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Sample records for time consistent dynamic

  1. Analysis of Shooting Consistency in Archers: A Dynamic Time Warping Algorithm-Based Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Quan, Cheng-Hao; Mohy-Ud-Din, Zia; Lee, Sangmin

    2017-01-01

    The shooting consistency of an archer is commonly perceived to be an important determinant of successful scores. Four (n=4) elementary level archers from a middle school in Korea participated in this study. In order to quantify shooting consistency, movement of the bow forearm was measured with an inertia sensor during archery shooting. The shooting consistency was calculated and defined by the dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm as the distance between two time sequences of acceleration dat...

  2. Analysis of Shooting Consistency in Archers: A Dynamic Time Warping Algorithm-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hao Quan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The shooting consistency of an archer is commonly perceived to be an important determinant of successful scores. Four (n=4 elementary level archers from a middle school in Korea participated in this study. In order to quantify shooting consistency, movement of the bow forearm was measured with an inertia sensor during archery shooting. The shooting consistency was calculated and defined by the dynamic time warping (DTW algorithm as the distance between two time sequences of acceleration data. Small distance values indicate that the archer has maintained high-level shooting consistency while archery shooting repetitively. To verify the shooting consistency metric, the relationship between scores and shooting consistency is evaluated. The results show that the higher the scores achieved by the archer, the higher is the level of shooting consistency demonstrated.

  3. Dynamically consistent oil import tariffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karp, L.; Newbery, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    The standard theory of optimal tariffs considers tariffs on perishable goods produced abroad under static conditions, in which tariffs affect prices only in that period. Oil and other exhaustable resources do not fit this model, for current tariffs affect the amount of oil imported, which will affect the remaining stock and hence its future price. The problem of choosing a dynamically consistent oil import tariff when suppliers are competitive but importers have market power is considered. The open-loop Nash tariff is solved for the standard competitive case in which the oil price is arbitraged, and it was found that the resulting tariff rises at the rate of interest. This tariff was found to have an equilibrium that in general is dynamically inconsistent. Nevertheless, it is shown that necessary and sufficient conditions exist under which the tariff satisfies the weaker condition of time consistency. A dynamically consistent tariff is obtained by assuming that all agents condition their current decisions on the remaining stock of the resource, in contrast to open-loop strategies. For the natural case in which all agents choose their actions simultaneously in each period, the dynamically consistent tariff was characterized, and found to differ markedly from the time-inconsistent open-loop tariff. It was shown that if importers do not have overwhelming market power, then the time path of the world price is insensitive to the ability to commit, as is the level of wealth achieved by the importer. 26 refs., 4 figs

  4. Multiconfiguration time-dependent self-consistent field approximations in the numerical solution of quantum dynamical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotler, Z.; Neria, E.; Nitzan, A.

    1991-01-01

    The use of the time-dependent self-consistent field approximation (TDSCF) in the numerical solution of quantum curve crossing and tunneling dynamical problems is investigated. Particular emphasis is given to multiconfiguration TDSCF (MCTDSCF) approximations, which are shown to perform considerably better with only a small increase in computational effort. We investigate a number of simple models in which a 'system' characterized by two electronic potential surfaces evolves while interacting with a 'bath' mode described by an harmonic oscillator, and compare exact numerical solutions to one- and two-configuration TDSCF approximations. We also introduce and investigate a semiclassical approximation in which the 'bath' mode is described by semiclassical wavepackets (one for each electronic state) and show that for all models investigated this scheme works very well in comparison with the fully quantum MCTDSCF approximation. This provides a potentially very useful method to simulate strongly quantum systems coupled to an essentially classical environment. (orig.)

  5. Time-consistent actuarial valuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelsser, A.A.J.; Salahnejhad Ghalehjooghi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Time-consistent valuations (i.e. pricing operators) can be created by backward iteration of one-period valuations. In this paper we investigate the continuous-time limits of well-known actuarial premium principles when such backward iteration procedures are applied. This method is applied to an

  6. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory for laser-driven many-electron dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miyagi, Haruhide; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2013-01-01

    We present the time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field (TD-RASSCF) theory as a framework for the time-dependent many-electron problem. The theory generalizes the multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) theory by incorporating the restricted-active-space scheme...... well known in time-independent quantum chemistry. Optimization of the orbitals as well as the expansion coefficients at each time step makes it possible to construct the wave function accurately while using only a relatively small number of electronic configurations. In numerical calculations of high...

  7. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent eld theory: Formulation and application to laser-driven many-electron dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miyagi, Haruhide; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    We have developed a new theoretical framework for time-dependent many-electron problems named time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent field (TD-RASSCF) theory. The theory generalizes the multicongurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) theory by truncating the expansion...... at a specific excitation level. In a numerical application to laser-driven electron dynamics of the one-dimensional beryllium atom, the TD-RASSCF method performs accurately while largely reducing the computational complexity compared to the MCTDHF method....

  8. Time-consistent and market-consistent evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelsser, A.; Stadje, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    We consider evaluation methods for payoffs with an inherent financial risk as encountered for instance for portfolios held by pension funds and insurance companies. Pricing such payoffs in a way consistent to market prices typically involves combining actuarial techniques with methods from

  9. First principles molecular dynamics without self-consistent field optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souvatzis, Petros; Niklasson, Anders M. N.

    2014-01-01

    We present a first principles molecular dynamics approach that is based on time-reversible extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization. The optimization-free dynamics keeps the computational cost to a minimum and typically provides molecular trajectories that closely follow the exact Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Only one single diagonalization and Hamiltonian (or Fockian) construction are required in each integration time step. The proposed dynamics is derived for a general free-energy potential surface valid at finite electronic temperatures within hybrid density functional theory. Even in the event of irregular functional behavior that may cause a dynamical instability, the optimization-free limit represents a natural starting guess for force calculations that may require a more elaborate iterative electronic ground state optimization. Our optimization-free dynamics thus represents a flexible theoretical framework for a broad and general class of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

  10. Optimal dynamic soaring consists of successive shallow arcs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Gabriel D; Triantafyllou, Michael S; Slotine, Jean-Jacques E

    2017-10-01

    Albatrosses can travel a thousand kilometres daily over the oceans. They extract their propulsive energy from horizontal wind shears with a flight strategy called dynamic soaring. While thermal soaring, exploited by birds of prey and sports gliders, consists of simply remaining in updrafts, extracting energy from horizontal winds necessitates redistributing momentum across the wind shear layer, by means of an intricate and dynamic flight manoeuvre. Dynamic soaring has been described as a sequence of half-turns connecting upwind climbs and downwind dives through the surface shear layer. Here, we investigate the optimal (minimum-wind) flight trajectory, with a combined numerical and analytic methodology. We show that contrary to current thinking, but consistent with GPS recordings of albatrosses, when the shear layer is thin the optimal trajectory is composed of small-angle, large-radius arcs. Essentially, the albatross is a flying sailboat, sequentially acting as sail and keel, and is most efficient when remaining crosswind at all times. Our analysis constitutes a general framework for dynamic soaring and more broadly energy extraction in complex winds. It is geared to improve the characterization of pelagic birds flight dynamics and habitat, and could enable the development of a robotic albatross that could travel with a virtually infinite range. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. Dynamic Consistency in Process Algebra: From Paradigm to ACP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Andova; L.P.J. Groenewegen; E.P. de Vink (Erik Peter)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractThe coordination modelling language Paradigm addresses collaboration between components in terms of dynamic constraints. Within a Paradigm model, component dynamics are consistently specified at various levels of abstraction. The operational semantics of Paradigm is given. For a

  12. Absolute and Relative Time-Consistent Revealed Preferences

    OpenAIRE

    T. DEMUYNCK

    2007-01-01

    We introduce an Absolute (Relative) Time-consistent Axiom of Revealed Preference which characterizes the consistency of a choice function with the property of absolute (relative) time-consistency and impatience. The axiom requires that the absolute (relative) time-consistent and impatient closure of the revealed preference relation does not conflict with the strict revealed preference relation.

  13. Self-Consistent Dynamical Model of the Broad Line Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerny, Bozena; Li, Yan-Rong; Sredzinska, Justyna; Hryniewicz, Krzysztof; Panda, Swayam; Wildy, Conor; Karas, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    We develop a self-consistent description of the Broad Line Region based on the concept of a failed wind powered by radiation pressure acting on a dusty accretion disk atmosphere in Keplerian motion. The material raised high above the disk is illuminated, dust evaporates, and the matter falls back toward the disk. This material is the source of emission lines. The model predicts the inner and outer radius of the region, the cloud dynamics under the dust radiation pressure and, subsequently, the gravitational field of the central black hole, which results in asymmetry between the rise and fall. Knowledge of the dynamics allows us to predict the shapes of the emission lines as functions of the basic parameters of an active nucleus: black hole mass, accretion rate, black hole spin (or accretion efficiency) and the viewing angle with respect to the symmetry axis. Here we show preliminary results based on analytical approximations to the cloud motion.

  14. Self-Consistent Dynamical Model of the Broad Line Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerny, Bozena [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Li, Yan-Rong [Key Laboratory for Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Sredzinska, Justyna; Hryniewicz, Krzysztof [Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Panda, Swayam [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Wildy, Conor [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Karas, Vladimir, E-mail: bcz@cft.edu.pl [Astronomical Institute, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-06-22

    We develop a self-consistent description of the Broad Line Region based on the concept of a failed wind powered by radiation pressure acting on a dusty accretion disk atmosphere in Keplerian motion. The material raised high above the disk is illuminated, dust evaporates, and the matter falls back toward the disk. This material is the source of emission lines. The model predicts the inner and outer radius of the region, the cloud dynamics under the dust radiation pressure and, subsequently, the gravitational field of the central black hole, which results in asymmetry between the rise and fall. Knowledge of the dynamics allows us to predict the shapes of the emission lines as functions of the basic parameters of an active nucleus: black hole mass, accretion rate, black hole spin (or accretion efficiency) and the viewing angle with respect to the symmetry axis. Here we show preliminary results based on analytical approximations to the cloud motion.

  15. Stable functional networks exhibit consistent timing in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapeton, Julio I; Inati, Sara K; Zaghloul, Kareem A

    2017-03-01

    Despite many advances in the study of large-scale human functional networks, the question of timing, stability, and direction of communication between cortical regions has not been fully addressed. At the cellular level, neuronal communication occurs through axons and dendrites, and the time required for such communication is well defined and preserved. At larger spatial scales, however, the relationship between timing, direction, and communication between brain regions is less clear. Here, we use a measure of effective connectivity to identify connections between brain regions that exhibit communication with consistent timing. We hypothesized that if two brain regions are communicating, then knowledge of the activity in one region should allow an external observer to better predict activity in the other region, and that such communication involves a consistent time delay. We examine this question using intracranial electroencephalography captured from nine human participants with medically refractory epilepsy. We use a coupling measure based on time-lagged mutual information to identify effective connections between brain regions that exhibit a statistically significant increase in average mutual information at a consistent time delay. These identified connections result in sparse, directed functional networks that are stable over minutes, hours, and days. Notably, the time delays associated with these connections are also highly preserved over multiple time scales. We characterize the anatomic locations of these connections, and find that the propagation of activity exhibits a preferred posterior to anterior temporal lobe direction, consistent across participants. Moreover, networks constructed from connections that reliably exhibit consistent timing between anatomic regions demonstrate features of a small-world architecture, with many reliable connections between anatomically neighbouring regions and few long range connections. Together, our results demonstrate

  16. Criteria for the generation of spectra consistent time histories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.-W.

    1977-01-01

    Several methods are available to conduct seismic analysis for nuclear power plant systems and components. Among them, the response spectrum technique has been most widely adopted for linear type of modal analysis. However, for designs which consist of structural or material nonlinearites such as frequency dependent soil properties, the existance of gaps, single tie rods, and friction between supports where the response has to be computed as a function of time, time history approach is the only viable method of analysis. Two examples of time history analysis are: 1) soil-structure interaction study and, 2) a coupled reactor coolant system and building analysis to either generate the floor response specra or compute nonlinear system time history response. The generation of a suitable time history input for the analysis has been discussed in the literature. Some general guidelines are available to insure that the time history imput will be as conservative as the design response spectra. Very little has been reported as to the effect of the dyanmic characteristics of the time history input upon the system response. In fact, the only available discussion in this respect concerns only with the statitical independent nature of the time history components. In this paper, numerical results for cases using the time history approach are presented. Criteria are also established which may be advantageously used to arrive at spectra consistent time histories which are conservative and more importantly, realistic. (Auth.)

  17. Towards a self-consistent dynamical nuclear model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca-Maza, X; Colò, G; Bortignon, P F; Niu, Y F

    2017-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is a powerful and accurate tool, exploited in nuclear physics to investigate the ground-state and some of the collective properties of nuclei along the whole nuclear chart. Models based on DFT are not, however, suitable for the description of single-particle dynamics in nuclei. Following the field theoretical approach by A Bohr and B R Mottelson to describe nuclear interactions between single-particle and vibrational degrees of freedom, we have taken important steps towards the building of a microscopic dynamic nuclear model. In connection with this, one important issue that needs to be better understood is the renormalization of the effective interaction in the particle-vibration approach. One possible way to renormalize the interaction is by the so-called subtraction method . In this contribution, we will implement the subtraction method in our model for the first time and study its consequences. (paper)

  18. Weakly time consistent concave valuations and their dual representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, B.; Schumacher, Hans

    We derive dual characterizations of two notions of weak time consistency for concave valuations, which are convex risk measures under a positive sign convention. Combined with a suitable risk aversion property, these notions are shown to amount to three simple rules for not necessarily minimal

  19. Weakly time consistent concave valuations and their dual representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, Berend; Schumacher, Johannes M.

    2016-01-01

    We derive dual characterizations of two notions of weak time consistency for concave valuations, which are convex risk measures under a positive sign convention. Combined with a suitable risk aversion property, these notions are shown to amount to three simple rules for not necessarily minimal

  20. EVALUATION OF CONSISTENCY AND SETTING TIME OF IRANIAN DENTAL STONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F GOL BIDI

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Dental stones are widely used in dentistry and the success or failure of many dental treatments depend on the accuracy of these gypsums. The purpose of this study was the evaluation of Iranian dental stones and comparison between Iranian and foreign ones. In this investigation, consistency and setting time were compared between Pars Dendn, Almas and Hinrizit stones. The latter is accepted by ADA (American Dental Association. Consistency and setting time are 2 of 5 properties that are necessitated by both ADA specification No. 25 and Iranian Standard Organization specification No. 2569 for evaluation of dental stones. Methods. In this study, the number and preparation of specimens and test conditions were done according to the ADA specification No. 25 and all the measurements were done with vicat apparatus. Results. The results of this study showed that the standard consistency of Almas stone was obtained by 42ml water and 100gr powder and the setting time of this stone was 11±0.03 min. Which was with in the limits of ADA specification (12±4 min. The standard consistency of Pars Dandan stone was obrianed by 31ml water and 100 gr powder, but the setting time of this stone was 5± 0.16 min which was nt within the limits of ADA specification. Discussion: Comparison of Iranian and Hinrizit stones properties showed that two probable problems of Iranian stones are:1- Unhemogrnousity of Iranian stoned powder was caused by uncontrolled temperature, pressure and humidity in the production process of stone. 2- Impurities such as sodium chloride was responsible fo shortening of Pars Dendens setting time.

  1. Multiple time scale dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kuehn, Christian

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to dynamical systems with multiple time scales. The approach it takes is to provide an overview of key areas, particularly topics that are less available in the introductory form.  The broad range of topics included makes it accessible for students and researchers new to the field to gain a quick and thorough overview. The first of its kind, this book merges a wide variety of different mathematical techniques into a more unified framework. The book is highly illustrated with many examples and exercises and an extensive bibliography. The target audience of this  book are senior undergraduates, graduate students as well as researchers interested in using the multiple time scale dynamics theory in nonlinear science, either from a theoretical or a mathematical modeling perspective. 

  2. Time-Consistent and Market-Consistent Evaluations (Revised version of 2012-086)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stadje, M.A.; Pelsser, A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: We consider evaluation methods for payoffs with an inherent financial risk as encountered for instance for portfolios held by pension funds and insurance companies. Pricing such payoffs in a way consistent to market prices typically involves combining actuarial techniques with methods from

  3. An internally consistent gamma ray burst time history phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    A phenomenology for gamma ray burst time histories is outlined. Order of their generally chaotic appearance is attempted, based on the speculation that any one burst event can be represented above 150 keV as a superposition of similarly shaped increases of varying intensity. The increases can generally overlap, however, confusing the picture, but a given event must at least exhibit its own limiting characteristic rise and decay times if the measurements are made with instruments having adequate temporal resolution. Most catalogued observations may be of doubtful or marginal utility to test this hypothesis, but some time histories from Helios-2, Pioneer Venus Orbiter and other instruments having one-to several-millisecond capabilities appear to provide consistency. Also, recent studies of temporally resolved Solar Maximum Mission burst energy spectra are entirely compatible with this picture. The phenomenology suggested here, if correct, may assist as an analytic tool for modelling of burst processes and possibly in the definition of burst source populations.

  4. Toward a Self-Consistent Dynamical Model of the NSSL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matilsky, Loren

    2018-01-01

    The advent of helioseismology has revealed in detail the internal differential rotation profile of the Sun. In particular, the presence of two boundary layers, the tachocline at the bottom of the convection zone (CZ) and the Near Surface Shear Layer (NSSL) at the top of the CZ, has remained a mystery. These two boundary layers may have significant consequences for the internal dynamo that operates the Sun's magnetic field, and so understanding their dynamics is an important step in solar physics and in the theory of solar-like stellar structure in general. In this talk, we analyze three numerical models of hydrodynamic convection in rotating spherical shells with varying degrees of stratification in order to understand the dynamical balance of the solar near-surface shear layer (NSSL). We find that with sufficient stratification, a boundary layer with some characteristics of the NSSL develops at high latitudes, and it is maintained purely an inertial balance of torques in which the viscosity is negligible. An inward radial flux of angular momentum from the Reynold's stress (as has been predicted by theory) is balanced by the poleward latitudinal flux of angular momentum due to the meridional circulation. We analyze the similarities of the near surface shear in our models to that of the Sun, and find that the solar NSSL is most likely maintained by the inertial balance our simulations display at high latitudes, but with a modified upper boundary condition.

  5. Gender consistency and flexibility: using dynamics to understand the relationship between gender and adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiDonato, Matthew D; Martin, Carol L; Hessler, Eric E; Amazeen, Polemnia G; Hanish, Laura D; Fabes, Richard A

    2012-04-01

    Controversy surrounds questions regarding the influence of being gender consistent (i.e., having and expressing gendered characteristics that are consistent with one's biological sex) versus being gender flexible (i.e., having and expressing gendered characteristics that vary from masculine to feminine as circumstances arise) on children's adjustment outcomes, such as self-esteem, positive emotion, or behavior problems. Whereas evidence supporting the consistency hypothesis is abundant, little support exists for the flexibility hypothesis. To shed new light on the flexibility hypothesis, we explored children's gendered behavior from a dynamical perspective that highlighted variability and flexibility in addition to employing a conventional approach that emphasized stability and consistency. Conventional mean-level analyses supported the consistency hypothesis by revealing that gender atypical behavior was related to greater maladjustment, and dynamical analyses supported the flexibility hypothesis by showing that flexibility of gendered behavior over time was related to positive adjustment. Integrated analyses showed that gender typical behavior was related to the adjustment of children who were behaviorally inflexible, but not for those who were flexible. These results provided a more comprehensive understanding of the relation between gendered behavior and adjustment in young children and illustrated for the first time the feasibility of applying dynamical analyses to the study of gendered behavior.

  6. Consistent treatment of one-body dynamics and collective fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfitzner, A.

    1986-09-01

    We show how the residual coupling deltaV between collective and intrinsic motion induces correlations, which lead to fluctuations of the collective variables and to a redistribution of single-particle occupation numbers rho/sub α/. The evolution of rho/sub α/ and of the collective fluctuations is consistently described by a coupled system of equations, which accounts for the dependence of the transport coefficients on rho/sub α/, and for the dependence of the transition rates in the master equation on the collective variances. (author)

  7. Complex dynamic in ecological time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Turchin; Andrew D. Taylor

    1992-01-01

    Although the possibility of complex dynamical behaviors-limit cycles, quasiperiodic oscillations, and aperiodic chaos-has been recognized theoretically, most ecologists are skeptical of their importance in nature. In this paper we develop a methodology for reconstructing endogenous (or deterministic) dynamics from ecological time series. Our method consists of fitting...

  8. Criteria for the generation of spectra consistent time histories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.-W.

    1977-01-01

    There are several approaches currently being used by the nuclear industry to generate design time history input. None of these produce unique results. That is, given a design response spectrum, nearly unlimited number of synthesized time history motions can be constructed. The effects of these time history motions on the system response vary and they have not been properly evaluated. For instance, some time histories may have high frequency content, higher than indicated by the real earthquake records. This may have adverse influence on the system response with high frequency impact or predominate high frequency modes. Other time histories may have unnecessarily long duration which makes a large and detailed analytical model uneconomical. The influence of the time history duration is primarily on the number of peak response stress cycles computed which can be either extrapolated from limited duration input or determined using other means. Rarely is the case that duration has to be kept long enough for the structure response to reach its peak. Consequently, input duration should be kept no longer than necessary to produce peak response to allow the use of more sophisticated model which enables the problem to be studied thoroughly. There are also time histories which have satisfied the generally accepted definition of statistical independent requirements, but possess statistical characteristics unlike those of the real earthquakes. Finally, some time histories may require smaller integration time steps than ordinarily used to insure that certain systems will have converge and stable solutions

  9. Influence of Sensor Ingestion Timing on Consistency of Temperature Measures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goodman, Daniel A; Kenefick, Robert W; Cadarette, Bruce S; Cheuvront, Samuel N

    2009-01-01

    ... (ITS) to measure core body temperature have been demonstrated. However, the effect of elapsed time between ITS ingestion and Tint measurement has not been thoroughly studied. Methods: Eight volunteers...

  10. Consistency of Likability to Objects across Views and Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Niimi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Human object recognition is largely independent of conditions in which objects are viewed, although affective impressions to the objects may be influenced by viewing conditions. To what degree does viewing condition alter our subjective likability to objects? We tested the effects of viewpoint (frontal view and three-quarter view and viewing durations (100, 500, and 1000 msec on the subjective likability to 32 common objects (e.g., vehicles, furniture, stationery. Participants observed the object images on the computer display and rated their likability of the objects by 7-point Likert scale. The viewing conditions affected the likability; the mean rated likability was higher for three-quarter view than for frontal view, and higher for longer duration. However, the object-wise correlations of rated likability were fairly high and significant between the object orientations and among the durations, indicating that the rank order of the objects were largely consistent across the viewing conditions. Our findings suggest that the mechanism for determining likability to visual objects may be composed of two components; one is sensitive to viewing condition and another is robust against viewing condition.

  11. Dynamic inequalities on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Ravi; Saker, Samir

    2014-01-01

    This is a monograph devoted to recent research and results on dynamic inequalities on time scales. The study of dynamic inequalities on time scales has been covered extensively in the literature in recent years and has now become a major sub-field in pure and applied mathematics. In particular, this book will cover recent results on integral inequalities, including Young's inequality, Jensen's inequality, Holder's inequality, Minkowski's inequality, Steffensen's inequality, Hermite-Hadamard inequality and Čebyšv's inequality. Opial type inequalities on time scales and their extensions with weighted functions, Lyapunov type inequalities, Halanay type inequalities for dynamic equations on time scales, and Wirtinger type inequalities on time scales and their extensions will also be discussed here in detail.

  12. Time as a dynamical variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thron, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Since the time of Galileo, the equations of physics have expressed dynamical variables such as particle position or electromagnetic field strength as functions of time. In this paper, we argue that this assumption reflects observational bias, and that there are many good reasons for viewing time also as a dynamical variable. We hypothesize that the spacetime universe is an outcome of a process, rather than a process unfolding in time. This new viewpoint gives rise to a physical interpretation of the wavefunction as a complex vibrational amplitude in a non-spacetime independent variable. It resolves quantum mechanical paradoxes involving wavefunction entanglement, and gives a much simpler solution to the problem of wavefunction collapse than the many-worlds interpretation. The Born rule is also shown to be a natural consequence. We also show that small deviations from conventional quantum probabilities are predicted.

  13. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory with space partition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, Haruhide; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2017-02-01

    Aiming at efficient numerical analysis of time-dependent (TD) many-electron dynamics of atoms involving multielectron continua, the TD restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory with space partition (TD-RASSCF-SP) is presented. The TD-RASSCF-SP wave function is expanded in terms of TD configuration-interaction coefficients with Slater determinants composed of two kinds of TD orbitals: M ̂ orbitals are defined to be nonvanishing in the inner region (V ̂), a small volume around the atomic nucleus, and M ˇ orbitals are nonvanishing in the large outer region (V ˇ). For detailed discussion of the SP strategy, the equations of motion are derived by two different formalisms for comparison. To ensure continuous differentiability of the wave function across the two regions, one of the formalisms makes use of the property of the finite-element discrete-variable-representation (FEDVR) functions and introduces additional time-independent orbitals. The other formalism is more general and is based on the Bloch operator as in the R -matrix theory, but turns out to be less practical for numerical applications. Hence, using the FEDVR-based formalism, the numerical performance is tested by computing double-ionization dynamics of atomic beryllium in intense light fields. To achieve high accuracy, M ̂ should be set large to take into account the strong many-electron correlation around the nucleus. On the other hand, M ˇ can be set much smaller than M ̂ for capturing the weaker correlation between the two outgoing photoelectrons. As a result, compared with more accurate multiconfigurational TD Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method, the TD-RASSCF-SP method may achieve comparable accuracy in the description of the double-ionization dynamics. There are, however, difficulties related to the stiffness of the equations of motion of the TD-RASSCF-SP method, which makes the required time step for this method smaller than the one needed for the MCTDHF approach.

  14. Consistent model reduction of polymer chains in solution in dissipative particle dynamics: Model description

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas

    2015-06-30

    We introduce a framework for model reduction of polymer chain models for dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, where the properties governing the phase equilibria such as the characteristic size of the chain, compressibility, density, and temperature are preserved. The proposed methodology reduces the number of degrees of freedom required in traditional DPD representations to model equilibrium properties of systems with complex molecules (e.g., linear polymers). Based on geometrical considerations we explicitly account for the correlation between beads in fine-grained DPD models and consistently represent the effect of these correlations in a reduced model, in a practical and simple fashion via power laws and the consistent scaling of the simulation parameters. In order to satisfy the geometrical constraints in the reduced model we introduce bond-angle potentials that account for the changes in the chain free energy after the model reduction. Following this coarse-graining process we represent high molecular weight DPD chains (i.e., ≥200≥200 beads per chain) with a significant reduction in the number of particles required (i.e., ≥20≥20 times the original system). We show that our methodology has potential applications modeling systems of high molecular weight molecules at large scales, such as diblock copolymer and DNA.

  15. Self-consistent treatment of spin and magnetization dynamic effect in spin transfer switching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Jie; Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor Bin Abdul; Koh, Dax Enshan; Han, Guchang; Meng, Hao

    2011-01-01

    The effect of itinerant spin moment (m) dynamic in spin transfer switching has been ignored in most previous theoretical studies of the magnetization (M) dynamics. Thus in this paper, we proposed a more refined micromagnetic model of spin transfer switching that takes into account in a self-consistent manner of the coupled m and M dynamics. The numerical results obtained from this model further shed insight on the switching profiles of m and M, both of which show particular sensitivity to parameters such as the anisotropy field, the spin torque field, and the initial deviation between m and M.

  16. Sexual Identity Development among Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Youths: Consistency and Change Over Time

    OpenAIRE

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce; Braun, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    A longitudinal report of 156 gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths examined changes in sexual identity over time. Fifty-seven percent of the youths remained consistently self-identified as gay/lesbian, 18% transited from bisexual to gay/lesbian, and 15% consistently identified as bisexual over time. Although youths who consistently identified as gay/lesbian did not differ from other youths on time since experiencing sexual developmental milestones, they reported current sexual orientation and sex...

  17. Static and Dynamic Facial Cues Differentially Affect the Consistency of Social Evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehman, Eric; Flake, Jessica K; Freeman, Jonathan B

    2015-08-01

    Individuals are quite sensitive to others' appearance cues when forming social evaluations. Cues such as facial emotional resemblance are based on facial musculature and thus dynamic. Cues such as a face's structure are based on the underlying bone and are thus relatively static. The current research examines the distinction between these types of facial cues by investigating the consistency in social evaluations arising from dynamic versus static cues. Specifically, across four studies using real faces, digitally generated faces, and downstream behavioral decisions, we demonstrate that social evaluations based on dynamic cues, such as intentions, have greater variability across multiple presentations of the same identity than do social evaluations based on static cues, such as ability. Thus, although evaluations of intentions vary considerably across different instances of a target's face, evaluations of ability are relatively fixed. The findings highlight the role of facial cues' consistency in the stability of social evaluations. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  18. Time-Consistent and Market-Consistent Evaluations (replaced by CentER DP 2012-086)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelsser, A.; Stadje, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    We consider evaluation methods for payoffs with an inherent financial risk as encountered for instance for portfolios held by pension funds and insurance companies. Pricing such payoffs in a way consistent to market prices typically involves combining actuarial techniques with methods from

  19. Time-Consistent and Market-Consistent Evaluations (Revised version of CentER DP 2011-063)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelsser, A.; Stadje, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: We consider evaluation methods for payoffs with an inherent financial risk as encountered for instance for portfolios held by pension funds and insurance companies. Pricing such payoffs in a way consistent to market prices typically involves combining actuarial techniques with methods from

  20. Dynamic and Quantitative Method of Analyzing Service Consistency Evolution Based on Extended Hierarchical Finite State Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linjun Fan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the dynamic evolution analysis and quantitative measurement of primary factors that cause service inconsistency in service-oriented distributed simulation applications (SODSA. Traditional methods are mostly qualitative and empirical, and they do not consider the dynamic disturbances among factors in service’s evolution behaviors such as producing, publishing, calling, and maintenance. Moreover, SODSA are rapidly evolving in terms of large-scale, reusable, compositional, pervasive, and flexible features, which presents difficulties in the usage of traditional analysis methods. To resolve these problems, a novel dynamic evolution model extended hierarchical service-finite state automata (EHS-FSA is constructed based on finite state automata (FSA, which formally depict overall changing processes of service consistency states. And also the service consistency evolution algorithms (SCEAs based on EHS-FSA are developed to quantitatively assess these impact factors. Experimental results show that the bad reusability (17.93% on average is the biggest influential factor, the noncomposition of atomic services (13.12% is the second biggest one, and the service version’s confusion (1.2% is the smallest one. Compared with previous qualitative analysis, SCEAs present good effectiveness and feasibility. This research can guide the engineers of service consistency technologies toward obtaining a higher level of consistency in SODSA.

  1. Dynamic and quantitative method of analyzing service consistency evolution based on extended hierarchical finite state automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Linjun; Tang, Jun; Ling, Yunxiang; Li, Benxian

    2014-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the dynamic evolution analysis and quantitative measurement of primary factors that cause service inconsistency in service-oriented distributed simulation applications (SODSA). Traditional methods are mostly qualitative and empirical, and they do not consider the dynamic disturbances among factors in service's evolution behaviors such as producing, publishing, calling, and maintenance. Moreover, SODSA are rapidly evolving in terms of large-scale, reusable, compositional, pervasive, and flexible features, which presents difficulties in the usage of traditional analysis methods. To resolve these problems, a novel dynamic evolution model extended hierarchical service-finite state automata (EHS-FSA) is constructed based on finite state automata (FSA), which formally depict overall changing processes of service consistency states. And also the service consistency evolution algorithms (SCEAs) based on EHS-FSA are developed to quantitatively assess these impact factors. Experimental results show that the bad reusability (17.93% on average) is the biggest influential factor, the noncomposition of atomic services (13.12%) is the second biggest one, and the service version's confusion (1.2%) is the smallest one. Compared with previous qualitative analysis, SCEAs present good effectiveness and feasibility. This research can guide the engineers of service consistency technologies toward obtaining a higher level of consistency in SODSA.

  2. Near-resonant absorption in the time-dependent self-consistent field and multiconfigurational self-consistent field approximations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, Patrick; Bishop, David M.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa

    2001-01-01

    Computationally tractable expressions for the evaluation of the linear response function in the multiconfigurational self-consistent field approximation were derived and implemented. The finite lifetime of the electronically excited states was considered and the linear response function was shown...... to be convergent in the whole frequency region. This was achieved through the incorporation of phenomenological damping factors that lead to complex response function values....

  3. Maintaining Arc Consistency in Non-Binary Dynamic CSPs using Simple Tabular Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queva, Matthieu Stéphane Benoit; Probst, Christian W.; Ricci, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    CSPs use filtering techniques such as arc consistency, which also have been adapted to handle DCSPs with binary constraints. However, there exists only one algorithm targeting non-binary DCSPs (DnGAC4). In this paper we present a new algorithm DnSTR for maintaining arc consistency in DCSPs with non......-binary constraints. Our algorithm is based on Simple Tabular Reduction for Table Constraints, a technique that dynamically maintains the tables of supports within the constraints. Initial results show that our algorithm outperforms DnGAC4 both for addition and removal of constraints....

  4. Dynamical self-consistent description of exotic structures in nuclear matter at subnuclear densities

    CERN Document Server

    de la Mota, Virginia; Figerou, Sébastien

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the occurrence of exotic structures in nuclear matter at subnuclear densities within the framework of the dywan model. This approach, developed ab initio for the description of nuclear collisions, is a microscopic dynamical approach in which the numerical treatment makes use of wavelet representation techniques. Before tackling the effects of multi-particle correlations on the overall dynamics, we focused the present work on the study of cold matter within a pure mean field description. Starting from inhomogeneous initial conditions provided by an arrangement of nuclei located on an initial crystalline lattice, the exotic structures result from the dynamical self-consistent evolution. The nuclear system can freely self-organize, it can modify or even break the lattice structure and the initial symmetries of matter distribution. This approach goes beyond the Wigner-Seitz approximation and no assumption of final shapes of matter is made. In this framework, different effects, as the sensitivity of...

  5. Multi-Time Scale Model Order Reduction and Stability Consistency Certification of Inverter-Interfaced DG System in AC Microgrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Meng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available AC microgrid mainly comprise inverter-interfaced distributed generators (IIDGs, which are nonlinear complex systems with multiple time scales, including frequency control, time delay measurements, and electromagnetic transients. The droop control-based IIDG in an AC microgrid is selected as the research object in this study, which comprises power droop controller, voltage- and current-loop controllers, and filter and line. The multi-time scale characteristics of the detailed IIDG model are divided based on singular perturbation theory. In addition, the IIDG model order is reduced by neglecting the system fast dynamics. The static and transient stability consistency of the IIDG model order reduction are demonstrated by extracting features of the IIDG small signal model and using the quadratic approximation method of the stability region boundary, respectively. The dynamic response consistencies of the IIDG model order reduction are evaluated using the frequency, damping and amplitude features extracted by the Prony transformation. Results are applicable to provide a simplified model for the dynamic characteristic analysis of IIDG systems in AC microgrid. The accuracy of the proposed method is verified by using the eigenvalue comparison, the transient stability index comparison and the dynamic time-domain simulation.

  6. Analysis of the Time Reversible Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Lin; Lu, Jianfeng; Shao, Sihong

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the time reversible Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (TRBOMD) scheme, which preserves the time reversibility of the Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics even with non-convergent self-consistent field iteration. In the linear response regime, we derive the stability condition as well as the accuracy of TRBOMD for computing physical properties such as the phonon frequency obtained from the molecular dynamic simulation. We connect and compare TRBOMD with the Car-Parrinello molecular...

  7. Consistency across missions of long time series of global biophysical variables: challenges and lessons learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze, Roselyne; Smets, Bruno; Calvet, Jean-Christophe; Camacho, Fernando; Swinnen, Else; Verger, Aleixandre

    2017-04-01

    The Global component of the Copernicus Land Monitoring Service (CGLS) provides continuously a set of bio-geophysical variables describing the dynamics of vegetation, the energy budget at the continental surface, the water cycle and the cryosphere. Products are generated on a reliable and automatic basis from Earth Observation satellite data, at a frequency ranging from one hour to 10 days. They are accessible free of charge through the GCLS website (http://land.copernicus.eu/global/), associated with documentation describing the physical methodologies, the technical properties of products, and the quality of variables based on the results of validation exercises. The portfolio of the CGLS contains some Essential Climate Variables (ECV) like the Leaf Area Index (LAI), the Fraction of PAR absorbed by the vegetation (FAPAR), the surface albedo, and additional vegetation indices. These products were derived from SPOT/VEGETATION sensor data till December 2013, are currently derived from PROBA-V sensor data, and will be derived in the future from Sentinel-3 data. This talk will show how challenging is the transition between sensors to ensure the sustainability of the production while keeping the consistency of the time series. We will discuss the various sources of differences from input data, the impact of these differences on the biophysical variables and, in turn, on some final users' applications as such those based upon anomalies or assimilation of time series. We will present the mitigation measures taken to reduce as much as possible this impact. We will conclude with the lessons learnt and how this experience will be exploited to manage the transition towards Sentinel-3.

  8. Time-Consistent Strategies for a Multiperiod Mean-Variance Portfolio Selection Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiling Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It remained prevalent in the past years to obtain the precommitment strategies for Markowitz's mean-variance portfolio optimization problems, but not much is known about their time-consistent strategies. This paper takes a step to investigate the time-consistent Nash equilibrium strategies for a multiperiod mean-variance portfolio selection problem. Under the assumption that the risk aversion is, respectively, a constant and a function of current wealth level, we obtain the explicit expressions for the time-consistent Nash equilibrium strategy and the equilibrium value function. Many interesting properties of the time-consistent results are identified through numerical sensitivity analysis and by comparing them with the classical pre-commitment solutions.

  9. On a Stable and Consistent Finite Difference Scheme for a Time ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, a stable and consistent criterion to an explicit finite difference scheme for a time-dependent Schrodinger wave equation (TDSWE) was presented. This paper is a departure from the well-established time independent Schrodinger Wave Equation (SWE). To develop the stability criterion for the scheme, the ...

  10. The dynamics of a food web consisting of two preys and a harvesting predator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gakkhar, Sunita; Singh, Brahampal

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the dynamical behavior of an exploited system consisting of two preys and a predator which is being harvested. The existence of biological, economic and optimum equilibrium of the system is examined. The local and global stability analysis of the model has been carried out. The optimal harvesting policy for harvesting the predator species is studied. The bifurcation diagram is drawn for biologically feasible choice of parameters and the harvest parameter is chosen in the range for which optimum equilibrium also exist. It is observed that harvesting can control the chaos

  11. Self-consistent nonlinearly polarizable shell-model dynamics for ferroelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mkam Tchouobiap, S.E.; Kofane, T.C.; Ngabireng, C.M.

    2002-11-01

    We investigate the dynamical properties of the polarizable shellmodel with a symmetric double Morse-type electron-ion interaction in one ionic species. A variational calculation based on the Self-Consistent Einstein Model (SCEM) shows that a theoretical ferroelectric (FE) transition temperature can be derive which demonstrates the presence of a first-order phase transition for the potassium selenate (K 2 SeO 4 ) crystal around Tc 91.5 K. Comparison of the model calculation with the experimental critical temperature yields satisfactory agreement. (author)

  12. Consistent temperature coupling with thermal fluctuations of smooth particle hydrodynamics and molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg C Ganzenmüller

    Full Text Available We propose a thermodynamically consistent and energy-conserving temperature coupling scheme between the atomistic and the continuum domain. The coupling scheme links the two domains using the DPDE (Dissipative Particle Dynamics at constant Energy thermostat and is designed to handle strong temperature gradients across the atomistic/continuum domain interface. The fundamentally different definitions of temperature in the continuum and atomistic domain - internal energy and heat capacity versus particle velocity - are accounted for in a straightforward and conceptually intuitive way by the DPDE thermostat. We verify the here-proposed scheme using a fluid, which is simultaneously represented as a continuum using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics, and as an atomistically resolved liquid using Molecular Dynamics. In the case of equilibrium contact between both domains, we show that the correct microscopic equilibrium properties of the atomistic fluid are obtained. As an example of a strong non-equilibrium situation, we consider the propagation of a steady shock-wave from the continuum domain into the atomistic domain, and show that the coupling scheme conserves both energy and shock-wave dynamics. To demonstrate the applicability of our scheme to real systems, we consider shock loading of a phospholipid bilayer immersed in water in a multi-scale simulation, an interesting topic of biological relevance.

  13. Consistent temperature coupling with thermal fluctuations of smooth particle hydrodynamics and molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzenmüller, Georg C; Hiermaier, Stefan; Steinhauser, Martin O

    2012-01-01

    We propose a thermodynamically consistent and energy-conserving temperature coupling scheme between the atomistic and the continuum domain. The coupling scheme links the two domains using the DPDE (Dissipative Particle Dynamics at constant Energy) thermostat and is designed to handle strong temperature gradients across the atomistic/continuum domain interface. The fundamentally different definitions of temperature in the continuum and atomistic domain - internal energy and heat capacity versus particle velocity - are accounted for in a straightforward and conceptually intuitive way by the DPDE thermostat. We verify the here-proposed scheme using a fluid, which is simultaneously represented as a continuum using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics, and as an atomistically resolved liquid using Molecular Dynamics. In the case of equilibrium contact between both domains, we show that the correct microscopic equilibrium properties of the atomistic fluid are obtained. As an example of a strong non-equilibrium situation, we consider the propagation of a steady shock-wave from the continuum domain into the atomistic domain, and show that the coupling scheme conserves both energy and shock-wave dynamics. To demonstrate the applicability of our scheme to real systems, we consider shock loading of a phospholipid bilayer immersed in water in a multi-scale simulation, an interesting topic of biological relevance.

  14. Accelerating molecular dynamics simulations by linear prediction of time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutovsky, B.; Mülders, T.; Kneller, G. R.

    2003-04-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation scheme which allows to speed up molecular dynamics simulations by linear prediction of force time series. The explicit calculation of nonbonding forces is periodically replaced by linear prediction from past values. Applying our method to liquid oxygen consisting of flexible molecules we obtained real speedups between 5.4 and 6.5, compared to conventional molecular dynamics simulations. Here only the bond-stretching forces were calculated at each time step. We demonstrate that essential dynamical quantities, such as the mean-square displacement and the velocity autocorrelation function, are preserved.

  15. Consistency and Security in Mobile Real Time Distributed Database (MRTDDB): A Combinational Giant Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Gyanendra Kr.; Sharma, A. K.; Swaroop, Vishnu

    2010-11-01

    Many type of Information System are widely used in various fields. With the hasty development of computer network, Information System users care more about data sharing in networks. In traditional relational database, data consistency was controlled by consistency control mechanism when a data object is locked in a sharing mode, other transactions can only read it, but can not update it. If the traditional consistency control method has been used yet, the system's concurrency will be inadequately influenced. So there are many new necessities for the consistency control and security in MRTDDB. The problem not limited only to type of data (e.g. mobile or real-time databases). There are many aspects of data consistency problems in MRTDDB, such as inconsistency between attribute and type of data; the inconsistency of topological relations after objects has been modified. In this paper, many cases of consistency are discussed. As the mobile computing becomes well liked and the database grows with information sharing security is a big issue for researchers. Consistency and Security of data is a big challenge for researchers because when ever the data is not consistent and secure no maneuver on the data (e.g. transaction) is productive. It becomes more and more crucial when the transactions are used in non-traditional environment like Mobile, Distributed, Real Time and Multimedia databases. In this paper we raise the different aspects and analyze the available solution for consistency and security of databases. Traditional Database Security has focused primarily on creating user accounts and managing user privileges to database objects. But in the mobility and nomadic computing uses these database creating a new opportunities for research. The wide spread use of databases over the web, heterogeneous client-server architectures, application servers, and networks creates a critical need to amplify this focus. In this paper we also discuss an overview of the new and old

  16. Adolescent Condom Use Consistency over Time: Global Versus Partner-Specific Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearinger, Linda H.; Sieving, Renee E.; Duke, Naomi N.; McMorris, Barbara J.; Stoddard, Sarah; Pettingell, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    Background The conundrum of measuring condom use consistency, particularly with adolescents, has left researchers with a cacophony of strategies, thereby limiting comparability and interpretation. Objective The aim of this analysis was to compare and contrast two measures of condom use consistency, global versus partner-specific, and their relationships with key covariates, using trajectory groups differentiated by stability of condom use consistency over three time-points. Method Using self-report data from sexually-active girls (ages 13-17 years) in a clinic-based intervention study aimed at lowering risk for early pregnancy, this analysis compared two measures of self-reported condom use consistency: 1) a global measure: overall condom use consistency in the past 6 months, and 2) a partner-specific measure: condom use consistency with the most recent sex partner in the last 6 months. Using a subjective rule-based approach, the adolescent girls in the study (N=151) were classified into trajectory groups representing their condom use consistency at three time-points (baseline, 6, and 12 months). Then, using bivariate methods, trajectory groups were compared on four baseline covariates (age, treatment condition, hormonal use in the last 6 months, number of sex partners in the last 6 months) and three time-varying covariates measured at baseline, 6, and 12 months (hormonal use stability, stability of primary sex partner, stability of number of sex partners). Results For the trajectory groups formed using the global measure of condom use consistency, stability of the primary sex partner differed significantly between trajectory groups. For the partner-specific trajectory groups, two baseline and one time-varying covariate relationships were significant: hormonal use in 6 months prior to baseline, number of sex partners in past 6 months (baseline), and stability of the primary sex partner (time-varying) with hormone use stability (time-varying) trending toward

  17. Consistency questions in the light cone gauge based on equal time commutation rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, K.

    1989-01-01

    We investigate whether time displacement invariant propagators are compatible canonical formulations in the light cone gauge based on equal time commutation rules. We conclude that, in the light cone gauge, time displacement invariant propagators are not consistent with the requirement that, in canonical formulations of gauge theories, only transversely polarized, massless gauge field excitations (photons, or gluons in perturbative QCD), can contribute to the transverse part of a time displacement invariant propagator. When the time displacement invariant light cone gauge propagator is represented as a four-dimensional momentum space Fourier integral the following is observed: Transverse parts of the propagator obtain time displacement invariant contributions from the (k 3 -k 0 ) pole, as well as from the (vertical strokekvertical stroke 2 -k 0 2 ) pole. But since, in the Schroedinger picture (i.e. at t=0), the divergence-free part of the gauge field consists of transversely polarized gauge field excitations only, the transverse part of the propagator either can have time displacement invariant time dependence determined by the (vertical strokekvertical stroke 2 -k 0 2 ) pole; or, if any part of the transverse propagator has time dependence determined by the (k 3 -k 0 ) pole, it cannot be time displacement invariant. (orig.)

  18. Sexual identity development among gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths: consistency and change over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W; Hunter, Joyce; Braun, Lisa

    2006-02-01

    A longitudinal report of 156 gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths examined changes in sexual identity over time. Fifty-seven percent of the youths remained consistently self-identified as gay/lesbian, 18% transited from bisexual to gay/lesbian, and 15% consistently identified as bisexual over time. Although youths who consistently identified as gay/lesbian did not differ from other youths on time since experiencing sexual developmental milestones, they reported current sexual orientation and sexual behaviors that were more same-sex centered and they scored higher on aspects of the identity integration process (e.g., more certain, comfortable, and accepting of their same-sex sexuality, more involved in gay-related social activities, more possessing of positive attitudes toward homosexuality, and more comfortable with others knowing about their sexuality) than youths who transited to a gay/lesbian identity and youths who consistently identified as bisexual. Contrary to the hypothesis that females are more sexually fluid than males, female youths were less likely to change identities than male youths. The finding that youths who transited to a gay/lesbian identity differed from consistently gay/lesbian youths suggests that identity integration continues after the adoption of a gay/lesbian sexual identity.

  19. Development of a Model for Dynamic Recrystallization Consistent with the Second Derivative Criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Imran

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic recrystallization (DRX processes are widely used in industrial hot working operations, not only to keep the forming forces low but also to control the microstructure and final properties of the workpiece. According to the second derivative criterion (SDC by Poliak and Jonas, the onset of DRX can be detected from an inflection point in the strain-hardening rate as a function of flow stress. Various models are available that can predict the evolution of flow stress from incipient plastic flow up to steady-state deformation in the presence of DRX. Some of these models have been implemented into finite element codes and are widely used for the design of metal forming processes, but their consistency with the SDC has not been investigated. This work identifies three sources of inconsistencies that models for DRX may exhibit. For a consistent modeling of the DRX kinetics, a new strain-hardening model for the hardening stages III to IV is proposed and combined with consistent recrystallization kinetics. The model is devised in the Kocks-Mecking space based on characteristic transition in the strain-hardening rate. A linear variation of the transition and inflection points is observed for alloy 800H at all tested temperatures and strain rates. The comparison of experimental and model results shows that the model is able to follow the course of the strain-hardening rate very precisely, such that highly accurate flow stress predictions are obtained.

  20. Development of a Model for Dynamic Recrystallization Consistent with the Second Derivative Criterion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Muhammad; Kühbach, Markus; Roters, Franz; Bambach, Markus

    2017-11-02

    Dynamic recrystallization (DRX) processes are widely used in industrial hot working operations, not only to keep the forming forces low but also to control the microstructure and final properties of the workpiece. According to the second derivative criterion (SDC) by Poliak and Jonas, the onset of DRX can be detected from an inflection point in the strain-hardening rate as a function of flow stress. Various models are available that can predict the evolution of flow stress from incipient plastic flow up to steady-state deformation in the presence of DRX. Some of these models have been implemented into finite element codes and are widely used for the design of metal forming processes, but their consistency with the SDC has not been investigated. This work identifies three sources of inconsistencies that models for DRX may exhibit. For a consistent modeling of the DRX kinetics, a new strain-hardening model for the hardening stages III to IV is proposed and combined with consistent recrystallization kinetics. The model is devised in the Kocks-Mecking space based on characteristic transition in the strain-hardening rate. A linear variation of the transition and inflection points is observed for alloy 800H at all tested temperatures and strain rates. The comparison of experimental and model results shows that the model is able to follow the course of the strain-hardening rate very precisely, such that highly accurate flow stress predictions are obtained.

  1. Multiscale and multilevel technique for consistent segmentation of nonstationary time series

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Haeran; Fryzlewicz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a fast, well-performing, and consistent method for segmenting a piecewise-stationary, linear time series with an unknown number of breakpoints. The time series model we use is the nonparametric Locally Stationary Wavelet model, in which a complete description of the piecewise-stationary second-order structure is provided by wavelet periodograms computed at multiple scales and locations. The initial stage of our method is a new binary segmentation procedure, with a th...

  2. Dynamic Time Warping for Vehicle Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Halachkin, A.

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on the dynamic time warping for vehicle classification. The theoretical part includes the dynamic time warping algorithm description. The DTW module in Python, that was created during this work, is subsequently applied for the recognition of vehicle types by their side profiles based on the DTW.

  3. Self-consistent mean field theory studies of the thermodynamics and quantum spin dynamics of magnetic Skyrmions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, R

    2017-05-04

    A self-consistent mean field theory is introduced and used to investigate the thermodynamics and spin dynamics of an S  =  1 quantum spin system with a magnetic Skyrmion. The temperature dependence of the Skyrmion profile as well as the phase diagram are calculated. In addition, the spin dynamics of a magnetic Skyrmion is described by solving the time dependent Schrödinger equation with additional damping term. The Skyrmion annihilation process driven by an electric field is used to compare the trajectories of the quantum mechanical simulation with a semi-classical description for the spin expectation values using a differential equation similar to the classical Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation.

  4. FRACTIONAL DYNAMICS AT MULTIPLE TIMES

    OpenAIRE

    Meerschaert, Mark M.; Straka, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A continuous time random walk (CTRW) imposes a random waiting time between random particle jumps. CTRW limit densities solve a fractional Fokker-Planck equation, but since the CTRW limit is not Markovian, this is not sufficient to characterize the process. This paper applies continuum renewal theory to restore the Markov property on an expanded state space, and compute the joint CTRW limit density at multiple times.

  5. FRACTIONAL DYNAMICS AT MULTIPLE TIMES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerschaert, Mark M; Straka, Peter

    2012-11-01

    A continuous time random walk (CTRW) imposes a random waiting time between random particle jumps. CTRW limit densities solve a fractional Fokker-Planck equation, but since the CTRW limit is not Markovian, this is not sufficient to characterize the process. This paper applies continuum renewal theory to restore the Markov property on an expanded state space, and compute the joint CTRW limit density at multiple times.

  6. Adults' reports of their earliest memories: consistency in events, ages, and narrative characteristics over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Patricia J; Tasdemir-Ozdes, Aylin; Larkina, Marina

    2014-07-01

    Earliest memories have been of interest since the late 1800s, when it was first noted that most adults do not have memories from the first years of life (so-called childhood amnesia). Several characteristics of adults' earliest memories have been investigated, including emotional content, the perspective from which they are recalled, and vividness. The focus of the present research was a feature of early memories heretofore relatively neglected in the literature, namely, their consistency. Adults reported their earliest memories 2-4 times over a 4-year period. Reports of earliest memories were highly consistent in the events identified as the bases for earliest memories, the reported age at the time of the event, and in terms of qualities of the narrative descriptions. These findings imply stability in the boundary that marks the offset of childhood amnesia, as well as in the beginning of a continuous sense of self over time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Adults’ reports of their earliest memories: Consistency in events, ages, and narrative characteristics over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Patricia J.; Tasdemir-Ozdes, Aylin; Larkina, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Earliest memories have been of interest since the late 1800s, when it was first noted that most adults do not have memories from the first years of life (so-called childhood amnesia). Several characteristics of adults’ earliest memories have been investigated, including emotional content, the perspective from which they are recalled, and vividness. The focus of the present research was a feature of early memories heretofore relatively neglected in the literature, namely, their consistency. Adults reported their earliest memories 2 to 4 times over a 4-year period. Reports of earliest memories were highly consistent in the events identified as the bases for earliest memories, the reported age at the time of the event, and in terms of qualities of the narrative descriptions. These findings imply stability in the boundary that marks the offset of childhood amnesia, as well as in the beginning of a continuous sense of self over time. PMID:24836979

  8. A Consistent Dynamic Finite Element Formulation For a Pipe Using Euler Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ara Arabyan

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A pipe element developed earlier for the analysis of combined large bending and torsional deformations of blood vessels under static loading is extended to model behavior in the presence of large rotations and time-varying external forces. As in the case of the earlier element, the enhanced element supports ovalization and warping of its cross-section. The enhancements presented in this paper are comprised of a mass matrix and gyroscopic effects resulting from fast rotation rates and large deformations. The effectiveness of the element is demonstrated by two examples, which simulate the three-dimensional behavior of a highly flexible pipe under dynamic loading conditions.

  9. Implications of short time scale dynamics on long time processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystel El Hage

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This review provides a comprehensive overview of the structural dynamics in topical gas- and condensed-phase systems on multiple length and time scales. Starting from vibrationally induced dissociation of small molecules in the gas phase, the question of vibrational and internal energy redistribution through conformational dynamics is further developed by considering coupled electron/proton transfer in a model peptide over many orders of magnitude. The influence of the surrounding solvent is probed for electron transfer to the solvent in hydrated I−. Next, the dynamics of a modified PDZ domain over many time scales is analyzed following activation of a photoswitch. The hydration dynamics around halogenated amino acid side chains and their structural dynamics in proteins are relevant for iodinated TyrB26 insulin. Binding of nitric oxide to myoglobin is a process for which experimental and computational analyses have converged to a common view which connects rebinding time scales and the underlying dynamics. Finally, rhodopsin is a paradigmatic system for multiple length- and time-scale processes for which experimental and computational methods provide valuable insights into the functional dynamics. The systems discussed here highlight that for a comprehensive understanding of how structure, flexibility, energetics, and dynamics contribute to functional dynamics, experimental studies in multiple wavelength regions and computational studies including quantum, classical, and more coarse grained levels are required.

  10. DYNAMICO-1.0, an icosahedral hydrostatic dynamical core designed for consistency and versatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubos, T.; Dubey, S.; Tort, M.; Mittal, R.; Meurdesoif, Y.; Hourdin, F.

    2015-10-01

    The design of the icosahedral dynamical core DYNAMICO is presented. DYNAMICO solves the multi-layer rotating shallow-water equations, a compressible variant of the same equivalent to a discretization of the hydrostatic primitive equations in a Lagrangian vertical coordinate, and the primitive equations in a hybrid mass-based vertical coordinate. The common Hamiltonian structure of these sets of equations is exploited to formulate energy-conserving spatial discretizations in a unified way. The horizontal mesh is a quasi-uniform icosahedral C-grid obtained by subdivision of a regular icosahedron. Control volumes for mass, tracers and entropy/potential temperature are the hexagonal cells of the Voronoi mesh to avoid the fast numerical modes of the triangular C-grid. The horizontal discretization is that of Ringler et al. (2010), whose discrete quasi-Hamiltonian structure is identified. The prognostic variables are arranged vertically on a Lorenz grid with all thermodynamical variables collocated with mass. The vertical discretization is obtained from the three-dimensional Hamiltonian formulation. Tracers are transported using a second-order finite-volume scheme with slope limiting for positivity. Explicit Runge-Kutta time integration is used for dynamics, and forward-in-time integration with horizontal/vertical splitting is used for tracers. Most of the model code is common to the three sets of equations solved, making it easier to develop and validate each piece of the model separately. Representative three-dimensional test cases are run and analyzed, showing correctness of the model. The design permits to consider several extensions in the near future, from higher-order transport to more general dynamics, especially deep-atmosphere and non-hydrostatic equations.

  11. Is the Quilted Multiverse Consistent with a Thermodynamic Arrow of Time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakir Aharonov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical achievements, as well as much controversy, surround multiverse theory. Various types of multiverses, with an increasing amount of complexity, were suggested and thoroughly discussed in literature by now. While these types are very different, they all share the same basic idea: our physical reality consists of more than just one universe. Each universe within a possibly huge multiverse might be slightly or even very different from the others. The quilted multiverse is one of these types, whose uniqueness arises from the postulate that every possible event will occur infinitely many times in infinitely many universes. In this paper we show that the quilted multiverse is not self-consistent due to the instability of entropy decrease under small perturbations. We therefore propose a modified version of the quilted multiverse which might overcome this shortcoming. It includes only those universes where the minimal entropy occurs at the same instant of (cosmological time. Only these universes whose initial conditions are fine-tuned within a small phase-space region would evolve consistently to form their “close” states at present. A final boundary condition on the multiverse may further lower the amount of possible, consistent universes. Finally, some related observations regarding the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics and the emergence of classicality are discussed.

  12. Time Consistency and the Duration of Government Debt: A Signalling Theory of Quantitative Easing

    OpenAIRE

    Gauti Eggertsson; Bulat Gafarov; Saroj Bhatarai

    2014-01-01

    We present a signalling theory of Quantitative Easing (QE) at the zero lower bound on the short term nominal interest rate. QE is effective because it generates a credible signal of low future real interest rates in a time consistent equilibrium. We show these results in two models. One has coordinated monetary and fiscal policy. The other an independent central bank with balance sheet concerns. Numerical experiments show that the signalling effect can be substantial in both models.

  13. Fourier rebinning and consistency equations for time-of-flight PET planograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yusheng; Defrise, Michel; Matej, Samuel; Metzler, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    Due to the unique geometry, dual-panel PET scanners have many advantages in dedicated breast imaging and on-board imaging applications since the compact scanners can be combined with other imaging and treatment modalities. The major challenges of dual-panel PET imaging are the limited-angle problem and data truncation, which can cause artifacts due to incomplete data sampling. The time-of-flight (TOF) information can be a promising solution to reduce these artifacts. The TOF planogram is the native data format for dual-panel TOF PET scanners, and the non-TOF planogram is the 3D extension of linogram. The TOF planograms is five-dimensional while the objects are three-dimensional, and there are two degrees of redundancy. In this paper, we derive consistency equations and Fourier-based rebinning algorithms to provide a complete understanding of the rich structure of the fully 3D TOF planograms. We first derive two consistency equations and John's equation for 3D TOF planograms. By taking the Fourier transforms, we obtain two Fourier consistency equations and the Fourier-John equation, which are the duals of the consistency equations and John's equation, respectively. We then solve the Fourier consistency equations and Fourier-John equation using the method of characteristics. The two degrees of entangled redundancy of the 3D TOF data can be explicitly elicited and exploited by the solutions along the characteristic curves. As the special cases of the general solutions, we obtain Fourier rebinning and consistency equations (FORCEs), and thus we obtain a complete scheme to convert among different types of PET planograms: 3D TOF, 3D non-TOF, 2D TOF and 2D non-TOF planograms. The FORCEs can be used as Fourier-based rebinning algorithms for TOF-PET data reduction, inverse rebinnings for designing fast projectors, or consistency conditions for estimating missing data. As a byproduct, we show the two consistency equations are necessary and sufficient for 3D TOF planograms

  14. Time and Causality in the Economic Process – a Critical Approach Based on Consistency Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina TĂNĂSESCU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our paper proposes a critical analysis based on criteria of consistency of the fundamental concepts underlying the comprehensive description of economic process, namely: time, context and causality. Issues of such action taken by us arise from the existence of the fact that the emergence of new paradigms, amid an economic complexity, should include elements of theoretical, instrumental and methodological nature. Moreover, dominant economic science, at this time (positivist, is subject to an epistemological imperialism exercised by Newtonian mechanics, without one's own epistemology. Regarding the underlying causality explaining the economic process, we find that, yet at this time, it is a singular and efficient one (in the Aristotelian sense, but not a teleological one, so we wonder whether the final causality (purpose form may better explain the economic process and his completeness, and in this sense, the shaping of new paradigms based on premises other than those already existed, in understanding the economic process.

  15. Fractional dynamic calculus and fractional dynamic equations on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiev, Svetlin G

    2018-01-01

    Pedagogically organized, this monograph introduces fractional calculus and fractional dynamic equations on time scales in relation to mathematical physics applications and problems. Beginning with the definitions of forward and backward jump operators, the book builds from Stefan Hilger’s basic theories on time scales and examines recent developments within the field of fractional calculus and fractional equations. Useful tools are provided for solving differential and integral equations as well as various problems involving special functions of mathematical physics and their extensions and generalizations in one and more variables. Much discussion is devoted to Riemann-Liouville fractional dynamic equations and Caputo fractional dynamic equations.  Intended for use in the field and designed for students without an extensive mathematical background, this book is suitable for graduate courses and researchers looking for an introduction to fractional dynamic calculus and equations on time scales. .

  16. Can time be a discrete dynamical variable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.D.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility that time can be regarded as a discrete dynamical variable is examined through all phases of mechanics: from classical mechanics to nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, and to relativistic quantum field theories. (orig.)

  17. Coupling Detonation Shock Dynamics in a Consistent Manner to Equations of State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfield, William

    2017-06-01

    In hydrocode simulations, detonating high explosives (HE) are often modelled using programmed burn. Each HE cell is assigned a ``burn time'' at which it should begin to behave as HE products in the subsequent simulation. Traditionally, these burn times were calculated using a Huygens construction to propagate the detonation wave at a constant speed corresponding to the planar Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) velocity. The Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) model improves upon this approach by treating the local detonation velocity as a function of wave curvature, reflecting that the detonation speed is not constant in reality. However, without alterations being made, this variable detonation velocity is inconsistent with the CJ velocity associated with the HE products equation of state (EOS). Previous work has shown that the inconsistency can be resolved by modifying the HE product EOS, but this treatment is empirical in nature and has only been applied to the JWL EOS. This work investigates different methods to resolve the inconsistency that are applicable both to JWL and to tabular HE product EOS, and their impact on hydrocode simulations.

  18. Self-consistent Vlasov-Maxwell description of the longitudinal dynamics of intense charged particle beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald C. Davidson

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a self-consistent kinetic model for the longitudinal dynamics of a long, coasting beam propagating in straight (linear geometry in the z direction in the smooth-focusing approximation. Starting with the three-dimensional Vlasov-Maxwell equations, and integrating over the phase-space (x_{⊥},p_{⊥} transverse to beam propagation, a closed system of equations is obtained for the nonlinear evolution of the longitudinal distribution function F_{b}(z,p_{z},t and average axial electric field ⟨E_{z}^{s}⟩(z,t. The primary assumptions in the present analysis are that the dependence on axial momentum p_{z} of the distribution function f_{b}(x,p,t is factorable, and that the transverse beam dynamics remains relatively quiescent (absence of transverse instability or beam mismatch. The analysis is carried out correct to order k_{z}^{2}r_{w}^{2} assuming slow axial spatial variations with k_{z}^{2}r_{w}^{2}≪1, where k_{z}∼∂/∂z is the inverse length scale of axial variation in the line density λ_{b}(z,t=∫dp_{z}F_{b}(z,p_{z},t, and r_{w} is the radius of the conducting wall (assumed perfectly conducting. A closed expression for the average longitudinal electric field ⟨E_{z}^{s}⟩(z,t in terms of geometric factors, the line density λ_{b}, and its derivatives ∂λ_{b}/∂z,… is obtained for the class of bell-shaped density profiles n_{b}(r,z,t=(λ_{b}/πr_{b}^{2}f(r/r_{b}, where the shape function f(r/r_{b} has the form specified by f(r/r_{b}=(n+1(1-r^{2}/r_{b}^{2}^{n} for 0≤r

  19. Magy: Time dependent, multifrequency, self-consistent code for modeling electron beam devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botton, M.; Antonsen, T.M.; Levush, B.

    1997-01-01

    A new MAGY code is being developed for three dimensional modeling of electron beam devices. The code includes a time dependent multifrequency description of the electromagnetic fields and a self consistent analysis of the electrons. The equations of motion are solved with the electromagnetic fields as driving forces and the resulting trajectories are used as current sources for the fields. The calculations of the electromagnetic fields are based on the waveguide modal representation, which allows the solution of relatively small number of coupled one dimensional partial differential equations for the amplitudes of the modes, instead of the full solution of Maxwell close-quote s equations. Moreover, the basic time scale for updating the electromagnetic fields is the cavity fill time and not the high frequency of the fields. In MAGY, the coupling among the various modes is determined by the waveguide non-uniformity, finite conductivity of the walls, and the sources due to the electron beam. The equations of motion of the electrons are solved assuming that all the electrons traverse the cavity in less than the cavity fill time. Therefore, at each time step, a set of trajectories are calculated with the high frequency and other external fields as the driving forces. The code includes a verity of diagnostics for both electromagnetic fields and particles trajectories. It is simple to operate and requires modest computing resources, thus expected to serve as a design tool. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  20. Simulating variable-density flows with time-consistent integration of Navier-Stokes equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoyi; Pantano, Carlos

    2017-11-01

    In this talk, we present several features of a high-order semi-implicit variable-density low-Mach Navier-Stokes solver. A new formulation to solve pressure Poisson-like equation of variable-density flows is highlighted. With this formulation of the numerical method, we are able to solve all variables with a uniform order of accuracy in time (consistent with the time integrator being used). The solver is primarily designed to perform direct numerical simulations for turbulent premixed flames. Therefore, we also address other important elements, such as energy-stable boundary conditions, synthetic turbulence generation, and flame anchoring method. Numerical examples include classical non-reacting constant/variable-density flows, as well as turbulent premixed flames.

  1. Representation independent algorithms for molecular response calculations in time-dependent self-consistent field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tretiak, Sergei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Four different numerical algorithms suitable for a linear scaling implementation of time-dependent Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham self-consistent field theories are examined. We compare the performance of modified Lanczos, Arooldi, Davidson, and Rayleigh quotient iterative procedures to solve the random-phase approximation (RPA) (non-Hermitian) and Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) (Hermitian) eigenvalue equations in the molecular orbital-free framework. Semiempirical Hamiltonian models are used to numerically benchmark algorithms for the computation of excited states of realistic molecular systems (conjugated polymers and carbon nanotubes). Convergence behavior and stability are tested with respect to a numerical noise imposed to simulate linear scaling conditions. The results single out the most suitable procedures for linear scaling large-scale time-dependent perturbation theory calculations of electronic excitations.

  2. Consistent Classification of Landsat Time Series with an Improved Automatic Adaptive Signature Generalization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Dannenberg

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Classifying land cover is perhaps the most common application of remote sensing, yet classification at frequent temporal intervals remains a challenging task due to radiometric differences among scenes, time and budget constraints, and semantic differences among class definitions from different dates. The automatic adaptive signature generalization (AASG algorithm overcomes many of these limitations by locating stable sites between two images and using them to adapt class spectral signatures from a high-quality reference classification to a new image, which mitigates the impacts of radiometric and phenological differences between images and ensures that class definitions remain consistent between the two classifications. We refined AASG to adapt stable site identification parameters to each individual land cover class, while also incorporating improved input data and a random forest classifier. In the Research Triangle region of North Carolina, our new version of AASG demonstrated an improved ability to update existing land cover classifications compared to the initial version of AASG, particularly for low intensity developed, mixed forest, and woody wetland classes. Topographic indices were particularly important for distinguishing woody wetlands from other forest types, while multi-seasonal imagery contributed to improved classification of water, developed, forest, and hay/pasture classes. These results demonstrate both the flexibility of the AASG algorithm and the potential for using it to produce high-quality land cover classifications that can utilize the entire temporal range of the Landsat archive in an automated fashion while maintaining consistent class definitions through time.

  3. Time-consistent calibration of short-term regional wind power ensemble forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Späth

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available With increasing wind power capacity, accurate uncertainty forecasts get more and more important for grid integration. The uncertainty of forecasts can be quantified by ensemble forecasts. We use ensemble forecasts from the COSMO-DE EPS to generate short-term ensemble forecasts of regionally aggregated wind power. The wind power forecasts are generated by an optimised regional power curve model that is based on minimum score estimation and leads to wind power forecasts with small deterministic errors. Remaining bias and dispersion errors in the wind power forecasts are removed by statistical post-processing (also called calibration with ensemble model output statistics and the temporal rank correlation of the raw ensemble is maintained by ensemble copula coupling. The verification of raw and calibrated ensembles shows both strong improvements by calibration and the benefit of ensuring time consistency with ensemble copula coupling. The improvements are indicated by the multivariate energy score as well as in a proposed univariate verification approach that is based on integrated wind power forecast and measurement trajectories. Slight deficits in time consistency of the forecasts remain because the theoretical assumptions of ensemble copula coupling are not always fulfilled as the COSMO-DE EPS is based on distinguishable ensemble members. The more training days are used for calibration against measurements of regionally aggregated wind power, the lower is the improvement by calibration which contradicts former results for different variables like wind speed.

  4. Timing of head movements is consistent with energy minimization in walking ungulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscher, David M; Meyer, Fiete; Kracht, Kerstin; Nyakatura, John A

    2016-11-30

    Many ungulates show a conspicuous nodding motion of the head when walking. Until now, the functional significance of this behaviour remained unclear. Combining in vivo kinematics of quadrupedal mammals with a computer model, we show that the timing of vertical displacements of the head and neck is consistent with minimizing energy expenditure for carrying these body parts in an inverted pendulum walking gait. Varying the timing of head movements in the model resulted in increased metabolic cost estimate for carrying the head and neck of up to 63%. Oscillations of the head-neck unit result in weight force oscillations transmitted to the forelimbs. Advantageous timing increases the load in single support phases, in which redirecting the trajectory of the centre of mass (COM) is thought to be energetically inexpensive. During double support, in which-according to collision mechanics-directional changes of the impulse of the COM are expensive, the observed timing decreases the load. Because the head and neck comprise approximately 10% of body mass, the effect shown here should also affect the animals' overall energy expenditure. This mechanism, working analogously in high-tech backpacks for energy-saving load carriage, is widespread in ungulates, and provides insight into how animals economize locomotion. © 2016 The Author(s).

  5. A Time-Dependent Λ and G Cosmological Model Consistent with Cosmological Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kantha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevailing constant Λ-G cosmological model agrees with observational evidence including the observed red shift, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN, and the current rate of acceleration. It assumes that matter contributes 27% to the current density of the universe, with the rest (73% coming from dark energy represented by the Einstein cosmological parameter Λ in the governing Friedmann-Robertson-Walker equations, derived from Einstein’s equations of general relativity. However, the principal problem is the extremely small value of the cosmological parameter (~10−52 m2. Moreover, the dark energy density represented by Λ is presumed to have remained unchanged as the universe expanded by 26 orders of magnitude. Attempts to overcome this deficiency often invoke a variable Λ-G model. Cosmic constraints from action principles require that either both G and Λ remain time-invariant or both vary in time. Here, we propose a variable Λ-G cosmological model consistent with the latest red shift data, the current acceleration rate, and BBN, provided the split between matter and dark energy is 18% and 82%. Λ decreases (Λ~τ-2, where τ is the normalized cosmic time and G increases (G~τn with cosmic time. The model results depend only on the chosen value of Λ at present and in the far future and not directly on G.

  6. The Neuromagnetic Dynamics of Time Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Carver, Frederick W.; Elvevåg, Brita; Altamura, Mario; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Coppola, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Examining real-time cortical dynamics is crucial for understanding time perception. Using magnetoencephalography we studied auditory duration discrimination of short (.5 s) versus a pitch control. Time-frequency analysis of event-related fields showed widespread beta-band (13-30 Hz) desynchronization during all tone presentations. Synthetic aperture magnetometry indicated automatic primarily sensorimotor responses in short and pitch conditions, with activation specific to timing in bilateral ...

  7. The Chapman psychosis-proneness scales: Consistency across culture and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Raymond C K; Shi, Hai-song; Geng, Fu-lei; Liu, Wen-hua; Yan, Chao; Wang, Yi; Gooding, Diane C

    2015-07-30

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the factor structure and the temporal stability of the Chapman psychosis-proneness scales in a representative sample of nonclinical Chinese young adults. The four psychosis-proneness scales evaluated were the Perceptual Aberration (PAS), Magical Ideation (MIS), revised Social Anhedonia (RSAS), and revised Physical Anhedonia (RPAS) scales. The sample consisted of 1724 young adults with a mean age of 18.8 years (S.D. = 0.84). The results of the confirmatory factor analyses indicated that the best fitting model was a two-factor model with positive schizotypy (PER and MIS) scales and negative schizotypy (RSAS and RPAS) scales. The data add to the growing literature indicating that the measurement of schizotypal traits is consistent across cultures. In addition, the results support the measurement invariance of the Chapman psychosis-proneness scales across time, i.e., there was ample evidence of test-retest reliability over a test interval of 6 months. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Time consistent model for monetary value of man-sievert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, S.H.; Kim, Sun G.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Performing a cost-benefit analysis to establish optimum levels of radiation protection under the ALARA principle, we introduce a discrete stepwise model to evaluate man-sievert monetary value of Korea. The model formula, which is unique and country-specific, is composed of GDP, the nominal risk coefficient for cancer and hereditary effects, the aversion factor against radiation exposure, and the average life expectancy. Unlike previous researches on alpha-value assessment, we showed different alpha values optimized with respect to various ranges of individual dose, which would be more realistic and applicable to the radiation protection area. Employing economically constant term of GDP we showed the real values of man-sievert by year, which should be consistent in time series comparison even under price level fluctuation. GDP deflators of an economy have to be applied to measure one's own consistent value of radiation protection by year. In addition, we recommend that the concept of purchasing power parity should be adopted if it needs international comparison of alpha values in real terms. Finally, we explain the way that this stepwise model can be generalized simply to other countries without normalizing any country-specific factors. (author)

  9. Self-consistent RPA and the time-dependent density matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuck, P. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay (France); CNRS et Universite Joseph Fourier, Laboratoire de Physique et Modelisation des Milieux Condenses, Grenoble (France); Tohyama, M. [Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    The time-dependent density matrix (TDDM) or BBGKY (Bogoliubov, Born, Green, Kirkwood, Yvon) approach is decoupled and closed at the three-body level in finding a natural representation of the latter in terms of a quadratic form of two-body correlation functions. In the small amplitude limit an extended RPA coupled to an also extended second RPA is obtained. Since including two-body correlations means that the ground state cannot be a Hartree-Fock state, naturally the corresponding RPA is upgraded to Self-Consistent RPA (SCRPA) which was introduced independently earlier and which is built on a correlated ground state. SCRPA conserves all the properties of standard RPA. Applications to the exactly solvable Lipkin and the 1D Hubbard models show good performances of SCRPA and TDDM. (orig.)

  10. Location decisions of a polluting firm and the time consistency of environmental policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrakis, Emmanuel; Xepapadeas, Anastasios

    2003-01-01

    This paper considers location decisions of a monopolist, who faces a tax on its emissions in the home country, under ex post that is, time consistent, and ex ante, that is precommitment, environmental policies. We show that the monopolist will relocate more often under ex post optimal emission taxes. A government which cannot commit to an ex ante emission tax and sets its tax ex post after abatement effort has been chosen, is unable to affect the monopolist's location decision, because it cannot commit to strategically reduce its tax level in the first stage. Domestic welfare is often higher under ex post emission taxes whenever the monopolist relocates under both policy regimes. Otherwise, welfare is higher under government commitment to an ex ante emission tax level. Thus, government commitment to a policy is not always welfare improving

  11. A dynamically consistent analysis of circulation and transports in the southwestern Weddell Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yaremchuk

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available An inverse model is applied for the analysis of hydrographic and current meter data collected on the repeat WOCE section SR4 in the Weddell Sea in 1989–1992. The section crosses the Weddell Sea cyclonic gyre from Kapp Norvegia to the northern end of the Antarctic Peninsula. The concepts of geostrophy, conservation of planetary vorticity and hydrostatics are combined with advective balances of active and passive properties to provide a dynamically consistent circulation pattern. Our variational assimilation scheme allows the calculation of three-dimensional velocities in the section plane. Current speeds are small except along the coasts where they reach up to 12 cm/s. We diagnose a gyre transport of 34 Sverdrup which is associated with a poleward heat transport of 28×1012 W corresponding to an average heat flux of 15 Wm–2 in the Weddell Sea south of the transect. This exceeds the estimated local flux on the transect of 2 Wm–2. As the transect is located mostly in the open ocean, we conclude that the shelf areas contribute significantly to the ocean-atmosphere exchange and are consequently key areas for the contribution of the Weddell Sea to global ocean ventilation. Conversion of water masses occuring south of the section transform 6.6±1.1 Sv of the inflowing warm deep water into approximately equal amounts of Weddell Sea deep water and Weddell Sea bottom water. The volume transport of surface water equals in the in- and outflow. This means that almost all newly formed surface water is involved in the deep and bottom water formation. Comparison with the results obtained by pure velocity interpolation combined with a hydrographic data subset indicates major differences in the derived salt transports and the water mass conversion of the surface water. The differences can be explained by deviations in the structure of the upper ocean currents to which shelf areas contribute significantly. Additionally a rigorous variance analysis is

  12. A consistent approach for the treatment of Fermi acceleration in time-dependent billiards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlis, A. K.; Diakonos, F. K.; Constantoudis, V.

    2012-06-01

    The standard description of Fermi acceleration, developing in a class of time-dependent billiards, is given in terms of a diffusion process taking place in momentum space. Within this framework, the evolution of the probability density function (PDF) of the magnitude of particle velocities as a function of the number of collisions n is determined by the Fokker-Planck equation (FPE). In the literature, the FPE is constructed by identifying the transport coefficients with the ensemble averages of the change of the magnitude of particle velocity and its square in the course of one collision. Although this treatment leads to the correct solution after a sufficiently large number of collisions have been reached, the transient part of the evolution of the PDF is not described. Moreover, in the case of the Fermi-Ulam model (FUM), if a standard simplification is employed, the solution of the FPE is even inconsistent with the values of the transport coefficients used for its derivation. The goal of our work is to provide a self-consistent methodology for the treatment of Fermi acceleration in time-dependent billiards. The proposed approach obviates any assumptions for the continuity of the random process and the existence of the limits formally defining the transport coefficients of the FPE. Specifically, we suggest, instead of the calculation of ensemble averages, the derivation of the one-step transition probability function and the use of the Chapman-Kolmogorov forward equation. This approach is generic and can be applied to any time-dependent billiard for the treatment of Fermi-acceleration. As a first step, we apply this methodology to the FUM, being the archetype of time-dependent billiards to exhibit Fermi acceleration.

  13. Self-consistent description of local density dynamics in simple liquids. The case of molten lithium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokshin, A. V.; Galimzyanov, B. N.

    2018-02-01

    The dynamic structure factor is the quantity, which can be measured by means of Brillouin light-scattering as well as by means of inelastic scattering of neutrons and x-rays. The spectral (or frequency) moments of the dynamic structure factor define directly the sum rules of the scattering law. The theoretical scheme formulated in this study allows one to describe the dynamics of local density fluctuations in simple liquids and to obtain the expression of the dynamic structure factor in terms of the spectral moments. The theory satisfies all the sum rules, and the obtained expression for the dynamic structure factor yields correct extrapolations into the hydrodynamic limit as well as into the free-particle dynamics limit. We discuss correspondence of this theory with the generalized hydrodynamics and with the viscoelastic models, which are commonly used to analyze the data of inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering in liquids. In particular, we reveal that the postulated condition of the viscoelastic model for the memory function can be directly obtained within the presented theory. The dynamic structure factor of liquid lithium is computed on the basis of the presented theory, and various features of the scattering spectra are evaluated. It is found that the theoretical results are in agreement with inelastic x-ray scattering data.

  14. Self-consistent description of local density dynamics in simple liquids. The case of molten lithium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokshin, A V; Galimzyanov, B N

    2018-02-28

    The dynamic structure factor is the quantity, which can be measured by means of Brillouin light-scattering as well as by means of inelastic scattering of neutrons and x-rays. The spectral (or frequency) moments of the dynamic structure factor define directly the sum rules of the scattering law. The theoretical scheme formulated in this study allows one to describe the dynamics of local density fluctuations in simple liquids and to obtain the expression of the dynamic structure factor in terms of the spectral moments. The theory satisfies all the sum rules, and the obtained expression for the dynamic structure factor yields correct extrapolations into the hydrodynamic limit as well as into the free-particle dynamics limit. We discuss correspondence of this theory with the generalized hydrodynamics and with the viscoelastic models, which are commonly used to analyze the data of inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering in liquids. In particular, we reveal that the postulated condition of the viscoelastic model for the memory function can be directly obtained within the presented theory. The dynamic structure factor of liquid lithium is computed on the basis of the presented theory, and various features of the scattering spectra are evaluated. It is found that the theoretical results are in agreement with inelastic x-ray scattering data.

  15. Consistent allometric scaling of stomatal sizes and densities across taxonomic ranks and geologic time

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, H. J.; Price, C. A.; Wagner-Cremer, F.; Dekker, S. C.; Veneklaas, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    Stomatal pores on plants leaves are an important link in the chain of processes that determine biosphere fluxes of water and carbon. Stomatal density (i.e. the number of stomata per area) and the size of the stomatal pore at maximum aperture are particularly relevant traits in this context because they determine the theoretical maximum diffusive stomatal conductance (gsmax) and thereby set an upper limit for leaf gas exchange. Observations on (sub)fossil leaves revealed that changes in stomatal densities are anti-correlated with changes in stomatal sizes at developmental and evolutionary timescales. Moreover, this anti-correlation appears consistently within single species, across multiple species in the extant plant community and at evolutionary time scales. The consistency of the relation between stomatal densities and sizes suggests that common mechanisms constrain the adaptation of these traits across the plant community. In an attempt to identify such potential generic constraints, we investigated the allometry between stomatal densities and sizes in the extant plant community and across geological time. As the size of the stomatal pore at maximum aperture is typically derived from the length of the stomatal pore, we considered the allometric scaling of pore length (lp) with stomatal density (Ds) as the power law: lp = k . Dsa in which k is a normalization constant and the exponent a is the slope of the scaling relation. Our null-hypothesis predicts that stomatal density and pore length scale along a constant slope of -1/2 based on a scale-invariant relation between pore length and the distance between neighboring pores. Our alternative hypothesis predicts a constant slope of -1 based on the idea that stomatal density and pore length scale along an invariant gsmax. To explore these scaling hypotheses in the extant plant community we compiled a dataset of combined observations of stomatal density and pore length on 111 species from published literature and new

  16. A dynamically consistent analysis of circulation and transports in the southwestern Weddell Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yaremchuk

    Full Text Available An inverse model is applied for the analysis of hydrographic and current meter data collected on the repeat WOCE section SR4 in the Weddell Sea in 1989–1992. The section crosses the Weddell Sea cyclonic gyre from Kapp Norvegia to the northern end of the Antarctic Peninsula. The concepts of geostrophy, conservation of planetary vorticity and hydrostatics are combined with advective balances of active and passive properties to provide a dynamically consistent circulation pattern. Our variational assimilation scheme allows the calculation of three-dimensional velocities in the section plane. Current speeds are small except along the coasts where they reach up to 12 cm/s. We diagnose a gyre transport of 34 Sverdrup which is associated with a poleward heat transport of 28×1012 W corresponding to an average heat flux of 15 Wm–2 in the Weddell Sea south of the transect. This exceeds the estimated local flux on the transect of 2 Wm–2. As the transect is located mostly in the open ocean, we conclude that the shelf areas contribute significantly to the ocean-atmosphere exchange and are consequently key areas for the contribution of the Weddell Sea to global ocean ventilation. Conversion of water masses occuring south of the section transform 6.6±1.1 Sv of the inflowing warm deep water into approximately equal amounts of Weddell Sea deep water and Weddell Sea bottom water. The volume transport of surface water equals in the in- and outflow. This means that almost all newly formed surface water is involved in the deep and bottom water formation. Comparison with the results obtained by pure velocity interpolation combined with a hydrographic data subset indicates major differences in the derived salt transports and the water mass conversion of the surface water. The differences can be explained by deviations in the structure of the upper ocean currents to which shelf areas contribute significantly. Additionally a

  17. Consistent Long-Time Series of GPS Satellite Antenna Phase Center Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigenberger, P.; Schmid, R.; Rothacher, M.

    2004-12-01

    The current IGS processing strategy disregards satellite antenna phase center variations (pcvs) depending on the nadir angle and applies block-specific phase center offsets only. However, the transition from relative to absolute receiver antenna corrections presently under discussion necessitates the consideration of satellite antenna pcvs. Moreover, studies of several groups have shown that the offsets are not homogeneous within a satellite block. Manufacturer specifications seem to confirm this assumption. In order to get best possible antenna corrections, consistent ten-year time series (1994-2004) of satellite-specific pcvs and offsets were generated. This challenging effort became possible as part of the reprocessing of a global GPS network currently performed by the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden. The data of about 160 stations since the official start of the IGS in 1994 have been reprocessed, as today's GPS time series are mostly inhomogeneous and inconsistent due to continuous improvements in the processing strategies and modeling of global GPS solutions. An analysis of the signals contained in the time series of the phase center offsets demonstrates amplitudes on the decimeter level, at least one order of magnitude worse than the desired accuracy. The periods partly arise from the GPS orbit configuration, as the orientation of the orbit planes with regard to the inertial system repeats after about 350 days due to the rotation of the ascending nodes. In addition, the rms values of the X- and Y-offsets show a high correlation with the angle between the orbit plane and the direction to the sun. The time series of the pcvs mainly point at the correlation with the global terrestrial scale. Solutions with relative and absolute phase center corrections, with block- and satellite-specific satellite antenna corrections demonstrate the effect of this parameter group on other global GPS parameters such as the terrestrial scale, station velocities, the

  18. A consistent turbulence formulation for the dynamic wake meandering model in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; Veldkamp, Dick; Wedel-Heinen, Jens Jakob

    as a standalone flow-solver for the velocity and turbulence distribution, and power production in a wind farm. The performance of the standalone implementation is validated against field data, higher-order computational fluid dynamics models, as well as the most common engineering wake models in the wind industry...... evolution 4. atmospheric stability effects on wake deficit evolution and meandering The conducted research is to a large extent based on detailed wake investigations and reference data generated through computational fluid dynamics simulations, where the wind turbine rotor has been represented......This thesis describes the further development and validation of the dynamic meandering wake model for simulating the flow field and power production of wind farms operating in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The overall objective of the conducted research is to improve the modelling...

  19. Are the effects of an invasive crayfish on lake littoral macroinvertebrate communities consistent over time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruokonen T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of invasive species requires assessment of their effects on recipient ecosystems. However, impact assessment of invasive species commonly lacks a long-term perspective which can potentially lead to false conclusions. We examined the effects of the invasive signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus Dana on the stony littoral macroinvertebrate communities of a large boreal lake and assessed the extent to which the patterns observed in previous short-term studies were stable over time. We used temporal macroinvertebrate data collected in five consecutive years from a site with a well-established crayfish population, a site with no crayfish and a site where crayfish had been recently introduced. Our results revealed that signal crayfish had temporally rather consistent negative effects on the benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages but that the effects might be limited to certain taxa, in particular Gastropoda and Coleoptera. We also observed increases in Gastropoda density and taxa richness following a decline in crayfish density, indicating that the recovery of invertebrate assemblages might be fast. Hence, negative effects on benthic macroinvertebrates can likely be minimized by effective control of the signal crayfish population.

  20. Some Nonlinear Dynamic Inequalities on Time Scales

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The aim of this paper is to investigate some nonlinear dynamic inequalities on time scales, which provide explicit bounds on unknown functions. The inequalities given here unify and extend some inequalities in (B G Pachpatte, On some new inequalities related to a certain inequality arising in the theory of differential ...

  1. Abstraction of Dynamical Systems by Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer

    2011-01-01

    To enable formal verification of a dynamical system, given by a set of differential equations, it is abstracted by a finite state model. This allows for application of methods for model checking. Consequently, it opens the possibility of carrying out the verification of reachability and timing re...

  2. Some nonlinear dynamic inequalities on time scales

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    unify and extend some inequalities by Pachpatte in [13]. This paper is organized as follows: In §2 we give some preliminary results with respect to the calculus on time scales, which can also be found in [4, 5]. In §3 we deal with our nonlinear dynamic inequalities on time scales. In §4 we give an example to illustrate our main ...

  3. Maintaining Arc Consistency in Non-Binary Dynamic CSPs using Simple Tabular Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queva, Matthieu Stéphane Benoit; Probst, Christian W.; Ricci, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Constraint Satisfaction Problems (CSPs) are well known models used in Artificial Intelligence. In order to represent real world systems, CSPs have been extended to Dynamic CSPs (DCSPs), which support adding and removing constraints at runtime. Some approaches to the NP-complete problem of solving...

  4. On consistent definitions of momentum and energy fluxes for molecular dynamics models with multi-body interatomic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaojie; Li, Xiantao

    2015-01-01

    Results from molecular dynamics simulations often need to be further processed to understand the physics on a larger scale. This paper considers the definitions of momentum and energy fluxes obtained from a control-volume approach. To assess the validity of these defined quantities, two consistency criteria are proposed. As examples, the embedded atom potential and the Tersoff potential are considered. The consistency is verified using analytical and numerical methods.

  5. Enabling Efficient Dynamic Resizing of Large DRAM Caches via A Hardware Consistent Hashing Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Kevin K.; Loh, Gabriel H.; Thottethodi, Mithuna; Eckert, Yasuko; O'Connor, Mike; Manne, Srilatha; Hsu, Lisa; Subramanian, Lavanya; Mutlu, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Die-stacked DRAM has been proposed for use as a large, high-bandwidth, last-level cache with hundreds or thousands of megabytes of capacity. Not all workloads (or phases) can productively utilize this much cache space, however. Unfortunately, the unused (or under-used) cache continues to consume power due to leakage in the peripheral circuitry and periodic DRAM refresh. Dynamically adjusting the available DRAM cache capacity could largely eliminate this energy overhead. However, the current p...

  6. The Development of Australia's National Training System: A Dynamic Tension between Consistency and Flexibility. Occasional Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Kaye; McKenna, Suzy

    2016-01-01

    This occasional paper provides an overview of the development of Australia's national training system and is a key knowledge document of a wider research project "Consistency with flexibility in the Australian national training system." This research project investigates the various approaches undertaken by each of the jurisdictions to…

  7. On the consistency of adjoint sensitivity analysis for structural optimization of linear dynamic problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Nakshatrala, Praveen B.; Tortorelli, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    on a differentiate-then-discretize approach, may lead to inconsistent sensitivities. Herein this effect is explicitly demonstrated for a single dof system and the source of inconsistency is identified. Additionally, we outline an alternative discretize-then-differentiate AVM that inherently produces consistent...

  8. Consistency in long-distance bird migration: contrasting patterns in time and space for two raptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vardanis, Yannis; Nilsson, Jan-Ake; Klaassen, Raymond H. G.; Strandberg, Roine; Alerstam, Thomas

    As the evolutionary responses to environmental change depend on selection acting on individual differences, disentangling within- and between-individual variation becomes imperative. In animal migration research, multiyear tracks are thus needed to estimate the individual consistency of phenotypic

  9. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory for bosonic many-body systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque, Camille; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2017-04-01

    We have developed an ab-initio time-dependent wavefunction based theory for the description of many-body systems of bosons. The theory is based on a configurational interaction Ansatz for the many-body wavefunction with time-dependent self-consistent-field orbitals. The active space of the orbital excitations is subject to restrictions to be specified based on the physical situation at hand. The restrictions on the active space allow the theory to be evaluated under conditions where other wavefunction based methods, due to exponential scaling in the numerical efforts, cannot. The restrictions also allow us to clearly identify the excitations that are important for an accurate description, significantly beyond the mean-field approach. We first apply this theory to compute the ground-state energy of tens of trapped bosons, and second to simulate the dynamics following an instantaneous quenching of a non-contact interaction. The method provides accurate results and its computational cost is largely reduced compared with other wavefunction based many-body methods thanks to the restriction of the active orbital space. The important excitations are clearly identified and the method provides a new way to gain insight in correlation effects. This work was supported by the ERC-StG (Project No. 277767-TDMET) and the VKR center of excellence, QUSCOPE.

  10. Consistency in Estimation and Model Selection of Dynamic Panel Data Models with Fixed Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjie Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We examine the relationship between consistent parameter estimation and model selection for autoregressive panel data models with fixed effects. We find that the transformation of fixed effects proposed by Lancaster (2002 does not necessarily lead to consistent estimation of common parameters when some true exogenous regressors are excluded. We propose a data dependent way to specify the prior of the autoregressive coefficient and argue for comparing different model specifications before parameter estimation. Model selection properties of Bayes factors and Bayesian information criterion (BIC are investigated. When model uncertainty is substantial, we recommend the use of Bayesian Model Averaging to obtain point estimators with lower root mean squared errors (RMSE. We also study the implications of different levels of inclusion probabilities by simulations.

  11. An eddy-permitting, dynamically consistent adjoint-based assimilation system for the tropical Pacific: Hindcast experiments in 2000

    KAUST Repository

    Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2010-03-02

    An eddy-permitting adjoint-based assimilation system has been implemented to estimate the state of the tropical Pacific Ocean. The system uses the Massachusetts Institute of Technology\\'s general circulation model and its adjoint. The adjoint method is used to adjust the model to observations by controlling the initial temperature and salinity; temperature, salinity, and horizontal velocities at the open boundaries; and surface fluxes of momentum, heat, and freshwater. The model is constrained with most of the available data sets in the tropical Pacific, including Tropical Atmosphere and Ocean, ARGO, expendable bathythermograph, and satellite SST and sea surface height data, and climatologies. Results of hindcast experiments in 2000 suggest that the iterated adjoint-based descent is able to significantly improve the model consistency with the multivariate data sets, providing a dynamically consistent realization of the tropical Pacific circulation that generally matches the observations to within specified errors. The estimated model state is evaluated both by comparisons with observations and by checking the controls, the momentum balances, and the representation of small-scale features that were not well sampled by the observations used in the assimilation. As part of these checks, the estimated controls are smoothed and applied in independent model runs to check that small changes in the controls do not greatly change the model hindcast. This is a simple ensemble-based uncertainty analysis. In addition, the original and smoothed controls are applied to a version of the model with doubled horizontal resolution resulting in a broadly similar “downscaled” hindcast, showing that the adjustments are not tuned to a single configuration (meaning resolution, topography, and parameter settings). The time-evolving model state and the adjusted controls should be useful for analysis or to supply the forcing, initial, and boundary conditions for runs of other models.

  12. Self-Consistent 3D Modeling of Electron Cloud Dynamics and Beam Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, Miguel; Furman, M.A.; Celata, C.M.; Kireeff-Covo, M.; Sonnad, K.G.; Vay, J.-L.; Venturini, M.; Cohen, R.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Molvik, A.; Stoltz, P.

    2007-01-01

    We present recent advances in the modeling of beam electron-cloud dynamics, including surface effects such as secondary electron emission, gas desorption, etc, and volumetric effects such as ionization of residual gas and charge-exchange reactions. Simulations for the HCX facility with the code WARP/POSINST will be described and their validity demonstrated by benchmarks against measurements. The code models a wide range of physical processes and uses a number of novel techniques, including a large-timestep electron mover that smoothly interpolates between direct orbit calculation and guiding-center drift equations, and a new computational technique, based on a Lorentz transformation to a moving frame, that allows the cost of a fully 3D simulation to be reduced to that of a quasi-static approximation

  13. More consistent, yet less sensitive : Interval timing in autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falter, Christine M.; Noreika, Valdas; Wearden, John H.; Bailey, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Even though phenomenological observations and anecdotal reports suggest atypical time processing in individuals with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), very few psychophysical studies have investigated interval timing, and the obtained results are contradictory. The present study aimed to clarify

  14. Coping with the Collapse: A Stock-Flow Consistent Monetary Macro-dynamics of Global Warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, Gael; Mc Isaac, Florent; Bovari, Emmanuel; Zatsepina, Ekaterina

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a macro-economic model of endogenous growth that enables to take into consideration both the economic impact of climate change and the pivotal role of private debt. Using a Goodwin-Keen approach, based on the Lotka-Volterra logic, we couple its nonlinear dynamics of underemployment and income distribution with abatement costs. Moreover, various damage functions a la Nordhaus and Dietz-Stern reflect the loss in final production due to the temperature increase caused by the rising levels of CO 2 emissions. An empirical estimation of the model at the world-scale enables us to simulate plausible trajectories for the planetary business-as-usual scenario. Our main finding is that, even though the short-run impact of climate change on economic fundamentals may seem prima facie rather minor, its long-run dynamic consequences may lead to an extreme downside. Under plausible circumstances, global warming forces the private sector to leverage in order to compensate for output losses; the private debt overhang may eventually induce a global financial collapse, even before climate change could cause serious damage to the production sector. Under more severe conditions, the interplay between global warming and debt may lead to a secular stagnation followed by a collapse in the second half of this century. We analyze the extent to which slower demographic growth or higher carbon pricing allow a global breakdown to be avoided. The paper concludes by examining the conditions under which the +1.5 C target, adopted by the Paris Agreement (2015), could be reached. (authors)

  15. Reconstruction of dynamic image series from undersampled MRI data using data-driven model consistency condition (MOCCO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikina, Julia V; Samsonov, Alexey A

    2015-11-01

    To accelerate dynamic MR imaging through development of a novel image reconstruction technique using low-rank temporal signal models preestimated from training data. We introduce the model consistency condition (MOCCO) technique, which utilizes temporal models to regularize reconstruction without constraining the solution to be low-rank, as is performed in related techniques. This is achieved by using a data-driven model to design a transform for compressed sensing-type regularization. The enforcement of general compliance with the model without excessively penalizing deviating signal allows recovery of a full-rank solution. Our method was compared with a standard low-rank approach utilizing model-based dimensionality reduction in phantoms and patient examinations for time-resolved contrast-enhanced angiography (CE-MRA) and cardiac CINE imaging. We studied the sensitivity of all methods to rank reduction and temporal subspace modeling errors. MOCCO demonstrated reduced sensitivity to modeling errors compared with the standard approach. Full-rank MOCCO solutions showed significantly improved preservation of temporal fidelity and aliasing/noise suppression in highly accelerated CE-MRA (acceleration up to 27) and cardiac CINE (acceleration up to 15) data. MOCCO overcomes several important deficiencies of previously proposed methods based on pre-estimated temporal models and allows high quality image restoration from highly undersampled CE-MRA and cardiac CINE data. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Multivariable dynamic calculus on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Bohner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book offers the reader an overview of recent developments of multivariable dynamic calculus on time scales, taking readers beyond the traditional calculus texts. Covering topics from parameter-dependent integrals to partial differentiation on time scales, the book’s nine pedagogically oriented chapters provide a pathway to this active area of research that will appeal to students and researchers in mathematics and the physical sciences. The authors present a clear and well-organized treatment of the concept behind the mathematics and solution techniques, including many practical examples and exercises.

  17. Effects of driving time on microsaccadic dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stasi, Leandro L; McCamy, Michael B; Pannasch, Sebastian; Renner, Rebekka; Catena, Andrés; Cañas, José J; Velichkovsky, Boris M; Martinez-Conde, Susana

    2015-02-01

    Driver fatigue is a common cause of car accidents. Thus, the objective detection of driver fatigue is a first step toward the effective management of fatigue-related traffic accidents. Here, we investigated the effects of driving time, a common inducer of driver fatigue, on the dynamics of fixational eye movements. Participants drove for 2 h in a virtual driving environment while we recorded their eye movements. Microsaccade velocities decreased with driving time, suggesting a potential effect of fatigue on microsaccades during driving.

  18. Radiation Belt Data-Assimilation Using Self-Consistent Storm-Time Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, M. G.; Koller, J.; Chen, Y.; Zaharia, S.; Jordanova, V.; Reeves, G. D.

    2008-12-01

    The lack of suitably realistic magnetic field models for use in radiation belt data assimilation remains a critical unresolved problem in space weather specification and prediction. Although the high-energy radiation belt particles themselves do not significantly alter the magnetic fields in which they drift, the lower-energy ring current populations do. And the deviation (especially during storms) of the real magnetic field from that computed even with the best of the presently available empirical models can be very large. To overcome this problem, the LANL DREAM code has been modified to use magnetic fields that are self-consistently maintained in force balance with the plasma. We compare second and third adiabatic invariants computed from the self-consistent fields to those obtained with empirical B-field models, and we utilize a phase-space density matching technique in order to test the various field models. Finally, the PSD at constant mu and K in a data-assimilation model obtained with the self-consistent and non-self-consistent magnetic field models will be compared.

  19. Self-consistent Optomechanical Dynamics and Radiation Forces in Thermal Light Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnleitner, M.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss two different aspects of the mechanical interaction between neutral matter and electromagnetic radiation.The first part addresses the complex dynamics of an elastic dielectric deformed by optical forces. To do so we use a one-dimensional model describing the medium by an array of beam splitters such that the interaction with the incident waves can be described with a transfer-matrix approach. Since the force on each individual beam splitter is known we thus obtain the correct volumetric force density inside the medium. Sending a light field through an initially homogeneous dielectric then results in density modulations which in turn alter the optical properties of this medium.The second part is concerned with mechanical light-effects on atoms in thermal radiation fields. At hand of a generic setup of an atom interacting with a hot sphere emitting blackbody radiation we show that the emerging gradient force may surpass gravity by several orders of magnitude. The strength of the repulsive scattering force strongly depends on the spectrum of the involved atoms and can be neglected in some setups. A special emphasis lies on possible implications on astrophysical scenarios where the interactions between heated dust and atoms, molecules or nanoparticles are of crucial interest. (author) [de

  20. Reaction coordinates, one-dimensional Smoluchowski equations, and a test for dynamical self-consistency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, B.; Bolhuis, P.G.; Mullen, R.G.; Shea, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a method for identifying accurate reaction coordinates among a set of trial coordinates. The method applies to special cases where motion along the reaction coordinate follows a one-dimensional Smoluchowski equation. In these cases the reaction coordinate can predict its own short-time

  1. On a Stable and Consistent Finite Difference Scheme for a Time ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJABS

    stationary state of a quantum mechanics. Accordingly, it tells how the quantum state of a physical system changes with time (Schrodinger Equation (Physics),. Encyclopedia Britannica). Time-Dependent SWE. According to Shanker (1994), the form of Schrodinger equation depends on the physical situation. The most general ...

  2. [Dynamic Attending Binds Time and Rhythm Perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Tsuyoshi; Ono, Fuminori; Kadota, Hiroshi

    2017-11-01

    Relations between time and rhythm perception are discussed in this review of psychophysical research relevant to the multiple-look effect and dynamic-attending theory. Discrimination of two neighboring intervals that are marked by three successive sounds is improved when the presentation of the first (standard, S) interval is repeated before that of the second (comparison, C), as SSSSC. This improvement in sensitivity, called the multiple-look effect, occurs because listeners (1) perceive regular rhythm during the repetition of the standard interval, (2) predict the timing of subsequent sounds, and (3) detect sounds that are deviated from the predicted timing. The dynamic-attending theory attributes such predictions to the entrainment of attentional rhythms. An endogenous attentional rhythm is synchronized with the periodic succession of sounds marking the repeated standard. The standard and the comparison are discriminated on the basis of whether the ending marker of the comparison appears at the peak of the entrained attentional rhythm. This theory is compatible with the findings of recent neurophysiological studies that relate temporal prediction to neural oscillations.

  3. Space-time analysis of Down syndrome: results consistent with transient pre-disposing contagious agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Richard J Q; Rankin, Judith; Shirley, Mark D F; Rushton, Stephen P; Pless-Mulloli, Tanja

    2008-10-01

    Whilst maternal age is an established risk factor for Patau syndrome (trisomy 13), Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18) and Down syndrome (trisomy 21), the aetiology and contribution of genetic and environmental factors remains unclear. We analysed for space-time clustering using high quality fully population-based data from a geographically defined region. The study included all cases of Patau, Edwards and Down syndrome, delivered during 1985-2003 and resident in the former Northern Region of England, including terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly. We applied the K-function test for space-time clustering with fixed thresholds of close in space and time using residential addresses at time of delivery. The Knox test was used to indicate the range over which the clustering effect occurred. Tests were repeated using nearest neighbour (NN) thresholds to adjust for variable population density. The study analysed 116 cases of Patau syndrome, 240 cases of Edwards syndrome and 1084 cases of Down syndrome. There was evidence of space-time clustering for Down syndrome (fixed threshold of close in space: P = 0.01, NN threshold: P = 0.02), but little or no clustering for Patau (P = 0.57, P = 0.19) or Edwards (P = 0.37, P = 0.06) syndromes. Clustering of Down syndrome was associated with cases from more densely populated areas and evidence of clustering persisted when cases were restricted to maternal age syndrome suggests an aetiological role for transient environmental factors, such as infections.

  4. More Symmetrical Children Have Faster and More Consistent Choice Reaction Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, David; Bates, Timothy C.; Dykiert, Dominika; Der, Geoff; Deary, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    Greater cognitive ability in childhood is associated with increased longevity, and speedier reaction time (RT) might account for much of this linkage. Greater bodily symmetry is linked to both higher cognitive test scores and faster RTs. It is possible, then, that differences in bodily system integrity indexed by symmetry may underlie the…

  5. Temnothorax rugatulus ant colonies consistently vary in nest structure across time and context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas DiRienzo

    Full Text Available A host of animals build architectural constructions. Such constructions frequently vary with environmental and individual/colony conditions, and their architecture directly influences behavior and fitness. The nests of ant colonies drive and enable many of their collective behaviors, and as such are part of their 'extended phenotype'. Since ant colonies have been recently shown to differ in behavior and life history strategy, we ask whether colonies differ in another trait: the architecture of the constructions they create. We allowed Temnothorax rugatulus rock ants, who create nests by building walls within narrow rock gaps, to repeatedly build nest walls in a fixed crevice but under two environmental conditions. We find that colonies consistently differ in their architecture across environments and over nest building events. Colony identity explained 12-40% of the variation in nest architecture, while colony properties and environmental conditions explained 5-20%, as indicated by the condition and marginal R2 values. When their nest boxes were covered, which produced higher humidity and lower airflow, colonies built thicker, longer, and heavier walls. Colonies also built more robust walls when they had more brood, suggesting a protective function of wall thickness. This is, to our knowledge, the first study to explicitly investigate the repeatability of nestbuilding behavior in a controlled environment. Our results suggest that colonies may face tradeoffs, perhaps between factors such as active vs. passive nest defense, and that selection may act on individual construction rules as a mechanisms to mediate colony-level behavior.

  6. Time as a Quantum Observable, Canonically Conjugated to Energy, and Foundations of Self-Consistent Time Analysis of Quantum Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Olkhovsky

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments are reviewed and some new results are presented in the study of time in quantum mechanics and quantum electrodynamics as an observable, canonically conjugate to energy. This paper deals with the maximal Hermitian (but nonself-adjoint operator for time which appears in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics and in quantum electrodynamics for systems with continuous energy spectra and also, briefly, with the four-momentum and four-position operators, for relativistic spin-zero particles. Two measures of averaging over time and connection between them are analyzed. The results of the study of time as a quantum observable in the cases of the discrete energy spectra are also presented, and in this case the quasi-self-adjoint time operator appears. Then, the general foundations of time analysis of quantum processes (collisions and decays are developed on the base of time operator with the proper measures of averaging over time. Finally, some applications of time analysis of quantum processes (concretely, tunneling phenomena and nuclear processes are reviewed.

  7. Identifying the microbial taxa that consistently respond to soil warming across time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliverio, Angela M; Bradford, Mark A; Fierer, Noah

    2017-05-01

    Soil microbial communities are the key drivers of many terrestrial biogeochemical processes. However, we currently lack a generalizable understanding of how these soil communities will change in response to predicted increases in global temperatures and which microbial lineages will be most impacted. Here, using high-throughput marker gene sequencing of soils collected from 18 sites throughout North America included in a 100-day laboratory incubation experiment, we identified a core group of abundant and nearly ubiquitous soil microbes that shift in relative abundance with elevated soil temperatures. We then validated and narrowed our list of temperature-sensitive microbes by comparing the results from this laboratory experiment with data compiled from 210 soils representing multiple, independent global field studies sampled across spatial gradients with a wide range in mean annual temperatures. Our results reveal predictable and consistent responses to temperature for a core group of 189 ubiquitous soil bacterial and archaeal taxa, with these taxa exhibiting similar temperature responses across a broad range of soil types. These microbial 'bioindicators' are useful for understanding how soil microbial communities respond to warming and to discriminate between the direct and indirect effects of soil warming on microbial communities. Those taxa that were found to be sensitive to temperature represented a wide range of lineages and the direction of the temperature responses were not predictable from phylogeny alone, indicating that temperature responses are difficult to predict from simply describing soil microbial communities at broad taxonomic or phylogenetic levels of resolution. Together, these results lay the foundation for a more predictive understanding of how soil microbial communities respond to soil warming and how warming may ultimately lead to changes in soil biogeochemical processes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Communication: On the consistency of approximate quantum dynamics simulation methods for vibrational spectra in the condensed phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Mariana; Liu, Hanchao; Paesani, Francesco; Bowman, Joel; Ceriotti, Michele

    2014-11-14

    Including quantum mechanical effects on the dynamics of nuclei in the condensed phase is challenging, because the complexity of exact methods grows exponentially with the number of quantum degrees of freedom. Efforts to circumvent these limitations can be traced down to two approaches: methods that treat a small subset of the degrees of freedom with rigorous quantum mechanics, considering the rest of the system as a static or classical environment, and methods that treat the whole system quantum mechanically, but using approximate dynamics. Here, we perform a systematic comparison between these two philosophies for the description of quantum effects in vibrational spectroscopy, taking the Embedded Local Monomer model and a mixed quantum-classical model as representatives of the first family of methods, and centroid molecular dynamics and thermostatted ring polymer molecular dynamics as examples of the latter. We use as benchmarks D2O doped with HOD and pure H2O at three distinct thermodynamic state points (ice Ih at 150 K, and the liquid at 300 K and 600 K), modeled with the simple q-TIP4P/F potential energy and dipole moment surfaces. With few exceptions the different techniques yield IR absorption frequencies that are consistent with one another within a few tens of cm(-1). Comparison with classical molecular dynamics demonstrates the importance of nuclear quantum effects up to the highest temperature, and a detailed discussion of the discrepancies between the various methods let us draw some (circumstantial) conclusions about the impact of the very different approximations that underlie them. Such cross validation between radically different approaches could indicate a way forward to further improve the state of the art in simulations of condensed-phase quantum dynamics.

  9. Consistent prevalence of asymptomatic infections in malaria endemic populations in Colombia over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-Jiménez, Juan M; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Henao-Giraldo, Juliana; Molina-Gómez, Karen; Arce-Plata, María; Vallejo, Andrés F; Herrera, Sócrates

    2016-02-06

    Malaria control programmes rely on confirmation of parasite presence in patients' blood prior to treatment administration. Plasmodium parasites are detected mostly by microscopy or rapid diagnostic test (RDT). Although these methods contribute significantly to malaria control/elimination, they are not suitable for detecting the significant proportion of asymptomatic subjects harbouring low levels of parasitaemia, which endure untreated as potential reservoirs for transmission. Malaria prevalence was assessed in endemic regions of Colombia over a 4-year follow-up. A series of cross-sectional surveys were conducted between 2011 and 2014 in low to moderate malaria transmission sentinel sites (SS) of Tumaco, Buenaventura and Tierralta municipalities of Colombia. A census was performed and a random sample of houses was selected from each SS prior to each survey. Inhabitants were asked to answer a questionnaire on clinical, epidemiological and demographic aspects, and to provide a blood sample for malaria diagnosis using microscopy and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). A total of 3059 blood samples were obtained from all SS, 58.5 % of which were from women and displayed a malaria prevalence ranging from 4 % (95 % CI 3-5 %) to 10 % (95 % CI 8-12 %) in the 4 years' study period. Almost all malaria cases (n = 220, 97 %) were sub-microscopic and only detectable by qPCR; 90 % of the cases were asymptomatic at the time of blood collection. While Buenaventura and Tierralta had a decreasing tendency during the follow-up, Tumaco had a rise in 2013 and then a decrease in 2014. Plasmodium vivax accounted for the majority (66-100 %) of cases in Tierralta and Buenaventura and for 25-50 % of the cases in Tumaco. This study demonstrates an important prevalence of asymptomatic malaria cases not detectable by microscopy, which therefore remain untreated representing a parasite pool for malaria transmission. This demands the introduction of alternative strategies

  10. SCOUT: simultaneous time segmentation and community detection in dynamic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulovatyy, Yuriy; Milenković, Tijana

    2016-11-01

    Many evolving complex real-world systems can be modeled via dynamic networks. An important problem in dynamic network research is community detection, which finds groups of topologically related nodes. Typically, this problem is approached by assuming either that each time point has a distinct community organization or that all time points share a single community organization. The reality likely lies between these two extremes. To find the compromise, we consider community detection in the context of the problem of segment detection, which identifies contiguous time periods with consistent network structure. Consequently, we formulate a combined problem of segment community detection (SCD), which simultaneously partitions the network into contiguous time segments with consistent community organization and finds this community organization for each segment. To solve SCD, we introduce SCOUT, an optimization framework that explicitly considers both segmentation quality and partition quality. SCOUT addresses limitations of existing methods that can be adapted to solve SCD, which consider only one of segmentation quality or partition quality. In a thorough evaluation, SCOUT outperforms the existing methods in terms of both accuracy and computational complexity. We apply SCOUT to biological network data to study human aging.

  11. The Perception of Time While Perceiving Dynamic Emotional Faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang On eLi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Emotion plays an essential role in the perception of time such that time is perceived to fly when events are enjoyable, while unenjoyable moments are perceived to drag. Previous studies have reported a time-drag effect when participants are presented with emotional facial expressions, regardless of the emotion presented. This effect can hardly be explained by induced emotion given the heterogeneous nature of emotional expressions. We conducted two experiments (n=44 & n=39 to examine the cognitive mechanism underlying this effect by presenting dynamic sequences of emotional expressions to participants. Each sequence started with a particular expression, then morphed to another. The presentation of dynamic facial expressions allows a comparison between the time-drag effect of homogeneous pairs of emotional expressions sharing similar valence and arousal to heterogeneous pairs. Sequences of seven durations (400ms, 600ms, 800ms, 1,000ms, 1,200ms, 1,400ms, 1,600ms were presented to participants, who were asked to judge whether the sequences were closer to 400ms or 1,600ms in a two-alternative forced choice task. The data were then collated according to conditions and fit into cumulative Gaussian curves to estimate the point of subjective equivalence indicating the perceived duration of 1,000ms. Consistent with previous reports, a feeling of time dragging is induced regardless of the sequence presented, such that 1,000ms is perceived to be longer than 1,000ms. In addition, dynamic facial expressions exert a greater effect on perceived time drag than static expressions. The effect is most prominent when the dynamics involve an angry face or a change in valence. The significance of this sensitivity is discussed in terms of emotion perception and its evolutionary significance for our attention mechanism.

  12. Shapes and dynamics from the time-dependent mean field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, P.D.; Goddard, P.M.; Rios, A.

    2015-01-01

    Explaining observed properties in terms of underlying shape degrees of freedom is a well-established prism with which to understand atomic nuclei. Self-consistent mean-field models provide one tool to understand nuclear shapes, and their link to other nuclear properties and observables. We present examples of how the time-dependent extension of the mean-field approach can be used in particular to shed light on nuclear shape properties, particularly looking at the giant resonances built on deformed nuclear ground states, and at dynamics in highly-deformed fission isomers. Example calculations are shown of 28 Si in the first case, and 240 Pu in the latter case

  13. Optimal Time-Consistent Investment Strategy for a DC Pension Plan with the Return of Premiums Clauses and Annuity Contracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Lei Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Defined contribution and annuity contract are merged into one pension plan to study both accumulation phase and distribution phase, which results in such effects that both phases before and after retirement being “defined”. Under the Heston’s stochastic volatility model, this paper focuses on mean-variance insurers with the return of premiums clauses to study the optimal time-consistent investment strategy for the DC pension merged with an annuity contract. Both accumulation phase before retirement and distribution phase after retirement are studied. In the time-consistent framework, the extended Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations associated with the optimization problem are established. Applying stochastic optimal control technique, the time-consistent explicit solutions of the optimal strategies and the efficient frontiers are obtained. In addition, numerical analysis illustrates our results and also deepens our knowledge or understanding of the research results.

  14. The Initial Mass Function in the Nearest Strong Lenses from SNELLS: Assessing the Consistency of Lensing, Dynamical, and Spectroscopic Constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Andrew B. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA (United States); Smith, Russell J. [Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, University of Durham, South Road, Durham (United Kingdom); Conroy, Charlie [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States); Villaume, Alexa [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Van Dokkum, Pieter, E-mail: anewman@obs.carnegiescience.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2017-08-20

    We present new observations of the three nearest early-type galaxy (ETG) strong lenses discovered in the SINFONI Nearby Elliptical Lens Locator Survey (SNELLS). Based on their lensing masses, these ETGs were inferred to have a stellar initial mass function (IMF) consistent with that of the Milky Way, not the bottom-heavy IMF that has been reported as typical for high- σ ETGs based on lensing, dynamical, and stellar population synthesis techniques. We use these unique systems to test the consistency of IMF estimates derived from different methods. We first estimate the stellar M {sub *}/ L using lensing and stellar dynamics. We then fit high-quality optical spectra of the lenses using an updated version of the stellar population synthesis models developed by Conroy and van Dokkum. When examined individually, we find good agreement among these methods for one galaxy. The other two galaxies show 2–3 σ tension with lensing estimates, depending on the dark matter contribution, when considering IMFs that extend to 0.08 M {sub ⊙}. Allowing a variable low-mass cutoff or a nonparametric form of the IMF reduces the tension among the IMF estimates to <2 σ . There is moderate evidence for a reduced number of low-mass stars in the SNELLS spectra, but no such evidence in a composite spectrum of matched- σ ETGs drawn from the SDSS. Such variation in the form of the IMF at low stellar masses ( m ≲ 0.3 M {sub ⊙}), if present, could reconcile lensing/dynamical and spectroscopic IMF estimates for the SNELLS lenses and account for their lighter M {sub *}/ L relative to the mean matched- σ ETG. We provide the spectra used in this study to facilitate future comparisons.

  15. On robust multi-period pre-commitment and time-consistent mean-variance portfolio optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Cong (Fei); C.W. Oosterlee (Cornelis)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractWe consider robust pre-commitment and time-consistent mean-variance optimal asset allocation strategies, that are required to perform well also in a worst-case scenario regarding the development of the asset price. We show that worst-case scenarios for both strategies can be found by

  16. Time machines the principle of self-consistency as a consequence of the principle of minimal action

    CERN Document Server

    Carlini, A; Mensky, M B; Novikov, I D; Soleng, H H

    1995-01-01

    We consider the action principle to derive the classical, non-relativistic motion of a self-interacting particle in a 4-D Lorentzian spacetime containing a wormhole and which allows the existence of closed time-like curves. For the case of a `hard-sphere' self-interaction potential we show that the only possible trajectories (for a particle with fixed initial and final positions and which traverses the wormhole once) minimizing the classical action are those which are globally self-consistent, and that the `Principle of self-consistency' (originally introduced by Novikov) is thus a natural consequence of the `Principle of minimal action.'

  17. Empirical phylogenies and species abundance distributions are consistent with pre-equilibrium dynamics of neutral community models with gene flow

    KAUST Repository

    Bonnet-Lebrun, Anne-Sophie

    2017-03-17

    Community characteristics reflect past ecological and evolutionary dynamics. Here, we investigate whether it is possible to obtain realistically shaped modelled communities - i.e., with phylogenetic trees and species abundance distributions shaped similarly to typical empirical bird and mammal communities - from neutral community models. To test the effect of gene flow, we contrasted two spatially explicit individual-based neutral models: one with protracted speciation, delayed by gene flow, and one with point mutation speciation, unaffected by gene flow. The former produced more realistic communities (shape of phylogenetic tree and species-abundance distribution), consistent with gene flow being a key process in macro-evolutionary dynamics. Earlier models struggled to capture the empirically observed branching tempo in phylogenetic trees, as measured by the gamma statistic. We show that the low gamma values typical of empirical trees can be obtained in models with protracted speciation, in pre-equilibrium communities developing from an initially abundant and widespread species. This was even more so in communities sampled incompletely, particularly if the unknown species are the youngest. Overall, our results demonstrate that the characteristics of empirical communities that we have studied can, to a large extent, be explained through a purely neutral model under pre-equilibrium conditions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Effective charges of ionic liquid determined self-consistently through combination of molecular dynamics simulation and density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Ryosuke; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2017-11-15

    A self-consistent scheme combining the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and density functional theory (DFT) was recently proposed to incorporate the effects of the charge transfer and polarization of ions into non-poralizable force fields of ionic liquids for improved description of energetics and dynamics. The purpose of the present work is to analyze the detailed setups of the MD/DFT scheme by focusing on how the basis set, exchange-correlation (XC) functional, charge-fitting method or force field for the intramolecular and Lennard-Jones interactions affects the MD/DFT results of 1,3-dimethylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ( [C1mim][NTf2]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium glycinate ( [C2mim][Gly]). It was found that the double-zeta valence polarized or larger size of basis set is required for the convergence of the effective charge of the ion. The choice of the XC functional was further not influential as far as the generalized gradient approximation is used. The charge-fitting method and force field govern the accuracy of the MD/DFT scheme, on the other hand. We examined the charge-fitting methods of Blöchl, the iterative Hirshfeld (Hirshfeld-I), and REPEAT in combination with Lopes et al.'s force field and general AMBER force field. There is no single combination of charge fitting and force field that provides good agreements with the experiments, while the MD/DFT scheme reduces the effective charges of the ions and leads to better description of energetics and dynamics compared to the original force field with unit charges. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Hybrid approximations via second order combined dynamic derivatives on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Sheng

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the approximation of conventional second order derivative via the combined (diamond-$\\alpha$ dynamic derivative on time scales with necessary smoothness conditions embedded. We will show the constraints under which the second order dynamic derivative provides a consistent approximation to the conventional second derivative; the cases where the dynamic derivative approximates the derivative only via a proper modification of the existing formula; and the situations in which the dynamic derivative can never approximate consistently even with the help of available structure correction methods. Constructive error analysis will be given via asymptotic expansions for practical hybrid modeling and computational applications.

  20. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory for bosonic many-body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lévêque, Camille; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2017-01-01

    We develop an ab initio time-dependent wavefunction based theory for the description of a many-body system of cold interacting bosons. Like the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method for bosons (MCTDHB), the theory is based on a configurational interaction Ansatz for the many-body wavefunction with time-dependent self-consistent-field orbitals. The theory generalizes the MCTDHB method by incorporating restrictions on the active space of the orbital excitations. The restrictions are specified based on the physical situation at hand. The equations of motion of this time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field (TD-RASSCF) theory are derived. The similarity between the formal development of the theory for bosons and fermions is discussed. The restrictions on the active space allow the theory to be evaluated under conditions where other wavefunction based methods due to exponential scaling in the numerical effort cannot, and to clearly identify the excitations that are important for an accurate description, significantly beyond the mean-field approach. For ground state calculations we find it to be important to allow a few particles to have the freedom to move in many orbitals, an insight facilitated by the flexibility of the restricted-active-space Ansatz . Moreover, we find that a high accuracy can be obtained by including only even excitations in the many-body self-consistent-field wavefunction. Time-dependent simulations of harmonically trapped bosons subject to a quenching of their noncontact interaction, show failure of the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii approach within a fraction of a harmonic oscillation period. The TD-RASSCF theory remains accurate at much reduced computational cost compared to the MCTDHB method. Exploring the effect of changes of the restricted-active-space allows us to identify that even self-consistent-field excitations are mainly responsible for the accuracy of the method. (paper)

  1. Escape dynamics: a continuous-time approximation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolyuzhnov, D.; Bogomolova, A.; Slobodyan, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 38, January (2014), s. 161-183 ISSN 0165-1889 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : constant gain adaptive learning * escape dynamics * recursive least squares Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.018, year: 2014

  2. Estimation of mountain slope stability depending on ground consistency and slip-slide resistance changes on impact of dynamic forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayroyan, H. S.; Hayroyan, S. H.; Karapetyan, K. A.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, three types of clayish soils with different consistency and humidity properties and slip-slide resistance indexes are considered on impact of different cyclic shear stresses. The side-surface deformation charts are constructed on the basis of experimental data obtained testing cylindrical soil samples. It is shown that the fluctuation amplitude depends on time and the consistency index depends on the humidity condition in the soil inner contact and the connectivity coefficients. Consequently, each experiment is interpreted. The main result of this research is that it is necessary to make corrections in the currently active schemes of slip-hazardous slopes stability estimation, which is a crucial problem requiring ASAP solution.

  3. Ordering kinetics of lamella-forming block copolymers under the guidance of various external fields studied by dynamic self-consistent field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaomin; Gao, Tong; Zhang, Liangshun; Lin, Jiaping

    2017-03-01

    Self-consistent field theory with a dynamic extension is exploited to investigate the kinetics of the lamellar formation of symmetric block copolymers under the direction of external fields. In particular, three types of directed self-assembly methods - a permanent field for chemo-epitaxy, a dynamic field for zone annealing and an integrated permanent/dynamic field - are examined. For the chemo-epitaxy involving sparsely prepatterned substrates or zone annealing, the block copolymers generally develop into polycrystalline nanostructures with multiple orientations due to the lack of strong driving forces for eliminating the long-lived imperfections in a limited time. As the integrated chemo-epitaxy and zone annealing method is applied to the block copolymer systems, single-crystalline nanostructures with precisely registered orientations are achieved in a short annealing time owing to the mutual acceleration of defect annihilations, which cannot be produced by the conventional techniques alone. Furthermore, the integrated method allows the rapid fabrication of well-ordered nanostructures on the extremely sparse prepatterned substrates. Our theoretical work may serve to rationalize the faster modern nanolithographic fabrication of smaller microelectronic components using lower-spatial-frequency templates.

  4. Transcriptome dynamics along axolotl regenerative development are consistent with an extensive reduction in gene expression heterogeneity in dedifferentiated cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Díaz-Castillo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although in recent years the study of gene expression variation in the absence of genetic or environmental cues or gene expression heterogeneity has intensified considerably, many basic and applied biological fields still remain unaware of how useful the study of gene expression heterogeneity patterns might be for the characterization of biological systems and/or processes. Largely based on the modulator effect chromatin compaction has for gene expression heterogeneity and the extensive changes in chromatin compaction known to occur for specialized cells that are naturally or artificially induced to revert to less specialized states or dedifferentiate, I recently hypothesized that processes that concur with cell dedifferentiation would show an extensive reduction in gene expression heterogeneity. The confirmation of the existence of such trend could be of wide interest because of the biomedical and biotechnological relevance of cell dedifferentiation-based processes, i.e., regenerative development, cancer, human induced pluripotent stem cells, or plant somatic embryogenesis. Here, I report the first empirical evidence consistent with the existence of an extensive reduction in gene expression heterogeneity for processes that concur with cell dedifferentiation by analyzing transcriptome dynamics along forearm regenerative development in Ambystoma mexicanum or axolotl. Also, I briefly discuss on the utility of the study of gene expression heterogeneity dynamics might have for the characterization of cell dedifferentiation-based processes, and the engineering of tools that afforded better monitoring and modulating such processes. Finally, I reflect on how a transitional reduction in gene expression heterogeneity for dedifferentiated cells can promote a long-term increase in phenotypic heterogeneity following cell dedifferentiation with potential adverse effects for biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  5. Time series pCO2 at a coastal mooring: Internal consistency, seasonal cycles, and interannual variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Janet J.; Cai, Wei-Jun; Xue, Liang; Vargas, Rodrigo; Noakes, Scott; Hu, Xinping; Signorini, Sergio R.; Mathis, Jeremy T.; Feely, Richard A.; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Sabine, Christopher; Musielewicz, Sylvia; Chen, Baoshan; Wanninkhof, Rik

    2017-08-01

    Marine carbonate system monitoring programs often consist of multiple observational methods that include underway cruise data, moored autonomous time series, and discrete water bottle samples. Monitored parameters include all, or some of the following: partial pressure of CO2 of the water (pCO2w) and air, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), and pH. Any combination of at least two of the aforementioned parameters can be used to calculate the others. In this study at the Gray's Reef (GR) mooring in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB) we: examine the internal consistency of pCO2w from underway cruise, moored autonomous time series, and calculated from bottle samples (DIC-TA pairing); describe the seasonal to interannual pCO2w time series variability and air-sea flux (FCO2), as well as describe the potential sources of pCO2w variability; and determine the source/sink for atmospheric pCO2. Over the 8.5 years of GR mooring time series, mooring-underway and mooring-bottle calculated-pCO2w strongly correlate with r-values > 0.90. pCO2w and FCO2 time series follow seasonal thermal patterns; however, seasonal non-thermal processes, such as terrestrial export, net biological production, and air-sea exchange also influence variability. The linear slope of time series pCO2w increases by 5.2 ± 1.4 μatm y-1 with FCO2 increasing 51-70 mmol m-2 y-1. The net FCO2 sign can switch interannually with the magnitude varying greatly. Non-thermal pCO2w is also increasing over the time series, likely indicating that terrestrial export and net biological processes drive the long term pCO2w increase.

  6. Escape dynamics: a continuous-time approximation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolyuzhnov, Dmitri; Bogomolova, Anna; Slobodyan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 38, January (2014), s. 161-183 ISSN 0165-1889 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP402/12/G097 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : constant gain adaptive learning * escape dynamics * recursive least squares Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.018, year: 2014

  7. Escape dynamics: a continuous-time approximation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolyuzhnov, Dmitri; Bogomolova, Anna; Slobodyan, Sergey

    -, č. 285 (2006), s. 1-42 ISSN 1211-3298 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : escape dynamics * constant gain adaptive learning * large deviations theory Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp285.pdf

  8. A Dynamic Travel Time Estimation Model Based on Connected Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daxin Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With advances in connected vehicle technology, dynamic vehicle route guidance models gradually become indispensable equipment for drivers. Traditional route guidance models are designed to direct a vehicle along the shortest path from the origin to the destination without considering the dynamic traffic information. In this paper a dynamic travel time estimation model is presented which can collect and distribute traffic data based on the connected vehicles. To estimate the real-time travel time more accurately, a road link dynamic dividing algorithm is proposed. The efficiency of the model is confirmed by simulations, and the experiment results prove the effectiveness of the travel time estimation method.

  9. Physical relativity. Space-time structure from a dynamical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Harvey R.

    Physical Relativity explores the nature of the distinction at the heart of Einstein's 1905 formulation of his special theory of relativity: that between kinematics and dynamics. Einstein himself became increasingly uncomfortable with this distinction, and with the limitations of what he called the 'principle theory' approach inspired by the logic of thermodynamics. A handful of physicists and philosophers have over the last century likewise expressed doubts about Einstein's treatment of the relativistic behaviour of rigid bodies and clocks in motion in the kinematical part of his great paper, and suggested that the dynamical understanding of length contraction and time dilation intimated by the immediate precursors of Einstein is more fundamental. Harvey Brown both examines and extends these arguments (which support a more 'constructive' approach to relativistic effects in Einstein's terminology), after giving a careful analysis of key features of the pre-history of relativity theory. He argues furthermore that the geometrization of the theory by Minkowski in 1908 brought illumination, but not a causal explanation of relativistic effects. Finally, Brown tries to show that the dynamical interpretation of special relativity defended in the book is consistent with the role this theory must play as a limiting case of Einstein's 1915 theory of gravity: the general theory of relativity. Appearing in the centennial year of Einstein's celebrated paper on special relativity, Physical Relativity is an unusual, critical examination of the way Einstein formulated his theory. It also examines in detail certain specific historical and conceptual issues that have long given rise to debate in both special and general relativity theory, such as the conventionality of simultaneity, the principle of general covariance, and the consistency or otherwise of the special theory with quantum mechanics. Harvey Brown's new interpretation of relativity theory will interest anyone working on

  10. Toroidal Ampere-Faraday Equations Solved Consistently with the CQL3D Fokker-Planck Time-Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, R. W.; Petrov, Yu. V.

    2013-10-01

    A self-consistent, time-dependent toroidal electric field calculation is a key feature of a complete 3D Fokker-Planck kinetic distribution radial transport code for f(v,theta,rho,t). In the present CQL3D finite-difference model, the electric field E(rho,t) is either prescribed, or iteratively adjusted to obtain prescribed toroidal or parallel currents. We discuss first results of an implementation of the Ampere-Faraday equation for the self-consistent toroidal electric field, as applied to the runaway electron production in tokamaks due to rapid reduction of the plasma temperature as occurs in a plasma disruption. Our previous results assuming a constant current density (Lenz' Law) model showed that prompt ``hot-tail runaways'' dominated ``knock-on'' and Dreicer ``drizzle'' runaways; we will examine modifications due to the more complete Ampere-Faraday solution. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FG02-ER54744.

  11. Frequency-dependent dynamic magnetic properties of the Ising bilayer system consisting of spin-3/2 and spin-5/2 spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Mustafa; Ertaş, Mehmet

    2018-04-01

    Dynamic magnetic properties of the Ising bilayer system consisting of the mixed (3/2, 5/2) Ising spins with a crystal-field interaction in an oscillating field on a two-layer square lattice is studied by the use of dynamic mean-field theory based on the Glauber-type stochastic. Dynamic phase transition temperatures are obtained and dynamic phase diagrams are presented in three different planes. The frequency dependence of dynamic hysteresis loops is also investigated in detail. We compare the results with some available theoretical and experimental works and observe a quantitatively good agreement with some theoretical and experimental results.

  12. Dynamic travel time estimation using regression trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    This report presents a methodology for travel time estimation by using regression trees. The dissemination of travel time information has become crucial for effective traffic management, especially under congested road conditions. In the absence of c...

  13. Diurnal variation of aldosterone and plasma renin activity: timing relation to melatonin and cortisol and consistency after prolonged bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Shelley; Cohen, Richard J; Williams, Gordon H

    2004-04-01

    Exposure to prolonged bed rest is known to induce changes in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) by way of posture, sodium and potassium balance, and stress, which may have serious consequences for patients. We focused on the diurnal variation of the RAAS by investigating changes in the levels of plasma renin activity (PRA) and aldosterone; for comparison to markers of the intrinsic pacemaker and to stress, we measured melatonin and cortisol. PRA, aldosterone, melatonin, and cortisol were measured hourly in 10 normal subjects with standardized sleep patterns, posture, and diet at baseline and after 11 days of prolonged bed rest conducted under a light-dark cycle. Circadian characteristics of hormone secretion patterns were estimated by multiple harmonic regression with excellent goodness-of-fit measures. Variability in the melatonin and cortisol patterns across subjects was minimal. Even for pulsatile hormones, this technique successfully estimated the acrophase, which was the salient feature. Baseline hormone peak times started with melatonin near the middle of the sleep period, followed by PRA, then aldosterone, and then cortisol around wake time. Prolonged bed rest did not induce significant changes in any timing characteristic of the secretion patterns. Baseline and prolonged bed rest peak times for melatonin and cortisol and amplitude characteristics for all hormones were highly correlated, indicating consistency within individuals. These data provide strong evidence that prolonged bed rest of 11 days' duration does not disrupt either the timing characteristics of the RAAS or the intrinsic pacemaker.

  14. Self-consistent residual dipolar coupling based model-free analysis for the robust determination of nanosecond to microsecond protein dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakomek, Nils-Alexander; Walter, Korvin F. A.; Fares, Christophe [Max-Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department for NMR-based Structural Biology (Germany); Lange, Oliver F.; Groot, Bert L. de; Grubmueller, Helmut [Max-Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department for Theoretical and Computational Biophysics (Germany); Brueschweiler, Rafael [Florida State University, NHFML (United States); Munk, Axel [University of Goettingen, Institut for Mathematical Stochastics (Germany); Becker, Stefan [Max-Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department for NMR-based Structural Biology (Germany); Meiler, Jens [Vanderbilt University, Department of Chemistry, Center of Structural Biology (United States); Griesinger, Christian [Max-Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department for NMR-based Structural Biology (Germany)], E-mail: cigr@nmr.mpibpc.mpg.de

    2008-07-15

    Residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) provide information about the dynamic average orientation of inter-nuclear vectors and amplitudes of motion up to milliseconds. They complement relaxation methods, especially on a time-scale window that we have called supra-{tau}{sub c} ({tau}{sub c} < supra-{tau}{sub c} < 50 {mu}s). Here we present a robust approach called Self-Consistent RDC-based Model-free analysis (SCRM) that delivers RDC-based order parameters-independent of the details of the structure used for alignment tensor calculation-as well as the dynamic average orientation of the inter-nuclear vectors in the protein structure in a self-consistent manner. For ubiquitin, the SCRM analysis yields an average RDC-derived order parameter of the NH vectors = 0.72 {+-} 0.02 compared to = 0.778 {+-} 0.003 for the Lipari-Szabo order parameters, indicating that the inclusion of the supra-{tau}{sub c} window increases the averaged amplitude of mobility observed in the sub-{tau}{sub c} window by about 34%. For the {beta}-strand spanned by residues Lys48 to Leu50, an alternating pattern of backbone NH RDC order parameter S{sub rdc}{sup 2} (NH) = (0.59, 0.72, 0.59) was extracted. The backbone of Lys48, whose side chain is known to be involved in the poly-ubiquitylation process that leads to protein degradation, is very mobile on the supra-{tau}{sub c} time scale (S{sub rdc}{sup 2} (NH) = 0.59 {+-} 0.03), while it is inconspicuous (S{sub LS}{sup 2} (NH) = 0.82) on the sub-{tau}{sub c} as well as on {mu}s-ms relaxation dispersion time scales. The results of this work differ from previous RDC dynamics studies of ubiquitin in the sense that the results are essentially independent of structural noise providing a much more robust assessment of dynamic effects that underlie the RDC data.

  15. Bounds of Certain Dynamic Inequalities on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak B. Pachpatte

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study explicit bounds of certain dynamic integral inequalities on time scales. These estimates give the bounds on unknown functions which can be used in studying the qualitative aspects of certain dynamic equations. Using these inequalities we prove the uniqueness of some partial integro-differential equations on time scales.

  16. Entry Times Distribution for Dynamical Balls on Metric Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydn, N.; Yang, F.

    2017-04-01

    We show that the entry and return times for dynamical balls (Bowen balls) is exponential for systems that have an α -mixing invariant measure with certain regularities. We also show that systems modeled by Young's tower has exponential entry time distribution for dynamical balls. We also apply the results to conformal maps and expanding maps on the interval.

  17. Dynamic Observers for Fault Diagnosis of Timed Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Cassez, Franck

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we extend the work on \\emph{dynamic ob\\-servers} for fault diagnosis to timed automata. We study sensor minimization problems with static observers and then address the problem of computing the most permissive dynamic observer for a system given by a timed automaton.

  18. Developmental timing of signals affects information content: song complexity but not consistency reflects innate immune strategy in male song sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubli, Shawn P; MacDougall-Shackleton, Elizabeth A

    2014-05-01

    In short-lived animals, innate immunity is an important component of fitness and quality. Although receivers cannot generally assess a signaler's immune function directly, sexually selected displays such as birdsong may reflect past or current condition. We investigated the degree to which song complexity and consistency, thought to reflect condition over different developmental timescales, predict multiple aspects of innate immunity in male song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). We also investigated correlations among immune measures. Noncellular components of innate immunity (soluble blood proteins including natural antibody and other protective proteins) were negatively related to cellular (phagocytosis-based) components, suggesting trade-offs within innate immune protection. This pattern underscores the risk of inferring "immunocompetence" from a single metric. Song complexity, a permanent trait in this species, was positively related to noncellular relative to cellular immune components and may thus provide information as to the singer's innate immune strategy (investment in noncellular vs. cellular activity). Such a relationship could arise through shared timing of song learning and antibody repertoire development in early life. Singing consistency, thought to track variation in current condition and measured at both whole-song and syllable scales, did not predict any immune measures. Developmental timing of signals thus appears to influence their information content.

  19. Dancing to CHANGA: a self-consistent prediction for close SMBH pair formation time-scales following galaxy mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremmel, M.; Governato, F.; Volonteri, M.; Quinn, T. R.; Pontzen, A.

    2018-04-01

    We present the first self-consistent prediction for the distribution of formation time-scales for close supermassive black hole (SMBH) pairs following galaxy mergers. Using ROMULUS25, the first large-scale cosmological simulation to accurately track the orbital evolution of SMBHs within their host galaxies down to sub-kpc scales, we predict an average formation rate density of close SMBH pairs of 0.013 cMpc-3 Gyr-1. We find that it is relatively rare for galaxy mergers to result in the formation of close SMBH pairs with sub-kpc separation and those that do form are often the result of Gyr of orbital evolution following the galaxy merger. The likelihood and time-scale to form a close SMBH pair depends strongly on the mass ratio of the merging galaxies, as well as the presence of dense stellar cores. Low stellar mass ratio mergers with galaxies that lack a dense stellar core are more likely to become tidally disrupted and deposit their SMBH at large radii without any stellar core to aid in their orbital decay, resulting in a population of long-lived `wandering' SMBHs. Conversely, SMBHs in galaxies that remain embedded within a stellar core form close pairs in much shorter time-scales on average. This time-scale is a crucial, though often ignored or very simplified, ingredient to models predicting SMBH mergers rates and the connection between SMBH and star formation activity.

  20. Stability theory for dynamic equations on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Martynyuk, Anatoly A

    2016-01-01

    This monograph is a first in the world to present three approaches for stability analysis of solutions of dynamic equations. The first approach is based on the application of dynamic integral inequalities and the fundamental matrix of solutions of linear approximation of dynamic equations. The second is based on the generalization of the direct Lyapunovs method for equations on time scales, using scalar, vector and matrix-valued auxiliary functions. The third approach is the application of auxiliary functions (scalar, vector, or matrix-valued ones) in combination with differential dynamic inequalities. This is an alternative comparison method, developed for time continuous and time discrete systems. In recent decades, automatic control theory in the study of air- and spacecraft dynamics and in other areas of modern applied mathematics has encountered problems in the analysis of the behavior of solutions of time continuous-discrete linear and/or nonlinear equations of perturbed motion. In the book “Men of Ma...

  1. The congruency effect in the posterior medial frontal cortex is more consistent with time on task than with response conflict.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Weissman

    Full Text Available The posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC is thought to play a pivotal role in enabling the control of attention during periods of distraction. In line with this view, pMFC activity is ubiquitously greater in incongruent trials of response-interference (e.g., Stroop tasks than in congruent trials. Nonetheless, the process underlying this congruency effect remains highly controversial. We therefore sought to distinguish between two competing accounts of the congruency effect. The conflict monitoring account posits the effect indexes a process that detects conflict between competing response alternatives, which is indexed by trial-specific reaction time (RT. The time on task account posits the effect indexes a process whose recruitment increases with time on task independent of response conflict (e.g., sustained attention, arousal, effort, etc.. To distinguish between these accounts, we used functional MRI to record brain activity in twenty-four healthy adults while they performed two tasks: a response-interference task and a simple RT task with only one possible response. We reasoned that demands on a process that detects response conflict should increase with RT in the response-interference task but not in the simple RT task. In contrast, demands on a process whose recruitment increases with time on task independent of response conflict should increase with RT in both tasks. Trial-by-trial analyses revealed that pMFC activity increased with RT in both tasks. Moreover, pMFC activity increased with RT in the simple RT task enough to fully account for the congruency effect in the response-interference task. These findings appear more consistent with the time on task account of the congruency effect than with the conflict monitoring account.

  2. Theories of time-dependent and time-independent nearside-farside reactive scattering dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monks, Phillip David Durrant

    The first application of nearside-farside (NF) theory is made to the time-dependent partial wave series (PWS) representation of the scattering amplitude for the reaction H + D[2](v = 0,j = 0, m = 0) → HD(v' = 3,j' = 0, m'= 0) + D. Time-dependent NF angular distributions and time-dependent NF local angular momenta (LAMs) are defined and used to analyse the dynamics in terms of time- direct and time-delayed reaction mechanisms. The concept of a cumulative time-evolving differential cross section (DCS) is introduced and used to provide a new method for visualising the time evolution of a chemical reaction. Time-independent NF DCS and LAM analyses of the H + D[2] reaction are presented, highlighting a distinctive "trench-ridge" feature present in the full and N LAMs. It is used to define a cut line which separates the energy-analogs of the two time- distinct reaction mechanisms. This trench-ridge feature is shown to be an interference between the time-direct (backward-scattered) and time-delayed (forward-scattered) reaction mechanisms. Resummation PWS theory is used to "clean" plots of the NF DCSs and LAMs of unphysical effects. A limitation of the resummation theory is described, whereby unphysical behaviour is sometimes introduced into the N and F subamplitudes. A technique for predicting and avoiding these undesired effects is used to further improve the usefulness of the resummation technique. The fundamental identity for NF local angular momenta is stated and derived by two methods. This identity gives rise to a CLAM plot (where CLAM denotes Cross section x LAM), which provides insight into the empirical obsei'vation that DCS and LAM analyses give consistent, yet complementary, information on the reaction dynamics. Applications are reported for the H + D[2] reaction, as well as for F + H[2](v = 0,j=0, m = 0)→ FH(v' = 3,j' = 3, m' = 0) + H. The angular time-delay for a state-to-state reactive collision often displays complicated behaviour. It is shown for the H

  3. Perspective: Computer simulations of long time dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elber, Ron [Department of Chemistry, The Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2016-02-14

    Atomically detailed computer simulations of complex molecular events attracted the imagination of many researchers in the field as providing comprehensive information on chemical, biological, and physical processes. However, one of the greatest limitations of these simulations is of time scales. The physical time scales accessible to straightforward simulations are too short to address many interesting and important molecular events. In the last decade significant advances were made in different directions (theory, software, and hardware) that significantly expand the capabilities and accuracies of these techniques. This perspective describes and critically examines some of these advances.

  4. Family dynamics and first-time homeownership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, A.; Mulder, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    The transition to first-time homeownership is related to household events such as cohabitation and marriage as well as to parents' homeownership. This paper investigates how these relationships have changed during the last few decades, using the first wave of the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study and

  5. Self consistent propagation of hyperons and antikaons in nuclear matter based on relativistic chiral SU(3) dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, M.F.M.; Korpa, C.L.

    2001-05-01

    We evaluate the antikaon spectral density in isospin symmetric nuclear matter. The in-medium antikaon-nucleon scattering process and the antikaon propagation is treated in a self consistent and relativistic manner where a maximally scheme-independent formulation is derived by performing a partial density resummation in terms of the free-space antikaon-nucleon scattering amplitudes. The latter amplitudes are taken from a relativistic and chiral coupled-channel SU(3) approach which includes s-, p- and d-waves systematically. Particular care is taken on the proper evaluation of the in-medium mixing of the partial waves. Our analysis establishes a rich structure of the antikaon spectral function with considerable strength at small energies. At nuclear saturation density we predict attractive mass shifts for the Λ(1405), Σ(1385) and Λ(1520) of about 130 MeV, 60 MeV and 100 MeV respectively. The hyperon states are found to exhibit at the same time an increased decay width of about 150 MeV for the s-wave Λ(1405), 70 MeV for the p-wave Σ(1385) and 100 MeV for the d-wave Λ(1520) resonance. (orig.)

  6. Fractal differential equations and fractal-time dynamical systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    equations. Hence the latter can be used to model fractal-time processes or sublinear dynamical systems. ... for the treatment of diffusion, heat conduction, waves, etc., on self-similar fractals [25–28]. Harmonic ... differential equations offer possibilities of modeling dynamical behaviours naturally for which ordinary differential ...

  7. Long time dynamics of von Karman evolutions with thermal effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Lasiecka

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a short survey of recent results pertaining tostability and long time behavior of von Karman thermoelastic plates. Questions such as uniform stability - and associated exponential decay rates for the energy function, existence of attractors in the case of internally/externally forced plates along with properties of attractors such as smoothness and dimensionality will be presented. The model considered consists of undamped oscillatory plate equationstrongly coupled with heat equation. There are no other sources of dissipation. Nevertheless it will be shown that that the long-time behavior of the nonlinear evolution is ultimately finite dimensional and "smooth". In addition, the obtained estimate for the dimension and the size of the attractor are independent of the rotational inertia parameter °, which is known to change the character of dynamics from hyperbolic (gamma > 0 to parabolic like (gamma = 0. Other properties such as additional smoothness of attractors, upper-semicontinuity with respect to parameter gamma and existence of inertial manifolds are also presented.

  8. X-ray testing for short-time dynamic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurfiss, Malte; Moser, Stefan; Popko, Gregor; Nau, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    For nondestructive testing purposes new challenges are short-time dynamic processes. The application of x-ray flash tubes and modern high-speed cameras allows the observation of the opening of air-bags or the energy absorption of compressed tubes as occurring during a vehicle crash. Special algorithms designed for computerized tomography analyses allow the 3D reconstruction at individual time points of the dynamic process. Possibilities and limitations of the actual techniques are discussed.

  9. Arresting Strategy Based on Dynamic Criminal Networks Changing over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqing Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a sequence of dynamic criminal networks on a time series based on the dynamic network analysis (DNA. According to the change of networks’ structure, networks’ variation trend is analyzed to forecast its future structure. Finally, an optimal arresting time and priority list are designed based on our analysis. Better results can be expected than that based on social network analysis (SNA.

  10. Real time SQUID dynamics revealed using high resolution cryogenic sampler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faris, S.M.; Pedersen, N.F.

    1981-01-01

    Real time measurements of SQUID dynamics have been performed using a fast cryogenic sampler based on Josephson junction electronics. Complex waveforms representing the switching of a SQUID from one voltage state to another are obtained with time and current resolution of 10 ps and 1 μA, respectively. With this setup, it is possible to demonstrate the interaction between the internal SQUID dynamics (resonances) and the load. The interaction depends on the details of the bias and control currents. (orig.)

  11. Chemical dynamics in time and energy space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, James Douglas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-04-01

    The development of a versatile picosecond ultraviolet/vacuum ultraviolet temporal spectrometer and its potential use for measuring internal energy redistribution in isolated molecules are described in detail. A detailed description of the double-pass Nd:YAG amplifier and the dye amplifiers is given with the pulse energies achieved in the visible, ultraviolet, and vacuum ultraviolet. The amplified visible pulses are shown to be of sub-picosecond duration and near transform limited. The instrument`s temporal response (≤10 ps) is derived from an instrument limited measurement of the dissociation lifetime of methyl iodide at 266 nm. The methyl iodide experiment is used to discuss the various sources of noise and background signals that are intrinsic to this type of experiment. Non-time-resolved experiments measuring the branching ratio and kinetic energy distributions of products from the 193 nm photodissociation of cyclopentadiene and thiophene are presented. These studies were done using the molecular beam Photofragment Translational Spectroscopy (PTS) technique. The results from the cyclopentadiene experiment confirm that H atom elimination to yield the cyclopentadienyl radical is the dominant dissociation channel. A barrier of ≥5 kcal/mol can be understood in terms of the delocalization of the radical electron of the cyclopentadienyl fragment. A concerted elimination yielding cyclopropene and acetylene was also observed and is proposed to occur via a bicyclo-[2.1.0]pent-2-ene intermediate. Two other channels, yielding acetylene plus the CH2CHCH triplet carbene, and CH2 plus 1-buten-3-yne, are postulated to occur via ring opening. The implications of the experimental results for bulk thermal oxidation and pyrolysis models are discussed. The thiophene experiment shows six competing dissociation channels. The postulated intermediates for the various thiophene dissociation channels include bicyclo, ring opened, and possibly ring contracted

  12. Consistency of Flashbulb Memories of September 11 over Long Delays: Implications for Consolidation and Wrong Time Slice Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvavilashvili, Lia; Mirani, Jennifer; Schlagman, Simone; Foley, Kerry; Kornbrot, Diana E.

    2009-01-01

    The consistency of flashbulb memories over long delays provides a test of theories of memory for highly emotional events. This study used September 11, 2001 as the target event, with test-retest delays of 2 and 3 years. The nature and consistency of flashbulb memories were examined as a function of delay between the target event and an initial…

  13. Species Turnover through Time: Colonization and Extinction Dynamics across Metacommunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuvoloni, Felipe Micali; Feres, Reinaldo José Fazzio; Gilbert, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    Island biogeography and metacommunity theory often use equilibrium assumptions to predict local diversity, yet nonequilibrium dynamics are common in nature. In nonequilibrium communities, local diversity fluctuates through time as the relative importance of colonization and extinction change. Here, we test the prevalence and causes of nonequilibrium dynamics in metacommunities of mites associated with rubber trees distributed over large spatial (>1,000 km) and temporal (>30-60 generations) scales in Brazil. We measured colonization and extinction rates to test species turnover and nonequilibrium dynamics over a growing season. Mite metacommunities exhibited nonequilibrium dynamics for most months of the year, and these dynamics tracked climatic conditions. Monthly shifts in temperature of more than 1°C resulted in nonequilibrium dynamics, as did mean temperatures outside of two critical ranges. Nonequilibrium dynamics were caused by a change in colonization with temperature change and changes in both colonization and extinction with absolute temperature. Species turnover showed different trends; high relative humidity increased both colonization and extinction rates, increasing turnover but not nonequilibrium dynamics. Our study illustrates that testing nonequilibrium dynamics can provide new insights into the drivers of colonization, extinction, and diversity fluctuations in metacommunities.

  14. Nonlinear dynamics of wind waves: multifractal phase/time effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Mellen

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the bispectral coherence method, phase/time analysis of analytic signals is another promising avenue for the investigation of phase effects in wind waves. Frequency spectra of phase fluctuations obtained from both sea and laboratory experiments follow an F-β power law over several decades, suggesting that a fractal description is appropriate. However, many similar natural phenomena have been shown to be multifractal. Universal multifractals are quantified by two additional parameters: the Lévy index 0 α 2 for the type of multifractal and the co-dimension 0 C1 1 for intermittence. The three parameters are a full statistical measure the nonlinear dynamics. Analysis of laboratory flume data is reported here and the results indicate that the phase fluctuations are 'hard multifractal' (α > 1. The actual estimate is close to the limiting value α = 2,  which is consistent with Kolmogorov's lognormal model for turbulent fluctuations. Implications for radar and sonar backscattering from the sea surface are briefly considered.

  15. Spherical time dependent Thomas-Fermi calculation of the dynamical evolution of hot and compressed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemeth, J.; Barranco, M.; Ngo, C.; Tomasi, E.

    1985-01-01

    We have used a self-consistent time dependent Thomas-Fermi model at finite temperature to calculate the dynamical evolution of hot and compressed nuclei. It has been found that nuclei can accomodate more thermal energy than compressional energy before they break. (orig.)

  16. Dynamical Solution to the Problem of a Small Cosmological Constant and Late-Time Cosmic Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armendariz-Picon, C.; Mukhanov, V.; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2000-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that most of the energy density of the universe consists of a dark energy component with negative pressure that causes the cosmic expansion to accelerate. We address why this component comes to dominate the universe only recently. We present a class of theories based on an evolving scalar field where the explanation is based entirely on internal dynamical properties of the solutions. In the theories we consider, the dynamics causes the scalar field to lock automatically into a negative pressure state at the onset of matter domination such that the present epoch is the earliest possible time consistent with nucleosynthesis restrictions when it can start to dominate

  17. LIDT-DD: A new self-consistent debris disc model that includes radiation pressure and couples dynamical and collisional evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Q.; Thébault, P.; Charnoz, S.

    2013-10-01

    Context. In most current debris disc models, the dynamical and the collisional evolutions are studied separately with N-body and statistical codes, respectively, because of stringent computational constraints. In particular, incorporating collisional effects (especially destructive collisions) into an N-body scheme has proven a very arduous task because of the exponential increase of particles it would imply. Aims: We present here LIDT-DD, the first code able to mix both approaches in a fully self-consistent way. Our aim is for it to be generic enough to be applied to any astrophysical case where we expect dynamics and collisions to be deeply interlocked with one another: planets in discs, violent massive breakups, destabilized planetesimal belts, bright exozodiacal discs, etc. Methods: The code takes its basic architecture from the LIDT3D algorithm for protoplanetary discs, but has been strongly modified and updated to handle the very constraining specificities of debris disc physics: high-velocity fragmenting collisions, radiation-pressure affected orbits, absence of gas that never relaxes initial conditions, etc. It has a 3D Lagrangian-Eulerian structure, where grains of a given size at a given location in a disc are grouped into super-particles or tracers whose orbits are evolved with an N-body code and whose mutual collisions are individually tracked and treated using a particle-in-a-box prescription designed to handle fragmenting impacts. To cope with the wide range of possible dynamics for same-sized particles at any given location in the disc, and in order not to lose important dynamical information, tracers are sorted and regrouped into dynamical families depending on their orbits. A complex reassignment routine that searches for redundant tracers in each family and reassignes them where they are needed, prevents the number of tracers from diverging. Results: The LIDT-DD code has been successfully tested on simplified cases for which robust results have

  18. Verification of Continuous Dynamical Systems by Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Christoffer; Wisniewski, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a method for abstracting continuous dynamical systems by timed automata. The abstraction is based on partitioning the state space of a dynamical system using positive invariant sets, which form cells that represent locations of a timed automaton. The abstraction is intended......, which is generated utilizing sub-level sets of Lyapunov functions, as they are positive invariant sets. It is shown that this partition generates sound and complete abstractions. Furthermore, the complete abstractions can be composed of multiple timed automata, allowing parallelization...

  19. Quantum Dynamics of Test Particle in Curved Space-Time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piechocki, W.

    2002-01-01

    To reveal the nature of space-time singularities of removable type we examine classical and quantum dynamics of a free particle in the Sitter type spacetimes. Consider space-times have different topologies otherwise are isometric. Our systems are integrable and we present analytic solutions of the classical dynamics. We quantize the systems by making use of the group theoretical method: we find an essentially self-adjoint representation of the algebra of observables integrable to the irreducible unitarity representation of the symmetry group of each consider gravitational system. The massless particle dynamics is obtained in the zero-mass limit of the massive case. Global properties of considered gravitational systems are of primary importance for the quantization procedure. Systems of a particle in space-times with removable singularities appear to be quantizable. We give specific proposal for extension of our analysis to space-times with essential type singularities. (author)

  20. Properties of Some Partial Dynamic Equations on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak B. Pachpatte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the paper is to study the properties of the solution of a certain partial dynamic equation on time scales. The tools employed are based on the application of the Banach fixed-point theorem and a certain integral inequality with explicit estimates on time scales.

  1. Dynamics of nonlinear oscillators with time-varying conjugate coupling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We explore the dynamical consequences of time-varying conjugate coupling in a system of nonlinear oscillators. We analyze the behavior of coupled ... Conjugate coupling; time varying coupling. PACS Nos 05.45.Xt. 1. Introduction ..... MDS acknowledges the financial support from DST,. New Delhi. References. [1] L Glass ...

  2. Innovative tools for real-time simulation of dynamic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palli, Gianluca; Carloni, Raffaella; Melchiorri, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a software architecture, based on RTAI-Linux, for the real-time simulation of dynamic systems and for the rapid prototyping of digital controllers. Our aim is to simplify the testing phase of digital controllers by providing the real-time simulation of the plant with the

  3. Full-scale locomotive dynamic crash testing and correlations : locomotive consist colliding with steel coil truck at grade crossing (test 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    This report presents the test results and finite element correlations of a full-scale dynamic collision between a locomotive and a highway truck loaded with two heavy steel coils. The locomotive consist was moving at 58 miles per hour before it struc...

  4. Incubation time approach to rock dynamic strength characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrov Y.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic characterization of rocks under intermediate and high strain rates is fundamental to understand the material behaviour in case of heavy earthquakes and dynamic events. The implementation of material constitutive laws is of capital importance for the numerical simulation of the dynamic processes as those caused by earthquakes. These data are necessary and require experimental techniques able to induce on the rock materials state of loading reproducing the actual dynamic condition. Consider the work [1]. The dynamic characterization has been carried out by means of two special apparatus: the split Hopkinson tension bar and the hydro-pneumatic machine . These equipments are briefly described with a discussion on the results of dynamic tension tests at three different strain rates (0.1, 10, 100 strain/s on Onsernone Orthogneiss for loading directions 0∘, 45∘ and 90∘ with respect to the schistosity. Results of the tests show a significant strain rate sensitive behaviour, exhibiting dynamic tensile strength increasing with strain rate, up to about two times with respect to the quasi-static conditions in the case of 0∘ and 45∘ orientation and more than three times in the case of 90 at high strain rates.

  5. An Optimization Framework for Dynamic, Distributed Real-Time Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Klaus; Juedes, David; Welch, Lonnie; Chelberg, David; Bruggerman, Carl; Drews, Frank; Fleeman, David; Parrott, David; Pfarr, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    Abstract. This paper presents a model that is useful for developing resource allocation algorithms for distributed real-time systems .that operate in dynamic environments. Interesting aspects of the model include dynamic environments, utility and service levels, which provide a means for graceful degradation in resource-constrained situations and support optimization of the allocation of resources. The paper also provides an allocation algorithm that illustrates how to use the model for producing feasible, optimal resource allocations.

  6. Generalized Continuous-Time Random Walks (CTRW), Subordination by Hitting Times and Fractional Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Kolokoltsov, Vassili N.

    2007-01-01

    Functional limit theorem for continuous-time random walks (CTRW) are found in general case of dependent waiting times and jump sizes that are also position dependent. The limiting anomalous diffusion is described in terms of fractional dynamics. Probabilistic interpretation of generalized fractional evolution is given in terms of the random time change (subordination) by means of hitting times processes.

  7. Recovery time after localized perturbations in complex dynamical networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, Chiranjit; Kittel, Tim; Kurths, Jürgen; Donner, Reik V; Choudhary, Anshul

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining the synchronous motion of dynamical systems interacting on complex networks is often critical to their functionality. However, real-world networked dynamical systems operating synchronously are prone to random perturbations driving the system to arbitrary states within the corresponding basin of attraction, thereby leading to epochs of desynchronized dynamics with a priori unknown durations. Thus, it is highly relevant to have an estimate of the duration of such transient phases before the system returns to synchrony, following a random perturbation to the dynamical state of any particular node of the network. We address this issue here by proposing the framework of single-node recovery time (SNRT) which provides an estimate of the relative time scales underlying the transient dynamics of the nodes of a network during its restoration to synchrony. We utilize this in differentiating the particularly slow nodes of the network from the relatively fast nodes, thus identifying the critical nodes which when perturbed lead to significantly enlarged recovery time of the system before resuming synchronized operation. Further, we reveal explicit relationships between the SNRT values of a network, and its global relaxation time when starting all the nodes from random initial conditions. Earlier work on relaxation time generally focused on investigating its dependence on macroscopic topological properties of the respective network. However, we employ the proposed concept for deducing microscopic relationships between topological features of nodes and their respective SNRT values. The framework of SNRT is further extended to a measure of resilience of the different nodes of a networked dynamical system. We demonstrate the potential of SNRT in networks of Rössler oscillators on paradigmatic topologies and a model of the power grid of the United Kingdom with second-order Kuramoto-type nodal dynamics illustrating the conceivable practical applicability of the proposed

  8. Decay of surface nanostructures via long-time-scale dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voter, A.F.; Stanciu, N.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors have developed a new approach for extending the time scale of molecular dynamics simulations. For infrequent-event systems, the category that includes most diffusive events in the solid phase, this hyperdynamics method can extend the simulation time by a few orders of magnitude compared to direct molecular dynamics. The trajectory is run on a potential surface that has been biased to raise the energy in the potential basins without affecting the transition state region. The method is described and applied to surface and bulk diffusion processes, achieving microsecond and millisecond simulation times. The authors have also developed a new parallel computing method that is efficient for small system sizes. The combination of the hyperdynamics with this parallel replica dynamics looks promising as a general materials simulation tool

  9. Bifurcation and complex dynamics of a discrete-time predator-prey system involving group defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Sohel Rana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of a discrete-time predator-prey system involving group defense. The existence and local stability of positive fixed point of the discrete dynamical system is analyzed algebraically. It is shown that the system undergoes a flip bifurcation and a Neimark-Sacker bifurcation in the interior of R+2 by using bifurcation theory. Numerical simulation results not only show the consistence with the theoretical analysis but also display the new and interesting dynamical behaviors, including phase portraits, period-7, 20-orbits, attracting invariant circle, cascade of period-doubling bifurcation from period-20 leading to chaos, quasi-periodic orbits, and sudden disappearance of the chaotic dynamics and attracting chaotic set. The Lyapunov exponents are numerically computed to characterize the complexity of the dynamical behaviors.

  10. Time course of dynamic range adaptation in the auditory nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Grace I.; Dean, Isabel; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Auditory adaptation to sound-level statistics occurs as early as in the auditory nerve (AN), the first stage of neural auditory processing. In addition to firing rate adaptation characterized by a rate decrement dependent on previous spike activity, AN fibers show dynamic range adaptation, which is characterized by a shift of the rate-level function or dynamic range toward the most frequently occurring levels in a dynamic stimulus, thereby improving the precision of coding of the most common sound levels (Wen B, Wang GI, Dean I, Delgutte B. J Neurosci 29: 13797–13808, 2009). We investigated the time course of dynamic range adaptation by recording from AN fibers with a stimulus in which the sound levels periodically switch from one nonuniform level distribution to another (Dean I, Robinson BL, Harper NS, McAlpine D. J Neurosci 28: 6430–6438, 2008). Dynamic range adaptation occurred rapidly, but its exact time course was difficult to determine directly from the data because of the concomitant firing rate adaptation. To characterize the time course of dynamic range adaptation without the confound of firing rate adaptation, we developed a phenomenological “dual adaptation” model that accounts for both forms of AN adaptation. When fitted to the data, the model predicts that dynamic range adaptation occurs as rapidly as firing rate adaptation, over 100–400 ms, and the time constants of the two forms of adaptation are correlated. These findings suggest that adaptive processing in the auditory periphery in response to changes in mean sound level occurs rapidly enough to have significant impact on the coding of natural sounds. PMID:22457465

  11. An NDVI-Based Vegetation Phenology Is Improved to be More Consistent with Photosynthesis Dynamics through Applying a Light Use Efficiency Model over Boreal High-Latitude Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siheng Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing of high-latitude forests phenology is essential for understanding the global carbon cycle and the response of vegetation to climate change. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI has long been used to study boreal evergreen needleleaf forests (ENF and deciduous broadleaf forests. However, the NDVI-based growing season is generally reported to be longer than that based on gross primary production (GPP, which can be attributed to the difference between greenness and photosynthesis. Instead of introducing environmental factors such as land surface or air temperature like previous studies, this study attempts to make VI-based phenology more consistent with photosynthesis dynamics through applying a light use efficiency model. NDVI (MOD13C2 was used as a proxy for both fractional of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (APAR and light use efficiency at seasonal time scale. Results show that VI-based phenology is improved towards tracking seasonal GPP changes more precisely after applying the light use efficiency model compared to raw NDVI or APAR, especially over ENF.

  12. Radar time delays in the dynamic theory of gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haranas I.I.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a new theory gravity called the dynamic theory, which is derived from thermodynamic principles in a five dimensional space, radar signals traveling times and delays are calculated for the major planets in the solar system, and compared to those of general relativity. This is done by using the usual four dimensional spherically symmetric space-time element of classical general relativistic gravity which has now been slightly modified by a negative inverse radial exponential term due to the dynamic theory of gravity potential.

  13. Neural Computations in a Dynamical System with Multiple Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Mi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural systems display rich short-term dynamics at various levels, e.g., spike-frequencyadaptation (SFA at single neurons, and short-term facilitation (STF and depression (STDat neuronal synapses. These dynamical features typically covers a broad range of time scalesand exhibit large diversity in different brain regions. It remains unclear what the computationalbenefit for the brain to have such variability in short-term dynamics is. In this study, we proposethat the brain can exploit such dynamical features to implement multiple seemingly contradictorycomputations in a single neural circuit. To demonstrate this idea, we use continuous attractorneural network (CANN as a working model and include STF, SFA and STD with increasing timeconstants in their dynamics. Three computational tasks are considered, which are persistent activity,adaptation, and anticipative tracking. These tasks require conflicting neural mechanisms, andhence cannot be implemented by a single dynamical feature or any combination with similar timeconstants. However, with properly coordinated STF, SFA and STD, we show that the network isable to implement the three computational tasks concurrently. We hope this study will shed lighton the understanding of how the brain orchestrates its rich dynamics at various levels to realizediverse cognitive functions.

  14. Absorption dynamics and delay time in complex potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villavicencio, Jorge; Romo, Roberto; Hernández-Maldonado, Alberto

    2018-05-01

    The dynamics of absorption is analyzed by using an exactly solvable model that deals with an analytical solution to Schrödinger’s equation for cutoff initial plane waves incident on a complex absorbing potential. A dynamical absorption coefficient which allows us to explore the dynamical loss of particles from the transient to the stationary regime is derived. We find that the absorption process is characterized by the emission of a series of damped periodic pulses in time domain, associated with damped Rabi-type oscillations with a characteristic frequency, ω = (E + ɛ)/ℏ, where E is the energy of the incident waves and ‑ɛ is energy of the quasidiscrete state of the system induced by the absorptive part of the Hamiltonian; the width γ of this resonance governs the amplitude of the pulses. The resemblance of the time-dependent absorption coefficient with a real decay process is discussed, in particular the transition from exponential to nonexponential regimes, a well-known feature of quantum decay. We have also analyzed the effect of the absorptive part of the potential on the dynamical delay time, which behaves differently from the one observed in attractive real delta potentials, exhibiting two regimes: time advance and time delay.

  15. A Novel Time Synchronization Method for Dynamic Reconfigurable Bus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Weigong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available UM-BUS is a novel dynamically reconfigurable high-speed serial bus for embedded systems. It can achieve fault tolerance by detecting the channel status in real time and reconfigure dynamically at run-time. The bus supports direct interconnections between up to eight master nodes and multiple slave nodes. In order to solve the time synchronization problem among master nodes, this paper proposes a novel time synchronization method, which can meet the requirement of time precision in UM-BUS. In this proposed method, time is firstly broadcasted through time broadcast packets. Then, the transmission delay and time deviations via three handshakes during link self-checking and channel detection can be worked out referring to the IEEE 1588 protocol. Thereby, each node calibrates its own time according to the broadcasted time. The proposed method has been proved to meet the requirement of real-time time synchronization. The experimental results show that the synchronous precision can achieve a bias less than 20 ns.

  16. A self-consistent derivation of ion drag and Joule heating for atmospheric dynamics in the thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zhu

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The thermosphere is subject to additional electric and magnetic forces, not important in the middle and lower atmosphere, due to its partially ionized atmosphere. The effects of charged particles on the neutral atmospheric dynamics are often parameterized by ion drag in the momentum equations and Joule heating in the energy equation. Presented in this paper are a set of more accurate parameterizations for the ion drag and Joule heating for the neutral atmosphere that are functions of the difference between bulk ion velocity and neutral wind. The parameterized expressions also depend on the magnetic field, the Pedersen and Hall conductivities, and the ratio of the ion cyclotron frequency to the ion-neutral collision frequency. The formal relationship between the electromagnetic energy, atmospheric kinetic energy, and Joule heating is illustrated through the conversion terms between these three types of energy. It is shown that there will always be an accompanying conversion of kinetic energy into Joule heating when electromagnetic energy is generated through the dynamo mechanism of the atmospheric neutral wind. Likewise, electromagnetic energy cannot be fully converted into kinetic energy without producing Joule heating in the thermosphere.

  17. Managing space-time networks for the dynamic time-constrained VRP

    OpenAIRE

    ZEDDINI, Besma; ZARGAYOUNA, Mahdi; YASSINE, Adnan; TEMANI, Moncef

    2012-01-01

    Vehicle routing problems are highly complex problems for which different artificial intelligence techniques have been used. In this paper, we propose an agent-oriented self-organization model for the dynamic version of the problem with time windows. Our proposal is based on a space-time representation of teh agent's Action Zones, which is able to maintain a good distribution of the vehicles on the environment. This distribution answers the objective of the dynamic problem, since it allows the...

  18. Life quality time allocation index-an equilibrium economy consistent version of the current life quality index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove; Friis-Hansen, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The definition the Life Quality Index for a country as originally suggested by Nathwani, Lind and Pandey is based on the gross domestic product (GDP), the expected life in good health at birth, and the fraction of life time the anonymous citizen of the country is occupied with money making work...... definition this equilibrium economy principle is applied under the assumption that the GDP is directly proportional to the work time fraction. This direct proportionality has been relaxed by the author in two earlier papers with an essential effect on the combination parameter. The present paper presents...... a further development casting the definition into dimensionless quantities that make the index get a pure unit of time and not the somewhat obscure unit as a power product of a money unit and a time unit. To avoid confusion, this new variant of the LQI is called the Life Quality Time Allocation Index (LQTAI...

  19. Complexity, Sustainability, Justice, and Meaning: Chronological Versus Dynamical Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio Velasco

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available

    Times New Roman;">Abstract: It is shown that time may be appreciated in at least two senses: chronological and dynamical. Chronological time is the time of our naïve acquaintance as transient beings. At its most extensive scale, it corresponds to history encompassing both the abiotic and the biotic  universe. Dynamical time, deriving from classical mechanics, is the time embraced by most of the laws of physics. It concerns itself only with present conditions since it is held that that the past may be reconstructed from the present (literally and the future predicted from the present, a position known as Laplacian determinism.

    Times New Roman;"> 

    Times New Roman;">Nonlinear dynamics has shown the fallacy of this supposition because, of necessity, the concrete values that may be assumed in the variables of the equations of motion constituting the laws of physics (i.e. the present or starting conditions as a result of the spontaneous or intentional interaction of subject (or measuring systems and of object (or measured systems, cannot be of infinite precision. Indeed, even if they could be, it is not at all clear that they would permit Laplacian determinism because of what is thought to be the ubiquity of K-flow dynamics in nature in which even infinite past information leading to the present cannot yield prediction of the future. In consequence, nonlinear dynamics, in rebellion against dynamical time, generates a primitive form of history distinguishing past, present, and future that may be termed nonlinear dynamical hysteresis.

  20. Interface Consistency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes that Interface Consistency is an important issue for the development of modular designs. Byproviding a precise specification of component interfaces it becomes possible to check that separately developedcomponents use a common interface in a coherent matter thus avoiding a very...... significant source of design errors. Awide range of interface specifications are possible, the simplest form is a syntactical check of parameter types.However, today it is possible to do more sophisticated forms involving semantic checks....

  1. Multiple dynamical time-scales in networks with hierarchically ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Multiple dynamical time-scales in networks with hierarchically nested modular organization ... http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/pram/077/05/0833-0842 ... Many natural and engineered complex networks have intricate mesoscopic organization, e.g., the clustering of the constituent nodes into several communities or ...

  2. Labour Market Dynamics in Times of Crisis: Evidence from Africa ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Labour Market Dynamics in Times of Crisis: Evidence from Africa. Across the world, young people and women have suffered a disproportionate increase in unemployment. According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), joblessness among young people (aged 15-25) has increased by seven percentage points ...

  3. Exponential stability of dynamic equations on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffoul Youssef N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the exponential stability of the zero solution to a system of dynamic equations on time scales. We do this by defining appropriate Lyapunov-type functions and then formulate certain inequalities on these functions. Several examples are given.

  4. Life quality time allocation index-an equilibrium economy consistent version of the current life quality index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove; Friis-Hansen, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The definition the Life Quality Index for a country as originally suggested by Nathwani, Lind and Pandey is based on the gross domestic product (GDP), the expected life in good health at birth, and the fraction of life time the anonymous citizen of the country is occupied with money making work...... a further development casting the definition into dimensionless quantities that make the index get a pure unit of time and not the somewhat obscure unit as a power product of a money unit and a time unit. To avoid confusion, this new variant of the LQI is called the Life Quality Time Allocation Index (LQTAI.......92 to be applied to the total life expectation at birth to obtain the expected life in good health. Among other infinitely many choices of (c, r ) there are (0.085, 1.0) and (0.1, 0.85)....

  5. One-loop calculation in time-dependent non-equilibrium thermo field dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, H.; Yamanaka, Y.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is a review on the structure of thermo field dynamics (TFD) in which the basic concepts such as the thermal doublets, the quasi-particles and the self-consistent renormalization are presented in detail. A strong emphasis is put on the computational scheme. A detailed structure of this scheme is illustrated by the one-loop calculation in a non-equilibrium time-dependent process. A detailed account of the one-loop calculation has never been reported anywhere. The role of the self-consistent renormalization is explained. The equilibrium TFD is obtained as the long-time limit of non-equilibrium TFD. (author)

  6. Linear prediction of force time series to accelerate molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutovsky, Branislav; Kneller, Gerald R.

    2005-07-01

    We have recently proposed a molecular dynamics simulation scheme in which the time-consuming evaluation of non-bonding forces is periodically replaced by linear prediction of the latter from previous values [B. Brutovsky, T. Mülders, G.R. Kneller, J. Chem. Phys. 118 (2003) 6179]. For a simple molecular liquid, consisting of linear molecules with an internal vibrational degree of freedom, the method yields a speedup of up to 7 compared to conventional simulations. The hybrid simulation scheme preserves all essential structural and dynamical quantities. We show here that the linear predictor can be considered as an optimal integrator for finite time steps whose coefficients approach those of a discrete Taylor series if the simulation step tends to zero. The short time dynamics and the structure of the liquid are preserved for much longer periods if linear prediction is used instead of Taylor expansion to predict the non-bonding forces.

  7. PROGENITOR-DEPENDENT EXPLOSION DYNAMICS IN SELF-CONSISTENT, AXISYMMETRIC SIMULATIONS OF NEUTRINO-DRIVEN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summa, Alexander; Hanke, Florian; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Melson, Tobias [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Marek, Andreas [Max Planck Computing and Data Facility (MPCDF), Gießenbachstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Müller, Bernhard, E-mail: asumma@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-01

    We present self-consistent, axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations performed with the Prometheus-Vertex code for 18 pre-supernova models in the range of 11–28 M {sub ⊙}, including progenitors recently investigated by other groups. All models develop explosions, but depending on the progenitor structure, they can be divided into two classes. With a steep density decline at the Si/Si–O interface, the arrival of this interface at the shock front leads to a sudden drop of the mass-accretion rate, triggering a rapid approach to explosion. With a more gradually decreasing accretion rate, it takes longer for the neutrino heating to overcome the accretion ram pressure and explosions set in later. Early explosions are facilitated by high mass-accretion rates after bounce and correspondingly high neutrino luminosities combined with a pronounced drop of the accretion rate and ram pressure at the Si/Si–O interface. Because of rapidly shrinking neutron star radii and receding shock fronts after the passage through their maxima, our models exhibit short advection timescales, which favor the efficient growth of the standing accretion-shock instability. The latter plays a supportive role at least for the initiation of the re-expansion of the stalled shock before runaway. Taking into account the effects of turbulent pressure in the gain layer, we derive a generalized condition for the critical neutrino luminosity that captures the explosion behavior of all models very well. We validate the robustness of our findings by testing the influence of stochasticity, numerical resolution, and approximations in some aspects of the microphysics.

  8. Surgical gesture classification using Dynamic Time Warping and affine velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Jenny; Minh Tu Pham; Moreau, Richard; Prieto, Flavio; Boulanger, Pierre

    2017-07-01

    Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) has become widespread as an important surgical technique due to its advantages related to pain relief and short recovery time periods. However, this approach implies the acquisition of special surgical skills, which represents a challenge in the objective assessment of surgical gestures. In this way, several studies shown that kinematics and kinetic analysis of hand movement is a valuable assessment tool of basic surgical skills in MIS. In addition, recent researches proved that human motion performed during surgery can be described as a sequence of constant affine velocity movements. In this paper, we present a novel method to classify gestures based on an affine velocity analysis of 3D motion and an implementation of the Dynamic Time Warping algorithm. In particular, affine velocity calculation correlates kinematics and geometrical variables such as curvature, torsion, and euclidean velocity, reducing the dimension of the conventional 3D problem. In this way, using the simplicity of dynamic time warping algorithm allows us to perform an accurate classification, easier to implement and understand. Experimental validation of the algorithm is presented based on the position and orientation data of a laparoscope instrument, determiMinimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) has become widespread as an important surgical technique due to its advantages related to pain relief and short recovery time periods. However, this approach implies the acquisition of special surgical skills, which represents a challenge in the objective assessment of surgical gestures. In this way, several studies shown that kinematics and kinetic analysis of hand movement is a valuable assessment tool of basic surgical skills in MIS. In addition, recent researches proved that human motion performed during surgery can be described as a sequence of constant affine velocity movements. In this paper, we present a novel method to classify gestures based on an affine velocity

  9. That's not what you said the first time: A theoretical account of the relationship between consistency and accuracy of recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Sarah E; Benjamin, Aaron S

    2016-01-01

    Over multiple response opportunities, recall may be inconsistent. For example, an eyewitness may report information at trial that was not reported during initial questioning-a phenomenon called reminiscence . Such inconsistencies are often assumed by lawyers to be inaccurate and are sometimes interpreted as evidence of the general unreliability of the rememberer. In two experiments, we examined the output-bound accuracy of inconsistent memories and found that reminisced memories were indeed less accurate than memories that were reported consistently over multiple opportunities. However, reminisced memories were just as accurate as memories that were reported initially but not later, indicating that it is the inconsistency of recall, and not the later addition to the recall output, that predicts lower accuracy. Finally, rememberers who exhibited more inconsistent recall were less accurate overall, which, if confirmed by more ecologically valid studies, may indicate that the common legal assumption may be correct: Witnesses who provide inconsistent testimony provide generally less trustworthy information overall.

  10. Musicians are more consistent: Gestural cross-modal mappings of pitch, loudness and tempo in real-time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats B. Küssner

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cross-modal mappings of auditory stimuli reveal valuable insights into how humans make sense of sound and music. Whereas researchers have investigated cross-modal mappings of sound features varied in isolation within paradigms such as speeded classification and forced-choice matching tasks, investigations of representations of concurrently varied sound features (e.g., pitch, loudness and tempo with overt gestures—accounting for the intrinsic link between movement and sound—are scant. To explore the role of bodily gestures in cross-modal mappings of auditory stimuli we asked sixty-four musically trained and untrained participants to represent pure tones—continually sounding and concurrently varied in pitch, loudness and tempo—with gestures while the sound stimuli were played. We hypothesised musical training to lead to more consistent mappings between pitch and height, loudness and distance/height, and tempo and speed of hand movement and muscular energy.Our results corroborate previously reported pitch vs. height (higher pitch leading to higher elevation in space and tempo vs. speed (increasing tempo leading to increasing speed of hand movement associations, but also reveal novel findings pertaining to musical training which influenced consistency of pitch mappings, annulling a commonly observed bias for convex (i.e. rising-falling pitch contours. Moreover, we reveal effects of interactions between musical parameters on cross-modal mappings (e.g., pitch and loudness on speed of hand movement, highlighting the importance of studying auditory stimuli concurrently varied in different musical parameters. Results are discussed in light of cross-modal cognition, with particular emphasis on studies within (embodied music cognition. Implications for theoretical refinements and potential clinical applications are provided.

  11. Topology Identification of General Dynamical Network with Distributed Time Delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao-Yan, Wu; Xin-Chu, Fu

    2009-01-01

    General dynamical networks with distributed time delays are studied. The topology of the networks are viewed as unknown parameters, which need to be identified. Some auxiliary systems (also called the network estimators) are designed to achieve this goal. Both linear feedback control and adaptive strategy are applied in designing these network estimators. Based on linear matrix inequalities and the Lyapunov function method, the sufficient condition for the achievement of topology identification is obtained. This method can also better monitor the switching topology of dynamical networks. Illustrative examples are provided to show the effectiveness of this method. (general)

  12. Metabolic changes in the normal ageing brain: Consistent findings from short and long echo time proton spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, S.; Pinker, K. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); MR Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Riederer, F. [Department of Neurology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Chmelik, M. [Department of Internal Medicine III, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); MR Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Stadlbauer, A. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Bittsansky, M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); MR Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Mlynarik, V. [LIFMET, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland); Frey, R. [Department of Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Serles, W. [Department of Neurology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Bodamer, O. [Department of Paediatrics, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Moser, E. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); MR Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: ewald.moser@meduniwien.ac.at

    2008-11-15

    Objectives: Sixty three healthy subjects were measured to assess dependence of brain metabolites on age using short- and long echo time spectroscopy in different brain regions. Material and methods: Younger and elderly humans were measured with long echo time (TE = 135 ms) 3D-MR-spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) (10 subjects) and with ultra-short echo (TE = 11 ms) time 2D-MRSI (7 subjects). In addition, results from single voxel {sup 1}H-spectroscopy (TE = 20 ms) of two cohorts of 46 healthy subjects were retrospectively correlated with age. Results: 3D-MR SI revealed reduced NAA/Cr in the older group in the frontal lobe (-22%; p < 0.01), parietal lobe (-28%; p < 0.01) and semiovale (-9%; p < 0.01) compared to the younger group. Cho/Cr was elevated in the semiovale (+35%; p < 0.01) and in the n. lentiformis (+42%; p < 0.01) in the older group. NAA/Cho was reduced in all regions measured, except the thalamus, in the older group compared to the younger group (from -21 to -49%; p < 0.01). 2D-MRSI revealed decreased total NAA (-3.1% per decade; p < 0.01) and NAA/Cr (-3.8% per decade; p < 0.01), increased total Cho (+3.6% per decade; p < 0.01) and Cho/Cr (+4.6% per decade; p < 0.01) and increased total myo-Inositol (mI, +4.7% per decade; p < 0.01) and mI/Cr (+5.4% per decade; p < 0.01) and decreased NAA/Cho (-8% per decade; p < 0.01) in semiovale WM. Results from single voxel spectroscopy revealed a significantly negative correlation of NAA/Cho in frontal (-13% per decade; p < 0.01) and in temporal lobe (-7.4% per decade; p < 0.01) as well as increased total Cr (10% per decade; p < 0.01) in frontal lobe. Other results from single voxel measurements were not significant, but trends were comparable to that from multivoxel spectroscopy. Conclusion: Age-related changes measured with long echo time and short echo time 1H-MRS were comparable and cannot, therefore, be caused by different T2 relaxation times in young and old subjects, as suggested previously.

  13. Dynamic Leidenfrost Effect: Relevant Time and Length Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirota, Minori; van Limbeek, Michiel A. J.; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-02-01

    When a liquid droplet impacts a hot solid surface, enough vapor may be generated under it to prevent its contact with the solid. The minimum solid temperature for this so-called Leidenfrost effect to occur is termed the Leidenfrost temperature, or the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature when the droplet velocity is non-negligible. We observe the wetting or drying and the levitation dynamics of the droplet impacting on an (isothermal) smooth sapphire surface using high-speed total internal reflection imaging, which enables us to observe the droplet base up to about 100 nm above the substrate surface. By this method we are able to reveal the processes responsible for the transitional regime between the fully wetting and the fully levitated droplet as the solid temperature increases, thus shedding light on the characteristic time and length scales setting the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature for droplet impact on an isothermal substrate.

  14. Estimating postural control with the balance rehabilitation unit: measurement consistency, accuracy, validity, and comparison with dynamic posturography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahmari, Khalid A; Marchetti, Gregory F; Sparto, Patrick J; Furman, Joseph M; Whitney, Susan L

    2014-01-01

    To examine the psychometric properties (test-retest reliability, concurrent validity, construct validity) of the Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU) during testing of sensory integration processes in healthy adults and individuals with vestibular disorders. Experimental cross-sectional design. Clinic. Participants (N=90) included 30 subjects with vestibular disorders (age range, 18-85y), 30 young healthy adults (age range, 18-50y), and 30 older healthy adults (age range, 60-85y). Not applicable. Participants were tested twice with the BRU and once with the SMART EquiTest Sensory Organization Test (SOT). The center of pressure (COP) in the anteroposterior direction (COPap) and the COP in the mediolateral direction (COPml) were recorded. The COPap and COPml time series were used to estimate the area and velocity of the COP. The intraclass correlation coefficient of the COP area and velocity measures for the BRU for all subjects was at least .76 in all sensory organization conditions (PCOP area and from .44 to .76 for COP velocity. The older control group had significantly greater COP area and velocity compared with younger controls for the BRU and the SOT. The COP (area, velocity) was significantly higher for the younger individuals in the vestibular group than the younger controls. The reliability and validity of COP measurements obtained during testing of the sensory integration processes were demonstrated using the BRU. Future work should examine the responsiveness of these measures when individuals with balance disorders participate in rehabilitation. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Spectral Unmixing Model for the Integration of Multi-Sensor Imagery: A Tool to Generate Consistent Time Series Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Doxani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Sentinel missions have been designed to support the operational services of the Copernicus program, ensuring long-term availability of data for a wide range of spectral, spatial and temporal resolutions. In particular, Sentinel-2 (S-2 data with improved high spatial resolution and higher revisit frequency (five days with the pair of satellites in operation will play a fundamental role in recording land cover types and monitoring land cover changes at regular intervals. Nevertheless, cloud coverage usually hinders the time series availability and consequently the continuous land surface monitoring. In an attempt to alleviate this limitation, the synergistic use of instruments with different features is investigated, aiming at the future synergy of the S-2 MultiSpectral Instrument (MSI and Sentinel-3 (S-3 Ocean and Land Colour Instrument (OLCI. To that end, an unmixing model is proposed with the intention of integrating the benefits of the two Sentinel missions, when both in orbit, in one composite image. The main goal is to fill the data gaps in the S-2 record, based on the more frequent information of the S-3 time series. The proposed fusion model has been applied on MODIS (MOD09GA L2G and SPOT4 (Take 5 data and the experimental results have demonstrated that the approach has high potential. However, the different acquisition characteristics of the sensors, i.e. illumination and viewing geometry, should be taken into consideration and bidirectional effects correction has to be performed in order to reduce noise in the reflectance time series.

  16. Dynamical analysis and visualization of tornadoes time series.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António M Lopes

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze the behavior of tornado time-series in the U.S. from the perspective of dynamical systems. A tornado is a violently rotating column of air extending from a cumulonimbus cloud down to the ground. Such phenomena reveal features that are well described by power law functions and unveil characteristics found in systems with long range memory effects. Tornado time series are viewed as the output of a complex system and are interpreted as a manifestation of its dynamics. Tornadoes are modeled as sequences of Dirac impulses with amplitude proportional to the events size. First, a collection of time series involving 64 years is analyzed in the frequency domain by means of the Fourier transform. The amplitude spectra are approximated by power law functions and their parameters are read as an underlying signature of the system dynamics. Second, it is adopted the concept of circular time and the collective behavior of tornadoes analyzed. Clustering techniques are then adopted to identify and visualize the emerging patterns.

  17. Dynamical analysis and visualization of tornadoes time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, António M; Tenreiro Machado, J A

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the behavior of tornado time-series in the U.S. from the perspective of dynamical systems. A tornado is a violently rotating column of air extending from a cumulonimbus cloud down to the ground. Such phenomena reveal features that are well described by power law functions and unveil characteristics found in systems with long range memory effects. Tornado time series are viewed as the output of a complex system and are interpreted as a manifestation of its dynamics. Tornadoes are modeled as sequences of Dirac impulses with amplitude proportional to the events size. First, a collection of time series involving 64 years is analyzed in the frequency domain by means of the Fourier transform. The amplitude spectra are approximated by power law functions and their parameters are read as an underlying signature of the system dynamics. Second, it is adopted the concept of circular time and the collective behavior of tornadoes analyzed. Clustering techniques are then adopted to identify and visualize the emerging patterns.

  18. Observing Bridge Dynamic Deflection in Green Time by Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chengxin; Zhang, Guojian; Zhao, Yongqian; Chen, Mingzhi

    2018-01-01

    As traditional surveying methods are limited to observe bridge dynamic deflection; information technology is adopted to observe bridge dynamic deflection in Green time. Information technology used in this study means that we use digital cameras to photograph the bridge in red time as a zero image. Then, a series of successive images are photographed in green time. Deformation point targets are identified and located by Hough transform. With reference to the control points, the deformation values of these deformation points are obtained by differencing the successive images with a zero image, respectively. Results show that the average measurement accuracies of C0 are 0.46 pixels, 0.51 pixels and 0.74 pixels in X, Z and comprehensive direction. The average measurement accuracies of C1 are 0.43 pixels, 0.43 pixels and 0.67 pixels in X, Z and comprehensive direction in these tests. The maximal bridge deflection is 44.16mm, which is less than 75mm (Bridge deflection tolerance value). Information technology in this paper can monitor bridge dynamic deflection and depict deflection trend curves of the bridge in real time. It can provide data support for the site decisions to the bridge structure safety.

  19. Linear and nonlinear dynamic systems in financial time series prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Lahmiri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Autoregressive moving average (ARMA process and dynamic neural networks namely the nonlinear autoregressive moving average with exogenous inputs (NARX are compared by evaluating their ability to predict financial time series; for instance the S&P500 returns. Two classes of ARMA are considered. The first one is the standard ARMA model which is a linear static system. The second one uses Kalman filter (KF to estimate and predict ARMA coefficients. This model is a linear dynamic system. The forecasting ability of each system is evaluated by means of mean absolute error (MAE and mean absolute deviation (MAD statistics. Simulation results indicate that the ARMA-KF system performs better than the standard ARMA alone. Thus, introducing dynamics into the ARMA process improves the forecasting accuracy. In addition, the ARMA-KF outperformed the NARX. This result may suggest that the linear component found in the S&P500 return series is more dominant than the nonlinear part. In sum, we conclude that introducing dynamics into the ARMA process provides an effective system for S&P500 time series prediction.

  20. Time-dependent Hartree-Fock studies of the dynamical fusion threshold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakatsukasa Takashi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A microscopic description of dynamical fusion threshold in heavy ion collisions is performed in the framework of time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF theory using Skyrme energy density functional (EDF. TDHF fusion threshold is in a better agreement with experimental fusion barrier. We find that the onset of extra push lies at the effective fissility 33, which is consistent with the prediction of Swiatecki’s macroscopic model. The extra push energy in our TDHF simulation is systematically smaller than the prediction in macroscopic model. The important dynamical effects and the way to fit the parameter might be responsible for the different results.

  1. Structure and dynamics of stock market in times of crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Longfeng; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu

    2016-02-01

    Daily correlations among 322 S&P 500 constituent stocks are investigated by means of correlation-based (CB) network. By using the heterogeneous time scales, we identify global expansion and local clustering market behaviors during crises, which are mainly caused by community splits and inter-sector edge number decreases. The CB networks display distinctive community and sector structures. Graph edit distance is applied to capturing the dynamics of CB networks in which drastic structure reconfigurations can be observed during crisis periods. Edge statistics reveal the power-law nature of edges' duration time distribution. Despite the networks' strong structural changes during crises, we still find some long-duration edges that serve as the backbone of the stock market. Finally the dynamical change of network structure has shown its capability in predicting the implied volatility index (VIX).

  2. The impact of conventional space-time aggregation on the dynamics of continuous-time rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansom, John; Bulla, Jan; Carey-Smith, Trevor; Thomson, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Rainfall is a continuous-time phenomenon typically characterized by precipitation states such as rain, showers, and dry whose dependence varies over a variety of space-time scales. Here attention is focused on the effective identification of rain and shower precipitation states over a region where these states have been determined by a hidden semi-Markov model of continuous-time precipitation. The states identified provide an accurate description of precipitation dynamics and can be regarded as close proxies to synoptic weather types of the same name. The stochastic properties and structure of these states (rather than precipitation amounts) are explored and delineated. A primary objective of the paper is to better understand the impact of conventional space-time aggregation on the dynamics of rainfall. What aggregation time scales result in more faithful descriptions of the space-time dynamics of continuous-time rainfall? While rain might be expected to be more spatially coherent than showers and involve longer time scales, dry periods involve much longer time and space scales again than either rain or showers. These issues are discussed and conclusions drawn which provide guidance and insights useful for the development of space-time precipitation models and, more generally, the design of rainfall observation networks and data archives.

  3. Dynamical Sparse Recovery with Finite-time Convergence

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Lei; Zheng, Gang; Barbot, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Even though Sparse Recovery (SR) has been successfully applied in a wide range of research communities, there still exists a barrier to real applications because of the inefficiency of the state-of-the-art algorithms. In this paper, we propose a dynamical approach to SR which is highly efficient and with finite-time convergence property. Firstly, instead of solving the ℓ1 regularized optimization programs that requires exhausting iterations, which is computer-oriented,...

  4. Disequilibrium dynamics in a Keynesian model with time delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Luca; Guerrini, Luca; Sodini, Mauro

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this research is to analyse a Keynesian goods market closed economy by considering a continuous-time setup with fixed delays. The work compares dynamic results based on linear and nonlinear adjustment mechanisms through which the aggregate supply (production) reacts to a disequilibrium in the goods market and consumption depends on income at a preceding date. Both analytical and geometrical (stability switching curves) techniques are used to characterise the stability properties of the stationary equilibrium.

  5. Online dynamic mode decomposition for time-varying systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Rowley, Clarence; Deem, Eric; Cattafesta, Louis

    2017-11-01

    Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is a popular technique for modal decomposition, flow analysis, and reduced-order modeling. In situations where a system is time varying, one would like to update the system's description online as time evolves. This work provides an efficient method for computing the DMD matrix in real time, updating the approximation of a system's dynamics as new data becomes available. The algorithm does not require storage of past data, and computes the exact DMD matrix using rank-1 updates. A weighting factor that places less weight on older data can be incorporated in a straightforward manner, making the method particularly well suited to time-varying systems. The efficiency of the method is compared against several existing DMD algorithms: for problems in which the state dimension is less than about 200, the proposed algorithm is the most efficient for real-time computation, and it can be orders of magnitude more efficient than the standard DMD algorithm. The method is demonstrated on several examples, including a time-varying linear system and a more complex example using data from a wind tunnel experiment. Supported by AFOSR Grant FA9550-14-1-0289, and by DARPA award HR0011-16-C-0116.

  6. Structural dynamics of phenylisothiocyanate in the light-absorbing excited states: Resonance Raman and complete active space self-consistent field calculation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Bing; Xue, Jia-Dan; Zheng, Xuming; Fang, Wei-Hai

    2014-01-01

    The excited state structural dynamics of phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC) after excitation to the light absorbing S 2 (A′), S 6 (A′), and S 7 (A′) excited states were studied by using the resonance Raman spectroscopy and complete active space self-consistent field method calculations. The UV absorption bands of PITC were assigned. The vibrational assignments were done on the basis of the Fourier transform (FT)-Raman and FT-infrared measurements, the density-functional theory computations, and the normal mode analysis. The A-, B-, and C-bands resonance Raman spectra in cyclohexane, acetonitrile, and methanol solvents were, respectively, obtained at 299.1, 282.4, 266.0, 252.7, 228.7, 217.8, and 208.8 nm excitation wavelengths to probe the corresponding structural dynamics of PITC. The results indicated that the structural dynamics in the S 2 (A′), S 6 (A′), and S 7 (A′) excited states were very different. The conical intersection point CI(S 2 /S 1 ) were predicted to play important role in the low-lying excited state decay dynamics. Two major decay channels were predicted for PITC upon excitation to the S 2 (A′) state: the radiative S 2,min → S 0 transition and the nonradiative S 2 → S 1 internal conversion via CI(S 2 /S 1 ). The differences in the decay dynamics between methyl isothiocyanate and PITC in the first light absorbing excited state were discussed. The role of the intersystem crossing point ISC(S 1 /T 1 ) in the excited state decay dynamics of PITC is evaluated

  7. Prediction of dynamic expected time to system failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Deog Yeon; Lee, Chong Chul [Korea Nuclear Fuel Co., Ltd., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The mean time to failure (MTTF) expressing the mean value of the system life is a measure of system effectiveness. To estimate the remaining life of component and/or system, the dynamic mean time to failure concept is suggested. It is the time-dependent property depending on the status of components. The Kalman filter is used to estimate the reliability of components using the on-line information (directly measured sensor output or device-specific diagnostics in the intelligent sensor) in form of the numerical value (state factor). This factor considers the persistency of the fault condition and confidence level in measurement. If there is a complex system with many components, each calculated reliability`s of components are combined, which results in the dynamic MTTF of system. The illustrative examples are discussed. The results show that the dynamic MTTF can well express the component and system failure behaviour whether any kinds of failure are occurred or not. 9 refs., 6 figs. (Author)

  8. Communication: Time-dependent optimized coupled-cluster method for multielectron dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeshi; Pathak, Himadri; Orimo, Yuki; Ishikawa, Kenichi L.

    2018-02-01

    Time-dependent coupled-cluster method with time-varying orbital functions, called time-dependent optimized coupled-cluster (TD-OCC) method, is formulated for multielectron dynamics in an intense laser field. We have successfully derived the equations of motion for CC amplitudes and orthonormal orbital functions based on the real action functional, and implemented the method including double excitations (TD-OCCD) and double and triple excitations (TD-OCCDT) within the optimized active orbitals. The present method is size extensive and gauge invariant, a polynomial cost-scaling alternative to the time-dependent multiconfiguration self-consistent-field method. The first application of the TD-OCC method of intense-laser driven correlated electron dynamics in Ar atom is reported.

  9. Quantum dynamics at finite temperature: Time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christov, Ivan P.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we investigate the ground state and the dissipative quantum dynamics of interacting charged particles in an external potential at finite temperature. The recently devised time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo (TDQMC) method allows a self-consistent treatment of the system of particles together with bath oscillators first for imaginary-time propagation of Schrödinger type of equations where both the system and the bath converge to their finite temperature ground state, and next for real time calculation where the dissipative dynamics is demonstrated. In that context the application of TDQMC appears as promising alternative to the path-integral related techniques where the real time propagation can be a challenge.

  10. The dynamics of female time allocation upon a first birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belzil, Christian

    1997-01-01

    I estimate a non-stationary dynamic programming model of time allocation decisions between full-time work, child care and search activities upon a first birth using recursive methods. The model incorporates the following sequence of decisions; whether to stop working or not (for those who work...... both home an labor market productivities. Overall, the model is able to explain the relatively large fraction of women who do not experience career interruptions, the rapidly declining re-employment hazards and the weak effect of education on the duration of non-employment (hometime) spells....

  11. Dynamical continuous time random Lévy flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Chen, Xiaosong

    2016-03-01

    The Lévy flights' diffusive behavior is studied within the framework of the dynamical continuous time random walk (DCTRW) method, while the nonlinear friction is introduced in each step. Through the DCTRW method, Lévy random walker in each step flies by obeying the Newton's Second Law while the nonlinear friction f(v) = - γ0v - γ2v3 being considered instead of Stokes friction. It is shown that after introducing the nonlinear friction, the superdiffusive Lévy flights converges, behaves localization phenomenon with long time limit, but for the Lévy index μ = 2 case, it is still Brownian motion.

  12. Dynamics of particles around time conformal Schwarzschild black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Abdul; Ali, Farhad; Shahzad, M. Umair; Abbas, G.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we present the new technique for discussing the dynamical motion of neutral as well as charged particles in the absence/presence of a magnetic field around the time conformal Schwarzschild black hole. Initially, we find the numerical solutions of geodesics of the Schwarzschild black hole and the time conformal Schwarzschild black hole. We observe that the Schwarzschild spacetime admits the time conformal factor e^{ɛ f(t)}, where f( t) is an arbitrary function and ɛ is very small, which causes a perturbation in the spacetimes. This technique also re-scales the energy content of spacetime. We also investigate the thermal stability, horizons and energy conditions corresponding to time conformal Schwarzschild spacetime. Also, we examine the dynamics of a neutral and charged particle around a time conformal Schwarzschild black hole. We investigate the circumstances under which the particle can escape from the vicinity of a black hole after collision with another particle. We analyze the effective potential and effective force of a particle in the presence of a magnetic field with angular momentum graphically.

  13. Bifurcation and complex dynamics of a discrete-time predator-prey system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Sohel Rana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of a discrete-time predator-prey system of Holling-I type in the closed first quadrant R+2. The existence and local stability of positive fixed point of the discrete dynamical system is analyzed algebraically. It is shown that the system undergoes a flip bifurcation and a Neimark-Sacker bifurcation in the interior of R+2 by using bifurcation theory. It has been found that the dynamical behavior of the model is very sensitive to the parameter values and the initial conditions. Numerical simulation results not only show the consistence with the theoretical analysis but also display the new and interesting dynamic behaviors, including phase portraits, period-9, 10, 20-orbits, attracting invariant circle, cascade of period-doubling bifurcation from period-20 leading to chaos, quasi-periodic orbits, and sudden disappearance of the chaotic dynamics and attracting chaotic set. In particular, we observe that when the prey is in chaotic dynamic, the predator can tend to extinction or to a stable equilibrium. The Lyapunov exponents are numerically computed to characterize the complexity of the dynamical behaviors. The analysis and results in this paper are interesting in mathematics and biology.

  14. Dynamical electron-phonon coupling, G W self-consistency, and vertex effect on the electronic band gap of ice and liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei, Vafa; Bredow, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    We study the impact of dynamical electron-phonon (el-ph) effects on the electronic band gap of ice and liquid water by accounting for frequency-dependent Fan contributions in the el-ph mediated self-energy within the many-body perturbation theory (MBPT). We find that the dynamical el-ph coupling effects greatly reduce the static el-ph band-gap correction of the hydrogen-rich molecular ice crystal from-2.46 to -0.23 eV in great contrast to the result of Monserrat et al. [Phys. Rev. B 92, 140302 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.140302]. This is of particular importance as otherwise the static el-ph gap correction would considerably reduce the electronic band gap, leading to considerable underestimation of the intense peaks of optical absorption spectra of ice which would be in great disagreement to experimental references. By contrast, the static el-ph gap correction of liquid water is very moderate (-0.32 eV), and inclusion of dynamical effects slightly reduces the gap correction to -0.19 eV. Further, we determine the diverse sensitivity of ice and liquid water to the G W self-consistency and show that the energy-only self-consistent approach (GnWn ) exhibits large implicit vertex character in comparison to the quasiparticle self-consistent approach, for which an explicit calculation of vertex corrections is necessary for good agreement with experiment.

  15. Effects of dynamic response time in an evolving market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Li-Xin; Qiu, Tian; Chen, Bi-Hui; Liu, Cai-Feng

    2009-03-01

    Considering the time scales of global information and personal reaction, we study the role of dynamic response time in the evolution of collective behavior in an evolving market. The insensitiveness to the market information makes the population cluster around a kind of extreme behavior, in which they always follow what happened last time, while a sensitive population tends to self-segregate into opposing groups. The average success rate R among all the agents is found to have a nonmonotonic dependence on the time scale parameter q. There exists a critical value below (above) which R decreases (increases) with the rise of q. Theoretical analyses demonstrate that the higher efficiency found in the market with an insensitive population is related to its predictability. In such a predictable market, the agents following current prediction have a higher winning probability than those rejecting it. Analytical calculations are in good agreement with numerical data.

  16. Acute effects of static and dynamic stretching on balance, agility, reaction time and movement time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzopoulos, Dimitris; Galazoulas, Christos; Patikas, Dimitrios; Kotzamanidis, Christos

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of three different stretching protocols on balance, agility, reaction time and movement time of the upper limbs. Participants were thirty one female high school athletes (age = 17.3 ± 0.5 yr.). All participants performed one of the following protocols on different days: (a) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min static stretching (SS), (b) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min dynamic stretching (DS), and (c) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min of rest (NS). After the protocols participants performed the following tests: dynamic balance, 505 agility test, reaction time (time between a sound stimulus and release of a button) and movement time (movement of the upper extremity over a 0.5 m distance). The order of stretching protocols and performance tests were counterbalanced to avoid carryover effects. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed significant main effects for all variables except reaction time. The DS protocol compared to SS performed significantly better in balance, agility and movement time. Additionally, the DS protocol compared to NS performed significantly better in agility. According to the results of the study, a DS protocol is more appropriate than SS for activities that require balance, rapid change of running direction (agility) and movement time of the upper extremities. Key pointsStatic stretching has a negative effect on balance and agility performance compared to dynamic stretching.There was no effect of the stretching protocols on reaction time.Dynamic stretching was more effective than static stretching for increasing movement time of the upper extremities.

  17. The Regularity and Irregularity of Travel: an Analysis of the Consistency of Travel Times Associated with Subsistence, Maintenance and Discretionary Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Longden, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Regular and irregular travel patterns coincide with different underlying purposes of travel and days of the week. Within this paper, it is shown that the balance between subsistence (i.e. work) and discretionary (i.e. leisure) activities is related to differences in travel patterns and explains consistency across years. Using eight years of time use diary entries this paper finds that travel time related to subsistence activities tends to be regular and stable. In contrast, travel time associ...

  18. Space-time Contraction and the Dynamics of Urban Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Pumain

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available An attempt is made to identify the dynamics of urban systems during the historical process of their evolution. An illustration is made with the case of European cities between 1200 and 1990, using harmonised historical data bases. Simple maps show first a general expansion in cities number and size over time, reflecting the ability of the system to continuously adapt its structure over time. A second trend is an increased hierarchisation in city size, which may be related to the continuous improvement in the speed and capacity of transportation means. Because of this space-time contraction, large cities short-circuit small towns, and inequalities in city size are widening. A third trend leading to a spatial reorganisation, emerges from maps of the urban population potentials. Among all possible mathematical equations and parameters values which could describe the intensity and the spatial range of interactions between cities, we choose those which give rather stable results and which are compatible with the analysis of urban historians, as De Vries, Braudel, Bairoch, Hohenberg and Lees, for the centuries preceding industrial revolution, by using evaluations of distances in terms of time and cost. Urban systems dynamics is better approached with reference to this relative space than on usual topographic maps.

  19. Dynamic ADMM for Real-time Optimal Power Flow: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall-Anese, Emiliano [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-02-23

    This paper considers distribution networks featuring distributed energy resources (DERs), and develops a dynamic optimization method to maximize given operational objectives in real time while adhering to relevant network constraints. The design of the dynamic algorithm is based on suitable linearizations of the AC power flow equations, and it leverages the so-called alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). The steps of the ADMM, however, are suitably modified to accommodate appropriate measurements from the distribution network and the DERs. With the aid of these measurements, the resultant algorithm can enforce given operational constraints in spite of inaccuracies in the representation of the AC power flows, and it avoids ubiquitous metering to gather the state of non-controllable resources. Optimality and convergence of the propose algorithm are established in terms of tracking of the solution of a convex surrogate of the AC optimal power flow problem.

  20. Real-time dynamic PC image generation techniques for high performance and high dynamic range fidelity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunfield, Dennis H.; Trimble, Darian E.; Fronckowiak, Thomas, Jr.; Ballard, Gary; Morris, Joesph

    2008-04-01

    AMRDEC has developed and implemented new techniques for rendering real-time 32-bit floating point energy-conserved dynamic scenes using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) Personal Computer (PC) based hardware and high performance nVidia Graphics Processing Units (GPU). The AMRDEC IGStudio rendering framework with the real-time Joint Scientific Image Generator (JSIG) core has been integrated into numerous AMRDEC Hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) facilities, successfully replacing the lower fidelity legacy SGI hardware and software. JSIG uses high dynamic range unnormalized radiometric 32-bit floating point rendering through the use of GPU frame buffer objects (FBOs). A high performance nested zoom anti-aliasing (NZAA) technique was developed to address performance and geometric errors of past zoom anti-aliasing (ZAA) implementations. The NZAA capability for multi-object and occluded object representations includes: cluster ZAA, object ZAA, sub-object ZAA, and point source generation for unresolved objects. This technique has an optimal 128x128 pixel asymmetrical field-of-view zoom. The current NZAA capability supports up to 8 objects in real-time with a near future capability of increasing to a theoretical 128 objects in real-time. JSIG performs other dynamic entity effects which are applied in vertex and fragment shaders. These effects include floating point dynamic signature application, dynamic model ablation heating models, and per-material thermal emissivity rolloff interpolated on a per-pixel zoomed window basis. JSIG additionally performs full scene per-pixel effects in a post render process. These effects include real-time convolutions, optical scene corrections, per-frame calibrations, and energy distribution blur used to compensate for projector element energy limitations.

  1. All-time dynamics of continuous-time random walks on complex networks

    OpenAIRE

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of continuous-time random walks (CTRW) is a generalization of ordinary random walk models, and it is a powerful tool for investigating a broad spectrum of phenomena in natural, engineering, social and economic sciences. Recently, several theoretical approaches have been developed that allowed to analyze explicitly dynamics of CTRW at all times, which is critically important for understanding mechanisms of underlying phenomena. However, theoretical analysis has been done mostly for...

  2. Abdominal and obstetric applications of a dynamically focused phased array real time ultrasound system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, C L; Trought, W S; von Ramm, O T; Thurstone, F L

    1980-05-01

    Abdominal and obstetric applications of a dynamically focused phased array real time ultrasonic system are described. This work was performed utilising both the Thaumascan (two-dimensional, high resolution, actual time, ultrasound, multi-element array scanner) and the first commercial unit based on this system, the Grumman RT-400. Examples of normal and pathological anatomy are presented from over 300 examinations performed to date, including a series of 28 abdominal aortic aneurysms studied with the RT-400. Following electronic alterations in the Thaumascan with resultant improvement in the grey scale, prospective analyses in 86 obstetric and 23 abdominal examinations were undertaken. These studies indicate that fetal, intra-uterine, and abdominal structures can be rapidly and consistently imaged. The value of real time ultrasonic scanning in obstetric and abdominal examinations is illustrated. The principles of dynamically focused phased arrays are described, and the merits and limitations of these systems are discussed.

  3. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Time-Dependent Quantum Molecular Dynamics : Theory and Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lathouwers, L

    1992-01-01

    From March 30th to April 3rd, 1992, a NATO Advanced Research workshop entitled "Time Dependent Quantum Molecular Dynamics: Theory and Experiment" was held at Snowbird, Utah. The organizing committee consisted of J. BROECKHOVE (Antwerp, Belgium), L. CEDERBAUM (Heidelberg, Germany), L. LATHOUWERS (Antwerp, Belgium), N. OHRN (Gainesville, Florida) and J. SIMONS (Salt Lake City, Utah). Fifty-two participants from eleven different countries attended the meeting at which thirty-three talks and one poster session were held. Twenty-eight participants submitted contributions to the proceedings of the meeting, which are reproduced in this volume. The workshop brought together experts in different areas 0 f molecular quantum dynamics, all adhering to the time dependent approach. The aim was to discuss and compare methods and applications. The ~amiliarityo~ the aUdience with the concepts o~ time dependent approaches greatly facilitated topical discussions and probing towards new applications. A broad area of subject matt...

  4. Late-time dynamics of rapidly rotating black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glampedakis, K.; Andersson, N.

    2001-01-01

    We study the late-time behaviour of a dynamically perturbed rapidly rotating black hole. Considering an extreme Kerr black hole, we show that the large number of virtually undamped quasinormal modes (that exist for nonzero values of the azimuthal eigenvalue m) combine in such a way that the field (as observed at infinity) oscillates with an amplitude that decays as 1/t at late times. For a near extreme black hole, these modes, collectively, give rise to an exponentially decaying field which, however, is considerably 'long-lived'. Our analytic results are verified using numerical time-evolutions of the Teukolsky equation. Moreover, we argue that the physical mechanism behind the observed behaviour is the presence of a 'superradiance resonance cavity' immediately outside the black hole. We present this new feature in detail, and discuss whether it may be relevant for astrophysical black holes. (author)

  5. Self-consistent residual dipolar coupling based model-free analysis for the robust determination of nanosecond to microsecond protein dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakomek, Nils-Alexander; Walter, Korvin F. A.; Fares, Christophe; Lange, Oliver F.; Groot, Bert L. de; Grubmueller, Helmut; Brueschweiler, Rafael; Munk, Axel; Becker, Stefan; Meiler, Jens; Griesinger, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) provide information about the dynamic average orientation of inter-nuclear vectors and amplitudes of motion up to milliseconds. They complement relaxation methods, especially on a time-scale window that we have called supra-τ c (τ c c rdc > = 0.72 ± 0.02 compared to LS 2 > = 0.778 ± 0.003 for the Lipari-Szabo order parameters, indicating that the inclusion of the supra-τ c window increases the averaged amplitude of mobility observed in the sub-τ c window by about 34%. For the β-strand spanned by residues Lys48 to Leu50, an alternating pattern of backbone NH RDC order parameter S rdc 2 (NH) = (0.59, 0.72, 0.59) was extracted. The backbone of Lys48, whose side chain is known to be involved in the poly-ubiquitylation process that leads to protein degradation, is very mobile on the supra-τ c time scale (S rdc 2 (NH) = 0.59 ± 0.03), while it is inconspicuous (S LS 2 (NH) = 0.82) on the sub-τ c as well as on μs-ms relaxation dispersion time scales. The results of this work differ from previous RDC dynamics studies of ubiquitin in the sense that the results are essentially independent of structural noise providing a much more robust assessment of dynamic effects that underlie the RDC data

  6. Relationships between Isometric Force-Time Characteristics and Dynamic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Dos’Santos

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP force-time characteristics (peak force and time-specific force vales (100–250 ms and dynamic performance and compare dynamic performance between stronger and weaker athletes. Forty-three athletes from different sports (rowing, soccer, bicycle motocross, and hockey performed three trials of the squat jump (SJ, countermovement jump (CMJ, and IMTP, and performed a one repetition maximum power clean (PC. Reactive strength index modified (RSImod was also calculated from the CMJ. Statistically significant large correlations between IMTP force-time characteristics and PC (ρ = 0.569–0.674, p < 0.001, and moderate correlations between IMTP force-time characteristics (excluding force at 100 ms and RSImod (ρ = 0.389–0.449, p = 0.013–0.050 were observed. Only force at 250 ms demonstrated a statistically significant moderate correlation with CMJ height (ρ = 0.346, p = 0.016 and no statistically significant associations were observed between IMTP force-time characteristics and SJ height. Stronger athletes (top 10 demonstrated statistically significantly greater CMJ heights, RSImods, and PCs (p ≤ 0.004, g = 1.32–1.89 compared to weaker (bottom 10 athletes, but no differences in SJ height were observed (p = 0.871, g = 0.06. These findings highlight that the ability to apply rapidly high levels of force in short time intervals is integral for PC, CMJ height, and reactive strength.

  7. Classification of genomic signals using dynamic time warping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skutkova, Helena; Vitek, Martin; Babula, Petr; Kizek, Rene; Provaznik, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    Classification methods of DNA most commonly use comparison of the differences in DNA symbolic records, which requires the global multiple sequence alignment. This solution is often inappropriate, causing a number of imprecisions and requires additional user intervention for exact alignment of the similar segments. The similar segments in DNA represented as a signal are characterized by a similar shape of the curve. The DNA alignment in genomic signals may adjust whole sections not only individual symbols. The dynamic time warping (DTW) is suitable for this purpose and can replace the multiple alignment of symbolic sequences in applications, such as phylogenetic analysis. The proposed method is composed of three main parts. The first part represent conversion of symbolic representation of DNA sequences in the form of a string of A,C,G,T symbols to signal representation in the form of cumulated phase of complex components defined for each symbol. Next part represents signals size adjustment realized by standard signal preprocessing methods: median filtration, detrendization and resampling. The final part necessary for genomic signals comparison is position and length alignment of genomic signals by dynamic time warping (DTW). The application of the DTW on set of genomic signals was evaluated in dendrogram construction using cluster analysis. The resulting tree was compared with a classical phylogenetic tree reconstructed using multiple alignment. The classification of genomic signals using the DTW is evolutionary closer to phylogeny of organisms. This method is more resistant to errors in the sequences and less dependent on the number of input sequences. Classification of genomic signals using dynamic time warping is an adequate variant to phylogenetic analysis using the symbolic DNA sequences alignment; in addition, it is robust, quick and more precise technique.

  8. Time-Frequency Dynamics of Biofuel-Fuel-Food System

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vácha, Lukáš; Janda, K.; Krištoufek, Ladislav; Zilberman, D.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 1 (2013), s. 233-241 ISSN 0140-9883 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP402/12/G097 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP402/11/0948 Program:GA Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : biofuels * correlations * wavelet coherence Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 2.580, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/E/vacha-time-frequency dynamics of biofuels-fuels-food system.pdf

  9. Complete Abstractions of Dynamical Systems by Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Christoffer; Wisniewski, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    the vector field, which allows the generation of a complete abstraction. To compute the functions that define the subdivision of the state space in an algorithm, we formulate a sum of squares optimization problem. This optimization problem finds the best subdivisioning functions, with respect to the ability......This paper addresses the generation of complete abstractions of polynomial dynamical systems by timed automata. For the proposed abstraction, the state space is divided into cells by sublevel sets of functions. We identify a relation between these functions and their directional derivatives along...

  10. Extending the Dynamic Range of a Time Projection Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estee, Justin; S πRIT Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The use of Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) in intermediate heavy ion reactions faces some challenges in addressing the energy losses that range from the small energy loss of relativistic pions to the large energy loss of slow moving heavy ions. A typical trade-off can be to set the smallest desired signals to be well within the lower limits of the dynamic range of the electronics while allowing for some larger signals to saturate the electronics. With wire plane anodes, signals from readout pads further away from the track remain unsaturated and allow signals from tracks with saturated pads to be accurately recovered. We illustrate this technique using data from the SAMURAI Pion-Reconstruction and Ion-Tracker (S πRIT) TPC , which recently measured pions and light charged particles in collisions of Sn+Sn isotopes. Our method exploits knowledge of how the induced charge distribution depends on the distance from the track to smoothly extend dynamic range even when some of the pads in the track are saturated. To accommodate the analysis of slow moving heavy ions, we have extended the Bichsel energy loss distributions to handle slower moving ions as well. In this talk, I will discuss a combined approach which successfully extends the dynamic range of the TPC electronics. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE under Grant Nos. DE-SC0014530, DE-NA0002923, US NSF Grant No. PHY-1565546 and the Japan MEXT KAKENHI Grant No. 24105004.

  11. All-time dynamics of continuous-time random walks on complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B

    2013-02-28

    The concept of continuous-time random walks (CTRW) is a generalization of ordinary random walk models, and it is a powerful tool for investigating a broad spectrum of phenomena in natural, engineering, social, and economic sciences. Recently, several theoretical approaches have been developed that allowed to analyze explicitly dynamics of CTRW at all times, which is critically important for understanding mechanisms of underlying phenomena. However, theoretical analysis has been done mostly for systems with a simple geometry. Here we extend the original method based on generalized master equations to analyze all-time dynamics of CTRW models on complex networks. Specific calculations are performed for models on lattices with branches and for models on coupled parallel-chain lattices. Exact expressions for velocities and dispersions are obtained. Generalized fluctuations theorems for CTRW models on complex networks are discussed.

  12. Introduction to Focus Issue: Time-delay dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erneux, Thomas; Javaloyes, Julien; Wolfrum, Matthias; Yanchuk, Serhiy

    2017-11-01

    The field of dynamical systems with time delay is an active research area that connects practically all scientific disciplines including mathematics, physics, engineering, biology, neuroscience, physiology, economics, and many others. This Focus Issue brings together contributions from both experimental and theoretical groups and emphasizes a large variety of applications. In particular, lasers and optoelectronic oscillators subject to time-delayed feedbacks have been explored by several authors for their specific dynamical output, but also because they are ideal test-beds for experimental studies of delay induced phenomena. Topics include the control of cavity solitons, as light spots in spatially extended systems, new devices for chaos communication or random number generation, higher order locking phenomena between delay and laser oscillation period, and systematic bifurcation studies of mode-locked laser systems. Moreover, two original theoretical approaches are explored for the so-called Low Frequency Fluctuations, a particular chaotical regime in laser output which has attracted a lot of interest for more than 30 years. Current hot problems such as the synchronization properties of networks of delay-coupled units, novel stabilization techniques, and the large delay limit of a delay differential equation are also addressed in this special issue. In addition, analytical and numerical tools for bifurcation problems with or without noise and two reviews on concrete questions are proposed. The first review deals with the rich dynamics of simple delay climate models for El Nino Southern Oscillations, and the second review concentrates on neuromorphic photonic circuits where optical elements are used to emulate spiking neurons. Finally, two interesting biological problems are considered in this Focus Issue, namely, multi-strain epidemic models and the interaction of glucose and insulin for more effective treatment.

  13. Continuous time modelling of dynamical spatial lattice data observed at sparsely distributed times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jakob Gulddahl; Møller, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    , and they exhibit spatial interaction. For specificity we consider a particular dynamical spatial lattice data set which has previously been analysed by a discrete time model involving unknown normalizing constants. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using continuous time processes compared......Summary. We consider statistical and computational aspects of simulation-based Bayesian inference for a spatial-temporal model based on a multivariate point process which is only observed at sparsely distributed times. The point processes are indexed by the sites of a spatial lattice...

  14. Seasonal dynamics of bacterial meningitis: a time-series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paireau, Juliette; Chen, Angelica; Broutin, Helene; Grenfell, Bryan; Basta, Nicole E

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial meningitis, which is caused mainly by Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, inflicts a substantial burden of disease worldwide. Yet, the temporal dynamics of this disease are poorly characterised and many questions remain about the ecology of the disease. We aimed to comprehensively assess seasonal trends in bacterial meningitis on a global scale. We developed the first bacterial meningitis global database by compiling monthly incidence data as reported by country-level surveillance systems. Using country-level wavelet analysis, we identified whether a 12 month periodic component (annual seasonality) was detected in time-series that had at least 5 years of data with at least 40 cases reported per year. We estimated the mean timing of disease activity by computing the centre of gravity of the distribution of cases and investigated whether synchrony exists between the three pathogens responsible for most cases of bacterial meningitis. We used country-level data from 66 countries, including from 47 countries outside the meningitis belt in sub-Saharan Africa. A persistent seasonality was detected in 49 (96%) of the 51 time-series from 38 countries eligible for inclusion in the wavelet analyses. The mean timing of disease activity had a latitudinal trend, with bacterial meningitis seasons peaking during the winter months in countries in both the northern and southern hemispheres. The three pathogens shared similar seasonality, but time-shifts differed slightly by country. Our findings provide key insight into the seasonal dynamics of bacterial meningitis and add to knowledge about the global epidemiology of meningitis and the host, environment, and pathogen characteristics driving these patterns. Comprehensive understanding of global seasonal trends in meningitis could be used to design more effective prevention and control strategies. Princeton University Health Grand Challenge, US National Institutes of Health (NIH

  15. Monte Carlo techniques for real-time quantum dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, Mark R.; Davis, Matthew J.; Drummond, Peter D.; Corney, Joel F.

    2007-01-01

    The stochastic-gauge representation is a method of mapping the equation of motion for the quantum mechanical density operator onto a set of equivalent stochastic differential equations. One of the stochastic variables is termed the 'weight', and its magnitude is related to the importance of the stochastic trajectory. We investigate the use of Monte Carlo algorithms to improve the sampling of the weighted trajectories and thus reduce sampling error in a simulation of quantum dynamics. The method can be applied to calculations in real time, as well as imaginary time for which Monte Carlo algorithms are more-commonly used. The Monte-Carlo algorithms are applicable when the weight is guaranteed to be real, and we demonstrate how to ensure this is the case. Examples are given for the anharmonic oscillator, where large improvements over stochastic sampling are observed

  16. Managing time-substitutable electricity usage using dynamic controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Soumyadip; Hosking, Jonathan R.; Natarajan, Ramesh; Subramaniam, Shivaram; Zhang, Xiaoxuan

    2017-02-21

    A predictive-control approach allows an electricity provider to monitor and proactively manage peak and off-peak residential intra-day electricity usage in an emerging smart energy grid using time-dependent dynamic pricing incentives. The daily load is modeled as time-shifted, but cost-differentiated and substitutable, copies of the continuously-consumed electricity resource, and a consumer-choice prediction model is constructed to forecast the corresponding intra-day shares of total daily load according to this model. This is embedded within an optimization framework for managing the daily electricity usage. A series of transformations are employed, including the reformulation-linearization technique (RLT) to obtain a Mixed-Integer Programming (MIP) model representation of the resulting nonlinear optimization problem. In addition, various regulatory and pricing constraints are incorporated in conjunction with the specified profit and capacity utilization objectives.

  17. Managing time-substitutable electricity usage using dynamic controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Soumyadip; Hosking, Jonathan R.; Natarajan, Ramesh; Subramaniam, Shivaram; Zhang, Xiaoxuan

    2017-02-07

    A predictive-control approach allows an electricity provider to monitor and proactively manage peak and off-peak residential intra-day electricity usage in an emerging smart energy grid using time-dependent dynamic pricing incentives. The daily load is modeled as time-shifted, but cost-differentiated and substitutable, copies of the continuously-consumed electricity resource, and a consumer-choice prediction model is constructed to forecast the corresponding intra-day shares of total daily load according to this model. This is embedded within an optimization framework for managing the daily electricity usage. A series of transformations are employed, including the reformulation-linearization technique (RLT) to obtain a Mixed-Integer Programming (MIP) model representation of the resulting nonlinear optimization problem. In addition, various regulatory and pricing constraints are incorporated in conjunction with the specified profit and capacity utilization objectives.

  18. Hamiltonian Dynamics of Doubly-Foliable Space-Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Gergely

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2 + 1 + 1 decomposition of space-time is useful in monitoring the temporal evolution of gravitational perturbations/waves in space-times with a spatial direction singled-out by symmetries. Such an approach based on a perpendicular double foliation has been employed in the framework of dark matter and dark energy-motivated scalar-tensor gravitational theories for the discussion of the odd sector perturbations of spherically-symmetric gravity. For the even sector, however, the perpendicularity has to be suppressed in order to allow for suitable gauge freedom, recovering the 10th metric variable. The 2 + 1 + 1 decomposition of the Einstein–Hilbert action leads to the identification of the canonical pairs, the Hamiltonian and momentum constraints. Hamiltonian dynamics is then derived via Poisson brackets.

  19. Dynamic backcalculation with different load-time histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Stine Skov; Levenberg, Eyal

    2017-01-01

    This paper focused attention to the falling weight deflectometer (FWD) load-time history. For a commonly used device, it studied the pulse generation mechanism and the influence of different load histories on backcalculation results. In this connection, a semi-analytic impact theory was first...... introduced for realistically simulating FWD pulse generation. Then a newly developed finite-element code was presented for FWD interpretation; the code is capable of addressing dynamics, time-dependent layer properties, and quasi-nonlinear behaviour. Both new developments were demonstrated...... be placed on generating diverse FWD pulse histories. Collectively, the resulting deflection histories will contain pertinent constitutive information for supporting the calibration of more complex pavement models....

  20. Real Time Mapping and Dynamic Navigation for Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maki K. Habib

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the importance, the complexity and the challenges of mapping mobile robot?s unknown and dynamic environment, besides the role of sensors and the problems inherited in map building. These issues remain largely an open research problems in developing dynamic navigation systems for mobile robots. The paper presenst the state of the art in map building and localization for mobile robots navigating within unknown environment, and then introduces a solution for the complex problem of autonomous map building and maintenance method with focus on developing an incremental grid based mapping technique that is suitable for real-time obstacle detection and avoidance. In this case, the navigation of mobile robots can be treated as a problem of tracking geometric features that occur naturally in the environment of the robot. The robot maps its environment incrementally using the concept of occupancy grids and the fusion of multiple ultrasonic sensory information while wandering in it and stay away from all obstacles. To ensure real-time operation with limited resources, as well as to promote extensibility, the mapping and obstacle avoidance modules are deployed in parallel and distributed framework. Simulation based experiments has been conducted and illustrated to show the validity of the developed mapping and obstacle avoidance approach.

  1. Connectionist Architectures for Time Series Prediction of Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigend, Andreas Sebastian

    We investigate the effectiveness of connectionist networks for predicting the future continuation of temporal sequences. The problem of overfitting, particularly serious for short records of noisy data, is addressed by the method of weight-elimination: a term penalizing network complexity is added to the usual cost function in back-propagation. We describe the dynamics of the procedure and clarify the meaning of the parameters involved. From a Bayesian perspective, the complexity term can be usefully interpreted as an assumption about prior distribution of the weights. We analyze three time series. On the benchmark sunspot series, the networks outperform traditional statistical approaches. We show that the network performance does not deteriorate when there are more input units than needed. In the second example, the notoriously noisy foreign exchange rates series, we pick one weekday and one currency (DM vs. US). Given exchange rate information up to and including a Monday, the task is to predict the rate for the following Tuesday. Weight-elimination manages to extract a significant part of the dynamics and makes the solution interpretable. In the third example, the networks predict the resource utilization of a chaotic computational ecosystem for hundreds of steps forward in time.

  2. Assessing Coupling Dynamics from an Ensemble of Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Gómez-Herrero

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Finding interdependency relations between time series provides valuable knowledge about the processes that generated the signals. Information theory sets a natural framework for important classes of statistical dependencies. However, a reliable estimation from information-theoretic functionals is hampered when the dependency to be assessed is brief or evolves in time. Here, we show that these limitations can be partly alleviated when we have access to an ensemble of independent repetitions of the time series. In particular, we gear a data-efficient estimator of probability densities to make use of the full structure of trial-based measures. By doing so, we can obtain time-resolved estimates for a family of entropy combinations (including mutual information, transfer entropy and their conditional counterparts, which are more accurate than the simple average of individual estimates over trials. We show with simulated and real data generated by coupled electronic circuits that the proposed approach allows one to recover the time-resolved dynamics of the coupling between different subsystems.

  3. Real-time dynamics of dissipative quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    The first part of this thesis motivates a real time approach to the dynamics of dissipative quantum systems. We review previous imaginary time methods for calculating escape rates and discuss their applications to the analysis of data in macroscopic quantum tunneling experiments. In tunneling experiments on heavily damped Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices, the instanton method gave results that compare reasonably well with data. In tunneling experiments on weakly damped Current Biased Josephson Junctions, two problems arise. First, the classical limit of the instanton result disagrees with the classical rate of thermal activation. Second, the instanton method cannot predict the microwave enhancement of escape rates. In the third chapter, we discuss our real time approach to the dynamics of dissipative systems in terms of a kinetic equation for the reduced density matrix. We demonstrate some known equilibrium properties of dissipative systems through the kinetic equation and derived the bath induced widths and energy shifts. In the low damping limit, the kinetic equation reduces to a much simpler master equation. The classical limit of the master equation is completely equivalent to the Fokker-Planck equation that describes thermal activation. In the fourth chapter, we apply the master equation to the problem of tunneling and resonance enhancement of tunneling in weakly damped current biased Josephson junctions. In the classical regime, microwaves of the appropriate frequency induce resonances between many neighboring levels and an asymmetrical resonance peak is measured. We can calibrate the junction parameters by fitting the stationary solution of the master equation to the classical resonance data. In the quantum regime, the stationary solution of the master equation, predicts well-resolved resonance peaks which agree very well with the observed data

  4. Dynamic Web Expression for Near-real-time Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, K. G.; Newman, R. L.; Nayak, A.; Vernon, F. L.; Nelson, C.; Hansen, T. S.; Yuen-Wong, R.

    2003-12-01

    As near-real-time sensor grids become more widespread, and processing systems based on them become more powerful, summarizing the raw and derived information products and delivering them to the end user become increasingly important both for ongoing monitoring and as a platform for cross-disciplinary research. We have re-engineered the dbrecenteqs program, which was designed to express real-time earthquake databases into dynamic web pages, with several powerful new technologies. While the application is still most fully developed for seismic data, the infrastructure is extensible (and being extended) to create a real-time information architecture for numerous signal domains. This work provides a practical, lightweight approach suitable for individual seismic and sensor networks, which does not require a full 'web-services' implementation. Nevertheless, the technologies here are extensible to larger applications such as the Storage-Resource-Broker based VORB project. The technologies included in the new system blend real-time relational databases as a focus for processing and data handling; an XML->XSLT architecture as the core of the web mirroring; PHP extensions to Antelope (the environmental monitoring-system context adopted for RoadNET) in order to support complex, user-driven interactivity; and VRML output for expression of information as web-browsable three-dimensional worlds.

  5. Dynamic fiber Bragg grating strain sensor interrogation with real-time measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinwoo; Kwon, Yong Seok; Ko, Myeong Ock; Jeon, Min Yong

    2017-11-01

    We demonstrate a 1550 nm band resonance Fourier-domain mode-locked (FDML) fiber laser with fiber Bragg grating (FBG) array. Using the FDML fiber laser, we successfully demonstrate real-time monitoring of dynamic FBG strain sensor interrogation for structural health monitoring. The resonance FDML fiber laser consists of six multiplexed FBGs, which are arranged in series with delay fiber lengths. It is operated by driving the fiber Fabry-Perot tunable filter (FFP-TF) with a sinusoidal waveform at a frequency corresponding to the round-trip time of the laser cavity. Each FBG forms a laser cavity independently in the FDML fiber laser because the light travels different length for each FBG. The very closely positioned two FBGs in a pair are operated simultaneously with a frequency in the FDML fiber laser. The spatial positions of the sensing pair can be distinguished from the variation of the applied frequency to the FFP-TF. One of the FBGs in the pair is used as a reference signal and the other one is fixed on the piezoelectric transducer stack to apply the dynamic strain. We successfully achieve real-time measurement of the abrupt change of the frequencies applied to the FBG without any signal processing delay. The real-time monitoring system is displayed simultaneously on the monitor for the variation of the two peaks, the modulation interval of the two peaks, and their fast Fourier transform spectrum. The frequency resolution of the dynamic variation could reach up to 0.5 Hz for 2 s integration time. It depends on the integration time to measure the dynamic variation. We believe that the real-time monitoring system will have a potential application for structural health monitoring.

  6. Approximate but accurate quantum dynamics from the Mori formalism. II. Equilibrium time correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Castillo, Andrés; Reichman, David R.

    2017-02-01

    The ability to efficiently and accurately calculate equilibrium time correlation functions of many-body condensed phase quantum systems is one of the outstanding problems in theoretical chemistry. The Nakajima-Zwanzig-Mori formalism coupled to the self-consistent solution of the memory kernel has recently proven to be highly successful for the computation of nonequilibrium dynamical averages. Here, we extend this formalism to treat symmetrized equilibrium time correlation functions for the spin-boson model. Following the first paper in this series [A. Montoya-Castillo and D. R. Reichman, J. Chem. Phys. 144, 184104 (2016)], we use a Dyson-type expansion of the projected propagator to obtain a self-consistent solution for the memory kernel that requires only the calculation of normally evolved auxiliary kernels. We employ the approximate mean-field Ehrenfest method to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. Via comparison with numerically exact results for the correlation function Cz z(t ) =Re ⟨σz(0 ) σz(t ) ⟩ , we show that the current scheme affords remarkable boosts in accuracy and efficiency over bare Ehrenfest dynamics. We further explore the sensitivity of the resulting dynamics to the choice of kernel closures and the accuracy of the initial canonical density operator.

  7. What does scalar timing tell us about neural dynamics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harel Z Shouval

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Scalar Timing Law, which is a temporal domain generalization of the well known Weber Law, states that the errors in estimating temporal intervals scale linearly with the durations of the intervals. Linear scaling has been studied extensively in human and animal models and holds over several orders of magnitude, though to date there is no agreed upon explanation for its physiological basis. Starting from the assumption that behavioral variability stems from neural variability, this work shows how to derive firing rate functions that are consistent with scalar timing. We show that firing rate functions with a log-power form, and a set of parameters that depend on spike count statistics, can account for scalar timing. Our derivation depends on a linear approximation, but we use simulations to validate the theory and show that log-power firing rate functions result in scalar timing over a large range of times and parameters.Simulation results also show that our theory as first posed exhibits a slight bias towards overestimation.We show that this bias can be corrected using a simple iterative approach to learn a decision threshold.

  8. Long-time atomistic dynamics through a new self-adaptive accelerated molecular dynamics method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, N.; Yang, L.; Gao, F.; Kurtz, R. J.; West, D.; Zhang, S.

    2017-02-27

    A self-adaptive accelerated molecular dynamics method is developed to model infrequent atomic- scale events, especially those events that occur on a rugged free-energy surface. Key in the new development is the use of the total displacement of the system at a given temperature to construct a boost-potential, which is slowly increased to accelerate the dynamics. The temperature is slowly increased to accelerate the dynamics. By allowing the system to evolve from one steady-state con guration to another by overcoming the transition state, this self-evolving approach makes it possible to explore the coupled motion of species that migrate on vastly different time scales. The migrations of single vacancy (V) and small He-V clusters, and the growth of nano-sized He-V clusters in Fe for times in the order of seconds are studied by this new method. An interstitial- assisted mechanism is rst explored for the migration of a helium-rich He-V cluster, while a new two-component Ostwald ripening mechanism is suggested for He-V cluster growth.

  9. Population dynamics of minimally cognitive individuals. Part 2: Dynamics of time-dependent knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmieder, R.W.

    1995-07-01

    The dynamical principle for a population of interacting individuals with mutual pairwise knowledge, presented by the author in a previous paper for the case of constant knowledge, is extended to include the possibility that the knowledge is time-dependent. Several mechanisms are presented by which the mutual knowledge, represented by a matrix K, can be altered, leading to dynamical equations for K(t). The author presents various examples of the transient and long time asymptotic behavior of K(t) for populations of relatively isolated individuals interacting infrequently in local binary collisions. Among the effects observed in the numerical experiments are knowledge diffusion, learning transients, and fluctuating equilibria. This approach will be most appropriate to small populations of complex individuals such as simple animals, robots, computer networks, agent-mediated traffic, simple ecosystems, and games. Evidence of metastable states and intermittent switching leads them to envision a spectroscopy associated with such transitions that is independent of the specific physical individuals and the population. Such spectra may serve as good lumped descriptors of the collective emergent behavior of large classes of populations in which mutual knowledge is an important part of the dynamics.

  10. Consistency in suicide rates in twenty-two developed countries by gender over time 1874--78, 1974--76, and 1998--2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lars; Pritchard, Colin

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether the relative levels of suicide rates among the 22 developed countries were consistent over time 1974--76 v 2000--02 and to compare Durkheim's 11 European countries 1874--78 with their modern counterparts, including the 1984--86 period associated with the European recession. Data from the WHO of All Age "General Population Suicide Rates" (GPSR) by sex were calculated to obtain 3-year averages for the end-points. To determine the consistency of the levels of suicides a series of Spearman Rank Order correlations are calculated for each period. Highly significant correlations are found for men, women and total suicide rates between 1974--76 and 1998--2000, and for the Durkheim countries for the three review periods, indicating despite within-national variations over time, the relative rates between countries was consistent. This consistency suggests a certain national "suicide tradition" based on a complex interaction between cultural, sociological, recording/administrative, and genetic factors.

  11. Formal methods for discrete-time dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Belta, Calin; Aydin Gol, Ebru

    2017-01-01

    This book bridges fundamental gaps between control theory and formal methods. Although it focuses on discrete-time linear and piecewise affine systems, it also provides general frameworks for abstraction, analysis, and control of more general models. The book is self-contained, and while some mathematical knowledge is necessary, readers are not expected to have a background in formal methods or control theory. It rigorously defines concepts from formal methods, such as transition systems, temporal logics, model checking and synthesis. It then links these to the infinite state dynamical systems through abstractions that are intuitive and only require basic convex-analysis and control-theory terminology, which is provided in the appendix. Several examples and illustrations help readers understand and visualize the concepts introduced throughout the book.

  12. Improved real-time dynamics from imaginary frequency lattice simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Jan M.; Rothkopf, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    The computation of real-time properties, such as transport coefficients or bound state spectra of strongly interacting quantum fields in thermal equilibrium is a pressing matter. Since the sign problem prevents a direct evaluation of these quantities, lattice data needs to be analytically continued from the Euclidean domain of the simulation to Minkowski time, in general an ill-posed inverse problem. Here we report on a novel approach to improve the determination of real-time information in the form of spectral functions by setting up a simulation prescription in imaginary frequencies. By carefully distinguishing between initial conditions and quantum dynamics one obtains access to correlation functions also outside the conventional Matsubara frequencies. In particular the range between ω0 and ω1 = 2πT, which is most relevant for the inverse problem may be more highly resolved. In combination with the fact that in imaginary frequencies the kernel of the inverse problem is not an exponential but only a rational function we observe significant improvements in the reconstruction of spectral functions, demonstrated in a simple 0+1 dimensional scalar field theory toy model.

  13. Improved real-time dynamics from imaginary frequency lattice simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlowski Jan M.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The computation of real-time properties, such as transport coefficients or bound state spectra of strongly interacting quantum fields in thermal equilibrium is a pressing matter. Since the sign problem prevents a direct evaluation of these quantities, lattice data needs to be analytically continued from the Euclidean domain of the simulation to Minkowski time, in general an ill-posed inverse problem. Here we report on a novel approach to improve the determination of real-time information in the form of spectral functions by setting up a simulation prescription in imaginary frequencies. By carefully distinguishing between initial conditions and quantum dynamics one obtains access to correlation functions also outside the conventional Matsubara frequencies. In particular the range between ω0 and ω1 = 2πT, which is most relevant for the inverse problem may be more highly resolved. In combination with the fact that in imaginary frequencies the kernel of the inverse problem is not an exponential but only a rational function we observe significant improvements in the reconstruction of spectral functions, demonstrated in a simple 0+1 dimensional scalar field theory toy model.

  14. Evaluation of robotic surgery skills using dynamic time warping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jingyu; Xing, Yuan; Wang, Shuxin; Liang, Ke

    2017-12-01

    accompanied with the wide acceptance of robot assisted minimally invasive surgery (RMIS), the demand for efficient and objective surgical skills evaluation method is increased. Recently, with the development of medical engineering technology, several evaluation methods have been proposed. Among them, kinematic analysis, an unsupervised and data-based method, has been accepted by many researchers. However, this method is still limited by the number of metrics and unconvinced scoring system. This paper aims to propose a new evaluation method to assess surgical skills efficiently and objectively. this research proposed an efficient and effective surgical skills evaluation algorithm which used the trajectories of instrument tip and dynamic time warping (DTW) to provide trainees with real-time and summative feedback. The optimum trajectories based on 'Therbligs' theory was designed as a template. DTW algorithm was used to align actual trajectories to optimum trajectories with an evaluating indicator designed to emphasize the crucial motion features in surgical skills evaluation. The real-time feedback was obtained through a sliding time window to help trainees improve learning efficiency. experts (n = 2) and novices (n = 8) were invited to complete the peg transfer tasks and 60 instrument tip trajectories were assessed by the proposed algorithm. Significant differences between different groups were observed (experts' right trajectories versus experts' left trajectories, p = 0.0002; experts' right trajectories versus novices' right trajectories, p = 0.0124). In addition, evaluation results of trajectories with operational mistakes were significantly different from those of others. the proposed evaluation method showed its advantages in distinguishing and evaluating surgical performance. Given its ability to evaluate the performance based on kinematic information, the proposed evaluation method can be further developed in the future. Furthermore, because

  15. Classification of time series patterns from complex dynamic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schryver, J.C.; Rao, N.

    1998-07-01

    An increasing availability of high-performance computing and data storage media at decreasing cost is making possible the proliferation of large-scale numerical databases and data warehouses. Numeric warehousing enterprises on the order of hundreds of gigabytes to terabytes are a reality in many fields such as finance, retail sales, process systems monitoring, biomedical monitoring, surveillance and transportation. Large-scale databases are becoming more accessible to larger user communities through the internet, web-based applications and database connectivity. Consequently, most researchers now have access to a variety of massive datasets. This trend will probably only continue to grow over the next several years. Unfortunately, the availability of integrated tools to explore, analyze and understand the data warehoused in these archives is lagging far behind the ability to gain access to the same data. In particular, locating and identifying patterns of interest in numerical time series data is an increasingly important problem for which there are few available techniques. Temporal pattern recognition poses many interesting problems in classification, segmentation, prediction, diagnosis and anomaly detection. This research focuses on the problem of classification or characterization of numerical time series data. Highway vehicles and their drivers are examples of complex dynamic systems (CDS) which are being used by transportation agencies for field testing to generate large-scale time series datasets. Tools for effective analysis of numerical time series in databases generated by highway vehicle systems are not yet available, or have not been adapted to the target problem domain. However, analysis tools from similar domains may be adapted to the problem of classification of numerical time series data.

  16. Mode coupling theory analysis of electrolyte solutions: Time dependent diffusion, intermediate scattering function, and ion solvation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Susmita; Yashonath, Subramanian; Bagchi, Biman

    2015-03-28

    A self-consistent mode coupling theory (MCT) with microscopic inputs of equilibrium pair correlation functions is developed to analyze electrolyte dynamics. We apply the theory to calculate concentration dependence of (i) time dependent ion diffusion, (ii) intermediate scattering function of the constituent ions, and (iii) ion solvation dynamics in electrolyte solution. Brownian dynamics with implicit water molecules and molecular dynamics method with explicit water are used to check the theoretical predictions. The time dependence of ionic self-diffusion coefficient and the corresponding intermediate scattering function evaluated from our MCT approach show quantitative agreement with early experimental and present Brownian dynamic simulation results. With increasing concentration, the dispersion of electrolyte friction is found to occur at increasingly higher frequency, due to the faster relaxation of the ion atmosphere. The wave number dependence of intermediate scattering function, F(k, t), exhibits markedly different relaxation dynamics at different length scales. At small wave numbers, we find the emergence of a step-like relaxation, indicating the presence of both fast and slow time scales in the system. Such behavior allows an intriguing analogy with temperature dependent relaxation dynamics of supercooled liquids. We find that solvation dynamics of a tagged ion exhibits a power law decay at long times-the decay can also be fitted to a stretched exponential form. The emergence of the power law in solvation dynamics has been tested by carrying out long Brownian dynamics simulations with varying ionic concentrations. The solvation time correlation and ion-ion intermediate scattering function indeed exhibit highly interesting, non-trivial dynamical behavior at intermediate to longer times that require further experimental and theoretical studies.

  17. On-farm animal welfare assessment in beef bulls: consistency over time of single measures and aggregated Welfare Quality(®) scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, M K; Schulze Westerath, H; Knierim, U; Tessitore, E; Cozzi, G; Winckler, C

    2014-03-01

    Consistency over time of (on-farm) animal welfare assessment systems forms part of reliability, meaning that results of the assessment should be representative of the longer-term welfare state of the farm as long as the housing and management conditions have not changed considerably. This is especially important if assessments are to be used for certification purposes. It was the aim of the present study to investigate consistency over time of the Welfare Quality(®) (WQ(®)) assessment system for fattening cattle at single measure level, aggregated criterion and principle scores, and overall classification across short-term (1 month) and longer-term periods (6 months). We hypothesized that consistency over time of aggregated criterion and principle scores is higher than that of single measures. Consistency was also expected to be lower with longer intervals between assessments. Data were obtained using the WQ(®) protocol for fattening cattle during three visits (months 0, 1 and 7) on 63 beef farms in Austria, Germany and Italy. Only data from farms where no major changes in housing and management had taken place were considered for analysis. At the single measure level, Spearman rank correlations between visits were >0.7 and variance was lower within farms than between farms for six and two of 19 measures after 1 month and 6 months, respectively. After aggregation of single measures into criterion and principle scores, five and two of 10 criteria and three and one of four principles were found reliable after 1 and 6 months, respectively. At the WQ(®) principle level, this was the case for three and one of four principles. Seventy-nine per cent and 75% of the farms were allocated to the same overall welfare category after 1 month and 6 months. Possible reasons for a lack of consistency are seasonal effects or short-term fluctuations that occur under normal farm conditions, low prevalence of clinical measures and probably insufficient sample size, whereas poor

  18. MyDTW - Dynamic Time Warping program for stratigraphical time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, Sergey; Paelike, Heiko

    2017-04-01

    One of the general tasks in many geological disciplines is matching of one time or space signal to another. It can be classical correlation between two cores or cross-sections in sedimentology or marine geology. For example, tuning a paleoclimatic signal to a target curve, driven by variations in the astronomical parameters, is a powerful technique to construct accurate time scales. However, these methods can be rather time-consuming and can take ours of routine work even with the help of special semi-automatic software. Therefore, different approaches to automate the processes have been developed during last decades. Some of them are based on classical statistical cross-correlations such as the 'Correlator' after Olea [1]. Another ones use modern ideas of dynamic programming. A good example is as an algorithm developed by Lisiecki and Lisiecki [2] or dynamic time warping based algorithm after Pälike [3]. We introduce here an algorithm and computer program, which are also stemmed from the Dynamic Time Warping algorithm class. Unlike the algorithm of Lisiecki and Lisiecki, MyDTW does not lean on a set of penalties to follow geological logics, but on a special internal structure and specific constrains. It differs also from [3] in basic ideas of implementation and constrains design. The algorithm is implemented as a computer program with a graphical user interface using Free Pascal and Lazarus IDE and available for Windows, Mac OS, and Linux. Examples with synthetic and real data are demonstrated. Program is available for free download at http://www.marum.de/Sergey_Kotov.html . References: 1. Olea, R.A. Expert systems for automated correlation and interpretation of wireline logs // Math Geol (1994) 26: 879. doi:10.1007/BF02083420 2. Lisiecki L. and Lisiecki P. Application of dynamic programming to the correlation of paleoclimate records // Paleoceanography (2002), Volume 17, Issue 4, pp. 1-1, CiteID 1049, doi: 10.1029/2001PA000733 3. Pälike, H. Extending the

  19. A new heterogeneous asynchronous explicit-implicit time integrator for nonsmooth dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekak, Fatima-Ezzahra; Brun, Michael; Gravouil, Anthony; Depale, Bruno

    2017-07-01

    In computational structural dynamics, particularly in the presence of nonsmooth behavior, the choice of the time-step and the time integrator has a critical impact on the feasibility of the simulation. Furthermore, in some cases, as in the case of a bridge crane under seismic loading, multiple time-scales coexist in the same problem. In that case, the use of multi-time scale methods is suitable. Here, we propose a new explicit-implicit heterogeneous asynchronous time integrator (HATI) for nonsmooth transient dynamics with frictionless unilateral contacts and impacts. Furthermore, we present a new explicit time integrator for contact/impact problems where the contact constraints are enforced using a Lagrange multiplier method. In other words, the aim of this paper consists in using an explicit time integrator with a fine time scale in the contact area for reproducing high frequency phenomena, while an implicit time integrator is adopted in the other parts in order to reproduce much low frequency phenomena and to optimize the CPU time. In a first step, the explicit time integrator is tested on a one-dimensional example and compared to Moreau-Jean's event-capturing schemes. The explicit algorithm is found to be very accurate and the scheme has generally a higher order of convergence than Moreau-Jean's schemes and provides also an excellent energy behavior. Then, the two time scales explicit-implicit HATI is applied to the numerical example of a bridge crane under seismic loading. The results are validated in comparison to a fine scale full explicit computation. The energy dissipated in the implicit-explicit interface is well controlled and the computational time is lower than a full-explicit simulation.

  20. Detection of time delays and directional interactions based on time series from complex dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huanfei; Leng, Siyang; Tao, Chenyang; Ying, Xiong; Kurths, Jürgen; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Lin, Wei

    2017-07-01

    Data-based and model-free accurate identification of intrinsic time delays and directional interactions is an extremely challenging problem in complex dynamical systems and their networks reconstruction. A model-free method with new scores is proposed to be generally capable of detecting single, multiple, and distributed time delays. The method is applicable not only to mutually interacting dynamical variables but also to self-interacting variables in a time-delayed feedback loop. Validation of the method is carried out using physical, biological, and ecological models and real data sets. Especially, applying the method to air pollution data and hospital admission records of cardiovascular diseases in Hong Kong reveals the major air pollutants as a cause of the diseases and, more importantly, it uncovers a hidden time delay (about 30-40 days) in the causal influence that previous studies failed to detect. The proposed method is expected to be universally applicable to ascertaining and quantifying subtle interactions (e.g., causation) in complex systems arising from a broad range of disciplines.

  1. Self-consistent predictor/corrector algorithms for stable and efficient integration of the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Herbert, John M.

    2018-01-01

    The "real time" formulation of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) involves integration of the time-dependent Kohn-Sham (TDKS) equation in order to describe the time evolution of the electron density following a perturbation. This approach, which is complementary to the more traditional linear-response formulation of TDDFT, is more efficient for computation of broad-band spectra (including core-excited states) and for systems where the density of states is large. Integration of the TDKS equation is complicated by the time-dependent nature of the effective Hamiltonian, and we introduce several predictor/corrector algorithms to propagate the density matrix, one of which can be viewed as a self-consistent extension of the widely used modified-midpoint algorithm. The predictor/corrector algorithms facilitate larger time steps and are shown to be more efficient despite requiring more than one Fock build per time step, and furthermore can be used to detect a divergent simulation on-the-fly, which can then be halted or else the time step modified.

  2. The Application of Factorial Surveys in General Population Samples: The Effects of Respondent Age and Education on Response Times and Response Consistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Sauer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, there has been a marked increase in the number of studies on attitude and decision research which use the factorial survey (FS design. The FS integrates experimental set-ups into a survey: respondents react to hypothetical descriptions (vignettes while the values of each attribute (dimension of these descriptions systematically vary in order to estimate their impact on respondent judgments. As the vignettes are based on a number of dimensions and as respondents evaluate several vignettes, FSs are demanding in terms of individual cognitive and information-processing abilities. So far, there is little empirical knowledge of whether and to what extent this complexity is feasible in general population samples with heterogeneous respondents. Using data from a study on the fairness of earnings (with a mixed mode sample consisting a computer assisted personal interview [CAPI], computer assisted self interview [CASI], and paper and pencil [PAPI] mode, the complexity of FSs is analyzed in terms of: 1 design dimensions, such as the number of vignette dimensions (five, eight, or 12 and the number of vignettes for single respondents (10, 20, or 30, which were varied in a 3x3 experimental design; and 2 respondent characteristics that are associated with cognitive abilities (age and education. Two different indicators for cognitive load as well as learning and fatigue effects are analyzed: 1 latency time and 2 response consistency. The results show that raw reaction times but not latency times are longer for older respondents, suggesting that the cognitive effort needed for the evaluation of vignettes is not particularly high. Consistency measures reveal that respondents with a lower educational level show greater inconsistency in their evaluations when the number of vignettes is high. The number of dimensions has an effect on consistency only when respondents have to rate a large number of vignettes. In short, the results demonstrate

  3. Turnout Fault Diagnosis through Dynamic Time Warping and Signal Normalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shize Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Turnout is one key fundamental infrastructure in the railway signal system, which has great influence on the safety of railway systems. Currently, turnout fault diagnoses are conducted manually in China; engineers are obliged to observe the signals and make problem solving decisions. Thus, the accuracies of fault diagnoses totally depend on the engineers’ experience although massive data are produced in real time by the turnout microcomputer-based monitoring systems. This paper aims to develop an intelligent diagnosis method for railway turnout through Dynamic Time Warping (DTW. We firstly extract the features of normal turnout operation current curve and normalize the collected turnout current curves. Then, five typical fault reference curves are ascertained through the microcomputer-based monitoring system, and DTW is used to identify the turnout current curve fault through test data. The analysis results based on the similarity data indicate that the analyzed five turnout fault types can be diagnosed automatically with 100% accuracy. Finally, the benefits of the proposed method and future research directions were discussed.

  4. Nine time steps: ultra-fast statistical consistency testing of the Community Earth System Model (pyCECT v3.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milroy, Daniel J.; Baker, Allison H.; Hammerling, Dorit M.; Jessup, Elizabeth R.

    2018-02-01

    The Community Earth System Model Ensemble Consistency Test (CESM-ECT) suite was developed as an alternative to requiring bitwise identical output for quality assurance. This objective test provides a statistical measurement of consistency between an accepted ensemble created by small initial temperature perturbations and a test set of CESM simulations. In this work, we extend the CESM-ECT suite with an inexpensive and robust test for ensemble consistency that is applied to Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) output after only nine model time steps. We demonstrate that adequate ensemble variability is achieved with instantaneous variable values at the ninth step, despite rapid perturbation growth and heterogeneous variable spread. We refer to this new test as the Ultra-Fast CAM Ensemble Consistency Test (UF-CAM-ECT) and demonstrate its effectiveness in practice, including its ability to detect small-scale events and its applicability to the Community Land Model (CLM). The new ultra-fast test facilitates CESM development, porting, and optimization efforts, particularly when used to complement information from the original CESM-ECT suite of tools.

  5. Influence of Nano-SiO2 on the Consistency, Setting Time, Early-Age Strength, and Shrinkage of Composite Cement Pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study outlined the raw materials and mix proportions to prepare composite cement pastes with the addition of silica-based micro- and nanoparticles. The effects of amorphous nano-SiO2 on the early-age properties, including the consistency, setting time, early-age strength, and chemical and autogenous shrinkages, were investigated. Under the condition of the same dosage of superplasticizer used, the consistency of cement paste with nano-SiO2 is higher than that with silica fume. Significant reductions of the initial and final setting times are observed especially for nano-SiO2 addition groups, and the time difference between the initial and final setting times goes up with the increasing proportions of nano-SiO2. The addition of nano-SiO2 is more helpful to the improvement of early-age strengths of the paste with or without fly ash admixed than silica fume additive for the same mass proportion. Both the chemical and autogenous shrinkages of cement paste develop with the increasing amount of micro- or nanolevel silica particles; however, nano-SiO2 plays a more active role than silica fume in inspiring early-age shrinkage. The physical and chemical mechanisms of nano-SiO2 in cement paste are also discussed.

  6. Viscosity, relaxation time, and dynamics within a model asphalt of larger molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Derek D.; Greenfield, Michael L., E-mail: greenfield@egr.uri.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island 02881 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    The dynamics properties of a new “next generation” model asphalt system that represents SHRP AAA-1 asphalt using larger molecules than past models is studied using molecular simulation. The system contains 72 molecules distributed over 12 molecule types that range from nonpolar branched alkanes to polar resins and asphaltenes. Molecular weights range from 290 to 890 g/mol. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations conducted at six temperatures from 298.15 to 533.15 K provide a wealth of correlation data. The modified Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts equation was regressed to reorientation time correlation functions and extrapolated to calculate average rotational relaxation times for individual molecules. The rotational relaxation rate of molecules decreased significantly with increasing size and decreasing temperature. Translational self-diffusion coefficients followed an Arrhenius dependence. Similar activation energies of ∼42 kJ/mol were found for all 12 molecules in the model system, while diffusion prefactors spanned an order of magnitude. Viscosities calculated directly at 533.15 K and estimated at lower temperatures using the Debye-Stokes-Einstein relationship were consistent with experimental data for asphalts. The product of diffusion coefficient and rotational relaxation time showed only small changes with temperature above 358.15 K, indicating rotation and translation that couple self-consistently with viscosity. At lower temperatures, rotation slowed more than diffusion.

  7. The Attempt to Overcome Time Dynamic Theory in the Concept Of Eternal Return

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizbar Elizbarashvili

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the various variants of time rotation eternal concept, and how it was directed to overcome time dynamical theory. The article describes time cycle theory in the period of the Vedas, antiques philosophy and Nietzsche’s philosophy. The article highlights three major features of the time dynamic theory but none of them is finally overcame in time cycling concept. It is concluded that the time dynamic theory is theoretically not established.

  8. Dynamic Subcarrier Allocation for Real-Time Traffic over Multiuser OFDM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li VictorOK

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic resource allocation algorithm to satisfy the packet delay requirements for real-time services, while maximizing the system capacity in multiuser orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM systems is introduced. Our proposed cross-layer algorithm, called Dynamic Subcarrier Allocation algorithm for Real-time Traffic (DSA-RT, consists of two interactive components. In the medium access control (MAC layer, the users' expected transmission rates in terms of the number of subcarriers per symbol and their corresponding transmission priorities are evaluated. With the above MAC-layer information and the detected subcarriers' channel gains, in the physical (PHY layer, a modified Kuhn-Munkres algorithm is developed to minimize the system power for a certain subcarrier allocation, then a PHY-layer resource allocation scheme is proposed to optimally allocate the subcarriers under the system signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and power constraints. In a system where the number of mobile users changes dynamically, our developed MAC-layer access control and removal schemes can guarantee the quality of service (QoS of the existing users in the system and fully utilize the bandwidth resource. The numerical results show that DSA-RT significantly improves the system performance in terms of the bandwidth efficiency and delay performance for real-time services.

  9. Computing the sensitivity of drag and lift in flow past a circular cylinder: Time-stepping versus self-consistent analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meliga, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    We provide in-depth scrutiny of two methods making use of adjoint-based gradients to compute the sensitivity of drag in the two-dimensional, periodic flow past a circular cylinder (Re≲189 ): first, the time-stepping analysis used in Meliga et al. [Phys. Fluids 26, 104101 (2014), 10.1063/1.4896941] that relies on classical Navier-Stokes modeling and determines the sensitivity to any generic control force from time-dependent adjoint equations marched backwards in time; and, second, a self-consistent approach building on the model of Mantič-Lugo et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 084501 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.084501] to compute semilinear approximations of the sensitivity to the mean and fluctuating components of the force. Both approaches are applied to open-loop control by a small secondary cylinder and allow identifying the sensitive regions without knowledge of the controlled states. The theoretical predictions obtained by time-stepping analysis reproduce well the results obtained by direct numerical simulation of the two-cylinder system. So do the predictions obtained by self-consistent analysis, which corroborates the relevance of the approach as a guideline for efficient and systematic control design in the attempt to reduce drag, even though the Reynolds number is not close to the instability threshold and the oscillation amplitude is not small. This is because, unlike simpler approaches relying on linear stability analysis to predict the main features of the flow unsteadiness, the semilinear framework encompasses rigorously the effect of the control on the mean flow, as well as on the finite-amplitude fluctuation that feeds back nonlinearly onto the mean flow via the formation of Reynolds stresses. Such results are especially promising as the self-consistent approach determines the sensitivity from time-independent equations that can be solved iteratively, which makes it generally less computationally demanding. We ultimately discuss the extent to

  10. Time scales of relaxation dynamics during transient conditions in two-phase flow: RELAXATION DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlüter, Steffen [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; Department Soil Physics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Halle Germany; Berg, Steffen [Shell Global Solutions International B.V., Rijswijk Netherlands; Li, Tianyi [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; Vogel, Hans-Jörg [Department Soil Physics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Halle Germany; Institut für Agrar- und Ernährungswissenschaften, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Halle Germany; Wildenschild, Dorthe [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA

    2017-06-01

    The relaxation dynamics toward a hydrostatic equilibrium after a change in phase saturation in porous media is governed by fluid reconfiguration at the pore scale. Little is known whether a hydrostatic equilibrium in which all interfaces come to rest is ever reached and which microscopic processes govern the time scales of relaxation. Here we apply fast synchrotron-based X-ray tomography (X-ray CT) to measure the slow relaxation dynamics of fluid interfaces in a glass bead pack after fast drainage of the sample. The relaxation of interfaces triggers internal redistribution of fluids, reduces the surface energy stored in the fluid interfaces, and relaxes the contact angle toward the equilibrium value while the fluid topology remains unchanged. The equilibration of capillary pressures occurs in two stages: (i) a quick relaxation within seconds in which most of the pressure drop that built up during drainage is dissipated, a process that is to fast to be captured with fast X-ray CT, and (ii) a slow relaxation with characteristic time scales of 1–4 h which manifests itself as a spontaneous imbibition process that is well described by the Washburn equation for capillary rise in porous media. The slow relaxation implies that a hydrostatic equilibrium is hardly ever attained in practice when conducting two-phase experiments in which a flux boundary condition is changed from flow to no-flow. Implications for experiments with pressure boundary conditions are discussed.

  11. A Bayesian method for construction of Markov models to describe dynamics on various time-scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rains, Emily K; Andersen, Hans C

    2010-10-14

    The dynamics of many biological processes of interest, such as the folding of a protein, are slow and complicated enough that a single molecular dynamics simulation trajectory of the entire process is difficult to obtain in any reasonable amount of time. Moreover, one such simulation may not be sufficient to develop an understanding of the mechanism of the process, and multiple simulations may be necessary. One approach to circumvent this computational barrier is the use of Markov state models. These models are useful because they can be constructed using data from a large number of shorter simulations instead of a single long simulation. This paper presents a new Bayesian method for the construction of Markov models from simulation data. A Markov model is specified by (τ,P,T), where τ is the mesoscopic time step, P is a partition of configuration space into mesostates, and T is an N(P)×N(P) transition rate matrix for transitions between the mesostates in one mesoscopic time step, where N(P) is the number of mesostates in P. The method presented here is different from previous Bayesian methods in several ways. (1) The method uses Bayesian analysis to determine the partition as well as the transition probabilities. (2) The method allows the construction of a Markov model for any chosen mesoscopic time-scale τ. (3) It constructs Markov models for which the diagonal elements of T are all equal to or greater than 0.5. Such a model will be called a "consistent mesoscopic Markov model" (CMMM). Such models have important advantages for providing an understanding of the dynamics on a mesoscopic time-scale. The Bayesian method uses simulation data to find a posterior probability distribution for (P,T) for any chosen τ. This distribution can be regarded as the Bayesian probability that the kinetics observed in the atomistic simulation data on the mesoscopic time-scale τ was generated by the CMMM specified by (P,T). An optimization algorithm is used to find the most

  12. Regular and chaotic dynamics in time-dependent relativistic mean-field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vretenar, D.; Ring, P.; Lalazissis, G.A.; Poeschl, W.

    1997-01-01

    Isoscalar and isovector monopole oscillations that correspond to giant resonances in spherical nuclei are described in the framework of time-dependent relativistic mean-field theory. Time-dependent and self-consistent calculations that reproduce experimental data on monopole resonances in 208 Pb show that the motion of the collective coordinate is regular for isoscalar oscillations, and that it becomes chaotic when initial conditions correspond to the isovector mode. Regular collective dynamics coexists with chaotic oscillations on the microscopic level. Time histories, Fourier spectra, state-space plots, Poincare sections, autocorrelation functions, and Lyapunov exponents are used to characterize the nonlinear system and to identify chaotic oscillations. Analogous considerations apply to higher multipolarities. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  13. Effectiveness of slow motion video compared to real time video in improving the accuracy and consistency of subjective gait analysis in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.M. Lane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective measures of canine gait quality via force plates, pressure mats or kinematic analysis are considered superior to subjective gait assessment (SGA. Despite research demonstrating that SGA does not accurately detect subtle lameness, it remains the most commonly performed diagnostic test for detecting lameness in dogs. This is largely because the financial, temporal and spatial requirements for existing objective gait analysis equipment makes this technology impractical for use in general practice. The utility of slow motion video as a potential tool to augment SGA is currently untested. To evaluate a more accessible way to overcome the limitations of SGA, a slow motion video study was undertaken. Three experienced veterinarians reviewed video footage of 30 dogs, 15 with a diagnosis of primary limb lameness based on history and physical examination, and 15 with no indication of limb lameness based on history and physical examination. Four different videos were made for each dog, demonstrating each dog walking and trotting in real time, and then again walking and trotting in 50% slow motion. For each video, the veterinary raters assessed both the degree of lameness, and which limb(s they felt represented the source of the lameness. Spearman’s rho, Cramer’s V, and t-tests were performed to determine if slow motion video increased either the accuracy or consistency of raters’ SGA relative to real time video. Raters demonstrated no significant increase in consistency or accuracy in their SGA of slow motion video relative to real time video. Based on these findings, slow motion video does not increase the consistency or accuracy of SGA values. Further research is required to determine if slow motion video will benefit SGA in other ways.

  14. Behavioural repertoire of working donkeys and consistency of behaviour over time, as a preliminary step towards identifying pain-related behaviours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fran H Regan

    Full Text Available The donkey has a reputation for stoicism and its behavioural repertoire in clinical contexts is under-reported. Lack of understanding of the norms of donkey behaviour and how it may vary over time can compromise use of behavioural measures as indicators of pain or emotional state. The objective of this study was to find out whether the behaviour of working donkeys was influenced by gender, the time of day or differed between days with a view to assessing how robust these measures are for inclusion in a working donkey ethogram.Frequency and consistency of postural and event behaviours were measured in 21 adult working donkeys (12 females; 9 males. Instantaneous (scan and focal sampling were used to measure maintenance, lying, ingestive and investigative behaviours at hourly intervals for ten sessions on each of two consecutive days. High head carriage and biting were seen more frequently in male donkeys than females (P<0.001. Level head carriage, licking/chewing and head-shaking were observed more frequently in female donkeys (P<0.001. Tail position, ear orientation, foot stamping, rolling/lying and head-shaking behaviours were affected by time of day (P<0.001. However, only two variations in ear orientation were found to be significantly different over the two days of observations (P<0.001. Tail swishing, head shaking, foot stamping, and ears held sideways and downwards were significantly correlated (P<0.001 and are assumed to be behaviours to discourage flies.All donkeys expressed an extensive behavioural repertoire, although some differences in behaviour were evident between genders. While most behaviours were consistent over time, some behaviours were influenced by time of day. Few behaviours differed between the two test days. The findings can be used to inform the development of a robust, evidence-based ethogram for working donkeys.

  15. Interglacial climate dynamics and advanced time series analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudelsee, Manfred; Bermejo, Miguel; Köhler, Peter; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2013-04-01

    Studying the climate dynamics of past interglacials (IGs) helps to better assess the anthropogenically influenced dynamics of the current IG, the Holocene. We select the IG portions from the EPICA Dome C ice core archive, which covers the past 800 ka, to apply methods of statistical time series analysis (Mudelsee 2010). The analysed variables are deuterium/H (indicating temperature) (Jouzel et al. 2007), greenhouse gases (Siegenthaler et al. 2005, Loulergue et al. 2008, L¨ü thi et al. 2008) and a model-co-derived climate radiative forcing (Köhler et al. 2010). We select additionally high-resolution sea-surface-temperature records from the marine sedimentary archive. The first statistical method, persistence time estimation (Mudelsee 2002) lets us infer the 'climate memory' property of IGs. Second, linear regression informs about long-term climate trends during IGs. Third, ramp function regression (Mudelsee 2000) is adapted to look on abrupt climate changes during IGs. We compare the Holocene with previous IGs in terms of these mathematical approaches, interprete results in a climate context, assess uncertainties and the requirements to data from old IGs for yielding results of 'acceptable' accuracy. This work receives financial support from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Project ClimSens within the DFG Research Priority Program INTERDYNAMIK) and the European Commission (Marie Curie Initial Training Network LINC, No. 289447, within the 7th Framework Programme). References Jouzel J, Masson-Delmotte V, Cattani O, Dreyfus G, Falourd S, Hoffmann G, Minster B, Nouet J, Barnola JM, Chappellaz J, Fischer H, Gallet JC, Johnsen S, Leuenberger M, Loulergue L, Luethi D, Oerter H, Parrenin F, Raisbeck G, Raynaud D, Schilt A, Schwander J, Selmo E, Souchez R, Spahni R, Stauffer B, Steffensen JP, Stenni B, Stocker TF, Tison JL, Werner M, Wolff EW (2007) Orbital and millennial Antarctic climate variability over the past 800,000 years. Science 317:793. Köhler P, Bintanja R

  16. Estimation of dynamic flux profiles from metabolic time series data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou I-Chun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in modern high-throughput techniques of molecular biology have enabled top-down approaches for the estimation of parameter values in metabolic systems, based on time series data. Special among them is the recent method of dynamic flux estimation (DFE, which uses such data not only for parameter estimation but also for the identification of functional forms of the processes governing a metabolic system. DFE furthermore provides diagnostic tools for the evaluation of model validity and of the quality of a model fit beyond residual errors. Unfortunately, DFE works only when the data are more or less complete and the system contains as many independent fluxes as metabolites. These drawbacks may be ameliorated with other types of estimation and information. However, such supplementations incur their own limitations. In particular, assumptions must be made regarding the functional forms of some processes and detailed kinetic information must be available, in addition to the time series data. Results The authors propose here a systematic approach that supplements DFE and overcomes some of its shortcomings. Like DFE, the approach is model-free and requires only minimal assumptions. If sufficient time series data are available, the approach allows the determination of a subset of fluxes that enables the subsequent applicability of DFE to the rest of the flux system. The authors demonstrate the procedure with three artificial pathway systems exhibiting distinct characteristics and with actual data of the trehalose pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusions The results demonstrate that the proposed method successfully complements DFE under various situations and without a priori assumptions regarding the model representation. The proposed method also permits an examination of whether at all, to what degree, or within what range the available time series data can be validly represented in a particular functional format of

  17. Modelling Protein Dynamics on the Microsecond Time Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siuda, Iwona Anna

    Recent years have shown an increase in coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulations, providing structural and dynamic details of large proteins and enabling studies of self-assembly of biological materials. It is not easy to acquire such data experimentally, and access is also still limited...... family....

  18. Positive dynamical systems in discrete time theory, models, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a systematic, rigorous and self-contained treatment of positive dynamical systems. A dynamical system is positive when all relevant variables of a systemare nonnegative in a natural way. This is in biology, demography or economics, where the levels of populations or prices of goods are positive. The principle also finds application in electrical engineering, physics and computer sciences.

  19. Dynamic Simulation over Long Time Periods with 100% Solar Generation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Concepcion, Ricky James [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Elliott, Ryan Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This project aimed to identify the path forward for dynamic simulation tools to accommodate these needs by characterizing the properties of power systems (with high PV penetration), analyzing how these properties affect dynamic simulation software, and offering solutions for potential problems.

  20. Transmission and time delay properties of an integrated system consisting of atomic vapor cladding on top of a micro ring resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Liron; Levy, Uriel

    2012-12-17

    In this paper we analyze the transmission and time delay properties of light propagating through a microring resonator (MRR) consisting of a solid core waveguide surrounded by an atomic vapor cladding. Using the atomic effective susceptibility of Rubidium we derive the complex transmission spectrum of the integrated system. We show, that when the system is under-coupled, the transmission can exceed the standalone MRR's background transmission and is accompanied by enhanced positive time delay. It is shown that in this case the contrast of the atomic lines is greatly enhanced. This allows achieving high optical densities at short propagation length. Furthermore, owing to its features such as small footprint, high tunability, and high delay-transmission product, this system may become an attractive choice for chip scale manipulations of light.

  1. Time evolution of photon-pulse propagation in scattering and absorbing media: The dynamic radiative transfer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakopoulos, A.; Politopoulos, K.; Georgiou, E.

    2018-03-01

    A new dynamic-system approach to the problem of radiative transfer inside scattering and absorbing media is presented, directly based on first-hand physical principles. This method, the Dynamic Radiative Transfer System (DRTS), employs a dynamical system formality using a global sparse matrix, which characterizes the physical, optical and geometrical properties of the material-volume of interest. The new system state is generated by the above time-independent matrix, using simple matrix-vector multiplication for each subsequent time step. DRTS is capable of calculating accurately the time evolution of photon propagation in media of complex structure and shape. The flexibility of DRTS allows the integration of time-dependent sources, boundary conditions, different media and several optical phenomena like reflection and refraction in a unified and consistent way. Various examples of DRTS simulation results are presented for ultra-fast light pulse 3-D propagation, demonstrating greatly reduced computational cost and resource requirements compared to other methods.

  2. Fully-dynamic minimum spanning forest with improved worst-case update time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff-Nilsen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    , and this bound also holds in expectation. This is the first data structure achieving an improvement over the O(√n) deterministic worst-case update time of Eppstein et al., a bound that has been standing for 25 years. In fact, it was previously not even known how to maintain a spanning forest of an unweighted......We give a Las Vegas data structure which maintains a minimum spanning forest in an n-vertex edge-weighted undirected dynamic graph undergoing updates consisting of any mixture of edge insertions and deletions. Each update is supported in O(n1/2-c) worst-case time wh.p. where c > 0 is some constant...... graph in worst-case time polynomially faster than Θ(√n). Our result is achieved by first giving a reduction from fully-dynamic to decremental minimum spanning forest preserving worst-case update time up to logarithmic factors. Then decremental minimum spanning forest is solved using several novel...

  3. Multiscale methods framework: self-consistent coupling of molecular theory of solvation with quantum chemistry, molecular simulations, and dissipative particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, Andriy; Gusarov, Sergey

    2018-01-31

    In this work, we will address different aspects of self-consistent field coupling of computational chemistry methods at different time and length scales in modern materials and biomolecular science. Multiscale methods framework yields dramatically improved accuracy, efficiency, and applicability by coupling models and methods on different scales. This field benefits many areas of research and applications by providing fundamental understanding and predictions. It could also play a particular role in commercialization by guiding new developments and by allowing quick evaluation of prospective research projects. We employ molecular theory of solvation which allows us to accurately introduce the effect of the environment on complex nano-, macro-, and biomolecular systems. The uniqueness of this method is that it can be naturally coupled with the whole range of computational chemistry approaches, including QM, MM, and coarse graining.

  4. Nonlinear wave time dependent dynamic evolution in solar flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedun, V.; Erdelyi, R.

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the excitation, time dependent dynamic evolution and interaction of weakly nonlinear propagating (i.e. solitary) waves on vertical cylindrical magnetic flux tubes in a compressible solar atmospheric plasma. The axisymmetric flux tube has a field strength of 1000 G at its footpoint what is typical for photospheric regions. Solitons are excited by a footpoint driver. The propagation of the nonlinear signal is investigated by solving numerically a set of fully nonlinear 2D MHD equations in cylindrical coordinates. For the initial conditions the solutions of the linear dispersion relation for wave modes (in the present case we focus on the sausage mode) in a magnetic flux tube is applied. This dispersion relation is solved numerically for a range of plasma parameters. We compare our results with the works of Roberts [1], Wilson [2] (dispersion relation), Molotovshchikov [3] (nonlinear slow sausage waves) and Weisshaar [4] (numerical solutions of the Leibovich-Prichard-Roberts equation). (1) We found solitary solutions and investigate solitary propagating with external sound speed by solving the full MHD equations. (2) We also found a solitary wave propagating with the tube speed. A natural application of our studies may be spicule formation in the chromosphere, as suggested by Roberts [5], where it was demonstrated theoretically, that a solar photospheric magnetic flux tube can support the propagation of solitons governed by the Benjamin-Ono (slow mode) equations. Future possible improvements in modeling and the relevance of the photospheric chromospheric transition region coupling by spicules is suggested. [1] B. Roberts and A. Webb, Sol. Phys., 1978, v. 56, p. 5 [2] P.R. Wilson, Astron. Astrophys., 1980, v. 87, p. 121 [3] A.L. Molotovshchikov and M.S. Ruderman, Sol. Phys., 1987, v. 109, p. 247 [4] E. Weisshaar, Phys. Fluids A, 1989, v. 1(8), p. 1406 [5] B. Roberts and A. Mangeney, Royal Astronomical Society, Monthly

  5. Sensing winter soil respiration dynamics in near-real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contosta, A.; Burakowski, E. A.; Varner, R. K.; Frey, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Some of the largest reductions in seasonal snow cover are projected to occur in temperate latitudes. Limited measurements from these ecosystems indicate that winter soil respiration releases as much as 30% of carbon fixed during the previous growing season. This respiration is possible with a snowpack that insulates soil from ambient fluctuations in climate. However, relationships among snowpack, soil temperature, soil moisture, and winter soil respiration in temperate regions are not well-understood. Most studies have infrequently sampled soil respiration and its drivers, and most measurements have been limited to the soil surface. We made near-real time, continuous measurements of temperature, moisture, and CO2 fluxes from the soil profile, through the snowpack, and into the atmosphere in a deciduous forest of New Hampshire, USA. We coupled these data with daily sampling of snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE). Our objectives were to continuously measure soil CO2 production (Psoil) and CO2 flux through the snowpack (Fsnow) and to compare Fsnow and Psoil with environmental drivers. We found that Fsnow was more dynamic than Psoil, changing as much as 30% over several days with shifting environmental conditions. Multiple regression indicated that SWE, air temperature, surface soil temperature, surface soil CO2 concentrations, and soil moisture at 15 cm were significant predictors of Fsnow. The transition of surface temperature from below to above 0°C was particularly important as it represented a phase change from ice to liquid water. Only air temperature and soil moisture at 15 cm were significant drivers of Psoil, where higher moisture at 15 cm resulted in lower Psoil rates. Time series analysis showed that Fsnow lagged 40 days behind Psoil. This lag may be due to slow CO2 diffusion through soil to overlying snow under high moisture conditions. Our results suggest that surface soil CO2 losses are driven by rapid changes in snow cover, surface temperature

  6. Real time assessment of dynamic loads on bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Highway bridges are an important class of civil structures that are subject to continuously : acting and varying dynamic loads due to traffic. A large number of highway bridges in the US : (bridges on interstate highways or state highways which have ...

  7. Short-time maximum entropy method analysis of molecular dynamics simulation: Unimolecular decomposition of formic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Osamu; Nomura, Tetsuo; Tabayashi, Kiyohiko; Yamasaki, Katsuyoshi

    2008-07-01

    We performed spectral analysis by using the maximum entropy method instead of the traditional Fourier transform technique to investigate the short-time behavior in molecular systems, such as the energy transfer between vibrational modes and chemical reactions. This procedure was applied to direct ab initio molecular dynamics calculations for the decomposition of formic acid. More reactive trajectories of dehydrolation than those of decarboxylation were obtained for Z-formic acid, which was consistent with the prediction of previous theoretical and experimental studies. Short-time maximum entropy method analyses were performed for typical reactive and non-reactive trajectories. Spectrograms of a reactive trajectory were obtained; these clearly showed the reactant, transient, and product regions, especially for the dehydrolation path.

  8. Estimating the level of dynamical noise in time series by using fractal dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sase, Takumi, E-mail: sase@sat.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Ramírez, Jonatán Peña [CONACYT Research Fellow, Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education at Ensenada (CICESE), Carretera Ensenada-Tijuana No. 3918, Zona Playitas, C.P. 22860, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Kitajo, Keiichi [BSI-Toyota Collaboration Center, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2016-03-11

    We present a method for estimating the dynamical noise level of a ‘short’ time series even if the dynamical system is unknown. The proposed method estimates the level of dynamical noise by calculating the fractal dimensions of the time series. Additionally, the method is applied to EEG data to demonstrate its possible effectiveness as an indicator of temporal changes in the level of dynamical noise. - Highlights: • A dynamical noise level estimator for time series is proposed. • The estimator does not need any information about the dynamics generating the time series. • The estimator is based on a novel definition of time series dimension (TSD). • It is demonstrated that there exists a monotonic relationship between the • TSD and the level of dynamical noise. • We apply the proposed method to human electroencephalographic data.

  9. A randomised trial of the effect of different fluid consistencies used in the management of dysphagia on quality of life: a time trade-off study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Daniel J H; Mulkerrin, Siofra Maire; Mulkerrin, Eamon C; O'Keeffe, Shaun T

    2016-03-01

    thickened fluids are commonly advised to minimise the risk of aspiration in people with dysphagia, although many do not comply with this treatment. In health economics, utilities are values that reflect an individual's preferences for different health states. We examined the healthcare utilities, elicited using a time trade-off approach (TTO), from healthcare professionals and non-dysphagic patients, associated with long-term use of thickened fluids. the risk of aspiration with thin fluids was explained to consecutive hospital patients without dysphagia (n = 76) and to a convenience sample of healthcare professionals (n = 75) who were then randomly allocated to drink as much as possible of 200 ml of pre-prepared water of Grade 1 (very mildly thick) or Grade 2 (mildly thick) consistency. A standardised script with a ping-pong approach was then used to elicit TTO utilities for use of thickened fluids using a 10-year horizon. median (inter-quartile range) utilities were 0.7 (0.5-0.9) for those receiving Grade 1 and 0.5 (0.3-0.7) for those receiving Grade 2 consistency fluid (Mann-Whitney test, P = 0.001). Thus, for example, on average those allocated to Grade 2 fluid would be willing to sacrifice 5 years of a 10-year lifespan not to be restricted to fluid of that consistency. There were no significant differences between patient and professional values. patients and professionals judge that long-term use of thickened fluids would significantly impair quality of life. Utilities associated with more viscous fluids are particularly low. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A novel time dependent gamma evaluation function for dynamic 2D and 3D dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podesta, Mark; Persoon, Lucas CGG; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Modern external beam radiotherapy requires detailed verification and quality assurance so that confidence can be placed on both the delivery of a single treatment fraction and on the consistency of delivery throughout the treatment course. To verify dose distributions, a comparison between prediction and measurement must be made. Comparisons between two dose distributions are commonly performed using a Gamma evaluation which is a calculation of two quantities on a pixel by pixel basis; the dose difference, and the distance to agreement. By providing acceptance criteria (e.g. 3%, 3 mm), the function will find the most appropriate match within its two degrees of freedom. For complex dynamic treatments such as IMRT or VMAT it is important to verify the dose delivery in a time dependent manner and so a gamma evaluation that includes a degree of freedom in the time domain via a third parameter, time to agreement, is presented here. A C++ (mex) based gamma function was created that could be run on either CPU and GPU computing platforms that would allow a degree of freedom in the time domain. Simple test cases were created in both 2D and 3D comprising of simple geometrical shapes with well-defined boundaries varying over time. Changes of varying magnitude in either space or time were introduced and repeated gamma analyses were performed varying the criteria. A clinical VMAT case was also included, artificial air bubbles of varying size were introduced to a patient geometry, along with shifts of varying magnitude in treatment time. For all test cases where errors in distance, dose or time were introduced, the time dependent gamma evaluation could accurately highlight the errors. The time dependent gamma function presented here allows time to be included as a degree of freedom in gamma evaluations. The function allows for 2D and 3D data sets which are varying over time to be compared using appropriate criteria without penalising minor offsets of subsequent radiation

  11. A recipe for consistent 3D management of velocity data and time-depth conversion using Vel-IO 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesano, Francesco E.; D'Ambrogi, Chiara

    2017-04-01

    3D geological model production and related basin analyses need large and consistent seismic dataset and hopefully well logs to support correlation and calibration; the workflow and tools used to manage and integrate different type of data control the soundness of the final 3D model. Even though seismic interpretation is a basic early step in such workflow, the most critical step to obtain a comprehensive 3D model useful for further analyses is represented by the construction of an effective 3D velocity model and a well constrained time-depth conversion. We present a complex workflow that includes comprehensive management of large seismic dataset and velocity data, the construction of a 3D instantaneous multilayer-cake velocity model, the time-depth conversion of highly heterogeneous geological framework, including both depositional and structural complexities. The core of the workflow is the construction of the 3D velocity model using Vel-IO 3D tool (Maesano and D'Ambrogi, 2017; https://github.com/framae80/Vel-IO3D) that is composed by the following three scripts, written in Python 2.7.11 under ArcGIS ArcPy environment: i) the 3D instantaneous velocity model builder creates a preliminary 3D instantaneous velocity model using key horizons in time domain and velocity data obtained from the analysis of well and pseudo-well logs. The script applies spatial interpolation to the velocity parameters and calculates the value of depth of each point on each horizon bounding the layer-cake velocity model. ii) the velocity model optimizer improves the consistency of the velocity model by adding new velocity data indirectly derived from measured depths, thus reducing the geometrical uncertainties in the areas located far from the original velocity data. iii) the time-depth converter runs the time-depth conversion of any object located inside the 3D velocity model The Vel-IO 3D tool allows one to create 3D geological models consistent with the primary geological constraints (e

  12. Multiple Time-Step Dual-Hamiltonian Hybrid Molecular Dynamics - Monte Carlo Canonical Propagation Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunjie; Kale, Seyit; Weare, Jonathan; Dinner, Aaron R; Roux, Benoît

    2016-04-12

    A multiple time-step integrator based on a dual Hamiltonian and a hybrid method combining molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) is proposed to sample systems in the canonical ensemble. The Dual Hamiltonian Multiple Time-Step (DHMTS) algorithm is based on two similar Hamiltonians: a computationally expensive one that serves as a reference and a computationally inexpensive one to which the workload is shifted. The central assumption is that the difference between the two Hamiltonians is slowly varying. Earlier work has shown that such dual Hamiltonian multiple time-step schemes effectively precondition nonlinear differential equations for dynamics by reformulating them into a recursive root finding problem that can be solved by propagating a correction term through an internal loop, analogous to RESPA. Of special interest in the present context, a hybrid MD-MC version of the DHMTS algorithm is introduced to enforce detailed balance via a Metropolis acceptance criterion and ensure consistency with the Boltzmann distribution. The Metropolis criterion suppresses the discretization errors normally associated with the propagation according to the computationally inexpensive Hamiltonian, treating the discretization error as an external work. Illustrative tests are carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  13. Scaling symmetry, renormalization, and time series modeling: the case of financial assets dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamparo, Marco; Baldovin, Fulvio; Caraglio, Michele; Stella, Attilio L

    2013-12-01

    We present and discuss a stochastic model of financial assets dynamics based on the idea of an inverse renormalization group strategy. With this strategy we construct the multivariate distributions of elementary returns based on the scaling with time of the probability density of their aggregates. In its simplest version the model is the product of an endogenous autoregressive component and a random rescaling factor designed to embody also exogenous influences. Mathematical properties like increments' stationarity and ergodicity can be proven. Thanks to the relatively low number of parameters, model calibration can be conveniently based on a method of moments, as exemplified in the case of historical data of the S&P500 index. The calibrated model accounts very well for many stylized facts, like volatility clustering, power-law decay of the volatility autocorrelation function, and multiscaling with time of the aggregated return distribution. In agreement with empirical evidence in finance, the dynamics is not invariant under time reversal, and, with suitable generalizations, skewness of the return distribution and leverage effects can be included. The analytical tractability of the model opens interesting perspectives for applications, for instance, in terms of obtaining closed formulas for derivative pricing. Further important features are the possibility of making contact, in certain limits, with autoregressive models widely used in finance and the possibility of partially resolving the long- and short-memory components of the volatility, with consistent results when applied to historical series.

  14. Ultrafast Dynamics in Vanadium Dioxide: Separating Spatially Segregated Mixed Phase Dynamics in the Time-domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, David

    2011-10-01

    In correlated electronic systems, observed electronic and structural behavior results from the complex interplay between multiple, sometimes competing degrees-of- freedom. One such material used to study insulator-to-metal transitions is vanadium dioxide, which undergoes a phase transition from a monoclinic-insulating phase to a rutile-metallic phase when the sample is heated to 340 K. The major open question with this material is the relative influence of this structural phase transition (Peirels transition) and the effects of electronic correlations (Mott transition) on the observed insulator-to-metal transition. Answers to these major questions are complicated by vanadium dioxide's sensitivity to perturbations in the chemical structure in VO2. For example, related VxOy oxides with nearly a 2:1 ratio do not demonstrate the insulator-to- metal transition, while recent work has demonstrated that W:VO2 has demonstrated a tunable transition temperature controllable with tungsten doping. All of these preexisting results suggest that the observed electronic properties are exquisitely sensitive to the sample disorder. Using ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, it is now possible to impulsively excite this transition and investigate the photoinduced counterpart to this thermal phase transition in a strongly nonequilibrium regime. I will discuss our recent results studying the terahertz-frequency conductivity dynamics of this photoinduced phase transition in the poorly understood near threshold temperature range. We find a dramatic softening of the transition near the critical temperature, which results primarily from the mixed phase coexistence near the transition temperature. To directly study this mixed phase behavior, we directly study the nucleation and growth rates of the metallic phase in the parent insulator using non-degenerate optical pump-probe spectroscopy. These experiments measure, in the time- domain, the coexistent phase separation in VO2 (spatially

  15. Langevin approach to synchronization of hyperchaotic time-delay dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budini, Adrian A [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones CientIficas y Tecnicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Av. E Bustillo Km 9.5, (8400) Bariloche (Argentina); Consortium of the Americas for Interdisciplinary Science and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2008-11-07

    In this paper, we characterize the synchronization phenomenon of hyperchaotic scalar nonlinear delay dynamics in a fully-developed chaos regime. Our results rely on the observation that, in that regime, the stationary statistical properties of a class of hyperchaotic attractors can be reproduced with a linear Langevin equation, defined by replacing the nonlinear delay force by a delta-correlated noise. Therefore, the synchronization phenomenon can be analytically characterized by a set of coupled Langevin equations. We apply this formalism to study anticipated synchronization dynamics subject to external noise fluctuations as well as for characterizing the effects of parameter mismatch in a hyperchaotic communication scheme. The same procedure is applied to second-order differential delay equations associated with synchronization in electro-optical devices. In all cases, the departure with respect to perfect synchronization is measured through a similarity function. Numerical simulations in discrete maps associated with the hyperchaotic dynamics support the formalism.

  16. Introduction to modern dynamics chaos, networks, space and time

    CERN Document Server

    Nolte, David D

    2015-01-01

    The best parts of physics are the last topics that our students ever see. These are the exciting new frontiers of nonlinear and complex systems that are at the forefront of university research and are the basis of many high-tech businesses. Topics such as traffic on the World Wide Web, the spread of epidemics through globally-mobile populations, or the synchronization of global economies are governed by universal principles just as profound as Newton's laws. Nonetheless, the conventional university physics curriculum reserves most of these topics for advanced graduate study. Two justifications are given for this situation: first, that the mathematical tools needed to understand these topics are beyond the skill set of undergraduate students, and second, that these are speciality topics with no common theme and little overlap. Introduction to Modern Dynamics dispels these myths. The structure of this book combines the three main topics of modern dynamics - chaos theory, dynamics on complex networks, and gener...

  17. Reporting consistently on CSR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Christa; Nielsen, Anne Ellerup

    2006-01-01

    This chapter first outlines theory and literature on CSR and Stakeholder Relations focusing on the different perspectives and the contextual and dynamic character of the CSR concept. CSR reporting challenges are discussed and a model of analysis is proposed. Next, our paper presents the results...... in the reporting material. By implementing consistent discourse strategies that interact according to a well-defined pattern or order, it is possible to communicate a strong social commitment on the one hand, and to take into consideration the expectations of the shareholders and the other stakeholders...

  18. Causes and Consequences of Time-Varying Dynamic Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicky

    2013-04-01

    Convective circulation of the Earth's mantle maintains plate motion but we know little about the spatial and temporal details of this circulation. Accurate maps of the spatial and temporal pattern of dynamic topography will profoundly affect our understanding the the relationship between surface geology and deep Earth processes. A major difficulty is the 'tyranny of isostasy'. In other words, dynamic topography is difficult to measure because crustal and lithospheric thickness and density changes are the dominant control of surface elevation. Some progress can be made along continental margins by measuring residual depth anomalies of the oldest oceanic floor on newly available seismic reflection and wide-angle profiles. These estimates of dynamic topography have amplitudes of ±1 km and wavelengths of 102-104 km. They mostly, but not always, correlate with long wavelength free-air gravity anomalies. Correlation with seismic tomographic images is much poorer. The distribution of dynamic topography throughout the rest of the oceanic realm can be supplemented by using ship-track data in regions with sparse sedimentary cover and by exploiting the mid-oceanic ridge system. On the continents, it is more difficult to measure dynamic topography with the same accuracy since the density structure of continental lithosphere is so variable but progress can be made on three fronts. First, long-wavelength gravity anomalies which straddle continental margins are an obvious and important guide. Secondly, stratal geometries across continental shelves contain information about positive and negative surface elevation changes. In several cases, 2- and 3-D seismic surveys calibrated by boreholes can be used to constrain spatial and temporal patterns of dynamic topography. In the North Atlantic Ocean, examples of buried ephemeral landscapes suggest that dynamic topography can grow and decay on timescales as short as a few million years. Recognition of positive and negative vertical

  19. The Relative Contribution of Interaural Time and Magnitude Cues to Dynamic Sound Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary data from a study examining the relative contribution of interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs) to the localization of virtual sound sources both with and without head motion. The listeners' task was to estimate the apparent direction and distance of virtual sources (broadband noise) presented over headphones. Stimuli were synthesized from minimum phase representations of nonindividualized directional transfer functions; binaural magnitude spectra were derived from the minimum phase estimates and ITDs were represented as a pure delay. During dynamic conditions, listeners were encouraged to move their heads; the position of the listener's head was tracked and the stimuli were synthesized in real time using a Convolvotron to simulate a stationary external sound source. ILDs and ITDs were either correctly or incorrectly correlated with head motion: (1) both ILDs and ITDs correctly correlated, (2) ILDs correct, ITD fixed at 0 deg azimuth and 0 deg elevation, (3) ITDs correct, ILDs fixed at 0 deg, 0 deg. Similar conditions were run for static conditions except that none of the cues changed with head motion. The data indicated that, compared to static conditions, head movements helped listeners to resolve confusions primarily when ILDs were correctly correlated, although a smaller effect was also seen for correct ITDs. Together with the results for static conditions, the data suggest that localization tends to be dominated by the cue that is most reliable or consistent, when reliability is defined by consistency over time as well as across frequency bands.

  20. Multiple time scale dynamics in the breakdown of superhydrophobicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pirat, C.; Sbragaglia, M.; Peters, A.M.; Borkent, B.M.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Wessling, Matthias; Lohse, Detlef

    2008-01-01

    Drops deposited on rough and hydrophobic surfaces can stay suspended with gas pockets underneath the liquid, then showing very low hydrodynamic resistance. When this superhydrophobic state breaks down, the subsequent wetting process can show different dynamical properties. A suitable choice of the

  1. Dynamic Leidenfrost Effect: Relevant Time and Length Scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shirota, Minori; van Limbeek, Michiel Antonius Jacobus; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    When a liquid droplet impacts a hot solid surface, enough vapor may be generated under it to prevent its contact with the solid. The minimum solid temperature for this so-called Leidenfrost effect to occur is termed the Leidenfrost temperature, or the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature when the droplet

  2. A dynamic lot-sizing model with demand time windows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.Y. Lee (Chung-Yee); S. Cetinkaya; A.P.M. Wagelmans (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractOne of the basic assumptions of the classical dynamic lot-sizing model is that the aggregate demand of a given period must be satisfied in that period. Under this assumption, if backlogging is not allowed then the demand of a given period cannot be delivered earlier or later than the

  3. A Dynamic Lot-Sizing Model with Demand Time Windows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.Y. Lee (Chung-Yee); S. Çetinkaya; A.P.M. Wagelmans (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractOne of the basic assumptions of the classical dynamic lot-sizing model is that the aggregate demand of a given period must be satisfied in that period. Under this assumption, if backlogging is not allowed then the demand of a given period cannot be delivered earlier or later than the

  4. Linking PCA and time derivatives of dynamic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanimirovic, Olja; Hoefsloot, Huub C. J.; de Bokx, Pieter K.; Smilde, Age K.

    2006-01-01

    Low dimensional approximate descriptions of the high dimensional phase space of dynamic processes are very useful. Principal component analysis (PCA) is the most used technique to find the low dimensional subspace of interest. Here, it will be shown that mean centering of the process data across

  5. Audibility of time switching in dynamic binaural synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Pablo F.F.; Møller, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    In binaural synthesis, signals are convolved with head-related transfer functions (HRTFs). In dynamic systems, the update is often done by cross- fading between signals that have been filtered in parallel with two HRTFs. An alternative to cross-fading that is attractive in terms of computing powe...

  6. Quantum dynamics via a time propagator in Wigner's phase space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønager, Michael; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1995-01-01

    that the simple classical deterministic motion breaks down surprisingly fast in an anharmonic potential. Finally, we discuss the possibility of using the scheme as a useful approach to quantum dynamics in many dimensions. To that end we present a Monte Carlo integration scheme using the norm of the propagator...

  7. Mobile charge generation dynamics in P3HT: PCBM observed by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, D. G.; Krebs, Frederik C; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-broadband time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy is used to examine the sub-ps conductivity dynamics of a conjugated polymer bulk heterojunction film P3HT:PCBM. We directly observe mobile charge generation dynamics on a sub-100 fs time scale.......Ultra-broadband time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy is used to examine the sub-ps conductivity dynamics of a conjugated polymer bulk heterojunction film P3HT:PCBM. We directly observe mobile charge generation dynamics on a sub-100 fs time scale....

  8. Phase transition of the susceptible-infected-susceptible dynamics on time-varying configuration model networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Guillaume; Young, Jean-Gabriel; Laurence, Edward; Murphy, Charles; Dubé, Louis J.

    2018-02-01

    We present a degree-based theoretical framework to study the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) dynamics on time-varying (rewired) configuration model networks. Using this framework on a given degree distribution, we provide a detailed analysis of the stationary state using the rewiring rate to explore the whole range of the time variation of the structure relative to that of the SIS process. This analysis is suitable for the characterization of the phase transition and leads to three main contributions: (1) We obtain a self-consistent expression for the absorbing-state threshold, able to capture both collective and hub activation. (2) We recover the predictions of a number of existing approaches as limiting cases of our analysis, providing thereby a unifying point of view for the SIS dynamics on random networks. (3) We obtain bounds for the critical exponents of a number of quantities in the stationary state. This allows us to reinterpret the concept of hub-dominated phase transition. Within our framework, it appears as a heterogeneous critical phenomenon: observables for different degree classes have a different scaling with the infection rate. This phenomenon is followed by the successive activation of the degree classes beyond the epidemic threshold.

  9. Real-Time Simulation of Coaxial Rotor Configurations with Combined Finite State Dynamic Wake and VPM

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jinggen; He, Chengjian

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a first-principle based finite state dynamic rotor wake model that addresses the complex aerodynamic interference inherent to coaxial rotor configurations in support of advanced vertical lift aircraft simulation, design, and analysis. The high fidelity rotor dynamic wake solution combines an enhanced real-time finite state dynamic wake model (DYW) with a first-principle based viscous Vortex Particle Method (VPM). The finite state dynamic wake model provides a state-spa...

  10. Diffusive long-time behavior of Kawasaki dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Cancrin, C; Roberto, C

    2003-01-01

    If $P_t$ is the semigroup associated with the Kawasaki dynamics on $\\Z^d$ and $f$ is a local function on the configuration space, then the variance with respect to the invariant measure $\\mu$ of $P_t f$ goes to zero as $t\\to\\oo$ faster than $t^{-d/2+\\e}$, with $\\e$ arbitrarily small. The fundamental assumption is a mixing condition on the interaction of Dobrushin and Schlosman type.

  11. Real-time dynamic simulation of angular velocity and suppression of dead zone in IFOG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hong; Huan, Yunpeng; Wang, Ansu; Luan, Jinwen

    2015-02-01

    The mechanism of the dead zone in closed-loop IFOGs is theoretically analyzed. The digital closed-loop transfer model for fiber-optic gyroscope is modified and the electronic cross-coupling interference from the feedback channel in the output signal of the detector in the forward channel is added. Using this model, we achieve a real-time dynamic simulation for the dead zone. The simulation results are basically consistent with experiment results. Before the electronic cross-coupling has been eliminated, the dead zone of the high-precision fiber-optic gyro is about , while the medium precision fiber-optic gyro is . After modifying the modulator circuit boards, the dead zone and the noise of the IFOG are of the same order of magnitude, better than and , respectively.

  12. Sliding time of flight: sliding time of flight MR angiography using a dynamic image reconstruction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joonsung; Seo, Hyunseok; Lim, Yongwan; Han, Yeji; Park, HyunWook

    2015-03-01

    To obtain three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography having high contrast between vessel and stationary background tissue, a novel technique called sliding time of flight (TOF) is proposed. The proposed method relies on the property that flow-related enhancement (FRE) is maximized at the blood-entering slice in an imaging slab. For the proposed sliding TOF, a sliding stack-of-stars sampling and a dynamic MR image reconstruction algorithm were developed. To verify the performance of the proposed method, in vivo study was performed and the results were compared with multiple overlapping thin 3D slab acquisition (MOTSA) and sliding interleaved ky (SLINKY). In MOTSA and SLINKY, the variation of FRE resulted in severe venetian blind (MOTSA) or ghost (SLINKY) artifacts, while the vessel-contrast increased as the flip angle of radiofrequency (RF) pulses increased. On the other hand, the proposed method could provide high-contrast angiograms with reduced FRE-related artifacts. The sliding TOF can provide 3D angiography without image artifacts even if high flip angle RF pulses with thick slab excitation are used. Although remains of subsampling artifacts can be present in the reconstructed images, they can be reduced by MIP operation and resolved further by regularization techniques. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A time-dependent density-functional theory and complete active space self-consistent field method study of vibronic absorption and emission spectra of coumarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junfeng; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Cao, Zexing

    2014-07-07

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TD-DFT) and complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations have been used to determine equilibrium structures and vibrational frequencies of the ground state and several singlet low-lying excited states of coumarin. Vertical and adiabatic transition energies of S1, S2, and S3 have been estimated by TD-B3LYP and CASSCF/PT2. Calculations predict that the dipole-allowed S1 and S3 states have a character of (1)(ππ*), while the dipole-forbidden (1)(nπ*) state is responsible for S2. The vibronic absorption and emission spectra of coumarin have been simulated by TD-B3LYP and CASSCF calculations within the Franck-Condon approximation, respectively. The simulated vibronic spectra show good agreement with the experimental observations available, which allow us to reasonably interpret vibronic features in the S0→S1 and S0→S3 absorption and the S0←S1 emission spectra. Based on the calculated results, activity, intensity, and density of the vibronic transitions and their contribution to the experimental spectrum profile have been discussed.

  14. Implementation of the infinite-range exterior complex scaling to the time-dependent complete-active-space self-consistent-field method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orimo, Yuki; Sato, Takeshi; Scrinzi, Armin; Ishikawa, Kenichi L.

    2018-02-01

    We present a numerical implementation of the infinite-range exterior complex scaling [Scrinzi, Phys. Rev. A 81, 053845 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevA.81.053845] as an efficient absorbing boundary to the time-dependent complete-active-space self-consistent field method [Sato, Ishikawa, Březinová, Lackner, Nagele, and Burgdörfer, Phys. Rev. A 94, 023405 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.94.023405] for multielectron atoms subject to an intense laser pulse. We introduce Gauss-Laguerre-Radau quadrature points to construct discrete variable representation basis functions in the last radial finite element extending to infinity. This implementation is applied to strong-field ionization and high-harmonic generation in He, Be, and Ne atoms. It efficiently prevents unphysical reflection of photoelectron wave packets at the simulation boundary, enabling accurate simulations with substantially reduced computational cost, even under significant (≈50 % ) double ionization. For the case of a simulation of high-harmonic generation from Ne, for example, 80% cost reduction is achieved, compared to a mask-function absorption boundary.

  15. keV-Scale sterile neutrino sensitivity estimation with time-of-flight spectroscopy in KATRIN using self-consistent approximate Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrink, Nicholas M. N.; Behrens, Jan D.; Mertens, Susanne; Ranitzsch, Philipp C.-O.; Weinheimer, Christian

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment (KATRIN) to keV-scale sterile neutrinos, which are promising dark matter candidates. Since the active-sterile mixing would lead to a second component in the tritium β-spectrum with a weak relative intensity of order sin ^2θ ≲ 10^{-6}, additional experimental strategies are required to extract this small signature and to eliminate systematics. A possible strategy is to run the experiment in an alternative time-of-flight (TOF) mode, yielding differential TOF spectra in contrast to the integrating standard mode. In order to estimate the sensitivity from a reduced sample size, a new analysis method, called self-consistent approximate Monte Carlo (SCAMC), has been developed. The simulations show that an ideal TOF mode would be able to achieve a statistical sensitivity of sin ^2θ ˜ 5 × 10^{-9} at one σ , improving the standard mode by approximately a factor two. This relative benefit grows significantly if additional exemplary systematics are considered. A possible implementation of the TOF mode with existing hardware, called gated filtering, is investigated, which, however, comes at the price of a reduced average signal rate.

  16. 'Self-consistent' production of ion conics on return current region auroral field lines - A time-dependent, semi-kinetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David G.; Wilson, Gordon R.; Horwitz, James L.; Gallagher, Dennis L.

    1991-01-01

    We describe initial results from a time-dependent, semi-kinetic model of plasma outflow incorporating wave-particle interactions along current-carrying auroral field lines. Electrostatic waves are generated by the current driven ion cyclotron instability (CDICI), causing perpendicular velocity diffusion of ions plus electron heating via anomalous resistivity when and where the relative drift between electrons and ions exceeds certain critical velocities. Using the local bulk parameters we calculate these critical velocities, and so are able to self-consistently switch on and off the heating of the various particle species. Due to the dependence of these critical velocities on the bulk parameters of the species the heating effects exhibit quite complex spatial and temporal variations. A wide range of ion distribution functions are observed in these simulations, including conics with energies of a few electron volts and 'ring' distributions. The rings are seen to be a natural result of transverse heating and velocity filter effects and do not require coherent acceleration processes. We also observe the formation of a density depletion in hydrogen and enhanced oxygen densities at high altitudes.

  17. Online Synchrophasor-Based Dynamic State Estimation using Real-Time Digital Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khazraj, Hesam; Adewole, Adeyemi Charles; Udaya, Annakkage

    2018-01-01

    -time digital simulator (RTDS). The dynamic state variables of the system are the rotor angle and speed of the generators. The performance of the UKF method is tested with PMU measurements as inputs using the IEEE 14-bus test system. This test system was modeled in the RSCAD software and tested in real time......Dynamic state estimation is a very important control center application used in the dynamic monitoring of state variables. This paper presents and validates a time-synchronized phasor measurement unit (PMU)-based for dynamic state estimation by unscented Kalman filter (UKF) method using the real...

  18. A Dynamic Fuzzy Cluster Algorithm for Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ji

    2013-01-01

    clustering time series by introducing the definition of key point and improving FCM algorithm. The proposed algorithm works by determining those time series whose class labels are vague and further partitions them into different clusters over time. The main advantage of this approach compared with other existing algorithms is that the property of some time series belonging to different clusters over time can be partially revealed. Results from simulation-based experiments on geographical data demonstrate the excellent performance and the desired results have been obtained. The proposed algorithm can be applied to solve other clustering problems in data mining.

  19. Predictive Event Triggered Control based on Heuristic Dynamic Programming for Nonlinear Continuous Time Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-17

    Control based on Heuristic Dynamic Programming for Nonlinear Continuous-Time Systems In this paper, a novel predictive event-triggered control...method based on heuristic dynamic programming (HDP) algorithm is developed for nonlinear continuous-time systems. A model network is used to estimate...College Road, Suite II Kingston, RI 02881 -1967 ABSTRACT Predictive Event-Triggered Control based on Heuristic Dynamic Programming for Nonlinear

  20. Electron dynamics in complex environments with real-time time dependent density functional theory in a QM-MM framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morzan, Uriel N.; Ramírez, Francisco F.; Scherlis, Damián A., E-mail: damian@qi.fcen.uba.ar, E-mail: mcgl@qb.ffyb.uba.ar [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física/INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. II, Buenos Aires (C1428EHA) (Argentina); Oviedo, M. Belén; Sánchez, Cristián G. [Departamento de Matemática y Física, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, INFIQC, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA Córdoba (Argentina); Lebrero, Mariano C. González, E-mail: damian@qi.fcen.uba.ar, E-mail: mcgl@qb.ffyb.uba.ar [Instituto de Química y Fisicoquímica Biológicas, IQUIFIB, CONICET (Argentina)

    2014-04-28

    This article presents a time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) implementation to propagate the Kohn-Sham equations in real time, including the effects of a molecular environment through a Quantum-Mechanics Molecular-Mechanics (QM-MM) hamiltonian. The code delivers an all-electron description employing Gaussian basis functions, and incorporates the Amber force-field in the QM-MM treatment. The most expensive parts of the computation, comprising the commutators between the hamiltonian and the density matrix—required to propagate the electron dynamics—, and the evaluation of the exchange-correlation energy, were migrated to the CUDA platform to run on graphics processing units, which remarkably accelerates the performance of the code. The method was validated by reproducing linear-response TDDFT results for the absorption spectra of several molecular species. Two different schemes were tested to propagate the quantum dynamics: (i) a leap-frog Verlet algorithm, and (ii) the Magnus expansion to first-order. These two approaches were confronted, to find that the Magnus scheme is more efficient by a factor of six in small molecules. Interestingly, the presence of iron was found to seriously limitate the length of the integration time step, due to the high frequencies associated with the core-electrons. This highlights the importance of pseudopotentials to alleviate the cost of the propagation of the inner states when heavy nuclei are present. Finally, the methodology was applied to investigate the shifts induced by the chemical environment on the most intense UV absorption bands of two model systems of general relevance: the formamide molecule in water solution, and the carboxy-heme group in Flavohemoglobin. In both cases, shifts of several nanometers are observed, consistently with the available experimental data.

  1. Electron dynamics in complex environments with real-time time dependent density functional theory in a QM-MM framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morzan, Uriel N.; Ramírez, Francisco F.; Oviedo, M. Belén; Sánchez, Cristián G.; Scherlis, Damián A.; Lebrero, Mariano C. González

    2014-04-01

    This article presents a time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) implementation to propagate the Kohn-Sham equations in real time, including the effects of a molecular environment through a Quantum-Mechanics Molecular-Mechanics (QM-MM) hamiltonian. The code delivers an all-electron description employing Gaussian basis functions, and incorporates the Amber force-field in the QM-MM treatment. The most expensive parts of the computation, comprising the commutators between the hamiltonian and the density matrix—required to propagate the electron dynamics—, and the evaluation of the exchange-correlation energy, were migrated to the CUDA platform to run on graphics processing units, which remarkably accelerates the performance of the code. The method was validated by reproducing linear-response TDDFT results for the absorption spectra of several molecular species. Two different schemes were tested to propagate the quantum dynamics: (i) a leap-frog Verlet algorithm, and (ii) the Magnus expansion to first-order. These two approaches were confronted, to find that the Magnus scheme is more efficient by a factor of six in small molecules. Interestingly, the presence of iron was found to seriously limitate the length of the integration time step, due to the high frequencies associated with the core-electrons. This highlights the importance of pseudopotentials to alleviate the cost of the propagation of the inner states when heavy nuclei are present. Finally, the methodology was applied to investigate the shifts induced by the chemical environment on the most intense UV absorption bands of two model systems of general relevance: the formamide molecule in water solution, and the carboxy-heme group in Flavohemoglobin. In both cases, shifts of several nanometers are observed, consistently with the available experimental data.

  2. Physical relativity space-time structure from a dynamical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Harvey R

    2005-01-01

    Physical Relativity explores the nature of the distinction at the heart of Einstein's 1905 formulation of his special theory of relativity: that between kinematics and dynamics. Einstein himself became increasingly uncomfortable with this distinction, and with the limitations of what he called the 'principle theory' approach inspired by the logic of thermodynamics. A handful of physicists and philosophers have over the last century likewise expressed doubts about Einstein'streatment of the relativistic behaviour of rigid bodies and clocks in motion in the kinematical part of his great paper, a

  3. On synchronized regions of discrete-time complex dynamical networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Zhisheng; Chen Guanrong

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the local synchronization of discrete-time complex networks is studied. First, it is shown that for any natural number n, there exists a discrete-time network which has at least left floor n/2 right floor +1 disconnected synchronized regions for local synchronization, which implies the possibility of intermittent synchronization behaviors. Different from the continuous-time networks, the existence of an unbounded synchronized region is impossible for discrete-time networks. The convexity of the synchronized regions is also characterized based on the stability of a class of matrix pencils, which is useful for enlarging the stability region so as to improve the network synchronizability.

  4. Real-time visualization of dynamic particle contact failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parab, Niranjan D.; Hudspeth, Matthew; Claus, Ben; Guo, Zherui; Sun, Tao; Fezzaa, Kamel; Chen, Weinong W.

    2017-01-01

    Granular materials are widely used to resist impact and blast. Under these dynamic loadings, the constituent particles in the granular system fracture. To study the fracture mechanisms in brittle particles under dynamic compressive loading, a high speed X-ray phase contrast imaging setup was synchronized with a Kolsky bar apparatus. Controlled compressive loading was applied on two contacting particles using the Kolsky bar apparatus and fracture process was captured using the high speed X-ray imaging setup. Five different particles were investigated: soda-lime glass, polycrystalline silica (silicon dioxide), polycrystalline silicon, barium titanate glass, and yttrium stabilized zirconia. For both soda lime glass and polycrystalline silica particles, one of the particles fragmented explosively, thus breaking into many small pieces. For Silicon and barium titanate glass particles, a finite number of cracks were observed in one of the particles causing it to fracture. For yttrium stabilized zirconia particles, a single meridonial crack developed in one of the particles, breaking it into two parts.

  5. Finite-time rotation number: A fast indicator for chaotic dynamical structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szezech, J.D., E-mail: jds98@fisica.ufpr.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 5315-970, São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84033-240, Ponta Grossa, Paraná (Brazil); Schelin, A.B., E-mail: schelin@if.usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 5315-970, São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná, 80230-901, Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Caldas, I.L., E-mail: ibere@if.usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 5315-970, São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Lopes, S.R., E-mail: lopes@fisica.ufpr.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Morrison, P.J., E-mail: morrison@physics.utexas.edu [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Viana, R.L., E-mail: rlv640@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil)

    2013-02-04

    Lagrangian coherent structures are effective barriers, sticky regions, that separate chaotic phase space regions of different dynamical behavior. The usual way to detect such structures is by calculating finite-time Lyapunov exponents. We show that similar results can be obtained for time-periodic systems by calculating finite-time rotation numbers, which are faster to compute. We illustrate our claim by considering examples of continuous- and discrete-time dynamical systems of physical interest.

  6. Dynamic Planar Convex Hull with Optimal Query Time and O(log n · log log n ) Update Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Jakob, Riko

    2000-01-01

    The dynamic maintenance of the convex hull of a set of points in the plane is one of the most important problems in computational geometry. We present a data structure supporting point insertions in amortized O(log n · log log log n) time, point deletions in amortized O(log n · log log n) time, a...

  7. Dynamical Constants and Time Universals: A First Step toward a Metrical Definition of Ordered and Abnormal Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Mark A; du Bois, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    From the point of view of the cognitive dynamicist the organization of brain circuitry into assemblies defined by their synchrony at particular (and precise) oscillation frequencies is important for the correct correlation of all independent cortical responses to the different aspects of a given complex thought or object. From the point of view of anyone operating complex mechanical systems, i.e., those comprising independent components that are required to interact precisely in time, it follows that the precise timing of such a system is essential - not only essential but measurable, and scalable. It must also be reliable over observations to bring about consistent behavior, whatever that behavior is. The catastrophic consequence of an absence of such precision, for instance that required to govern the interference engine in many automobiles, is indicative of how important timing is for the function of dynamical systems at all levels of operation. The dynamics and temporal considerations combined indicate that it is necessary to consider the operating characteristic of any dynamical, cognitive brain system in terms, superficially at least, of oscillation frequencies. These may, themselves, be forensic of an underlying time-related taxonomy. Currently there are only two sets of relevant and necessarily systematic observations in this field: one of these reports the precise dynamical structure of the perceptual systems engaged in dynamical binding across form and time; the second, derived both empirically from perceptual performance data, as well as obtained from theoretical models, demonstrates a timing taxonomy related to a fundamental operator referred to as the time quantum. In this contribution both sets of theory and observations are reviewed and compared for their predictive consistency. Conclusions about direct comparability are discussed for both theories of cognitive dynamics and time quantum models. Finally, a brief review of some experimental data

  8. The arrow of time in the dynamic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.E.

    1981-02-01

    A newly proposed, and as yet unverified, theory provides new answers to the old questions concerning the symmetry of time in nature. The theory requires an asymmetry in time for systems whose Newtonian or relativistic description is symmetrical. This is accompanied with the prediction that the universe must forever grow older and continually expand, and provides new insight on the extreme red shift of quasars

  9. Time-resolved imaging of purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hockett, Paul; Bisgaard, Christer Z.; Clarkin, Owen J.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reactions are manifestations of the dynamics of molecular valence electrons and their couplings to atomic motions. Emerging methods in attosecond science can probe purely electronic dynamics in atomic and molecular systems(1-6). By contrast, time-resolved structural-dynamics methods......,17): in both cases, this sensitivity derives from the ionization-matrix element(18,19). Here we demonstrate a time-resolved molecular-frame photoelectron-angular-distribution (TRMFPAD) method for imaging the purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction. Specifically, the TRMFPADs measured during...

  10. Beyond the dynamical universe unifying block universe physics and time as experienced

    CERN Document Server

    Silberstein, Michael; McDevitt, Timothy

    2018-01-01

    Theoretical physics and foundations of physics have not made much progress in the last few decades. Whether we are talking about unifying general relativity and quantum field theory (quantum gravity), explaining so-called dark energy and dark matter (cosmology), or the interpretation and implications of quantum mechanics and relativity, there is no consensus in sight. In addition, both enterprises are deeply puzzled about various facets of time including above all, time as experienced. The authors argue that, across the board, this impasse is the result of the "dynamical universe paradigm," the idea that reality is fundamentally made up of physical entities that evolve in time from some initial state according to dynamical laws. Thus, in the dynamical universe, the initial conditions plus the dynamical laws explain everything else going exclusively forward in time. In cosmology, for example, the initial conditions reside in the Big Bang and the dynamical law is supplied by general relativity. Accordingly, th...

  11. Time series of ground reaction forces following a single leg drop jump landing in elite youth soccer players consist of four distinct phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransz, Duncan P.; Huurnink, Arnold; de Boode, Vosse A.; Kingma, Idsart; van Dieën, Jaap H.

    2016-01-01

    The single leg drop jump landing test may assess dynamic and static balance abilities in different phases of the landing. However objective definitions of different phases following landing and associated reliability are lacking. Therefore, we determined the existence of possible distinct phases of

  12. DCS - A high flux beamline for time resolved dynamic compression science – Design highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capatina, D.; D’Amico, K.; Nudell, J.; Collins, J.; Schmidt, O.

    2016-01-01

    The Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) beamline, a national user facility for time resolved dynamic compression science supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the Department of Energy (DOE), has recently completed construction and is being commissioned at Sector 35 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The beamline consists of a First Optics Enclosure (FOE) and four experimental enclosures. A Kirkpatrick–Baez focusing mirror system with 2.2 mrad incident angles in the FOE delivers pink beam to the experimental stations. A refocusing Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror system is situated in each of the two most downstream enclosures. Experiments can be conducted in either white, monochromatic, pink or monochromatic-reflected beam mode in any of the experimental stations by changing the position of two interlocked components in the FOE. The beamline Radiation Safety System (RSS) components have been designed to handle the continuous beam provided by two in-line revolver undulators with periods of 27 and 30 mm, at closed gap, 150 mA beam current, and passing through a power limiting aperture of 1.5 x 1.0 mm 2 . A novel pink beam end station stop [1] is used to stop the continuous and focused pink beam which can achieve a peak heat flux of 105 kW/mm 2 . A new millisecond shutter design [2] is used to deliver a quick pulse of beam to the sample, synchronized with the dynamic event, the microsecond shutter, and the storage ring clock.

  13. Novel Modeling of Task vs. Rest Brain State Predictability Using a Dynamic Time Warping Spectrum: Comparisons and Contrasts with Other Standard Measures of Brain Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinov, Martin; Lorenz, Romy; Scott, Gregory; Sharp, David J; Fagerholm, Erik D; Leech, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic time warping, or DTW, is a powerful and domain-general sequence alignment method for computing a similarity measure. Such dynamic programming-based techniques like DTW are now the backbone and driver of most bioinformatics methods and discoveries. In neuroscience it has had far less use, though this has begun to change. We wanted to explore new ways of applying DTW, not simply as a measure with which to cluster or compare similarity between features but in a conceptually different way. We have used DTW to provide a more interpretable spectral description of the data, compared to standard approaches such as the Fourier and related transforms. The DTW approach and standard discrete Fourier transform (DFT) are assessed against benchmark measures of neural dynamics. These include EEG microstates, EEG avalanches, and the sum squared error (SSE) from a multilayer perceptron (MLP) prediction of the EEG time series, and simultaneously acquired FMRI BOLD signal. We explored the relationships between these variables of interest in an EEG-FMRI dataset acquired during a standard cognitive task, which allowed us to explore how DTW differentially performs in different task settings. We found that despite strong correlations between DTW and DFT-spectra, DTW was a better predictor for almost every measure of brain dynamics. Using these DTW measures, we show that predictability is almost always higher in task than in rest states, which is consistent to other theoretical and empirical findings, providing additional evidence for the utility of the DTW approach.

  14. Determining Stochasticity and Causality of Vegetation Dynamics in the Southwestern Amazon: Non-linear Time Series Analysis and Dynamic Factor Analysis of EVI2 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarenberg, G.

    2015-12-01

    Infrastructure projects such as road paving have proven to bring a variety of (mainly) socio-economic advantages to countries and populations. However, many studies have also highlighted the negative socio-economic and biophysical effects that these developments have at local, regional and even larger scales. The "MAP" area (Madre de Dios in Peru, Acre in Brazil, and Pando in Bolivia) is a biodiversity hotspot in the southwestern Amazon where sections of South America's Inter-Oceanic Highway were paved between 2006 and 2010. We are interested in vegetation dynamics in the area since it plays an important role in ecosystem functions and ecosystem services in socio-ecological systems: it provides information on productivity and structure of the forest. In preparation of more complex and mechanistic simulation of vegetation, non-linear time series analysis and Dynamic Factor Analysis (DFA) was conducted on Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) time series - which is a remote sensing product and provides information on vegetation dynamics as it detects chlorophyll (productivity) and structural change. Time series of 30 years for EVI2 (from MODIS and AVHRR) were obtained for 100 communities in the area. Through specific time series cluster analysis of the vegetation data, communities were clustered to facilitate data analysis and pattern recognition. The clustering is spatially consistent, and appears to be driven by median road paving progress - which is different for each cluster. Non-linear time series analysis (multivariate singular spectrum analysis, MSSA) separates common signals (or low-dimensional attractors) across clusters. Despite the presence of this deterministic structure though, time series behavior is mostly stochastic. Granger causality analysis between EVI2 and possible response variables indicates which variables (and with what lags) are to be included in DFA, resulting in unique Dynamic Factor Models for each cluster.

  15. RETRIEVAL TIME RESEARCH IN TEMPORAL KNOWLEDGE BASES WITH DYNAMIC CONTENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Koroleva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Results of retrieval time research of actual data effectiveness search in temporal knowledge bases built in the basis of state of events have been proposed. This type of knowledge base gives the possibility for quick access to relevant states as well as for history based on events chronology. It is shown that data storage for deep retrospective increases significantly the search time due to the growth of the decision tree. The search time for temporal knowledge bases depending on the average number of events prior to the current state has been investigated. Experimental results confirm the advantage of knowledge bases in the basis of state of events over traditional methods for design of intelligent systems.

  16. Real-time dynamics of parton-hadron conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Ellis, John; Geiger, Klaus

    1995-01-01

    We propose a new and universal approach to the hadronization problem that incorporates both perturbative QCD and effective field theory in their respective domains of validity and that models the transition between them in analogy to the finite temperature QCD phase transition. Using techniques of quantum kinetic theory, we formulate a real-time description in momentum and position space. The approach is applied to the evolution of fragmenting q\\bar q and gg jets as the system evolves from the initial 2-jet, via parton multiplication and cluster formation, to the final yield of hadrons. We investigate time scale of the transition, energy dependence, cluster size and mass distributions, and compare our results for particle production and Bose-Einstein correlations with experimental data for e^+e^-\\rightarrow hadrons. An interesting possibility to extract the space-time evolution of the system from Bose enhancement measurements is suggested.

  17. Economic Man in the Dynamics of Time and Expanse Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin V. Kondratiev

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the issue of time perception by an economic person as an independent direction in the field of its study. The urgency of addressing this topic is conditioned, on the one hand, by the lack of its systemic coverage in literature about an economic man, and on the other hand, by the fact that the perception of time by an economic person not only develops the principles of his activity, but also influences the nature of their changes. Our study is built in accordance with the systemic, comparative-historical and dialectical method, the principle of historical and logical element unity. It is substantiated that an economic man could not appear in antiquity due to the lack of favorable conditions for his appearance, which will take shape only during the late Middle Ages and will be associated with the development of human existence secular vector. The contours of a bourgeois existence in the modern conditions of a postmodern situation are outlined. The mechanism of the bourgeois activity subordination is revealed to both linear and scattered-situational ways of time perception. The role of bourgeois activity is highlighted separately (through the transformation of the principle of uncertainty into the norm of life in the change of the linear time model by its scattered-situational interpretation. The study concludes that A The dialectical nature of the influence on each other concerning the way of time and bourgeois activity perception. B The scattered-situational model of time does not mean an end, but a new stage in the history of bourgeois, whose characteristics are the following ones: the combination of features characteristic of both of modernity epoch and the epoch preceding modernity; the transformation of the market from the method of a person's personality oppression into the instrument of his self-creation.

  18. Testing for time-varying loadings in dynamic factor models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Jakob Guldbæk

    Abstract: In this paper we develop a test for time-varying factor loadings in factor models. The test is simple to compute and is constructed from estimated factors and residuals using the principal components estimator. The hypothesis is tested by regressing the squared residuals on the squared...... factors. The squared correlation coefficient times the sample size has a limiting chi-squared distribution. The test can be made robust to serial correlation in the idiosyncratic errors. We find evidence for factor loadings variance in over half of the variables in a dataset for the US economy, while...

  19. Time-limited optimal dynamics beyond the Quantum Speed Limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Das, Kunal K.; Arlt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    -off expressed in terms of the direct Hilbert velocity provides a robust prediction of the quantum speed limit and allows to adapt the control optimization such that it yields a predefined fidelity. The results are verified numerically in a multilevel system with a constrained Hamiltonian, and a classification......The quantum speed limit sets the minimum time required to transfer a quantum system completely into a given target state. At shorter times the higher operation speed has to be paid with a loss of fidelity. Here we quantify the trade-off between the fidelity and the duration in a system driven...

  20. A Dynamic Vegetation Senescence Indicator for Near-Real-Time Desert Locust Habitat Monitoring with MODIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Renier

    2015-06-01

    both time and space and is affected by several factors, such as vegetation density, the north-south climatic gradient and the relief. Smoothing the vegetation time series resulted in an increase of the overall accuracy of about 5% at the expense of a loss in timeliness of ten days. To simulate near-real-time monitoring conditions, the decision tree was applied to the decade of 2010. Overall, the seasonal vegetation cycle appeared clear and consistent. The results obtained pave the way for an operational implementation of the senescence dynamic mapping and, consequently, to further strengthen the capacity of the locust control management.

  1. Synchronization stability of general complex dynamical networks with time-varying delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Kun; Guan Shuguang; Gong Xiaofeng; Lai, C.-H.

    2008-01-01

    The synchronization problem of some general complex dynamical networks with time-varying delays is investigated. Both time-varying delays in the network couplings and time-varying delays in the dynamical nodes are considered. The novel delay-dependent criteria in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMI) are derived based on free-weighting matrices technique and appropriate Lyapunov functional proposed recently. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness and advantage of the proposed synchronization criteria

  2. Nonlinear Maps for Design of Discrete Time Models of Neuronal Network Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-29

    network activity. D· 1S. SUBJECT TERMS Map-based neuronal model, Discrete time spiking dynamics, Synapses, Neurons , Neurobiological Networks 16...N00014-16-1-2252 Report #1 Performance/Technical Monthly Report Nonlinear Maps for Design of Discrete-Time Models of Neuronal Network Dynamics...Postdoc. The research plan assumes part-time involvement (50%) of a postdoc, which have experience with neuronal network simulations using standard

  3. dynamic-threshold-limited timed-token (dtltt) protocol

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) [9, 10, 11,. 12, 13 ] SAFENET [14], Manufacturing Automation ... Messages generated in the system at run time may be classified as either synchronous messages ...... ble FDDI's ability of supporting synchronous traffic. IEEE Trans. on Parallel and Distributed Systems,.

  4. Dynamic maintenance of majority information in constant time per update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Gudmund Skovbjerg; Skyum, Sven

    1997-01-01

    We show how to maintain information about the existence of a majority colour in a set of elements under insertion and deletion of single elements using O(1) time and at most 4 equality tests on colours per update. No ordering information is used....

  5. Time Resolved Broadband Terahertz Relaxation Dynamics of Electron in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Tianwu; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Cooke, David G.

    We investigated the transient response of the solvated electron in water ejected by photodetachment from potassium ferrocyanide using time resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TSTS). Ultrabroadband THz transients are generated and detected by a two-color femtosecond-induced air plasma and air biased...

  6. Dynamic-Threshold-Limited Timed-Token (DTLTT) Protocol | Kalu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An improved version of the Static-Threshold-Limited On-Demand Guaranteed Service Timed-Token (STOGSTT) Media Access Control (MAC) protocol for channel capacity allocation to the asynchronous trac in Multiservice Local Area Network (MLANs) was developed and analyzed. TLODGSTT protocol uses static value of ...

  7. Static and dynamic appointment scheduling to improve patient access time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vrugt, Maartje; Laan, Corine Maartje; Olsman, Jan; Boucherie, Richardus J.

    2017-01-01

    Appointment schedules for outpatient clinics have great influence on efficiency and timely access to health care services. The number of new patients per week fluctuates, and capacity at the clinic varies because physicians have other obligations. However, most outpatient clinics use static

  8. Improving the Timed Automata Approach to Biological Pathway Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langerak, R.; Pol, Jaco van de; Post, Janine N.; Schivo, Stefano; Aceto, Luca; Bacci, Giorgio; Bacci, Giovanni; Ingólfsdóttir, Anna; Legay, Axel; Mardare, Radu

    2017-01-01

    Biological systems such as regulatory or gene networks can be seen as a particular type of distributed systems, and for this reason they can be modeled within the Timed Automata paradigm, which was developed in the computer science context. However, tools designed to model distributed systems often

  9. Correlation-based characterisation of time-varying dynamical complexity in the Earth's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Reik V.; Balasis, George; Kurths, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    The dynamical behaviour of the magnetosphere is known to be a sensitive indicator for the response of the system to solar wind coupling. Since the solar activity commonly displays very interesting non-stationary and multi-scale dynamics, the magnetospheric response also exhibits a high degree of dynamical complexity associated with fundamentally different characteristics during periods of quiescence and magnetic storms. The resulting temporal complexity profile has been explored regarding several approaches from applied statistics, dynamical systems theory and statistical mechanics. Here, we propose an alternative way of looking at time-varying dynamical complexity of nonlinear geophysical time series utilising subtle but significant changes in the linear auto-correlation structure of the recorded data. Our approach is demonstrated to sensitively trace the dynamic signatures associated with intense magnetic storms, and to display reasonable skills in distinguishing between quiescence and storm periods. The potentials and methodological limitations of this new viewpoint are discussed in some detail.

  10. Performing dynamic time history analyses by extension of the response spectrum method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulbert, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented to calculate the dynamic time history response of finite-element models using results from response spectrum analyses. The proposed modified time history method does not represent a new mathamatical approach to dynamic analysis but suggests a more efficient ordering of the analytical equations and procedures. The modified time history method is considerably faster and less expensive to use than normal time hisory methods. This paper presents the theory and implementation of the modified time history approach along with comparisons of the modified and normal time history methods for a prototypic seismic piping design problem

  11. Dynamic scheduling and analysis of real time systems with multiprocessors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.D. Nashid Anjum

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This research work considers a scenario of cloud computing job-shop scheduling problems. We consider m realtime jobs with various lengths and n machines with different computational speeds and costs. Each job has a deadline to be met, and the profit of processing a packet of a job differs from other jobs. Moreover, considered deadlines are either hard or soft and a penalty is applied if a deadline is missed where the penalty is considered as an exponential function of time. The scheduling problem has been formulated as a mixed integer non-linear programming problem whose objective is to maximize net-profit. The formulated problem is computationally hard and not solvable in deterministic polynomial time. This research work proposes an algorithm named the Tube-tap algorithm as a solution to this scheduling optimization problem. Extensive simulation shows that the proposed algorithm outperforms existing solutions in terms of maximizing net-profit and preserving deadlines.

  12. Deriving dynamic marketing effectiveness from econometric time series models

    OpenAIRE

    Horváth, C.; Franses, Ph.H.B.F.

    2003-01-01

    textabstractTo understand the relevance of marketing efforts, it has become standard practice to estimate the long-run and short-run effects of the marketing-mix, using, say, weekly scanner data. A common vehicle for this purpose is an econometric time series model. Issues that are addressed in the literature are unit roots, cointegration, structural breaks and impulse response functions. In this paper we summarize the most important concepts by reviewing all possible empirical cases that can...

  13. Timing of Investment and Dynamic Pricing in Privatized Sectors

    OpenAIRE

    Sandro Brusco; Ornella Tarola; Sandro Trento

    2012-01-01

    In equipment-intensive sectors - such as water utilities, power generation, gas - billions of dollars are spent in capital equipment. We discuss and characterize the optimal policy of a profit-maximizing firm and compare it with the optimal policy of a welfare-maximizing planner. When there is no technical progress, the duration of the plant is longer for a private firm. With technical progress, we show that duration tends to increase when the installed capacity increases over time, while it ...

  14. The grounds for time dependent market potentials from dealers' dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, K.; Takayasu, H.; Takayasu, M.

    2008-06-01

    We apply the potential force estimation method to artificial time series of market price produced by a deterministic dealer model. We find that dealers’ feedback of linear prediction of market price based on the latest mean price changes plays the central role in the market’s potential force. When markets are dominated by dealers with positive feedback the resulting potential force is repulsive, while the effect of negative feedback enhances the attractive potential force.

  15. String dynamics in curved space-time revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrakchi, A.L.; Singh, L.P.

    1989-09-01

    The equations of motion of the general background of curved space-time, Einstein's equations, are derived simply by demanding the renormalized energy-momentum tensor of a bosonic string propagating in this background to be traceless. The energy-momentum tensor of such a string is then separable into a holomorphic and an antiholomorphic parts as a consequence of the conformal invariance of the theory regained at the quantum level. (author). 8 refs

  16. Decision dynamics of departure times: Experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyan; Han, Xiao; Bao, Jian-Zhang; Jiang, Rui; Jia, Bin; Yan, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Boyu; Wang, Wen-Xu; Gao, Zi-You

    2017-10-01

    A fundamental problem in traffic science is to understand user-choice behaviors that account for the emergence of complex traffic phenomena. Despite much effort devoted to theoretically exploring departure time choice behaviors, relatively large-scale and systematic experimental tests of theoretical predictions are still lacking. In this paper, we aim to offer a more comprehensive understanding of departure time choice behaviors in terms of a series of laboratory experiments under different traffic conditions and feedback information provided to commuters. In the experiment, the number of recruited players is much larger than the number of choices to better mimic the real scenario, in which a large number of commuters will depart simultaneously in a relatively small time window. Sufficient numbers of rounds are conducted to ensure the convergence of collective behavior. Experimental results demonstrate that collective behavior is close to the user equilibrium, regardless of different scales and traffic conditions. Moreover, the amount of feedback information has a negligible influence on collective behavior but has a relatively stronger effect on individual choice behaviors. Reinforcement learning and Fermi learning models are built to reproduce the experimental results and uncover the underlying mechanism. Simulation results are in good agreement with the experimentally observed collective behaviors.

  17. Physical relativity: space-time structure from a dynamical perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Harvey R

    2005-01-01

    ... relativity, there was nonetheless a vein of doubt running through his writings- culminating in his 1949 Autobiographical Notes- concerning the way he formulated the theory in 1905. It is clear, to me at least, that Einstein was fully conscious right from the beginning that there were two routes to relativistic kinematics, and that as time went on the appropriateness of the route he had chosen, which he felt he had to choose in 1905, was increasingly open to question. In his acclaimed 1982 scientific biogr...

  18. Bubble dynamics and space-time structure in extended inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Kei-Ichi

    1993-12-01

    Developing a thin-wall formalism, we study the evolution of bubbles in extended inflation. We find the following two results. (1) Any true vacuum bubble expands, contrary to the results of Goldwirth and Zaglauer, who claim that bubbles created initially later collapse. We show that their initial conditions for collapsing bubbles are physically inconsistent. (2) Concerning the global space-time structure of the Universe in extended inflation, we show that workholes are produced as in old inflation, resulting in the multiproduction of universes.

  19. Real time modeling, simulation and control of dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mughal, Asif Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces modeling and simulation of linear time invariant systems and demonstrates how these translate to systems engineering, mechatronics engineering, and biomedical engineering. It is organized into nine chapters that follow the lectures used for a one-semester course on this topic, making it appropriate for students as well as researchers. The author discusses state space modeling derived from two modeling techniques and the analysis of the system and usage of modeling in control systems design. It also contains a unique chapter on multidisciplinary energy systems with a special focus on bioengineering systems and expands upon how the bond graph augments research in biomedical and bio-mechatronics systems.

  20. Solving Algebraic Riccati Equation Real Time for Integrated Vehicle Dynamics Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnappillil Madhusudhanan, A; Corno, M.; Bonsen, B.; Holweg, E.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a comparison study of different computational methods to implement State Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE) based control in real time for a vehicle dynamics control application. Vehicles are mechatronic systems with nonlinear dynamics. One of the promising nonlinear control

  1. Dynamic coupling design for nonlinear output agreement and time-varying flow control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buerger, Mathias; De Persis, Claudio

    This paper studies the problem of output agreement in networks of nonlinear dynamical systems under time-varying disturbances, using dynamic diffusive couplings. Necessary conditions are derived for general networks of nonlinear systems, and these conditions are explicitly interpreted as conditions

  2. Princeton_TIGRESS 2.0: High refinement consistency and net gains through support vector machines and molecular dynamics in double-blind predictions during the CASP11 experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, George A; Smadbeck, James; Kieslich, Chris A; Koskosidis, Alexandra J; Guzman, Yannis A; Tamamis, Phanourios; Floudas, Christodoulos A

    2017-06-01

    Protein structure refinement is the challenging problem of operating on any protein structure prediction to improve its accuracy with respect to the native structure in a blind fashion. Although many approaches have been developed and tested during the last four CASP experiments, a majority of the methods continue to degrade models rather than improve them. Princeton_TIGRESS (Khoury et al., Proteins 2014;82:794-814) was developed previously and utilizes separate sampling and selection stages involving Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations and classification using an SVM predictor. The initial implementation was shown to consistently refine protein structures 76% of the time in our own internal benchmarking on CASP 7-10 targets. In this work, we improved the sampling and selection stages and tested the method in blind predictions during CASP11. We added a decomposition of physics-based and hybrid energy functions, as well as a coordinate-free representation of the protein structure through distance-binning Cα-Cα distances to capture fine-grained movements. We performed parameter estimation to optimize the adjustable SVM parameters to maximize precision while balancing sensitivity and specificity across all cross-validated data sets, finding enrichment in our ability to select models from the populations of similar decoys generated for targets in CASPs 7-10. The MD stage was enhanced such that larger structures could be further refined. Among refinement methods that are currently implemented as web-servers, Princeton_TIGRESS 2.0 demonstrated the most consistent and most substantial net refinement in blind predictions during CASP11. The enhanced refinement protocol Princeton_TIGRESS 2.0 is freely available as a web server at http://atlas.engr.tamu.edu/refinement/. Proteins 2017; 85:1078-1098. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Dataset of the molecular dynamics simulations of bilayers consisting of short amyloidogenic peptide VDSWNVLVAG from Bgl2p–glucantransferase of S. cerevisiae cell wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V. Glyakina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The amyloidogenic peptide VDSWNVLVAG from Bgl2p–glucantransferase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall and its modifying analog VESWNVLVAG were taken for the construction of four types of bilayers which differ by orientation of the peptides in the layers and of the layers relative to each other. These bilayers were used as starting models for the molecular dynamics (MD at three charge states (neutral, pH3, and pH5. The changes of the fraction of secondary structure during 1 ns simulations were received for 96 MD trajectories. The data article contains the necessary information for the construction of models of β-strands organization in the oligomer structure. These results were used in the associated research article “Structural model of amyloid fibrils for amyloidogenic peptide from Bgl2p–glucantransferase of S. cerevisiae cell wall and its modifying analog. New morphology of amyloid fibrils” (Selivanova et al., 2016 [1].

  4. An integrative time-varying frequency detection and channel sounding method for dynamic plasma sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Yao, Bo; Zhao, Lei; Liu, Xiaotong; Yang, Min; Liu, Yanming

    2018-01-01

    The plasma sheath-surrounded hypersonic vehicle is a dynamic and time-varying medium and it is almost impossible to calculate time-varying physical parameters directly. The in-fight detection of the time-varying degree is important to understand the dynamic nature of the physical parameters and their effect on re-entry communication. In this paper, a constant envelope zero autocorrelation (CAZAC) sequence based on time-varying frequency detection and channel sounding method is proposed to detect the plasma sheath electronic density time-varying property and wireless channel characteristic. The proposed method utilizes the CAZAC sequence, which has excellent autocorrelation and spread gain characteristics, to realize dynamic time-varying detection/channel sounding under low signal-to-noise ratio in the plasma sheath environment. Theoretical simulation under a typical time-varying radio channel shows that the proposed method is capable of detecting time-variation frequency up to 200 kHz and can trace the channel amplitude and phase in the time domain well under -10 dB. Experimental results conducted in the RF modulation discharge plasma device verified the time variation detection ability in practical dynamic plasma sheath. Meanwhile, nonlinear phenomenon of dynamic plasma sheath on communication signal is observed thorough channel sounding result.

  5. Quantifying the Dynamical Complexity of Chaotic Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    A powerful approach is proposed for the characterization of chaotic signals. It is based on the combined use of two classes of indicators: (i) the probability of suitable symbolic sequences (obtained from the ordinal patterns of the corresponding time series); (ii) the width of the corresponding cylinder sets. This way, much information can be extracted and used to quantify the complexity of a given signal. As an example of the potentiality of the method, I introduce a modified permutation entropy which allows for quantitative estimates of the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy in hyperchaotic models, where other methods would be unpractical. As a by-product, estimates of the fractal dimension of the underlying attractors are possible as well.

  6. Global Format for Conservative Time Integration in Nonlinear Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2014-01-01

    in the new generation of energy conserving algorithms developed over the last two decades. However, the conservative algorithms typically rely on the special structure of the problem to be solved and require intermediate calculations using a mean state. This seems to have limited their use outside academia......The widely used classic collocation-based time integration procedures like Newmark, Generalized-alpha etc. generally work well within a framework of linear problems, but typically may encounter problems, when used in connection with essentially nonlinear structures. These problems are overcome...... equivalent static load steps, easily implemented in existing computer codes. The paper considers two aspects: representation of nonlinear internal forces in a form that implies energy conservation, and the option of an algorithmic damping with the purpose of extracting energy from undesirable high...

  7. Real-time dynamic imaging of virus distribution in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean E Hofherr

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of viruses and gene therapy vectors is difficult to assess in a living organism. For instance, trafficking in murine models can usually only be assessed after sacrificing the animal for tissue sectioning or extraction. These assays are laborious requiring whole animal sectioning to ascertain tissue localization. They also obviate the ability to perform longitudinal or kinetic studies in one animal. To track viruses after systemic infection, we have labeled adenoviruses with a near-infrared (NIR fluorophore and imaged these after intravenous injection in mice. Imaging was able to track and quantitate virus particles entering the jugular vein simultaneous with injection, appearing in the heart within 500 milliseconds, distributing in the bloodstream and throughout the animal within 7 seconds, and that the bulk of virus distribution was essentially complete within 3 minutes. These data provide the first in vivo real-time tracking of the rapid initial events of systemic virus infection.

  8. Chaotic dynamics and basin erosion in nanomagnets subject to time-harmonic magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aquino, M., E-mail: daquino@uniparthenope.it [Engineering Department, University of Naples “Parthenope”, 80143 Naples (Italy); Quercia, A.; Serpico, C. [DIETI, University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples (Italy); Bertotti, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, 10135 Torino (Italy); Mayergoyz, I.D. [ECE Department and UMIACS, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Perna, S. [DIETI, University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples (Italy); Ansalone, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2016-04-01

    Magnetization dynamics in uniformly magnetized particles subject to time-harmonic (AC) external fields is considered. The study is focused on the behavior of the AC-driven dynamics close to saddle equilibria. It happens that such dynamics has chaotic nature at moderately low power level, due to the heteroclinic tangle phenomenon which is produced by the combined effect of AC-excitations and saddle type dynamics. By using analytical theory for the threshold AC excitation amplitudes necessary to create the heteroclinic tangle together with numerical simulations, we quantify and show how the tangle produces the erosion of the safe basin around the stable equilibria.

  9. DYNAMIC STRAIN MAPPING AND REAL-TIME DAMAGE STATE ESTIMATION UNDER BIAXIAL RANDOM FATIGUE LOADING

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DYNAMIC STRAIN MAPPING AND REAL-TIME DAMAGE STATE ESTIMATION UNDER BIAXIAL RANDOM FATIGUE LOADING SUBHASISH MOHANTY*, ADITI CHATTOPADHYAY, JOHN N. RAJADAS, AND CLYDE...

  10. IceBridge ZLS Dynamic Gravity Meter Time-Registered L1B Vertical Accelerations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The IceBridge ZLS Dynamic Gravity Meter Time-Registered L1B Vertical Accelerations (IGZLS1B) data set contains vertical, cross body, and along body acceleration...

  11. Incorporating time and income constraints in dynamic agent-based models of activity generation and time use : Approach and illustration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arentze, Theo; Ettema, D.F.; Timmermans, Harry

    Existing theories and models in economics and transportation treat households’ decisions regarding allocation of time and income to activities as a resource-allocation optimization problem. This stands in contrast with the dynamic nature of day-by-day activity-travel choices. Therefore, in the

  12. Novel modeling of task versus rest brain state predictability using a dynamic time warping spectrum: comparisons and contrasts with other standard measures of brain dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eDinov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic time warping, or DTW, is a powerful and domain-general sequence alignment method for computing a similarity measure. Such dynamic programming-based techniques like DTW are now the backbone and driver of most bioinformatics methods and discoveries. In neuroscience it has had far less use, though this has begun to change. We wanted to explore new ways of applying DTW, not simply as a measure with which to cluster or compare similarity between features but in a conceptually different way. We have used DTW to provide a more interpretable spectral description of the data, compared to standard approaches such as the Fourier and related transforms. The DTW approach and standard discrete Fourier transform (DFT are assessed against benchmark measures of neural dynamics. These include EEG microstates, EEG avalanches and the sum squared error (SSE from a multilayer perceptron (MLP prediction of the EEG timeseries, and simultaneously acquired FMRI BOLD signal. We explored the relationships between these variables of interest in an EEG-FMRI dataset acquired during a standard cognitive task, which allowed us to explore how DTW differentially performs in different task settings. We found that despite strong correlations between DTW and DFT-spectra, DTW was a better predictor for almost every measure of brain dynamics. Using these DTW measures, we show that predictability is almost always higher in task than in rest states, which is consistent to other theoretical and empirical findings, providing additional evidence for the utility of the DTW approach.

  13. Is This Year's Exam as Demanding as Last Year's? Using a Pilot Method to Evaluate the Consistency of Examination Demands over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Victoria; Novakovic, Nadezda

    2009-01-01

    Maintaining standards over time is a much debated topic in the context of national examinations in the UK. This study used a pilot method to compare the demands, over time, of two examination units testing administration. The method involved 15 experts revising a framework of demand types and making paired comparisons of examinations from…

  14. Bounds of Double Integral Dynamic Inequalities in Two Independent Variables on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Saker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim in this paper is to establish some explicit bounds of the unknown function in a certain class of nonlinear dynamic inequalities in two independent variables on time scales which are unbounded above. These on the one hand generalize and on the other hand furnish a handy tool for the study of qualitative as well as quantitative properties of solutions of partial dynamic equations on time scales. Some examples are considered to demonstrate the applications of the results.

  15. Nonlinear Maps for Design of Discrete-Time Models of Neuronal Network Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Neuronal Network Dynamics Sb. GRANT NUMBER N00014-16-1-2252 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR{S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER Nikolai Rulkov Se. TASK NUMBER...studies of large-scale neuronal network activity. D 15. SUBJECT TERMS Map-based neuronal model, Discrete time spiking dynamics, Synapses, Neurons ...time involvement (50%) of a postdoc, which have experience with neuronal network simulations using standard conductance-based models and analysis of

  16. X-ray testing for short-time dynamic applications; Roentgenuntersuchungen fuer kurzzeitdynamische Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurfiss, Malte; Moser, Stefan; Popko, Gregor; Nau, Siegfried [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Kurzzeitdynamik, Efringen-Kirchen (Germany). Ernst-Mach-Inst. (EMI)

    2017-08-01

    For nondestructive testing purposes new challenges are short-time dynamic processes. The application of x-ray flash tubes and modern high-speed cameras allows the observation of the opening of air-bags or the energy absorption of compressed tubes as occurring during a vehicle crash. Special algorithms designed for computerized tomography analyses allow the 3D reconstruction at individual time points of the dynamic process. Possibilities and limitations of the actual techniques are discussed.

  17. How have inflation dynamics changed over time? Evidence from the euro area and USA

    OpenAIRE

    Oinonen, Sami; Paloviita, Maritta; Vilmi , Lauri

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes euro area and U.S. inflation dynamics since the beginning of the 1990s by estimating New Keynesian hybrid Phillips curves with time-varying parameters. We measure inflation expectations by subjective forecasts from Consensus Economics survey and so do not assume rational expectations. Both rolling regressions and state-space models are employed. The results indicate that in both economic areas the inflation dynamics have steadily become more forward-looking over time. We a...

  18. Dynamic phase transitions in a cylindrical Ising nanowire under a time-dependent oscillating magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deviren, Bayram; Kantar, Ersin; Keskin, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic phase transitions in a cylindrical Ising nanowire system under a time-dependent oscillating external magnetic field for both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions are investigated within the effective-field theory with correlations and the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics approach. The effective-field dynamic equations for the average longitudinal magnetizations on the surface shell and core are derived by employing the Glauber transition rates. Temperature dependence of the dynamic magnetizations, the dynamic total magnetization, the hysteresis loop areas and the dynamic correlations are investigated in order to characterize the nature (first- or second-order) of the dynamic transitions as well as the dynamic phase transition temperatures and the compensation behaviors. The system strongly affected by the surface situations. Some characteristic phenomena are found depending on the ratio of the physical parameters in the surface shell and the core. According to the values of Hamiltonian parameters, five different types of compensation behaviors in the Néel classification nomenclature exist in the system. The system also exhibits a reentrant behavior. - Highlights: ► The dynamic aspects of a cylindrical Ising nanowire are investigated in detail. ► The dynamic magnetizations, hysteresis loop areas and correlations are calculated. ► We studied both the FM and AFM interactions within the EFT with correlations. ► Some characteristic phenomena are found depending on the interaction parameters. ► We obtained five different types of compensation behaviors and reentrant behavior.

  19. Dynamic phase transitions in a cylindrical Ising nanowire under a time-dependent oscillating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deviren, Bayram [Department of Physics, Nevsehir University, 50300 Nevsehir (Turkey); Kantar, Ersin [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Keskin, Mustafa, E-mail: keskin@erciyes.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2012-07-15

    The dynamic phase transitions in a cylindrical Ising nanowire system under a time-dependent oscillating external magnetic field for both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions are investigated within the effective-field theory with correlations and the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics approach. The effective-field dynamic equations for the average longitudinal magnetizations on the surface shell and core are derived by employing the Glauber transition rates. Temperature dependence of the dynamic magnetizations, the dynamic total magnetization, the hysteresis loop areas and the dynamic correlations are investigated in order to characterize the nature (first- or second-order) of the dynamic transitions as well as the dynamic phase transition temperatures and the compensation behaviors. The system strongly affected by the surface situations. Some characteristic phenomena are found depending on the ratio of the physical parameters in the surface shell and the core. According to the values of Hamiltonian parameters, five different types of compensation behaviors in the Neel classification nomenclature exist in the system. The system also exhibits a reentrant behavior. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamic aspects of a cylindrical Ising nanowire are investigated in detail. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamic magnetizations, hysteresis loop areas and correlations are calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied both the FM and AFM interactions within the EFT with correlations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some characteristic phenomena are found depending on the interaction parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We obtained five different types of compensation behaviors and reentrant behavior.

  20. Slow dynamics of a protein backbone in molecular dynamics simulation revealed by time-structure based independent component analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naritomi, Yusuke [Department of Supramolecular Biology, Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, 1-7-29 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Fuchigami, Sotaro, E-mail: sotaro@tsurumi.yokohama-cu.ac.jp [Department of Medical Life Science, Graduate School of Medical Life Science, Yokohama City University, 1-7-29 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan)

    2013-12-07

    We recently proposed the method of time-structure based independent component analysis (tICA) to examine the slow dynamics involved in conformational fluctuations of a protein as estimated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation [Y. Naritomi and S. Fuchigami, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 065101 (2011)]. Our previous study focused on domain motions of the protein and examined its dynamics by using rigid-body domain analysis and tICA. However, the protein changes its conformation not only through domain motions but also by various types of motions involving its backbone and side chains. Some of these motions might occur on a slow time scale: we hypothesize that if so, we could effectively detect and characterize them using tICA. In the present study, we investigated slow dynamics of the protein backbone using MD simulation and tICA. The selected target protein was lysine-, arginine-, ornithine-binding protein (LAO), which comprises two domains and undergoes large domain motions. MD simulation of LAO in explicit water was performed for 1 μs, and the obtained trajectory of C{sub α} atoms in the backbone was analyzed by tICA. This analysis successfully provided us with slow modes for LAO that represented either domain motions or local movements of the backbone. Further analysis elucidated the atomic details of the suggested local motions and confirmed that these motions truly occurred on the expected slow time scale.

  1. Controller synthesis for dynamic hierarchical real-time plants using timed automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bin Waez, Md Tawhid; Wasowski, Andrzej; Dingel, Juergen

    2017-01-01

    We use timed I/O automata based timed games to synthesize task-level reconfiguration services for cost-effective fault tolerance in a case study. The case study shows that state-space explosion is a severe problem for timed games. By applying suitable abstractions, we dramatically improve the sca...

  2. Consistent Regulatory Policy under Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Michael J. Brennan; Eduardo S. Schwartz

    1982-01-01

    This article is concerned with the effects of regulation on the risk and value of the regulated firm in a dynamic context. Current regulatory practice is shown to be logically deficient, since it ignores the effect of regulatory policy on the cost of capital and therefore on the appropriate allowed rate of return. A notion of consistency in regulatory policy is developed, and it is shown how consistent regulatory policies may be implemented once the valuation problem is solved.

  3. Modeling Nonstationary Emotion Dynamics in Dyads using a Time-Varying Vector-Autoregressive Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringmann, Laura F; Ferrer, Emilio; Hamaker, Ellen L; Borsboom, Denny; Tuerlinckx, Francis

    2018-03-05

    Emotion dynamics are likely to arise in an interpersonal context. Standard methods to study emotions in interpersonal interaction are limited because stationarity is assumed. This means that the dynamics, for example, time-lagged relations, are invariant across time periods. However, this is generally an unrealistic assumption. Whether caused by an external (e.g., divorce) or an internal (e.g., rumination) event, emotion dynamics are prone to change. The semi-parametric time-varying vector-autoregressive (TV-VAR) model is based on well-studied generalized additive models, implemented in the software R. The TV-VAR can explicitly model changes in temporal dependency without pre-existing knowledge about the nature of change. A simulation study is presented, showing that the TV-VAR model is superior to the standard time-invariant VAR model when the dynamics change over time. The TV-VAR model is applied to empirical data on daily feelings of positive affect (PA) from a single couple. Our analyses indicate reliable changes in the male's emotion dynamics over time, but not in the female's-which were not predicted by her own affect or that of her partner. This application illustrates the usefulness of using a TV-VAR model to detect changes in the dynamics in a system.

  4. Time lagged ordinal partition networks for capturing dynamics of continuous dynamical systems

    OpenAIRE

    McCullough, Michael; Small, Michael; Stemler, Thomas; Iu, Herbert Ho-Ching

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a generalised version of the recently proposed ordinal partition time series to network transformation algorithm. Firstly we introduce a fixed time lag for the elements of each partition that is selected using techniques from traditional time delay embedding. The resulting partitions define regions in the embedding phase space that are mapped to nodes in the network space. Edges are allocated between nodes based on temporal succession thus creating a Markov chain representation...

  5. Diagnosing the Dynamics of Observed and Simulated Ecosystem Gross Primary Productivity with Time Causal Information Theory Quantifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippel, Sebastian; Lange, Holger; Mahecha, Miguel D; Hauhs, Michael; Bodesheim, Paul; Kaminski, Thomas; Gans, Fabian; Rosso, Osvaldo A

    2016-01-01

    Data analysis and model-data comparisons in the environmental sciences require diagnostic measures that quantify time series dynamics and structure, and are robust to noise in observational data. This paper investigates the temporal dynamics of environmental time series using measures quantifying their information content and complexity. The measures are used to classify natural processes on one hand, and to compare models with observations on the other. The present analysis focuses on the global carbon cycle as an area of research in which model-data integration and comparisons are key to improving our understanding of natural phenomena. We investigate the dynamics of observed and simulated time series of Gross Primary Productivity (GPP), a key variable in terrestrial ecosystems that quantifies ecosystem carbon uptake. However, the dynamics, patterns and magnitudes of GPP time series, both observed and simulated, vary substantially on different temporal and spatial scales. We demonstrate here that information content and complexity, or Information Theory Quantifiers (ITQ) for short, serve as robust and efficient data-analytical and model benchmarking tools for evaluating the temporal structure and dynamical properties of simulated or observed time series at various spatial scales. At continental scale, we compare GPP time series simulated with two models and an observations-based product. This analysis reveals qualitative differences between model evaluation based on ITQ compared to traditional model performance metrics, indicating that good model performance in terms of absolute or relative error does not imply that the dynamics of the observations is captured well. Furthermore, we show, using an ensemble of site-scale measurements obtained from the FLUXNET archive in the Mediterranean, that model-data or model-model mismatches as indicated by ITQ can be attributed to and interpreted as differences in the temporal structure of the respective ecological time

  6. Hard X-ray spectral and timing properties of IGR J17454-2919 consistent with a black hole in the hard state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Bachetti, Matteo; Tomsick, J.

    2014-01-01

    frequencies. The Lorentzian has a width of 2 Hz and a fractional rms of 25+/-3%. The hard power-law index, the high energy of the cutoff, and the level of variability all are consistent with properties expected for an accreting black hole in the hard state. While we cannot completely rule out the possibility...... power-law with an exponential cutoff and a broad, asymmetric, iron emission line. The column density is (3.3+/-0.6)e22 cm-2 (using Anders & Grevesse 1989 abundances; errors on all spectral parameters are 90% confidence), the photon index is 1.46+/-0.06, and the e-folding energy is >100 keV (with...... the "cutoffpl" model in XSPEC). The unabsorbed 3-79 keV flux is 3.96e-10 erg/cm2/s with a 0.8% error. At the Galactic center distance, this corresponds to an isotropic luminosity of 3e36 erg/s. The power spectrum consists of two components: a zero-centered Lorentzian peaking near 1 Hz and a power-law at lower...

  7. Entrainment to a real time fractal visual stimulus modulates fractal gait dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea, Christopher K; Kiefer, Adam W; D'Andrea, Susan E; Warren, William H; Aaron, Roy K

    2014-08-01

    Fractal patterns characterize healthy biological systems and are considered to reflect the ability of the system to adapt to varying environmental conditions. Previous research has shown that fractal patterns in gait are altered following natural aging or disease, and this has potential negative consequences for gait adaptability that can lead to increased risk of injury. However, the flexibility of a healthy neurological system to exhibit different fractal patterns in gait has yet to be explored, and this is a necessary step toward understanding human locomotor control. Fifteen participants walked for 15min on a treadmill, either in the absence of a visual stimulus or while they attempted to couple the timing of their gait with a visual metronome that exhibited a persistent fractal pattern (contained long-range correlations) or a random pattern (contained no long-range correlations). The stride-to-stride intervals of the participants were recorded via analog foot pressure switches and submitted to detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to determine if the fractal patterns during the visual metronome conditions differed from the baseline (no metronome) condition. DFA α in the baseline condition was 0.77±0.09. The fractal patterns in the stride-to-stride intervals were significantly altered when walking to the fractal metronome (DFA α=0.87±0.06) and to the random metronome (DFA α=0.61±0.10) (both p<.05 when compared to the baseline condition), indicating that a global change in gait dynamics was observed. A variety of strategies were identified at the local level with a cross-correlation analysis, indicating that local behavior did not account for the consistent global changes. Collectively, the results show that a gait dynamics can be shifted in a prescribed manner using a visual stimulus and the shift appears to be a global phenomenon. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Spatially heterogeneous dynamics investigated via a time-dependent four-point density correlation function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacevic, N.; Starr, F. W.; Schrøder, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Relaxation in supercooled liquids above their glass transition and below the onset temperature of "slow" dynamics involves the correlated motion of neighboring particles. This correlated motion results in the appearance of spatially heterogeneous dynamics or "dynamical heterogeneity." Traditional...... two-point time-dependent density correlation functions, while providing information about the transient "caging" of particles on cooling, are unable to provide sufficiently detailed information about correlated motion and dynamical heterogeneity. Here, we study a four-point, time-dependent density......-q behavior of S4(q,t) provides an estimate of the range of correlated particle motion. We find that xi4(t) has a maximum as a function of time t, and that the value of the maximum of xi4(t) increases steadily from less than one particle diameter to a value exceeding nine particle diameters in the temperature...

  9. Thermodynamic modeling, energy equipartition, and nonconservation of entropy for discrete-time dynamical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chellaboina Vijaysekhar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop thermodynamic models for discrete-time large-scale dynamical systems. Specifically, using compartmental dynamical system theory, we develop energy flow models possessing energy conservation, energy equipartition, temperature equipartition, and entropy nonconservation principles for discrete-time, large-scale dynamical systems. Furthermore, we introduce a new and dual notion to entropy; namely, ectropy, as a measure of the tendency of a dynamical system to do useful work and grow more organized, and show that conservation of energy in an isolated thermodynamic system necessarily leads to nonconservation of ectropy and entropy. In addition, using the system ectropy as a Lyapunov function candidate, we show that our discrete-time, large-scale thermodynamic energy flow model has convergent trajectories to Lyapunov stable equilibria determined by the system initial subsystem energies.

  10. Gaussian Mixture Random Coefficient model based framework for SHM in structures with time-dependent dynamics under uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendaño-Valencia, Luis David; Fassois, Spilios D.

    2017-12-01

    The problem of vibration-based damage diagnosis in structures characterized by time-dependent dynamics under significant environmental and/or operational uncertainty is considered. A stochastic framework consisting of a Gaussian Mixture Random Coefficient model of the uncertain time-dependent dynamics under each structural health state, proper estimation methods, and Bayesian or minimum distance type decision making, is postulated. The Random Coefficient (RC) time-dependent stochastic model with coefficients following a multivariate Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) allows for significant flexibility in uncertainty representation. Certain of the model parameters are estimated via a simple procedure which is founded on the related Multiple Model (MM) concept, while the GMM weights are explicitly estimated for optimizing damage diagnostic performance. The postulated framework is demonstrated via damage detection in a simple simulated model of a quarter-car active suspension with time-dependent dynamics and considerable uncertainty on the payload. Comparisons with a simpler Gaussian RC model based method are also presented, with the postulated framework shown to be capable of offering considerable improvement in diagnostic performance.

  11. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2016-02-25

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser’s relatively large penetration depth and consequently they record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and sub-picosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample’s surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystals and its powder film. We also provide the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study on the Effects of RATO Timing on the Scale Model Acoustic Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Tanner; Williams, B.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The SLS lift off configuration consists of four RS-25 liquid thrusters on the core stage, with two solid boosters connected to each side. Past experience with scale model testing at MSFC (in ER42), has shown that there is a delay in the ignition of the Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) motor, which is used as the 5% scale analog of the solid boosters, after the signal to ignite is given. This delay can range from 0 to 16.5ms. While this small of a delay maybe insignificant in the case of the full scale SLS, it can significantly alter the data obtained during the SMAT due to the much smaller geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs during full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is much smaller allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust duct, through the trench, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. To better understand the effect of the RATO timing simultaneity on the SMAT IOP test data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed using the Loci/CHEM CFD software program. Five different timing offsets, based on RATO ignition delay statistics, were simulated. A variety of results and comparisons will be given, assessing the overall effect of RATO timing simultaneity on the SMAT overpressure environment.

  13. Serial Processing is Consistent With the Time Course of Linguistic Information Extraction from Consecutive Words During Eye Fixations in Reading: A Response to Inhoff, Eiter, and Radach (2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollatsek, Alexander; Reichle, Erik D.; Rayner, Keith

    2006-01-01

    In their article, "Time Course of Linguistic Information Extraction from Consecutive Words During Eye Fixations in Reading," A. W. Inhoff, B. M. Eiter, and R. Radach (see EJ735287) reported the results of two experiments that they claimed were problematic for serial attention models of eye movements in reading (such as the E-Z Reader…

  14. Effect of time delay on the upper bound of the time derivative of information entropy in a stochastic dynamical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Min-Min; Mei Dong-Cheng; Wang Can-Jun

    2011-01-01

    The effects of the time delay on the upper bound of the time derivative of information entropy are investigated in a time-delayed dynamical system driven by correlated noise. Using the Markov approximation of the stochastic delay differential equations and the Schwartz inequality principle, we obtain an analytical expression for the upper bound U B (t) of the time derivative of the information entropy. The results show that there is a critical value of τ (delay time), and U B (t) presents opposite behaviours on difference sides of the critical value. For the case of the weak additive noise, τ can induce a reentrance transition. Delay time τ also causes a reversal behaviour in U B (t)-λ plot, where λ denotes the degree of the correlation between the two noises. (general)

  15. Real-time dynamics of RNA Polymerase II clustering in live human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisse, Ibrahim

    2014-03-01

    Transcription is the first step in the central dogma of molecular biology, when genetic information encoded on DNA is made into messenger RNA. How this fundamental process occurs within living cells (in vivo) is poorly understood,[1] despite extensive biochemical characterizations with isolated biomolecules (in vitro). For high-order organisms, like humans, transcription is reported to be spatially compartmentalized in nuclear foci consisting of clusters of RNA Polymerase II, the enzyme responsible for synthesizing all messenger RNAs. However, little is known of when these foci assemble or their relative stability. We developed an approach based on photo-activation localization microscopy (PALM) combined with a temporal correlation analysis, which we refer to as tcPALM. The tcPALM method enables the real-time characterization of biomolecular spatiotemporal organization, with single-molecule sensitivity, directly in living cells.[2] Using tcPALM, we observed that RNA Polymerase II clusters form transiently, with an average lifetime of 5.1 (+/- 0.4) seconds. Stimuli affecting transcription regulation yielded orders of magnitude changes in the dynamics of the polymerase clusters, implying that clustering is regulated and plays a role in the cells ability to effect rapid response to external signals. Our results suggest that the transient crowding of enzymes may aid in rate-limiting steps of genome regulation.

  16. Fluctuation of similarity (FLUS) to detect transitions between distinct dynamical regimes in short time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Nishant; Marwan, Norbert; Zou, Yong; Mucha, Peter J.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A method to identify distinct dynamical regimes and transitions between those regimes in a short univariate time series was recently introduced [1], employing the computation of fluctuations in a measure of nonlinear similarity based on local recurrence properties. In the present work, we describe the details of the analytical relationships between this newly introduced measure and the well known concepts of attractor dimensions and Lyapunov exponents. We show that the new measure has linear dependence on the effective dimension of the attractor and it measures the variations in the sum of the Lyapunov spectrum. To illustrate the practical usefulness of the method, we identify various types of dynamical transitions in different nonlinear models. We present testbed examples for the new method’s robustness against noise and missing values in the time series. We also use this method to analyze time series of social dynamics, specifically an analysis of the U.S. crime record time series from 1975 to 1993. Using this method, we find that dynamical complexity in robberies was influenced by the unemployment rate until the late 1980’s. We have also observed a dynamical transition in homicide and robbery rates in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s, leading to increase in the dynamical complexity of these rates. PMID:25019852

  17. Anti-rumor dynamics and emergence of the timing threshold on complex network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Kaihua; Liu, Jiawei; Xiang, Gang

    2014-10-01

    Anti-rumor dynamics is proposed on the basis of rumor dynamics and the characteristics of anti-rumor dynamics are explored by both mean-field equations and numerical simulations on complex network. The main metrics we study are the timing effect of combating rumor and the identification of influential nodes, which are what an efficient strategy against rumor may concern about. The results indicate that, there exists robust time dependence of anti-rumor dynamics and the timing threshold emerges as a consequence of launching the anti-rumor at different delay time after the beginning of rumor spreading. The timing threshold as a critical feature is further verified on a series of Barabási-Albert scale-free networks (BA networks), where anti-rumor dynamics arises explicitly. The timing threshold is a network-dependent quantity and its value decreases as the average degree of the BA network increases until close to zero. Meanwhile, coreness also constitutes a better topological descriptor to identify hubs. Our results will hopefully be useful for the understanding of spreading behaviors of rumor and anti-rumor and suggest a possible avenue for further study of interplays of multiple pieces of information on complex network.

  18. Real-Time Dynamics in U(1 Lattice Gauge Theories with Tensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pichler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tensor network algorithms provide a suitable route for tackling real-time-dependent problems in lattice gauge theories, enabling the investigation of out-of-equilibrium dynamics. We analyze a U(1 lattice gauge theory in (1+1 dimensions in the presence of dynamical matter for different mass and electric-field couplings, a theory akin to quantum electrodynamics in one dimension, which displays string breaking: The confining string between charges can spontaneously break during quench experiments, giving rise to charge-anticharge pairs according to the Schwinger mechanism. We study the real-time spreading of excitations in the system by means of electric-field and particle fluctuations. We determine a dynamical state diagram for string breaking and quantitatively evaluate the time scales for mass production. We also show that the time evolution of the quantum correlations can be detected via bipartite von Neumann entropies, thus demonstrating that the Schwinger mechanism is tightly linked to entanglement spreading. To present a variety of possible applications of this simulation platform, we show how one could follow the real-time scattering processes between mesons and the creation of entanglement during scattering processes. Finally, we test the quality of quantum simulations of these dynamics, quantifying the role of possible imperfections in cold atoms, trapped ions, and superconducting circuit systems. Our results demonstrate how entanglement properties can be used to deepen our understanding of basic phenomena in the real-time dynamics of gauge theories such as string breaking and collisions.

  19. LONG-TIME INVESTIGATION OF CEMENT COMPOSITE MATERIAL WITH MICRONIZED WASTE MARBLE POWDER: DYNAMIC MODULES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Prošek

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article focus on “blended cement”. The blended cement was created by using waste marble powder (WMP as a partial replacement for cement. We investigated the influence of WMP on the developing of the dynamic modulus of elasticity and the dynamic shear modulus in time. Four different cement composites with WMP as a partial replacement for cement were studied (5, 10, 15 and 50 wt. % together with reference samples. Dynamic modulus of elasticity was monitored during the first 377 days since manufacture by use of non-destructive testing (resonance method. The results showed that WMP in a small amount had a no effect on the dynamic modulus of elasticity and the dynamic shear modulus.

  20. A Method Based on Dial's Algorithm for Multi-time Dynamic Traffic Assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongjie Kuang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to static traffic assignment has poor performance in reflecting actual case and dynamic traffic assignment may incurs excessive compute cost, method of multi-time dynamic traffic assignment combining static and dynamic traffic assignment balances factors of precision and cost effectively. A method based on Dial's logit algorithm is proposed in the article to solve the dynamic stochastic user equilibrium problem in dynamic traffic assignment. Before that, a fitting function that can proximately reflect overloaded traffic condition of link is proposed and used to give corresponding model. Numerical example is given to illustrate heuristic procedure of method and to compare results with one of same example solved by other literature's algorithm. Results show that method based on Dial's algorithm is preferable to algorithm from others.

  1. Dynamical response of the Ising model to the time dependent magnetic field with white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akıncı, Ümit

    2018-03-01

    The effect of the white noise in time dependent magnetic field on the dynamic behavior of the Ising model has been investigated within the effective field theory based on Glauber type of stochastic process. Discrete white noise has been chosen from both Gaussian and uniform probability distributions. Detailed investigation on probability distribution of dynamical order parameter results that, both type of noise distributions yield the same probability distribution related to the dynamical order parameter, namely Gaussian probability distribution. The variation of the parameters that describe the probability distribution of dynamical order parameter (mean value and standard deviation) with temperature and strength of the noise have been inspected. Also, it has been shown that, rising strength of the noise can induce dynamical phase transition in the system.

  2. Stress Analysis and Fatigue Behaviour of PTFE-Bronze Layered Journal Bearing under Real-Time Dynamic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, M. S.; Kaplan, E.; Cuvalcı, O.

    2018-01-01

    The present paper is based on experimental studies and numerical simulations on the surface fatigue failure of the PTFE-bronze layered journal bearings under real-time loading. ‘Permaglide Plain Bearings P10’ type journal bearings were experimentally tested under different real time dynamic loadings by using real time journal bearing test system in our laboratory. The journal bearing consists of a PTFE-bronze layer approximately 0.32 mm thick on the steel support layer with 2.18 mm thick. Two different approaches have been considered with in experiments: (i) under real- time constant loading with varying bearing widths, (ii) under different real-time loadings at constant bearing widths. Fatigue regions, micro-crack dispersion and stress distributions occurred at the journal bearing were experimentally and theoretically investigated. The relation between fatigue region and pressure distributions were investigated by determining the circumferential pressure distribution under real-time dynamic loadings for the position of every 10° crank angles. In the theoretical part; stress and deformation distributions at the surface of the journal bearing analysed by using finite element methods to determine the relationship between stress and fatigue behaviour. As a result of this study, the maximum oil pressure and fatigue cracks were observed in the most heavily loaded regions of the bearing surface. Experimental results show that PTFE-Bronze layered journal bearings fatigue behaviour is better than the bearings include white metal alloy.

  3. Photoinduced Structural Dynamics of Molecular Systems Mapped by Time-Resolved X-ray Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chergui, Majed; Collet, Eric

    2017-08-23

    We review the tremendous advances in ultrafast X-ray science, over the past 15 years, making the best use of new ultrashort X-ray sources including table-top or large-scale facilities. Different complementary X-ray-based techniques, including spectroscopy, scattering, and diffraction, are presented. The broad and expanding spectrum of these techniques in the ultrafast time domain is delivering new insight into the dynamics of molecular systems, of solutions, of solids, and of biosystems. Probing the time evolution of the electronic and structural degrees of freedom of these systems on the time scales of femtosecond to picoseconds delivers new insight into our understanding of dynamical matter.

  4. Optimization of mixed quantum-classical dynamics: Time-derivative coupling terms and selected couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittner, Jiri; Lischka, Hans; Barbatti, Mario

    2009-01-01

    The usage of time-derivative non-adiabatic coupling terms and partially coupled time-dependent equations are investigated to accelerate non-adiabatic dynamics simulations at multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) level. The quality of the results and computational costs are compared against non-adiabatic benchmark dynamics calculations using non-adiabatic coupling vectors. In the comparison between the time-derivative couplings and coupling vectors, deviations in the adiabatic population of individual trajectories were observed in regions of rapid variation of the coupling terms. They, however, affected the average adiabatic population to only about 5%. For small multiconfiguration spaces, dynamics with time-derivative couplings are significantly faster than those with coupling vectors. This relation inverts for larger configuration spaces. The use of the partially coupled equations approach speeds up the simulations significantly while keeping the deviations in the population below few percent. Imidazole and the methaniminium cation are used as test examples

  5. Dynamic Reconfiguration in Real-Time Systems Energy, Performance, and Thermal Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Weixun; Ranka, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Given the widespread use of real-time multitasking systems, there are tremendous optimization opportunities if reconfigurable computing can be effectively incorporated while maintaining performance and other design constraints of typical applications. The focus of this book is to describe the dynamic reconfiguration techniques that can be safely used in real-time systems. This book provides comprehensive approaches by considering synergistic effects of computation, communication as well as storage together to significantly improve overall performance, power, energy and temperature.  Provides a comprehensive introduction to optimization and dynamic reconfiguration techniques in real-time embedded systems; Covers state-of-the-art techniques and ongoing research in reconfigurable architectures; Focuses on algorithms tuned for dynamic reconfiguration techniques in real-time systems;  Provides reference for anyone designing low-power systems, energy-/temperature-constrained devices, and power-performance efficie...

  6. Dynamics of Bayesian non-Gaussian sensorimotor learning with multiple time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Baohua; Hofmann, David; Sober, Samuel; Nemenman, Ilya

    Various theoretical and experimental studies have suggested that sensorimotor learning in animals happens on multiple time scales. In such models, animals can respond to perturbations quickly but keep memories for a long period of time. However, those previous models only focus on average learning behaviors. Here, we propose a model with multiple time scales that deals with the dynamics of whole behavior distributions. The model includes multiple memories, each with a non-Gaussian distribution and its own associated time scale. The memories are combined to generate a distribution of the desired motor command. Our model explains simultaneously the dynamics of distributions of the songbird vocal behaviors in various experiments, including adaptations after step changes or ramps in the error signals and dynamics of forgetting during the washout period, where an immediate sharp approach to the baseline is followed by a prolonged decay. This work was supported partially by NIH Grant # 1 R01 EB022872, and NIH Grant # NS084844.

  7. Hydration water dynamics around a protein surface: a first passage time approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shivangi; Biswas, Parbati

    2018-01-01

    A stochastic noise-driven dynamic model is proposed to study the diffusion of water molecules around a protein surface, under the effect of thermal fluctuations that arise due to the collision of water molecules with the surrounding environment. The underlying dynamics of such a system may be described in the framework of the generalized Langevin equation, where the thermal fluctuations are assumed to be algebraically correlated in time, which governs the non-Markovian behavior of the system. Results of the calculations of mean-square displacement and the velocity autocorrelation function reveal that the hydration water around the protein surface follows subdiffusive dynamics at long times. Analytical expressions for the first passage time distribution, survival probability, mean residence time and mean first passage time of water molecules are derived for different boundary conditions, to analyze hydration water dynamics under the effect of thermally correlated noise. The results depict a unimodal distribution of the first passage time unlike Brownian motion. The survival probability of hydration water follows a stretched exponential decay for both boundary conditions. The mean residence time of the hydration water molecule for different initial positions increases with increase in the complexity/heterogeneity of the surrounding environment for both boundary conditions. The mean first passage time of the water molecule to reach the absorbing/reflecting boundary follows an asymptotic power law with respect to the thickness of the hydration layer, and increases with increase in the complexity/heterogeneity of the environment.

  8. Dynamic Bus Travel Time Prediction Models on Road with Multiple Bus Routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Cong; Peng, Zhong-Ren; Lu, Qing-Chang; Sun, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and real-time travel time information for buses can help passengers better plan their trips and minimize waiting times. A dynamic travel time prediction model for buses addressing the cases on road with multiple bus routes is proposed in this paper, based on support vector machines (SVMs) and Kalman filtering-based algorithm. In the proposed model, the well-trained SVM model predicts the baseline bus travel times from the historical bus trip data; the Kalman filtering-based dynamic algorithm can adjust bus travel times with the latest bus operation information and the estimated baseline travel times. The performance of the proposed dynamic model is validated with the real-world data on road with multiple bus routes in Shenzhen, China. The results show that the proposed dynamic model is feasible and applicable for bus travel time prediction and has the best prediction performance among all the five models proposed in the study in terms of prediction accuracy on road with multiple bus routes.

  9. A non-critical string approach to black holes, time and quantum dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John R.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.

    1994-01-01

    We review our approach to time and quantum dynamics based on non-critical string theory, developing its relationship to previous work on non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics and the microscopic arrow of time. We exhibit specific non-factorizing contributions to the {\

  10. Dynamic response of the Initial Systolic Time Interval to a breathing stimulus measured with impedance cardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Jan H.; Hoekstra, Femke; Habers, Esther; Verdaasdonk, Ruud M.; Janssen, T. W J

    2010-01-01

    The Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI) is a measure for the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. The present study reports about the dynamic response of ISTI to a Valsalva manoeuvre. This response was investigated in 22 young healthy volunteers, having different

  11. Real Time Emulation of Dynamic Tariff for Congestion Management in Distribution Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Theis Bo; Wu, Qiuwei; Huang, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the real time evaluation of the dynamic tariff (DT) method for alleviating congestion in a distribution networks with high penetration of distributed energy resources (DERs). The DT method is implemented in a real time digital testing platform that emulates a real distribution...

  12. Dynamic Bus Travel Time Prediction Models on Road with Multiple Bus Routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Cong; Peng, Zhong-Ren; Lu, Qing-Chang; Sun, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and real-time travel time information for buses can help passengers better plan their trips and minimize waiting times. A dynamic travel time prediction model for buses addressing the cases on road with multiple bus routes is proposed in this paper, based on support vector machines (SVMs) and Kalman filtering-based algorithm. In the proposed model, the well-trained SVM model predicts the baseline bus travel times from the historical bus trip data; the Kalman filtering-based dynamic algorithm can adjust bus travel times with the latest bus operation information and the estimated baseline travel times. The performance of the proposed dynamic model is validated with the real-world data on road with multiple bus routes in Shenzhen, China. The results show that the proposed dynamic model is feasible and applicable for bus travel time prediction and has the best prediction performance among all the five models proposed in the study in terms of prediction accuracy on road with multiple bus routes. PMID:26294903

  13. Malvinas Current Volume Transport at 41°S: A 24 Yearlong Time Series Consistent With Mooring Data From 3 Decades and Satellite Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artana, Camila; Ferrari, Ramiro; Koenig, Zoé; Sennéchael, Nathalie; Saraceno, Martin; Piola, Alberto R.; Provost, Christine

    2018-01-01

    We combined altimetric data and the in situ data sets from three 10 years apart mooring deployments to compute a coherent and accurate volume transport time series of the Malvinas Current (MC) at 41°S. We used a method developed in Koenig et al. (2014) and explored three types of geostrophic shear to estimate the uncertainty derived from the lack of velocity data in the upper 300 m. The mean MC transport over 24 years in the upper 1,500 m is 37.1 ± 2.6 Sv and the standard deviation 6.6 ± 1 Sv. Since 1993, annual mean transports have varied from 32 to 41 Sv and the three in situ records corresponded to low annual mean transports. The MC transport time series is not stationary, its spectral content evolves with time showing significant energy at the 30-110 days, semiannual and annual period. The distribution of the MC volume transport anomalies is asymmetric, negatively skewed with larger negative anomalies than positive anomalies. Several transport maxima appear to result from cyclonic eddies that propagate northwestward following the 4,000-5,000 m isobaths and locally reinforce the circulation on the slope when they reach 41°S. During transport maxima, the northernmost extension of the Subantarctic Front (SAF) remains at its mean location (39.5°S). During minima, the SAF migrates southward of 41°S as positive anomalies shed by the Brazil Current overshoot moves westward onto the slope. Apart from continental trapped waves, changes in the MC volume transport at 41°S show no correlation with upstream conditions on the continental slope.

  14. Hybrid time-space dynamical systems of growth bacteria with applications in segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Rabha W; Nashine, Hemant K; Kamaruddin, Norshaliza

    2017-10-01

    A biological dynamic system carries engineering properties such as control systems and signal processing (or image processing) addicted to molecular biology at the level of bio-molecular communication networks. Dynamical system features and signal reply functions of cellular signaling pathways are some of the main topics in biological dynamic systems (for example the biological segmentation). In the present paper, we introduce new generalized hybrid time-space dynamical systems of growing bacteria. We impose the approximate analytic solution for the system. The generalization adapted the concepts of the Riemann-Liouville fractional operators for time and the Srivastava-Owa fractional operators for space. Moreover, we introduce a numerical perturbation method of two operators to obtain the approximate solutions. We establish the existence and uniqueness results and impose some applications in the sequel. Moreover, we study the Ulam stability and apply these stable solutions to improve the segmentation of a class of growing bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Delay-dependent dynamical analysis of complex-valued memristive neural networks: Continuous-time and discrete-time cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; Jiang, Haijun; Ma, Tianlong; Hu, Cheng

    2018-05-01

    This paper considers the delay-dependent stability of memristive complex-valued neural networks (MCVNNs). A novel linear mapping function is presented to transform the complex-valued system into the real-valued system. Under such mapping function, both continuous-time and discrete-time MCVNNs are analyzed in this paper. Firstly, when activation functions are continuous but not Lipschitz continuous, an extended matrix inequality is proved to ensure the stability of continuous-time MCVNNs. Furthermore, if activation functions are discontinuous, a discontinuous adaptive controller is designed to acquire its stability by applying Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals. Secondly, compared with techniques in continuous-time MCVNNs, the Halanay-type inequality and comparison principle are firstly used to exploit the dynamical behaviors of discrete-time MCVNNs. Finally, the effectiveness of theoretical results is illustrated through numerical examples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Real-Time Motion Planning and Safe Navigation in Dynamic Multi-Robot Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Special Issue on Multi- Robot Systems, 2006, to appear. [25] J. Chestnutt, J. J. Kuffner, K. Nishiwaki, and S. Kagami. Planning biped navigation strategies...Real-Time Motion Planning and Safe Navigation in Dynamic Multi- Robot Environments James Robert Bruce CMU-CS-06-181 December 15, 2006 School of...Planning and Safe Navigation in Dynamic Multi- Robot Environments 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  17. Nuclear dynamical correlation effects in X-ray spectroscopy from a time-domain perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Karsten, Sven; Ivanov, Sergei D.; Aziz, Saadullah G.; Bokarev, Sergey I.; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    To date X-ray spectroscopy has become a routine tool that can reveal highly local and element-specific information on the electronic structure of atoms in complex environments. Here, we focus on nuclear dynamical effects in X-ray spectra and develop a rigorous time-correlation method employing ground state molecular dynamics simulations. The importance of nuclear correlation phenomena is demonstrated by comparison against the results from the conventional sampling approach for gas phase water...

  18. Bayesian dynamic modeling of time series of dengue disease case counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Bello, Daniel Adyro; López-Quílez, Antonio; Torres-Prieto, Alexander

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study is to model the association between weekly time series of dengue case counts and meteorological variables, in a high-incidence city of Colombia, applying Bayesian hierarchical dynamic generalized linear models over the period January 2008 to August 2015. Additionally, we evaluate the model's short-term performance for predicting dengue cases. The methodology shows dynamic Poisson log link models including constant or time-varying coefficients for the meteorological variables. Calendar effects were modeled using constant or first- or second-order random walk time-varying coefficients. The meteorological variables were modeled using constant coefficients and first-order random walk time-varying coefficients. We applied Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations for parameter estimation, and deviance information criterion statistic (DIC) for model selection. We assessed the short-term predictive performance of the selected final model, at several time points within the study period using the mean absolute percentage error. The results showed the best model including first-order random walk time-varying coefficients for calendar trend and first-order random walk time-varying coefficients for the meteorological variables. Besides the computational challenges, interpreting the results implies a complete analysis of the time series of dengue with respect to the parameter estimates of the meteorological effects. We found small values of the mean absolute percentage errors at one or two weeks out-of-sample predictions for most prediction points, associated with low volatility periods in the dengue counts. We discuss the advantages and limitations of the dynamic Poisson models for studying the association between time series of dengue disease and meteorological variables. The key conclusion of the study is that dynamic Poisson models account for the dynamic nature of the variables involved in the modeling of time series of dengue disease, producing useful

  19. Bayesian dynamic modeling of time series of dengue disease case counts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Adyro Martínez-Bello

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to model the association between weekly time series of dengue case counts and meteorological variables, in a high-incidence city of Colombia, applying Bayesian hierarchical dynamic generalized linear models over the period January 2008 to August 2015. Additionally, we evaluate the model's short-term performance for predicting dengue cases. The methodology shows dynamic Poisson log link models including constant or time-varying coefficients for the meteorological variables. Calendar effects were modeled using constant or first- or second-order random walk time-varying coefficients. The meteorological variables were modeled using constant coefficients and first-order random walk time-varying coefficients. We applied Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations for parameter estimation, and deviance information criterion statistic (DIC for model selection. We assessed the short-term predictive performance of the selected final model, at several time points within the study period using the mean absolute percentage error. The results showed the best model including first-order random walk time-varying coefficients for calendar trend and first-order random walk time-varying coefficients for the meteorological variables. Besides the computational challenges, interpreting the results implies a complete analysis of the time series of dengue with respect to the parameter estimates of the meteorological effects. We found small values of the mean absolute percentage errors at one or two weeks out-of-sample predictions for most prediction points, associated with low volatility periods in the dengue counts. We discuss the advantages and limitations of the dynamic Poisson models for studying the association between time series of dengue disease and meteorological variables. The key conclusion of the study is that dynamic Poisson models account for the dynamic nature of the variables involved in the modeling of time series of dengue disease

  20. Multiscale Fluctuation Features of the Dynamic Correlation between Bivariate Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meihui Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fluctuation of the dynamic correlation between bivariate time series has some special features on the time-frequency domain. In order to study these fluctuation features, this paper built the dynamic correlation network models using two kinds of time series as sample data. After studying the dynamic correlation networks at different time-scales, we found that the correlation between time series is a dynamic process. The correlation is strong and stable in the long term, but it is weak and unstable in the short and medium term. There are key correlation modes which can effectively indicate the trend of the correlation. The transmission characteristics of correlation modes show that it is easier to judge the trend of the fluctuation of the correlation between time series from the short term to long term. The evolution of media capability of the correlation modes shows that the transmission media in the long term have higher value to predict the trend of correlation. This work does not only propose a new perspective to analyze the correlation between time series but also provide important information for investors and decision makers.

  1. Capturing change: the duality of time-lapse imagery to acquire data and depict ecological dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinley Buckley, Emma M.; Allen, Craig R.; Forsberg, Michael; Farrell, Michael; Caven, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the scientific and communicative value of time-lapse imagery by exploring applications for data collection and visualization. Time-lapse imagery has a myriad of possible applications to study and depict ecosystems and can operate at unique temporal and spatial scales to bridge the gap between large-scale satellite imagery projects and observational field research. Time-lapse data sequences, linking time-lapse imagery with data visualization, have the ability to make data come alive for a wider audience by connecting abstract numbers to images that root data in time and place. Utilizing imagery from the Platte Basin Timelapse Project, water inundation and vegetation phenology metrics are quantified via image analysis and then paired with passive monitoring data, including streamflow and water chemistry. Dynamic and interactive time-lapse data sequences elucidate the visible and invisible ecological dynamics of a significantly altered yet internationally important river system in central Nebraska.

  2. Impact Time Guidance Law Considering Autopilot Dynamics Based on Variable Coefficients Strategy for Maneuvering Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the terminal guidance problem for the missile intercepting a maneuvering target with impact time constraint. An impact time guidance law based on finite time convergence control theory is developed regarding the target motion as an unknown disturbance. To further improve the performance of the guidance law, an autopilot dynamics which is considered as a first-order lag is taken into consideration. In the proposed method, the coefficients change with the relative distance between missile and target. This variable coefficient strategy ensures that the missile impacts the target at the desired time with little final miss distance. Then it is proved that states of the guidance system converge to sliding mode in finite time under the proposed guidance law. Numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the impact time guidance law with autopilot dynamics (ITGAD.

  3. Capturing change: the duality of time-lapse imagery to acquire data and depict ecological dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma M. Brinley Buckley

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the scientific and communicative value of time-lapse imagery by exploring applications for data collection and visualization. Time-lapse imagery has a myriad of possible applications to study and depict ecosystems and can operate at unique temporal and spatial scales to bridge the gap between large-scale satellite imagery projects and observational field research. Time-lapse data sequences, linking time-lapse imagery with data visualization, have the ability to make data come alive for a wider audience by connecting abstract numbers to images that root data in time and place. Utilizing imagery from the Platte Basin Timelapse Project, water inundation and vegetation phenology metrics are quantified via image analysis and then paired with passive monitoring data, including streamflow and water chemistry. Dynamic and interactive time-lapse data sequences elucidate the visible and invisible ecological dynamics of a significantly altered yet internationally important river system in central Nebraska.

  4. Attractors of relaxation discrete-time systems with chaotic dynamics on a fast time scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslennikov, Oleg V.; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a new type of relaxation systems is considered. Their prominent feature is that they comprise two distinct epochs, one is slow regular motion and another is fast chaotic motion. Unlike traditionally studied slow-fast systems that have smooth manifolds of slow motions in the phase space and fast trajectories between them, in this new type one observes, apart the same geometric objects, areas of transient chaos. Alternating periods of slow regular motions and fast chaotic ones as well as transitions between them result in a specific chaotic attractor with chaos on a fast time scale. We formulate basic properties of such attractors in the framework of discrete-time systems and consider several examples. Finally, we provide an important application of such systems, the neuronal electrical activity in the form of chaotic spike-burst oscillations.

  5. Excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of N-methylpyrrole: A time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Guorong; Neville, Simon P.; Schalk, Oliver; Sekikawa, Taro; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Worth, Graham A.; Stolow, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of N-methylpyrrole following excitation at wavelengths in the range 241.5-217.0 nm were studied using a combination of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES), ab initio quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-layer multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method, as well as high-level photoionization cross section calculations. Excitation at 241.5 and 236.2 nm results in population of the A 2 (πσ ∗ ) state, in agreement with previous studies. Excitation at 217.0 nm prepares the previously neglected B 1 (π3p y ) Rydberg state, followed by prompt internal conversion to the A 2 (πσ ∗ ) state. In contrast with the photoinduced dynamics of pyrrole, the lifetime of the wavepacket in the A 2 (πσ ∗ ) state was found to vary with excitation wavelength, decreasing by one order of magnitude upon tuning from 241.5 nm to 236.2 nm and by more than three orders of magnitude when excited at 217.0 nm. The order of magnitude difference in lifetimes measured at the longer excitation wavelengths is attributed to vibrational excitation in the A 2 (πσ ∗ ) state, facilitating wavepacket motion around the potential barrier in the N–CH 3 dissociation coordinate

  6. Excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of N-methylpyrrole: A time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guorong [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information & Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Neville, Simon P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Schalk, Oliver [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Sekikawa, Taro [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ashfold, Michael N. R. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Worth, Graham A. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Stolow, Albert, E-mail: astolow@uottawa.ca [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2016-01-07

    The dynamics of N-methylpyrrole following excitation at wavelengths in the range 241.5-217.0 nm were studied using a combination of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES), ab initio quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-layer multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method, as well as high-level photoionization cross section calculations. Excitation at 241.5 and 236.2 nm results in population of the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, in agreement with previous studies. Excitation at 217.0 nm prepares the previously neglected B{sub 1}(π3p{sub y}) Rydberg state, followed by prompt internal conversion to the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state. In contrast with the photoinduced dynamics of pyrrole, the lifetime of the wavepacket in the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state was found to vary with excitation wavelength, decreasing by one order of magnitude upon tuning from 241.5 nm to 236.2 nm and by more than three orders of magnitude when excited at 217.0 nm. The order of magnitude difference in lifetimes measured at the longer excitation wavelengths is attributed to vibrational excitation in the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, facilitating wavepacket motion around the potential barrier in the N–CH{sub 3} dissociation coordinate.

  7. Selecting local constraint for alignment of batch process data with dynamic time warping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spooner, Max Peter; Kold, David; Kulahci, Murat

    2017-01-01

    observation number for every batch. Dynamic time warping has been shown to be an effective method for meeting these objectives. This is based on a dynamic programming algorithm that aligns a batch to a reference batch, by stretching and compressing its local time dimension. The resulting ”warping function......There are two key reasons for aligning batch process data. The first is to obtain same-length batches so that standard methods of analysis may be applied, whilst the second reason is to synchronise events that take place during each batch so that the same event is associated with the same......” may be interpreted as a progress signature of the batch which may be appended to the aligned data for further analysis. For the warping function to be a realistic reflection of the progress of a batch, it is necessary to impose some constraints on the dynamic time warping algorithm, to avoid...

  8. Discrete time population dynamics of a two-stage species with recruitment and capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladino, Lilia M.; Mammana, Cristiana; Michetti, Elisabetta; Valverde, Jose C.

    2016-01-01

    This work models and analyzes the dynamics of a two-stage species with recruitment and capture factors. It arises from the discretization of a previous model developed by Ladino and Valverde (2013), which represents a progress in the knowledge of the dynamics of exploited populations. Although the methods used here are related to the study of discrete-time systems and are different from those related to continuous version, the results are similar in both the discrete and the continuous case what confirm the skill in the selection of the factors to design the model. Unlike for the continuous-time case, for the discrete-time one some (non-negative) parametric constraints are derived from the biological significance of the model and become fundamental for the proofs of such results. Finally, numerical simulations show different scenarios of dynamics related to the analytical results which confirm the validity of the model.

  9. Time Dynamic Modeling and Inference Approaches for Outcomes in Patients on Dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Estes, Jason

    2015-01-01

    In the first chapter of this work, we characterize the dynamics of cardiovascular event risk trajectories for patients on dialysis while conditioning on survival status via multiple time indices: (1) time since the start of dialysis, (2) time since the pivotal initial infection-related hospitalization and (3) the patient's age at the start of dialysis. This is achieved by using a new class of generalized multiple-index varying coefficient (GM-IVC) models utilizing a multiplicative structure a...

  10. Real-time intraoperative evaluation of implant quality and dose correction during prostate brachytherapy consistently improves target coverage using a novel image fusion and optimization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelefsky, Michael J; Cohen, Gilad N; Taggar, Amandeep S; Kollmeier, Marisa; McBride, Sean; Mageras, Gig; Zaider, Marco

    Our purpose was to describe the process and outcome of performing postimplantation dosimetric assessment and intraoperative dose correction during prostate brachytherapy using a novel image fusion-based treatment-planning program. Twenty-six consecutive patients underwent intraoperative real-time corrections of their dose distributions at the end of their permanent seed interstitial procedures. After intraoperatively planned seeds were implanted and while the patient remained in the lithotomy position, a cone beam computed tomography scan was obtained to assess adequacy of the prescription dose coverage. The implanted seed positions were automatically segmented from the cone-beam images, fused onto a new set of acquired ultrasound images, reimported into the planning system, and recontoured. Dose distributions were recalculated based upon actual implanted seed coordinates and recontoured ultrasound images and were reviewed. If any dose deficiencies within the prostate target were identified, additional needles and seeds were added. Once an implant was deemed acceptable, the procedure was completed, and anesthesia was reversed. When the intraoperative ultrasound-based quality assurance assessment was performed after seed placement, the median volume receiving 100% of the dose (V100) was 93% (range, 74% to 98%). Before seed correction, 23% (6/26) of cases were noted to have V100 90%. In these patients, postimplantation evaluation during the actual prostate seed implant procedure was successfully applied to determine the need for additional seeds to correct dose deficiencies before anesthesia reversal. When applied, this approach should significantly reduce intraoperative errors and chances for suboptimal dose delivery during prostate brachytherapy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Interacting opinion and disease dynamics in multiplex networks: Discontinuous phase transition and nonmonotonic consensus times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez-Rojas, Fátima; Vazquez, Federico

    2017-05-01

    Opinion formation and disease spreading are among the most studied dynamical processes on complex networks. In real societies, it is expected that these two processes depend on and affect each other. However, little is known about the effects of opinion dynamics over disease dynamics and vice versa, since most studies treat them separately. In this work we study the dynamics of the voter model for opinion formation intertwined with that of the contact process for disease spreading, in a population of agents that interact via two types of connections, social and contact. These two interacting dynamics take place on two layers of networks, coupled through a fraction q of links present in both networks. The probability that an agent updates its state depends on both the opinion and disease states of the interacting partner. We find that the opinion dynamics has striking consequences on the statistical properties of disease spreading. The most important is that the smooth (continuous) transition from a healthy to an endemic phase observed in the contact process, as the infection probability increases beyond a threshold, becomes abrupt (discontinuous) in the two-layer system. Therefore, disregarding the effects of social dynamics on epidemics propagation may lead to a misestimation of the real magnitude of the spreading. Also, an endemic-healthy discontinuous transition is found when the coupling q overcomes a threshold value. Furthermore, we show that the disease dynamics delays the opinion consensus, leading to a consensus time that varies nonmonotonically with q in a large range of the model's parameters. A mean-field approach reveals that the coupled dynamics of opinions and disease can be approximately described by the dynamics of the voter model decoupled from that of the contact process, with effective probabilities of opinion and disease transmission.

  12. Exploratory Study for Continuous-time Parameter Estimation of Ankle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.; Boyle, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a parallel pathway model to describe ankle dynamics was proposed. This model provides a relationship between ankle angle and net ankle torque as the sum of a linear and nonlinear contribution. A technique to identify parameters of this model in discrete-time has been developed. However, these parameters are a nonlinear combination of the continuous-time physiology, making insight into the underlying physiology impossible. The stable and accurate estimation of continuous-time parameters is critical for accurate disease modeling, clinical diagnosis, robotic control strategies, development of optimal exercise protocols for longterm space exploration, sports medicine, etc. This paper explores the development of a system identification technique to estimate the continuous-time parameters of ankle dynamics. The effectiveness of this approach is assessed via simulation of a continuous-time model of ankle dynamics with typical parameters found in clinical studies. The results show that although this technique improves estimates, it does not provide robust estimates of continuous-time parameters of ankle dynamics. Due to this we conclude that alternative modeling strategies and more advanced estimation techniques be considered for future work.

  13. Heterogeneous dynamics of ionic liquids: A four-point time correlation function approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiannan; Willcox, Jon A. L.; Kim, Hyung J.

    2018-05-01

    Many ionic liquids show behavior similar to that of glassy systems, e.g., large and long-lasted deviations from Gaussian dynamics and clustering of "mobile" and "immobile" groups of ions. Herein a time-dependent four-point density correlation function—typically used to characterize glassy systems—is implemented for the ionic liquids, choline acetate, and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate. Dynamic correlation beyond the first ionic solvation shell on the time scale of nanoseconds is found in the ionic liquids, revealing the cooperative nature of ion motions. The traditional solvent, acetonitrile, on the other hand, shows a much shorter length-scale that decays after a few picoseconds.

  14. High throughput gene expression measurement with real time PCR in a microfluidic dynamic array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra L Spurgeon

    Full Text Available We describe a high throughput gene expression platform based on microfluidic dynamic arrays. This system allows 2,304 simultaneous real time PCR gene expression measurements in a single chip, while requiring less pipetting than is required to set up a 96 well plate. We show that one can measure the expression of 45 different genes in 18 tissues with replicates in a single chip. The data have excellent concordance with conventional real time PCR and the microfluidic dynamic arrays show better reproducibility than commercial DNA microarrays.

  15. Low-energy fusion dynamics of weakly bound nuclei: A time dependent perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz-Torres A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent dynamical fusion models for weakly bound nuclei at low incident energies, based on a time-dependent perspective, are briefly presented. The main features of both the PLATYPUS model and a new quantum approach are highlighted. In contrast to existing timedependent quantum models, the present quantum approach separates the complete and incomplete fusion from the total fusion. Calculations performed within a toy model for 6Li + 209Bi at near-barrier energies show that converged excitation functions for total, complete and incomplete fusion can be determined with the time-dependent wavepacket dynamics.

  16. Low-energy fusion dynamics of weakly bound nuclei: A time dependent perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Torres, A.; Boselli, M.

    2016-05-01

    Recent dynamical fusion models for weakly bound nuclei at low incident energies, based on a time-dependent perspective, are briefly presented. The main features of both the PLATYPUS model and a new quantum approach are highlighted. In contrast to existing timedependent quantum models, the present quantum approach separates the complete and incomplete fusion from the total fusion. Calculations performed within a toy model for 6Li + 209Bi at near-barrier energies show that converged excitation functions for total, complete and incomplete fusion can be determined with the time-dependent wavepacket dynamics.

  17. An evaluation of dynamic mutuality measurements and methods in cyclic time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaohua; Huang, Guitian; Duan, Na

    2010-12-01

    Several measurements and techniques have been developed to detect dynamic mutuality and synchronicity of time series in econometrics. This study aims to compare the performances of five methods, i.e., linear regression, dynamic correlation, Markov switching models, concordance index and recurrence quantification analysis, through numerical simulations. We evaluate the abilities of these methods to capture structure changing and cyclicity in time series and the findings of this paper would offer guidance to both academic and empirical researchers. Illustration examples are also provided to demonstrate the subtle differences of these techniques.

  18. Reversible Reaction-Based Fluorescent Probe for Real-Time Imaging of Glutathione Dynamics in Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianwei; Jiang, Xiqian; Zhang, Chengwei; MacKenzie, Kevin R; Stossi, Fabio; Palzkill, Timothy; Wang, Meng C; Wang, Jin

    2017-09-22

    We report a mitochondria-specific glutathione (GSH) probe-designated as Mito-RealThiol (MitoRT)-that can monitor in vivo real-time mitochondrial glutathione dynamics, and apply this probe to follow mitochondrial GSH dynamic changes in living cells for the first time. MitoRT can be utilized in confocal microscopy, super-resolution fluorescence imaging, and flow cytometry systems. Using MitoRT, we demonstrate that cells have a high priority to maintain the GSH level in mitochondria compared to the cytosol not only under normal growing conditions but also upon oxidative stress.

  19. Dynamical coupling of plasmons and molecular excitations by hybrid quantum/classical calculations: time-domain approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakko, Arto; Rossi, Tuomas P; Nieminen, Risto M

    2014-01-01

    The presence of plasmonic material influences the optical properties of nearby molecules in untrivial ways due to the dynamical plasmon-molecule coupling. We combine quantum and classical calculation schemes to study this phenomenon in a hybrid system that consists of a Na 2 molecule located in the gap between two Au/Ag nanoparticles. The molecule is treated quantum-mechanically with time-dependent density-functional theory, and the nanoparticles with quasistatic classical electrodynamics. The nanoparticle dimer has a plasmon resonance in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum, and the Na 2 molecule has an electron-hole excitation in the same energy range. Due to the dynamical interaction of the two subsystems the plasmon and the molecular excitations couple, creating a hybridized molecular-plasmon excited state. This state has unique properties that yield e.g. enhanced photoabsorption compared to the freestanding Na 2 molecule. The computational approach used enables decoupling of the mutual plasmon-molecule interaction, and our analysis verifies that it is not legitimate to neglect the backcoupling effect when describing the dynamical interaction between plasmonic material and nearby molecules. Time-resolved analysis shows nearly instantaneous formation of the coupled state, and provides an intuitive picture of the underlying physics. (paper)

  20. Frequency-scanning interferometry using a time-varying Kalman filter for dynamic tracking measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xingyu; Liu, Zhigang; Tao, Long; Deng, Zhongwen

    2017-10-16

    Frequency scanning interferometry (FSI) with a single external cavity diode laser (ECDL) and time-invariant Kalman filtering is an effective technique for measuring the distance of a dynamic target. However, due to the hysteresis of the piezoelectric ceramic transducer (PZT) actuator in the ECDL, the optical frequency sweeps of the ECDL exhibit different behaviors, depending on whether the frequency is increasing or decreasing. Consequently, the model parameters of Kalman filter appear time varying in each iteration, which produces state estimation errors with time-invariant filtering. To address this, in this paper, a time-varying Kalman filter is proposed to model the instantaneous movement of a target relative to the different optical frequency tuning durations of the ECDL. The combination of the FSI method with the time-varying Kalman filter was theoretically analyzed, and the simulation and experimental results show the proposed method greatly improves the performance of dynamic FSI measurements.

  1. Role of time delay on intracellular calcium dynamics driven by non-Gaussian noises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wei-Long; Zeng, Chunhua

    2016-04-28

    Effect of time delay (τ) on intracellular calcium dynamics with non-Gaussian noises in transmission processes of intracellular Ca(2+) is studied by means of second-order stochastic Runge-Kutta type algorithm. By simulating and analyzing time series, normalized autocorrelation function, and characteristic correlation time of cytosolic and calcium store's Ca(2+) concentration, the results exhibit: (i) intracellular calcium dynamics's time coherence disappears and stability strengthens as τ → 0.1s; (ii) for the case of τ short, but they trend to a level line as τ → 0.1s, and for the case of τ > 0.1s, they show different variation as τ increases, the former changes from underdamped motion to a level line, but the latter changes from damped motion to underdamped motion; and (iii) at the moderate value of time delay, reverse resonance occurs both in cytosol and calcium store.

  2. Global Phase Synchronization for a Class of Dynamical Complex Networks with Time-Varying Coupling Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li XinBin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Global phase synchronization for a class of dynamical complex networks composed of multiinput multioutput pendulum-like systems with time-varying coupling delays is investigated. The problem of the global phase synchronization for the complex networks is equivalent to the problem of the asymptotical stability for the corresponding error dynamical networks. For reducing the conservation, no linearization technique is involved, but by Kronecker product, the problem of the asymptotical stability of the high dimensional error dynamical networks is reduced to the same problem of a class of low dimensional error systems. The delay-dependent criteria guaranteeing global asymptotical stability for the error dynamical complex networks in terms of Liner Matrix Inequalities (LMIs are derived based on free-weighting matrices technique and Lyapunov function. According to the convex characterization, a simple criterion is proposed. A numerical example is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed results.

  3. Synchronization criterion for Lur'e type complex dynamical networks with time-varying delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, D.H.; Park, Ju H.; Yoo, W.J.; Won, S.C.; Lee, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    In this Letter, the synchronization problem for a class of complex dynamical networks in which every identical node is a Lur'e system with time-varying delay is considered. A delay-dependent synchronization criterion is derived for the synchronization of complex dynamical network that represented by Lur'e system with sector restricted nonlinearities. The derived criterion is a sufficient condition for absolute stability of error dynamics between the each nodes and the isolated node. Using a convex representation of the nonlinearity for error dynamics, the stability condition based on the discretized Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional is obtained via LMI formulation. The proposed delay-dependent synchronization criterion is less conservative than the existing ones. The effectiveness of our work is verified through numerical examples.

  4. Inferring changes in water cycle dynamics of intensively managed landscapes via the theory of time-variant travel time distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danesh-Yazdi, Mohammad; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Karwan, Diana L.; Botter, Gianluca

    2016-10-01

    Climatic trends and anthropogenic changes in land cover and land use are impacting the hydrology and water quality of streams at the field, watershed, and regional scales in complex ways. In poorly drained agricultural landscapes, subsurface drainage systems have been successful in increasing crop productivity by removing excess soil moisture. However, their hydroecological consequences are still debated in view of the observed increased concentrations of nitrate, phosphorus, and pesticides in many streams, as well as altered runoff volumes and timing. In this study, we employ the recently developed theory of time-variant travel time distributions within the StorAge Selection function framework to quantify changes in water cycle dynamics resulting from the combined climate and land use changes. Our results from analysis of a subbasin in the Minnesota River Basin indicate a significant decrease in the mean travel time of water in the shallow subsurface layer during the growing season under current conditions compared to the pre-1970s conditions. We also find highly damped year-to-year fluctuations in the mean travel time, which we attribute to the "homogenization" of the hydrologic response due to artificial drainage. The dependence of the mean travel time on the spatial heterogeneity of some soil characteristics as well as on the basin scale is further explored via numerical experiments. Simulations indicate that the mean travel time is independent of scale for spatial scales larger than approximately 200 km2, suggesting that hydrologic data from larger basins may be used to infer the average of smaller-scale-driven changes in water cycle dynamics.

  5. Real-time electricity pricing mechanism in China based on system dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Yongxiu; Zhang, Jixiang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The system dynamics is used to research the real-time electricity pricing mechanism. • Four kinds of the real-time electricity pricing models are carried out and simulated. • It analysed the electricity price, the user satisfaction and the social benefits under the different models. • Market pricing is the trend of the real-time electricity pricing mechanism. • Initial development path of the real-time price mechanism for China is designed between 2015 and 2030. - Abstract: As an important means of demand-side response, the reasonable formulation of the electricity price mechanism will have an important impact on the balance between the supply and demand of electric power. With the introduction of Chinese intelligence apparatus and the rapid development of smart grids, real-time electricity pricing, as the frontier electricity pricing mechanism in the smart grid, will have great significance on the promotion of energy conservation and the improvement of the total social surplus. From the perspective of system dynamics, this paper studies different real-time electricity pricing mechanisms based on load structure, cost structure and bidding and analyses the situation of user satisfaction and the total social surplus under different pricing mechanisms. Finally, through the comparative analysis of examples under different real-time pricing scenarios, this paper aims to explore and design the future dynamic real-time electricity pricing mechanism in China, predicts the dynamic real-time pricing level and provides a reference for real-time electricity price promotion in the future

  6. Life and Death of Stationary Linear Response in Anomalous Continuous Time Random Walk Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igor, Goychuk

    2014-10-01

    Linear theory of stationary response in systems at thermal equilibrium requires to find equilibrium correlation function of unperturbed responding system. Studies of the response of the systems exhibiting anomalously slow dynamics are often based on the continuous time random walk description (CTRW) with divergent mean waiting times. The bulk of the literature on anomalous response contains linear response functions like one by Cole-Cole calculated from such a CTRW theory and applied to systems at thermal equilibrium. Here we show within a fairly simple and general model that for the systems with divergent mean waiting times the stationary response at thermal equilibrium is absent, in accordance with some recent studies. The absence of such stationary response (or dying to zero non-stationary response in aging experiments) would confirm CTRW with divergent mean waiting times as underlying physical relaxation mechanism, but reject it otherwise. We show that the absence of stationary response is closely related to the breaking of ergodicity of the corresponding dynamical variable. As an important new result, we derive a generalized Cole-Cole response within ergodic CTRW dynamics with finite waiting time. Moreover, we provide a physically reasonable explanation of the origin and wide presence of 1/f noise in condensed matter for ergodic dynamics close to normal, rather than strongly deviating.

  7. Consistent model driven architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław J.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the MDA is to produce software systems from abstract models in a way where human interaction is restricted to a minimum. These abstract models are based on the UML language. However, the semantics of UML models is defined in a natural language. Subsequently the verification of consistency of these diagrams is needed in order to identify errors in requirements at the early stage of the development process. The verification of consistency is difficult due to a semi-formal nature of UML diagrams. We propose automatic verification of consistency of the series of UML diagrams originating from abstract models implemented with our consistency rules. This Consistent Model Driven Architecture approach enables us to generate automatically complete workflow applications from consistent and complete models developed from abstract models (e.g. Business Context Diagram). Therefore, our method can be used to check practicability (feasibility) of software architecture models.

  8. Impact of stock market structure on intertrade time and price dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Yuen, Ainslie; Perakakis, Pandelis

    2014-01-01

    We analyse times between consecutive transactions for a diverse group of stocks registered on the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, and we relate the dynamical properties of the intertrade times with those of the corresponding price fluctuations. We report that market structure strongly impacts the scale-invariant temporal organisation in the transaction timing of stocks, which we have observed to have long-range power-law correlations. Specifically, we find that, compared to NYSE stocks, stocks registered on the NASDAQ exhibit significantly stronger correlations in their transaction timing on scales within a trading day. Further, we find that companies that transfer from the NASDAQ to the NYSE show a reduction in the correlation strength of transaction timing on scales within a trading day, indicating influences of market structure. We also report a persistent decrease in correlation strength of intertrade times with increasing average intertrade time and with corresponding decrease in companies' market capitalization-a trend which is less pronounced for NASDAQ stocks. Surprisingly, we observe that stronger power-law correlations in intertrade times are coupled with stronger power-law correlations in absolute price returns and higher price volatility, suggesting a strong link between the dynamical properties of intertrade times and the corresponding price fluctuations over a broad range of time scales. Comparing the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, we demonstrate that the stronger correlations we find in intertrade times for NASDAQ stocks are associated with stronger correlations in absolute price returns and with higher volatility, suggesting that market structure may affect price behavior through information contained in transaction timing. These findings do not support the hypothesis of universal scaling behavior in stock dynamics that is independent of company characteristics and stock market structure. Further, our results have implications for utilising transaction timing

  9. Impact of Stock Market Structure on Intertrade Time and Price Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Yuen, Ainslie; Perakakis, Pandelis

    2014-01-01

    We analyse times between consecutive transactions for a diverse group of stocks registered on the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, and we relate the dynamical properties of the intertrade times with those of the corresponding price fluctuations. We report that market structure strongly impacts the scale-invariant temporal organisation in the transaction timing of stocks, which we have observed to have long-range power-law correlations. Specifically, we find that, compared to NYSE stocks, stocks registered on the NASDAQ exhibit significantly stronger correlations in their transaction timing on scales within a trading day. Further, we find that companies that transfer from the NASDAQ to the NYSE show a reduction in the correlation strength of transaction timing on scales within a trading day, indicating influences of market structure. We also report a persistent decrease in correlation strength of intertrade times with increasing average intertrade time and with corresponding decrease in companies' market capitalization–a trend which is less pronounced for NASDAQ stocks. Surprisingly, we observe that stronger power-law correlations in intertrade times are coupled with stronger power-law correlations in absolute price returns and higher price volatility, suggesting a strong link between the dynamical properties of intertrade times and the corresponding price fluctuations over a broad range of time scales. Comparing the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, we demonstrate that the stronger correlations we find in intertrade times for NASDAQ stocks are associated with stronger correlations in absolute price returns and with higher volatility, suggesting that market structure may affect price behavior through information contained in transaction timing. These findings do not support the hypothesis of universal scaling behavior in stock dynamics that is independent of company characteristics and stock market structure. Further, our results have implications for utilising transaction timing

  10. Impact of stock market structure on intertrade time and price dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plamen Ch Ivanov

    Full Text Available We analyse times between consecutive transactions for a diverse group of stocks registered on the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, and we relate the dynamical properties of the intertrade times with those of the corresponding price fluctuations. We report that market structure strongly impacts the scale-invariant temporal organisation in the transaction timing of stocks, which we have observed to have long-range power-law correlations. Specifically, we find that, compared to NYSE stocks, stocks registered on the NASDAQ exhibit significantly stronger correlations in their transaction timing on scales within a trading day. Further, we find that companies that transfer from the NASDAQ to the NYSE show a reduction in the correlation strength of transaction timing on scales within a trading day, indicating influences of market structure. We also report a persistent decrease in correlation strength of intertrade times with increasing average intertrade time and with corresponding decrease in companies' market capitalization-a trend which is less pronounced for NASDAQ stocks. Surprisingly, we observe that stronger power-law correlations in intertrade times are coupled with stronger power-law correlations in absolute price returns and higher price volatility, suggesting a strong link between the dynamical properties of intertrade times and the corresponding price fluctuations over a broad range of time scales. Comparing the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, we demonstrate that the stronger correlations we find in intertrade times for NASDAQ stocks are associated with stronger correlations in absolute price returns and with higher volatility, suggesting that market structure may affect price behavior through information contained in transaction timing. These findings do not support the hypothesis of universal scaling behavior in stock dynamics that is independent of company characteristics and stock market structure. Further, our results have implications for utilising

  11. Discrete-time dynamic network model for the spread of susceptible-infective-recovered diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Sanjeev Kumar

    2017-07-01

    We propose a discrete-time dynamic network model describing the spread of susceptible-infective-recovered diseases in a population. We consider the case in which the nodes in the network change their links due to social mixing dynamics as well as in response to the disease. The model shows the behavior that, as we increase social mixing, disease spread is inhibited in certain cases, while in other cases it is enhanced. We also extend this dynamic network model to take into account the case of hidden infection. Here we find that, as expected, the disease spreads more readily if there is a time period after contracting the disease during which an individual is infective but is not known to have the disease.

  12. Direct Observation of Insulin Association Dynamics with Time-Resolved X-ray Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmerman, Dolev; Leshchev, Denis; Hsu, Darren J; Hong, Jiyun; Kosheleva, Irina; Chen, Lin X

    2017-09-21

    Biological functions frequently require protein-protein interactions that involve secondary and tertiary structural perturbation. Here we study protein-protein dissociation and reassociation dynamics in insulin, a model system for protein oligomerization. Insulin dimer dissociation into monomers was induced by a nanosecond temperature-jump (T-jump) of ∼8 °C in aqueous solution, and the resulting protein and solvent dynamics were tracked by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering (TRXSS) on time scales of 10 ns to 100 ms. The protein scattering signals revealed the formation of five distinguishable transient species during the association process that deviate from simple two-state kinetics. Our results show that the combination of T-jump pump coupled to TRXSS probe allows for direct tracking of structural dynamics in nonphotoactive proteins.

  13. Neural Network Based Real-time Correction of Transducer Dynamic Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roj, J.

    2013-12-01

    In order to carry out real-time dynamic error correction of transducers described by a linear differential equation, a novel recurrent neural network was developed. The network structure is based on solving this equation with respect to the input quantity when using the state variables. It is shown that such a real-time correction can be carried out using simple linear perceptrons. Due to the use of a neural technique, knowledge of the dynamic parameters of the transducer is not necessary. Theoretical considerations are illustrated by the results of simulation studies performed for the modeled second order transducer. The most important properties of the neural dynamic error correction, when emphasizing the fundamental advantages and disadvantages, are discussed.

  14. Real-time spectral interferometry probes the internal dynamics of femtosecond soliton molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herink, G; Kurtz, F; Jalali, B; Solli, D R; Ropers, C

    2017-04-07

    Solitons, particle-like excitations ubiquitous in many fields of physics, have been shown to exhibit bound states akin to molecules. The formation of such temporal soliton bound states and their internal dynamics have escaped direct experimental observation. By means of an emerging time-stretch technique, we resolve the evolution of femtosecond soliton molecules in the cavity of a few-cycle mode-locked laser. We track two- and three-soliton bound states over hundreds of thousands of consecutive cavity roundtrips, identifying fixed points and periodic and aperiodic molecular orbits. A class of trajectories acquires a path-dependent geometrical phase, implying that its dynamics may be topologically protected. These findings highlight the importance of real-time detection in resolving interactions in complex nonlinear systems, including the dynamics of soliton bound states, breathers, and rogue waves. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Direct Observation of Insulin Association Dynamics with Time-Resolved X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimmerman, Dolev [Department; Leshchev, Denis [Department; Hsu, Darren J. [Department; Hong, Jiyun [Department; Kosheleva, Irina [Center; Chen, Lin X. [Department; Chemical

    2017-09-05

    Biological functions frequently require protein-protein interactions that involve secondary and tertiary structural perturbation. Here we study protein-protein dissociation and reassociation dynamics in insulin, a model system for protein oligomerization. Insulin dimer dissociation into monomers was induced by a nanosecond temperature-jump (T-jump) of ~8 °C in aqueous solution, and the resulting protein and solvent dynamics were tracked by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering (TRXSS) on time scales of 10 ns to 100 ms. The protein scattering signals revealed the formation of five distinguishable transient species during the association process that deviate from simple two state kinetics. Our results show that the combination of T-jump pump coupled to TRXSS probe allows for direct tracking of structural dynamics in nonphotoactive proteins.

  16. PolyWaTT: A polynomial water travel time estimator based on Derivative Dynamic Time Warping and Perceptually Important Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claure, Yuri Navarro; Matsubara, Edson Takashi; Padovani, Carlos; Prati, Ronaldo Cristiano

    2018-03-01

    Traditional methods for estimating timing parameters in hydrological science require a rigorous study of the relations of flow resistance, slope, flow regime, watershed size, water velocity, and other local variables. These studies are mostly based on empirical observations, where the timing parameter is estimated using empirically derived formulas. The application of these studies to other locations is not always direct. The locations in which equations are used should have comparable characteristics to the locations from which such equations have been derived. To overcome this barrier, in this work, we developed a data-driven approach to estimate timing parameters such as travel time. Our proposal estimates timing parameters using historical data of the location without the need of adapting or using empirical formulas from other locations. The proposal only uses one variable measured at two different locations on the same river (for instance, two river-level measurements, one upstream and the other downstream on the same river). The recorded data from each location generates two time series. Our method aligns these two time series using derivative dynamic time warping (DDTW) and perceptually important points (PIP). Using data from timing parameters, a polynomial function generalizes the data by inducing a polynomial water travel time estimator, called PolyWaTT. To evaluate the potential of our proposal, we applied PolyWaTT to three different watersheds: a floodplain ecosystem located in the part of Brazil known as Pantanal, the world's largest tropical wetland area; and the Missouri River and the Pearl River, in United States of America. We compared our proposal with empirical formulas and a data-driven state-of-the-art method. The experimental results demonstrate that PolyWaTT showed a lower mean absolute error than all other methods tested in this study, and for longer distances the mean absolute error achieved by PolyWaTT is three times smaller than empirical

  17. The time consistent public goods provision

    OpenAIRE

    Shigeo Morita

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we reconsider the optimal non-linear tax problem with the public goods from the perspective of the commitment issue and examine how it affects the condition of the public goods provision. We show that the Samuelson rule should be modified when the government cannot commit and the skill types of taxpayers are revealed. Even if taxpayers have the same preference, which is separable and additive with respect to consumption and leisure, the Samuelson rule breaks down. Our analysis ...

  18. Integration of domain and resource-based reasoning for real-time control in dynamic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Keith; Whitebread, Kenneth R.; Kendus, Michael; Cromarty, Andrew S.

    1993-01-01

    A real-time software controller that successfully integrates domain-based and resource-based control reasoning to perform task execution in a dynamically changing environment is described. The design of the controller is based on the concept of partitioning the process to be controlled into a set of tasks, each of which achieves some process goal. It is assumed that, in general, there are multiple ways (tasks) to achieve a goal. The controller dynamically determines current goals and their current criticality, choosing and scheduling tasks to achieve those goals in the time available. It incorporates rule-based goal reasoning, a TMS-based criticality propagation mechanism, and a real-time scheduler. The controller has been used to build a knowledge-based situation assessment system that formed a major component of a real-time, distributed, cooperative problem solving system built under DARPA contract. It is also being employed in other applications now in progress.

  19. Dynamic response and time-frequency analysis for gear tooth crack detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Omar D.; Rantatalo, Matti

    2016-01-01

    Vibration health monitoring is a non-destructive technique which can be applied to detect cracks propagating in gear teeth. This paper studies gear tooth crack detection by investigating the natural frequencies and by performing time-frequency analysis of a 6 DOF dynamic gear model. The gear mesh stiffness used in the model was calculated analytically for different cases of crack sizes. The frequency response functions (FRFs) of the model were derived for healthy and faulty cases and dynamic simulation was performed to obtain the time signal responses. A new approach involving a short-time Fourier transform (STFT) was applied where a fast Fourier transform (FFT) was calculated for successive blocks with different sizes corresponding to the time segments of the varying gear mesh stiffness. The relationship between the different crack sizes and the mesh-stiffness-dependent eigenfrequencies was studied in order to detect the tooth crack and to estimate its size.

  20. Dynamic life-time assessing method for the N1C700 turbine's rotor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu-Vifor, B.

    1993-01-01

    The N1C700 turbine's rotor subject to different sorts of stress variations was investigated through dynamic life-time assessing method. To obtain the temperature fields at different steam parameters inside the turbine components, a computer code named DENOPAR was developed

  1. Shape selection in Landsat time series: A tool for monitoring forest dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretchen G. Moisen; Mary C. Meyer; Todd A. Schroeder; Xiyue Liao; Karen G. Schleeweis; Elizabeth A. Freeman; Chris Toney

    2016-01-01

    We present a new methodology for fitting nonparametric shape-restricted regression splines to time series of Landsat imagery for the purpose of modeling, mapping, and monitoring annual forest disturbance dynamics over nearly three decades. For each pixel and spectral band or index of choice in temporal Landsat data, our method delivers a smoothed rendition of...

  2. Towards a Unified Formulation of Dynamics and Thermodynamics I. From Microscopic to Macroscopic Time Scales

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Durand, P.; Paidarová, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 2 (2011), s. 225-236 ISSN 0020-7608 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100400501; GA AV ČR IAA401870702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Liouville equation * time scales * chemical kinetics and dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.357, year: 2011

  3. Hardy inequality on time scales and its application to half-linear dynamic equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Řehák Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A time-scale version of the Hardy inequality is presented, which unifies and extends well-known Hardy inequalities in the continuous and in the discrete setting. An application in the oscillation theory of half-linear dynamic equations is given.

  4. Changes in dynamic balance control over time in children with and without Developmental Coodination Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelsma, L.D.; Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Geuze, R.H.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in dynamic balance control over time in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder L.D. Jelsma1, B.C.M. Smits-Engelsman2 & R.H. Geuze1 1Clinical and Developmental Neuropsychology, University of Groningen, Grote Kruisstraat 2-1, 9712 TS Groningen, the Netherlands.

  5. Principal and nonprincipal solutions of symplectic dynamic systems on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Dosly

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We establish the concept of the principal and nonprincipal solution for the so-called symplectic dynamic systems on time scales. We also present a brief survey of the history of these concept for differential and difference equations.

  6. Space-time discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for inviscid gas dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ven, H.; van der Vegt, Jacobus J.W.; Bouwman, E.G.; Bathe, K.J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper an overview is given of the space-time discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for the solution of the Euler equations of gas dynamics. This technique is well suited for problems which require moving meshes to deal with changes in the domain boundary. The method is demonstrated

  7. Performance analysis of a cooperative adaptive cruise controller subject to dynamic time headway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semsar-Kazerooni, E.; Ploeg, J.

    2013-01-01

    The current paper shows string stability of a platoon of vehicles when the spacing policy within the platoon is dynamic, i.e., it has time-varying parameters. This problem setup is to address the safety issues that arise due to malfunction of some redundant sensing/communicating devices installed on

  8. Time series analysis of landslide dynamics using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner, Darren; Lucieer, Arko; de Jong, Steven M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/120221306

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) to collect a time series of high-resolution images over four years at seven epochs to assess landslide dynamics. Structure from Motion (SfM) was applied to create Digital Surface Models (DSMs) of the landslide surface with an accuracy of 4-5 cm

  9. Oscillation and nonoscillation for impulsive dynamic equations on certain time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henderson Johnny

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the existence of oscillatory and nonoscillatory solutions for first-order impulsive dynamic equations on time scales with certain restrictions on the points of impulse. We will rely on the nonlinear alternative of Leray-Schauder type combined with a lower and upper solutions method.

  10. Changes in dynamic balance control over time in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelsma, L.D.; Smits-Engelsman, B. C. M.; Krijnen, W. P.; Geuze, R.H.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in underlying adaptations of dynamic balance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) during a Wii Fit game and to measure changes over time and after intervention. Twenty-eight children with DCD and 21 typically

  11. The effect of finite response–time in coupled dynamical systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The paper investigates synchronization in unidirectionally coupled dynamical systems wherein the influence of drive on response is cumulative: coupling signals are integrated over a time interval τ. A major consequence of integrative coupling is that the onset of the generalized and phase synchronization occurs ...

  12. Real-time dynamic hydraulic model for water distribution networks: steady state modelling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osman, Mohammad S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available steady state hydraulic model that will be used within a real-time dynamic hydraulic model (DHM). The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) water distribution network (WDN) is used as a pilot study for this purpose. A hydraulic analysis...

  13. Real-time dynamic hydraulic model for potable water loss reduction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abu-Mahfouz, Adnan M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available -overlay required for the WDN can itself be a cause of technical problems that also need to be solved before water utilities will implement these techniques. This paper propose a real-time dynamic hydraulic model (DHM) based control system connected to near realtime...

  14. Stability of Intelligent Transportation Network Dynamics: A Daily Path Flow Adjustment considering Travel Time Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chorng Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretic formulation on how traffic time information distributed by ITS operations influences the trajectory of network flows is presented in this paper. The interactions between users and ITS operator are decomposed into three parts: (i travel time induced path flow dynamics (PFDTT; (ii demand induced path flow dynamics (PFDD; and (iii predicted travel time dynamics for an origin-destination (OD pair (PTTDOD. PFDTT describes the collective results of user’s daily route selection by pairwise comparison of path travel time provided by ITS services. The other two components, PTTDOD and PFDD, are concentrated on the evolutions of system variables which are predicted and observed, respectively, by ITS operators to act as a benchmark in guiding the target system towards an expected status faster. In addition to the delivered modelings, the stability theorem of the equilibrium solution in the sense of Lyapunov stability is also provided. A Lyapunov function is developed and employed to the proof of stability theorem to show the asymptotic behavior of the aimed system. The information of network flow dynamics plays a key role in traffic control policy-making. The evaluation of ITS-based strategies will not be reasonable without a well-established modeling of network flow evolutions.

  15. No Time Like the Present : Discovering the Hidden Dynamics in Intensive Longitudinal Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamaker, Ellen L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/208146660; Wichers, Marieke

    2017-01-01

    There has been a strong increase in the number of studies based on intensive longitudinal data, such as those obtained with experience sampling and daily diaries. These data contain a wealth of information regarding the dynamics of processes as they unfold within individuals over time. In this

  16. Impacts of Wake Effect and Time Delay on the Dynamic Analysis of Wind Farms Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fouly, Tarek H. M.; El-Saadany, Ehab F.; Salama, Magdy M. A.

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the impacts of proper modeling of the wake effects and wind speed delays, between different wind turbines' rows, on the dynamic performance accuracy of the wind farms models. Three different modeling scenarios were compared to highlight the impacts of wake effects and wind speed time-delay models. In the first scenario,…

  17. Real-Time Dynamics in the (1+1)-D Abelian Higgs Model with Fermions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, G.; Smit, J.

    2000-01-01

    In approximate dynamical equations, inhomogenous classical (mean) gauge and Higgs fields are coupled to quantized fermions. The equations are solved numerically on a spacetime lattice. The fermions appear to equilibrate according to the Fermi-Dirac distribution with time-dependent temperature and

  18. The effect of finite response–time in coupled dynamical systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Corresponding author. E-mail: gsaxena2006@yahoo.co.in. Abstract. The paper investigates synchronization in unidirectionally coupled dynamical systems wherein the influence of drive on response is cumulative: coupling signals are integrated over a time interval τ. A major consequence of integrative coupling is that the ...

  19. Time-Varying Dynamic Properties of Offshore Wind Turbines Evaluated by Modal Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads; Andersen, J. K. F.; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    resonance of the wind turbine structure. In this paper, free vibration tests and a numerical Winkler type approach are used to evaluate the dynamic properties of a total of 30 offshore wind turbines located in the North Sea. Analyses indicate time-varying eigenfrequencies and damping ratios of the lowest...

  20. Effects of Training in Time-Limited Dynamic Psychotherapy: Mediators of Therapists' Responses to Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, William P.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Sixteen therapists in year-long manualized training program as part of Vanderbilt II study of time-limited dynamic psychotherapy changed their interventions in line with protocol, but some unanticipated changes occurred that ran counter to intent of training, including increased negative interpersonal transactions. Found that patient difficulty…