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Sample records for time corrosion feuerungstechnik

  1. Firing technology in practice - temperature, residence time, corrosion; Feuerungstechnik in der Praxis - Temperatur, Verweilzeit, Korrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freimann, P.; Holl, D. [Muellheizkraftwerk Betriebsgesellschaft mbH, Burgkirchen/Alz (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    In a circular dated 1st Sept. 1994, i.e., after the issue of the pertinent planning decision, the Federal Environmental Ministry, BMU, laid down uniform standards on measurements and the parameterisation of the evaluation system for different operation states and loads. Subsequently, TUeV, the German Technical Control Board, prepared the parameterisation curves on the basis of these specifications. The implementation of the BMU paper of 1st Sept. 1994 did not result in any advantage, nor did it lead to a reduction of plant emissions, nor to advantages in the operation of the waste-fuelled cogeneration plant. On the contrary, elevated gas consumption and operating trouble due to frequent feed stops worsened the operating state of the plant. Elevated crude gas temperature in the boiler reduced the lifetime of the two boilers to a critical degree. An operating temperature of 850 C and a residence time of approx. 1 sec. in Burgkirchen waste-fuelled cogeneration plant have not worsened emission values while rendering the plant operable again. [Deutsch] Durch Rundschreiben d. BMU vom 01.09.1994 - also nach Erlass des Planfeststellungsbeschlusses - wurden einheitliche Vorgaben ueber Messungen und Parametrierung des Auswertesystems fuer die verschiedenen Betriebs- bzw. Lastzustaende erlassen. Unter Beruecksichtigung dieser Vorgaben wurden vom TUeV die Parametrierungskurven erstellt. Die Umsetzung des BMU-Papieres vom 01.09.1994 ergab keinerlei Vorteile, weder gab es eine Verringerung der anlagenbedingten Emissionen noch Vorteile fuer den Betrieb des MHKW`s. Im Gegenteil, erhoehte Gasverbraeuche und Betriebsstoerungen durch oftmalige Beschickungsstops verschlechterten den Betriebszustand. Erhoehte Rohgastemperatur im Kessel reduzierten die Lebensdauer der beiden Kessel kritisch. Der Betrieb mit 850 C und mit einer Verweilzeit von ca. 1 sec. fuehrt im MHKW Burgkirchen zu keiner Verschlechterung der Emissionswerte, macht aber die Anlagen wieder betreibbar. (orig./SR)

  2. Real time corrosion monitoring in atmosphere using automated battery driven corrosion loggers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prosek, T.; Kouril, M.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2008-01-01

    diminishes due to corrosion. Zinc, iron, copper and nickel sensors at several thicknesses are available. Sensitivity of the corrosion measurement varies from 1 to 10 nm depending on the type and thickness of the sensor. Changes in the air corrosivity can be thus detected within hours or even tens of minutes....... The logger lifetime in medium corrosive environments is designed to be 2 years with full autonomy. Data on the sensor corrosion rate are available any time through GPRS connection or by a non-contact inductive reading without the need of retracting the logger from the exposure site....

  3. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  4. Time-dependent reliability of corrosion-affected RC beams. Part 3: Effect of corrosion initiation time and its variability on time-dependent failure probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhargava, Kapilesh; Mori, Yasuhiro; Ghosh, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper forms the third part of a study which addresses time-dependent reliability analyses of reinforced concrete (RC) beams affected by reinforcement corrosion. Parts 1 and 2 of the reliability study are presented in companion papers. Part 1 of the reliability study presents evaluation of probabilistic descriptions for time-dependent strengths of a typical simply supported corrosion-affected RC beam. These probabilistic descriptions, i.e., mean and coefficient of variation (c.o.v.) for the time-dependent strengths are presented for two limit states: (a) flexural failure; and (b) shear failure. Part 2 of the reliability study presents evaluation of time-dependent failure probability for the considered RC beam by utilizing the information on probabilistic descriptions for time-dependent strengths available in Part 1. Evaluation of time-dependent failure probability considering the variability in time-dependent strengths and/or time-dependent degradation functions is also presented. This paper investigates the effects of time to corrosion initiation and its variability on failure probability of the same RC beam presented in companion papers. By considering variability in the identified variables that could affect the expected time of first corrosion, simple estimations are presented for mean time to corrosion initiation and variability associated with time to corrosion initiation. Evaluation of time-dependent failure probability for the beam is presented by considering estimated probabilistic descriptions, i.e., mean and c.o.v. for time to corrosion initiation. Parametric analyses show that failure probability for the beam is sensitive to the mode of strength degradation and time to corrosion initiation.

  5. Effect of ageing time and temperature on corrosion behaviour of aluminum alloy 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadpale, Vikas; Banjare, Pragya N.; Manoj, Manoranjan Kumar

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of corrosion behaviour of aluminium alloy 2014 were studied by potentiodynamic polarization in 1 mole of NaCl solution of aged sample. The experimental testing results concluded that, corrosion resistance of Aluminum alloy 2014 degraded with the increasing the temperature (150°C & 200°C) and time of ageing. Corroded surface of the aged specimens was tested under optical microscopes for microstructures for phase analysis. Optical micrographs of corroded surfaces showed general corrosion and pitting corrosion. The corrosion resistance of lower ageing temperature and lower ageing time is higher because of its fine distribution of precipitates in matrix phase.

  6. Online, real-time corrosion monitoring in district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress......, precipitation of deposits or crevices. The authors describe methods used for on-line monitoring of corrosion, cover the complications and the main results of a Nordic project....

  7. Experimental and Empirical Time to Corrosion of Reinforced Concrete Structures under Different Curing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Abouhussien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete structures, especially those in marine environments, are commonly subjected to high concentrations of chlorides, which eventually leads to corrosion of the embedded reinforcing steel. The total time to corrosion of such structures may be divided into three stages: corrosion initiation, cracking, and damage periods. This paper evaluates, both empirically and experimentally, the expected time to corrosion of reinforced concrete structures. The tested reinforced concrete samples were subjected to ten alternative curing techniques, including hot, cold, and normal temperatures, prior to testing. The corrosion initiation, cracking, and damage periods in this investigation were experimentally monitored by an accelerated corrosion test performed on reinforced concrete samples. Alternatively, the corrosion initiation time for counterpart samples was empirically predicted using Fick’s second law of diffusion for comparison. The results showed that the corrosion initiation periods obtained experimentally were comparable to those obtained empirically. The corrosion initiation was found to occur at the first jump of the current measurement in the accelerated corrosion test which matched the half-cell potential reading of around −350 mV.

  8. Flow-induced corrosion of absorbable magnesium alloy: In-situ and real-time electrochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Juan; Jang, Yongseok; Wan, Guojiang; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Song, Guang-Ling; Xu, Zhigang; Koo, Youngmi; Qi, Pengkai; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An in-situ and real-time electrochemical monitoring of flow-induced corrosion of Mg alloy is designed in a vascular bioreactor. • Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products is analyzed. • Flow accelerates mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. • Flow increases not only the thickness of uniform corrosion product layer, but the removal rate of localized corrosion products. • Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provide a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography. - Abstract: An in-situ and real-time electrochemical study in a vascular bioreactor was designed to analyze corrosion mechanism of magnesium alloy (MgZnCa) under mimetic hydrodynamic conditions. Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products was analyzed. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerated mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. FISS increased the thickness of uniform corrosion layer, but filiform corrosion decreased this layer resistance at high FISS conditions. FISS also increased the removal rate of localized corrosion products. Impedance-estimated and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provided a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography.

  9. Real Time Corrosion Monitoring in Lead and Lead-Bismuth Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James F. Stubbins; Alan Bolind; Ziang Chen

    2010-02-25

    The objective of this research program is to develop a real-time, in situ corrosion monitoring technique for flowing liquid Pb and eutectic PbBi (LBE) systems in a temperature range of 400 to 650 C. These conditions are relevant to future liquid metal cooled fast reactor operating parameters. THis program was aligned with the Gen IV Reactor initiative to develp technologies to support the design and opertion of a Pb or LBE-cooled fast reactor. The ability to monitor corrosion for protection of structural components is a high priority issue for the safe and prolonged operation of advanced liquid metal fast reactor systems. In those systems, protective oxide layers are intentionally formed and maintained to limit corrosion rates during operation. This program developed a real time, in situ corrosion monitoring tecnique using impedance spectroscopy (IS) technology.

  10. A discussion for stabilization time of carbon steel in atmospheric corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zong-kai; Ma, Xiao-bing; Cai, Yi-kun

    2017-09-01

    Stabilization time is an important parameter in long-term prediction of carbon steel corrosion in atmosphere. The range of the stabilization time of carbon steel in atmospheric corrosion has been published in many scientific literatures. However, the results may not precise because engineering experiences is dominant. This paper deals with the recalculation of stabilization time based on ISO CORRAG program, and analyzes the results and makes a comparison to the data mentioned above. In addition, a new thinking to obtain stabilization time will be proposed.

  11. Flow-induced corrosion of absorbable magnesium alloy: In-situ and real-time electrochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Jang, Yongseok; Wan, Guojiang; Giridharan, Venkataraman; Song, Guang-Ling; Xu, Zhigang; Koo, Youngmi; Qi, Pengkai; Sankar, Jagannathan; Huang, Nan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-01-01

    An in-situ and real-time electrochemical study in a vascular bioreactor was designed to analyze corrosion mechanism of magnesium alloy (MgZnCa) under mimetic hydrodynamic conditions. Effect of hydrodynamics on corrosion kinetics, types, rates and products was analyzed. Flow-induced shear stress (FISS) accelerated mass and electron transfer, leading to an increase in uniform and localized corrosions. FISS increased the thickness of uniform corrosion layer, but filiform corrosion decreased this layer resistance at high FISS conditions. FISS also increased the removal rate of localized corrosion products. Impedance-estimated and linear polarization-measured polarization resistances provided a consistent correlation to corrosion rate calculated by computed tomography. PMID:28626241

  12. Effect of Sonification Time on Synthesisi and Corrosion Resistance of Epoxy-Clay Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloufar Bahrami Panah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years many research works have been carried out on anti-corrosive nanocomposites coatings containing mineral reinforcements. The most important criteria in these attempts are polymerization method and the type of matrix and reinforcement of nanocomposites. In this regard, the physical and mechanical properties of the polymers in which a small amount of filler is used can be improved. In this research, an epoxy-clay nanocomposite was synthesized by in-situ polymerization method using a resin matrix based on bisphenol-A type epoxy and montmorillonite clay (Closite 15A. The treatment was used at different ultrasonic stirring times to disperse 1-4 weight percentages of clay particles into the matrix. The structure of synthesized epoxy-clay nanocomposite was studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. The average size of clay particles was determined by X-ray diffraction measurement. Then, anti-corrosion properties of epoxy-clay coatings, prepared under different ultrasonic durations and applied on carbon steel panels, were investigated by Tafel and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. For this purpose, the carbon steel panels coated with these coatings were immersed in 3.5% sodium chloride solution and tested at different immersion times. The results indicated that a nanocomposite containing 1% clay, synthesized, stirred 60 min ultrasonically, produced smaller particle size, lower corrosion current density and higher coating corrosion resistance than the other composite formulations. This nanocomposite provided superior protection against corrosion in sodium chloride solution.

  13. Influence of Short-time Oxidation on Corrosion Properties of Directionally Solidified Superalloys with Different Orientations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Luo-ning

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the corrosion performance on intersecting and longitudinal surfaces of unoxidized and oxidized directionally solidified superalloys, Ni-base directionally solidified superalloy DZ125 and Co-base directionally solidified superalloy DZ40M were selected. Oxidation behavior on both alloys with different orientations was investigated at 1050℃ at different times, simulating the oxidation process of vanes or blades in service; subsequent electrochemical performance in 3.5%NaCl aqueous solution was studied on two orientations of unoxidized and oxidized alloys, simulating the corrosion process of superalloy during downtime. The results show that grain boundaries and sub-boundaries of directionally solidified superalloys are susceptible to corrosion and thus longitudinal surface with lower area fraction of grain boundaries has higher corrosion resistance. Compared to intersecting surface of alloys, the structure of grain boundaries of longitudinal surface is less conducive to diffusion and thus the oxidation rate on longitudinal surface is lower. Formation of oxide layers on alloys after short-time oxidation provides protective effect and enhances the corrosion resistance.

  14. Effect of phosphating time and temperature on microstructure and corrosion behavior of magnesium phosphate coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouladi, M.; Amadeh, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel phosphate coating “magnesium phosphate” was applied on carbon steel. • Effect of phosphating temperature on morphological and corrosion behavior of the coating was studied. • Effect of phosphating time on morphological and corrosion behavior of the coating was studied. • Optimum condition for application of the coating was achieved. -- Abstract: In this study a novel phosphate coating, magnesium phosphate, was developed on steel surface. The formation of the coating was confirmed by X-ray diffraction method. Morphological evolution of the coating, as a function of phosphating time and temperature, was examined by scanning electron microscope. Magnetic thickness gauge was used to determine the thickness of the coating and the bath sludge weight was specified to determine the bath efficiency. Corrosion behavior of the samples was studied using potentiodynamic polarization curves. The results indicated that increasing the phosphating temperature facilitated the precipitation of coating and increased its thickness. Furthermore the best corrosion behavior was observed at 80 °C. Also increasing the phosphating time, enhanced both thickness and uniformity of the coating. The best results were observed after 20 min of phosphating

  15. 77 FR 25405 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-580-816] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit for the Preliminary Results of... antidumping duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from the Republic of Korea, covering...

  16. 75 FR 18153 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-580-818] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of... countervailing duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE) from Korea. See Countervailing...

  17. 75 FR 25841 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-580-816] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limits for the Preliminary Results of... antidumping duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from the Republic of Korea, covering...

  18. 76 FR 21332 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-580-816] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limits for the Preliminary Results of... antidumping duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from the Republic of Korea, covering...

  19. 76 FR 20954 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-580-818] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of... Register the countervailing duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE) from Korea...

  20. 77 FR 16810 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-580-818] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of... Register the countervailing duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE) from Korea...

  1. Effect of the Unsaturation of the Hydrocarbon Chain of Fatty-Amides on the CO2 Corrosion of Carbon Steel Using EIS and Real-Time Corrosion Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Porcayo-Calderon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty-amide derivatives were evaluated to study the effect of the double bonds into the hydrocarbon chain (C18 on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and real-time corrosion measurements were used to evaluate the inhibition mechanism of the fatty-amides on carbon steel in CO2-saturated (3% NaCl + 10% diesel emulsion at 50°C. EIS results demonstrated that the unsaturation present into the hydrocarbon chain contributes to the efficiency of fatty-amides, because they can be adsorbed on the metal surface by a flat-adsorption process reducing the presence of active sites and blocking the corrosion process and preventing the diffusion of corrosive species, such as H2O, H+, Cl−, and HCO3-. Real-time corrosion measurements also indicated that the effectiveness of the inhibitors is dependent on the unsaturation into the hydrocarbon chain, being also a good technique to determine the stability of the adsorption process of the inhibitors.

  2. Corrosion and time dependent passivation of Al 5052 in the presence of H2O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batmanghelich, Farhad; Hariri, Mohiedin Bagheri; Sharifi-Asl, Samin; Yaghoubinezhad, Yadollah; Mortazavi, Golsa; Seo, Youngwoo

    2016-07-01

    Corrosion and time-dependent oxide film growth on AA5052 Aluminum alloy in 0.25M Na2SO4 solution containing H2O2 was studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization, chronoamperometric and open circuit potential monitoring. It was found that sequential addition of H2O2 provokes passivation of AA5052 which ultimately thickens the oxide film and brings slower corrosion rates for AA5052. H2O2 facilitates kinetics of oxide film growth on AA 5052 at 25° and 60 °C which is indicative of formation of a thick barrier film that leads to an increment in the charge transfer resistance. Pitting incubation time increases by introduction of H2O2 accompanied by lower pitting and smoother surface morphologies. At short exposure (up to 8 h) to H2O2-containing solution, the inductive response at low frequencies predominantly determined the corrosion mechanism of AA5052. On the other hand, at prolonged exposure times (more than 24 h) to 0.25M Na2SO4+1vol% H2O2 solution, thicker oxide layers resulted in the mixed inductive-Warburg elements in the spectra.

  3. Life time forecasting method upon occurrence of stress corrosion cracking of structure and test device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzai, Hideya; Kida, Toshitaka; Urayama, Yoshinao; Kikuchi, Eiji; Shimanuki, Sei; Kuniya, Jiro; Nakata, Kiyotomo; Izumitani, Masakiyo; Hattori, Shigeo.

    1993-01-01

    A load stress is applied to a metal piece made of a material identical with the constituent material of a structure and having the sensitivity enhanced to a predetermined level, and plurality of such pieces are immersed in a corrosive circumstance in this state. Then, the time from the immersion till the rupture thereof and the number of ruptured pieces of the metal pieces are detected while observing them. The relation with the probability of rupture is plotted on a paper to determine the life time for the occurrence of minimum stress corrosion creacks (SSC) of the metal pieces. Based on the relationship between the previously determined stress and the life time for the occurrence of minimum SSC, the ratio between the life time for the occurrence of minimum SSC relative to estimated stress applied to the structure and the life time for the occurrence of minimum SSC relative to the stress applied to the metal pieces is determined as a first SSC acceleration rate. The ratio between the time of occurrence for minimum SSC and the sensitivity is determined as a second SSC acceleration rate. The first and the second SSC acceleration rates are multiplied to estimate the time for the occurrence of SSC of the structure. Then, the life time for the occurrence of SSC for the equipments and structures can be recognized quantitatively, to prevent ruptures of actual equipments and extend the life time. (N.H.)

  4. Measuring the corrosion rate of steel in concrete – effect of measurement technique, polarisation time and current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Peter Vagn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2012-01-01

    , are in some studies considered the main reasons for the variations. This paper presents an experimental study on the quantitative effect of polarisation time and current on the measured polarisation resistance – and thus the corrosion current density – of passively and actively corroding steel. Two...... electrochemical techniques often used in instruments for on-site corrosion rate measurements are investigated. On passively corroding reinforcement the measured polarisation resistance was for both techniques found to be highly affected by the polarisation time and current and no plateaus at either short or long......Both on-site investigations and laboratory studies have shown that different corrosion rates are obtained when different commercially available corrosion rate instruments are used. The different electrochemical techniques and the measurement parameters used, i.e. polarisation current and time...

  5. Time-dependent electrochemical characterization of the corrosion of a magnesium rare-earth alloy in simulated body fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettig, Ralf; Virtanen, Sannakaisa

    2008-04-01

    The electrochemistry of the corrosion process of a magnesium rare-earth-alloy is studied in detail in simulated body fluid (m-SBF) over the first 5 days. The aim is to investigate the corrosion mechanism under in vitro conditions. For this purpose we also used electrolytes that contain only some of the components of SBF, they were compared to SBF to investigate the influence of the different ions in SBF. The influence of albumin on the corrosion process was studied with a solution containing m-SBF and albumin in physiological concentration. For this study, impedance spectroscopy series measurements were performed. Additional results were gained from polarization curves. We conclude from the study that the corrosion resistance is significantly lower in m-SBF than in simple isotonic NaCl-solution. Albumin may form a blocking layer on the surface in the first hours of exposure. The formed corrosion layers consisting of amorphous apatite have only a low protective ability. Further results show that the corrosion processes in SBFs follow a linear time-law. The results elucidate critical factors and mechanisms of the electrochemical corrosion process of magnesium rare-earth alloys in SBFs, this understanding is crucial for a successful application of Mg alloys in biomedical applications. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Stress corrosion crack depth investigation using the time reversed elastic nonlinearity diagnostic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian E; Pieczonka, Lukasz; Remillieux, Marcel C; Ulrich, Timothy J; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2017-01-01

    Evidence of the ability to probe depth information of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) are presented using the time reversed elastic nonlinearity diagnostic (TREND). Depth estimation of SCC is important to determine when a stainless steel canister has been breached. TREND is a method to focus elastic energy to a point in space in order to probe that point for damage and its' depth penetration is used here to study depth information about SCC. High frequencies are used to probe near the surface, while low frequencies are used to probe deeper into a stainless steel section of a cylinder.

  7. In situ monitoring of corrosion mechanisms and phosphate inhibitor surface deposition during corrosion of zinc-magnesium-aluminium (ZMA) alloys using novel time-lapse microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, James; Cooze, Nathan; Gallagher, Callum; Lewis, Tom; Prosek, Tomas; Thierry, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    In situ time-lapse optical microscopy was used to examine the microstructural corrosion mechanisms in three zinc-magnesium-aluminium (ZMA) alloy coated steels immersed in 1% NaCl pH 7. Preferential corrosion of MgZn(2) lamellae within the eutectic phases was observed in all the ZMA alloys followed by subsequent dissolution of Zn rich phases. The total extent and rate of corrosion, measured using time-lapse image analysis and scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) estimated mass loss, decreased as Mg and Al alloying additions were increased up to a level of 3 wt% Mg and 3.7 wt% Al. This was probably due to the increased presence of MgO and Al(2)O(3) at the alloy surface retarding the kinetics of cathodic oxygen reduction. The addition of 1 × 10(-2) mol dm(-3) Na(3)PO(4) to 1% NaCl pH 7 had a dramatic influence on the corrosion mechanism for a ZMA with passivation of anodic sites through phosphate precipitation observed using time-lapse image analysis. Intriguing rapid precipitation of filamentous phosphate was also observed and it is postulated that these filaments nucleate and grow due to super saturation effects. Polarisation experiments showed that the addition of 1 × 10(-2) mol dm(-3) Na(3)PO(4) to the 1% NaCl electrolyte promoted an anodic shift of 50 mV in open circuit potential for the ZMA alloy with a reduction in anodic current of 2.5 orders of magnitude suggesting that it was acting primarily as an anodic inhibitor supporting the inferences from the time-lapse investigations. These phosphate additions resulted in a 98% reduction in estimated mass loss as measured by SVET demonstrating the effectiveness of phosphate inhibitors for this alloy system.

  8. Assessment of multi-phase movements in a gas-gathering pipeline and the relevance to on-line, real-time corrosion monitoring and inhibitor injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, M.A.; Asperger, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the time required for aqueous fluid to travel 100 miles (160 km) from an offshore platform in the Gulf of Mexico to landfill. If this time is short, the corrosivity of the water at landfall may be used as the basis for setting the offshore corrosion inhibitor injection rates. But, for this particular system, the traveling time was found to be long, greater than 65 days. Therefore, the corrosivity as measured on-shore can not be used for online, real-time adjustments of the offshore, corrosion inhibitor chemical pumps.

  9. [The effect of bacteria reaction time on corrosion properties of Ni-Cr alloys pretreated with different proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Han-quan; Zhang, Song-mei; Qian, Chao; Yuan-Li, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the corrosion properties of absorbed protein on the surface of NiCr alloys, and provide experimental base for corrosion resistance of dental casting alloys. NiCr alloy specimens were divided into 3 groups: one group was exposed to the artificial saliva(control group), and the other 2 groups were exposed to the artificial saliva with 1% bovine serum albumin(BSA), or 0.22% lysozyme(LSZ). Group of BSA and group of LSZ were the experimental group. Specimens in 3 groups were cultured in solution of Streptococcus mutans for 12 h, 24 h, 36 h and 48h, and investigated with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurement(EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization measurement(POT) to determine the corrosion resistance of the alloys. The data was analyzed with SPSS 17.0 software package. The results indicated that the corrosion resistance of both BSA group and LSZ group were higher than that of the control group (Pcorrosion resistance of BSA group and LSZ group had no significant difference (P>0.05), but was still higher than that of the control group. After 36 h culture time, the control group and the BSA group had no statistical difference in corrosion resistance (P>0.05), while the LSZ group had the poorest corrosion resistance. When the culture time extended to 48 h, the control group had a better corrosion resistance compared with the BAS group and the LSZ group(Pcorrosion properties than LSZ group. The potentiodynamic polarization curve and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy had similar results. The adhesion of BSA and LSZ on the surface of the NiCr alloys in the early time could effectively inhibit the corrosive effect of Streptococcus mutans. The LSZ had better effect than BSA. With the continuing role of bacteria and the consumption of the absorb protein, the corrosion resistance of NiCr alloys toward Streptococcus mutans becomes lower than the alloys without absorb protein, which demonstrated that the adhesion of protein would change the surface

  10. Statistical analysis of failure time in stress corrosion cracking of fuel tube in light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, Keiichi; Yamane, Toshimi; Minamino, Yoritoshi

    1991-01-01

    This report is to show how the life due to stress corrosion cracking breakdown of fuel cladding tubes is evaluated by applying the statistical techniques to that examined by a few testing methods. The statistical distribution of the limiting values of constant load stress corrosion cracking life, the statistical analysis by making the probabilistic interpretation of constant load stress corrosion cracking life, and the statistical analysis of stress corrosion cracking life by the slow strain rate test (SSRT) method are described. (K.I.)

  11. 77 FR 25141 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and South Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ...-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and South Korea: Extension of Time Limits for Preliminary...) orders on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE) from Germany and South Korea (Korea... from Germany and South Korea: Adequacy Redetermination Memorandum,'' (April 20, 2012). The preliminary...

  12. Corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, A.S.; Totlani, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion has always been associated with structures, plants, installations and equipment exposed to aggressive environments. It effects economy, safety and product reliability. Monitoring of component corrosion has thus become an essential requirement for the plant health and safety. Protection methods such as appropriate coatings, cathodic protection and use of inhibitors have become essential design parameters. High temperature corrosion, especially hot corrosion, is still a difficult concept to accommodate in corrosion allowance; there is a lack of harmonized system of performance testing of materials at high temperatures. In order to discuss and deliberate on these aspects, National Association for Corrosion Engineers International organised a National Conference on Corrosion and its Control in Bombay during November 28-30, 1995. This volume contains papers presented at the symposium. Paper relevant to INIS is indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  13. Time-temperature influence on the corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr-Nb superalloys in contact with Na2SO4-V2O5 molten mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otero, E.; Pardo, A.; Hernaez, J.; Hierro, P.

    1990-01-01

    Corrosion rate data obtained by the polarization resistance method in nickel-base superalloys in contact with Na 2 SO 4 -V 2 O 5 molten mixtures are presented. The instrumental technique is also described. Time-temperature influence on the corrosion kinetics in the described conditions is discussed (Author)

  14. Monitoring corrosion and corrosion control of iron in HCl by non-ionic surfactants of the TRITON-X series - Part III. Immersion time effects and theoretical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Mohammed A.; Ahmed, M.A.; Arida, H.A.; Kandemirli, Fatma; Saracoglu, Murat; Arslan, Taner; Basaran, Murat A.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: . Display Omitted Research highlights: → The inhibition effect of TX-100, TX-165 and TX-305 on iron corrosion in 1.0 M HCl was studied. → TX-305 inhibited iron corrosion more effectively than TX-100 and TX-165. → In most cases, inhibition efficiency increased with time during the first 60 min of immersion, then decreased. → Calculated quantum chemical parameters confirmed the experimental inhibition efficiencies of the tested surfactants. - Abstract: The inhibition performance of three selected non-ionic surfactants of the TRITON-X series, namely TRITONX-100 (TX-100), TRITON-X-165 (TX-165) and TRITON-X-305 (TX-305), on the corrosion of iron was studied in 1.0 M HCl solutions as a function of inhibitor concentration (0.01-0.20 g L -1 ) and immersion time (0.0-8 h) at 298 K. Measurements were conducted based on Tafel polarization, LPR and impedance studies. At high frequencies, the impedance spectrum showed a depressed capacitive loop in the complex impedance plane, whose diameter is a function of the immersion time and the type and concentration of the introduced surfactant. In all cases, an inductive loop was observed in the low frequency and this could be attributed to the adsorption behavior. The inhibition efficiency increased with immersion time, reached a maximum and then decreased. This was attributed to the orientation change of adsorbed surfactant molecules. TX-305 inhibited iron corrosion more effectively than TX-100 and TX-165. The frontier orbital energies, the energy gap between frontier orbitals, dipole moments (μ), charges on the C and O atoms, the polarizabilities, and the quantum chemical descriptors were calculated. The quantum chemical calculation results inferred that for the HOMO representing the condensed Fukui function for an electrophilic attack (f k + ), the contributions belong to the phenyl group and the oxygen atom attached to the phenyl group for each tested surfactant. Quantitative structure

  15. Effect of Dissolved Oxygen and Immersion Time on the Corrosion Behaviour of Mild Steel in Bicarbonate/Chloride Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaius Debi Eyu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behavior of mild steel in bicarbonate solution at different dissolved oxygen (DO concentrations and immersion times has been studied under dynamic conditions using electrochemical techniques. The results show that both DO and immersion times influence the morphology of the corrosion products. In comparative tests, the corrosion rate was systematically found to be lower in solutions with lower DO, lower HCO3− concentrations and longer immersion time. The SEM analyses reveal that the iron dissolution rate was more severe in solutions containing higher DO. The decrease in corrosion rate can be attributed to the formation of a passive layer containing mainly α -FeO (OH and ( γ -Fe2O3/Fe3O4 as confirmed by the X-ray diffractometry (XRD and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. Passivation of mild steel is evident in electrochemical test at ≈ −600 mVSCE at pH ≥ 8 in dearated ( ≤ 0.8 ppm DO chloride bicarbonate solution under dynamic conditions.

  16. Chemical vapour deposition at atmospheric pressure of graphene on molybdenum foil: Effect of annealing time on characteristics and corrosion stability of graphene coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naghdi, Samira; Jevremović, Ivana; Mišković-Stanković, Vesna; Rhee, Kyong Yop

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of graphene on molybdenum foils. • Quality and domain size of graphene layers increased with longer annealing times. • The number of graphene layers decreased with longer annealing times. • Graphene coatings on molybdenum foils exhibited corrosion inhibitive properties. - Abstract: In this work, the effect of pre-annealing of Mo substrate on the quality of graphene layers grown by chemical vapour deposition was investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, different electrochemical techniques were employed to investigate the corrosion stability of the graphene coated Mo in 0.1 M NaCl. Longer annealing time resulted in less defective graphene coatings with fewer layers. Graphene coating on the annealed Mo provided better protection against corrosion during the initial exposure times, while after prolonged exposure times, both graphene coatings on annealed and non-annealed Mo exhibited nearly the same corrosion inhibitive properties.

  17. 76 FR 77775 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-580-818] Corrosion-Resistant Carbon... results of the administrative review of the countervailing duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel.... See Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

  18. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-05

    Widdel, F. (2012) Marine sulfate-reducing bacteria cause serious corrosion of iron under electroconductive biogenic mineral crust. Envi- ronmental...inCluding oil and gas, from to 2011 [2]. Over that period of time approximately of all releases were attributed to corrosion . National ;sociati<Jn...c>fComJsicmEngineers (NACE) International [3] the cost of corrosion for onshore gas and liquid nsn1ission pipelines was $7 billion. However, there

  19. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  20. Effect of Deposition Time on the Morphological Features and Corrosion Resistance of Electroless Ni-High P Coatings on Aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High phosphorus Ni-P alloy was deposited on aluminium substrate using electroless deposition route. Using zincating bath, the surface was activated before deposition. Deposition time was varied from 15 minutes to 3 hours. Deposit was characterised using scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscope, X-ray diffraction, and microhardness tester. The corrosion resistance was measured using Tafel extrapolation route. The medium was aqueous 5% HNO3 solution. The analysis showed that the deposit consisted of nodules of submicron and micron scale. The predominant phase in the deposit was nickel along with phosphides of nickel. Compared to substrate material, deposit showed higher hardness. With increase in deposition time, the deposit showed more nobleness in 5% HNO3 solution and nobleness reached a limiting value in 1 hour deposition time.

  1. Archaeological analogs and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, D.

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of the high level and long life radioactive wastes disposal deep underground, the ANDRA built a research program on the material corrosion. In particular they aim to design containers for a very long time storage. Laboratory experiments are in progress and can be completed by the analysis of metallic archaeological objects and their corrosion after hundred years. (A.L.B.)

  2. Numerical method for time-dependent localized corrosion analysis with moving boundaries by combining the finite volume method and voxel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Yuki; Takiyasu, Jumpei; Amaya, Kenji; Yakuwa, Hiroshi; Hayabusa, Keisuke

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A novel numerical method to analyze time dependent localized corrosion is developed. ► It takes electromigration, mass diffusion, chemical reactions, and moving boundaries. ► Our method perfectly satisfies the conservation of mass and electroneutrality. ► The behavior of typical crevice corrosion is successfully simulated. ► Both verification and validation of our method are carried out. - Abstract: A novel numerical method for time-dependent localized corrosion analysis is presented. Electromigration, mass diffusion, chemical reactions, and moving boundaries are considered in the numerical simulation of localized corrosion of engineering alloys in an underwater environment. Our method combines the finite volume method (FVM) and the voxel method. The FVM is adopted in the corrosion rate calculation so that the conservation of mass is satisfied. A newly developed decoupled algorithm with a projection method is introduced in the FVM to decouple the multiphysics problem into the electrostatic, mass transport, and chemical reaction analyses with electroneutrality maintained. The polarization curves for the corroding metal are used as boundary conditions for the metal surfaces to calculate the corrosion rates. The voxel method is adopted in updating the moving boundaries of cavities without remeshing and mesh-to-mesh solution mapping. Some modifications of the standard voxel method, which represents the boundaries as zigzag-shaped surfaces, are introduced to generate smooth surfaces. Our method successfully reproduces the numerical and experimental results of a capillary electrophoresis problem. Furthermore, the numerical results are qualitatively consistent with the experimental results for several examples of crevice corrosion.

  3. Influence of Applied Voltage and Film-Formation Time on Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Coatings Formed on Mg-Zn-Zr-Ca Bio-magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yandong, Yu; Shuzhen, Kuang; Jie, Li

    2015-09-01

    The influence of applied voltage and film-formation time on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of coatings formed on a Mg-Zn-Zr-Ca novel bio-magnesium alloy has been investigated by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) treatment. Phase composition and microstructure of as-coated samples were analyzed by the x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. And the porosity and average of micro-pore aperture of the surface on ceramic coatings were analyzed by general image software. Corrosion microstructure of as-coated samples was caught by a microscope digital camera. The long-term corrosion resistance of as-coated samples was tested in simulated body fluid for 30 days. The results showed that the milky white smooth ceramic coating formed on the Mg-Zn-Zr-Ca novel bio-magnesium alloy was a compound of MgO, Mg2SiO4 and MgSiO3, and its corrosion resistance was significantly improved compared with that of the magnesium substrate. In addition, when the MAO applied voltage were 450 V and 500 V and film-formation time were 9 min and 11 min, the surface micro-morphology and the corrosion resistance of as-coated samples were relatively improved. The results provided a theoretical foundation for the application of the Mg-Zn-Zr-Ca novel bio-magnesium alloy in biomedicine.

  4. Aircraft Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    transport anciens dont il a fallu remplacer les panneaux extrados en raison de is corrosion profonde des lisses. Ce type d’avion a etc mis en service h partir...as six years) where lavatories are placed above the lower section of the aft pressure dome bulkhead (fig.8)., corrosion Is found in the bulkhead web ...due to leakage of toilet fluids. One of the most severe corrosion ever found In this area was with the corrosion completely penetrated through the web

  5. Pitting corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allgaier, W.

    1985-01-01

    Pitting corrosion is a kind of electrolytic corrosion by which the surface of a material is locally affected owing to inhomogeneities on the part of the material or medium. The paper deals briefly with questions relating to the importance, to parameters medium or materialwise, influence on production and construction, as well as the general conditions for pitting corrosion. In particular oxygen corrosion in unalloyed and low-alloy steel, and pitting corrosion in ferritic chromium-steel and austenitic chromium-nickel (molybdenum) steel is described. (DG) [de

  6. The detailed analysis of the spray time effects of the aluminium coating using self-generated atmospheric plasma spray system on the microstructure and corrosion behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Khandanjou

    Full Text Available In the present paper our aim is to investigate the effect of the spray time of the aluminium coated layers on the microstructure and corrosion behaviour. For this purpose we use the self-generated atmospheric plasma spray system for coating of aluminium on the carbon steel substrate. The different thicknesses of coating are created. To evaluate this effect we use the several analyses such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, Micro hardness analysis by Vickers method, Adhesion strength analysis and electrochemical polarization test. The results are very interesting and show that due to low porosity, thicker layers are more homogeneous. The nanoparticles are observed in the thicker layers. The micro hardness tests show that the thicker layers have the better micro hardness value. Next, the adhesion strength tests illustrate that the highest adhesion strength are for longer spray times. On the other hand, the corrosion resistance behaviour of the coating is investigated by electrochemical polarization test. It is shown that the corrosion resistance increases by increasing the thickness due to low percentage of porosity. Keywords: Plasma spray, Thickness, Aluminium, Micro hardness, Corrosion resistance

  7. 49 CFR 192.477 - Internal corrosion control: Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal corrosion control: Monitoring. 192.477... Control § 192.477 Internal corrosion control: Monitoring. If corrosive gas is being transported, coupons... internal corrosion. Each coupon or other means of monitoring internal corrosion must be checked two times...

  8. Corrosion of steel structures in sea-bed sediment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    corrosion mechanism, measurement of metal corrosion rate, corrosion evaluation and prediction of corrosion are also discussed here. Keywords. ... The corrosion rate at high temperature can be four times bigger than at low temperature. ... exchange of substance and energy depends only on the surface SBS, therefore, it is ...

  9. Corrosion protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

  10. Combining hygrothermal and corrosion models to predict corrosion of metal fasteners embedded in wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Dominique Derome; Samuel V. Glass

    2011-01-01

    A combined heat, moisture, and corrosion model is presented and used to simulate the corrosion of metal fasteners embedded in solid wood exposed to the exterior environment. First, the moisture content and temperature at the wood/fastener interface is determined at each time step. Then, the amount of corrosion is determined spatially using an empirical corrosion rate...

  11. Effects of aging temperature and time on the corrosion protection provided by trivalent chromium process coatings on AA2024-T3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liangliang; Swain, Greg M

    2013-08-28

    The effects of aging temperature and time on the physical structure of and corrosion protection provided by trivalent chromium process (TCP) coatings on AA2024-T3 are reported. The TCP coating forms a partially blocking barrier layer on the alloy surface that consists of hydrated channels and or defects. It is through these channels and defects that ions and dissolved O2 can be transported to small areas of the underlying alloy. Reactions initiate at these sites, which can ultimately lead to undercutting of the coating and localized corrosion. We tested the hypothesis that collapsing the channels and or reducing the number of defects in the coating might be possible through post-deposition heat treatment, and that this would enhance the corrosion protection provided by the coating. This was tested by aging the TCP-coated AA2024 alloys in air overnight at room temperature (RT), 55, 100, or 150 °C. The TCP coating became dehydrated and thinner at the high temperatures (55 and 100 °C). This improved the corrosion protection as evidenced by a 2× increase in the charge transfer resistance. Aging at 150 °C caused excessive coating dehydration and shrinkage. This led to severe cracking and detachment of the coating from the surface. The TCP-coated AA2024 samples were also aged in air at RT from 1 to 7 days. There was no thinning of the coating, but the corrosion protection was enhanced with a longer aging period as evidenced by a 4× increase in the charge transfer resistance. The coating became more hydrophobic after aging at elevated temperature (up to 100 °C) and with aging time at RT as evidenced by an increased water contact angle from 7 to 100 °C.

  12. Corrosion Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  13. Real-time corrosion control system for cathodic protection of buried pipes for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Tae; Kim, Hae Woong; Kim, Young Sik; Chang, Hyun Young; Lim, Bu Taek; Park, Heung Bae

    2015-01-01

    Since the operation period of nuclear power plants has increased, the degradation of buried pipes gradually increases and recently it seems to be one of the emerging issues. Maintenance on buried pipes needs high quality of management system because outer surface of buried pipe contacts the various soils but inner surface reacts with various electrolytes of fluid. In the USA, USNRC and EPRI have tried to manage the degradation of buried pipes. However, there is little knowledge about the inspection procedure, test and manage program in the domestic nuclear power plants. This paper focuses on the development and build-up of real-time monitoring and control system of buried pipes. Pipes to be tested are tape-coated carbon steel pipe for primary component cooling water system, asphalt-coated cast iron pipe for fire protection system, and pre-stressed concrete cylinder pipe for sea water cooling system. A control system for cathodic protection was installed on each test pipe which has been monitored and controlled. For the calculation of protection range and optimization, computer simulation was performed using COMSOL Multiphysics (Altsoft co.)

  14. Corrosion of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Corrosion rates were also obtained by immersion testing. The variation of corrosion rate as a function of time was similar for both the intermetallics. The variation in corrosion rate as a function of time has been explained based on the observed potentiodynamic polarization behaviour. Scanning electron microscopy of ...

  15. Corrosion of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.J.; Adolphson, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of beryllium in aqueous and elevated-temperature oxidizing environments has been extensively studied for early-intended use of beryllium in nuclear reactors and in jet and rocket propulsion systems. Since that time, beryllium has been used as a structural material in les corrosive environments. Its primary applications include gyro systems, mirror and reentry vehicle structures, and aircraft brakes. Only a small amount of information has been published that is directly related to the evaluation of beryllium for service in the less severe or normal atmospheric environments associated with these applications. Despite the lack of published data on the corrosion of beryllium in atmospheric environments, much can be deduced about its corrosion behavior from studies of aqueous corrosion and the experiences of fabricators and users in applying, handling, processing, storing, and shipping beryllium components. The methods of corrosion protection implemented to resist water and high-temperature gaseous environments provide useful information on methods that can be applied to protect beryllium for service in future long-term structural applications

  16. Archaeological analogs and corrosion; Analogues archeologiques et corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, D

    2008-07-01

    In the framework of the high level and long life radioactive wastes disposal deep underground, the ANDRA built a research program on the material corrosion. In particular they aim to design containers for a very long time storage. Laboratory experiments are in progress and can be completed by the analysis of metallic archaeological objects and their corrosion after hundred years. (A.L.B.)

  17. Accelerated cyclic corrosion tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prošek T.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated corrosion testing is indispensable for material selection, quality control and both initial and residual life time prediction for bare and painted metallic, polymeric, adhesive and other materials in atmospheric exposure conditions. The best known Neutral Salt Spray (NSS test provides unrealistic conditions and poor correlation to exposures in atmosphere. Modern cyclic accelerated corrosion tests include intermittent salt spray, wet and dry phases and eventually other technical phases. They are able to predict the material performance in service more correctly as documented on several examples. The use of NSS should thus be restricted for quality control.

  18. Time-temperature influence on the corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr-Nb superalloys in contact with Na sub 2 SO sub 4 -V sub 2 O sub 5 molten mixtures. Influencia del tiempo y de la temperatura en la resistencia a la corrosion de superaleaciones Ni-Cr-Nb en presencia de mezclas Na sub 2 SO sub 4 - V sub 2 O sub 5 fundidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otero, E.; Pardo, A.; Hernaez, J.; Hierro, P. (Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain) Dept. Ciencias de Materiales)

    1990-01-01

    Corrosion rate data obtained by the polarization resistance method in nickel-base superalloys in contact with Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-V{sub 2}O{sub 5} molten mixtures are presented. The instrumental technique is also described. Time-temperature influence on the corrosion kinetics in the described conditions is discussed (Author)

  19. Corrosion inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ashry, El Sayed H.; El Nemr, Ahmed; Esawy, Sami A.; Ragab, Safaa

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition efficiencies of some triazole, oxadiazole and thiadiazole derivatives for steel in presence of acidic medium have been studied by using AM1, PM3, MINDO/3 and MNDO semi-empirical SCF molecular orbital methods. Geometric structures, total negative charge on the molecule (TNC), highest occupied molecular energy level (E HOMO ), lowest unoccupied molecular energy level (E LUMO ), core-core repulsion (CCR), dipole moment (μ) and linear solvation energy terms, molecular volume (V i ) and dipolar-polarization (π *), were correlated to corrosion inhibition efficiency. Four equations were proposed to calculate corrosion inhibition efficiency. The agreement with the experimental data was found to be satisfactory; the standard deviations between the calculated and experimental results ranged between ±0.03 and ±4.18. The inhibition efficiency was closely related to orbital energies (E HOMO and E LUMO ) and μ. The correlation between quantum parameters and experimental inhibition efficiency has been validated by single point calculations for the semi-empirical AM1 structures using B3LYP/6-31G** as a higher level of theory. The proposed equations were applied to predict the corrosion inhibition efficiency of some related structures to select molecules of possible activity from a presumable library of compounds

  20. Underground pipeline corrosion

    CERN Document Server

    Orazem, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Underground pipelines transporting liquid petroleum products and natural gas are critical components of civil infrastructure, making corrosion prevention an essential part of asset-protection strategy. Underground Pipeline Corrosion provides a basic understanding of the problems associated with corrosion detection and mitigation, and of the state of the art in corrosion prevention. The topics covered in part one include: basic principles for corrosion in underground pipelines, AC-induced corrosion of underground pipelines, significance of corrosion in onshore oil and gas pipelines, n

  1. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge

  2. Stress corrosion crack growth rates and general corrosion rates at crack tips of steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speidel, M.O.; Magdowski, R.

    1995-01-01

    The maximum stress corrosion crack growth rates for a number of structural materials (steels and nickel alloys) have been measured in 288 C water. Also, the general corrosion rates of these materials have been determined from weight loss experiments in simulated stress corrosion crack tip electrolytes at 288 C. It is shown that the stress corrosion crack growth rates are typically twenty times faster than the general corrosion rates. This correlation holds over five orders of magnitude. It is concluded that strategies to prevent stress corrosion cracking in high temperature aqueous environments might include alloys of higher general corrosion resistance

  3. Corrosion Rate Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo; Andersen, A.

    2005-01-01

    Quality control in district heating systems to keep uniform corrosion rates low and localized corrosion minimal is based on water quality control. Side-stream units equipped with carbon steel probes for online monitoring were mounted in district heating plants to investigate which techniques would...... be applicable, and if on-line monitoring could improve the quality control. Water quality monitoring was applied as well as corrosion rate monitoring with linear polarization resistance (LPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrical resistance (ER) technique, mass loss and a crevice corrosion...... cell for localized corrosion risk estimation. Important variations in corrosion rate due to changes in make-up water quality were detected with the continuous monitoring provided by ER and crevice cell, while LPR gave unreliable corrosion rates. The acquisition time of two-three days for EIS...

  4. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H. [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  5. Surface engineering for corrosion and wear resistance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, J. R

    2001-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Pitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Crevice Corrosion . . . . . . . . ....

  6. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  7. Vehicle accelerated corrosion test procedures for automotive in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar Liza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An accelerated corrosion test, known as proving ground accelerated test, is commonly performed by automotive manufacturers to evaluate the corrosion performance of a vehicle. The test combines corrosion and durability inputs to detect potential failures that may occur during in-service conditions. Currently, the test is conducted at an external test center overseas. Such test is aimed to simulate the effects of one year accelerated corrosion in severe corrosive environment of the north-east and south east of America. However, the test results obtained do not correlate with the actual corrosion conditions observed in the Malaysian market, which is likely attributed to the different test environment of the tropical climate of vehicles in service. Therefore, a vehicle accelerated corrosion test procedure that suits the Malaysian market is proposed and benchmarked with other global car manufacturers that have their own dedicated corrosion test procedure. In the present work, a test track is used as the corrosion test ground and consists of various types of roads for structural durability exposures. Corrosion related facilities like salt trough, mud trough and gravel road are constructed as addition to the existing facilities. The establishment of accelerated corrosion test facilities has contributed to the development of initial accelerated corrosion test procedure for the national car manufacturer. The corrosion exposure is monitored by fitting test coupons at the underbody of test vehicle using mass loss technique so that the desired corrosion rate capable of simulating the real time corrosion effects for its target market.

  8. A Time-Variant Reliability Model for Copper Bending Pipe under Seawater-Active Corrosion Based on the Stochastic Degradation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Liao, Baopeng; Li, Mengmeng; Ren, Yi; Feng, Qiang; Yang, Dezhen

    2018-03-27

    In the degradation process, the randomness and multiplicity of variables are difficult to describe by mathematical models. However, they are common in engineering and cannot be neglected, so it is necessary to study this issue in depth. In this paper, the copper bending pipe in seawater piping systems is taken as the analysis object, and the time-variant reliability is calculated by solving the interference of limit strength and maximum stress. We did degradation experiments and tensile experiments on copper material, and obtained the limit strength at each time. In addition, degradation experiments on copper bending pipe were done and the thickness at each time has been obtained, then the response of maximum stress was calculated by simulation. Further, with the help of one kind of Monte Carlo method we propose, the time-variant reliability of copper bending pipe was calculated based on the stochastic degradation process and interference theory. Compared with traditional methods and verified by maintenance records, the results show that the time-variant reliability model based on the stochastic degradation process proposed in this paper has better applicability in the reliability analysis, and it can be more convenient and accurate to predict the replacement cycle of copper bending pipe under seawater-active corrosion.

  9. A Time-Variant Reliability Model for Copper Bending Pipe under Seawater-Active Corrosion Based on the Stochastic Degradation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Sun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the degradation process, the randomness and multiplicity of variables are difficult to describe by mathematical models. However, they are common in engineering and cannot be neglected, so it is necessary to study this issue in depth. In this paper, the copper bending pipe in seawater piping systems is taken as the analysis object, and the time-variant reliability is calculated by solving the interference of limit strength and maximum stress. We did degradation experiments and tensile experiments on copper material, and obtained the limit strength at each time. In addition, degradation experiments on copper bending pipe were done and the thickness at each time has been obtained, then the response of maximum stress was calculated by simulation. Further, with the help of one kind of Monte Carlo method we propose, the time-variant reliability of copper bending pipe was calculated based on the stochastic degradation process and interference theory. Compared with traditional methods and verified by maintenance records, the results show that the time-variant reliability model based on the stochastic degradation process proposed in this paper has better applicability in the reliability analysis, and it can be more convenient and accurate to predict the replacement cycle of copper bending pipe under seawater-active corrosion.

  10. Analysis of electrochemical noise data in both time and frequency domains to evaluate the effect of ZnO nanopowder addition on the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ashassi-Sorkhabi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epoxy–ZnO nanocomposite coatings have been developed for corrosion protection of steel. Structural characterization of the prepared nanocomposites was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The anti-corrosive properties of the coatings were evaluated by electrochemical noise (EN. On the basis of the EN results in both time and frequency domains, the nanocomposite material with low ZnO concentration (0.1% wt.% was found to be much superior in corrosion protection when tested in aqueous NaCl electrolyte. Finally, EIS measurements were carried out and the data fitted with suitable equivalent circuit. Resistance parameters obtained by both techniques were found to be in relatively good agreement.

  11. Development of green vapour corrosion inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmara, Y. P.; Suraj, V.; Siregar, J. P.; Kurniawan, T.; Bachtiar, D.; Mohamed, N. M. Z. N.

    2017-10-01

    Corrosion control using inhibitor is an effective method to protect carbon steel from corrosion. Due to environmental toxicity of chemical inorganic corrosion inhibitors (synthetic), green inhibitors are potentially to develop. In atmospheric conditions, green vapour corrosion inhibitors are the best solutions to replace the uses of inorganic corrosion inhibitors. This research used chemical acid extraction from the key lime (citrus aurantiifolia) leaves and seeds. They are used as the main ingredients to produce this effective green corrosion inhibitor. The experiments investigated effects of corrosion inhibition on corrosion rate of low carbon steel in 3% NaCl solution using both fog salt chamber and electrochemical cell. Using salt fog chamber to represent atmospheric conditions, and corrosion rates are evaluated visually and calculated using weight loss methods. Corrosion rate on electrochemical cell were calculated using linear polarization resistance (LPR) methods. All of the experiments were set in natural conditions at pH 7. Using weight loss for three days exposure time, the efficiency of the inhibitor reached 82.39%.

  12. Detection of microbiologically influenced corrosion by electrochemical noise transients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homborg, A.M.; Morales, C.F. Leon; Tinga, Tiedo; de Wit, J.H.W.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates the electrochemical processes involved in pitting corrosion induced by microbiologically influenced corrosion by using time-resolved instantaneous frequency information of electrochemical current noise (ECN) transients obtained from Hilbert spectra. In addition to the

  13. Corrosion performance tests for reinforcing steel in concrete : technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    The existing test method used to assess the corrosion performance of reinforcing steel embedded in : concrete, mainly ASTM G 109, is labor intensive, time consuming, slow to provide comparative results, : and can be expensive. However, with corrosion...

  14. Corrosion performance tests for reinforcing steel in concrete : test procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    The existing test method to assess the corrosion performance of reinforcing steel embedded in concrete, mainly : ASTM G109, is labor intensive, time consuming, slow to provide comparative results, and often expensive. : However, corrosion of reinforc...

  15. An evaluation method for corrosion fatigue life of steel structure considering mechanical factors

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Huili; Qin, Sifeng; Jiang, Tao

    2018-01-01

    Steel structures in corrosive environment are often subjected to coupling effect and damage caused by corrosion and fatigue. This paper proposed a new assessment method to study corrosion fatigue life of steel structure, including the effect of cyclic loading and corrosion damage. Based on mechanical factors, the corrosion depth of structure under cyclic loading at different time intervals was defined by a mathematical model for corrosion damage. A finite element model was established to calc...

  16. Corrosion Behavior of New Cr-Ni-Cu Low Alloy Seawater Corrosion Resistant Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Piaopiao; Yang, Zhongmin; Chen, Ying; Wang, Huimin

    Two kinds of Cr-Ni-Cu low alloyed steels were designed, 0.1%C-0.7%Cr-1.2%Ni-0.7Cu and 0.1%C-0.7%Cr-0.3%Ni-0.5Cu. With the method of SEM, XRD and electrochemical analysis and testing technology, periodic immersion accelerated corrosion test was carried out to investigate the corrosion resistance of the designed steels in simulated marine environment. The steel with best corrosion resistance was selected, and then focused on the variation of its corrosion rate with time. The results indicated that the designed Cu-Cr-Ni low alloyed steels showed better corrosion resistance than 20MnSi, the ratio of their corrosion rates was 0.44. The corrosion rate of designed steels decreased gradually to 3 4 g/(mm2·h) with the elongation of test period, while the corrosion rate of 20MnSi kept downward trend, not reach stability, and the corrosion rate gap between them became smaller. The Cr element banding enriched in the inner rust can withstand the diffusion of Cl-. Besides, the addition of Ni raised the self-corrosion potential of the bare steels and promoted the transformation of γ-FeOOH to α-FeOOH, and consequently, improved the stability of the rust and the corrosion resistance of steels.

  17. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO 2 corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  18. Stochastic process corrosion growth models for pipeline reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazán, Felipe Alexander Vargas; Beck, André Teófilo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Novel non-linear stochastic process corrosion growth model is proposed. •Corrosion rate modeled as random Poisson pulses. •Time to corrosion initiation and inherent time-variability properly represented. •Continuous corrosion growth histories obtained. •Model is shown to precisely fit actual corrosion data at two time points. -- Abstract: Linear random variable corrosion models are extensively employed in reliability analysis of pipelines. However, linear models grossly neglect well-known characteristics of the corrosion process. Herein, a non-linear model is proposed, where corrosion rate is represented as a Poisson square wave process. The resulting model represents inherent time-variability of corrosion growth, produces continuous growth and leads to mean growth at less-than-one power of time. Different corrosion models are adjusted to the same set of actual corrosion data for two inspections. The proposed non-linear random process corrosion growth model leads to the best fit to the data, while better representing problem physics

  19. Microbiologically influenced corrosion in ship ballast tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyer, A.

    2013-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is known to be a dangerous process in ship tanks due to its rapid and yet unpredictable occurrence, leading to extremely fast local corrosion, possibly jeopardizing the structural integrity, in a relatively short time. This project focuses on a

  20. Glove corrosive liquid immersion and permeability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, H.W.

    1977-01-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration's requirement for protective equipment for personnel working with chemical hazards resulted in a study of gloves used in work with corrosive liquids. Gloves of different materials and weights were tested using ASTM methods, in various corrosive liquids. Results show the best material for gloves used for different lengths of time in the liquids

  1. NOVEL CORROSION SENSOR FOR VISION 21 SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heng Ban

    2004-12-01

    Advanced sensor technology is identified as a key component for advanced power systems for future energy plants that would have virtually no environmental impact. This project intends to develop a novel high temperature corrosion sensor and subsequent measurement system for advanced power systems. Fireside corrosion is the metal loss caused by chemical reactions on surfaces exposed to the combustion environment. Such corrosion is the leading mechanism for boiler tube failures and has emerged to be a significant concern for current and future energy plants due to the introduction of technologies targeting emissions reduction, efficiency improvement, or fuel/oxidant flexibility. Corrosion damage can lead to catastrophic equipment failure, explosions, and forced outages. Proper management of corrosion requires real-time indication of corrosion rate. However, short-term, on-line corrosion monitoring systems for fireside corrosion remain a technical challenge to date due to the extremely harsh combustion environment. The overall objective of this proposed project is to develop a technology for on-line corrosion monitoring based on a new concept. This report describes the initial results from the first-year effort of the three-year study that include laboratory development and experiment, and pilot combustor testing.

  2. Fouling corrosion in aluminum heat exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Jingxin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fouling deposits on aluminum heat exchanger reduce the heat transfer efficiency and cause corrosion to the apparatus. This study focuses on the corrosive behavior of aluminum coupons covered with a layer of artificial fouling in a humid atmosphere by their weight loss, Tafel plots, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, and scanning electron microscope (SEM observations. The results reveal that chloride is one of the major elements found in the fouling which damages the passive film and initiates corrosion. The galvanic corrosion between the metal and the adjacent carbon particles accelerates the corrosive process. Furthermore, the black carbon favors the moisture uptake, and gives the dissolved oxygen greater chance to migrate through the fouling layer and form a continuous diffusive path. The corrosion rate decreasing over time is conformed to electrochemistry measurements and can be verified by Faraday’s law. The EIS results indicate that the mechanism of corrosion can be interpreted by the pitting corrosion evolution mechanism, and that pitting was observed on the coupons by SEM after corrosive exposure.

  3. CORROSION RATE OF STEELS DX51D AND S220GD IN DIFFERENT CORROSION ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Crina CIUBOTARIU

    2016-06-01

    stability of the steel decrease in time and corrosion stability coefficient increase at 6. For steel S220GD it was found a corrosion stability coefficient equal with 6 after 21 days of immersion and 5 after 28 days of immersion in 5% NaOH solution. In 0.5M NaCl solution the corrosion stability coefficient at steel S220GD was 6 for all period tested.

  4. Ultrasonic guided wave for monitoring corrosion of steel bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi; Qin, Lei; Huang, Bosheng

    2018-01-01

    Steel corrosion of reinforced concrete structures has become a serious problem all over the word. In this paper, the work aims at monitoring steel corrosion using ultrasonic guided wave (UGW). Ultrasonic guided wave monitoring is a dynamic and non-destructive testing technology. The advantages of ultrasonic guided wave monitoring for reinforcement corrosion are real-time, online and continuous. In addition, it can judge the different stages of steel bar corrosion, which achieved non-destructive detection.

  5. Corrosion studies with high burnup light water reactor fuel. Release of nuclides into simulated groundwater during accumulated contact time of up to two years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwicky, Hans-Urs (Zwicky Consulting GmbH, Remigen (Switzerland)); Low, Jeanett; Ekeroth, Ella (Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden))

    2011-03-15

    In the framework of comprehensive research work supporting the development of a Swedish concept for the disposal of highly radioactive waste and spent fuel, Studsvik has performed a significant number of spent fuel corrosion studies under a variety of different conditions. These experiments, performed between 1990 and 2002, covered a burnup range from 27 to 49 MWd/kgU, which was typical for fuel to be disposed at that time. As part of this work, the so called Series 11 tests were performed under oxidising conditions in synthetic groundwater with fuel samples from a rod irradiated in the Ringhals 1 Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). In the meantime, Swedish utilities tend to increase the discharge burnup of fuel operated in their reactors. This means that knowledge of spent fuel corrosion performance has to be extended to higher burnup as well. Therefore, a series of experiments has been started at Studsvik, aiming at extending the data base acquired in the Series 11 corrosion tests to higher burnup fuel. Fuel burnup leads to complex and significant changes in the composition and properties of the fuel. The transformed microstructure, which is referred to as the high burnup structure or rim structure in the outer region of the fuel, consists of small grains of submicron size and a high concentration of pores of typical diameter 1 to 2 mum. This structure forms in UO{sub 2} fuel at a local burnup above 50 MWd/kgU, as long as the temperature is below 1,000-1,100 deg C. The high burnup at the pellet periphery is the consequence of plutonium build-up by neutron capture in 238U followed by fission of the formed plutonium. The amount of fission products in the fuel increases more or less linearly with burnup, in contrast to alpha emitting actinides that increase above average. As burnup across a spent fuel pellet is not uniform, but increases towards the periphery, the radiation field is also larger at the pellet surface. At the same time, it is easier for water to access the

  6. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly

  7. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel and zirconium in nitric acid containing highly oxidizing species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, Masami; Fujita, Tomonari

    1994-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of 304ELC, 310Nb stainless steels and Zirconium was investigated in the simulated dissolver solution of a reprocessing plant to obtain fundamental data for life prediction. Corrosion of heat transfer surface was also investigated in nitric acid solutions containing Ce ion. The results obtained are as follows: (1) Stainless steels showed intergranular corrosion in the simulated dissolver solution. The corrosion rate increased with time and reached to a constant value after several hundred hours of immersing time. The constant corrosion rate changed depending on potential suggesting that corrosion potential dominates the corrosion process. 310Nb showed superior corrosion resistance to 304ELC. (2) Corrosion rate of stainless steels increased in the heat transfer condition. The causes of corrosion enhancement are estimated to be higher corrosion potential and higher temperature of heat transfer surface. (3) Zirconium showed perfect passivity in all the test conditions employed. (author)

  8. An electrochemical study of the corrosion behavior of primer coated 2219-T87 aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.; Higgins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The corrosion behavior for 2219-T87 aluminum coated with various primers, including those used for the external tank and solid rocket boosters of the Space Shuttle Transportation System, were investigated using electrochemical techniques. Corrosion potential time, polarization resistance time, electrical resistance time, and corrosion rate time measurements were all investigated. It was found that electrical resistance time and corrosion rate time measurement were most useful for studying the corrosion behavior of painted aluminum. Electrical resistance time determination give useful information concerning the porosity of paint films, while corrosion rate time curves give important information concerning overall corrosion rates and corrosion mechanisms. In general, the corrosion rate time curves all exhibited at least one peak during the 30 day test period, which was attributed, according to the proposed mechanisms, to the onset of the hydrogen evolution reaction and the beginning of destruction of the protective properties of the paint film.

  9. Removal of corrosion products of construction materials in heat carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A review of reported data has been made on the removal of structural material corrosion products into the heat-carrying agent of power reactors. The corrosion rate, and at the same time, removal of corrosion products into the heat-carrying agent (water) decreases with time. Thus, for example, the corrosion rate of carbon steel in boiling water at 250 deg C and O 2 concentration of 0.1 mg/1 after 3000 hr is 0.083 g/m 2 . day; after 9000 hr the corrosion rate has been reduced 2.5 times. Under static conditions the transfer rate of corrosion products into water has been smaller than in the stream and also depends on time. The corrosion rate of carbon steel under nuclear plant operating conditions is almost an order higher over that of steel Kh18N10T

  10. pH Responsive Microcapsules for Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wenyan; Muehlberg, Aaron; Boraas, Samuel; Webster, Dean; JohnstonGelling, Victoria; Croll, Stuart; Taylor, S Ray; Contu, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    The best coatings for corrosion protection provide not only barriers to the environment, but also a controlled release of a corrosion inhibitor, as demanded by the presence of corrosion or mechanical damage. NASA has developed pH sensitive microcapsules (patent pending) that can release their core contents when corrosion starts. The objectives of the research presented here were to encapsulate non-toxic corrosion inhibitors, to incorporate the encapsulated inhibitors into paint formulations, and to test the ability of the paints to control corrosion. Results showed that the encapsulated corrosion inhibitors, specifically Ce(NO3)3 , are effective to control corrosion over long periods of time when incorporated at relatively high pigment volume concentrations into a paint formulation.

  11. Catastrophes caused by corrosion

    OpenAIRE

    PETROVIC ZORAN C.

    2016-01-01

    For many years, huge attention has been paid to the problem of corrosion damage and destruction of metallic materials. Experience shows that failures due to corrosion problems are very important, and statistics at the world level shows that the damage resulting from the effects of various forms of corrosion is substantial and that, for example, in industrialized countries it reaches 4-5% of national incomes. Significant funds are determined annually for the prevention and control of corrosion...

  12. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  13. Standard practice for measurement of time-of-wetness on surfaces exposed to wetting conditions as in atmospheric corrosion testing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1989-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a technique for monitoring time-of-wetness (TOW) on surfaces exposed to cyclic atmospheric conditions which produce depositions of moisture. 1.2 The practice is also applicable for detecting and monitoring condensation within a wall or roof assembly and in test apparatus. 1.3 Exposure site calibration or characterization can be significantly enhanced if TOW is measured for comparison with other sites, particularly if this data is used in conjunction with other site-specific instrumentation techniques. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  14. Microbiological corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladislavlev, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    Problems is considered of development of the microbiological corrosion of the NPP equipment. The main attention is paid to the selective character of microbiological corrosion in zones of welded joints of austenitic steels. It is noted that the presence of technological defects promotes growth of corrosional damages. Methods for microbiological corrosion protection are discussed

  15. Management of Reinforcement Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, André; Geiker, Mette Rica; Møller, Per

    Reinforcement corrosion is the most important cause for deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, both with regard to costs and consequences. Thermodynamically consistent descriptions of corrosion mechanisms are expected to allow the development of innovative concepts for the management...... of reinforcement corrosion....

  16. Plant applications of online corrosion monitoring: CO2 capture amine plant case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kane, R.D.; Srinivasan, S.; Khakharia, P.M.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Mertens, J.; Vroey, S. de

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several years, there has been a significant effort to bring corrosion monitoring into the realm of online, real-time management with plant process control technology. As part of this new direction in corrosion monitoring, corrosion data (e.g. information on corrosion rate, measured

  17. Less-toxic corrosion inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1981-01-01

    Combinations of borates, nitrates, phosphates, silicates, and sodium MBT protect aluminum from corrosion in fresh water. Most effective combinations contained sodium phosphate and were alkaline. These inhibitors replace toxic chromates which are subject to governmental restrictions, but must be used in larger quantities. Experimental exposure times varied from 1 to 14 months depending upon nature of submersion solution.

  18. Modeling of Corrosion-induced Concrete Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Anna Emilie A.; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper a finite element model is introduced to simulate corrosion-induced damage in concrete. The model takes into account the penetration of corrosion products into the concrete as well as non-uniform formation of corrosion products around the reinforcement. To ac-count for the non......-uniform formation of corrosion products at the concrete/reinforcement interface, a deterministic approach is used. The model gives good estimates of both deformations in the con-crete/reinforcement interface and crack width when compared to experimental data. Further, it is shown that non-uniform deposition...... of corrosion products affects both the time-to cover cracking and the crack width at the concrete surface....

  19. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.B. Rebak; J.H. Payer

    2006-01-01

    Alloy 22 (NO6022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nano-meters per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids

  20. Parametric Study of Time-Dependent Corrosion Product Activity due to 56Mn, 58Co, and 60Co in the Primary Coolant Circuit of a Typical Pressurized Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rafique

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of a detailed study, based on the parametric analysis of activated corrosion products, in primary coolant of a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR are presented. The parameters influencing time dependent buildup of corrosion product activity (CPA in primary coolant loop of PWR were identified. The computer program CPAIR was used to accommodate for time dependent corrosion rates. The behaviors of 56Mn, 58Co, and 60Co were studied over the reactor operational time. During the course of normal operation of reactor, the CPA is dominated by 56Mn, while 58Co and 60Co are the predominant radionuclides after reactor shutdown. Parametric study suggests that the total CPA is most sensitive to ion-exchanger removal rates. For a removal rate of 300 cm3-s−1, the specific activity due to 56Mn has the maximum value of 3.552 × 104 Bq-m−3 after 1,000 hours of reactor operation. This value decreases drastically to 8.325 × 103 Bq-m−3 at removal rate of 900 cm3-s−1. Additionally, CPA due to 56Mn, 58Co, and 60Co shows strong dependence on removal rates from the core material surfaces. Variations in the values of radionuclide removal rates from piping surface and radionuclide removal rate from deposition on pipes showed only very small effects on CPA buildup.

  1. Corrosion of metallic materials. Dry corrosion, aqueous corrosion and corrosion by liquid metal, methods of protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helie, Max

    2015-01-01

    This book is based on a course on materials given in an engineering school. The author first gives an overview of metallurgy issues: metallic materials (pure metals, metallic alloys), defects of crystal lattices (point defects, linear defects or dislocations), equilibrium diagrams, steels and cast, thermal processing of steels, stainless steels, aluminium and its alloys, copper and its alloys. The second part addresses the properties and characterization of surfaces and interfaces: singularity of a metal surface, surface energy of a metal, energy of grain boundaries, adsorption at a material surface, metal-electrolyte interface, surface oxide-electrolyte interface, techniques of surface analysis. The third chapter addresses the electrochemical aspects of corrosion: description of the corrosion phenomenon, free enthalpy of a compound and free enthalpy of a reaction, case of dry corrosion (thermodynamic aspect, Ellingham diagram, oxidation mechanisms, experimental study, macroscopic modelling), case of aqueous corrosion (electrochemical thermodynamics and kinetics, experimental determination of corrosion rate). The fourth part addresses the different forms of aqueous corrosion: generalized corrosion (atmospheric corrosion, mechanisms and tests), localized corrosion (galvanic, pitting, cracking, intergranular, erosion and cavitation), particular cases of stress cracking (stress corrosion, fatigue-corrosion, embrittlement by hydrogen), and bi-corrosion (of non alloyed steels, of stainless steels, and of aluminium and copper alloys). The sixth chapter addresses the struggle and the protection against aqueous corrosion: methods of prevention, scope of use of main alloys, geometry-based protection of pieces, use of corrosion inhibitors, use of organic or metallic coatings, electrochemical protection. The last chapter proposes an overview of corrosion types in industrial practices: in the automotive industry, in the oil industry, in the aircraft industry, and in the

  2. Vibrational Spectroscopy in Studies of Atmospheric Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpour, Saman; Johnson, Magnus

    2017-04-18

    Vibrational spectroscopy has been successfully used for decades in studies of the atmospheric corrosion processes, mainly to identify the nature of corrosion products but also to quantify their amounts. In this review article, a summary of the main achievements is presented with focus on how the techniques infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy can be used in the field. Several different studies have been discussed where these instruments have been used to assess both the nature of corrosion products as well as the properties of corrosion inhibitors. Some of these techniques offer the valuable possibility to perform in-situ measurements in real time on ongoing corrosion processes, which allows the kinetics of formation of corrosion products to be studied, and also minimizes the risk of changing the surface properties which may occur during ex-situ experiments. Since corrosion processes often occur heterogeneously over a surface, it is of great importance to obtain a deeper knowledge about atmospheric corrosion phenomena on the nano scale, and this review also discusses novel vibrational microscopy techniques allowing spectra to be acquired with a spatial resolution of 20 nm.

  3. Vibrational Spectroscopy in Studies of Atmospheric Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Hosseinpour

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational spectroscopy has been successfully used for decades in studies of the atmospheric corrosion processes, mainly to identify the nature of corrosion products but also to quantify their amounts. In this review article, a summary of the main achievements is presented with focus on how the techniques infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy can be used in the field. Several different studies have been discussed where these instruments have been used to assess both the nature of corrosion products as well as the properties of corrosion inhibitors. Some of these techniques offer the valuable possibility to perform in-situ measurements in real time on ongoing corrosion processes, which allows the kinetics of formation of corrosion products to be studied, and also minimizes the risk of changing the surface properties which may occur during ex-situ experiments. Since corrosion processes often occur heterogeneously over a surface, it is of great importance to obtain a deeper knowledge about atmospheric corrosion phenomena on the nano scale, and this review also discusses novel vibrational microscopy techniques allowing spectra to be acquired with a spatial resolution of 20 nm.

  4. Corrosion in Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Gudla, Helene Virginie Conseil; Verdingovas, Vadimas

    2017-01-01

    and high density packing combined with the use of several materials, which can undergo electrochemical corrosion in the presence of water film formed due to humidity exposure and bias conditions on the PCBA surface. This article provides a short review of the corrosion reliability issues of electronics due...... to the use of electronics under varying humidity conditions. Important PCBA aspects, which are fundamental to the corrosion cell formation under humid conditions, are discussed. Effect of hygroscopic residues from the process and service and their role in assisting water film build up and corrosion...... is presented. Various failure modes resulting from the corrosion and influence factors are discussed including humid and gaseous conditions....

  5. Apollo experience report: The problem of stress-corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking has been the most common cause of structural-material failures in the Apollo Program. The frequency of stress-corrosion cracking has been high and the magnitude of the problem, in terms of hardware lost and time and money expended, has been significant. In this report, the significant Apollo Program experiences with stress-corrosion cracking are discussed. The causes of stress-corrosion cracking and the corrective actions are discussed, in terminology familiar to design engineers and management personnel, to show how stress-corrosion cracking can be prevented.

  6. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Calle, Luz

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as accurately and reliably as current long-term atmospheric exposure tests. This new accelerated test method will shorten the time needed to evaluate the corrosion protection performance of coatings for NASA's critical ground support structures. Lifetime prediction for spaceport structure coatings has a 5-year qualification cycle using atmospheric exposure. Current accelerated corrosion tests often provide false positives and negatives for coating performance, do not correlate to atmospheric corrosion exposure results, and do not correlate with atmospheric exposure timescales for lifetime prediction.

  7. The Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository From A Corrosion Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.H. Payer

    2005-01-01

    Corrosion is a primary determinant of waste package performance at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository and will control the delay time for radionuclide transport from the waste package. Corrosion is the most probable and most likely degradation process that will determine when packages will be penetrated and the shape size and distribution of those penetrations. The general issues in corrosion science, materials science and electrochemistry are well defined, and the knowledge base is substantial for understanding corrosion processes. In this paper, the Yucca Mountain Repository is viewed from a corrosion perspective

  8. Electrochemical noise based corrosion monitoring: FY 2001 final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDGAR, C.

    2001-01-01

    Underground storage tanks made of mild steel are used to contain radioactive waste generated by plutonium production at the Hanford Site. Corrosion of the walls of these tanks is a major issue. Corrosion monitoring and control are currently provided at the Hanford Site through a waste chemistry sampling and analysis program. In this process, tank waste is sampled, analyzed and compared to a selection of laboratory exposures of coupons in simulated waste. Tank wall corrosion is inferred by matching measured tank chemistries to the results of the laboratory simulant testing. This method is expensive, time consuming, and does not yield real-time data. Corrosion can be monitored through coupon exposure studies and a variety of electrochemical techniques. A small number of these techniques have been tried at Hanford and elsewhere within the DOE complex to determine the corrosivity of nuclear waste stored in underground tanks [1]. Coupon exposure programs, linear polarization resistance (LPR), and electrical resistance techniques have all been tried with limited degrees of success. These techniques are most effective for monitoring uniform corrosion, but are not well suited for early detection of localized forms of corrosion such as pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Pitting and SCC have been identified as the most likely modes of corrosion failure for Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST'S) [2-3]. Over the last 20 years, a new corrosion monitoring system has shown promise in detecting localized corrosion and measuring uniform corrosion rates in process industries [4-20]. The system measures electrochemical noise (EN) generated by corrosion. The term EN is used to describe low frequency fluctuations in current and voltage associated with corrosion. In their most basic form, EN-based corrosion monitoring systems monitor and record fluctuations in current and voltage over time from electrodes immersed in an environment of interest. Laboratory studies and field

  9. Electrochemical Measurement of Atmospheric Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeArmond, Anna H.; Davis, Dennis D.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    Corrosion of Shuttle thruster components in atmospheres containing high concentrations of nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) and water is an important issue in ground operations of bipropellant systems in humid locations. Measurements of the corrosivities of NTO-containing atmospheres and the responses of different materials to these atmospheres have been accomplished using an electrochemical sensor. The sensor is composed of alternating aluminum/titanium strips separated by thin insulating layers. Under high humidity conditions a thin film of water covers the surface of the sensor. Added NTO vapor reacts with the water film to form a conductive medium and establishes a galvanic cell. The current from this cell can be integrated with respect to time and related to the corrosion activity. The surface layer formed from humid air/NTO reacts in the same way as an aqueous solution of nitric acid. Nitric acid is generally considered an important agent in NTO corrosion situations. The aluminum/titanium sensor is unresponsive to dry air, responds slightly to humid air (> 75% RH), and responds strongly to the combination of humid air and NTO. The sensor response is a power function (n = 2) of the NTO concentration. The sensor does not respond to NTO in dry air. The response of other materials in this type of sensor is related to position of the material in a galvanic series in aqueous nitric acid. The concept and operation of this electrochemical corrosion measurement is being applied to other corrosive atmospheric contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, sulfur dioxide, and acidic aerosols.

  10. Development of Copper Corrosion Products and Relation between Surface Appearance and Corrosion Rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Tran Thi Ngoc; Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Tru, Nguyen Nhi; Yoshino, Tsujino; Yasuki, Maeda

    2008-01-01

    Copper was exposed unsheltered and sheltered in four humid tropical sites, representing urban, urban-industrial, urban-marine and rural environments. The corrosion rates and the sequence of corrosion product formation are presented and discussed in relation with climatic and atmospheric pollution parameters. Chemical compositions of corrosion products were found to depend on environments and duration of exposure. In all environments, cuprite was the predominating corrosion product that formed first and continuously increased during the exposure. Among the sulphur-containing corrosion products, posnjakite and brochantite were more frequently found and the first formed earlier. Nantokite was the most common chlorine-containing products for most cases, except the high-chloride environment, where atacamite was detected instead. The corrosion rate of copper was well indicated by the colour of patina. The red-purple colour corresponded to the high corrosion rate and the greenish grey colour corresponded to the low corrosion rate. Corrosion rate of sheltered copper in urban-marine environment increased with the exposure time

  11. Engineering Task Plan for Fourth Generation Hanford Corrosion Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-01-01

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) describes the activities associated with the installation of cabinets containing corrosion monitoring equipment on tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. The new cabinets (one per tank) will be installed adjacent to existing corrosion probes already installed in riser WST-RISER-016 on both tanks. The corrosion monitoring equipment to be installed utilizes the technique of electrochemical noise (EN) for monitoring waste tank corrosion. Typically, EN consists of low frequency (4 Hz) and small amplitude signals that are spontaneously generated by electrochemical reactions occurring at corroding or other surfaces. EN analysis is well suited for monitoring and identifying the onset of localized corrosion, and for measuring uniform corrosion rates. A typical EN based corrosion-monitoring system measures instantaneous fluctuations in corrosion current and potential between three nominally identical electrodes of the material of interest immersed in the environment of interest. Time-dependent fluctuations in corrosion current are described by electrochemical current noise, and time-dependent fluctuations of corrosion potential are described by electrochemical noise. The corrosion monitoring systems are designed to detect the onset of localized corrosion phenomena if tank conditions should change to allow these phenomena to occur. In addition to the EN technique, the systems also facilitate the use of the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) technique to collect uniform corrosion rate information. LPR measures the linearity at the origin of the polarization curve for overvoltages up to a few millivolts away from the rest potential or natural corrosion potential. The slope of the current vs. voltage plot gives information on uniform corrosion rates

  12. Statistical characterization of pitting corrosion process and life prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, A.K.; Younas, M.

    1995-01-01

    In order to prevent corrosion failures of machines and structures, it is desirable to know in advance when the corrosion damage will take place, and appropriate measures are needed to mitigate the damage. The corrosion predictions are needed both at development as well as operational stage of machines and structures. There are several forms of corrosion process through which varying degrees of damage can occur. Under certain conditions these corrosion processes at alone and in other set of conditions, several of these processes may occur simultaneously. For a certain type of machine elements and structures, such as gears, bearing, tubes, pipelines, containers, storage tanks etc., are particularly prone to pitting corrosion which is an insidious form of corrosion. The corrosion predictions are usually based on experimental results obtained from test coupons and/or field experiences of similar machines or parts of a structure. Considerable scatter is observed in corrosion processes. The probabilities nature and kinetics of pitting process makes in necessary to use statistical method to forecast the residual life of machine of structures. The focus of this paper is to characterization pitting as a time-dependent random process, and using this characterization the prediction of life to reach a critical level of pitting damage can be made. Using several data sets from literature on pitting corrosion, the extreme value modeling of pitting corrosion process, the evolution of the extreme value distribution in time, and their relationship to the reliability of machines and structure are explained. (author)

  13. Experimental Investigation of the Corrosion Behavior of Friction Stir Welded AZ61A Magnesium Alloy Welds under Salt Spray Corrosion Test and Galvanic Corrosion Test Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dhanapal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extruded Mg alloy plates of 6 mm thick of AZ61A grade were butt welded using advanced welding process and friction stir welding (FSW processes. The specimens were exposed to salt spray conditions and immersion conditions to characterize their corrosion rates on the effect of pH value, chloride ion concentration, and corrosion time. In addition, an attempt was made to develop an empirical relationship to predict the corrosion rate of FSW welds in salt spray corrosion test and galvanic corrosion test using design of experiments. The corrosion morphology and the pit morphology were analyzed by optical microscopy, and the corrosion products were examined using scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction analysis. From this research work, it is found that, in both corrosion tests, the corrosion rate decreases with the increase in pH value, the decrease in chloride ion concentration, and a higher corrosion time. The results show the usage of the magnesium alloy for best environments and suitable applications from the aforementioned conditions. Also, it is found that AZ61A magnesium alloy welds possess low-corrosion rate and higher-corrosion resistance in the galvanic corrosion test than in the salt spray corrosion test.

  14. Trend on Corrosion Mitigation Research Paper Publication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Ki Woung [Korea Institute Of Science and Technology Information, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Those papers were analyzed and arranged in the form of publication years and citation, document types, research areas, source titles, countries and languages, organization and funding agencies. In the 'corrosion mitigation' search, the percentage of the publication number of the nuclear science and technology field was about 12%. The sum of the time cited and the average citation number per item in corrosion mitigation survey were 5059 and 11.47, respectively, while those in nuclear corrosion mitigation survey were 285 and 7.5, respectively. Among 38 source titles, the major ones were Nuclear Eng. and Design, Nuclear Sci. and Eng., Intl. J. of Pressure Vessels and Piping.

  15. Monitoring Microbially Influenced Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    Abstract Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel may occur in media with microbiological activity of especially sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The applicability and reliability of a number of corrosion monitoring techniques for monitoring MIC has been evaluated in experiments...... and diffusional effects and unreliable corrosion rates, when biofilm and ferrous sulphide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 by electrochemical techniques. Weight loss coupons and ER are recommended as necessary basic monitoring techniques....... EIS might be used for detection of MIC as the appearance of very large capacitances can be attributed to the combined ferrous sulphide and biofilm formation. Capacitance correlates directly with sulphide concentration in sterile sulphide media. Keywords: Corrosion monitoring, carbon steel, MIC, SRB...

  16. SRB seawater corrosion project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozack, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 2219 aluminum when exposed to seawater was characterized. Controlled corrosion experiments at three different temperatures (30, 60 and 100 C) and two different environments (seawater and 3.5 percent salt solution) were designed to elucidate the initial stages in the corrosion process. It was found that 2219 aluminum is an active catalytic surface for growth of Al2O3, NaCl, and MgO. Formation of Al2O3 is favored at lower temperatures, while MgO is favored at higher temperatures. Visible corrosion products are formed within 30 minutes after seawater exposure. Corrosion characteristics in 3.5 percent salt solution are different than corrosion in seawater. Techniques utilized were: (1) scanning electron microscopy, (2) energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and (3) Auger electron spectroscopy.

  17. Long Term Corrosion/Degradation Test Six Year Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. K. Adler Flitton; C. W. Bishop; M. E. Delwiche; T. S. Yoder

    2004-09-01

    The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel, nuclear reactor core components. The Long-Term Corrosion/Degradation (LTCD) Test is designed to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements to the environment. The test is using two proven, industry-standard methods—direct corrosion testing using metal coupons, and monitored corrosion testing using electrical/resistance probes—to determine corrosion rates for various metal alloys generally representing the metals of interest buried at the SDA, including Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, Beryllium S200F, Aluminum 6061, Zircaloy-4, low-carbon steel, and Ferralium 255. In the direct testing, metal coupons are retrieved for corrosion evaluation after having been buried in SDA backfill soil and exposed to natural SDA environmental conditions for times ranging from one year to as many as 32 years, depending on research needs and funding availability. In the monitored testing, electrical/resistance probes buried in SDA backfill soil will provide corrosion data for the duration of the test or until the probes fail. This report provides an update describing the current status of the test and documents results to date. Data from the one-year and three-year results are also included, for comparison and evaluation of trends. In the six-year results, most metals being tested showed extremely low measurable rates of general corrosion. For Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, and Ferralium 255, corrosion rates fell in the range of “no reportable” to 0.0002 mils per year (MPY). Corrosion rates for Zircaloy-4 ranged from no measurable corrosion to 0.0001 MPY. These rates are two orders of magnitude lower than those specified in

  18. Task E container corrosion studies: Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunnell, L.R.; Doremus, L.A.; Topping, J.B.; Duncan, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting the Solid Waste Technology Support Program (SWTSP) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Task E is the Container Corrosion Study Portion of the SWTSP that will perform testing to provide defensible data on the corrosion of low-carbon steel, as used in drums to contain chemical and radioactive wastes at the Hanford Site. A second objective of Task E is to provide and test practical alternative materials that have higher corrosion resistance than low-carbon steel. The scope of work for fiscal year (FY) 1993 included initial testing of mild steel specimens buried in Hanford soils or exposed to atmospheric corrosion in metal storage sheds. During FY 1993, progress was made in three areas of Task E. First, exposure of test materials began at the Soil Corrosion Test Site where low-carbon steel specimens were placed in the soil in five test shafts at depths of 9 m (30 ft). Second, the corrosion measurement of low-carbon steel in the soil of two solid waste trenches continued. The total exposure time is ∼ 500 days. Third, an atmospheric corrosion test of low-carbon steel was put initiated in a metal shed (Building 2401-W) in the 200 West Area. This annual report describes the Task E efforts and provides a current status

  19. Steel corrosion in radioactive waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, Ricardo M.; Giordano, Celia M.; Saenz, E.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2004-01-01

    A collaborative study is being conducted by CNEA and USDOE (Department of Energy of the United States of America) to investigate the effects of tank waste chemistry on radioactive waste storage tank corrosion. Radioactive waste is stored in underground storage tanks that contain a combination of salts, consisting primarily of sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite and sodium hydroxide. The USDOE, Office of River Protection at the Hanford Site, has identified a need to conduct a laboratory study to better understand the effects of radioactive waste chemistry on the corrosion of waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. The USDOE science need (RL-WT079-S Double-Shell Tanks Corrosion Chemistry) called for a multi year effort to identify waste chemistries and temperatures within the double-shell tank (DST) operating limits for corrosion control and operating temperature range that may not provide the expected corrosion protection and to evaluate future operations for the conditions outside the existing corrosion database. Assessment of corrosion damage using simulated (non-radioactive) waste is being made of the double-shell tank wall carbon steel alloy. Evaluation of the influence of exposure time, and electrolyte composition and/or concentration is being also conducted. (author) [es

  20. Corrosion induced failure analysis of subsea pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yongsheng; Khan, Faisal; Thodi, Premkumar; Abbassi, Rouzbeh

    2017-01-01

    Pipeline corrosion is one of the main causes of subsea pipeline failure. It is necessary to monitor and analyze pipeline condition to effectively predict likely failure. This paper presents an approach to analyze the observed abnormal events to assess the condition of subsea pipelines. First, it focuses on establishing a systematic corrosion failure model by Bow-Tie (BT) analysis, and subsequently the BT model is mapped into a Bayesian Network (BN) model. The BN model facilitates the modelling of interdependency of identified corrosion causes, as well as the updating of failure probabilities depending on the arrival of new information. Furthermore, an Object-Oriented Bayesian Network (OOBN) has been developed to better structure the network and to provide an efficient updating algorithm. Based on this OOBN model, probability updating and probability adaptation are performed at regular intervals to estimate the failure probabilities due to corrosion and potential consequences. This results in an interval-based condition assessment of subsea pipeline subjected to corrosion. The estimated failure probabilities would help prioritize action to prevent and control failures. Practical application of the developed model is demonstrated using a case study. - Highlights: • A Bow-Tie (BT) based corrosion failure model linking causation with the potential losses. • A novel Object-Oriented Bayesian Network (OOBN) based corrosion failure risk model. • Probability of failure updating and adaptation with respect to time using OOBN model. • Application of the proposed model to develop and test strategies to minimize failure risk.

  1. Time exposure studies on stress corrosion cracking of aluminum 2014-T6, 2219-T87, 2014-T651, 7075-T651, and titanium 6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, J.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of a constant applied stress in crack initiation of aluminum 2014-T6, 2219-T87, 2014-T651, 7075-T651 and titanium 6Al-4V has been investigated. Aluminum c-ring specimens (1-inch diameter) and u-band titanium samples were exposed continuously to a 3.5% NaCl solution (pH 7) and organic fluids of ethyl, methyl, and iso-propyl alcohol (reagent purity), and demineralized distilled water. Corrosive action was observed to begin during the first and second day of constant exposure as evidenced by accumulation of hydrogen bubbles on the surface of stressed aluminum samples. However, titanium stressed specimens showed no reactions to its environment. Results of this investigation seems to suggest that aluminum 2014-T6, aluminum 7075-T651 and aluminum 2014-T651 are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in chloride solution (NaCl), while aluminum 2219-T87 seem to resist stress corrosion cracking in sodium chloride at three levels of stress (25%, 50%, and 75% Y.S.). In organic fluids of methyl, ethyl, and iso-propyl alcohol, 2014-T6 and 7075-T651 did not fail by SCC; but 2014-T651 was susceptible to SCC in methly alcohol, but resistant in ethyl alcohol, iso-propyl alcohol and demineralized distilled water.

  2. Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory is to develop and analyze the effectiveness of innovative coatings test procedures while evaluating the...

  3. Corrosion in the oil industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brondel, D. (Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France)); Edwards, R. (Schlumberger Well Services, Columbus, OH (United States)); Hayman, A. (Etudes et Productions Schlumberger, Clamart (France)); Hill, D. (Schlumberger Dowell, Tulsa, OK (United States)); Mehta, S. (Schlumberger Dowell, St. Austell (United Kingdom)); Semerad, T. (Mobil Oil Indonesia, Inc., Sumatra (Indonesia))

    1994-04-01

    Corrosion costs the oil industry billions of dollars a year, a fact that makes the role of the corrosion engineer an increasingly important one. Attention is paid to how corrosion affects every aspect of exploration and production, from offshore rigs to casing. Also the role of corrosion agents such as drilling and production fluids is reviewed. Methods of control and techniques to monitor corrosion are discussed, along with an explanation of the chemical causes of corrosion. 21 figs., 32 refs.

  4. Study on influence of native oxide and corrosion products on atmospheric corrosion of pure Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanjie; Wang, Zhenyao; Ke, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Corrosion products layer is only formed in coastal atmosphere. •In coastal atmosphere, rate controlling step is diffusion process. •In rural atmosphere, rate controlling step is charge transfer process. •Pitting area increases greatly in coastal site, but slightly in rural site. -- Abstract: Effects of native oxide and corrosion products on atmospheric corrosion of aluminium in rural and coastal sites were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), open-circuit potential (OCP) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques after outdoor exposure. In the rural atmosphere, only the compact, adhesive native oxide layer exists, and the rate controlling step is diffusion process, while in the coastal atmosphere, another loose, inadhesive corrosion products layer exists, and a charge transfer process controls the corrosion process. The pitting area in the coastal atmosphere increases over time more obviously than that in the rural atmosphere

  5. NASA's Beachside Corrosion Test Site and Current Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Control Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard W.; Calle, Luz Marina; Johnston, Frederick; Montgomery, Eliza L.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    NASA began corrosion studies at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term corrosion protective coatings for carbon steel. KSC's Beachside Corrosion Test Site (BCTS), which has been documented by the American Society of Materials (ASM) as one of the most corrosive, naturally occurring, environments in the world, was established at that time. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acid ic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. In the years that followed, numerous studies have identified materials, coatings, and maintenance procedures for launch hardware and equipment exposed to the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad. This paper presents a historical overview of over 45 years of corrosion and coating evaluation studies and a description of the BCTS's current capabilities. Additionally, current research and testing programs involving chromium free coatings, environmentally friendly corrosion preventative compounds, and alternates to nitric acid passivation will be discussed.

  6. Civil Engineering Corrosion Control. Volume 1. Corrosion Control - General

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    inum by electrolysis and partly by re-forming the film. In time, the layer of corrosion products formed maintains an alkaline condition at the aluminum... brines , strong, hot caustic solutions, hydro- fluoric and hydrofluosilicic acids, hot sulfates and sul- fites, sulfurous acid, phosphoric acid, and...and fractionating towers, brine and sea water applications 317 Process equipment involving strong acids or chlor- inated solvents 321 Furnace parts in

  7. Corrosion analysis in mooring chain links; Analise de corrosao em elos de amarras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, Silvia N.; Pereira, Marcos V. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencia dos Materiais e Metalurgia; Costa, Luis C. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas; Motta, Sergio H. [Brasilamarras - Companhia Brasileira de Amarras, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize the localized corrosion phenomenon in the weld region of offshore mooring chain links type ORQ. In this sense, a number of chain links were selected after finishing their projected life time without corrosion signs (chains without corrosion) as well as chain links which showed a reduced life time caused by localized corrosion (chains with corrosion). In the sequence, electrochemistry tests evaluated the corrosion susceptibility of the different regions of the weld joint. The results showed that the heat affected zone concerning the chains with corrosion was the anodic region, with high corrosion rate, while the same region on the not corroded chains was the cathodic one, with low corrosion rate. (author)

  8. Corrosion evaluation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Uh Chul; Han, Jeong Ho; Nho, Kye Ho; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo

    1997-09-01

    A multifrequency ACPD system was assembled which can measure very small crack. Stress corrosion cracking test system with SSRT operating high temperature was installed. Stress corrosion cracking test of newly developed alloy 600 and existing alloy 600 was carried out in steam atmosphere of 400 deg C. No crack was observed in both materials within a test period of 2,000 hrs. Corrosion fatigue test system operating at high temperature was installed in which fatigue crack was measured by CDPD. Lead enhanced the SCC of the Alloy 600 in high temperature water, had a tendency to modify a cracking morphology from intergranular to transgranular. Pit initiation preferentially occurred at Ti-rich carbide. Resistance to pit initiation decreased with increasing temperature up to 300 deg C. Test loop for erosion corrosion was designed and fabricated. Thin layer activation technique was very effective in measuring erosion corrosion. Erosion corrosion of a part of secondary side pipe was evaluated by the Check Family Codes of EPRI. Calculated values of pipe thickness by Check Family Codes coincided with the pipe thickness measured by UT with an error of {+-} 20%. Literature review on turbine failure showed that failure usually occurred in low pressure turbine rotor disc and causes of failure are stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. (author). 12 refs., 20 tabs., 77 figs.

  9. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  10. A microwave sensor for zinc corrosion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammal, Jamal; Salameh, Farah; Tantot, Olivier; Delhote, Nicolas; Verdeyme, Serge; Rioual, Stéphane; Gallée, François; Lescop, Benoit

    2017-09-01

    This article presents a sensor based on zinc wires of different widths deposited on the surface of the ceramic resonator capable of detecting and following the evolution of the corrosion of the zinc material. Electromagnetic studies show that due to the evolution of the corrosion, the progressive degradation of the conductivity of the formed zinc grid (from 6 S/μm to 0.015 S/μm) causes a degradation of the quality factor (from Q0 = 50 to Q0 transmission of the TE101 mode of the resonator (from -8 dB to transmission coefficient, and a degradation of the unloaded quality factor. Confirmed by electronic microscopy and X-Ray analysis, these variations are due to the evolution in the corrosion of zinc wires over time, leading to a creation of corrosion products in these wires.

  11. Corrosion behavior of Cu during graphene growth by CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Yuhua; Liu, Qingqing; Zhou, Qiong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphene films were deposited on the Cu by chemical vapor deposition method. • Annealing affects the corrosion property of Cu. • Graphene films improve corrosion performance of Cu for a short period of time. - Abstract: The corrosion performance of Cu samples may be affected by annealing at high temperatures during graphene growth via the chemical vapor deposition method. In this study, multiple graphene films were deposited on Cu and characterized by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion behavior of Cu immersed in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The Cu morphology was observed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Results indicated that annealing affects the corrosion process of Cu. The presence of graphene films on the Cu substrate improved the corrosion performance of the material for a short period of time

  12. Corrosive Poisonings in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibishev, Andon; Pereska, Zanina; Chibisheva, Vesna; Simonovska, Natasa

    2012-01-01

    Ingestion of corrosive substances may cause severe to serious injuries of the upper gastrointestinal tract and the poisoning can even result in death. Acute corrosive intoxications pose a major problem in clinical toxicology since the most commonly affected population are the young with psychic disorders, suicidal intent and alcohol addiction. The golden standard for determination of the grade and extent of the lesion is esophagogastroduodenoscopy performed in the first 12-24 hours following corrosive ingestion. The most common late complications are esophageal stenosis, gastric stenosis of the antrum and pyloris, and rarely carcinoma of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Treatment of the acute corrosive intoxications include: neutralization of corrosive agents, antibiotics, anti-secretory therapy, nutritional support, collagen synthesis inhibitors, esophageal dilation and stent placement, and surgery. PMID:23678319

  13. Electrochemical and chemical corrosion of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drazic, Dragutin M.; Popic, Jovan P.

    2004-01-01

    It was shown that chromium in deaerated sulfuric acid of pH 1 exhibits two stable corrosion potentials, depending whether the metal had previously been in contact with air or subjected to activation by cathodic evolving hydrogen. Electrochemical polarization measurements, as well as the measurements of the actual metal dissolution rate at the corrosion potential, anodic or cathodic polarization, using the analytical determination of Cr ions in the solution, or volumes of hydrogen evolved, showed that hydrogen can evolve on chromium by three different reaction mechanisms. The first one is the electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction from H + ions at the bare chromium surface obtained by cathodic activation. This reaction and the active anodic dissolution of chromium determine one stable corrosion potential. The second reaction is the reaction of H + ions on the oxidized chromium surface which, coupled with the anodic dissolution of passivated chromium determines the other stable corrosion potential. The third one is the 'anomalous' or chemical reaction of chromium with water molecules and hydrogen ions whereby hydrogen is liberated. This is a potential independent reaction, occurring on the bare metal surface, and which is at pH 1 several times faster at the corrosion potential than the electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction. The consequence is that the overall corrosion rate is several times faster than that determined by the usual electrochemical methods. The measurements were performed in the temperature interval 20 - 65 o C and apparent energies of activation for anodic, cathodic and anomalous dissolution reactions were estimated as 63.1, 19.5 and 66.9 kJ mol -1 , respectively. This implies that the anomalous dissolution rate increases more with the increase of temperature than the electrochemical corrosion rate. The applicability of the different methods of measuring electrochemical corrosion rates is discussed. (Author)

  14. Markov Chain Models for the Stochastic Modeling of Pitting Corrosion

    OpenAIRE

    Valor, A.; Caleyo, F.; Alfonso, L.; Velázquez, J. C.; Hallen, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    The stochastic nature of pitting corrosion of metallic structures has been widely recognized. It is assumed that this kind of deterioration retains no memory of the past, so only the current state of the damage influences its future development. This characteristic allows pitting corrosion to be categorized as a Markov process. In this paper, two different models of pitting corrosion, developed using Markov chains, are presented. Firstly, a continuous-time, nonhomogeneous linear growth (pure ...

  15. Experimental Investigation on Corrosion of Cast Iron Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mohebbi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that corrosion is the predominant mechanism for the deterioration of cast iron pipes, leading to the reduction of pipe capacity and ultimate collapse of the pipes. In order to assess the remaining service life of corroded cast iron pipes, it is imperative to understand the mechanisms of corrosion over a long term and to develop models for pipe deterioration. Although many studies have been carried out to determine the corrosion behavior of cast iron, little research has been undertaken to understand how cast iron pipes behave over a longer time scale than hours, days, or weeks. The present paper intends to fill the gap regarding the long-term corrosion behaviour of cast iron pipes in the absence of historical data. In this paper, a comprehensive experimental program is presented in which the corrosion behaviour of three exservice pipes was thoroughly examined in three simulated service environments. It has been found in the paper that localised corrosion is the primary form of corrosion of cast iron water pipes. It has also been found that the microstructure of cast irons is a key factor that affects the corrosion behaviour of cast iron pipes. The paper concludes that long-term tests on corrosion behaviour of cast iron pipes can help develop models for corrosion-induced deterioration of the pipes for use in predicting the remaining service life of the pipes.

  16. Engineering Task Plan for the 241-AN-105 Multi-Function Corrosion Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDGEMON, G.L.

    1999-01-01

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) describes the activities associated with the installation of the corrosion probe assembly into riser WST-RISER-016 (formerly 15B) of tank 241-AN-105. The corrosion monitoring system utilizes the technique of electrochemical noise (EN) for monitoring waste tank corrosion. Typically, EN consists of low frequency (4 Hz) and small amplitude signals that are spontaneously generated by electrochemical reactions occurring at corroding or other surfaces. EN analysis is well suited for monitoring and identifying the onset of localized corrosion, and for measuring uniform corrosion rates. A typical EN based corrosion-monitoring system measures instantaneous fluctuations in corrosion current and potential between three nominally identical electrodes of the material of interest immersed in the environment of interest. Time-dependent fluctuations in corrosion current are described by electrochemical current noise, and time-dependent fluctuations of corrosion potential are described by electrochemical noise. The corrosion monitoring system is designed to detect the onset of localized corrosion phenomena if tank conditions should change to allow these phenomena to occur. In addition to the EN technique, the system also facilitates the use of the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) technique to collect uniform corrosion rate information. LPR measures the linearity at the origin of the polarization curve for overvoltages up to a few millivolts away from the rest potential or natural corrosion potential. The slope of the current vs. voltage plot gives information on uniform corrosion rates

  17. Screening of soil corrosivity by field testing: Results and design of an electrochemical soil corrosion probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars vendelbo; Bruun, Niels Kåre

    1996-01-01

    The corrosivity of different types of soil have been assessed by exposing carbon-steel plates at 50 different locations in Denmark for an extended period of time. The investigations included weight loss measurements and analysis of the chemical compositions of the corrosion products formed on the...... and hydrogen absorption rates. In addition, traditional carbon-steel 3-electrode arrangements allow for performance of any kind of electrochemical meaurement (EIS, polarisation curves, LPR-measurements, galvanostatic pulse etc.).......The corrosivity of different types of soil have been assessed by exposing carbon-steel plates at 50 different locations in Denmark for an extended period of time. The investigations included weight loss measurements and analysis of the chemical compositions of the corrosion products formed...... on the plates during exposure. An electrochemical soil corrosion probe has been designed and manufactured allowing for simultaneous measurements of several qauntities to predict corrosion. The probe consists of individual sections capable of measuring redox-potential, corrosion potential, soil resistivity...

  18. Corrosion Failures in Marine Environment

    OpenAIRE

    R. Krishnan

    1985-01-01

    This paper gives a brief description of typical marine environments and the most common form of corrosion of materials used in this environment. Some typical case histories of failures pertaining to pitting, bimetallic corrosion, dealloying, cavitation and stress corrosion cracking are illustrated as typical examples of corrosion failures.

  19. Automated Methods Of Corrosion Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Reeve, John Ch

    1997-01-01

    The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell.......The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell....

  20. Pipeline corrosion assessment using embedded Fiber Bragg grating sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Huang, Ying; Galedari, Sahar Abuali; Azarmi, Fardad

    2015-04-01

    Corrosion is a leading cause of failure in metallic transmission pipelines. It significantly impacts the reliability and safety of metallic pipelines. An accurate assessment of corrosion status of the pipelines would contribute to timely pipeline maintenance and repair and extend the service life of the associated pipelines. To assess pipeline corrosion, various technologies have been investigated and the pipe-to-soil voltage potential measurement was commonly applied. However, remote and real-time corrosion assessment approaches are in urgent needs but yet achieved. Fiber optic sensors, especially, fiber Bragg gating (FBG) sensors, with unique advantages of real-time sensing, compactness, immune to EMI and moisture, capability of quasi-distributed sensing, and long life cycle, will be a perfect candidate for longterm pipeline corrosion assessment. In this study, FBG sensors are embedded inside pipeline external coating for corrosion monitoring of on-shore buried metallic transmission pipelines. Detail sensing principle, sensor calibration and embedment are introduced in this paper together with experimental corrosion evaluation testing ongoing. Upon validation, the developed sensing system could serve the purpose of corrosion monitoring to the numerous metallic pipelines across nation and would possibly reduce the pipeline corrosion induced tragedies.

  1. Space Shuttle Corrosion Protection Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Cris E.

    2007-01-01

    The reusable Manned Space Shuttle has been flying into Space and returning to earth for more than 25 years. The launch pad environment can be corrosive to metallic substrates and the Space Shuttles are exposed to this environment when preparing for launch. The Orbiter has been in service well past its design life of 10 years or 100 missions. As part of the aging vehicle assessment one question under evaluation is how the thermal protection system and aging protective coatings are performing to insure structural integrity. The assessment of this cost resources and time. The information is invaluable when minimizing risk to the safety of Astronauts and Vehicle. This paper will outline a strategic sampling plan and some operational improvements made by the Orbiter Structures team and Corrosion Control Review Board.

  2. Corrosion of steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preece, C.M.

    1982-10-01

    A comparative study has been made of those properties of Massiv and Standard cements which are considered to determine their ability to protect steel reinforcement from corroding. Saturated Massiv cement has a higher evaporabel water content, but a significantly finer pore structure than has saturated Standard cement. This fine structure resulted in an electrical resistivity ten times higher and chloride diffusivity ten times lower than those of Standard cement. Electrochemical measurements have shown that the passive current density of steel in Massiv mortar is higher than that of steel in Standard mortar, but the higher current should lead to a more rapid decrease in potential to a level at which neither chloride attack of hydrogen evolution will occur. Whereas steel in Standard mortar was found to be highly susceptible to crevice corrosion, no such attack has been observed in Massiv mortar. Moreover, the initiation of chloride induced corrosion and the subsequent rates of corrosion were both lower in Massiv mortar than in Standard mortar. Thus, it may be predicted that Massiv cement would provide greater protection for steel reinforcement in underground structures exposed to chloride containing ground water than would Standard cement. (author)

  3. Measurement of weak magnetic field of corrosion current of isolated corrosion center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Bardin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A very small magnetic field of corrosion current, of the order of 10−4 Oe, generated by isolated zinc inclusion in a copper platelet placed in electrolyte has been measured for the first time with a highly sensitive giant magneto-impedance magnetometer. The total corrosion current of the inclusion is estimated comparing the measured magnetic field distribution with corresponding theoretical calculation. The estimated value of the total corrosion current turns out to be in reasonable agreement with that one obtained in the standard gravimetric measurement.

  4. The corrosion of depleted uranium in terrestrial and marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toque, C; Milodowski, A E; Baker, A C

    2014-02-01

    Depleted Uranium alloyed with titanium is used in armour penetrating munitions that have been fired in a number of conflict zones and testing ranges including the UK ranges at Kirkcudbright and Eskmeals. The study presented here evaluates the corrosion of DU alloy cylinders in soil on these two UK ranges and in the adjacent marine environment of the Solway Firth. The estimated mean initial corrosion rates and times for complete corrosion range from 0.13 to 1.9 g cm(-2) y(-1) and 2.5-48 years respectively depending on the particular physical and geochemical environment. The marine environment at the experimental site was very turbulent. This may have caused the scouring of corrosion products and given rise to a different geochemical environment from that which could be easily duplicated in laboratory experiments. The rate of mass loss was found to vary through time in one soil environment and this is hypothesised to be due to pitting increasing the surface area, followed by a build up of corrosion products inhibiting further corrosion. This indicates that early time measurements of mass loss or corrosion rate may be poor indicators of late time corrosion behaviour, potentially giving rise to incorrect estimates of time to complete corrosion. The DU alloy placed in apparently the same geochemical environment, for the same period of time, can experience very different amounts of corrosion and mass loss, indicating that even small variations in the corrosion environment can have a significant effect. These effects are more significant than other experimental errors and variations in initial surface area. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Corrosion and Cracking of Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of the deterioration of reinforced concrete has in recent years changed from being a deterministic modelling based on experience to be stochastic modelling based on sound and consistent physical, chemical and mechanical principles. In this paper is presented a brief review of modern mod...... for time to initial corrosion, time to initial cracking, and time to a given crack width may be obtained....

  6. Silica nanocontainers for active corrosion protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Frederico; Tedim, João; Lisenkov, Aleksey D; Salak, Andrei N; Zheludkevich, Mikhail L; Ferreira, Mário G S

    2012-02-21

    Novel self-healing protective coatings with nanocontainers of corrosion inhibitors open new opportunities for long-term anticorrosion protection of different metallic materials. In this paper a new type of functional nanoreservoir based on silica nanocapsules (SiNC) synthesized and loaded with corrosion inhibitor 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) in a one-stage process is reported for the first time. Unlike conventional mesoporous silica nanoparticles, SiNC possess an empty core and shell with gradual mesoporosity, arising from the particular conditions of the synthetic route adopted, which confers significant loading capacity and allows prolonged and stimuli-triggered release of the inhibiting species. The kinetics of inhibitor release was studied at different pH values and concentrations of NaCl. The results show a clear dependence of the release profiles on corrosion relevant triggers such as pH and Cl(-) concentration. When SiNC loaded with MBT are dispersed in NaCl solution, there is a significant decrease of the corrosion activity on aluminium alloy 2024. More importantly, when SiNC-MBT is added to a conventional water-based coating formulation, the modified coating hampers corrosion activity at the metal interface, better than in the case of direct addition of corrosion inhibitor. Furthermore, self-healing is observed before and after artificially inflicting defects in the modified coatings. As a result, the developed nanocontainers show high potential to be used in new generation of active protective coatings. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  7. Corrosion Behavior of Titanium in Artificial Saliva by Lactic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Qu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As one of the main products produced by oral microorganisms, the role of lactic acid in the corrosion of titanium is very important. In this study, the corrosion behavior of titanium in artificial saliva with and without lactic acid were investigated by open-circuit potentials (OCPs, polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. OCP firstly increased with the amount of lactic acid from 0 to 3.2 g/L and then tended to decrease from 3.2 to 5.0 g/L. The corrosion of titanium was distinctly affected by lactic acid, and the corrosion rate increased with increasing the amount of lactic acid. At each concentration of lactic acid, the corrosion rate clearly increased with increasing the immersing time. Results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM also indicated that lactic acid accelerated the pitting corrosion in artificial saliva. A probable mechanism was also proposed to explain the experimental results.

  8. Atmospheric Corrosion Behavior of 2A12 Aluminum Alloy in a Tropical Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyu Cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric corrosion behavior of 2A12 aluminum alloy exposed to a tropical marine environment for 4 years was investigated. Weight loss of 2A12 alloy in the log-log coordinates can be well fitted with two linear segments, attributing to the evolution of the corrosion products. EIS results indicate that the corrosion product layer formed on the specimens exposed for 12 months or longer presents a good barrier effect. Corrosion morphology changes from pitting corrosion to severe intergranular corrosion with the extension of exposure time, resulting in the reduction of the mechanical properties.

  9. Corrosion chemistry closing comments: opportunities in corrosion science facilitated by operando experimental characterization combined with multi-scale computational modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, John R

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in characterization tools, computational capabilities, and theories have created opportunities for advancement in understanding of solid-fluid interfaces at the nanoscale in corroding metallic systems. The Faraday Discussion on Corrosion Chemistry in 2015 highlighted some of the current needs, gaps and opportunities in corrosion science. Themes were organized into several hierarchical categories that provide an organizational framework for corrosion. Opportunities to develop fundamental physical and chemical data which will enable further progress in thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of corrosion were discussed. These will enable new and better understanding of unit processes that govern corrosion at the nanoscale. Additional topics discussed included scales, films and oxides, fluid-surface and molecular-surface interactions, selected topics in corrosion science and engineering as well as corrosion control. Corrosion science and engineering topics included complex alloy dissolution, local corrosion, and modelling of specific corrosion processes that are made up of collections of temporally and spatially varying unit processes such as oxidation, ion transport, and competitive adsorption. Corrosion control and mitigation topics covered some new insights on coatings and inhibitors. Further advances in operando or in situ experimental characterization strategies at the nanoscale combined with computational modelling will enhance progress in the field, especially if coupling across length and time scales can be achieved incorporating the various phenomena encountered in corrosion. Readers are encouraged to not only to use this ad hoc organizational scheme to guide their immersion into the current opportunities in corrosion chemistry, but also to find value in the information presented in their own ways.

  10. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Pullen, William C.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Bell, Richard T.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  11. Corrosion of PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnsey, R.

    1979-01-01

    Some designs of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators have experienced a variety of corrosion problems which include stress corrosion cracking, tube thinning, pitting, fatigue, erosion-corrosion and support plate corrosion resulting in 'denting'. Large international research programmes have been mounted to investigate the phenomena. The operational experience is reviewed and mechanisms which have been proposed to explain the corrosion damage are presented. The implications for design development and for boiler and feedwater control are discussed. (author)

  12. Corrosion of AA2024-T3 Part II: Co-operative corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, A.E.; Boag, A.; Glenn, A.M.; McCulloch, D.; Muster, T.H.; Ryan, C.; Luo, C.; Zhou, X.; Thompson, G.E.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Corrosion of AA2024 in 0.1 M NaCl was examined for immersion times up to 120 min. → Rings of corrosion products with H 2 evolution developed as early as 5 min after immersion. → The rings were distinct from corrosion around isolated intermetallics elsewhere on the surface. → Analyses of chloride containing sites (red) showed a significant level of IM particle clustering. → The number of neighbors was much higher at these sites than the average particle number density. - Abstract: Polished specimens of AA2024-T3 alloy were immersed for up to 120 min in 0.1 M NaCl. The development of corrosion was monitored using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) and particle induced X-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE). Both techniques revealed the intermetallic (IM) particle distributions and attack sites as distinguished by detection of chloride species. The earliest stages of attack involved localized attack around isolated IM particles as reported in Part I. Additionally attack occurred on a larger scale developing rapidly with rings of corrosion product surrounding clusters of IM particles. There were significantly higher numbers of IM particles within the corrosion rings, indicating that local clustering played an important role in co-operative corrosion.

  13. In Situ X-ray Microtomography of Stress Corrosion Cracking and Corrosion Fatigue in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sudhanshu S.; Stannard, Tyler J.; Xiao, Xianghui; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2017-08-01

    Structural materials are subjected to combinations of stress and corrosive environments that work synergistically to cause premature failure. Therefore, studies on the combined effect of stress and corrosive environments on material behavior are required. Existing studies have been performed in two dimensions that are inadequate for full comprehension of the three-dimensional (3D) processes related to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and corrosion-fatigue (CF) behavior. Recently, x-ray synchrotron tomography has evolved as an excellent technique to obtain the microstructure in 3D. Moreover, being nondestructive in nature, x-ray synchrotron tomography is well suited to study the evolution of microstructure with time (4D, or fourth dimension in time). This article presents our recent 4D studies on SCC and CF of Al 7075 alloys using x-ray synchrotron tomography.

  14. Stochastic modeling of pitting corrosion: A new model for initiation and growth of multiple corrosion pits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valor, A. [Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de La Habana, San Lazaro y L, Vedado, 10400 Havana (Cuba); Caleyo, F. [Departamento de Ingenieria, Metalurgica, IPN-ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico DF 07738 (Mexico)]. E-mail: fcaleyo@gmail.com; Alfonso, L. [Departamento de Ingenieria, Metalurgica, IPN-ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico DF 07738 (Mexico); Rivas, D. [Departamento de Ingenieria, Metalurgica, IPN-ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico DF 07738 (Mexico); Hallen, J.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria, Metalurgica, IPN-ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico DF 07738 (Mexico)

    2007-02-15

    In this work, a new stochastic model capable of simulating pitting corrosion is developed and validated. Pitting corrosion is modeled as the combination of two stochastic processes: pit initiation and pit growth. Pit generation is modeled as a nonhomogeneous Poisson process, in which induction time for pit initiation is simulated as the realization of a Weibull process. In this way, the exponential and Weibull distributions can be considered as the possible distributions for pit initiation time. Pit growth is simulated using a nonhomogeneous Markov process. Extreme value statistics is used to find the distribution of maximum pit depths resulting from the combination of the initiation and growth processes for multiple pits. The proposed model is validated using several published experiments on pitting corrosion. It is capable of reproducing the experimental observations with higher quality than the stochastic models available in the literature for pitting corrosion.

  15. Study of corrosion behaviour in saturated bentonite barrier Corroben

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azkarate, I.; Insausti, M.; Medina, V.

    2004-01-01

    The corrosion behavior in saturated bentonite of various candidate metallic materials, to be used in the fabrication of containers of high level radioactive waste granite repositories, has been studied in this project. Due to the multi-barrier concept in which the canisters are surrounded by a clay barrier of compacted bentonite blocks, special attention has been paid to the characterization of corrosion products and the interaction between these and the repository sealing bentonite. The following metallic materials have been studied: S355 carbon steel, AISI 316L stainless steel, Cu-ETP electrolytic copper and Cu30Ni alloy. Samples of the alloys have been embedded in saturated bentonite to a water content of 25%, and compacted. The obtained pastilles have been introduced in autoclaves and tested at different temperatures and times ranging from one to 18 months. Once tests have concluded, several parameters have been evaluated: corrosion morphology, general corrosion rates calculated by gravimetric methods, nature and composition of the corrosion products and penetration of the corrosion products into the bentonite. Experimental data obtained are used to developed models of the corrosion behavior of canisters under disposal conditions. Results show that S355 carbon steel has suffered the highest general corrosion attack, with average corrosion rates of 10 per year and maximum penetration of 100 measured in specimens tested at 75C during 18 months. The most common analyzed corrosion product has been siderite, FeCO3. Formation of siderite, in the test conditions, effectively passivated the steel because of its stable and adherent feature. In test carried out at 25 and 5 C, sulfur rich corrosion products are observed, thus indicating a microbiologically corrosion phenomena due to the metabolic activity of bacteria present in the bentonite. No appreciable general corrosion rates, nor sensitivity to localized corrosion, has been observed in the AISI 316L stainless steel

  16. BWR steel containment corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, C.P.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-04-01

    The report describes regulatory actions taken after corrosion was discovered in the drywell at the Oyster Creek Plant and in the torus at the Nine Mile Point 1 Plant. The report describes the causes of corrosion, requirements for monitoring corrosion, and measures to mitigate the corrosive environment for the two plants. The report describes the issuances of generic letters and information notices either to collect information to determine whether the problem is generic or to alert the licensees of similar plants about the existence of such a problem. Implementation of measures to enhance the containment performance under severe accident conditions is discussed. A study by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the performance of a degraded containment under severe accident conditions is summarized. The details of the BNL study are in the appendix to the report.

  17. Corrosion Inhibitors for Aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bodo

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable test method used to investigate the corrosion-inhibiting effects of various chelating agents on aluminum pigments in aqueous alkaline media. The experiments that are presented require no complicated or expensive electronic equipment. (DDR)

  18. Corrosion of valve metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draley, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A general survey related to the corrosion of valve metals or film-forming metals. The way these metals corrode with some general examples is described. Valve metals form relatively perfect oxide films with little breakdown or leakage when anodized

  19. Monitoring corrosion rates and localised corrosion in low conductivity water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring of low corrosion rates and localised corrosion in a media with low conductivity is a challenge. In municipal district heating, quality control may be improved by implementing on-line corrosion monitoring if a suitable technique can be identified to measure both uniform and localised...... corrosion. Electrochemical techniques (LPR, EIS, crevice corrosion current) as well as direct measurement techniques (high-sensitive electrical resistance, weight loss) have been applied in operating plants. Changes in the corrosion processes are best monitored in non-aggressive, low conductivity media...

  20. A Review of Field Corrosion Control and Monitoring Techniques of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All steel pipelines used in hydrocarbon transportation are susceptible to either electrolytic or galvanic corrosion attack which deteriorate with time leading to failure even before end of design life. Consequences of corrosion attack and eventual failure of pipelines within oil and gas industry has been classified into economic, ...

  1. Economic effects of full corrosion surveys for aging concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.; Raupach, M.; Reichling, K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the economic effects of full corrosion surveys of concrete structures. The background is that the existing concrete infrastructure is aging, while being exposed to aggressive influences, which increases the occurrence of corrosion and related concrete damage over time. The

  2. Grease Inhibits Stress-Corrosion Cracking In Bearing Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Robert F.; Mcvey, Scott E.

    1991-01-01

    Coating with suitable grease found to inhibit stress-corrosion cracking in bore of inner race of ball-bearing assembly operating in liquid oxygen. Protects bore and its corner radii from corrosion-initiating and -accelerating substances like moisture and contaminants, which enter during assembly. Operating life extended at low cost, and involves very little extra assembly time.

  3. The study of epoxy polyamide and polyvinyl resins as corrosion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The corrosion resistance of two commonly used protective coatings (epoxy polyamide and polyvinyl resins) in the Niger Delta area of Nigeria has been assessed. The coatings on low carbon steel were subjected to varying conditions of pH, temperature and exposure time and the corrosion rates calculated. At a pH of 2, 3, 4, ...

  4. Corrosion and anticorrosion. Industrial practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beranger, G.; Mazille, H.

    2002-01-01

    This book comprises 14 chapters written with the collaboration of about 50 French experts of corrosion. It is complementary to another volume entitled 'corrosion of metals and alloys' and published by the same editor. This volume comprises two parts: part 1 presents the basic notions of corrosion phenomena, the properties of surfaces, the electrochemical properties of corrosion etc.. Part 2 describes the most frequent forms of corrosion encountered in industrial environments and corresponding to specific problems of protection: marine environment, atmospheric corrosion, galvanic corrosion, tribo-corrosion, stress corrosion etc.. The first 8 chapters (part 1) treat of the corrosion problems encountered in different industries and processes: oil and gas production, chemical industry, phosphoric acid industry, PWR-type power plants, corrosion of automobile vehicles, civil engineering and buildings, corrosion of biomaterials, non-destructive testing for the monitoring of corrosion. The other chapters (part 2) deal with anticorrosion and protective coatings and means: choice of materials, coatings and surface treatments, thick organic coatings and enamels, paints, corrosion inhibitors and cathodic protection. (J.S.)

  5. Kinetic studies of stress-corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    Use of time-to-failure curves for stress-corrosion cracking processes may lead to incorrect estimates of structural life, if material is strongly dependent upon prestress levels. Technique characterizes kinetics of crackgrowth rates and intermediate arrest times by load-level changes.

  6. Microbially influenced corrosion of stainless steel by marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens: (I) Corrosion behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Sha; Tian Jintao; Chen Shougang; Lei Yanhua; Chang Xueting; Liu Tao; Yin Yansheng

    2009-01-01

    The microbially influenced corrosion of stainless steel (SS) by marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens (V. natriegens) was investigated using surface analysis (atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA)) and electrochemical techniques (the open circuit potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potentiodynamic polarization curves ). AFM images corroborated the results from the EIS models which show biofilm attachment and subsequent detachment over time. The SEM images revealed the occurrence of micro-pitting corrosion underneath the biofilms on the metal surface after the biofilm removal. The presence of carbon, oxygen, phosphor and sulfur obtained from EDXA proved the formation of biofilm. The electrochemical results showed that the corrosion of SS was accelerated in the presence of V. natriegens based on the decrease in the resistance of the charge transfer resistance (R ct ) obtained from EIS and the increase in corrosion current densities obtained from potentiodynamic polarization curves.

  7. Corrosion and electrochemical properties of lanthanum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomashov, N.D.; Matveeva, T.V.

    The kinetics of the corrosion rate of lanthanum at 25 0 in air of different relative humidities, distilled water, sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, phosphoric acid, hydrofluoric acid, potassium hydroxide of different concentrations and at 100 0 C in distilled water and potassium hydroxide have been studied. In air at 22--100% relative humidity, the corrosion rate of lanthanum increases with time and with increasing humidity. In distilled water and in potassium hydroxide solutions, the corrosion rate of lanthanum increases with time and decreasees when the concentration of alkali exceeds 20%. With increasing concentration of the acids, the corrosion rate of lanthanum increases in hydrochloric acid and nitric acid and passes through a maximum in sulfuric acid (20%) and phosphoric acid (60%). The values of the corrosion rates of lanthanum in 40% nitric acid, 35% hydrochloric acid, 20% sulfuric acid, 60% phosphoric acid, and 40% hydrofluoric acid are 8 x 10 5 ; 4.4 x 10 4 ; 1.3 x 10 3 ; 9 g/m 2 h respectively

  8. Corrosion of breached UF6 storage cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, E.J.; Taylor, M.S.; DeVan, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the corrosion processes that occurred following the mechanical failure of two steel 14-ton storage cylinders containing depleted UF 6 . The failures both were traced to small mechanical tears that occurred during stacking of the cylinders. Although subsequent corrosion processes greatly extended the openings in the wall. the reaction products formed were quite protective and prevented any significant environmental insult or loss of uranium. The relative sizes of the two holes correlated with the relative exposure times that had elapsed from the time of stacking. From the sizes and geometries of the two holes, together with analyses of the reaction products, it was possible to determine the chemical reactions that controlled the corrosion process and to develop a scenario for predicting the rate of hydrolysis of UF 6 , the loss rate of HF, and chemical attack of a breached UF 6 storage cylinder

  9. Effect of zinc injection on BWR fuel cladding corrosion. Pt. 1. Study on an accelerated corrosion condition to evaluate corrosion resistance of zircaloy-2 fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hirotaka; Kanbe, Hiromu; Furuya, Masahiro

    2002-01-01

    Japanese BWR utilities have a plan to apply zinc injection to the primary coolant in order to reduce radioactivity accumulation on the structure. Prior to applying the zinc injection to BWR plants, it is necessary to evaluate the effect of zinc injection on corrosion resistance of fuel cladding. The objective of this report was to examine the accelerated corrosion condition for evaluation of BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance under non-irradiated conditions, as the first step of a zinc injection evaluation study. A heat transfer corrosion test facility, in which a two phase flow condition could be achieved, was designed and constructed. The effects of heat flux, void fraction and solution temperature on BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance were quantitatively investigated. The main findings were as follows. (1) In situ measurements using high speed camera and a void sensor together with one dimensional two phase flow analysis results showed that a two phase flow simulated BWR core condition can be obtained in the corrosion test facility. (2) The heat transfer corrosion test results showed that the thickness of the zirconium oxide layer increased with increasing solution temperature and was independent of heat flux and void fraction. The corrosion accelerating factor was about 2.5 times in the case of a temperature increase from 288degC to 350degC. (author)

  10. Comparative Stress Corrosion Cracking and General Corrosion Resistance of Annealed and Hardened 440 C Stainless Steel - New Techniques in Stress Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendreck, M. J.; Hurless, B. E.; Torres, P. D.; Danford, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) characteristics of annealed and hardened 440C stainless steel were evaluated in high humidity and 3.5-percent NaCl solution. Corrosion testing consisted of an evaluation of flat plates, with and without grease, in high humidity, as well as electrochemical testing in 3.5-percent NaCl. Stress corrosion testing consisted of conventional, constant strain, smooth bar testing in high humidity in addition to two relatively new techniques under evaluation at MSFC. These techniques involve either incremental or constant rate increases in the load applied to a precracked SE(B) specimen, monitoring the crack-opening-displacement response for indications of crack growth. The electrochemical corrosion testing demonstrated an order of magnitude greater general corrosion rate in the annealed 440C. All techniques for stress corrosion testing showed substantially better SCC resistance in the annealed material. The efficacy of the new techniques for stress corrosion testing was demonstrated both by the savings in time and the ability to better quantify SCC data.

  11. Detection of corrosion by radiographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.; Ashraf, M.M.; Khurshid, U.

    2004-01-01

    Radiation processing technologies are playing an increasing role during manufacturing and subsequent use of everyday products. These technologies are now well established and are extensively practiced in industries, to ensure quality and safety of machinery. Corrosion reduces the operational life of the component, its efficiency and helps generate waste. There is an increasing need to detect and characterize the formation of corrosion in industrial components and assemblies at an early stage. Radiation methods and techniques are applied worldwide to examine defects and corrosion-formation in industrial components. For safety and economic reason, appropriate monitoring of the machinery and industrial components would help reduce accidental risks during operation and avoid production-losses. In the present study, X-ray and neutron-radiography techniques were applied for the inspection and evaluation of corrosion in metallic samples for thickness values of the order of 5 mm or less. Relative contrast at various degrees of metal corrosion product loss was computed theoretical and also measured experimentally by applying radiographic techniques. The relative contrast-sensitivity was also measured in two different ways by X-ray and neutron radiography, to compare the visibility of coarse and fine features. Thick metallic areas, free from sealant and variable paint thickness, were imaged with thermal neutrons beam. Low KV X-rays were also applied for imaging corrosion in metallic components. To optimize exposure-time at low KV in X-ray radiography, a medical film/screen combination was used. X-ray radiography approved to be the more promising technique for imaging of corrosion, as compared to neutron radiography. (author)

  12. A strain-mediated corrosion model for bioabsorbable metallic stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, E; O'Brien, D; Cummins, C; Mac Donald, B J; Lally, C

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a strain-mediated phenomenological corrosion model, based on the discrete finite element modelling method which was developed for use with the ANSYS Implicit finite element code. The corrosion model was calibrated from experimental data and used to simulate the corrosion performance of a WE43 magnesium alloy stent. The model was found to be capable of predicting the experimentally observed plastic strain-mediated mass loss profile. The non-linear plastic strain model, extrapolated from the experimental data, was also found to adequately capture the corrosion-induced reduction in the radial stiffness of the stent over time. The model developed will help direct future design efforts towards the minimisation of plastic strain during device manufacture, deployment and in-service, in order to reduce corrosion rates and prolong the mechanical integrity of magnesium devices. The need for corrosion models that explore the interaction of strain with corrosion damage has been recognised as one of the current challenges in degradable material modelling (Gastaldi et al., 2011). A finite element based plastic strain-mediated phenomenological corrosion model was developed in this work and was calibrated based on the results of the corrosion experiments. It was found to be capable of predicting the experimentally observed plastic strain-mediated mass loss profile and the corrosion-induced reduction in the radial stiffness of the stent over time. To the author's knowledge, the results presented here represent the first experimental calibration of a plastic strain-mediated corrosion model of a corroding magnesium stent. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of corrosive behavior of SAE 5155 by corrosion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Jae Pil; Park, Keyung Dong

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the influence of shot peening and corrosive condition for corrosion property was investigated on immersed in 3.5% NaCl, 10% HNO 3 + 3% HF, 6% FeCl 3 . The immersion test was performed on two kinds of specimen. The immersion periods was performed 30days. Corrosion potential, weight loss were investigated from experimental results. From test results, the effect of shot peening on the corrosion was evaluated

  14. Potential high temperature corrosion problems due to co-firing of biomass and fossil fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Vilhelmsen, T.; Jensen, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few years, considerable high temperature corrosion problems have been encountered when firing biomass in power plants due to the high content of potassium chloride in the deposits. Therefore, to combat chloride corrosion problems cofiring of biomass with a fossil fuel has been....... However, the most significant corrosion attack was sulphidation attack at the grain boundaries of 18-8 steel after 3 years exposure. The corrosion mechanisms and corrosion rates are compared with biomass firing and coal firing. Potential corrosion problems due to co-firing biomass and fossil fuels...... corrosion mechanisms appear such as sulphidation and hot corrosion due to sulphate deposits. At Studstrup power plant Unit 4, based on trials with exposure times of 3000 h using 0–20% straw co-firing with coal, the plant now runs with a fuel mix of 10% strawþcoal. Based on results from a 3 years exposure...

  15. Corrosion testing facilities in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, R.; Subramanian, Venu

    1981-01-01

    Major types of corrosion tests, establishment of specifications on corrosion testing and scope of their application in practice are briefly described. Important organizations in the world which publish specifications/standards are listed. Indian organizations which undertake corrosion testing and test facilities available at them are also listed. Finally in an appendix, a comprehensive list of specifications relevant to corrosion testing is given. It is arranged under the headings: environmental testing, humidity tests, salt spray/fog tests, immersion tests, specification corrosion phenomena, (tests) with respect to special corrosion media, (tests) with respect to specific corrosion prevention methods, and specific corrosion tests using electrical and electrochemical methods (principles). Each entry in the list furnishes information about: nature of the test, standard number, and its specific application. (M.G.B.)

  16. Corrosion inhibitors for concrete bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Deicing salts and salt-water spray can cause serious corrosion problems for reinforced concrete bridge structures. : These problems can lead to costly and labor-intensive repair and even replacement of the structure. Surface applied : corrosion inhib...

  17. Modelling reinforcement corrosion in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A physio-chemical model for the simulation of reinforcement corrosion in concrete struc-tures was developed. The model allows for simulation of initiation and subsequent propaga-tion of reinforcement corrosion. Corrosion is assumed to be initiated once a defined critical chloride threshold is rea......, a numerical example is pre-sented, that illustrates the formation of corrosion cells as well as propagation of corrosion in a reinforced concrete structure.......A physio-chemical model for the simulation of reinforcement corrosion in concrete struc-tures was developed. The model allows for simulation of initiation and subsequent propaga-tion of reinforcement corrosion. Corrosion is assumed to be initiated once a defined critical chloride threshold...

  18. Grain boundary corrosion of copper canister material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fennell, P.A.H.; Graham, A.J.; Smart, N.R.; Sofield, C.J.

    2001-03-01

    The proposed design for a final repository for spent fuel and other long-lived residues in Sweden is based on the multi-barrier principle. The waste will be encapsulated in sealed cylindrical canisters, which will then be placed in granite bedrock and surrounded by compacted bentonite clay. The canister design is based on a thick cast inner container fitted inside a corrosion-resistant copper canister. During fabrication of the outer copper canisters there will be some unavoidable grain growth in the welded areas. As grains grow they will tend to concentrate impurities within the copper at the new grain boundaries. The work described in this report was undertaken to determine whether there is any possibility of enhanced corrosion at grain boundaries within the copper canister. The potential for grain boundary corrosion was investigated by exposing copper specimens, which had undergone different heat treatments and hence had different grain sizes, to aerated artificial bentonite-equilibrated groundwater with two concentrations of chloride, for increasing periods of time. The degree of grain boundary corrosion was determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical microscopy. AFM showed no increase in grain boundary 'ditching' for low chloride groundwater. In high chloride groundwater the surface was covered uniformly with a fine-grained oxide. No increases in oxide thickness were observed. No significant grain boundary attack was observed using optical microscopy either. The work suggests that in aerated artificial groundwaters containing chloride ions, grain boundary corrosion of copper is unlikely to adversely affect SKB's copper canisters

  19. Corrosion of conducting polymers in aqueous electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, F. (Fachgebiet Elektrochemie, Univ. Duisburg (Germany)); Barsch, U. (Fachgebiet Elektrochemie, Univ. Duisburg (Germany))

    1993-03-22

    The corrosion of polythiophene, poly-bisthiophene and poly-3-methylthiophene in aqueous electrolytes at pH 1 to 13 was investigated. Corrosion rate was determined experimentally by potentiodynamic discharge of residual redox capacity of the conducting polymer after exposure to the corrosion medium. Two corrosion reactions were found to proceed after quasi first order kinetics. The initial rapid process is due to an electrochemical mechanism. The cathodic undoping is balanced by an anodic overoxidation reaction, even at the relatively negative potentials. A rather slow second process is caused by chemical attack of nucleophiles dissolved in the solid at the remaining radical cationic centers. Both rate constants are appreciably larger than those measured previously for polypyrrole, and they increase with increasing pH. The acceleration is due to the more positive redox potentials for the polythiophenes. From the exponential decay of the corrosion potential with time, the same rate constants could be evaluated. In contrast to polypyrrole, the polymer backbone conjugation is not interrupted initially due to -S- [yields] -SO[sub 2]-, and recharge is possible to some extent. (orig.)

  20. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi [Wading River, NY

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  1. Atmospheric corrosion of mild steel

    OpenAIRE

    Morcillo, M.; de la Fuente, D.; Díaz, I.; Cano, H.

    2011-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of mild steel is an extensive topic that has been studied by many authors in different regions throughout the world. This compilation paper incorporates relevant publications on the subject, in particular about the nature of atmospheric corrosion products, mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion and kinetics of the atmospheric corrosion process, paying special attention to two matters upon which relatively less information has been published: a) the morphology of steel c...

  2. Atmospheric corrosion of mild steel

    OpenAIRE

    Morcillo, Manuel; Fuente, Daniel de la; Díaz, Iván; Cano, H.

    2011-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of mild steel is an extensive topic that has been studied by many authors in different regions throughout the world. This compilation paper incorporates relevant publications on the subject, in particular about the nature of atmospheric corrosion products, mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion and kinetics of the atmospheric corrosion process, paying special attention to two matters upon which relatively less information has been published: a) the morpholog...

  3. The corrosion of depleted uranium in terrestrial and marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toque, C.; Milodowski, A.E.; Baker, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Depleted Uranium alloyed with titanium is used in armour penetrating munitions that have been fired in a number of conflict zones and testing ranges including the UK ranges at Kirkcudbright and Eskmeals. The study presented here evaluates the corrosion of DU alloy cylinders in soil on these two UK ranges and in the adjacent marine environment of the Solway Firth. The estimated mean initial corrosion rates and times for complete corrosion range from 0.13 to 1.9 g cm −2 y −1 and 2.5–48 years respectively depending on the particular physical and geochemical environment. The marine environment at the experimental site was very turbulent. This may have caused the scouring of corrosion products and given rise to a different geochemical environment from that which could be easily duplicated in laboratory experiments. The rate of mass loss was found to vary through time in one soil environment and this is hypothesised to be due to pitting increasing the surface area, followed by a build up of corrosion products inhibiting further corrosion. This indicates that early time measurements of mass loss or corrosion rate may be poor indicators of late time corrosion behaviour, potentially giving rise to incorrect estimates of time to complete corrosion. The DU alloy placed in apparently the same geochemical environment, for the same period of time, can experience very different amounts of corrosion and mass loss, indicating that even small variations in the corrosion environment can have a significant effect. These effects are more significant than other experimental errors and variations in initial surface area. -- Highlights: ► In-situ experiments were conducted to evaluate corrosion rates of depleted uranium. ► Samples were corroded in marine sediments, open sea water and two terrestrial soils. ► The depleted uranium titanium alloy corroded fastest in the marine environments. ► Rates of mass loss can vary through time if corrosion products are not removed.

  4. Corrosion of well casings in compressed air energy storage environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmore, R.P.; Stottlemyre, J.A.

    1980-10-01

    The goal of this study was to determine corrosive effects of compressed air energy storage (CAES) environments on several well casing materials to aid in material selections. A literature search on corrosion behavior of well casing material in similar environments revealed that corrosion rates of 0.20 to 0.25 mm/y might be expected. This information was employed in designing the laboratory study. Unstressed electrically isolate samples of various carbon steels were autoclaved at varying humidities, temperatures, and exposure durations to simulate anticipated environments in the well bore during CAES operation. All compressed air tests were run at 12.1 MPa. Temperatures varied from 323/sup 0/K to 573/sup 0/K, and humidity varied from 100% to completely dry air. The effects of salts in the humidified air were also studied. Results indicated that typical well casings of carbon steel as used in oil, gas, and water production wells adequately withstand the anticipated CAES reservoir environment. An acceptable corrosion rate arrived at by these laboratory simulations was between 0.0015 and 0.15 mm/y. Corrosion was caused by metal oxidation that formed a protective scale of iron oxide. Higher temperatures, humidity rates, or salinity content of the humid air increased corrosion. Corrosion also increased on a metal coupon in contact with a sandstone sample, possibly due to crevice corrosion. For each of these factors either singularly or collectively, the increased corrosion rates were still acceptable with the maximum measured at 0.15 mm/y. When coupons were reused in an identical test, the corrosion rates increased beyond the anticipated values that had been determined by extrapolation from one-time runs. Fine cracking of the protective scale probably occurred due to thermal variations, resulting in increased corrosion rates and a greater potential for particulates, which could plug the reservoir.

  5. Plastics for corrosion inhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Goldade, Victor A; Makarevich, Anna V; Kestelman, Vladimir N

    2005-01-01

    The development of polymer composites containing inhibitors of metal corrosion is an important endeavour in modern materials science and technology. Corrosion inhibitors can be located in a polymer matrix in the solid, liquid or gaseous phase. This book details the thermodynamic principles for selecting these components, their compatibility and their effectiveness. The various mechanisms of metal protection – barrier, inhibiting and electromechanical – are considered, as are the conflicting requirements placed on the structure of the combined material. Two main classes of inhibited materials (structural and films/coatings) are described in detail. Examples are given of structural plastics used in friction units subjected to mechano-chemical wear and of polymer films/coatings for protecting metal objects against corrosion.

  6. Numerical Study of Corrosion Crack Opening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    To determine the reliability of reinforced concrete structures based on visual inspection of corroding cracks on the surfaces of structures is of great interest. In the present study, models for the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures are presented with special emphasis on a model...... for the corrosion crack opening. Experiments and theoretical analysis by a numerical method, FEM, support that the relation between the reduction of the reinforcement bar diameter due to corrosion and the corresponding increase in crack width for a given time interval, measured on the surface of a concrete specimen...... is proportional. More recently, the constant of proportionality, the so-called crack-corrosion index, has been studied further with respect to its dependence on the diameter of the reinforcement and the concrete cover. In the present paper the above-mentioned work is presented and extended with more realistic 3D...

  7. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, R.N. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  8. Copper corrosion experiments under anoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ollila, Kaija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2013-06-15

    This report gives results from the corrosion experiments with copper under anoxic conditions. The objective was to study whether hydrogen-evolving corrosion reaction could occur. Copper foil samples were exposed in deaerated deionized water in Erlenmeyer flasks in the glove box with inert atmosphere. Four corrosion experiments (Cu1, Cu2, Cu3 and Cu4) were started, as well as a reference test standing in air. Cu1 and Cu2 had gas tight seals, whereas Cu3 and Cu4 had palladium foils as hydrogen permeable enclosure. The test vessels were stored during the experiments in a closed stainless steel vessel to protect them from the trace oxygen of the gas atmosphere and light. After the reaction time of three and a half years, there were no visible changes in the copper surfaces in any of the tests in the glove box, in contrast the Cu surfaces looked shiny and unaltered. The Cu3 test was terminated after the reaction time of 746 days. The analysis of the Pd-membrane showed the presence of H2 in the test system. If the measured amount of 7.2{center_dot}10{sup 5} mol H{sub 2} was the result of formation of Cu{sub 2}O this would correspond to a 200 nm thick corrosion layer. This was not in agreement with the measured layer thickness with SIMS, which was 6{+-}1 nm. A clear weight loss observed for the Cu3 test vessel throughout the test period suggests the evaporation of water through the epoxy sealing to the closed steel vessel. If this occurred, the anaerobic corrosion of steel surface in humid oxygen-free atmosphere could be a source of hydrogen. A similar weight loss was not observed for the parallel test (Cu4). The reference test standing in air showed visible development of corrosion products.

  9. Surface films and corrosion of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilden, J.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Bojinov, M.

    1999-03-01

    In Sweden and Finland the spent nuclear fuel is planned to be encapsulated in cast iron canisters that have an outer shield made of copper. The copper shield is responsible for the corrosion protection of the canister construction. General corrosion of the copper is not expected to be the limiting factor in the waste repository environment when estimating the life-time of the canister construction. However, different forms of localised corrosion, i.e. pitting, stress corrosion cracking, or environmentally assisted creep fracture may cause premature failure of the copper shield. Of the probable constituents in the groundwater, nitrites, chlorides, sulphides and carbonates have been suggested to promote localised corrosion of copper. The main assumption made in planning this research program is that the surface films forming on copper in the repository environment largely determine the susceptibility of copper to the different forms of localised corrosion. The availability of reactants, which also may become corrosion rate limiting, is investigated in several other research programs. This research program consists of a set of successive projects targeted at characterising the properties of surface films on copper in repository environment containing different detrimental anions. A further aim was to assess the significance of the anion-induced changes in the stability of the oxide films with regard to localised corrosion of copper. This report summarises the results from a series of investigations on properties of surface films forming on copper in water of pH = 8.9 at temperature of 80 deg C and pressure of 2 MPa. The main results gained so far in this research program are as follows: The surface films forming on copper in the thermodynamic stability region of monovalent copper at 80 deg C consist of a bulk part (about 1 mm thick) which is a good ionic and electronic conductor, and an outer, interfacial layer (0.001 - 0.005 mm thick) which shows p-type semiconductor

  10. Corrosion of reinforcement induced by environment containing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... the action of chloride solutions may intensify the process of corrosion of steel reinforcement in comparison to the converse sequence of the action of mentioned media. At the same time the natrium chloride solution has been shown as a more aggressive medium opposite to the calcium and magnesium chloride solutions.

  11. Evaluation of corrosion inhibitor : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    Solution to the problem of deterioration of bridge decks due to the corrosion of embedded steel has been sought by engineers for a long time. The purpose of the study was to evaluate, under laboratory conditions, the properties of concrete using a co...

  12. Corrosion behavior of construction materials for intermediate temperature steam electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey; Petrushina, Irina; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2013-01-01

    Different corrosion resistant stainless steels, nickel-based alloys, pure nickel, Ta-coated stainless steel (AISI 316L), niobium, platinum and gold rods were evaluated as possible materials for use in the intermediate temperature (200-400 °C) acidic water electrolysers. The corrosion resistance...... was measured under simulated conditions (molten KH2PO4) corresponding to the proton-conducting solid acids or transition metal phosphates as electrolytes. It was shown that, unlike at temperatures below 200 °C, gold is unstable with respect to corrosion in molten KH2PO4. Platinum demonstrated high corrosion...... resistance and the anodic and cathodic limits were for the first time found for the electrolyte. Nickel, niobium, Inconel®625, Hastelloy®C-276 and Ta-coated stainless steel (AISI 316L) demonstrated high corrosion stability and can be recommended as construction materials for bipolar plates. © (2013) Trans...

  13. On-line corrosion monitoring in district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Sonja; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2004-01-01

    Traditionally corrosion monitoring in district heating systems has been performed offline via weight loss coupons. These measurements give information about the past and not the present situation and require long exposure time (weeks or months). The good quality of district heating medium makes...... corrosion monitoring a challenge. Under normal conditions the pH is high (app. 9), conductivity is low (app. 10-200 µS/cm) and the concentration of dissolved oxygen is negligible. The low corrosion rates (in the order of µm/y) are difficult to measure and furthermore, factors such as hydrogen sulphide......), Electrochemical Noise (EN) and Zero Resistance Ammetry (ZRA). Electrochemical Resistance (ER) has also been used to measure corrosion. The method traditionally only measures corrosion off-line but with newly developed high-sensitive ER technique developed by MetriCorr in Denmark, on-line monitoring is possible...

  14. Atmospheric corrosion of carbon steel resulting from short term exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, R.; Cook, D.C.; Perez, T.; Reyes, J.

    1998-01-01

    The study of corrosion products from short term atmospheric exposures of carbon steel, is very important to understand the processes that lead to corrosion of steels, and ultimately improve the performance of such steel in highly corrosive environments. Many regions along the Gulf of Mexico have extremely corrosive environments due to high mean annual temperature, humidity, time-of-wetness and every high atmospheric pollutants. The process the formation of corrosion products resulting from short term exposure of carbon steel, both as a function of environmental conditions and exposure time, has been investigated. Two sets of coupons were exposed at marine and marine locations, in Campeche, Mexico. Each set was exposed between 1 and 12 months to study the corrosion as a function of time. During the exposure periods, the relative humidity, rainfall, mean temperature, wind speed and wind direction were monitored along with the chloride and sulfur dioxide concentrations in the air. The corroded coupons were analyzed by Moessbauer, Raman, Infrared spectroscopies and X-ray diffraction in order to completely identify the oxides and map their location in the corrosion coating. Scattering and transmission Moessbauer analysis showed some layering of the oxides with lepidocrocite and akaganeite closer to the surface. The fraction of akaganeite phase increased at sites with higher chloride concentrations. A detailed analysis on the development of the oxide phases as a function of exposure time and environmental conditions will be presented. (Author)

  15. Propagation of steel corrosion in concrete: Experimental and numerical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Otieno, M.; Stang, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on experimental and numerical investigations of the propagation phase of reinforcement corrosion to determine anodic and cathodic Tafel constants and exchange current densities, from corrosion current density and corrosion potential measurements. The experimental program includ...... through numerical simulations of the experimental data. Anodic and cathodic exchange current densities ranged from 1.0E-12 to 1.0E-09 A/mm2 and 1.0E-12 to 1.1E-09 A/mm2, respectively.......This paper focuses on experimental and numerical investigations of the propagation phase of reinforcement corrosion to determine anodic and cathodic Tafel constants and exchange current densities, from corrosion current density and corrosion potential measurements. The experimental program included....... The numerical model was, furthermore, used to identify electrochemical parameters, which are independent of concrete cover thickness and crack width and at the same time allow for determination of the corrosion current density and corrosion potential of concrete structures within an acceptable error.Very good...

  16. Effects of climate and corrosion on concrete behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mohammad; Egba, Ernest Ituma

    2017-11-01

    Corrosion of steel is a damaging agent that reduces the functional and structural responsibilities of reinforced concrete structures. Accordingly, reinforced concrete members in the environments that are prone to concrete carbonation or chloride attack coupled with high temperature and relative humidity suffer from accelerated corrosion of reinforcing material. Also, literature proves that climate influences corrosion of concrete, and suggests investigation of impact of corrosion on concrete based on climate zone. Therefore, this paper presents the effects of climate and corrosion on concrete behavior, using bond strength of concrete as a case study. Concrete specimens were prepared form concrete mix that was infested with 3.5 kgm-3 of sodium chloride to accelerate corrosion. The specimens were cured sodium chloride solution 3.5% by weight of water for 28 days before placing them in the exposure conditions. Pull-out tests were conducted at time intervals for one year to measure the impact of exposure condition and corrosion on bond strength of concrete. The results show reduction of bond strength of concrete by 32%, 28% and 8% after one year of subjection of the specimens to the unsheltered natural climate, sheltered natural climate, and laboratory ambient environment respectively. The findings indicate that the climate influences corrosion, which reduces the interlocking bond between the reinforcing bar and the adjacent concrete.

  17. Simulation of Corrosion Process for Structure with the Cellular Automata Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M. C.; Wen, Q. Q.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, from the mesoscopic point of view, under the assumption of metal corrosion damage evolution being a diffusive process, the cellular automata (CA) method was proposed to simulate numerically the uniform corrosion damage evolution of outer steel tube of concrete filled steel tubular columns subjected to corrosive environment, and the effects of corrosive agent concentration, dissolution probability and elapsed etching time on the corrosion damage evolution were also investigated. It was shown that corrosion damage increases nonlinearly with increasing elapsed etching time, and the longer the etching time, the more serious the corrosion damage; different concentration of corrosive agents had different impacts on the corrosion damage degree of the outer steel tube, but the difference between the impacts was very small; the heavier the concentration, the more serious the influence. The greater the dissolution probability, the more serious the corrosion damage of the outer steel tube, but with the increase of dissolution probability, the difference between its impacts on the corrosion damage became smaller and smaller. To validate present method, corrosion damage measurements for concrete filled square steel tubular columns (CFSSTCs) sealed at both their ends and immersed fully in a simulating acid rain solution were conducted, and Faraday’s law was used to predict their theoretical values. Meanwhile, the proposed CA mode was applied for the simulation of corrosion damage evolution of the CFSSTCs. It was shown by the comparisons of results from the three methods aforementioned that they were in good agreement, implying that the proposed method used for the simulation of corrosion damage evolution of concrete filled steel tubular columns is feasible and effective. It will open a new approach to study and evaluate further the corrosion damage, loading capacity and lifetime prediction of concrete filled steel tubular structures.

  18. Modeling pore corrosion in normally open gold- plated copper connectors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moffat, Harry K.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Enos, David George; Serna, Lysle M.; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study is to model the electrical response of gold plated copper electrical contacts exposed to a mixed flowing gas stream consisting of air containing 10 ppb H{sub 2}S at 30 C and a relative humidity of 70%. This environment accelerates the attack normally observed in a light industrial environment (essentially a simplified version of the Battelle Class 2 environment). Corrosion rates were quantified by measuring the corrosion site density, size distribution, and the macroscopic electrical resistance of the aged surface as a function of exposure time. A pore corrosion numerical model was used to predict both the growth of copper sulfide corrosion product which blooms through defects in the gold layer and the resulting electrical contact resistance of the aged surface. Assumptions about the distribution of defects in the noble metal plating and the mechanism for how corrosion blooms affect electrical contact resistance were needed to complete the numerical model. Comparisons are made to the experimentally observed number density of corrosion sites, the size distribution of corrosion product blooms, and the cumulative probability distribution of the electrical contact resistance. Experimentally, the bloom site density increases as a function of time, whereas the bloom size distribution remains relatively independent of time. These two effects are included in the numerical model by adding a corrosion initiation probability proportional to the surface area along with a probability for bloom-growth extinction proportional to the corrosion product bloom volume. The cumulative probability distribution of electrical resistance becomes skewed as exposure time increases. While the electrical contact resistance increases as a function of time for a fraction of the bloom population, the median value remains relatively unchanged. In order to model this behavior, the resistance calculated for large blooms has been weighted more heavily.

  19. Corrosion of bio implants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical stability, mechanical behaviour and biocompatibility in body fluids and tissues are the basic requirements for successful application of implant materials in bone fractures and replacements. Corrosion is one of the major processes affecting the life and service of orthopaedic devices made of metals and alloys used ...

  20. Corrosion resistant steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubchenko, A.S.; Borisov, V.P.; Latyshev, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    Corrosion resistant steel for production of sheets and tubes containing C, Mn, Cr, Si, Fe is suggested. It is alloyed with vanadium and cerium for improving tensile properties and ductility. The steel can be melted by a conventional method in electric-arc or induction furnaces. The mentioned steel is intended to be used as a substitute for nickel-bearing austenitic steels

  1. Corrosion in seawater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrikson, S.

    1988-01-01

    Highly alloyed stainless steels have been exposed to natural chlorinated and chlorine-free seawater at 35 deg. C. Simulated tube-tubesheet joints, weld joints and galvanic couples with titanium, 90/10 CuNi and NiAl bronze were tested and evaluated for corrosion. The corrosion rates of various anode materials - zinc, aluminium and soft iron - were also determined. Finally the risk of hydrogen embrittlement of tubes of ferritic stainless steels and titanium as a consequence of cathodic protection was studied. An attempt was also made to explain the cracking mechanism of the ferritic steels by means of transmission electron microscopy. One important conclusion of the project is that chlorinated seawater is considerably more corrosive to stainless steels than chlorine-free water, whereas chlorination reduces the rate of galvanic corrosion of copper materials coupled to stainless steels. Hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic stainless steels and titanium as a consequence of cathodic protection of carbon steel or cast iron in the same structure can be avoided by strict potentiostatic control of the applied potential. (author)

  2. Corrosion of AA2024-T3 Part I: Localised corrosion of isolated IM particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boag, A.; Hughes, A.E.; Glenn, A.M.; Muster, T.H.; McCulloch, D.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Corrosion of AA2024-T3 in 0.1 M NaCl was examined after various immersion times up to 120 min. → It was found that localised corrosion at isolated intermetallic (IM) particles proceeded through a hierarchy of attack. → Attack began at around 2.5 min on S-phase particles which underwent dealloying and by 15 min had developed trenches around their peripheries. The morphology of the corrosion product changed considerably during this period. → Attack on cathodic particles appeared to initiate after corrosion had finished at S-phase particles and proceeded to AlCuFeMn IM particles where the attack was complete by 30 min. Corrosion then became active around the (Al,Cu) x (Fe,Mn) y Si. IM particles and was complete by 120 min immersion. - Abstract: Polished specimens of AA2024-T3 were immersed for various times up to 120 min in 0.1 M NaCl. The development of corrosion around isolated intermetallic particles was monitored using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). The earliest stages of attack started with localised corrosion of the S-phase particles resulting in dealloying which was followed by trenching around these particles. Subsequently, trenching was observed around cathodic particles where trenching started with AlCuFeMn particles with Cu/Fe ratios typically around 2.5 and then progressed to AlCuFeMnSi particles. This latter category of particles had a much lower Cu/Fe ratio, typically 0.5.

  3. Smart Coatings for Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wendy; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it.

  4. FEM Modelling of the Evolution of Corrosion Cracks in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    of the concrete near the reinforcement. Tensile stresses are then initiated in the concrete. With increasing corrosion, the tensile stresses will at a certain time reach a critical value and cracks will be developed. The increase of the crack with after formation of the initial crack is the subject of this paper......Corrosion cracks are caused by the increasing volume of corrosion products during the corrosion of the reinforcement. After corrosion initiation the rust products from the corroded reinforcement will initially fill the porous zone near the reinforcement and the result in an expansion...

  5. Silicate glasses corrosion. Texture analysis of the corrosion layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portal, Sabine

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the kinetic and the texture evolution of the corroded layer that forms on glass surfaces exposed to acidic solutions. The corroded layer is depleted in alkali cations and is produced by an ion exchange mechanism. It is porous and shows a lower refractive index than the one of the bulk glass. Spectroscopic ellipsometry allows determining the thickness of the layer and its refractive index. Several other techniques have been developed for characterizing the corrosion behaviour of glass surfaces: porosity is thus investigated by adsorption-desorption of nitrogen; the thickness and the composition of the layer are studied by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (S.I.M.S.); sodium concentration in the solution has been analyzed by atomic absorption. This study shows the importance of leaching conditions and glass preparation. The type of drying employed is susceptible to modify the texture and the structure of the layer. The layers produced in the early stages of the leaching process are not easily detectable. The different results lead however to the same conclusion: after a strong increase of porosity, a densification of the layer is observed with increasing time. The evolution of the layer texture could therefore modify the kinetic of the glass corrosion. (author) [fr

  6. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80 degrees C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either open-quotes satisfactoryclose quotes (2-20 mpy) or open-quotes excellentclose quotes (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment

  7. Corrosion of Inconel-625, Hastelloy-X280 and Incoloy-800 in 550 - 750°C superheated steam. Influence of alloy heat treatment, surface treatment, steam temperature and steam velocity. Part I: Results up to 6000 hours exposure time. RCN Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilborg, P.J. van; Linde, A. van der

    1969-10-01

    Sheet samples of Inconel-625, Hastelloy-X280 and Incoloy-800 were tested, in the solution annealed and in the solution annealed + 20% cold worked + 800°C tempered condition, in steam with a velocity of 5 m/sec. at 550, 650 and 750°C and in steam with a volocity of 15 and 85 m/sec. at 550°C. At 550°C and 750°C the samples were tested in the heat treated, annealed or tempered and the heat treated + electropolished condition. At 650°C moreover as heat treated + ground and pickled samples were tested. Post-corrosion sample investigations involved measurement of the adherent oxide thickness, the total amount of corroded metal, the metal loss to system, and the metallographic and microprobe investigation of the adherent oxide film and adjacent diffusion disturbed alloy layer. The results obtained up to 6000 hours exposure time showed that the surface treatment has a decisive influence on the corrosion behaviour of all three alloys tested. The differences in the corrosion data for the two heat treatment conditions are small. The influence of the steam velocity, as tested at 550°C, on the initial corrosion rate was surprisingly high, while the long-term linear corrosion rates are only slightly influenced by the gas velocity. In general the linear corrosion rates were low, 1-5 mg/dm 2 month, and not consistently affected by the test-temperature. The metal loss to system values were 2 <15 mg/dm 2 in the low velocity steam at all three test temperatures and <30 mg/dm 2 in the high velocity steam at 550°C. The metallographic and microprobe examinations revealed no remarkable results, as compared with the results of analogous tests reported in literature. (author)

  8. Post-corrosive injuries of upper gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibishev, A; Simonovska, N; Shikole, A

    2010-01-01

    Acute poisonings with corrosive substances may cause serious chemical injuries to upper gastrointestinal tract, the most common location being the esophagus and the stomach. If the patient survives the acute phase of the poisoning, regenerative response may result in esophageal and/or gastric stenosis and increased risk for esophageal cancer. Acute corrosive intoxications pose a major problem in clinical toxicology since the most commonly affected population are the young with psychic disorders, suicidal intent and alcohol addiction. In establishing the diagnosis of acute corrosive poisonings, the severity of the post-corrosive endoscopic changes of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum is of major importance. According to Holinder and Fridman classification, post-corrosive endoscopic changes are classified in three degrees: First degree--superficial damage associated with hyperthermia, epithelial desquamation and mucous edema. Second degree--transmucous damage affecting all of the mucosal layers, followed by exudation, erosions and ulcerations. Third degree--transmural damage associated with ulcer's penetration in the deep layers of the tissue and neighboring organs. Severity of the lesions depends on the nature, quantity and concentration of the corrosive substance, the duration of exposure and current state of the exposed organs. Most often caustic injuries occur to the esophagus and stomach since the corrosive substance remains there for a longer period of time. Treatment of the acute corrosive intoxications include: neutralization of corrosive agents, antibiotics, corticosteroids, anti-secretory therapy, nutritional support, collagen synthesis inhibitors, esophageal dilation and stent placement, and surgery. The most common complications that may appear are: perforation, gastrointestinal bleeding, sepsis, esophageal strictures and stenosis, stenosis of gastric antrum and pylorus, cancer of the esophagus and the stomach. Today, owing to the substantially enhanced

  9. Copper corrosion under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F. [Integrity Corrosion Consulting Ltd, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Ahonen, L. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Taxen, C. [Swedish Corrosion Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Vuorinen, U. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Werme, L. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-12-01

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 20 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear disposal repository located in he Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long- term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature.Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion before and during saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer by groundwater, general and localized corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. Much has been learnt about the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper canisters over the past 20 years. The majority of the information reviewed here is drawn from the Swedish/Finnish and Canadian programmes. Despite differences in scientific approach, and canister and repository design, the results of these two programmes both suggest that copper provides an excellent corrosion barrier in an underground repository. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid.

  10. Copper corrosion under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Ahonen, L.; Taxen, C.; Vuorinen, U.; Werme, L.

    2001-12-01

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 20 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear disposal repository located in he Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long- term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature.Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion before and during saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer by groundwater, general and localized corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. Much has been learnt about the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper canisters over the past 20 years. The majority of the information reviewed here is drawn from the Swedish/Finnish and Canadian programmes. Despite differences in scientific approach, and canister and repository design, the results of these two programmes both suggest that copper provides an excellent corrosion barrier in an underground repository. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid

  11. Copper corrosion under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Ahonen, L.; Taxen, C.; Vuorinen, U.; Werme, L.

    2002-01-01

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 20 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear disposal repository located in the Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long-term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature. Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion before and during saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer by groundwater, general and localized corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. Much has been learnt about the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper canisters over the past 20 years. The majority of the information reviewed here is drawn from the Swedish/Finnish and Canadian programmes. Despite differences in scientific approach, and canister and repository design, the results of these two programmes both suggest that copper provides an excellent corrosion barrier in an underground repository. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid. (orig.)

  12. Modeling flow-accelerated corrosion in CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrill, K.A.

    1995-11-01

    Flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) of large areas of carbon steel in various circuits of CANDU plants generates significant quantities of corrosion products. As well, the relatively rapid corrosion rate can lead to operating difficulties with some components. Three areas in the plant are identified and a simple model of mass-transfer controlled corrosion of the carbon steel is derived and applied to these areas. The areas and the significant finding for each are given below: A number of lines in the feedwater system generate sludge by FAC, which causes steam generator fouling. Prediction of the steady-state iron concentration at the feedtrain outlet compares well with measured values. Carbon steel outlet feeders connect the reactor core with the steam generators. The feeder surface provides the dissolved iron through FAC, which fouls the primary side of the steam generator tubes, and can lead to derating of the plant and difficulty in tube inspection. Segmented carbon steel divider plates in the steam generator primary head leak at an increasing rate with time. The leakage rate is strongly dependent on the tightness of the overlapping joints. which undergo FAC at an increasing rate with time. (author) 7 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs

  13. Effects of Alloying Elements (Cr, Mn) on Corrosion Properties of Carbon Steel in Synthetic Seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Youngmin; Kim, Heesan

    2016-01-01

    Effects of alloying elements, manganese and chromium, on corrosion resistance of carbon steel were examined using weight loss test and electrochemical tests (polarization test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)) in synthetic seawater at 60 ℃. The results from the weight loss test showed that chromium effectively improved corrosion resistance of carbon steel during the entire immersion time, but manganese improved corrosion resistance after the lowered corrosion resistance at the beginnings of immersion. Unlike the weight loss test, the electrochemical tests showed that the corrosion resistance did not increase with immersion time, in all the specimens. This disagreement is explained by the presence of rust involved in electrochemical reaction during electrochemical tests. The analysis of rust with transmission electron microscopy (TEM)−energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) showed that the amorphous-like rust layer located at the metal/rust interface with enriched alloying element (Cr, Mn) prevents diffusion of corrosive species into a metal/rust interface effectively, which leads to increased corrosion resistance. The initial corrosion behaviour is also affected by the rust types. In other words, manganese accelerated the formation of spinel oxides, negatively affecting corrosion resistance. Meanwhile, chromium accelerated the formation of goethite but impeded the formation of spinel oxides, positively affecting the corrosion resistance. From the above results, the corrosion resistance of steel is closely related with a rust type.

  14. Novel corrosion experiments using the wire beam electrode: (II) Monitoring the effects of ions transportation on electrochemical corrosion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aung, Naing Naing; Tan, Yong-Jun; Liu, Tie

    2006-01-01

    An electrochemically integrated multi-electrode system namely the wire beam electrode (WBE) has been applied for the first time to study the effects of the transportation of electrochemically active species on the process, rate and pattern of electrochemical corrosion. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the applicability of the WBE method for investigating ion transportation related corrosion processes. A series of experiments have been carried out using WBEs made from mild steel and stainless steel wires. The WBE working surfaces were exposed to simulated diffusion-controlled corrosion environments where there were diffusion induced ions concentration gradients (termed diffusion-corrosion environment). Corrosion potential and current distribution maps (CPCD maps) were measured from WBE surfaces in continuous bases. Typical patterns have been identified from CPCD maps and the characteristics of these patterns have been found to depend heavily upon the type of electrode material and the type of corrosive ion. For mild steel WBE surface exposed to a diffusion-corrosion environment containing NiSO 4 or FeCl 3 , the characteristic pattern in CPCD maps was found to emulate NiSO 4 or FeCl 3 concentration gradients, suggesting an ion-concentration controlled corrosion behaviour. However, when the mild steel WBE surface was exposed to a diffusion-corrosion environment containing NaCl, the characteristic pattern was found to show higher cathodic currents along the WBE edges with the magnitude decreasing in a contour-like manner towards the centre of the WBE surface, suggesting an oxygen concentration-controlled corrosion behaviour. When a stainless steel (SS316L) WBE surface was exposed to a diffusion-corrosion environment containing NiSO 4 or NaCl, the corrosion pattern appeared to be mainly determined by the random distribution of weak sites in passive film. When the SS316L WBE was exposed to a diffusion-corrosion environment containing FeCl 3 , the CPCD map

  15. Corrosion research from the practical view - 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, D.; Rahmel, A.; Baselt, J.P.

    1987-09-01

    This volume contains brief descriptions of R+D projects in corrosion research, including those just terminated, those still going on, and those due to begin soon. On the whole, the brief accounts cover 133 individual projects. The topics of the nine project groups are: Hydrogen-induced material damage; stress-cracking corrosion; fatigue cracking corrosion and local corrosion; fluid-flow-induced corrosion; high-temperature corrosion; material behaviour in waters and soils; corrosion in special media; material behaviour in seawater; corrosion protection by means of coatings and coverings; testing procedures for detecting material damage due to corrosion. (orig./MM) [de

  16. Online Corrosion and Force Monitoring for Inner Containment Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kumar

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of steel in concrete reduces the service life and durability of concrete structures. It is a worldwide problem, which causes heavy losses to the economy of the country. The durability of concrete structures primarily depends on the condition of the embedded steel in concrete, apart from any deterioration that concrete may undergo. In general potential surveys are carried out on concrete structures to know about the condition of steel. Most of these measurements in the field are carried out manually and the data obtained are analyzed. This offline measurements leads to an error in the data collected, time consuming and involvement of huge man power. Online corrosion monitoring eliminates such errors in the measurements and improves the accuracy of the data collected from humanly inaccessible regions of a structure. To mitigate corrosion prior to significant degradation and optimize the performance of such concrete structures, various sensors have been used to detect the corrosion and to provide early warning. To assess the condition of the embedded steel, the sensors of the probe are connected to a computer through specialized data acquisition hardware. The computer controls the data acquisition using suitable user friendly software that calculates the corrosion rate at prescribed intervals for continuous monitoring. New types of corrosion sensors and its mechanism in real time measurements are described. Online analysis of data for corrosion and force monitoring is described in this paper.

  17. Corrosion of steel tanks in liquid nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, Ricardo M.; Giordano, Celia M.; Saenz, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this work is to understand how solution chemistry would impact on the corrosion of waste storage steel tanks at the Hanford Site. Future tank waste operations are expected to process wastes that are more dilute with respect to some current corrosion inhibiting waste constituents. Assessment of corrosion damage and of the influence of exposure time and electrolyte composition, using simulated (non-radioactive) wastes, of the double-shell tank wall carbon steel alloys is being conducted in a statistically designed long-term immersion experiment. Corrosion rates at different times of immersion were determined using both weight-loss determinations and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Localized corrosion susceptibility was assessed using short-term cyclic potentiodynamic polarization curves. The results presented in this paper correspond to electrochemical and weight-loss measurements of the immersed coupons during the first year of immersion from a two year immersion plan. A good correlation was obtained between electrochemical measurements, weight-loss determinations and visual observations. Very low general corrosion rates ( -1 ) were estimated using EIS measurements, indicating that general corrosion rate of the steel in contact with liquid wastes would no be a cause of tank failure even for these out-of-chemistry limit wastes. (author) [es

  18. Corrosion Evaluation and Corrosion Control of Steam Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeng, W. Y.; Kim, U. C.; Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Lee, Y. H.; Lee, D. H.; Kim, K. M

    2008-06-15

    Corrosion damage significantly influences the integrity and efficiency of steam generator. Corrosion problems of steam generator are unsolved issues until now even though much effort is made around world. Especially the stress corrosion cracking of heat exchange materials is the first issue to be solved. The corrosion protection method of steam generator is important and urgent for the guarantee of nuclear plant's integrity. The objectives of this study are 1) to evaluate the corrosion properties of steam generator materials, 2) to optimize the water chemistry of steam generator and 3) to develop the corrosion protection method of primary and secondary sides of steam generator. The results will be reflected to the water chemistry guideline for improving the integrity and efficiency of steam generator in domestic power plants.

  19. Corrosion Evaluation and Corrosion Control of Steam Generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeng, W. Y.; Kim, U. C.; Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Lee, Y. H.; Lee, D. H.; Kim, K. M.

    2008-06-01

    Corrosion damage significantly influences the integrity and efficiency of steam generator. Corrosion problems of steam generator are unsolved issues until now even though much effort is made around world. Especially the stress corrosion cracking of heat exchange materials is the first issue to be solved. The corrosion protection method of steam generator is important and urgent for the guarantee of nuclear plant's integrity. The objectives of this study are 1) to evaluate the corrosion properties of steam generator materials, 2) to optimize the water chemistry of steam generator and 3) to develop the corrosion protection method of primary and secondary sides of steam generator. The results will be reflected to the water chemistry guideline for improving the integrity and efficiency of steam generator in domestic power plants

  20. Scanning reference electrode techniques in localized corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, H.S.; Vyas, B.

    1979-04-01

    The principles, advantages, and implementations of scanning reference electrode techniques are reviewed. Data related to pitting, intergranular corrosion, welds and stress corrosion cracking are presented. The technique locates the position of localized corrosion and can be used to monitor the development of corrosion and changes in the corrosion rate under a wide range of conditions

  1. Corrosion control for low-cost reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This conference was held September 19-24, 1993 in Houston, Texas to provide a forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on corrosion. Topics of interest focus on the following: atmospheric corrosion; chemical process industry corrosion; high temperature corrosion; and corrosion of plant materials. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  2. Corrosion behavior of friction stir welded AZ31B Mg alloy - Al6063 alloy joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ratna Sunil

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, AZ31B Mg alloy and Al6063 alloy-rolled sheets were successfully joined by friction stir welding. Microstructural studies revealed a sound joint with good mechanical mixing of both the alloys at the nugget zone. Corrosion performance of the joint was assessed by immersing in 3.5% NaCl solution for different intervals of time and the corrosion rate was calculated. The joint has undergone severe corrosion attack compared with both the base materials (AZ31B and Al6063 alloys. The predominant corrosion mechanism behind the high corrosion rate of the joint was found to be high galvanic corrosion. From the results, it can be suggested that the severe corrosion of dissimilar Mg–Al joints must be considered as a valid input while designing structures intended to work in corroding environment.

  3. Potential high temperature corrosion problems due to co-firing of biomass and fossil fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Vilhelmsen, T.; Jensen, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past years, considerable high temperature corrosion problems have been encountered when firing biomass in power plants due to the high content of potassium chloride in the deposits. Therefore to combat chloride corrosion problems co-firing of biomass with a fossil fuel has been undertaken...... significant corrosion attack was due to sulphidation attack at the grain boundaries of 18-8 steel after 3 years exposure. The corrosion mechanisms and corrosion rates are compared with biomass firing and coal firing. Potential corrosion problems due to co-firing biomass and fossil fuels are discussed....... appear such as sulphidation and hot corrosion due to sulphate deposits. At Studstrup power plant Unit 4, based on trials with exposure times of 3000 hours using 0-20% straw co-firing with coal, the plant now runs with a fuel of 10% straw + coal. After three years exposure in this environment...

  4. Analyzing the effect of high repetition laser shock peening on dynamic corrosion rate of magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caralapatti, Vinodh Krishna; Narayanswamy, Sivakumar

    2017-08-01

    Magnesium as implant material is being investigated extensively due to its superior suitability. With corrosion rate being the major obstacle, this paper aims to determine the effects of high repetition laser shock peening (HRLSP) on the dynamic corrosion rate of magnesium. While there is lot of research on corrosion of magnesium, in this work, a specially designed test bench was used for characterization of dynamic corrosion to mimic the physiological conditions experienced by the implant inside human body. From the results, it can be inferred that corrosion rate of peened samples reduced by at least 6 times compared to unpeened sample and sample peened with 66% overlap 1 scans exhibited the least corrosion. The wettability of the samples was also determined as a measure to analyze the effects of HRLSP on biocompatibility. In addition, peening is seen to induce surface corrosion, which minimizes the risks of implant failure.

  5. Markov chain model helps predict pitting corrosion depth and rate in underground pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caleyo, F.; Velazquez, J.C.; Hallen, J. M. [ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Esquivel-Amezcua, A. [PEMEX PEP Region Sur, Villahermosa, Tabasco (Mexico); Valor, A. [Universidad de la Habana, Vedado, La Habana (Cuba)

    2010-07-01

    Recent reports place pipeline corrosion costs in North America at seven billion dollars per year. Pitting corrosion causes the higher percentage of failures among other corrosion mechanisms. This has motivated multiple modelling studies to be focused on corrosion pitting of underground pipelines. In this study, a continuous-time, non-homogenous pure birth Markov chain serves to model external pitting corrosion in buried pipelines. The analytical solution of Kolmogorov's forward equations for this type of Markov process gives the transition probability function in a discrete space of pit depths. The transition probability function can be completely identified by making a correlation between the stochastic pit depth mean and the deterministic mean obtained experimentally. The model proposed in this study can be applied to pitting corrosion data from repeated in-line pipeline inspections. Case studies presented in this work show how pipeline inspection and maintenance planning can be improved by using the proposed Markovian model for pitting corrosion.

  6. Corrosion of Cast Iron Mill Plates in Wet Grinding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony ANDREWS

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion studies were carried out on two different maize grinding plates. Maize was soaked in water for three days and the water decanted and used as electrolyte. Mass loss and pH measurements were carried out every 3 days for 15-day period. Results show that, for each plate, mass loss and pH increased with exposure time. Corrosion rates determined from mass loss data was found to be strongly dependent on pH. The observed behaviour may be explained in terms of the chemical composition and/or microstructures of the plates. Results are briefly discussed in terms of the contribution of corrosion to wear.

  7. Stochastic Models for Chloride-Initiated Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Svend; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    Corrosion of the reinforcement in concrete structures can lead to a substantial decrease of the load-bearing capacity. One mode of corrosion initiation is when the chloride content around the reinforcement exceeds a threshold value. In the present paper a statistical model is developed by which...... the chloride content in a 1reinforced concrete structure can be predicted. The model parameters are estimated on the basis of measurements. The distribution of the time to initiation of corrosion is estimated by FORMISORM-analysis....

  8. Investigation of Corrosion Inhibitors by Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Relaxometry Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Sinyavsky

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The changes taking place with the corrosion-resistant coating, but not the state of the surface subjected to corrosion are investigated in this paper in contrast to traditional approaches. We used the method of nitrogen relaxometry NQR and multi-exponential inversion of decay of longitudinal and transverse components of the nuclear magnetization is applied for the first time for this purpose. The results of experimental studies of changes in the distributions of spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation of crystallite powder of sodium nitrite and urotropin, the mixture of which is used as a corrosion inhibitor of ferrous metals are considered.

  9. Stochastic Models for Chloride-Initiated Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, S.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1996-01-01

    Corrosion of the reinforcement in concrete structures can lead to a substantial decrease of the load-bearing capacity. One mode of corrosion initiation is when the chloride content around the reinforcement exceeds a threshold value. In the present paper a statistical model is developed by which...... the chloride content in a reinforced concrete structure can be predicted. The model parameters are estimated on the basis of measurements. The distribution of the time to initiation of corrosion is estimated by FORM/SORM-analysis....

  10. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Aliphatic amines and nitrites used as corrosion inhibitors can be degraded by microorganisms, decreasing the effectiveness of the compounds and...workers (123) reported that silicone rubber dental liners could be degraded by yeasts. Moisture and chemical resistant polymeric coatings and...to be susceptible. 7.5. Concrete. Concrete is an inert aggregate, such as rock and gravel, surrounded by a cement binder. Concrete is a moderately

  11. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  12. Corrosion Resistance and Durability of Superhydrophobic Copper Surface in Corrosive NaCl Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Wei Yao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Artificial superhydrophobic copper surfaces play an important role in modern applications such as self-cleaning and dropwise condensation; however, corrosion resistance and durability often present as major concerns in such applications. In this study, the anti-corrosion properties and mechanical durability of superhydrophobic copper surface have been investigated. The superhydrophobic copper surfaces were achieved with wet chemical etching and an immersion method to reduce the complexity of the fabrication process. The surface structures and materials were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR. The corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of the superhydrophobic copper surface were characterized after immersing surfaces in a 3.5 wt % NaCl solution. The chemical stability of the superhydrophobic copper surface in the NaCl solution for a short period of time was also evaluated. An abrasion test and an ultrasound oscillation were conducted to confirm that the copper surface contained durable superhydrophobic properties. In addition, an atomic force microscope was employed to study the surface mechanical property in the corrosion conditions. The present study shows that the resulting superhydrophobic copper surface exhibit enhanced corrosion resistance and durability.

  13. Pipe Lines – External Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Babor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Two areas of corrosion occur in pipe lines: corrosion from the medium carried inside the pipes; corrosion attack upon the outside of the pipes (underground corrosion. Electrolytic processes are also involved in underground corrosion. Here the moisture content of the soil acts as an electrolyte, and the ions required to conduct the current are supplied by water-soluble salts (chlorides, sulfates, etc. present in the soil. The nature and amount of these soluble materials can vary within a wide range, which is seen from the varying electrical conductivity and pH (varies between 3 and 10. Therefore the characteristics of a soil will be an important factor in under-ground corrosion.

  14. Nuclear corrosion science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Understanding corrosion mechanisms, the systems and materials they affect, and the methods necessary for accurately measuring their incidence is of critical importance to the nuclear industry for the safe, economic and competitive running of its plants. This book reviews the fundamentals of nuclear corrosion. Corrosion of nuclear materials, i.e. the interaction between these materials and their environments, is a major issue for plant safety as well as for operation and economic competitiveness. Understanding these corrosion mechanisms, the systems and materials they affect, and the methods to accurately measure their incidence is of critical importance to the nuclear industry. Combining assessment techniques and analytical models into this understanding allows operators to predict the service life of corrosion-affected nuclear plant materials, and to apply the most appropriate maintenance and mitigation options to ensure safe long term operation. This book critically reviews the fundamental corrosion mechani...

  15. Corrosion inhibitors from expired drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaszilcsin, Nicolae; Ordodi, Valentin; Borza, Alexandra

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a method of expired or unused drugs valorization as corrosion inhibitors for metals in various media. Cyclic voltammograms were drawn on platinum in order to assess the stability of pharmaceutically active substances from drugs at the metal-corrosive environment interface. Tafel slope method was used to determine corrosion rates of steel in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Expired Carbamazepine and Paracetamol tablets were used to obtain corrosion inhibitors. For the former, the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 0.1 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid solution was about 90%, whereas for the latter, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the same material in the 0.25 mol L(-1) acetic acid-0.25 mol L(-1) sodium acetate buffer solution was about 85%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Corrosion of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elston, J.; Caillat, R.

    1958-01-01

    Data are reported on the volatilization rate of beryllium oxide in moist air depending on temperature and water vapour concentration. They are concerned with powder samples or sintered shapes of various densities. For sintered samples, the volatilization rate is very low under the following conditions: - temperature: 1300 deg. C, - water vapour concentration in moist air: 25 g/m 3 , - flow rate: 12 I/hour corresponding to a speed of 40 m/hour on the surface of the sample. For calcinated powders (1300 deg. C), grain growth has been observed under a stream of moist air at 1100 deg. C. For instance, grain size changes from 0,5 to at least 2 microns after 500 hours of exposure at this temperature. Furthermore, results data are reported on corrosion of sintered beryllium oxide in pressurized water. At 250 deg. C, under a pressure of 40 kg/cm 2 water is very slightly corrosive; however, internal strains are revealed. Finally, some features on the corrosion in liquid sodium are exposed. (author) [fr

  17. Nanocontainer-based corrosion sensing coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, F.; Tedim, J.; Bastos, A. C.; Ferreira, M. G. S.; Zheludkevich, M. L.

    2013-10-01

    The present paper reports on the development of new sensing active coating on the basis of nanocontainers containing pH-indicating agent. The coating is able to detect active corrosion processes on different metallic substrates. The corrosion detection functionality based on the local colour change in active cathodic zones results from the interaction of hydroxide ions with phenolphthalein encapsulated in mesoporous nanocontainers which function as sensing nanoreactors. The mesoporous silica nanocontainers are synthesized and loaded with pH indicator phenolphthalein in a one-stage process. The resulting system is mesoporous, which together with bulkiness of the indicator molecules limits their leaching. At the same time, penetration of water molecules and ions inside the container is still possible, allowing encapsulated phenolphthalein to be sensitive to the pH in the surrounding environment and outperforming systems when an indicator is directly dispersed in the coating layer. The performed tests demonstrate the pH sensitivity of the developed nanocontainers being dispersed in aqueous solutions. The corrosion sensing functionality of the protective coatings with nanocontainers are proven for aluminium- and magnesium-based metallic substrates. As a result, the developed nanocontainers show high potential to be used in a new generation of active protective coatings with corrosion-sensing coatings.

  18. Electrochemical study of corrosion inhibition of stainless steel in phosphoric medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnini, K.; Chtaini, A. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Bio Corrosion, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Beni-Mellal (Morocco); Khouili, M.; Elbouadili, A. [Laboratoire de Chimie Organique et Analytique, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Beni-Mellal (Morocco)

    2004-07-01

    The corrosion of metals represents a terrible waste of both natural resources and money, the failure of some stainless steel resulting from pitting corrosion is some times considered a technological problem, consequently, much effort has been expended in attempting to understand and overcome the corrosion therefore, many stainless steel/ environment combinations have been studied. The use of heterocyclic compounds as inhibitors is one of the most practical methods for protection against corrosion in acidic media. In continuation of our work on development of macrocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors we report in our study the corrosion inhibiting behaviour of organic compound Methoxy-2-Allyl-4 Phenol (MAP) containing coordinating and conjugation groups, at three forms (natural, polymerized and chemically treated) on the corrosion of stainless steel in phosphoric acid. This study focused on the comparison for corrosion inhibition proprieties of these different applications using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and SEM. The specimen was evaluated to determine change in his corrosion potential and resistance polarization; These MAP products have exhibited corrosion inhibition by maintaining a high resistance polarization (low corrosion rate) in each application. These results reveal that this compound is efficient inhibitor in all forms; the most inhibition efficiency is obtained with polymerized form. To further evaluate the test data, the steel surfaces were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, SEM observations of surface treated concrete confirmed presence of inhibitor on the steel surfaces. (authors)

  19. Corrosion of fuel assembly materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noe, M.; Frejaville, G.; Beslu, P.

    1985-08-01

    Corrosion of zircaloy-4 is reviewed in relation with previsions of improvement in PWRs performance: higher fuel burnup; increase coolant temperature, implying nucleate boiling on the hot clad surfaces; increase duration of the cycle due to load-follow operation. Actual knowledge on corrosion rates, based partly on laboratory tests, is insufficient to insure that external clad corrosion will not constitute a limitation to these improvements. Therefore, additional testing within representative conditions is felt necessary [fr

  20. Testing methodologies for corrosion fatigue

    OpenAIRE

    Delmotte, Edward; Micone, Nahuel; De Waele, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Offshore constructions are subjected to cyclic loading conditions. This situation is combined with the corrosive nature of the surrounding environment. It is of actual concern whether the combined effect is more damaging or not than the superposition of each effect independently. This literature review first introduces the reader to corrosion fatigue. Thereafter a critical comparison of some typical lab-scale fatigue corrosion test setups is given. Special emphasis is devoted to the instru...

  1. Corrosion Monitors for Embedded Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Alex L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pfeifer, Kent B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Casias, Adrian L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorensen, Neil R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Missert, Nancy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    We have developed and characterized novel in-situ corrosion sensors to monitor and quantify the corrosive potential and history of localized environments. Embedded corrosion sensors can provide information to aid health assessments of internal electrical components including connectors, microelectronics, wires, and other susceptible parts. When combined with other data (e.g. temperature and humidity), theory, and computational simulation, the reliability of monitored systems can be predicted with higher fidelity.

  2. Corrosion problems of power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The proceedings contain 26 contributions, out of which 11 have been inputted in INIS. These are concerned with methods for the evaluation of corrosion resistance of materials for the nuclear industry, with examination of the corrosion behavior of composite overlays and of steels after the action of decontamination solutions, and with theoretical models of crack propagation. Corrosion problems of steam turbines, steam generator tubes and thermocouple bushings are discussed. (M.D.). 28 figs., 8 tabs., 63 refs

  3. Task E container corrosion studies: Annual report. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunnell, L.R.; Doremus, L.A.; Topping, J.B.; Duncan, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting the Solid Waste Technology Support Program (SWTSP) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Task E is the Container Corrosion Study Portion of the SWTSP that will perform testing to provide defensible data on the corrosion of low-carbon steel, as used in drums to contain chemical and radioactive wastes at the Hanford Site. A second objective of Task E is to provide and test practical alternative materials that have higher corrosion resistance than low-carbon steel. The scope of work for fiscal year (FY) 1993 included initial testing of mild steel specimens buried in Hanford soils or exposed to atmospheric corrosion in metal storage sheds. During FY 1993, progress was made in three areas of Task E. First, exposure of test materials began at the Soil Corrosion Test Site where low-carbon steel specimens were placed in the soil in five test shafts at depths of 9 m (30 ft). Second, the corrosion measurement of low-carbon steel in the soil of two solid waste trenches continued. The total exposure time is ∼ 500 days. Third, an atmospheric corrosion test of low-carbon steel was initiated in a metal shed (Building 2401-W) in the 200 West Area. This annual report describes the Task E efforts and provides a current status

  4. Effective Utilization for Data of Natural Environment Corrosion of Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An analysis architecture is built to make full use of natural environment corrosion of materials data. All environmental factors, such as average temperature, average relative humidity, rainfall hours, sunshine duration, chloride ion settlement, etc., in nine atmospheric test stations, including Beijing, Wuhan, Jiangjin, and Wanning, and seawater temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, pH values, etc. in four marine test stations, including Qingdao, Zhoushan, Xiamen, and Yulin, are modelled monthly using a statistical analysis technique. Normal distribution, logarithmic normal distribution, Weibull distribution, and uniform distribution of the samples are checked by the Shapiro-Wilk and Kolmogorov-Smirnov methods. Subsequently, the probability distribution function, the expected population value and variance, and the confidence interval are estimated. Corrosion data for twenty-two kinds of carbon steels, low alloy steels, and stainless steels, including A3, 3C, 16Mn, 10CrMoAl, 1Cr18Ni9Ti, in atmospheric and marine test stations are analyzed. The main environmental factors for atmospheric and marine corrosion of each type of steel are determined by grey relational analysis. Subsequently, a predictive model incorporating the main corrosion environmental factors, exposure time, and corrosion rate is built by the BP artificial neural network. After the evolution of corrosion pit depth is predicted by the artificial neural network, a fracture mechanics calculation is used to evaluate the residual life of a structure with corrosion pit defects.

  5. Corrosion resistance of zinc-magnesium coated steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosking, N.C.; Stroem, M.A.; Shipway, P.H.; Rudd, C.D.

    2007-01-01

    A significant body of work exists in the literature concerning the corrosion behaviour of zinc-magnesium coated steel (ZMG), describing its enhanced corrosion resistance when compared to conventional zinc-coated steel. This paper begins with a review of the literature and identifies key themes in the reported mechanisms for the attractive properties of this material. This is followed by an experimental programme where ZMG was subjected to an automotive laboratory corrosion test using acidified NaCl solution. A 3-fold increase in time to red rust compared to conventional zinc coatings was measured. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the corrosion products formed. The corrosion products detected on ZMG included simonkolleite (Zn 5 Cl 2 (OH) 8 . H 2 O), possibly modified by magnesium uptake, magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH) 2 ) and a hydroxy carbonate species. It is proposed that the oxygen reduction activity at the (zinc) cathodes is reduced by precipitation of alkali-resistant Mg(OH) 2 , which is gradually converted to more soluble hydroxy carbonates by uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide. This lowers the surface pH sufficiently to allow thermodynamically for general precipitation of insoluble simonkolleite over the corroding surface thereby retarding the overall corrosion reactions, leaving only small traces of magnesium corrosion products behind. Such a mechanism is consistent with the experimental findings reported in the literature

  6. Intergranular corrosion testing of austenitic stainless steels in nitric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whillock, G.O.H.; Dunnett, B. F. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, BNFL, B170, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    In hot strong nitric acid solutions, stainless steels exhibit intergranular corrosion. Corrosion rates are often measured from immersion testing of specimens manufactured from the relevant material (e.g. plate or pipe). The corrosion rates, measured from weight loss, are found to increase with time prior to reaching steady state, which can take thousands of hours to achieve. The apparent increase in corrosion rate as a function of time was found to be an artefact due to the surface area of the specimen's being used in the corrosion rate calculations, rather than that of the true area undergoing active corrosion i.e. the grain boundaries. The steady state corrosion rate coincided with the onset of stable grain dropping, where the use of the surface area of the specimen to convert the weight loss measurements to corrosion rates was found to be appropriate. This was confirmed by sectioning of the specimens and measuring the penetration depths. The rate of penetration was found to be independent of time and no induction period was observed. A method was developed to shorten considerably the testing time to reach the steady state corrosion rate by use of a pre-treatment that induces grain dropping. The long-term corrosion rates from specimens which were pre-treated was similar to that achieved after prolonged testing of untreated (i.e. initially ground) specimens. The presence of cut surfaces is generally unavoidable in the simple immersion testing of specimens in test solutions. However, inaccuracy in the results may occur as the measured corrosion rate is often influenced by the orientation of the microstructure, the highest rates typically being observed on the cut surfaces. Two methods are presented which allow deconvolution of the corrosion rates from immersion testing of specimens containing cut surfaces, thus allowing reliable prediction of the long-term corrosion rate of plate surfaces. (authors)

  7. Evaluation of steel corrosion by numerical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahigashi, Tatsuo

    2017-01-01

    Recently, various non-destructive and numerical methods have been used and many cases of steel corrosion are examined. For example, methods of evaluating corrosion through various numerical methods and evaluating macrocell corrosion and micro-cell corrosion using measurements have been proposed. However, there are few reports on estimating of corrosion loss with distinguishing the macro-cell and micro-cell corrosion and with resembling an actuality phenomenon. In this study, for distinguishin...

  8. Influence of bovine serum albumin in Hanks' solution on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of a magnesium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harandi, Shervin Eslami; Banerjee, Parama Chakraborty; Easton, Christopher D; Singh Raman, R K

    2017-11-01

    It is essential for any temporary implant to possess adequate strength to maintain their mechanical integrity under the synergistic effects of mechanical loading characteristics of human body and the corrosive physiological environment. Such synergistic effects can cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of the addition of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to Hanks' solution in corrosion and SCC susceptibility of AZ91D magnesium alloy. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results indicated that the addition of BSA increased corrosion resistance of the alloy during the first 48h of immersion and then decreased it rapidly. The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses indicated adsorption of BSA on the alloy surface during initial hours of immersion. However, with the increasing immersion time, BSA chelated with the corrosion products causing disruption of the protective film; thus, it accelerated the corrosion of the alloy. Both the mechanical data and fractographic evidence have confirmed susceptibility of the alloy to SCC. However, in the presence of BSA, the alloy suffered greater SCC which was attributed to its increased susceptibility towards localized corrosion. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Atmospheric corrosion data of weathering steels. A review

    OpenAIRE

    Morcillo, Manuel; Chico, Belén; Cano, H.; Fuente, Daniel de la

    2013-01-01

    Extensive information on the atmospheric corrosion of weathering steel has been published in the scientific literature. The contribution of the present work is to provide a bibliographic review of the reported information, which mostly concerns the weathering steel ASTM A-242. This review addresses issues such as rust layer stabilisation times, steady-state steel corrosion rates, and situations where the use of unpainted weathering steel is feasible. It also analyses the effect of exposure co...

  10. Regenerative nano-hybrid coating tailored for autonomous corrosion protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, The Hai; Vimalanandan, Ashokanand; Genchev, Georgi; Fickert, Johannes; Landfester, Katharina; Crespy, Daniel; Rohwerder, Michael

    2015-07-01

    A novel bilayer coating system for autonomous corrosion-triggered self-healing is demonstrated. The storage of the encapsulated monomer and the catalyst is separated in two different layers. The encapsulated catalyst is stored inside a metallic coating, which ensures its activity even for an extended exposure time. The release from the capsules is triggered by corrosion and the correlated pH increase. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Corrosion studies on HGW-canister materials for marine disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, K.J.; Bland, I.D.; Smith, S.; Marsh, G.P.

    1986-03-01

    Results are presented from theoretical and experimental work undertaken to investigate and assess the general corrosion behaviour of carbon steel canister/overpacks for heat generating nuclear waste under marine disposal conditions. The mean general corrosion rates of carbon steels, determined experimentally by polarisation resistance measurements on specimens in on-going immersion tests, are between 65-124 μm yr -1 at 90 0 C and 5-25 μm yr -1 at 25 0 C and are tending to increase with time. Anomalously high corrosion rates are being indicated by similar tests at 50 0 C. It is not clear what reliance should be placed on the polarisation resistance results, however, and therefore no conclusion will be drawn until the tests are dismantled and inspected in the 1985/86 programme. Tests with γ-radiation on forged carbon steel specimens immersed in deaerated seawater at 90 0 C show that this causes an acceleration of corrosion rate at the three dose rates down to at least 300 R h -1 . Deep ocean sediment from GME also accelerates the corrosion rate of carbon steel in deaerated seawater both with and without γ-radiation. The effect diminishes with continued exposure and is thought to be due to the presence of either an additional so far unidentified oxidising agent or some component which reduces the corrosion protection afforded by the build up of a corrosion product layer. Acquisition of improved electrochemical kinetic data for the mathematical model is now complete, and the model has been run for temperatures of 25 and 90 0 C, where it predicts steady corrosion rates of 19.3 and 180 μm/yr. The model has shown that the rate of attack is not influenced greatly by the depth of sediment, and that the component of corrosion caused by radiation is of the order of 7 mm over 1000 years. (author)

  12. Super-Hydrophobic Green Corrosion Inhibitor On Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, H.; Ismail, A.; Ahmad, S.; Soon, C. F.

    2017-06-01

    There are many examples of organic coatings used for corrosion protection. In particular, hydrophobic and super-hydrophobic coatings are shown to give good protection because of their enhanced ability to slow down transport of water and ions through the coating. The purpose of this research is to develop water repellent coating to avoid direct contact between metal and environment corrosive and mitigate corrosion attack at pipeline system. This water repellent characteristic on super-hydrophobic coating was coated by electrodeposition method. Wettability of carbon steel with super-hydrophobic coating (cerium chloride and myristic acid) and oxidized surface was investigated through contact angle and inhibitor performance test. The inhibitor performance was studied in 25% tannin acid corrosion test at 30°C and 3.5% sodium chloride (NaCl). The water contact angle test was determined by placing a 4-μL water droplet of distilled water. It shows that the wettability of contact angle super-hydrophobic with an angle of 151.60° at zero minute can be classified as super-hydrophobic characteristic. By added tannin acid as inhibitor the corrosion protection on carbon steel becomes more consistent. This reveals that the ability of the coating to withstand with the corrosion attack in the seawater at different period of immersions. The results elucidate that the weight loss increased as the time of exposure increased. However, the corrosion rates for uncoated carbon steel is high compared to coated carbon steel. As a conclusion, from both samples it can be seen that the coated carbon steel has less corrosion rated compared to uncoated carbon steel and addition of inhibitor to the seawater provides more protection to resist corrosion attack on carbon steel.

  13. Facilities Corrosion Impacts: When Corrosion Wins, the Mission Ends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    Product/Results - Technology demonstrations and implementations at DoD Installations. - Cost and performance reports. - Recommendations for design ...guidance updates– ACSIM Installation Design Standards Payoff Service life extension of aging mission critical utilities and structures. Reduction in...corrosion.  Technology- Microcapsules in the form of microscopic spheres on the order of 50 to 150 microns in diameter containing corrosion-inhibiting

  14. Phytochemicals as Green Corrosion Inhibitors in Various Corrosive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is an intensive effort underway to develop new plant origin corrosion inhibitors for metal subjected to various environmental conditions. These efforts have been motivated by the desire to replace toxic inhibitors used for mitigation of corrosion of various metals and alloys in aqueous solutions. Plants represent a class ...

  15. phytochemicals as green corrosion inhibitors in various corrosive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    with aggressive environment is one among the acceptable practices used to reduce and/or prevent corrosion. ... may exhibit electrochemical activity such as corrosion inhibition (Davis et al. 2001). Some of their results ... zinc and copper in both HCl and H2SO4 acid solutions using gravimetric and polarization measurement ...

  16. The Development of Corrosion Resistant Zirconium Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul-Latief; Noor-Yudhi; Isfandi; Djoko-Kisworo; Pranjono

    2000-01-01

    Corrosion test of Zr alloy consisting of quenching and tempering Zry-2,Zry-4 cast, Zr-1% Nb cast, has been. conducted. In corrosion test, thechanges during β-quenching, tempering and corrosion test at varioustemperature and time in autoclave water medium, can be seen. The treatmentconsisted of heating at 1050 o C for 30 minutes, quenching in water andtempering at 200 o C, 300 o C, 400 o C, 500 o C, 600 o C as well as corrosiontests at 225 o C, 275 o C, 325 o C at 4, 8, 12 hours. Sample preparation forcorrosion test was based on ASTM G-2 procedure, which consisted of washing,rinsing, pickling (3.5 cc HF 50%; 2.9 cc HNO 3 65% and 57 cc AMB),neutralizing in 0.1 M Al(NO 3 ) 3 , 9 H 2 O and ultrasonic rinsing/washing.Measurement performed are weight gain during corrosion, hardness test andmicrostructure observation using microscope optic. The results show thatβ-quenching of Zr alloy which was followed by tempering can turn αmartensite into tempered α 1 martensit. The increase of temperingtemperature decreases the Zr alloy hardness and the lowest hardness ispossessed by Zr-1% Nb alloy. The corrosion test at 275 o C and 325 o C showsthat the weight gain depends on the tempering temperature, the temperingtemperature of 400 o C and 200 o C gives the maximum weight gain for Zry-2,Zry-4 cast, Zr-1% Nb. The largest number of hydride formed during corrosionis found in Zry-2, while the small one is in Zr-1% Nb. (author)

  17. Corrosion protection of aluminum by silane-based surface treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun

    The possibility of using silane coupling agents as replacements for chromate treatments was investigated for aluminum substrates. In order to understand the influence of deposition parameters on silane film formation, pure Al substrates were used to study the interaction between silane coupling agents and aluminum surfaces. The silane films formed on pure A1 substrates from aqueous solutions were characterized by ellipsometry, contact angle measurements, reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Time-of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. The deposition parameters studied include solution concentration, solution dipping time and pH value of the applied solution. It appears that silane film formation involved a true equilibrium of hydrolysis and condensation in aqueous solution. It has been found that the silane film thickness obtained depends primarily on the solution concentration and is independent of the solution dipping time. The molecular orientation of the applied silane film is determined by the pH value of the applied silane solution and the isoelectic point of the metal substrates. The deposition window in terms of pH value for A1 substrates is between 4 and 7. The total surface energy of silane-coated A1 substrate decreases with film aging time, the decreased rate, however, is determined by the nature of silane coupling agents. Based on the results obtained above, a pretreatment, which involved two-step bis-(triethoxysilyl) ethane and gamma-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, was developed for Al substrates with commercial polyester and polyurethane paints. The results of salt spray testing, cyclic corrosion testing, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed that this treatment provided the same level of corrosion performance as the treatment of phosphating plus a final chromate rinse. The likely reasons for excellent performance are discussed in terms of the physical and chemical characteristics of the

  18. Corrosion of copper in alkaline chloride environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.

    2002-08-01

    result in passivation of the surface by a duplex Cu 2 S/CuS film. Increasing pH due to an alkaline plume will tend to enhance the passivity, because of the decrease in solubility of Cu 2 S. At the same time, pitting corrosion will become less likely, since the corrosion potential will shift to more-negative values and the pitting potential to more-positive values with increasing pH. As in sulphide-free environments, therefore, there appears to be little threat to the integrity of the canister from an increase in pore-water pH. In summary, an increase in pore-water pH due to an alkaline plume from cementitious material will induce passivation of the canister surface. The stability of the passive film, and its ability to prevent localised corrosion, are enhanced by increasing pH. In this regard, there appears to be little negative impact on the integrity of the canister from the use in the repository of cementitious materials with pore fluids in the pH range pH 12 -13

  19. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  20. New technologies - new corrosion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitz, E.

    1994-01-01

    Adequate resistance of materials to corrosion is equally important for classical and for new technologies. This article considers the economic consequences of corrosion damage and, in addition to the long-known GNP orientation, presents a new approach to the estimation of the costs of corrosion and corrosion protection via maintenance and especially corrosion-related maintenance. The significance of ''high-tech'', ''medium-tech'' and ''low-tech'' material and corrosion problems is assessed. Selected examples taken from new technologies in the areas of power engineering, environmental engineering, chemical engineering, and biotechnology demonstrate the great significance of the problems. It is concluded that corrosion research and corrosion prevention technology will never come to an end but will constantly face new problems. Two technologies are of particular interest since they focus attention on new methods of investigation: microelectronics and final disposal of radioactive wastes. The article closes by considering the importance of the transfer of experience and technology. Since the manufacturs and operators of machines and plant do not generally have access to the very latest knowledge, they should be kept informed through advisory services, experimental studies, databases, and further education. (orig.) [de

  1. corrosion inhibitor for carbon steels

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    potentiodynamic polarisation techniques. It was found that. CNSL reduces the extent of the electrochemical processes taking place on carbon steel undergoing corrosion. The corrosion rate of the carbon steel was reduced by over 92 % when only 300 ppm of CNSL was applied. This indicates that. CNSL is a potential ...

  2. Tensammetric Studies on Corrosion Inhibitors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tensammetric Studies on Corrosion Inhibitors-I 277 paralleled potential data and corrosion data given in the next section. The only chemicals which bring about increased polarization of the steel speci- mens are sodium nitrite, dicyclohexylamine nitrite, cyclohexylamine and morpholine. The extent of polarization follows the ...

  3. Agricultural Polymers as Corrosion Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural polymers were composed of extra-cellular polysaccharides secreted by Leuconostoc mesenteroides have been shown to inhibit corrosion on corrosion-sensitive metals. The substantially pure exopolysaccharide has a general structure consisting of alpha(1-6)-linked D-glucose backbone and appr...

  4. DPC materials and corrosion environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest

    2014-10-01

    After an exposition of the materials used in DPCs and the factors controlling material corrosion in disposal environments, a survey is given of the corrosion rates, mechanisms, and products for commonly used stainless steels. Research needs are then identified for predicting stability of DPC materials in disposal environments. Stainless steel corrosion rates may be low enough to sustain DPC basket structural integrity for performance periods of as long as 10,000 years, especially in reducing conditions. Uncertainties include basket component design, disposal environment conditions, and the in-package chemical environment including any localized effects from radiolysis. Prospective disposal overpack materials exist for most disposal environments, including both corrosion allowance and corrosion resistant materials. Whereas the behavior of corrosion allowance materials is understood for a wide range of corrosion environments, demonstrating corrosion resistance could be more technically challenging and require environment-specific testing. A preliminary screening of the existing inventory of DPCs and other types of canisters is described, according to the type of closure, whether they can be readily transported, and what types of materials are used in basket construction.

  5. EXTRACT OF COMBRETUM MICRANTHUM AS CORROSION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2016-10-04

    Oct 4, 2016 ... The leaf extract of Combretum micranthum (CM) was tested as green corrosion inhibitor for Al-Si-Mg alloy in. 3.5wt% NaCl solution using gravimetric and linear polarization methods at 300C, 500C and 700C, from 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 hours of exposure time with concentration of the extract 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 ...

  6. Thin layer activation: measuring wear and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delvigne, T.; Leyman, D.; Oxorn, K.

    1995-01-01

    The technique known as thin layer activation (TLA) is explained and assessed in this article. Widely used, in for example the automotive industry, TLA allows on-line monitoring of the loss of matter from a critical surface, by wear erosion and corrosion. The technique offers extremely high sensitivity thus leading to reduced test times. On-line wear phenomena can be assessed during operation of a mechanical process, even through thick engine walls. (UK)

  7. The stochastic model of pitting corrosion of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Y. H.; Wang, B. R.; Hu, H. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Considering that pitting corrosion is a stochastic process, the purpose of this paper is to use stochastic theory to investigate the growth process of pitting corrosion of metals. Based on the mechanism of pit growth and nonequilibrium statistical theory, the time evolution equations of pit depth and corrosion rate are obtained, and the probability density function can be derived by solving Fock-Plank Equation. Subsequently, the failure probability or reliability of metals is calculated based on the weakest link model of pitting corrosion. Finally, the stochastic model is used on the aircraft aluminum alloy LD2. Furthermore, this methodology can be applied to analyze the reliability and predict the pitting life of metals.

  8. Concrete cover cracking due to uniform reinforcement corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe; Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2013-01-01

    Service life design (SLD) is an important tool for civil engineers to ensure that the structural integrity and functionality of the structure is not compromised within a given time frame, i.e. the service life. In SLD of reinforced concrete structures, reinforcement corrosion is of major concern...... and reinforcement de-passivation is a frequently used limit state. The present paper investigates an alternative limit state: corrosion-induced cover cracking. Results from numerical simulations of concrete cover cracking due to reinforcement corrosion are presented. The potential additional service life...... is calculated using literature data on corrosion rate and Faraday’s law. The parameters varied comprise reinforcement diameter, concrete cover thickness and concrete material properties, viz. concrete tensile strength and ductility (plain concrete and fibre reinforced concrete). Results obtained from...

  9. Sensor Systems for Corrosion Monitoring in Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Kumar

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available It is a need of permanently embedded corrosion monitoring devices to monitor the progress of corrosion problems on a new or existing reinforced concrete structures before embarking on repair or rehabilitation of the structures. Numerous devices are available for investigating corrosion problems, because no single technique exists which tells an engineer what he needs to know, namely how much damage there is on a structure now and how rapidly the damage will grow with time. In this investigation the studies on the sensors systems based on the measurements of half cell potential of rebars inside the concrete, resistivity of concrete, corrosion rate of rebars by eddy current measurements and sensing of chloride ions are reported. An integrated system consists of above sensors are fabricated and embedded into concrete. The response from each sensor was acquired and analyzed by NI hardware through LabVIEW software.

  10. Corrosion Detection of Reinforcement of Building Materials with Piezoelectric Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Peng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The extensive use of reinforced materials in the construction industry has raised increased concerns about their safety and durability, while corrosion detection of steel materials is becoming increasingly important. For the scientific management, timely repair and health monitoring of construction materials, as well as to ensure construction safety and prevent accidents, this paper investigates corrosion detection on construction materials based on piezoelectric sensors. At present, the commonly used corrosion detection methods include physical and electrochemical methods, but there are shortcomings such as large equipment area, low detection frequency, and complex operation. In this study an improved piezoelectric ultrasonic sensor was designed, which could not only detect the internal defects of buildings while not causing structural damage, but also realize continuous detection and enable qualitative and quantitative assessment. Corrosion detection of reinforced building materials with piezoelectric sensors is quick and accurate, which can find hidden dangers and provide a reliable basis for the safety of the buildings.

  11. Standard guide for corrosion-related failure analysis

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers key issues to be considered when examining metallic failures when corrosion is suspected as either a major or minor causative factor. 1.2 Corrosion-related failures could include one or more of the following: change in surface appearance (for example, tarnish, rust, color change), pin hole leak, catastrophic structural failure (for example, collapse, explosive rupture, implosive rupture, cracking), weld failure, loss of electrical continuity, and loss of functionality (for example, seizure, galling, spalling, swelling). 1.3 Issues covered include overall failure site conditions, operating conditions at the time of failure, history of equipment and its operation, corrosion product sampling, environmental sampling, metallurgical and electrochemical factors, morphology (mode) or failure, and by considering the preceding, deducing the cause(s) of corrosion failure. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibili...

  12. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  13. Electrochemical studies of corrosion inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of single salts, as well as multicomponent mixtures, on corrosion inhibition was studied for type 1010 steel; for 5052, 1100, and 2219-T87 aluminum alloys; and for copper. Molybdate-containing inhibitors exhibit an immediate, positive effect for steel corrosion, but an incubation period may be required for aluminum before the effect of a given inhibitor can be determined. The absence of oxygen was found to provide a positive effect (smaller corrosion rate) for steel and copper, but a negative effect for aluminum. This is attributed to the two possible mechanisms by which aluminum can oxidize. Corrosion inhibition is generally similar for oxygen-rich and oxygen-free environments. The results show that the electrochemical method is an effective means of screening inhibitors for the corrosion of single metals, with caution to be exercised in the case of aluminum.

  14. Fatigue and Corrosion in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Milella, Pietro Paolo

    2013-01-01

    This textbook, suitable for students, researchers and engineers, gathers the experience of more than 20 years of teaching fracture mechanics, fatigue and corrosion to professional engineers and running experimental tests and verifications to solve practical problems in engineering applications. As such, it is a comprehensive blend of fundamental knowledge and technical tools to address the issues of fatigue and corrosion. The book initiates with a systematic description of fatigue from a phenomenological point of view, since the early signs of submicroscopic damage in few surface grains and continues describing, step by step, how these precursors develop to become mechanically small cracks and, eventually, macrocracks whose growth is governed by fracture mechanics. But fracture mechanics is also introduced to analyze stress corrosion and corrosion assisted fatigue in a rather advanced fashion. The author dedicates a particular attention to corrosion starting with an electrochemical treatment that mechanical e...

  15. Fatigue strength degradation of metals in corrosive environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adasooriya, N. D.; Hemmingsen, T.; Pavlou, D.

    2017-12-01

    Structures exposed to aggressive environmental conditions are often subjected to time-dependent loss of coating and loss of material due to corrosion; this causes reduction in the cross-sectional properties of the members, increased surface roughness, surface irregularities and corrosion pits, and degradation of material strengths. These effects have been identified and simulated in different research studies. However, time and corrosive media dependent fatigue strength curves for materials have not been discussed in the design or assessment guidelines for structures. This paper attempts to review the corrosion degradation process and available approaches/models used to determine the fatigue strength of corroded materials and to interpolate corrosion deterioration data. High cycle fatigue and full range fatigue life formulae for fatigue strength of corroded materials are proposed. The above formulae depend on the endurance limit of corroded material, in addition to the stress-life fatigue curve parameters of the uncorroded material. The endurance limit of corroded material can either be determined by a limited number of tests in the very high-cycle fatigue region or predicted by an analytical approach. Comparison with experimentally measured corrosion fatigue behavior of several materials is provided and discussed.

  16. The Secant Rate of Corrosion: Correlating Observations of the USS Arizona Submerged in Pearl Harbor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donald L.; DeAngelis, Robert J.; Medlin, Dana J.; Johnson, Jon E.; Carr, James D.; Conlin, David L.

    2018-03-01

    Contrary to previous linear projections of steel corrosion in seawater, analysis of an inert marker embedded in USS Arizona concretion since the 7 December 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor reveals evidence that the effective corrosion rate decreases with time. The secant rate of corrosion, or SRC correlation, derived from this discovery could have a significant impact on failure analysis investigations for concreted shipwrecks or underwater structures. The correlation yields a lower rate of metal thinning than predicted. Development of the correlation is described.

  17. Corrosion resistant Zn–Co alloy coatings deposited using saw-tooth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Optimal configuration, represented as (Zn–Co)2.0/4.0/300 was found to exhibit ∼ 89 times better corrosion resistance compared to monolithic (Zn–Co)3.0 alloy deposited for same time, from same bath. The better corrosion resistance of CMMA coatings was attributed to changed interfacial dielectric properties, evidenced by ...

  18. Effect of Pre-Ageing Thermal Conditions on the Corrosion Properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From the results, the corrosion rate decreases with increasing pre-ageing time and temperatures. Equally, from the linear polarization data/curves, the corrosion rate of the treated alloy decreases at all ageing temperatures along with the ageing time. The Optical Microscope (OM) results of as-corroded samples revealed that ...

  19. Effect of molybdate on phosphating of Nd-Fe-B magnets for corrosion protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adonis Marcelo Saliba-Silva

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Nd-Fe-B magnets are highly susceptible to corrosion and need protection against environment attack. The use of organic coatings is one of the main methods of corrosion protection of these materials. Data related to the effect of conversion coatings, such as phosphating, on corrosion performance of these magnets is still scarce. Studies about the effect of phosphating on the corrosion resistance of a commercial Nd-Fe-B sintered magnet indicated that it increases the corrosion resistance of these magnets, compared to non-phosphated magnets. In this study, the solution chemistry of a phosphating bath was altered with the addition of molybdate and its effect on the corrosion resistance of magnets investigated. Sintered magnet specimens were phosphated in solutions of 10 g/L NaH2PO4 (pH 3.8, either with or without molybdate [10-3 M MoO4(2-], to improve their corrosion resistance. The effect of phosphating time was also evaluated, and specimens were phosphated for 4 and 18 hours. To evaluate the corrosion performance of phosphated and unphosphated specimens, a corrosion test based on monitoring hydrogen evolution on the surface of the magnets was used. This technique revealed that the addition of molybdate to the phosphating solution improved the corrosion resistance of the magnets phosphated by immersion for short periods but had no beneficial effect if phosphated by immersion for longer periods.

  20. Initiation and developmental stages of steel corrosion in wet H2S environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Pengpeng; Zhao, Hui; Zheng, Shuqi; Chen, Changfeng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The initiation and development stages of steel corrosion in wet H 2 S environment were investigated. • Preferential dissolution at the grain boundaries of steel allowed corrosion products to form and accumulate. • The shapes and crystal types of corrosion products at various steel layers differed. • With increasing duration time, the S 2− peak with a binding energy of 161.2 eV gradually decreased. • A model of the formation process of corrosion product films was proposed. - Abstract: The initiation and various developmental stages of steel corrosion in H 2 S environments were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results revealed that grain boundaries corrode at the initiation stage and that corrosion products initially form on both sides of the grain boundary and then accumulate. Corrosion products grew at the interface between the steel and corrosion product layer at the developmental stage. XPS analyses showed the composition and valence states of the corrosion products, and a model of the formation process of corrosion product films was proposed

  1. Ultimate strength performance of tankers associated with industry corrosion addition practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Kyun Kim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the ship and offshore structure design, age-related problems such as corrosion damage, local denting, and fatigue damage are important factors to be considered in building a reliable structure as they have a significant influence on the residual structural capacity. In shipping, corrosion addition methods are widely adopted in structural design to prevent structural capacity degradation. The present study focuses on the historical trend of corrosion addition rules for ship structural design and investigates their effects on the ultimate strength performance such as hull girder and stiffened panel of double hull oil tankers. Three types of rules based on corrosion addition models, namely historic corrosion rules (pre-CSR, Common Structural Rules (CSR, and harmonised Common Structural Rules (CSRH are considered and compared with two other corrosion models namely UGS model, suggested by the Union of Greek Shipowners (UGS, and Time-Dependent Corrosion Wastage Model (TDCWM. To identify the general trend in the effects of corrosion damage on the ultimate longitudinal strength performance, the corrosion addition rules are applied to four representative sizes of double hull oil tankers namely Panamax, Aframax, Suezmax, and VLCC. The results are helpful in understanding the trend of corrosion additions for tanker structures.

  2. Ultimate strength performance of tankers associated with industry corrosion addition practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Do Kyun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the ship and offshore structure design, age-related problems such as corrosion damage, local denting, and fatigue damage are important factors to be considered in building a reliable structure as they have a significant influence on the residual structural capacity. In shipping, corrosion addition methods are widely adopted in structural design to prevent structural capacity degradation. The present study focuses on the historical trend of corrosion addition rules for ship structural design and investigates their effects on the ultimate strength performance such as hull girder and stiffened panel of double hull oil tankers. Three types of rules based on corrosion addition models, namely historic corrosion rules (pre-CSR, Common Structural Rules (CSR, and harmonised Common Structural Rules (CSRH are considered and compared with two other corrosion models namely UGS model, suggested by the Union of Greek Shipowners (UGS, and Time-Dependent Corrosion Wastage Model (TDCWM. To identify the general trend in the effects of corrosion damage on the ultimate longitudinal strength performance, the corrosion addition rules are applied to four representative sizes of double hull oil tankers namely Panamax, Aframax, Suezmax, and VLCC. The results are helpful in understanding the trend of corrosion additions for tanker structures

  3. The Underground Corrosion of Selected Type 300 Stainless Steels After 34 Years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoder, T.S.; Adler Flitton, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, interest in long-term underground corrosion has greatly increased because of the ongoing need to dispose of nuclear waste. Additionally, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 requires disposal of high-level nuclear waste in an underground repository. Current contaminant release and transport models use limited available short-term underground corrosion rates when considering container and waste form degradation. Consequently, the resulting models oversimplify the complex mechanisms of underground metal corrosion. The complexity of stainless steel corrosion mechanisms and the processes by which corrosion products migrate from their source are not well depicted by a corrosion rate based on general attack. The research presented here is the analysis of austenitic stainless steels after 33 and a half years of burial. In this research, the corrosion specimens were analyzed using applicable ASTM standards as well as microscopic and X-ray examination to determine the mechanisms of underground stainless steel corrosion. As presented, the differences in the corrosion mechanisms vary with the type of stainless steel and the treatment of the samples. The uniqueness of the long sampling time allows for further understanding of the actual stainless steel corrosion mechanisms, and when applied back into predictive models, will assist in reduction of the uncertainty in parameters for predicting long-term fate and transport

  4. The Underground Corrosion of Selected Type 300 Stainless Steels After 34 Years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. S. Yoder; M. K. Adler Flitton

    2009-03-01

    Recently, interest in long-term underground corrosion has greatly increased because of the ongoing need to dispose of nuclear waste. Additionally, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 requires disposal of high-level nuclear waste in an underground repository. Current contaminant release and transport models use limited available short-term underground corrosion rates when considering container and waste form degradation. Consequently, the resulting models oversimplify the complex mechanisms of underground metal corrosion. The complexity of stainless steel corrosion mechanisms and the processes by which corrosion products migrate from their source are not well depicted by a corrosion rate based on general attack. The research presented here is the analysis of austenitic stainless steels after 33½ years of burial. In this research, the corrosion specimens were analyzed using applicable ASTM standards as well as microscopic and X-ray examination to determine the mechanisms of underground stainless steel corrosion. As presented, the differences in the corrosion mechanisms vary with the type of stainless steel and the treatment of the samples. The uniqueness of the long sampling time allows for further understanding of the actual stainless steel corrosion mechanisms, and when applied back into predictive models, will assist in reduction of the uncertainty in parameters for predicting long-term fate and transport.

  5. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  6. An example of transition from a corrosion process in gaseous phase to corrosion in aqueous environment: the case of Z2CN18-10 stainless steel by iodine and water in vapour phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, Bruno

    1990-01-01

    This research thesis addresses an example of transition of a corrosion process in gaseous phase towards corrosion in aqueous environment, specifically in the case of the corrosion of the Z2CN18-10 stainless steel by gaseous iodine in presence of water vapour (and possibly nitrogen dioxide). This transition occurs in two steps: initiation in gaseous phase and growth in aqueous environment. This transition is due to hygroscopic properties of mostly chromium iodides and, to a lesser extent, iron iodides. Morphological, electrochemical and thermogravimetry studies have been performed by varying different parameters governing corrosion processes: corrosion temperature, iodine concentration, relative humidity, and reaction time [fr

  7. Corrosion Behavior in 3.5% NaCl Solutions of γ-TiAl Processed by Electron Beam Melting Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asiful Hossain Seikh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the corrosion behavior of γ-TiAl alloy produced by electron beam melting (EBM process in 3.5% NaCl solution was reported. The study has been performed using potentiodynamic polarization resistance and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques and complemented by scanning electron microscopy investigations. All measurements were carried out after different periods of alloy exposure in the chloride solutions and at different temperatures. The results showed that the EBM produced γ-TiAl alloy has excellent corrosion resistance confirmed by the high values of polarization resistance and the low values of corrosion current and corrosion rate. With increase in immersion time, the corrosion potential moved to a higher positive value with a decrease in corrosion current and corrosion rate, which suggests an improvement in corrosion resistance. On the other hand, the increase of temperature was found to significantly increase the corrosion of the processed γ-TiAl alloy.

  8. Treatment screening for internal corrosion control of PETROBRAS oil pipelines; Selecao de tratamento para controle da corrosao interna de oleodutos da PETROBRAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Cynthia de Azevedo; Muller, Eduardo Gullo [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas; Antunes, Warlley Ligorio; Shioya, Nilce Hiromi; Salvador, Angelica Dias [PETROBRAS, RJ (Brazil). Unidade de Negocios da Bacia de Campos

    2005-07-01

    The use of corrosion inhibitors is spread out in oil and gas industry and is the most common methodology to control pipeline internal corrosion. However, their effectiveness depends on the pipeline material, inhibitor composition, flow type and scale characteristics. When a pipeline has heavy scale deposits, thick bacterial biofilm, or oxygen contamination, the corrosion control via filmic inhibitors is not effective. So, the only way to control internal corrosion of an oil pipeline is to primary identifies the corrosive agent and the main corrosion mechanism. The monitoring of the inhibitor efficiency and the determination of minimal residual concentration to prevent corrosion, are also fundamental. In this paper, is presented the criteria used to identify the main corrosion mechanism of oil pipelines, the treatment proposed in each case and the techniques employed in real time corrosion monitoring. (author)

  9. Improvement of PWR reliability by corrosion prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Since first PWR in Japan started commercial operation in 1970, we have encountered the various modes of corrosion on primary and secondary side components. We have paid much efforts for resolving these corrosion problems, that is, investigating the causes of corrosion and establishing the countermeasures for these corrosion. We summarize these efforts in this article. (author)

  10. Corrosion detection of nanowires by magnetic sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jürgen

    2017-10-05

    Disclosed are various embodiments related to a corrosion detection device for detecting corrosive environments. A corrosion detection device comprises a magnetic sensor and at least one magnetic nanowire disposed on the magnetic sensor. The magnetic sensor is configured to detect corrosion of the one or more magnetic nanowires based at least in part on a magnetic field of the one or more magnetic nanowires.

  11. Recognition and Analysis of Corrosion Failure Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Suess

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion has a vast impact on the global and domestic economy, and currently incurs losses of nearly $300 billion annually to the U.S. economy alone. Because of the huge impact of corrosion, it is imperative to have a systematic approach to recognizing and mitigating corrosion problems as soon as possible after they become apparent. A proper failure analysis includes collection of pertinent background data and service history, followed by visual inspection, photographic documentation, material evaluation, data review and conclusion procurement. In analyzing corrosion failures, one must recognize the wide range of common corrosion mechanisms. The features of any corrosion failure give strong clues as to the most likely cause of the corrosion. This article details a proven approach to properly determining the root cause of a failure, and includes pictographic illustrations of the most common corrosion mechanisms, including general corrosion, pitting, galvanic corrosion, dealloying, crevice corrosion, microbiologically-influenced corrosion (MIC, corrosion fatigue, stress corrosion cracking (SCC, intergranular corrosion, fretting, erosion corrosion and hydrogen damage.

  12. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  13. Effects of copper and titanium on the corrosion behavior of newly fabricated nanocrystalline aluminum in natural seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherif, El-Sayed M.; Ammar, Hany Rizk; Khalil, Khalil Abdelrazek

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We fabricated nanocrystalline Al and some of its alloys by mechanical alloying method. • The corrosion behavior of the fabricated materials in natural seawater was reported. • We found that Al suffers both uniform and localized corrosion in the seawater. • The presence of Cu significantly decreased the corrosion of Al. • The addition of Ti to the Al–Cu alloy presented more protection to Al against corrosion. - Abstract: Fabrication of a newly nanocrystalline Al and two of its alloys, namely Al–10%Cu; and Al–10%Cu–5%Ti has been carried out using mechanical alloying (MA) technique. The corrosion behavior of these materials in aerated stagnant Arabian Gulf seawater (AGSW) at room temperature has been reported. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP), chronoamperometric current-time (CCT) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements along with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray energy dispersive (EDX) investigations were employed to report the corrosion behavior of the fabricated materials. All results indicated that Al suffers both uniform and localized corrosion in the AGSW test solution. The presence of 10%Cu decreases the corrosion current density, the anodic and cathodic currents and corrosion rate and increases the corrosion resistance of Al. The addition of 5%Ti to the Al–10%Cu alloy produced further decreases in the corrosion parameters. Measurements together confirmed that the corrosion of the fabricated materials in AGSW decreases in the order Al > Al–10%Cu > Al–10%Cu–5%Ti

  14. Effects of copper and titanium on the corrosion behavior of newly fabricated nanocrystalline aluminum in natural seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherif, El-Sayed M., E-mail: esherif@ksu.edu.sa [Mechanical Engineering Department, College of Engineering, King Saud University, P.O. Box 800, Al-Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Electrochemistry and Corrosion Laboratory, Department of Physical Chemistry, National Research Centre , (NRC), Dokki, 12622, Cairo 8 (Egypt); Ammar, Hany Rizk [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez University, Suez (Egypt); Khalil, Khalil Abdelrazek [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez University, Suez (Egypt); Mechanical Design and Materials Department, Faculty of Energy Engineering, Aswan University, Aswan (Egypt)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We fabricated nanocrystalline Al and some of its alloys by mechanical alloying method. • The corrosion behavior of the fabricated materials in natural seawater was reported. • We found that Al suffers both uniform and localized corrosion in the seawater. • The presence of Cu significantly decreased the corrosion of Al. • The addition of Ti to the Al–Cu alloy presented more protection to Al against corrosion. - Abstract: Fabrication of a newly nanocrystalline Al and two of its alloys, namely Al–10%Cu; and Al–10%Cu–5%Ti has been carried out using mechanical alloying (MA) technique. The corrosion behavior of these materials in aerated stagnant Arabian Gulf seawater (AGSW) at room temperature has been reported. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP), chronoamperometric current-time (CCT) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements along with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray energy dispersive (EDX) investigations were employed to report the corrosion behavior of the fabricated materials. All results indicated that Al suffers both uniform and localized corrosion in the AGSW test solution. The presence of 10%Cu decreases the corrosion current density, the anodic and cathodic currents and corrosion rate and increases the corrosion resistance of Al. The addition of 5%Ti to the Al–10%Cu alloy produced further decreases in the corrosion parameters. Measurements together confirmed that the corrosion of the fabricated materials in AGSW decreases in the order Al > Al–10%Cu > Al–10%Cu–5%Ti.

  15. Corrosion of simulated nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Ristic, M.; Gotic, M.; Foric, J.

    1988-01-01

    In this study the preparation and characterization of borosilicate glasses of different chemical composition were investigated. Borosilicate glasses were doped with simulated nuclear waste oxides. The chemical corrosion in water of these glasses was followed by measuring the leach rates as a function of time. It was found that a simulated nuclear waste glass with the chemical composition (weight %), 15.61% Na 2 O, 10.39% B 2 O 3 , 45.31% SiO 2 , 13.42% ZnO, 6.61% TiO 2 and 8.66% waste oxides, is characterized by low melting temperature and with good corrosion resistance in water. Influence of passive layers on the leaching behaviour of nuclear waste glasses is discussed. (author) 20 refs.; 7 figs.; 4 tabs

  16. Tunneling corrosion mechanism of the hot forged austenitic stainless steel in highly oxidizing nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Hiroo; Kajimura, Haruhiko

    1993-01-01

    Austenitic Stainless Steels have been used for reprocessing plants where spent nuclear fuels are dealt with in hot nitric acid. Conventional stainless steels are resistant enough to nitric acid. However, they are prone to localized corrosion when nitric acid becomes highly oxidizing with birth of oxidants such as Ce 4+ or Cr 6+ ion during the reprocessing. Pitting type corrosion, so-called tunneling or end-grain corrosion occurred on the forgings of 25%-20%-Nb stainless steel (310Nb stainless steel) in such nitric acid solutions because of transpassive corrosion. It has been well known that metal surfaces of steel products casted, forged or rolled are susceptible to the tunneling corrosion in aggressive corrosion media. Nevertheless, neither clear explanations of the mechanism nor definite countermeasures have been proposed yet. This paper describes the mechanism and countermeasures on the tunneling corrosion of stainless steels in nitric acid relevant to spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. The results obtained are as follows: both general and intergranular corrosion occur on austenitic stainless steels in boiling 8N HNO 3 with Cr 6+ ions. Tunneling corrosion is initiated and propagates at the metal surfaces of 310Nb stainless steel forgings along chromium depleted areas vertical to metal flows. The grooves due to the tunneling corrosion are of diameters of 0.5 to 2 mm with a maximum depth of 6mm depending on exposure time and Cr 6+ concentration in nitric acid. Tunneling corrosion proceeds by build up of galvanic corrosion cells with Cr depleted parts as anodes and their neighborhoods as cathodes. The Cr depleted parts are formed during solidification of ingots and still retained parallel to the metal flow even after forging. The ESR (Electro Slag Remelting) is one of the useful preventive methods to tunneling corrosion from the view point of steel homogenization

  17. Research and development activities at INE concerning corrosion of final repository container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzler, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    The present work provides a historical overview of the research and development activities carried out at the (Nuclear) Research Center Karlsruhe (today KIT) since the beginning of the 1980s on the corrosion of materials which might be suitable for construction of containers for highly radioactive wastes. The report relates almost exclusively to the work performed by Dr. Emmanuel Smailos, who elaborated the corrosion of various materials at the Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE). The requirements for the containers and materials, which were subject to changes in time, are presented. The changes were strongly influenced by the changed perception of the use of nuclear energy. The selection of the materials under investigations, the boundary conditions for the corrosion experiments and the analytical methods are described. Results of the corrosion of the materials such as finegrained steel, Hastelloy C4, nodular cast iron, titanium-palladium and copper or copper-nickel alloys in typical salt solutions are summarized. The findings of special investigations, e.g. corrosion under irradiation or the influence of sulfide on the corrosion rates are shown. For construction of disposal canisters, experiments were conducted to determine the contact corrosion, the influence of the hydrogen embrittlement of Ti-Pd and fine-grained steels on the corrosion behavior as well as the corrosion behavior of welding and the influence of different welding processes with the resulting heat-affected zones on the corrosion behavior. The work was contributed to several European research programs and was well recognized in the USA. Investigations on the corrosion of steels in non-saline solutions and corrosion under interim storage conditions as well as under the expected conditions of the Konrad repository for low-level radioactive wastes are also described. In addition, the experiments on ceramic materials are presented and the results of the corrosion of Al 2 O 3 and ZrO 2 ceramics

  18. Corrosion of steel structures in sea-bed sediment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SBS corrosion has now become a serious problem in marine environment and an important issue in corrosion science. In this paper, approach in the field of SBS corrosion is reviewed. Electrochemical and microbial corrosion factors, corrosion mechanism, measurement of metal corrosion rate, corrosion evaluation and ...

  19. Atmospheric corrosion of mild steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morcillo, M.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric corrosion of mild steel is an extensive topic that has been studied by many authors in different regions throughout the world. This compilation paper incorporates relevant publications on the subject, in particular about the nature of atmospheric corrosion products, mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion and kinetics of the atmospheric corrosion process, paying special attention to two matters upon which relatively less information has been published: a the morphology of steel corrosion products and corrosion product layers; and b long-term atmospheric corrosion ( > 10 years.

    La corrosión atmosférica del acero suave es un tema de gran amplitud que ha sido tratado por muchos autores en numerosas regiones del mundo. Este artículo de compilación incorpora publicaciones relevantes sobre esta temática, en particular sobre la naturaleza de los productos de corrosión atmosférica, mecanismos y cinética de los procesos de corrosión atmosférica, prestando una atención especial a dos aspectos sobre los que la información publicada ha sido menos abundante: a morfología de los productos de corrosión del acero y capas de productos de corrosión, y b corrosión atmosférica a larga duración (> 10 años.

  20. In Vitro Corrosion Study of Friction Stir Processed WE43 Magnesium Alloy in a Simulated Body Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Genghua; Zhang, Datong; Zhang, Weiwen; Zhang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of friction stir processing (FSP) WE43 alloy in a simulated body fluid (SBF) was investigated. Micro-galvanic corrosion was the dominated corrosion behavior, and the corrosion resistance of FSP WE43 alloy was improved compared to the cast counterpart. Furthermore, due to the fine-grained and homogeneous microstructure, uniform corrosion morphology was observed on FSP WE43 alloy. According to the tensile properties of specimens with different immersion time intervals, FSP WE43 alloy shows better performance to maintain the mechanical integrity in SBF as compared to the as-cast alloy. PMID:28773664

  1. Corrosion protection and control using nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, R

    2012-01-01

    This book covers the use of nanomaterials to prevent corrosion. The first section deals with the fundamentals of corrosion prevention using nanomaterials. Part two includes a series of case studies and applications of nanomaterials for corrosion control.$bCorrosion is an expensive and potentially dangerous problem in many industries. The potential application of different nanostructured materials in corrosion protection, prevention and control is a subject of increasing interest. Corrosion protection and control using nanomaterials explores the potential use of nanotechnology in corrosion control. The book is divided into two parts. Part one looks at the fundamentals of corrosion behaviour and the manufacture of nanocrystalline materials. Chapters discuss the impact of nanotechnology in reducing corrosion cost, and investigate the influence of various factors including thermodynamics, kinetics and grain size on the corrosion behaviour of nanocrystalline materials. There are also chapters on electrodeposition ...

  2. Corrosion potential recovery of dental amalgam restorations following prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutow, Elliott J; Maillet, J Peggy; Maillet, Wayne A; Hall, Gordon C; Millar, Michele

    2007-07-01

    Dental amalgam restorations are subjected to abrasion during selective prophylaxis that can damage or remove the protective oxide and result in increased rates of corrosion and chemical dissolution of mercury. It was the objective of this research to study the corrosion potential change of dental amalgam restorations to obtain an indication of the time required for in vivo repassivation following prophylaxis. The corrosion potentials of 27 Class I and Class II amalgam restorations were measured pre- and post-prophylaxis using a high impedance voltmeter and a Ag/AgCl micro-reference electrode. Prophylaxis was performed for approximately 2s on each amalgam surface using a slow-speed handpiece with a rubber-cup and commercial abrasive paste. Subjects thoroughly rinsed before the post-prophylaxis corrosion potentials were measured. The data were analyzed using a confidence interval, a t-test and correlation analysis. The pre- and post-prophylaxis mean corrosion potentials were, respectively, -132 (27)mV and -126 (27)mV. The mean of the differences between the pre- and post-prophylaxis corrosion potentials was 6.1 (28)mV, with an associated 95% confidence interval of (-4.8, 17)mV. A t-test showed the mean absolute difference in corrosion potential was less than 50 mV (pamalgam restorations occurred by at most 10-44 min, indicating that the period of elevated corrosion rate and elevated chemical dissolution rate of mercury, due to oxide damage or removal, may be short-lived.

  3. Study of biofuels corrosiveness; Estudo da corrosividade de biocombustiveis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Rafaela da Conceicao; Branco, Lucas da Paz Nogueira; Guimaraes, Maria Jose de Oliveria Cavalcanti; Seidl, Peter Rudolf [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    The replacement of crude oil derivatives with biofuels is part of an energy strategy, in which efficiency and conservation should play a leading role. The renewable nature of biodiesel is based in the fact that it is derived from raw materials from agricultural activities, instead of petroleum. Thinking about the increasingly production of biodiesel and its storage to make the proper mixtures, the corrosion of biodiesel tanks can occur over time. The copper corrosion test is used as the standard method for biodiesel corrosivity, however it is designed for diesel fuel from petroleum. Petrodiesel contains sulfur, which attacks the copper alloys. Since biodiesel is free of this element, it should be characterized in a different way. This work intends to analyze existing methodologies in order to evaluate the corrosivity of biodiesel. A literature search was performed in Web of Science database, selecting keywords for a comprehensive search. For the final analysis, a selection of papers classified according to publication year, country and main subject covered was used. Research on biofuels corrosivity is recent and major countries where published (USA, Malaysia and Brazil) which have advantages in terms of size and production of oil seeds. Biodiesel is more corrosive than petroleum diesel, but there is no sufficient evidences as to verify if the level of corrosion found in biodiesel is within acceptable limits for automotive components. Ferrous alloys are more resistant to biodiesel attack than non-ferrous alloys. Among non-ferrous alloys, copper and lead alloys are the most vulnerable, followed by aluminum. It is necessary to develop appropriate methodologies to determine and characterize the corrosivity of biodiesel on engine parts and alloys used in its manufacture and storage. (author)

  4. Corrosion properties of cladding materials from Zr1Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloc, K.; Kosler, S.

    1975-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour was observed of the Zr1Nb alloy in hot water and superheated steam and the effects of impurity content, of the purity of the corrosion environment and of the heat treatment of the alloy were studied on the alloy corrosion resistance. Also studied were the absorption of hydrogen by the alloy and its behaviour in reactor situations. It was ascertained that the alloy has a good corrosion resistance up to a temperature of 350 degC. The corrosion resistance is reduced by the presence of nitrogen above 50 to 70 ppm and of carbon above 50 to 90 ppm. A graphic representation is given of the dependence of corrosion resistance on the temperature of annealing, the nitrogen content of the alloy and the time of the action of hot water or steam, as well as the dependence of the hydrogen content in the alloy on the peripheral tension of the cladding in hot water both in non-active environment and at irradiation with a neutron flux of approximately 10 20 n/cm 2 . (J.B.)

  5. Determination of corrosion potential of coated hollow spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorkova, Andrea; Orinakova, Renata; Orinak, Andrej; Dudrova, Eva; Kupkova, Miriam; Kalavsky, Frantisek

    2008-01-01

    Copper hollow spheres were created on porous iron particles by electro-less deposition. The consequent Ni plating was applied to improve the mechanical properties of copper hollow micro-particles. Corrosion properties of coated hollow spheres were investigated using potentiodynamic polarisation method in 1 mol dm -3 NaCl solution. Surface morphology and composition were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), light microscopy (LM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Original iron particles, uncoated copper spheres and iron particles coated with nickel were studied as the reference materials. The effect of particle composition, particularly Ni content on the corrosion potential value was investigated. The results indicated that an increase in the amount of Ni coating layer deteriorated corrosion resistivity of coated copper spheres. Amount of Ni coating layer depended on conditions of Ni electrolysis, mainly on electrolysis time and current intensity. Corrosion behaviour of sintered particles was also explored by potentiodynamic polarisation experiments for the sake of comparison. Formation of iron rich micro-volumes on the particle surface during sintering caused the corrosion potential shift towards more negative values. A detailed study of the morphological changes between non-sintered and sintered micro-particles provided explanation of differences in corrosion potential (E corr )

  6. Investigation on the thermographic detection of corrosion in RC structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantele, Elia A.; Votsis, Renos A.; Kyriakides, Nicholas; Georgiou, Panagiota G.; Ioannou, Fotia G.

    2017-09-01

    Corrosion of the steel reinforcement is the main problem of reinforced concrete (RC) structures. Over the past decades, several methods have been developed aiming to detect the corrosion process early in order to minimise the structural damage and consequently the repairing costs. Emphasis was given in developing methods and techniques of non-destructive nature providing fast on-the-spot detection and covering large areas rather that concentrating on single locations. This study, investigates a non-destructive corrosion detection technique for reinforced concrete, which is based on infrared thermography and the difference in thermal characteristics of corroded and non-corroded steel rebars. The technique is based on the principle that corrosion products have poor heat conductivity, and they inhibit the diffusion of heat that is generated in the reinforcing bar due to heating. For the investigation RC specimens, have been constructed in the laboratory using embedded steel bars of different corrosion states. Afterward, one surface of the specimens was heated using an electric device while thermal images were captured at predefined time instants on the opposite surface with an IR camera. The test results showed a clear difference between the thermal characteristics of the corroded and the non-corroded samples, which demonstrates the potential of using thermography in corrosion detection in RC structures.

  7. Laser Surface Alloying of Aluminum for Improving Acid Corrosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiru, Woldetinsay Gutu; Sankar, Mamilla Ravi; Dixit, Uday Shanker

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, laser surface alloying of aluminum with magnesium, manganese, titanium and zinc, respectively, was carried out to improve acid corrosion resistance. Laser surface alloying was conducted using 1600 and 1800 W power source using CO2 laser. Acid corrosion resistance was tested by dipping the samples in a solution of 2.5% H2SO4 for 200 h. The weight loss due to acid corrosion was reduced by 55% for AlTi, 41% for AlMg alloy, 36% for AlZn and 22% for AlMn alloy. Laser surface alloyed samples offered greater corrosion resistance than the aluminum substrate. It was observed that localized pitting corrosion was the major factor to damage the surface when exposed for a long time. The hardness after laser surface alloying was increased by a factor of 8.7, 3.4, 2.7 and 2 by alloying with Mn, Mg, Ti and Zn, respectively. After corrosion test, hardness was reduced by 51% for AlTi sample, 40% for AlMg sample, 41.4% for AlMn sample and 33% for AlZn sample.

  8. Effect of Pseudomonas fluorescens on Buried Steel Pipeline Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spark, Amy J; Law, David W; Ward, Liam P; Cole, Ivan S; Best, Adam S

    2017-08-01

    Buried steel infrastructure can be a source of iron ions for bacterial species, leading to microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Localized corrosion of pipelines due to MIC is one of the key failure mechanisms of buried steel pipelines. In order to better understand the mechanisms of localized corrosion in soil, semisolid agar has been developed as an analogue for soil. Here, Pseudomonas fluorescens has been introduced to the system to understand how bacteria interact with steel. Through electrochemical testing including open circuit potentials, potentiodynamic scans, anodic potential holds, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy it has been shown that P. fluorescens increases the rate of corrosion. Time for oxide and biofilms to develop was shown to not impact on the rate of corrosion but did alter the consistency of biofilm present and the viability of P. fluorescens following electrochemical testing. The proposed mechanism for increased corrosion rates of carbon steel involves the interactions of pyoverdine with the steel, preventing the formation of a cohesive passive layer, after initial cell attachment, followed by the formation of a metal concentration gradient on the steel surface.

  9. EMBEDDED CAPACITOR SENSOR FOR MONITORING CORROSION OF REINFORCEMENT IN CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SITI FATIMAH ABDUL RAHMAN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of reinforcement can affect durability and integrity of reinforced concrete structures. Repair cost for a badly corroded structure can be very costly and time consuming. In this paper, several capacitor sensors were developed to monitor corrosion potential of reinforcement in concrete. The impedance capacitive of sensors was tested in various acid and alkali solutions using Agilent 4284A Precision LCR meter. The other sensors were tied to reinforcements and embedded in concrete specimen contaminated with 5% chloride to measure corrosion potential. The specimens were exposed to the corrosion chamber and indoor environments. From the research, it was found that the sensor can measure the impedance capacitive at different frequencies in the aggressive solutions. Besides, it was observed that the patterns of corrosion potential shown by the embedded sensors were similar to the SRI sensor. The output values from embedded sensor are in a range of recommendation by the ASTM-C876. Eventually, the bars were found corroded from the broken specimens that confirmed the detection of corrosion activities as recorded by the sensors.

  10. Corrosion resistance of metals and alloys in molten alkalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarubitskij, O.G.; Dmitruk, B.F.; Minets, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    Literature data on the corrosion of non-ferrous and noble metals, iron and steels in the molten alkalis and mixtures of their base are presented. It is shown that zirconium, niobium and tantalum are characterized by high corrosion stability in the molten NaOH. Additions of NaOH and KOH to the alkali chloride melts result in a 1000 time decrease of zirconium corrosion rate at 850 deg. The data testify to the characteristic passivating properties of OH - ions; Mo and W do not possess an ability to selfpassivation in hydroxide melts. Corrosion resistance of carbon and chromium-nickel steels in hydroxide melts depends considerably on the temperature, electrolyte composition and atmosphere over them. At the temperatures up to 600 deg C chromium-nickel steel is corrosion resistant in the molten alkali only in the inert atmosphere. Corrosion rate of chromium-nickel alloy is the lower the less chromium and the more nickel it contains. For the small installations the 4Kh18N25S2 and Kh23N28M3D3T steels can be recommended

  11. Inhibition of the Cu65/Zn35 brass corrosion by natural extract of Camellia sinensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramde, Tambi, E-mail: t_ramde@univ-ouaga.bf [Equipe Chimie Physique et Electrochimie, Laboratoire de Chimie Moléculaire et des Matériaux, Université de Ouagadougou, 03 BP 7021 Ouagadougou 03 (Burkina Faso); Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, via Sommarive 9, 38123 Trento (Italy); Rossi, Stefano; Zanella, Caterina [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, via Sommarive 9, 38123 Trento (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    In this work, the corrosion inhibition of brass was studied using natural plant extract, Camellia sinensis, in 0.1 M Na2SO4 solutions with pH 7 and pH 4. Electrochemical techniques (potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were applied to study the brass corrosion behavior in presence and absence of the extract. The results indicated that the extract is a very effective corrosion inhibitor for brass corrosion process in both the acidic and neutral media by virtue of adsorption. The inhibition effect increases by time as demonstrated by the EIS monitoring for 120 h. In the blank solution the corrosion process leads to the formation of a dark oxide patina at pH 7 and induces localized corrosion morphology at pH 4. The extract presence can avoid both the dark patina and the pits formation.

  12. Inhibition of the Cu65/Zn35 brass corrosion by natural extract of Camellia sinensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramde, Tambi; Rossi, Stefano; Zanella, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the corrosion inhibition of brass was studied using natural plant extract, Camellia sinensis, in 0.1 M Na2SO4 solutions with pH 7 and pH 4. Electrochemical techniques (potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were applied to study the brass corrosion behavior in presence and absence of the extract. The results indicated that the extract is a very effective corrosion inhibitor for brass corrosion process in both the acidic and neutral media by virtue of adsorption. The inhibition effect increases by time as demonstrated by the EIS monitoring for 120 h. In the blank solution the corrosion process leads to the formation of a dark oxide patina at pH 7 and induces localized corrosion morphology at pH 4. The extract presence can avoid both the dark patina and the pits formation.

  13. Influence of cracks and pitting corrosion on residual ultimate strength of stiffened plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Jing

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] Ships and offshore platforms serve in the harsh sea environment for a long time. Cracks and pitting corrosion will occur in such a structure and the damage will affect its ultimate strength.[Methods] To investigate the influence of cracks and pitting corrosion on ultimate bearing capacity, the ultimate strength of a structure under axial compression is studied by using a nonlinear finite element. The mesh size of a stiffened plate with cracks and pitting corrosion is first discussed. Then the influence of the relative positions of cracks and pitting corrosion, number of corrosion points and crack length impact on the residual ultimate strength of damaged stiffened plates is discussed via a series of calculations.[Results] The results indicate that the increase in crack length and pitting corrosion significantly decreases the ultimate strength of a stiffened plate. [Conclusions] This provides a useful reference for designing and maintaining ships and offshore structures in their life cycles.

  14. Fatty Amides from Crude Rice Bran Oil as Green Corrosion Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Reyes-Dorantes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to its high oil content, this research proposes the use of an agroindustrial byproduct (rice bran as a sustainable option for the synthesis of corrosion inhibitors. From the crude rice bran oil, the synthesis of fatty amide-type corrosion inhibitors was carried out. The corrosion inhibitory capacity of the fatty amides was evaluated on an API X-70 steel using electrochemical techniques such as real-time corrosion monitoring and potentiodynamic polarization curves. As a corrosive medium, a CO2-saturated solution (3.5% NaCl was used at three temperatures (30, 50, and 70°C and different concentrations of inhibitor (0, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 ppm. The results demonstrate that the sustainable use of agroindustrial byproducts is a good alternative to the synthesis of environmentally friendly inhibitors with high corrosion inhibition efficiencies.

  15. High temperature corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.

    1988-08-01

    This paper covers three main topics: 1. high temperature oxidation of metals and alloys, 2. corrosion in sulfur containing environments and 3. structural changes caused by corrosion. The following 21 subjects are discussed: Influence of implanted yttrium and lanthanum on the oxidation behaviour of beta-NiA1; influence of reactive elements on the adherence and protective properties of alumina scales; problems related to the application of very fine markers in studying the mechanism of thin scale formation; oxidation behaviour of chromia forming Co-Cr-Al alloys with or without reactive element additions; growth and properties of chromia-scales on high-temperature alloys; quantification of the depletion zone in high temperature alloys after oxidation in process gas; effects of HC1 and of N2 in the oxidation of Fe-20Cr; investigation under nuclear safety aspects of Zircaloy-4 oxidation kinetics at high temperatures in air; on the sulfide corrosion of metallic materials; high temperature sulfide corrosion of Mn, Nb and Nb-Si alloys; corrosion behaviour or NiCrAl-based alloys in air and air-SO2 gas mixtures; sulfidation of cobalt at high temperatures; preoxidation for sulfidation protection; fireside corrosion and application of additives in electric utility boilers; transport properties of scales with complex defect structures; observations of whiskers and pyramids during high temperature corrosion of iron in SO2; corrosion and creep of alloy 800H under simulated coal gasification conditions; microstructural changes of HK 40 cast alloy caused by exploitation in tubes in steam reformer installation; microstructural changes during exposure in corrosive environments and their effect on mechanical properties; coatings against carburization; mathematical modeling of carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation in Ni-Cr-based alloys. (MM)

  16. pH Sensitive Microcapsules for Delivery of Corrosion Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Calle, Luz M.

    2006-01-01

    A considerable number of corrosion problems can be solved by coatings. However, even the best protective coatings can fail by allowing the slow diffusion of oxygen and moisture to the metal surface. Corrosion accelerates when a coating delaminates. Often, the problems start when microscopic nicks or pits on the surface develop during manufacturing or through wear and tear. This problem can be solved by the incorporation of a self-healing function into the coating. Several new concepts are currently under development to incorporate this function into a coating. Conductive polymers, nanoparticles, and microcapsules are used to release corrosion-inhibiting ions at a defect site. The objective of this investigation is to develop a smart coating for the early detection and inhibition of corrosion. The dual function of this new smart coating system is performed by pH-triggered release microcapsules. The microcapsules can be used to deliver healing agents to terminate the corrosion process at its early stage or as corrosion indicators by releasing dyes at the localized corrosion sites. The dyes can be color dyes or fluorescent dyes, with or without pH sensitivity. Microcapsules were formed through the interfacial polymerization process. The average size of the microcapsules can be adjusted from 1 to 100 micron by adjusting the emulsion formula and the microcapsule forming conditions. A typical microcapsule size is around 10 microns with a narrow size distribution. The pH sensitivity of the microcapsule can also be controlled by adjusting the emulsion formula and the polymerization reaction time. Both corrosion indicator (pH indicator) and corrosion inhibitor containing microcapsules were formed and incorporated into paint systems. Test panels of selected steels and aluminum alloys were painted using these paints. Testing of compatibility between the microcapsule system and different paint systems are in progress. Initial experiments with the microcapsule containing paint

  17. Corrosion aspects in reprocessing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauvet, P.; Pinard Legry, G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents two examples illustrating the importance of the physicochemical conditions existing at the metal-medium interface on the corrosion behaviour of materials utilized in spent fuel reprocessing plants: corrosion of a stainless steel in the presence of nitric acid condensates, which is much more severe than in the liquid bulk; behaviour of zirconium, which has an outstanding corrosion resistance in nitric acid, but may suffer depassivation in drastic conditions (not existing in reprocessing plants), with the consequence of a loss of the protective effect of the zirconia passive layer

  18. Critical Study of Corrosion Damaged Concrete Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Sallehuddin Shah Ayop; John Cairns

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete is one of the major problems with respect to the durability of reinforced concrete structures. The degradation of the structure strength due to reinforcement corrosion decreases its design life. This paper presents the literature study on the influence of the corrosion on concrete structure starting from the mechanism of the corrosion until the deterioration stage and the structural effects of corrosion on concrete structures.

  19. Corrosion and corrosion fatigue of airframe aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G. S.; Gao, M.; Harlow, D. G.; Wei, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    Localized corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and growth are recognized as degradation mechanisms that effect the durability and integrity of commercial transport aircraft. Mechanically based understanding is needed to aid the development of effective methodologies for assessing durability and integrity of airframe components. As a part of the methodology development, experiments on pitting corrosion, and on corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and early growth from these pits were conducted. Pitting was found to be associated with constituent particles in the alloys and pit growth often involved coalescence of individual particle-nucleated pits, both laterally and in depth. Fatigue cracks typically nucleated from one of the larger pits that formed by a cluster of particles. The size of pit at which fatigue crack nucleates is a function of stress level and fatigue loading frequency. The experimental results are summarized, and their implications on service performance and life prediction are discussed.

  20. Assessing resistance of stabilized corrosion resistant steels to intergranular corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karas, A.; Cihal, V. Jr.; Vanek, V.; Herzan, J.; Protiva, K.; Cihal, V.

    1987-01-01

    Resistance to intergranular corrosion was determined for four types of titanium-stabilized steels from the coefficients of stabilization efficiency according to the degree the chemical composition was known. The ATA SUPER steel showed the highest resistance parameter value. The resistance of this type of steel of a specific composition, showing a relatively low value of mean nitrogen content was compared with steel of an optimized chemical composition and with low-carbon niobium stabilized, molybdenum modified steels. The comparison showed guarantees of a sufficient resistance of the steel to intergranular corrosion. The method of assessing the resistance to intergranular corrosion using the calculation of the minimum content of Cr', i.e., the effective chromium content, and the maximum effective carbon content C' giving the resistance parameter k seems to be prospective for practical use in the production of corrosion resistant steels. (author). 1 tab., 5 figs., 15 refs

  1. Corrosion resistance of magnesium treated by hydrocarbon plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yekehtaz, M.; Baba, K.; Hatada, R.; Flege, S.; Sittner, F.; Ensinger, W.

    2009-01-01

    Due to its low weight, magnesium is increasingly being used as construction materials for e.g. automobile bodies or cell phone housings. However, the material suffers from poor tribological features and particularly from poor corrosion resistance. In order to protect magnesium from corrosion, it was treated by hydrocarbon plasma immersion ion implantation. Magnesium samples were implanted with methane and acetylene at different process times at ambient temperature. Electrochemical corrosion measurements in dilute buffered acetic acid showed that the treatment led to well-adhering films with an effective corrosion protection.

  2. Application of Terahertz Radiation to the Detection of Corrosion under the Shuttle's Thermal Protection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Anastasi, Robert F.; Smith, Stephen W.; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Walker, James L.; Lomness, Janice K.; Hintze, Paul E.; Kammerer, Catherine C.; Winfree, William P.; Russell, Richard W.

    2007-01-01

    There is currently no method for detecting corrosion under Shuttle tiles except for the expensive process of tile removal and replacement; hence NASA is investigating new NDE methods for detecting hidden corrosion. Time domain terahertz radiation has been applied to corrosion detection under tiles in samples ranging from small lab samples to a Shuttle with positive results. Terahertz imaging methods have been able to detect corrosion at thicknesses of 5 mils or greater under 1" thick Shuttle tiles and 7-12 mils or greater under 2" thick Shuttle tiles.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Monitoring Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete Based on Ultrasonic Guided Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhupeng Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation based on finite element method is conducted to predict the location of pitting corrosion in reinforced concrete. Simulation results show that it is feasible to predict corrosion monitoring based on ultrasonic guided wave in reinforced concrete, and wavelet analysis can be used for the extremely weak signal of guided waves due to energy leaking into concrete. The characteristic of time-frequency localization of wavelet transform is adopted in the corrosion monitoring of reinforced concrete. Guided waves can be successfully used to identify corrosion defects in reinforced concrete with the analysis of suitable wavelet-based function and its scale.

  4. Corrosion of a carbon steel in simulated liquid nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenz Gonzalez, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    This work is part of a collaboration agreement between CNEA (National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina) and USDOE (Department of Energy of the United States of America), entitled 'Tank Corrosion Chemistry Cooperation', to study the corrosion behavior of carbon steel A537 class 1 in different simulated non-radioactive wastes in order to establish the safety concentration limits of the tank waste chemistry at Hanford site (Richland-US). Liquid high level nuclear wastes are stored in tanks made of carbon steel A537 (ASTM nomenclature) that were designed for a service life of 20 to 50 years. A thickness reduction of some tank walls, due to corrosion processes, was detected at Hanford site, beyond the existing predicted values. Two year long-term immersion tests were started using non radioactive simulated liquid nuclear waste solutions at 40 C degrees. This work extends throughout the first year of immersion. The simulated solutions consist basically in combinations of the 10 most corrosion significant chemical components: 5 main components (NaNO 3 , NaCl, NaF, NaNO 2 and NaOH) at three concentration levels and 5 secondary components at two concentration levels. Measurements of the general corrosion rate with time were performed for carbon steel coupons, both immersed in the solutions and in the vapor phases, using weight loss and electrochemistry impedance spectroscopy techniques. Optic and scanning electron microscopy examination, analysis of U-bend samples and corrosion potential measurements, were also done. Localized corrosion susceptibility (pitting and crevice corrosion) was assessed in isolated short-term tests by means of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization curves. The effect of the simulated waste composition on the corrosion behavior of A537 steel was studied based on statistical analyses. The Surface Response Model could be successfully applied to the statistical analysis of the A537 steel corrosion in the studied solutions. General corrosion was not

  5. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  6. CFD investigating the air ingress accident for a HTGR simulation of graphite corrosion oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferng, Y.M.; Chi, C.W.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A CFD model is proposed to investigate graphite oxidation corrosion in the HTR-10. ► A postulated air ingress accident is assumed in this paper. ► Air ingress flowrate is the predicted result, instead of the preset one. ► O 2 would react with graphite on pebble surface, causing the graphite corrosion. ► No fuel exposure is predicted to be occurred under the air ingress accident. - Abstract: Through a compressible multi-component CFD model, this paper investigates the characteristics of graphite oxidation corrosion in the HTR-10 core under the postulated accident of gas duct rupture. In this accident, air in the steam generator cavity would enter into the core after pressure equilibrium is achieved between the core and the cavity, which is also called as the air ingress accident. Oxygen in the air would react with graphite on pebble surface, subsequently resulting in oxidation corrosion and challenging fuel integrity. In this paper, characteristics of graphite oxidation corrosion during the air ingress accident can be reasonably captured, including distributions of graphite corrosion amount on the different cross-sections, time histories of local corrosion amount at the monitoring points and overall corrosion amount in the core, respectively. Based on the transient simulation results, the corrosion pattern and its corrosion rate would approach to the steady-state conditions as the accident continuously progresses. The total amount of graphite corrosion during a 3-day accident time is predicted to be about 31 kg with the predicted asymptotic corrosion rate. This predicted value is less than that from the previous work of Gao and Shi.

  7. Uniform Corrosion and General Dissolution of Aluminum Alloys 2024-T3, 6061-T6, and 7075-T6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, I.-Wen

    Uniform corrosion and general dissolution of aluminum alloys was not as well-studied in the past, although it was known for causing significant amount of weight loss. This work comprises four chapters to understand uniform corrosion of aluminum alloys 2024-T3, 6061-T6, and 7075-T6. A preliminary weight loss experiment was performed for distinguishing corrosion induced weight loss attributed to uniform corrosion and pitting corrosion. The result suggested that uniform corrosion generated a greater mass loss than pitting corrosion. First, to understand uniform corrosion mechanism and kinetics in different environments, a series of static immersion tests in NaCl solutions were performed to provide quantitative measurement of uniform corrosion. Thereafter, uniform corrosion development as a function of temperature, pH, Cl-, and time was investigated to understand the influence of environmental factors. Faster uniform corrosion rate has been found at lower temperature (20 and 40°C) than at higher temperature (60 and 80°C) due to accelerated corrosion product formation at high temperatures inhibiting corrosion reactions. Electrochemical tests including along with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were utilized to study the temperature effect. Second, in order to further understand the uniform corrosion influence on pit growth kinetics, a long term exposures for 180 days in both immersion and ASTM-B117 test were performed. Uniform corrosion induced surface recession was found to have limited impact on pit geometry regardless of exposure methods. It was also found that the competition for limited cathodic current from uniform corrosion the primary rate limiting factor for pit growth. Very large pits were found after uniform corrosion growth reached a plateau due to corrosion product coverage. Also, optical microscopy and focused ion beam (FIB) imaging has provided more insights of distinctive pitting geometry and subsurface damages found from immersion samples and B117

  8. Furniture Rack Corrosion Coupon Surveillance - 2012 Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickalonis, J. I.; Murphy, T. R.; Berry, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    Under the L Basin corrosion surveillance program furniture rack coupons immersed for 14 years (FY2009 coupons) and 16 years (FY2011 coupons) were analyzed and the results trended with coupons exposed for shorter times. In addition, a section harvested from an actual furniture rack that was immersed for 14 years was analyzed for pitting in the weld and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) regions. The L Basin operations maintained very good water quality over the entire immersion period for these samples. These results for FY2009 and FY2011 coupons showed that the average pit depths for the 6061 and 6063 base metal are 1 and 2 mils, respectively, while those for the weld and HAZ are 3 and 4 mils, respectively. The results for the weld and HAZ regions are similar to coupons removed during the period of FY2003 to FY2007. These similarities indicate that the pit development occurred quickly followed by slow kinetics of increase in pit depth. For the actual furniture rack sample average pits of 5 and 2 mils were measured for the HAZ and weld, respectively. These results demonstrate that pitting corrosion of the aluminum furniture racks used to support the spent fuel occurs in waters of good quality. The corrosion kinetics or pit depth growth rate is much less that 1 mil/year, and would not impact long-term use of this material system for fuel storage racks in L Basin if good water quality is maintained

  9. Furniture Rack Corrosion Coupon Surveillance - 2012 Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J. I.; Murphy, T. R.; Berry, C. J.

    2012-10-01

    Under the L Basin corrosion surveillance program furniture rack coupons immersed for 14 years (FY2009 coupons) and 16 years (FY2011 coupons) were analyzed and the results trended with coupons exposed for shorter times. In addition, a section harvested from an actual furniture rack that was immersed for 14 years was analyzed for pitting in the weld and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) regions. The L Basin operations maintained very good water quality over the entire immersion period for these samples. These results for FY2009 and FY2011 coupons showed that the average pit depths for the 6061 and 6063 base metal are 1 and 2 mils, respectively, while those for the weld and HAZ are 3 and 4 mils, respectively. The results for the weld and HAZ regions are similar to coupons removed during the period of FY2003 to FY2007. These similarities indicate that the pit development occurred quickly followed by slow kinetics of increase in pit depth. For the actual furniture rack sample average pits of 5 and 2 mils were measured for the HAZ and weld, respectively. These results demonstrate that pitting corrosion of the aluminum furniture racks used to support the spent fuel occurs in waters of good quality. The corrosion kinetics or pit depth growth rate is much less that 1 mil/year, and would not impact long-term use of this material system for fuel storage racks in L Basin if good water quality is maintained.

  10. Electrochemical study of corrosion layer of archaeological object formed in atmospheric corrosion; Etude electrochimique de couche de corrosion d'objet archeologique formee en corrosion atmospherique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antony, H.; Perrin, St.; Legrand, L.; Chausse, A. [Univ. d' Evry-val-d' Essonne, Laboratoire Analyse et Modelisation pour la Biologie et l' Environnement (LAMBE CNRS UMR 8587), 91 - Evry (France); Antony, H.; Perrin, St. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DEN/DPC/SCCME), Lab. d' Etude de la Corrosion Aqueuse, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Monnier, J.; Dillmann, Ph. [Laboratoire Pierre Sue (LPS) CEA/CNRS, (DSM/DRECAM/SCM)- CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2007-07-01

    The degradation of iron materials in atmospheric corrosion is a well known phenomenon which can have important consequences, particularly in the case of radioactive wastes storage/disposal. The corrosion layers developed on old patrimony objects are very interesting sources to give data at predictive corrosion models because they allow to report data on several thousands years periods. In this work has been studied the electrochemical behaviour of such layers in reduction. Rust powders have been scraped on old objects (0-800 years). These powders have been mixed with graphite in mass ratio: 20/80, and then compacted on platinum grid to constitute composite electrodes. Chrono-potentiometric answers have been obtained under a current imposition of 25 {mu}A/mg, in NaCl medium 0.1 mol/L{sup -1} at neutralized pH of 7.5 and at 25 C. From these results, two parameters have been determined, Q{sub {tau}} corresponding to the electric power quantity implemented during the reduction process and E{sub {tau}}{sub /2} corresponding to the potential value of half-reaction. These two parameters allow to estimate the 'reactivity in reduction' of the corrosion layer; this reactivity decreases with the age of the object, which could suggest a stabilization of the layer with time. In a second part, the 'reactivity in reduction' has been correlated with the composition of the layer. The electrochemical answers obtained with the old layers have been reproduced in making synthetic powder mixtures of ferritic compounds (goethite, lepidocrocite, ferri-hydrite...). (O.M.)

  11. Greener Approach towards Corrosion Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Patni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion control of metals is technically, economically, environmentally, and aesthetically important. The best option is to use inhibitors for protecting metals and alloys against corrosion. As organic corrosion inhibitors are toxic in nature, so green inhibitors which are biodegradable, without any heavy metals and other toxic compounds, are promoted. Also plant products are inexpensive, renewable, and readily available. Tannins, organic amino acids, alkaloids, and organic dyes of plant origin have good corrosion-inhibiting abilities. Plant extracts contain many organic compounds, having polar atoms such as O, P, S, and N. These are adsorbed on the metal surface by these polar atoms, and protective films are formed, and various adsorption isotherms are obeyed. Various types of green inhibitors and their effect on different metals are mentioned in the paper.

  12. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jor-Shan [El Cerrito, CA; Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Lee, Chuck K [Hayward, CA; Walker, Jeffrey [Gaithersburg, MD; Russell, Paige [Las Vegas, NV; Kirkwood, Jon [Saint Leonard, MD; Yang, Nancy [Lafayette, CA; Champagne, Victor [Oxford, PA

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  13. Corrosion-Resistant Acrylic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-31

    ester solvents include ethylene glycol acceptable for anti-corrosive compositions. Blistering in monoethyl ether acetate, diethylene glycol monoethyl ...corrosion and 0 is i inch or more methyl isobutyl ketone. diethyl ketone, and cyclohexa- creepage from the scribe. Ratings of 3 or above are none. Glycol ...45 * coating is determined in accordance with ASTM ether acetate, etc. D714-56. This method describes blister size as numbers The coating has

  14. Non-Destructive Evaluation for Corrosion Monitoring in Concrete: A Review and Capability of Acoustic Emission Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Ahmad; Chai, Hwa Kian; Aggelis, Dimitrios G.; Alver, Ninel

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete (RC) structures has been one of the major causes of structural failure. Early detection of the corrosion process could help limit the location and the extent of necessary repairs or replacement, as well as reduce the cost associated with rehabilitation work. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods have been found to be useful for in-situ evaluation of steel corrosion in RC, where the effect of steel corrosion and the integrity of the concrete structure can be assessed effectively. A complementary study of NDT methods for the investigation of corrosion is presented here. In this paper, acoustic emission (AE) effectively detects the corrosion of concrete structures at an early stage. The capability of the AE technique to detect corrosion occurring in real-time makes it a strong candidate for serving as an efficient NDT method, giving it an advantage over other NDT methods. PMID:26251904

  15. Identification of key factors in Accelerated Low Water Corrosion through experimental simulation of tidal conditions: influence of stimulated indigenous microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Florence; Gueuné, Hervé; Malard, Emilie; Sánchez-Amaya, José M; Sjögren, Lena; Abbas, Ben; Quillet, Laurent; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Muyzer, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors favoring Accelerated Low Water Corrosion (ALWC) on harbor steel structures remain unclear warranting their study under controlled experimental tidal conditions. Initial stimulation of marine microbial consortia by a pulse of organic matter resulted in localized corrosion and the highest corrosion rates (up to 12-times higher than non-stimulated conditions) in the low water zone, persisting after nine months exposure to natural seawater. Correlations between corrosion severity and the abundance and composition of metabolically active sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) indicated the importance and persistence of specific bacterial populations in accelerated corrosion. One phylotype related to the electrogenic SRB Desulfopila corrodens appeared as the major causative agent of the accelerated corrosion. The similarity of bacterial populations related to sulfur and iron cycles, mineral and tuberculation with those identified in ALWC support the relevance of experimental simulation of tidal conditions in the management of steel corrosion exposed to harbor environments.

  16. Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Preventative Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Montgomery, Eliza; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry; Back, Teddy; Balles, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings and Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) project is to identify, test, and develop qualification criteria for the use of environmentally friendly corrosion protective coatings and CPCs for flight hardware and ground support equipment. This document is the Final Report for Phase I evaluations, which included physical property, corrosion resistance, and NASA spaceport environment compatibility testing and analysis of fifteen CPC types. The CPCs consisted of ten different oily film CPCs and five different wax or grease CPC types. Physical property testing encompassed measuring various properties of the bulk CPCs, while corrosion resistance testing directly measured the ability of each CPC material to protect various metals against corrosion. The NASA spaceport environment compatibility testing included common tests required by NASA-STD-6001, "Flammability, Odor, Offgassing, and Compatibility Requirements and Test Procedures for Materials in Environments that Support Combustion". At the end of Phase I, CPC materials were down-selected for inclusion in the next test phases. This final report includes all data and analysis of results obtained by following the experimental test plan that was developed as part of the project. Highlights of the results are summarized by test criteria type.

  17. Corrosion testing in flash tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, S.J.; Stead, N.J.

    1999-07-01

    As kraft pulp mills adopt modified cooking processes, an increasing amount of corrosion of carbon steel digester systems is being encountered. Many mills have had severe corrosion in the flash tanks, in particular, the first ({number{underscore}sign}1) flash tank. The work described in this report was aimed at characterizing the corrosion. Coupons of carbon steel, several stainless steels and titanium were exposed at two mills. At mill A, identical sets of coupons were exposed in the {number{underscore}sign}1 and {number{underscore}sign}2 flash tank. At mill B, three identical sets of coupons were placed in flash tank {number{underscore}sign}1. The results of the exposures showed that both carbon steel and titanium suffered high rates of general corrosion, while the stainless steels suffered varying degrees of localized attack. The ranking of the resistance of corrosion in the flash tank was the same ranking as would be expected in a reducing acid environment. In the light of the coupon results, organic acids is concluded to be the most likely cause of corrosion of the flash tanks.

  18. Effect of Fe ion concentration on corrosion of carbon steel in CO2 environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogowska, Magdalena; Gudme, J.; Rubin, A.

    2016-01-01

    of the corrosion scales was performed using microscopic and diffraction techniques. Scale analysis revealed that the passivation of samples, exposed to initially highly Fe2+ supersaturated solution, occurred when a formation of a double layer took place, resulting in 30 times lower corrosion rate compared...

  19. Corrosion behavior of austempered ductile iron (ADI) in iron ore slurry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corrosion behavior of austempered ductile iron (ADI) in iron ore slurry was studied as a function of the microstructure developed by austempering at 380 and 300°C for different exposure time in the slurry. The corrosion rates of the ADI balls immersed in the iron ore slurry was determined using weight loss method.

  20. Semi-empirical model for carbon steel corrosion in long term geological nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foct, F.; Gras, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    In France and other countries, carbon and low alloy steels have been proposed as suitable materials for nuclear waste containers for long term geological disposal since, for such types of steels, general and localised corrosion can be fairly well predicted in geological environments (mainly argillaceous and granitic conditions) during the initial oxic and the following anoxic stages. This paper presents a model developed for the long term estimation of general and localised corrosion of carbon steel in argillaceous and granitic environments. In the case of localised corrosion, the model assumes that pitting and crevice corrosion propagation rates are similar. The estimations are based on numerous data coming from various experimental programmes conducted by the following laboratories: UKAEA (United Kingdom); NAGRA (Switzerland); SCK-CEN (Belgium); JNC (Japan) and ANDRA-CEA-EDF (France). From these data, the corrosion rates measured over long periods (from six months to several years) and derived from mass loss measurements have been selected to construct the proposed models. For general corrosion, the model takes into account an activation energy deduced from the experimental results (Arrhenius law) and proposes three equations for the corrosion rate: one for the oxic conditions, one for the early stage of the anoxic conditions and one for the long term anoxic corrosion. Concerning localised corrosion, a semi-empirical model, based on the evolution of the pitting factor (ratio between the maximum pit depth and the average general corrosion depth) as a function of the general corrosion depth, is proposed. This model is compared to other approaches where the maximum pit depth is directly calculated as a function of time, temperature and oxic or anoxic conditions. Finally, the presented semi-empirical models for long term corrosion estimation are applied to the case of nuclear waste storage. The results obtained by the different methods are then discussed and compared

  1. Brillouin Corrosion Expansion Sensors for Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures Using a Fiber Optic Coil Winding Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjun Lv

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring.

  2. Corrosion inhibition in drinking water: Effect of temperature. Part I. Galvanized steel. Inhibicion de la corrosion en agua potable. Efecto de la temperatura. I parte. Acero galvanizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royuela, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    The corrosivity of several drinking waters, with and without addition of sodium silicate and sodium polyphosphate as inhibitor, in contact with galvanized steel, is studied in the range 20-65 degree centigree. The corrosion rate in the course of time was followed by means of the polarization resistance method. Linearity between potential and intensity of current is observed in the range-20 to + 30 mV from corrosion potential E[sub 0]. Polarization curves were also drawn with the aim to obtain the Tafel slopes. E[sub 0] values are more active when inhibitor is present. With temperature increases corrosion rate. Inhibitor addition to the waters tested means a reduction of galvanized steel corrosion of about 40%. (Author) 30 refs.

  3. Sensitivity Analysis of Corrosion Rate Prediction Models Utilized for Reinforced Concrete Affected by Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamphukdee, Kanjana; Collins, Frank; Zou, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Chloride-induced reinforcement corrosion is one of the major causes of premature deterioration in reinforced concrete (RC) structures. Given the high maintenance and replacement costs, accurate modeling of RC deterioration is indispensable for ensuring the optimal allocation of limited economic resources. Since corrosion rate is one of the major factors influencing the rate of deterioration, many predictive models exist. However, because the existing models use very different sets of input parameters, the choice of model for RC deterioration is made difficult. Although the factors affecting corrosion rate are frequently reported in the literature, there is no published quantitative study on the sensitivity of predicted corrosion rate to the various input parameters. This paper presents the results of the sensitivity analysis of the input parameters for nine selected corrosion rate prediction models. Three different methods of analysis are used to determine and compare the sensitivity of corrosion rate to various input parameters: (i) univariate regression analysis, (ii) multivariate regression analysis, and (iii) sensitivity index. The results from the analysis have quantitatively verified that the corrosion rate of steel reinforcement bars in RC structures is highly sensitive to corrosion duration time, concrete resistivity, and concrete chloride content. These important findings establish that future empirical models for predicting corrosion rate of RC should carefully consider and incorporate these input parameters.

  4. Probabilistic models for steel corrosion loss and pitting of marine infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melchers, R.E.; Jeffrey, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    With the increasing emphasis on attempting to retain in service ageing infrastructure models for the description and prediction of corrosion losses and for maximum pit depth are of increasing interest. In most cases assessment and prediction will be done in a probabilistic risk assessment framework and this then requires probabilistic corrosion models. Recently, novel models for corrosion loss and maximum pit depth under marine immersion conditions have been developed. The models show that both corrosion loss and pit depth progress in a non-linear fashion with increased exposure time and do so in a non-monotonic manner as a result of the controlling corrosion process changing from oxidation to being influenced by bacterial action. For engineers the importance of this lies in the fact that conventional 'corrosion rates' have no validity, particularly for the long-term corrosion effects as relevant to deteriorated infrastructure. The models are consistent with corrosion science principles as well as current understanding of the considerable influence of bacterial processes on corrosion loss and pitting. The considerable practical implications of this are described

  5. Sulfate-reducing bacteria inhabiting natural corrosion deposits from marine steel structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Païssé, Sandrine; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Marty, Florence; Abbas, Ben; Gueuné, Hervé; Amaya, José Maria Sanchez; Muyzer, Gerard; Quillet, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, investigations were conducted on natural corrosion deposits to better understand the role of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the accelerated corrosion process of carbon steel sheet piles in port environments. We describe the abundance and diversity of total and metabolically active SRB within five natural corrosion deposits located within tidal or low water zone and showing either normal or accelerated corrosion. By using molecular techniques, such as quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis, and sequence cloning based on 16S rRNA, dsrB genes, and their transcripts, we demonstrated a clear distinction between SRB population structure inhabiting normal or accelerated low-water corrosion deposits. Although SRB were present in both normal and accelerated low-water corrosion deposits, they dominated and were exclusively active in the inner and intermediate layers of accelerated corrosion deposits. We also highlighted that some of these SRB populations are specific to the accelerated low-water corrosion deposit environment in which they probably play a dominant role in the sulfured corrosion product enrichment.

  6. Corrosion of low alloy steels in natural seawater. Influence of alloying elements and bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dajoux Malard, Emilie

    2006-01-01

    Metallic infrastructures immersed in natural seawater are exposed to important corrosion phenomena, sometimes characterised as microbiologically influenced corrosion. The presence of alloying elements in low alloy steels could present a corrosion resistance improvement of the structures. In this context, tests are performed with commercial steel grades, from 0,05 wt pc Cr to 11,5 wt pc Cr. They consist in 'on site' immersion in natural seawater on the one hand, and in laboratory tests with immersion in media enriched with marine sulphide-producing bacteria on the other hand. Gravimetric, microbiological, electrochemical measurements and corrosion product analyses are carried out and show that corrosion phenomenon is composed of several stages. A preliminary step is the reduction of the corrosion kinetics and is correlated with the presence of sessile sulphide-producing bacteria and an important formation of sulphur-containing species. This phase is shorter when the alloying element content of the steel increases. This phase is probably followed by an increase of corrosion, appearing clearly after an 8-month immersion in natural seawater for some of the grade steels. Chromium and molybdenum show at the same time a beneficial influence to generalised corrosion resistance and a toxic effect on sulphide-producing bacteria. This multidisciplinary study reflects the complexity of the interactions between bacteria and steels; sulphide-producing bacteria seem to be involved in corrosion processes in natural seawater and complementary studies would have to clarify occurring mechanisms. (author) [fr

  7. Hydrogen evolution behavior in the corrosion of carbon steel in contact with magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Naoki; Kawakami, Susumu; Tateishi, Tsuyoshi; Fukudome, Kazuyuki; Nishimura, Tsutomu

    2005-07-01

    It has been reported that the corrosion of carbon steel is accelerated by a contact with magnetite, which is a representative corrosion product in low oxygen environment. It is important to clarify the corrosion mechanism in the presence of magnetite for long term prediction of overpack corrosion. There are two possible cathodic reactions in the presence of magnetite coupled with anodic reaction. One is reduction of Fe(III) in magnetite, and the other is hydrogen evolution reaction. If the former dominates the cathodic reaction, corrosion acceleration will stop with the consumption of Fe(III). While, if the latter is the main cathodic reaction, corrosion acceleration is possible to continue for a long time. In this study, corrosion rate and hydrogen evolution behavior were investigated by the immersion test of carbon steel in contact with dummy corrosion product to contribute to understanding the corrosion mechanism. The immersion tests of carbon steel were carried out in sealed glass ampoule in the presence of dummy corrosion product with changing the Fe(III)/Fe(II) ratio. The corrosion rates increased with increase in Fe(III)/Fe(II) ratio, and rapid acceleration was observed when Fe(III)/Fe(II) ratio over stoichiometrical value of magnetite(=2). The hydrogen evolution reaction was not influenced by Fe(III)/Fe(II) although its rate was larger that without dummy corrosion product. According to the results, the cause of severe corrosion acceleration due to magnetite is inferred to be the oxidation by excessive Fe(III) in the magnetite. It was also indicated that corrosion acceleration by a factor of several times is possible to occur when Fe(III)/Fe(II) ratio in magnetite is 2 or less, and the hydrogen evolution reaction dominates the cathodic reaction. The hydrogen evolution rate and its change with time of carbon steel in contact with high purity magnetite without excessive Fe(III) were measured. As a result, the hydrogen evolution reaction was accelerated up to

  8. Corrosion monitoring of reinforcement steel using galvanostatically induced potential transients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, Yawar; Nutma, J.S.; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Investigation and results on a dynamic measurement technique to qualitatively evaluate the status of corrosion of reinforcement steel are presented. The sensing method is based on the measurement of the time constant of the relaxation of the current-induced polarization potential. This time constant

  9. Corrosion Behavior of Low-C Medium-Mn Steel in Simulated Marine Immersion and Splash Zone Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dazheng; Gao, Xiuhua; Su, Guanqiao; Du, Linxiu; Liu, Zhenguang; Hu, Jun

    2017-05-01

    The corrosion behavior of low-C medium-Mn steel in simulated marine immersion and splash zone environment was studied by static immersion corrosion experiment and wet-dry cyclic corrosion experiment, respectively. Corrosion rate, corrosion products, surface morphology, cross-sectional morphology, elemental distribution, potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectra were used to elucidate the corrosion behavior of low-C medium-Mn steel. The results show that corrosion rate in immersion zone is much less than that in splash zone owing to its relatively mild environment. Manganese compounds are detected in the corrosion products and only appeared in splash zone environment, which can deteriorate the protective effect of rust layer. With the extension of exposure time, corrosion products are gradually transformed into dense and thick corrosion rust from the loose and porous one in these two environments. But in splash zone environment, alloying elements of Mn appear significant enrichment in the rust layer, which decrease the corrosion resistance of the steel.

  10. FeS Corrosion Products Formation and Hydrogen Uptake in a Sour Environment for Quenched & Tempered Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elien Wallaert

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface corrosion product formation is one of the important factors affecting the corrosion rate and hydrogen uptake in a H2S environment. However, it is still unclear how the base material composition will affect the corrosion products that are generated, and consequently their impact on the corrosion rate. In this paper, corrosion product formation and the impact of the Mo content of the base material on the composition of the corrosion products and hydrogen absorption in a sour environment was investigated. The corrosion layer was composed of a double layered mackinawite (FeS1−x structure, which was enriched with molybdenum and chromium. The layers were formed via two different mechanisms, i.e., the inner layer was created via a general oxide film formation corrosion mechanism, whereas the upper layer was formed by a precipitation mechanism. The presence of this double corrosion layer had a large influence on the amount of diffusible hydrogen in the materials. This amount decreased as a function of contact time with the H2S saturated solution, while the corrosion rate of the materials shows no significant reduction. Therefore, the corrosion products are assumed to act as a physical barrier against hydrogen uptake. Mo addition caused a decrease in the maximal amount of diffusible hydrogen.

  11. Encyclopedia of electrochemistry. Vol. 4. Corrosion and oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratmann, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany); Frankel, G.S. (eds.) [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2003-07-01

    This book is one of the eleven volumes of the ''Encyclopaedia of Electrochemistry'' and provides both an introduction to the different fields of corrosion as well as a detailed overview of the subjects. The volume is divided into seven main chapters each of them containing some special papers written by well known specialists. The main chapters are structured as follows: 1. Fundamentals (of corrosion, thermodynamics, kinetics and transport phenomena in electrolytic corrosion); 2. Homogeneous corrosion of metallic materials in electrolytes; 3. Corrosion of oxide covered materials (Atmospheric corrosion; Passivity of metals, alloys, and semiconductors); 4. Localised corrosion phenomena (Crevice corrosion; Pitting corrosion; Intergranular corrosion); 5. Corrosion protection 6. Corrosion in special environments (Molten salt-induced corrosion of metals; High-temperature corrosion of metals by gases; Microbiologically influenced corrosion); and 7. Electrochemical techniques for corrosion.

  12. A Theoretical Model for Metal Corrosion Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David V. Svintradze

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many aluminum and stainless steel alloys contain thin oxide layers on the metal surface which greatly reduce the corrosion rate. Pitting corrosion, a result of localized breakdown of such films, results in accelerated dissolution of the underlying metal through pits. Many researchers have studied pitting corrosion for several decades and the exact governing equation for corrosion pit degradation has not been obtained. In this study, the governing equation for corrosion degradation due to pitting corrosion behavior was derived from solid-state physics and some solutions and simulations are presented and discussed.

  13. Solutions of corrosion Problems in advanced Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Karlsson, Asger

    1999-01-01

    were investigated using light optical and scanning electron microscopy. The ferritic steels suffered from corrosion mainly via material loss. The austenitic steels suffered from predominantly selective corrosion resulting in chromium depletion from the alloy. A clear trend was observed that selective...... corrosion increased with increasing chromium content of the alloy.......Austenitic and ferritic steels were exposed in the superheater area of a straw-fired CHP plant. The specimens were exposed for 1400 hours at 450-600°C. The rate of corrosion was assessed based on unattacked metal remaining. The corrosion products and course of corrosion for the various steel types...

  14. Concrete cover cracking with reinforcement corrosion of RC beam during chloride-induced corrosion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ruijin; Castel, Arnaud; Francois, Raoul

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the evolution of the corrosion pattern based on two beams corroded by 14 years (beam B1CL1) and 23 years (beam B2CL1) of conservation in a chloride environment. The experimental results indicate that, at the cracking initiation stage and the first stage of cracking propagation, localized corrosion due to chloride ingress is the predominant corrosion pattern and pitting corrosion is the main factor that influences the cracking process. As corrosion cracking increases, general corrosion develops rapidly and gradually becomes predominant in the second stage of cracking propagation. A comparison between existing models and experimental results illustrates that, although Vidal et al.'s model can better predict the reinforcement corrosion of beam B1CL1 under localized corrosion, it cannot predict the corrosion of beam B2CL1 under general corrosion. Also, Rodriguez's model, derived from the general corrosion due to electrically accelerated corrosion experiments, cannot match natural chloride corrosion irrespective of whether corrosion is localized or general. Thus, for natural general corrosion in the second stage of cracking propagation, a new model based on the parameter of average steel cross-section loss is put forward to predict steel corrosion from corrosion cracking.

  15. Markov chain modelling of pitting corrosion in underground pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caleyo, F.; Velazquez, J.C.; Valor, A.; Hallen, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    A continuous-time, non-homogenous linear growth (pure birth) Markov process has been used to model external pitting corrosion in underground pipelines. The closed form solution of Kolmogorov's forward equations for this type of Markov process is used to describe the transition probability function in a discrete pit depth space. The identification of the transition probability function can be achieved by correlating the stochastic pit depth mean with the deterministic mean obtained experimentally. Monte-Carlo simulations previously reported have been used to predict the time evolution of the mean value of the pit depth distribution for different soil textural classes. The simulated distributions have been used to create an empirical Markov chain-based stochastic model for predicting the evolution of pitting corrosion depth and rate distributions from the observed properties of the soil. The proposed model has also been applied to pitting corrosion data from pipeline repeated in-line inspections and laboratory immersion experiments.

  16. SNF Interim Storage Canister Corrosion and Surface Environment Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Enos, David G. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This progress report describes work being done at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Of particular concern is stress corrosion cracking (SCC), by which a through-wall crack could potentially form in a canister outer wall over time intervals that are shorter than possible dry storage times. In order for SCC to occur, three criteria must be met. A corrosive environment must be present on the canister surface, the metal must susceptible to SCC, and sufficient tensile stress to support SCC must be present through the entire thickness of the canister wall. SNL is currently evaluating the potential for each of these criteria to be met.

  17. The effect of heat treatments on the corrosion behavior of Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Bangxin; Zhao Wenjin; Miao Zhi; Pan Shufang; Li Cong; Jiang Yourong

    1996-06-01

    The effect of penultimate annealing temperature and cooling rate on the corrosion behavior of Zircaloy-4 cladding tube has been investigated. Both nodular corrosion and uniform corrosion resistance can be improved obviously after changing the heat treatment from the original annealing at 650 degree C to quenching from 830 degree C (upper temperature of alpha phase region or lower temperature of beta phase region). Although the nodular corrosion resistance can be improved obviously after quenching from beta phase, there was a second transition in the variation between weight gain and exposure time, which shows a poor uniform corrosion resistance after a long exposure time during the autoclave tests. The main factor of affecting corrosion behavior is the solid solution contents of Fe and Cr in alpha zirconium rather than the size of second phase particles. About 200 μg/g Fe and Cr super saturated solid solution in alpha zirconium could get good uniform and nodular corrosion resistance, but much more solid solution contents of Fe and Cr in alpha zirconium could bring about a trend toward poor uniform corrosion resistance for long-term exposure time. (14 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.)

  18. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F. Hua

    2004-01-01

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847])

  19. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  20. FY17 Status Report: Research on Stress Corrosion Cracking of SNF Interim Storage Canisters.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindelholz, Eric John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Alexander, Christopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This progress report describes work done in FY17 at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Of particular concern is stress corrosion cracking (SCC), by which a through-wall crack could potentially form in a canister outer wall over time intervals that are shorter than possible dry storage times. Work in FY17 refined our understanding of the chemical and physical environment on canister surfaces, and evaluated the relationship between chemical and physical environment and the form and extent of corrosion that occurs. The SNL corrosion work focused predominantly on pitting corrosion, a necessary precursor for SCC, and process of pit-to-crack transition; it has been carried out in collaboration with university partners. SNL is collaborating with several university partners to investigate SCC crack growth experimentally, providing guidance for design and interpretation of experiments.

  1. Corrosion calculations report for the safety assessment SR-Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-15

    This report is a compilation of the quantitative assessments of corrosion of the copper canisters in a KBS-3 repository. The calculations are part of the safety assessment SR-Site that is the long-term safety assessment to support the license application for building a final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark, Sweden. The safety assessment methodology gives the frame for the structured and documented approach to assess all conceivable corrosion processes. The quantitative assessments are done in different ways depending on the nature of the process and on the implications for the long-term safety. The starting point for the handling of the corrosion processes is the description of all known corrosion processes for copper with the current knowledge base and applied to the specific system and geology. Already at this stage some processes are excluded for further analysis, for example if the repository environment is not a sufficient prerequisite for the process to occur. The next step is to identify processes where the extent of corrosion could be bounded, e.g. by a mass balance approach. For processes where a mass balance is not limiting, the mass transport of corrodants (or corrosion products) is taken into account. A simple approach would be just to calculate the diffusive transport of corrodants through the bentonite, but generally the transport resistance for the interface between groundwater in a rock fracture intersecting the deposition hole and the bentonite buffer is more important. In SR-Site, the concept of equivalent flowrate, Q{sub eq}, is used. This assessment is done integrated with the evaluation of the geochemical and hydrogeological evolution of the repository. For most of the corrosion processes analysed, the corrosion depth is much smaller than the copper shell thickness, even for the assessment time of 106 years. Several processes give corrosion depths less than 100 mum, but no process give corrosion depths larger than a few

  2. Corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent fuel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-12-01

    reactor aluminium clad spent fuel. These corrosion activities were quite similar to those carried out in the CRP. Eight Member States participated in Phase-II of the CRP and five Member States in the Regional Project RLA/4/018. Two of the countries participating in the regional project were also participants in the CRP. This report documents the work performed in the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase II) and in the IAEA's Technical Cooperation Regional Project for Latin America (RLA/4/018) entitled Management of Spent Fuel from Research Reactors. The key activity of both, the CRP and the Regional Project, consisted of the exposure of standard racks of corrosion coupons in the spent fuel pools of the participating research reactor laboratories and the evaluation of the coupons after predetermined exposure times, along with periodic monitoring of the storage water and evaluation of sediments settling in the spent fuel pools. The report includes: a description of the standard corrosion racks, experimental protocols, test procedures and water quality monitoring; the specific contributions by each of the participating laboratories; a compilation of all experimental results obtained and the analysis and discussion of the results, along with conclusions

  3. Corrosion of steel structures in sea-bed sediment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    SBS corrosion has now become a serious problem in marine environment and an important issue in corrosion science. In this ... corrosion mechanism, measurement of metal corrosion rate, corrosion evaluation and prediction of corrosion are also discussed ..... Hou Baorong and Li Yantao 1998 Studia Marina Sinica 13 119.

  4. Novel corrosion experiments using the wire beam electrode: (III) Measuring electrochemical corrosion parameters from both the metallic and electrolytic phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Yong-Jun; Liu, Tie; Aung, Naing Naing

    2006-01-01

    The wire beam electrode (WBE) and the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) have been applied in a novel combination to measure, for the first time, electrochemical parameters simultaneously from both the metallic and electrolytic phases of a corroding metal surface. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the application of this combined WBE-SRET method in obtaining unique information on localised corrosion mechanism, by investigating typical corrosion processes occurring over a mild steel WBE surface exposed to the classic Evans solution. The WBE method was used to map current and potential distributions in the metallic phase, and the SRET was used to map current or potential distribution in the electrolytic phase. It has been found that the combined WBE-SRET method is able to gain useful information on macro-cell electrochemical corrosion processes that involve macro-scale separation of anodes and cathodes. In such macro-cell corrosion systems, maps measured using WBE and SRET were found to correlate with each other and both methods were able to detect the locations of anodic sites. However the movement of the scanning probe during SRET measurements was found to affect the SRET detection of cathodic sites. In micro-cell corrosion systems where the separation of anodic and cathodic sites were less distinct, SRET measurement was found to be insensitive in detecting anodic and cathodic sites, while the WBE method was still able to produce results that correlated well with observed corrosion behaviour. Results obtained from this work suggest that the WBE-SRET method is applicable for understanding the initiation, propagation and electrochemical behaviour of localised corrosion anodes and cathodes, and also their dependence on externally controllable variables, such as solution pH changes and the existence of surface coatings

  5. Hanford transuranic storage corrosion review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.L.; Divine, J.R.

    1980-12-01

    The rate of atmospheric corrosion of the transuranic (TRU) waste drums at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Project, near Richland, Washington, was evaluated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The rate of corrosion is principally contingent upon the effects of humidity, airborne pollutants, and temperature. Results of the study indicate that actual penetration of barrels due to atmospheric corrosion will probably not occur within the 20-year specified recovery period. Several other US burial sites were surveyed, and it appears that there is sufficient uncertainty in the available data to prevent a clearcut statement of the corrosion rate at a specific site. Laboratory and site tests are recommended before any definite conclusions can be made. The corrosion potential at the Hanford TRU waste site could be reduced by a combination of changes in drum materials (for example, using galvanized barrels instead of the currently used mild steel barrels), environmental exposure conditions (for example, covering the barrels in one of numerous possible ways), and storage conditions

  6. Quantitative measures of corrosion and prevention: application to corrosion in agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, J.C.; Gellings, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The corrosion protection factor (c.p.f.) and the corrosion condition (c.c.) are simple instruments for the study and evaluation of the contribution and efficiency of several methods of corrosion prevention and control. The application of c.p.f. and c.c. to corrosion and prevention in agriculture in

  7. Elucidation of corrosion factors based on the data acquisition simulating complex real environment. Examples of marine environment and nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    This study has devised a test method simulating real environment as an accelerated corrosion test, and has elucidated the factors that determine the actual corrosion phenomena based on analysis of the obtained data. As part of this effort, this paper explains implemented contents on the corrosion phenomena of nuclear facilities associated with radioactive materials and marine environment. As for the macroscopic corrosion phenomena of common steel in the marine environment, the process where the maximum of corrosion rate just below a tidal zone proceeds under natural environment was analyzed using an experimental tank. The mechanism was assumed like this: At just under the tidal zone, anode current flows at the time of high tide flow by a larger amount than in the underwater part, whose effect makes the anode current continuously flow even at the time of low tide flow, which increases a corrosion amount. This study also examined in detail the intergranular corrosion phenomena of stainless steel under Np-containing conditions at nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. The result showed that Np contained in boiling nitric acid solution was reduced to pentavalent on metal's surface, corroding stainless steel, and it afterwards was re-oxidized to hexavalent in the solution. The mechanism to accelerate corrosion by repeating this process could be proposed. As for the corrosion phenomena of stainless steel in a light-water reactor, the measurement results suggested the corrosion environment containing oxygen or hydrogen peroxide produced by radiolysis. (A.O.)

  8. Atmospheric corrosion monitoring at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge K-25 Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, M.

    1995-01-01

    Depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) at the US Department of Energy's K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, TN has been stored in large steel cylinders which have undergone significant atmospheric corrosion damage over the last 35 years. A detailed experimental program to characterize and monitor the corrosion damage was initiated in 1992. Large amounts of corrosion scale and deep pits are found to cover cylinder surfaces. Ultrasonic wall thickness measurements have shown uniform corrosion losses up to 20 mils (0.5 mm) and pits up to 100 mils (2.5 mm) deep. Electrical resistance corrosion probes, time-of-wetness sensors and thermocouples have been attached to cylinder bodies. Atmospheric conditions are monitored using rain gauges, relative humidity sensors and thermocouples. Long-term (16 years) data are being obtained from mild steel corrosion coupons on test racks as well as attached directly to cylinder surfaces. Corrosion rates have been found to intimately related to the times-of-wetness, both tending to be higher on cylinder tops due to apparent sheltering effects. Data from the various tests are compared, discrepancies are discussed and a pattern of cylinder corrosion as a function of cylinder position and location is described

  9. AE signal characteristics of the initial Stress Corrosion Crack in the STS 304 pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Seong; Kang, Sung Sik; Lee, Bo Young

    2011-01-01

    The stress corrosion crack is one of the life-limiting mechanisms in nuclear power plant conditions. During the operation of a power plant stress corrosion cracks can initiate and grow in dissimilar metal weld pipe joints of primary loop components. In particular, stress corrosion cracking usually occurs when the following three factors exist at the same time; susceptible material, corrosive environment, and tensile stress (including residual stress). Thus, residual stress becomes very critical for stress-corrosion cracking when it is difficult to improve the material corrosivity of the components and their environment under operating conditions. Since the research conducted by Coriou et al., it is well known that Ni-based alloy and stainless steel are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in deaerated pure water at high temperature and the SCC is difficult to be reproduced in laboratory. In this study, stress corrosion crack was artificially produced on STS 304 pipe. And a characteristic of the AE (acoustic emission) signal, which is generated at crack initiation time, was investigated

  10. Some observations about the Incoloy 800 corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, W.; Sathler, L.; Mattos, O.R.

    1985-01-01

    The chemical and electrochemical characteristics of synthetic solutions similar to those inside the occluded cell corrosion - OCC (pitting, cracks from stress corrosion) of incoloy 800, 25 0 C are studied. (E.G.) [pt

  11. Corrosion problems in light water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    The corrosion problems encountered during the author's career are reviewed. Attention is given to the development of Zircaloys and attendant factors that affect corrosion; the caustic and chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel steam generator tubing; the qualification of Inconel Alloy 600 for steam generator tubing and the subsequent corrosion problem of secondary side wastage, caustic SCC, pitting, intergranular attack, denting, and primary side SCC; and SCC in weld and furnace sensitized stainless steel piping and internals in boiling water reactor primary coolants. Also mentioned are corrosion of metallic uranium alloy fuels; corrosion of aluminum and niobium candidate fuel element claddings; crevice corrosion and seizing of stainless steel journal-sleeve combinations; SCC of precipitation hardened and martensitic stainless steels; low temperature SCC of welded austenitic stainless steels by chloride, fluoride, and sulfur oxy-anions; and corrosion problems experienced by condensers

  12. Corrosion of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    alloyed intermetallics were susceptible to galvanic corrosion, due to the presence of carbides. Keywords. Corrosion; iron aluminides; Fe3Al; potentiodynamic polarization. 1. Introduction. Ordered intermetallic alloys based on iron aluminides of.

  13. Cracking of SHCC due to reinforcement corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savija, B.; Lukovic, M.; Pacheco Farias, J.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; Saouma, V.; Bolander, J.; Landis, E.

    2016-01-01

    Reinforcement corrosion is the most important deterioration mechanism affecting reinforced concrete infrastructures. After corrosion starts, expansive pressures are exerted onto the surrounding concrete, causing cracking and spalling of the cover concrete. The amount of cover cracking can possibly

  14. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as...

  15. Rail base corrosion and cracking prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Rail base corrosion combined with fatigue or damage can significantly reduce rail life. Studies were done to examine the relative contribution of damage, corrosion, and fatigue on rail life. The combined effects can be separated into constituent fact...

  16. Microencapsulation of Corrosion Indicators for Smart Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.; Calle, Luz M.; Hanna,Joshua S.; Rawlins, James W.

    2011-01-01

    A multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous detection, indication, and control of corrosion is been developed based on microencapsulation technology. This paper summarizes the development, optimization, and testing of microcapsules specifically designed for early detection and indication of corrosion when incorporated into a smart coating. Results from experiments designed to test the ability of the microcapsules to detect and indicate corrosion, when blended into several paint systems, show that these experimental coatings generate a color change, indicative of spot specific corrosion events, that can be observed with the naked eye within hours rather than the hundreds of hours or months typical of the standard accelerated corrosion test protocols.. Key words: smart coating, corrosion detection, microencapsulation, microcapsule, pH-sensitive microcapsule, corrosion indicator, corrosion sensing paint

  17. Corrosion product film-induced stress facilitates stress corrosion cracking

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhiliang; Ren, Xuechong; Guan, Yongjun; Su, Yanjing

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analyses were conducted to clarify the role of corrosion product films (CPFs) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Flat and U-shaped edge-notched specimens were investigated in terms of the CPF-induced stress in the metallic substrate and the stress in the CPF. For a U-shaped edge-notched specimen, the stress field in front of the notch tip is affected by the Young’s modulus of the CPF and the CPF thickness and notch geometry. The CPF-induced tensile stress in the metallic subst...

  18. Corrosion of AA2024-T3 Part III: Propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenn, A.M.; Muster, T.H.; Luo, C.; Zhou, X.; Thompson, G.E.; Boag, A.; Hughes, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Corrosion of AA2024 in 0.1 M NaCl was examined for immersion times up to 120 min. → Rings of corrosion product with H 2 evolution developed after 5 min immersion. → Intergranular attack penetrated up to 60 μm below the rings within 120 min. → After 240 min mixed intergranular attack and grain etchout were observed. - Abstract: Optical and electron microscopies and EBSD were used to study the early stages of corrosion propagation during stable pit formation on AA2024-T3. Polished AA2024-T3 developed large scale rings of corrosion product, typically a few hundred microns in diameter, within 2 h of exposure to 0.1 M NaCl at room temperature. These features were sectioned using diamond ultramicrotomy and substantial subsurface attack, in the form of intergranular corrosion was observed beneath these sites with virtually no grain etchout. A model is proposed for the mechanism of stable pit progression which involves extensive grain boundary attack, followed by grain etchout leading to open pit formation.

  19. Failure Modes in Concrete Repair Systems due to Ongoing Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladena Luković

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of steel reinforcement is the main cause of deterioration in reinforced concrete structures. It can result in cracking and spalling of the concrete cover. After the damaged cover is repaired, reinforcement corrosion might continue and even accelerate. While the development of the corrosion cell is difficult to control, the damage can be possibly delayed and controlled by use of a suitable repair material. The lattice fracture model is used in this paper to investigate the performance of strain hardening cementitious composite (SHCC in concrete repair systems exposed to ongoing corrosion. Numerical results were verified by experimental tests when SHCC, nonreinforced material (repair mortar, and commercial repair mortar are used as repair materials. In experiments, reinforcement bars (surrounded by a repair material were exposed to accelerated corrosion tests. The influence of the substrate surface preparation, the type of repair material, the interface, and the substrate strength on the resulting damage and failure mode of repair systems are discussed. In general, SHCC repair enables distributed cracking with small crack widths, up to several times smaller compared to repair mortar. Furthermore, more warning signs prior to the final failure are present in the SHCC repair system.

  20. Smart Coatings for Launch Site Corrosion Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.

    2014-01-01

    Smart, environmentally friendly paint system for early corrosion detection, mitigation, and healing that will enable supportability in KSC launch facilities and ground systems through their operational life cycles. KSC's Corrosion Technology Laboratory is developing a smart, self-healing coating that can detect and repair corrosion at an early stage. This coating is being developed using microcapsules specifically designed to deliver the contents of their core when corrosion starts.

  1. Marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels

    OpenAIRE

    Morcillo, Manuel; Alcántara, Jenifer; Díaz, Iván; Chico, Belén; Simancas, Joaquín; de la Fuente, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Basic research on marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels is a relatively young scientific field and there continue to be great gaps in this area of knowledge. The presence of akaganeite in the corrosion products that form on steel when it is exposed to marine atmospheres leads to a notable increase in the corrosion rate. This work addresses the following issues: (a) environmental conditions necessary for akaganeite formation; (b) characterisation of akaganeite in the corrosion products...

  2. Filiform corrosion formation on painted aluminium extrusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordlien, J.H. [SINTEF Materials Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Dept. of Corrosion and Surface Technology; Defrancq, J. [Lab. for Strength of Materials and Welding Technology, Univ. of Gent (Belgium); Zuest, W. [Algroup Alusuisse, Technology Center, Neuhausen (Switzerland); Benmalek, M. [Pechiney, Centre de Recherches de Voreppe, Voreppe (France); Stuckart, R. [Hydro Aluminium Extrusion, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2000-07-01

    The filiform corrosion susceptibility of extruded, chromated and coated AA 6060/6063 alloys has been investigated. It is shown that, provided sufficient metal is removed before chromating, these alloys will exhibit high filiform corrosion resistance. In those cases where extensive filiform corrosion attack is observed during corrosion testing it is shown to be due to a reactive surface region, formed during the thermo-mechanical processing of the alloy and remaining after chemical pretreatment for painting. (orig.)

  3. Corrosion Protection of Launch Infrastructure and Hardware Through the Space Shuttle Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion, the environmentally induced degradation of materials, has been a challenging and costly problem that has affected NASA's launch operations since the inception of the Space Program. Corrosion studies began at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term protective coatings for the atmospheric protection of carbon steel. NASA's KSC Beachside Corrosion Test Site, which has been documented by the American Society of Materials (ASM) as one of the most corrosive, naturally occurring environments in the world, was established at that time. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive natural conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acidic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. In the years that followed, numerous efforts at KSC identified materials, coatings, and maintenance procedures for launch hardware and equipment exposed to the highly corrosiye environment at the launch pads. Knowledge on materials degradation, obtained by facing the highly corrosive conditions of the Space Shuttle launch environment, as well as limitations imposed by the environmental impact of corrosion control, have led researchers at NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory to establish a new technology development capability in the area of corrosion prevention, detection, and mitigation at KSC that is included as one of the "highest priority" technologies identified by NASA's integrated technology roadmap. A historical perspective highlighting the challenges encountered in protecting launch infrastructure and hardware from corrosion during the life of the Space Shuttle program and the new technological advances that have resulted from facing the unique and highly corrosive conditions of the Space Shuttle launch environment will be presented.

  4. Corrosion monitoring using FSM technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strommen, R.; Horn, H.; Gartland, P.O.; Wold, K.; Haroun, M.

    1995-01-01

    FSM is a non-intrusive monitoring technique based on a patented principle, developed for the purpose of detection and monitoring of both general and localized corrosion, erosion, and cracking in steel and metal structures, piping systems, and vessels. Since 1991, FSM has been used for a wide range of applications, including for buried and open pipelines, process piping offshore, subsea pipelines and flowlines, applications in the nuclear power industry, and in materials, research in general. This paper describes typical applications of the FSM technology, and presents operational experience from some of the land-based and subsea installations. The paper also describes recent enhancements in the FSM technology and in the analysis of FSM readings, allowing for monitoring and detailed quantification of pitting and mesa corrosion, and of corrosion in welds

  5. Electrochemical corrosion of metallic biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourbaix, M

    1984-05-01

    Methods of electrochemical thermodynamics (electrode potential-pH equilibrium diagrams) and electrochemical kinetics (polarization curves) may help to understand and predict the corrosion behaviour of metals and alloys in the presence of body fluids. A short review of the literature is given concerning some applications of such methods, both in vitro and in vivo, relating to surgical implants (stainless steels, chromium-cobalt-molybdenum alloys, titanium and titanium alloys) and to dental alloys (silver-tin-copper amalgams, silver-base and gold-base casting alloys, nickel-base casting alloys). Attention is drawn to the necessity of more basic research on crevice- and fretting-corrosion of surgical implant materials and dental alloys, and to the toxicity of corrosion products. A perfect understanding of the exact significance of electrode-potentials is essential for the success of such a task.

  6. Mechanisms of metal dusting corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo

    In this thesis the early stages of metal dusting corrosion is addressed; the development of carbon expanded austenite, C, and the decomposition hereof into carbides. Later stages of metal dusting corrosion are explored by a systematic study of stainless steel foils exposed to metal dusting...... the supersaturated alloy, into a diverse carbide network. Finally, the foils turn into metal dust accompanied by a thinning and disappearance of the foils. Investigations of TEM samples, prepared by means of FIB, on the carbide network revealed a lamellar structure with carbides and austenite. Finally, the mutual...... influence of oxygen and carbon on the metal dusting corrosion is explored. The results indicate that exposure to metal dusting conditions have a detrimental effect on the resistance against oxidation and, conversely, that exposure to oxidation has a detrimental effect on the resistance towards metal dusting...

  7. Experiments to understand the corrosion process of fuel rod claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groeschel, F.; Hermann, A.

    1997-01-01

    Fuel rods in light water reactors have to respond to the trends in increased burn-up and extended dwelling time in reactor. Waterside corrosion of the cladding affecting wall thickness, mechanical stability due to hydriding and the heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of the oxide scale may become the limiting factors. The corrosion process is complex and involves a large variety of mechanisms. Understanding of the process is important for safe operation and a prerequisite for development of improved materials. A variety of analytical techniques and mechanical tests, including examination of irradiated pathfinder rods, are used to tackle the different aspects. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 17 refs

  8. Fokker-Planck modeling of pitting corrosion in underground pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, Eliana Nogueira [Risco Ambiental Engenharia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Melo, Paulo F. Frutuoso e [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Saldanha, Pedro Luiz C. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CGRC/CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao Geral de Reatores e Ciclo do Combustivel; Silva, Edson de Pinho da [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Physics

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The stochastic nature of pitting corrosion has been recognized since the 1930s. It has been learned that this damage retains no memory of its past. Instead, the future state is determined only by the knowledge of its present state. This Markovian property that underlies the stochastic process governing pitting corrosion has been explored as a discrete Markovian process by many authors since the beginning of the 1990s for underground pipelines of the oil and gas industries and nuclear power plants. Corrosion is a genuine continuous time and space state Markovian process, so to model it as a discrete time and/or state space is an approximation to the problem. Markovian chains approaches, with an increasing number of states, could involve a large number of parameters, the transition rates between states, to be experimentally determined. Besides, such an increase in the number of states produces matrices with huge dimensions leading to time-consuming computational solutions. Recent approaches involving Markovian discrete process have overcome those difficulties but, on the other hand, a large number of soil and pipe stochastic variables have to be known. In this work we propose a continuous time and space state approach to the evolution of pit corrosion depths in underground pipelines. In order to illustrate the application of the model for defect depth growth a combination of real life data and Monte Carlo simulation was used. The process is described by a Fokker-Planck equation. The Fokker-Planck equation is completely determined by the knowledge of two functions known as the drift and diffusion coefficients. In this work we also show that those functions can be estimated from corrosion depth data from in-line inspections. Some particular forms of drift and diffusion coefficients lead to particular Fokker-Planck equations for which analytical solutions are known, as is the case for the Wiener process, the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and the Brownian motion

  9. Bio-Corrosion of Magnesium Alloys for Orthopaedic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Emily K.; Ehrensberger, Mark T.

    2017-01-01

    Three Mg alloys, Mg–1.34% Ca–3% Zn (MCZ), Mg–1.34% Ca–3% Zn–0.2% Sr (MCZS), and Mg–2% Sr (MS), were examined to understand their bio-corrosion behavior. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and polarization scans were performed after 6 days of immersion in cell culture medium, and ion release and changes in media pH were tracked over a 28 day time period. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of alloy microstructure was performed to help interpret the results of the electrochemical testing. Results indicate that corrosion resistance of the alloys is as follows: MCZ > MCZS > MS. PMID:28862647

  10. Bio-Corrosion of Magnesium Alloys for Orthopaedic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily K. Brooks

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Three Mg alloys, Mg–1.34% Ca–3% Zn (MCZ, Mg–1.34% Ca–3% Zn–0.2% Sr (MCZS, and Mg–2% Sr (MS, were examined to understand their bio-corrosion behavior. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and polarization scans were performed after 6 days of immersion in cell culture medium, and ion release and changes in media pH were tracked over a 28 day time period. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM of alloy microstructure was performed to help interpret the results of the electrochemical testing. Results indicate that corrosion resistance of the alloys is as follows: MCZ > MCZS > MS.

  11. The corrosion protection of 2219-T87 aluminum by anodizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.

    1991-01-01

    Various types of anodizing coatings were studied for 2219-T87 aluminum. These include both type II and type III anodized coats which were water sealed and a newly developed and proprietary Magnaplate HCR (TM) coat. Results indicate that type II anodizing is not much superior to type II anodizing as far as corrosion protection for 2219-T87 aluminum is concerned. Magnaplate HCR (TM) coatings should provide superior corrosion protection over an extended period of time using a coating thickness of 51 microns (2.0 mils).

  12. Corrosion and Inhibition Effects of Mild Steel in Hydrochloric Acid Solutions Containing Organophosphonic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A study has been made on the mechanism of corrosion of mild steel and the effect of nitrilo trimethylene phosphonic (NTMP acid as a corrosion inhibitor in acidic medium, that is, 10% HC1 using the weight loss method and electrochemical techniques, that is, potentiodynamic and galvanostatic polarization measurements. Although corrosion is a long-time process, but it takes place at a faster rate in the beginning which goes on decreasing with due course of time. The above-mentioned methods of corrosion rate determination furnish an average value for a long-time interval. Looking at the versatility and minimum detection limit of the voltammetric method, the authors have developed a new voltammetric method for the determination of corrosion rate at short-time intervals. The results of corrosion of mild steel in 10% HC1 solution with and without NTMP inhibitor at short-time intervals have been reported. The corrosion inhibition efficiency of NTMP is 93% after 24 h.

  13. Alternatives to reduce corrosion of carbon steel storage drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirker, L.R.; Beitel, G.A.

    1995-11-01

    The major tasks of this research were (a) pollution prevention opportunity assessments on the overpacking operations for failed or corroded drums, (b) research on existing container corrosion data, (c) investigation of the storage environment of the new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Type II storage modules, (d) identification of waste streams that demonstrate deleterious corrosion affects on drum storage life, and (e) corrosion test cell program development. Twenty-one waste streams from five US Department of Energy (DOE) sites within the DOE Complex were identified to demonstrate a deleterious effect to steel storage drums. The major components of these waste streams include acids, salts, and solvent liquids, sludges, and still bottoms. The solvent-based waste streams typically had the shortest time to failure: 0.5 to 2 years. The results of this research support the position that pollution prevention evaluations at the front end of a project or process will reduce pollution on the back end

  14. Computational technique for estimating corrosion product release in an LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, W.L.

    1976-01-01

    A model is developed to predict the release of activated corrosion products in an LMFBR. Model parameters are obtained from literature correlations and from fitting the model to release rates observed in experimental sodium loops. The model is simplified to consider only two cases: release controlled by corrosion only or controlled by simultaneous corrosion and diffusion only. The release rates, radionuclide inventories, and resulting radiation fields near primary system components are predicted for the Fast Flux Test Facility as a function of operating temperature, oxygen concentration in the sodium, and time of operation. Saturation inventories are reported for 54 Mn, 60 Co, 58 Co, 51 Cr, and 59 Fe. The resulting radiation fields are due mainly to 54 Mn, and are found to reach the 5 R/hr range for operation at a core outlet temperature of 593 0 C

  15. Atmospheric corrosion evaluation of galvanised steel by thin layer activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroosnijder, M.F.; Brugnoni, C.; Laguzzi, G.; Luvidi, L.; De Cristofaro, N

    2004-09-01

    The release of certain metals, such as zinc, from outdoor constructions due to atmospheric corrosion is of some concern. For risk assessments the evaluation of the amount of released metal is of importance. Various methods can be used to study the release of metals. These include those using radiotracers, such as thin layer activation (TLA). To verify the reliability of TLA with respect to conventional techniques in the evaluation of atmospheric corrosion, galvanised steel was exposed to a mild marine environment. The amount of zinc in the corrosion products, released through artificial leaching, at different time intervals was evaluated by TLA and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). A good correlation between the results was found indicating the feasibility of TLA for these release studies.

  16. Corrosion rate evaluation of the carbon steel trough electrochemical techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeimmy González-Masís

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Usually the atmospheric corrosion studies are cha­racterized by their long duration, months and even years. However electrochemical techniques have been developed, recent in comparison to other methods, allowing obtain real-time data, including corrosion rate. In this research electrochemical noise and lineal polarization resistance tests are valued, so obtained data were analyzed, relations were establis­hed between the graphics form and the corrosion type, as well as the relationship between the corro­sion data and atmospheric conditions, to find, finally, there is a more consistent behavior when the lineal polarization resistance test is used with the three comb-type electrodes electrochemical monitor.

  17. Corrosion at system chimneys made of CrNi-steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajonk, Gunther [Institute of Materials Testing of Northrhine-Westfalia, D-44285 Dortmund (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Names like 'chimney' und 'funnel' usually identify flue gas devices made of bricks. Much less known is the fact that chimney elements are still manufactured from alloys. The following article describes the particular demands ruled by legislation on building pro-ducts, just as the consequences resulting from corrosion loads by flue gas condensates. Difficulties caused by manufacturing and construction are primarily discussed. Furthermore a test procedure is introduced that allows to catch and correlate corrosion loads and technical designs systematically to corrosion behaviour and service life of flue gas devices. For the first time a tool for active quality assurance has been given by this test rig allowing to recognize construction errors systematically. This way, manufacturers of system chimneys and flue liners are enabled to optimize their products applications going ahead to the respective requests of the market. (authors)

  18. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion is a destructive process that often causes failure in metallic components and structures. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of other existing microcapsules designs, the corrosion controlled release function that allows the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand only when and where they are needed. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into the microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection efficacy.

  19. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or reliability...

  20. Corrosion inhibitor testing in archaeological conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Faltermeier

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Metal objects from archaeological contexts often suffer serious damage by corrosion. Various methods for inhibiting corrosion have been developed, but their effects need to be evaluated. Here new research is described on how treatments to inhibit the corrosion of copper and copper-alloy artefacts may be tested.

  1. Corrosion and chemical resistant masonry materials handbook

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sheppard, Walter Lee

    1986-01-01

    ... and other equipment. But few other than chemists and chemical engineers identify "corrosion" as chemical degradation or destruction of a material, and therefore, something that can happen to nonmetals (concrete, plastics, brick, timber, etc.) as well as to nletals. The National Association of Corrosion Engineers so defined "corrosion" over thirty years ago but this f...

  2. The Corrosivity of the Mauritian Atmosphere

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nafiisah

    the outdoor exposure of carbon steel samples of commercial quality. They were exposed at three sites, ... 25% of this cost could be avoided by using appropriate corrosion control technology. Atmospheric corrosion is ... then compared with ISO 9223 to determine the corrosivity of the atmosphere at the three different sites.

  3. Alloy Microstructure Dictates Corrosion Modes in THA Modular Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourzal, Robin; Hall, Deborah J; Ehrich, Jonas; McCarthy, Stephanie M; Mathew, Mathew T; Jacobs, Joshua J; Urban, Robert M

    2017-12-01

    Adverse local tissue reactions (ALTRs) triggered by corrosion products from modular taper junctions are a known cause of premature THA failure. CoCrMo devices are of particular concern because cobalt ions and chromium-orthophosphates were shown to be linked to ALTRs, even in metal-on-polyethylene THAs. The most common categories of CoCrMo alloy are cast and wrought alloy, which exhibit fundamental microstructural differences in terms of grain size and hard phases. The impact of implant alloy microstructure on the occurring modes of corrosion and subsequent metal ion release is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine whether (1) the microstructure of cast CoCrMo alloy varies broadly between manufacturers and can dictate specific corrosion modes; and whether (2) the microstructure of wrought CoCrMo alloy is more consistent between manufacturers and has low implications on the alloy's corrosion behavior. The alloy microstructure of four femoral-stem and three femoral-head designs from four manufacturers was metallographically and electrochemically characterized. Three stem designs were made from cast alloy; all three head designs and one stem design were made from wrought alloy. Alloy samples were sectioned from retrieved components and then polished and etched to visualize grain structure and hard phases such as carbides (eg, M 23 C 6 ) or intermetallic phases (eg, σ phase). Potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) tests were conducted to determine the corrosion potential (E corr ), corrosion current density (I corr ), and pitting potential (E pit ) for each alloy. Four devices were tested within each group, and each measurement was repeated three times to ensure repeatable results. Differences in PDP metrics between manufacturers and between alloys with different hard phase contents were compared using one-way analysis of variance and independent-sample t-tests. Microstructural features such as twin boundaries and slip bands as well as corrosion

  4. Morphological kinetics and localized corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarini, G.

    1992-01-01

    A phenomenological modeling is proposed for physicochemical systems that evolve by initiation and growth of well distinct defects. It consists in a mathematical treatment of data on the evolution of defect distribution, which leads to the knowledge of evolution parameters ultimately usable for behaviour predictions. A method is given for calculating a validity parameter which quantifies the pertinence of the choice for analytical representations. An example of application to localized corrosion is given with the intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high temperature water. (Author). 6 refs

  5. Corrosion problems of power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The proceedings of the conference Corrosion Problems of Power Engineering held from 8 to 10 Dec 1987 in Marianske Lazne (CS) contain the full texts of 26 papers of which 12 fall under the INIS Subject Scope. The papers discuss structural materials for the components of the primary and secondary coolant circuits of nuclear power plants with WWER type reactors. Attention is devoted to various aspects of corrosion behaviour of the materials during normal operation of a nuclear power plant and in deactivation agents. (Z.M.)

  6. High temperature corrosion in gasifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakker Wate

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several commercial scale coal gasification combined cycle power plants have been built and successfully operated during the last 5-10 years. Supporting research on materials of construction has been carried out for the last 20 years by EPRI and others. Emphasis was on metallic alloys for heat exchangers and other components in contact with hot corrosive gases at high temperatures. In this paper major high temperature corrosion mechanisms, materials performance in presently operating gasifiers and future research needs will be discussed.

  7. Corrosion Reliability of Electronic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Jensen, Stine G.; Møller, Per

    2008-01-01

    Inherently two factors namely multi-material usage and potential bias makes electronic devices susceptible to corrosion if exposed to humid conditions. The problem is compounded today due to miniaturization and contamination effects. The reduction in size of the components and close spacing...... on a Printed Circuit Board (PCB) for high density packing has greatly increased the risk of corrosion under humid conditions. An important issue is the failures due to electrolytic metal migration. This paper describes an investigation of the electrolytic migration of Sn-Pb solder lines on PCBs in humid...

  8. Evaluations of corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr plated and Zn-plated Fe Substrates Using an Electrolytic Corrosion Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jaebong; Kim, Kyungwook; Park, Minwoo; Song, Taejun; Lee, Chaeseung; Lee, Euijong; Kim, Sangyeol

    2013-01-01

    An Eectrolytic Corrosion(EC) test method was evaluated by the comparison with Copper Accelerated Acetic Salt Spray(CASS) and Neutral Salt Spray(SS) tests. Those methods were applied in order to evaluate corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr plated and Zn-plated Fe substrates. The correlations between results obtained by different test methods were investigated. Results showed that the electrochemical method such as the EC test method was superior to the conventional methods such as CASS and SS, in terms of the quantitative accuracy and the test-time span. Furthermore, the EC test method provided the useful means to estimate the initiation of corrosion of each layer by monitoring the rest potentials of the coated layers such as Ni, Cr, and Zn on Fe substrate. With regard to test time spans, the EC test provided the 78 times and 182 times faster results than the CASS test in cases of Fe + 5μm Ni + 0.5 μm Cr and Fe + 20 μm Ni + 0.5 μm Cr respectively, while the EC test was 85 times faster results than the Salt Spray test in the case of Fe + 20 g/m 2 Zn. Therefore, the EC test can be the better method to evaluate the resistance to corrosion of coated layers than the conventional methods such as the SS test and the CASS

  9. Kinetic mechanism of steel corrosion in clay soils by impedance measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arpaia, M.; Pernice, P.; Costantini, A.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion of steel in clay soil at m.c. 15% has been studied for a long exposure time by electrochemical methods. A.c. impedance measurements results show that at a short exposure time the corrosion process is controlled by the diffusion of H + coupled with a rate determining homogeneous reaction, whereas at a long exposure time the process is controlled by pure diffusion. We have hypothesized that the rate determining homogeneous reaction might be the clay particles cations exchange. (orig.)

  10. The corrosion resistance of zinc coatings in the presence of boron-doped detonation nanodiamonds (DND)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkat, G. K.; Alexandrova, G. S.; Dolmatov, V. Yu; Osmanova, E. D.; Myllymäki, V.; Vehanen, A.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of detonation nanodiamonds, doped with boron (boron-DND) in detonation synthesis on the process of zinc electrochemical deposition from zincate electrolyte is investigated. It is shown that the scattering power (coating uniformity) increases 2-4 times (depending on the concentration of DND-boron electrolyte conductivity does not change, the corrosion resistance of Zn- DND -boron coating increases 2.6 times in 3% NaCl solution (corrosion currents) and 3 times in the climatic chamber.

  11. Effect of radiation on anaerobic corrosion of iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, N.R.; Rance, A.P.

    2005-01-01

    higher dose rate. The corrosion products were predominantly magnetite, with some indications of unidentified higher oxidation state corrosion products being formed at the higher dose rates. The main conclusions from the work are as follows: 1. The presence of gamma radiation fields increases the anaerobic corrosion rate of carbon steel in artificial groundwaters simulating those expected in the SKB repository. At 11 Gray/hr the increase only lasts for approximately 7,000 hours, but at 300 Gray/hr the enhancement is longer lasting and may be continuous. 2. The enhancement in the corrosion rate is greater in Allard water, where a 30 fold increase in corrosion rate was observed, than in bentonite-equilibrated groundwater, which had a higher ionic strength and a higher initial pH, where the radiation-induced enhancement was 10-20 times. 3. The predominant corrosion product of anaerobic corrosion of iron under irradiated conditions is magnetite, but there was some evidence of higher oxidation state oxyhydroxides under the high dose rate conditions. 4. A more detailed analysis of the radiochemical conditions in the tests is required to develop a more detailed understanding of the reasons for the increase in corrosion rate when irradiated

  12. Corrosion Map for Metal Pipes in Coastal Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Transportation agencies often allow metal pipes as an option for cross drains under/along roads and highways. Metal culverts can corrode over time at various rates based on their environmental conditions (e.g., corrosive nature of coastal soils, high...

  13. pitting corrosion susceptibility pitting corrosion susceptibility of aisi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    The susceptibility of austenitic (AISI 301) stainless steel to pitting corrosion was evaluated in sodium chloride ... halides, the most aggressive and thus, the most frequently investigated is the chloride ions, particularly its effect on pit formation in 18/8 stainless steel [1 - 3]. ... in sea water), and moderately high temperatures.

  14. [Evaluation of the corrosion resistance of orthodontic wires by electrochemical measures and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, André El; Klein, Lorena; Frateur, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the corrosion resistance of orthodontic wires made of different alloys (stainless steel, chrome-cobalt, nickel-titanium and β-titanium) and for the same alloy from different vendors (GAC(®), RMO(®), 3M(®) and ORMCO(®)). Different electrochemical techniques (corrosion potential monitoring as a function of immersion time, current-potential curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)) were used. The wires' resistance to corrosion was measured and compared with the surface condition, assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Using the recorded data, a rating system based on the corrosion resistance of orthodontic wires was developed. The comparison of these data with the results of SEM shows that the surface chemical composition plays a primary role in the electrochemical behavior of the orthodontic wires and, unlike surface defects, is a key parameter for the corrosion resistance of the alloy. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2013.

  15. The Corrosion Characteristics and Tensile Behavior of Reinforcement under Coupled Carbonation and Static Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yidong Xu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the non-uniform corrosion characteristics and mechanical properties of reinforcement under coupled action of carbonation and static loading. The two parameters, namely area-box (AB value and arithmetical mean deviation (Ra, are adopted to characterize the corrosion morphology and pitting distribution from experimental observations. The results show that the static loading affects the corrosion characteristics of reinforcement. Local stress concentration in corroded reinforcement caused by tensile stress drives the corrosion pit pattern to be more irregular. The orthogonal test results from finite element simulations show that pit shape and pit depth are the two significant factors affecting the tensile behavior of reinforcement. Under the condition of similar corrosion mass loss ratio, the maximum plastic strain of corroded reinforcement increases with the increase of Ra and load time-history significantly.

  16. A New Experimental Method for in Situ Corrosion Monitoring Under Alternate Wet-Dry Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ke

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A new experimental method was applied in in situ corrosion monitoring of mild steel Q235 under alternate wet-dry conditions. The thickness of the electrolyte film during the wet cycle was monitored by a high-precision balance with a sensibility of 0.1 mg. At the same time, an electrochemical impedance technique was employed to study the effect of film thickness on corrosion rates. Experimental results showed that there was a critical electrolyte film condition for which the corrosion rate reached a maximum during wet-dry cycles. For the substrate, the critical condition could be described by a film thickness of about 17 μm. For the rusted specimen, the critical condition could be described by an electrolyte amount of about 0.038 g, which is equivalent to a film thickness of 38 μm. This monitoring system was very useful for studying atmospheric corrosion of metals covered by corrosion products.

  17. Corrosion behavior of niobium coated 304 stainless steel in acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, T. J.; Chen, Y.; Zhang, B.; Hu, J.; Li, C.

    2016-04-01

    The niobium coating is fabricated on the surface of AISI Type 304 stainless steel (304SS) by using a high energy micro arc alloying technique in order to improvecorrosion resistance of the steel against acidic environments. The electrochemical corrosion resistance of the niobium coating in 0.7 M sulfuric acid solutions is evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization and the open circuit potential versus time. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the niobium coating increases the free corrosion potential of the substrate by 110 mV and a reduction in the corrosion rate by two orders of magnitude compared to the substrate alone. The niobium coating maintains large impedance and effectively offers good protection for the substrate during the long-term exposure tests, which is mainly ascribed to the niobium coating acting inhibiting permeation of corrosive species. Finally, the corresponding electrochemical impedance models are proposed to elucidate the corrosion resistance behavior of the niobium coating in acid solutions.

  18. Corrosion Behavior of Primid Solidified Polyester Powder Coating in Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU He-rong

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of primid-curing solidified polyester powder coating defects in marine environment was investigated by CASS test, immersion test, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and scanning Kelvin probe (SKP. The results show that the primid-curing polyester powder coating has a small amount of blisters along the scratch edge, the maximu single side corrosion width is less than 0.5mm, and the surface adhesion is 0 after 240 hours' CASS test. The EIS map in 0.6mol/L NaCl solution exhibits that the corrosion rate of aluminu alloy is decreased with increasing immersion time and gradually stable. The scanning Kelvin spectrum reveals that the corrosion of the metal under the coating of the polyester powder is extended from scratch to the coating, the anode and the cathode are alternately changed, which leads to the expansion of the corrosion area.

  19. INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE ON THE CORROSION POTENTIAL OF THE 241-AN-102 MULTI PROBE CORROSION MONITORING SYSTEM SECONDARY REFERENCE ELECTRODES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EDGEMON GL; TAYLOR TM

    2008-09-30

    A test program using 241-AN-102 waste simulants and metallic secondary reference electrodes similar to those used on the 241-AN-102 MPCMS was performed to characterize the relationship between temperature and secondary reference electrode open-circuit corrosion potential. This program showed that the secondary reference electrodes can be used to make tank and tank steel corrosion potential measurements, but that a correction factor of approximately 2 mV per degree Celsius of temperature difference must be applied, where temperature difference is defined as the difference between tank temperature at the time of measurement and 30 C, the average tank temperature during the first several months of 241-AN-102 MPCMS operation (when the corrosion potentials of the secondary reference electrodes were being recorded relative to the primary reference electrodes).

  20. 219-S CORROSION STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DIVINE, J.R.; PARSONS, G.L.

    2008-01-01

    A minor leak was detected in a drain line for Hood 2B located in the 222-S Laboratory. The line transfers radioactive waste, spent analytical standards, and chemicals used in various analytical procedures. Details are in the report provided by David Comstock, 2B NDE June 2008, work package LAB-WO-07-2012. Including the noted leak, the 222-S Laboratory has experienced two drain line leaks in approximately the last two years of operation. As a consequence, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) requested the support of ChemMet, Ltd., PC (ChemMet) at the Hanford Site 222-S Laboratory. The corrosion expertise from ChemMet was required prior to preparation of a compatibility assessment for the 222-S Laboratory waste transfer system to assure the expected life of the piping system is extended as much as practicable. The system includes piping within the 222-S Laboratory and the 219-S Waste Storage and Transfer Facility and Operations Process. The ChemMet support was required for an assessment by 222-S staff to analyze what improvements to operational activities may be implemented to extend the tank/piping system life. This assessment will include a summary of the various material types, age, and locations throughout the facility. The assessment will also include a discussion of materials that are safe for drain line disposal on a regular basis, materials that are safe for disposal on a case-by-case basis including specific additional requirements such as flushing, neutralization to a specific pH, and materials prohibited from disposal. The assessment shall include adequate information for 222-S Laboratory personnel to make informed decisions in the future disposal of specific material types by discussing types of compatibility of system materials and potential wastes. The assessment is expected to contain some listing of acceptable waste materials but is not anticipated to be a complete or comprehensive list. Finally the assessment will encompass a brief discussion of

  1. Review and study of physics driven pitting corrosion modeling in 2024-T3 aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lingyu; Jata, Kumar V.

    2015-04-01

    Material degradation due to corrosion and corrosion fatigue has been recognized to significantly affect the airworthiness of civilian and military aircraft, especially for the current fleet of airplanes that have served beyond their initial design life. The ability to predict the corrosion damage development in aircraft components and structures, therefore, is of great importance in managing timely maintenance for the aging aircraft vehicles and in assisting the design of new ones. The assessment of aircraft corrosion and its influence on fatigue life relies on appropriate quantitative models that can evaluate the initiation of the corrosion as well as the accumulation during the period of operation. Beyond the aircraft regime, corrosion has also affected the maintenance, safety and reliability of other systems such as nuclear power systems, steam and gas turbines, marine structures and so on. In the work presented in this paper, we reviewed and studied several physics based pitting corrosion models that have been reported in the literature. The classic work of particle induced pitting corrosion by Wei and Harlow is reviewed in detail. Two types of modeling, a power law based simplified model and a microstructure based model, are compared for 2024-T3 alloy. Data from literatures are used as model inputs. The paper ends with conclusions and recommendations for future work.

  2. A laboratory scale investigation scheme to prognosticate corrosion characteristics of nuclear power plant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, I.

    1983-01-01

    To determine the corrosion properties of system components in primary and secondary circuits of nuclear power plants long-term investigations are needed and experimental loops are required containing all the construction materials of the real system with operation parameters matching that of the power station as close as possible. A different approach should be looked for when response time of some days or weeks can not be exceeded. Comparative investigations were carried out to evaluate a fast method to determine corrosion characteristics of multi-component systems using the model samples representing typical components of a nuclear power plant. In the usual way corrosion rates were determined in experimental runs of several weeks in primary coolant solutions at the nominal operational temperature of 90-100 deg. C in the presence and in the absence of oxygen. On the other hand electrode potentials were measured in the coolant, while variations in surface and ''near surface'' elemental composition of the model samples during corrosion as well as the corrosion rate was measured in diluted decontamination solution. Comparing the results it could be established, that the proposed method can not offer absolute values of the corrosion rate but it can be used to determine the relative corrosion resistance of the system components and to prognosticate possible corrosion-incompatibility, and this can be done within a couple of hours. (author)

  3. Corrosion damage diagnosis of a reinforced concrete beam after 40 years natural exposure in marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poupard, O.; L'Hostis, V.; Catinaud, S.; Petre-Lazar, I.

    2006-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the chloride induced corrosion damage was performed on a 40 years old reinforced concrete beam exposed in marine environment. Visual observations, electrochemical measurements, carbonation depth, total chloride content were carried out. Half-cell potential measurements were used to locate corrosion areas. It appeared that the interpretation based on gradient of the potential was in good concordance with real state of damage. Complementary destructive methods are applied to observe the real corrosion state of steel rebars and characterize the corrosion products and the steel/concrete interface (optical and electronical microscopy tools (XRD, SEM, EDS and μ-Raman). All these data indicate that on the beam, one may distinguish two types of areas: 'high-corrosion zones' and 'low-corrosion zones.' Given the fact that the 'high corrosion zones' were found to be close to corrosion induced cracks and that they have a different morphology, this contribution concludes that the position of these areas did not shift in time

  4. SITE-94. CAMEO: A model of mass-transport limited general corrosion of copper canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worgan, K.J.; Apted, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the technical basis for the CAMEO code, which models the general, uniform corrosion of a copper canister either by transport of corrodants to the canister, or by transport of corrosion products away from the canister. According to the current Swedish concept for final disposal of spent nuclear fuels, extremely long containment times are achieved by thick (60-100 mm) copper canisters. Each canister is surrounded by a compacted bentonite buffer, located in a saturated, crystalline rock at a depth of around 500 m below ground level. Three diffusive transport-limited cases are identified for general, uniform corrosion of copper: General corrosion rate-limited by diffusive mass-transport of sulphide to the canister surface under reducing conditions; General corrosion rate-limited by diffusive mass-transport of oxygen to the canister surface under mildly oxidizing conditions; General corrosion rate-limited by diffusive mass-transport of copper chloride away from the canister surface under highly oxidizing conditions. The CAMEO code includes general corrosion models for each of the above three processes. CAMEO is based on the well-tested CALIBRE code previously developed as a finite-difference, mass-transfer analysis code for the SKI to evaluate long-term radionuclide release and transport in the near-field. A series of scoping calculations for the general, uniform corrosion of a reference copper canister are presented

  5. Assessing Level and Effectiveness of Corrosion Education in the UAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwee Ling Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of corrosion can be minimized by an engineering workforce well trained in corrosion fundamentals and management. Since the United Arab Emirates incurs the second highest cost of corrosion after Saudi Arabia, this paper examined the quality of corrosion education in the UAE. Surveys with academia and industry respondents showed that dedicated corrosion courses and engineering courses that integrated corrosion into the curricula were available in UAE universities, but graduates had insufficient knowledge of corrosion engineering and superficial understanding of corrosion in real-life design contexts. The effectiveness of corrosion education is determined by both competence in corrosion knowledge/skills and availability of resources (faculty and research. Though most departments would not hire new corrosion-specialist faculty, department research efforts and industry partnerships in corrosion research were present. The paper concluded with recommendations for improving knowledge and skills of future engineers in corrosion and enhancing corrosion instruction to better meet industry needs.

  6. Liquid metal corrosion considerations in alloy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid metal corrosion can be an important consideration in developing alloys for fusion and fast breeder reactors and other applications. Because of the many different forms of liquid metal corrosion (dissolution, alloying, carbon transfer, etc.), alloy optimization based on corrosion resistance depends on a number of factors such as the application temperatures, the particular liquid metal, and the level and nature of impurities in the liquid and solid metals. The present paper reviews the various forms of corrosion by lithium, lead, and sodium and indicates how such corrosion reactions can influence the alloy development process

  7. X-rays absorption study on medieval corrosion layers for the understanding of very long-term indoor atmospheric iron corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monnier, J. [SIS2M UMR 3299 CEA-CNRS, Laboratoire Archeomateriaux et Prevision de l' Alteration (LAPA), Gif/Yvette cedex (France); UMR 7182 CNRS and UPEC, Universite Paris-Est, Institut de Chimie et des Materiaux Paris-Est (ICMPE), Thiais (France); Reguer, S.; Vantelon, D. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dillmann, P. [SIS2M UMR 3299 CEA-CNRS, Laboratoire Archeomateriaux et Prevision de l' Alteration (LAPA), Gif/Yvette cedex (France); IRAMAT UMR 5060 CNRS, Gif sur Yvette (France); Neff, D. [SIS2M UMR 3299 CEA-CNRS, Laboratoire Archeomateriaux et Prevision de l' Alteration (LAPA), Gif/Yvette cedex (France); Guillot, I. [UMR 7182 CNRS and UPEC, Universite Paris-Est, Institut de Chimie et des Materiaux Paris-Est (ICMPE), Thiais (France)

    2010-05-15

    The study and prediction of very long-term atmospheric corrosion behaviour of ferrous alloys is of great importance in different fields. First the conservation of metallic artefacts in museum and the corrosion diagnosis on ferrous reinforcement used in ancient monuments since medieval times needs reliable data to understand the mechanisms. Second, in the frame of the interim storage of nuclear waste in France, it is necessary to model the long-term corrosion of low alloy steel overcontainer. The nature of phases and elements constituting the corrosion layers can greatly influence the corrosion mechanisms. On the one hand, it is crucial to precisely determine the nature of microscopic phases that can be highly reactive. On the other hand, some elements as P and S could modify this reactivity. To clarify this point and complementary to other studies using Raman micro spectroscopy technique, X-rays Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) under synchrotron radiation plays a crucial role. It allows one to precisely identify the reactive phases in the corrosion layers. Micro-XAS was required in order to refine the spatial variation, at micrometer scale, of the predominant Fe oxidation state and to characterise the corresponding corrosion products. Moreover, the role of minor elements on phase's stability and the chemical form of these elements in the rust layer, especially phosphorus and sulphur, was investigated. (orig.)

  8. Steam based conversion coating on AA6060 alloy: Effect of sodium silicate chemistry and corrosion performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Bordo, Kirill; Tabrizian, Naja; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2017-11-01

    Surface treatment of aluminium alloy AA6060 using an industrially applicable pilot steam jet system with and without silicate chemistry has been investigated. Treatment using steam alone and steam with silicate, resulted in an oxide layer formation with thickness ∼425 nm and ∼160 nm, respectively. Moreover, the use of sodium silicate resulted in the formation of distinct microstructure and incorporation of silicate into the oxide film. These oxide films reduced the anodic activity 4 times, while the corrosion protection by silicate containing oxide was the function of its concentration. Further, in acid salt spray and filiform corrosion tests, oxide layer containing silicate exhibited two times higher corrosion resistance.

  9. The corrosion rate of copper in a bentonite test package measured with electric resistance sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosborg, Bo [Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Kosec, Tadeja; Kranjc, Andrej; Kuhar, Viljem; Legat, Andraz [Slovenian National Building and Civil Engineering Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-12-15

    LOT1 test parcel A2 was exposed for six years in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, which offers a realistic environment for the conditions that will prevail in a deep repository for high-level radioactive waste disposal in Sweden. The test parcel contained copper electrodes for real-time corrosion monitoring in bentonite ring 36, where the temperature was 24 deg C, and copper coupons in bentonite rings 22 and 30, where the temperature was higher. After retrieval of the test parcel in January 2006, a bentonite test package consisting of bentonite rings 35 - 37 was placed in a container and sealed with a thick layer of paraffin. Later the same year new copper electrodes were installed in the test package. In January 2007 electric resistance (ER) sensors of pure copper with a thickness of 35 {mu}m were also installed in the test package mainly to facilitate the interpretation of the results from the real-time corrosion monitoring with electrochemical techniques. The ER measurements have shown that the corrosion rate of pure copper exposed in an oxic bentonite/ saline groundwater environment at room temperate decreases slowly with time to low but measurable values. The corrosion rates estimated from the regularly performed EIS measurements replicate the ER data. Thus, for this oxic environment in which copper acquires corrosion potentials of the order of 200 mV (SHE) or higher, electrochemical measurements provide believable data. Comparing the recorded ER data with an estimate of the average corrosion rate based on comparing cross-sections from exposed and protected sensor elements, it is obvious that the former overestimates the actual corrosion rate, which is understandable. It seems as if electrochemical measurements can provide a better estimate of the corrosion rate; however, this is quite dependent on the use of proper measuring frequencies and evaluation methods. In this respect ER measurements are more reliable. It has been shown that real-time corrosion

  10. Corrosion of UN in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunder, S.; Miller, N.H.

    1996-10-01

    Corrosion of UN in water was investigated as a function of pH and temperature using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and by measuring the amount of ammonia formed due to its corrosion. The XPS results indicate that a freshly fractured surface of UN is quickly converted to U0 2 on exposure to liquid water or water vapours at ambient temperatures. These results show that UN is unstable in contact with water. The corrosion rate of UN is estimated to be ≥40 μmol·m -2 ·h -1 in deaerated water at ∼92 o C. There was no significant difference in corrosion rates measured in water at initial pHs of ∼6 and ∼10.3. These results contradict the literature reports stating that UN is stable in contact with boiling water. The implications of these results on the suitability of UN as a nuclear fuel for reactors are discussed. (author)

  11. Tubing with high corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioffe, A. V.; Tetyueva, T. V.; Vyboyshchik, M. A.; Trifonova, E. A.; Lutsenko, E. S.

    2010-07-01

    The optimum chemical composition and the regime for heat treatment of heat-resistant steel 15Kh5M are determined for the production of tubing with strength of group L80 (API 5CT) and high cold resistance and resistance to carbon dioxide and sulfurated hydrogen corrosion at low alloying additives of chromium and molybdenum.

  12. Automated methods of corrosion measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Reeve, John Ch

    1997-01-01

    to revise assumptions regarding the basis of the method, which sometimes leads to the discovery of as-yet unnoticed phenomena. The present selection of automated methods for corrosion measurements is not motivated simply by the fact that a certain measurement can be performed automatically. Automation...

  13. The dual role of microbes in corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion. PMID:25259571

  14. The dual role of microbes in corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion.

  15. Corrosion of Metal-Matrix Composites with Aluminium Alloy Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bobic

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of MMCs with aluminium alloy matrix was presented. The corrosion characteristics of boron-, graphite-, silicon carbide-, alumina- and mica- reinforced aluminium MMCs were reviewed. The reinforcing phase influence on MMCs corrosion rate as well as on various corrosion forms (galvanic, pitting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatique, tribocorrosion was discussed. Some corrosion protection methods of aluminium based MMCs were described

  16. Predicting the Performance of Organic Corrosion Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Winkler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The withdrawal of effective but toxic corrosion inhibitors has provided an impetus for the discovery of new, benign organic compounds to fill that role. Concurrently, developments in the high-throughput synthesis of organic compounds, the establishment of large libraries of available chemicals, accelerated corrosion inhibition testing technologies, and the increased capability of machine learning methods have made discovery of new corrosion inhibitors much faster and cheaper than it used to be. We summarize these technical developments in the corrosion inhibition field and describe how data-driven machine learning methods can generate models linking molecular properties to corrosion inhibition that can be used to predict the performance of materials not yet synthesized or tested. We briefly summarize the literature on quantitative structure–property relationships models of small organic molecule corrosion inhibitors. The success of these models provides a paradigm for rapid discovery of novel, effective corrosion inhibitors for a range of metals and alloys in diverse environments.

  17. Corrosion Control in the Aerospace Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it..

  18. Evolutionary Computation Techniques for Predicting Atmospheric Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Marref

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion occurs in many engineering structures such as bridges, pipelines, and refineries and leads to the destruction of materials in a gradual manner and thus shortening their lifespan. It is therefore crucial to assess the structural integrity of engineering structures which are approaching or exceeding their designed lifespan in order to ensure their correct functioning, for example, carrying ability and safety. An understanding of corrosion and an ability to predict corrosion rate of a material in a particular environment plays a vital role in evaluating the residual life of the material. In this paper we investigate the use of genetic programming and genetic algorithms in the derivation of corrosion-rate expressions for steel and zinc. Genetic programming is used to automatically evolve corrosion-rate expressions while a genetic algorithm is used to evolve the parameters of an already engineered corrosion-rate expression. We show that both evolutionary techniques yield corrosion-rate expressions that have good accuracy.

  19. NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2015-01-01

    The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in North America. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the highly corrosive hydrochloric acid (HCl) generated by the solid rocket boosters (SRBs). Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion. The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. NASA has over fifty years of experience dealing with unexpected failures caused by corrosion and has developed expertise in corrosion control in the launch and other environments. The Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC evolved, from what started as an atmospheric exposure test site near NASAs launch pads, into a capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA, external partners, and customers.This paper provides a chronological overview of NASAs role in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion in highly corrosive environments. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

  20. Pattern of corrosive ingestion in southwestern Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlBinali Ali M; AlShehri, Mohammed A; AlFifi, Suliman H; Abdelmoneim, Ismail; Shomrani, Ali S

    2009-01-01

    Ingested corrosive material is a major pediatric emergency all over the world. The corrosive material can cause damage to the digestive tract, ranging from minor injury to strictures, and sometimes even death. We aimed to review the pattern of corrosive ingestion in children who had been admitted to Aseer Central Hospital in the Southwestern region of Saudi Arabia. This is a retrospective study of all children who had been admitted with a history of corrosive ingestion to Aseer Central Hospital over a period of five years period from 1990 to 1995. The records of 72 patients (38 males and 34 females) were reviewed. The data included age, sex, time lapse till admission, action taken by parents, presenting symptoms, general management given to the child, barium study, endoscopy, and the postcorrosive ingestion outcome of the child. The mean age of the pediatric patients was 28 + - 20 months. Different types of corrosives were encountered. The most common type was 5.25% hypochlorite in 36 patients (50%), kerosene in 12 patients (16.7%), caustic soda in nine patients (12.5%), hydrogen chloride and N-alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (HC and ADB) in eight patients (11.1%), and other material in seven patients (9.7%). Endoscopy was done in 30 patients (31.7%), 14 of whom were abnormal. Barium swallow was performed in 11 patients; five of them showed strictures that required frequent dilatation whereas one needed interposition surgery. Corrosive injury is still a major pediatric emergency among young children. It carries a major risk of complications (mainly stricture) and requires standardized management based on evidence-based medicine. (author)

  1. Evaluation of Deoxygenation as a Corrosion Control Measure for Ballast Tanks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Jason S; Ray, Richard I; Lemieux, Edward; Little, Brenda J

    2005-01-01

    .... When gaskets and seals failed oxygen was inadvertently introduced. The impact on corrosion depended on the amount of dissolved oxygen in the system at the time of the inadvertent oxygen introduction...

  2. Magnesium-Based Corrosion Nano-Cells For Reductive Transformation Of Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium, with its potential to reduce a variety of aqueous contaminants, unique self-limiting corrosion behavior affording long active life times, natural abundance, low cost, and environmentally friendly nature, promises to be an effective technology. However, nanoparticles o...

  3. Fatigue and Fracture Characterization of Aircraft Aluminum Alloys Damaged by Prior Corrosion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baldwin, J

    2002-01-01

    At the time of the initiation of this project, there was no comprehensive data describing corrosion's effect on the fatigue and fracture behavior of aluminum alloys typically found in aging aircraft...

  4. Flow-accelerated corrosion 2016 international conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Shipkov, A. A.

    2017-05-01

    The paper discusses materials and results of the most representative world forum on the problems of flow-accelerated metal corrosion in power engineering—Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) 2016, the international conference, which was held in Lille (France) from May 23 through May 27, 2016, sponsored by EdF-DTG with the support of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO). The information on major themes of reports and materials of the exhibition arranged within the framework of the congress is presented. The statistics on operation time and intensity of FAC wall thinning of NPP pipelines and equipment in the world is set out. The paper describes typical examples of flow-accelerated corrosion damage of condensate-feed and wet-steam pipeline components of nuclear and thermal power plants that caused forced shutdowns or accidents. The importance of research projects on the problem of flow-accelerated metal corrosion of nuclear power units coordinated by the IAEA with the participation of leading experts in this field from around the world is considered. The reports presented at the conference considered issues of implementation of an FAC mechanism in single- and two-phase flows, the impact of hydrodynamic and water-chemical factors, the chemical composition of the metal, and other parameters on the intensity and location of FAC wall thinning localized areas in pipeline components and power equipment. Features and patterns of local and general FAC leading to local metal thinning and contamination of the working environment with ferriferous compounds are considered. Main trends of modern practices preventing FAC wear of NPP pipelines and equipment are defined. An increasing role of computer codes for the assessment and prediction of FAC rate, as well as software systems of support of the NPP personnel for the inspection planning and prevention of FAC wall thinning of equipment operating in singleand two

  5. Future and benefits of corrosion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staehle, Roger W.

    2002-01-01

    The subject of corrosion is a design science. The subject of stress analysis is a design science as is the subject of heat transfer. When the subject of corrosion is considered in the framework design a clear framework of the priorities and objectives becomes apparent. Further, corrosion becomes a more explicit and important subject in the overall design, manufacturing, and operation phases of equipment: in this framework, the funding and support of corrosion work is necessary to the designers and users of equipment. The subject of corrosion is usually less important in the early stages of operation of equipment: in these early stages, the subjects. Corrosion becomes important to the longer term reliability and safety of equipment. Corrosion is often a principal determiner of design life. Corrosion is often more important after the manufacturing warranty is expired: therefore the subject is often more important to the user than to the manufacturer. In order that the subject of corrosion is considered and incorporated in the design as well as in user specifications, there must be a language and means of easily understood communication between the design-operation community and the corrosion community. For example, the designers do not understand the language of 'pitting potential': rather, they understand design life and permissible stress. Thus, corrosion must be put into terms that can be understood and utilized by designers and operators. Two methodologies have been developed for communicating effectively between the corrosion and the design communities: these are the 'Corrosion Based Design Approach' and the 'Location for Analysis Matrix.' These provide simple check off lists to designers for asking questions and assuring that credible answers have been obtained on issues that affect reliable and economic performance. Both of these subject are discussed in this presentation. The future of corrosion research is its effective linkage with design and operation of

  6. Development of a phosphating process for corrosion protection in NdFeB magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Adonis Marcelo Saliba

    2001-01-01

    NdFeB magnets are important materials, which produce better energy efficiency in electrical devices, but they are rather vulnerable to corrosion. In this study, a phosphating treatment for protection against corrosion of NdFeB magnets has been investigated. Phosphating is generally used as a pretreatment in the application of protective coatings. This treatment increases the corrosion assistance in defective areas of the coating as well as improves the adhesion between coating and substrate. A commercial NdFeB magnet produced by powder metallurgy has been used and the effect of the following parameters on phosphating was studied: time of phosphating; pH of phosphating solution; anodic polarization and molybdate addition to the phosphating solution. The results showed a significant increase in the corrosion resistance of magnets phosphated in a solution concentrated between 10-20 g/L NaH 2 PO 4 , pH in the range of 3 to 4.6, acidulated preferably with H 3 PO 4 at room temperature (20±1) deg C. Conversion coatings formed at solutions of pH 3.8 showed better corrosion resistance. Phosphating times longer than 4 hours increased the magnet corrosion resistance 10 to 20 times. This resistance improves with higher immersion times. Anodic polarization of the magnet in the range 200-400 mV SCE accelerated phosphating. Results indicated that molybdate interacts preferentially with Nd rich phase of the magnet. In addition to the newly developed technology in this work for NdFeB corrosion protection, two methodologies have been introduced to facilitate electrochemical analyses: selection of samples of similar electrochemical behavior, based on the current density after 200s of constant anodic polarization; and evaluation of the corrosion protection provided by conversion coatings by monitoring of gas evolution during corrosion in acid solution. (author)

  7. General corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical evaluation of nuclear-waste-package structural-barrier materials. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerman, R.E.; Pitman, S.G.; Nelson, J.L.

    1982-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is studying the general corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmentally enhanced crack propagation of five candidate materials in high-temperature aqueous environments simulating those expected in basalt and tuff repositories. The materials include three cast ferrous materials (ductile cast iron and two low-alloy Cr-Mo cast steels) and two titanium alloys, titanium Grade 2 (commercial purity) and Grade 12 (a Ti-Ni-Mo alloy). The general corrosion results are being obtained by autoclave exposure of specimens to slowly replenished simulated ground water flowing upward through a bed of the appropriate crushed rock (basalt or tuff), which is maintained at the desired test temperature (usually 250 0 C). In addition, tests are being performed in deionized water. Metal penetration rates of iron-base alloys are being derived by stripping off the corrosion product film and weighing the specimen after the appropriate exposure time. The corrosion of titanium alloy specimens is being determined by weight gain methods. The irradiation-corrosion studies are similar to the general corrosion tests, except that the specimen-bearing autoclaves are held in a 60 Co gamma radiation field at dose rates up to 2 x 10 6 rad/h. For evaluating the resistance of the candidate materials to environmentally enhanced crack propagation, three methods are being used: U-bend and fracture toughness specimens exposed in autoclaves; slow strain rate studies in repository-relevant environments to 300 0 C; and fatigue crack growth rate studies at ambient pressure and 90 0 C. The preliminary data suggest a 1-in. corrosion allowance for iron-base barrier elements intended for 1000-yr service in basalt or tuff repositories. No evidence has yet been found that titanium Grade 2 or Grade 12 is susceptible to environmentally induced crack propagation or, by extension, to stress corrosion cracking

  8. Estimating Corrosion Initiation Period Due to Chloride Ingress into Reinforced Self-Compacting Concrete Incorporating High Volume Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiawan Stefanus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main sources of reinforcement corrosion is the ingress of chloride ion into a concrete structure. The rate of chloride ingress and its consequence to initiate corrosion could determine the service life of the structure. This paper aims to estimate the corrosion initiation period of reinforced self-compacting concrete incorporating high volume fly ash. The governing equation whih characterize the chloride ingress through ionic diffusion is numerically solved using finite difference method. The numerical solutions are used to assess the influence of fly ash content, concrete cover and temperature on the time of corrosion initiation.

  9. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY14 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steven J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    observed in solutions with 50 wppm iodine (the actual SHINE process expects 0.1–1 wppm) with the highest corrosion rates (up to ~6 mil/year) observed on specimens exposed in the vapor phase. Lower concentrations of iodine species (5 or 28 wppm) proved much less corrosive, and the planned-interval data indicated that metal corrodibility decreased with time for all immersed exposures and, with one minor exception, all vapor exposures. Little change in susceptibility to corrosion was observed as a result of nitric acid additions to the test environment (simulating radiolysis products). The trend toward reduced corrosion (immersion and vapor phase) with decreasing iodine concentration suggests that, at the expected conditions in the SHINE process, it is unlikely that iodine species will generate a general corrosion concern for the candidate stainless steels.

  10. Effects of short-time heat treatment and subsequent chemical surface treatment on the mechanical properties, low-cycle fatigue behavior and corrosion resistance of a Ni-Ti (50.9 at.% Ni) biomedical alloy wire used for the manufacture of stents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojtech, D.; Voderova, M.; Kubasek, J.; Novak, P.; Seda, P.; Michalcova, A.; Fojt, J.; Hanus, J.; Mestek, O.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Effect of short-time heat treatments on functional properties of a NiTi alloy. → Negative effect of heat treatments on corrosion resistance. → Positive effect of heat treatments on fatigue life. → Positive influence of chemical treatment on both fatigue and corrosion resistance. - Abstract: Cold-drawn and straight-annealed NiTi wires (50.9% Ni) with a tensile strength of 1650 MPa were subjected to heat treatments at 450, 510 and 600 deg. C for 10 min in air to simulate the shape-setting process in the manufacture of stents. Afterwards, the wires were chemically etched in acidic baths containing HF, HNO 3 and H 2 O, followed by boiling in water. Variations in the internal structure, surface state and chemistry and transformation behavior of the wires due to these treatments were examined in detail by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersion spectrometry, glow discharge spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Mechanical properties were determined by tensile tests, and low-cycle fatigue behavior was measured by bend-type cyclic loading tests. Corrosion behavior was assessed by immersion tests and potentiodynamic measurements. A high tensile strength of the wire was shown to be attributable to a very fine-grained structure and work hardening. Heat treatment at 450-510 deg. C/10 min did not significantly affect the tensile strength of the wire. At 600 deg. C/10 min, the strength decreased by about 600 MPa due to recrystallization. The transformation temperatures first slightly increased after heat treatment at 450 deg. C and then reduced after treatments at higher temperatures due to changes in the composition of the B2 phase. The fatigue life was observed to prolong with both heat treatment and chemical etching. In contrast, the corrosion resistance worsened with heat treatment, but it improved significantly upon chemical etching. The observed behaviors are discussed in

  11. Quantitative measures of corrosion and prevention: application to corrosion in agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Schouten, J.C.; Gellings, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The corrosion protection factor (c.p.f.) and the corrosion condition (c.c.) are simple instruments for the study and evaluation of the contribution and efficiency of several methods of corrosion prevention and control. The application of c.p.f. and c.c. to corrosion and prevention in agriculture in The Netherlands is considered in detail. Attention is paid to relations between c.p.f. and c.c., the corrosion costs, possible cost savings and the applied corrosion protection scheme on farms. It ...

  12. Long-Term Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22 in 5M CaCl2 at 120 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.C. Estill; G.A. Hust; K.J. Evans; M.L. Stuart; R.B. Rebak

    2006-05-08

    In conditions where tight crevices exist in hot chloride containing solutions Alloy 22 may suffer crevice corrosion. The occurrence (or not) of crevice corrosion in a given environment (e.g, salt concentration and temperature), is governed by the values of the critical potential (E{sub crit}) for crevice corrosion and the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}). This paper discusses the evolution of E{sub corr} and corrosion rate (CR) of creviced Alloy 22 specimens in 5 M calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) at 120 C. Tested specimens included non-creviced rods and multiple creviced assemblies (MCA) both non-welded (wrought) and welded. Results show that Alloy 22 suffers crevice corrosion under the open circuit conditions in the aerated hot CaCl{sub 2} brine. However, after more than a year of immersion the propagation of crevice corrosion was not significant. The general corrosion rate decreased or remained unchanged as the immersion time increased. For rods and MCA specimens, the corrosion rate was lower than 100 nm/year after more than a year immersion time.

  13. Performance evaluation of corrosion probes in simulated WVNS tank 8D-2 waste: WVNS tank farm process support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmore, M.R.

    1994-07-01

    Five corrosion probes were received from West Valley Nuclear Services for evaluation in simulated tank 8D-2 3rd-stage sludge wash slurry. The same waste slurry simulated was also used in a series of ongoing corrosion studies assessing the effects of in-tank sludge washing on the integrity of tank 8D-2. Two of the corrosion probes were installed in the coupon corrosion test vessels operating at ∼150 degrees F to compare performance of the probes with that observed by coupon tests conducted in the same vessels. Corrosion rate data calculated from electrical resistance measurements of the corrosion probes were evaluated for this study using two slightly different approaches. One approach uses the total length of exposure of the probe to give a ''time-averaged'' value of the corrosion rate. The other approach uses a shorter period of time (relative to the length of the test) in the calculation of corrosion rate, and is referred to as the ''instantaneous'' rate. The interpretation of the probe data and the implications of corrosion rates calculated with either of these methods are discussed in this report

  14. The Holy Grail: Deterministic prediction of corrosion damage thousands of years into the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, Digby D.

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarises work being carried out by the author, under Department of Energy (DoE) sponsorship, to develop general corrosion models for Alloy C-22 HLNW canisters in a Yucca Mountain type repository. Two models have been developed to date: (1) the General Corrosion Model (GCM), which yields the corrosion potential and corrosion rate at a specified state point (i.e. a point on the evolutionary path), and (2) the Accumulated Damage Model (ADM), which integrates the corrosion rate calculated for closely spaced state points along the evolutionary path to yield the corrosion loss over the history of the repository. The GCM is based upon the Point Defect Model (PDM) for the steady state growth of passive films on metal surfaces and upon the general Butler-Volmer equation for the kinetics of redox reactions (hydrogen evolution and oxygen reduction), both of which are combined within the framework of the Mixed Potential Model (MPM) to yield the desired corrosion potential and corrosion rate. Importantly, the solution of the constitutive equations contained within the MPM is constrained by the conservation of charge, thereby imparting a high degree of determinism to the predictions. Application of the ADM to evolutionary paths defined by the repository temperature, and assuming that the canisters are always in contact with saturated brine under ambient oxygen pressure conditions, yields a corrosion loss of about 1.7 mm over the 10 000-year service life of the repository. It is estimated that complete loss of the 2 cm Alloy C-22 wall would require an exposure time of about 200 000 years and that the corrosion loss after 1 000 000 years would be slightly less than 9 cm. (authors)

  15. Comparison of surface fractal dimensions of chromizing coating and P110 steel for corrosion resistance estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Naiming; Guo, Junwen; Xie, Faqin; Zou, Jiaojuan; Tian, Wei; Yao, Xiaofei; Zhang, Hongyan; Tang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Continuous chromizing coating was synthesized on P110 steel by pack cementation. • The chromizing coating showed better corrosion resistance. • Comparison of surface fractal dimensions can estimate corrosion resistance. - Abstract: In the field of corrosion research, mass gain/loss, electrochemical tests and comparing the surface elemental distributions, phase constitutions as well as surface morphologies before and after corrosion are extensively applied to investigate the corrosion behavior or estimate the corrosion resistance of materials that operated in various environments. Most of the above methods are problem oriented, complex and longer-period time-consuming. However from an object oriented point of view, the corroded surfaces of materials often have self-similar characterization: fractal property which can be employed to efficiently achieve damaged surface analysis. The present work describes a strategy of comparison of the surface fractal dimensions for corrosion resistance estimation: chromizing coating was synthesized on P110 steel surface to improve its performance via pack cementation. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to investigate the surface morphologies of the original and corroded samples. Surface fractal dimensions of the detected samples were calculated by binary images related to SEM images of surface morphologies with box counting algorithm method. The results showed that both surface morphologies and surface fractal dimensions of P110 steel varied greatly before and after corrosion test, but the chromizing coating changed slightly. The chromizing coating indicated better corrosion resistance than P110 steel. Comparison of surface fractal dimensions of original and corroded samples can rapidly and exactly realize the estimation of corrosion resistance

  16. Effect of segregation bands on corrosion of steel plate for ship hull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mazur

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant progress in the manufacturing of sheet metal ships carried both by optimizing the chemical compositions of steel mills as well as rolling and heat treatment, it still fails to remove the effects of persistent segregation. As a result we observed anisotropy of mechanical properties of the material which essentially complicates the process of construction for shipbuilding industry. Anisotropy of mechanical properties occurring in sheet metal hull is even more dangerous, that during their work, they are exposed to continuous exposure variable charges arising from sea surface waves. Another factor weakening the resistance to cracking metal ship is sea-water, which in the surface layer is highly aerated and very aggressive corrosion. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of the segregation bands in the process of corrosion of low alloy steels used for ship hull. It was estimate a rate of corrosion in aerated sea water areas of the metal with or without segregation bands. After corrosion tests were made observations of specimens surfaces. Inside the segregation bands were found phosphorus. The contents of it were exceeded the average this element content in the steel. At the same time areas of the sheet metal with segregation bands were slowly corroded than areas without bands, although the changes of corrosion rate was similar in nature.Corrosion activity of rich in phosphorus segregation band is similar to phosphate corrosion inhibitors. These are effective in the presenceof chloride in seawater to form a protective layer that protects against corrosion segregation band. Under the observation on scanningelectron microscope there was no change in the appearance of surface samples after corrosion tests. A future direction of research will be estimate the stress corrosion in the same species – with and without segregation bands.

  17. Markov Chain Models for the Stochastic Modeling of Pitting Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Valor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The stochastic nature of pitting corrosion of metallic structures has been widely recognized. It is assumed that this kind of deterioration retains no memory of the past, so only the current state of the damage influences its future development. This characteristic allows pitting corrosion to be categorized as a Markov process. In this paper, two different models of pitting corrosion, developed using Markov chains, are presented. Firstly, a continuous-time, nonhomogeneous linear growth (pure birth Markov process is used to model external pitting corrosion in underground pipelines. A closed-form solution of the system of Kolmogorov's forward equations is used to describe the transition probability function in a discrete pit depth space. The transition probability function is identified by correlating the stochastic pit depth mean with the empirical deterministic mean. In the second model, the distribution of maximum pit depths in a pitting experiment is successfully modeled after the combination of two stochastic processes: pit initiation and pit growth. Pit generation is modeled as a nonhomogeneous Poisson process, in which induction time is simulated as the realization of a Weibull process. Pit growth is simulated using a nonhomogeneous Markov process. An analytical solution of Kolmogorov's system of equations is also found for the transition probabilities from the first Markov state. Extreme value statistics is employed to find the distribution of maximum pit depths.

  18. REMOTE DETECTION OF INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION USING FLUIDIZED SENSORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narasi Sridhar; Garth Tormoen; Ashok Sabata

    2005-10-31

    Pipelines present a unique challenge to monitoring because of the great geographical distances they cover, their burial depth, their age, and the need to keep the product flowing without much interruption. Most other engineering structures that require monitoring do not pose such combined challenges. In this regard, a pipeline system can be considered analogous to the blood vessels in the human body. The human body has an extensive ''pipeline'' through which blood and other fluids are transported. The brain can generally sense damage to the system at any location and alert the body to provide temporary repair, unless the damage is severe. This is accomplished through a vast network of fixed and floating sensors combined with a vast and extremely complex communication/decision making system. The project described in this report mimics the distributed sensor system of our body, albeit in a much more rudimentary fashion. Internal corrosion is an important factor in pipeline integrity management. At present, the methods to assess internal corrosion in pipelines all have certain limitations. In-line inspection tools are costly and cannot be used in all pipelines. Because there is a significant time interval between inspections, any impact due to upsets in pipeline operations can be missed. Internal Corrosion Direct Assessment (ICDA) is a procedure that can be used to identify locations of possible internal corrosion. However, the uncertainties in the procedure require excavation and location of damage using more detailed inspection tools. Non-intrusive monitoring techniques can be used to monitor internal corrosion, but these tools also require pipeline excavation and are limited in the spatial extent of corrosion they can examine. Therefore, a floating sensor system that can deposit at locations of water accumulation and communicate the corrosion information to an external location is needed. To accomplish this, the project is divided into four main

  19. Atmospheric corrosion: statistical validation of models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, V.; Martinez-Luaces, V.; Guineo-Cobs, G.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we discuss two different methods for validation of regression models, applied to corrosion data. One of them is based on the correlation coefficient and the other one is the statistical test of lack of fit. Both methods are used here to analyse fitting of bi logarithmic model in order to predict corrosion for very low carbon steel substrates in rural and urban-industrial atmospheres in Uruguay. Results for parameters A and n of the bi logarithmic model are reported here. For this purpose, all repeated values were used instead of using average values as usual. Modelling is carried out using experimental data corresponding to steel substrates under the same initial meteorological conditions ( in fact, they are put in the rack at the same time). Results of correlation coefficient are compared with the lack of it tested at two different signification levels (α=0.01 and α=0.05). Unexpected differences between them are explained and finally, it is possible to conclude, at least in the studied atmospheres, that the bi logarithmic model does not fit properly the experimental data. (Author) 18 refs

  20. Microencapsulation Technology for Corrosion Mitigation by Smart Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrow, Jerry; Li, Wenyan; Jolley, Scott; Calle, Luz M.

    2011-01-01

    A multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion is being developed based on micro-encapsulation technology. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection effectiveness. This paper summarizes the development, optimization, and testing of microcapsules specifically designed to be incorporated into a smart coating that will deliver corrosion inhibitors to mitigate corrosion autonomously. Key words: smart coating, corrosion inhibition, microencapsulation, microcapsule, pH sensitive microcapsule, corrosion inhibitor, corrosion protection pain

  1. Corrosion Product Film-Induced Stress Facilitates Stress Corrosion Cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhiliang; Ren, Xuechong; Guan, Yongjun; Su, Yanjing

    2015-06-11

    Finite element analyses were conducted to clarify the role of corrosion product films (CPFs) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Flat and U-shaped edge-notched specimens were investigated in terms of the CPF-induced stress in the metallic substrate and the stress in the CPF. For a U-shaped edge-notched specimen, the stress field in front of the notch tip is affected by the Young's modulus of the CPF and the CPF thickness and notch geometry. The CPF-induced tensile stress in the metallic substrate is superimposed on the applied load to increase the crack tip strain and facilitate localized plasticity deformation. In addition, the stress in the CPF surface contributes to the rupture of the CPFs. The results provide physical insights into the role of CPFs in SCC.

  2. Nanocontainer-Enhanced Self-Healing for Corrosion-Resistant Ni Coating on Mg Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhi-Hui; Li, Dan; Skeete, Zakiya; Sharma, Anju; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2017-10-18

    The ability to manipulate the functionalization of Ni coating is of great importance in improving the corrosion resistance of magnesium (Mg) alloy for many industrial applications. In the present work, MCM-41 type mesoporous silica nanocontainers (MSNs) loaded with corrosion inhibitor (NaF) were synthesized and employed as smart reinforcements to enhance the integrity and corrosion inhibition of the Ni coating. The incorporation of the F-loaded MSNs (F@MSNs) to enhance the corrosion resistant capacity of a metallic coating is reported for the first time. The mesoporous structures of the as-prepared MSNs and F@MSNs were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle X-rays scattering (SAXS), and N 2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data demonstrated the successful immobilization of fluoride ion on the MSNs and formation of a magnesium fluoride (MgF 2 ) protective film at the corrosion sites of the Mg alloy upon soaking in a F@MSNs-containing NaCl solution. The results from potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for both bare Mg alloy and Ni coatings with and without F@MSNs have revealed a clear decrease in corrosion rate in a corrosive solution for a long-time immersion due to the introduction of F@MSNs. These findings open new opportunities in the exploration of self-healing metallic coatings for highly enhanced anticorrosion protection of Mg alloy.

  3. Corrosion Protection of Electrically Conductive Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Song

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The basic function of the electrically conductive surface of electrical contacts is electrical conduction. The electrical conductivity of contact materials can be largely reduced by corrosion and in order to avoid corrosion, protective coatings must be used. Another phenomenon that leads to increasing contact resistance is fretting corrosion. Fretting corrosion is the degradation mechanism of surface material, which causes increasing contact resistance. Fretting corrosion occurs when there is a relative movement between electrical contacts with surfaces of ignoble metal. Avoiding fretting corrosion is therefore extremely challenging in electronic devices with pluggable electrical connections. Gold is one of the most commonly used noble plating materials for high performance electrical contacts because of its high corrosion resistance and its good and stable electrical behavior. The authors have investigated different ways to minimize the consumption of gold for electrical contacts and to improve the performance of gold plating. Other plating materials often used for corrosion protection of electrically conductive surfaces are tin, nickel, silver and palladium. This paper will deal with properties and new research results of different plating materials in addition to other means used for corrosion protection of electrically conductive surfaces and the testing of corrosion resistance of electrically conductive surfaces.

  4. Analysis of corrosive environmental factors of seabed sediment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    relation between distance from seashore and corrosivity of seabed sediment. Keywords. Seabed sediment; corrosion; environmental factors. 1. Introduction. The corrosion due to seabed sediment is an important branch of corrosion research. The problem of metal corrosion in seabed sediments has become more and more.

  5. Development of chloride-induced corrosion in pre-cracked RC beams under sustained loading: Effect of load-induced cracks, concrete cover, and exposure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Linwen [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC, Toulouse (France); Université de Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada); François, Raoul, E-mail: raoul.francois@insa-toulouse.fr [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC, Toulouse (France); Dang, Vu Hiep [Hanoi Architectural University, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Hanoi (Viet Nam); L' Hostis, Valérie [CEA Saclay, CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, Laboratoire d' Etude du Comportement des Bétons et des Argiles, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gagné, Richard [Université de Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    This paper deals with corrosion initiation and propagation in pre-cracked reinforced concrete beams under sustained loading during exposure to a chloride environment. Specimen beams that were cast in 2010 were compared to specimens cast in 1984. The only differences between the two sets of beams were the casting direction in relation to tensile reinforcement and the exposure conditions in the salt-fog chamber. The cracking maps, corrosion maps, chloride profiles, and cross-sectional loss of one group of two beams cast in 2010 were studied and their calculated corrosion rates were compared to that of beams cast in 1984 in order to investigate the factors influencing the natural corrosion process. Experimental results show that, after rapid initiation of corrosion at the crack tip, the corrosion process practically halted and the time elapsing before corrosion resumed depended on the exposure conditions and cover depth.

  6. Long term corrosion tests of OFHC-coppers in simulated repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.; Varis, P.

    1993-03-01

    This research program 'long term corrosion tests of OFHC-coppers in simulated repository conditions' was planned to provide an experimental evaluation with respect to the theoretical calculations and forecasts made for the corrosion behaviour of OFHC-coppers in bentonite ground water environments at temperatures between 20-80 deg C. The aim of this study in the first place was to evaluate the effects of ground water composition, bentonite and temperature on the equilibrium and possible corrosion reactions between OFHC coppers and the simulated repository environment. The tests were started in 1987 and this final report includes the results obtained after 72 months exposure time. (orig.)

  7. Archaeological analogue studies for the prediction of long term corrosion on buried metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, D.; Lemaitre, C.; Crusset, D.

    2003-01-01

    The prediction of the behaviour of metallic materials exposed to soil corrosion depends on many parameters. Any consideration of the effect of time, over long periods, can result only from a comparison with real cases of corrosion. It is the material-soil association which is the determining factor. This paper reports studies performed using modern techniques of materials science. The studies concern not only the characterisation of solid phase components, but corrosion products too and consequently it was also necessary to conduct electrochemical evaluations of corroded layer properties. (authors)

  8. Enhanced stress corrosion resistance from steels having a dual-phase austenite-martensite microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatasubramanian, T.V.; Baker, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    A high strength steel with an austenite-martensite duplex microstructure has been produced by extruding nickel coated steel powder. The austenite is present as a continuous network surrounding a high strength martensite. The steel exhibits superior resistance to stress corrosion cracking in 3.5 pct NaCl solution, the effectiveness of the austenite in improving stress corrosion cracking resistance increases as yield strength increases. The austenite reduces the effective stress intensity at the advancing crack tip and at the same time shields the crack tip from the corrosive environment

  9. Microstructure and Salt Fog Corrosion Behavior of AA2219 Friction-Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa Rao, G.; Subba Rao, V. V.; Rao, S. R. K.

    2017-07-01

    Plates (8.1-mm-thick) from aluminum alloy AA2219-T87 are studied after friction stir welding. The plates are subjected to salt fog corrosion tests according to ASTM B117 at different pH values and different spraying times. The regions affected by corrosion are studied in different zones of welded joints by the methods of optical and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is determined in acid, basic and neutral solutions. The resistances of the base metal and of the zones of welded joints are compared.

  10. Influence of active marine organic matter on electrochemical corrosion. Study on brown algae polyphenol's action on carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shi-de; Yan, Xiao-Jun; Fan, Xiao; Chen, Yu-Min; Fang, Guo-Ming; Du, Ai-Ling

    1999-12-01

    Chemical means were used to extract polyphenols from healthy brown algae collected in littoral seawater. Experiments on corrosion of A3 steel, the time-potential curve, and polarization curve in polyphenols seawater showed stronger cathodic polarization compared with that in common seawater. This indicates that brown algae polyphenols might feasibly be used as corrosion inhibitor in seawater.

  11. Corrosion Behaviour of Steels in Nigerian Food Processing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    also in terms of the (specific metal loss per unit time in mg/cm2/day) (Fig.3) to indicate the quantity of metal getting into the food (or whatever product) per unit area of the metal exposed per unit time. This has the benefit that with a knowledge of the chemical composition of the metal or alloy and assuming a uniform corrosion ...

  12. Automated Methods of Corrosion Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    1997-01-01

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques rely on computer recordings of interactions between the tip of a minute probe and the surface of the small specimen as a function of position; the measurements are used to depict an image of the atomic-scale surface topography on the computer screen....... Mechanical control, recording, and data processing must therefore be automated to a high level of precision and reliability. These general techniques and the apparatus involved have been described extensively. The automated methods of such high-resolution microscopy coordinated with computerized...... electrochemical measurements as well as elemental analysis look very promising for elucidating corrosion reaction mechanisms. The study of initial surface reactions at the atomic or submicron level is becoming an important field of research in the understanding of corrosion processes. At present, mainly two...

  13. Corrosion of carbon steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, B.

    1988-09-01

    This report assesses the factors which cause preferential attack to occur in carbon steel fusion welds. It was concluded that the main factors were: the inclusion content of the weld metal, the potential of the weld metal being less noble than that of the parent, and the presence of low-temperature transformation products in the heat-affected zone of the weld. These factors should be minimized or eliminated as appropriate so that the corrosion allowances determined for carbon steel waste drums is also adequate for the welds. An experimental/theoretical approach is recommended to evaluate the relative corrosion resistance of welds prepared from BS 4360 grade 43A steel to that of the parent material. (author)

  14. Corrosion scenario development for corrosion lifetime prediction of carbon steel used for geological disposal package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Takanori; Nakayama, Guen; Akashi, Masatsune

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion scenario has been developed in an attempt to ensure the long-term integrity of carbon steel geological disposal packages for high-level nuclear waste. As the service life of the packages must span 1,000-10,000 years, the temperature, pH, and amount of oxygen, in the disposal facilities can hardly be expected to remain constant. Therefore, we clarified a system for predicting the corrosion lifetime of packages, taking into account long-term changes in the types of corrosion of carbon steel in disposal facilities relative to changes in the conditions of such facilities. This corrosion scenario charts the possible types of corrosion (i.e., general corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and crevice corrosion) to which packages are subjected

  15. Corrosion behavior induced by LiCl-KCl in type 304 and 316 stainless steel and copper at low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jee-Hyung Sim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of stainless steel (304 and 316 type and copper induced by LiCl-KCl at low temperatures in the presence of sufficient oxygen and moisture was investigated through a series of experiments (at 30°C, 40°C, 60°C, and 80°C for 24 hours, 48 hours, 72 hours, and 96 hours. The specimens not coated on one side with an aqueous solution saturated with LiCl-KCl experienced no corrosion at any temperature, not even when the test duration exceeded 96 hours. Stainless steel exposed to LiCl-KCl experienced almost no corrosion below 40°C, but pitting corrosion was observed at temperatures above 60°C. As the duration of the experiment was increased, the rate of corrosion accelerated in proportion to the temperature. The 316 type stainless steel exhibited better corrosion resistance than did the 304 type. In the case of copper, the rate of corrosion accelerated in proportion to the duration and temperature but, unlike the case of stainless steel, the corrosion was more general. As a result, the extent of copper corrosion was about three times that of stainless steel.

  16. Corrosion Behavior of Surface-Treated Implant Ti-6Al-4V by Electrochemical Polarization and Impedance Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Subir; Yadav, Kasturi

    2011-04-01

    Implant materials for orthopedic and heart surgical services demand a better corrosion resistance material than the presently used titanium alloys, where protective oxide layer breaks down on a prolonged stay in aqueous physiological human body, giving rise to localized corrosion of pitting, crevice, and fretting corrosion. A few surface treatments on Ti alloy, in the form of anodization, passivation, and thermal oxidation, followed by soaking in Hank solution have been found to be very effective in bringing down the corrosion rate as well as producing high corrosion resistance surface film as reflected from electrochemical polarization, cyclic polarization, and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) studies. The XRD study revealed the presence of various types of oxides along with anatase and rutile on the surface, giving rise to high corrosion resistance film. While surface treatment of passivation and thermal oxidation could reduce the corrosion rate by 1/5th, anodization in 0.3 M phosphoric acid at 16 V versus stainless steel cathode drastically brought down the corrosion rate by less than ten times. The mechanism of corrosion behavior and formation of different surface films is better understood from the determination of EIS parameters derived from the best-fit equivalent circuit.

  17. States and transport of hydrogen in the corrosion process of an AZ91 magnesium alloy in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jian; Wang Jianqiu; Han Enhou; Dong Junhua; Ke Wei

    2008-01-01

    Mott-Schottky measurement and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) were used to investigate the states and transport of hydrogen during the corrosion behavior of an AZ91 magnesium alloy in 0.1 M sodium sulfate solution. The results showed that when samples were immersed or charged in solution, hydrogen atoms diffused into the film and reacted with vacancy to cause the increases of the carrier concentration (excess electron or hole carrier) and diffusion rate of hydrogen. Some hydrogen atoms diffused to interior of matrix and enriched in β phase while others resorted in the corrosive film. With the increase of immersion or charging time, magnesium hydride would be brittle fractured when the inner stress caused by hydrogen pressure and expansion stress of formation of magnesium hydride was above the fracture strength, which provided the direct experimental evidence of the hydrogen embrittlement (HE) mechanism of magnesium and its alloys. After immersion in solution, the transfer of excess electrons to the interfaces of corrosion film and solution would destroy the charge equilibrium in the film and stimulate the adsorption of SO 4 2- , which resulted in the initiation of localized corrosion; after cathodic charging and then immersion, the enrichment of hydrogen atoms at interior of corrosion film would combine into hydrogen gas to form high pressure and result in the rupture of corrosion film, and localized corrosion initiated and developed at surface. Therefore, localized corrosion nucleated earlier on the charged samples than on the uncharged samples. Hydrogen invasion accelerated the corrosion of matrix

  18. Castable hot corrosion resistant alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Charles A. (Inventor); Holt, William H. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Some 10 wt percent nickel is added to an Fe-base alloy which has a ferrite microstructure to improve the high temperature castability and crack resistance while about 0.2 wt percent zirconium is added for improved high temperatur cyclic oxidation and corrosion resistance. The basic material is a high temperature FeCrAl heater alloy, and the addition provides a material suitable for burner rig nozzles.

  19. Prevention of corrosion with polyaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDiarmid, Alan G. (Inventor); Ahmad, Naseer (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Methods for improving the corrosion inhibition of a metal or metal alloy substrate surface are provided wherein the substrate surface is coated with a polyaniline film. The polyaniline film coating is applied by contacting the substrate surface with a solution of polyaniline. The polyaniline is dissolved in an appropriate organic solvent and the solvent is allowed to evaporate from the substrate surface yielding the polyaniline film coating.

  20. Corrosion-Activated Micro-Containers for Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, J. W.; Zhang, X.; Johnsey, M. N.; Pearman, B. P.; Jolley, S. T.; Calle, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    This work concerns the development of environmentally friendly encapsulation technology, specifically designed to incorporate corrosion indicators, inhibitors, and self-healing agents into a coating, in such a way that the delivery of the indicators and inhibitors is triggered by the corrosion process, and the delivery of self-healing agents is triggered by mechanical damage to the coating. Encapsulation of the active corrosion control ingredients allows the incorporation of desired autonomous corrosion control functions such as: early corrosion detection, hidden corrosion detection, corrosion inhibition, and self-healing of mechanical damage into a coating. The technology offers the versatility needed to include one or several corrosion control functions into the same coating.The development of the encapsulation technology has progressed from the initial proof-of-concept work, in which a corrosion indicator was encapsulated into an oil-core (hydrophobic) microcapsule and shown to be delivered autonomously, under simulated corrosion conditions, to a sophisticated portfolio of micro carriers (organic, inorganic, and hybrid) that can be used to deliver a wide range of active corrosion ingredients at a rate that can be adjusted to offer immediate as well as long-term corrosion control. The micro carriers have been incorporated into different coating formulas to test and optimize the autonomous corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing functions of the coatings. This paper provides an overview of progress made to date and highlights recent technical developments, such as improved corrosion detection sensitivity, inhibitor test results in various types of coatings, and highly effective self-healing coatings based on green chemistry. The NASA Kennedy Space Centers Corrosion Technology Lab at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, U.S.A. has been developing multifunctional smart coatings based on the microencapsulation of environmentally friendly corrosion

  1. Countermeasures to corrosion on water walls. Part 2; Aatgaerder mot eldstadskorrosion paa panntuber. Etapp 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storesund, Jan; Elger, Ragna; Nordling, Magnus; Viklund, Peter

    2011-01-15

    Background: The problems with water wall corrosion have been accelerating over the last years. There are a number of reasons for this. Originally mild steels were successfully used in power plant water walls. The magnetite layer that forms at the fire side of the tubes when the boiler is taken into operation protected from corrosion attack. The fuels at that time (oil, coal, gas) were not able to break down the magnetite by corrosion. In addition, there were no restrictions for pollutions and for the combustion itself that could contribute to corrosion attack. The usage of fossil fuels has decreased substantially over the last 25 years, not least by environmental reasons. As a replacement a number of different kinds of bio mass fuels are used. These are typically more or less corrosive and the magnetite layers are attacked. The corrosion is often supported by reducing conditions as a result of the restrictions of the NO{sub x}-pollution. Also the waste fuelled boilers have huge corrosion problems. This has been the case for the last 25 years but nowadays the number of such plants is so much higher and the service data have been turned up. Corrosion protection of the water wall tubes started to be successful in the beginning of the seventies by the introduction of the composite tube. Such tubes are fabricated by mild steel or a low alloy core and corrosion resistant austenite steel or nickel base as an about 2 mm thick corrosion protective coating. Weld cladding of the water wall tubes was introduced in the 1980's as a significantly cheaper alternative to the composite tubes. Thermal spraying and refractory protection are other methods. These corrosion protection methods have not always been effective. For example, depending on incorrect materials selection, incorrect performance and incorrect method selection for the current corrosion or erosion attack. Therefore, there is a need for increased knowledge of which protection method and material that will work

  2. Evaluation of corrosion attack of chimney liners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blahetová M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The case study of chimney liner corrosion addresses three specific cases of damage of chimney systems from of stainless steels. These systems were used for flue of gas arising from the combustion of brown coal in small automatic boilers, which are used for heating. Detailed analyzes implied that the cause of devastating corrosion of the steel AISI 316 and 304 steel (CSN 17349, 17241 was particularly high content of halides (chlorides and fluorides, which caused a severe pitting corrosion, which led up to the perforation of the liner material. Simultaneous reduction of the thickness of the used sheets was due to by the general corrosion, which was caused by the sulfur in the solid fuel. The condensation then led to acid environment and therefore the corrosion below the dew point of the sulfuric acid has occurred. All is documented by metallographic analysis and microanalysis of the corrosion products.

  3. Corrosion monitoring during a chemical cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delepine, J.; Feron, D.; Roy, M.

    1994-01-01

    In order to estimate the possible corrosion induced by the chemical cleaning, a corrosion monitoring has been realized during the cleaning of the secondary circuit (including the model boiler) of ORION loop. It included coupons and electrodes and has required a preliminary setting in laboratory. The electrochemical device which was used during the chemical cleaning included two reference electrodes (Ag/AgCl) and eight metallic electrodes (carbon steel, stainless steel, Alloy 600 and Alloy 690) for free corrosion potential monitoring, three other carbon steel electrodes for instantaneous corrosion rate measurements by polarization resistance and three coupling devices with different surface ratios between carbon steel and Alloy 600. The results showed a good agreement between corrosion rates measured by weight losses on coupons or by electrochemistry (polarization resistance), and an increase of the carbon steel corrosion rate when it was coupled with Alloy 600. (authors). 5 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs

  4. Electrochemical corrosion testing of metal waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, D. P.; Peterson, J. J.; Katyal, H. K.; Keiser, D. D.; Hilton, B. A.

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical corrosion tests have been conducted on simulated stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) metal waste form (MWF) samples. The uniform aqueous corrosion behavior of the samples in various test solutions was measured by the polarization resistance technique. The data show that the MWF corrosion rates are very low in groundwaters representative of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Galvanic corrosion measurements were also conducted on MWF samples that were coupled to an alloy that has been proposed for the inner lining of the high-level nuclear waste container. The experiments show that the steady-state galvanic corrosion currents are small. Galvanic corrosion will, hence, not be an important mechanism of radionuclide release from the MWF alloys

  5. Graphene coatings for protection against microbiologically induced corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Ajay

    Microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) is a special form of electrochemical corrosion where micro-organisms affect the local environmental conditions at the metal-electrolyte interface by forming a stable biofilm. The biofilm introduces localized concentration cells, which accelerate the electrochemical corrosion rates. MIC has been found to affect many industrial systems such as sewage waste water pipes, heat exchangers, ships, underwater pipes etc. It has been traditionally eradicated by physical, biochemical and surface protection methods. The cleaning methods and the biocidal deliveries are required periodically and don't provide a permanent solution to the problem. Further, the use of biocides has been harshly criticized by environmentalists due to safety concerns associated with their usage. Surface based coatings have their own drawback of rapid degradation under harsh microbial environments. This has led to the exploration of thin, robust, inert, conformal passivation coatings for the protection of metallic surfaces from microbiologically induced corrosion. Graphene is a 2D arrangement of carbon atoms in a hexagonal honeycomb lattice. The carbon atoms are bonded to one another by sp2 hybridization and each layer of the carbon ring arrangement spans to a thickness of less than a nm. Due to its unique 2D arrangement of carbon atoms, graphene exhibits interesting in-plane and out of plane properties that have led to it being considered as the material for the future. Its excellent thermal, mechanical, electrical and optical properties are being explored in great depth to understand and realize potential applications in various technological realms. Early studies have shown the ability of bulk and monolayer graphene to protect metallic surfaces from air oxidation and solution based galvanic corrosion processes for short periods. However, the role of graphene in resisting MIC is yet to be determined, particularly over the long time spans characteristic of

  6. Galvanic corrosion of beryllium welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.; Butt, D.P.; Lillard, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Beryllium is difficult to weld because it is highly susceptible to cracking. The most commonly used filler metal in beryllium welds is Al-12 wt.% Si. Beryllium has been successfully welded using Al-Si filler metal with more than 30 wt.% Al. This filler creates an aluminum-rich fusion zone with a low melting point that tends to backfill cracks. Drawbacks to adding a filler metal include a reduction in service temperature, a lowering of the tensile strength of the weld, and the possibility for galvanic corrosion to occur at the weld. To evaluate the degree of interaction between Be and Al-Si in an actual weld, sections from a mock beryllium weldment were exposed to 0.1 M Cl - solution. Results indicate that the galvanic couple between Be and the Al-Si weld material results in the cathodic protection of the weld and of the anodic dissolution of the bulk Be material. While the cathodic protection of Al is generally inefficient, the high anodic dissolution rate of the bulk Be during pitting corrosion combined with the insulating properties of the Be oxide afford some protection of the Al-Si weld material. Although dissolution of the Be precipitate in the weld material does occur, no corrosion of the Al-Si matrix was observed

  7. Chemical cleaning, decontamination and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadiyar, H.S.; Das Chintamani; Gaonkar, K.B.

    1991-01-01

    Chemical cleaning of process equipments and pipings in chemical/petrochemical industries is necessitated for improving operation, for preventing premature failures and for avoiding contamination. In developing a chemical formulation for cleaning equipments, the important aspects to be considered include (i) effective removal of corrosion products and scales, (ii) minimum corrosion of the base metal, (iii) easy to handle chemicals and (iv) economic viability. As on date, a wide variety of chemical formulations are available, many of them are either proprietory or patented. For evolving an effective formulation, knowledge of the oxides of various metals and alloys on the one hand and acid concentration, complexing agents and inhibitors to be incorporated on the other, is quite essential. Organic acids like citric acid, acetic acid and formic acid are more popular ones, often used with EDTA for effective removal of corrosion products from ferrous components. The report enumerates some of the concepts in developing effective formulations for chemical cleaning of carbon steel components and further, makes an attempt to suggest simple formulations to be developed for chemical decontamination. (author). 6 refs., 3 fi gs., 4 tabs

  8. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.

    1993-03-01

    Iron aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in fossil energy systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe[sub 3]Al-based alloys to improve the engineering ductility of these alloys. This paper describes results from the ongoing program to evaluate the corrosion performance of these alloys. The experimental program at Argonne National Laboratory involvesthermogravimetric analyses of alloys exposed to environments that simulate coal gasification and fluidized-bed combustion. Experiments were conducted at 650--1000[degrees]C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. In addition, oxidation/sulfidation behavior of several alumina-forming Fe-Al and Fe-Cr-Ni-Al alloys was determined for comparison with the corrosion rates obtained on iron aluminides. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HC1-containing gases and in the presence of slag from a slogging gasifier. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales. Thermal cycling tests are used to examine the spalling resistance of the scales.

  9. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.

    1993-03-01

    Iron aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in fossil energy systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys to improve the engineering ductility of these alloys. This paper describes results from the ongoing program to evaluate the corrosion performance of these alloys. The experimental program at Argonne National Laboratory involvesthermogravimetric analyses of alloys exposed to environments that simulate coal gasification and fluidized-bed combustion. Experiments were conducted at 650--1000{degrees}C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. In addition, oxidation/sulfidation behavior of several alumina-forming Fe-Al and Fe-Cr-Ni-Al alloys was determined for comparison with the corrosion rates obtained on iron aluminides. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HC1-containing gases and in the presence of slag from a slogging gasifier. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales. Thermal cycling tests are used to examine the spalling resistance of the scales.

  10. Modeling corrosion and constituent release from a metal waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, T. H.; Fink, J. K.; Abraham, D. P.; Johnson, I.; Johnson, S. G.; Wigeland, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Several ANL ongoing experimental programs have measured metal waste form (MWF) corrosion and constituent release. Analysis of this data has initiated development of a consistent and quantitative phenomenology of uniform aqueous MWF corrosion. The effort so far has produced a preliminary fission product and actinide release model based on measured corrosion rates and calibrated by immersion test data for a 90 C J-13 and concentrated J-13 solution environment over 1-2 year exposure times. Ongoing immersion tests of irradiated and unirradiated MWF samples using more aggressive test conditions and improved tracking of actinides will serve to further validate, modify, and expand the application base of the preliminary model-including effects of other corrosion mechanisms. Sample examination using both mechanical and spectrographic techniques will better define both the nature and durability of the protective barrier layer. It is particularly important to assess whether the observations made with J-13 solution at 900 C persist under more aggressive conditions. For example, all the multiplicative factors in Table 1 implicitly assume the presence of protective barriers. Under sufficiently aggressive test conditions, such protective barriers may very well be altered or even eliminated

  11. An assessment of corrosion life of copper overpack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, A.; Taniguchi, N.

    1999-08-01

    Corrosion life of copper overpack is estimated on the basis of current understandings of copper corrosion processes. The assessment is based on the mass balance. Oxygen and sulfide were taken into account as corrosive species. The sulfate existing in bentonite is assumed to be reduced to sulfide by sulfate reducing bacteria and corrodes copper overpacks. Pitting is involved in the assesment using two methods. One method is use of pitting factor acquired from analysis of archeological artifacts. The other is use of extreme value statistical technique. The time evolution of parameters for cumulative probability distribution function, Gumbel distribution, was estimated using the data from copper specimens buried in various soil and archeological artifacts of the bronze age. The pitting depth for 1000 years is estimated using the parameters for probability distribution function. The result of estimation shows 39-mm is the maximum penetration for 1000 years. Natural analogue data suggest the corrosion rate of 3 mm/1000 years. Therefore the estimation is considered to be conservative. (author)

  12. Combating corrosion in biomass and waste fired plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Pamela [Vattenfall AB, Stockholm (Sweden). Research and Development; Hjoernhede, Anders [Vattenfall AB, Gothenburg (Sweden). Power Consultant

    2010-07-01

    Many biomass- or waste-fired plants have problems with high temperature corrosion especially if the steam temperature is greater than 500 C. An increase in the combustion of waste fuels means that an increasing number of boilers have had problems. Therefore, there is great interest in reducing the costs associated with high temperature corrosion and at the same time there exists a desire to improve the electrical efficiency of a plant by the use of higher steam temperatures. Assuming that the fuel is well-mixed and that there is good combustion control, there are in addition a number of other measures which can be used to reduce superheater corrosion in biomass and waste fired plants, and these are described in this paper. These include the use of fuel additives, specifically sulphur-containing ones; design aspects like placing superheaters in less corrosive positions in a boiler, using tube shielding, a wider pitch between the tubes; operational considerations such as more controlled soot-blowing and the use of better materials. (orig.)

  13. Corrosion of dental alloys in artificial saliva with Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunhui; Zheng, Yuanli; Zhong, Qun

    2017-01-01

    A comparative study of the corrosion resistance of CoCr and NiCr alloys in artificial saliva (AS) containing tryptic soy broth (Solution 1) and Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) species (Solution 2) was performed by electrochemical methods, including open circuit potential measurements, impedance spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization. The adherence of S. mutans to the NiCr and CoCr alloy surfaces immersed in Solution 2 for 24 h was verified by scanning electron microscopy, while the results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy confirmed the importance of biofilm formation for the corrosion process. The R(QR) equivalent circuit was successfully used to fit the data obtained for the AS mixture without S. mutans, while the R(Q(R(QR))) circuit was found to be more suitable for describing the biofilm properties after treatment with the AS containing S. mutans species. In addition, a negative shift of the open circuit potential with immersion time was observed for all samples regardless of the solution type. Both alloys exhibited higher charge transfer resistance after treatment with Solution 2, and lower corrosion current densities were detected for all samples in the presence of S. mutans. The obtained results suggest that the biofilm formation observed after 24 h of exposure to S. mutans bacteria might enhance the corrosion resistance of the studied samples by creating physical barriers that prevented oxygen interactions with the metal surfaces.

  14. In-pile loop experiments in water chemistry and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kysela, J.

    1986-09-01

    Results on the study of Zr-1% Nb alloy corrosion, in out-of and in-pile loops simulating the working conditions of the VVER-440 reactor (Soviet, PWR type), covered the time period May 1982-April 1986 were reported, as well as, results on transport and filtration of corrosion products. Methods and techniques used in the study included remote measurement of corrosion rate by polarizing resistance, out-of-pile loop at the temperature 350 deg. C, pressure 19 MPa, circulation 20 kgs/h and in-pile water loop with constant flow rate 10,000 kgs/h, pressure 16 MPa, temperature 330 deg. C and neutron flux 7x10 13 n/cm 2 .s. It was shown that solid suspended particles with chemical composition corresponding most frequently to magnetite or nickelous ferrite, though with non-stoichiometric composition Me x 2+ Fe 3- x 3+ O 4 were found. Continuous filtration of water by means of electromagnetic filter leads to a decrease of radioactivity of the outer epitactic layer only. Effect of filtration on the inner topotactic layer is negligible. The corrosion rates for the above-mentioned parameters are given

  15. Durability Tests of a Fiber Optic Corrosion Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher K.Y. Leung

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Steel corrosion is a major cause of degradation in reinforced concrete structures, and there is a need to develop cost-effective methods to detect the initiation of corrosion in such structures. This paper presents a low cost, easy to use fiber optic corrosion sensor for practical application. Thin iron film is deposited on the end surface of a cleaved optical fiber by sputtering. When light is sent into the fiber, most of it is reflected by the coating. If the surrounding environment is corrosive, the film is corroded and the intensity of the reflected signal drops significantly. In previous work, the sensing principle was verified by various experiments in laboratory and a packaging method was introduced. In this paper, the method of multiplexing several sensors by optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR and optical splitter is introduced, together with the interpretation of OTDR results. The practical applicability of the proposed sensors is demonstrated in a three-year field trial with the sensors installed in an aggressive marine environment. The durability of the sensor against chemical degradation and physical degradation is also verified by accelerated life test and freeze-thaw cycling test, respectively.

  16. Method of preventing stress corrosion cracks of reactor pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oonaka, Noriyuki; Shoji, Saburo; Kikuchi, Eiji; Tanno, Kazuo.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: In a case where, at the time of the transient operation of the reactor, the pH in reactor water and the concentration of oxidants are monitored, and the monitoring signals depart from the reference values or the welding heat affected portions of the pipeline are monitored by a non-destructive detector, and stress corrosion cracks are detected, these portions are protected from corrosion by a cathode current, and the generation and development of cracks are prevented. Method: The concentrations of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide in reactor water are monitored by a sensitized SUS 304 stainless steel electrode and a silver/silver chloride electrode. When monitoring signals depart from the reference values at temperatures with respect to the natural potential of stainless steel, memorized in the control system, a cathod current is caused to flow to the welding heat affected portions thereby to protect the same from corroding. Furthermore, the welding heat affected portions are monitored by the non-destructive detector, and even when stress corrosion cracks have been detected, the welding heat affected portions are prevented from corroding by a cathode current, thereby to prevent the development of stress corrosion cracks of the primary pipeline system. (Sekiya, K.)

  17. Corrosion of dental alloys in artificial saliva with Streptococcus mutans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhui Lu

    Full Text Available A comparative study of the corrosion resistance of CoCr and NiCr alloys in artificial saliva (AS containing tryptic soy broth (Solution 1 and Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans species (Solution 2 was performed by electrochemical methods, including open circuit potential measurements, impedance spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization. The adherence of S. mutans to the NiCr and CoCr alloy surfaces immersed in Solution 2 for 24 h was verified by scanning electron microscopy, while the results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy confirmed the importance of biofilm formation for the corrosion process. The R(QR equivalent circuit was successfully used to fit the data obtained for the AS mixture without S. mutans, while the R(Q(R(QR circuit was found to be more suitable for describing the biofilm properties after treatment with the AS containing S. mutans species. In addition, a negative shift of the open circuit potential with immersion time was observed for all samples regardless of the solution type. Both alloys exhibited higher charge transfer resistance after treatment with Solution 2, and lower corrosion current densities were detected for all samples in the presence of S. mutans. The obtained results suggest that the biofilm formation observed after 24 h of exposure to S. mutans bacteria might enhance the corrosion resistance of the studied samples by creating physical barriers that prevented oxygen interactions with the metal surfaces.

  18. The Application of Mechanical-Chemical Corrosion Theory in Downhole Tubing CO2 Corrosion Research

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Peike; Yan, Wei; Deng, Liyu; Deng, Jingen

    2015-01-01

    Indoor simulating experiment is a main method for oil field CO2 corrosion research. Experimental parameters are very important for an accurate simulation. Based on the mechanical-chemical corrosion theory, the external load may be possible to accelerate the corrosion rate. However, the influence of N2 pressure on CO2 corrosion during the simulating experiment is negligible. Because the coupon stress induced by additional N2 pressure is very low, therefore, the N2 adding procedure can be cance...

  19. Application of Corrosion Test for Austenitic SS 304 in PWR with Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance (EQCM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Seok; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Jong Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2011-01-01

    and coolant water. Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance is a new electrochemical technique developed in recent years able to be applied to study the filming kinetics of corrosion phenomena using piezoelectric effect. The high sensitivity of EQCM is the basis for its applications in thin film studies. In addition, interfacial process can be measured with the exact time scale depending on the frequency counter used. The purpose of this study is to understand the corrosion inhibition mechanisms of pitting corrosion for stainless steel 304 using inhibitor based on phosphoric acid and to contribute the application of corrosion test by EQCM techniques for corrosion research of steam condenser tube exposed of seawater coolant in the secondary system of NPP

  20. WVNS Tank Farm Process Support: Experimental evaluation of an inert gas (nitrogen) to mitigate external corrosion of high-level waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmore, M.R.

    1996-02-01

    Corrosion of the carbon steel waste storage tanks at West Valley Nuclear Services continues to be of concern, especially as the planned duration of waste storage time increases and sludge washing operations are conducted. The external surfaces of Tanks 8D-1 and 8D-2 have been exposed for more than 10 years to water that has intruded into the tank vaults. Visual inspection of the external tank surfaces using a remote video camera has shown indications of heavy corrosion in localized areas on the tank walls. Tests on mild steel specimens under simulated tank vault conditions showed that corrosion is related to the availability of oxygen for the corrosion reactions; consequently, removing oxygen as one of the reactants should effectively eliminate corrosion. In terms of the waste tanks, excluding oxygen from the annular vault space, such as by continuous flushing with an inert gas, should substantially decrease corrosion of the external surfaces of the mild steel tanks (100% exclusion of oxygen is probably not practicable). Laboratory corrosion testing was conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to give a preliminary assessment of the ability of nitrogen-inerting to reduce steel corrosion. This report summarizes test results obtained after 18-month corrosion tests comparing open-quotes nitrogen-inertedclose quotes corrosion with open-quotes air-equilibratedclose quotes corrosion under simulated tank vault conditions