. Other real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCRs have been published based on highly specific fluorescent dye-labeled probes, but they have high initial cost, complex validation, and a marked susceptibility to the genetic variability of their target sequence. With this in mind, we developed and validated a SYBR Green I-based quantitative RT-PCR for the detection of the two most prevalent AMPV subtypes (i.e., subtypes A and B). The assay demonstrated an analytical sensitivity comparable with that of a previously published real-time RT-PCR and the ability to detect RNA equivalent to approximately 0.5 infectious doses for both A and B subtypes. The high efficiency and linearity between viral titer and crossing point displayed for both subtypes make it suited for viral quantification. Optimization of reaction conditions and the implementation of melting curve analysis guaranteed the high specificity of the assay. The stable melting temperature difference between the two subtypes indicated the possibility of subtyping through melting temperature analysis. These characteristics make our assay a sensitive, specific, and rapid tool, enabling contemporaneous detection, quantification, and discrimination of AMPV subtype A and B.

  15. Rapid and sensitive detection of canine distemper virus by real-time reverse transcription recombinase polymerase amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianchang; Wang, Jinfeng; Li, Ruiwen; Liu, Libing; Yuan, Wanzhe

    2017-08-15

    Canine distemper, caused by Canine distemper virus (CDV), is a highly contagious and fatal systemic disease in free-living and captive carnivores worldwide. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), as an isothermal gene amplification technique, has been explored for the molecular detection of diverse pathogens. A real-time reverse transcription RPA (RT-RPA) assay for the detection of canine distemper virus (CDV) using primers and exo probe targeting the CDV nucleocapsid protein gene was developed. A series of other viruses were tested by the RT-RPA.Thirty-two field samples were further tested by RT-RPA, and the resuts were compared with those obtained by the real-time RT-PCR. The RT-RPA assay was performed successfully at 40 °C, and the results were obtained within 3 min-12 min. The assay could detect CDV, but did not show cross-detection of canine parvovirus-2 (CPV-2), canine coronavirus (CCoV), canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), pseudorabies virus (PRV) or Newcastle disease virus (NDV), demonstrating high specificity. The analytical sensitivity of RT-RPA was 31.8 copies in vitro transcribed CDV RNA, which is 10 times lower than the real-time RT-PCR. The assay performance was validated by testing 32 field samples and compared to real-time RT-PCR. The results indicated an excellent correlation between RT-RPA and a reference real-time RT-PCR method. Both assays provided the same results, and R 2 value of the positive results was 0.947. The results demonstrated that the RT-RPA assay offers an alternative tool for simple, rapid, and reliable detection of CDV both in the laboratory and point-of-care facility, especially in the resource-limited settings.

  16. Reference genes for gene expression analysis by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Pedersen, Shona; Kristensen, Søren Risom; Marcussen, Niels

    2011-12-01

    Differentiation between malignant renal cell carcinoma and benign oncocytoma is of great importance to choose the optimal treatment. Accurate preoperative diagnosis of renal tumor is therefore crucial; however, existing imaging techniques and histologic examinations are incapable of providing an optimal differentiation profile. Analysis of gene expression of molecular markers is a new possibility but relies on appropriate standardization to compare different samples. The aim of this study was to identify stably expressed reference genes suitable for the normalization of results extracted from gene expression analysis of renal tumors. Expression levels of 8 potential reference genes (ATP5J, HMBS, HPRT1, PPIA, TBP, 18S, GAPDH, and POLR2A) were examined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in tumor and normal tissue from removed kidneys from 13 patients with renal cell carcinoma and 5 patients with oncocytoma. The expression levels of genes were compared by gene stability value M, average gene stability M, pairwise variation V, and coefficient of variation CV. More candidates were not suitable for the purpose, but a combination of HMBS, PPIA, ATP5J, and TBP was found to be the best combination with an average gene stability value M of 0.9 and a CV of 0.4 in the 18 tumors and normal tissues. A combination of 4 genes, HMBS, PPIA, ATP5J, and TBP, is a possible reference in renal tumor gene expression analysis by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. A combination of four genes, HMBS, PPIA, ATP5J and TBP, being stably expressed in tissues from RCC is possible reference genes for gene expression analysis.

  17. Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR Enhancement Comparison of Impulse-, Coding- and Novel Linear-Frequency-Chirp-Based Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (OTDR for Passive Optical Network (PON Monitoring Based on Unique Combinations of Wavelength Selective Mirrors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Bentz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We compare optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR techniques based on conventional single impulse, coding and linear frequency chirps concerning their signal to noise ratio (SNR enhancements by measurements in a passive optical network (PON with a maximum one-way attenuation of 36.6 dB. A total of six subscribers, each represented by a unique mirror pair with narrow reflection bandwidths, are installed within a distance of 14 m. The spatial resolution of the OTDR set-up is 3.0 m.

  18. A Conceptual Mirror

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badie, Farshad

    2017-01-01

    product of the constructivist interactions. The most significant matter in meaning construction is producing the own meaningful comprehension, realisation and understanding. Here the learner gets to know how to develop her/his thinking. In this research, I will focus on relating (i) meaning construction...... will analyse the logical dependencies between learner and men- tor and will check their reflectional symmetrical relationship in a conceptual mirror. The conceptual mirror is a phenomenon that represents the meeting point of the mentor’s and the learner’s conceptual knowledge....

  19. Entanglement entropy of a three-spin-interacting spin chain with a time-reversal-breaking impurity at one boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Tanay; Rajak, Atanu

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the effect of a time-reversal-breaking impurity term (of strength λd) on both the equilibrium and nonequilibrium critical properties of entanglement entropy (EE) in a three-spin-interacting transverse Ising model, which can be mapped to a p -wave superconducting chain with next-nearest-neighbor hopping and interaction. Importantly, we find that the logarithmic scaling of the EE with block size remains unaffected by the application of the impurity term, although, the coefficient (i.e., central charge) varies logarithmically with the impurity strength for a lower range of λd and eventually saturates with an exponential damping factor [˜exp(-λd) ] for the phase boundaries shared with the phase containing two Majorana edge modes. On the other hand, it receives a linear correction in term of λd for an another phase boundary. Finally, we focus to study the effect of the impurity in the time evolution of the EE for the critical quenching case where the impurity term is applied only to the final Hamiltonian. Interestingly, it has been shown that for all the phase boundaries, contrary to the equilibrium case, the saturation value of the EE increases logarithmically with the strength of impurity in a certain regime of λd and finally, for higher values of λd, it increases very slowly dictated by an exponential damping factor. The impurity-induced behavior of EE might bear some deep underlying connection to thermalization.

  20. Ultrasonic imaging of defects in coarse-grained steels with the decomposition of the time reversal operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Villaverde, Eduardo; Robert, Sébastien; Prada, Claire

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, the Synthetic Transmit Aperture (STA) imaging is combined with the Decomposition of the Time Reversal Operator (DORT) method to image a coarse grained austenitic-ferritic steel using a contact transducer array. The highly heterogeneous structure of this material produces a strong scattering noise in ultrasound images. Furthermore, the surface waves guided along the array interfere with the bulk waves backscattered by defects. In order to overcome these problems, the DORT method is applied before calculating images with the STA algorithm. The method consists in analyzing in the frequency domain the singular values and singular vectors of the full array transfer matrix. This paper first presents an analysis of the singular values of different waves contained in the data acquisition, which facilitates the identification of the subspace associated with the surface guided waves for filtering operations. Then, a filtered matrix is defined where the contribution of structural noise and guided waves are reduced. Finally, in the time domain, the STA algorithm is applied to this matrix in order to calculate an image with reduced structural noise. Experiments demonstrate that this filtering improves the signal-to-noise ratio by more than 12 dB in comparison with the STA image before filtering.

  1. Performance Comparison with Different Antenna Properties in Time Reversal Ultra-Wideband Communications for Sensor System Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Wang, Bing-Zhong; Ding, Shuai

    2017-12-30

    The complexity reduction of receivers in ultrawideband (UWB) communication when time reversal (TR) technique is applied makes it suitable for low-cost and low-power sensor systems. Larger antenna dispersion can generally lead to a less stable phase center and will increase the interference in UWB communications based on pulse radio, whereas a higher antenna gain will result in higher channel gain and further larger channel capacity. To find out the trade-off between antenna gain and dispersion, we performed the channel measurements using different antennas in a dense multipath environment and established the distribution of channel capacities based on the measured channel responses. The results show that the capacity loss caused by antenna dispersion cannot be compensated by antenna gain with line-of-sight transmission to some extent, the effect of phase center on the communication system is negligible, and antennas with smaller time dispersion will have a better energy focusing property and anti-interference performance in TR systems.

  2. Seismic monitoring of a rock slope Åknes, Norway: time-reversal localization of seismic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tomas; Roth, Michael; Kühn, Daniela

    2014-05-01

    The Åknes rockslide in western Norway is characterized by a steady movement of a rock mass of about 1 km2 area with yearly rate of few centimeters. A seismic network consisting of 8 three-component geophones is used to monitor the slope. Tens to hundreds of local and distant seismic events are recorded daily. The local seismic events show a variety of waveforms, both with abrupt and emergent onsets, including events related to the rock-slide activity, rolling stones and snow avalanches. This makes, along with the relatively low frequency content of the waveforms, the standard processing in the form of arrival time measurement rather difficult. We present a method of time reversal stacking of signal envelopes and their STA/LTA ratios, which allows for identification and approximate location of the local seismic events. The method was successfully tested by locating two types of ground-truth data: surface blasts carried out during a seismic survey and a block rock collapse occurring in September 2012. The test proved the ability of the method to determine the approximate position of microseismic events, which enables to distinguish among several foci of the rock slide activity. Application of the method to 8 years of recorded data showed a continuous seismic activity that is concentrated at the centre and at the eastern edge of the monitored area. A seasonal increase of activity is observed during spring, which is probably related to the snow-melt period.

  3. Real-Time Quantitative PCR (QPCR) and Reverse Transcription-QPCR for Detection and Enumeration of Total Yeasts in Wine▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hierro, Núria; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; González, Ángel; Mas, Albert; Guillamón, Jose M.

    2006-01-01

    Real-time PCR, or quantitative PCR (QPCR), has been developed to rapidly detect and quantify the total number of yeasts in wine without culturing. Universal yeast primers were designed from the variable D1/D2 domains of the 26S rRNA gene. These primers showed good specificity with all the wine yeasts tested, and they did not amplify the most representative wine species of acetic acid bacteria and lactic acid bacteria. Numerous standard curves were constructed with different strains and species grown in yeast extract-peptone-dextrose medium or incubated in wine. The small standard errors with these replicas proved that the assay is reproducible and highly robust. This technique was validated with artificially contaminated and natural wine samples. We also performed a reverse transcription-QPCR (RT-QPCR) assay from rRNA for total viable yeast quantification. This technique had a low detection limit and was more accurate than QPCR because the dead cells were not quantified. As far as we know, this is the first time that RT-QPCR has been performed to quantify viable yeasts from rRNA. RT-QPCR is a rapid and accurate technique for enumerating yeasts during industrial wine fermentation and controlling the risk of wine spoilage. PMID:17088381

  4. Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Assay for Detection of Mumps Virus RNA in Clinical Specimens▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddicker, Jennifer D.; Rota, Paul A.; Kreman, Trisha; Wangeman, Andrea; Lowe, Louis; Hummel, Kimberly B.; Thompson, Robert; Bellini, William J.; Pentella, Michael; DesJardin, Lucy E.

    2007-01-01

    The mumps virus is a negative-strand RNA virus in the family Paramyxoviridae. Mumps infection results in an acute illness with symptoms including fever, headache, and myalgia, followed by swelling of the salivary glands. Complications of mumps can include meningitis, deafness, pancreatitis, orchitis, and first-trimester abortion. Laboratory confirmation of mumps infection can be made by the detection of immunoglobulin M-specific antibodies to mumps virus in acute-phase serum samples, the isolation of mumps virus in cell culture, or by detection of the RNA of the mumps virus by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. We developed and validated a multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for rapid mumps diagnosis in a clinical setting. This assay used oligonucleotide primers and a TaqMan probe targeting the mumps SH gene, as well as primers and a probe that targeted the human RNase P gene to assess the presence of PCR inhibitors and as a measure of specimen quality. The test was specific, since it did not amplify a product from near-neighbor viruses, as well as sensitive and accurate. Real-time RT-PCR results showed 100% correlation with results from viral culture, the gold standard for mumps diagnostic testing. Assay efficiency was over 90% and displayed good precision after performing inter- and intraassay replicates. Thus, we have developed and validated a molecular method for rapidly diagnosing mumps infection that may be used to complement existing techniques. PMID:17652480

  5. Reverse transcriptase real-time PCR for detection and quantification of viable Campylobacter jejuni directly from poultry faecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Xuan Thanh; Wolff, Anders; Madsen, Mogens; Bang, Dang Duong

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter spp. is the most common cause of bacterial diarrhoea in humans worldwide. Therefore, rapid and reliable methods for detection and quantification of this pathogen are required. In this study, we have developed a reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) for detection and quantification of viable Campylobacter jejuni directly from chicken faecal samples. The results of this method and a DNA-based quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) method were compared with those of a bacterial culture method. Using bacterial culture and RT-qPCR methods, viable C. jejuni cells could be detected for up to 5 days in both the C. jejuni spiked and the naturally contaminated faecal samples. We found that no RT-qPCR signals were obtained when viable C. jejuni cells could not be counted by the culture method. In contrast, using a DNA-based qPCR method, dead or non-viable Campylobacter cells were detected, and all tested samples were positive, even after 20 days of storage. The developed method for detection and quantification of viable C. jejuni cells directly from chicken faecal samples can be used for further research on the survival of Campylobacter in the environment. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Amorphous Metals and Composites as Mirrors and Mirror Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Davis, Gregory L. (Inventor); Agnes, Gregory S. (Inventor); Shapiro, Andrew A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A mirror or mirror assembly fabricated by molding, pressing, assembling, or depositing one or more bulk metal glass (BMG), bulk metal glass composite (BMGMC), or amorphous metal (AM) parts and where the optical surface and backing of the mirror can be fabricated without machining or polishing by utilizing the unique molding capabilities of this class of materials.

  7. Deformable Mirrors Correct Optical Distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    By combining the high sensitivity of space telescopes with revolutionary imaging technologies consisting primarily of adaptive optics, the Terrestrial Planet Finder is slated to have imaging power 100 times greater than the Hubble Space Telescope. To this end, Boston Micromachines Corporation, of Cambridge, Massachusetts, received Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for space-based adaptive optical technology. The work resulted in a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) called the Kilo-DM. The company now offers a full line of MEMS DMs, which are being used in observatories across the world, in laser communication, and microscopy.

  8. The Mirror MMDBMS architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, A.P.; van Doorn, M.G.L.M.; Blanken, Henk; Apers, Peter M.G.

    Handling large collections of digitized multimedia data, usually referred to as multimedia digital libraries, is a major challenge for information technology. The Mirror DBMS is a research database system that is developed to better understand the kind of data management that is required in the

  9. Rearview Mirror Dimming Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, William

    2011-01-01

    Students are often unaware of the little tab on a rear-view mirror that is used to dim headlights from the rear. Those who know about this tab are usually interested in knowing how it works. Explanations of the optics involved can be found in Serway and Jewett and Jones and Edge. An alternate explanation is given.

  10. Tandem mirror reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Barr, W.L.; Carlson, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    A parametric analysis and a preliminary conceptual design for a 1000 MWe Tandem Mirror Reactor (TMR) are described. The concept is sufficiently attractive to encourage further work, both for a pure fusion TMR and a low technology TMR Fusion-Fission Hybrid

  11. Mirror reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.; Barmore, W.L.; Bender, D.J.; Doggett, J.N.; Galloway, T.R.

    1976-01-01

    The general requirements of a breeding blanket for a mirror reactor are described. The following areas are discussed: (1) facility layout and blanket maintenance, (2) heat transfer and thermal conversion system, (3) materials, (4) tritium containment and removal, and (5) nuclear performance

  12. Simultaneous angular alignment of segmented mirrors using sinusoidal pattern analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heejoo; Trumper, Isaac; Dubin, Matthew; Zhao, Wenchuan; Kim, Dae Wook

    2017-08-01

    A segmented mirror is one of the most promising solutions to build an extremely large aperture telescope to reveal the secrets of the universe. In this manuscript, we present a simultaneous angle alignment method for segmented mirrors. By taking the displayed sinusoidal pattern reflecting off the mirrors, the tip-tilt angles are measured with 0.8 μrad resolution for a flat mirror. Due to the efficient calculation using Fourier analysis, the total measurement time for seven flat mirrors is 0.07 s. In addition, a multiplexed sinusoidal pattern is adapted to resolve the intrinsic 2π ambiguity problem in a sinusoidal signal. The presented method can measure any number of segmented mirrors provided that the camera's field of view can cover them all simultaneously.

  13. A Smart Home Center Platform Solution Based on Smart Mirror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Xibo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the popularization of the concept of smart home, people have raised requirements on the experience of smart living. A smart home platform center solution is put forward in order to solve the intelligent interoperability and information integration of smart home, which enable people to have a more intelligent and convenient life experience. This platform center is achieved through the Smart Mirror. The Smart Mirror refers to a smart furniture, on the basis of the traditional concept of mirror, combining Raspberry Pi, the application of one-way mirror imaging principle, the touch-enabled design, voice and video interaction. Smart Mirror can provide a series of intelligent experience for the residents, such as controlling all the intelligent furniture through Smart Mirror; accessing and displaying the weather, time, news and other life information; monitoring the home environment; remote interconnection operation.

  14. Physics of mirror fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    Recent experimental results with the 2XIIB mirror machine at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory have demonstrated the stable confinement of plasmas at fusion temperatures and with energy densities equaling or exceeding that of the confining fields. The physics of mirror confinement is discussed in the context of these new results. Some possible approaches to further improving the confinement properties of mirror systems and the impact of these new approaches on the prospects for mirror fusion reactors are discussed

  15. Mirror reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Barr, W.L.; Bender, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    Design studies of a fusion mirror reactor, a fusion-fission mirror reactor, and two small mirror reactors are summarized. The fusion reactor uses 150-keV neutral-beam injectors based on the acceleration of negative ions. The injectors provide over 1 GW of continuous power at an efficiency greater than 80%. The fusion reactor has three-stage, modularized, Venetian blind, plasma direct converter with a predicted efficiency of 59% and a new concept for removal of the lune-shaped blanket: a crane is brought between the two halves of the Yin-Yang magnet, which are separated by a float. The design has desirable features such as steady-state operation, minimal impurity problems, and low first-wall thermal stress. The major disadvantage is low Q resulting in high re-circulating power and hence high cost of electrical power. However, the direct capital cost per unit of gross electrical power is reasonable [$1000/kW(e)]. By contrast, the fusion-fission reactor design is not penalized by re-circulating power and uses relatively near-term fusion technology being developed for the fusion power program. New results are presented on the Th- 233 U and the U- 239 Pu fuel cycles. The purpose of this hybrid is fuel production, with projected costs at $55/g of Pu or $127/g of 233 U. Blanket and cooling system designs, including an emergency cooling system, by General Atomic Company, lead us to the opinion that the reactor can meet expected safety standards for licensing. The smallest mirror reactor having only a shield between the plasma and the coil is the 4.2-m long fusion engineering research facility (FERF) designed for material irradiation. The smallest mirror reactor having both a blanket and shield is the 7.5-m long experimental power reactor (EPR), which has both a fusion and a fusion-fission version. (author)

  16. Plasma confinement in the TMX tandem mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B. Jr.; Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    Plasma confinement in the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) is described. Axially confining potentials are shown to exist throughout the central 20-cm core of TMX. Axial electron-confinement time is up to 100 times that of single-cell mirror machines. Radial transport of ions is smaller than axial transport near the axis. It has two parts at large radii: nonambipolar, in rough agreement with predictions from resonant-neoclassical transport theory, and ambipolar, observed near the plasma edge under certain conditions, accompanied by a low-frequency, m = 1 instability or strong turbulence

  17. Spatial discordance and phase reversals during alternate pacing in discrete-time kinematic and cardiomyocyte ionic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Seth H.

    2015-10-01

    Alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in the cardiac action potential duration (APD), is a dynamical instability linked with the initiation of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, and arises via a period-doubling bifurcation when myocytes are stimulated at fast rates. In this study, we analyze the stability of a propagating electrical wave in a one-dimensional cardiac myocyte model in response to an arrhythmogenic rhythm known as alternate pacing. Using a discrete-time kinematic model and complex frequency (Z) domain analysis, we derive analytical expressions to predict phase reversals and spatial discordance in the interbeat interval (IBI) and APD, which, importantly, cannot be predicted with a model that neglects the influence of cell coupling on repolarization. We identify key dimensionless parameters that determine the transition from spatial concordance to discordance. Finally, we show that the theoretical predictions agree closely with numerical simulations of an ionic myocyte model, over a wide range of parameters, including variable IBI, altered ionic current gating, and reduced cell coupling. We demonstrate a novel approach to predict instability in cardiac tissue during alternate pacing and further illustrate how this approach can be generalized to more detail models of myocyte dynamics.

  18. 3D Seismic Imaging through Reverse-Time Migration on Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Multi-Core Processors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Araya-Polo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse-Time Migration (RTM is a state-of-the-art technique in seismic acoustic imaging, because of the quality and integrity of the images it provides. Oil and gas companies trust RTM with crucial decisions on multi-million-dollar drilling investments. But RTM requires vastly more computational power than its predecessor techniques, and this has somewhat hindered its practical success. On the other hand, despite multi-core architectures promise to deliver unprecedented computational power, little attention has been devoted to mapping efficiently RTM to multi-cores. In this paper, we present a mapping of the RTM computational kernel to the IBM Cell/B.E. processor that reaches close-to-optimal performance. The kernel proves to be memory-bound and it achieves a 98% utilization of the peak memory bandwidth. Our Cell/B.E. implementation outperforms a traditional processor (PowerPC 970MP in terms of performance (with an 15.0× speedup and energy-efficiency (with a 10.0× increase in the GFlops/W delivered. Also, it is the fastest RTM implementation available to the best of our knowledge. These results increase the practical usability of RTM. Also, the RTM-Cell/B.E. combination proves to be a strong competitor in the seismic arena.

  19. Novel Robust Optimization and Power Allocation of Time Reversal-MIMO-UWB Systems in an Imperfect CSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Alizadeh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Time Reversal (TR technique is an attractive solution for a scenario where the transmission system employs low complexity receivers with multiple antennas at both transmitter and receiver sides. The TR technique can be combined with a high data rate MIMO-UWB system as TR-MIMO-UWB system. In spite of TR's good performance in MIMO-UWB systems, it suffers from performance degradation in an imperfect Channel State Information (CSI case. In this paper, at first a robust TR pre-filter is designed together with a MMSE equalizer in TR-MIMO-UWB system where is robust against channel imperfection conditions. We show that the robust pre-filter optimization technique, considerably improves the BER performance of TR-MIMO-UWB system in imperfect CSI, where temporal focusing of the TR technique is kept, especially for high SNR values. Then, in order to improve the system performance more than ever, a power loading scheme is developed by minimizing the average symbol error rate in an imperfect CSI. Numerical and simulation results are presented to confirm the performance advantage attained by the proposed robust optimization and power loading in an imperfect CSI scenario.

  20. An Adjoint Sensitivity Method Applied to Time Reverse Imaging of Tsunami Source for the 2009 Samoa Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossen, M. Jakir; Gusman, Aditya; Satake, Kenji; Cummins, Phil R.

    2018-01-01

    We have previously developed a tsunami source inversion method based on "Time Reverse Imaging" and demonstrated that it is computationally very efficient and has the ability to reproduce the tsunami source model with good accuracy using tsunami data of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake tsunami. In this paper, we implemented this approach in the 2009 Samoa earthquake tsunami triggered by a doublet earthquake consisting of both normal and thrust faulting. Our result showed that the method is quite capable of recovering the source model associated with normal and thrust faulting. We found that the inversion result is highly sensitive to some stations that must be removed from the inversion. We applied an adjoint sensitivity method to find the optimal set of stations in order to estimate a realistic source model. We found that the inversion result is improved significantly once the optimal set of stations is used. In addition, from the reconstructed source model we estimated the slip distribution of the fault from which we successfully determined the dipping orientation of the fault plane for the normal fault earthquake. Our result suggests that the fault plane dip toward the northeast.

  1. Dynamical Time-Reversal Symmetry Breaking and Photo-Induced Chiral Spin Liquid in Frustrated Mott Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, Martin; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Moritz, Brian; Devereaux, Thomas

    Spurred by recent progress in melting, enhancement and induction of electronic order out of equilibrium, a tantalizing prospect concerns instead accessing transient Floquet steady states via broad pump pulses, to manipulate band topology and affect electronic transport. Here, we extend these ideas to strongly-correlated systems and show that pumping frustrated Mott insulators with circularly-polarized light can drive the effective spin system across a phase transition to a chiral spin liquid (CSL). Starting from a Kagome Hubbard model deep in the Mott phase, circular polarization promotes a scalar spin chirality Si . (Sj ×Sk) term directly to the Hamiltonian level, dynamically breaking time-reversal while preserving SU(2) spin symmetry. We find that the transient physics is well-captured by an effective Floquet spin model, fingerprint its phase diagram, and find a stable photo-induced CSL in close proximity to the equilibrium state. The results presented suggest a new avenue of employing dynamical symmetry breaking to engineer quantum spin liquids and access elusive phase transitions that are not readily accessible in equilibrium.

  2. Clinical characteristics of mirror syndrome: a comparison of 10 cases of mirror syndrome with non-mirror syndrome fetal hydrops cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Go; Aoki, Shigeru; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate clinical features of mirror syndrome. We retrospectively reviewed 71 cases of fetal hydrops with or without mirror syndrome, and compared with respect to maternal age, the body mass index, the primipara rate, the gestational age at delivery, the timing of fetal hydrops onset, the severity of fetal edema, placental swelling, the laboratory data and the fetal mortality. The data are expressed as the medians. Mirror syndrome developed in 29% (10/35) of the cases with fetal hydrops. In mirror group, the onset time of fetal hydrops was significantly earlier (29 weeks versus 31 weeks, p = 0.011), and the severity of fetal hydrops (fetal edema/biparietal diameter) was significantly higher than non-mirror group (0.23 versus 0.16, p syndrome is occurred frequently in early and severe fetal hydrops and cause hemodilution and elevation of serum hCG.

  3. Effective modeling and reverse-time migration for novel pure acoustic wave in arbitrary orthorhombic anisotropic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shigang; Liu, Yang

    2018-03-01

    The conventional pseudo-acoustic wave equations (PWEs) in arbitrary orthorhombic anisotropic (OA) media usually have coupled P- and SV-wave modes. These coupled equations may introduce strong SV-wave artifacts and numerical instabilities in P-wave simulation results and reverse-time migration (RTM) profiles. However, pure acoustic wave equations (PAWEs) completely decouple the P-wave component from the full elastic wavefield and naturally solve all the aforementioned problems. In this article, we present a novel PAWE in arbitrary OA media and compare it with the conventional coupled PWEs. Through decomposing the solution of the corresponding eigenvalue equation for the original PWE into an ellipsoidal differential operator (EDO) and an ellipsoidal scalar operator (ESO), the new PAWE in time-space domain is constructed by applying the combination of these two solvable operators and can effectively describe P-wave features in arbitrary OA media. Furthermore, we adopt the optimal finite-difference method (FDM) to solve the newly derived PAWE. In addition, the three-dimensional (3D) hybrid absorbing boundary condition (HABC) with some reasonable modifications is developed for reducing artificial edge reflections in anisotropic media. To improve computational efficiency in 3D case, we adopt graphic processing unit (GPU) with Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) instead of traditional central processing unit (CPU) architecture. Several numerical experiments for arbitrary OA models confirm that the proposed schemes can produce pure, stable and accurate P-wave modeling results and RTM images with higher computational efficiency. Moreover, the 3D numerical simulations can provide us with a comprehensive and real description of wave propagation.

  4. Zernike polynomial based Rayleigh-Ritz model of a piezoelectric unimorph deformable mirror

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Long, CS

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric bimorph- or unimorph-type deformable mirrors are commonly used in adaptive optics to correct for time-dependent phase aberrations. In the optics community, the surface deformations that deformable mirrors are required to achieve...

  5. Giant pandas failed to show mirror self-recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaozan; Jin, Yuan; Luo, Bo; Zhang, Guiquan; Wei, Rongping; Liu, Dingzhen

    2015-05-01

    Mirror self-recognition (MSR), i.e., the ability to recognize oneself in a mirror, is considered a potential index of self-recognition and the foundation of individual development. A wealth of literature on MSR is available for social animals, such as chimpanzees, Asian elephants and dolphins, yet little is known about MSR in solitary mammalian species. We aimed to evaluate whether the giant panda can recognize itself in the mirror, and whether this capacity varies with age. Thirty-four captive giant pandas (F:M = 18:16; juveniles, sub-adults and adults) were subjected to four mirror tests: covered mirror tests, open mirror tests, water mark control tests, and mark tests. The results showed that, though adult, sub-adult and juvenile pandas exposed to mirrors spent similar amounts of time in social mirror-directed behaviors (χ(2) = 0.719, P = 0.698), none of them used the mirror to touch the mark on their head, a self-directed behavior suggesting MSR. Individuals of all age groups initially displayed attacking, threatening, foot scraping and backwards walking behaviors when exposed to their self-images in the mirror. Our data indicate that, regardless of age, the giant pandas did not recognize their self-image in the mirror, but instead considered the image to be a conspecific. Our results add to the available information on mirror self-recognition in large mammals, provide new information on a solitary species, and will be useful for enclosure design and captive animal management.

  6. Mirror Me: Imitative Responses in Adults with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunke, Odette; Schöttle, Daniel; Vettorazzi, Eik; Brandt, Valerie; Kahl, Ursula; Bäumer, Tobias; Ganos, Christos; David, Nicole; Peiker, Ina; Engel, Andreas K; Brass, Marcel; Münchau, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctions of the human mirror neuron system have been postulated to underlie some deficits in autism spectrum disorders including poor imitative performance and impaired social skills. Using three reaction time experiments addressing mirror neuron system functions under simple and complex conditions, we examined 20 adult autism spectrum…

  7. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, Gavin E

    2011-01-01

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa

  8. Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, F.P.

    1977-01-01

    On October 1, 1977 work began at LLL on the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), an advanced experimental fusion device. Scheduled for operation in late 1981, MFTF is designed as an intermediate step between present mirror machines, such as 2XIIB, and an experimental fusion reactor. This design incorporates improved technology and a better theoretical understanding of how neutral beam injection, plasma guns, and gas injection into the plasma region compensate for cooling and particle losses. With the new facility, we expect to achieve a confinement factor (n tau) of 10 12 particles . sm/cm 3 --a tenfold increase over 2XIIB n tau values--and to increase plasma temperature to over 500 million K. The following article describes this new facility and reports on progress in some of the R and D projects that are providing the technological base for its construction

  9. Thermal performance of the ATST secondary mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myung K.; DeVries, Joe; Hansen, Eric

    2007-12-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) has a 4.24m off-axis primary mirror designed to deliver diffractionlimited images of the sun. Its baseline secondary mirror (M2) design uses a 0.65m diameter Silicon Carbide mirror mounted kinematically by a bi-pod flexure mechanism at three equally spaced locations. Unlike other common telescopes, the ATST M2 is to be exposed to a significant solar heat loading. A thermal management system (TMS) will be developed to accommodate the solar loading and minimize "mirror seeing effect" by controlling the temperature difference between the M2 optical surface and the ambient air at the site. Thermo-elastic analyses for steady state thermal behaviors of the ATST secondary mirror was performed using finite element analysis by I-DEAS TM and PCRINGE TM for the optical analysis. We examined extensive heat transfer simulation cases and their results were discussed. The goal of this study is to establish thermal models by I-DEAS for an adequate thermal environment. These thermal models will be useful for estimating segment thermal responses. Current study assumes a few sample time dependent thermal loadings to synthesize the operational environment.

  10. Performance evaluations of the ATST secondary mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myung K.; DeVries, Joseph; Hansen, Eric

    2007-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) has a 4.24m off-axis primary mirror designed to deliver diffraction-limited images of the sun. Its baseline secondary mirror (M2) design uses a 0.65m diameter Silicon Carbide mirror mounted kinematically by a bi-pod flexure mechanism at three equally spaced locations. Unlike other common telescopes, the ATST M2 is to be exposed to a significant solar heat loading. A thermal management system will be developed to accommodate the solar loading and minimize "mirror seeing effect" by controlling the temperature difference between the M2 optical surface and the ambient air at the site. Thermo-elastic analyses for steady state thermal behaviors of the ATST secondary mirror was performed using finite element analysis by I-DEAS TM and PCFRINGE TM for the optical analysis. We examined extensive heat transfer simulation cases and their results are discussed. The goal of this study is to evaluate the optical performances of M2 using thermal models and mechanical models. Thermal responses from the models enable us to manipulate time dependent thermal loadings to synthesize the operational environment for the design and development of TMS.

  11. A novel hybrid surface micromachined segmented mirror for large aperture laser applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Chen, Haiqing; Yu, Hongbin

    2006-07-01

    A novel hybrid surface micromachined segmented mirror array is described. This device is capable of scaling to large apertures for correcting time-varying aberrations in laser applications. Each mirror is composed of bottom electrode, support part, and mirror plate, in which a T-shaped beam structure is used to support the mirror plate. It can provide mirror with vertical movement and rotation around two horizontal axes. The test results show that the maximum deflection along the vertical direction of the mirror plate is 2 microns, while the rotation angles around x and y axes are +-2.3 deg. and +-1.45 deg., respectively.

  12. Tinbergen on mirror neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Niko Tinbergen defined the scope of behavioural biology with his four problems: causation, ontogeny, survival value and evolution. About 20 years ago, there was another highly significant development in behavioural biology—the discovery of mirror neurons (MNs). Here, I use Tinbergen's original four problems (rather than the list that appears in textbooks) to highlight the differences between two prominent accounts of MNs, the genetic and associative accounts; to suggest that ...

  13. Optimization and Validation of a Real Time Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction with RNA Internal Control to Detect Rubella RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winny Xie

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: According to a report from WHO, cases of rubella infection in Indonesia has increased up to 10-fold from 2007 to 2011. Despite no data of congenital rubella syndrome in the report, there are approximately 45,000 cases of babies born with heart failure and 0.1-0.3% live births with congenital deafness in Indonesia. Allegedly, rubella infection during pregnancy may play a role in this condition. This study aimed to optimize and validate a real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR method to detect rubella virus RNA as an aid for the diagnosis of congenital rubella infection. METHODS: Method optimization was conducted using nucleic acids extracted from Trimovax Merieux vaccine with the High Pure Viral Nucleic Acid Kit. One step RT-qPCR was performed with Quantifast Multiplex RTPCR+R Kit. Target synthetic DNA was designed and used to determine the sensitivity of the method. RNA internal control was synthesized to control the process of extraction and amplification. RESULTS: The analytical sensitivity of this method was as low as 5 copies target synthetic DNA/μl. The mean Coefficient of Variation (CV % of the critical threshold (Ct obtained were 2.71%, 1.20%, 1.62%, and 1.59% for within run, between run, between kit lots, and between operators, respectively. Recovery of the target synthetic DNA from amniotic fluid was 100.51% (by the log copies/μl at the concentration of 1,000,000 copies/μl. CONCLUSIONS: RT-qPCR is successfully used for the detection of rubella virus RNA in vaccine and synthetic nucleic acid. With its high sensitivity, good precision and recovery, this method offers a means to improve the diagnosis of congenital rubella infection in developing countries like Indonesia. KEYWORDS: congenital rubella, RT-qPCR, prenatal diagnosis, amniotic fluid.

  14. Development, optimization, and validation of a Classical swine fever virus real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberling, August J; Bieker-Stefanelli, Jill; Reising, Monica M; Siev, David; Martin, Barbara M; McIntosh, Michael T; Beckham, Tammy R

    2011-09-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an economically devastating disease of pigs. Instrumental to the control of CSF is a well-characterized assay that can deliver a rapid, accurate diagnosis prior to the onset of clinical signs. A real-time fluorogenic-probe hydrolysis (TaqMan) reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for CSF was developed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) at the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (CSF PIADC assay) and evaluated for analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. A well-characterized panel including Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and Border disease virus (BDV) isolates was utilized in initial feasibility and optimization studies. The assay was initially designed and validated for use on the ABI 7900HT using the Qiagen QuantiTect® Probe RT-PCR chemistry. However, demonstrating equivalency with multiple one-step RT-PCR chemistries and PCR platforms increased the versatility of the assay. Limit of detection experiments indicated that the Qiagen QuantiTect® Multiplex (NoROX) and the Invitrogen SuperScript® III RT-PCR kits were consistently the most sensitive one-step chemistries for use with the CSF PIADC primer/probe set. Analytical sensitivity of the CSF PIADC assay ranged from <1-2.95 log(10) TCID(50)/ml on both the ABI 7900HT and ABI 7500 platforms. The CSF PIADC assay had 100% diagnostic sensitivity and specificity when tested on a panel of 152 clinical samples from the Dominican Republic and Colombia. The ability to perform this newly developed assay in 96-well formats provides an increased level of versatility for use in CSF surveillance programs.

  15. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays for identification of wild poliovirus 1 & 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepa K; Nalavade, Uma P; Deshpande, Jagadish M

    2015-10-01

    The poliovirus serotype identification and intratypic differentiation by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assay is suitable for serotype mixtures but not for intratypic mixtures of wild and vaccine poliovirus strains. This study was undertaken to develop wild poliovirus 1 and 3 (WPV1 and WPV3) specific rRT-PCR assays for use. Specific primers and probes for rRT-PCR were designed based on VP1 sequences of WPV1 and WPV3 isolated in India since 2000. The specificity of the rRT-PCR assays was evaluated using WPV1 and WPV3 of different genetic lineages, non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs) and mixtures of wild/wild and wild/Sabin vaccine strains. The sensitivity of the assays was determined by testing serial 10-fold dilutions of wild poliovirus 1 and 3 stock suspensions of known titre. No cross-reactivity with Sabin strains, intertypic wild poliovirus isolates or 27 types of NPEVs across all the four Enterovirus species was found for both the wild poliovirus 1 and 3 rRT-PCR assays. All WPV1 and WPV3 strains isolated since 2000 were successfully amplified. The rRT-PCR assays detected 10 4.40 CCID 50 /ml of WPV1 and 10 4.00 CCID 50 /ml of WPV3, respectively either as single isolate or mixture with Sabin vaccine strains or intertypic wild poliovirus. rRT-PCR assays for WPV1 and WPV3 have been validated to detect all the genetic variations of the WPV1 and WPV3 isolated in India for the last decade. When used in combination with the current rRT-PCR assay testing was complete for confirmation of the presence of wild poliovirus in intratypic mixtures.

  16. BN-350 ''Mirror System''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, A.L.; Halbig, J.K.

    2004-01-01

    The BN-350 Unattended Monitoring System plays an important role for the Safeguards Department of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In 1998, the Los Alamos National Laboratory, in conjunction with the IAEA and sponsored by the US Department of Energy, designed and installed an integrated multi-instrument safeguards system at the BN-350 reactor in Aktau, Kazakhstan, to monitor spent-fuel and blanket assembly conditioning and canning activities. The purpose of the system was to provide effective safeguards at this facility while reducing the manpower load on the IAEA. The system is composed of many individual nondestructive analysis and surveillance components, each having a unique function and working together to provide fully unattended measurement of spent-fuel assemblies. The BN-350 ''Mirror System'' was built to provide a similar system with like components at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna to facilitate analysis and/or simulation of problems that might occur in the field and for training inspectors and other technical staff in preparation for their work in the field. In addition, the system is used to test new equipment and qualify new or modified software. This paper describes the main components of the Mirror System, how the components are integrated, and how the Mirror System has benefited the IAEA.

  17. Mirror reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Barr, W.L.; Bender, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Design studies of a fusion mirror reactor, a fusion-fission mirror reactor, and two small mirror reactors are summarized. The fusion reactor uses 150-keV neutral-beam injectors based on the acceleration of negative ions. The injectors provide over 1 GW of continuous power at an efficiency greater than 80 percent. The fusion reactor has three-stage, modularized, Venetian blind, plasma direct converter with a predicted efficiency of 59 percent and a new concept for removal of the lune-shaped blanket: a crane is brought between the two halves of the Yin-Yang magnet, which are separated by a float. The design has desirable features such as steady-state operation, minimal impurity problems, and low first-wall thermal stress. The major disadvantage is low Q resulting in high recirculating power and hence high cost of electrical power. However, the direct capital cost per unit of gross electrical power is reasonable [$1000/kW(e)

  18. Real-time zymography and reverse zymography: a method for detecting activities of matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors using FITC-labeled collagen and casein as substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Shunji; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Kiriyama, Tomomi; Yokoyama, Tsukao; Irie, Shinkichi

    2002-02-01

    Zymography and reverse zymography are widely used techniques for identifying the proteolytic activity of enzymes and the presence of protease inhibitors in polyacrylamide gels. In the current studies, we utilized a fluorescein-isothiocyanate-labeled substrate to develop novel zymographic and reverse zymographic methods for detecting matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of the metalloproteinases, respectively. Using a transilluminator, the results can be observed visually without stopping the enzymatic reaction. For this reason, we have named these methods real-time zymography and real-time reverse zymography. These methods have the following advantages compared with conventional protocols: (1) because the reaction can be repeatedly monitored on the polyacrylamide gels, optimization of the incubation time can be achieved without preliminary analyses; (2) higher sensitivity is achieved with a lower amount of substrate than with conventional methods; (3) a semi-quantitative analysis of matrix metalloproteinases is possible. An additional advantage of the real-time reverse zymography is that, because the fluorescence detection is specific for substrate digestion, the inhibitor bands can be easily distinguished from contaminating proteins.

  19. Rapid group-, serotype-, and vaccine strain-specific identification of poliovirus isolates by real-time reverse transcription-PCR using degenerate primers and probes containing deoxyinosine residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, David R; Yang, Chen-Fu; Ching, Karen; Vincent, Annelet; Iber, Jane; Campagnoli, Ray; Mandelbaum, Mark; De, Lina; Yang, Su-Ju; Nix, Allan; Kew, Olen M

    2009-06-01

    We have adapted our previously described poliovirus diagnostic reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assays to a real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) format. Our highly specific assays and rRT-PCR reagents are designed for use in the WHO Global Polio Laboratory Network for rapid and large-scale identification of poliovirus field isolates.

  20. Rapid Differentiation and Identification of Potential Severe Strains of Citrus tristeza Virus by Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multiplex Taqman®-based real-time reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to detect all strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and to identify potentially severe strains of the virus. A CTV TaqMan probe (CTV-CY5) based on the coat protein (CP) gene sequences...

  1. Specific detection of rinderpest virus by real-time reverse transcription-PCR in preclincal and clinical samples of experimentally infected cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    A highly sensitive detection test for Rinderpest virus (RPV), based on a real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PR) system, was developed. Five different RPV genomic targets were examined, and one was selected and optimized to detect viral RNA in infected tissue culture fluid with a level of detec...

  2. Comparison of pooling 11 or 5 oropharyngeal swabbings for detecting avian influenza virus by real-time reverse transcription-PCR in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of pooling five or 11 orophyarngeal (O/P) swabbings on detecting avian influenza virus (AIV) by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) was evaluated. The model used for the evaluation was designed to minimize viral load and thus assess the effect of the pooli...

  3. Design and Assessment of a Real Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Method to Genotype Single-Stranded RNA Male-Specific Coliphages (Family Leviviridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    A real-time, reverse transcription-PCR (RT-qPCR) assay was developed to differentiate the four genogroups of male-specific ssRNA coliphages (FRNA) (family Leviviridae). As FRNA display a trend of source-specificity (human sewage or animal waste) at the genogroup level, this assa...

  4. Development of duplex SYBR Green I-based real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR for detection and discrimination of grapevine viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    A SYBR® Green-based real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) assay in combination with melt curve analysis (MCA) was developed for the detection of nine grapevine viruses. The detection limits for singleplex qRT-PCR for all nine grapevine viruses were determined to be in the range ...

  5. Strand-specific real-time RT-PCR quantitation of Maize fine streak virus genomic and positive-sense RNAs using high temperature reverse transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efforts to analyze the replicative RNA produced by Maize fine streak virus (MVSF) within maize tissue was complicated by the lack of specificity during cDNA generation using standard reverse transcriptase protocols. Real-time qRT-PCR using cDNA generated by priming with random hexamers does not dist...

  6. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus: Interlaboratory ring trial to evaluate real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction detection methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernike, Kerstin; Bonilauri, Paolo; Dauber, Malte

    2012-01-01

    To compare the real-time reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assays used for the diagnosis of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a Europe-wide interlaboratory ring trial was conducted. A variety of PRRSV strains including North American...

  7. Amplifying mirrors with saturated gain without and with a resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skettrup, Torben

    2007-01-01

    An investigation of amplifying mirrors with a view to their use in resonator structures has been performed. Both non-saturated and saturated amplifying mirrors are demonstrated. It was found that relatively high values of gain (typical 5-10 times) can be obtained even when saturation is taken...... into account. Several resonator structures containing from two up to four mirrors, some including beamsplitters, are investigated. It was found that the gain to a first approximation depends only on the ratio between the pumping power and the input power on the amplifying mirror. It was also found...... that the configuration with four mirrors is well suited as an amplifier device working as an optical transistor since high values of gain up to 40 times could be obtained....

  8. Improved performance of Mg–Y alloy thin film switchable mirrors after coating with a superhydrophobic surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La, Mao [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Inner Mongolia Normal University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia, 010020 (China); State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 200050 (China); Zhou, Huaijuan; Li, Ning; Xin, Yunchuan [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 200050 (China); Sha, Ren, E-mail: sr@imnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Inner Mongolia Normal University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia, 010020 (China); Bao, Shanhu, E-mail: shanhu.bao@mail.sic.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 200050 (China); Jin, Ping [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 200050 (China)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • The PTFE films was prepared for use as the top layer of Mg–Y/Pd switchable mirrors. • The PTFE as an antireflection layer to improve the luminous transmission, and also to enhance the switching durability of the switchable mirrors. • The PTFE film has a superhydrophobic surface, which endows the Mg–Y/Pd switchable mirrors with self-cleaning properties. - Abstract: The magnesium based switchable mirrors can reversibly change their optical properties between the transparent and the reflective state as a result of hydrogenation and dehydrogenation. These films can potentially be applied as new energy-saving windows, by controlling the transmittance of solar radiation through the regulation of their reflective state. In this study, magnesium–yttrium (Mg–Y) alloy thin films were prepared using a DC magnetron sputtering method. However, the luminous transmittance in the transparent state and the switching durability of switchable mirrors are too poor to satisfy practical demands. In order to improve the films switching durability, luminous transmittance and the surface functionalization, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was coated with thermal vacuum deposition for use as the top layer of Mg–Y/Pd switchable mirrors. The PTFE layer had a porous network structure and exhibited a superhydrophobic surface with a water contact angle of approximately 152°. By characterization, PTFE thin films shows the excellent protection role against the oxidization of Mg, the switching durability of the films were improved 3 times, and also shows the antireflection role the luminous transmission of films was enhanced by 7% through the top covered with PTFE.

  9. Relating the "mirrorness" of mirror neurons to their origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, James M; Friston, Karl J

    2014-04-01

    Ever since their discovery, mirror neurons have generated much interest and debate. A commonly held view of mirror neuron function is that they transform "visual information into knowledge," thus enabling action understanding and non-verbal social communication between con-specifics (Rizzolatti & Craighero 2004). This functionality is thought to be so important that it has been argued that mirror neurons must be a result of selective pressure.

  10. Rapid Genome Detection of Schmallenberg Virus and Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus by Use of Isothermal Amplification Methods and High-Speed Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Aebischer, Andrea; Wernike, Kerstin; Hoffmann, Bernd; Beer, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few years, there has been an increasing demand for rapid and simple diagnostic tools that can be applied outside centralized laboratories by using transportable devices. In veterinary medicine, such mobile test systems would circumvent barriers associated with the transportation of samples and significantly reduce the time to diagnose important infectious animal diseases. Among a wide range of available technologies, high-speed real-time reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (R...

  11. Screening suitable reference genes for normalization in reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR analysis in melon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiusheng Kong

    Full Text Available Melon (Cucumis melo. L is not only an economically important cucurbitaceous crop but also an attractive model for studying many biological characteristics. Screening appropriate reference genes is essential to reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR, which is key to many studies involving gene expression analysis. In this study, 14 candidate reference genes were selected, and the variations in their expression in roots and leaves of plants subjected to biotic stress, abiotic stress, and plant growth regulator treatment were assessed by RT-qPCR. The stability of the expression of the selected genes was determined and ranked using geNorm and NormFinder. geNorm identified the two most stable genes for each set of conditions: CmADP and CmUBIep across all samples, CmUBIep and CmRPL in roots, CmRAN and CmACT in leaves, CmADP and CmRPL under abiotic stress conditions, CmTUA and CmACT under biotic stress conditions, and CmRAN and CmACT under plant growth regulator treatments. NormFinder determined CmRPL to be the best reference gene in roots and under biotic stress conditions and CmADP under the other experimental conditions. CmUBC2 and CmPP2A were not found to be suitable under many experimental conditions. The catalase family genes CmCAT1, CmCAT2, and CmCAT3 were identified in melon genome and used as target genes to validate the reliability of identified reference genes. The catalase family genes showed the most upregulation 3 days after inoculation with Fusarium wilt in roots, after which they were downregulated. Their levels of expression were significantly overestimated when the unsuitable reference gene was used for normalization. These results not only provide guidelines for the selection of reference genes for gene expression analyses in melons but may also provide valuable information for studying the functions of catalase family genes in stress responses.

  12. Real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for the rapid detection of Salmonella using invA primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Doris H; Critzer, Faith J; Golden, David A

    2009-11-01

    Recent outbreaks of Salmonella linked to fresh produce emphasize the need for rapid detection methods to help control the spread of disease. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) can detect the presence of mRNA (shorter half-life than DNA) with greater potential for detecting viable pathogens. The chromosomally located invA gene required for host invasion by Salmonella is widely used for detection of this pathogen by PCR. Detection of Salmonella was undertaken by real-time RT-PCR (rt-RT-PCR) using newly designed invA gene primers to develop a sensitive and specific assay. Salmonella serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis were grown (7.68 log(10) CFU/mL) in Luria-Bertani broth overnight at 37 degrees C, and RNA was extracted, followed by rt-RT-PCR with and without SYBR green I and agarose gel electrophoresis. All experiments were replicated at least thrice. Detection for both serovars using traditional RT-PCR was lower ( approximately 10(5) CFU/mL) than rt-RT-PCR (10(3) CFU/mL) by gel electrophoresis. Melt curve analysis showed melt temperatures at 87.5 degrees C with Ct values from 12 to 15 for up to 10(3) CFU/mL and improved to 10(2) CFU/mL after further optimization. Further, addition of RNA internal amplification control constructed using in vitro transcription with a T7 RNA polymerase promoter, to the RT-PCR assay also gave detection limits of 10(2) CFU/mL. Cross-reactivity was not observed against a panel of 21 non-Salmonella bacteria. Heat-inactivated (autoclaved) Salmonella showed faint or no detection by rt-RT-PCR or gel electrophoresis. This method has potential to be applied for the detection of Salmonella serovars in fresh produce and the simultaneous detection of foodborne viral (RNA viruses) and bacterial pathogens in a multiplex format.

  13. Screening suitable reference genes for normalization in reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR analysis in melon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qiusheng; Yuan, Jingxian; Niu, Penghui; Xie, Junjun; Jiang, Wei; Huang, Yuan; Bie, Zhilong

    2014-01-01

    Melon (Cucumis melo. L) is not only an economically important cucurbitaceous crop but also an attractive model for studying many biological characteristics. Screening appropriate reference genes is essential to reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR), which is key to many studies involving gene expression analysis. In this study, 14 candidate reference genes were selected, and the variations in their expression in roots and leaves of plants subjected to biotic stress, abiotic stress, and plant growth regulator treatment were assessed by RT-qPCR. The stability of the expression of the selected genes was determined and ranked using geNorm and NormFinder. geNorm identified the two most stable genes for each set of conditions: CmADP and CmUBIep across all samples, CmUBIep and CmRPL in roots, CmRAN and CmACT in leaves, CmADP and CmRPL under abiotic stress conditions, CmTUA and CmACT under biotic stress conditions, and CmRAN and CmACT under plant growth regulator treatments. NormFinder determined CmRPL to be the best reference gene in roots and under biotic stress conditions and CmADP under the other experimental conditions. CmUBC2 and CmPP2A were not found to be suitable under many experimental conditions. The catalase family genes CmCAT1, CmCAT2, and CmCAT3 were identified in melon genome and used as target genes to validate the reliability of identified reference genes. The catalase family genes showed the most upregulation 3 days after inoculation with Fusarium wilt in roots, after which they were downregulated. Their levels of expression were significantly overestimated when the unsuitable reference gene was used for normalization. These results not only provide guidelines for the selection of reference genes for gene expression analyses in melons but may also provide valuable information for studying the functions of catalase family genes in stress responses.

  14. Thermal effects on beryllium mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinswig, S.

    1989-01-01

    Beryllium is probably the most frequently used material for spaceborne system scan mirrors. Beryllium's properties include lightweightedness, high Young's modulus, high stiffness value, high resonance value. As an optical surface, beryllium is usually nickel plated in order to produce a higher quality surface. This process leads to the beryllium mirror acting like a bimetallic device. The mirror's deformation due to the bimetallic property can possibly degrade the performance of the associated optical system. As large space borne systems are designed and as temperature considerations become more crucial in the instruments, the concern about temporal deformation of the scan mirrors becomes a prime consideration. Therefore, two sets of tests have been conducted in order to ascertain the thermal effects on nickel plated beryllium mirrors. These tests are categorized. The purpose of this paper is to present the values of the bimetallic effect on typical nickel plated beryllium mirrors

  15. Complex/Symplectic Mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Wu-yen; Kachru, Shamit; /Stanford U., ITP /SLAC; Tomasiello, Alessandro; /Stanford U., ITP

    2005-10-28

    We construct a class of symplectic non-Kaehler and complex non-Kaehler string theory vacua, extending and providing evidence for an earlier suggestion by Polchinski and Strominger. The class admits a mirror pairing by construction. Comparing hints from a variety of sources, including ten-dimensional supergravity and KK reduction on SU(3)-structure manifolds, suggests a picture in which string theory extends Reid's fantasy to connect classes of both complex non-Kaehler and symplectic non-Kaehler manifolds.

  16. Multilayer Active Shell Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, John

    This thesis presents a novel active mirror technology based on carbon fiber composites and replication manufacturing processes. Multiple additional layers are implemented into the structure in order to provide the reflective layer, actuation capabilities and electrode routing. The mirror is thin, lightweight, and has large actuation capabilities. These features, along with the associated manufacturing processes, represent a significant change in design compared to traditional optics. Structural redundancy in the form of added material or support structures is replaced by thin, unsupported lightweight substrates with large actuation capabilities. Several studies motivated by the desire to improve as-manufactured figure quality are performed. Firstly, imperfections in thin CFRP laminates and their effect on post-cure shape errors are studied. Numerical models are developed and compared to experimental measurements on flat laminates. Techniques to mitigate figure errors for thicker laminates are also identified. A method of properly integrating the reflective facesheet onto the front surface of the CFRP substrate is also presented. Finally, the effect of bonding multiple initially flat active plates to the backside of a curved CFRP substrate is studied. Figure deformations along with local surface defects are predicted and characterized experimentally. By understanding the mechanics behind these processes, significant improvements to the overall figure quality have been made. Studies related to the actuation response of the mirror are also performed. The active properties of two materials are characterized and compared. Optimal active layer thicknesses for thin surface-parallel schemes are determined. Finite element simulations are used to make predictions on shape correction capabilities, demonstrating high correctabiliity and stroke over low-order modes. The effect of actuator saturation is studied and shown to significantly degrade shape correction performance. The

  17. Status report on mirror alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condit, W.C.; Fowler, T.K.; Post, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    The present status of studies at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) directed toward exploring variants on the basic magnetic mirror confinement concept is described. These studies have emphasized those ideas that could lead most directly to improvements in the scientific and economic viability of fusion reactors based on the mirror concept, within the general context of the extensive body of specialized physics and technology that has been developed in the course of the Mirror Program

  18. Racial Disparities After Stoma Construction Exist in Time to Closure After 1 Year but Not in Overall Stoma Reversal Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnells, Drew J; Wood, Lauren N; Goss, Lauren; Morris, Melanie S; Kennedy, Gregory D; Cannon, Jamie A; Chu, Daniel I

    2018-02-01

    Conflicting data exist on racial disparities in stoma reversal (SR) rates. Our aim was to investigate the role of race in SR rates, and time to closure, in a longitudinal, racially diverse database. All adult patients (>18 years) who received an ileostomy or colostomy from 1999 to 2016 at a single institution were identified. Primary outcomes were SR rates and time to closure. Failure to reverse and time to closure was modeled using Cox regression. Kaplan-Meier survival curves, stratified by race, were generated for time to closure and hazard ratios (HRs) calculated. Of 770 patients with stomas, 65.6% of patients underwent SR; 76.6% were white and 23.4% were black. On adjusted analysis, race did not predict overall SR rates or time to closure if performed less than 1 year. Instead, significant predictors for failure in SR included age, insurance status, end colostomy/ileostomy, and loop colostomy (p existed only for black patients if reversed more than 1 year after index stoma construction. While equitable outcomes were achieved for most patients, further investigation is necessary to understand stoma disparities after 1 year.

  19. Mirrors are hard to break: A critical review and behavioral evidence on mirror-image processing in developmental dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Tânia; Leite, Isabel

    2017-07-01

    The relation between reversal errors (e.g., d for b, Я for R) and developmental dyslexia has been elusive. In this study, we investigated the roles of reading level, visual category, and orientation processing in this relation. Children with developmental dyslexia, chronological-age-matched controls, and reading-level-matched controls performed two "same-different" matching tasks on reversible (e.g., b) and nonreversible (e.g., e) letters and on geometric shapes (e.g., ). In the orientation-based task, orientation processing was explicitly required; in the shape-based task, orientation processing would be automatic inasmuch as it was task irrelevant and would hinder successful performance. Two orientation contrasts were examined: mirror images (e.g., d-b) and plane rotations (e.g., d-p). For the latter, dyslexics behaved as controls; all were worse on shape-based judgments of plane rotation than on identical (e.g., d-d) pairs and were better able to attend to orientation than to shape. In contrast, for mirror images and across visual categories, dyslexics showed an advantage over typical readers on shape-based judgments. Both control groups had worse performance on shape-based judgments of mirror images than of identical pairs and exhibited similar magnitudes of mirror interference. Dyslexic children were the only group whose shape-based judgments were immune to mirror-image differences because they failed to automatize mirror discrimination during visual object processing. This deficit is not a consequence of reading level, is found across visual categories, and is specific to mirror images. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. MBR-SIFT: A mirror reflected invariant feature descriptor using a binary representation for image matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Mingzhe; Ma, Yan; Zhang, Xiangfen; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Yuping

    2017-01-01

    The traditional scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) method can extract distinctive features for image matching. However, it is extremely time-consuming in SIFT matching because of the use of the Euclidean distance measure. Recently, many binary SIFT (BSIFT) methods have been developed to improve matching efficiency; however, none of them is invariant to mirror reflection. To address these problems, in this paper, we present a horizontal or vertical mirror reflection invariant binary descriptor named MBR-SIFT, in addition to a novel image matching approach. First, 16 cells in the local region around the SIFT keypoint are reorganized, and then the 128-dimensional vector of the SIFT descriptor is transformed into a reconstructed vector according to eight directions. Finally, the MBR-SIFT descriptor is obtained after binarization and reverse coding. To improve the matching speed and accuracy, a fast matching algorithm that includes a coarse-to-fine two-step matching strategy in addition to two similarity measures for the MBR-SIFT descriptor are proposed. Experimental results on the UKBench dataset show that the proposed method not only solves the problem of mirror reflection, but also ensures desirable matching accuracy and speed.