WorldWideScience

Sample records for tidal freshwater vegetation

  1. Biogenic silica in tidal freshwater marsh sediments and vegetation (Schelde estuary, Belgium)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struyf, E.; van Damme, S.; Gribsholt, B.; Middelburg, J.J.; Meire, P.

    2005-01-01

    To date, estuarine ecosystem research has mostly neglected silica cycling in freshwater intertidal marshes. However, tidal marshes can store large amounts of biogenic silica (BSi) in vegetation and sediment. BSi content of the typical freshwater marsh plants Phragmites australis, Impatiens

  2. Vegetation recovery in an oil-impacted and burned Phragmites australis tidal freshwater marsh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengel, Scott; Weaver, Jennifer; Wilder, Susan L; Dauzat, Jeff; Sanfilippo, Chris; Miles, Martin S; Jellison, Kyle; Doelling, Paige; Davis, Adam; Fortier, Barret K; Harris, James; Panaccione, James; Wall, Steven; Nixon, Zachary

    2018-01-15

    In-situ burning of oiled marshes is a cleanup method that can be more effective and less damaging than intrusive manual and mechanical methods. In-situ burning of oil spills has been examined for several coastal marsh types; however, few published data are available for Phragmites australis marshes. Following an estimated 4200gallon crude oil spill and in-situ burn in a Phragmites tidal freshwater marsh at Delta National Wildlife Refuge (Mississippi River Delta, Louisiana), we examined vegetation impacts and recovery across 3years. Oil concentrations in marsh soils were initially elevated in the oiled-and-burned sites, but were below background levels within three months. Oiling and burning drastically affected the marsh vegetation; the formerly dominant Phragmites, a non-native variety in our study sites, had not fully recovered by the end of our study. However, overall vegetation recovery was rapid and local habitat quality in terms of native plants, particularly Sagittaria species, and wildlife value was enhanced by burning. In-situ burning appears to be a viable response option to consider for future spills in marshes with similar plant species composition, hydrogeomorphic settings, and oiling conditions. In addition, likely Phragmites stress from high water levels and/or non-native scale insect damage was also observed during our study and has recently been reported as causing widespread declines or loss of Phragmites stands in the Delta region. It remains an open question if these stressors could lead to a shift to more native vegetation, similar to what we observed following the oil spill and burn. Increased dominance by native plants may be desirable as local patches, but widespread loss of Phragmites, even if replaced by native species, could further acerbate coastal erosion and wetland loss, a major concern in the region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fish abundances in shoreline habitats and submerged aquatic vegetation in a tidal freshwater embayment of the Potomac River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Richard T; Jones, R Christian

    2012-05-01

    Submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) is considered an important habitat for juvenile and small forage fish species, but many long-term recruitment surveys do not effectively monitor fish communities in SAV. To better understand the impact of recent large increases of SAV on the fish community in tidal freshwater reaches of the Potomac River, we compared traditional seine sampling from shore with drop ring sampling of SAV beds (primarily Hydrilla) in a shallow water (depths, shoreline and SAV habitats in late summer of three different years (2007, 2008, and 2009). For the dominant species (Fundulus diaphanus, Lepomis macrochirus, Etheostoma olmstedi, Morone americana, Lepomis gibbosus, and Fundulus heteroclitus), density was nearly always higher in SAV, but overall, species richness was highest in shoreline habitats sampled with seines. Although historical monitoring of fish in Gunston Cove (and throughout Chesapeake Bay) is based upon seine sampling (and trawl sampling in deeper areas), the high densities of fish and larger areal extent of SAV indicated that complementary sampling of SAV habitats would produce more accurate trends in abundances of common species. Because drop ring samples cover much less area than seines and may miss rare species, a combination of methods that includes seine sampling is needed for biodiversity assessment. The resurgence of SAV in tidal freshwater signifies improving water quality, and methods we evaluated here support improved inferences about population trends and fish community structure as indicators of ecosystem condition.

  4. Methane emission from tidal freshwater marshes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Nat, F.J.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    In two tidal freshwater marshes, methane emission, production and accumulation in the pore-water have been studied. The two sites differ in their dominant vegetation, i.e., reed and bulrush, and in their heights above sea level. The reed site was elevated in relation to the bulrush site and had

  5. Tidal Freshwater Wetlands: Variation and Changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendregt, A.; Swarth, C.W.

    2013-01-01

    Tidal freshwater wetlands (TFW) are situated in the upper estuary in a zone bordered upstream by the nontidal river and downstream by the oligohaline region. Here, discharge of freshwater from the river and the daily tidal pulse from the sea combine to create conditions where TFW develop. TFW

  6. 2008 NWFSC Tidal Freshwater Genetics Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Teel

    2009-05-01

    Genetic Analysis of Juvenile Chinook Salmon for inclusion in 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008. Annual Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.'

  7. Tidal day organic and inorganic material flux of ponds in the Liberty Island freshwater tidal wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Peggy W; Mayr, Shawn; Liu, Leji; Tang, Alison

    2015-01-01

    The loss of inorganic and organic material export and habitat produced by freshwater tidal wetlands is hypothesized to be an important contributing factor to the long-term decline in fishery production in San Francisco Estuary. However, due to the absence of freshwater tidal wetlands in the estuary, there is little information on the export of inorganic and organic carbon, nutrient or phytoplankton community biomass and the associated mechanisms. A single-day study was conducted to assess the potential contribution of two small vegetated ponds and one large open-water pond to the inorganic and organic material flux within the freshwater tidal wetland Liberty Island in San Francisco Estuary. The study consisted of an intensive tidal day (25.5 h) sampling program that measured the flux of inorganic and organic material at three ponds using continuous monitoring of flow, chlorophyll a, turbidity and salt combined with discrete measurements of phytoplankton community carbon, total and dissolved organic carbon and nutrient concentration at 1.5 h intervals. Vegetated ponds had greater material concentrations than the open water pond and, despite their small area, contributed up to 81% of the organic and 61% of the inorganic material flux of the wetland. Exchange between ponds was important to wetland flux. The small vegetated pond in the interior of the wetland contributed as much as 72-87% of the total organic carbon and chlorophyll a and 10% of the diatom flux of the wetland. Export of inorganic and organic material from the small vegetated ponds was facilitated by small-scale topography and tidal asymmetry that produced a 40% greater material export on ebb tide. The small vegetated ponds contrasted with the large open water pond, which imported 29-96% of the inorganic and 4-81% of the organic material into the wetland from the adjacent river. This study identified small vegetated ponds as an important source of inorganic and organic material to the wetland and the

  8. Ammonium transformation in a nitrogen-rich tidal freshwater marsh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gribsholt, B.; Andersson, M.; Boschker, H.T.S.

    2006-01-01

    The fate and transport of watershed-derived ammonium in a tidal freshwater marsh fringing the nutrient rich Scheldt River, Belgium, was quantified in a whole ecosystem 15N labeling experiment. In late summer (September) we added 15N-NH4+ to the flood water entering a 3477 m2 tidal freshwater marsh...

  9. Nitrogen assimilation and short term retention in a nutrient-rich tidal freshwater marsh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gribsholt, B.; Struyf, E.; Tramper, A.

    2007-01-01

    An intact tidal freshwater marsh system (3477m2) was labelled by adding 15N-ammonium as a tracer to the flood water inundating the ecosystem. The appearance and retention of 15N-label in different marsh components (leaves, roots, sediment, leaf litter and invertebrate fauna) was followed over 15......, the results clearly revealed that the less conspicuous compartments such as leaf litter and ruderal vegetations are more important in nitrogen uptake and retention than the prominent reed (Phragmites australis) meadows. Moreover, short-term nitrogen retention in these nutrient rich marshes occurs mainly via...... microbial pathways associated with the litter and sediment. Rather than direct uptake by macrophytes, it is the large reactive surface area provided by the tidal freshwater marsh vegetation that is most crucial for nitrogen transformation, assimilation and short term retention in nutrient rich tidal...

  10. Long-term 15N-nitrogen retention in tidal freshwater marsh sediment: Elucidating the microbial contribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gribsholt, B.; Veuger, B.; Tramper, A.; Middelburg, J.J.; Boschker, H.T.S.

    2009-01-01

    The long-term retention of nitrogen in sediment of a tidal freshwater marsh in the Scheldt estuary (Belgium) was investigated by an in situ 15N-labeling experiment. Sediment of an unvegetated creek bank and sediment vegetated by common reed (Phragmites australis) were labeled with 15NN-enriched NH4+

  11. Bio-geomorphic effects on tidal channel evolution: impact of vegetation establishment and tidal prism change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenbruwaene, W.; Meire, P.; Temmerman, S.; Bouma, T.J.

    2013-01-01

    The long-term (10–100 years) evolution of tidal channels is generally considered to interact with the bio-geomorphic evolution of the surrounding intertidal platform. Here we studied how the geometric properties of tidal channels (channel drainage density and channel width) change as (1) vegetation

  12. Oregon Tidal Wetland vegetation and edaphic data 2010 - 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data includes edaphic and vegetation field data from four Oregon tidal wetlands. National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) classification: low marsh, high marsh, and...

  13. A process study of the interaction of tidal currents, tidal mixing and density gradients in a region of freshwater influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jiuxing; Chen, Shengli

    2017-08-01

    A three dimensional unstructured grid model of the west coast of Britain is used to study the process of the interaction of tidal currents, tidal mixing and density gradient in the Liverpool Bay region. Calculations with M2 tidal forcing and omitting freshwater discharge show that tidal currents in the region are strong (of order 1 ms- 1), with tidal current ellipses essentially rectilinear in the surface and bottom. In the absence of tidal forcing, the freshwater is confined to a thin surface layer. With the inclusion of tidal mixing the surface layer thickens, and in the shallow water area mixed layer occupies the whole water depth. This has a significant effect of reducing its lateral spread. A detailed study of time series of velocity, salinity and turbulence reveals that at flood tide, more saline water is advected into the coastal region and rapid vertical mixing occurs, whereas at ebb tide, fresher water is advected over more saline water. The induced strong pycnocline uncouples surface and bottom layers leading to more circular tidal ellipses which rotate in opposite directions in the vertical, as found in observations. The three dimensional nature of the model reveals that this process involves both horizontal and vertical density gradients, and shows significant horizontal variability in the Liverpool Bay region.

  14. Nitrogen processing in a tidal freshwater marsh: a whole ecosystem 15N labeling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gribsholt, B.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Struyf, E.; Andersson, M.G.I.; Tramper, A.; de Brabandere, L.; van Damme, S.; Brion, N.; Meire, P.; Dehairs, F.; Middelburg, J.J.; Heip, C.H.R.

    2005-01-01

    We quantified the fate and transport of watershed-derived ammonium in a tidal freshwater marsh fringing the nutrientrich Scheldt River in a whole-ecosystem 15N labeling experiment. 15N-NH4+ was added to the floodwater entering a 3,477 14 m2 tidal marsh area, and marsh ammonium processing and

  15. Effects of discharge, wind, and tide on sedimentation in a recently restored tidal freshwater wetland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschelling, Eelco; van der Deijl, Eveline; van der Perk, Marcel; Sloff, C.J.; Middelkoop, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Sediment deposition is one of the key mechanisms to counteract the impact of sea level rise in tidal freshwater wetlands (TFWs). However, information about sediment deposition rates in TFWs is limited, especially for those located in the transition zone between the fluvially dominated and tidally

  16. Tidal freshwater wetlands, the fresh dimension of the estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendregt, A.

    2016-01-01

    Upstream in the estuary, where the river ends, the tidal energy is still present but the constant input from the river creates permanent fresh water conditions. The physical, chemical and biological conditions differ from the brackish part of the tidal area, but by processes from the tidal wave also

  17. Ecological consequences of diurnal flooding in tidal freshwater wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendregt, A.; Wassen, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Diurnal flooding can be observed in the upper end of tidal estuaries, where flooding water originating from the river is constantly fresh. Here, the input from the river is confronted with a tidal wave, so that the sand banks, mud flats, low and high marshes and tidal forests are flooded mostly

  18. Dissolved organic carbon in the freshwater tidal reaches of the Schelde estuary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muylaert, K.; Dasseville, R.; De Brabandere, Loreto

    2005-01-01

    To unravel the factors that regulate DOC dynamics in the freshwater tidal reaches of the Schelde estuary, DOC concentration and biodegradability were monitored in the upper Schelde estuary and its major tributaries. Although the Schelde estuary possesses a densely populated and industrialized...... catchment, our data suggest that the bulk of DOC in the freshwater tidal reaches is not derived from waste water. This was concluded from the low biodegradability of DOC (on average 9%), DOC concentrations that are close to the mean for European rivers (4.61 mg/l) and the absence of an inverse relationship....../l), these blooms did not appear to produce large quantities of DOC in the freshwater tidal reaches as DOC concentrations were low when phytoplankton biomass was high. The fact that DOC concentrations were high in winter and decreased in summer suggests a predominantly terrestrial source of DOC in the freshwater...

  19. Seed dispersal into wetlands: Techniques and results for a restored tidal freshwater marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, K.P.; Baldwin, A.H.

    2005-01-01

    Although seed dispersal is assumed to be a major factor determining plant community development in restored wetlands, little research exists on density and species richness of seed available through dispersal in these systems. We measured composition and seed dispersal rates at a restored tidal freshwater marsh in Washington, DC, USA by collecting seed dispersing through water and wind. Seed dispersal by water was measured using two methods of seed collection: (1) stationary traps composed of coconut fiber mat along an elevation gradient bracketing the tidal range and (2) a floating surface trawl net attached to a boat. To estimate wind dispersal rates, we collected seed from stationary traps composed of coconut fiber mat positioned above marsh vegetation. We also collected a small number of samples of debris deposited along high tide lines (drift lines) and feces of Canada Goose to explore their seed content. We used the seedling emergence method to determine seed density in all samples, which involved placing the fiber mats or sample material on top of potting soil in a greenhouse misting room and enumerating emerging seedlings. Seedlings from a total of 125 plant species emerged during this study (including 82 in river trawls, 89 in stationary water traps, 21 in drift lines, 39 in wind traps, and 10 in goose feces). The most abundant taxa included Bidens frondosa, Boehmeria cylindrica, Cyperus spp., Eclipta prostrata, and Ludwigia palustris. Total seedling density was significantly greater for the stationary water traps (212 + 30.6 seeds/m2/month) than the equal-sized stationary wind traps (18 + 6.0 seeds/m(2)/month). Lower-bound estimates of total species richness based on the non-parametric Chao 2 asymptotic estimators were greater for seeds in water (106 + 1.4 for stationary water traps and 104 + 5.5 for trawl samples) than for wind (54 + 6.4). Our results indicate that water is the primary source of seeds dispersing to the site and that a species-rich pool

  20. The effect of increasing salinity and forest mortality on soil nitrogen and phosphorus mineralization in tidal freshwater forested wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, Gregory B.; Krauss, Ken W.; Lockaby, B. Graeme; Conner, William H.; Hupp, Cliff R.

    2013-01-01

    Tidal freshwater wetlands are sensitive to sea level rise and increased salinity, although little information is known about the impact of salinification on nutrient biogeochemistry in tidal freshwater forested wetlands. We quantified soil nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) mineralization using seasonal in situ incubations of modified resin cores along spatial gradients of chronic salinification (from continuously freshwater tidal forest to salt impacted tidal forest to oligohaline marsh) and in hummocks and hollows of the continuously freshwater tidal forest along the blackwater Waccamaw River and alluvial Savannah River. Salinification increased rates of net N and P mineralization fluxes and turnover in tidal freshwater forested wetland soils, most likely through tree stress and senescence (for N) and conversion to oligohaline marsh (for P). Stimulation of N and P mineralization by chronic salinification was apparently unrelated to inputs of sulfate (for N and P) or direct effects of increased soil conductivity (for N). In addition, the tidal wetland soils of the alluvial river mineralized more P relative to N than the blackwater river. Finally, hummocks had much greater nitrification fluxes than hollows at the continuously freshwater tidal forested wetland sites. These findings add to knowledge of the responses of tidal freshwater ecosystems to sea level rise and salinification that is necessary to predict the consequences of state changes in coastal ecosystem structure and function due to global change, including potential impacts on estuarine eutrophication.

  1. Distribution and diversity of gallionella-like neutrophilic iron oxidizers in a tidal freshwater marsh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Vollrath, S.; Behrends, T.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Muyzer, G.; Den Oudsten, F.; Meima-Franke, M.; Cappellen, P.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial iron oxidation is an integral part of the iron redox cycle in wetlands. Nonetheless, relatively little is known about the composition and ecology of iron-oxidizing communities in the soils and sediments of wetlands. In this study, sediment cores were collected across a freshwater tidal

  2. Distribution and diversity of Gallionella-like neutrophilic iron oxidizers in a tidal freshwater marsh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Vollrath, S.; Behrends, T.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Muyzer, G.; Meima-Franke, M.; den Oudsten, F.; van Cappellen, P.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial iron oxidation is an integral part of the iron redox cycle in wetlands. Nonetheless, relatively little is known about the composition and ecology of iron-oxidizing communities in the soils and sediments of wetlands. In this study, sediment cores were collected across a freshwater tidal

  3. Tidal exchange between a freshwater tidal marsh and an impacted estuary: the Scheldt estuary, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Damme, S.; Dehairs, F.; Tackx, M.; Beauchard, O.; Struyf, E.; Gribsholt, B.; van Cleemput, O.; Meire, P.

    2009-01-01

    Tidal marsh exchange studies are relatively simple tools to investigate the interaction between tidal marshes and estuaries. They have mostly been confined to only a few elements and to saltwater or brackish systems. This study presents mass-balance results of an integrated one year campaign in a

  4. Periodicity in stem growth and litterfall in tidal freshwater forested wetlands: influence of salinity and drought on nitrogen recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Nicole; Krauss, Ken W.; Conner, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Many tidally influenced freshwater forested wetlands (tidal swamps) along the south Atlantic coast of the USA are currently undergoing dieback and decline. Salinity often drives conversion of tidal swamps to marsh, especially under conditions of regional drought. During this change, alterations in nitrogen (N) uptake from dominant vegetation or timing of N recycling from the canopy during annual litter senescence may help to facilitate marsh encroachment by providing for greater bioavailable N with small increases in salinity. To monitor these changes along with shifts in stand productivity, we established sites along two tidal swamp landscape transects on the lower reaches of the Waccamaw River (South Carolina) and Savannah River (Georgia) representing freshwater (≤0.1 psu), low oligohaline (1.1–1.6 psu), and high oligohaline (2.6–4.1 psu) stands; the latter stands have active marsh encroachment. Aboveground tree productivity was monitored on all sites through monthly litterfall collection and dendrometer band measurements from 2005 to 2009. Litterfall samples were pooled by season and analyzed for total N and carbon (C). On average between the two rivers, freshwater, low oligohaline, and high oligohaline tidal swamps returned 8,126, 3,831, and 1,471 mg N m−2 year−1, respectively, to the forest floor through litterfall, with differences related to total litterfall volume rather than foliar N concentrations. High oligohaline sites were most inconsistent in patterns of foliar N concentrations and N loading from the canopy. Leaf N content generally decreased and foliar C/N generally increased with salinization (excepting one site), with all sites being fairly inefficient in resorbing N from leaves prior to senescence. Stands with higher salinity also had greater flood frequency and duration, lower basal area increments, lower tree densities, higher numbers of dead or dying trees, and much reduced leaf litter fall (103 vs. 624 g m−2 year−1) over the

  5. Soil Porewater Salinity Response to Sea-level Rise in Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands: A Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, C. L.; Wang, H.; Krauss, K.; Conrads, P. A.; Swarzenski, C.; Duberstein, J. A.; DeAngelis, D.

    2017-12-01

    There is a growing concern about the adverse effects of salt water intrusion via tidal rivers and creeks into tidal freshwater forested wetlands (TFFWs) due to rising sea levels and reduction of freshwater flow. The distribution and composition of plant species, vegetation productivity, and biogeochemical functions including carbon sequestration capacity and flux rates in TFFWs have been found to be affected by increasing river and soil porewater salinities, with significant shifts occurring at a porewater salinity threshold of 3 PSU. However, the drivers of soil porewater salinity, which impact the health and ecological functions of TFFWs remains unclear, limiting our capability of predicting the future impacts of saltwater intrusion on ecosystem services provided by TFFWs. In this study, we developed a soil porewater salinity model for TFFWs based on an existing salt and water balance model with modifications to several key features such as the feedback mechanisms of soil salinity on evapotranspiration reduction and hydraulic conductivity. We selected sites along the floodplains of two rivers, the Waccamaw River (SC, USA) and the Savannah River (GA and SC, USA) that represent landscape salinity gradients of both surface water and soil porewater from tidal influence of the Atlantic Ocean. These sites represent healthy, moderately and highly salt-impacted forests, and oligohaline marshes. The soil porewater salinity model was calibrated and validated using field data collected at these sites throughout 2008-2016. The model results agreed well with field measurements. Analyses of the preliminary simulation results indicate that the magnitude, seasonal and annual variability, and duration of threshold salinities (e.g., 3 PSU) tend to vary significantly with vegetation status and type (i.e., healthy, degraded forests, and oligohaline marshes), especially during drought conditions. The soil porewater salinity model could be coupled with a wetland soil biogeochemistry

  6. Nitrogen assimilation and short term retention in a nutrient-rich tidal freshwater marsh – a whole ecosystem 15N enrichment study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gribsholt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An intact tidal freshwater marsh system (3477 m2 was labelled by adding 15N-ammonium as a tracer to the flood water inundating the ecosystem. The appearance and retention of 15N-label in different marsh components (leaves, roots, sediment, leaf litter and invertebrate fauna was followed over 15 days. This allowed us to elucidate the direct assimilation and dependence on creek-water nitrogen on a relatively short term and provided an unbiased assessment of the relative importance of the various compartments within the ecosystem. Two separate experiments were conducted, one in spring/early summer (May 2002 when plants were young and building up biomass; the other in late summer (September 2003 when macrophytes were in a flowering or early senescent state. Nitrogen assimilation rate (per hour inundated was >3 times faster in May compared to September. On both occasions, however, the results clearly revealed that the less conspicuous compartments such as leaf litter and ruderal vegetations are more important in nitrogen uptake and retention than the prominent reed (Phragmites australis meadows. Moreover, short-term nitrogen retention in these nutrient rich marshes occurs mainly via microbial pathways associated with the litter and sediment. Rather than direct uptake by macrophytes, it is the large reactive surface area provided by the tidal freshwater marsh vegetation that is most crucial for nitrogen transformation, assimilation and short term retention in nutrient rich tidal freshwater marshes. Our results clearly revealed the dominant role of microbes in initial nitrogen retention in marsh ecosystems.

  7. Identifying the controlling factors of sedimentation in a recently restored tidal freshwater wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Perk, Marcel; Verschelling, Eelco; van der Deijl, Eveline; Sloff, Kees; Middelkoop, Hans

    2017-04-01

    Sediment deposition is one of the key mechanisms to counteract the impact of sea level rise in tidal freshwater wetlands (TFWs). In a study to identify the factors controlling sedimentation in a recently restored tidal freshwater wetland in the Biesbosch National Park in the Rhine-Meuse delta - The Netherlands, we adopted both a modelling and a field measurement approach. This approximately 700 ha large tidal freshwater wetland is characterised by two openings with the main inlet connected to the Nieuwe Merwede river, a distributary of the River Rhine, two artificial channels connecting the in- and outlet of the area, and tidal flats. We quantified the sediment budgets of the TFW using 10-minute interval measurement of water level, discharge and suspended sediment concentration at the in- and outlet of the area for several events including a river discharge event and several windstorm events, and for different tidal ranges. In addition, we conducted 14 numerical experiments using a combined hydrodynamic and sediment transport model to simulate sedimentation rates and patterns for different river discharges, windstorm magnitudes, and tidal conditions. Both the results from the field measurements and the modelling results show that the overall sediment budget is positive in the area and increases with river discharge due to the associated higher water inflow and suspended sediment concentrations at the main inlet of the study area. The short-term sediment budget is generally positive during flood and negative during ebb, but the net sediment budget during a tidal cycle is not influenced by the tidal range. The sedimentation rates decrease with increasing windstorm magnitude, as wind waves cause sediment resuspension on the tidal flats and transport of the resuspended sediment towards the channels. Sediment trapping efficiencies are in the order of 45% of the incoming sediment load, but decrease with increasing river discharge and wind magnitude. The effect of wind on

  8. Saltwater intrusion into tidal freshwater marshes alters the biogeochemical processing of organic carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Neubauer, S. C.; Franklin, R. B.; Berrier, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental perturbations in wetlands affect the integrated plant-microbial-soil system, causing biogeochemical responses that can manifest at local to global scales. The objective of this study was to determine how saltwater intrusion affects carbon mineralization and greenhouse gas production in coastal wetlands. Working with tidal freshwater marsh soils that had experienced ~ 3.5 yr of in situ saltwater additions, we quantified changes in soil properties, measured ex...

  9. Saltwater intrusion into tidal freshwater marshes alters the biogeochemical processing of organic carbon

    OpenAIRE

    S. C. Neubauer; R. B. Franklin; D. J. Berrier

    2013-01-01

    Environmental perturbations in wetlands affect the integrated plant-microbial-soil system, causing biogeochemical responses that can manifest at local to global scales. The objective of this study was to determine how saltwater intrusion affects carbon mineralization and greenhouse gas production in coastal wetlands. Working with tidal freshwater marsh soils that had experienced roughly 3.5 yr of in situ saltwater additions, we quantified changes in soil properties, measured extracellu...

  10. Semi-diurnal tidal ellipse variability in a region of freshwater influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verspecht, F.; Simpson, J. H.; Rippeth, T. P.

    2010-09-01

    New insight into a key process, instrumental in the onset of stratification in tidally driven systems, is presented for the first time using long-term field observations from the Liverpool Bay region of freshwater influence (ROFI). Tidal ellipses respond to changes in stratification, becoming more circular with greater vertical structure, and reveal variability in response to tidal straining. An inflection point that occurs before the maximum vertical density difference, at the time of maximum positive bed-surface cross-shore shear, is identified as the crucial point where the water column abruptly decouples. The surface and bed layers then rotate in clockwise and anti-clockwise directions, respectively. The maximum vertical stratification is observed when the maximum negative bed-surface along-shore shear is reached. Decoupling to a two-layer system is therefore not the smooth progression predicted using turbulence closure models, but rather a very sudden switch, highlighting the importance of the role of Reynolds stresses.

  11. Recovery of freshwater marsh vegetation after a saltwater intrusion event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, K M; McKee, K L; Mendelssohn, I A

    1995-07-01

    Greenhouse mesocosms of freshwater marsh vegetation were exposed to a simulated saltwater intrusion event followed by a recovery period during which water levels and interstitial water salinity were adjusted over a range of conditions. Virtually all above-ground vegetation, including the three dominant species, Sagittaria lancifolia L., Leersia oryzoides (L.) Swartz, and Panicum hemitomon Schultes, was killed by the initial saltwater intrusion event. P. hemitomon did not recover, but S. lancifolia and L. oryzoides, as well as many of the other species initially present, exhibited some ability to recover depending on post-saltwater intrusion conditions. Increasingly harsh recovery conditions (for freshwater marsh vegetation), including more reduced soil conditions, higher interstitial salinities, and higher interstitial sulfide concentrations were associated with decreased live above-ground biomass and species richness. The effect of elevated salinity on vegetative recovery became more pronounced under flooded conditions. This experiment illustrates that the response of a freshwater marsh community to the long-term disturbance effect of a transient saltwater intrusion event will be strongly influenced by post-intrusion salinity and water levels.

  12. Avian response to tidal freshwater habitat creation by controlled reduced tide system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchard, Olivier; Jacobs, Sander; Ysebaert, Tom; Meire, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have caused extensive loss of estuarine wetlands, and the restoration of functional habitats remains a challenging task given several physical constraints in strongly embanked estuaries. In the Schelde estuary (Belgium), a new tidal marsh restoration technique, Controlled Reduced Tide system (CRT), is being implemented in the freshwater zone. A polder area of 8.2 ha was equipped with a CRT to test the system functionality. Among different ecological compartments that are studied for assessing the CRT restoration success, avifauna was monitored over three years. The tidal regime generated a habitat gradient typical of tidal freshwater wetlands along which the distributions of bird and ecological groups were studied. 103 bird species were recorded over the three years. In addition to many generalist bird species, several specialist species typical of the North Sea coast were present. Thirty-nine species of local and/or international conservation interest were encountered, emphasising the importance of this habitat for certain species. Species communities and ecological groups were strongly habitat specific and non-randomly organized across habitats. Spatiotemporal analyses highlighted a rapid habitat colonization, and a subsequent stable habitat community structure across seasons in spite of strong seasonal species turnovers. Hence, these findings advocate CRT implementation as a means to effectively compensate for wetland habitat loss.

  13. Ecology of tidal freshwater forests in coastal deltaic Louisiana and northeastern South Carolina: Chapter 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, William H.; Krauss, Ken W.; Doyle, Thomas W.

    2007-01-01

    Tidal freshwater swamps in the southeastern United States are subjected to tidal hydroperiods ranging in amplitude from microtidal (<0.1 m) to mesotidal (2-4 m), both having different susceptibilities to anthropogenic change. Small alterations in flood patterns, for example, can switch historically microtidal swamps to permanently flooded forests, scrub-shrub stands, marsh, or open water but are less likely to convert mesotidal swamps. Changes to hydrological patterns tend to be more noticeable in Louisiana than do those in South Carolina.The majority of Louisiana’s coastal wetland forests are found in the Mississippi River deltaic plain region. Coastal wetland forests in the deltaic plain have been shaped by the sediments, water, and energy of the Mississippi River and its major distributaries. Baldcypress (Taxodium distichum [L.] L.C. Rich.) and water tupelo (Nyssa aquatica L.) are the primary tree species in the coastal swamp forests of Louisiana. Sites where these species grow usually hold water for most of the year; however, some of the more seaward sites were historically microtidal, especially where baldcypress currently dominates. In many other locations, baldcypress and water tupelo typically grow in more or less pure stands or as mixtures of the two with common associates such as black willow (Salix nigra Marsh.), red maple (Acer rubrum L.), water locust (Gleditsia aquatic Marsh.), overcup oak (Quercus lyrata Walt.), water hickory (Carya aquatica [Michx. f.] Nutt.), green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.), pumpkin ash (F. profunda Bush.), and redbay (Persea borbonia [L.] Sprengel) (Brown and Montz 1986).The South Carolina coastal plain occupies about two-thirds of the state and rises gently to 150 m from the Atlantic Ocean up to the Piedmont plateau. Many rivers can be found in the Coastal Plain with swamps near the coast that extend inland along the rivers. Strongly tidal freshwater forests occur along the lower reaches of redwater rivers (Santee

  14. Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobocinski, Kathryn; Johnson, Gary; Sather, Nichole [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2008-03-17

    This document is the first annual report for the study titled 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River'. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of the 2007-2009 Tidal Freshwater Monitoring Study is to answer the following questions: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; Figure 1) are yearling and subyearling salmonids found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions?1 And, what is the ecological importance2 of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of Upper Columbia River spring Chinook salmon and steelhead and Snake River fall Chinook salmon? Research in 2007 focused mainly on the first question, with fish stock identification data providing some indication of Chinook salmon presence at the variety of habitat types sampled. The objectives and sub-objectives for the 2007 study were as follows: (1) Habitat and Fish Community Characteristics-Provide basic data on habitat and fish community characteristics for yearling and subyearling salmonids at selected sites in the tidal freshwater reach in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (1a) Characterize vegetation assemblage percent cover, conventional water quality, substrate composition, and beach slope at each of six sampling sites in various tidal freshwater habitat types. (1b

  15. Tidal wetland vegetation and ecotone profiles: The Rush Ranch Open Space Preserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Rush Ranch Open Space Preserve (Rush Ranch) is a component site of the San Francisco Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (SF Bay NERR) that includes one of the largest undiked tidal wetlands in the San Francisco Estuary. The brackish tidal wetlands grade into transitional vegetation and unde...

  16. Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats of the Lower Columbia River, 2007–2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Mallette, Christine; Borde, Amy B.; Van Dyke, E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, David; Dawley, Earl M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Kuligowski, D. R.

    2011-03-01

    The TFM study was designed to investigate the ecology and early life history of juvenile salmonids within shallow (<5 m) tidal freshwater habitats of the LCRE. We started collecting field data in June 2007. Since then, monthly sampling has occurred in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (rkm 192–208) and at other sites and times in lower river reaches of tidal freshwater (rkm 110 to 141). This report provides a comprehensive synthesis of data covering the field period from June 2007 through April 2010.

  17. Saltwater intrusion into tidal freshwater marshes alters the biogeochemical processing of organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, S. C.; Franklin, R. B.; Berrier, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Environmental perturbations in wetlands affect the integrated plant-microbial-soil system, causing biogeochemical responses that can manifest at local to global scales. The objective of this study was to determine how saltwater intrusion affects carbon mineralization and greenhouse gas production in coastal wetlands. Working with tidal freshwater marsh soils that had experienced ~ 3.5 yr of in situ saltwater additions, we quantified changes in soil properties, measured extracellular enzyme activity associated with organic matter breakdown, and determined potential rates of anaerobic carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) production. Soils from the field plots treated with brackish water had lower carbon content and higher C : N ratios than soils from freshwater plots, indicating that saltwater intrusion reduced carbon availability and increased organic matter recalcitrance. This was reflected in reduced activities of enzymes associated with the hydrolysis of cellulose and the oxidation of lignin, leading to reduced rates of soil CO2 and CH4 production. The effects of long-term saltwater additions contrasted with the effects of short-term exposure to brackish water during three-day laboratory incubations, which increased rates of CO2 production but lowered rates of CH4 production. Collectively, our data suggest that the long-term effect of saltwater intrusion on soil CO2 production is indirect, mediated through the effects of elevated salinity on the quantity and quality of autochthonous organic matter inputs to the soil. In contrast, salinity, organic matter content, and enzyme activities directly influence CH4 production. Our analyses demonstrate that saltwater intrusion into tidal freshwater marshes affects the entire process of carbon mineralization, from the availability of organic carbon through its terminal metabolism to CO2 and/or CH4, and illustrate that long-term shifts in biogeochemical functioning are not necessarily consistent with short

  18. Nutrient and Organic Matter Dynamics in Tidally-Influenced Freshwater Sections of the Mission and Aransas Rivers, South Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, N. J.; Bulloch, S. K.; Mooney, R. M.; Garlough, P.; McCllelland, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    The Mission and Aransas rivers empty into Copano Bay, Texas, a part of the Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve (MANERR). Both rivers have extensive agricultural and other developed land use in their watersheds. Export from the rivers is dominated by infrequent storm events. During normal, low- flow conditions, the lower sections of both rivers are pushed upstream during incoming tides, but a salinity gradient forms only relatively near the bay. Tidally-influenced freshwater reaches are poorly accounted for in riverine export modeling, but may significantly alter export due to processing during long residence times. Samples collected between June and August, 2008, were analyzed for nutrient and organic matter concentrations as well as particulate C and N stable isotope ratios. Although nutrient concentrations are high in upstream sections of the rivers, dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations are near limit of detection throughout the tidally-influenced freshwater reaches, and both systems are strongly N-limited. Autochthonous production dominates (POδ13C freshwater reaches and peaks near the beginning of the salinity gradient. The [DON] and [DOC] maximum lies just downstream of maximum productivity and corresponds with a peak in [POC]:[Chl a] ratios, indicating decomposition likely due to breakdown of freshwater phytoplankton encountering the increasing salinity. DON and DOC concentrations decrease downstream and into the bay, but remain elevated. Overall, the data indicate high production stimulated by inorganic nutrient inputs within the tidally-influenced freshwater reaches, resulting in an export of freshly produced organic material to the bay. The transformative effects of tidal freshwater reaches can be significant and should be considered in models and when designing management plans for such systems.

  19. Nitrogen processing in a tidal freshwater marsh: a whole ecosystem 15N labeling study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gribsholt, B.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Struyf, E.

    2005-01-01

    and retention were traced in six subsequent tide cycles. We present data for the water phase components of the marsh system, in which changes in concentration and isotopic enrichment of NO3-, NO2- , N2O, N2, NH4+, and suspended particulate nitrogen (SPN) were measured in concert with a mass balance study......We quantified the fate and transport of watershed-derived ammonium in a tidal freshwater marsh fringing the nutrient-rich Scheldt River in a whole-ecosystem 15N labeling experiment. 15N-NH4+ was added to the floodwater entering a 3,477 m2 tidal marsh area, and marsh ammonium processing......, with nitrification accounting for 30% of 15N-transformation. In situ whole-ecosystem nitrification rates were four to nine times higher than those in the water column alone, implying a crucial role for the large reactive marsh surface area in N-transformation. Under conditions of low oxygen concentrations and high...

  20. Growth and production of Pisidium amnicum in the freshwater tidal area of the River Minho estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ronaldo; Nogueira, António J. A.; Antunes, Carlos; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2008-09-01

    Pisidium amnicum is an important indigenous species in the freshwater tidal portion of the River Minho estuary and until the introduction of the non-indigenous invasive species Corbicula fluminea was the most abundant bivalve in this ecosystem. Between January 2005 and August 2006 monthly samples were collected in three sites to study the abundance, biomass, growth and production of P. amnicum. Results indicate that P. amnicum has continuous growth throughout its life span and growth rates were higher during the early phases of development, coincident with the spring and summer months. Life span estimated was 24 months. The annual 2005 growth production of P. amnicum estimated was 2.339 g AFDW m -2 year -1, and the mean annual biomass was 1.594 g AFDW m -2, resulting in a P/B¯ ratio of 1.47 year -1 and a turnover time of 248.7 days. The annual 2005 elimination production estimated was 7.541 g AFDW m -2 year -1, resulting in an E/B¯ ratio of 4.73 year -1. It is concluded that P. amnicum continues to play an important role in the food web in areas where it coexists with C. fluminea. Previous studies showed declines in the indigenous population after the introduction of C. fluminea and currently, areas of high abundance are restricted to small patches in the upper limit of the tidal influence. Consequently, P. amnicum is now under considerable pressure and this situation requires ecological and conservational attention.

  1. Effects of vegetation patterns and grazers on tidal marshes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elschot, K.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARYsoil. These effects of large-bodied grazers on soil properties in tidal marshes has beenlargely neglected so far, but need to be considered when we want to introduce livestockto ungrazed marshes.Next to above-ground grazing, we also find small grazers that grub for below-groundstorage organs

  2. Linking freshwater tidal hydrology to carbon cycling in bottomland hardwood wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl C. Trettin; Brooke J. Czwartacki; Craig J. Allan; Devendra M. Amatya

    2016-01-01

    Hydrology is recognized as one of the principal factors regulating soil biogeochemical processes in forested wetlands. However, the consequences of tidally mediated hydrology are seldom considered within forested wetlands that occur along tidal water bodies. These tidal water bodies may be either fresh or brackish, and the tidal streams function as a reservoir to...

  3. Effects of causeway construction on vegetation and sedimentation in North Carolina tidal marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, A.; Leonard, L.; Pricope, N. G.; Eulie, D.

    2017-12-01

    Causeways, especially those constructed to facilitate transportation across low lying tidal marshes, are known to affect tidal exchanges and thereby potentially influence geological and biological processes in these ecosystems. While these impacts have been documented in several expansive marsh systems with large tidal ranges, the extent of these impacts in smaller tidal creek watersheds is less understood. This study examined how the presence, absence, and removal of small causeways affected sedimentological processes and vegetation characteristics in two small tidal creek watersheds in Wilmington, NC. Surficial deposition rates, determined using petri-dish sediment traps, indicate that mean deposition landward of a small causeway (1.64 mg cm-2day-1) is significantly lower (pexchange, spectroradiometer data and aerial imagery available in 2006 and 2016 will be used to quantify changes in canopy coverage subsequent to causeway removal. Although this study is ongoing, the preliminary results indicate that small causeways, similar to their larger counterparts, significantly affect the rate and characteristics of sediment delivered to landward marshes and also affect tidal exchanges that lead to changes in vegetation characteristics.

  4. The secret gardener: vegetation and the emergence of biogeomorphic patterns in tidal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Lio, Cristina; D'Alpaos, Andrea; Marani, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The presence and continued existence of tidal morphologies, and in particular of salt marshes, is intimately connected with biological activity, especially with the presence of halophytic vegetation. Here, we review recent contributions to tidal biogeomorphology and identify the presence of multiple competing stable states arising from a two-way feedback between biomass productivity and topographic elevation. Hence, through the analysis of previous and new results on spatially extended biogeomorphological systems, we show that multiple stable states constitute a unifying framework explaining emerging patterns in tidal environments from the local to the system scale. Furthermore, in contrast with traditional views we propose that biota in tidal environments is not just passively adapting to morphological features prescribed by sediment transport, but rather it is 'The Secret Gardener', fundamentally constructing the tidal landscape. The proposed framework allows to identify the observable signature of the biogeomorphic feedbacks underlying tidal landscapes and to explore the response and resilience of tidal biogeomorphic patterns to variations in the forcings, such as the rate of relative sea-level rise.

  5. High temperature and salinity enhance soil nitrogen mineralization in a tidal freshwater marsh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haifeng; Bai, Junhong; He, Xinhua; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Wang, Junjing

    2014-01-01

    Soil nitrogen (N) mineralization in wetlands is sensitive to various environmental factors. To compare the effects of salinity and temperature on N mineralization, wetland soils from a tidal freshwater marsh locating in the Yellow River Delta was incubated over a 48-d anaerobic incubation period under four salinity concentrations (0, 10, 20 and 35‰) and four temperature levels (10, 20, 30 and 40°C). The results suggested that accumulated ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N) increased with increasing incubation time under all salinity concentrations. Higher temperatures and salinities significantly enhanced soil N mineralization except for a short-term (≈10 days) inhibiting effect found under 35‰ salinity. The incubation time, temperature, salinity and their interactions exhibited significant effects on N mineralization (Psalinity and temperature (P>0.05), while temperature exhibited the greatest effect (Pfreshwater wetlands under a range of 30 to 40°C (R2 = 0.88-0.99, Psalinity deriving from the projected global warming could have profound effects on nutrient cycling in coastal wetland ecosystems.

  6. Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sather, NK; Johnson, GE; Storch, AJ [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2009-07-06

    The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington. The overarching goal of the TFM project is to bridge the gap in knowledge between tidal freshwater habitats and the early life history attributes of migrating salmon. The research questions include: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the Columbia River are juvenile salmon found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions? What is the ecological contribution of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of ESA-listed salmon in the Columbia River basin? Field data collection for the TFM project commenced in June 2007 and since then has continued monthly at six to nine sites in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (river kilometer 192-208). While this report includes summary data spanning the 19-month period of study from June 2007 through December 2008, it highlights sampling conducted during calendar year 2008. Detailed data for calendar year 2007 were reported previously. The 2008 research objectives were as follows: (1) Characterize the vegetation composition and percent cover, conventional water quality, water surface elevation, substrate composition, bathymetry, and beach slope at the study sites within the vicinity of the Sandy

  7. Landscape-scale flow patterns over a vegetated tidal marsh and an unvegetated tidal flat: implications for the landform properties of the intertidal floodplain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenbruwaene, W.; Schwarz, C.; Bouma, T.; Meire, P.; Temmerman, S.

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation is increasingly recognized as an important control on flow and landformpatterns inmany landscape types. Field studies on the landscape-scale effect of vegetation in fluvial and tidal floodplains are relatively scarce while insights are especially based on flume and numerical models.

  8. Effects of vegetation patterns and grazers on tidal marshes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elschot, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Increasing grazing pressures threaten grasslands on a global scale. Therefore, it is important to understand the impact of grazers on the functioning of an ecosystem. In this study, we focused on the effects of small and large grazers on the marsh vegetation and important marsh dynamics, such as

  9. Use of geomorphic, hydrologic, and nitrogen mass balance data to model ecosystem nitrate retention in tidal freshwater wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Seldomridge

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Geomorphic characteristics have been used as scaling parameters to predict water and other fluxes in many systems. In this study, we combined geomorphic analysis with in-situ mass balance studies of nitrate retention (NR to evaluate which geomorphic scaling parameters best predicted NR in a tidal freshwater wetland ecosystem. Geomorphic characteristics were measured for 267 individual marshes that constitute the freshwater tidal wetland ecosystem of the Patuxent River, Maryland. Nitrate retention was determined from mass balance measurements conducted at the inlets of marshes of varying size (671, 5705, and 536 873 m2 over a period of several years. Mass balance measurements indicate that NR is proportional to total water flux over the tidal cycle. Relationships between estimated tidal prism (calculated water volume for spring tides and various geomorphic parameters (marsh area, total channel length, and inlet width were defined using measurements from air photos and compared to field data. From these data, NR equations were determined for each geomorphic parameter, and used to estimate NR for all marshes in the ecosystem for a reference spring (high tide. The resulting ecosystem NR estimates were evaluated for (a accuracy and completeness of geomorphic data, (b relationship between the geomorphic parameters and hydrologic flux, and (c the ability to adapt the geomorphic parameter to varying tidal conditions. This analysis indicated that inlet width data were the most complete and provided the best estimate of ecosystem nitrate retention. Predictions based on marsh area were significantly lower than the inlet width-based predictions. Cumulative probability distributions of nitrate retention indicate that the largest 3–4% of the marshes retained half of the total nitrate for the ecosystem.

  10. Growth and seasonal behavior of Anguilla anguilla in the River Minho tidal freshwater wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Correia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The River Minho estuary, located on the northwest coast of the Iberian Peninsula, is a mesotidal estuary, partially mixed that during the period of high floods it tends to evolve towards a salt wedge estuary. The influence of spring tides extends approximately 40 km upstream and the tidal freshwater wetlands (TFWs are located in the upper 30 km. The Minho estuary is part of a Natura 2000 site, which includes the entire international section of the river being considered a very important river concerning migratory fish species. In the River Minho TFWs several fish species have ecological and economic value (Salmo trutta, Alosa fallax, Platichthys flesus, Anguilla anguilla, Salmo salar, Alosa alosa and Petromyzon marinus. European eel, A. anguilla, is in Appendix II of CITES list, that includes species not necessarily threatened with extinction, but in which trade must be controlled in order to avoid utilization incompatible with their survival. Between January 2007 and December 2014, in a selected semi-enclosed area of TFW and using 5 fyke-nets, were captured 1303 eels. All eels were measured and weighted, ocular index was determined and also marked with pit-tags and released in the same area. During these 8 years of work, around 15% of the total captured eels were recaptured once, less than 3% were recapture twice, less than 1% three times and 3 eels were recaptured 4 times. Eels marked in 2009 are until now the ones that were recaptured more times. Biological data as eel growth, seaward migration state, seasonal differences of by-catch will be crossed with abiotic data namely river flow, precipitation and water temperature.

  11. Soil Metabolome and Metabolic Fate: Microbial Insights into Freshwater Tidal Wetland Redox Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Chowdhury, T.; Bramer, L.; Hoyt, D. W.; Kim, Y. M.; Metz, T. O.; McCue, L. A.; Jansson, J.; Bailey, V. L.

    2017-12-01

    Earth System Models predict climate extremes that will impact regional and global hydrology. Aquatic-terrestrial transition zones like wetlands will experience the immediate consequence of climate change as shifts in the magnitude and dynamics of hydrologic flow. Such fluctuating hydrology can alter the structure and function of the soil microbial populations that in turn will alter the nature and rate of biogeochemical transformations and significantly impact the carbon balance of the ecosystem. We tested the impacts of shifting hydrology on the soil microbiome and the role of antecedent moisture condition on redox active microbial processes in soils sampled from a tidal freshwater wetland system in the lower Columbia River, WA, USA. Our objectives were to characterize changes in the soil microbial community composition in response to soil moisture legacy effects, and to elucidate relationships between community response, geochemical signatures and metabolite profiles in this soil. The 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed significant decreases in bacterial abundance capable of anaerobic metabolism in response to drying, but quickly recovered to the antecedent moisture condition, as observed by redox processes. Metabolomics and biogeochemical process rates generated evidence for moisture-driven redox conditions as principal controls on the community and metabolic function. Fluctuating redox conditions altered terminal electron acceptor and donor availability and recovery strengths of these pools in soil such that a disproportionate release of carbon dioxide stemmed from alternative anaerobic degradation processes like sulfate and iron reduction in compared to methanogenesis. Our results show that anoxic conditions impact microbial communities in both permanently and temporarily saturated conditions and that rapid change in hydrology can increase substrate availability for both aerobic and anaerobic decomposition processes, including methanogenesis.

  12. Hydraulic Geometry and Microtopography of Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands and Implications for Restoration, Columbia River, U.S.A.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Coleman, Andre M.; Borde, Amy B.; Sinks, Ian A.

    2008-01-01

    The hydrologic reconnection of tidal channels, riverine floodplains, and main stem channels are among responses by ecological restoration practitioners to the increasing fragmentation and land conversion occurring in coastal and riparian zones. Design standards and monitoring of such ecological restoration depend upon the characterization of reference sites that vary within and among regions. Few locales, such as the 235 km tidal portion of the Columbia River on the West Coast U.S.A., remain in which the reference conditions and restoration responses of tidal freshwater forested wetlands on temperate zone large river floodplains can be compared. This study developed hydraulic geometry relationships for Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated tidal forests (swamps) in the vicinity of Grays Bay on the Columbia River some 37 km from the Pacific Coast using field surveys and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Scaling relationships between catchment area and the parameters of channel cross-sectional area at outlet and total channel length were comparable to tidally influenced systems of San Francisco Bay and the United Kingdom. Dike breaching, culvert replacement, and tide gate replacement all affected channel cross-sectional geometry through changes in the frequency of over-marsh flows. Radiocarbon dating of buried wood provided evidence of changes in sedimentation rates associated with diking, and restoration trajectories may be confounded by historical subsidence behind dikes rendering topographical relationships with water level incomparable to reference conditions. At the same time, buried wood is influencing the development of channel morphology toward characteristics resembling reference conditions. Ecological restoration goals and practices in tidal forested wetland regions of large river floodplains should reflect the interactions of these controlling factors.

  13. Summer use of the tidal freshwaters of the River Seine by three estuarine fish: Coupling telemetry and GIS spatial analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pichon, C.; Coustillas, J.; Zahm, A.; Bunel, M.; Gazeau-Nadin, C.; Rochard, E.

    2017-09-01

    Acoustic telemetry and GIS-based spatial analysis were used to investigate the summer habitat use and movement patterns of three fish species in the tidal freshwaters of the Seine estuary (France). Experimental displacement of tagged individuals of thin-lipped grey mullet (Liza ramada), European eel (Anguilla anguilla), and common bream (Abramis brama) were conducted to test for their spatial fidelity and home range establishment. Most tagged individuals (95%) successfully returned to their previously occupied capture site, showing spatial homing abilities. The studied upstream tidal freshwater segment of the Seine estuary was regularly used by grey mullet as a part of its larger summer home range, while European eel and common bream were resident in this segment. The fidelity of eel to small nocturnal refuges and the regular use of intertidal waterbodies at high tide by grey mullet and bream suggested that they possess a capacity of acquiring spatial memory of habitats in a fluctuating environment. Importantly, the scale of movements travelled by each species was positively related to tidal phase. Grey mullet and bream, both visual feeders, exhibited short-term tidal movements to known habitats, providing food resources and contiguous resting habitat suggesting that they have shown behavioural strategies adaptive to fluctuating environments. Eel, in contrast, was found to have a different strategy strongly related to diel dynamics: it stayed in subtidal habitats rich in refuges that remained available at low tide. The results of this study emphasize the importance of restoring intertidal waterbodies and the relevance of considering the availability of adjacent subtidal habitats providing refuge at low tides.

  14. Changes in standing stocks and fluxes of carbon due to salinization: tidal freshwater wetland forest retreat to marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, K.; Noe, G. B.; Duberstein, J. A.; Conner, W. H.; Stagg, C. L.; Jones, M.; Bernhardt, C. E.; Cormier, N.

    2017-12-01

    Assessments of organic carbon (C) standing stocks and fluxes as wetland ecosystems transition from tidally influenced freshwater forested wetlands to low-salinity marshes are not typically included in "blue carbon" accounting. However, these ecosystems have the potential to store and convey large quantities of C. Here, we report on data collected from eight riverine sites along salinity and hydro-edaphic gradients in South Carolina and Georgia to provide the first complete estimates of C storage, flux, and burial, including estimation of C export to aquatic environments, in tidal freshwater forested wetlands undergoing transition to oligohaline marsh. Total standing stocks of C ranged from 280 to 891 Mg C/ha along both rivers but with no consistent trend in standing stock shifts along salinity gradients between the two rivers. Soil C standing stocks were most variable among sites. Furthermore, we assessed input (litterfall, woody growth, herbaceous growth, root growth and surface sediment C accretion) in comparison with output (surface litter decomposition, root decomposition and gaseous C) fluxes over periods ranging from 2 to 11 years. C sequestration from mass balance calculations ranged from 103 to 728 g C/m2/year among sites, with generally greater C sequestration on sites with prominent salinity-mediated conversion to oligohaline marsh. Dissolved C export was estimated as the difference between C sequestration and soil C burial using 14C dating of cores, and ranged from 144 to 404 g C/m2/year, representing a large amount of C export to feed aquatic biogeochemical transformations and secondary productivity. Along with C accounting, these sites also differed in how N and P were mineralized in soils, with considerable N mineralization on salinity-stressed (2.4-4.3 parts per thousand) forested sites with newly encroached marsh plants and considerable P mineralization on slightly higher salinity marshes. In all, C storage from tidal freshwater forested wetlands

  15. The Impact of Late Holocene Land Use Change, Climate Variability, and Sea Level Rise on Carbon Storage in Tidal Freshwater Wetlands on the Southeastern United States Coastal Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Miriam C.; Bernhardt, Christopher E.; Krauss, Ken W.; Noe, Gregory B.

    2017-12-01

    This study examines Holocene impacts of changes in climate, land use, and sea level rise (SLR) on sediment accretion, carbon accumulation rates (CAR), and vegetation along a transect of tidal freshwater forested wetlands (TFFW) to oligohaline marsh along the Waccamaw River, South Carolina (four sites) and along the Savannah River, Georgia (four sites). We use pollen, plant macrofossils, accretion, and CAR from cores, spanning the last 1,500-6,000 years to test the hypothesis that TFFW have remained stable throughout the late Holocene and that marshes transitioned from TFFW during elevated SLR during the Medieval Climate Anomaly, with further transformation resulting from colonial land use change. Results show low and stable accretion and CAR through much of the Holocene, despite moderate changes associated with Holocene paleoclimate. In all records, the largest observed change occurred within the last 400 years, driven by colonial land clearance, shifting terrigenous sediment into riparian wetlands, resulting in order-of-magnitude increases in accretion and C accumulation. The oligohaline marshes transitioned from TFFW 300-500 years ago, coincident with colonial land clearance. Postcolonial decreases in CAR and accretion occur because of watershed reforestation over the last century. All sites show evidence of recent (decades to century) swamp forest decline due to increasing salinity and tidal inundation from SLR. This study suggests that allochthonous sediment input during colonialization helped maintain TFFW but that current SLR rates are too high for TFFW to persist, although higher accretion rates in oligohaline marshes increase the resilience of tidal wetlands as they transition from TFFW to marsh.

  16. Effects of freshwater leaching on potential bioavailability of heavy metals in tidal flat soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Lu, Jun; Li, Qu-Sheng; He, Bao-Yan; Mei, Xiu-Qin; Yu, Dan-Ping; Xu, Zhi-Min; Guo, Shi-Hong; Chen, Hui-Jun

    2016-02-01

    Leaching experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of desalination levels and sediment depths on potential bioavailability of heavy metal (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in tidal flat soils. The data showed that both the desalination levels (p tidal flats with low desalinisation are suitable for saline water aquaculture, transforming the present land use of reclaimed tidal flats from fresh water aquaculture into saline water aquaculture may reduce health risk of heavy metals remained in sediments. These results will also contribute to our understanding of the dynamic behavior of heavy metals in the reclamation of tidal flats during leaching and the role of the ratio of SEM/AVS predictions on assessing the ecological risks of reclaimed tidal flats.

  17. Vegetation community response to tidal marsh restoration of a large river estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belleveau, Lisa J.; Takekawa, John Y.; Woo, Isa; Turner, Kelley L.; Barham, Jesse B.; Takekawa, Jean E.; Ellings, Christopher S.; Chin-Leo, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Estuaries are biologically productive and diverse ecosystems that provide ecosystem services including protection of inland areas from flooding, filtering freshwater outflows, and providing habitats for fish and wildlife. Alteration of historic habitats, including diking for agriculture, has decreased the function of many estuarine systems, and recent conservation efforts have been directed at restoring these degraded areas to reestablish their natural resource function. The Nisqually Delta in southern Puget Sound is an estuary that has been highly modified by restricting tidal flow, and recent restoration of the delta contributed to one of the largest tidal salt marsh restorations in the Pacific Northwest. We correlated the response of nine major tidal marsh species to salinities at different elevation zones. Our results indicated that wetland species richness was not related to soil pore-water salinity (R2 = 0.03), but were stratified into different elevation zones (R2 = 0.47). Thus, restoration that fosters a wide range of elevations will provide the most diverse plant habitat, and potentially, the greatest resilience to environmental change.

  18. Sapflow and water use of freshwater wetland trees exposed to saltwater incursion in a tidally influenced South Carolina watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, K.W.; Duberstein, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Sea-level rise and anthropogenic activity promote salinity incursion into many tidal freshwater forested wetlands. Interestingly, individual trees can persist for decades after salt impact. To understand why, we documented sapflow (Js), reduction in Js with sapwood depth, and water use (F) of baldcypress (Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich.) trees undergoing exposure to salinity. The mean Js of individual trees was reduced by 2.8 g H2O??m-2??s-1 (or by 18%) in the outer sapwood on a saline site versus a freshwater site; however, the smallest trees, present only on the saline site, also registered the lowest Js. Hence, tree size significantly influenced the overall site effect on Js. Trees undergoing perennial exposure to salt used greater relative amounts of water in outer sapwood than in inner sapwood depths, which identifies a potentially different strategy for baldcypress trees coping with saline site conditions over decades. Overall, individual trees used 100 kg H2O??day-1 on a site that remained relatively fresh versus 23.9 kg H2O??day-1 on the saline site. We surmise that perennial salinization of coastal freshwater forests forces shifts in individual-tree osmotic balance and water-use strategy to extend survival time on suboptimal sites, which further influences growth and morphology.

  19. Landscape evolution in tidal embayments: modeling the interplay of erosion, sedimentation, and vegetation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alpaos, A.; Lanzoni, S.; Marani, M.; Rinaldo, A.

    2006-12-01

    Modeling the long-term landscape evolution of tidal embayments requires a holistic eco-geomorphological approach to incorporate the description of the delicate balance and strong feedbacks characterizing hydrodinamic and sediment transport processes on the one hand, and ecological dynamics on the other. In order to address issues of conservation of these delicate systems and predict their future fate we have set up a process-based eco-morphodynamic model which conceptualizes the chief landforming processes operating on the intertwined, long-term evolution of marsh platforms and tidal networks cutting through them. Such a model is aimed at improving our understanding of the main processes shaping the geomorphological and biological characters of the tidal landscape. Based on observational evidence indicating the existence of different time scales governing the various landscape-forming processes, the model decouples the initial rapid network incision from its subsequent slower elaboration and from the eco-morphological evolution of intertidal areas, governed by sediment erosion and deposition and crucially affected by the presence of vegetation. This allows us to investigate the response of tidal morphologies to different scenarios of sediment supply, colonization by halophytes and changing sea level. Different morphological evolutionary regimes are shown to depend on marsh ecology. Marsh accretion rates, enhanced by vegetation growth, and the related platform elevations are found to decrease with distance from the creek, measured along suitably defined flow paths. The negative feedback between surface elevation and its inorganic accretion rate is reinforced by the relation between plant productivity and soil elevation in Spartina-dominated marshes, whereas counteracted by positive feedbacks in marshes populated by a variety of vegetation species. When evolving under constant sea level, unvegetated and Spartina-dominated marshes asymptotically tend to mean high

  20. Nitrogen assimilation and short term retention in a nutrient-rich tidal freshwater marsh - a whole ecosystem 15N enrichment study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gribsholt, B.; Struyf, E.; Tramper, A.; de Brabandere, L.; Brion, N.; van Damme, S.; Meire, P.; Dehairs, F.; Middelburg, J.J.; Boschker, H.T.S.

    2007-01-01

    An intact tidal freshwater marsh system (3477 m2) was labelled by adding 15N-ammonium as a tracer to the flood water inundating the ecosystem. The appearance and retention of 15N-label in different marsh components (leaves, roots, sediment, leaf litter and invertebrate fauna) was followed over 15

  1. Vegetation cover, tidal amplitude and land area predict short-term marsh vulnerability in Coastal Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoolmaster, Donald; Stagg, Camille L.; Sharp, Leigh Anne; McGinnis, Tommy S.; Wood, Bernard; Piazza, Sarai

    2018-01-01

    The loss of coastal marshes is a topic of great concern, because these habitats provide tangible ecosystem services and are at risk from sea-level rise and human activities. In recent years, significant effort has gone into understanding and modeling the relationships between the biological and physical factors that contribute to marsh stability. Simulation-based process models suggest that marsh stability is the product of a complex feedback between sediment supply, flooding regime and vegetation response, resulting in elevation gains sufficient to match the combination of relative sea-level rise and losses from erosion. However, there have been few direct, empirical tests of these models, because long-term datasets that have captured sufficient numbers of marsh loss events in the context of a rigorous monitoring program are rare. We use a multi-year data set collected by the Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS) that includes transitions of monitored vegetation plots to open water to build and test a predictive model of near-term marsh vulnerability. We found that despite the conclusions of previous process models, elevation change had no ability to predict the transition of vegetated marsh to open water. However, we found that the processes that drive elevation change were significant predictors of transitions. Specifically, vegetation cover in prior year, land area in the surrounding 1 km2 (an estimate of marsh fragmentation), and the interaction of tidal amplitude and position in tidal frame were all significant factors predicting marsh loss. This suggests that 1) elevation change is likely better a predictor of marsh loss at time scales longer than we consider in this study and 2) the significant predictive factors affect marsh vulnerability through pathways other than elevation change, such as resistance to erosion. In addition, we found that, while sensitivity of marsh vulnerability to the predictive factors varied spatially across coastal Louisiana

  2. Biogeochemicl and surface elevation controls over tidally influenced freshwater forested wetlands as they transition to marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Conner; Ken W. Krauss; Gregory B. Noe; Jamie A. Duberstein; Nicole Cormier; Camille L. Stagg

    2016-01-01

    Many coastal ecosystems along the south Atlantic are transitioning from forested wetlands to marsh due to increasing tidal inundation and saltwater intrusion primarily attributed to global climate change processes. In 2004, we established long-term research sites in Georgia, South Carolina, and Louisiana to understand how climate factors (temperature, precipitation, ...

  3. Vegetable oil sources in diets for freshwater angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare, Cichlidae: growth and thermal tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Ikeda

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of fatty acid composition of the diets on the productive performance and on cold and heat tolerance of juvenile freshwater angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare, in three different phases, was studied. Phase I studied the productive performance of freshwater angelfish in a completely randomized experimental design with four treatments, canola, linseed, olive and soybean oils and four replicates during 50 days using 192 fish in 16 aquaria. Phase II studied the cold tolerance of juvenile freshwater angelfish using 72 juvenile freshwater angelfish, coming from phase I and maintained in 12 aquaria climatized chamber. The temperature was reduced 1ºC per day, until the observation of 100% fish mortality. Phase III, it was studied the heat tolerance of juvenile freshwater angelfish employing an identical procedure to phase II, but with a daily increase of 1ºC. Significant differences (P>0.05 were not observed for any parameters evaluated. Thus, it was concluded that the type of vegetable oil (canola, linseed, olive and soybean used as a diet supplement did not affect the productive performance, nor the tolerance to cold and heat, of juvenile freshwater angelfish.

  4. Ideal vegetation height maximizes sedimentation in freshwater deltaic marshes during flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardin, W.; Edmonds, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    River deltas are complex environments affected by the morphodynamic interaction between flow and sediment transport. This morphodynamic interaction is potentially affected by the freshwater marsh vegetation (e.g. sagittaria and typha) on the exposed surfaces of emergent deltaic islands. As a first step, we present modeling results and remote sensing data on how vegetation affects sedimentation within deltaic islands. Our modeling starts from a pre-formed river delta configuration and then we populate it with different vegetation with different height characteristics. We then subject the delta to floods of varying magnitudes to evaluate how vegetation affects sedimentation during a flood. In our numerical experiments vegetation height affects sedimentation in two key ways. Increase in vegetation height causes a non-linear decrease in sediment flux on to the islands (up to 80% when compared to the case without vegetation). On the other hand vegetation slows water velocity and lengthens the residence time of a water particle up to 50%. Even though vegetation reduces the sediment flux onto the islands, the increase in residence time traps more sediment resulting in higher island sedimentation rates when vegetation is present. Interestingly, we find that an intermediate vegetation height that maximizes island sedimentation rate. This occurs because sediment flux exiting the islands decreases faster (due to increase in residence time) than the sediment flux entering the islands. Finally we analyzed the spatial and seasonal evolution of the vegetation on Wax lake delta, Louisiana through the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). We find that NDVI varies seasonally as vegetation grows and dies, suggesting that the timing of the arrival flood wave relative to vegetation height is a critical parameter that for predicting sedimentation of deltaic islands.

  5. Seasonal variations of nitrous oxide fluxes and soil denitrification rates in subtropical freshwater and brackish tidal marshes of the Min River estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuming; Hu, Minjie; Ren, Hongchang; Li, Jiabing; Tong, Chuan; Musenze, Ronald S

    2018-03-01

    Estuarine tidal marshes provide favorable conditions for nitrous oxide (N 2 O) production. Saltwater intrusion caused by sea-level rise would exert complex effects on the production and emission of N 2 O in estuarine tidal marshes; however, few studies have been conducted on its effects on N 2 O emissions. Salinity gradients are a common occurrence in estuarine tidal marshes. Studies on production and emission of N 2 O in tidal marshes with different salinities may elucidate the impact of saltwater intrusion on the emission of greenhouse gases. This study explores the seasonal variations of N 2 O fluxes and soil denitrification rates in freshwater (Daoqingzhou wetland) and brackish (Shanyutan wetland) tidal marshes dominated by Cyperus malaccensis var. brevifolius (shichito matgrass) in the Min River estuary, southeastern China. N 2 O fluxes in both marshes showed strong temporal variability. The highest N 2 O fluxes were observed in the hot and wet summer months, whereas the lowest fluxes were observed in the cold winter and autumn months. N 2 O fluxes from the freshwater marsh (48.81±9.01μgm -2 h -1 ) were significantly higher (ptidal wetlands and exert a negative feedback on the climate system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Nitrogen dynamics in the tidal freshwater Potomac River, Maryland and Virginia, water years 1979-81

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, David J.

    1989-01-01

    On an annual basis, river-supplied nitrate is the predominant form of nitrogen supplied to the tidal Potomac River from external sources. Much of the nitrate is associated with high flows that have rapid transit times through the tidal river. The Blue Plains Sewage-Treatment Plant (STP) at Washington, D.C., is the greatest source of all nitrogen species during low-flow periods. Prior to the fall of 1980, ammonia concentrations in depth-integrated, composited water samples were greatest (more than 1.00 mg/L (milligram per liter) as nitrogen) during summer periods near Alexandria, Va., because of loading from the nearby Blue Plains STP and reduced river discharge. After the fall of 1980, initiation of advanced wastewater treatment at the Blue Plains STP reduced ammonia loading to the river by 90 percent and increased nitrate loading by a similar percentage. As a result, concentrations of ammonia during the 1981 low-flow period were less than 0.20 mg/L as nitrogen at Alexandria, while nitrate concentrations were greater than 1.50 mg/L as nitrogen. Concentrations of ammonia and nitrate at Alexandria were shown to be reasonably predictable by use of a simple dilution model that considers only loading from Chain Bridge and the Blue Plains STP. This apparently is the result of the short residence time through the Chain Bridge-to-Alexandria section of the tidal Potomac River, which precludes significant biological alterations. In marked contrast, the residence times of water parcels in the tidal Potomac River from Alexandria to Quantico, Va., are much greater because of the geometry of the reach. Biological nitrogen-cycle transformation processes affect nitrogen-species concentrations to a greater extent in this reach, especially during summer low-flow periods. Mass-balance calculations that separate changes in transport mass from biological transformations indicatethat the tidal Potomac River was a net sink for all the nitrogen constituents during the 1980 and 1981 summer

  7. The Distribution of Submersed Aquatic Vegetation in the Fresh and Oligohaline Tidal Potomac River, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Nancy B.; Yoon, Sarah N.; Schenk, Edward R.; Baldizar, Julie B.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV) is a critical component of the Potomac River ecosystem. Though SAV provides important habitat for fauna and stabilizes bottom sediment, very dense beds may restrict recreational and commercial navigation. Exotic species of SAV are managed by the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments Potomac Aquatic Plant Management Program (PAPMP). Selected beds of exotic SAV species that limit navigation are harvested mechanically. The program began in 1986 when approximately 40 acres of plants were harvested from 18 sites (Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments 1987). Monitoring efforts are an effective means of quantifying the distribution and abundance of the exotic species, Hydrilla verticillata (hydrilla) and other SAV species. These annual surveys provide a basis for identifying large-scale changes throughout the ecosystem and allow managers to evaluate the effectiveness of resource management policies based on a reliable scientific foundation. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has monitored the distribution and composition of SAV beds in the fresh and oligohaline (salinity 0.5 to 5) tidal Potomac River since 1978 using transect sampling (1978 to 1981, 1985 to 1987, and 2002) and shoreline surveys (1983 to 2004). Shoreline survey data from the tidal Potomac River are incorporated into the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) annual report on SAV distribution in Chesapeake Bay. The VIMS report and methods are available at http://www.vims.edu/bio/sav. Additional publications concerning SAV distribution in the Potomac River can be found at http://water.usgs.gov/nrp/proj.bib/sav/wethome.htm.

  8. Tidal saline wetland regeneration of sentinel vegetation types in the Northern Gulf of Mexico: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Scott F; Stagg, Camille L.; Krauss, Ken W.; Hester, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Tidal saline wetlands in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGoM) are dynamic and frequently disturbed systems that provide myriad ecosystem services. For these services to be sustained, dominant macrophytes must continuously recolonize and establish after disturbance. Macrophytes accomplish this regeneration through combinations of vegetative propagation and sexual reproduction, the relative importance of which varies by species. Concurrently, tidal saline wetland systems experience both anthropogenic and natural hydrologic alterations, such as levee construction, sea-level rise, storm impacts, and restoration activities. These hydrologic alterations can affect the success of plant regeneration, leading to large-scale, variable changes in ecosystem structure and function. This review describes the specific regeneration requirements of four dominant coastal wetland macrophytes along the NGoM (Spartina alterniflora, Avicennia germinans, Juncus roemerianus, and Batis maritima) and compares them with current hydrologic alterations to provide insights into potential future changes in dominant ecosystem structure and function and to highlight knowledge gaps in the current literature that need to be addressed.

  9. Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Jones, Tucker A.; Mallette, Christine; Dawley, Earl M.; Skalski, John R.; Teel, David; Moran, Paul

    2008-03-18

    This document is the first annual report for the study titled “Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River.” Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

  10. The salinity responses of tropical estuaries to changes in freshwater discharge, tidal mixing and geomorphology: case study of the man-affected Senegal River Estuary (West Africa)

    OpenAIRE

    Chevalier, Cristèle; Pagano, Marc; Corbin, Daniel; Arfi, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Salinity in estuaries is influenced by a variety of processes including tidal advection and diffusion and river discharge. The effect of hydrodynamic features on salinity was studied in the Senegal River Estuary (SRE). This estuary is of strategic importance for large populations, but it has been greatly affected by human action (regulation of the freshwater inflow, change in the location of the river mouth ...), which has caused major changes in salinity and ecological functioning. To analys...

  11. The Distribution of Submersed Aquatic Vegetation in the Fresh and Oligohaline Tidal Potomac River, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Nancy B.; Justiniano-Velez, Erika M.; Schenk, Edward R.; Baldizar, Julie M.; Hunter, Sarah E.

    2008-01-01

    Submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV) is a critical component of the Potomac River ecosystem. Though SAV provides important habitat for fauna and stabilizes bottom sediment, very dense beds may restrict recreational and commercial navigation. Exotic species of SAV are managed by the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments Potomac Aquatic Plant Management Program (PAPMP). Selected beds of primarily exotic SAV species that limit navigation are harvested mechanically. The program began in 1986 when approximately 40 acres of plants were harvested from 18 sites (Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments 1987). Monitoring efforts are an effective means of quantifying the distribution and abundance of the exotic species, Hydrilla verticillata (hydrilla) and other SAV species. These annual surveys provide a basis for identifying large-scale changes and trends throughout the ecosystem and allow managers to evaluate the effectiveness of resource management policies based on a reliable scientific foundation (Rybicki and Landwehr, 2007). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has monitored the distribution and composition of SAV beds in the fresh and oligohaline (salinity 0.5 to 5) tidal Potomac River since 1978 using transect sampling (1978 to 1981, 1985 to 1987, and 2002) and shoreline surveys (1983 to 2005). The Government of the District of Columbia has monitored the portion of the Potomac and Anacostia Rivers within Washington DC since 1998 (Rottman, 1999; Ryan, 2005, 2006). The species of SAV observed in beds in the tidal Potomac River are incorporated into the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) annual report on SAV distribution in Chesapeake Bay. The VIMS report and methods are available at http://www.vims.edu/bio/sav (Orth et al., 2006). Additional publications concerning SAV distribution in the Potomac River can be found at http://water.usgs.gov/nrp/proj.bib/sav/wethome.htm.

  12. A long-term comparison of carbon sequestration rates in impounded and naturally tidal freshwater marshes along the lower Waccamaw River, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z.; Krauss, Ken W.; Sasser, M. Craig; Fuller, Christopher C.; Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Powell, Amber; Swanson, Kathleen M.; Orlando, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon storage was compared between impounded and naturally tidal freshwater marshes along the Lower Waccamaw River in South Carolina, USA. Soil cores were collected in (1) naturally tidal, (2) moist soil (impounded, seasonally drained since ~1970), and (3) deeply flooded “treatments” (impounded, flooded to ~90 cm since ~2002). Cores were analyzed for % organic carbon, % total carbon, bulk density, and 210Pb and 137Cs for dating purposes. Carbon sequestration rates ranged from 25 to 200 g C m−2 yr−1 (moist soil), 80–435 g C m−2 yr−1 (naturally tidal), and 100–250 g C m−2 yr−1 (deeply flooded). The moist soil and naturally tidal treatments were compared over a period of 40 years. The naturally tidal treatment had significantly higher carbon storage (mean = 219 g C m−2 yr−1 vs. mean = 91 g C m−2 yr−1) and four times the vertical accretion rate (mean = 0.84 cm yr−1 vs. mean = 0.21 cm yr−1) of the moist soil treatment. The results strongly suggest that the long drainage period in moist soil management limits carbon storage over time. Managers across the National Wildlife Refuge system have an opportunity to increase carbon storage by minimizing drainage in impoundments as much as practicable.

  13. Observed vegetation patterns in tidal environments: neutral vs. non-neutral explanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belluco, E.; Zillio, T.; Silvestri, S.; Maritan, A.; Marani, M.

    2009-12-01

    The quantitative retrieval of vegetation patterns in tidal environments from high-resolution satellite and airborne sensors has recently been shown to be accurate and repeatable. This makes available unprecedentedly accurate observations of competing species distributions over a broad range of spatial scales. Such distributions are here characterized statistically, suggesting the absence of characteristic scales, as revealed by the power-law form of cluster size pdf's. A competition model based on a neutral approach, serving as a reference null hypothesis, reproduces some of the basic observed system properties. It is, however, shown that the availability of spatially-detailed observations allows the development and application of a non-neutral model, which is seen to capture several observed bio-diversity properties (alpha and beta diversity). The non-neutral model developed, based on cloning and seed dispersal processes, is amenable to analytical solution and yields closed-form characterizations of beta-diversity. The validation of the non-neutral model shows a remarkable agreement with observations within the wide observational range of scales explored (0.5 m - 1000 m). We contend the good agreement of the neutral model with the more limited characterization of beta-diversity typical of the neutral theory to be misleading, as the recruitment rates by propagules and by seed dispersal assumed by the neutral model do not reflect known species characteristics and correspond to averages of those obtained under the more general non-neutral hypothesis. We conclude that non-neutral beta-diversity characterizations are required to describe ecosystem dynamics in the presence of species-dependent properties and to successfully relate the observed patterns to the underlying processes. The hypothesis of neutrality, often fostered by the lack of spatially-detailed data, is no longer a necessity, in view of the recent advances in remote-sensing retrievals of vegetation

  14. Effects of Invasive-Plant Management on Nitrogen-Removal Services in Freshwater Tidal Marshes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Alldred

    Full Text Available Establishing relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem function is an ongoing endeavor in contemporary ecosystem and community ecology, with important practical implications for conservation and the maintenance of ecosystem services. Removal of invasive plant species to conserve native diversity is a common management objective in many ecosystems, including wetlands. However, substantial changes in plant community composition have the potential to alter sediment characteristics and ecosystem services, including permanent removal of nitrogen from these systems via microbial denitrification. A balanced assessment of costs associated with keeping and removing invasive plants is needed to manage simultaneously for biodiversity and pollution targets. We monitored small-scale removals of Phragmites australis over four years to determine their effects on potential denitrification rates relative to three untreated Phragmites sites and adjacent sites dominated by native Typha angustifolia. Sediment ammonium increased following the removal of vegetation from treated sites, likely as a result of decreases in both plant uptake and nitrification. Denitrification potentials were lower in removal sites relative to untreated Phragmites sites, a pattern that persisted at least two years following removal as native plant species began to re-colonize treated sites. These results suggest the potential for a trade-off between invasive-plant management and nitrogen-removal services. A balanced assessment of costs associated with keeping versus removing invasive plants is needed to adequately manage simultaneously for biodiversity and pollution targets.

  15. Effects of Invasive-Plant Management on Nitrogen-Removal Services in Freshwater Tidal Marshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldred, Mary; Baines, Stephen B; Findlay, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Establishing relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem function is an ongoing endeavor in contemporary ecosystem and community ecology, with important practical implications for conservation and the maintenance of ecosystem services. Removal of invasive plant species to conserve native diversity is a common management objective in many ecosystems, including wetlands. However, substantial changes in plant community composition have the potential to alter sediment characteristics and ecosystem services, including permanent removal of nitrogen from these systems via microbial denitrification. A balanced assessment of costs associated with keeping and removing invasive plants is needed to manage simultaneously for biodiversity and pollution targets. We monitored small-scale removals of Phragmites australis over four years to determine their effects on potential denitrification rates relative to three untreated Phragmites sites and adjacent sites dominated by native Typha angustifolia. Sediment ammonium increased following the removal of vegetation from treated sites, likely as a result of decreases in both plant uptake and nitrification. Denitrification potentials were lower in removal sites relative to untreated Phragmites sites, a pattern that persisted at least two years following removal as native plant species began to re-colonize treated sites. These results suggest the potential for a trade-off between invasive-plant management and nitrogen-removal services. A balanced assessment of costs associated with keeping versus removing invasive plants is needed to adequately manage simultaneously for biodiversity and pollution targets.

  16. Ecosystem level methane fluxes from tidal freshwater and brackish marshes of the Mississippi River Delta: Implications for coastal wetland carbon projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Guerry O.; Perez, Brian C.; McWhorter, David E.; Krauss, Ken W.; Johnson, Darren J.; Raynie, Richard C.; Killebrew, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfate from seawater inhibits methane production in tidal wetlands, and by extension, salinity has been used as a general predictor of methane emissions. With the need to reduce methane flux uncertainties from tidal wetlands, eddy covariance (EC) techniques provide an integrated methane budget. The goals of this study were to: 1) establish methane emissions from natural, freshwater and brackish wetlands in Louisiana based on EC; and 2) determine if EC estimates conform to a methane-salinity relationship derived from temperate tidal wetlands with chamber sampling. Annual estimates of methane emissions from this study were 62.3 g CH4/m2/yr and 13.8 g CH4/m2/yr for the freshwater and brackish (8–10 psu) sites, respectively. If it is assumed that long-term, annual soil carbon sequestration rates of natural marshes are ~200 g C/m2/yr (7.3 tCO2e/ha/yr), healthy brackish marshes could be expected to act as a net radiative sink, equivalent to less than one-half the soil carbon accumulation rate after subtracting methane emissions (4.1 tCO2e/ha/yr). Carbon sequestration rates would need case-by-case assessment, but the EC methane emissions estimates in this study conformed well to an existing salinity-methane model that should serve as a basis for establishing emission factors for wetland carbon offset projects.

  17. Modeling tidal freshwater marsh sustainability in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta under a broad suite of potential future scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Kathleen M.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the adaptation and application of a one-dimensional marsh surface elevation model, the Wetland Accretion Rate Model of Ecosystem Resilience (WARMER), to explore the conditions that lead to sustainable tidal freshwater marshes in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta. We defined marsh accretion parameters to encapsulate the range of observed values over historic and modern time-scales based on measurements from four marshes in high and low energy fluvial environments as well as possible future trends in sediment supply and mean sea level. A sensitivity analysis of 450 simulations was conducted encompassing a range of eScholarship provides open access, scholarly publishing services to the University of California and delivers a dynamic research platform to scholars worldwide. porosity values, initial elevations, organic and inorganic matter accumulation rates, and sea-level rise rates. For the range of inputs considered, the magnitude of SLR over the next century was the primary driver of marsh surface elevation change. Sediment supply was the secondary control. More than 84% of the scenarios resulted in sustainable marshes with 88 cm of SLR by 2100, but only 32% and 11% of the scenarios resulted in surviving marshes when SLR was increased to 133 cm and 179 cm, respectively. Marshes situated in high-energy zones were marginally more resilient than those in low-energy zones because of their higher inorganic sediment supply. Overall, the results from this modeling exercise suggest that marshes at the upstream reaches of the Delta—where SLR may be attenuated—and high energy marshes along major channels with high inorganic sediment accumulation rates will be more resilient to global SLR in excess of 88 cm over the next century than their downstream and low-energy counterparts. However, considerable uncertainties exist in the projected rates of sea-level rise and sediment avail-ability. In addition, more research is needed to constrain future

  18. Influence of Vegetation on Sediment Accumulation in Restored Tidal Saltmarshes: Field Evidence from the Blackwater Estuary, Essex, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, D.; French, J.; Burningham, H.

    2013-12-01

    Tidal saltmarshes in the UK, and especially in the estuaries of southeast England, have been subject to degradation and erosion over the last few decades, primarily caused by sea-level rise and coastal squeeze due to fixed coastal defences. This is of great concern to a range of coastal stakeholders due to the corresponding loss of functions and services associated with these systems. The coastal defence role that saltmarshes play is well established, and the importance of saltmarsh ecosystems as habitats for birds, fish, and other species is evidenced in the fact that a large proportion of saltmarsh in the southeast England is designated for its scientific and conservation significance. Sediment accumulation is critical for the maintenance of marsh elevation within the tidal frame and for delivery of the aforementioned functions and services. Although many studies have examined accumulation processes, key questions have yet to be fully tested through intensive field observations. One such question relates to the role of vegetation in mediating the retention of newly introduced sediment, as recent research has called into doubt the traditional view of halophytes significantly enhancing rates of sedimentation through wave dissipation. This study presents early results from a project designed to advance our understanding of the processes controlling sediment accumulation. The research focuses on the UK's first large-scale experimental managed flood defence realignment at Tollesbury, Blackwater estuary, Essex. The seawall protecting 21ha of reclaimed agricultural land was artificially breached in 1995 and saltmarsh has progressively developed as tidal exchange has introduced fine sediment into the site. Results from a 12 month monitoring campaign involving hierarchical two-week sediment trap deployments indicates that the role of vegetation in marsh development is less clear cut that previously thought. Gross sedimentation rates were generally higher in non-vegetated

  19. Contemporary deposition and long-term accumulation of sediment and nutrients by tidal freshwater forested wetlands impacted by sea level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, Gregory; Hupp, Cliff R.; Bernhardt, Christopher E.; Krauss, Ken W.

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary deposition (artificial marker horizon, 3.5 years) and long-term accumulation rates (210Pb profiles, ~150 years) of sediment and associated carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) were measured in wetlands along the tidal Savannah and Waccamaw rivers in the southeastern USA. Four sites along each river spanned an upstream-to-downstream salinification gradient, from upriver tidal freshwater forested wetland (TFFW), through moderately and highly salt-impacted forested wetlands, to oligohaline marsh downriver. Contemporary deposition rates (sediment, C, N, and P) were greatest in oligohaline marsh and lowest in TFFW along both rivers. Greater rates of deposition in oligohaline and salt-stressed forested wetlands were associated with a shift to greater clay and metal content that is likely associated with a change from low availability of watershed-derived sediment to TFFW and to greater availability of a coastal sediment source to oligohaline wetlands. Long-term accumulation rates along the Waccamaw River had the opposite spatial pattern compared to contemporary deposition, with greater rates in TFFW that declined to oligohaline marsh. Long-term sediment and elemental mass accumulation rates also were 3–9× lower than contemporary deposition rates. In comparison to other studies, sediment and associated nutrient accumulation in TFFW are lower than downriver/estuarine freshwater, oligohaline, and salt marshes, suggesting a reduced capacity for surface sedimentation (short-term) as well as shallow soil processes (long-term sedimentation) to offset sea level rise in TFFW. Nonetheless, their potentially large spatial extent suggests that TFFW have a large impact on the transport and fate of sediment and nutrients in tidal rivers and estuaries.

  20. Top-down vs. bottom-up control on vegetation composition in a tidal marsh depends on scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Elschot

    Full Text Available The relative impact of top-down control by herbivores and bottom-up control by environmental conditions on vegetation is a subject of debate in ecology. In this study, we hypothesize that top-down control by goose foraging and bottom-up control by sediment accretion on vegetation composition within an ecosystem can co-occur but operate at different spatial and temporal scales. We used a highly dynamic marsh system with a large population of the Greylag goose (Anser anser to investigate the potential importance of spatial and temporal scales on these processes. At the local scale, Greylag geese grub for below-ground storage organs of the vegetation, thereby creating bare patches of a few square metres within the marsh vegetation. In our study, such activities by Greylag geese allowed them to exert top-down control by setting back vegetation succession. However, we found that the patches reverted back to the initial vegetation type within 12 years. At large spatial (i.e. several square kilometres and temporal scales (i.e. decades, high rates of sediment accretion surpassing the rate of local sea-level rise were found to drive long-term vegetation succession and increased cover of several climax vegetation types. In summary, we conclude that the vegetation composition within this tidal marsh was primarily controlled by the bottom-up factor of sediment accretion, which operates at large spatial as well as temporal scales. Top-down control exerted by herbivores was found to be a secondary process and operated at much smaller spatial and temporal scales.

  1. Tidal propagation in the Mandovi-Zuari Estuarine network, west coast of India: Impact of freshwater influx

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A.S.; Shetye, S.R.; Gouveia, A.D.

    propagation, the model behaviour is consistent with the theory that geometric amplification balances frictional decay leaving the tidal unchanged. This balance breaks down near the upstream end, where channels are narrowest, and mean velocity associated...

  2. Tidal Creek Morphology and Sediment Type Influence Spatial Trends in Salt Marsh Vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Daehyun; Cairns, David M.; Bartholdy, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Zonal patterns of salt marsh plants and physical conditions have been addressed primarily across the elevation gradient from inland to coastline rather than across tidal creeks in relation to their hydro-geomorphic processes such as bar formation and bank erosion. We found at a Danish marsh...... to fully understand the underlying structure and geographic variability in salt marshes....

  3. Effect Of Iron On The Sensitivity Of Hydrogen, Acetate, And Butyrate Metabolism To Inhibition By Long-Chain Fatty Acids In Vegetable-Oil-Enriched Freshwater Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freshwater sediment microbial communities enriched by growth on vegetable oil in the presence of a substoichiometric amount of ferric hydroxide (sufficient to accept about 12% of the vegetable-oil-derived electrons) degrade vegetable oil to methane faster than similar microbial c...

  4. Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sather, Nichole K.; Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Teel, David; Skalski, John R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Dawley, Earl M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Borde, Amy B.; Mallette, Christine; Farr, R.

    2009-05-29

    The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington.

  5. Water Quality Assessment of the Tidal Freshwater Schuylkill River, Philadelphia, PA.: Understanding Sources and Fate of Nutrients and Trace Metals in an Urban System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettner, A. R.; Velinsky, D. J.; Fikslin, T. J.; Kiry, P. R.; DeAlteris, J. A.; Compton, A. M.; Wilson-Finelli, A.

    2001-05-01

    The tidal portion of the Schuylkill River (approximately 15 km) drains a heavily urbanized and industrialized segment of greater Philadelphia, and is the second largest input of freshwater into the Delaware River. Even though the Schuylkill River is located in the heart of a major urban area, there has been little monitoring of the chemical and biological status. To begin understanding the sources and fate of nutrients and trace metals in the tidal section of the river a two year monitoring effort was undertaken. Sub-surface water samples were collected monthly, beginning in April 1999, using trace metal clean techniques. Dissolved (0.45 μ m)and particulate matter were analyzed for various forms of N, C, P and selected trace metals at 10 stations from above the head of tide (Fairmount Dam) to the tidal Delaware River. The distribution of nutrients and trace metals within the tidal Schuylkill River appear to be closely related to both biological and hydrologic changes. The hydrology is very dynamic, with flows as low as 450 cfs in July and as high as 5500 cfs in September (Tropical Storm Floyd) of 1999. Biological production was high during the late spring and early summer as apparent by the elevated levels of chl a and lower nutrient concentrations. In early summer of 1999 and 2000 there were large increases (approximately 40 μ g/L) in chl a concentrations from the uppermost portion of the tidal river below Fairmount Dam. At the same station during the time of peak biomass there was almost complete removal of NH4+ (ca. 8 μ M N) and substantial removal of NO3-+NO2- (ca. 70 μ M N). Spatially, concentrations of dissolved NO3-+NO2- were highest in the upper portion of the tidal river (ca. 210 μ M N) decreasing to approximately 90 μ M N at the confluence with the tidal Delaware River. In addition to dilution, algal consumption may account for a portion of these changes. Trace metal concentrations were elevated compared to the mainstem Delaware River. Dissolved

  6. Historic developments in macrozoobenthos of the Rhine-Meuse estuary: From a tidal inlet to a freshwater lake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, S.; Sistermans, W.C.H.; Hummel, H.

    2008-01-01

    Water works during the 1960s and 1970s changed the northern part of the Rhine–Meuse estuary in the south-west of the Netherlands into a freshwater lake, from west to east divided into three basins called the Haringvliet, the Hollands Diep and the Biesbosch. Concurrently water quality parameters

  7. Sediment Dynamics in a Vegetated Tidally Influenced Interdistributary Island: Wax Lake, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    interior. The emergence of American lotus (Nelumbo lutea) in summer forms a dense canopy over the island reducing wave and current energy, increasing the...environmental concerns of this century (Nicholls and Cazenave 2010). An encroaching sea increases the likelihood of flooding and storm inundation, imposing...aquatic vegetation is the American lotus (Nelumbo lutea). Nelumbo lutea is an emergent, aquatic plant common to the southeastern United States and grows

  8. Pharmaceutical chemicals, steroids and xenoestrogens in water, sediments and fish from the tidal freshwater Potomac River (Virginia, USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Golala; Tadayon, Sara; Sadighian, James; Jones, Jennifer; de Mutsert, Kim; Huff, Thomas B; Foster, Gregory D

    2017-06-07

    Selected pharmaceutical chemicals, steroids and xenoestrogens (PCSXs) consisting of 29 endocrine modulators, therapeutic drugs, pesticides, detergents, plastics, and active ingredients in household products were measured in water, riverbed sediments and fish collected in a tributary embayment of the Potomac River (Hunting Creek, Alexandria, VA, USA) in the vicinity of wastewater discharge. A total of 17 PCSXs were found in the Hunting Creek samples, with steroid hormones (e.g., progesterone and 17α-ethinylestradiol), triclosan, dextromethorphan and bisphenol A being the most prominent micropollutants detected.The geospatial distribution of the PCSXs in Hunting Creek indicated that the steroids correlated with wastewater treatment plant discharge in all matrices, but such an association is tentative in Hunting Creek given the complex nature of urban sources of PCSXs and hydrodynamics in an urban tidal river. The sediment PCSX concentrations correlated with sediment total organic carbon content at all sampling sites. For the most part, the PCSXs showed an enrichment in fish tissue relative to sediments when concentrations were normalized to lipids and sediment organic carbon contents, but the influence of endogenous steroids is also an important consideration for these chemicals.

  9. Climate change impacts on freshwater wetland hydrology and vegetation cover cycling along a regional aridity gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Global mean temperature may increase up to 6°C by the end of this century and together with precipitation change may steepen regional aridity gradients, impacting the hydrology, productivity, diversity, and ecosystem goods and services from freshwater wetlands, where the water balance is tightly cou...

  10. Modeling tidal marsh distribution with sea-level rise: evaluating the role of vegetation, sediment, and upland habitat in marsh resiliency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schile, Lisa M; Callaway, John C; Morris, James T; Stralberg, Diana; Parker, V Thomas; Kelly, Maggi

    2014-01-01

    Tidal marshes maintain elevation relative to sea level through accumulation of mineral and organic matter, yet this dynamic accumulation feedback mechanism has not been modeled widely in the context of accelerated sea-level rise. Uncertainties exist about tidal marsh resiliency to accelerated sea-level rise, reduced sediment supply, reduced plant productivity under increased inundation, and limited upland habitat for marsh migration. We examined marsh resiliency under these uncertainties using the Marsh Equilibrium Model, a mechanistic, elevation-based soil cohort model, using a rich data set of plant productivity and physical properties from sites across the estuarine salinity gradient. Four tidal marshes were chosen along this gradient: two islands and two with adjacent uplands. Varying century sea-level rise (52, 100, 165, 180 cm) and suspended sediment concentrations (100%, 50%, and 25% of current concentrations), we simulated marsh accretion across vegetated elevations for 100 years, applying the results to high spatial resolution digital elevation models to quantify potential changes in marsh distributions. At low rates of sea-level rise and mid-high sediment concentrations, all marshes maintained vegetated elevations indicative of mid/high marsh habitat. With century sea-level rise at 100 and 165 cm, marshes shifted to low marsh elevations; mid/high marsh elevations were found only in former uplands. At the highest century sea-level rise and lowest sediment concentrations, the island marshes became dominated by mudflat elevations. Under the same sediment concentrations, low salinity brackish marshes containing highly productive vegetation had slower elevation loss compared to more saline sites with lower productivity. A similar trend was documented when comparing against a marsh accretion model that did not model vegetation feedbacks. Elevation predictions using the Marsh Equilibrium Model highlight the importance of including vegetation responses to sea

  11. Spartina alterniflora alters ecosystem DMS and CH4 emissions and their relationship along interacting tidal and vegetation gradients within a coastal salt marsh in Eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinxin; Wang, Jinshu

    2017-10-01

    Invasive Spartina alterniflora accumulates organic carbon rapidly and can utilize a wide range of potential precursors for dimethyl sulfide (DMS) production, as well as a wide variety of methanogenic substrates. Therefore, we predicted that S. alterniflora invasion would alter the relationships between DMS and methane (CH4) fluxes along the interacting gradients of tidal influence and vegetation, as well as the ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of DMS and CH4. In this study, we used static flux chambers to measure DMS and CH4 fluxes in August (growing season) and December (non-growing season) of 2013, along creek and vegetation transects in an Eastern Chinese coastal salt marsh. S. alterniflora invasion dramatically increased DMS and CH4 emission rates by 3.8-513.0 and 2.0-127.1 times the emission rates within non-vegetated regions and regions populated with native species, respectively, and significantly altered the spatial distribution of DMS and CH4 emissions. We also observed a substantial amount of variation in the DMS and CH4 fluxes along the elevation gradient in the salt marsh studied. A significant relationship between DMS and CH4 fluxes was observed, with the CH4 flux passively related to the DMS flux. The correlation between CH4 and DMS emissions along the vegetation transects was more significant than along the tidal creek. In the S. alterniflora salt marsh, the relationship between DMS and CH4 fluxes was more significant than within any other salt marsh. Additionally, CH4 emissions within the S. alterniflora salt marsh were more sensitive to the variation in DMS emissions than within any other vegetation zone. The spatial variability in the relationship observed between DMS and CH4 fluxes appears to be at least partly due to the alteration of substrates involved in DMS and CH4 by S. alterniflora invasion. In the S. alterniflora salt marsh, methanogenesis was more likely to be derived from non-competitive substrates than competitive substrates, but within

  12. Bistability of mangrove forests and competition with freshwater plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiang; Fuller, Douglas O; Teh, Su Yean; Zhai, Lu; Koh, Hock Lye; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Sternberg, L.D.S.L.

    2015-01-01

    Halophytic communities such as mangrove forests and buttonwood hammocks tend to border freshwater plant communities as sharp ecotones. Most studies attribute this purely to underlying physical templates, such as groundwater salinity gradients caused by tidal flux and topography. However, a few recent studies hypothesize that self-reinforcing feedback between vegetation and vadose zone salinity are also involved and create a bistable situation in which either halophytic dominated habitat or freshwater plant communities may dominate as alternative stable states. Here, we revisit the bistability hypothesis and demonstrate the mechanisms that result in bistability. We demonstrate with remote sensing imagery the sharp boundaries between freshwater hardwood hammock communities in southern Florida and halophytic communities such as buttonwood hammocks and mangroves. We further document from the literature how transpiration of mangroves and freshwater plants respond differently to vadose zone salinity, thus altering the salinity through feedback. Using mathematical models, we show how the self-reinforcing feedback, together with physical template, controls the ecotones between halophytic and freshwater communities. Regions of bistability along environmental gradients of salinity have the potential for large-scale vegetation shifts following pulse disturbances such as hurricane tidal surges in Florida, or tsunamis in other regions. The size of the region of bistability can be large for low-lying coastal habitat due to the saline water table, which extends inland due to salinity intrusion. We suggest coupling ecological and hydrologic processes as a framework for future studies.

  13. Design and analysis of a natural-gradient ground-water tracer test in a freshwater tidal wetland, West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Lisa D.; Tenbus, Frederick J.

    2005-01-01

    A natural-gradient ground-water tracer test was designed and conducted in a tidal freshwater wetland at West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The objectives of the test were to characterize solute transport at the site, obtain data to more accurately determine the ground-water velocity in the upper wetland sediments, and to compare a conservative, ionic tracer (bromide) to a volatile tracer (sulfur hexafluoride) to ascertain whether volatilization could be an important process in attenuating volatile organic compounds in the ground water. The tracer test was conducted within the upper peat unit of a layer of wetland sediments that also includes a lower clayey unit; the combined layer overlies an aquifer. The area selected for the test was thought to have an above-average rate of ground-water discharge based on ground-water head distributions and near-surface detections of volatile organic compounds measured in previous studies. Because ground-water velocities in the wetland sediments were expected to be slow compared to the underlying aquifer, the test was designed to be conducted on a small scale. Ninety-seven ?-inch-diameter inverted-screen stainless-steel piezometers were installed in a cylindrical array within approximately 25 cubic feet (2.3 cubic meters) of wetland sediments, in an area with a vertically upward hydraulic gradient. Fluorescein dye was used to qualitatively evaluate the hydrologic integrity of the tracer array before the start of the tracer test, including verifying the absence of hydraulic short-circuiting due to nonnatural vertical conduits potentially created during piezometer installation. Bromide and sulfur hexafluoride tracers (0.139 liter of solution containing 100,000 milligrams per liter of bromide ion and 23.3 milligrams per liter of sulfur hexafluoride) were co-injected and monitored to generate a dataset that could be used to evaluate solute transport in three dimensions. Piezometers were sampled 2 to 15 times

  14. A comparative study of nitrogen and phosphorus cycling in tidal and non-tidal riverine wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, J. T.A.; Whigham, D.F.; van Logtestijn, R.; O'Neill, J.K.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a study of nutrient dynamics in 12 tidal and non-tidal freshwater riverine wetlands in The Netherlands, Belgium, and Maryland (USA). The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationships between nutrient cycling processes in riverine wetlands that were geographically

  15. Tidal circulation and salinity distribution in the Mandovi and Zuari estuaries: Case study

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Manoj, N.T.; Unnikrishnan, A.S.

    . The simulated tidally averaged salinities over the M2 tidal period for varying river discharges show that even a small freshwater influx can affect the longitudinal distribution of salinity to a great extent in this type of estuaries...

  16. Vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epstein, H.E.; Walker, D.A.; Bhatt, U.S.

    2012-01-01

    • Over the past 30 years (1982-2011), the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), an index of green vegetation, has increased 15.5% in the North American Arctic and 8.2% in the Eurasian Arctic. In the more southern regions of Arctic tundra, the estimated aboveground plant biomass has...... in vegetation (including shrub tundra expansion) and thunderstorm activity, each a result of Arctic warming, have created conditions that favor a more active Arctic fire regime....

  17. An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Gary E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thom, Ronald M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Borde, Amy B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Woodley, Christa M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weitkamp, Laurie A. [Marine Sciences lab., Sequim, WA (United States); Buenau, Kate E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kropp, Roy K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The listing of 13 salmon and steelhead stocks in the Columbia River basin (hereafter collectively referred to as “salmon”) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, has stimulated tidal wetland restoration in the lower 235 kilometers of the Columbia River and estuary for juvenile salmon habitat functions. The purpose of the research reported herein was to evaluate the effect on listed salmon of the restoration effort currently being conducted under the auspices of the federal Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Linking changes in the quality and landscape pattern of tidal wetlands in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) to salmon recovery is a complex problem because of the characteristics of the ecosystem, the salmon, the restoration actions, and available sampling technologies. Therefore, we designed an evidence-based approach to develop, synthesize, and evaluate information to determine early-stage (~10 years) outcomes of the CEERP. We developed an ecosystem conceptual model and from that, a primary hypothesis that habitat restoration activities in the LCRE have a cumulative beneficial effect on juvenile salmon. There are two necessary conditions of the hypothesis: • habitat-based indicators of ecosystem controlling factors, processes, and structures show positive effects from restoration actions, and • fish-based indicators of ecosystem processes and functions show positive effects from restoration actions and habitats undergoing restoration. Our evidence-based approach to evaluate the primary hypothesis incorporated seven lines of evidence, most of which are drawn from the LCRE. The lines of evidence are spatial and temporal synergies, cumulative net ecosystem improvement, estuary-wide meta-analysis, offsite benefits to juvenile salmon, landscape condition evaluation, and evidence-based scoring of global literature. The general methods we used to develop information for the lines of evidence included field

  18. Tidal power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    This book describes how large tides develop in particular places and how the energy could be extracted by building suitable barrages. The principal features of a barrage and possible methods of operation are described in detail. Although a tidal power barrage would be non-polluting, the resulting changes in the tidal regime would have important environmental effects. These are discussed together with the economics of tidal power. Methods of assessing the likely cost of electricity from any site are set out and applied to possible sites around the world. (author)

  19. Tidal radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashhoon, B.

    1977-01-01

    The general theory of tides is developed within the framework of Einstein's theory of gravitation. It is based on the concept of Fermi frame and the associated notion of tidal frame along an open curve in spacetime. Following the previous work of the author an approximate scheme for the evaluation of tidal gravitational radiation is presented which is valid for weak gravitational fields. The emission of gravitational radiation from a body in the field of a black hole is discussed, and for some cases of astrophysical interest estimates are given for the contributions of radiation due to center-of-mass motion, purely tidal deformation, and the interference between the center of mass and tidal motions

  20. Tidal Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impact of Science on Society, 1987

    1987-01-01

    States that tidal power projects are feasible in a relatively limited number of locations around the world. Claims that together they could theoretically produce the energy equivalent to more than one million barrels of oil per year. (TW)

  1. Freshwater quality of a stream in agricultural area where organic compost from animal and vegetable wastes is used

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Maria Saran

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Organic compost from biomass residues constitutes a viable alternative for partial or total replacement of mineral fertilizers for growing vegetables. This study evaluated the effects of compost on the water quality of a stream used mainly for irrigation of agricultural crops cultivated in nearby soil that has been treated with organic compost produced by carcasses, animal and vegetable waste for the last ten years. We sampled water biannually for two years, 2013 and 2014, from five locations along the stream. Physical variables and some chemical variables were analyzed. We also analyzed the total number of coliforms (Escherichia coli. Bacterial populations were compared by carbon substrate consumption. Total phosphorus contents in the samples from 2014 exceeded 0.1 mg L-1. The concentrations of other chemical species analyzed and the results for the physical variables were in accordance with the expected values compared with national and international water quality standards. The environment showed differential carbon source consumption and a high diversity of microorganisms, but our results did not show any evidence that the applied compost is changing the microbial population or its metabolic activity. This study shows that the use of the organic compost in agricultural areas seen does not negatively influence the quality of surface water in the study area. These results are important because the process of composting animal and vegetable waste and the use of compost obtained can be an alternative sustainable for adequate destination of these wastes.

  2. Tides and tidal currents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, A.

    1997-01-01

    Basic phenomena, origin and generation of tides, analysis and prediction of tides, basic equation and types of long waves in one dimension, tidal propagation in one dimension, tidal propagation in two directions, analytical tidal computation, numerical tidal computation.

  3. Freshwater Macroinvertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalepa, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of freshwater biology particularly freshwater macroinvertebrates and their effect on water pollution, covering publications of 1976-77. A list of 158 references is also presented. (HM)

  4. Diversity and composition of sulfate- and sulfite-reducing prokaryotes as affected by marine-freshwater gradient and sulfate availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lan-Feng; Tang, Sen-Lin; Chen, Chang-Po; Hsieh, Hwey-Lian

    2012-01-01

    Sulfate- and sulfite-reducing prokaryotes (SSRP) communities play a key role in both sulfur and carbon cycles. In estuarine ecosystems, sulfate concentrations change with tides and could be limited in tidal freshwater reach or deep sediments. In a subtropical estuary of northern Taiwan in December 2007, we examined the compositional changes of SSRP communities. We examined three sites: from the lower estuarine brackish-water reach (site GR and mangrove vegetation site, GM) to the upper estuarine tidal freshwater reach (site HR), as well as from surface to a 50-cm depth. The partial sequence of sulfite reductase (dsrB) genes was used as a molecular marker of SSRP, linked to polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) techniques. SSRP communities of the DGGE profiles varied with sites according to one-way analyses of similarities (Global R = 0.69, P = 0.001). Using cluster analysis, the DGGE profile was found to show site-specific clusters and a distinct depth zonation (five, six, and two SSRP communities at the GM, GR, and HR sites, respectively). SSRP composition was highly correlated to the combination of salinity, reduced sulfur, and total organic carbon contents (BIO-ENV analysis, r ( s ) = 0.56). After analyzing a total of 35 dsrB sequences in the DGGE gel, six groups with 15 phylotypes were found, which were closely related to marine-freshwater gradient. Moreover, sequences neighboring sulfite-reducing prokaryotes were observed, in addition to those affiliated to sulfate-reducing prokaryotes. Four phylotypes harvested in HR resembled the genus Desulfitobacterium, a sulfite-reducing prokaryote, which failed to use sulfate as an electron acceptor and were active in freshwater and sulfate-limited habitat. The other five phylotypes in the HR reach belonged to the sulfate-reducing prokaryotes of the genera Desulfatiferula, Desulfosarcina, Desulfovibrio, and Desulfotomaculum, which appeared to tolerate low salinity and

  5. Tidal extension and sea-level rise: recommendations for a research agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensign, Scott H.; Noe, Gregory

    2018-01-01

    Sea-level rise is pushing freshwater tides upstream into formerly non-tidal rivers. This tidal extension may increase the area of tidal freshwater ecosystems and offset loss of ecosystem functions due to salinization downstream. Without considering how gains in ecosystem functions could offset losses, landscape-scale assessments of ecosystem functions may be biased toward worst-case scenarios of loss. To stimulate research on this concept, we address three fundamental questions about tidal extension: Where will tidal extension be most evident, and can we measure it? What ecosystem functions are influenced by tidal extension, and how can we measure them? How do watershed processes, climate change, and tidal extension interact to affect ecosystem functions? Our preliminary answers lead to recommendations that will advance tidal extension research, enable better predictions of the impacts of sea-level rise, and help balance the landscape-scale benefits of ecosystem function with costs of response.

  6. VEGETATION SYNTAXONOMY AND LAND MANAGEMENT EFFECT ON METHANE AND CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS FROM WETLANDS: A CASE STUDY FROM TIDAL SALT AND BRACKISH MARSH

    OpenAIRE

    Annisa Satyanti; Evi Saragih; Paul Egan; Nuria Simon Cid; Elise Knecht; Marieke Euwe

    2014-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emission from wetlands significantly contribute to climate change and global warming. The interaction between among vegetation type, various environmental factors, and management regimes such as grazing and mowing is considered important in the calculation of CO2 and CH4 gas flux for an ecosystem. In this study, vegetation composition, CH4 and CO2 flux, soil characteristics, air temperature and humidity from the brackish marsh and salt marsh wetland ecos...

  7. Linking channel hydrology with riparian wetland accretion in tidal rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensign, Scott H.; Noe, Gregory B.; Hupp, Cliff R.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrologic processes by which tide affects river channel and riparian morphology within the tidal freshwater zone are poorly understood, yet are fundamental to predicting the fate of coastal rivers and wetlands as sea level rises. We investigated patterns of sediment accretion in riparian wetlands along the non-tidal through oligohaline portion of two coastal plain rivers in Maryland, U.S.A., and how flow velocity, water level, and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) in the channel may have contributed to those patterns. Sediment accretion was measured over a one year period using artificial marker horizons, channel hydrology was measured over a one month period using acoustic Doppler current profilers, and SSC was predicted from acoustic backscatter. Riparian sediment accretion was lowest at the non-tidal sites (mean and standard deviation = 8 ± 8 mm yr-1), highest at the upstream tidal freshwater forested wetlands (TFFW) (33 ± 28 mm yr-1), low at the midstream TFFW (12 ± 9 mm yr-1), and high at the oligohaline (fresh-to-brackish) marshes (19 ± 8 mm yr-1). Channel maximum flood and ebb velocity was 2-fold faster at the oligohaline than tidal freshwater zone on both tidal rivers, corresponding with the differences in in-channel SSC: the oligohaline zone's SSC was more than double the tidal freshwater zone's, and was greater than historical SSC at the non-tidal gages. The tidal wave characteristics differed between rivers, leading to significantly greater in-channel SSC during floodplain inundation in the weakly convergent than the strongly convergent tidal river. Overall sediment accretion was higher in the embayed river likely due to a single storm discharge and associated sedimentation.

  8. Evaluation of Dicentrarchus labrax meats and the vegetable quality of Beta vulgaris var. Cicla farmed in freshwater and saltwater aquaponic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Nozzi, Valentina; Parisi, Giuliana; Di Crescenzo, Davide; Giordano, Mario; Carnevali, Oliana

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to exploit the euryhaline nature of commercially attractive species for their cultivation in freshwater aquaponic systems. This approach may increase the profitability of aquaponic production in coastal countries where the consumption of marine fish is traditional and of commercial relevance. For this purpose, juvenile European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) were reared in an aquaponic freshwater (AFW) system and an aquaponic saltwater (ASW) system (salinity 20 p...

  9. Where’s the Ground Surface? – Elevation Bias in LIDAR-derived Digital Elevation Models Due to Dense Vegetation in Oregon Tidal Marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) is a powerful resource for coastal and wetland managers and its use is increasing. Vegetation density and other land cover characteristics influence the accuracy of LIDAR-derived ground surface digital elevation models; however the degree to wh...

  10. Windows of opportunity for salt marsh vegetation establishment on bare tidal flats : The importance of temporal and spatial variability in hydrodynamic forcing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Z.; Van Belzen, J.; Van der Wal, D.; Balke, T.; Wang, Z.B.; Stive, M.J.F.; Bouma, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms limiting and facilitating salt marsh vegetation initial establishment is of widespread importance due to the many valuable services salt marsh ecosystems offer. Salt marsh dynamics have been investigated by many previous studies, but the mechanisms that enable or disable

  11. Evaluation of Dicentrarchus labrax Meats and the Vegetable Quality of Beta vulgaris var. cicla Farmed in Freshwater and Saltwater Aquaponic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Nozzi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to exploit the euryhaline nature of commercially attractive species for their cultivation in freshwater aquaponic systems. This approach may increase the profitability of aquaponic production in coastal countries where the consumption of marine fish is traditional and of commercial relevance. For this purpose, juvenile European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax were reared in an aquaponic freshwater (AFW system and an aquaponic saltwater (ASW system (salinity 20 ppt, in combination with chard (Beta vulgaris var. cicla seedlings, a salt tolerant plant. At the end of the trial, nitrate and phosphate concentration in water significantly increased in the ASW system, suggesting that the ability of B. vulgaris to absorb these substances was limited by salinity. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry revealed that the concentration of some oligoelements such as Fe remained lower with respect to the concentration in the freshwater hydroponic solution, in both AFW and ASW. FTIR-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy on plants showed that growth at high salinity affected their lipid content. In the case of fish, freshwater had no effects on mono- and poly-unsaturated fatty acid profiles, although saturated fatty acids were significantly decreased in D. labrax reared in AFW. Our results demonstrates that it is possible to increase aquaponic profitability by farming D. labrax juveniles in an aquaponic freshwater system together with Beta vulgaris, obtaining good quality products.

  12. Tracking salinity intrusions in a coastal forested freshwater wetland system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand D. Jayakaran; Thomas M. Williams; William H. Conner

    2016-01-01

    Coastal forested freshwater wetlands are sentinel sites for salinity intrusions associated with large, tidally influenced, storm-driven or drought-induced incursions of estuarine waters into freshwater ecosystems. These incursions may also be exacerbated by rising sea levels associated with climate change.

  13. VEGETATION SYNTAXONOMY AND LAND MANAGEMENT EFFECT ON METHANE AND CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS FROM WETLANDS: A CASE STUDY FROM TIDAL SALT AND BRACKISH MARSH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annisa Satyanti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 and methane (CH4 emission from wetlands significantly contribute to climate change and global warming. The interaction between among vegetation type, various environmental factors, and management regimes such as grazing and mowing is considered important in the calculation of CO2 and CH4 gas flux for an ecosystem. In this study, vegetation composition, CH4 and CO2 flux, soil characteristics, air temperature and humidity from the brackish marsh and salt marsh wetland ecosystems on Terschelling Island in Northern Holland were measured. We aimed to investigate the relationship between vegetation composition, grazing, and mowing on CH4 and CO2 emission. The abundance and number of plant species were higher in brackish than in salt marsh. Grazing was found to influence species richness, 39 species being found in a grazed site of brackish marsh compared to 31 species in a similar ungrazed site. CO2 fluxes in salt and brackish marsh were found to be similar while CH4 flux in the salt marsh was found to be lower than in the brackish marsh. Within the brackish marsh, a higher methane emission was recorded in the grazed zone. However the overall effect of grazing and mowing was found to be negligible for CH4 flux but is suggested to clearly reduce CO2 flux in both the salt and brackish marsh.

  14. Three Conservation Applications of Astronaut Photographs of Earth: Tidal Flat Loss (Japan), Elephant Impacts on Vegetation (Botswana), and Seagrass and Mangrove Monitoring (Australia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulla, Kamlesh P.; Robinson, Julie A.; Minorukashiwagi; Maggiesuzuki; Duanenellis, M.; Bussing, Charles E.; Leelong, W. J.; McKenzie, Andlen J.

    2000-01-01

    NASA photographs taken from low Earth orbit can provide information relevant to conservation biology. This data source is now more accessible due to improvements in digitizing technology, Internet file transfer, and availability of image processing software. We present three examples of conservation-related projects that benefited from using orbital photographs. (1) A time series of photographs from the Space Shuttle showing wetland conversion in Japan was used as a tool for communicating about the impacts of tidal flat loss. Real-time communication with astronauts about a newsworthy event resulted in acquiring current imagery. These images and the availability of other high resolution digital images from NASA provided timely public information on the observed changes. (2) A Space Shuttle photograph of Chobe National Park in Botswana was digitally classified and analyzed to identify the locations of elephant-impacted woodland. Field validation later confirmed that areas identified on the image showed evidence of elephant impacts. (3) A summary map from intensive field surveys of seagrasses in Shoalwater Bay, Australia was used as reference data for a supervised classification of a digitized photograph taken from orbit. The classification was able to distinguish seagrasses, sediments and mangroves with accuracy approximating that in studies using other satellite remote sensing data. Orbital photographs are in the public domain and the database of nearly 400,000 photographs from the late 1960s to the present is available at a single searchable location on the Internet. These photographs can be used by conservation biologists for general information about the landscape and in quantitative applications.

  15. Seasonal Dynamics of Soil Labile Organic Carbon and Enzyme Activities in Relation to Vegetation Types in Hangzhou Bay Tidal Flat Wetland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuexin Shao

    Full Text Available Soil labile organic carbon and soil enzymes play important roles in the carbon cycle of coastal wetlands that have high organic carbon accumulation rates. Soils under three vegetations (Phragmites australis, Spartina alterniflora, and Scirpusm mariqueter as well as bare mudflat in Hangzhou Bay wetland of China were collected seasonally. Seasonal dynamics and correlations of soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities were analyzed. The results showed that there were significant differences among vegetation types in the contents of soil organic carbon (SOC and dissolved organic carbon (DOC, excepting for that of microbial biomass carbon (MBC. The P. australis soil was with the highest content of both SOC (7.86 g kg-1 and DOC (306 mg kg-1, while the S. mariqueter soil was with the lowest content of SOC (6.83 g kg-1, and the bare mudflat was with the lowest content of DOC (270 mg kg-1. Soil enzyme activities were significantly different among vegetation types except for urease. The P. australis had the highest annual average activity of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (21.4 mg kg-1 h-1, and the S. alterniflora had the highest annual average activities of β-glycosidase (4.10 mg kg-1 h-1 and invertase (9.81 mg g-1 24h-1; however, the bare mudflat had the lowest activities of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (16.2 mg kg-1 h-1, β-glycosidase (2.87 mg kg-1 h-1, and invertase (8.02 mg g-1 24h-1. Analysis also showed that the soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities had distinct seasonal dynamics. In addition, the soil MBC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease and β-glucosidase. The DOC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease, alkaline phosphomonoesterase, and invertase. The results indicated that vegetation type is an important factor influencing the spatial-temporal variation of soil enzyme activities and labile organic carbon in coastal wetlands.

  16. Seasonal Dynamics of Soil Labile Organic Carbon and Enzyme Activities in Relation to Vegetation Types in Hangzhou Bay Tidal Flat Wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xuexin; Yang, Wenying; Wu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Soil labile organic carbon and soil enzymes play important roles in the carbon cycle of coastal wetlands that have high organic carbon accumulation rates. Soils under three vegetations (Phragmites australis, Spartina alterniflora, and Scirpusm mariqueter) as well as bare mudflat in Hangzhou Bay wetland of China were collected seasonally. Seasonal dynamics and correlations of soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities were analyzed. The results showed that there were significant differences among vegetation types in the contents of soil organic carbon (SOC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), excepting for that of microbial biomass carbon (MBC). The P. australis soil was with the highest content of both SOC (7.86 g kg-1) and DOC (306 mg kg-1), while the S. mariqueter soil was with the lowest content of SOC (6.83 g kg-1), and the bare mudflat was with the lowest content of DOC (270 mg kg-1). Soil enzyme activities were significantly different among vegetation types except for urease. The P. australis had the highest annual average activity of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (21.4 mg kg-1 h-1), and the S. alterniflora had the highest annual average activities of β-glycosidase (4.10 mg kg-1 h-1) and invertase (9.81 mg g-1 24h-1); however, the bare mudflat had the lowest activities of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (16.2 mg kg-1 h-1), β-glycosidase (2.87 mg kg-1 h-1), and invertase (8.02 mg g-1 24h-1). Analysis also showed that the soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities had distinct seasonal dynamics. In addition, the soil MBC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease and β-glucosidase. The DOC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease, alkaline phosphomonoesterase, and invertase. The results indicated that vegetation type is an important factor influencing the spatial-temporal variation of soil enzyme activities and labile organic carbon in coastal wetlands.

  17. Long-term organic carbon sequestration in tidal marsh sediments is dominated by old-aged allochthonous inputs in a macrotidal estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Broek, Marijn; Vandendriessche, Caroline; Poppelmonde, Dries; Merckx, Roel; Temmerman, Stijn; Govers, Gerard

    2018-02-12

    Tidal marshes are vegetated coastal ecosystems that are often considered as hotspots of atmospheric CO 2 sequestration. Although large amounts of organic carbon (OC) are indeed being deposited on tidal marshes, there is no direct link between high OC deposition rates and high OC sequestration rates due to two main reasons. First, the deposited OC may become rapidly decomposed once it is buried and, second, a significant part of preserved OC may be allochthonous OC that has been sequestered elsewhere. In this study we aimed to identify the mechanisms controlling long-term OC sequestration in tidal marsh sediments along an estuarine salinity gradient (Scheldt estuary, Belgium and the Netherlands). Analyses of deposited sediments have shown that OC deposited during tidal inundations is up to millennia old. This allochthonous OC is the main component of OC that is effectively preserved in these sediments, as indicated by the low radiocarbon content of buried OC. Furthermore, OC fractionation showed that autochthonous OC is decomposed on a decadal timescale in saltmarsh sediments, while in freshwater marsh sediments locally produced biomass is more efficiently preserved after burial. Our results show that long-term OC sequestration is decoupled from local biomass production in the studied tidal marsh sediments. This implies that OC sequestration rates are greatly overestimated when they are calculated based on short-term OC deposition rates, which are controlled by labile autochthonous OC inputs. Moreover, as allochthonous OC is not sequestered in-situ, it does not contribute to active atmospheric CO 2 sequestration in these ecosystems. A correct assessment of the contribution of allochthonous OC to the total sedimentary OC stock in tidal marsh sediments as well as a correct understanding of the long-term fate of locally produced OC are both necessary to avoid overestimations of the rate of in-situ atmospheric CO 2 sequestration in tidal marsh sediments. © 2018 John

  18. Tidal marshes and biogenic silica recycling at the land-sea interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struyf, E.; Dausse, A.; van Damme, S.; Bal, K.; Gribsholt, B.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Meire, P.

    2006-01-01

    We studied the seasonal exchange of biogenic silica (BSi) and dissolved silica (DSi) between a freshwater and a saltwater tidal marsh and the adjacent coastal waters. Export of DSi was observed from both tidal marshes, whereas BSi was imported in association with suspended solids. The export of DSi

  19. Dynamics and fate of SOC in tidal marshes along a salinity gradient (Scheldt estuary, Belgium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Broek, Marijn; Temmermann, Stijn; Merckx, Roel; Wang, Zhengang; Govers, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Coastal ecosystems have been attributed the potential to store large amounts of organic carbon (OC), often referred to as blue carbon, of which a considerable amount is stored in tidal marsh soils. Large uncertainties still exist with respect to the amount and controlling factors of soil organic carbon (SOC) stored in these ecosystems. Moreover, most research has focused on SOC dynamics of saltmarshes, while brackish and freshwater marshes are often even more productive and thus receive even larger organic carbon inputs. Therefore, in this study the OC dynamics of tidal marsh soils along an estuarine gradient are studied in order to contribute to our knowledge of 1) the stocks, 2) the controlling factors and 3) the fate of SOC in tidal marshes with different environmental characteristics. This research thus contributes to a better understanding of the potential of coastal environments to store organic carbon under future climatic changes. Soil and vegetation samples are collected in tidal salt-, brackish- and freshwater marshes in the Scheldt estuary (Belgium - The Netherlands). At each tidal marsh, three replicate soil cores up to 1.5m depth in 0.03m increments are collected at locations with both a low and a high elevation. These cores are analyzed for OC, stable C and N isotopes, bulk density and texture. Incubation experiments of topsoil samples were conducted and both aboveground and belowground biomass were collected. The results show that SOC stocks (range: 13,5 - 35,4 kg OC m-2), standing biomass (range: 2000 - 7930 g DW m-2) and potential soil respiration of CO2 (range: 0,03 - 0,12 % per unit OC per day) decrease with increasing salinity. This shows that both the amount of OC from local macrophytes and the quality of the organic matter are important factors controlling the SOC stocks. In addition, based on the analysis of stable C and N isotopes, it appears that when a significant fraction of SOC is derived from local macrophytes, higher SOC stocks are

  20. Tidal flat landscape formation and evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Tidal flat landscape formation and evolution are closely related to the biotic and abiotic processes that take place in the intertidal environments. Extensive studies have been carried out on the relevant agents such as hydrodynamics, sediment transport and the related ecosystem (vegetation and

  1. Tidal energy update 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O Rourke, Fergal; Boyle, Fergal; Reynolds, Anthony [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dublin Institute of Technology, Bolton Street, Dublin 1 (Ireland)

    2010-02-15

    Tidal energy has the potential to play a valuable part in a sustainable energy future. It is an extremely predictable energy source, depending only on the gravitational pull of the moon and the sun and the centrifugal forces created by the rotation of the earth-moon system. Tidal energy has been exploited on a significant scale since the construction of the La Rance tidal barrage in France in 1967. A tidal barrage utilises the potential energy of the tide and has proven to be very successful, despite opposition from environmental groups. Kinetic energy can also be harnessed from tidal currents to generate electricity and involves the use of a tidal current turbine. This is the more desired method of capturing the energy in the tides. However, tidal current turbine technology is currently not economically viable on a large scale, as it is still in an early stage of development. This paper provides an up-to-date review of the status of tidal energy technology and identifies some of the key barriers challenging the development of tidal energy. The future development of tidal current devices and tidal barrage systems is discussed as well as examining the importance of a supportive policy to assist development. (author)

  2. Land Use in Korean Tidal Wetlands: Impacts and Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sun-Kee; Koh, Chul-Hwan; Harris, Richard R.; Kim, Jae-Eun; Lee, Jeom-Sook; Ihm, Byung-Sun

    2010-05-01

    The coastal landscapes in southwestern Korea include a diverse array of tidal wetlands and salt marshes. These coastal zones link the ecological functions of marine tidal wetlands and freshwater ecosystems with terrestrial ecosystems. They are rich in biological diversity and play important roles in sustaining ecological health and processing environmental pollutants. Korean tidal wetlands are particularly important as nurseries for economically important fishes and habitats for migratory birds. Diking, draining, tourism, and conversion to agricultural and urban uses have adversely affected Korean tidal wetlands. Recent large development projects have contributed to further losses. Environmental impact assessments conducted for projects affecting tidal wetlands and their surrounding landscapes should be customized for application to these special settings. Adequate environmental impact assessments will include classification of hydrogeomorphic units and consideration of their responses to biological and environmental stressors. As is true worldwide, Korean laws and regulations are changing to be more favorable to the conservation and protection of tidal wetlands. More public education needs to be done at the local level to build support for tidal wetland conservation. Some key public education points include the role of tidal wetlands in maintaining healthy fish populations and reducing impacts of nonpoint source pollution. There is also a need to develop procedures for integrating economic and environmental objectives within the overall context of sustainable management and land uses.

  3. Land use in Korean tidal wetlands: impacts and management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sun-Kee; Koh, Chul-Hwan; Harris, Richard R; Kim, Jae-Eun; Lee, Jeom-Sook; Ihm, Byung-Sun

    2010-05-01

    The coastal landscapes in southwestern Korea include a diverse array of tidal wetlands and salt marshes. These coastal zones link the ecological functions of marine tidal wetlands and freshwater ecosystems with terrestrial ecosystems. They are rich in biological diversity and play important roles in sustaining ecological health and processing environmental pollutants. Korean tidal wetlands are particularly important as nurseries for economically important fishes and habitats for migratory birds. Diking, draining, tourism, and conversion to agricultural and urban uses have adversely affected Korean tidal wetlands. Recent large development projects have contributed to further losses. Environmental impact assessments conducted for projects affecting tidal wetlands and their surrounding landscapes should be customized for application to these special settings. Adequate environmental impact assessments will include classification of hydrogeomorphic units and consideration of their responses to biological and environmental stressors. As is true worldwide, Korean laws and regulations are changing to be more favorable to the conservation and protection of tidal wetlands. More public education needs to be done at the local level to build support for tidal wetland conservation. Some key public education points include the role of tidal wetlands in maintaining healthy fish populations and reducing impacts of nonpoint source pollution. There is also a need to develop procedures for integrating economic and environmental objectives within the overall context of sustainable management and land uses.

  4. Effects of dietary supplementation of fish and vegetable oils on the growth performance and muscle compositions of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Muralisankar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was conducted to assess the suitability of three vegetable oils (sunflower oil, coconut oil and castor oil as an alternative dietary lipid source for cod liver oil to culture Macrobrachium rosenbergii post larvae (PLs. The experimental feeds contained 40% protein with separately incorporated three vegetable oils and cod liver oil. The feeding trial was conducted on M. rosenbergii PL for 60 days. In the final day of the experimental period, the survival rate, weight gain, length gain, specific growth rate and protein efficiency ratio of prawns showed no significance (P > 0.05 between sunflower oil and cod liver oil incorporated feed fed groups. The coconut oil and castor oil showed lower performance when compared with cod liver oil. The present result showed biochemical accumulation of total protein, amino acids, carbohydrate and lipid in experimental groups. Also there is no significant difference in ash and mineral (Na+ and K+ contents. Among the tested diets, the recorded growth rate and biochemical constituents of sunflower oil and cod liver oil incorporated feed fed groups were similar. The present results revealed that the sunflower oil was on par with cod liver oil. Hence, the sunflower oil can be incorporated in feed formulation for M. rosenbergii PL culture. It can be concluded that the coconut oil and castor oil are not ideal vegetable lipid source with these concentrations which produced lower performance in survival, growth and biochemical compositions of M. rosenbergii PL.

  5. Tidal Energy Update 2009

    OpenAIRE

    O'Rourke, Fergal; Boyle, Fergal; Reynolds, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Tidal energy has the potential to play a valuable part in a sustainable energy future. It is an extremely predictable energy source, depending only on the gravitational pull of the moon and the sun and the centrifugal forces created by the rotation of the earth-moon system. Tidal energy has been exploited on a significant scale since the construction of the La Rance tidal barrage in France in 1967. A tidal barrage utilises the potential energy of the tide and has proven to be very successful,...

  6. Defining the ecogeomorphic succession of land building for freshwater, intertidal wetlands in Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olliver, Elizabeth A.; Edmonds, Douglas A.

    2017-09-01

    Land building in deltaic environments occurs when sediment discharged from a river mouth is deposited subaqueously and transitions to subaerial land. The transition from subaqueous deposition to subaerial land is a critical process that marks the creation of relatively stable land, yet it is unclear what controls the speed and style of this transition. We define how this transition, herein termed the land building succession, varies in time and space for the freshwater, intertidal wetlands in Wax Lake Delta, LA. Using remote sensing and field data we classify land cover into sediment, water, or vegetation classes at maximum and minimum biomass. We see two succession patterns within Wax Lake Delta. Deltaic islands near the apex are initially covered by sediment and open water. Through time, open water and sediment coverage decreases as vegetation coverage increases. On the other hand, distal islands show little sediment exposure through time. In both cases, all deltaic islands become covered with vegetation by 2015. As vegetation colonizes the island, the topography organizes into two platforms vertically separated by ∼0.35 m. The lower, intertidal platform occurs in the island interiors and is commonly inundated by water and dominated by subaqueous or floating vegetation. The upper, subaerial platform occurs along island edges and is dominated by a variety of vegetation species including Salix nigra, Colocasia esculenta, and Polygonum punctatum. It takes an average of ∼10 years for the intertidal platform to transition to the subaerial platform. These two platforms are separated by the tidal range measured in Atchafalaya Bay, and the different vegetation communities occupying each platform suggest they are a manifestation of multiple stable states and arise due to vegetation and sedimentation feedbacks.

  7. Tidal river dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoitink, A.J.F.; Jay, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    Tidal rivers are a vital and little studied nexus between physical oceanography and hydrology. It is only in the last few decades that substantial research efforts have been focused on the interactions of river discharge with tidal waves and storm surges into regions beyond the limit of salinity

  8. Tidal Marshes across a Chesapeake Bay Subestuary Are Not Keeping up with Sea-Level Rise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah H Beckett

    Full Text Available Sea-level rise is a major factor in wetland loss worldwide, and in much of Chesapeake Bay (USA the rate of sea-level rise is higher than the current global rate of 3.2 mm yr-1 due to regional subsidence. Marshes along estuarine salinity gradients differ in vegetation composition, productivity, decomposition pathways, and sediment dynamics, and may exhibit different responses to sea-level rise. Coastal marshes persist by building vertically at rates at or exceeding regional sea-level rise. In one of the first studies to examine elevation dynamics across an estuarine salinity gradient, we installed 15 surface elevation tables (SET and accretion marker-horizon plots (MH in tidal freshwater, oligohaline, and brackish marshes across a Chesapeake Bay subestuary. Over the course of four years, wetlands across the subestuary decreased 1.8 ± 2.7 mm yr-1 in elevation on average, at least 5 mm yr-1 below that needed to keep pace with global sea-level rise. Elevation change rates did not significantly differ among the marshes studied, and ranged from -9.8 ± 6.9 to 4.5 ± 4.3 mm yr-1. Surface accretion of deposited mineral and organic matter was uniformly high across the estuary (~9-15 mm yr-1, indicating that elevation loss was not due to lack of accretionary input. Position in the estuary and associated salinity regime were not related to elevation change or surface matter accretion. Previous studies have focused on surface elevation change in marshes of uniform salinity (e.g., salt marshes; however, our findings highlight the need for elevation studies in marshes of all salinity regimes and different geomorphic positions, and warn that brackish, oligohaline, and freshwater tidal wetlands may be at similarly high risk of submergence in some estuaries.

  9. Tidal Marshes across a Chesapeake Bay Subestuary Are Not Keeping up with Sea-Level Rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Leah H; Baldwin, Andrew H; Kearney, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Sea-level rise is a major factor in wetland loss worldwide, and in much of Chesapeake Bay (USA) the rate of sea-level rise is higher than the current global rate of 3.2 mm yr-1 due to regional subsidence. Marshes along estuarine salinity gradients differ in vegetation composition, productivity, decomposition pathways, and sediment dynamics, and may exhibit different responses to sea-level rise. Coastal marshes persist by building vertically at rates at or exceeding regional sea-level rise. In one of the first studies to examine elevation dynamics across an estuarine salinity gradient, we installed 15 surface elevation tables (SET) and accretion marker-horizon plots (MH) in tidal freshwater, oligohaline, and brackish marshes across a Chesapeake Bay subestuary. Over the course of four years, wetlands across the subestuary decreased 1.8 ± 2.7 mm yr-1 in elevation on average, at least 5 mm yr-1 below that needed to keep pace with global sea-level rise. Elevation change rates did not significantly differ among the marshes studied, and ranged from -9.8 ± 6.9 to 4.5 ± 4.3 mm yr-1. Surface accretion of deposited mineral and organic matter was uniformly high across the estuary (~9-15 mm yr-1), indicating that elevation loss was not due to lack of accretionary input. Position in the estuary and associated salinity regime were not related to elevation change or surface matter accretion. Previous studies have focused on surface elevation change in marshes of uniform salinity (e.g., salt marshes); however, our findings highlight the need for elevation studies in marshes of all salinity regimes and different geomorphic positions, and warn that brackish, oligohaline, and freshwater tidal wetlands may be at similarly high risk of submergence in some estuaries.

  10. Turtles: Freshwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, J. Whitfield; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Bowden, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    With their iconic shells, turtles are morphologically distinct in being the only extant or extinct vertebrate animals to have their shoulders and hips inside their rib cages. By the time an asteroid hit the earth 65.5 million years ago, causing the extinction of dinosaurs, turtles were already an ancient lineage that was 70% through their evolutionary history to date. The remarkable evolutionary success of turtles over 220 million years is due to a combination of both conservative and effective life history traits and an essentially unchanging morphology that withstood the test of time. However, the life history traits of many species make them particularly susceptible to overharvest and habitat destruction in the modern world, and a majority of the world’s species face serious conservation challenges with several extinctions documented in modern times. The global plight of turtles is underscored by the fact that the percentage of imperiled species exceeds that of even the critically endangered primates.Freshwater turtles, with over 260 recognized species, have become a focus on a worldwide scale for many conservation issues. This article is a synthesis of a diverse body of information on the general biology of freshwater turtles, with particular emphasis on the extensive research on ecology, life history, and behavior that has been accomplished in the last half century. Much of the research has been applicable to the aforementioned conservation challenges. The studies presented include a combination of laboratory and field experiments and observational studies on this intriguing group of animals.

  11. The role of the upper tidal estuary in wetland blue carbon storage and flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Ken W.; Noe, Gregory B.; Duberstein, Jamie A.; Conner, William H.; Stagg, Camille L.; Cormier, Nicole; Jones, Miriam C.; Bernhardt, Christopher E.; Lockaby, B. Graeme; From, Andrew S.; Doyle, Thomas W.; Day, Richard H.; Ensign, Scott H.; Pierfelice, Katherine N.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Chow, Alex T.; Whitbeck, Julie L.

    2018-01-01

    Carbon (C) standing stocks, C mass balance, and soil C burial in tidal freshwater forested wetlands (TFFW) and TFFW transitioning to low‐salinity marshes along the upper estuary are not typically included in “blue carbon” accounting, but may represent a significant C sink. Results from two salinity transects along the tidal Waccamaw and Savannah rivers of the US Atlantic Coast show total C standing stocks were 321‐1264 Mg C ha‐1 among all sites, generally shifting to greater soil storage as salinity increased. Carbon mass balance inputs (litterfall, woody growth, herbaceous growth, root growth, surface accumulation) minus C outputs (surface litter and root decomposition, gaseous C) over a period of up to 11 years were 340‐900 g C m‐2 yr‐1. Soil C burial was variable (7‐337 g C m‐2 yr‐1), and lateral C export was estimated as C mass balance minus soil C burial as 267‐849 g C m‐2yr‐1. This represents a large amount of C export to support aquatic biogeochemical transformations. Despite reduced C persistence within emergent vegetation, decomposition of organic matter, and higher lateral C export, total C storage increased as forests converted to marsh with salinization. These tidal river wetlands exhibited high N mineralization in salinity‐stressed forested sites and considerable P mineralization in low salinity marshes. Large C standing stocks and rates of C sequestration suggest that TFFW and oligohaline marshes are considerably important globally to coastal C dynamics and in facilitating energy transformations in areas of the world in which they occur.

  12. Tidal power in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The world's first tidal power station is scheduled for stat-up in the spring of 2003. It is located in Kvalsundet, off Hammerfest, Norway. This is a pilot installation of a 300 kW tidal turbine at a depth of 50 metres. When fully developed in 2007, the tidal power plant will deliver 32 GWh per year. Hammerfest Stroem has patented the energy and the company hopes to be able to install similar power stations both in Norway and abroad. The potential worldwide is claimed to be more than 450 TWh per year

  13. Tidal viscosity of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efroimsky, Michael

    2018-01-01

    In the preceding paper (Efroimsky, 2017), we derived an expression for the tidal dissipation rate in a homogeneous near-spherical Maxwell body librating in longitude. Now, by equating this expression to the outgoing energy flux due to the vapour plumes, we estimate the mean tidal viscosity of Enceladus, under the assumption that the Enceladean mantle behaviour is Maxwell. This method yields a value of 0.24 × 1014 Pa s for the mean tidal viscosity, which is very close to the viscosity of ice near the melting point.

  14. Tidal alignment of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazek, Jonathan; Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš

    2015-08-01

    We develop an analytic model for galaxy intrinsic alignments (IA) based on the theory of tidal alignment. We calculate all relevant nonlinear corrections at one-loop order, including effects from nonlinear density evolution, galaxy biasing, and source density weighting. Contributions from density weighting are found to be particularly important and lead to bias dependence of the IA amplitude, even on large scales. This effect may be responsible for much of the luminosity dependence in IA observations. The increase in IA amplitude for more highly biased galaxies reflects their locations in regions with large tidal fields. We also consider the impact of smoothing the tidal field on halo scales. We compare the performance of this consistent nonlinear model in describing the observed alignment of luminous red galaxies with the linear model as well as the frequently used "nonlinear alignment model," finding a significant improvement on small and intermediate scales. We also show that the cross-correlation between density and IA (the "GI" term) can be effectively separated into source alignment and source clustering, and we accurately model the observed alignment down to the one-halo regime using the tidal field from the fully nonlinear halo-matter cross correlation. Inside the one-halo regime, the average alignment of galaxies with density tracers no longer follows the tidal alignment prediction, likely reflecting nonlinear processes that must be considered when modeling IA on these scales. Finally, we discuss tidal alignment in the context of cosmic shear measurements.

  15. Broad timescale forcing and geomorphic mediation of tidal marsh flow and temperature dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwright, Christopher; Culberson, Steven; Burau, Jon R.

    2013-01-01

    Tidal marsh functions are driven by interactions between tides, landscape morphology, and emergent vegetation. Less often considered are the diurnal pattern of tide extremes and seasonal variation of solar insolation in the mix of tidal marsh driver interactions. This work demonstrates how high-frequency hydroperiod and water temperature variability emerges from disparate timescale interactions between tidal marsh morphology, tidal harmonics, and meteorology in the San Francisco Estuary. We compare the tidal and residual flow and temperature response of neighboring tidal sloughs, one possessing natural tidal marsh morphology, and one that is modified for water control. We show that the natural tidal marsh is tuned to lunar phase and produces tidal and fortnight water temperature variability through interacting tide, meteorology, and geomorphic linkages. In contrast, temperature variability is dampened in the modified slough where overbank marsh plain connection is severed by levees. Despite geomorphic differences, a key finding is that both sloughs are heat sinks in summer by latent heat flux-driven residual upstream water advection and sensible and long-wave heat transfer. The precession of a 335-year tidal harmonic assures that these dynamics will shift in the future. Water temperature regulation appears to be a key function of natural tidal sloughs that depends critically on geomorphic mediation. We investigate approaches to untangling the relative influence of sun versus tide on residual water and temperature transport as a function of system morphology. The findings of this study likely have ecological consequences and suggest physical process metrics for tidal marsh restoration performance.

  16. Tidal Effects on Groundwater in a Very Small Tropical Island: A Study on the Groundwater Resources of Pag-asa Island, Kalayaan Island Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ong

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The Pag-asa Island, with its very small land area and low relief, has a very limited fresh water supply occurring as a thin freshwater lens. Climate, topography, vegetation, lithology, human abstractions, and tides affect the volume of the freshwater lens. Topographic and hydrogeologic surveys, coupled with a 72-hour groundwater-monitoring program were done to assess the effects of tides on the freshwater lens.Groundwater parameters measured in wells during the monitoring program include variations in water table depths, specific electrical conductivity (SEC, and temperature. Changes in these parameters were then correlated with the observed variations of the tides.The groundwater levels oscillate with the tides at varying amplitudes. The hydraulic properties of the lithologies making up the island's aquifer influence the amplitude of the oscillations. Groundwater level oscillations are least in the reef materials and greatest in the sandy materials where it is nearly simultaneous with the tidal variations. High electrical conductivity values are marked in wells built near the coasts and in sandy materials.The average annual precipitation is approximately 2,020 mm. Based on empirical studies, the estimated sustainable yield for small tropical islands is 6% of the lowest annual rainfall or about 20,300 m3/yr for Pag-asa Island.

  17. Tidal-scale flow routing and sedimentation in mangrove forests: combining field data and numerical modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horstman, Erik; Dohmen-Janssen, Catarine M.; Bouma, T.J.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Tidal-scale biophysical interactions establish particular flow routing and sedimentation patterns in coastal mangroves. Sluggish water flows through the mangrove vegetation and enhanced sediment deposition are essential to maintain these valuable ecosystems, thereby enabling their contribution to

  18. Benthic metabolism and sulfur cycling along an inundation gradient in a tidal Spartina anglica salt marsh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gribsholt, B.; Kristensen, E.

    2003-01-01

    Central aspects of carbon and sulfur biogeochemistry were studied along a transect extending from an unvegetated mudflat into a Spartina anglica salt marsh. Conditions along the transect differed with respect to tidal elevation, sediment characteristics, vegetation coverage, and benthic macrofauna

  19. Freshwater availability and coastal wetland foundation species: ecological transitions along a rainfall gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osland, Michael J.; Enwright, Nicholas M.; Stagg, Camille L.

    2014-01-01

    Climate gradient-focused ecological research can provide a foundation for better understanding critical ecological transition points and nonlinear climate-ecological relationships, which is information that can be used to better understand, predict, and manage ecological responses to climate change. In this study, we examined the influence of freshwater availability upon the coverage of foundation plant species in coastal wetlands along a northwestern Gulf of Mexico rainfall gradient. Our research addresses the following three questions: (1) what are the region-scale relationships between measures of freshwater availability (e.g., rainfall, aridity, freshwater inflow, salinity) and the relative abundance of foundation plant species in tidal wetlands; (2) How vulnerable are foundation plant species in tidal wetlands to future changes in freshwater availability; and (3) What is the potential future relative abundance of tidal wetland foundation plant species under alternative climate change scenarios? We developed simple freshwater availability-based models to predict the relative abundance (i.e., coverage) of tidal wetland foundation plant species using climate data (1970-2000), estuarine freshwater inflow-focused data, and coastal wetland habitat data. Our results identify regional ecological thresholds and nonlinear relationships between measures of freshwater availability and the relative abundance of foundation plant species in tidal wetlands. In drier coastal zones, relatively small changes in rainfall could produce comparatively large landscape-scale changes in foundation plant species abundance which would affect some ecosystem good and services. Whereas a drier future would result in a decrease in the coverage of foundation plant species, a wetter future would result in an increase in foundation plant species coverage. In many ways, the freshwater-dependent coastal wetland ecological transitions we observed are analogous to those present in dryland

  20. Freshwater Fish Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freshwater fish are ecologically important in stream ecosystems, and they provide people with significant food, recreation, and conservation value as biological indicator of freshwater streams. Historically, the streams and rivers of southern New England supported moderately dive...

  1. Coastal inlets and tidal basins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vriend, H.J.; Dronkers, J.; Stive, M.J.F.; Van Dongeren, A.; Wang, J.H.

    2002-01-01

    lecture note: Tidal inlets and their associated basins (lagoons) are a common feature of lowland coasts all around the world. A significant part ofthe world's coastlines is formed by barrier island coasts, and most other tidal coasts are interrupted by estuaries and lagoon inlets. These tidal

  2. Exploring Freshwater Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hydrological modifications on freshwater fish communities ... transformation on eco-hydrology. Freshwater ecosystems and associated habitats harbor incred- ible biodiversity. They offer various ecosystem services and sustain human livelihoods. However, due to ... complete their life cycle exclusively in the freshwater ...

  3. Tropical Freshwater Biology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Freshwater Biology promotes the publication of scientific contributions in the field of freshwater biology in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. One issue is published annually but this number may be increased. Original research papers and short communications on any aspect of tropical freshwater ...

  4. A meeting of the waters: interdisciplinary challenges and opportunities in tidal rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensign, Scott H.; Noe, Gregory B.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Fagherazzi, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    At the interface of estuarine tides and freshwater rivers lie wetland and aquatic ecosystems, which experience dramatic effects of sea level rise. There, nontidal channels and riparian floodplains are transforming into tidal ecosystems, and tidal freshwater ecosystems are receiving increasing salinity. These river-floodplain systems have both fluvial characteristics, including meandering channels and expansive floodplain forests, and estuarine characteristics, including tides and intertidal wetlands [see Barendregt et al., 2009; Conner et al., 2007, and references therein]. Because tidal rivers lie at the disciplinary divide between fluvial and estuarine science, a knowledge gap has developed in scientists' understanding of the geomorphic and biogeochemical response of these environments to sea level rise, climate change, and anthropogenically driven variations in watershed exports.

  5. Relativistic tidal disruption events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levan A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In March 2011 Swift detected an extremely luminous and long-lived outburst from the nucleus of an otherwise quiescent, low luminosity (LMC-like galaxy. Named Swift J1644+57, its combination of high-energy luminosity (1048 ergs s−1 at peak, rapid X-ray variability (factors of >100 on timescales of 100 seconds and luminous, rising radio emission suggested that we were witnessing the birth of a moderately relativistic jet (Γ ∼ 2 − 5, created when a star is tidally disrupted by the supermassive black hole in the centre of the galaxy. A second event, Swift J2058+0516, detected two months later, with broadly similar properties lends further weight to this interpretation. Taken together this suggests that a fraction of tidal disruption events do indeed create relativistic outflows, demonstrates their detectability, and also implies that low mass galaxies can host massive black holes. Here, I briefly outline the observational properties of these relativistic tidal flares observed last year, and their evolution over the first year since their discovery.

  6. Carbon Sequestration in Tidal Salt Marshes of the Northeast United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Katherine; Halifax, Holly; Adamowicz, Susan C; Craft, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    Tidal salt marshes provide important ecological services, habitat, disturbance regulation, water quality improvement, and biodiversity, as well as accumulation and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in vegetation and soil organic matter. Different management practices may alter their capacity to provide these ecosystem services. We examined soil properties (bulk density, percent organic C, percent N), C and N pools, C sequestration and N accumulation at four marshes managed with open marsh water management (OMWM) and four marshes that were not at U.S. Fish and Wildlife National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs) on the East Coast of the United States. Soil properties (bulk density, percent organic C, percent N) exhibited no consistent differences among managed and non-OMWM marshes. Soil organic carbon pools (0-60-cm depth) also did not differ. Managed marshes contained 15.9 kg C/m(2) compared to 16.2 kg C/m(2) in non-OMWM marshes. Proportionately, more C (per unit volume) was stored in surface than in subsurface soils. The rate of C sequestration, based on (137)Cs and (210)Pb dating of soil cores, ranged from 41 to 152 g/m(2)/year. Because of the low emissions of CH4 from salt marshes relative to freshwater wetlands and the ability to sequester C in soil, protection and restoration of salt marshes can be a vital tool for delivering key ecosystem services, while at the same time, reducing the C footprint associated with managing these wetlands.

  7. Prehospital tidal volume influences hospital tidal volume: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltze, Andrew J; Wong, Terrence S; Harland, Karisa K; Ahmed, Azeemuddin; Fuller, Brian M; Mohr, Nicholas M

    2015-06-01

    The purposes of the study are to describe current practice of ventilation in a modern air medical system and to measure the association of ventilation strategy with subsequent ventilator care and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Retrospective observational cohort study of intubated adult patients (n = 235) transported by a university-affiliated air medical transport service to a 711-bed tertiary academic center between July 2011 and May 2013. Low tidal volume ventilation was defined as tidal volumes less than or equal to 8 mL/kg predicted body weight. Multivariable regression was used to measure the association between prehospital tidal volume, hospital ventilation strategy, and ARDS. Most patients (57%) were ventilated solely with bag valve ventilation during transport. Mean tidal volume of mechanically ventilated patients was 8.6 mL/kg predicted body weight (SD, 0.2 mL/kg). Low tidal volume ventilation was used in 13% of patients. Patients receiving low tidal volume ventilation during air medical transport were more likely to receive low tidal volume ventilation in the emergency department (P tidal volume (P = .840). Low tidal volume ventilation was rare during air medical transport. Air transport ventilation strategy influenced subsequent ventilation but was not associated with ARDS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dissipation of Tidal Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The moon's gravity imparts tremendous energy to the Earth, raising tides throughout the global oceans. What happens to all this energy? This question has been pondered by scientists for over 200 years, and has consequences ranging from the history of the moon to the mixing of the oceans. Richard Ray at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. and Gary Egbert of the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Ore. studied six years of altimeter data from the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite to address this question. According to their report in the June 15 issue of Nature, about 1 terawatt, or 25 to 30 percent of the total tidal energy dissipation, occurs in the deep ocean. The remainder occurs in shallow seas, such as on the Patagonian Shelf. 'By measuring sea level with the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite altimeter, our knowledge of the tides in the global ocean has been remarkably improved,' said Richard Ray, a geophysicist at Goddard. The accuracies are now so high that this data can be used to map empirically the tidal energy dissipation. (Red areas, above) The deep-water tidal dissipation occurs generally near rugged bottom topography (seamounts and mid-ocean ridges). 'The observed pattern of deep-ocean dissipation is consistent with topographic scattering of tidal energy into internal motions within the water column, resulting in localized turbulence and mixing', said Gary Egbert an associate professor at OSU. One important implication of this finding concerns the possible energy sources needed to maintain the ocean's large-scale 'conveyor-belt' circulation and to mix upper ocean heat into the abyssal depths. It is thought that 2 terawatts are required for this process. The winds supply about 1 terawatt, and there has been speculation that the tides, by pumping energy into vertical water motions, supply the remainder. However, all current general circulation models of the oceans ignore the tides. 'It is possible that properly

  9. Tidal power: trends and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This volume covers works and studies on tidal power currently being undertaken, both nationally and internationally. The 20 papers included cover the proposed Mersey barrage, the Severn estuary and several papers on the Severn barrage. The Department of Energy's continued variety of generic work on tidal power and various overseas studies carried out by other experts are also detailed, giving the reader an up to date picture of developments in tidal power worldwide. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (author)

  10. Tidal Venuses: triggering a climate catastrophe via tidal heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Rory; Mullins, Kristina; Goldblatt, Colin; Meadows, Victoria S; Kasting, James F; Heller, René

    2013-03-01

    Traditionally, stellar radiation has been the only heat source considered capable of determining global climate on long timescales. Here, we show that terrestrial exoplanets orbiting low-mass stars may be tidally heated at high-enough levels to induce a runaway greenhouse for a long-enough duration for all the hydrogen to escape. Without hydrogen, the planet no longer has water and cannot support life. We call these planets "Tidal Venuses" and the phenomenon a "tidal greenhouse." Tidal effects also circularize the orbit, which decreases tidal heating. Hence, some planets may form with large eccentricity, with its accompanying large tidal heating, and lose their water, but eventually settle into nearly circular orbits (i.e., with negligible tidal heating) in the habitable zone (HZ). However, these planets are not habitable, as past tidal heating desiccated them, and hence should not be ranked highly for detailed follow-up observations aimed at detecting biosignatures. We simulated the evolution of hypothetical planetary systems in a quasi-continuous parameter distribution and found that we could constrain the history of the system by statistical arguments. Planets orbiting stars with massesplanet orbiting a 0.3 MSun star at 0.12 AU. We found that it probably did not lose its water via tidal heating, as orbital stability is unlikely for the high eccentricities required for the tidal greenhouse. As the inner edge of the HZ is defined by the onset of a runaway or moist greenhouse powered by radiation, our results represent a fundamental revision to the HZ for noncircular orbits. In the appendices we review (a) the moist and runaway greenhouses, (b) hydrogen escape, (c) stellar mass-radius and mass-luminosity relations, (d) terrestrial planet mass-radius relations, and (e) linear tidal theories.

  11. Tidal Energy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelzenmuller, Nickolas [Univ of Washington; Aliseda, Alberto [Univ of Washington; Palodichuk, Michael [Univ of Washington; Polagye, Brian [Univ of Washington; Thomson, James [Univ of Washington; Chime, Arshiya [Univ of Washington; Malte, Philip [Univ of washington

    2014-03-31

    This technical report contains results on the following topics: 1) Testing and analysis of sub-scale hydro-kinetic turbines in a flume, including the design and fabrication of the instrumented turbines. 2) Field measurements and analysis of the tidal energy resource and at a site in northern Puget Sound, that is being examined for turbine installation. 3) Conceptual design and performance analysis of hydro-kinetic turbines operating at high blockage ratio, for use for power generation and flow control in open channel flows.

  12. Archives: Tropical Freshwater Biology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 23 of 23 ... Archives: Tropical Freshwater Biology. Journal Home > Archives: Tropical Freshwater Biology. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 23 of 23 Items ...

  13. The freshwater biodiversity crisis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    group of native fishes, the cyprinids, still persist in many of the country's freshwaters. This paper combines review of ... Key words/phrases: Deforestation, Ethiopia, fish diversity, freshwater ecosystems, introduced species ...... Stomach pH, feeding rhythm and ingestion rate in Oreo- chromis niloticus L. (Pisces: Cichlidae) in ...

  14. Sedimentary structures of tidal flats

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sedimentary structures of some coastal tropical tidal flats of the east coast of India, and inner estuarine tidal point bars located at 30 to 50 kilometers inland from the coast, have been extensively studied under varying seasonal conditions. The results reveal that physical features such as flaser bedding, herringbone ...

  15. Freshwater springs on intertidal sand flats cause a switch in dominance among polychaete worms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zipperle, A; Reise, K

    Effects of freshwater seepage on benthic macrofauna were investigated on the sandy tidal flats near the island of Sylt (German Wadden Sea) in 2002. Several permanent seepage areas (50 to 200 m offshore; up to 200 m 2 in area) were examined, in which salinity ranged from 22-29 outside to 0-16 psu

  16. Tidal energy in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemperiere, F.

    2010-01-01

    The author first discusses the potential theoretical production of tidal energy in the world and more particularly in France, and compares this potential production with that of hydroelectric energy. He discusses the existence of potentially interesting sites in France in terms of sizing and exploitation modes. He describes the main associated works for turbines and sea walls, impacts on the environment, on the economy and on employment. He discusses the production possibilities and their cost, and the issue of energy storage. He indicates sites which could be built before 2025: Saint-Brieuc, Portbail-Coutainville or Granville, Mers or Cayeux, Penly or Saint-Valery en Caux. For each of this site, the author describes the project implantation, gives an gross assessment of the construction cost, and therefore of the kWh cost

  17. Freshwater Fungal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J. Baumgardner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections as a result of freshwater exposure or trauma are fortunately rare. Etiologic agents are varied, but commonly include filamentous fungi and Candida. This narrative review describes various sources of potential freshwater fungal exposure and the diseases that may result, including fungal keratitis, acute otitis externa and tinea pedis, as well as rare deep soft tissue or bone infections and pulmonary or central nervous system infections following traumatic freshwater exposure during natural disasters or near-drowning episodes. Fungal etiology should be suspected in appropriate scenarios when bacterial cultures or molecular tests are normal or when the infection worsens or fails to resolve with appropriate antibacterial therapy.

  18. Tidal energy site - Tidal energy site mammal/bird survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A vessel-based line visual transect survey was conducted for birds and marine mammals near the proposed Snohomish County PUD Admiralty Inlet tidal energy site...

  19. A Search for Freshwater in the Saline Aquifers of Coastal Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, C.; Hornberger, G. M.

    2017-12-01

    Can we locate pockets of freshwater amidst brackish groundwater in remote villages in Bangladesh? This study explores what we can infer about local groundwater-surface water (GW-SW) interactions in the polders of coastal Bangladesh. In this underdeveloped region, the shallow groundwater is primarily brackish with unpredictable apportioning of freshwater pockets. We use transects of piezometers, cores, electromagnetic induction, and water chemistry surveys to explore two sources of potential fresh groundwater: (1) tidal channel-aquifer exchange and (2) meteoric recharge. Freshwater is difficult to find due to disparate subsurface lithology, asymmetrical tidal dynamics, extreme seasonal fluctuations in rainfall, and limited field data. Observations suggest substantial lateral variability in shallow subsurface conductivity profiles as well as tidal pressure signals in piezometers. Nevertheless, active exchange of freshwater may be limited due to low permeability of banks and surface sediments limits. Small scale heterogeneity in delta formation likely caused much of the groundwater salinity variation. Without adequate ground truthing of groundwater quality, the ability to deduce the exact location of freshwater pockets may be restricted.

  20. Tidal Venuses: Triggering a Climate Catastrophe via Tidal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Kristina; Goldblatt, Colin; Meadows, Victoria S.; Kasting, James F.; Heller, René

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Traditionally, stellar radiation has been the only heat source considered capable of determining global climate on long timescales. Here, we show that terrestrial exoplanets orbiting low-mass stars may be tidally heated at high-enough levels to induce a runaway greenhouse for a long-enough duration for all the hydrogen to escape. Without hydrogen, the planet no longer has water and cannot support life. We call these planets “Tidal Venuses” and the phenomenon a “tidal greenhouse.” Tidal effects also circularize the orbit, which decreases tidal heating. Hence, some planets may form with large eccentricity, with its accompanying large tidal heating, and lose their water, but eventually settle into nearly circular orbits (i.e., with negligible tidal heating) in the habitable zone (HZ). However, these planets are not habitable, as past tidal heating desiccated them, and hence should not be ranked highly for detailed follow-up observations aimed at detecting biosignatures. We simulated the evolution of hypothetical planetary systems in a quasi-continuous parameter distribution and found that we could constrain the history of the system by statistical arguments. Planets orbiting stars with massestidal heating. We have applied these concepts to Gl 667C c, a ∼4.5 MEarth planet orbiting a 0.3 MSun star at 0.12 AU. We found that it probably did not lose its water via tidal heating, as orbital stability is unlikely for the high eccentricities required for the tidal greenhouse. As the inner edge of the HZ is defined by the onset of a runaway or moist greenhouse powered by radiation, our results represent a fundamental revision to the HZ for noncircular orbits. In the appendices we review (a) the moist and runaway greenhouses, (b) hydrogen escape, (c) stellar mass-radius and mass-luminosity relations, (d) terrestrial planet mass-radius relations, and (e) linear tidal theories. Key Words: Extrasolar terrestrial planets—Habitability—Habitable zone

  1. Exploring Freshwater Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Freshwater ecosystems and associated habitats harbor incrediblebiodiversity. They offer various ecosystem services andsustain human livelihoods. However, due to increasing developmentalpressure and rising water demand, these systemsare under huge threat. As a result, many aquatic species arefeared to become ...

  2. On luminescence bleaching of tidal channel sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Pejrup, Morten; Murray, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the processes responsible for bleaching of the quartz OSL signal from tidal channel sediment. Tidal dynamics are expected to play an important role for complete bleaching of tidal sediments. However, no studies have examined the amount of reworking occurring in tidal channels...... and on tidal flats due to the mixing caused by currents and waves. We apply bed level data to evaluate the amount of vertical sediment reworking in modern tidal channels and at a tidal flat. Cycles of deposition and erosion are measured with a bed level sensor, and the results show that gross sedimentation...... was several times higher than net sedimentation. We propose that tidal channel sediment is bleached either on the tidal flat before it is transported to the tidal channels and incorporated in channel-fill successions or, alternatively, on the shallow intertidal part of the channel banks. Based...

  3. Summertime influences of tidal energy advection on the surface energy balance in a mangrove forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Barr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove forests are ecosystems susceptible to changing water levels and temperatures due to climate change as well as perturbations resulting from tropical storms. Numerical models can be used to project mangrove forest responses to regional and global environmental changes, and the reliability of these models depends on surface energy balance closure. However, for tidal ecosystems, the surface energy balance is complex because the energy transport associated with tidal activity remains poorly understood. This study aimed to quantify impacts of tidal flows on energy dynamics within a mangrove ecosystem. To address the research objective, an intensive 10-day study was conducted in a mangrove forest located along the Shark River in the Everglades National Park, FL, USA. Forest–atmosphere turbulent exchanges of energy were quantified with an eddy covariance system installed on a 30-m-tall flux tower. Energy transport associated with tidal activity was calculated based on a coupled mass and energy balance approach. The mass balance included tidal flows and accumulation of water on the forest floor. The energy balance included temporal changes in enthalpy, resulting from tidal flows and temperature changes in the water column. By serving as a net sink or a source of available energy, flood waters reduced the impact of high radiational loads on the mangrove forest. Also, the regression slope of available energy versus sink terms increased from 0.730 to 0.754 and from 0.798 to 0.857, including total enthalpy change in the water column in the surface energy balance for 30-min periods and daily daytime sums, respectively. Results indicated that tidal inundation provides an important mechanism for heat removal and that tidal exchange should be considered in surface energy budgets of coastal ecosystems. Results also demonstrated the importance of including tidal energy advection in mangrove biophysical models that are used for predicting ecosystem

  4. Tidal Creek Sentinel Habitat Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ecological Research, Assessment and Prediction's Tidal Creeks: Sentinel Habitat Database was developed to support the National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  5. Tidal locking of habitable exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Rory

    2017-12-01

    Potentially habitable planets can orbit close enough to their host star that the differential gravity across their diameters can produce an elongated shape. Frictional forces inside the planet prevent the bulges from aligning perfectly with the host star and result in torques that alter the planet's rotational angular momentum. Eventually the tidal torques fix the rotation rate at a specific frequency, a process called tidal locking. Tidally locked planets on circular orbits will rotate synchronously, but those on eccentric orbits will either librate or rotate super-synchronously. Although these features of tidal theory are well known, a systematic survey of the rotational evolution of potentially habitable exoplanets using classic equilibrium tide theories has not been undertaken. I calculate how habitable planets evolve under two commonly used models and find, for example, that one model predicts that the Earth's rotation rate would have synchronized after 4.5 Gyr if its initial rotation period was 3 days, it had no satellites, and it always maintained the modern Earth's tidal properties. Lower mass stellar hosts will induce stronger tidal effects on potentially habitable planets, and tidal locking is possible for most planets in the habitable zones of GKM dwarf stars. For fast-rotating planets, both models predict eccentricity growth and that circularization can only occur once the rotational frequency is similar to the orbital frequency. The orbits of potentially habitable planets of very late M dwarfs ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]) are very likely to be circularized within 1 Gyr, and hence, those planets will be synchronous rotators. Proxima b is almost assuredly tidally locked, but its orbit may not have circularized yet, so the planet could be rotating super-synchronously today. The evolution of the isolated and potentially habitable Kepler planet candidates is computed and about half could be tidally locked. Finally, projected TESS planets

  6. Experimental removal of wetland emergent vegetation leads to decreased methylmercury production in surface sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Agee, Jennifer L.; Cox, Marisa H.; Heredia-Middleton, Pilar; Coates, Carolyn; Kakouros, Evangelos

    2009-01-01

    We performed plant removal (devegetation) experiments across a suite of ecologically diverse wetland settings (tidal salt marshes, river floodplain, rotational rice fields, and freshwater wetlands with permanent or seasonal flooding) to determine the extent to which the presence (or absence) of actively growing plants influences the activity of the Hg(II)-methylating microbial community and the availability of Hg(II) to those microbes. Vegetated control plots were paired with neighboring devegetated plots in which photosynthetic input was terminated 4–8 months prior to measurements, through clipping aboveground biomass, severing belowground connections, and shading the sediment surface to prevent regrowth. Across all wetlands, devegetation decreased the activity of the Hg(II)-methylating microbial community (kmeth) by 38%, calculated MeHg production potential (MP) rates by 36%, and pore water acetate concentration by 78%. Decreases in MP were associated with decreases in microbial sulfate reduction in salt marsh settings. In freshwater agricultural wetlands, decreases in MP were related to indices of microbial iron reduction. Sediment MeHg concentrations were also significantly lower in devegetated than in vegetated plots in most wetland settings studied. Devegetation effects were correlated with live root density (percent volume) and were most profound in vegetated sites with higher initial pore water acetate concentrations. Densely rooted wetlands had the highest rates of microbial Hg(II)-methylation activity but often the lowest concentrations of bioavailable reactive Hg(II). We conclude that the exudation of labile organic carbon (e.g., acetate) by plants leads to enhanced microbial sulfate and iron reduction activity in the rhizosphere, which results in high rates of microbial Hg(II)-methyation and high MeHg concentrations in wetland sediment.

  7. Estimating Coastal Lagoon Tidal Flooding and Repletion with Multidate ASTER Thermal Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R. Allen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Coastal lagoons mix inflowing freshwater and tidal marine waters in complex spatial patterns. This project sought to detect and measure temperature and spatial variability of flood tides for a constricted coastal lagoon using multitemporal remote sensing. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission Radiometer (ASTER thermal infrared data provided estimates of surface temperature for delineation of repletion zones in portions of Chincoteague Bay, Virginia. ASTER high spatial resolution sea-surface temperature imagery in conjunction with in situ observations and tidal predictions helped determine the optimal seasonal data for analyses. The selected time series ASTER satellite data sets were analyzed at different tidal phases and seasons in 2004–2006. Skin surface temperatures of ocean and estuarine waters were differentiated by flood tidal penetration and ebb flows. Spatially variable tidal flood penetration was evaluated using discrete seed-pixel area analysis and time series Principal Components Analysis. Results from these techniques provide spatial extent and variability dynamics of tidal repletion, flushing, and mixing, important factors in eutrophication assessment, water quality and resource monitoring, and application of hydrodynamic modeling for coastal estuary science and management.

  8. Is there evidence of adaptation to tidal flooding in saplings of baldcypress subjected to different salinity regimes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, K.W.; Doyle, T.W.; Howard, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Plant populations may adapt to environmental conditions over time by developing genetically based morphological or physiological characteristics. For tidal freshwater forested wetlands, we hypothesized that the conditions under which trees developed led to ecotypic difference in response of progeny to hydroperiod. Specifically, we looked for evidence of ecotypic adaptation for tidal flooding at different salinity regimes using growth and ecophysiological characteristics of two tidal and two non-tidal source collections of baldcypress (Taxodium distichum (L.) L.C. Rich) from the southeastern United States. Saplings were subjected to treatments of hydrology (permanent versus tidal flooding) and salinity (0 versus ???2 g l-1) for two and a half growing seasons in a greenhouse environment. Saplings from tidal sources maintained 21-41% lower overall growth and biomass accumulation than saplings from non-tidal sources, while saplings from non-tidal sources maintained 14-19% lower overall rates of net photosynthetic assimilation, leaf transpiration, and stomatal conductance than saplings from tidal sources. However, we found no evidence for growth or physiological enhancement of saplings from tidal sources to tide, or of saplings from non-tidal sources to no tide. All saplings growing under permanent flooding exhibited reduced growth and leaf gas exchange regardless of source, with little evidence for consistent salinity effects across hydroperiods. While we reject our original hypothesis, we suggest that adaptations of coastal baldcypress to broad (rather than narrow) environmental conditions may promote ecophysiological and growth enhancements under a range of global-change-induced stressors, perhaps reflecting a natural resilience to environmental change while precluding adaptations for specific flood regimes.

  9. Simulating the Effects of Sea Level Rise on the Resilience and Migration of Tidal Wetlands along the Hudson River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Nava M; Laba, Magdeline; Spector, Sacha

    2016-01-01

    Sea Level Rise (SLR) caused by climate change is impacting coastal wetlands around the globe. Due to their distinctive biophysical characteristics and unique plant communities, freshwater tidal wetlands are expected to exhibit a different response to SLR as compared with the better studied salt marshes. In this study we employed the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM), which simulates regional- or local-scale changes in tidal wetland habitats in response to SLR, and adapted it for application in a freshwater-dominated tidal river system, the Hudson River Estuary. Using regionally-specific estimated ranges of SLR and accretion rates, we produced simulations for a spectrum of possible future wetland distributions and quantified the projected wetland resilience, migration or loss in the HRE through the end of the 21st century. Projections of total wetland extent and migration were more strongly determined by the rate of SLR than the rate of accretion. Surprisingly, an increase in net tidal wetland area was projected under all scenarios, with newly-formed tidal wetlands expected to comprise at least 33% of the HRE's wetland area by year 2100. Model simulations with high rates of SLR and/or low rates of accretion resulted in broad shifts in wetland composition with widespread conversion of high marsh habitat to low marsh, tidal flat or permanent inundation. Wetland expansion and resilience were not equally distributed through the estuary, with just three of 48 primary wetland areas encompassing >50% of projected new wetland by the year 2100. Our results open an avenue for improving predictive models of the response of freshwater tidal wetlands to sea level rise, and broadly inform the planning of conservation measures of this critical resource in the Hudson River Estuary.

  10. Ecological survey of freshwater ecosystems of Ovia, Edo state ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The survey for freshwater snails in streams, rivers and a lake in Ovia Southwest LGA of Edo State, Nigeria was carried out from June to November, 2013. Samples were collected by using sweep-net and by hand picking of snails within the open water habitat, at marginal areas and on submerged vegetation at edges of the ...

  11. Preliminary Studies on the Occurrence of Freshwater Epipelic Algae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence and composition of the freshwater algae in the epipelon were determined at three sites, namely Machigeni, Manhean and Weija, located in the coastal savanna thicket and grassland vegetation zone of the River Densu basin in southern Ghana. Samples of sediments from the water-substratum interface ...

  12. Freshwater and fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxen, R.

    1997-01-01

    Severe radioactive contamination of the freshwater environment could have serious consequences for both drinking water and fish. Most of the Nordic countries have an abundance of freshwater lakes and rivers. Finland alone has about 56,000 lakes, each with a surface area of 1 hectare or more. Nearly 10% of Finland's surface is covered with lakes and rivers. In Sweden, about 9% of the surface area is freshwater, in Norway about 5%, and in Denmark only about 2%. Freshwater plays a minor role in Iceland, but even there numerous rivers discharge from the volcanic soils to the Ocean. Cs-137 and 90 Sr are likely to be the most important radionuclides with respect to long term radioactive contamination of freshwater. If radioactive deposition occurs in the absence of snow and ice radionuclides will contaminate the surface water directly and may rapidly enter the aquatic food chain. Fish which eat contaminated plankton become contaminated almost immediately. Deposition during summer increases the transfer for radionuclides to fish since fish metabolism is faster during the warm season. During the cold period, fish metabolism is slow and thus uptake and excretion of radiocaesium are also slow. (EG)

  13. Freshwater Megafauna: Flagships for Freshwater Biodiversity under Threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrizo, Savrina F; Jähnig, Sonja C; Bremerich, Vanessa; Freyhof, Jörg; Harrison, Ian; He, Fengzhi; Langhans, Simone D; Tockner, Klement; Zarfl, Christiane; Darwall, William

    2017-10-01

    Freshwater biodiversity is highly threatened and is decreasing more rapidly than its terrestrial or marine counterparts; however, freshwaters receive less attention and conservation investment than other ecosystems do. The diverse group of freshwater megafauna, including iconic species such as sturgeons, river dolphins, and turtles, could, if promoted, provide a valuable tool to raise awareness and funding for conservation. We found that freshwater megafauna inhabit every continent except Antarctica, with South America, Central Africa, and South and Southeast Asia being particularly species rich. Freshwater megafauna co-occur with up to 93% of mapped overall freshwater biodiversity. Fifty-eight percent of the 132 megafauna species included in the study are threatened, with 84% of their collective range falling outside of protected areas. Of all threatened freshwater species, 83% are found within the megafauna range, revealing the megafauna's capacity as flagship and umbrella species for fostering freshwater conservation.

  14. Applications of Remote Sensing for Studying Lateral Carbon Fluxes and Inundation Dynamics in Tidal Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, B. T.; Tzortziou, M.; McDonald, K. C.

    2017-12-01

    Wetlands play a key role in Earth's carbon cycle. However, wetland carbon cycling exhibits a high level of spatiotemporal dynamism, and thus, is not as well understood as carbon cycling in other ecosystems. In order to accurately characterize wetland carbon cycling and fluxes, wetland vegetation phenology, seasonal inundation dynamics, and tidal regimes must be understood as these factors influence carbon generation and transport. Here, we use radar remote sensing to map wetland properties in the Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the United States with more than 1,500 square miles of tidal wetlands, across a range of tidal amplitudes, salinity regimes, and soil organic matter content levels. We have been using Sentinel-1 and ALOS PALSAR-1 radar measurements to characterize vegetation and seasonal inundation dynamics with the future goal of characterizing salinity gradients and tidal regimes. Differences in radar backscatter from various surface targets has been shown to effectively discriminate between dry soil, wet soil, vegetated areas, and open water. Radar polarization differences and ratios are particularly effective at distinguishing between vegetated and non-vegetated areas. Utilizing these principles, we have been characterizing wetland types using supervised classification techniques including: Random Forest, Maximum Likelihood, and Minimum Distance. The National Wetlands Inventory has been used as training and validation data. Ideally, the techniques we outline in this research will be applicable to the characterization of wetlands in coastal areas outside of Chesapeake Bay.

  15. Remnants of strong tidal interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mcglynn, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the properties of stellar systems that have recently undergone a strong tidal shock, i.e., a shock which removes a significant fraction of the particles in the system, and where the shocked system has a much smaller mass than the producer of the tidal field. N-body calculations of King models shocked in a variety of ways are performed, and the consequences of the shocks are investigated. The results confirm the prediction of Jaffe for shocked systems. Several models are also run where the tidal forces on the system are constant, simulating a circular orbit around a primary, and the development of tidal radii under these static conditions appears to be a mild process which does not dramatically affect material that is not stripped. The tidal radii are about twice as large as classical formulas would predict. Remnant density profiles are compared with a sample of elliptical galaxies, and the implications of the results for the development of stellar populations and galaxies are considered. 38 refs

  16. The economics of tidal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denny, Eleanor

    2009-01-01

    Concern over global climate change has led policy makers to accept the importance of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This in turn has led to a large growth in clean renewable generation for electricity production. Much emphasis has been on wind generation as it is among the most advanced forms of renewable generation, however, its variable and relatively unpredictable nature result in increased challenges for electricity system operators. Tidal generation on the other hand is almost perfectly forecastable and as such may be a viable alternative to wind generation. This paper calculates the break-even capital cost for tidal generation on a real electricity system. An electricity market model is used to determine the impact of tidal generation on the operating schedules of the conventional units on the system and on the resulting cycling costs, emissions and fuel savings. It is found that for tidal generation to produce positive net benefits for the case study, the capital costs would have to be less than Euro 510,000 per MW installed which is currently an unrealistically low capital cost. Thus, it is concluded that tidal generation is not a viable option for the case system at the present time.

  17. Tidal effects on stellar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppenhaeger, K.

    2017-10-01

    The architecture of many exoplanetary systems is different from the solar system, with exoplanets being in close orbits around their host stars and having orbital periods of only a few days. We can expect interactions between the star and the exoplanet for such systems that are similar to the tidal interactions observed in close stellar binary systems. For the exoplanet, tidal interaction can lead to circularization of its orbit and the synchronization of its rotational and orbital period. For the host star, it has long been speculated if significant angular momentum transfer can take place between the planetary orbit and the stellar rotation. In the case of the Earth-Moon system, such tidal interaction has led to an increasing distance between Earth and Moon. For stars with Hot Jupiters, where the orbital period of the exoplanet is typically shorter than the stellar rotation period, one expects a decreasing semimajor axis for the planet and enhanced stellar rotation, leading to increased stellar activity. Also excess turbulence in the stellar convective zone due to rising and subsiding tidal bulges may change the magnetic activity we observe for the host star. I will review recent observational results on stellar activity and tidal interaction in the presence of close-in exoplanets, and discuss the effects of enhanced stellar activity on the exoplanets in such systems.

  18. Tidal variations of earth rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, C. F.; Williams, J. G.; Parke, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    The periodic variations of the earths' rotation resulting from the tidal deformation of the earth by the sun and moon were rederived including terms with amplitudes of 0.002 millisec and greater. The series applies to the mantle, crust, and oceans which rotate together for characteristic tidal periods; the scaling parameter is the ratio of the fraction of the Love number producing tidal variations in the moment of inertia of the coupled mantle and oceans (k) to the dimensionless polar moment of inertia of the coupled moments (C). The lunar laser ranging data shows that k/C at monthly and fortnightly frequencies equals 0.99 + or - 0.15 and 0.99 + or - 0.20 as compared to the theoretical value of 0.94 + or - 0.04.

  19. Properties of active tidal bedforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Christian; Lefebvre, Alice; Becker, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Bedforms of various shapes and sizes are ubiquitous in tidal channels, inlets and estuaries. They constitute a form roughness which has a large scale effect on the hydrodynamics and sediment transport of coastal environments. It has been shown that this form roughness can be expressed in terms...... of the lee side slope of bedforms. This study compiles data on the topography and hydraulics of compound dunes from different settings in the German Bight to discuss implications of a critical lee slope in tidal environments with reversing flow. Data from the Weser estuary is used to exemplify and quantify...

  20. CROATIAN FRESHWATER FISHERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Višnja Knjaz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The basic characteristics of freshwater fishery in Croatia are predominantly negative trend in the past twenty years. Even though the total fish pond area covers more than 12,000 hectares, only 6,200 hectares of carp ponds and 58,700 m2 of trout ponds have been exploited. In 2006 the production of total freshwater fish reached 6,547 tons, out of which the production of consumable fish amounted to 5,067 tons and the juveniles 1,480 tons. The export of freshwater fish to EU countries, Macedonia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia and Monte Negro shows the positive trend and the Republic of Croatia continuously records a foreign trade surplus (987,000 US$. It must be pointed out, though, that the import of trout from Bosnia and Herzegovina significantly increased in the past three years which resulted in the decrease of the foreign trade surplus in that sector. The freshwater fishery in Croatia has been overly burdened by many problems

  1. The distribution and tapping tidal energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygmunt Kowalik

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tidal power along tidal shores has been used for centuries to run small tidal mills. Generating electricity by tapping tidal power proved to be very successful only in the last century through the tidal power plant constructed in 1967 in La Rance, France. This used a large barrier to generate the sea level head necessary for driving turbines. Construction of such plants evolved very slowly because of prohibitive costs and concerns about the environmental impact. Developments in the construction of small, efficient and inexpensive underwater turbines admit the possibility of small scale operations that will use local tidal currents to bring electricity to remote locations. Since the generation of such electricity is concerned with the tidal energy in local water bodies, it is important to understand the site-specific energy balance, i.e., the energy flowing in through open boundaries, and the energy generated and dissipated within the local domain. The question is how to tap the tidal energy while keeping possible changes in the present tidal regimes to a minimum. The older approach of constructing barrages may still be quite useful in some locations. The basics of such tidal power plants constructed in a small bay are analyzed in order to understand the principal parameter for tidal plant evaluation, i.e., the power produced.     The new approach is to place turbines - devices similar to windmills - in the pathway of tidal currents. Theoretically, the amount of power available by such turbines for electricity generation is proportional to the water density and velocity cubed of the tidal flow. The naturally dissipated tidal power due to bottom friction forces is also proportional to the cube of the velocity. Because of this similarity, the exploitation of tidal energy can be directed to reinvesting the naturally dissipated power into tidal power for the generation of electricity. This approach to tidal power exploitation is better tuned

  2. Turning the tide : tidal power in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Sustainable Development Commission

    2007-01-01

    Contents: Turning the tide : tidal power in the UK -- Executive summary -- Tidal power in the UK : research report 1 : UK tidal resource assessment -- Tidal power in the UK : research report 2 : tidal technologies overview -- Tidal power in the UK : research report 3 : Severn barrage proposals -- Tidal power in the UK : research report 4 : Severn non-barrage options -- Tidal power in the UK : research report 5 : UK case studies. Summarised in the Welsh language version of the executive ...

  3. Facies architecture of heterolithic tidal deposits : The Holocene Holland Tidal Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donselaar, M.E.; Geel, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    The size, shape and spatial position of lithofacies types (or facies architecture) in a tidal estuarine basin are complex and therefore difficult to model. The tidal currents in the basin concentrate sand-sized sediment in a branching pattern of tidal channels and fringing tidal flats. Away from the

  4. Relativistic theory of tidal Love numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Binnington, Taylor; Poisson, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In Newtonian gravitational theory, a tidal Love number relates the mass multipole moment created by tidal forces on a spherical body to the applied tidal field. The Love number is dimensionless, and it encodes information about the body's internal structure. We present a relativistic theory of Love numbers, which applies to compact bodies with strong internal gravities; the theory extends and completes a recent work by Flanagan and Hinderer, which revealed that the tidal Love number of a neut...

  5. Modelling the impacts of sea level rise on tidal basin ecomorphodynamics and mangrove habitat evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Maanen, Barend; Coco, Giovanni; Bryan, Karin

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of tidal basins and estuaries in tropical and subtropical regions is often influenced by the presence of mangrove forests. These forests are amongst the most productive environments in the world and provide important ecosystem services. However, these intertidal habitats are also extremely vulnerable and are threatened by climate change impacts such as sea level rise. It is therefore of key importance to improve our understanding of how tidal systems occupied by mangrove vegetation respond to rising water levels. An ecomorphodynamic model was developed that simulates morphological change and mangrove forest evolution as a result of mutual feedbacks between physical and biological processes. The model accounts for the effects of mangrove trees on tidal flow patterns and sediment dynamics. Mangrove growth is in turn controlled by hydrodynamic conditions. Under stable water levels, model results indicate that mangrove trees enhance the initiation and branching of tidal channels, partly because the extra flow resistance in mangrove forests favours flow concentration, and thus sediment erosion in between vegetated areas. The landward expansion of the channels, on the other hand, is reduced. Model simulations including sea level rise suggest that mangroves can potentially enhance the ability of the soil surface to maintain an elevation within the upper portion of the intertidal zone. While the sea level is rising, mangroves are migrating landward and the channel network tends to expand landward too. The presence of mangrove trees, however, was found to hinder both the branching and headward erosion of the landward expanding channels. Simulations are performed according to different sea level rise scenarios and with different tidal range conditions to assess which tidal environments are most vulnerable. Changes in the properties of the tidal channel networks are being examined as well. Overall, model results highlight the role of mangroves in driving the

  6. Predicting the retreat and migration of tidal forests along the northern Gulf of Mexico under sea-level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, T.W.; Krauss, K.W.; Conner, W.H.; From, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    Tidal freshwater forests in coastal regions of the southeastern United States are undergoing dieback and retreat from increasing tidal inundation and saltwater intrusion attributed to climate variability and sea-level rise. In many areas, tidal saltwater forests (mangroves) contrastingly are expanding landward in subtropical coastal reaches succeeding freshwater marsh and forest zones. Hydrological characteristics of these low-relief coastal forests in intertidal settings are dictated by the influence of tidal and freshwater forcing. In this paper, we describe the application of the Sea Level Over Proportional Elevation (SLOPE) model to predict coastal forest retreat and migration from projected sea-level rise based on a proxy relationship of saltmarsh/mangrove area and tidal range. The SLOPE model assumes that the sum area of saltmarsh/mangrove habitat along any given coastal reach is determined by the slope of the landform and vertical tide forcing. Model results indicated that saltmarsh and mangrove migration from sea-level rise will vary by county and watershed but greater in western Gulf States than in the eastern Gulf States where millions of hectares of coastal forest will be displaced over the next century with a near meter rise in relative sea level alone. Substantial losses of coastal forests will also occur in the eastern Gulf but mangrove forests in subtropical zones of Florida are expected to replace retreating freshwater forest and affect regional biodiversity. Accelerated global eustacy from climate change will compound the degree of predicted retreat and migration of coastal forests with expected implications for ecosystem management of State and Federal lands in the absence of adaptive coastal management.

  7. Morphodynamics of ebb-tidal deltas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridderinkhof, W.

    2016-01-01

    Ebb-tidal deltas are bodies of sand that are located seaward of tidal inlets. The latter connect the open sea with a back-barrier basin and separate barrier islands. The morphology (e.g., sand volume, geometry, shoal formation) of ebb-tidal deltas evolves continuously, both due to natural processes

  8. Tidal energy - a technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.

    1991-01-01

    The tides are caused by gravitational attraction of the sun and the moon acting upon the world's oceans. This creates a clean renewable form of energy which can in principle be tapped for the benefit of mankind. This paper reviews the status of tidal energy, including the magnitude of the resource, the technology which is available for its extraction, the economics, possible environmental effects and non-technical barriers to its implementation. Although the total energy flux of the tides is large, at about 2 TW, in practice only a very small fraction of this total potential can be utilised in the foreseeable future. This is because the energy is spread diffusely over a wide area, requiring large and expensive plant for its collection, and is often available remote from centres of consumption. The best mechanism for exploiting tidal energy is to employ estuarine barrages at suitable sites with high tidal ranges. The technology is relatively mature and components are commercially available now. Also, many of the best sites for implementation have been identified. However, the pace and extent of commercial exploitation of tidal energy is likely to be significantly influenced, both by the treatment of environmental costs of competing fossil fuels, and by the availability of construction capital at modest real interest rates. The largest projects could require the involvement of national governments if they are to succeed. (author) 8 figs., 2 tabs., 19 refs

  9. To move or not to move : determinants of seed retention in a tidal marsh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, E. R.; Veeneklaas, R. M.; Buitenwerf, R.; Bakker, J. P.; Bouma, T. J.

    1. The effects of moisture conditions, seed morphology, vegetation structure and hydrodynamic variables on seed retention were examined in a system where the dominant dispersal agent is water. Experiments were conducted in a tidal salt marsh and in a flume facility where hydrodynamic variables could

  10. To move or not to move: determinants of seed retention in a tidal marsh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, E.R.; Veeneklaas, R.M.; Buitenwerf, R.; Bakker, J.P.; Bouma, T.J.

    2008-01-01

    1. The effects of moisture conditions, seed morphology, vegetation structure and hydrodynamic variables on seed retention were examined in a system where the dominant dispersal agent is water. Experiments were conducted in a tidal salt marsh and in a flume facility where hydrodynamic variables could

  11. Three-dimensional Modeling of Tidal Hydrodynamics in the San Francisco Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward S. Gross

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of circulation in the San Francisco Estuary were performed with the three-dimensional TRIM3D hydrodynamic model using a generic length scale turbulence closure. The model was calibrated to reproduce observed tidal elevations, tidal currents, and salinity observations in the San Francisco Estuary using data collected during 1996-1998, a period of high and variable freshwater flow. It was then validated for 1994-1995, with emphasis on spring of 1994, a period of intensive data collection in the northern estuary. The model predicts tidal elevations and tidal currents accurately, and realistically predicts salinity at both the seasonal and tidal time scales. The model represents salt intrusion into the estuary accurately, and therefore accurately represents the salt balance. The model’s accuracy is adequate for its intended purposes of predicting salinity, analyzing gravitational circulation, and driving a particle-tracking model. Two applications were used to demonstrate the utility of the model. We estimated the components of the longitudinal salt flux and examined their dependence on flow conditions, and compared predicted salt intrusion with estimates from two empirical models.

  12. Factors affecting marsh vegetation at the Liberty Island Conservation Bank in the Cache Slough region of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, James L.; Drexler, Judith Z.

    2017-07-07

    The Liberty Island Conservation Bank (LICB) is a tidal freshwater marsh restored for the purpose of mitigating adverse effects on sensitive fish populations elsewhere in the region. The LICB was completed in 2012 and is in the northern Cache Slough region of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta. The wetland vegetation at the LICB is stunted and yellow-green in color (chlorotic) compared to nearby wetlands. A study was done to investigate three potential causes of the stunted and chlorotic vegetation: (1) improper grading of the marsh plain, (2) pesticide contamination from agricultural and urban inputs upstream from the site, (3) nitrogen-deficient soil, or some combination of these. Water samples were collected from channels at five sites, and soil samples were collected from four wetlands, including the LICB, during the summer of 2015. Real-time kinematic global positioning system (RTK-GPS) elevation surveys were completed at the LICB and north Little Holland Tract, a closely situated natural marsh that has similar hydrodynamics as the LICB, but contains healthy marsh vegetation.The results showed no significant differences in carbon or nitrogen content in the surface soils or in pesticides in water among the sites. The elevation survey indicated that the mean elevation of the LICB was about 26 centimeters higher than that of the north Little Holland Tract marsh. Because marsh plain elevation largely determines the hydroperiod of a marsh, these results indicated that the LICB has a hydroperiod that differs from that of neighboring north Little Holland Tract marsh. This difference in hydroperiod contributed to the lower stature and decreased vigor of wetland vegetation at the LICB. Although the LICB cannot be regraded without great expense, it could be possible to reduce the sharp angle of the marsh edge to facilitate deeper and more frequent tidal flooding along the marsh periphery. Establishing optimal elevations for restored wetlands is necessary for obtaining

  13. Maine Tidal Power Initiative: Environmental Impact Protocols For Tidal Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Michael Leroy [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME; Zydlewski, Gayle Barbin [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME; Xue, Huijie [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME; Johnson, Teresa R. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME

    2014-02-02

    The Maine Tidal Power Initiative (MTPI), an interdisciplinary group of engineers, biologists, oceanographers, and social scientists, has been conducting research to evaluate tidal energy resources and better understand the potential effects and impacts of marine hydro-kinetic (MHK) development on the environment and local community. Project efforts include: 1) resource assessment, 2) development of initial device design parameters using scale model tests, 3) baseline environmental studies and monitoring, and 4) human and community responses. This work included in-situ measurement of the environmental and social response to the pre-commercial Turbine Generator Unit (TGU®) developed by Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) as well as considering the path forward for smaller community scale projects.

  14. Restricted-range fishes and the conservation of Brazilian freshwaters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Nogueira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Freshwaters are the most threatened ecosystems on earth. Although recent assessments provide data on global priority regions for freshwater conservation, local scale priorities remain unknown. Refining the scale of global biodiversity assessments (both at terrestrial and freshwater realms and translating these into conservation priorities on the ground remains a major challenge to biodiversity science, and depends directly on species occurrence data of high taxonomic and geographic resolution. Brazil harbors the richest freshwater ichthyofauna in the world, but knowledge on endemic areas and conservation in Brazilian rivers is still scarce. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using data on environmental threats and revised species distribution data we detect and delineate 540 small watershed areas harboring 819 restricted-range fishes in Brazil. Many of these areas are already highly threatened, as 159 (29% watersheds have lost more than 70% of their original vegetation cover, and only 141 (26% show significant overlap with formally protected areas or indigenous lands. We detected 220 (40% critical watersheds overlapping hydroelectric dams or showing both poor formal protection and widespread habitat loss; these sites harbor 344 endemic fish species that may face extinction if no conservation action is in place in the near future. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide the first analysis of site-scale conservation priorities in the richest freshwater ecosystems of the globe. Our results corroborate the hypothesis that freshwater biodiversity has been neglected in former conservation assessments. The study provides a simple and straightforward method for detecting freshwater priority areas based on endemism and threat, and represents a starting point for integrating freshwater and terrestrial conservation in representative and biogeographically consistent site-scale conservation strategies, that may be scaled-up following naturally linked

  15. Groundwater regime of a tidally influenced coastal pond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanek, Vladimir

    1993-11-01

    Hydraulic gradients between the water level of Little Pond, a small, tidally influenced coastal pond located on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and 41 mini-piezometers located along the shores and in the sand layer underlying soft bottom sediments indicate that the flow of groundwater to the Pond is mainly concentrated along the western shore, within a nearshore sandy strip. Similar results are obtained from the distribution of salinity in shallow bottom sediments. The point measurements of groundwater head are translated to long-term values by approximating tidal movements to a sinusoid and using a simple mathematical model. Salinity depth profiles in the shore and bottom sandy sediments indicate at least occasional outflow of salt water to the ground, and suggest that a density-driven convection may play an important role in determining the direction of flow and the distribution of solutes. Salinity depth profiles in the soft sediments compared with the results of an advection-diffusion model indicate a locally strong upward flow of fresh groundwater. The model is also used to estimate long-term average velocities of groundwater flow within soft bottom sediments. This flow makes up only about 1% of total groundwater inflow, but may be important for the exchange of solutes across the sediment-water interface. In 1989, groundwater contributed about 60% of total freshwater input to the Pond.

  16. Dynamical modeling of tidal streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovy, Jo

    2014-01-01

    I present a new framework for modeling the dynamics of tidal streams. The framework consists of simple models for the initial action-angle distribution of tidal debris, which can be straightforwardly evolved forward in time. Taking advantage of the essentially one-dimensional nature of tidal streams, the transformation to position-velocity coordinates can be linearized and interpolated near a small number of points along the stream, thus allowing for efficient computations of a stream's properties in observable quantities. I illustrate how to calculate the stream's average location (its 'track') in different coordinate systems, how to quickly estimate the dispersion around its track, and how to draw mock stream data. As a generative model, this framework allows one to compute the full probability distribution function and marginalize over or condition it on certain phase-space dimensions as well as convolve it with observational uncertainties. This will be instrumental in proper data analysis of stream data. In addition to providing a computationally efficient practical tool for modeling the dynamics of tidal streams, the action-angle nature of the framework helps elucidate how the observed width of the stream relates to the velocity dispersion or mass of the progenitor, and how the progenitors of 'orphan' streams could be located. The practical usefulness of the proposed framework crucially depends on the ability to calculate action-angle variables for any orbit in any gravitational potential. A novel method for calculating actions, frequencies, and angles in any static potential using a single orbit integration is described in the Appendix.

  17. Prospects for Fundy tidal power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    The Bay of Fundy in Canada probably possesses the most favourable conditions in the world for the exploitation of tidal energy. The results of the comprehensive investigations carried out during the past quarter-century are reviewed together with operating and environmental aspects of the modest (20 MW) Annapolis Tidal Power Station, commissioned in 1984, the primary purpose of which was to evaluate the operation of a large (7.6 m) diameter Straflo turbine unit under low heads. The results of the operating and maintenance experience for the Annapolis Station are reviewed as well as the results of the environmental/ecological studies that have been on-going in the Annapolis Basin. The tidal power investigations have shown that a 1400 MW development at the mouth of the Cumberland Basin, at the head of the bay of Fundy, is technically and economically feasible and that its output would probably be competitive with fossil-fired plants, particularly if a 'green' accounting technique were applied to such energy sources. The importance of timing, if the exploitation of this non-polluting, renewable and completely predicable source is to be used to meet the future electrical energy needs of the maritime provinces, is discussed. (author)

  18. Modeling the exposure time in a tidal system: the impacts of external domain, tidal range, and inflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xueping; Zhao, Guixia; Zhang, Chen; Wang, Yan

    2018-02-07

    Exposure time is an important characteristic for hydrodynamics that has simultaneous impacts on the biochemical processes in tidal systems. To eliminate man-made errors, decrease computational effort, and increase simulation efficiency, exposure time was evaluated under different hydrodynamic conditions for a bay to investigate the impact of the external domain on the accuracy of the computational results for exposure time. The exposure time was explicitly defined and computed using a hydrodynamic model and tracer experiments for a set of ten external domain sizes (EDS), five external domain lengths (EDL), and three special hydrodynamic conditions. The results indicated that the external domain had a significant influence on the exposure time, and the intensity of this influence was related to hydrodynamic conditions. The sensitivity of the exposure time to the external domain increased with increasing tidal range, while freshwater inflows decreased this sensitivity. However, the variation trends for exposure time with different EDS and EDL were independent of the hydrodynamic conditions. Considering the computational efficiency (maximum), the calculated error (minimum) of the exposure time, and the impact of the boundary conditions (minimum), the recommended EDS and EDL range from 9 to 13 times the initial domain size and 1.30 to 1.45 times the length in the bay, respectively. The research regarding exposure time and external domains not only helps to eliminate the errors caused by man-made factors and reduce the computational effort but also provides a reference for understanding the interrelationship between coastal waters, reciprocating flow, and the water environment.

  19. Hydrological exchanges and Organic Matter dynamics in highly vulnerable tidal wetland ecosystems at the land-ocean interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzortziou, M.; Neale, P.; Megonigal, P.; Loughner, C.

    2014-12-01

    Occupying a critical interface between the land and the sea, tidal wetlands are amongst the most ecologically valuable and economically important ecosystems on Earth, but also especially vulnerable to human pressures and climate change. These rich in biodiversity and highly productive ecosystems are hot spots of biogeochemical transformations, consistently exchanging Organic Matter with adjacent estuarine waters through tidal flushing. Here we discuss new results on the amount and directions of biogeochemical exchanges at the tidal wetland-estuary interface. Detailed microbial and photochemical degradation experiments and high resolution bio-optical observations in tidal freshwater and salt marsh systems of the Eastern US coast provide insights on the quality and fate of the organic compounds exported from tidal marshes and their influence on near-shore biological processes, biogeochemical cycles and optical variability. Impacts of anthropogenic activities and resulting air-pollution are also discussed. High resolution model runs were performed using the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, to examine atmospheric composition along the shoreline where processes such as sea and bay breeze circulations often favor the accumulation and air-deposition of atmospheric pollutants, impacting biogeochemical processes in sensitive tidal wetland ecosystems.

  20. TIDAL FRICTION AND TIDAL LAGGING. APPLICABILITY LIMITATIONS OF A POPULAR FORMULA FOR THE TIDAL TORQUE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efroimsky, Michael; Makarov, Valeri V.

    2013-01-01

    Tidal torques play a key role in rotational dynamics of celestial bodies. They govern these bodies' tidal despinning and also participate in the subtle process of entrapment of these bodies into spin-orbit resonances. This makes tidal torques directly relevant to the studies of habitability of planets and their moons. Our work begins with an explanation of how friction and lagging should be built into the theory of bodily tides. Although much of this material can be found in various publications, a short but self-consistent summary on the topic has been lacking in the hitherto literature, and we are filling the gap. After these preparations, we address a popular concise formula for the tidal torque, which is often used in the literature, for planets or stars. We explain why the derivation of this expression, offered in the paper by Goldreich and in the books by Kaula (Equation (4.5.29)) and Murray and Dermott (Equation (4.159)), implicitly sets the time lag to be frequency independent. Accordingly, the ensuing expression for the torque can be applied only to bodies having a very special (and very hypothetical) rheology which makes the time lag frequency independent, i.e., the same for all Fourier modes in the spectrum of tide. This expression for the torque should not be used for bodies of other rheologies. Specifically, the expression cannot be combined with an extra assertion of the geometric lag being constant, because at finite eccentricities the said assumption is incompatible with the constant-time-lag condition.

  1. TIDAL FRICTION AND TIDAL LAGGING. APPLICABILITY LIMITATIONS OF A POPULAR FORMULA FOR THE TIDAL TORQUE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efroimsky, Michael; Makarov, Valeri V., E-mail: michael.efroimsky@usno.navy.mil, E-mail: vvm@usno.navy.mil [US Naval Observatory, Washington, DC 20392 (United States)

    2013-02-10

    Tidal torques play a key role in rotational dynamics of celestial bodies. They govern these bodies' tidal despinning and also participate in the subtle process of entrapment of these bodies into spin-orbit resonances. This makes tidal torques directly relevant to the studies of habitability of planets and their moons. Our work begins with an explanation of how friction and lagging should be built into the theory of bodily tides. Although much of this material can be found in various publications, a short but self-consistent summary on the topic has been lacking in the hitherto literature, and we are filling the gap. After these preparations, we address a popular concise formula for the tidal torque, which is often used in the literature, for planets or stars. We explain why the derivation of this expression, offered in the paper by Goldreich and in the books by Kaula (Equation (4.5.29)) and Murray and Dermott (Equation (4.159)), implicitly sets the time lag to be frequency independent. Accordingly, the ensuing expression for the torque can be applied only to bodies having a very special (and very hypothetical) rheology which makes the time lag frequency independent, i.e., the same for all Fourier modes in the spectrum of tide. This expression for the torque should not be used for bodies of other rheologies. Specifically, the expression cannot be combined with an extra assertion of the geometric lag being constant, because at finite eccentricities the said assumption is incompatible with the constant-time-lag condition.

  2. Assessment of the climate change impacts on fecal coliform contamination in a tidal estuarine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Cheng; Chan, Wen-Ting

    2015-12-01

    Climate change is one of the key factors affecting the future microbiological water quality in rivers and tidal estuaries. A coupled 3D hydrodynamic and fecal coliform transport model was developed and applied to the Danshuei River estuarine system for predicting the influences of climate change on microbiological water quality. The hydrodynamic and fecal coliform model was validated using observational salinity and fecal coliform distributions. According to the analyses of the statistical error, predictions of the salinity and the fecal coliform concentration from the model simulation quantitatively agreed with the observed data. The validated model was then applied to predict the fecal coliform contamination as a result of climate change, including the change of freshwater discharge and the sea level rise. We found that the reduction of freshwater discharge under climate change scenarios resulted in an increase in the fecal coliform concentration. The sea level rise would decrease fecal coliform distributions because both the water level and the water volume increased. A reduction in freshwater discharge has a negative impact on the fecal coliform concentration, whereas a rising sea level has a positive influence on the fecal coliform contamination. An appropriate strategy for the effective microbiological management in tidal estuaries is required to reveal the persistent trends of climate in the future.

  3. Toxicology of freshwater cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, H M; Arachchi, D N Magana; Abeysekara, T; Guneratne, L

    2016-07-02

    Many chemical contaminants in drinking water have been shown to cause adverse health effects in humans after prolonged exposure. Cyanobacteria are one of the most potent and diverse groups of photosynthetic prokaryotes. One key component of cyanobacterial success in the environment is the production of potent toxins as secondary metabolites, which have been responsible for numerous adverse health impacts in humans. Anthropogenic activities have led to the increase of eutrophication in freshwater bodies' worldwide, causing cyanobacterial blooms to become more frequent. The present article will discuss about harmful cyanobacteria and their toxicology with special references to microcystin, nodularin, and cylindrospermopsin.

  4. TIDAL NOVAE IN COMPACT BINARY WHITE DWARFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, Jim; Lai Dong

    2012-01-01

    Compact binary white dwarfs (WDs) undergoing orbital decay due to gravitational radiation can experience significant tidal heating prior to merger. In these WDs, the dominant tidal effect involves the excitation of outgoing gravity waves in the inner stellar envelope and the dissipation of these waves in the outer envelope. As the binary orbit decays, the WDs are synchronized from outside in (with the envelope synchronized first, followed by the core). We examine the deposition of tidal heat in the envelope of a carbon-oxygen WD and study how such tidal heating affects the structure and evolution of the WD. We show that significant tidal heating can occur in the star's degenerate hydrogen layer. This layer heats up faster than it cools, triggering runaway nuclear fusion. Such 'tidal novae' may occur in all WD binaries containing a CO WD, at orbital periods between 5 minutes and 20 minutes, and precede the final merger by 10 5 -10 6 years.

  5. Tidal acceleration of black holes and superradiance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Pani, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Tidal effects have long ago locked the Moon in a synchronous rotation with the Earth and progressively increase the Earth–Moon distance. This ‘tidal acceleration’ hinges on dissipation. Binaries containing black holes may also be tidally accelerated, dissipation being caused by the event horizon—a flexible, viscous one-way membrane. In fact, this process is known for many years under a different guise: superradiance. Here, we provide compelling evidence for a strong connection between tidal acceleration and superradiant scattering around spinning black holes. In general relativity, tidal acceleration is obscured by the gravitational-wave emission. However, when coupling to light scalar degrees of freedom is allowed, an induced dipole moment produces a ‘polarization acceleration’, which might be orders of magnitude stronger than tidal quadrupolar effects. Consequences for optical and gravitational-wave observations are intriguing and it is not impossible that imprints of such a mechanism have already been observed. (paper)

  6. Field studies of estuarine turbidity under different freshwater flow conditions, Kaipara River, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Steven B.; Green, Malcolm O.; MacDonald, Iain T.; Pritchard, Mark

    2017-11-01

    We present a first interpretation of three days of measurements made in 2013 from the tidal reaches of the Kaipara River (New Zealand) under both low and high freshwater inputs and a neap tidal cycle. During the first day, we occupied two stations that were approximately 6 km apart in a tidal reach that runs for 25 km from the river mouth to the upstream limit of tidal influence. During the second day, longitudinal surveys were conducted over a distance of 6 km centred on the upstream station. The data reveal a turbidity maximum in the form of a high-concentration 'plug' of suspended mud that was advected downstream on the ebbing tide past the upper (HB) measurement station and which exchanged sediment with the seabed by settling at low slack water and by resuspension in the early flooding tide. The data suggest that fine sediment is transported landwards and trapped in the upper part of the tidal reach under these low-flow conditions. On the third day of measurements we repeated the experiments of the first day but later in the year, for a much higher freshwater flow. This interpretation of our data set highlights the potential contribution of a range of processes to the generation of the observed suspended-sediment signals, including resuspension of local bed sediment, advection by the tidal current, settling of suspended sediment over a long timescale compared to the advection timescale, advection of longitudinal gradients in suspended sediment, and suppression of vertical mixing by density stratification of the water column. The level of temporal and spatial detail afforded by these measurements allows a much clearer understanding of the timing and importance of vertical stratification on the transport of suspended particulate matter than is generally possible using fixed-point sensors.

  7. Dynamics of tidal and non-tidal currents along the southwest continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Aruna, C.; Ravichandran, C.; Srinivas, K.; Rasheed, P.A.A.; Lekshmi, S.

    The tidal regimes over the continental shelves are often less documented due to lack of coastal water level data. This is of concern since continental shelves rule the global dissipation of tidal energy. The tides along the Southwest Indian shelf...

  8. Array Optimization for Tidal Energy Extraction in a Tidal Channel – A Numerical Modeling Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an application of a hydrodynamic model to simulate tidal energy extraction in a tidal dominated estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast. A series of numerical experiments were carried out to simulate tidal energy extraction with different turbine array configurations, including location, spacing and array size. Preliminary model results suggest that array optimization for tidal energy extraction in a real-world site is a very complex process that requires consideration of m...

  9. Formation of double galaxies by tidal capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alladin, S.M.; Potdar, A.; Sastry, K.S.

    1975-01-01

    The conditions under which double galaxies may be formed by tidal capture are considered. Estimates for the increase in the internal energy of colliding galaxies due to tidal effects are used to determine the magnitudes Vsub(cap) and Vsub(dis) of the maximum relative velocities at infinite separation required for tidal capture and tidal disruption respectively. A double galaxy will be formed by tidal capture without tidal disruption of a component if Vsub(cap)>Vsub(i) and Vsub(cap)>Vsub(dis) where Vsub(i) is the initial relative speed of the two galaxies at infinite separation. If the two galaxies are of the same dimension, formulation of double galaxies by tidal capture is possible in a close collision either if the two galaxies do not differ much in mass and density distribution or if the more massive galaxy is less centrally concentrated than the other. If it is assumed as statistics suggest, that the mass of a galaxy is proportional to the square of its radius, it follows that the probability of the formation of double galaxies by tidal capture increases with the increase in mass of the galaxies and tidal distribution does not occur in a single collision for any distance of closest approach of the two galaxies. (Auth.)

  10. Interactions Between Wetlands and Tidal Inlets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sanchez, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    This Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note (CHETN) presents numerical simulations investigating how the loss of wetlands in estuaries modifies tidal processes in inlet navigation channels...

  11. Tidal evolution of globular clusters. I - Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, K. S.; Lin, D. N. C.; Aarseth, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Tidal evolution of globular clusters is regulated by both Galactic tidal effects and internal relaxation processes. In order to investigate the tidal evolution of globular clusters, a numerical scheme which utilizes a Fokker-Planck approach as well as direct numerical integration of the restricted three-body problem is developed. In the inner regions of the cluster, stellar orbits are mapped with the cluster's gravitational potential and orbit-averaged diffusion coefficients. In the outer regions, the Galactic tidal field is explicitly included in the direct orbital integration. This method is presented here with some tests on King-Michie models.

  12. The Zoogeography of North American freshwater fishes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hocutt, Charles H; Wiley, E. O

    1986-01-01

    ..., and Pleistoscene glaciation. The Zoogeography of North American Freshwater Fishes is a comprehensive treatment of the freshwater biogeography of North America, with implications for other disciplines...

  13. Tidal energy from the Wyre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, M.E.; Young, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    Amongst the estuaries around the United Kingdom, the Wyre has been found to be prominent in possessing the main requirements for a small scale tidal energy scheme. This paper describes the results of a Preliminary Feasibility Study undertaken to assess the viability of the construction of a barrage at the mouth of the Wyre estuary by establishing the form, cost, energy output and the nature and broad scale effect that the project may have on the environment and surrounding region. The study also investigated the potential benefits of utilising the barrage as a road crossing between the town of Fleetwood and Over Wyre. (author)

  14. Effect of tidal simulations and entrainment of an endogenous tidal rhythm in a non-tidal population of Gammarus zaddachi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looijenga, Paul J.; Dieleman, Jan C.

    1980-01-01

    The activity of G. zaddachi from a non-tidal environment (the brackish lake “De Putten”, prov. North Holland, The Netherlands), has been studied in a current chamber in which tidal cycles can be simulated, in order to make a comparison with estuarine populations. The animals show a clear nocturnal

  15. Measurement of Underwater Operational Noise Emitted by Wave and Tidal Stream Energy Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, Paul A; Robinson, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    The increasing international growth in the development of marine and freshwater wave and tidal energy harvesting systems has been followed by a growing requirement to understand any associated underwater impact. Radiated noise generated during operation is dependent on the device's physical properties, the sound-propagation environment, and the device's operational state. Physical properties may include size, distribution in the water column, and mechanics/hydrodynamics. The sound-propagation environment may be influenced by water depth, bathymetry, sediment type, and water column acoustic properties, and operational state may be influenced by tidal cycle and wave height among others This paper discusses some of the challenges for measurement of noise characteristics from these devices as well as a case study of the measurement of radiated noise from a full-scale wave energy converter.

  16. The role of cross-shore tidal dynamics in controlling intertidal sediment exchange in mangroves in Cù Lao Dung, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Karin R.; Nardin, William; Mullarney, Julia C.; Fagherazzi, Sergio

    2017-09-01

    Mangroves are halophytic plants common in tropical and sub-tropical environments. Their roots and pneumatophores strongly affect intertidal hydrodynamics and related sediment transport. Here, we investigate the role tree and root structures may play in altering tidal currents and the effect of these currents on the development of intertidal landscapes in mangrove-dominated environments. We use a one-dimensional Delft3D model, forced using typical intertidal slopes and vegetation characteristics from two sites with contrasting slope on Cù Lao Dung within the Mekong Delta in Vietnam, to examine the vegetation controls on tidal currents and suspended sediment transport as the tides propagate into the forest. Model results show that vegetation characteristics at the seaward fringe determine the shape of the cross-shore bottom profile, with sparse vegetation leading to profiles that are close to linear, whereas with dense vegetation resulting in a convex intertidal topography. Examples showing different profile developments are provided from a variety of published studies, ranging from linear profiles in sandier sites, and distinctive convex profiles in muddier sites. As expected, profile differences in the model are caused by increased dissipation due to enhanced drag caused by vegetation; however, the reduction of flow shoreward in sparsely vegetated or non-vegetated cases was similar, indicating that shallowing of the profile and slope effects play a dominant role in dissipation. Here, tidal velocities are measured in the field using transects of Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers, and confirm that cross-shore tidal currents diminish quickly as they move over the fringe of the forest; they then stay fairly consistent within the outer few 100 m of the forest, indicating that the fringing environment is likely a region of deposition. An understanding of how vegetation controls the development of topography is critical to predicting the resilience of these sensitive

  17. Kozai Cycles and Tidal Friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L, K; P.P., E

    2009-07-17

    Several studies in the last three years indicate that close binaries, i.e. those with periods of {approx}< 3 d, are very commonly found to have a third body in attendance. We argue that this proves that the third body is necessary in order to make the inner period so short, and further argue that the only reasonable explanation is that the third body causes shrinkage of the inner period, from perhaps a week or more to the current short period, by means of the combination of Kozai cycles and tidal friction (KCTF). In addition, once KCTF has produced a rather close binary, magnetic braking also combined with tidal friction (MBTF) can decrease the inner orbit further, to the formation of a contact binary or even a merged single star. Some of the products of KCTF that have been suggested, either by others or by us, are W UMa binaries, Blue Stragglers, X-ray active BY Dra stars, and short-period Algols. We also argue that some components of wide binaries are actually merged remnants of former close inner pairs. This may include such objects as rapidly rotating dwarfs (AB Dor, BO Mic) and some (but not all) Be stars.

  18. Salt Marsh Ecosystem Responses to Restored Tidal Connectivity across a 14y Chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capooci, M.; Spivak, A. C.; Gosselin, K.

    2016-02-01

    Salt marshes support valuable ecosystem services. Yet, human activities negatively impact salt marsh function and contribute to their loss at a global scale. On Cape Cod, MA, culverts and impoundments under roads and railways restricted tidal exchange and resulted in salt marsh conversion to freshwater wetlands. Over the past 14 y, these structures have been removed or replaced, restoring tidal connectivity between marshes and a saltwater bay. We evaluated differences in plant community composition, sediment properties, and pore water chemistry in marshes where tidal connectivity was restored using a space-for-time, or chronosequence approach. Each restored marsh was paired with a nearby, natural salt marsh to control for variability between marshes. In each restored and natural salt marsh we evaluated the plant community by measuring species-specific percent cover and biomass and collected sediment cores for bulk density and pore water analyses. Plant communities responded rapidly: salt-tolerant species, such as Spartina alterniflora, became established while freshwater species, including Phragmites australis, were less abundant within 3 y of restoration. The number of plant species was generally greater in marshes restored within 10 y, compared to older and natural marshes. Sediment bulk density varied with depth and across sites. This likely reflects differences in site history and local conditions. Deeper horizons (24-30cm) generally had higher values in restored sites while surface values (0-3cm) were similar in restored and natural marshes. Porewater pH and sulfide were similar in restored and natural marshes, suggesting rapid microbial responses to seawater reintroduction. Overall, marsh properties and processes reflecting biological communities responded rapidly to tidal restoration. However, variability between study locations underscores the potential importance of site history, local hydrology, and geomorphology in shaping marsh biogeochemistry.

  19. Vegetable Fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Eifert, Joell

    2014-01-01

    People have been fermenting vegetables for centuries to increase the stability of fresh foods, to make the foods safer to eat in the absence of refrigeration and to enhance their flavor. Today, vegetable fermentation is done on a large-scale setting in factories as well as in households across the world. In the United States, the primary vegetables fermented are cucumbers (pickles), cabbage (sauerkraut and Kimchi) and olives. In many parts of the world, especially in developing countries wher...

  20. The asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea (Müller), in the tidal Potomac River, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresler, Paul V.; Cory, Robert L.

    1980-01-01

    The Asiatic clam,Corbicula fluminea (Müller), has extended its range to include the tidal fresh-water portion of the Potomac River, Maryland. Though patchily distributed, the clams have attained densities of 665 m−2. Size-class distributions indicate that the clams first appeared in 1975. About 90% of the population belong to year-class I and were less than 12 mm in length. Elsewhere, this species has created severe water quality problems; it should be closely watched in the Potomac.

  1. Morphodynamics of Hue tidal inlets, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, N.T.; Stive, M.J.F.; Verhagen, H.J.; Wang, Z.B.

    2007-01-01

    Morphodynamics of a tidal inlet system on a micro-tidal coast in a tropical monsoon influenced region is modelled and discussed. Effects of tides, waves, river flows and system configuration on the inlet morphologies are investigated with the aid of process-based state-of-the-art numerical models.

  2. Dynamics and radiation from tidal disruption events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnerot, C.A.

    2017-01-01

    When a star gets too close to a supermassive black hole, it is torn apart by strong tidal forces in a tidal disruption event (TDE). The stellar matter then fuels the compact object causing a bright flare that is a unique probe of the majority of galactic nuclei, otherwise quiescent. For

  3. A preliminary study of tidal current ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenxia; Xia, Dongxing

    1985-06-01

    Tidal current ridges, widely distributed geomorphological phenomena over the continental shelf of the world, are studied. They are formed by tidal current and the trend of their sand bodies runs parallel to the direction of tidal current. There are two types of the plane shapes: the parallel and the fingered. Conditions of forming tidal current ridges are the velocities of tidal current ranging from 1 to 3.5 knots and the supply of abundant sediments. Tidal current ridges often develop in following morphological locations: the bays, estuaries, the mouths of channels, as well as the offshore area with strong tidal current. Tidal current ridges occur generally at a water depth of less than 35 metres. The sediments of tidal current ridges are mainly composed of sand. The grain size of the sediments is uniform and well sorted. The characteristics of grain size of the sand imply that their formation mechanism is similar to that of river sand, that is, both of them are the result of flow movements in a trongth channel controlled by boundary. There is however difference between them that the river sand is formed by one-way flow movement while the tidal current sand by two-way movement. There are two saltation populations in the log-probability curves of tidal current sand, the sorting of first saltation population is better than the second one, and having positive skewness, which differs from beach sand. In the C-M grain size pattern tidal current sand is most found in graded suspension segment. The continental shelves of the Yellow Sea, the East China Sea and the South China Sea have favourable conditions for developing tidal current ridges in massive scale and special shape, such as the tidal current ridges in the offshore of Jiangsu, the Gulf of Korea, the shoal of Liaodong, the east and west mouths of the channel of Qiongzhou, Jiaozhou Bay, the shoal of Taiwan, Lingdingyang, the north branch of Changjiang estuary. The studies of them are of vital significance in

  4. Relativistic theory of tidal Love numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnington, Taylor; Poisson, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In Newtonian gravitational theory, a tidal Love number relates the mass multipole moment created by tidal forces on a spherical body to the applied tidal field. The Love number is dimensionless, and it encodes information about the body's internal structure. We present a relativistic theory of Love numbers, which applies to compact bodies with strong internal gravities; the theory extends and completes a recent work by Flanagan and Hinderer, which revealed that the tidal Love number of a neutron star can be measured by Earth-based gravitational-wave detectors. We consider a spherical body deformed by an external tidal field, and provide precise and meaningful definitions for electric-type and magnetic-type Love numbers; and these are computed for polytropic equations of state. The theory applies to black holes as well, and we find that the relativistic Love numbers of a nonrotating black hole are all zero.

  5. The hydrodynamics of surface tidal flow exchange in saltmarshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, David L.; Bruder, Brittany L.; Haas, Kevin A.; Webster, Donald R.

    2016-04-01

    Modeling studies of estuary circulation show great sensitivity to the water exchange into and out of adjacent marshes, yet there is significant uncertainty in resolving the processes governing marsh surface flow. The objective of this study is to measure the estuary channel-to-saltmarsh pressure gradient and to guide parameterization for how it affects the surface flow in the high marsh. Current meters and high-resolution pressure transducers were deployed along a transect perpendicular to the nearby Little Ogeechee River in a saltmarsh adjacent to Rose Dhu Island near Savannah, Georgia, USA. The vertical elevations of the transducers were surveyed with static GPS to yield high accuracy water surface elevation data. It is found that water level differences between the Little Ogeechee River and neighboring saltmarsh are up to 15 cm and pressure gradients are up to 0.0017 m of water surface elevation change per m of linear distance during rising and falling tides. The resulting Little-Ogeechee-River-to-saltmarsh pressure gradient substantially affects tidal velocities at all current meter locations. At the velocity measurement station located closest to the Little Ogeechee River bank, the tidal velocity is nearly perpendicular to the bank. At this location, surface flow is effectively modeled as a balance between the pressure gradient force and the drag force due to marsh vegetation and bottom stress using the Darcy-Weisbach/Lindner's equations developed for flow-through-vegetation analysis in open channel flow. The study thus provides a direct connection between the pressure gradient and surface flow velocity in the high marsh, thereby overcoming a long-standing barrier in directly relating flow-through-saltmarsh studies to flow-through-vegetation studies in the open channel flow literature.

  6. Bio-geomorphic feedback causes alternative stable landscape states: insights from coastal marshes and tidal flats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temmerman, Stijn; Wang, Chen

    2014-05-01

    Many bio-geomorphic systems, such as hill slopes, river floodplains, tidal floodplains and dune areas, seem to be vulnerable to shifts between alternative bare and vegetated landscape states, and these shifts seem to be driven by bio-geomorphic feedbacks. Here we search for empirical evidence for alternative stable state behavior in intertidal flats and marshes, where bio-geomorphic interactions are known to be intense. Large-scale transitions have been reported worldwide between high-elevation vegetated marshes and low-elevation bare flats in intertidal zones of deltas, estuaries, and coastal embayments. It is of significant importance to understand and predict such transitions, because vegetated marshes provide significant services to coastal societies. Previous modeling studies suggest that the ecological theory of catastrophic shifts between alternative stable ecosystem states potentially explains the transition between bare flats and vegetated marshes. However, up to now only few empirical evidence exists. In our study, the hypothesis is empirically tested that vegetated marshes and bare tidal flats can be considered as alternative stable landscape states with rapid shifts between them. We studied historical records (1930s - 2000s) of intertidal elevation surveys and aerial pictures from the Westerschelde estuary (SW Netherlands). Our results demonstrated the existence of: (1) bimodality in the intertidal elevation distribution, i.e., the presence of two peaks in the elevation frequency distribution corresponding to a completely bare state and a densely vegetated state; (2) the relatively rapid transition in elevation when intertidal flats evolve from bare to vegetated states, with sedimentation rates that are 2 to 8 times faster than during the stable states; (3) a threshold elevation above which the shift from bare to vegetated state has a high chance to occur. Our observations demonstrate the abrupt non-linear shift between low-elevation bare flats and high

  7. Tidal current and tidal energy changes imposed by a dynamic tidal power system in the Taiwan Strait, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Peng; Zhang, Jisheng; Zheng, Jinhai

    2017-12-01

    The Taiwan Strait has recently been proposed as a promising site for dynamic tidal power systems because of its shallow depth and strong tides. Dynamic tidal power is a new concept for extracting tidal potential energy in which a coast-perpendicular dike is used to create water head and generate electricity via turbines inserted in the dike. Before starting such a project, the potential power output and hydrodynamic impacts of the dike must be assessed. In this study, a two-dimensional numerical model based on the Delft3D-FLOW module is established to simulate tides in China. A dike module is developed to account for turbine processes and estimate power output by integrating a special algorithm into the model. The domain decomposition technique is used to divide the computational zone into two subdomains with grid refinement near the dike. The hydrodynamic processes predicted by the model, both with and without the proposed construction, are examined in detail, including tidal currents and tidal energy flux. The predicted time-averaged power yields with various opening ratios are presented. The results show that time-averaged power yield peaks at an 8% opening ratio. For semidiurnal tides, the flow velocity increases in front of the head of the dike and decreases on either side. For diurnal tides, these changes are complicated by the oblique incidence of tidal currents with respect to the dike as well as by bathymetric features. The dike itself blocks the propagation of tidal energy flux.

  8. A national-scale remote sensing-based methodology for quantifying tidal marsh biomass to support "Blue Carbon" accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, K. B.; Ballanti, L.; Nguyen, D.; Simard, M.; Thomas, N.; Windham-Myers, L.; Castaneda, E.; Kroeger, K. D.; Gonneea, M. E.; O'Keefe Suttles, J.; Megonigal, P.; Troxler, T.; Schile, L. M.; Davis, M.; Woo, I.

    2016-12-01

    According to 2013 IPCC Wetlands Supplement guidelines, tidal marsh Tier 2 or Tier 3 accounting must include aboveground biomass carbon stock changes. To support this need, we are using free satellite and aerial imagery to develop a national scale, consistent remote sensing-based methodology for quantifying tidal marsh aboveground biomass. We are determining the extent to which additional satellite data will increase the accuracy of this "blue carbon" accounting. Working in 6 U.S. estuaries (Cape Cod, MA, Chesapeake Bay, MD, Everglades, FL, Mississippi Delta, LA, San Francisco Bay, CA, and Puget Sound, WA), we built a tidal marsh biomass dataset (n=2404). Landsat reflectance data were matched spatially and temporally with field plots using Google Earth Engine. We quantified percent cover of green vegetation, non-vegetation, and open water in Landsat pixels using segmentation of 1m National Agriculture Imagery Program aerial imagery. Sentinel-1A C-band backscatter data were used in Chesapeake, Mississippi Delta and Puget Sound. We tested multiple Landsat vegetation indices and Sentinel backscatter metrics in 30m scale biomass linear regression models by region. Scaling biomass by fraction green vegetation significantly improved biomass estimation (e.g. Cape Cod: R2 = 0.06 vs. R2 = 0.60, n=28). The best vegetation indices differed by region, though indices based on the shortwave infrared-1 and red bands were most predictive in the Everglades and the Mississippi Delta, while the soil adjusted vegetation index was most predictive in Puget Sound and Chesapeake. Backscatter metrics significantly improved model predictions over vegetation indices alone; consistently across regions, the most significant metric was the range in backscatter values within the green vegetation segment of the Landsat pixel (e.g. Mississippi Delta: R2 = 0.47 vs. R2 = 0.59, n=15). Results support using remote sensing of biomass stock change to estimate greenhouse gas emission factors in tidal

  9. Coupled Landscape and Channel Dynamics in the Ganges-Brahmaputra Tidal Deltaplain, Southwest Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomer, J.; Wilson, C.; Hale, R. P.

    2017-12-01

    In the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD) and other tide-dominated systems, periodic flooding of the land surface during the tidal cycle promotes sediment accretion and surface elevation gain over time. However, over the past several decades, anthropogenic modification of the GBD tidal deltaplain through embankment construction has precluded sediment delivery to catchment areas, leading to widespread channel siltation and subsidence in poldered landscapes. Amongst the current discussion on GBD sustainability, the relationship between tidal inundation period and resultant sedimentation in natural and embanked settings remains unclear. Moreover, an evaluation of how riparian sedimentology and stratigraphic architecture changes across the GBD tidal-fluvial spectrum is notably absent, despite its critical importance in assessing geomorphic change in human-impacted transitional environments. To provide local-scale, longitudinal trends of coupled landscape-channel dynamics, an array of surface elevation tables, groundwater piezometers, and sediment traps deployed in natural and embanked settings have been monitored seasonally over a time span of 4 years. This knowledge base will be extended across the GBD tidal-fluvial transition by collecting sediment cores from carefully selected point bars along the Gorai River. Sediments will be analyzed for lithologic, biostratigraphic, and geochemical properties to provide an integrated framework for discerning depositional zones and associated facies assemblages across this complex transitional environment. Preliminary comparisons of accretion and hydroperiod data suggest that inundation duration strongly governs mass accumulation on the intertidal platform, though other factors such as mass extraction from sediment source and vegetation density may play secondary roles.

  10. Tidal Streams Near and Far

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardal, Mark A.

    2014-06-01

    The Pandas survey of stars in M31's disk and halo is crisscrossed by numerous tidal features from both M31 and the Milky Way. Here I focus on two narrow stellar streams visible in the survey. They have comparable angular extent in the survey (10-13 degrees long versus only 0.3 degree wide), but one is a local Milky Way stream at about 30 kpc and one is in M31, roughly 25 times more distant. I estimate the stellar mass and metallicity in the streams and the distance gradient along them. The kinematics of the M31 stream is sparsely sampled by red giant stars and globular clusters. Bayesian modeling of the stream data yields accurate constraints on the orbital parameters of the streams.

  11. Simulation of tidal-flow, circulation, and flushing of the Charlotte Harbor Estuarine System, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    A two-dimensional circulation and constituent- transport model, SIMSYS2D, was used to simulate tidal-flow, circulation, and flushing characteristics in Charlotte Harbor. The model was calibrated and verified against field observations of stage,discharge, and velocity. Standard errors averaged about 3 percent of the range in stage at the tide stations and between 3 and 10 percent of the range in discharge measured in the inlets for the calibration period. Following calibration and verification, the model was applied to three different conditions. The first condition represented the existing physical configuration and typical freshwater inflow. The second condition represented reduced fresh water inflow, and the third represented an alteration of Sanibel Causeway. All three conditions were evaluated through Lagrangian particle tracks and simulated dye injections. Residual circulation patterns were similar for typical and reduced freshwater inflow, but reduced freshwater inflow increased the residence time in the upper harbor by a factor of two or more. Removal of Sanibel Causeway did not significantly affect residual flows in upper and lower Charlotte Harbor, Matlacha Pass, Gasparilla Sound, or the Gulf of Mexico. Analysis of Lagrangian particle tracks indicated changes in residence times in San Carlos Bay as a result of removing Sanibel Causeway, but the changes were not consistent for all particles. The residence time of 8 particles in San Carlos Bay decreased with removal of the causeway, 1 was unchanged, and the residence time of 3 particles increased. Simulated flushing characteristics of the estuarine system were affected more by reduced freshwater inflow than for typical freshwater inflow. After 30 days of simulation of reduced freshwater inflow, 42 percent of the dye injected into the upper harbor remained in the upper harbor, compared to 28 percent for typical freshwater inflow. The upper harbor has a relatively long flushing time because it is not directly

  12. The influence of waves on the tidal kinetic energy resource at a tidal stream energy site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillou, Nicolas; Chapalain, Georges; Neill, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We model the influence of waves on tidal kinetic energy in the Fromveur Strait. • Numerical results are compared with field data of waves and currents. • The introduction of waves improve predictions of tidal stream power during storm. • Mean spring tidal stream potential is reduced by 12% during extreme wave conditions. • Potential is reduced by 7.8% with waves forces and 5.3% with enhanced friction. - Abstract: Successful deployment of tidal energy converters relies on access to accurate and high resolution numerical assessments of available tidal stream power. However, since suitable tidal stream sites are located in relatively shallow waters of the continental shelf where tidal currents are enhanced, tidal energy converters may experience effects of wind-generated surface-gravity waves. Waves may thus influence tidal currents, and associated kinetic energy, through two non-linear processes: the interaction of wave and current bottom boundary layers, and the generation of wave-induced currents. Here, we develop a three-dimensional tidal circulation model coupled with a phase-averaged wave model to quantify the impact of the waves on the tidal kinetic energy resource of the Fromveur Strait (western Brittany) - a region that has been identified with strong potential for tidal array development. Numerical results are compared with in situ observations of wave parameters (significant wave height, peak period and mean wave direction) and current amplitude and direction 10 m above the seabed (the assumed technology hub height for this region). The introduction of waves is found to improve predictions of tidal stream power at 10 m above the seabed at the measurement site in the Strait, reducing kinetic energy by up to 9% during storm conditions. Synoptic effects of wave radiation stresses and enhanced bottom friction are more specifically identified at the scale of the Strait. Waves contribute to a slight increase in the spatial gradient of

  13. Freshwater Treatment and Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Freshwater Treatment and Test Facility, located at SANGB, has direct year-round access to water from Lake St. Clair and has a State of Michigan approved National...

  14. Atmospheric noise of a breaking tidal bore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanson, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    A tidal bore is a surge of waters propagating upstream in an estuary as the tidal flow turns to rising and the flood tide propagates into a funnel-shaped system. Large tidal bores have a marked breaking roller. The sounds generated by breaking tidal bores were herein investigated in the field (Qiantang River) and in laboratory. The sound pressure record showed two dominant periods, with some similarity with an earlier study [Chanson (2009). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125(6), 3561-3568]. The two distinct phases were the incoming tidal bore when the sound amplitude increased with the approaching bore, and the passage of the tidal bore in front of the microphone when loud and powerful noises were heard. The dominant frequency ranged from 57 to 131 Hz in the Qiantang River bore. A comparison between laboratory and prototype tidal bores illustrated both common features and differences. The low pitch sound of the breaking bore had a dominant frequency close to the collective oscillations of bubble clouds, which could be modeled with a bubble cloud model using a transverse dimension of the bore roller. The findings suggest that this model might be over simplistic in the case of a powerful breaking bore, like that of the Qiantang River.

  15. No Snowball on Habitable Tidally Locked Planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checlair, Jade; Abbot, Dorian S. [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Menou, Kristen, E-mail: jadecheclair@uchicago.edu [Centre for Planetary Sciences, Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto at Scarborough, Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada)

    2017-08-20

    The TRAPPIST-1, Proxima Centauri, and LHS 1140 systems are the most exciting prospects for future follow-up observations of potentially inhabited planets. All of the planets orbit nearby M-stars and are likely tidally locked in 1:1 spin–orbit states, which motivates the consideration of the effects that tidal locking might have on planetary habitability. On Earth, periods of global glaciation (snowballs) may have been essential for habitability and remote signs of life (biosignatures) because they are correlated with increases in the complexity of life and in the atmospheric oxygen concentration. In this paper, we investigate the snowball bifurcation (sudden onset of global glaciation) on tidally locked planets using both an energy balance model and an intermediate-complexity global climate model. We show that tidally locked planets are unlikely to exhibit a snowball bifurcation as a direct result of the spatial pattern of insolation they receive. Instead, they will smoothly transition from partial to complete ice coverage and back. A major implication of this work is that tidally locked planets with an active carbon cycle should not be found in a snowball state. Moreover, this work implies that tidally locked planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone with low CO{sub 2} outgassing fluxes will equilibrate with a small unglaciated substellar region rather than cycling between warm and snowball states. More work is needed to determine how the lack of a snowball bifurcation might affect the development of life on a tidally locked planet.

  16. No Snowball on Habitable Tidally Locked Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checlair, Jade; Menou, Kristen; Abbot, Dorian S.

    2017-08-01

    The TRAPPIST-1, Proxima Centauri, and LHS 1140 systems are the most exciting prospects for future follow-up observations of potentially inhabited planets. All of the planets orbit nearby M-stars and are likely tidally locked in 1:1 spin–orbit states, which motivates the consideration of the effects that tidal locking might have on planetary habitability. On Earth, periods of global glaciation (snowballs) may have been essential for habitability and remote signs of life (biosignatures) because they are correlated with increases in the complexity of life and in the atmospheric oxygen concentration. In this paper, we investigate the snowball bifurcation (sudden onset of global glaciation) on tidally locked planets using both an energy balance model and an intermediate-complexity global climate model. We show that tidally locked planets are unlikely to exhibit a snowball bifurcation as a direct result of the spatial pattern of insolation they receive. Instead, they will smoothly transition from partial to complete ice coverage and back. A major implication of this work is that tidally locked planets with an active carbon cycle should not be found in a snowball state. Moreover, this work implies that tidally locked planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone with low CO2 outgassing fluxes will equilibrate with a small unglaciated substellar region rather than cycling between warm and snowball states. More work is needed to determine how the lack of a snowball bifurcation might affect the development of life on a tidally locked planet.

  17. No Snowball on Habitable Tidally Locked Planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Checlair, Jade; Abbot, Dorian S.; Menou, Kristen

    2017-01-01

    The TRAPPIST-1, Proxima Centauri, and LHS 1140 systems are the most exciting prospects for future follow-up observations of potentially inhabited planets. All of the planets orbit nearby M-stars and are likely tidally locked in 1:1 spin–orbit states, which motivates the consideration of the effects that tidal locking might have on planetary habitability. On Earth, periods of global glaciation (snowballs) may have been essential for habitability and remote signs of life (biosignatures) because they are correlated with increases in the complexity of life and in the atmospheric oxygen concentration. In this paper, we investigate the snowball bifurcation (sudden onset of global glaciation) on tidally locked planets using both an energy balance model and an intermediate-complexity global climate model. We show that tidally locked planets are unlikely to exhibit a snowball bifurcation as a direct result of the spatial pattern of insolation they receive. Instead, they will smoothly transition from partial to complete ice coverage and back. A major implication of this work is that tidally locked planets with an active carbon cycle should not be found in a snowball state. Moreover, this work implies that tidally locked planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone with low CO 2 outgassing fluxes will equilibrate with a small unglaciated substellar region rather than cycling between warm and snowball states. More work is needed to determine how the lack of a snowball bifurcation might affect the development of life on a tidally locked planet.

  18. Spin Dependence in Tidal Disruption Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesden, Michael; Stone, Nicholas; van Velzen, Sjoert

    2018-01-01

    A supermassive black hole (SBH) can tidally disrupt stars when its tidal field overwhelms the stars’ self-gravity. The stellar debris produced in such tidal disruption events (TDEs) evolves into tidal streams that can self-intersect. These inelastic stream collisions dissipate orbital energy, both circularizing the tidal stream and contributing to the emission observed during the TDE. Once circularized into a disk, the stellar debris can be viscously accreted by the SBH powering additional luminous emission. We explore how SBH spin can affect the tidal disruption process. Tidal forces are spin dependent, as is the minimum orbital angular momentum below which stars are directly captured by the SBH. This implies that the TDE rate will be spin dependent, particularly for more massive SBHs for which relativistic effects are more significant. SBH spin also affects TDE light curves through the initial debris orbits, the nature of the stream collisions, the viscous evolution of the accretion disk, and the possibility of launching jets. We explore the spin dependence of these phenomena to identify promising signatures for upcoming surveys expected to discover hundreds of TDE candidates in the next decade.

  19. Relevance of tidal heating on large TNOs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Prabal; Renaud, Joe P.; Henning, Wade G.; Jutzi, Martin; Hurford, Terry

    2018-03-01

    We examine the relevance of tidal heating for large Trans-Neptunian Objects, with a focus on its potential to melt and maintain layers of subsurface liquid water. Depending on their past orbital evolution, tidal heating may be an important part of the heat budget for a number of discovered and hypothetical TNO systems and may enable formation of, and increased access to, subsurface liquid water. Tidal heating induced by the process of despinning is found to be particularly able to compete with heating due to radionuclide decay in a number of different scenarios. In cases where radiogenic heating alone may establish subsurface conditions for liquid water, we focus on the extent by which tidal activity lifts the depth of such conditions closer to the surface. While it is common for strong tidal heating and long lived tides to be mutually exclusive, we find this is not always the case, and highlight when these two traits occur together. We find cases where TNO systems experience tidal heating that is a significant proportion of, or greater than radiogenic heating for periods ranging from100‧s of millions to a billion years. For subsurface oceans that contain a small antifreeze component, tidal heating due to very high initial spin states may enable liquid water to be preserved right up to the present day. Of particular interest is the Eris-Dysnomia system, which in those cases may exhibit extant cryovolcanism.

  20. Salting our freshwater lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Sarah L.; Burke, Samantha M.; Doubek, Jonathan P.; Krivak-Tetley, Flora E.; Skaff, Nicholas K.; Summers, Jamie C.; Farrell, Kaitlin J.; McCullough, Ian M.; Morales-Williams, Ana M.; Roberts, Derek C.; Ouyang, Zutao; Scordo, Facundo; Hanson, Paul C.; Weathers, Kathleen C.

    2017-01-01

    The highest densities of lakes on Earth are in north temperate ecosystems, where increasing urbanization and associated chloride runoff can salinize freshwaters and threaten lake water quality and the many ecosystem services lakes provide. However, the extent to which lake salinity may be changing at broad spatial scales remains unknown, leading us to first identify spatial patterns and then investigate the drivers of these patterns. Significant decadal trends in lake salinization were identified using a dataset of long-term chloride concentrations from 371 North American lakes. Landscape and climate metrics calculated for each site demonstrated that impervious land cover was a strong predictor of chloride trends in Northeast and Midwest North American lakes. As little as 1% impervious land cover surrounding a lake increased the likelihood of long-term salinization. Considering that 27% of large lakes in the United States have >1% impervious land cover around their perimeters, the potential for steady and long-term salinization of these aquatic systems is high. This study predicts that many lakes will exceed the aquatic life threshold criterion for chronic chloride exposure (230 mg L−1), stipulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the next 50 y if current trends continue. PMID:28396392

  1. Intradaily variability of water quality in a shallow tidal lagoon: Mechanisms and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, L.V.; Sereno, D.M.; Burau, J.R.; Schraga, T.S.; Lopez, C.B.; Stacey, M.T.; Parchevsky, K.V.; Parchevsky, V.P.

    2006-01-01

    Although surface water quality and its underlying processes vary over time scales ranging from seconds to decades, they have historically been studied at the lower (weekly to interannual) frequencies. The aim of this study was to investigate intradaily variability of three water quality parameters in a small freshwater tidal lagoon (Mildred Island, California). High frequency time series of specific conductivity, water temperature, and chlorophyll a at two locations within the habitat were analyzed in conjunction with supporting hydrodynamic, meteorological, biological, and spatial mapping data. All three constituents exhibited large amplitude intradaily (e.g., semidiurnal tidal and diurnal) oscillations, and periodicity varied across constituents, space, and time. Like other tidal embayments, this habitat is influenced by several processes with distinct periodicities including physical controls, such as tides, solar radiation, and wind, and biological controls, such as photosynthesis, growth, and grazing. A scaling approach was developed to estimate individual process contributions to the observed variability. Scaling results were generally consistent with observations and together with detailed examination of time series and time derivatives, revealed specific mechanisms underlying the observed periodicities, including interactions between the tidal variability, heating, wind, and biology. The implications for monitoring were illustrated through subsampling of the data set. This exercise demonstrated how quantities needed by scientists and managers (e.g., mean or extreme concentrations) may be misrepresented by low frequency data and how short-duration high frequency measurements can aid in the design and interpretation of temporally coarser sampling programs. The dispersive export of chlorophyll a from the habitat exhibited a fortnightly variability corresponding to the modulation of semidiurnal tidal currents with the diurnal cycle of phytoplankton variability

  2. Development and application of hydraulic geometry equations for tidal channel restoration in Atlantic Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, J.; van Proosdij, D.; Bowron, T.

    2017-12-01

    Tidal wetlands play a key role in our environment, particularly in the face of climate change and rising sea levels. Successful restoration of these coastal habitats requires a good understanding of the hydrology and morphology of the site. In Atlantic Canada, restoration design must consider significant variation in tidal range (1 to 16 m), sediment supply (50-70,000 mg/L) and winter conditions. In 2012 ground surveys, aerial photos and digital terrain data were used to conduct a morphometric analysis of representative tidal channels and to establish regional hydraulic geometry relationships to aid in restoration design. Channel morphology was strongly related to freshwater discharge and channel order while drainage density, channel length, and sinuosity were related to site history and maturity. Five years after the initial study, two restored salt marshes have been analyzed to assess the validity of the equations. At both marshes, tidal channels were excavated and erosion/accretion tracked for five years following restoration. Channels were found to experience rapid erosion in the first 2 years following restoration but to stabilize with dimensions on par with those predicted. Furthermore, both sites rapidly developed hybrid creek networks beyond the primary excavated channels when allowed to self design. The methodology has been used to design tidal channels for 2 additional sites. Although these sites have not been restored at present, hydrodynamic modeling supported channel dimension predictions, with acceptable in-channel velocities and flood extents simulated in the model. The authors conclude that the use of regional hydraulic geometry equations have been effective in salt marsh restoration design in Atlantic Canada, particularly when used in conjunction with other techniques such as hydrodynamic modeling and analysis of historic conditions.

  3. Estimating effects of tidal power projects and climate change on threatened and endangered marine species and their food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, D Shallin; Greene, Correigh M; Good, Thomas P

    2013-12-01

    Marine hydrokinetic power projects will operate as marine environments change in response to increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. We considered how tidal power development and stressors resulting from climate change may affect Puget Sound species listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA) and their food web. We used risk tables to assess the singular and combined effects of tidal power development and climate change. Tidal power development and climate change posed risks to ESA-listed species, and risk increased with incorporation of the effects of these stressors on predators and prey of ESA-listed species. In contrast, results of a model of strikes on ESA-listed species from turbine blades suggested that few ESA-listed species are likely to be killed by a commercial-scale tidal turbine array. We applied scenarios to a food web model of Puget Sound to explore the effects of tidal power and climate change on ESA-listed species using more quantitative analytical techniques. To simulate development of tidal power, we applied results of the blade strike model. To simulate environmental changes over the next 50 years, we applied scenarios of change in primary production, plankton community structure, dissolved oxygen, ocean acidification, and freshwater flooding events. No effects of tidal power development on ESA-listed species were detected from the food web model output, but the effects of climate change on them and other members of the food web were large. Our analyses exemplify how natural resource managers might assess environmental effects of marine technologies in ways that explicitly incorporate climate change and consider multiple ESA-listed species in the context of their ecological community. Estimación de los Efectos de Proyectos de Energía de las Mareas y el Cambio Climático sobre Especies Marinas Amenazadas y en Peligro y su Red Alimentaria. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology No claim to original US government works.

  4. Tidal interactions with Kerr black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiscock, W.A.

    1977-01-01

    The tidal deformation of an extended test body falling with zero angular momentum into a Kerr black hole is calculated. Numerical results for infall along the symmetry axis and in the equatorial plane of the black hole are presented for a range of values of a, the specific angular momentum of the black hole. Estimates of the tidal contribution to the gravitational radiation are also given. The tidal contribution in equatorial infall into a maximally rotating Kerr black hole may be of the same order as the center-of-mass contribution to the gravitational radiation

  5. Snails promote methane release from a freshwater lake ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao eXu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Benthic fauna, as ecosystem engineers, can strongly affect microbial-driven ecosystem biogeochemical cycling. However, the effects of benthic fauna, especially epifauna, on CH4 cycling remain still elusive. In this study, CH4 effluxes were both measured along a gradient of snail density in a freshwater lake ecosystem in China, and monitored in manipulated laboratory microcosms with and without snails. Field CH4 efflux was significantly increased with snail density. Likewise, the stimulating effects of freshwater snails on CH4 effluxes were evident in the homogenised indoor microcosms. These results show that snails can stimulate CH4 efflux in the freshwater lake ecosystem. Moreover, the average efflux of CH4 emitted from snails’ habitats has reached 15.33 mg CH4-C m-2 d-1. By comparing with those emitted from vegetated coastal marsh and alpine wetland, this data indicates that snails’ habitats are strong sources of CH4 in a freshwater ecosystem. This study suggests identifying and modeling epifauna activity as a function of CH4 cycling could improve the mechanistic understanding of wetland biogeochemical cycling responses to climate change.

  6. Physical and Biological Regulation of Carbon Sequestration in Tidal Marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. T.; Callaway, J.

    2017-12-01

    The rate of carbon sequestration in tidal marshes is regulated by complex feedbacks among biological and physical factors including the rate of sea-level rise (SLR), biomass production, tidal amplitude, and the concentration of suspended sediment. We used the Marsh Equilibrium Model (MEM) to explore the effects on C-sequestration across a wide range of permutations of these variables. C-sequestration increased with the rate of SLR to a maximum, then down to a vanishing point at higher SLR when marshes convert to mudflats. An acceleration in SLR will increase C-sequestration in marshes that can keep pace, but at high rates of SLR this is only possible with high biomass and suspended sediment concentrations. We found that there were no feasible solutions at SLR >13 mm/yr for permutations of variables that characterize the great majority of tidal marshes, i.e., the equilibrium elevation exists below the lower vertical limit for survival of marsh vegetation. The rate of SLR resulting in maximum C-sequestration varies with biomass production. C-sequestration rates at SLR=1 mm/yr averaged only 36 g C m-2 yr-1, but at the highest maximum biomass tested (5000 g/m2) the mean C-sequestration reached 399 g C m-2 yr-1 at SLR = 14 mm/yr. The empirical estimate of C-sequestration in a core dated 50-years overestimates the theoretical long-term rate by 34% for realistic values of decomposition rate and belowground production. The overestimate of the empirical method arises from the live and decaying biomass contained within the carbon inventory above the marker horizon, and overestimates were even greater for shorter surface cores.

  7. Exploitation of tidal power in the Bay of Cadiz: ancient tidal mills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José J. Alonso del Rosario

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Tidal mills were the main industrial activity in the Bay of Cadiz for centuries. They were the last step in the production of salt and flour made by grinding grains. They were installed along the shallow channels, called “caños”, around the Bay, where the frictional and geometrical effects are very strong. The authors have analyzed the propagation of the semidiurnal tidal waves along the Caño de Sancti Petri and the available tidal power in the area. The ancient tidal mills were located where the available tidal potential energy is highest, which ensured productivity for grinding salt and wheat in ancient times. Some considerations about the possibility of installing tidal power plants in the Bay of Cadiz now are given, which show that it could be a real and renewal alternative source of energy for the area.

  8. Wave attenuation across a tidal marsh in San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster-Martinez, Madeline R.; Lacy, Jessica; Ferner, Matthew C.; Variano, Evan A.

    2018-01-01

    Wave attenuation is a central process in the mechanics of a healthy salt marsh. Understanding how wave attenuation varies with vegetation and hydrodynamic conditions informs models of other marsh processes that are a function of wave energy (e.g. sediment transport) and allows for the incorporation of marshes into coastal protection plans. Here, we examine the evolution of wave height across a tidal salt marsh in San Francisco Bay. Instruments were deployed along a cross-shore transect, starting on the mudflat and crossing through zones dominated by Spartina foliosa and Salicornia pacifica. This dataset is the first to quantify wave attenuation for these vegetation species, which are abundant in the intertidal zone of California estuaries. Measurements were collected in the summer and winter to assess seasonal variation in wave attenuation. Calculated drag coefficients of S. foliosa and S. pacifica were similar, indicating equal amounts of vegetation would lead to similar energy dissipation; however, S. pacifica has much greater biomass close to the bed (<20 cm) and retains biomass throughout the year, and therefore, it causes more total attenuation. S. foliosa dies back in the winter, and waves often grow across this section of the marsh. For both vegetation types, attenuation was greatest for low water depths, when the vegetation was emergent. For both seasons, attenuation rates across S. pacifica were the highest and were greater than published attenuation rates across similar (Spartina alterniflora) salt marshes for the comparable depths. These results can inform designs for marsh restorations and management plans in San Francisco Bay and other estuaries containing these species.

  9. Development of tidal watersheds in the Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Z.B.; Vroom, J.; van Prooijen, B.C.; Labeur, R.J.; Stive, M.J.F.; Hansen, M.H.P.

    2011-01-01

    The Wadden Sea consists of a series of tidal lagoons which are connected to the North Sea by tidal inlets. Boundaries to each lagoon are the mainland coast, the barrier islands on both sides of the tidal inlet, and the tidal watersheds behind the two barrier islands. Behind each Wadden Island there

  10. Downstream hydraulic geometry of a tidally influenced river delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sassi, M.G.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Brye, de B.; Deleersnijder, E.

    2012-01-01

    Channel geometry in tidally influenced river deltas can show a mixed scaling behavior between that of river and tidal channel networks, as the channel forming discharge is both of river and tidal origin. We present a method of analysis to quantify the tidal signature on delta morphology, by

  11. Wieslander Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Digital version of the 1945 California Vegetation Type Maps by A. E. Wieslander of the U.S. Forest Service. Source scale of maps are 1:100,000. These compiled maps...

  12. Kuchler Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Digital version of potential natural plant communites as compiled and published on 'Map of the Natural Vegetation of California' by A. W. Kuchler, 1976. Source map...

  13. Wieslander Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Digital version of the 1945 California Vegetation Type Maps by A. E. Wieslander of the U.S. Forest Service. Source scale of maps are 1:100,000. These compiled maps...

  14. Kuchler Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Digital version of potential natural plant communites as compiled and published on 'Map of the Natural Vegetation of California' by A. W. Kuchler, 1976. Source map...

  15. [Geographic variations in freshwater molluscs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinarskiĭ, M V

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of geographic variation is known in practically all taxa of living beings. However, the reality of this phenomenon in freshwater molluscs (snails and bivalves) has many times been questioned in the past. It was accepted that these animals do not demonstrate spatially-oriented variation, where specific "local race" is arisen in each specific habitat. Till the beginning of 1970s, there was no statistical evidence that geographic clines in freshwater molluscs really exist. However, a few species of freshwater molluscs has been studied in this respect so far, therefore it is almost impossible to draw any general patterns of geographical variation in this group of animals. Most species of freshwater molluscs studied to the date exhibit statistically significant decrease of their body size in the south-north direction. Perhaps, it may be explained by decrease of the duration of the growth season in high latitudes. Some species of freshwater snails demonstrate clinal changes in shell proportions. This allows to reject subspecies separation within these species since diagnostic characters of such "subspecies" may blur when geographic variation is taken into consideration. The data on geographic variation in anatomical traits in freshwater molluscs is much more scarce. At least one species of pond snails (Lymnaea terebra) demonstrates clinal variation in proportions of the copulative apparatus in the south-north direction. Further studies of geographic variation in freshwater molluscs should reveal whether it is truly adaptive, i.e. whether geographical clines have underlying genetic basis. Otherwise, the clines may arise as a result of direct modifying effect of a habitat.

  16. Tidal Mixing at the Shelf Break

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hogg, Nelson; Legg, Sonya

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this project was to study mixing forced by tidal flow over sudden changes in topographic slope such as near the shelf-break, using high-resolution nonhydrostatic numerical simulations employing the MIT gem...

  17. Tides and tidal harmonics at Umbharat, Gujarat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suryanarayana, A.; Swamy, G.N.

    A part of the data on tides recorded at Machiwada near Umbharat, Gulf of Cambay during April 1978 was subjected to harmonic analysis following the Admiralty procedure. The general tidal characteristics and the value of four major harmonic...

  18. Tidal mixing in Dahej creek waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Swamy, G.N.; Sarma, R.V.

    of effluent discharge has been worked out. The allowable duration of discharge of the hypothetical effluent over a tidal cycle ensuring a specified minimum dilution has also been indicated to help optimise the degree of inplant treatment. The results suggested...

  19. Microbial quality of a marine tidal pool

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Genthe, Bettina

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the source of microbial pollution to a tidal pool was investigated. Both adjacent seawater which could contribute to possible faecal pollution and potential direct bather pollution were studied. The microbial quality of the marine...

  20. On the ambiguity in relativistic tidal deformability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralla, Samuel E.

    2018-04-01

    The LIGO collaboration recently reported the first gravitational-wave constraints on the tidal deformability of neutron stars. I discuss an inherent ambiguity in the notion of relativistic tidal deformability that, while too small to affect the present measurement, may become important in the future. I propose a new way to understand the ambiguity and discuss future prospects for reliably linking observed gravitational waveforms to compact object microphysics.

  1. The environmental effects of tidal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muirhead, H.J.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to outline the environmental effects of tidal energy in relation to the estuarine ecosystem, and therefore will not deal with the regional environmental and socioeconomic implications of tidal power. The topics covered are: hydrodynamics of sediments; turbidity; water quality; fish; birds and wildlife conservation. The nature of the estuarine environment and how, as a system, it works, is briefly described by way of introduction. (author)

  2. Pond fractals in a tidal flat

    OpenAIRE

    Cael, B. B.; Bisson, Kelsey; Lambert, Bennett Spencer

    2015-01-01

    Studies over the past decade have reported power-law distributions for the areas of terrestrial lakes and Arctic melt ponds, as well as fractal relationships between their areas and coastlines. Here we report similar fractal structure of ponds in a tidal flat, thereby extending the spatial and temporal scales on which such phenomena have been observed in geophysical systems. Images taken during low tide of a tidal flat in Damariscotta, Maine, reveal a well-resolved power-law distribution of p...

  3. WIYN Open Cluster Study: Tidal Interactions in Solar type Binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Meibom, S.; Mathieu, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    We present an ongoing study on tidal interactions in late-type close binary stars. New results on tidal circularization are combined with existing data to test and constrain theoretical predictions of tidal circularization in the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase and throughout the main-sequence phase of stellar evolution. Current data suggest that tidal circularization during the PMS phase sets the tidal cutoff period for binary populations younger than ~1 Gyr. Binary populations older than ~1 G...

  4. Ocean renewable energy : Tidal power in the Yellow Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Han Soo

    2011-01-01

    Ocean renewable energy sources are briefly introduced in this review article. Special focus on tidal energy from ocean renewable energy in the Yellow Sea and its practical utilization in South Korea are illustrated with several examples. Among them, the Sihwa Lake tidal power plant, the Garolim Bay tidal power project, the Incheon tidal power project, and the Uldolmok tidal current power station were introduced with more details. A numerical modelling system, Regional Ocean Tide Simulator, is...

  5. Seasonal Variation, Export Dynamics and Consumption of Freshwater Invertebrates in an Estuarine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. D.; Williams, N. E.

    1998-03-01

    In the Aber Estuary, North Wales, significant numbers of freshwater benthic invertebrates occurred in the tidal freshwater area. Distinct seasonal patterns were observed in their longitudinal zonation which appeared to be unrelated to variations in tidal inundation. The December extension downstream of freshwater taxa is hypothesized to be in response to decreasing water temperatures. In April, larvae/nymphs of the Trichoptera (caddisflies), Ephemeroptera (mayflies) and Plecoptera (stoneflies) ranged as far as a site inundated by 80·9% of all high tides, and larval Elmidae and Chironomidae (midges) occurred at the most marine site (inundated twice daily by all high tides). In July, with the exception of the Chironomidae, the range of most aquatic insects had contracted to the upper estuary. Although, in general, densities of aquatic insects decreased towards the lower estuary, significant densities persisted there. For example, maxima of 3514 chironomid larvae and 48 caddisfly larvae m -2were recorded at the 80·9% inundation site. An estimated 31×10 6freshwater invertebrates (weighing 62·6 kg), per annum, passed from fresh water into salt water across any given transect along the estuary. In comparison, the annual influx of invertebrates carried upstream by incoming tides was estimated to be 1·9×10 6(6·2%; weighing 2·5 kg). Predominant in the downstream drift were the larvae/nymphs and/or pupae of chironomids, mayflies, stoneflies and caddisflies. The ' reverse ' drift comprised mainly copepods, ostracods, amphipods and oligochaetes. Mites and the brackishwater amphipod Gammarus zaddachicommonly moved in both directions. Highest drift densities occurred in July, whereas the lowest densities occurred in late autumn and winter. Multiple regression analysis showed no relationship between total drift or ' reverse ' drift densities and any of the measured environmental variables. Many of the freshwater invertebrates appeared not to die upon passing into tidal

  6. TIDAL INTERACTIONS IN MERGING WHITE DWARF BINARIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piro, Anthony L.

    2011-01-01

    The recently discovered system J0651 is the tightest known detached white dwarf (WD) binary. Since it has not yet initiated Roche-lobe overflow, it provides a relatively clean environment for testing our understanding of tidal interactions. I investigate the tidal heating of each WD, parameterized in terms of its tidal Q parameter. Assuming that the heating can be radiated efficiently, the current luminosities are consistent with Q 1 ∼ 7 x 10 10 and Q 2 ∼ 2 x 10 7 , for the He and C/O WDs, respectively. Conversely, if the observed luminosities are merely from the cooling of the WDs, these estimated values of Q represent the upper limits. A large Q 1 for the He WD means its spin velocity will be slower than that expected if it was tidally locked, which, since the binary is eclipsing, may be measurable via the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. After one year, gravitational wave emission shifts the time of eclipses by 5.5 s, but tidal interactions cause the orbit to shrink more rapidly, changing the time by up to an additional 0.3 s after a year. Future eclipse timing measurements may therefore infer the degree of tidal locking.

  7. VISCOELASTIC MODELS OF TIDALLY HEATED EXOMOONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobos, Vera; Turner, Edwin L.

    2015-01-01

    Tidal heating of exomoons may play a key role in their habitability, since the elevated temperature can melt the ice on the body even without significant solar radiation. The possibility of life has been intensely studied on solar system moons such as Europa or Enceladus where the surface ice layer covers a tidally heated water ocean. Tidal forces may be even stronger in extrasolar systems, depending on the properties of the moon and its orbit. To study the tidally heated surface temperature of exomoons, we used a viscoelastic model for the first time. This model is more realistic than the widely used, so-called fixed Q models because it takes into account the temperature dependence of the tidal heat flux and the melting of the inner material. Using this model, we introduced the circumplanetary Tidal Temperate Zone (TTZ), which strongly depends on the orbital period of the moon and less on its radius. We compared the results with the fixed Q model and investigated the statistical volume of the TTZ using both models. We have found that the viscoelastic model predicts 2.8 times more exomoons in the TTZ with orbital periods between 0.1 and 3.5 days than the fixed Q model for plausible distributions of physical and orbital parameters. The viscoelastic model provides more promising results in terms of habitability because the inner melting of the body moderates the surface temperature, acting like a thermostat

  8. Half Moon Cove Tidal Project. Feasibility report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-11-01

    The proposed Half Moon Cove Tidal Power Project would be located in a small cove in the northern part of Cobscook Bay in the vicinity of Eastport, Maine. The project would be the first tidal electric power generating plant in the United States of America. The basin impounded by the barrier when full will approximate 1.2 square miles. The average tidal range at Eastport is 18.2 feet. The maximum spring tidal range will be 26.2 feet and the neap tidal range 12.8 feet. The project will be of the single pool-type single effect in which generation takes place on the ebb tide only. Utilizing an average mean tidal range of 18.2 feet the mode of operation enables generation for approximately ten and one-half (10-1/2) hours per day or slightly in excess of five (5) hours per tide. The installed capacity will be 12 MW utilizing 2 to 6 MW units. An axial flow, or Bulb type of turbine was selected for this study.

  9. VISCOELASTIC MODELS OF TIDALLY HEATED EXOMOONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobos, Vera [Konkoly Thege Miklos Astronomical Institute, Research Centre of Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1121 Konkoly Thege Miklós út 15-17, Budapest (Hungary); Turner, Edwin L., E-mail: dobos@konkoly.hu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 08544, 4 Ivy Lane, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Tidal heating of exomoons may play a key role in their habitability, since the elevated temperature can melt the ice on the body even without significant solar radiation. The possibility of life has been intensely studied on solar system moons such as Europa or Enceladus where the surface ice layer covers a tidally heated water ocean. Tidal forces may be even stronger in extrasolar systems, depending on the properties of the moon and its orbit. To study the tidally heated surface temperature of exomoons, we used a viscoelastic model for the first time. This model is more realistic than the widely used, so-called fixed Q models because it takes into account the temperature dependence of the tidal heat flux and the melting of the inner material. Using this model, we introduced the circumplanetary Tidal Temperate Zone (TTZ), which strongly depends on the orbital period of the moon and less on its radius. We compared the results with the fixed Q model and investigated the statistical volume of the TTZ using both models. We have found that the viscoelastic model predicts 2.8 times more exomoons in the TTZ with orbital periods between 0.1 and 3.5 days than the fixed Q model for plausible distributions of physical and orbital parameters. The viscoelastic model provides more promising results in terms of habitability because the inner melting of the body moderates the surface temperature, acting like a thermostat.

  10. Observations and analytical modeling of freshwater and rainwater lenses in coastal dune systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuijfzand, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Observations are reported on (i) groundwater recharge rates under various types of vegetation as measured with megalysimeters in the dunes, (ii) freshwater lenses along the Dutch North Sea coast in the early 1900s, and (iii) rainwater lenses that develop on top of laterally migrating,

  11. Desalination - an alternative freshwater resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakaib, M.

    2005-01-01

    Global water constitutes 94 percent salt water that is from the oceans and 6% is in the form of freshwater. Out of this 6% freshwater approximately 27% is trapped in glaciers and 72% is underground. The sea water is important for transportation, fisheries. Oceans regulate climate through air sea interaction. However direct consumption of sea water is too salty to sustain human life. Water with a dissolved solids (salt) content generally below about 1000 milligrams per liter (mg/L) is considered acceptable for human consumption. The application of desalting technologies over the past 50 years have been in many of the arid zone where freshwater is available. Pakistan lies in the Sun Belt. It is considered a wide margin coastal belt (990 km), having an Exclusive Economic Zone of 240,000 km/sup 2/, that strokes trillion cubic meters of sea water that can be made available as freshwater source to meet the shortfall in the supply of domestic water through desalination along the coastal belt of Pakistan. The freshwater obtained from the other desalination processes is slightly expensive, but the cost of desalination can be considerably reduced provided that the available inexpensive or free waste energy is utilized mainly. (author)

  12. Inferring tidal wetland stability from channel sediment fluxes: Observations and a conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganju, Neil K.; Nidzieko, Nicholas J.; Kirwan, Matthew L.

    2013-12-01

    and climatic forces have modified the geomorphology of tidal wetlands over a range of timescales. Changes in land use, sediment supply, river flow, storminess, and sea level alter the layout of tidal channels, intertidal flats, and marsh plains; these elements define wetland complexes. Diagnostically, measurements of net sediment fluxes through tidal channels are high-temporal resolution, spatially integrated quantities that indicate (1) whether a complex is stable over seasonal timescales and (2) what mechanisms are leading to that state. We estimated sediment fluxes through tidal channels draining wetland complexes on the Blackwater and Transquaking Rivers, Maryland, USA. While the Blackwater complex has experienced decades of degradation and been largely converted to open water, the Transquaking complex has persisted as an expansive, vegetated marsh. The measured net export at the Blackwater complex (1.0 kg/s or 0.56 kg/m2/yr over the landward marsh area) was caused by northwesterly winds, which exported water and sediment on the subtidal timescale; tidally forced net fluxes were weak and precluded landward transport of suspended sediment from potential seaward sources. Though wind forcing also exported sediment at the Transquaking complex, strong tidal forcing and proximity to a turbidity maximum led to an import of sediment (0.031 kg/s or 0.70 kg/m2/yr). This resulted in a spatially averaged accretion of 3.9 mm/yr, equaling the regional relative sea level rise. Our results suggest that in areas where seaward sediment supply is dominant, seaward wetlands may be more capable of withstanding sea level rise over the short term than landward wetlands. We propose a conceptual model to determine a complex's tendency toward stability or instability based on sediment source, wetland channel location, and transport mechanisms. Wetlands with a reliable portfolio of sources and transport mechanisms appear better suited to offset natural and anthropogenic loss.

  13. Inferring tidal wetland stability from channel sediment fluxes: observations and a conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganju, Neil K.; Nidzieko, Nicholas J.; Kirwan, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic and climatic forces have modified the geomorphology of tidal wetlands over a range of timescales. Changes in land use, sediment supply, river flow, storminess, and sea level alter the layout of tidal channels, intertidal flats, and marsh plains; these elements define wetland complexes. Diagnostically, measurements of net sediment fluxes through tidal channels are high-temporal resolution, spatially integrated quantities that indicate (1) whether a complex is stable over seasonal timescales and (2) what mechanisms are leading to that state. We estimated sediment fluxes through tidal channels draining wetland complexes on the Blackwater and Transquaking Rivers, Maryland, USA. While the Blackwater complex has experienced decades of degradation and been largely converted to open water, the Transquaking complex has persisted as an expansive, vegetated marsh. The measured net export at the Blackwater complex (1.0 kg/s or 0.56 kg/m2/yr over the landward marsh area) was caused by northwesterly winds, which exported water and sediment on the subtidal timescale; tidally forced net fluxes were weak and precluded landward transport of suspended sediment from potential seaward sources. Though wind forcing also exported sediment at the Transquaking complex, strong tidal forcing and proximity to a turbidity maximum led to an import of sediment (0.031 kg/s or 0.70 kg/m2/yr). This resulted in a spatially averaged accretion of 3.9 mm/yr, equaling the regional relative sea level rise. Our results suggest that in areas where seaward sediment supply is dominant, seaward wetlands may be more capable of withstanding sea level rise over the short term than landward wetlands. We propose a conceptual model to determine a complex's tendency toward stability or instability based on sediment source, wetland channel location, and transport mechanisms. Wetlands with a reliable portfolio of sources and transport mechanisms appear better suited to offset natural and

  14. SOIL CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN COASTAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF VERACRUZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Marín-Muñiz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands play an important role in the global carbon (C cycle because they act as sinks of this element. Vegetation in the wetlands is a factor that influences C storage in these ecosystems. We investigated C storage in freshwater wetland soils with different types of vegetation (swamps and marshes in the coastal plain of Veracruz, Mexico. The study sites were: Estero Dulce (ED, Tecolutla and Laguna Chica (LCH, Vega de Alatorre. Bulk densities observed ranged from 0.1 to 1.15 g cm3. Average C stored in LCH was higher in swamp (13.30±0.11 % than in marsh soils (4.52±0.02 %. However, in ED the C content was similar in swamp (5.88±0.03 % and marsh soils (5.28±0.02 %. In LCH marshes, there was approximately 50 % less total C in the soil compared to the C content in the swamps. In ED, the C stored in the marshes was only 7.15 % lower than the C stored in the swamps. When the total C storage of freshwater swamps (35.04±4.0 kg cm-2 and marshes (24.8±4.0 kg cm-2 was compared, there was no effect caused by the type of vegetation (P = 0.213.

  15. Three-dimensional semi-idealized model for tidal motion in tidal estuaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, M.; Schuttelaars, H.M.; Roos, P.C.; Möller, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional semi-idealized model for tidal motion in a tidal estuary of arbitrary shape and bathymetry is presented. This model aims at bridging the gap between idealized and complex models. The vertical profiles of the velocities are obtained analytically in terms of the

  16. Native Freshwater Fish and Mussel Species Richness

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data represent predicted current distributions of all native freshwater fish and freshwater mussels in the Middle-Atlantic region. The data are available for...

  17. Effects of Invasive-Plant Management on Nitrogen-Removal Services in Freshwater Tidal Marshes

    OpenAIRE

    Alldred, Mary; Baines, Stephen B.; Findlay, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Establishing relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem function is an ongoing endeavor in contemporary ecosystem and community ecology, with important practical implications for conservation and the maintenance of ecosystem services. Removal of invasive plant species to conserve native diversity is a common management objective in many ecosystems, including wetlands. However, substantial changes in plant community composition have the potential to alter sediment characteristics and eco...

  18. The effects of acute salinity challenges on osmoregulation in Mozambique tilapia reared in a tidally changing salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, Benjamin P; Lerner, Darren T; Grau, E Gordon; Seale, Andre P

    2015-03-01

    This study characterizes the differences in osmoregulatory capacity among Mozambique tilapia, Oreochromis mossambicus, reared in freshwater (FW), in seawater (SW) or under tidally driven changes in salinity. This was addressed through the use of an abrupt exposure to a change in salinity. We measured changes in: (1) plasma osmolality and prolactin (PRL) levels; (2) pituitary expression of prolactin (PRL) and its receptors, PRLR1 and PRLR2; (3) branchial expression of PRLR1, PRLR2, Na(+)/Cl(-) co-transporter (NCC), Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) co-transporter (NKCC), α1a and α1b isoforms of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), aquaporin 3 (AQP3) and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3). Mozambique tilapia reared in a tidal environment successfully adapted to SW while fish reared in FW did not survive a transfer to SW beyond the 6 h sampling. With the exception of CFTR, the change in the expression of ion pumps, transporters and channels was more gradual in fish transferred from tidally changing salinities to SW than in fish transferred from FW to SW. Upon transfer to SW, the increase in CFTR expression was more robust in tidal fish than in FW fish. Tidal and SW fish successfully adapted when transferred to FW. These results suggest that Mozambique tilapia reared in a tidally changing salinity, a condition that more closely represents their natural history, gain an adaptive advantage compared with fish reared in FW when facing a hyperosmotic challenge. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Arctic freshwater export: Status, mechanisms, and prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haine, T.W.N.; Curry, B.; Gerdes, R.; Hansen, E.; Karcher, M.; Lee, C.; Rudels, B.; Spreen, G.; de Steur, L.; Stewart, K.D.; Woodgate, R.

    2015-01-01

    Large freshwater anomalies clearly exist in the Arctic Ocean. For example, liquid freshwater has accumulated in the Beaufort Gyre in the decade of the 2000s compared to 1980–2000, with an extra ˜ 5000 km3 — about 25% — being stored. The sources of freshwater to the Arctic from precipitation and

  20. On the migration rate of tidal meanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alpaos, A.; Finotello, A.; Ghinassi, M.; Lanzoni, S.; Marani, M.; Rinaldo, A.

    2016-12-01

    Sinuous channels shaped by periodically reversing tidal flows are a ubiquitous feature of tidal landscapes. Despite their fundamental role on the morphology and sedimentary patterns of these landscapes, tidal meanders have received less attention than their fluvial counterparts, particularly as far as migration processes are concerned. We have analyzed the migration of about 300 meander bends in the Northern Venice Lagoon (Italy), from 1968 to nowadays, through observations and modeling interpretation. Similarities with fluvial meanders occur, although important difference also emerge. Meanders cutting through salt-marshes in the Venice Lagoon follow the relationship between Cartesian length and channel width, typical of meanders developed within different settings. We find a mean migration rate of about 0.20 m/year. However, the potential migration rate can reach values of about 0.20 channel widths per year thus suggesting similarities with fluvial meanders. In addition, tidal channel migration dynamics displays features which qualitatively agree with theories developed for the fluvial setting. We deem our results are valuable for the understanding of the morphological evolution and architecture of tidal landscapes, with implications for restoration strategies, also in the face of changes in environmental conditions.

  1. Carbon sequestration by Australian tidal marshes

    KAUST Repository

    Macreadie, Peter I.

    2017-03-10

    Australia\\'s tidal marshes have suffered significant losses but their recently recognised importance in CO2 sequestration is creating opportunities for their protection and restoration. We compiled all available data on soil organic carbon (OC) storage in Australia\\'s tidal marshes (323 cores). OC stocks in the surface 1 m averaged 165.41 (SE 6.96) Mg OC ha-1 (range 14-963 Mg OC ha-1). The mean OC accumulation rate was 0.55 ± 0.02 Mg OC ha-1 yr-1. Geomorphology was the most important predictor of OC stocks, with fluvial sites having twice the stock of OC as seaward sites. Australia\\'s 1.4 million hectares of tidal marshes contain an estimated 212 million tonnes of OC in the surface 1 m, with a potential CO2-equivalent value of $USD7.19 billion. Annual sequestration is 0.75 Tg OC yr-1, with a CO2-equivalent value of $USD28.02 million per annum. This study provides the most comprehensive estimates of tidal marsh blue carbon in Australia, and illustrates their importance in climate change mitigation and adaptation, acting as CO2 sinks and buffering the impacts of rising sea level. We outline potential further development of carbon offset schemes to restore the sequestration capacity and other ecosystem services provided by Australia tidal marshes.

  2. Ridges and tidal stress on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, G.D.; Turtle, E.P.; Jaeger, W.L.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Greenberg, R.

    2004-01-01

    Sets of ridges of uncertain origin are seen in twenty-nine high-resolution Galileo images, which sample seven locales on Io. These ridges are on the order of a few kilometers in length with a spacing of about a kilometer. Within each locale, the ridges have a consistent orientation, but the orientations vary from place to place. We investigate whether these ridges could be a result of tidal flexing of Io by comparing their orientations with the peak tidal stress orientations at the same locations. We find that ridges grouped near the equator are aligned either north-south or east-west, as are the predicted principal stress orientations there. It is not clear why particular groups run north-south and others east-west. The one set of ridges observed far from the equator (52?? S) has an oblique azimuth, as do the tidal stresses at those latitudes. Therefore, all observed ridges have similar orientations to the tidal stress in their region. This correlation is consistent with the hypothesis that tidal flexing of Io plays an important role in ridge formation. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Freshwater sculpins: phylogenetics to ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan B. Adams; David A. Schmetterling

    2007-01-01

    Freshwater sculpins (Cottidae) are a diverse and ecologically important component of cool- and coldwater ecosystems throughout the northern hemisphere. More than 60 sculpin species occur in a variety of habitats, and sculpin distributions range from highly localized to widespread. Despite the frequently high biomass of sculpins and their numerous ecosystem functions,...

  4. Methods for preparing synthetic freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E J; Davison, W; Hamilton-Taylor, J

    2002-03-01

    Synthetic solutions that emulate the major ion compositions of natural waters are useful in experiments aimed at understanding biogeochemical processes. Standard recipes exist for preparing synthetic analogues of seawater, with its relatively constant composition, but, due to the diversity of freshwaters, a range of compositions and recipes is required. Generic protocols are developed for preparing synthetic freshwaters of any desired composition. The major problems encountered in preparing hard and soft waters include dissolving sparingly soluble calcium carbonate, ensuring that the ionic components of each concentrated stock solution cannot form an insoluble salt and dealing with the supersaturation of calcium carbonate in many hard waters. For acidic waters the poor solubility of aluminium salts requires attention. These problems are overcome by preparing concentrated stock solutions according to carefully designed reaction paths that were tested using a combination of experiment and equilibrium modeling. These stock solutions must then be added in a prescribed order to prepare a final solution that is brought into equilibrium with the atmosphere. The example calculations for preparing hard, soft and acidic freshwater surrogates with major ion compositions the same as published analyses, are presented in a generalized fashion that should allow preparation of any synthetic freshwater according to its known analysis.

  5. A marine to freshwater sediment succession from Kowhai Beach wetland, Northland : implications for Holocene sea level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, H.; Nichol, S.L.

    2007-01-01

    An infilled wetland located behind coastal dunes in north-east Northland is used to reconstruct a local history of environmental change spanning early Holocene (c. 7000 yr BP) to modern time. Proxy indicators (sediment texture, diatoms and pollen) provide evidence for a transition from marginal marine- to brackish- to freshwater-conditions in the wetland. Radiocarbon ages constrain the chronology of this succession to 7880-7430 cal. yr BP for the early period of marine conditions, 3570-3210 cal. yr BP for the latter brackish phase and 1060-800 cal. yr BP for the change to freshwater conditions. Within this succession, the diatom record preserves a strong brackish signal at core depths above the limit of the modern tidal range. This is presented as preliminary evidence for a mid-Holocene sea level highstand for northern New Zealand of approximately 1.2 m above present mean sea level. (author). 40 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  6. The development of the Ganges-Brahmaputra tidal delta plain: construction to maintenance phase changes in platform and channel morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C.; Goodbred, S. L., Jr.; Hale, R. P.; Bain, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    The lower Ganges-Brahmaputra (G-B) delta can be divided into the fluvial-tidal river mouth and distributaries under active construction by the G-B rivers, and the distal tidally maintained deltaplain. In the active river-mouth, distributaries have constructed 5,000 km2 of large, coalescing islands that define the prograding coastline and subaerial-delta front. Although seasonal riverbank erosion is common, the area as a whole has gained land, primarily via horizontal and vertical accretion of intertidal mudflats and seaward progradation of emergent, tidally-elongated sandy channel-mouth bars. An analysis of historical imagery within the active river mouth shows larger and higher order channels form as merging bars and shoal-islands constrict distributary channels, while lower order creeks emerge secondarily, presumably as flow on shoaling intertidal mudflats becomes channelized and mangrove vegetation takes hold. With waning fluvial input (occurring from major distributary migration or avulsion), tidal and marine processes exhibit a stronger control on sediment transport and distribution, as is happening in the downdrift areas of the G-B tidal delta plain. The relatively pristine Sundarbans mangrove forest covers 4,100 km2 along the coast, while 11,200 km2 of the lower tidal delta plain is densely inhabited (population density up to 1,000/km2) and embanked for agricultural purposes. Although considered moribund or abandoned from direct fluvial sediment input, distal portions of the tidal delta are connected to the sediment transport system by its dense network of tidal channels. The subaerial landscape that was initially constructed by the point-sourced input of coarser-grained fluvial sediment from the mainstem rivers is thereafter maintained predominantly by onshore tidal sediment transport of finer-grained silt, and we observe accretion rates as high as 2-4 cm/y supported on the mangrove platform during the monsoon season. The tidal channels show evidence of

  7. Observations of Tidal Straining Within Two Different Ocean Environments in the East China Sea: Stratification and Near-Bottom Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Wei, Hao; Zhao, Liang

    2017-11-01

    Tidal straining describes the straining effect induced by the vertical shear of oscillatory tidal currents that act on horizontal density gradients. It tends to create tidal periodic stratification and modulate the turbulence in the bottom boundary layer (BBL). Here, we present observations of current, hydrology and turbulence obtained at two mooring stations that are characterized by two typical hydrological environments in the East China Sea (ECS). One is located adjacent to the Changjiang River's mouth, and the other is located over a sloping shelf which is far from the freshwater sources. Tidal straining induces a semidiurnal switching between stable and unstable stratification at both stations. Near-bottom high-frequency velocity measurements further reveal that the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) is highly elevated during periods when unstable stratification occurs. A comparison between the TKE dissipation rate (ɛ) and the shear production (P) further reveals that the near-bottom mixing is locally shear-induced most of the time except during the unstable stratification period. Within this period, the magnitude of dissipation exceeds the expected value based on the law of the wall by an order of magnitude. The buoyancy flux that calculated by the balance method is too small to compensate for the existing discrepancy between the dissipation and shear production. Another plausible candidate is the advection of TKE, which may play an important role in the TKE budget during the unstable stratification period.

  8. Sediment transport and deposition on a river-dominated tidal flat: An idealized model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Christopher R.; Chen, Shih-Nan; Geyer, W. Rockwell; Ralston, David K.

    2010-01-01

    A 3-D hydrodynamic model is used to investigate how different size classes of river-derived sediment are transported, exported and trapped on an idealized, river-dominated tidal flat. The model is composed of a river channel flanked by sloping tidal flats, a configuration motivated by the intertidal region of the Skagit River mouth in Washington State, United States. It is forced by mixed tides and a pulse of freshwater and sediment with various settling velocities. In this system, the river not only influences stratification but also contributes a significant cross-shore transport. As a result, the bottom stress is strongly ebb-dominated in the channel because of the seaward advance of strong river flow as the tidal flats drain during ebbs. Sediment deposition patterns and mass budgets are sensitive to settling velocity. The lateral sediment spreading scales with an advective distance (settling time multiplied by lateral flow speed), thereby confining the fast settling sediment classes in the channel. Residual sediment transport is landward on the flats, because of settling lag, but is strongly seaward in the channel. The seaward transport mainly occurs during big ebbs and is controlled by a length scale ratio Ld/XWL, where Ld is a cross-shore advective distance (settling time multiplied by river outlet velocity), and XWL is the immersed cross-shore length of the intertidal zone. Sediment trapping requires Ld/XWL stratification and reducing tidal range both favor sediment trapping, whereas varying channel geometries and asymmetry of tides has relatively small impacts. Implications of the modeling results on the south Skagit intertidal region are discussed.

  9. Environmental controls on multiscale spatial patterns of salt marsh vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Daehyun; Cairns, David; Bartholdy, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    physical processes operate. This study investigated such a topography-vegetation relationship in a Danish salt marsh, focusing upon two scales: a macro-scale (ca. 500 m) across the marsh platform, encompassing seaward and landward areas, and a meso-scale ( ca. 25 m) across tidal creeks. While long-term sea...... represented an ecological sequence from early to late succession, and strongly correlated with surface elevation. However, the gradient did not show any significant relationship with distance from shoreline or tidal channels. Our results suggest that, in salt marshes, elevation plays a still more important...

  10. Tidal analysis of Met rocket wind data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedinger, J. F.; Constantinides, E.

    1976-01-01

    A method of analyzing Met Rocket wind data is described. Modern tidal theory and specialized analytical techniques were used to resolve specific tidal modes and prevailing components in observed wind data. A representation of the wind which is continuous in both space and time was formulated. Such a representation allows direct comparison with theory, allows the derivation of other quantities such as temperature and pressure which in turn may be compared with observed values, and allows the formation of a wind model which extends over a broader range of space and time. Significant diurnal tidal modes with wavelengths of 10 and 7 km were present in the data and were resolved by the analytical technique.

  11. TIDAL TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM A COMPLIANT MOORING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Richmond, Marshall C.; Talbert, Joe; deKlerk, Alex; Polagye, Brian; Guerra, Maricarmen; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

    2013-06-13

    A compliant mooring to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a series of short demon- stration deployments. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM) improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspend- ing Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are more relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion cor- rection (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are dis- cussed.

  12. Suspended sediment transport trough a large fluvial-tidal channel network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Scott A.; Morgan-King, Tara L.

    2015-01-01

    The confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, CA, forms a large network of interconnected channels, referred to as the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the Delta). The Delta comprises the transition zone from the fluvial influences of the upstream rivers and tidal influences of San Francisco Bay downstream. Formerly an extensive tidal marsh, the hydrodynamics and geomorphology of Delta have been substantially modified by humans to support agriculture, navigation, and water supply. These modifications, including construction of new channels, diking and draining of tidal wetlands, dredging of navigation channels, and the operation of large pumping facilities for distribution of freshwater from the Delta to other parts of the state, have had a dramatic impact on the physical and ecological processes within the Delta. To better understand the current physical processes, and their linkages to ecological processes, the USGS maintains an extensive network of flow, sediment, and water quality gages in the Delta. Flow gaging is accomplished through use of the index-velocity method, and sediment monitoring uses turbidity as a surrogate for suspended-sediment concentration. Herein, we present analyses of the transport and dispersal of suspended sediment through the complex network of channels in the Delta. The primary source of sediment to the Delta is the Sacramento River, which delivers pulses of sediment primarily during winter and spring runoff events. Upon reaching the Delta, the sediment pulses move through the fluvial-tidal transition while also encountering numerous channel junctions as the Sacramento River branches into several distributary channels. The monitoring network allows us to track these pulses through the network and document the dominant transport pathways for suspended sediment. Further, the flow gaging allows for an assessment of the relative effects of advection (the fluvial signal) and dispersion (from the tides) on the sediment pulses as they

  13. Increased Tidal Dissipation Using Advanced Rheological Models: Implications for Io and Tidally Active Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Joe P.; Henning, Wade G.

    2018-04-01

    The advanced rheological models of Andrade and Sundberg & Cooper are compared to the traditional Maxwell model to understand how each affects the tidal dissipation of heat within rocky bodies. We find both Andrade and Sundberg–Cooper rheologies can produce at least 10× the tidal heating compared to a traditional Maxwell model for a warm (1400–1600 K) Io-like satellite. Sundberg–Cooper can cause even larger dissipation around a critical temperature and frequency. These models allow cooler planets to stay tidally active in the face of orbital perturbations—a condition we term “tidal resilience.” This has implications for the time evolution of tidally active worlds and the long-term equilibria they fall into. For instance, if Io’s interior is better modeled by the Andrade or Sundberg–Cooper rheologies, the number of possible resonance-forming scenarios that still produce a hot, modern Io is expanded, and these scenarios do not require an early formation of the Laplace resonance. The two primary empirical parameters that define the Andrade anelasticity are examined in several phase spaces to provide guidance on how their uncertainties impact tidal outcomes, as laboratory studies continue to constrain their real values. We provide detailed reference tables on the fully general equations required for others to insert the models of Andrade and Sundberg–Cooper into standard tidal formulae. Lastly, we show that advanced rheologies can greatly impact the heating of short-period exoplanets and exomoons, while the properties of tidal resilience could mean a greater number of tidally active worlds among all extrasolar systems.

  14. CFD for wind and tidal offshore turbines

    CERN Document Server

    Montlaur, Adeline

    2015-01-01

    The book encompasses novel CFD techniques to compute offshore wind and tidal applications. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques are regarded as the main design tool to explore the new engineering challenges presented by offshore wind and tidal turbines for energy generation. The difficulty and costs of undertaking experimental tests in offshore environments have increased the interest in the field of CFD which is used to design appropriate turbines and blades, understand fluid flow physical phenomena associated with offshore environments, predict power production or characterise offshore environments, amongst other topics.

  15. Short period tidal variations of earth rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, C. F.; Williams, J. G.; Parke, M. E.; Dickey, J. O.

    1981-01-01

    It is explained that the tidal deformation of the earth's polar moment of inertia by the moon and sun cause periodic variations in rotation. The short period oscillations give rise to a meter-sized, diurnal signature in the lunar laser ranging data obtained at McDonald Observatory. A solution is given for the scale parameter k/C at fortnightly and monthly tidal frequencies. The results are compared with those obtained by other investigators and with a theoretical estimate which includes the effect of oceans and a decoupled fluid core.

  16. NOAA Historical Tidal Current Data for the Coastal United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Knowledge of the timing and strength of tidal currents is extremely important for safe navigation in coastal waters. Tidal currents are almost always the strongest...

  17. Tidal flow characteristics at Kasheli (Kalwa/ Bassein creek), Bombay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Swamy, G.N.; Suryanarayana, A.

    Tidal flow characteristics of waters at Kasheli, connected to the sea through Thane and Bassein Creeks in Bombay, Maharashtra, India are investigated based on tide and current observations carried out in 1980-81. The results establish that the tidal...

  18. Tidal capture of stars by a massive black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, I. D.; Pethick, C. J.; Polnarev, A. G.

    1992-01-01

    The processes leading to tidal capture of stars by a massive black hole and the consequences of these processes in a dense stellar cluster are discussed in detail. When the amplitude of a tide and the subsequent oscillations are sufficiently large, the energy deposited in a star after periastron passage and formation of a bound orbit cannot be estimated directly using the linear theory of oscillations of a spherical star, but rather numerical estimates must be used. The evolution of a star after tidal capture is discussed. The maximum ratio R of the cross-section for tidal capture to that for tidal disruption is about 3 for real systems. For the case of a stellar system with an empty capture loss cone, even in the case when the impact parameter for tidal capture only slightly exceeds the impact parameter for direct tidal disruption, tidal capture would be much more important than tidal disruption.

  19. The effects of freshwater inflow, inlet conveyance and sea level rise on the salinity regime in the Loxahatchee Estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, G.

    2002-01-01

    The upstream migration of salt water into the historic freshwater reaches of the Loxahatchee River is the likely cause of the altered floodplain cypress forest community along the Northwest Fork and some of its tributaries. Mangroves are replacing cypress forest and areas of mixed swamp hardwoods have reacted to different degrees to the saltwater stress. A hydrodynamic/salinity model was developed to study the influence of freshwater input, tidal inlet deepening and sea level rise on the salinity regime in the estuary. Field data analysis and model simulations indicate that the salinity condition in the estuary is sensitive to the amount of freshwater input from the watershed. During dry seasons the salt front advances into areas that were historically freshwater habitats. Historic evidence indicates that the Loxahatchee estuary was periodically closed and opened to the sea. Due to the active long shore sediment transport, the tidal inlet was probably characterized by shifting sandbars through which ran a narrow and unstable channel. Inlet dredging in the past several decades has increased the hydraulic conveyance of the inlet and the tidal influence into the estuary. The sea level record from a site in south Florida indicates that the sea level has been rising at a rate of approximately 2.3-mm per year. The rise of sea level in the past century has probably raised the mean tide level by about 23 centimeters. If the sea level rise continues as predicted, it is foreseeable that the salt front will move further upstream along with the sea level rise. Field data analysis and the preliminary model output led us to believe that the advance of seawater up the estuary is the combined effect of watershed hydrological changes, inlet deepening and sea level rise. (author)

  20. Salinity affects microbial activity and soil organic matter content in tidal wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Ember M; Gillespie, Jaimie L; Morina, Joseph C; Franklin, Rima B

    2014-04-01

    Climate change-associated sea level rise is expected to cause saltwater intrusion into many historically freshwater ecosystems. Of particular concern are tidal freshwater wetlands, which perform several important ecological functions including carbon sequestration. To predict the impact of saltwater intrusion in these environments, we must first gain a better understanding of how salinity regulates decomposition in natural systems. This study sampled eight tidal wetlands ranging from freshwater to oligohaline (0-2 ppt) in four rivers near the Chesapeake Bay (Virginia). To help isolate salinity effects, sites were selected to be highly similar in terms of plant community composition and tidal influence. Overall, salinity was found to be strongly negatively correlated with soil organic matter content (OM%) and C : N, but unrelated to the other studied environmental parameters (pH, redox, and above- and below-ground plant biomass). Partial correlation analysis, controlling for these environmental covariates, supported direct effects of salinity on the activity of carbon-degrading extracellular enzymes (β-1, 4-glucosidase, 1, 4-β-cellobiosidase, β-D-xylosidase, and phenol oxidase) as well as alkaline phosphatase, using a per unit OM basis. As enzyme activity is the putative rate-limiting step in decomposition, enhanced activity due to salinity increases could dramatically affect soil OM accumulation. Salinity was also found to be positively related to bacterial abundance (qPCR of the 16S rRNA gene) and tightly linked with community composition (T-RFLP). Furthermore, strong relationships were found between bacterial abundance and/or composition with the activity of specific enzymes (1, 4-β-cellobiosidase, arylsulfatase, alkaline phosphatase, and phenol oxidase) suggesting salinity's impact on decomposition could be due, at least in part, to its effect on the bacterial community. Together, these results indicate that salinity increases microbial decomposition rates

  1. Tidal Power Potential in the Submerged Channels of Dar es

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results from in-situ measurements show that currents on the sandbank and the tidal flat, in water depths from 0.5 m to 3.0 m, are directed opposite the main tidal current in the deeper waters. Current velocities vary during a tidal cycle and are strongest in the middle of the cycle. Generally, velocities on the tidal flat are around ...

  2. Improving Estimates of Aboveground Biomass as Trajectory Indicators in Tidal Wetlands using NAIP Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballanti, L.; Byrd, K. B.; Nguyen, D.; Windham-Myers, L.

    2016-12-01

    In an effort to improve carbon accounting in tidal marshes, a key "blue carbon" ecosystem, we developed a method for integrating high resolution imagery into biomass estimates and trajectory indicators of land cover change. Currently, NOAA's Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) provides tidal marsh cover classes nationally based on 30m Landsat imagery. In order to improve wetland biomass estimates derived from C-CAP land cover and Landsat reflectance data, we developed a methodology to better define biomass extents using 1m National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery. For each of six sentinel estuary sites around the U.S., we performed an object-based segmentation on NAIP imagery. Three classes, `green vegetation', `non- vegetation', and `water' were identified using four NAIP bands (red, green, blue and near infrared), the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and normalized difference water index (NDWI), in a rule-based classification. We performed an accuracy assessment at each site with results ranging from 79% to 92% overall accuracy. Using a fishnet grid of Landsat pixel extents, combined with our 1m classification, we calculated the proportion of green vegetation, non-vegetation, and water per 30m pixel. The proportion of green vegetation was used to scale biomass measurements to improve carbon stock estimates. In addition, we explored the use of multi-temporal NAIP-based fractional cover estimates as trajectory indicators for active marsh loss and restoration as defined by the C-CAP land cover transitions. With NAIP imagery collected ever two years, these methods provide a feasible approach for U.S. blue carbon accounting over time.

  3. Tidal Marshes: The Boundary between Land and Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselink, James

    An overview of the ecology of the tidal marshes along the gulf coast of the United States is presented. The following topics are included: (1) the human impact on tidal marshes; (2) the geologic origins of tidal marshes; (3) a description of the physical characteristics and ecosystem of the marshlands; (4) a description of the marshland food chain…

  4. Field migration rates of tidal meanders recapitulate fluvial morphodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotello, Alvise; Lanzoni, Stefano; Ghinassi, Massimiliano; Marani, Marco; Rinaldo, Andrea; D'Alpaos, Andrea

    2018-02-13

    The majority of tidal channels display marked meandering features. Despite their importance in oil-reservoir formation and tidal landscape morphology, questions remain on whether tidal-meander dynamics could be understood in terms of fluvial processes and theory. Key differences suggest otherwise, like the periodic reversal of landscape-forming tidal flows and the widely accepted empirical notion that tidal meanders are stable landscape features, in stark contrast with their migrating fluvial counterparts. On the contrary, here we show that, once properly normalized, observed migration rates of tidal and fluvial meanders are remarkably similar. Key to normalization is the role of tidal channel width that responds to the strong spatial gradients of landscape-forming flow rates and tidal prisms. We find that migration dynamics of tidal meanders agree with nonlinear theories for river meander evolution. Our results challenge the conventional view of tidal channels as stable landscape features and suggest that meandering tidal channels recapitulate many fluvial counterparts owing to large gradients of tidal prisms across meander wavelengths. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  5. Detecting areal changes in tidal flats after sea dike construction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    remote sensing, however, may be used for mapping tidal flats in a rapid and accurate manner. Orbital remote sensing may be used to effectively assess tidal flat accretion due to its repetitive and synop- tic nature (Sanjeevi 1996). Many researchers have used remote sensing images to classify tidal flats and analyze their.

  6. Subtidal flow division at a shallow tidal junction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschman, F.A.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Vegt, M. van der; Hoekstra, P.

    2010-01-01

    Tides influence distribution of river discharge at tidally affected channel junctions. At the apex of a channel network in an Indonesian delta, observations of flow division suggest that tidally averaged flow division depends on the tidal range. To understand the mechanisms governing the subtidal

  7. Field migration rates of tidal meanders recapitulate fluvial morphodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotello, Alvise; Lanzoni, Stefano; Ghinassi, Massimiliano; Marani, Marco; Rinaldo, Andrea; D'Alpaos, Andrea

    2018-02-01

    The majority of tidal channels display marked meandering features. Despite their importance in oil-reservoir formation and tidal landscape morphology, questions remain on whether tidal-meander dynamics could be understood in terms of fluvial processes and theory. Key differences suggest otherwise, like the periodic reversal of landscape-forming tidal flows and the widely accepted empirical notion that tidal meanders are stable landscape features, in stark contrast with their migrating fluvial counterparts. On the contrary, here we show that, once properly normalized, observed migration rates of tidal and fluvial meanders are remarkably similar. Key to normalization is the role of tidal channel width that responds to the strong spatial gradients of landscape-forming flow rates and tidal prisms. We find that migration dynamics of tidal meanders agree with nonlinear theories for river meander evolution. Our results challenge the conventional view of tidal channels as stable landscape features and suggest that meandering tidal channels recapitulate many fluvial counterparts owing to large gradients of tidal prisms across meander wavelengths.

  8. Tidal variations in the Sundarbans Estuarine System, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    At all stations, tidal water levels (every. 15 minutes), salinity, water and air temperatures (hourly) were measured over the six tidal cycles. We report the observed spatio-temporal variations of the tidal water level. The predominantly semi-diurnal tides were observed to amplify northwards along each estuary, with the highest ...

  9. Tidal exchange of larvae of Sesarma catenata (Decapoda, Brachyura)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tidal exchange of larvae of the salt-marsh grapsid crab Sesarma catenata was studied in the Swartkops estuary, a tidally driven, shallow estuary in Algoa Bay, South Africa. Plankton samples were collected bimonlhly during spring and neap tides from October to March at the tidal inlet. Samples were collected hourly for ...

  10. How Tidal Forces Cause Ocean Tides in the Equilibrium Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chiu-king

    2015-01-01

    We analyse why it is erroneous to think that a tidal bulge is formed by pulling the water surface directly up by a local vertical tidal force. In fact, ocean tides are caused by the global effect of the horizontal components of the tidal forces.

  11. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable...... bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures...... marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary...

  12. On the ecogeomorphological feedbacks that control tidal channel network evolution in a sandy mangrove setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Maanen, B.; Coco, G.; Bryan, K. R.

    2015-01-01

    An ecomorphodynamic model was developed to study how Avicennia marina mangroves influence channel network evolution in sandy tidal embayments. The model accounts for the effects of mangrove trees on tidal flow patterns and sediment dynamics. Mangrove growth is in turn controlled by hydrodynamic conditions. The presence of mangroves was found to enhance the initiation and branching of tidal channels, partly because the extra flow resistance in mangrove forests favours flow concentration, and thus sediment erosion in between vegetated areas. The enhanced branching of channels is also the result of a vegetation-induced increase in erosion threshold. On the other hand, this reduction in bed erodibility, together with the soil expansion driven by organic matter production, reduces the landward expansion of channels. The ongoing accretion in mangrove forests ultimately drives a reduction in tidal prism and an overall retreat of the channel network. During sea-level rise, mangroves can potentially enhance the ability of the soil surface to maintain an elevation within the upper portion of the intertidal zone, while hindering both the branching and headward erosion of the landward expanding channels. The modelling results presented here indicate the critical control exerted by ecogeomorphological interactions in driving landscape evolution. PMID:26339195

  13. Empirical Tidal Dissipation in Exoplanet Hosts From Tidal Spin-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penev, Kaloyan; Bouma, L. G.; Winn, Joshua N.; Hartman, Joel D.

    2018-04-01

    Stars with hot Jupiters (HJs) tend to rotate faster than other stars of the same age and mass. This trend has been attributed to tidal interactions between the star and planet. A constraint on the dissipation parameter {Q}\\star {\\prime } follows from the assumption that tides have managed to spin up the star to the observed rate within the age of the system. This technique was applied previously to HATS-18 and WASP-19. Here, we analyze the sample of all 188 known HJs with an orbital period tidal dissipation parameter ({Q}\\star {\\prime }) increases sharply with forcing frequency, from 105 at 0.5 day‑1 to 107 at 2 day‑1. This helps to resolve a number of apparent discrepancies between studies of tidal dissipation in binary stars, HJs, and warm Jupiters. It may also allow for a HJ to damp the obliquity of its host star prior to being destroyed by tidal decay.

  14. Salmon habitat use, tidal-fluvial estuary - Columbia River Estuary Tidal Habitats

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The goal of the tidal-fluvial estuary study is to determine the estuary's contribution to the spatial structure and life history diversity of Columbia River salmon...

  15. Changing Arctic Ocean freshwater pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morison, James; Kwok, Ron; Peralta-Ferriz, Cecilia; Alkire, Matt; Rigor, Ignatius; Andersen, Roger; Steele, Mike

    2012-01-04

    Freshening in the Canada basin of the Arctic Ocean began in the 1990s and continued to at least the end of 2008. By then, the Arctic Ocean might have gained four times as much fresh water as comprised the Great Salinity Anomaly of the 1970s, raising the spectre of slowing global ocean circulation. Freshening has been attributed to increased sea ice melting and contributions from runoff, but a leading explanation has been a strengthening of the Beaufort High--a characteristic peak in sea level atmospheric pressure--which tends to accelerate an anticyclonic (clockwise) wind pattern causing convergence of fresh surface water. Limited observations have made this explanation difficult to verify, and observations of increasing freshwater content under a weakened Beaufort High suggest that other factors must be affecting freshwater content. Here we use observations to show that during a time of record reductions in ice extent from 2005 to 2008, the dominant freshwater content changes were an increase in the Canada basin balanced by a decrease in the Eurasian basin. Observations are drawn from satellite data (sea surface height and ocean-bottom pressure) and in situ data. The freshwater changes were due to a cyclonic (anticlockwise) shift in the ocean pathway of Eurasian runoff forced by strengthening of the west-to-east Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation characterized by an increased Arctic Oscillation index. Our results confirm that runoff is an important influence on the Arctic Ocean and establish that the spatial and temporal manifestations of the runoff pathways are modulated by the Arctic Oscillation, rather than the strength of the wind-driven Beaufort Gyre circulation.

  16. Nova Scotia Power : in-stream tidal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meade, K.

    2007-01-01

    The Government of Nova Scotia, the Government of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia Power and others have funded a feasibility study of North American sites for commercial instream tidal power. In July 2007, Nova Scotia Power received partial funding for a demonstration project. This presentation provided information on a demonstration plant for tidal power run by Nova Scotia Power. It discussed the benefits of the Open Hydro technology for this plant. In this simple design, the generator is on the circumference of the turbine. The design does not involve any power transmission systems or any pitching of blades. In addition, the technology is environmentally sound as it is completely shrouded, has low rotational speed, and a large open centre allows fish to pass through, and it does not require lubricants. The last benefit that was presented was the scale up of 250 kW machine deployed in a European test facility. The presentation also discussed the advantages of developing tidal power at this time. It was concluded that tidal energy has significant potential. Although it is intermittent, it is predictable and bulk power system can be scheduled to accommodate it. figs

  17. Estuaries and Tidal Marshes. Habitat Pac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This educational packet consists of an overview, three lesson plans, student data sheets, and a poster. The overview examines estuaries and tidal or salt marshes by discussing the plants and animals in these habitats, marsh productivity, benefits and management of the habitats, historical aspects, and development and pollution. A glossary and list…

  18. Life on the Tidal Mudflats: Elkhorn Slough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Ruth

    Life in an estuarine environment is studied in this set of audio-visual materials prepared for grades 6-12. A 71-frame colored filmstrip, cassette tape narration, and teacher's guide focus upon Elkhorn Slough, a tidal mudflat in the Monterey Bay area, California. Topics examined range from river drainage and the effects of pollution on living…

  19. An optimal tuning strategy for tidal turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Tuning wind and tidal turbines is critical to maximizing their power output. Adopting a wind turbine tuning strategy of maximizing the output at any given time is shown to be an extremely poor strategy for large arrays of tidal turbines in channels. This ‘impatient-tuning strategy’ results in far lower power output, much higher structural loads and greater environmental impacts due to flow reduction than an existing ‘patient-tuning strategy’ which maximizes the power output averaged over the tidal cycle. This paper presents a ‘smart patient tuning strategy’, which can increase array output by up to 35% over the existing strategy. This smart strategy forgoes some power generation early in the half tidal cycle in order to allow stronger flows to develop later in the cycle. It extracts enough power from these stronger flows to produce more power from the cycle as a whole than the existing strategy. Surprisingly, the smart strategy can often extract more power without increasing maximum structural loads on the turbines, while also maintaining stronger flows along the channel. This paper also shows that, counterintuitively, for some tuning strategies imposing a cap on turbine power output to limit loads can increase a turbine’s average power output. PMID:27956870

  20. Palaemon pacijicus (Stimpson) in eastern Cape tidal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1984-09-25

    Sep 25, 1984 ... seasonally with peak numbers and biomass found in summer ... One part of the programme dealt with the tidal pool ... pools sampled. Unicam spectrophotometer at 458 run. A dilution series was made for each batch of concentrate used. A domestic water meter was coupled to the outlet of a portable pump ...

  1. Tidal Energy Dissipation from Topex/Poseidon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Richard D.; Egbert, G. D.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In a recent paper ({\\it Nature, 405,} 775, 2000) we concluded that 25 to 30\\% of the ocean's tidal energy dissipation, or about 1 terawatt, occurs in the deep ocean, with the remaining 2.6 TW in shallow seas. The physical mechanism for deep-ocean dissipation is apparently scattering of the surface tide into internal modes; Munk and Wunsch have suggested that this mechanism may provide half the power needed for mixing the deep-ocean. This paper builds further evidence for $1\\pm 0.2$ TW of deep-ocean dissipation. The evidence is extracted from tidal elevations deduced from seven years of Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter data. The dissipation rate Is formed as a balance between the rate of working by tidal forces and the energy flux divergence. While dynamical assumptions are required to compute fluxes, area integrals of the energy balance are, owing to the tight satellite constraints, remarkably insensitive to these assumptions. A large suite of tidal solutions based on a wide range of dynamical assumptions, on perturbations to bathymetric models, and on simulated elevation data are used to assess this sensitivity. These and Monte Carlo error fields from a generalized inverse model are used to establish error uncertainties.

  2. The history of tidal power in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banal, M.

    1997-01-01

    The first known use of tidal power in France concerns the tidal mills in general use during the Middle Age along the French coasts. The first research studies of tidal power plants started at the end of the first world war but it is only in 1940 with the stimulus of Robert Gibrat that was created the Research Society for the use of Tides and the Rance plant project. In 1946, Electricite de France (EdF) started again the studies of this company for a greater size project in the Chausey archipelago which was abandoned for the benefit of the Rance project in the 1960's. The start up of the plant took place in 1967 but the other projects were abandoned during the 1980's. This short paper recalls the historical aspects of the development of tidal power in France and focusses on the research and development studies and on the economical, political and legal factors that led to retain the Rance project among others proposed. (J.S.)

  3. Tidal dwarf galaxies in cosmological simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeckinger, Sylvia; Sharma, Kuldeep; Schaye, Joop; Crain, Robert A.; Schaller, Matthieu; Barber, Christopher

    2018-02-01

    The formation and evolution of gravitationally bound, star forming substructures in tidal tails of interacting galaxies, called tidal dwarf galaxies (TDG), has been studied, until now, only in idealized simulations of individual pairs of interacting galaxies for pre-determined orbits, mass ratios and gas fractions. Here, we present the first identification of TDG candidates in fully cosmological simulations, specifically the high-resolution simulations of the EAGLE suite. The finite resolution of the simulation limits their ability to predict the exact formation rate and survival time-scale of TDGs, but we show that gravitationally bound baryonic structures in tidal arms already form in current state-of-the-art cosmological simulations. In this case, the orbital parameter, disc orientations as well as stellar and gas masses and the specific angular momentum of the TDG forming galaxies are a direct consequence of cosmic structure formation. We identify TDG candidates in a wide range of environments, such as multiple galaxy mergers, clumpy high-redshift (up to z = 2) galaxies, high-speed encounters and tidal interactions with gas-poor galaxies. We present selection methods, the properties of the identified TDG candidates and a road map for more quantitative analyses using future high-resolution simulations.

  4. An optimal tuning strategy for tidal turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennell, Ross

    2016-11-01

    Tuning wind and tidal turbines is critical to maximizing their power output. Adopting a wind turbine tuning strategy of maximizing the output at any given time is shown to be an extremely poor strategy for large arrays of tidal turbines in channels. This 'impatient-tuning strategy' results in far lower power output, much higher structural loads and greater environmental impacts due to flow reduction than an existing 'patient-tuning strategy' which maximizes the power output averaged over the tidal cycle. This paper presents a 'smart patient tuning strategy', which can increase array output by up to 35% over the existing strategy. This smart strategy forgoes some power generation early in the half tidal cycle in order to allow stronger flows to develop later in the cycle. It extracts enough power from these stronger flows to produce more power from the cycle as a whole than the existing strategy. Surprisingly, the smart strategy can often extract more power without increasing maximum structural loads on the turbines, while also maintaining stronger flows along the channel. This paper also shows that, counterintuitively, for some tuning strategies imposing a cap on turbine power output to limit loads can increase a turbine's average power output.

  5. TIDAL EVOLUTION OF CLOSE-IN PLANETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Soko; Rasio, Frederic A.; Peale, Stanton J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent discoveries of several transiting planets with clearly non-zero eccentricities and some large obliquities started changing the simple picture of close-in planets having circular and well-aligned orbits. The two major scenarios that form such close-in planets are planet migration in a disk and planet-planet interactions combined with tidal dissipation. The former scenario can naturally produce a circular and low-obliquity orbit, while the latter implicitly assumes an initially highly eccentric and possibly high-obliquity orbit, which are then circularized and aligned via tidal dissipation. Most of these close-in planets experience orbital decay all the way to the Roche limit as previous studies showed. We investigate the tidal evolution of transiting planets on eccentric orbits, and find that there are two characteristic evolution paths for them, depending on the relative efficiency of tidal dissipation inside the star and the planet. Our study shows that each of these paths may correspond to migration and scattering scenarios. We further point out that the current observations may be consistent with the scattering scenario, where the circularization of an initially eccentric orbit occurs before the orbital decay primarily due to tidal dissipation in the planet, while the alignment of the stellar spin and orbit normal occurs on a similar timescale to the orbital decay largely due to dissipation in the star. We also find that even when the stellar spin-orbit misalignment is observed to be small at present, some systems could have had a highly misaligned orbit in the past, if their evolution is dominated by tidal dissipation in the star. Finally, we also re-examine the recent claim by Levrard et al. that all orbital and spin parameters, including eccentricity and stellar obliquity, evolve on a similar timescale to orbital decay. This counterintuitive result turns out to have been caused by a typo in their numerical code. Solving the correct set of tidal

  6. Relativistic tidal properties of neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damour, Thibault; Nagar, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    We study the various linear responses of neutron stars to external relativistic tidal fields. We focus on three different tidal responses, associated to three different tidal coefficients: (i) a gravito-electric-type coefficient Gμ l =[length] 2l+1 measuring the lth-order mass multipolar moment GM a 1 ...a l induced in a star by an external lth-order gravito-electric tidal field G a 1 ...a l ; (ii) a gravito-magnetic-type coefficient Gσ l =[length] 2l+1 measuring the lth spin multipole moment GS a 1 ...a l induced in a star by an external lth-order gravito-magnetic tidal field H a 1 ...a l ; and (iii) a dimensionless 'shape' Love number h l measuring the distortion of the shape of the surface of a star by an external lth-order gravito-electric tidal field. All the dimensionless tidal coefficients Gμ l /R 2l+1 , Gσ l /R 2l+1 , and h l (where R is the radius of the star) are found to have a strong sensitivity to the value of the star's 'compactness'c≡GM/(c 0 2 R) (where we indicate by c 0 the speed of light). In particular, Gμ l /R 2l+1 ∼k l is found to strongly decrease, as c increases, down to a zero value as c is formally extended to the 'black hole (BH) limit'c BH =1/2. The shape Love number h l is also found to significantly decrease as c increases, though it does not vanish in the formal limit c→c BH , but is rather found to agree with the recently determined shape Love numbers of black holes. The formal vanishing of μ l and σ l as c→c BH is a consequence of the no-hair properties of black holes. This vanishing suggests, but in no way proves, that the effective action describing the gravitational interactions of black holes may not need to be augmented by nonminimal worldline couplings.

  7. Effect of the tidal-seismic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Y.; Zheng, Y.

    2017-12-01

    For a moon spiraling inward to its planet, the tidal force frequency of a moon is increasing. When the distance of the moon to the planet is close enough, the tidal force frequency can intrude into the frequency range of planet normal modes. Usually the football mode, also known as 0S2, has the lowest frequency. This mode is most likely to be excited and coupled first. When the tidal force has the same frequency with the normal modes, the resonance can happen. The existence of the topography or internal heterogeneities of the planet can have mode coupling. So the energy of gravity force with higher spatial frequencies can be transferred to the low spatial 0S2 mode. The resonant mode 0S2 can exert a negative torque to the rotating moon so its orbit decays. With our 3D numerical boundary element method which takes into account planet surface topography (i.e., Mars as example), we found that the closer the moon is to the planet, the greater falling rate of the moon would be. We applied our method to a planet with equal size of Mars and elastic constants in possible range. The vibration amplitude on the planet surface can reach to the scale of meters when as the moon drop down to about 1.04 radius of the planet to achieve resonance with the 0S2 mode. Our modeling showed that the influence of tidal force caused resonance could not be neglected in the process of moon falling. On the other hand, the resonance may also be able to speed up the accretion of the early forming planet by absorbing the dust of small asteroid nearby by the tidal-seismic resonance.

  8. Light rays and the tidal gravitational pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, A. N. St J.

    2018-05-01

    Null geodesic deviation in classical general relativity is expressed in terms of a scalar function, defined as the invariant magnitude of the connecting vector between neighbouring light rays in a null geodesic congruence projected onto a two-dimensional screen space orthogonal to the rays, where λ is an affine parameter along the rays. We demonstrate that η satisfies a harmonic oscillator-like equation with a λ-dependent frequency, which comprises terms accounting for local matter affecting the congruence and tidal gravitational effects from distant matter or gravitational waves passing through the congruence, represented by the amplitude, of a complex Weyl driving term. Oscillating solutions for η imply the presence of conjugate or focal points along the rays. A polarisation angle, is introduced comprising the orientation of the connecting vector on the screen space and the phase, of the Weyl driving term. Interpreting β as the polarisation of a gravitational wave encountering the light rays, we consider linearly polarised waves in the first instance. A highly non-linear, second-order ordinary differential equation, (the tidal pendulum equation), is then derived, so-called due to its analogy with the equation describing a non-linear, variable-length pendulum oscillating under gravity. The variable pendulum length is represented by the connecting vector magnitude, whilst the acceleration due to gravity in the familiar pendulum formulation is effectively replaced by . A tidal torque interpretation is also developed, where the torque is expressed as a coupling between the moment of inertia of the pendulum and the tidal gravitational field. Precessional effects are briefly discussed. A solution to the tidal pendulum equation in terms of familiar gravitational lensing variables is presented. The potential emergence of chaos in general relativity is discussed in the context of circularly, elliptically or randomly polarised gravitational waves encountering the null

  9. Environmental consequences of tidal power in a hyper-tidal muddy regime: the Severn estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, R.

    1997-01-01

    Muddy hyper-tidal regimes, such as the Severn Estuary in the UK, are especially difficult for plants and animals. The difficulties stem from the semi-diurnal and semi-lunar energy fluctuations. On spring tides entrained fine sediment induces elevated suspended sediment concentrations such that photosynthesis is inhibited. On neap tides much of the entrained fine sediment is deposited on the sub-tidal bed over periods of several days to form ephemeral dense layers, which reach in excess of 100 G/l and rapidly become anaerobic on stagnation. Such occasional bed faunas as develop are characterised by very large numbers of immature individuals of a few species. One of the few organisms able to cope with the extreme conditions is the siliceous reef-building worn Sabellaria. Arising from the long term suppression in its calcareous fauna, erosion and winnowing of these Holocene clays fails to give rise to lag shell deposits, called chenier ridges, found elsewhere in eroding muddy inter-tidal systems. A tidal power barrage would shift the regime from hyper-tidal to macro-tidal decrease in turbidity would permit photosynthesis and phytoplankton growth, so stimulating the higher food chain. Ironically, perhaps, cleaning up the sewage discharges in the estuary, in the absence of barrage construction would lead to a wading bird crash whereas barrage construction would lead to an improved carrying capacity. (author)

  10. Flow paths of water and sediment in a tidal marsh: relations with marsh developmental stage and tidal inundation height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temmerman, S.; Bouma, T.J.; Govers, G.; Lauwaet, D.

    2005-01-01

    This study provides new insights in the relative role of tidal creeks and the marsh edge in supplying water and sediments to and from tidal marshes for a wide range of tidal inundation cycles with different high water levels and for marsh zones of different developmental stage. Net import or export

  11. Greenland Tidal Pools as Hot Spots for Ecosystem Metabolism and Calcification

    KAUST Repository

    Duarte, Carlos M.

    2018-01-18

    twice a day. Meroplankton larvae are exposed to ocean acidification until they settle in vegetated tidal pools, where they benefit from the protection offered by the “macroalgae-carbonate saturation state” interaction favouring calcification rates.

  12. The Freshwater Information Platform - an online network supporting freshwater biodiversity research and policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Kloiber, Astrid; De Wever, Aaike; Bremerich, Vanessa; Strackbein, Jörg; Hering, Daniel; Jähnig, Sonja; Kiesel, Jens; Martens, Koen; Tockner, Klement

    2017-04-01

    Species distribution data is crucial for improving our understanding of biodiversity and its threats. This is especially the case for freshwater environments, which are heavily affected by the global biodiversity crisis. Currently, a huge body of freshwater biodiversity data is often difficult to access, because systematic data publishing practices have not yet been adopted by the freshwater research community. The Freshwater Information Platform (FIP; www.freshwaterplatform.eu) - initiated through the BioFresh project - aims at pooling freshwater related research information from a variety of projects and initiatives to make it easily accessible for scientists, water managers and conservationists as well as the interested public. It consists of several major components, three of which we want to specifically address: (1) The Freshwater Biodiversity Data Portal aims at mobilising freshwater biodiversity data, making them online available Datasets in the portal are described and documented in the (2) Freshwater Metadatabase and published as open access articles in the Freshwater Metadata Journal. The use of collected datasets for large-scale analyses and models is demonstrated in the (3) Global Freshwater Biodiversity Atlas that publishes interactive online maps featuring research results on freshwater biodiversity, resources, threats and conservation priorities. Here we present the main components of the FIP as tools to streamline open access freshwater data publication arguing this will improve the capacity to protect and manage freshwater biodiversity in the face of global change.

  13. Statistical correction of lidar-derived digital elevation models with multispectral airborne imagery in tidal marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffington, Kevin J.; Dugger, Bruce D.; Thorne, Karen M.; Takekawa, John Y.

    2016-01-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) is a valuable tool for collecting large amounts of elevation data across large areas; however, the limited ability to penetrate dense vegetation with lidar hinders its usefulness for measuring tidal marsh platforms. Methods to correct lidar elevation data are available, but a reliable method that requires limited field work and maintains spatial resolution is lacking. We present a novel method, the Lidar Elevation Adjustment with NDVI (LEAN), to correct lidar digital elevation models (DEMs) with vegetation indices from readily available multispectral airborne imagery (NAIP) and RTK-GPS surveys. Using 17 study sites along the Pacific coast of the U.S., we achieved an average root mean squared error (RMSE) of 0.072 m, with a 40–75% improvement in accuracy from the lidar bare earth DEM. Results from our method compared favorably with results from three other methods (minimum-bin gridding, mean error correction, and vegetation correction factors), and a power analysis applying our extensive RTK-GPS dataset showed that on average 118 points were necessary to calibrate a site-specific correction model for tidal marshes along the Pacific coast. By using available imagery and with minimal field surveys, we showed that lidar-derived DEMs can be adjusted for greater accuracy while maintaining high (1 m) resolution.

  14. Tidal regimes and salt marshes - the River Hamble analogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, A.J.; Moy, I.L.; Warman, E.A.; Dawson, F.H.; Henville, P.

    1993-01-01

    Construction of estuarine tidal-energy barrages has a potentially major effect on the tidal regime of the estuary, particularly upstream of a barrage. Because tidal regime largely controls the distribution and species composition of intertidal plant and animal communities, it is important to understand how barrages may affect such communities. The main objectives of the research described in this report were to relate recent changes in tidal regime within an embanked area of salt marsh and mudflat to changes in the distribution of plant species. This was to test predictions about tidal control of species' range and to assess the site's suitability as an analogue of post-barrage conditions. (author)

  15. Global carbon sequestration in tidal, saline wetland soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmura, G.L.; Anisfeld, S.C.; Cahoon, D.R.; Lynch, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Wetlands represent the largest component of the terrestrial biological carbon pool and thus play an important role in global carbon cycles. Most global carbon budgets, however, have focused on dry land ecosystems that extend over large areas and have not accounted for the many small, scattered carbon-storing ecosystems such as tidal saline wetlands. We compiled data for 154 sites in mangroves and salt marshes from the western and eastern Atlantic and Pacific coasts, as well as the Indian Ocean, Mediterranean Ocean, and Gulf of Mexico. The set of sites spans a latitudinal range from 22.4??S in the Indian Ocean to 55.5??N in the northeastern Atlantic. The average soil carbon density of mangrove swamps (0.055 ?? 0.004 g cm-3) is significantly higher than the salt marsh average (0.039 ?? 0.003 g cm-3). Soil carbon density in mangrove swamps and Spartina patens marshes declines with increasing average annual temperature, probably due to increased decay rates at higher temperatures. In contrast, carbon sequestration rates were not significantly different between mangrove swamps and salt marshes. Variability in sediment accumulation rates within marshes is a major control of carbon sequestration rates masking any relationship with climatic parameters. Globally, these combined wetlands store at least 44.6 Tg C yr-1 and probably more, as detailed areal inventories are not available for salt marshes in China and South America. Much attention has been given to the role of freshwater wetlands, particularly northern peatlands, as carbon sinks. In contrast to peatlands, salt marshes and mangroves release negligible amounts of greenhouse gases and store more carbon per unit area. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Spatiotemporal variability in salinity and hydraulic relationship with salt intrusion in the tidal reaches of the Minjiang River, Fujian Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Rongrong; Pang, Yong; Luo, Bingrong; Li, Jiabing; Wu, Chunshan; Zheng, Yuyi; Sun, Qiyuan; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Feifeng

    2017-04-01

    Salinity is one of the most important factors for tidal-affected water bodies including estuaries and tidal river reaches. However, due to the limitations of simultaneous manual monitoring in long-distance areas, studies of estuaries are preferred to tidal reaches. Hence, in this study, we investigated the tidal reach of the Minjiang River and five sets of field observations were used to determine the influence of saltwater intrusion in different seasons. During the dry and wet season with low discharge, the longitudinal salinity profiles showed that a station located about 45 km from the river mouth still suffered from saltwater intrusion especially when the upstream discharge was under 754 m 3  s -1 , where the periodical fluctuation in the salinity remained the same with the water level, but there was a time lag of approximately 4 h compared with the discharge process. However, during the wet season in April and May 2016, the monitored salinity was approximately at the detectable limit of 0.02-0.04 ppt at the station close to the river mouth, which indicated that there was no saltwater exchange into the river, although dual flow directions were observed in the survey periods. The major differences among five survey periods were mainly related to upstream discharge rather than the seasons, the tidal range, and tidal excursion. The conclusions of this study have strategic importance for protecting water sources by guiding the government to assess the optimal freshwater release time and discharge rate to prevent saltwater entering the important tidal-affected river reaches.

  17. Tidal disruption of fuzzy dark matter subhalo cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaolong; Schwabe, Bodo; Niemeyer, Jens C.; Bürger, David

    2018-03-01

    We study tidal stripping of fuzzy dark matter (FDM) subhalo cores using simulations of the Schrödinger-Poisson equations and analyze the dynamics of tidal disruption, highlighting the differences with standard cold dark matter. Mass loss outside of the tidal radius forces the core to relax into a less compact configuration, lowering the tidal radius. As the characteristic radius of a solitonic core scales inversely with its mass, tidal stripping results in a runaway effect and rapid tidal disruption of the core once its central density drops below 4.5 times the average density of the host within the orbital radius. Additionally, we find that the core is deformed into a tidally locked ellipsoid with increasing eccentricities until it is completely disrupted. Using the core mass loss rate, we compute the minimum mass of cores that can survive several orbits for different FDM particle masses and compare it with observed masses of satellite galaxies in the Milky Way.

  18. A remote sensing-based model of tidal marsh aboveground carbon stocks for the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Kristin B.; Ballanti, Laurel; Thomas, Nathan; Nguyen, Dung; Holmquist, James R.; Simard, Marc; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie

    2018-05-01

    Remote sensing based maps of tidal marshes, both of their extents and carbon stocks, have the potential to play a key role in conducting greenhouse gas inventories and implementing climate mitigation policies. Our objective was to generate a single remote sensing model of tidal marsh aboveground biomass and carbon that represents nationally diverse tidal marshes within the conterminous United States (CONUS). We developed the first calibration-grade, national-scale dataset of aboveground tidal marsh biomass, species composition, and aboveground plant carbon content (%C) from six CONUS regions: Cape Cod, MA, Chesapeake Bay, MD, Everglades, FL, Mississippi Delta, LA, San Francisco Bay, CA, and Puget Sound, WA. Using the random forest machine learning algorithm, we tested whether imagery from multiple sensors, Sentinel-1 C-band synthetic aperture radar, Landsat, and the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP), can improve model performance. The final model, driven by six Landsat vegetation indices and with the soil adjusted vegetation index as the most important (n = 409, RMSE = 310 g/m2, 10.3% normalized RMSE), successfully predicted biomass for a range of marsh plant functional types defined by height, leaf angle and growth form. Model results were improved by scaling field-measured biomass calibration data by NAIP-derived 30 m fraction green vegetation. With a mean plant carbon content of 44.1% (n = 1384, 95% C.I. = 43.99%-44.37%), we generated regional 30 m aboveground carbon density maps for estuarine and palustrine emergent tidal marshes as indicated by a modified NOAA Coastal Change Analysis Program map. We applied a multivariate delta method to calculate uncertainties in regional carbon densities and stocks that considered standard error in map area, mean biomass and mean %C. Louisiana palustrine emergent marshes had the highest C density (2.67 ± 0.004 Mg/ha) of all regions, while San Francisco Bay brackish/saline marshes had the highest C density of all

  19. Tidal Friction in the Earth and Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R. D.

    2006-12-01

    "Tidal Friction" is a classic subject in geophysics, with ties to some of the great scientists of the Victorian era. The subject has been reinvigorated over the past decade by space geodesy, and particularly by the Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter mission. In fact, the topic has now taken on some significance in oceanography, with potential implications for problems of mixing, thermocline maintenance, and the thermohaline circulation. Likewise, tidal measurements have become sufficiently precise to reveal new information about the solid earth. In this respect, the tidal force is an invaluable "probe" of the earth, at frequencies well outside the seismic band. This talk will "follow the energy" of tides while noting some important geophysical implications at each stage. In the present earth-moon-sun configuration, energy for tides is extracted from the earth's rotation. Ancient eclipses bear witness to this, and the discrepancy between Babylonian (and other) observations and tidal predictions yields unique information about the mantle and the overlying fluid envelope. Complementary information comes from tidal anelasticity estimates, which are now available at frequencies ranging from semidiurnal to fortnightly, monthly, and 18.6 years. These data, when combined with various kinds of gravity measurements, are relevant to the present-day sea-level problem. Solid-earth tidal dissipation represents less than 5% of the system total. As has long been realized, the largest energy sink is the ocean. About 70% of the oceanic dissipation occurs in shallow seas (the traditional sink) and 30% in the deep ocean, generally near rugged bottom topography. The latter represents a substantial amount of power, roughly 1 gigawatt, available for generation of internal tides and other baroclinic motions. Experiments like HOME are helping unravel the links between barotropic tides, internal tides, turbulence, and mixing. The latter opens possible linkages to climate, and recent work

  20. Tidal power dams in the Bay of Fundy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsun, W. van

    1998-01-01

    The challenges of harnessing tidal power and the construction of dams and tidal power plants in a tidal-ocean environment such as the Bay of Fundy in New Brunswick are discussed. In the 1966-1988 series of studies, three sites were chosen at the Bay of Fundy as being the most promising, namely (1) site B9 in Minas Basin at the entrance to Cobequid Bay, (2) site A8 at the narrow neck beyond the entrance to Cumberland Basin, and (3) site A6 at the entrance to Shepody Bay. All the sites are located at the head of the Bay of Fundy because that is where the maximum tidal ranges are found and a basin's tidal energy potential is proportional to the square of its tidal range. Site B9 was determined to have the greatest tidal power potential but no plant has ever been built because reports have stated that a solid conventional tidal power barrage at site B9 would increase the tidal range at Boston by as much as 30 cm. Rather than abandoning the site for this reason, an installation consisting of a series of piers from shore to shore with hydraulic turbines mounted in the spaces between piers, was suggested. A simple mathematical model has been developed for determining the operation of this tidal fence. The cost of energy, generated by the tidal fence at site B9 was also calculated. Further studies are suggested to determine the exact environmental effect of the tidal fence on the tidal regime. If environmental problems persist, machines with larger discharge capabilities could be considered to reduce the interference of the fence with natural tidal movements. 9 refs., 6 figs

  1. Net sediment transport in tidal basins: quantifying the tidal barotropic mechanisms in a unified framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Vincenzo Marco; van Prooijen, Bram Christiaan; Wang, Zheng Bing

    2017-11-01

    Net sediment transport in tidal basins is a subtle imbalance between large fluxes produced by the flood/ebb alternation. The imbalance arises from several mechanisms of suspended transport. Lag effects and tidal asymmetries are regarded as dominant, but defined in different frames of reference (Lagrangian and Eulerian, respectively). A quantitative ranking of their effectiveness is therefore missing. Furthermore, although wind waves are recognized as crucial for tidal flats' morphodynamics, a systematic analysis of the interaction with tidal mechanisms has not been carried out so far. We review the tide-induced barotropic mechanisms and discuss the shortcomings of their current classification for numerical process-based models. Hence, we conceive a unified Eulerian framework accounting for wave-induced resuspension. A new methodology is proposed to decompose the sediment fluxes accordingly, which is applicable without needing (semi-) analytical approximations. The approach is tested with a one-dimensional model of the Vlie basin, Wadden Sea (The Netherlands). Results show that lag-driven transport is dominant for the finer fractions (silt and mud). In absence of waves, net sediment fluxes are landward and spatial (advective) lag effects are dominant. In presence of waves, sediment can be exported from the tidal flats and temporal (local) lag effects are dominant. Conversely, sand transport is dominated by the asymmetry of peak ebb/flood velocities. We show that the direction of lag-driven transport can be estimated by the gradient of hydrodynamic energy. In agreement with previous studies, our results support the conceptualization of tidal flats' equilibrium as a simplified balance between tidal mechanisms and wave resuspension.

  2. Tentacle structure in freshwater bryozoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamberg, Yuta; Shunatova, Natalia

    2017-05-01

    Tentacles are the main food-gathering organs of bryozoans. The most common design is a hollow tube of extracellular matrix (ECM), covered with ten columns of epithelial cells on the outside, and a coelothelium on the inside. Nerves follow the ECM, going between the bases of some epidermal cells. The tentacle musculature includes two bundles formed by myoepithelial cells of the coelothelium. The tentacles of freshwater (phylactolaemate) bryozoans, however, differ somewhat in structure from those of marine bryozoans. Here, we describe the tentacles of three species of phylactolaemates, comparing them to gymnolaemates and stenolaemates. Phylactolaemate tentacles tend to be longer, and with more voluminous coeloms. The composition of the frontal cell row and the number of frontal nerves is variable in freshwater bryozoans, but constant in marine groups. Abfrontal cells form a continuous row in Phylactolaemata, but occur intermittently in other two classes. Phylactolaemata lack the microvillar cuticle reported in Gymnolaemata. Abfrontal sensory tufts are always composed of pairs of mono- and/or biciliated cells. This arrangement differs from individual abfrontal ciliary cells of other bryozoans: monociliated in Stenolaemata and monociliated and multiciliated ones in Gymnolaemata. In all three groups, however, ciliated abfrontal cells probably serve as mechanoreceptors. We confirm previously described phylactolemate traits: an unusual arrangement of two-layered coelothelium lining the lateral sides of the tentacle and oral slits in the intertentacular membrane. As previously reported, tentacle movements involved in feeding differ between bryozoan groups, with phylactolaemates tending to have slower movements than both gymnolaemates and stenolaemates, and a narrower behavioral repertoire than gymnolaemates. The morphological and ultrastructural differences between the freshwater species we studied and marine bryozoans may be related to these functional differences. Muscle

  3. A forward-looking, national-scale remote sensing-based model of tidal marsh aboveground carbon stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmquist, J. R.; Byrd, K. B.; Ballanti, L.; Nguyen, D.; Simard, M.; Windham-Myers, L.; Thomas, N.

    2017-12-01

    Remote sensing based maps of tidal marshes, both of their extents and carbon stocks, have the potential to play a key role in conducting greenhouse gas inventories and implementing climate mitigation policies. Our goal was to generate a single remote sensing model of tidal marsh aboveground biomass and carbon that represents nationally diverse tidal marshes within the conterminous United States (CONUS). To meet this objective we developed the first national-scale dataset of aboveground tidal marsh biomass, species composition, and aboveground plant carbon content (%C) from six CONUS regions: Cape Cod, MA, Chesapeake Bay, MD, Everglades, FL, Mississippi Delta, LA, San Francisco Bay, CA, and Puget Sound, WA. Using the random forest algorithm we tested Sentinel-1 radar backscatter metrics and Landsat vegetation indices as predictors of biomass. The final model, driven by six Landsat vegetation indices and with the soil adjusted vegetation index as the most important (n=409, RMSE=310 g/m2, 10.3% normalized RMSE), successfully predicted biomass and carbon for a range of marsh plant functional types defined by height, leaf angle and growth form. Model error was reduced by scaling field measured biomass by Landsat fraction green vegetation derived from object-based classification of National Agriculture Imagery Program imagery. We generated 30m resolution biomass maps for estuarine and palustrine emergent tidal marshes as indicated by a modified NOAA Coastal Change Analysis Program map for each region. With a mean plant %C of 44.1% (n=1384, 95% C.I.=43.99% - 44.37%) we estimated mean aboveground carbon densities (Mg/ha) and total carbon stocks for each wetland type for each region. Louisiana palustrine emergent marshes had the highest C density (2.67 ±0.08 Mg/ha) of all regions, while San Francisco Bay brackish/saline marshes had the highest C density of all estuarine emergent marshes (2.03 ±0.06 Mg/ha). This modeling and data synthesis effort will allow for aboveground

  4. Tidal Disruption Events from Eccentric Nuclear Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernke, Heather N.; Madigan, Ann-Marie

    2018-04-01

    Stars that get too close to a supermassive black hole are in danger of being tidally disrupted. Stellar two-body relaxation is commonly assumed to be the main driver of these events. Recent work has shown, however, that secular gravitational torques from eccentric nuclear disks can push stars to extreme eccentricities at much higher rates than predicted by two-body relaxation. This work did not include the effects of general relativity, however, which could quench secular torques via rapid apsidal precession. Here we show that, for a star in danger of disruption, general relativity acts on a timescale of less than an orbital period. This short timescale means that general relativity does not have enough time to have a major effect on the orbit. When driven by secular torques from eccentric nuclear disks, tidal disruption event rates are not affected by general relativity.

  5. Power Generation for River and Tidal Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muljadi, Eduard [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wright, Alan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gevorgian, Vahan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Donegan, James [Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC), Portland, ME (United States); Marnagh, Cian [Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC), Portland, ME (United States); McEntee, Jarlath [Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC), Portland, ME (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Renewable energy sources are the second largest contributor to global electricity production, after fossil fuels. The integration of renewable energy continued to grow in 2014 against a backdrop of increasing global energy consumption and a dramatic decline in oil prices during the second half of the year. As renewable generation has become less expensive during recent decades, and it becomes more accepted by the global population, the focus on renewable generation has expanded from primarily wind and solar to include new types with promising future applications, such as hydropower generation, including river and tidal generation. Today, hydropower is considered one of the most important renewable energy sources. In river and tidal generation, the input resource flow is slower but also steadier than it is in wind or solar generation, yet the level of water turbulent flow may vary from one place to another. This report focuses on hydrokinetic power conversion.

  6. Capturing American black ducks in tidal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, M.K.; Haramis, G.M.; Jorde, Dennis G.; Stotts, D.B.

    2000-01-01

    We modified conventional, funnel-entrance dabbling duck bait traps to increase captures for banding of American Black Ducks (Anas rubripes) in tidal saltmarsh habitats of Smith Island, Maryland, one of the few remaining strongholds for breeding Black Ducks in the Chesapeake Bay. Traps and trapping techniques were adapted to tidal creeks and refined to improve capture rate, reduce mortality, and minimize interference by gulls. Best results were achieved by synchronizing trapping with predawn, low-tide foraging patterns of Black Ducks. Trap entrances were critical to retaining ducks, and use of loafing platforms reduced overall mortality to 3% of captures per year. We captured 3071 Black Ducks during the 14-year period, 1984-199

  7. Detecting Globular Star Cluster Tidal Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, William Lee, Jr.; Wilhelm, Ronald; Lauchner, Adam; McWilliam, Andrew

    2006-10-01

    Globular cluster tidal streams are of interest for what they can tell us of the dynamical evolution of the clusters and of our Galaxy. Recent studies have used photometric and statistical subtraction methods to attempt to separate potential streams from the field stars that contaminate the samples. As our primary method we choose instead to use photometry to select blue stars that match the horizontal branch of the clusters. We then make spectroscopic observations of these candidates to determine their metallicities and radial velocities, which further constrains whether the candidate stars really originated in the cluster. Combining these results with the photometric data offers a better picture of the structure of tidal streams, and allows comparison of detected stars to theoretical predictions. We present preliminary photometric and spectroscopic results. Data obtained at McDonald Observatory, Kitt Peak National Observatory, and Las Campanas Observatory.

  8. Globular Cluster Tidal Streams: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, William L.; Lauchner, A.; Wilhelm, R.; McWilliam, A.

    2006-12-01

    Globular cluster tidal streams are of interest for what they can tell us of the dynamical evolution of the clusters and of our Galaxy. Recent studies have used photometric and statistical subtraction methods to attempt to separate potential streams from the field stars that contaminate the samples. We chose instead as our primary method to use photometry to select blue stars that match the horizontal branch of the clusters. We then make spectroscopic observations of these candidates to determine their metallicity and radial velocities. Combining these results with the photometric data offers a better picture of the structure and validity of tidal streams. We present photometric and spectroscopic results for several globular clusters and their surrounding fields. Data were obtained at McDonald Observatory, Kitt Peak, and Las Campanas Observatory. SDSS data were also used. WLP acknowledges the support of a Sigma Xi Grant-In-Aid of research. RW acknowledges the support of a AAS Small Research Grant.

  9. Uranium and barium cycling in a salt wedge subterranean estuary: The influence of tidal pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, I.R.; Burnett, W.C.; Misra, S.; Suryaputra, I.G.N.A.; Chanton, J.P.; Dittmar, T.; Peterson, R.N.; Swarzenski, P.W.

    2011-01-01

    The contribution of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) to oceanic metal budgets is only beginning to be explored. Here, we demonstrate that biogeochemical processes in a northern Florida subterranean estuary (STE) significantly alter U and Ba concentrations entering the coastal ocean via SGD. Tidal pumping controlled the distribution of dissolved metals in shallow beach groundwater. Hourly observations of intertidal groundwaters revealed high U and low Ba concentrations at high tide as a result of seawater infiltration into the coastal aquifer. During ebb tide, U decreased and Ba increased due to freshwater dilution and, more importantly, biogeochemical reactions that removed U and added Ba to solution. U removal was apparently a result of precipitation following the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). A significant correlation between Ba and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in shallow beach groundwaters implied a common source, likely the mineralization of marine particulate organic matter driven into the beach face by tidal pumping. In deeper groundwaters, where the labile organic matter had been depleted, Ba correlated with Mn. We estimate that net SGD fluxes were − 163 and + 1660 μmol m− 1 d− 1 for U and Ba, respectively (or − 1 and + 8 μmol m− 2 d− 1 if a 200-m wide seepage area is considered). Our results support the emerging concept that subterranean estuaries are natural biogeochemical reactors where metal concentrations are altered relative to conservative mixing between terrestrial and marine endmembers. These deviations from conservative mixing significantly influence SGD-derived trace metal fluxes.

  10. Tampa Bay coastal wetlands: nineteenth to twentieth century tidal marsh-to-mangrove conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raabe, Ellen A.; Roy, Laura C.; McIvor, Carole C.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, mangroves dominate the tidal wetlands of Tampa Bay, Florida, but an examination of historic navigation charts revealed dominance of tidal marshes with a mangrove fringe in the 1870s. This study's objective was to conduct a new assessment of wetland change in Tampa Bay by digitizing nineteenth century topographic and public land surveys and comparing these to modern coastal features at four locations. We differentiate between wetland loss, wetland gain through marine transgression, and a wetland conversion from marsh to mangrove. Wetland loss was greatest at study sites to the east and north. Expansion of the intertidal zone through marine transgression, across adjacent low-lying land, was documented primarily near the mouth of the bay. Generally, the bay-wide marsh-to-mangrove ratio reversed from 86:14 to 25:75 in 125 years. Conversion of marsh to mangrove wetlands averaged 72 % at the four sites, ranging from 52 % at Old Tampa Bay to 95 % at Feather Sound. In addition to latitudinal influences, intact wetlands and areas with greater freshwater influence exhibited a lower rate of marsh-to-mangrove conversion. Two sources for nineteenth century coastal landscape were in close agreement, providing an unprecedented view of historic conditions in Tampa Bay.

  11. The Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) and Global Observations of Tidal Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpie, K. R.; Klemas, V. V.; Byrd, K. B.; Kelly, M.; Jo, Y. H.

    2016-02-01

    HyspIRI mission will employ a high-spectral resolution VSWIR spectrometer, with a 30 m spatial resolution and swath width equal to Landsat legacy instruments. The spectrometer is expected to have a signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio comparable to or better than the Hyperspectral Imager of the Coastal Ocean (HICO). The mission will also provide an imaging radiometer with eight thermal bands at 60m resolution 600 km swath width. HyspIRI will offer new and unique opportunities to globally study ecosystems where land meets sea. In particular, the mission will be a boon to observations of tidal wetlands, which are highly productive and act as critical habitat for a wide variety of plants, fish, shellfish, and other wildlife. These ecotones between aquatic and terrestrial environments also provide protection from storm damage, run-off filtering, and recharge of aquifers. Many wetlands along coasts have been exposed to stress-inducing alterations globally, including dredge and fill operations, hydrologic modifications, pollutants, impoundments, fragmentation by roads/ditches, and sea level rise. For wetland protection and sensible coastal development, there is a need to monitor these ecosystems at global and regional scales. We will describe how the HyspIRI hyperspectral and thermal infrared sensors can be used to study and map key ecological properties of tidal salt and brackish marshes and mangroves, and perhaps other major wetland types, including freshwater marshes and wooded/shrub wetlands.

  12. Tidal Heating in Multilayered Terrestrial Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Wade G.; Hurford, Terry

    2014-01-01

    The internal pattern and overall magnitude of tidal heating for spin-synchronous terrestrial exoplanets from 1 to 2.5 R(sub E) is investigated using a propagator matrix method for a variety of layer structures. Particular attention is paid to ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths, where a significant ice mantle is modeled to rest atop an iron-silicate core, and may or may not contain a liquid water ocean. We find multilayer modeling often increases tidal dissipation relative to a homogeneous model, across multiple orbital periods, due to the ability to include smaller volume low viscosity regions, and the added flexure allowed by liquid layers. Gradations in parameters with depth are explored, such as allowed by the Preliminary Earth Reference Model. For ice-silicate hybrid worlds, dramatically greater dissipation is possible beyond the case of a silicate mantle only, allowing non-negligible tidal activity to extend to greater orbital periods than previously predicted. Surface patterns of tidal heating are found to potentially be useful for distinguishing internal structure. The influence of ice mantle depth and water ocean size and position are shown for a range of forcing frequencies. Rates of orbital circularization are found to be 10-100 times faster than standard predictions for Earth-analog planets when interiors are moderately warmer than the modern Earth, as well as for a diverse range of ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths. Circularization rates are shown to be significantly longer for planets with layers equivalent to an ocean-free modern Earth, as well as for planets with high fractions of either ice or silicate melting.

  13. Integrating tidal and nontidal ecological assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Southerland; Roberto Llanso

    2016-01-01

    The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has a long history of conducting rigorous assessments of ecological conditions in both tidal and nontidal waters. The Long-Term Benthic (LTB) Monitoring Program and the Maryland Biological Stream Survey (MBSS) both use reference-based indicators of benthic invertebrate communities to provide areawide estimates of ...

  14. Tidal power from the River Mersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The studies described in this report relate to work carried out since those reported upon in the stage I Mersey Barrage Report on the possible construction of a tidal power barrage on the Mersey Estuary. The objectives of the work were to review basic engineering, re-assess cost and energy output, improve engineering configuration, quantify social, industrial and regional effects, determine preferred alignment, review the main environmental impacts, assess economic viability and financing and identify further study requirements. (UK)

  15. Tidal heating in multilayered terrestrial exoplanets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, Wade G.; Hurford, Terry

    2014-01-01

    The internal pattern and overall magnitude of tidal heating for spin-synchronous terrestrial exoplanets from 1 to 2.5 R E is investigated using a propagator matrix method for a variety of layer structures. Particular attention is paid to ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths, where a significant ice mantle is modeled to rest atop an iron-silicate core, and may or may not contain a liquid water ocean. We find multilayer modeling often increases tidal dissipation relative to a homogeneous model, across multiple orbital periods, due to the ability to include smaller volume low viscosity regions, and the added flexure allowed by liquid layers. Gradations in parameters with depth are explored, such as allowed by the Preliminary Earth Reference Model. For ice-silicate hybrid worlds, dramatically greater dissipation is possible beyond the case of a silicate mantle only, allowing non-negligible tidal activity to extend to greater orbital periods than previously predicted. Surface patterns of tidal heating are found to potentially be useful for distinguishing internal structure. The influence of ice mantle depth and water ocean size and position are shown for a range of forcing frequencies. Rates of orbital circularization are found to be 10-100 times faster than standard predictions for Earth-analog planets when interiors are moderately warmer than the modern Earth, as well as for a diverse range of ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths. Circularization rates are shown to be significantly longer for planets with layers equivalent to an ocean-free modern Earth, as well as for planets with high fractions of either ice or silicate melting.

  16. Capture of Small Bodies After Tidal Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershova, A.; Medvedev, Yu.

    2017-09-01

    The subject of the current work is the phisical and dynamical evolution of the small comets group formed by tidal disruption of the protocomet while passing near the large body (Sun, Jupiter). The equations of motion were integrated numericaly. In case of the Sun the evolution of the sun-grazing orbits were discussed and the typical lifetime of such comets was estimated. Nongravitational acceleration and the size reduction of fragments due to sublimation were taking into account using the Marsden formula.

  17. Tidal controls on river delta morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoitink, A. J. F.; Wang, Z. B.; Vermeulen, B.; Huismans, Y.; Kästner, K.

    2017-09-01

    River delta degradation has been caused by extraction of natural resources, sediment retention by reservoirs, and sea-level rise. Despite global concerns about these issues, human activity in the world’s largest deltas intensifies. Harbour development, construction of flood defences, sand mining and land reclamation emerge as key contemporary factors that exert an impact on delta morphology. Tides interacting with river discharge can play a crucial role in the morphodynamic development of deltas under pressure. Emerging insights into tidal controls on river delta morphology suggest that--despite the active morphodynamics in tidal channels and mouth bar regions--tidal motion acts to stabilize delta morphology at the landscape scale under the condition that sediment import during low flows largely balances sediment export during high flows. Distributary channels subject to tides show lower migration rates and are less easily flooded by the river because of opposing non-linear interactions between river discharge and the tide. These interactions lead to flow changes within channels, and a more uniform distribution of discharge across channels. Sediment depletion and rigorous human interventions in deltas, including storm surge defence works, disrupt the dynamic morphological equilibrium and can lead to erosion and severe scour at the channel bed, even decades after an intervention.

  18. Tidal energy extraction: renewable, sustainable and predictable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls-Lee, R F; Turnock, S R

    2008-01-01

    The tidal flow of sea water induced by planetary motion is a potential source of energy if suitable systems can be designed and operated in a cost-effective manner This paper examines the physical origins of the tides and how the local currents are influenced by the depth of the seabed and presence of land mass and associated coastal features. The available methods of extracting energy from tidal movement are classified into devices that store and release potential energy and those that capture kinetic energy directly. A survey is made of candidate designs and, for the most promising, the likely efficiency of energy conversion and methods of installing them are considered. Overall, the need to reduce CO2 emissions, a likely continued rise in fossil fuel cost will result in a significantly increased use of tidal energy. What is still required, especially for kinetic energy devices, is a much greater understanding of how they can be designed to withstand long-term immersion in the marine environment.

  19. Climate-related variation in plant peak biomass and growth phenology across Pacific Northwest tidal marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffington, Kevin J.; Dugger, Bruce D.; Thorne, Karen M.

    2018-03-01

    The interannual variability of tidal marsh plant phenology is largely unknown and may have important ecological consequences. Marsh plants are critical to the biogeomorphic feedback processes that build estuarine soils, maintain marsh elevation relative to sea level, and sequester carbon. We calculated Tasseled Cap Greenness, a metric of plant biomass, using remotely sensed data available in the Landsat archive to assess how recent climate variation has affected biomass production and plant phenology across three maritime tidal marshes in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. First, we used clipped vegetation plots at one of our sites to confirm that tasseled cap greenness provided a useful measure of aboveground biomass (r2 = 0.72). We then used multiple measures of biomass each growing season over 20-25 years per study site and developed models to test how peak biomass and the date of peak biomass varied with 94 climate and sea-level metrics using generalized linear models and Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) model selection. Peak biomass was positively related to total annual precipitation, while the best predictor for date of peak biomass was average growing season temperature, with the peak 7.2 days earlier per degree C. Our study provides insight into how plants in maritime tidal marshes respond to interannual climate variation and demonstrates the utility of time-series remote sensing data to assess ecological responses to climate stressors.

  20. Avian communities in tidal salt marshes of San Francisco Bay: a review of functional groups by foraging guild and habitat association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekawa, John Y.; Woo, Isa; Gardiner, Rachel J.; Casazza, Michael L.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Nur, Nadav; Liu, Leonard; Spautz, Hildie; Palaima, Arnas

    2011-01-01

    The San Francisco Bay estuary is highly urbanized, but it supports the largest remaining extent of tidal salt marshes on the west coast of North America as well as a diverse native bird community. San Francisco Bay tidal marshes are occupied by more than 113 bird species that represent 31 families, including five subspecies from three families that we denote as tidal-marsh obligates. To better identify the niche of bird species in tidal marshes, we present a review of functional groups based on foraging guilds and habitat associations. Foraging guilds describe the method by which species obtain food from tidal marshes, while habitat associations describe broad areas within the marsh that have similar environmental conditions. For example, the ubiquitous song sparrows (Alameda Melospiza melodia pusillula, Suisun M. m. maxillaris, and San Pablo M. m. samuelis) are surface-feeding generalists that consume prey from vegetation and the ground, and they are found across the entire marsh plain into the upland–marsh transition. In contrast, surface-feeding California black rails (Laterallus jamaicensis coturniculus) are cryptic, and generally restricted in their distribution to the mid- and high-marsh plain. Although in the same family, the endangered California clapper rail (Rallus longirostris obsoletus) has become highly specialized, foraging primarily on benthic fauna within marsh channels when they are exposed at low tide. Shorebirds such as the black-necked stilt (Himantopus mexicanus) typically probe in mud flats to consume macroinvertebrate prey, and are generally restricted to foraging on salt pans within the marsh plain, in ponds, or on mud flats during transitional stages of marsh evolution. The abundance and distribution of birds varies widely with changing water depths and vegetation colonization during different stages of restoration. Thus, tidal-marsh birds represent a rich and diverse community in bay marshes, with niches that may be distinguished by the

  1. A simple analytical expression to describe tidal damping or amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savenije, H. H. G.

    2001-03-01

    Can a single line describe tidal damping or amplification? Tidal damping and amplification in alluvial estuaries are constrained by an implicit feedback mechanism. The time lag ɛ between the occurrence of high water and high water slack is crucial in this regard. An analytical solution of the St. Venant equations appears to result in a surprisingly simple explicit relation for the tidal range, consisting of an exponential and a linear term. In alluvial estuaries, the linear term is dominant, particularly in the case of tidal amplification. In the case of tidal damping the exponential term only becomes important in the upper reaches of the estuary (preventing the expression for the tidal range from becoming negative). In tidal amplification, the exponential term is suppressed by the newly defined tidal Froude Number which (as it contains sin ɛ) tends to zero when the tidal wave gets a predominantly standing wave character. This negative feedback prevents the development of an exponentially increasing tidal range. Finally, the expression obtained is a very useful explicit equation to determine estuary parameters that are difficult to determine from direct observations, such as the roughness and the mean water depth.

  2. The effects of tidal range on saltmarsh morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Guillaume; Mudd, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Saltmarshes are highly productive coastal ecosystems that act simultaneously as flood barriers, carbon storage, pollutant filters and nurseries. As halophytic plants trap suspended sediment and decay in the settled strata, innervated platforms emerge from the neighbouring tidal flats, forming sub-vertical scarps on their eroding borders and sub-horizontal pioneer zones in areas of seasonal expansion. These evolutions are subject to two contrasting influences: stochastically generated waves erode scarps and scour tidal flats, whereas tidally-generated currents transport sediment to and from the marsh through the channel network. Hence, the relative power of waves and tidal currents strongly influences saltmarsh evolution, and regional variations in tidal range yield marshes of differing morphologies. We analyse several sheltered saltmarshes to determine how their morphology reflects variations in tidal forcing. Using tidal, topographic and spectral data, we implement an algorithm based on the open-source software LSDTopoTools to automatically identify features such as marsh platforms, tidal flats, erosion scarps, pioneer zones and tidal channels on local Digital Elevation Models. Normalised geometric properties are then computed and compared throughout the spectrum of tidal range, highlighting a notable effect on channel networks, platform geometry and wave exposure. We observe that micro-tidal marshes typically display jagged outlines and multiple islands along with wide, shallow channels. As tidal range increases, we note the progressive disappearance of marsh islands and linearization of scarps, both indicative of higher hydrodynamic stress, along with a structuration of channel networks and the increase of levee volume, suggesting higher sediment input on the platform. Future research will lead to observing and modelling the evolution of saltmarshes under various tidal forcing in order to assess their resilience to environmental change.

  3. Tidally influenced alongshore circulation at an inlet-adjacent shoreline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jeff E.; Elias, Edwin P.L.; List, Jeffrey H.; Erikson, Li H.; Barnard, Patrick L.

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of tidal forcing to alongshore circulation inside the surfzone is investigated at a 7 km long sandy beach adjacent to a large tidal inlet. Ocean Beach in San Francisco, CA (USA) is onshore of a ∼150 km2 ebb-tidal delta and directly south of the Golden Gate, the sole entrance to San Francisco Bay. Using a coupled flow-wave numerical model, we find that the tides modulate, and in some cases can reverse the direction of, surfzone alongshore flows through two separate mechanisms. First, tidal flow through the inlet results in a barotropic tidal pressure gradient that, when integrated across the surfzone, represents an important contribution to the surfzone alongshore force balance. Even during energetic wave conditions, the tidal pressure gradient can account for more than 30% of the total alongshore pressure gradient (wave and tidal components) and up to 55% during small waves. The wave driven component of the alongshore pressure gradient results from alongshore wave height and corresponding setup gradients induced by refraction over the ebb-tidal delta. Second, wave refraction patterns over the inner shelf are tidally modulated as a result of both tidal water depth changes and strong tidal flows (∼1 m/s), with the effect from currents being larger. These tidally induced changes in wave refraction result in corresponding variability of the alongshore radiation stress and pressure gradients within the surfzone. Our results indicate that tidal contributions to the surfzone force balance can be significant and important in determining the direction and magnitude of alongshore flow.

  4. Freshwater autotrophic picoplankton: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. STOCKNER

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Autotrophic picoplankton (APP are distributed worldwide and are ubiquitous in all types of lakes of varying trophic state. APP are major players in carbon production in all aquatic ecosystems, including extreme environments such as cold ice-covered and/or warm tropical lakes and thermal springs. They often form the base of complex microbial food webs, becoming prey for a multitude of protozoan and micro-invertebrate grazers, that effectively channel APP carbon to higher trophic levels including fish. In this review we examine the existing literature on freshwater autotrophic picoplankton, setting recent findings and current ecological issues within an historic framework, and include a description of the occurrence and distribution of both single-cell and colonial APP (picocyanobacteria in different types of lakes. In this review we place considerable emphasis on methodology and ecology, including sampling, counting, preservation, molecular techniques, measurement of photosynthesis, and include extensive comment on their important role in microbial food webs. The model outlined by Stockner of an increase of APP abundance and biomass and a decrease of its relative importance with the increase of phosphorus concentration in lakes has been widely accepted, and only recently confirmed in marine and freshwater ecosystems. Nevertheless the relationship which drives the APP presence and importance in lakes of differing trophic status appears with considerable variation so we must conclude that the success of APP in oligotrophic lakes worldwide is not a certainty but highly probable.

  5. Rethinking the role of edaphic condition in halophyte vegetation degradation on salt marshes due to coastal defense structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tian; Cui, Baoshan; Bai, Junhong; Li, Shanze; Zhang, Shuyan

    2018-02-01

    Determining how human disturbance affects plant community persistence and species conservation is one of the most pressing ecological challenges. The large-scale disturbance form defense structures usually have a long-term and potential effect on phytocommunity in coastal saltmarshes. Coastal defense structures usually remove the effect of tidal wave on tidal salt marshes. As a consequence, edaphic factors such as the salinity and moisture contents are disturbed by tidal action blocking. However, few previous studies have explicitly addressed the response of halophyte species persistence and dynamics to the changing edaphic conditions. The understanding of the response of species composition in seed banks and aboveground vegetation to the stress is important to identify ecological effect of coastal defense structures and provide usefully insight into restoration. Here, we conducted a field study to distinguish the density, species composition and relationships of seed bank with aboveground vegetation between tidal flat wetlands with and without coastal defense structures. We also addressed the role of edaphic condition in vegetation degradation caused by coastal defense structures in combination with field monitor and greenhouse experiments. Our results showed the density of the seed bank and aboveground vegetation in the tidal flat without coastal defense structures was significantly lower than the surrounded flat with coastal defense structures. A total of 14 species were founded in the surrounded flat seed bank and 11 species in the tidal flat, but three species were only recorded in aboveground vegetation of the tidal flat which was much lower than 24 aboveground species in the surrounded flat. The absent of species in aboveground vegetation contributed to low germination rate which depend on the edaphic condition. The germination of seeds in the seed bank were inhabited by high soil salinity in the tidal flat and low soil moisture in the surrounded flat. Our

  6. Characterization of a Freshwater Crab Sudanonautes aubryi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-01-31

    Jan 31, 2014 ... Recently, Cumberlidge and. Reed (2004) described the freshwater crab genus. Erimetopus of Congo basin. Sudanonautes aubryi, like all others edible crabs are also poorly understood. This preliminary study was undertaken to collect and realize a biometric characterization of this common freshwater crab ...

  7. Freshwater Ecology. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskern, Diana, Comp.

    Freshwater ecosystems include lakes, ponds, streams, rivers, and certain types of wetlands. This literature and resources guide is not intended to be a comprehensive bibliography on freshwater ecology; the guide is designed--as the name of the series implies--to put the reader or student "on target." Other literature guides related to…

  8. How Will Climate Change Affect Freshwater Fishing?

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Lael; Smith, Jordan W.

    2016-01-01

    This fact sheet reviews how climate change can affect freshwater fishing in the United States. Climate change can affect the availability and diversity of target species, the environmental and aesthetic quality of fishing sites, as well as the policies used to manage freshwater fishing.

  9. Effects of Pollution on Freshwater Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brungs, W. A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effects of pollution on freshwater fish, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) water quality; (2) pesticide pollutants; (3) chemical pollutants; (4) miscellaneous pollutants; and (5) physical factors of pollution on freshwater fish. A list of 338 references is also presented. (HM)

  10. Farming of Freshwater Rainbow Trout in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jokumsen, Alfred; Svendsen, Lars Moeslund

    Textbook on Farming of Freshwater Rainbow Trout in Denmark. Danish edition with the title: Opdræt af regnbueørred i Danmark......Textbook on Farming of Freshwater Rainbow Trout in Denmark. Danish edition with the title: Opdræt af regnbueørred i Danmark...

  11. Integrating the social, hydrological and ecological dimensions of freshwater health: The Freshwater Health Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Derek; Shaad, Kashif; Souter, Nicholas J; Farrell, Tracy; Dudgeon, David; Sullivan, Caroline A; Fauconnier, Isabelle; MacDonald, Glen M; McCartney, Matthew P; Power, Alison G; McNally, Amy; Andelman, Sandy J; Capon, Timothy; Devineni, Naresh; Apirumanekul, Chusit; Ng, Cho Nam; Rebecca Shaw, M; Wang, Raymond Yu; Lai, Chengguang; Wang, Zhaoli; Regan, Helen M

    2018-06-15

    Degradation of freshwater ecosystems and the services they provide is a primary cause of increasing water insecurity, raising the need for integrated solutions to freshwater management. While methods for characterizing the multi-faceted challenges of managing freshwater ecosystems abound, they tend to emphasize either social or ecological dimensions and fall short of being truly integrative. This paper suggests that management for sustainability of freshwater systems needs to consider the linkages between human water uses, freshwater ecosystems and governance. We present a conceptualization of freshwater resources as part of an integrated social-ecological system and propose a set of corresponding indicators to monitor freshwater ecosystem health and to highlight priorities for management. We demonstrate an application of this new framework -the Freshwater Health Index (FHI) - in the Dongjiang River Basin in southern China, where stakeholders are addressing multiple and conflicting freshwater demands. By combining empirical and modeled datasets with surveys to gauge stakeholders' preferences and elicit expert information about governance mechanisms, the FHI helps stakeholders understand the status of freshwater ecosystems in their basin, how ecosystems are being manipulated to enhance or decrease water-related services, and how well the existing water resource management regime is equipped to govern these dynamics over time. This framework helps to operationalize a truly integrated approach to water resource management by recognizing the interplay between governance, stakeholders, freshwater ecosystems and the services they provide. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Satellite Tidal Magnetic Signals Constrain Oceanic Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary Earth Tomography with Tidal Magnetic Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayver, Alexander V.; Schnepf, Neesha R.; Kuvshinov, Alexey V.; Sabaka, Terence J.; Chandrasekharan, Manoj; Olsen, Niles

    2016-01-01

    The tidal flow of electrically conductive oceans through the geomagnetic field results in the generation of secondary magnetic signals, which provide information on the subsurface structure. Data from the new generation of satellites were shown to contain magnetic signals due to tidal flow; however, there are no reports that these signals have been used to infer subsurface structure. Here we use satellite-detected tidal magnetic fields to image the global electrical structure of the oceanic lithosphere and upper mantle down to a depth of about 250 km. The model derived from more than 12 years of satellite data reveals an Approximately 72 km thick upper resistive layer followed by a sharp increase in electrical conductivity likely associated with the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, which separates colder rigid oceanic plates from the ductile and hotter asthenosphere.

  13. Analysis of Tidal DC Resistivity Time Series for Periodic Saltwater Mixing Patterns and Determination of Hydraulic Ground Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, E. M.; Ingham, M.

    2016-12-01

    Saline intrusion research using geoelectrical time-lapse monitoring, is often directed towards imaging the saltwater-freshwater boundary and the amount of seawater mixing within a coastal aquifer. However, these time series can contain additional information about subsurface hydrologic properties like hydraulic conductivity and permeability which are crucial elements in coastal groundwater management. In this study, DC resistivity time series from tidal time-lapse monitoring surveys of a shallow coastal sand and gravel aquifer in New Zealand have been analysed for recurring patterns of percentage seawater mixing in different portions of the aquifer. The results show a distinctly different behaviour of percentage seawater change with time for several horizontal locations along two profile lines with varying depth. In addition, the geoelectric time series have been cross-correlated with tidal stage data approximated near the survey location in order to find portions of the aquifer that exhibit different time lags with respect to a diurnal tidal cycle. First results yield a remarkably similar picture to resistivity ratios obtained between high and low tide inversion models of the DC resistivity time series both at different locations and for different seasons. The two methods indicate a correlation between rising and falling tides and the resistivity changes observed from geoelectrical monitoring studies .This may be used to distinguish between more or less hydraulically conductive portions of a coastal aquifer.

  14. Environmental extremes and biotic interactions facilitate depredation of endangered California Ridgway’s rail in a San Francisco Bay tidal marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Cory T.; Bobzien, Steven; Grefsrud, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    On 23 December 2015 while performing a high tide population survey for endangered Ridgway’s rails (Rallus obsoletus obsoletus; formerly known as the California clapper rail) and other rail species at Arrowhead Marsh, Martin Luther King Jr. Regional Shoreline, Oakland, California, the authors observed a series of species interactions resulting in the predation of a Ridgway’s rail by an adult female peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus). High tide surveys are performed during the highest tides of the year when tidal marsh vegetation at Arrowhead Marsh becomes inundated, concentrating the tidal marsh obligate species into the limited area of emergent vegetation remaining as refuge cover. Annual mean tide level (elevation referenced relative to mean lower low water) at Arrowhead Marsh is 1.10 m, mean higher high water is 2.04 m (NOAA National Ocean Service 2014) and the average elevation of the marsh surface is 1.60 m (Overton et al. 2014). Tidal conditions on the day of the survey were predicted to be 2.42 m. Observed tides at the nearby Alameda Island tide gauge were 8 cm higher than predicted due to a regional low-pressure system and warmer than average sea surface temperatures (NOAA National Ocean Service 2014). The approximately 80 cm deep inundation of the marsh plain was sufficient to completely submerge tidal marsh vegetation and effectively remove 90% of refugia habitats.

  15. The freshwater reservoir effect in radiocarbon dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    effect on radiocarbon dating in an estuarine environment is examined. Here, freshwater influence causes reservoir ages to vary between 250 and 700 14C years during the period 5400 BC - AD 700. The examples in this study show clearly that the freshwater reservoir effect can seriously corrupt radiocarbon......The freshwater reservoir effect can result in anomalously old radiocarbon ages of samples from lakes and rivers. This includes the bones of people whose subsistence was based on freshwater fish, and pottery in which fish was cooked. Water rich in dissolved ancient calcium carbonates, commonly known...... as hard water, is the most common reason for the freshwater reservoir effect. It is therefore also called hardwater effect. Although it has been known for more than 60 years, it is still less well-recognized by archaeologists than the marine reservoir effect. The aim of this study is to examine the order...

  16. Freshwater to seawater transitions in migratory fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zydlewski, Joseph D.; Michael P. Wilkie,

    2012-01-01

    The transition from freshwater to seawater is integral to the life history of many fishes. Diverse migratory fishes express anadromous, catadromous, and amphidromous life histories, while others make incomplete transits between freshwater and seawater. The physiological mechanisms of osmoregulation are widely conserved among phylogenetically diverse species. Diadromous fishes moving between freshwater and seawater develop osmoregulatory mechanisms for different environmental salinities. Freshwater to seawater transition involves hormonally mediated changes in gill ionocytes and the transport proteins associated with hypoosmoregulation, increased seawater ingestion and water absorption in the intestine, and reduced urinary water losses. Fishes attain salinity tolerance through early development, gradual acclimation, or environmentally or developmentally cued adaptations. This chapter describes adaptations in diverse taxa and the effects of salinity on growth. Identifying common strategies in diadromous fishes moving between freshwater and seawater will reveal the ecological and physiological basis for maintaining homeostasis in different salinities, and inform efforts to conserve and manage migratory euryhaline fishes.

  17. Utilisation of vegetable leaves for carp production

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, A.K.; Rai, S.P.; Datta, A.K.; Das, C.R.; Ghosh, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    The results of two sets of experiments on mono-culture of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) and mixed culture of carps (grass carp 50 : catla 20 : rohu 15 : mrigal 15) fed exclusively with vegetable leaves are reported. The experiments were conducted with two replicates each in 0.02 ha ponds of Wastewater Aquaculture Division of the Central Institute of Freshwater Aquaculture, Rahara during 1991-93. Monoculture of grass carp stocked at 1000/ha demonstrated an average net production of 21.0...

  18. Soras in tidal marsh: Banding and telemetry studies on the Patuxent River, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haramis, G.M.; Kearns, G.D.; Erwin, R. Michael; Watts, Bryan D.; Haramis, G.Michael; Perry, Matthew C.; Hobson, Keith A.

    2007-01-01

    From 1993 to 1999, we conducted banding and telemetry studies of fall migrant Soras (Porzana carolina) in the historic rail hunting and exceptional stopover habitat of the Wild Rice (Zizania aquatica) marshes of the tidal Patuxent River. Drift traps equipped with audio lures produced 3,897 Sora and 417 Virginia Rail (Rallus limicola) captures during the seven-year study. Sora captures were characterized by a high proportion (70% to 90%) of young-of-the year and a paucity of between-year recaptures (N = 12). Radio-telemetry studies depicted Soras as long distance migrants with high stopover survivaI and a critical dependence on tidal freshwater marshes for migratory fattening. Here, the high productivity of Wild Rice, Smartweeds (Polygonum spp.) and other seed-bearing annual plants seem intrinsically linked to Sora migratory fitness. A stopover period of >40 days and mean mass gain of +0.6g/d suggests Soras are accumulating large fat reserves for long-distance flight. Radio tracking confirmed Soras as strong flyers with a demonstrated overnight (ten h) flight range of 700-900+ km. Given the potential size of fat reserves and the ability to use tail winds, it is conceivable for Soras to make nonstop flights from the Patuxent River to Florida, the Bahamas, or even the Caribbean. Once a widely hunted species, a single sport-hunting recovery from our 3,900 bandings attests to the decline in popularity of the Sora as a game bird in the Atlantic Flyway. We suggest the few between-year recaptures observed in our bandings results from three possible factors: 1) the strong influence of wind drift on migration, 2) different migration chronology or flight path of AHY versus HY birds, and/or 3) high mortality of especially HY birds during Atlantic coastal and Gulf crossings. The critical dependence of Soras and other seed-dependent, fall-migrant waterbirds on highly productive yet limited tidal freshwater marsh habitats make conservation of such areas a priority mission within

  19. How Cassini can constrain tidal dissipation in Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Jing; Fuller, Jim; Quataert, Eliot

    2018-02-01

    Tidal dissipation inside giant planets is important for the orbital evolution of their natural satellites. It is conventionally treated by parametrized equilibrium tidal theory, in which the tidal torque declines rapidly with distance, and orbital expansion was faster in the past. However, some Saturnian satellites are currently migrating outward faster than predicted by equilibrium tidal theory. Resonance locking between satellites and internal oscillations of Saturn naturally matches the observed migration rates. Here, we show that the resonance locking theory predicts dynamical tidal perturbations to Saturn's gravitational field in addition to those produced by equilibrium tidal bulges. We show that these perturbations can likely be detected during Cassini's proximal orbits if migration of satellites results from resonant gravity modes, but will likely be undetectable if migration results from inertial wave attractors or dissipation of the equilibrium tide. Additionally, we show that the detection of gravity modes would place constraints on the size of the hypothetical stably stratified region in Saturn.

  20. Similarity conditions for investigations of hydraulic-thermal tidal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluegge, G.; Schwarze, H.

    1975-01-01

    With the construction of nuclear power plants near German tidal estuaries in mind, investigations of mixing and spreading processes which occur during the discharge of heated cooling water in tidal waters were carried out in hydraulic-thermal tidal models of the Lower Weser and Lower Elbe by the Franzius Institute for hydraulic and coastal engineering of the Technical University Hannover. This contribution discusses in detail the problems met and the experience gained in constructing and operating these models. (orig./TK) [de

  1. Tidal effects on groundwater contamination at Pekan, Pahang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nor Dalila Desa; Dominic, J.A.; Mohd Muzamil Mohd Hashim; Kamarudin Samuding; Mohd Faizun Khalid; Mod Omar Hassan; Kamaruzaman Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    The meeting of coastal ground water and the sea is a unique and dynamic hydro geologic boundary phenomenon that has fascinated groundwater engineers and scientists for the past century. The variation of seawater level resulting from tidal fluctuations is usually neglected in regional groundwater flow studies. In this study the effects of seawater tidal on groundwater are investigated using geophysical together with conventional method. Comparative result between these two methods shown how tidal fluctuations effects groundwater in study area. (author)

  2. New estimates of oceanic tidal energy dissipation from satellite altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, David E.; Ray, Richard D.

    1989-01-01

    As a novel approach to computing the flux of tidal power into shelf areas, tidal maps of an oceanic area near the Patagonian Shelf are derived from 11 months of altimetry records from the GEOSAT satellite. Power fluxes are computed from the maps through Laplace's tidal equations. Flux vectors for M2 clearly show a convergence on to the southern portion of the shelf sea and their total is nearly twice the loss computed by Miller for that area. A decrease of 'quality factor' with frequency from M2 to S2 is in keeping with Webb's hypothesis of shelf resonances at frequencies a little higher than the tidal band.

  3. Turbulent viscosity and Jupiter's tidal Q. [energy dissipation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldreich, P.; Nicholson, P. D.

    1977-01-01

    A recent estimate of tidal dissipation by turbulent viscosity in Jupiter's convective interior predicts that the current value of the planet's tidal Q is roughly 5 million. We point out a fundamental error in this calculation, and show that turbulent dissipation alone implies that at present Q is about 50 trillion. Our reduced estimate for the rate of tidal dissipation shows conclusively that tidal torques have produced only negligible modifications of the orbits of the Galilean satellites over the age of the solar system.

  4. Influence of tidal parameters on SeaGen flicker performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEnri, Joseph; Reed, Matthew; Thiringer, Torbjörn

    2013-02-28

    This paper presents the analysis of the study of the flicker emitted from the 1.2 MW tidal energy converter (TEC), SeaGen, against varying tidal parameters. This paper outlines the main elements of the TEC itself, the environment it is located in and the measurement set up. In this paper, the flicker emitted by the TEC is compared with the different tidal parameters, including flood and ebb tides, tidal speed, water depth and turbulence strength and intensity. Flicker emissions have been calculated from measured data in over 90 measurement (10 min) periods, and all of the tidal parameters vary significantly over that testing period. This allows for a detailed statistical and graphical analysis of the variation of flicker with the variation of the tidal parameters outlined above. It is found, with the exception of tidal speed, that there is no strong relationship between flicker emissions and any other tidal parameter. As SeaGen is an asymmetrical TEC with full blade pitching for flood and ebb generation, it was also found that the expected difference of flicker emissions owing to the effect of the submersed crossbeam was not significant. The TEC harmonic performance versus tidal speed is also presented.

  5. Seagrasses in the continental United States as of March 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aquatic vascular vegetation beds dominated by submerged, rooted, vascular species or submerged or rooted floating freshwater tidal vascular vegetation. This is NOT a...

  6. Diffusive Tidal Evolution for Migrating Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanqin

    2018-03-01

    I consider a Jovian planet on a highly eccentric orbit around its host star, a situation produced by secular interactions with its planetary or stellar companions. The tidal interactions at every periastron passage exchange energy between the orbit and the planet’s degree-2 fundamental-mode. Starting from zero energy, the f-mode can diffusively grow to large amplitudes if its one-kick energy gain is ≥10‑5 of the orbital energy. This requires a pericenter distance of ≤4 tidal radii (or 1.6 Roche radii). If the f-mode has a non-negligible initial energy, diffusive evolution can occur at a lower threshold. The first effect can stall the secular migration as the f-mode can absorb orbital energy and decouple the planet from its secular perturbers, parking all migrating jupiters safely outside the zone of tidal disruption. The second effect leads to rapid orbit circularization as it allows an excited f-mode to continuously absorb orbital energy as the orbit eccentricity decreases. So without any explicit dissipation, other than the fact that the f-mode will damp nonlinearly when its amplitude reaches unity, the planet can be transported from a few au to ∼0.2 au in ∼104 years. Such a rapid circularization is equivalent to a dissipation factor Q ∼ 1, and it explains the observed deficit of super-eccentric Jovian planets. Lastly, the repeated f-mode breaking likely deposits energy and angular momentum in the outer envelope and avoids thermally ablating the planet. Overall, this work boosts the case for hot Jupiter formation through high-eccentricity secular migration.

  7. Stable channel of reclaimed tidal lowland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syarifudin, Achmad; Imanuddin, Momon S.; Moerwanto, Arie S.; Suryadi, F. X.

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to develop models of the Operation and Maintenance in the reclaimed tidal marsh area to get a stable channel. The research location is reclaimed tidal delta area Telang I Primary 8 representing land typology A/B and a survey conducted in 13 South Secondary Schemes following existing tertiary Telang I. MIKE - 11 computer models used used to analyze the movement of sediment in the channel in both the Primary channel 8, SPD, SDU and tertiary channels in block 13 South. Calibration model with multiple channels in the field of physical parameters has been performed to obtain results close to the results of measurement modeling sediment movement in the channel. The integration models of MIKE - 11 models with various scenarios are used to model the operation and maintenance of the channel in the tidal marsh area to get a stable channel. According to the scheme P8 - 13S, OM models obtained 75 percent, in which the secondary channel (SPD/SDU) and built flap gate in tertiary channel, get a well prototype model of the stable channel (equilibriums), where the average erosion on P8 at a distance of 3,200 m in the amount of 4,472,049 m3 and the mean sedimentation in the SPD of 963,836 m3 and mean of sedimentation in the tertiary channel of 3,508,213 m3. Similarly, on average erosion P8 by 4,135,649 m3 and the mean sedimentation in the SDU of 681,304 m3 and the mean sedimentation in the tertiary channel of 3,454,345 m3.

  8. Simulations of freshwater lens recharge and salt/freshwater interfaces using the HYDRUS and SWI2 packages for MODFLOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymkiewicz Adam

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an evaluation of the combined use of the HYDRUS and SWI2 packages for MODFLOW as a potential tool for modeling recharge in coastal aquifers subject to saltwater intrusion. The HYDRUS package for MODFLOW solves numerically the one-dimensional form of the Richards equation describing water flow in variablysaturated media. The code computes groundwater recharge to or capillary rise from the groundwater table while considering weather, vegetation, and soil hydraulic property data. The SWI2 package represents in a simplified way variable-density flow associated with saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers. Combining these two packages within the MODFLOW framework provides a more accurate description of vadose zone processes in subsurface systems with shallow aquifers, which strongly depend upon infiltration. The two packages were applied to a two-dimensional problem of recharge of a freshwater lens in a sandy peninsula, which is a typical geomorphologic form along the Baltic and the North Sea coasts, among other places. Results highlighted the sensitivity of calculated recharge rates to the temporal resolution of weather data. Using daily values of precipitation and potential evapotranspiration produced average recharge rates more than 20% larger than those obtained with weekly or monthly averaged weather data, leading to different trends in the evolution of freshwater-saltwater interfaces. Root water uptake significantly influenced both the recharge rate and the position of the freshwater-saltwater interface. The results were less sensitive to changes in soil hydraulic parameters, which in our study were found to affect average yearly recharge rates by up to 13%.

  9. Tidal Tales of Minor Mergers: Star Formation in the Tidal Tails of Minor Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knierman, Karen; Monkiewicz, Jacqueline; Scowen, Paul; Groppi, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    While major mergers and their tidal debris are well studied, equal mass galaxy mergers are relatively rare compared to minor mergers (mass ratio HI for 15 minor mergers, are providing a larger sample of environments to study the threshold for star formation that can inform star formation models, particularly at low densities.

  10. Waddenfonds Tidal Texel Demonstration project. BlueTEC Texel Tidal Project: Environmental measurement and performance analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponsoni, L.; Nauw, J.J.; Smit, M.; Ober, S.; Nichols, C.; Kenkhuis, J.; Schmidt, C.; Buatois, A.; de Haas, P.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the BlueTEC project, this report starts by introducing theBlueTEC tidal energy platform and reviewing the patterns of circulation of theMarsdiep inlet. The energy resource assessment and the site selection for theplatform's deployment are reported. This document analyses di?erent

  11. Physics and observations of tidal disruption events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalam, Arun; Mageshwaran, Tamilan

    2018-04-01

    We describe a model of tidal disruption events (TDEs) with input physical parameters that include the black hole (BH) mass M•, the specific orbital energy E, the angular momentum J, the star mass M⊙ and radius R⊙. We calculate the rise time of the TDEs, the peak bolometric luminosity in terms of these physical parameters and a typical light curve of TDEs for various All Sky Survey (ASS) and Deep Sky Survey (DSS) missions. We then derive the expected detection rates and discuss the follow up of TDEs through observations in various spectral bands from X-rays to radio wavelengths.

  12. Atmospheric dynamics of tidally synchronized extrasolar planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, James Y-K

    2008-12-13

    Tidally synchronized planets present a new opportunity for enriching our understanding of atmospheric dynamics on planets. Subject to an unusual forcing arrangement (steady irradiation on the same side of the planet throughout its orbit), the dynamics on these planets may be unlike that on any of the Solar System planets. Characterizing the flow pattern and temperature distribution on the extrasolar planets is necessary for reliable interpretation of data currently being collected, as well as for guiding future observations. In this paper, several fundamental concepts from atmospheric dynamics, likely to be central for characterization, are discussed. Theoretical issues that need to be addressed in the near future are also highlighted.

  13. Novel Synechococcus Genomes Reconstructed from Freshwater Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J. Cabello-Yeves

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater picocyanobacteria including Synechococcus remain poorly studied at the genomic level, compared to their marine representatives. Here, using a metagenomic assembly approach we discovered two novel Synechococcus sp. genomes from two freshwater reservoirs Tous and Lake Lanier, both sharing 96% average nucleotide identity and displaying high abundance levels in these two lakes located at similar altitudes and temperate latitudes. These new genomes have the smallest estimated size (2.2 Mb and average intergenic spacer length (20 bp of any previously sequenced freshwater Synechococcus, which may contribute to their success in oligotrophic freshwater systems. Fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmed that Synechococcus sp. Tous comprises small cells (0.987 ± 0.139 μm length, 0.723 ± 0.119 μm width that amount to 90% of the picocyanobacteria in Tous. They appear together in a phylogenomic tree with Synechococcus sp. RCC307 strain, the main representative of sub-cluster 5.3 that has itself one of the smallest marine Synechococcus genomes. We detected a type II phycobilisome (PBS gene cluster in both genomes, which suggests that they belong to a phycoerythrin-rich pink low-light ecotype. The decrease of acidic proteins and the higher content of basic transporters and membrane proteins in the novel Synechococcus genomes, compared to marine representatives, support their freshwater specialization. A sulfate Cys transporter which is absent in marine but has been identified in many freshwater cyanobacteria was also detected in Synechococcus sp. Tous. The RuBisCo subunits from this microbe are phylogenetically close to the freshwater amoeba Paulinella chromatophora symbiont, hinting to a freshwater origin of the carboxysome operon of this protist. The novel genomes enlarge the known diversity of freshwater Synechococcus and improve the overall knowledge of the relationships among members of this genus at large.

  14. Status and Impacts of Arctic Freshwater Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haine, T. W. N.

    2017-12-01

    Large freshwater anomalies clearly exist in the Arctic Ocean. For example, liquid freshwater has accumulated in the Beaufort Gyre in the decade of the 2000s compared to 1980-2000, with an extra ≈5000 km3—about 25%—being stored. The sources of freshwater to the Arctic from precipitation and runoff have increased between these periods (most of the evidence comes from models). Despite flux increases from 2001 to 2011, it is uncertain if the marine freshwater source through Bering Strait for the 2000s has changed, as observations in the 1980s and 1990s are incomplete. The marine freshwater fluxes draining the Arctic through Fram and Davis straits are also insignificantly different. In this way, the balance of sources and sinks of freshwater to the Arctic, Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA), and Baffin Bay shifted to about 1200±730 km3yr-1 freshening the region, on average, during the 2000s. The observed accumulation of liquid freshwater is consistent with this increased supply and the loss of freshwater from sea ice (Figure, right). Evidence exists that such discharges can impact the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, and hence Atlantic sector climate. Nevertheless, it appears that the observed AMOC variability since 2004, when high quality measurements began, is not attributable to anthropogenic influence. This work is based on, and updated from, Haine et al. (2015), Carmack et al. (2016), and Haine (2016). Haine, T. W. N. Ocean science: Vagaries of Atlantic overturning. Nature Geoscience, 9, 479-480, 10.1038/ngeo2748, 2016. T. W. N. Haine et al., Arctic Freshwater Export: Status, Mechanisms, and Prospects, Global Planetary Change, 125, 13-35, 10.1016/j.glopacha.2014.11.013, 2015. E. Carmack et al., Fresh water and its role in the Arctic Marine System: sources, disposition, storage, export, and physical and biogeochemical consequences in the Arctic and global oceans. J. G. Res. Biogeosciences, 10.1002/2015JG003140, 2016.

  15. Novel Synechococcus Genomes Reconstructed from Freshwater Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello-Yeves, Pedro J.; Haro-Moreno, Jose M.; Martin-Cuadrado, Ana-Belen; Ghai, Rohit; Picazo, Antonio; Camacho, Antonio; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Freshwater picocyanobacteria including Synechococcus remain poorly studied at the genomic level, compared to their marine representatives. Here, using a metagenomic assembly approach we discovered two novel Synechococcus sp. genomes from two freshwater reservoirs Tous and Lake Lanier, both sharing 96% average nucleotide identity and displaying high abundance levels in these two lakes located at similar altitudes and temperate latitudes. These new genomes have the smallest estimated size (2.2 Mb) and average intergenic spacer length (20 bp) of any previously sequenced freshwater Synechococcus, which may contribute to their success in oligotrophic freshwater systems. Fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmed that Synechococcus sp. Tous comprises small cells (0.987 ± 0.139 μm length, 0.723 ± 0.119 μm width) that amount to 90% of the picocyanobacteria in Tous. They appear together in a phylogenomic tree with Synechococcus sp. RCC307 strain, the main representative of sub-cluster 5.3 that has itself one of the smallest marine Synechococcus genomes. We detected a type II phycobilisome (PBS) gene cluster in both genomes, which suggests that they belong to a phycoerythrin-rich pink low-light ecotype. The decrease of acidic proteins and the higher content of basic transporters and membrane proteins in the novel Synechococcus genomes, compared to marine representatives, support their freshwater specialization. A sulfate Cys transporter which is absent in marine but has been identified in many freshwater cyanobacteria was also detected in Synechococcus sp. Tous. The RuBisCo subunits from this microbe are phylogenetically close to the freshwater amoeba Paulinella chromatophora symbiont, hinting to a freshwater origin of the carboxysome operon of this protist. The novel genomes enlarge the known diversity of freshwater Synechococcus and improve the overall knowledge of the relationships among members of this genus at large. PMID:28680419

  16. Sediment quality in freshwater impoundments at Savannah National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    Freshwater impoundments at Savannah National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), South Carolina, provide an important habitat for wildlife species, but degraded sediment quality in the Savannah River downstream of the discharge from two impoundments have caused concern about potential contaminant problems within the impoundments. The quality of sediments from five impoundments (impoundments no. 1, 2, 6, 7, and 17) on the NWR was evaluated using physical and chemical characterization, contaminant concentrations (metals, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and toxicity testing. Survival of Hyalella azteca (freshwater amphipod) exposed for 28 days to solid-phase sediments was not significantly different from controls, but growth was significantly decreased at several sites. Survival in 96-hour exposures to sediment pore water was significantly decreased at most sites. Factors contributing to the toxic responses were low pH (3.7 to 4.1), ammonia (20 mg/L), and increased concentrations of cations in the pore water. The excess of simultaneously extracted metals over the acid volatile sulfides in the sediments was also typical of sites displaying decreased sediment quality. Elemental concentrations in pore water were negatively correlated with pH, and the highest concentrations were observed in impoundment no. 7. The acidic nature of the sediment in this impoundment was exacerbated by recent draining, burning, and disking, which allowed oxidation of the previously anoxic wetland sediment. Sediment disturbance and mixing of vegetation into the sediments by disking may also have contributed to the formation of ammonia caused by microbial decomposition of the fragmented organic matter. Contaminants were not detected in sediments from the impoundments, but releases of acidic water with increased levels of sediment cations from the impoundments may have contributed to the degraded sediment conditions previously observed in the river

  17. Avian response to early tidal salt marsh restoration at former commercial salt evaporation ponds in San Francisco Bay, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athearn, Nicole D.; Takekawa, John Y.; Shinn, Joel

    2009-01-01

    Restoration of former commercial salt evaporation ponds in the San Francisco Bay estuary is intended to reverse a severe decline (>79%) in tidal salt marshes. San Francisco Bay is a critical migratory stopover site and wintering area for shorebirds and waterfowl, and salt ponds are important high tide roosting and foraging areas. Conservation of past bird abundance is a stated goal of area restoration projects, and early adaptive management will be critical for achieving this objective. However, initial avian response at sites restored to tidal flow may not be indicative of long-term results. For example, winter shorebirds at a 529 ha pond breached in 2002 showed a marked increase in shorebird abundance following breaching. Shorebirds comprised 1% of area totals during 1999-2002 and increased to 46% during 2003-2008. These changes accompanied increased tidal range and sedimentation, but minimal vegetation establishment. Conversely, a fully vegetated, restored 216 ha pond in the same system consistently supported less than 2% of all waterbirds in the region. Early restoration may temporarily increase habitat, but managed ponds will be needed for long-term waterbird abundance within a restored pond-marsh system.

  18. The freshwater reservoir effect in radiocarbon dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philippsen, Bente

    case studies will show the degree of variability of the freshwater reservoir effect over short and long timescales. Radiocarbon dating of recent water samples, aquatic plants and animals, shows that age differences of up to 2000 years can occur within one river. In the Limfjord, freshwater influence...... caused reservoir ages to vary between 250 and 700 years during the period 5400 BC - AD 700. Finally, I will discuss the implications of the freshwater reservoir effect for radiocarbon dating of Mesolithic pottery from inland sites of the Ertebølle culture in Northern Germany....

  19. The spatial distribution of soil organic carbon in tidal wetland soils of the continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Audra L; Feagin, Rusty A; Eriksson, Marian; Najjar, Raymond G; Herrmann, Maria; Bianchi, Thomas S; Kemp, Michael; Hutchings, Jack A; Crooks, Steve; Boutton, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Tidal wetlands contain large reservoirs of carbon in their soils and can sequester carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) at a greater rate per unit area than nearly any other ecosystem. The spatial distribution of this carbon influences climate and wetland policy. To assist with international accords such as the Paris Climate Agreement, national-level assessments such as the United States (U.S.) National Greenhouse Gas Inventory, and regional, state, local, and project-level evaluation of CO 2 sequestration credits, we developed a geodatabase (CoBluCarb) and high-resolution maps of soil organic carbon (SOC) distribution by linking National Wetlands Inventory data with the U.S. Soil Survey Geographic Database. For over 600,000 wetlands, the total carbon stock and organic carbon density was calculated at 5-cm vertical resolution from 0 to 300 cm of depth. Across the continental United States, there are 1,153-1,359 Tg of SOC in the upper 0-100 cm of soils across a total of 24 945.9 km 2 of tidal wetland area, twice as much carbon as the most recent national estimate. Approximately 75% of this carbon was found in estuarine emergent wetlands with freshwater tidal wetlands holding about 19%. The greatest pool of SOC was found within the Atchafalaya/Vermilion Bay complex in Louisiana, containing about 10% of the U.S. total. The average density across all tidal wetlands was 0.071 g cm -3 across 0-15 cm, 0.055 g cm -3 across 0-100 cm, and 0.040 g cm -3 at the 100 cm depth. There is inherent variability between and within individual wetlands; however, we conclude that it is possible to use standardized values at a range of 0-100 cm of the soil profile, to provide first-order quantification and to evaluate future changes in carbon stocks in response to environmental perturbations. This Tier 2-oriented carbon stock assessment provides a scientific method that can be copied by other nations in support of international requirements. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Sensitivity of growth characteristics of tidal sand ridges and long bed waves to formulations of bed shear stress, sand transport and tidal forcing : A numerical model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, Bing; de Swart, Huib E.; Panadès, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Tidal sand ridges and long bed waves are large-scale bedforms that are observed on continental shelves. They differ in their wavelength and in their orientation with respect to the principal direction of tidal currents. Previous studies indicate that tidal sand ridges appear in areas where tidal

  1. A new relativistic model for tidal stream evolution during tidal disruption events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servin, Juan; Kesden, Michael

    2018-01-01

    When stars are tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole, approximately half of their original mass becomes gravitationally bound and may eventually produce a tidal flare. The stellar debris evolves into streams that can self-intersect due to relativistic pericenter precession. Energy loss in these inelastic collisions both circularizes the stream and contributes to the tidal flare. Models of this process often assume that all elements of the tidal stream have the same specific energy and angular momentum as the most bound debris element. Real tidal debris possesses a distribution of binding energies, however, which grants it a distribution of orbits. We propose a new treatment for this debris, wherein we evolve the elements of the stream individually. We determine the radial distance (from the black hole) and the time (after the disruption) of the stream collisions as a function of black-hole mass under both Newtonian gravity (N+1PN) and general relativity (GR). We also use the Lane-Emden equation to account for the mass differences among the debris elements when calculating the energy loss in the inelastic collisions. For the N+1PN method, we evolve the stream using Newtonian orbital mechanics and apply pericenter precession after each pericenter passage using a first-order post-Newtonian approximation. Our relativistic method directly integrates the geodesic equations of motion. We see that the higher precession in the fully relativistic method results in more prompt collisions, and that assuming equal masses for the colliding debris elements greatly overestimates the energy loss resulting from these collisions. We also provide light curves for the corresponding flares and compare our predictions to those of previous models.

  2. A one-dimensional biomorphodynamic model of tidal flats: Sediment sorting, marsh distribution, and carbon accumulation under sea level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zeng; Ye, Qinghua; Coco, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    We develop a biomorphodynamic model to investigate sediment and vegetation dynamics on a schematic intertidal flat characterized by an initially well-mixed sand-mud mixture. Major interactions between tides, wind waves, salt marshes, sediment transport and sea level rise (SLR) are taken into account. For a bare flat under only tidal action, the model predicts a convex cross-shore profile with the surficial distribution of mud and sand on the upper and lower part of the intertidal flat, respectively. When wind waves are strong, the intertidal flat is highly eroded resulting in a concave profile near the high water mark. This behavior is pronouncedly altered when the intertidal flat is vegetated with the presence of salt marshes. Numerical results suggest that a considerable amount of mud can still remain in the vegetated region even when wave action is strong. A steeper transition zone forms at the boundary between salt marshes and bare flats because of the differential sediment deposition in the two neighboring regions. The inclusion of wind waves is found to considerably enhance the size of the marsh-edge transition zone. For the numerical experiments designed in this study, the profile shape and sediment sorting behavior of tidal flats are not significantly modified by a gradual rising sea level. However, the impacts of SLR on vegetated tidal flats are still manifold: (a) driving the landward migration of intertidal zone and salt marshes; (b) enhancing sediment erosion on intertidal flats; and (c) drowning salt marshes under limited sediment supply with the constrain of seawalls. Finally, model results suggest that organic carbon accumulation on marshlands may be enhanced with an increasing SLR rate provided that salt marshes are not drowned.

  3. Pond fractals in a tidal flat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cael, B B; Lambert, Bennett; Bisson, Kelsey

    2015-11-01

    Studies over the past decade have reported power-law distributions for the areas of terrestrial lakes and Arctic melt ponds, as well as fractal relationships between their areas and coastlines. Here we report similar fractal structure of ponds in a tidal flat, thereby extending the spatial and temporal scales on which such phenomena have been observed in geophysical systems. Images taken during low tide of a tidal flat in Damariscotta, Maine, reveal a well-resolved power-law distribution of pond sizes over three orders of magnitude with a consistent fractal area-perimeter relationship. The data are consistent with the predictions of percolation theory for unscreened perimeters and scale-free cluster size distributions and are robust to alterations of the image processing procedure. The small spatial and temporal scales of these data suggest this easily observable system may serve as a useful model for investigating the evolution of pond geometries, while emphasizing the generality of fractal behavior in geophysical surfaces.

  4. Tidal Dwarf Galaxies and Missing Baryons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Bournaud

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tidal dwarf galaxies form during the interaction, collision, or merger of massive spiral galaxies. They can resemble “normal” dwarf galaxies in terms of mass, size, and become dwarf satellites orbiting around their massive progenitor. They nevertheless keep some signatures from their origin, making them interesting targets for cosmological studies. In particular, they should be free from dark matter from a spheroidal halo. Flat rotation curves and high dynamical masses may then indicate the presence of an unseen component, and constrain the properties of the “missing baryons,” known to exist but not directly observed. The number of dwarf galaxies in the Universe is another cosmological problem for which it is important to ascertain if tidal dwarf galaxies formed frequently at high redshift, when the merger rate was high, and many of them survived until today. In this paper, “dark matter” is used to refer to the nonbaryonic matter, mostly located in large dark halos, that is, CDM in the standard paradigm, and “missing baryons” or “dark baryons” is used to refer to the baryons known to exist but hardly observed at redshift zero, and are a baryonic dark component that is additional to “dark matter”.

  5. Tidal instability in exoplanetary systems evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Gal P.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A new element is proposed to play a role in the evolution of extrasolar planetary systems: the tidal (or elliptical instability. It comes from a parametric resonance and takes place in any rotating fluid whose streamlines are (even slightly elliptically deformed. Based on theoretical, experimental and numerical works, we estimate the growth rate of the instability for hot-jupiter systems, when the rotation period of the star is known. We present the physical process, its application to stars, and preliminary results obtained on a few dozen systems, summarized in the form of a stability diagram. Most of the systems are trapped in the so-called "forbidden zone", where the instability cannot grow. In some systems, the tidal instability is able to grow, at short timescales compared to the system evolution. Implications are discussed in the framework of misaligned transiting systems, as the rotational axis of the star would be unstable in systems where this elliptical instability grows.

  6. Tidal constraints on the interior of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, C.; Tobie, G.; Verhoeven, O.; Rosenblatt, P.; Rambaux, N.

    2017-12-01

    As a prospective study for a future exploration of Venus, we compute the tidal response of Venus' interior assuming various mantle compositions and temperature profiles representative of different scenarios of Venus' formation and evolution. The mantle density and seismic velocities are modeled from thermodynamical equilibria of mantle minerals and used to predict the moment of inertia, Love numbers, and tide-induced phase lag characterizing the signature of the internal structure in the gravity field. The viscoelasticity of the mantle is parameterized using an Andrade rheology. From the models considered here, the moment of inertia lies in the range of 0.327 to 0.342, corresponding to a core radius of 2900 to 3450 km. Viscoelasticity of the mantle strongly increases the potential Love number relative to previously published elastic models. Due to the anelasticity effects, we show that the possibility of a completely solid metal core inside Venus cannot be ruled out based on the available estimate of k2 from the Magellan mission (Konopliv and Yoder, 1996). A Love number k2 lower than 0.27 would indicate the presence of a fully solid iron core, while for larger values, solutions with an entirely or partially liquid core are possible. Precise determination of the Love numbers, k2 and h2, together with an estimate of the tidal phase lag, are required to determine the state and size of the core, as well as the composition and viscosity of the mantle.

  7. Time scales in tidal disruption events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krolik J.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We explore the temporal structure of tidal disruption events pointing out the corresponding transitions in the lightcurves of the thermal accretion disk and of the jet emerging from such events. The hydrodynamic time scale of the disrupted star is the minimal time scale of building up the accretion disk and the jet and it sets a limit on the rise time. This suggest that Swift J1644+57, that shows several flares with a rise time as short as a few hundred seconds could not have arisen from a tidal disruption of a main sequence star whose hydrodynamic time is a few hours. The disrupted object must have been a white dwarf. A second important time scale is the Eddington time in which the accretion rate changes form super to sub Eddington. It is possible that such a transition was observed in the light curve of Swift J2058+05. If correct this provides interesting constraints on the parameters of the system.

  8. Pond fractals in a tidal flat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cael, B. B.; Lambert, Bennett; Bisson, Kelsey

    2015-11-01

    Studies over the past decade have reported power-law distributions for the areas of terrestrial lakes and Arctic melt ponds, as well as fractal relationships between their areas and coastlines. Here we report similar fractal structure of ponds in a tidal flat, thereby extending the spatial and temporal scales on which such phenomena have been observed in geophysical systems. Images taken during low tide of a tidal flat in Damariscotta, Maine, reveal a well-resolved power-law distribution of pond sizes over three orders of magnitude with a consistent fractal area-perimeter relationship. The data are consistent with the predictions of percolation theory for unscreened perimeters and scale-free cluster size distributions and are robust to alterations of the image processing procedure. The small spatial and temporal scales of these data suggest this easily observable system may serve as a useful model for investigating the evolution of pond geometries, while emphasizing the generality of fractal behavior in geophysical surfaces.

  9. The Global Carbon Sink in Tidal Salt Marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmura, G. L.

    2004-05-01

    For decades researchers have concentrated on proving that C is exported from salt marshes to coastal waters, with limited success. Yet, the C retained in the marsh soils may be equally important. Presumptions that minor amounts of C are stored in salt marsh soils are based upon measurements of low percentages of C in many marshes. Simply measuring the organic matter content of marsh soils provides little indication of the amount or rate of C stored, as this parameter is based upon the percent by mass of the soil. The critical parameter to calculate is C density, derived from percent organic matter and bulk density. (The latter is often neglected in marsh soil studies.) Calculation of C density reveals that minerogenic soils with high bulk densities may have C densities or C storage rates equivalent to more organic soils with low bulk densities. A global average soil C density of 0.055 ± 0.004 g cm-3 has been calculated from 107 measurements reported for salt marshes around the world (Gulf of Mexico, NE and NW Atlantic, Mediterranean and NE Pacific). Assuming an average marsh soil depth of 0.5 m and using inventories of marsh area available for Europe, Scandinavia, Africa, Canada and the U.S., the C stored globally in salt marshes is greater than 430 ± 30 Tg C. The global carbon storage could be twice this as there are no marsh inventories available for Asia or South America. Rates of C storage can be calculated from 96 C density measurements where soil accretion rates also were measured. Globally, marshes sequester an average of 210 g CO2 m-2 yr-1, an order of magnitude greater than rates reported for peatlands. Salt marsh C storage can have regional importance. At a magnitude of 5 Tg C yr-1, tidal wetlands comprise 1--2 percent of the C sink (300--580 Tg C yr-1) estimated for the coterminous U.S. In the Bay of Fundy restoration of salt marshes reclaimed for agricultural land could enable sequestration of an additional 240 to 360 Gg C yr-1, equivalent to 4 to 6

  10. Davis Pond freshwater prediversion biomonitoring study: freshwater fisheries and eagles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Bourgeois, E. Beth; Jeske, Clint W.

    2008-01-01

    In January 2001, the construction of the Davis Pond freshwater diversion structure was completed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The diversion of freshwater from the Mississippi River is intended to mitigate saltwater intrusion from the Gulf of Mexico and to lessen the concomitant loss of wetland areas. In addition to the freshwater inflow, Barataria Bay basin would receive nutrients, increased flows of sediments, and water-borne and sediment-bound compounds. The purpose of this biomonitoring study was, therefore, to serve as a baseline for prediversion concentrations of selected contaminants in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nestlings (hereafter referred to as eaglets), representative freshwater fish, and bivalves. Samples were collected from January through June 2001. Two similarly designed postdiversion studies, as described in the biological monitoring program, are planned. Active bald eagle nests targeted for sampling eaglet blood (n = 6) were generally located southwest and south of the diversion structure. The designated sites for aquatic animal sampling were at Lake Salvador, at Lake Cataouatche, at Bayou Couba, and along the Mississippi River. Aquatic animals representative of eagle prey were collected. Fish were from three different trophic levels and have varying feeding strategies and life histories. These included herbivorous striped mullet (Mugil cephalus), omnivorous blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus), and carnivorous largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Three individuals per species were collected at each of the four sampling sites. Freshwater Atlantic rangia clams (Rangia cuneata) were collected at the downstream marsh sites, and zebra mussels (Dreissena spp.) were collected on the Mississippi River. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends (BEST) protocols served as guides for fish sampling and health assessments. Fish are useful for monitoring aquatic ecosystems because they accumulate

  11. Impact of marine inundation after a period of drought on the lakeshore vegetation of Lake St Lucia, South Africa : resilience of estuarine vegetation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieben, E. J. J.; Ellery, W. N.; Dullo, B. W.; Grootjans, A. P.

    The shore of Lake St Lucia in the vicinity of Catalina Bay, in the southern part of the lake, receives freshwater input as surface and groundwater seepage from the adjacent elevated coastal plain. Vegetation, water quality and landform were recorded on the lakeshore and on the dry lakebed near one

  12. Exotic freshwater planarians currently known from Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluys, R.; Kawakatsu, M.; Yamamoto, K.

    2010-01-01

    Biogeographical and taxonomic information on the four non-indigenous freshwater planarians of Japan is reviewed, viz. Dugesia austroasiatica Kawakatsu, 1985, Girardia tigrina (Girard, 1850), G. dorotocephala (Woodworth, 1897), and Rhodax evelinae? Marcus, 1947. The occurrence of Girardia

  13. Progress and challenges in freshwater conservation planning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nel, JL

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available . Challenges relating to both improvement of scientific rigour and implementation of freshwater conservation plans are identified. High demand for water from multiple stakeholders requires planning for implementation from the outset. Three guidelines...

  14. Persistent organochlorine pesticide residues in freshwater systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , heptachlor and endosulfan were determined in water and sediment samples of freshwater systems in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa that receive runoff from agricultural lands and effluents from industries. The organochlorine ...

  15. 33 CFR 117.181 - Oakland Inner Harbor Tidal Canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oakland Inner Harbor Tidal Canal. 117.181 Section 117.181 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Tidal Canal. The draws of the Alameda County highway drawbridges at Park Street, mile 5.2; Fruitvale...

  16. Tidal power - a major prospect for the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haws, E.T.

    1997-01-01

    Tidal power technology is reviewed and its prospects for the next century assessed. It is concluded that the technology is now in place and, given the political will to secure financing, tidal power offers a clean, renewable and sustainable source of power for the near future. (UK)

  17. Relation between tidal damping and wave celerity in estuaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savenije, H.H.G.; Veling, E.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Observations in estuaries indicate that an amplified tidal wave moves considerably faster than is indicated by the classical equation for wave propagation. Similarly, the celerity of propagation is lower if the tidal wave is damped. This phenomenon is clearly observed in the Schelde estuary (located

  18. Potential sites for tidal power in New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    High-resolution simulation is made to model tidal energy along the coastlines of New Jersey (NJ) and its neighbor states with an : unprecedentedly fine grid. On the basis of the simulation, a thorough search is made for sites for tidal power generati...

  19. On the superposition of bedforms in a tidal channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, C; Vittori, G.; Ernstsen, V.B.

    2008-01-01

    High resolution bathymetric measurements reveal the super-imposition of bedforms in the Grådyb tidal inlet in the Danish Wadden Sea. Preliminary results of numerical model simulations are discussed: A linear stability model was tested to explain the large bedforms as being caused by tidal system...

  20. Tidal Movement of Nioghalvfjerdsfjorden Glacier, Northeast Greenland: Observations and Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Niels; Mayer, C.; Olesen, O. B.

    2000-01-01

    , 1997 and 1998. As part of this work, tidal-movement observations were carried out by simultaneous differential global positioning system (GPS) measurements at several locations distributed on the glacier surface. The GPS observations were performed continuously over several tidal cycles. At the same...

  1. Hydrodynamics and morphodynamics of a seasonally forced tidal inlet system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, N.T.; Stive, M.J.F.; Wang, Z.B.; Verhagen, H.J.; Thuy, V.T.T.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrodynamics and morphodynamics of a seasonally forced tidal inlet system are investigated using numerical models. The ocean forcing including tidal and wave actions and sediment transport is simulated using Delft3D model. Fluvial processes in Delft3D are taken into account as results from SOBEK

  2. Detecting areal changes in tidal flats after sea dike construction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The area of tidal flats from a topographic map published in one year differs significantly from that shown in another, which appears to be attributable to the tide levels at the time of aerial photography. During the study period, the area of tidal flats, as estimated from Landsat-TM images, increased by 4.57 km2 per year in the ...

  3. Detecting areal changes in tidal flats after sea dike construction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    topographic map published in one year differs significantly from that shown in another, which appears to be attributable to the tide levels at the time of aerial photography. During the study period, the area of tidal flats, as estimated from Landsat-TM images, increased by 4.57 km. 2 per year in the study areas. The tidal flats in ...

  4. Are Wave and Tidal Energy Plants New Green Technologies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douziech, Mélanie; Hellweg, Stefanie; Verones, Francesca

    2016-07-19

    Wave and tidal energy plants are upcoming, potentially green technologies. This study aims at quantifying their various potential environmental impacts. Three tidal stream devices, one tidal range plant and one wave energy harnessing device are analyzed over their entire life cycles, using the ReCiPe 2008 methodology at midpoint level. The impacts of the tidal range plant were on average 1.6 times higher than the ones of hydro-power plants (without considering natural land transformation). A similar ratio was found when comparing the results of the three tidal stream devices to offshore wind power plants (without considering water depletion). The wave energy harnessing device had on average 3.5 times higher impacts than offshore wind power. On the contrary, the considered plants have on average 8 (wave energy) to 20 (tidal stream), or even 115 times (tidal range) lower impact than electricity generated from coal power. Further, testing the sensitivity of the results highlighted the advantage of long lifetimes and small material requirements. Overall, this study supports the potential of wave and tidal energy plants as alternative green technologies. However, potential unknown effects, such as the impact of turbulence or noise on marine ecosystems, should be further explored in future research.

  5. Tidal and gravity waves study from the airglow measurements at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The other waves may be the upward propagating gravity waves or waves resulting from the interaction of inter-mode tidal oscillations, interaction of tidal waves with planetary waves and gravity waves. Some times, the second harmonic wave has higher vertical velocity than the corresponding fundamental wave. Application ...

  6. Wave and tidal generation devices reliability and availability

    CERN Document Server

    Tavner, Peter John

    2017-01-01

    To some extent the wave and tidal generation industry is following in the wake of the wind industry, learning from the growing experience of offshore wind farm deployment. This book combines wind industry lessons with wave and tidal field knowledge to explore the main reliability and availability issues facing this growing industry.

  7. Tidal bending of glaciers: a linear viscoelastic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Niels; Christensen, Erik Lintz; Mayer, Christoph

    2003-01-01

    In theoretical treatments of tidal bending of floating glaciers, the glacier is usually modelled as an elastic beam with uniform thickness, resting on an elastic foundation. With a few exceptions, values of the elastic (Young's) modulus E of ice derived from tidal deflection records of floating...

  8. Forced tidal response in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouillon, Flavien; Morey, Steven L.; Dukhovskoy, Dmitry S.; O'Brien, James J.

    2010-10-01

    This study investigates the characteristics of tides in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) and the response to forcing by local tidal potential and tides propagating as waves through straits connecting this semienclosed sea to the Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean. Numerical simulations performed with the Navy Coastal Ocean Model run in a barotropic configuration with 1/60° horizontal resolution are used to analyze the tidal response to different forcing mechanisms. The tidal energy budget and tidal energy fluxes in the GoM are calculated from the simulations. Results show that diurnal tides in the GoM are dominantly due to co-oscillation with the western Atlantic and that a substantial amount of semidiurnal tidal energy also enters the Gulf through the straits. Model experiments suggest that adding the local tidal potential significantly modifies the propagation of the semidiurnal tidal signal within the GoM and reduces the tidal power associated with the diurnal tides in the basin. An interesting phenomenon of nonlinear interaction between the two forcing mechanisms (local forcing and propagation through the straits) is described and explained by using a mechanistic mass-spring system model.

  9. Detecting areal changes in tidal flats after sea dike construction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The main objective of this study was to estimate changes in the area of tidal flats that occurred after sea dike construction on the western coast of South Korea using Landsat-TM images. Applying the ISODATA method of unsupervised classification for Landsat-TM images, the tidal flats were identified, and the resulting areas ...

  10. Carbon dioxide uptake by a temperate tidal sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Wim

    2007-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange between the atmosphere and the Wadden Sea, a shallow coastal region along the northern Netherlands, has been measured from April 2006 onwards on a tidal flat and over open water. Tidal flat measurements were done using a flux chamber, and ship borne measurements using

  11. Tidal-Fluvial and Estuarine Processes in the Lower Columbia River: II. Water Level Models, Floodplain Wetland Inundation, and System Zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay, David A.; Borde, Amy B.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2016-04-26

    Spatially varying water-level regimes are a factor controlling estuarine and tidal-fluvial wetland vegetation patterns. As described in Part I, water levels in the Lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) are influenced by tides, river flow, hydropower operations, and coastal processes. In Part II, regression models based on tidal theory are used to quantify the role of these processes in determining water levels in the mainstem river and floodplain wetlands, and to provide 21-year inundation hindcasts. Analyses are conducted at 19 LCRE mainstem channel stations and 23 tidally exposed floodplain wetland stations. Sum exceedance values (SEVs) are used to compare wetland hydrologic regimes at different locations on the river floodplain. A new predictive tool is introduced and validated, the potential SEV (pSEV), which can reduce the need for extensive new data collection in wetland restoration planning. Models of water levels and inundation frequency distinguish four zones encompassing eight reaches. The system zones are the wave- and current-dominated Entrance to river kilometer (rkm) 5; the Estuary (rkm-5 to 87), comprised of a lower reach with salinity, the energy minimum (where the turbidity maximum normally occurs), and an upper estuary reach without salinity; the Tidal River (rkm-87 to 229), with lower, middle, and upper reaches in which river flow becomes increasingly dominant over tides in determining water levels; and the steep and weakly tidal Cascade (rkm-229 to 234) immediately downstream from Bonneville Dam. The same zonation is seen in the water levels of floodplain stations, with considerable modification of tidal properties. The system zones and reaches defined here reflect geological features and their boundaries are congruent with five wetland vegetation zones

  12. A stand-alone tidal prediction application for mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Han; Fan, Ren-Ye; Yang, Yi-Chung

    2017-04-01

    It is essential for people conducting fishing, leisure, or research activities at the coasts to have timely and handy tidal information. Although tidal information can be found easily on the internet or using mobile device applications, this information is all applicable for only certain specific locations, not anywhere on the coast, and they need an internet connection. We have developed an application for Android devices, which allows the user to obtain hourly tidal height anywhere on the coast for the next 24 hours without having to have any internet connection. All the necessary information needed for the tidal height calculation is stored in the application. To develop this application, we first simulate tides in the Taiwan Sea using the hydrodynamic model (MIKE21 HD) developed by the DHI. The simulation domain covers the whole coast of Taiwan and the surrounding seas with a grid size of 1 km by 1 km. This grid size allows us to calculate tides with high spatial resolution. The boundary conditions for the simulation domain were obtained from the Tidal Model Driver of the Oregon State University, using its tidal constants of eight constituents: M2, S2, N2, K2, K1, O1, P1, and Q1. The simulation calculates tides for 183 days so that the tidal constants for the above eight constituents of each water grid can be extracted by harmonic analysis. Using the calculated tidal constants, we can predict the tides in each grid of our simulation domain, which is useful when one needs the tidal information for any location in the Taiwan Sea. However, for the mobile application, we only store the eight tidal constants for the water grids on the coast. Once the user activates the application, it reads the longitude and latitude from the GPS sensor in the mobile device and finds the nearest coastal grid which has our tidal constants. Then, the application calculates tidal height variation based on the harmonic analysis. The application also allows the user to input location and

  13. nbody6tt: Tidal tensors in N-body simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Florent

    2015-02-01

    nbody6tt, based on Aarseth's nbody6 (ascl:1102.006) code, includes the treatment of complex galactic tides in a direct N-body simulation of a star cluster through the use of tidal tensors (tt) and offers two complementary methods. The first allows consideration of any kind of galaxy and orbit, thus offering versatility; this method cannot be used to study tidal debris, as it relies on the tidal approximation (linearization of the tidal force). The second method is not limited by this and does not require a galaxy simulation; the user defines a numerical function which takes position and time as arguments, and the galactic potential is returned. The space and time derivatives of the potential are used to (i) integrate the motion of the cluster on its orbit in the galaxy (starting from user-defined initial position and velocity vector), and (ii) compute the tidal acceleration on the stars.

  14. Freshwater Commercial Bycatch: an Understated Conservation Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raby, Graham D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel; Cooke, Steven J.

    2011-04-01

    Commercial fisheries bycatch in marine systems has been regarded as a global conservation concern by environmental groups, scientists, government, and the public for decades. Fortunately, some headway has been made to mitigate the negative impacts of bycatch in marine environments. In a survey of the literature, we found that despite freshwater commercial fisheries yields comprising 11% of the global commercial catch, bycatch research focusing on freshwater commercial fisheries represented only {approx}3% of the total bycatch literature. This paucity of research is particularly alarming given that freshwater animals and habitats are some of the world's most imperiled. The limited inland bycatch literature that does exist includes examples of population declines attributed to commercial bycatch (e.g., freshwater dolphins in the Yangtze River in China) and illustrates that in some systems bycatch can be substantial (e.g., lake trout bycatch in the Laurentian Great Lakes). Encouraging results from the marine realm can serve as models for bycatch research in freshwater, and lead to measurable gains in conservation of freshwater ecosystems. We summarize existing work on inland bycatch in an effort to draw attention to this understated and understudied conservation problem.

  15. Application of terrestrial laser scanner on tidal flat morphology at a typhoon event timescale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Weiming; He, Qing; Zhang, Keqi; Guo, Leicheng; Wang, Xianye; Shen, Jian; Cui, Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Quantification of tidal flat morphological changes at varying timescales is critical from a management point of view. High-resolution tidal flat morphology data, including those for mudflats and salt-marshes, are rare due to monitoring difficulty by traditional methods. Recent advances in Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) technology allow rapid acquisition of high-resolution and large-scale morphological data, but it remains problematic for its application on salt-marshes due to the presence of dense vegetation. In this study, we applied a TLS system to retrieve high-accuracy digital elevation models in a tidal flat of the Yangtze Estuary by using a robust and accurate Progressive Morphological filter (PM) to separate ground and non-ground points. Validations against GPS-supported RTK measurements suggested remarkable performance. In this case the average estimation error was about 0.3 cm, while the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) was 2.0 cm. We conducted three TLS surveys on the same field including salt-marshes and mudflats at the time points 5 days before, 3 days after, and 45 days after a typhoon event. The retrieved data showed that the mudflats suffered from profound erosion while the salt-marshes slightly accreted during the typhoon period. The average elevation change of the total area was about - 4 cm (- 0.28 cm per day). However, both the mudflats and salt-marshes deposited in the post-typhoon period and the accretion over salt-marshes occurred at a higher rate than that during the typhoon. The elevation of the total area increased by 15.9 cm (0.37 cm per day), suggesting fast recovery under calm conditions. Quantification of the erosion and deposition rates was aided by the high quality TLS data. This study shows the effectiveness of TLS in quantifying morphological changes of tidal flats at an event (and post-event) timescale. The data and analysis also provide sound evidence on vegetation impact in stimulating salt-marsh development and restoration

  16. Understanding relationships between morphology and ecosystem structure in a shallow tidal basins of Venice lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuseppina Persichillo, Maria; Taramelli, Andrea; Valentini, Emiliana; Filipponi, Federico; Meisina, Claudia; Zucca, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Coastal wetlands represent complex ecosystems prone to continue fluctuation of their internal equilibrium. They are valuable natural resources characterized by the continue interactions between geomorphological and biological components. Their adaptation to changing conditions is highly dependent on the rate and extent of spatial and temporal processes and their responses are still poorly understood. According to this, the vulnerability assessment to natural and human made hazard have became fundamental to analyse the resilience of these areas, their ability to cope with the impacts from externally driven forces or the efforts needed to minimize the impacts (Gitay et al., 2011). The objective of this research is to develop a comprehensive and replicable method through the application of Multi-Source data analysis, based on the integration of Earth Observation data and field survey, to analyse a shallow tidal basin of salt marshes, located in the northern part of the Venice lagoon. The study site is characterised by relatively elevated areas colonized by halophytic vegetation, and tidal flats, with not vegetated areas, characterized by lower elevations. Sub-pixel processing techniques (Spectral Mixing Analysis - SMA) were used to analyse the spatial distribution of both vegetation and sediments typology. Furthermore the classifications were assayed in terms of spatial (Power law) and temporal (Empirical Orthogonal Functions) patterns, in order to find the main characteristics of the aforementioned spatial trends and their variation over time. The principal aim is to study the spatio-temporal evolution of this coastal wetland area, in order to indentify tipping points, namely thresholds, beyond which the system reaches critical state and the main climatic, hydrodynamic and morphological variables that may influence and increase this behaviour. This research represents a new approach to study the geomorphological processes and to improve the management and

  17. NS begins tidal power test with 1 turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2009-01-01

    The Bay of Fundy holds huge potential as a source of clean renewable tidal energy. This article announced the successful installation of a turbine that will test the potential of tidal power in the Bay of Fundy. Rather than requiring any dams or head ponds, new tidal power technologies include offshore floating tidal turbines and turbines that are anchored to the ocean floor to take advantage of natural tidal flows. In September 2009, Nova Scotia Power unveiled the 1 MW Open-Centre tidal turbine that was manufactured in Ireland by OpenHydro. The 10-metre turbine will be deployed in the Minas Passage as part of the Fundy Ocean Research Centre for Energy (FORCE) tidal test site. The turbine will rest directly on the ocean floor using a subsea gravity base made in Dartmouth by Cherubini Metal Works. It has several design features that minimize the impact on marine life. A large open centre provides a safe passage for marine life and the turbine's clean hydrodynamic lines ensure that fish will not become entangled. The use of oils, greases and other lubricants has also been avoided. The unit produces only very low levels of mechanical noise. A detailed turbine and environmental monitoring program will begin upon completion of the installation. Nova Scotia Power's involvement with the tidal energy test facility is supported by Sustainable Development Technology Canada. Nova Scotia Hydro owns and operates 1 of only 3 tidal power plants in the world, and the only one in the western hemisphere. The Annapolis Tidal Power plant, which came online in 1984, has a capacity of 20 MW and a daily output of about 80 to 100 megawatt hours.

  18. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT IN FRESHWATER MICROCOSMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, John T.

    1978-01-01

    Two cylindrical freshwater microcosms with a volume of 700 {ell} were maintained under controlled laboratory conditions for 190 days. The two microcosms were identical with regard to initial chemical composition and biological inocula, with the exceptions that in one microcosm (designated Tank 2) mosquitofish (Gambusia) and herbivorous catfish (Placostomas) were added. Three distinct communities developed in the tanks: (1) a phytoplankton-zooplankton assemblage and (2) two periphyton-zoobenthos communities associated with the sides and bottom of the tank, respectively. Community development and successional patterns were similar in both tanks. Major differences between the tanks involved timing of succession of the zooplankton and zoobenthos, attributable to predation by fish, principally Gambusia. A major drawback for these microcosms as use for experimental analogs such as lakes was a luxuriant periphyton growth which eventually overwhelmed the biomass of the system. The tanks displayed a degree of successional replicability, a large number of species, and a diversity of community development. Microcosms of this size could find use as experimental systems for higher level trophic manipulation and observation of life cycles not amenable to field studies.

  19. Meeting ecological and societal needs for freshwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Jill S.; Poff, N.L.; Angermeier, P.L.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Gleick, P.H.; Hairston, N.G.; Jackson, R.B.; Johnston, C.A.; Richter, B.D.; Steinman, A.D.

    2002-01-01

    Human society has used freshwater from rivers, lakes, groundwater, and wetlands for many different urban, agricultural, and industrial activities, but in doing so has overlooked its value in supporting ecosystems. Freshwater is vital to human life and societal well-being, and thus its utilization for consumption, irrigation, and transport has long taken precedence over other commodities and services provided by freshwater ecosystems. However, there is growing recognition that functionally intact and biologically complex aquatic ecosystems provide many economically valuable services and long-term benefits to society. The short-term benefits include ecosystem goods and services, such as food supply, flood control, purification of human and industrial wastes, and habitat for plant and animal life—and these are costly, if not impossible, to replace. Long-term benefits include the sustained provision of those goods and services, as well as the adaptive capacity of aquatic ecosystems to respond to future environmental alterations, such as climate change. Thus, maintenance of the processes and properties that support freshwater ecosystem integrity should be included in debates over sustainable water resource allocation.The purpose of this report is to explain how the integrity of freshwater ecosystems depends upon adequate quantity, quality, timing, and temporal variability of water flow. Defining these requirements in a comprehensive but general manner provides a better foundation for their inclusion in current and future debates about allocation of water resources. In this way the needs of freshwater ecosystems can be legitimately recognized and addressed. We also recommend ways in which freshwater ecosystems can be protected, maintained, and restored.Freshwater ecosystem structure and function are tightly linked to the watershed or catchment of which they are a part. Because riverine networks, lakes, wetlands, and their connecting groundwaters, are literally the

  20. The technology of fish-vegetable feed production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukatova M. D.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Perspective direction of the Volga-Caspian basin fisheries is increasing the productivity of aquaculture production which requires the availability of sufficient quantities of feed. The cutting waste of carp and crucian carp, crayfish processing (cephalothorax, wheat bran, soy isolate, freshwater plants – pondweed perfoliate, fish-vegetable ration, produced feeding staffs have been investigated. In researching samples of manufactured pelleted feeds the standard methods adopted in the animal feed industry have been used. The number of nitrogen-free extractives and energy value has been determined by calculation. The composition of fish-vegetable ration has been worked out. Some manufacturing inspection of fish-vegetable feed technology using proofing process has been carried out. The possibility of manufacturing on the basis of crushed fish waste of the company LLC "VES" and dry ingredients of fish-vegetable feed has been determined; the output of feed at water content of not more than 10 % is 43 % of feed mix based on the mass of directed waste equal to 84 %. The pilot batch of dry fish-vegetable feed has been investigated to establish quality indicators. It has been determined that fish-vegetable feed meets the requirements of GOST 10385–2014 "Combined feeding staffs for fishes. General specifications" as for main quality indicators and refers to economic grower for catfish and carp fish weighing more than 50 g. This reveals good palatability of the experimental batch of floating feed by carp fish species and African catfish. Thus, fish-vegetable feed manufacturing technology can be implemented in the production for processing secondary raw materials: waste from butchering fish by grinding, cooking, mixing with selected vegetable fillings which is waste of flour or grain processing industries and freshwater plants mowed annually during the reclamation works on the Volga delta.

  1. Responses of freshwater molluscs to environmental factors in Southern Brazil wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltchik, L; Stenert, C; Kotzian, C B; Pereira, D

    2010-08-01

    Freshwater molluscs play an important role in aquatic ecosystems, providing food for many fish species and vertebrates. Investigations on factors that determine mollusc species richness and distribution in wetland systems are scarce in the Neotropical region. The main goal of this study was to determine how much variation in mollusc richness and composition is explained by area, hydroperiod, altitude, water conductivity, and dominant aquatic vegetation. This survey was performed in an extensive area of a Neotropical region (approximately 280,000 km(2) in southern Brazil), with a large number of wetland systems (111) and covering a wide gradient of altitude and wetland surface area. The mollusc richness was positively associated with wetland area and negatively associated with altitude. The richness and composition of the freshwater molluscs were similar between permanent and intermittent wetlands and it did not differ significantly between aquatic bed and emergent wetlands. The first three axes of CCA explained 16.2% of the total variation in the composition of the freshwater mollusc observed. The variation in the composition had a correlation with wetland area, altitude and water conductivity. Our results showed that the wetlands are important habitats for molluscs in southern Brazil, and that the richness and the composition of molluscs were associated with area, altitude, water conductivity and dominant vegetation.

  2. Water quality function of an extensive vegetated roof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Dimitar; Driscoll, Charles T; Todorova, Svetoslava; Montesdeoca, Mario

    2018-06-01

    In this paper we present the results of a four-year study of water quality in runoff from an extensive, sedum covered, vegetated roof on an urban commercial building. Monitoring commenced seven months after the roof was constructed, with the first growing season. Stormwater drainage quality function of the vegetated roof was compared to a conventional (impermeable, high-albedo) membrane roof in addition to paired measurements of wet and bulk depositions at the study site. We present concentrations and fluxes of nutrients and major solutes. We discuss seasonal and year-to-year variation in water quality of drainage from the vegetated roof and how it compares with atmospheric deposition and drainage from the impermeable roof. Drainage waters from the vegetated roof exhibited a high concentration of nutrients compared to atmospheric deposition, particularly during the warm temperature growing season. However, nutrient losses were generally low because of the strong retention of water by the vegetated roof. There was marked variation in the retention of nutrients by season due to variations in concentrations in drainage from the vegetated roof. The vegetated roof was a sink of nitrogen, total phosphorus and chloride, and a source of phosphate and dissolved inorganic and organic carbon. Chloride exhibited elevated inputs and leaching during the winter. The drainage from the vegetated and impermeable roofs met the United States Environmental Protection Agency freshwater standards for all parameters, except for total phosphorus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Sequential development of tidal ravinement surfaces in macro- to hypertidal estuaries with high volcaniclastic input: the Miocene Puerto Madryn Formation (Patagonia, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scasso, Roberto A.; Cuitiño, José I.

    2017-08-01

    The late Miocene beds of the Puerto Madryn Formation (Provincia del Chubut, Argentina) are formed by shallow marine and estuarine sediments. The latter include several tidal-channel infills well exposed on the cliffy coast of the Peninsula Valdés. The Bahía Punta Fósil and Cerro Olazábal paleochannels are end members of these tidal channels and show a fining-upward infilling starting with intraformational channel lag conglomerates above deeply erosional surfaces interpreted as fluvial ravinement surfaces (the erosion surface formed in the purely fluvial or the fluvially dominated part of the estuary, where erosion is driven by fluvial processes). These are overlain and eventually truncated (and suppressed) by the tidal ravinement surface (TRS), in turn covered with high-energy, bioclastic conglomerates mostly formed in the "tidally dominated/fluvially influenced" part of an estuary. Above, large straight or arcuate point bars with alternatively sandy/muddy seasonal beds and varying trace and body fossil contents were deposited from the freshwater fluvially dominated to saline-water tidally dominated part of the estuary. The upper channel infill is formed by cross-bedded sands with mud drapes and seaward-directed paleocurrents, together with barren, volcaniclastic sandy to muddy heterolithic seasonal rhythmites, both deposited in the fluvially dominated part of the estuary. Volcanic ash driven by the rivers after large explosive volcanic eruptions on land resulted in sedimentation rates as high as 0.9 m per year, preserving (through burial) the morphology of tidal channels and TRSs. The channel deposits were formed in a tide-dominated, macrotidal to hypertidal open estuary with well-developed TRSs resulting from strong tidal currents deeply scouring into the transgressive filling of the channels and eventually cutting the fluvial ravinement surface. The TRSs extended upstream to the inner part of the estuary during long periods of low sedimentation rates

  4. A improved tidal method without water level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, xiaowen

    2017-04-01

    Now most tide are obtained use water Level and pressure type water gage, but it is difficult to install them and reading is in low accuracy in this method . In view of above-mentioned facts, In order to improve tide accuracy, A improved method is introduced.sea level is obtained in given time using high-precision GNSS buoy combined instantaneous position from pressure gage. two steps are as following, (1) the GNSS time service is used as the source of synchronization reference in tidal measurement; (2) centimeter-level sea surface positions are obtained in real time using difference GNSS The improved method used in seafloor topography survey,in 145 cross points, 95% meet the requirements of the Hydrographic survey specification. It is effective method to obtain higher accuracy tide.

  5. Dwarf Galaxies Swimming in Tidal Tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This false-color infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows little 'dwarf galaxies' forming in the 'tails' of two larger galaxies that are colliding together. The big galaxies are at the center of the picture, while the dwarfs can be seen as red dots in the red streamers, or tidal tails. The two blue dots above the big galaxies are stars in the foreground. Galaxy mergers are common occurrences in the universe; for example, our own Milky Way galaxy will eventually smash into the nearby Andromeda galaxy. When two galaxies meet, they tend to rip each other apart, leaving a trail, called a tidal tail, of gas and dust in their wake. It is out of this galactic debris that new dwarf galaxies are born. The new Spitzer picture demonstrates that these particular dwarfs are actively forming stars. The red color indicates the presence of dust produced in star-forming regions, including organic molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These carbon-containing molecules are also found on Earth, in car exhaust and on burnt toast, among other places. Here, the molecules are being heated up by the young stars, and, as a result, shine in infrared light. This image was taken by the infrared array camera on Spitzer. It is a 4-color composite of infrared light, showing emissions from wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange), and 8.0 microns (red). Starlight has been subtracted from the orange and red channels in order to enhance the dust features.

  6. A bright year for tidal disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Stone, Nicholas C.

    2016-09-01

    When a star is tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole (SMBH), roughly half of its mass falls back to the SMBH at super-Eddington rates. As this gas is tenuously gravitationally bound and unable to cool radiatively, only a small fraction fin ≪ 1 may accrete, with the majority instead becoming unbound in an outflow of velocity ˜104 km s-1. The outflow spreads laterally as it expands to large radii, encasing the SMBH and blocking the inner disc's EUV/X-ray radiation, which becomes trapped in a radiation-dominated nebula. Ionizing nebular radiation heats the inner edge of the ejecta, converting the emission to optical/near-UV wavelengths where photons more readily escape due to the lower opacity. This can explain the unexpectedly low and temporally constant effective temperatures of optically discovered tidal disruption event (TDE) flares. For high-mass SMBHs, M• ≳ 107 M⊙, the ejecta can become fully ionized at an earlier stage, or for a wider range of viewing angles, producing a TDE flare accompanied by thermal X-ray emission. The peak optical luminosity is suppressed as the result of adiabatic losses in the inner disc wind when M• ≪ 107 M⊙, possibly contributing to the unexpected dearth of optical TDEs in galaxies with low-mass SMBHs. In the classical picture, where fin ≈ 1, TDEs de-spin supermassive SMBHs and cap their maximum spins well below theoretical accretion physics limits. This cap is relaxed in our model, and existing Fe Kα spin measurements provide preliminary evidence that fin < 1.

  7. Ambient Noise in an Urbanized Tidal Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Christopher

    In coastal environments, when topographic and bathymetric constrictions are combined with large tidal amplitudes, strong currents (> 2 m/s) can occur. Because such environments are relatively rare and difficult to study, until recently, they have received little attention from the scientific community. However, in recent years, interest in developing tidal hydrokinetic power projects in these environments has motivated studies to improve this understanding. In order to support an analysis of the acoustic effects of tidal power generation, a multi-year study was conducted at a proposed project site in Puget Sound (WA) are analyzed at a site where peak currents exceeded 3.5 m/s. From these analyses, three noise sources are shown to dominate the observed variability in ambient noise between 0.02-30 kHz: anthropogenic noise from vessel traffic, sediment-generated noise during periods of strong currents, and flow-noise resulting from turbulence advected over the hydrophones. To assess the contribution of vessel traffic noise, one calendar year of Automatic Identification System (AIS) ship-traffic data was paired with hydrophone recordings. The study region included inland waters of the Salish Sea within a 20 km radius of the hydrophone deployment site in northern Admiralty Inlet. The variability in spectra and hourly, daily, and monthly ambient noise statistics for unweighted broadband and M-weighted sound pressure levels is driven largely by vessel traffic. Within the one-year study period, at least one AIS transmitting vessel is present in the study area 90% of the time and over 1,363 unique vessels are recorded. A noise budget for vessels equipped with AIS transponders identifies cargo ships, tugs, and passenger vessels as the largest contributors to noise levels. A simple model to predict received levels at the site based on an incoherent summation of noise from different vessel types yields a cumulative probability density function of broadband sound pressure

  8. TIDALLY DRIVEN DYNAMOS IN A ROTATING SPHERE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cébron, D.; Hollerbach, R.

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale planetary or stellar magnetic fields generated by a dynamo effect are mostly attributed to flows forced by buoyancy forces in electrically conducting fluid layers. However, these large-scale fields may also be controlled by tides, as previously suggested for the star τ-boo, Mars, or the early Moon. By simulating a small local patch of a rotating fluid, Barker and Lithwick have recently shown that tides can drive small-scale dynamos by exciting a hydrodynamic instability, the so-called elliptical (or tidal) instability. By performing global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a rotating spherical fluid body, we investigate if this instability can also drive the observed large-scale magnetic fields. We are thus interested in the dynamo threshold and the generated magnetic field in order to test if such a mechanism is relevant for planets and stars. Rather than solving the problem in a geometry deformed by tides, we consider a spherical fluid body and add a body force to mimic the tidal deformation in the bulk of the fluid. This allows us to use an efficient spectral code to solve the magnetohydrodynamic problem. We first compare the hydrodynamic results with theoretical asymptotic results and numerical results obtained in a truly deformed ellipsoid, which confirms the presence of elliptical instability. We then perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations and investigate the dynamo capability of the flow. Kinematic and self-consistent dynamos are finally simulated, showing that the elliptical instability is capable of generating a dipole-dominated large-scale magnetic field in global simulations of a fluid rotating sphere

  9. Tidal River Management (TRM and Tidal Basin Management (TBM: A case study on Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talchabhadel Rocky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bangladesh is the biggest delta of the world. Construction of numbers of polders is one of the flood resilient approach. But the presence of coastal polders de-linked the flood plain. The siltation in river causes riverbeds to become higher than the adjacent crop lands, and vast area under the polders became permanently water logged rendering large tract of land uncultivable. The current practice is temporarily de-poldering by cutting embankment. This is a natural water management process with very little human interventions but it needs strong participation and consensus with a great deal of sacrifice by the stakeholders for a specific period (3 to 5 years or even more[1]. An attempt has been made to study the phenomena of tidal basin management reviewing some secondary data and processes involved in successfully operated tidal basins of Bangladesh. And preliminary laboratory experiments are carried out to precisely look into the suspended sediment transport. With varying outflow discharge and sediment supply, the transport processes are investigated. 3D sediment transport model developed using openFOAM has good agreement with experimental result and can be used to better understand effectiveness of tidal basin management.

  10. Diurnal, semidiurnal, and fortnightly tidal components in orthotidal proglacial rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briciu, Andrei-Emil

    2018-02-22

    The orthotidal rivers are a new concept referring to inland rivers influenced by gravitational tides through the groundwater tides. "Orthotidal signals" is intended to describe tidal signals found in inland streamwaters (with no oceanic input); these tidal signals were locally generated and then exported into streamwaters. Here, we show that orthotidal signals can be found in proglacial rivers due to the gravitational tides affecting the glaciers and their surrounding areas. The gravitational tides act on glacier through earth and atmospheric tides, while the subglacial water is affected in a manner similar to the groundwater tides. We used the wavelet analysis in order to find tidally affected streamwaters. T_TIDE analyses were performed for discovering the tidal constituents. Tidal components with 0.95 confidence level are as follows: O1, PI1, P1, S1, K1, PSI1, M2, T2, S2, K2, and MSf. The amplitude of the diurnal tidal constituents is strongly influenced by the daily thermal cycle. The average amplitude of the semidiurnal tidal constituents is less altered and ranges from 0.0007 to 0.0969 m. The lunisolar synodic fortnightly oscillation, found in the time series of the studied river gauges, is a useful signal for detecting orthotidal rivers when using noisier data. The knowledge of the orthotidal oscillations is useful for modeling fine resolution changes in rivers.

  11. Device interactions in reducing the cost of tidal stream energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, A.; Iglesias, G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Numerical modelling is used to estimate the levelised cost of tidal stream energy. • As a case study, a model of Lynmouth (UK) is implemented and successfully validated. • The resolution of the model allows the demarcation of individual devices on the model grid. • Device interactions reduce the available tidal resource and the cost increases significantly. - Abstract: The levelised cost of energy takes into account the lifetime generated energy and the costs associated with a project. The objective of this work is to investigate the effects of device interactions on the energy output and, therefore, on the levelised cost of energy of a tidal stream project, by means of numerical modelling. For this purpose, a case study is considered: Lynmouth (North Devon, UK), an area in the Bristol Channel in which the first tidal stream turbine was installed − a testimony of its potential as a tidal energy site. A state-of-the-art hydrodynamics model is implemented on a high-resolution computational grid, which allows the demarcation of the individual devices. The modification to the energy output resulting from interaction between turbines within the tidal farm is thus resolved for each individual turbine. The results indicate that significant changes in the levelised cost of energy values, of up to £0.221 kW h −1 , occur due to the aforementioned modifications, which should not be disregarded if the cost of tidal stream energy is to be minimised

  12. [Characteristics of tidal breathing pulmonary function in children with tracheobronchomalacia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan; Chen, Qaing; Zhang, Fan; Zhu, Shuang-Gui; Hu, Ci-Lang; Wu, Ai-Min

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the characteristics of tidal breathing pulmonary function in children with tracheobronchomalacia (TBM). In this study, 30 children who were diagnosed with TBM using electronic bronchoscopy were enrolled in the observation group; 30 healthy children were recruited in the normal control group. For individuals in each group, the assessment of tidal breath pulmonary function was performed at diagnosis and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after diagnosis. There were no significant differences in tidal volume, inspiratory time, expiratory time, and inspiratory to expiratory ratio between the two groups (P>0.05). Compared with the control group, the observation group had a significantly higher respiratory rate and significantly lower ratio of time to peak tidal expiratory flow to total expiratory time (TPTEF/TE) and ratio of volume to peak tidal expiratory flow to total expiratory volume (VPTEF/VE). There was a time-dependent increase in TPTEF/TE and VPTEF/VE for TBM children from the time of initial diagnosis to 12 months after diagnosis. Tidal breathing pulmonary function has characteristic changes in children with TBM. Tidal breathing pulmonary function tends to be recovered with increased age in children with TBM.

  13. Large tidal plants may supply 1,000 TWh / year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemperiere, F.

    2006-10-01

    Many studies of tidal plants have been made fifty years ago: they were usually devoted to sites with average tidal head over 6 m and reduced works at sea: estuaries such as La Rance (France) or Severn (U.K.) were favoured: preferred corresponding operation was using flow from a high basin to low sea level, supplying power 4 hours from 12. Such solutions had 2 drawbacks: power supply poorly adapted to needs and modified shore tidal ecosystems. Beyond that the power cost was usually higher than from thermal plants and very few plants were built, the main one being the Rance plant in France supplying 0,5 TWh/year with 240 MW. The world theoretical tidal potential is in the same range as the traditional hydropower potential. A new approach of tidal plants based upon solutions existing now and using new operating methods substantiates the possibility of over 1,000 TWh/year of cost efficient tidal energy with limited environmental impact and power supply well adapted to requirements. Over 15 countries may be involved. Tidal plants with heads as low as 4 m may be cost efficient. (author)

  14. Magnetic fields driven by tidal mixing in radiative stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Jérémie; Cébron, David; Schaeffer, Nathanaël; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2018-04-01

    Stellar magnetism plays an important role in stellar evolution theory. Approximatively 10 per cent of observed main sequence (MS) and pre-main-sequence (PMS) radiative stars exhibit surface magnetic fields above the detection limit, raising the question of their origin. These stars host outer radiative envelopes, which are stably stratified. Therefore, they are assumed to be motionless in standard models of stellar structure and evolution. We focus on rapidly rotating, radiative stars which may be prone to the tidal instability, due to an orbital companion. Using direct numerical simulations in a sphere, we study the interplay between a stable stratification and the tidal instability, and assess its dynamo capability. We show that the tidal instability is triggered regardless of the strength of the stratification (Brunt-Väisälä frequency). Furthermore, the tidal instability can lead to both mixing and self-induced magnetic fields in stably stratified layers (provided that the Brunt-Väisälä frequency does not exceed the stellar spin rate in the simulations too much). The application to stars suggests that the resulting magnetic fields could be observable at the stellar surfaces. Indeed, we expect magnetic field strengths up to several Gauss. Consequently, tidally driven dynamos should be considered as a (complementary) dynamo mechanism, possibly operating in radiative MS and PMS stars hosting orbital companions. In particular, tidally driven dynamos may explain the observed magnetism of tidally deformed and rapidly rotating Vega-like stars.

  15. A Summary of the San Francisco Tidal Wetlands Restoration Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry R. Brown

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The four topical articles of the Tidal Wetlands Restoration Series summarized and synthesized much of what is known about tidal wetlands and tidal wetland restoration in the San Francisco Estuary (hereafter “Estuary”. Despite a substantial amount of available information, major uncertainties remain. A major uncertainty with regard to fishes is the net benefit of restored tidal wetlands relative to other habitats for native fishes in different regions of the Estuary given the presence of numerous invasive alien species. With regard to organic carbon, a major uncertainty is the net benefit of land use change given uncertainty about the quantity and quality of different forms of organic carbon resulting from different land uses. A major challenge is determining the flux of organic carbon from open systems like tidal wetlands. Converting present land uses to tidal wetlands will almost certainly result in increased methylation of mercury at the local scale with associated accumulation of mercury within local food webs. However, it is unclear if such local accumulation is of concern for fish, wildlife or humans at the local scale or if cumulative effects at the regional scale will emerge. Based on available information it is expected that restored tidal wetlands will remain stable once constructed; however, there is uncertainty associated with the available data regarding the balance of sediment accretion, sea-level rise, and sediment erosion. There is also uncertainty regarding the cumulative effect of many tidal restoration projects on sediment supply. The conclusions of the articles highlight the need to adopt a regional and multidisciplinary approach to tidal wetland restoration in the Estuary. The Science Program of the CALFED effort provides an appropriate venue for addressing these issues.

  16. Coastal marsh degradation: modeling the influence of vegetation die-off patterns on flow and sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Lennert; Wang, Chen; Kirwan, Matthew; Belluco, Enrica; D'Alpaos, Andrea; Temmerman, Stijn

    2014-05-01

    Coastal marshes are vulnerable ecosystems that provide ecosystem functions such as storm protection and carbon sequestration. However, degradation of vegetated marshes into bare tidal flats or open water has been reported as a worldwide phenomenon, threatening their valuable wetland functions. Moreover, tidal marshes and bare flats are considered as alternative stable ecosystem states, which implies that, once vegetated marshes have degraded to bare flats, the (re)conversion from bare flats to marsh vegetation may be very difficult. Recent aerial photo analysis has demonstrated that the degradation or die-off of a marsh area is a spatial process, whereby vegetation is typically replaced by non-vegetated areas in the form of interior marsh pools, also known as ponds or marsh basins. On a small scale, these pools have similar characteristics among different marshes worldwide: pools that are located further away from tidal channels and with broad channel connections to the tidal channel system appear to have low surface elevations and a low probability for marsh recovery (this is re-establishment of vegetation on the surface). Interior pools located closer to, but that are not connected to channels on the other hand, are positioned on higher elevations and are more likely to recover. These findings may have important implications for the restoration potential of degraded marshes and their functions. We hypothesize that bio-geomorphologic interactions are the main mechanisms causing these differences in elevation and recovery potential of interior marsh pools: pools that are not connected to the channel system, are separated from the channel by vegetation, which reduces the flow velocity, increases sedimentation and may explain our observation of higher surface elevation of this type of pools. In contrast, pools that are connected with the channel system are not protected by vegetation and will experience higher flow velocities and lower sedimentation rates or even

  17. Fruits and vegetables (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A healthy diet includes adding vegetables and fruit every day. Vegetables like broccoli, green beans, leafy greens, zucchini, cauliflower, cabbage, carrots, and tomatoes are low in calories and high in fiber, vitamins, and minerals. ...

  18. Vegetable Production System (Veggie)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Vegetable Production System (Veggie) was developed to be a simple, easily stowed, high growth volume, low resource facility capable of producing fresh vegetables...

  19. Stratification and salt-wedge in the Seomjin river estuary under the idealized tidal influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jin Hwan; Jang, Dongmin; Kim, Yong Hoon

    2017-12-01

    Advection, straining, and vertical mixing play primary roles in the process of estuarine stratification. Estuaries can be classified as salt-wedge, partially-mixed or well-mixed depending on the vertical density structure determined by the balancing of advection, mixing and straining. In particular, straining plays a major role in the stratification of the estuarine water body along the estuarine channel. Also, the behavior of a salt wedge with a halocline shape in a stratified channel can be controlled by the competition between straining and mixing induced by buoyancy from the riverine source and tidal forcing. The present study uses Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) to show that straining and vertical mixing play major roles in controlling along-channel flow and stratification structures in the Seomjin river estuary (SRE) under idealized conditions. The Potential Energy Anomaly (PEA) dynamic equation quantifies the governing processes thereby enabling the determination of the stratification type. By comparing terms in the equation, we examined how the relative strengths of straining and mixing alter the stratification types in the SRE due to changes in river discharge and the depth resulting from dredging activities. SRE under idealized tidal forcing tends to be partially-mixed based on an analysis of the balance between terms and the vertical structure of salinity, and the morphological and hydrological change in SRE results in the shift of stratification type. While the depth affects the mixing, the freshwater discharge mainly controls the straining, and the balance between mixing and straining determines the final state of the stratification in an estuarine channel. As a result, the development and location of a salt wedge along the channel in a partially mixed and highly stratified condition is also determined by the ratio of straining to mixing. Finally, our findings confirm that the contributions of mixing and straining can be assessed by using the

  20. Vegetables in Kindergarten

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Lise

    2014-01-01

    In Oslo the amount of vegetables served in kindergarten is considerably lower than suggested by national authorities. This is a concern for both immediate and long-term health issues. The aim of the study was to investigate factors that contribute to vegetable serving in kindergartens. These factors could then be targeted in future interventions in order to increase vegetable serving in kindergartens. The study investigated social psychological factors in vegetable serving. This included coll...

  1. Satellite tidal magnetic signals constrain oceanic lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grayver, Alexander V.; Schnepf, Neesha R.; Kuvshinov, Alexey V.

    2016-01-01

    The tidal flow of electrically conductive oceans through the geomagnetic field results in the generation ofsecondary magnetic signals, which provide information on the subsurface structure. Data from the new generation of satellites were shown to contain magnetic signals due to tidal flow; however......, there are no reports that these signals have been used to infer subsurface structure. We use satellite-detected tidal magnetic fields to image the global electrical structure of the oceanic lithosphere and upper mantle down to a depth of about 250 km. Themodel derived from more than 12 years of satellite data reveals...

  2. Bedload transport in an inlet channel during a tidal cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstsen, V. B.; Becker, M.; Winter, C.

    2007-01-01

      Based on high-resolution swath bathymetry measurements at centimetre-scale precision conducted during a tidal cycle in a dune field in the Grådyb tidal inlet channel in the DanishWadden Sea, a simple tool to calculate bedload transport is presented. Bedload transport was related to simultaneous...... dunes being active during the ebb tide, but negligible during the flood tide. Bedload transport was also predicted using five classical and widely used formulae. These predictors were all unable to depict the temporal variation in bedload transport during the tidal cycle. It is suggested that temporal...

  3. Stability of Circular Orbits around a Tidal Charged Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, M.; Kousar, L.

    2018-01-01

    We study the effects of the tidal charge on the equatorial circular motion of neutral test particles near a tidal charged black hole. This analysis investigates stable as well as unstable circular orbits in all possible configurations of nonextremal and extremal cases. It is found that a negative tidal charge will increase the energy and angular momentum of a neutral test particle moving around a black hole. We obtain a continuous region of stability for both extremal and nonextremal cases. We conclude that the region of stability as well as radius of last stable circular orbit shows increasing behavior for Q < 0.

  4. Tidal energy UK Government R and D programme. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, J.W.; Davies, L.M.; Allington, M.A.

    1996-05-01

    The United Kingdom Government's research programme into the feasibility of exploiting tidal power for electricity generation in Britain's estuaries is described in this document. The history of the research is included from the Severn Barrage Committee in 1978 to the conclusion of the tidal energy barrages programme in 1994. The programme sought to reduce uncertainty on costs, technical performance and environmental and regional effects, in order to firm up on decisions on whether to construct certain specific barrages. It was concluded that, while technically feasible, tidal power from barrages, was and will continue to be uneconomic compared with other energy sources. Other renewable technologies would receive further research. (UK)

  5. Tidal double detonation: a new mechanism for the thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf induced by a tidal disruption event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikawa, Ataru

    2018-03-01

    We suggest tidal double detonation as a new mechanism for the thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf (WD) induced by a tidal disruption event (TDE). Tidal detonation is also a WD explosion induced by a TDE. In this case, helium (He) and carbon-oxygen (CO) detonation waves incinerate He WDs and CO WDs, respectively. On the other hand, for tidal double detonation, He detonation is first excited in the He shell of a CO WD, which then drives CO detonation in the CO core. We name this mechanism after the double detonation scenario in the context of type Ia supernovae. In this paper, by performing numerical simulations for CO WDs of mass 0.60 M⊙ with and without a He shell, we show that tidal double detonation occurs in the shallower encounter of a CO WD with an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) compared to simple tidal detonation. We expect tidal double detonation will increase the possibility of the occurrence of WD TDEs, which can help us to understand IMBHs.

  6. Analysis of Tidal Data for Dagang Tidal Gauge and Study of the Changes for the National Height Datum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Fumei

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The main tides affecting Dagang sea level are analyzed and the national height datum is studied by analyzing 1980—2011 hourly tidal data and 1952—2007 monthly mean tidal data. Firstly, the frequencies and amplitudes of main tides including 180 short-period tides and 6 long-period tides are gained by the Fouirer transform. Then the actual amplitudes and their variations of main tides are obtained by the harmonic analysis of the 1980—2011 hourly tidal data, and the changes with about 19 year period can easily be found in the amplitudes of Q1、O1、M2、K1、K2. And then the changes of the mean sea level at Dagang tidal gauge defining national height datum during the period of 1952—2011 are studied by the harmonic analysis and the shifting average of 18.61 year tidal heights. The results of these methods show that the mean sea level at Dagang tidal gauge descended with the speed of 1.07 mm/a and 0.76 mm/a respectively during 1952—1980, and that it ascended with the speed of 1.59 mm/a and 1.62 mm/a respectively during 1980—2011. And finally the difference of 0.14 cm is achieved by the shifting average of 18.61 year tidal heights for 1985 National Height Datum.

  7. Leaf-litter leachate concentration promotes heterotrophy in freshwater biofilms: Understanding consequences of water scarcity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Aingeru; Kominoski, John Stephen; Larrañaga, Aitor

    2017-12-01

    Climate change is increasing overall temporal variability in precipitation resulting in a seasonal water availability, both increasing periods of flooding and water scarcity. During low water availability periods, the concentration of leachates from riparian vegetation increases, subsequently increasing dissolved organic matter (DOM). Moreover, shifts in riparian vegetation by land use changes impact the quantity and quality of DOM. Our objective was to test effects of increasing DOM concentrations from Eucalyptus grandis (one of the most cultivated tree species in the world) leachates on the metabolism (respiration, R; gross primary productivity, GPP) and extracellular enzyme activities (EEAs) of freshwater biofilms. To test effects of DOM concentrations on freshwater biofilm functions, we incubated commercial cellulose sponges in a freshwater pond to allow biofilm colonization, and then exposed biofilms to five different concentrations of leaf-litter leachates of E. grandis for five days. To test if responses to DOM concentrations varied with colonization stage of biofilms, we measured treatment effects on biofilms colonizing standard substrates after one, two, three and four weeks of colonization. Increases in leachates concentrations enhanced biofilm heterotrophy, increasing R rates and decreasing GPP. Leachate concentrations did not affect biofilm EEAs, and changes in biofilm metabolism were not explained by treatment-induced changes in biofilm biomass or stoichiometry. We detected the lowest production:respiration ratios, i.e. more heterotrophic assemblages, with the most concentrated leachate solution and the most advanced biofilm colonization stages. Shifts in quantity of dissolved organic matter in freshwaters may further influence ecosystem metabolism and carbon processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Sulfate reduction in freshwater peatlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oequist, M.

    1996-01-01

    This text consist of two parts: Part A is a literature review on microbial sulfate reduction with emphasis on freshwater peatlands, and part B presents the results from a study of the relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane formation for the anaerobic decomposition in a boreal peatland. The relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane production for the anaerobic decomposition was studied in a small raised bog situated in the boreal zone of southern Sweden. Depth distribution of sulfate reduction- and methane production rates were measured in peat sampled from three sites (A, B, and C) forming an minerotrophic-ombrotrophic gradient. SO 4 2- concentrations in the three profiles were of equal magnitude and ranged from 50 to 150 μM. In contrast, rates of sulfate reduction were vastly different: Maximum rates in the three profiles were obtained at a depth of ca. 20 cm below the water table. In A it was 8 μM h -1 while in B and C they were 1 and 0.05 μM h -1 , respectively. Methane production rates, however, were more uniform across the three nutrient regimes. Maximum rates in A (ca. 1.5 μg d -1 g -1 ) were found 10 cm below the water table, in B (ca. 1.0 μg d -1 g -1 ) in the vicinity of the water table, and in C (0.75 μg d -1 g -1 ) 20 cm below the water table. In all profiles both sulfate reduction and methane production rates were negligible above the water table. The areal estimates of methane production for the profiles were 22.4, 9.0 and 6.4 mmol m -2 d -1 , while the estimates for sulfate reduction were 26.4, 2.5, and 0.1 mmol m -2 d -1 , respectively. The calculated turnover times at the sites were 1.2, 14.2, and 198.7 days, respectively. The study shows that sulfate reducing bacteria are important for the anaerobic degradation in the studied peatland, especially in the minerotrophic sites, while methanogenic bacteria dominate in ombrotrophic sites Examination paper. 67 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  9. Ecosystem Services : In Nordic Freshwater Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Kristin; Hasler, Berit; Zandersen, Marianne

    Human wellbeing is dependent upon and benefit from ecosystem services which are delivered by well-functioning ecosystems. Ecosystem services can be mapped and assessed consistently within an ecosystem service framework. This project aims to explore the use and usefulness of the ecosystem service...... framework in freshwater management, particularly water management according to the Water Framework Directive (WFD). There are several examples of how ecosystem services have been used in WFD related studies in all the Nordic countries. Most of them involve listing, describing and categorizing freshwater...... ecosystem services, while there are few comprehensive Cost Benefit Analyses and analyses of disproportionate costs that apply this framework. More knowledge about ecosystem services and the value of ecosystem services for freshwater systems is needed....

  10. Sulfate reduction and methanogenesis at a freshwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Vibeke Margrethe Nyvang; Andersen, Martin Søgaard; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    The freshwater-seawater interface was studied in a ~9-m thick anaerobic aquifer located in marine sand and gravel with thin peat lenses. Very limited amounts of iron-oxides are present. Consequently, the dominating redox processes are sulfate reduction and methanogenesis, and the groundwater...... is enriched in dissolved sulfide, methane and bicarbonate. Under normal conditions the seawater-freshwater interface is found at a depth of 4 m at the coastline and reaches the bottom of the aquifer 40 m inland. However, occasional flooding of the area occurs, introducing sulfate to the aquifer. Groundwater...... chemistry was studied in a 120 m transect perpendicular to the coast. Cores were taken for radiotracer rate measurements of sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. In the saline part of the aquifer 35 m inland, sulfate reduction was the dominant process with rates of 0.1-10 mM/year. In the freshwater part 100...

  11. Higher diversity of ammonia/ammonium-oxidizing prokaryotes in constructed freshwater wetland than natural coastal marine wetland

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yong-Feng; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2012-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria, aerobic ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are three groups of ammonium/ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes (AOPs) that are involved in the nitrogen cycle. This research compared the AOP communities in a constructed freshwater wetland with a natural coastal marine wetland in the subtropical Hong Kong. Both vegetated/rhizosphere and nonvegetated sediments were investigated to identify the effects of different macroph...

  12. Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the SFBWQP Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase I project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  13. Measuring and modeling exposure from environmental radiation on tidal flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, T.J.; Hess, C.T.

    2005-01-01

    To examine the shielding effects of the tide cycle, a high pressure ion chamber was used to measure the exposure rate from environmental radiation on tidal flats. A theoretical model is derived to predict the behavior of exposure rate as a function of time for a detector placed one meter above ground on a tidal flat. The numerical integration involved in this derivation results in an empirical formula which implies exposure rate ∝tan-1(sint). We propose that calculating the total exposure incurred on a tidal flat requires measurements of only the slope of the tidal flat and the exposure rate when no shielding occurs. Experimental results are consistent with the model

  14. Anticorrosion and halobios control for tidal power generating units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, J C; Ding, L X

    2012-01-01

    The anticorrosion and halobios control is the key techniquesrelated to the safety and durability of tidal power generating units. The technique of material application, antifouling coating and cathodic protection are often adopted. The technical research, application, updating and development are carried on Jiangxia Tidal Power Station, which is based on the old Unit 1-Unit 5 operated for nearly 30 years, and the new Unit 6 operated in 2007. It is found that stainless steeland the antifouling coating used in Unit 1- Unit 5 are very effective, but cathodic protection is often likely to fail because of the limitation of structure and installation. Analyses and studies for anticorrosion and halobios control techniques of tidal power generating units according to theory, experience and actual effects have been done, which can be for reference to the tidal power station designers and builders.

  15. The structure of turbulence in a rapid tidal flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, I A; Sharma, R N; Flay, R G J

    2017-08-01

    The structure of turbulence in a rapid tidal flow is characterized through new observations of fundamental statistical properties at a site in the UK which has a simple geometry and sedate surface wave action. The mean flow at the Sound of Islay exceeded 2.5 m s -1 and the turbulent boundary layer occupied the majority of the water column, with an approximately logarithmic mean velocity profile identifiable close to the seabed. The anisotropic ratios, spectral scales and higher-order statistics of the turbulence generally agree well with values reported for two-dimensional open channels in the laboratory and other tidal channels, therefore providing further support for the application of universal models. The results of the study can assist in developing numerical models of turbulence in rapid tidal flows such as those proposed for tidal energy generation.

  16. On tidal phenomena in a strong gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashoon, B.

    1975-01-01

    A simple framework based on the concept of quadrupole tidal potential is presented for the calculation of tidal deformation of an extended test body in a gravitational field. This method is used to study the behavior of an initially faraway nonrotating spherical body that moves close to a Schwarzschild or an extreme Kerr black hole. In general, an extended body moving in an external gravitational field emits gravitational radiation due to its center of mass motion, internal tidal deformation, and the coupling between the internal and center of mass motions. Estimates are given of the amount of tidal radiation emitted by the body in the gravitational fields considered. The results reported in this paper are expected to be of importance in the dynamical evolution of a dense stellar system with a massive black hole in its center

  17. On tidal radius determination for a globular cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, S.

    1985-01-01

    A tidal radius determination for a globular cluster based on its density minimum, which is caused by the galactic tidal forces and derivable from a model of the Galaxy, is proposed. Results obtained on the basis of the Schmidt model for two clusters are in a satisfactory agreement with those obtained earlier by means of other methods. A mass determination for the clusters through the tidal radius, when the latter one is identified with the cluster perigalactic distance, yields unusually large mass values. Probably, the tidal radius should be identified with the instantaneous galactocentric distance. Use of models more recent than the Schmidt one indicates that a globular cluster may contain a significant portion of an invisible interstellar matter. (author)

  18. Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the SFBWQP Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase II, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  19. Observation of Tidal Effects on LWIR Radiance Above the Mesopause

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wintersteiner, Peter

    2007-01-01

    ..., and season The local-time dependence, in particular, suggests a role for atmospheric tides using a tidal model, Global Scale Wave Model, and our non-GTE ARC rode, we modeled the 15 Om radiance...

  20. A new high resolution tidal model in the arctic ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cancet, M.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Lyard, F.

    The Arctic Ocean is a challenging region for tidal modeling, because of its complex and not well-documented bathymetry, together combined with the intermittent presence of sea ice and the fact that the in situ tidal observations are rather scarce at such high latitudes. As a consequence......, the accuracy of the global tidal models decreases by several centimeters in the Polar Regions. In particular, it has a large impact on the quality of the satellite altimeter sea surface heights in these regions (ERS1/2, Envisat, CryoSat-2, SARAL/AltiKa and the future Sentinel-3 mission). Better knowledge...... of the tides improves the quality of the high latitudes altimeter sea surface heights and of all derived products, such as the altimetry-derived geostrophic currents, the mean sea surface and the mean dynamic topography. In addition, accurate tidal models are highly strategic information for ever...

  1. Restoration of estuarine tidal mudflat sediments after hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Colen, Carl; Montserrat, F; Middelburg, JJ

    Ecosystem function recovery and benthic community recovery was investigated after experimentally induced depleted oxygen bottom water concentrations in a tidal mudflat (Paulinapolder, Westerschelde estuary). Macrofauna recovery developed through different succession stages and was structured...

  2. Carbohydrate secretion by phototrophic communities in tidal sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winder, B.; Staats, N.; Stal, L.J.; Paterson, D.M.

    1999-01-01

    Two different benthic phototrophic communities on tidal flats were investigated for their carbohydrate content and distribution. Carbohydrates were analysed as two operationally defined fractions, related to the difficulty of extraction from the sediment matrix. Water-soluble (colloidal) and EDTA-

  3. Inundation Mapping Tidal Surface - Mean Higher High Water

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are a derived product of the NOAA VDatum tool and they extend the tool's Mean Higher High Water (MHHW) tidal datum conversion inland beyond its original...

  4. Stranded oil in coastal sediments: permeation in tidal flats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harper, J. R; Humphrey, B

    1986-01-01

    Physical/sedimentological parameters determining the retention and penetration oil slicks in fine sediments were examined experimentally in natural and reconstituted cores, set up in a simulated tidal system...

  5. Planet formation, orbital evolution and planet-star tidal interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, D. N. C.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.; Bryden, G.; Ida, S.; Terquem, C.

    1998-01-01

    We consider several processes operating during the late stages of planet formation that can affect observed orbital elements. Disk-planet interactions, tidal interactions with the central star, long term orbital instability and the Kozai mechanism are discussed.

  6. Turbine Control of a Tidal and River Power Generator: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muljadi, Eduard; Gevorgian, Vahan; Wright, Alan; Donegan, James; Marnagh, Cian; McEntee, Jarlath

    2016-08-01

    As renewable generation has become less expensive during recent decades, and it becomes more accepted by the global population, the focus on renewable generation has expanded to include new types with promising future applications, such as river and tidal generation. The input variations to these types of resources are slower but also steadier than wind or solar generation. The level of water turbulent flow may vary from one place to another, however, the control algorithm can be adjusted to local environment. This paper describes the hydrokinetic aspects of river and tidal generation based on a river and tidal generator. Although the information given in this paper is not that of an exact generator deployed on site, the data used is representative of a typical river or tidal generator. In this paper, the hydrokinetic and associated electrical controller of the system were not included; however, the focus of this paper is on the hydrodynamic control.

  7. Freshwater exposure pathways in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveten, U.

    1984-06-01

    The report relates to a subproject under a Nordic project called ''Large reactor accidents - consequences and mitigating actions''. The report summarizes information available, primarily in the Nordic countries, on freshwater exposure pathways. Experimental and theoretical data concerning the deposition and run-off of the nuclides *sp90*Sr and*Sp137*Cs is presented. Internal exposure via drinking water and freshwater fish is dealt with, as well as external exposure due to swimming, boating, contact with fishing utensils and use of beach areas. In addition is exposure via irrigated agricultural products considered. (RF)

  8. Bedload transport in an inlet channel during a tidal cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstsen, V. B.; Becker, M.; Winter, C.

    2007-01-01

      Based on high-resolution swath bathymetry measurements at centimetre-scale precision conducted during a tidal cycle in a dune field in the Grådyb tidal inlet channel in the DanishWadden Sea, a simple tool to calculate bedload transport is presented. Bedload transport was related to simultaneous...... variations in grain-size composition of the mobilised sediment should be taken into account by sediment transport formulae....

  9. Threatened and Endangered Freshwater Fish and Mussel Species Richness

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data represent predicted current distributions of all US listed Threatened and Endangered freshwater fish and freshwater mussels in the Middle-Atlantic region....

  10. Tidal Current Energy Resource Assessment Around Buton Island, Southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Ribal, Agustinus; Amir, Amir Kamal; Toaha, Syamsuddin; Kusuma, Jeffry; Khaeruddin

    2017-01-01

    International Journal bereputasi An early stage of assessing tidal current energy resources is carried out in this present work. Tidal current power is estimated around Buton Island, Southeast Sulawesi province, Indonesia. Two-dimensional, depth-integrated of Advanced Circulation (ADCIRC) model has been used to simulate tidal elevation and barotropic tidal current around the island. Green???s function approach has been used to improve eight tidal constituents on the open boundary condition...

  11. Changes in freshwater mussel communities linked to legacy pollution in the Lower Delaware River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, Carrie J.; Silldorff, Erik L.; Galbraith, Heather S.

    2018-01-01

    Freshwater mussels are among the most-imperiled organisms worldwide, although they provide a variety of important functions in the streams and rivers they inhabit. Among Atlantic-slope rivers, the Delaware River is known for its freshwater mussel diversity and biomass; however, limited data are available on the freshwater mussel fauna in the lower, non-tidal portion of the river. This section of the Delaware River has experienced decades of water-quality degradation from both industrial and municipal sources, primarily as a function of one of its major tributaries, the Lehigh River. We completed semi-quantitative snorkel surveys in 53.5 of the 121 km of the river to document mussel community composition and the continued impacts from pollution (particularly inputs from the Lehigh River) on mussel fauna. We detected changes in mussel catch per unit effort (CPUE) below the confluence of the Lehigh River, with significant declines in the dominant species Elliptio complanata (Eastern Elliptio) as we moved downstream from its confluence—CPUE dropped from 179 to 21 mussels/h. Patterns in mussel distribution around the Lehigh confluence matched chemical signatures of Lehigh water input. Specifically, Eastern Elliptio CPUE declined more quickly moving downstream on the Pennsylvania bank, where Lehigh River water input was more concentrated compared to the New Jersey bank. A definitive causal link remains to be established between the Lehigh River and the dramatic shifts in mussel community composition, warranting continued investigation as it relates to mussel conservation and restoration in the basin.

  12. Development of upwelling on pathway and freshwater transport of Pearl River plume in northeastern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaoyun; Jiang, Yuwu; Liu, James T.; Gong, Wenping

    2017-08-01

    In situ observations, satellite images, and numerical modeling results have shown that the Pearl River plume axis extends alongshore and passes through two separate upwelling regions—one off the Guangdong and Fujian coasts (the Yuedong upwelling) and the other in the Taiwan Bank during the initial and medium stages of the Yuedong upwelling, while it is directed offshore when the Yuedong upwelling is strong. Model experiments are conducted to examine the effects of wind strength and baroclinicity on the upwelling and the corresponding pathway and freshwater transport of the Pearl River plume. The baroclinic effect is important to intensifying the horizontal velocity at the upwelling front and freshwater transport in the northeastern South China Sea. The freshwater transport flux is further decomposed into advection, vertical shear, and tidal pumping components, and advection is the dominant contributor. As the Yuedong upwelling develops, the zone with a relatively high-pressure gradient moves offshore due to offshore Ekman transport and the shift in the upwelling front, which is responsible for the offshore transport of the river plume. When the river plume is transported to the outer-shelf, sometimes it can be further entrained into eddies, allowing its export to the open sea.

  13. The prediction of the hydrodynamic performance of tidal current turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, B Y; Zhou, L J; Xiao, Y X; Wang, Z W

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays tidal current energy is considered to be one of the most promising alternative green energy resources and tidal current turbines are used for power generation. Prediction of the open water performance around tidal turbines is important for the reason that it can give some advice on installation and array of tidal current turbines. This paper presents numerical computations of tidal current turbines by using a numerical model which is constructed to simulate an isolated turbine. This paper aims at studying the installation of marine current turbine of which the hydro-environmental impacts influence by means of numerical simulation. Such impacts include free-stream velocity magnitude, seabed and inflow direction of velocity. The results of the open water performance prediction show that the power output and efficiency of marine current turbine varies from different marine environments. The velocity distribution should be clearly and the suitable unit installation depth and direction be clearly chosen, which can ensure the most effective strategy for energy capture before installing the marine current turbine. The findings of this paper are expected to be beneficial in developing tidal current turbines and array in the future

  14. The environmental interactions of tidal and wave energy generation devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, Chris; Andonegi, Eider; Depestele, Jochen; Judd, Adrian; Rihan, Dominic; Rogers, Stuart I.; Kenchington, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Global energy demand continues to grow and tidal and wave energy generation devices can provide a significant source of renewable energy. Technological developments in offshore engineering and the rising cost of traditional energy means that offshore energy resources will be economic in the next few years. While there is now a growing body of data on the ecological impacts of offshore wind farms, the scientific basis on which to make informed decisions about the environmental effects of other offshore energy developments is lacking. Tidal barrages have the potential to cause significant ecological impacts particularly on bird feeding areas when they are constructed at coastal estuaries or bays. Offshore tidal stream energy and wave energy collectors offer the scope for developments at varying scales. They also have the potential to alter habitats. A diversity of designs exist, including floating, mid-water column and seabed mounted devices, with a variety of moving-part configurations resulting in a unique complex of potential environmental effects for each device type, which are discussed to the extent possible. - Highlights: ► We review the environmental impacts of tidal barrages and fences, tidal stream farms and wave energy capture devices. ► Impacts on habitats, species and the water column, and effects of noise and electromagnetic fields are considered. ► Tidal barrages can cause significant impacts on bird feeding areas when constructed at coastal estuaries or bays. ► Wave energy collectors can alter water column and sea bed habitats locally and over large distances.

  15. Dynamical and photometric models of star formation in tidal tails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation into the causes of star formation in tidal tails has been conducted using a restricted three-body dynamical model in conjunction with a broadband photometric evolutionary code. Test particles are initially placed in circular orbits around a softened point mass and then perturbed by a companion passing in a parabotic orbit. During the passage, the density evolution of the galaxy is examined both in regions within the disk and in selected comoving regions in the tidal features. Even without the inclusion of self-gravity and hydrodynamics, regions of compression form inside the disk, along the tidal tail, and in the tidal bridge causing local density increases of up to 500 percent. By assuming that the density changes relate to the star-formation rate via a Schmidt (1959) law, limits on the density changes needed to make detectable changes in the colors are calculated. A spiral galaxy population is synthesized and the effects of modest changes in the star-formation rate are explored using a broadband photometric evolutionary code. Density changes similar to those found in the dynamical models will cause detectable changes in the colors of a stellar population. From these models, it is determined that the blue colors and knotty features observed in the tidal features of some galaxies result from increased rates of star formation induced by tidally produced density increases. Limitations of this model are discussed along with photometric evolutionary models based on the density evolution in the tails. 52 refs

  16. Tidal pumping facilitates dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanling; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Liu, Zhanfei; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Yin, Guoyu; Gao, Juan; Yu, Chendi; Wang, Rong; Jiang, Xiaofen

    2016-01-01

    Intertidal marshes are alternately exposed and submerged due to periodic ebb and flood tides. The tidal cycle is important in controlling the biogeochemical processes of these ecosystems. Intertidal sediments are important hotspots of dissimilatory nitrate reduction and interacting nitrogen cycling microorganisms, but the effect of tides on dissimilatory nitrate reduction, including denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, remains unexplored in these habitats. Here, we use isotope-tracing and molecular approaches simultaneously to show that both nitrate-reduction activities and associated functional bacterial abundances are enhanced at the sediment-tidal water interface and at the tide-induced groundwater fluctuating layer. This pattern suggests that tidal pumping may sustain dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal zones. The tidal effect is supported further by nutrient profiles, fluctuations in nitrogen components over flood-ebb tidal cycles, and tidal simulation experiments. This study demonstrates the importance of tides in regulating the dynamics of dissimilatory nitrate-reducing pathways and thus provides new insights into the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and other elements in intertidal marshes. PMID:26883983

  17. Tidal energy, a renewable energy within hand reach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielo, O.

    2011-01-01

    Tide energy and oceanic current energy represent a strong potentiality for a few countries in the world including France. In the domain of tidal energy there are 2 strategies. The first one is based on the search for the lowest power production cost in order to contribute efficiently to the country's energy mix. Generally this strategy leads to the construction of tidal dams. The second strategy is based on the search for the lowest environmental impact. This strategy is economically competitive only in places where electrical power is expensive like isolated islands. This strategy is illustrated by the tidal power station of the Alderney island. In fact the amount of energy delivered by a tidal power station depends on the rise of the tide and on the surface of the dam. It appears that tidal dams require less surface that hydroelectric power plants. The energy of oceanic currents like Gulf Stream or the thermal energy of oceans or wave power are very little exploited now but represent a potentiality higher by several orders of magnitude than tidal energy. (A.C.)

  18. Resonant Tidal Forcing in Close Binaries: Implications for CVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, K. E. Saavik; McKernan, Barry; Schwab, Elliana

    2018-01-01

    Resonant tidal forcing occurs when the tidal forcing frequency of a binary matches a quadrupolar oscillation mode of one of the binary members and energy is transferred from the orbit of the binary to the mode. Tidal locking permits ongoing resonant driving of modes even as binary orbital parameters change. At small binary separations during tidal lock, a significant fraction of binary orbital energy can be deposited quickly into a resonant mode and the binary decays faster than via the emission of gravitational radiation alone. Here we discuss some of the implications of resonant tidal forcing for the class of binaries known as Cataclysmic Variable (CV) stars. We show that resonant tidal forcing of the donor’s Roche lobe could explain the observed 2‑3hr period gap in CVs, assuming modest orbital eccentricities are allowed (eb ∼ 0.03), and can be complementary or an alternative to, existing models. Sudden collapse of the companion orbit, yielding a Type Ia supernova is disfavoured, since Hydrogen is not observed in Type Ia supernova spectra. Therefore, resonance must generally be truncated, probably via mass loss from the Roche lobe or orbital perturbation, ultimately producing a short period CV containing an ’overheated’ white dwarf.

  19. Tidal interaction of black holes and Newtonian viscous bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poisson, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The tidal interaction of a (rotating or nonrotating) black hole with nearby bodies produces changes in its mass, angular momentum, and surface area. Similarly, tidal forces acting on a Newtonian, viscous body do work on the body, change its angular momentum, and part of the transferred gravitational energy is dissipated into heat. The equations that describe the rate of change of the black-hole mass, angular momentum, and surface area as a result of the tidal interaction are compared with the equations that describe how the tidal forces do work, torque, and produce heat in the Newtonian body. The equations are strikingly similar, and unexpectedly, the correspondence between the Newtonian-body and black-hole results is revealed to hold in near-quantitative detail. The correspondence involves the combination k 2 τ of 'Love quantities' that incorporate the details of the body's internal structure; k 2 is the tidal Love number, and τ is the viscosity-produced delay between the action of the tidal forces and the body's reaction. The combination k 2 τ is of order GM/c 3 for a black hole of mass M; it does not vanish, in spite of the fact that k 2 is known to vanish individually for a nonrotating black hole.

  20. Geographic variation in Puget Sound tidal channel planform geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, W. Gregory

    2015-02-01

    Tidal channels are central elements of salt marsh hydrodynamics, sediment dynamics, and habitat. To develop allometric models predicting the number and size of tidal channels that could develop following salt marsh restoration, channels were digitized from aerial photographs of Puget Sound river delta marshes. Salt marsh area was the independent variable for all dependent channel planform metrics. Tidal channel allometry showed similar scaling exponents for channel planform metrics throughout Puget Sound, simplifying comparisons between locations. Y-intercepts of allometric relationships showed geographic variation, which multiple-regression indicated was associated with tidal range and storm significant wave height. Channel size and complexity were positively related to tidal range and negatively related to wave height. Four case studies, each with paired regions of similar tidal range and contrasting wave environments, further indicated wave environment affected channel geometry. Wave-mediated sediment delivery may be the mechanism involved, with wave-sheltered areas experiencing relative sediment deficits, such that some salt marshes in Puget Sound are already suffering sea-level rise impacts that are reflected in their channel network geometry.