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Sample records for tibiofemoral osteoarthritis affects

  1. Tibiofemoral osteoarthritis affects quality of life and function in elderly Koreans, with women more adversely affected than men

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    Hunter David J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis(OA in East Asia is as common for men and even higher for women than that reported in the Caucasian population. Since both population aging and economic growth have taken place at a much faster pace in Asian countries, such as South Korea, one would expect knee OA to become a major public health problem. However, few studies have examined the influence of knee OA on the quality of life (QoL and physical function in Asia. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to investigate the influence of knee osteoarthritis (OA on the quality of life (QoL, function and lower extremity physical performance and the gender difference in its influence in elderly community residents in Korea. Methods Participants were from the population-based Hallym Aging Study (HAS. The mean age of the 504 study subjects was 70.2 years and 274 (54% were women. Demographic information was obtained by questionnaire, and radiographic evaluations consisted of weight-bearing semi-flexed knee radiographs. Self-reported QoL and function were assessed using Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC Index and Short Form 12-item (SF-12. Performance-based lower extremity function was assessed using the tests consisting of standing balance, usual walk and chair stands. The odds ratios(ORs for belonging to the worst quartile of WOMAC and physical performance test were calculated by logistic regression analysis in radiographic knee OA compared to non-OA after adjustment of confounders. Scores for SF-12 items were analyzed using general linear models and means adjusted for age, BMI and OA severity were compared. Results Subjects with radiographic knee OA had significantly increased OR for belonging to the worst WOMAC quartile(for pain, 2.13,95% confidence interval[CI], 1.33-3.40, for stiffness, 2.94,95% CI,1.78-4.86, and for function, 2.97, 95% CI,1.83-4.81 and significantly worse SF-12 scores compared to non

  2. Tibiofemoral Osteoarthritis and Varus-Valgus Laxity.

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    Freisinger, Gregory M; Schmitt, Laura C; Wanamaker, Andrea B; Siston, Robert A; Chaudhari, Ajit M W

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review and synthesize the literature measuring varus-valgus laxity in individuals with tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (OA). Specifically, we aimed to identify varus-valgus laxity differences between persons with OA and controls, by radiographic disease severity, by frontal plane knee alignment, and by sex. We also aimed to identify if there was a relationship between varus-valgus laxity and clinical performance and self-reported function. We systematically searched for peer-reviewed original research articles in PubMed, Scopus, and CINAHL to identify all existing literature regarding knee OA and objective measurement of varus-valgus laxity in vivo. Forty articles were identified that met the inclusion criteria and data were extracted. Varus-valgus laxity was significantly greater in individuals with OA compared with controls in a majority of studies, while no study found laxity to be significantly greater in controls. Varus-valgus laxity of the knee was reported in persons with OA and varying degrees of frontal plane alignment, disease severity, clinical performance, and self-reported function but no consensus finding could be identified. Females with knee OA appear to have more varus-valgus laxity than males. Meta-analysis was not possible due to the heterogeneity of the subject populations and differences in laxity measurement devices, applied loading, and laxity definitions. Increased varus-valgus laxity is a characteristic of knee joints with OA. Large variances exist in reported varus-valgus laxity and may be due to differences in measurement devices. Prospective studies on joint laxity are needed to identify if increased varus-valgus laxity is a causative factor in OA incidence and progression. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Coronal tibiofemoral subluxation in knee osteoarthritis.

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    Khamaisy, Saker; Zuiderbaan, Hendrik A; Thein, Ran; Gladnick, Brian P; Pearle, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    To analyze knees in varying stages of osteoarthritis (OA) for the presence of coronal tibiofemoral (CTF) subluxation and to determine if CTF subluxation severity is related to knee OA worsening. We retrospectively evaluated CTF subluxation and limb alignment in 113 patients with different stages of knee OA who were being considered for an arthroplasty procedure. Knee OA was classified as "mild" or "severe" according to Kellgren-Lawrence scale. CTF subluxation was measured in the study groups and in 40 knees of healthy controls using software developed specifically on the basis of Iterative Closest Point mathematical algorithm. Mean CTF subluxation in "mild OA" and "severe OA" groups was 3.5% (±2) and 3.5 % (±5) of the tibial plateau, respectively. For both the mild and severe OA groups, CTF subluxation was significantly increased compared to the 1.4% (±1) CTF subluxation in the control group, (p < 0.0001) and (p = 0.012), respectively. However, there was no significant difference in CTF subluxation between the mild OA and severe OA groups (p = 0.75). Limb varus malalignment in mild OA and severe OA groups was 3.6° (±2.2) and 5.3° (±2.6), respectively. Both significantly increased comparing to the 1° (±0.7) control group alignment (p < 0.0001). Varus malalignment in the severe OA group was significantly increased comparing to the mild OA group (p = 0.0003). CTF subluxation is a radiographic finding related to knee OA which occurs mainly in the early stages of the osteoarthritic process and stagnates as OA progresses.

  4. Occupational kneeling and radiographic tibiofemoral and patellofemoral osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Søren; Egund, Niels; Jensen, Lilli Kirkeskov

    2009-01-01

    intervals (CI) of TF and PF OA was computed among floor layers compared to graphic designers in three age groups (/= 60 years). Using logistic regression, estimates were adjusted for body mass index and knee-straining sports. In addition, the association between trade seniority and TF OA was assessed in age......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The objective of our study was to evaluate the association between occupational kneeling and compartment specific radiographic tibiofemoral (TF) and patellofemoral (PF) osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Questionnaire data and bilateral knee radiographs were obtained in 134 male...... floor layers and 120 male graphic designers (referents). Weight-bearing radiographs in three views (postero-anterior, lateral and axial) were classified according to joint space narrowing. After the exclusion of subjects with reports of earlier knee injuries the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence...

  5. Crepitus is a first indication of patellofemoral osteoarthritis (and not of tibiofemoral osteoarthritis).

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    Schiphof, D; van Middelkoop, M; de Klerk, B M; Oei, E H G; Hofman, A; Koes, B W; Weinans, H; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A

    2014-05-01

    The patellofemoral joint (PFJ) is important in early detection of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Little is known about the relationship between specific clinical findings and PFJ Magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI) features. The objective was to examine the relationship between (early) clinical findings and PFJ MRI features in females (45-60 years) without knee OA (PFJ or tibiofemoral joint (TFJ) OA) based on a recently suggested MRI definition. MRIs of knees of women of a sub-study of the Rotterdam Study were scored with semi-quantitative scoring. Specific patellar tests were performed on physical examination. Current knee pain and history of patellar knee pain were reported. Binomial logistic generalized estimated equations were used to determine the association between clinical findings of OA and PFJ MRI features. All associations were adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI) and TFJ MRI features. In 888 women (1776 knees, mean age: 55.1 years and mean BMI: 27.0 kg/m(2)) we found significant associations between crepitus and all PFJ MRI features (Odds ratios (OR) range: 2.61-5.49). A history of patellar pain was significantly associated with almost all PFJ MRI features (ORcartilage: 1.95; ORcysts: 1.86; ORbone marrow lesions: 1.83), except for osteophytes. No significant associations were found between the clinical findings and TFJ MRI features. Crepitus and history of patellar pain are clinical findings that indicate PFJ lesions seen on MRI. These tests could help to indicate signs of PFJOA. Follow-up data needs to confirm whether these tests have an additional diagnostic value for early knee OA in PFJ or TFJ. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biomechanical factors associated with the development of tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Tunen, Joyce A C; Dell'Isola, Andrea; Juhl, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Altered biomechanics, increased joint loading and tissue damage, might be related in a vicious cycle within the development of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). We have defined biomechanical factors as joint-related factors that interact with the forces, moments and kinematics in and around...... a synovial joint. Although a number of studies and systematic reviews have been performed to assess the association of various factors with the development of KOA, a comprehensive overview focusing on biomechanical factors that are associated with the development of KOA is not available. The aim...... of this review is (1) to identify biomechanical factors that are associated with (the development of) KOA and (2) to identify the impact of other relevant risk factors on this association. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Cohort, cross-sectional and case-control studies investigating the association of a biomechanical...

  7. Is the atrophic phenotype of tibiofemoral osteoarthritis associated with faster progression of disease? The MOST study.

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    Crema, M D; Felson, D T; Guermazi, A; Nevitt, M C; Niu, J; Lynch, J A; Marra, M D; Torner, J; Lewis, C E; Roemer, F W

    2017-10-01

    To assess the associations of atrophic tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (OA) with progression of radiographic joint space narrowing (JSN) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined progression of cartilage damage. Participants of the Multicenter Osteoarthritis (MOST) Study with available radiographic and MRI assessments at baseline and 30 months were included. The atrophic OA phenotype was defined as Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) grades 1 or 2 for JSN and grade 0 for osteophytes. Based on MRI, atrophic OA was defined as tibiofemoral (TF) cartilage damage grades ≥3 in at least 2 of 10 subregions with absent or tiny osteophytes in all TF subregions. Progression of JSN and cartilage loss on MRI, was defined as (1) no, (2) slow, and (3) fast progression. Co-variance and logistic regression with generalized estimated equations were performed to assess the association of atrophic knee OA with any progression, compared to non-atrophic OA knees. A total of 476 knees from 432 participants were included. There were 50 (10.5%) knees with atrophic OA using the radiographic definition, and 16 (3.4%) knees with atrophic OA using MRI definition. Non-atrophic OA knees more commonly exhibited fast progression of JSN and cartilage damage. Logistic regression showed that the atrophic phenotype of knee OA was associated with a decreased likelihood of progression of JSN and cartilage loss. In this sample, the atrophic phenotype of knee OA was associated with a decreased likelihood of progression of JSN and cartilage loss compared to the non-atrophic knee OA phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Reliability of Semiautomated Computational Methods for Estimating Tibiofemoral Contact Stress in the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study

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    Donald D. Anderson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings suggest that contact stress is a potent predictor of subsequent symptomatic osteoarthritis development in the knee. However, much larger numbers of knees (likely on the order of hundreds, if not thousands need to be reliably analyzed to achieve the statistical power necessary to clarify this relationship. This study assessed the reliability of new semiautomated computational methods for estimating contact stress in knees from large population-based cohorts. Ten knees of subjects from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study were included. Bone surfaces were manually segmented from sequential 1.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging slices by three individuals on two nonconsecutive days. Four individuals then registered the resulting bone surfaces to corresponding bone edges on weight-bearing radiographs, using a semi-automated algorithm. Discrete element analysis methods were used to estimate contact stress distributions for each knee. Segmentation and registration reliabilities (day-to-day and interrater for peak and mean medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact stress were assessed with Shrout-Fleiss intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs. The segmentation and registration steps of the modeling approach were found to have excellent day-to-day (ICC 0.93–0.99 and good inter-rater reliability (0.84–0.97. This approach for estimating compartment-specific tibiofemoral contact stress appears to be sufficiently reliable for use in large population-based cohorts.

  9. Medial posterior meniscal root tears are associated with development or worsening of medial tibiofemoral cartilage damage: the multicenter osteoarthritis study.

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    Guermazi, Ali; Hayashi, Daichi; Jarraya, Mohamed; Roemer, Frank W; Zhang, Yuqing; Niu, Jingbo; Crema, Michel D; Englund, Martin; Lynch, John A; Nevitt, Michael C; Torner, James C; Lewis, Cora E; Felson, David T

    2013-09-01

    To assess the association of meniscal root tear with the development or worsening of tibiofemoral cartilage damage. Institutional review board approval and written informed consent from all subjects were obtained. A total of 596 knees with radiographically depicted osteoarthritis were randomly selected from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis study cohort. Cartilage damage was semiquantitatively assessed by using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS) system (grades 0-6). Subjects were separated into three groups: root tear only, meniscal tear without root tear, and neither meniscal nor root tear. A log-binomial regression model was used to calculate the relative risks for knees to develop incident or progressing cartilage damage in the root tear group and the meniscal tear group, with the no tear group serving as a reference. In the medial tibiofemoral joint, there were 37 knees with isolated medial posterior root tear, 294 with meniscal tear without root tear, and 264 without meniscal or root tear. There were only two lateral posterior root tears, and no anterior root tears were found. Thus, the focus was on the medial posterior root tear. The frequency of severe cartilage damage (WORMS ≥ 5) was higher in the group with root tear than in the group without root or meniscal tear (76.7% vs 19.7%, P meniscal but no root tear (76.7% vs 65.2%, P = .055). Longitudinal analyses included 33 knees with isolated medial posterior root tear, 270 with meniscal tear, and 245 with no tear. Adjusted relative risk of cartilage loss was 2.03 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.18, 3.48) for the root tear group and 1.84 (95% CI: 1.32, 2.58) for the meniscal tear group. Isolated medial posterior meniscal root tear is associated with incident and progressive medial tibiofemoral cartilage loss.

  10. Varus thrust during walking and the risk of incident and worsening medial tibiofemoral MRI lesions: the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study.

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    Wink, A E; Gross, K D; Brown, C A; Guermazi, A; Roemer, F; Niu, J; Torner, J; Lewis, C E; Nevitt, M C; Tolstykh, I; Sharma, L; Felson, D T

    2017-06-01

    To determine the association of varus thrust during walking to incident and worsening medial tibiofemoral cartilage damage and bone marrow lesions (BMLs) over 2 years in older adults with or at risk for osteoarthritis (OA). Subjects from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST) were studied. Varus thrust was visually assessed from high-speed videos of forward walking trials. Baseline and two-year MRIs were acquired from one knee per subject and read for cartilage loss and BMLs. Logistic regression with generalized estimating equations was used to estimate the odds of incident and worsening cartilage loss and BMLs, adjusting for age, sex, race, body mass index (BMI), and clinic site. The analysis was repeated stratified by varus, neutral, and valgus alignment. 1007 participants contributed one knee each. Varus thrust was observed in 29.9% of knees. Knees with thrust had 2.17 [95% CI: 1.51, 3.11] times the odds of incident medial BML, 2.51 [1.85, 3.40] times the odds of worsening medial BML, and 1.85 [1.35, 2.55] times the odds of worsening medial cartilage loss. When stratified by alignment, varus knees also had significantly increased odds of these outcomes. Varus thrust observed during walking is associated with increased odds of incident and worsening medial BMLs and worsening medial cartilage loss. Increased odds of these outcomes persist in varus-aligned knees. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Coronal tibiofemoral subluxation is not an independent risk factor for total knee arthroplasty in patients with moderate to severe varus-osteoarthritis: data from the "Osteoarthritis Initiative".

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    Schadler, Paul; Kasparek, Max; Boettner, Fritz; Sgroi, Mirco; Faschingbauer, Martin

    2017-10-01

    Only few prognostic factors for progression of knee osteoarthritis are well established, including varus malalignment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether coronal tibiofemoral subluxation is a predictor for total knee arthroplasty. Patients from the progression subcohort of the longitudinal database "Osteoarthritis Initiative" with moderate to severe osteoarthritis and varus malalignment of greater than 3 degrees were included. Patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty were matched with patients treated conservatively. Subluxation was measured on full limb length X-rays. Cox regression analysis was performed to retrospectively evaluate subluxation as a risk factor for total knee arthroplasty and check for a possible association between subluxation and pain at the beginning of the observation period in this study. A total of 215 patients were included. Cox regression demonstrated that varus malalignment increased the hazard to undergo surgery by 16% (HR 1.158, p = 0.008) while subluxation did not (HR 1.12, p = 0.11). Furthermore, subluxation was neither associated with poor WOMAC (OR 1.13, p = 0.194) nor KOOS (OR 1.11, p = 0.256) knee pain scores at the beginning of the observation period. The results presented show that subluxation is neither an independent risk factor for total knee arthroplasty, nor for poor pain scores. III.

  12. The relationship between the MRI features of mild osteoarthritis in the patellofemoral and tibiofemoral compartments of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornaat, Peter R.; Watt, Iain; Bloem, Johan L.; Riyazi, Naghmeh; Kloppenburg, Margreet

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to demonstrate the relationship between osteoarthritic changes seen on magnetic resonance (MR) images of the patellofemoral (PF) or tibiofemoral (TF) compartments in patients with mild osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. MR images of the knee were obtained in 105 sib pairs (210 patients) who had been diagnosed with OA at multiple joints. Entry criteria included that the degree of OA in the knee examined should be between a Kellgren and Lawrence score of 2 or 3. MR images were analyzed for the presence of cartilaginous lesions, bone marrow edema (BME) and meniscal tears. The relationship between findings in the medial and lateral aspects of the PF and TF compartments was examined. The number of cartilaginous defects on either side of the PF compartment correlated positively with number of cartilaginous defects in the ipsilateral TF compartment (odds ratio, OR, 55, confidence interval, CI, 7.8-382). The number of cartilaginous defects in the PF compartment correlated positively with ipsilateral meniscal tears (OR 3.7, CI 1.0-14) and ipsilateral PF BME (OR 17, CI 3.8-72). Cartilaginous defects in the TF compartment correlated positively with ipsilateral meniscal tears (OR 9.8, CI 2.5-38) and ipsilateral TF BME (OR 120, CI 6.5-2,221). Osteoarthritic defects lateralize or medialize in the PF and TF compartments of the knee in patients with mild OA. (orig.)

  13. Failure of high tibial varus osteotomy for lateral tibio-femoral osteoarthritis with<10° of valgus: Outcomes in 19 patients.

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    Mirouse, G; Dubory, A; Roubineau, F; Poignard, A; Hernigou, P; Allain, J; Flouzat Lachaniette, C H

    2017-10-01

    Osteotomy is a rational approach to slowing knee osteoarthritis progression by modifying loads, thereby avoiding joint replacement in younger individuals. Varus femoral osteotomy is recommended only in patients with more than 10° of valgus. The objective here was to assess outcomes of tibial varus osteotomy in patients with lateral compartment tibio-femoral osteoarthritis and less than 10° of valgus. The hypothesis was that high tibial varus osteotomy produces satisfactory and long-lasting improvements. A single-centre retrospective study was conducted in 19 consecutive patients managed by high tibial varus osteotomy between January 2005 and May 2012. Mean age was 54.5years. The clinical IKS knee and function scores and radiological parameters were determined pre-operatively then after 6 and 12months and at last follow-up. The primary outcome measure was the global IKS score. Failure was defined as a global IKS score varus osteotomy produced satisfactory and long-lasting improvements in lateral compartment tibio-femoral osteoarthritis. After the mean follow-up of 4.3years (range, 2-9years), 10/19 patients had a global IKS score Varus tibial osteotomy was followed by significant improvements in the IKS knee and function scores from baseline to last follow-up (P10° were associated with poor outcomes. High tibial varus osteotomy produces unsatisfactory medium-term outcomes, with an overall failure rate of 52%. At present, high tibial varus osteotomy has no role in the management of lateral compartment tibio-femoral osteoarthritis with <10° of valgus. IV, retrospective cohort study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. the Hip Joint Affected by Osteoarthritis

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    Anetta Zioła-Frankowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the content of particular elements Ca, Mg, P, Na, K, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mo, Cr, Ni, Ba, Sr, and Pb in the proximal femur bone tissue (cancellous and cortical bone of 96 patients undergoing total hip replacement for osteoarthritis using ICP-AES and FAAS analytical techniques. The interdependencies among these elements and their correlations depended on factors including age, gender, place of residence, tobacco consumption, alcohol consumption, exposure to environmental pollution, physical activity, and type of degenerative change which were examined by statistical and chemometric methods. The factors that exerted the greatest influence on the elements in the femoral head and neck were tobacco smoking (higher Cr and Ni content in smokers, alcohol consumption (higher concentrations of Ni, Cu in people who consume alcohol, and gender (higher Cu, Zn, and Ni concentrations in men. The factors influencing Pb accumulation in bone tissue were tobacco, alcohol, gender, and age. In primary and secondary osteoarthritis of the hip, the content and interactions of elements are different (mainly those of Fe and Pb. There were no significant differences in the concentrations of elements in the femoral head and neck that could be attributed to residence or physical activity.

  15. Osteoarthritis

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    ... live with osteoarthritis. A joint with severe osteoarthritis (representation) Osteoarthritis is a disease that damages the slippery ... Contact Us NIAMS Archive Viewers and Players Social Media Moderation Policy FOIA Privacy Statement Accessibility Disclaimer Digital ...

  16. [Measurements of tibio-femoral contact area after experimental partial and subtotal meniscectomie (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehne, H J; Riede, U N; Hauschild, G; Schlageter, M

    1981-02-01

    By means of section material, 24 partial and 58 subtotal meniscectomies were performed and the loss of tibio-femoral contact was evaluated by the Touchier-method planimetrically. In cases of partial resection this loss was 12% only, where as in subtotal resection 46%, where by the remaining contact zones lay in the central-, anyway meniscusfree area. The diagram of the chondral splitting lines showed a maximum of compression here, consecutively the remaining contact zone is reduced to the in earlier times most affected cartilage areas. The result correlates to the appearance of chondromalacies of the central tibial plateau in our own section cases and of postoperative osteoarthritis after subtotal meniscectomies in literature. Subtotal meniscectomies lead to incongruence and increased pressure. a pseudo-regeneration seems not to compensate the meniscus function sufficiently. A result for the clinic one should, when possible, resect menisci only partially.

  17. Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, Kelli D; Choong, Peter F; Davis, Aileen M

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of pain and disability worldwide. Despite the existence of evidence-based treatments and guidelines, substantial gaps remain in the quality of OA management. There is underutilization of behavioral and rehabilitative strategies to prevent and treat OA as well...... lessons learned include the importance of support from all stakeholders, consistent program delivery and tools, a coherent team to run the program, and a defined plan for outcome assessment. Efforts are still needed to develop, deliver, and evaluate models of care across the spectrum of OA, from...

  18. [Osteoarthritis].

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    Yamamoto, Seizo

    2014-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common cause of arthritis, and is associated with significant pain and disability. Epidemiological study showed a large number of the eldery in Japan suffered OA, especially OA of the knee. Rapid diagnosis and conservative treatments those includes patient education, weight loss, exercise, physical and occupational therapy are effective at early stage. Pharmacologic treatment are acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective agents. Surgery of the joint arthroplasty significantly reduces knee and hip pain, and restores the functions of the patient at the end stage.

  19. Mediolateral force distribution at the knee joint shifts across activities and is driven by tibiofemoral alignment.

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    Kutzner, I; Bender, A; Dymke, J; Duda, G; von Roth, P; Bergmann, G

    2017-06-01

    Tibiofemoral alignment is important to determine the rate of progression of osteoarthritis and implant survival after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Normally, surgeons aim for neutral tibiofemoral alignment following TKA, but this has been questioned in recent years. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether varus or valgus alignment indeed leads to increased medial or lateral tibiofemoral forces during static and dynamic weight-bearing activities. Tibiofemoral contact forces and moments were measured in nine patients with instrumented knee implants. Medial force ratios were analysed during nine daily activities, including activities with single-limb support (e.g. walking) and double-limb support (e.g. knee bend). Hip-knee-ankle angles in the frontal plane were analysed using full-leg coronal radiographs. The medial force ratio strongly correlated with the tibiofemoral alignment in the static condition of one-legged stance (R² = 0.88) and dynamic single-limb loading (R² = 0.59) with varus malalignment leading to increased medial force ratios of up to 88%. In contrast, the correlation between leg alignment and magnitude of medial compartment force was much less pronounced. A lateral shift of force occurred during activities with double-limb support and higher knee flexion angles. The medial force ratio depends on both the tibiofemoral alignment and the nature of the activity involved. It cannot be generalised to a single value. Higher medial ratios during single-limb loading are associated with varus malalignment in TKA. The current trend towards a 'constitutional varus' after joint replacement, in terms of overall tibiofemoral alignment, should be considered carefully with respect to the increased medial force ratio. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:779-87. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  20. Subject-specific knee joint geometry improves predictions of medial tibiofemoral contact forces

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    Gerus, Pauline; Sartori, Massimo; Besier, Thor F.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Delp, Scott L.; Banks, Scott A.; Pandy, Marcus G.; D’Lima, Darryl D.; Lloyd, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Estimating tibiofemoral joint contact forces is important for understanding the initiation and progression of knee osteoarthritis. However, tibiofemoral contact force predictions are influenced by many factors including muscle forces and anatomical representations of the knee joint. This study aimed to investigate the influence of subject-specific geometry and knee joint kinematics on the prediction of tibiofemoral contact forces using a calibrated EMG-driven neuromusculoskeletal model of the knee. One participant fitted with an instrumented total knee replacement walked at a self-selected speed while medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces, ground reaction forces, whole-body kinematics, and lower-limb muscle activity were simultaneously measured. The combination of generic and subject-specific knee joint geometry and kinematics resulted in four different OpenSim models used to estimate muscle-tendon lengths and moment arms. The subject-specific geometric model was created from CT scans and the subject-specific knee joint kinematics representing the translation of the tibia relative to the femur was obtained from fluoroscopy. The EMG-driven model was calibrated using one walking trial, but with three different cost functions that tracked the knee flexion/extension moments with and without constraint over the estimated joint contact forces. The calibrated models then predicted the medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces for five other different walking trials. The use of subject-specific models with minimization of the peak tibiofemoral contact forces improved the accuracy of medial contact forces by 47% and lateral contact forces by 7%, respectively compared with the use of generic musculoskeletal model. PMID:24074941

  1. Varus and Valgus Alignment and Incident and Progressive Knee Osteoarthritis

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    Sharma, Leena; Song, Jing; Dunlop, Dorothy; Felson, David; Lewis, Cora E.; Segal, Neil; Torner, James; Cooke, T. Derek V.; Hietpas, Jean; Lynch, John; Nevitt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objective Varus and valgus alignment increase, respectively, medial and lateral tibiofemoral load. Alignment was associated with tibiofemoral osteoarthritis progression in previous studies; an effect on risk of incident osteoarthritis is less certain. We tested whether alignment influences the risk of incident and progressive radiographic tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. Methods In an observational, longitudinal study of the MOST (Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study) cohort, full-limb x-rays to measure alignment were acquired at baseline and knee x-rays were acquired at baseline and 30 months. Varus alignment was defined as ≤ 178° and valgus as ≥ 182°. Using logistic regression and GEE, we examined the association of baseline alignment and incident osteoarthritis at 30 months (in knees without osteoarthritis at baseline), and alignment and osteoarthritis progression (in knees with baseline osteoarthritis). All analyses were adjusted for age, gender, BMI, knee injury, laxity, and extensor strength, with neutral knees as referent. Results 2958 knees (1752 participants) were without osteoarthritis at baseline. Varus (adj. OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.06, 2.10) but not valgus alignment was associated with incident osteoarthritis. 1307 knees (950 participants) had osteoarthritis at baseline. Varus alignment was associated with a greater risk of medial osteoarthritis progression (adj. OR 3.59, 95% CI 2.62, 4.92) and a reduced risk of lateral progression, and valgus with a greater risk of lateral progression (adj. OR 4.85, 95% CI 3.17, 7.42) and a reduced risk of medial progression. Conclusion Varus but not valgus alignment increased the risk of incident tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. In knees with osteoarthritis, varus and valgus alignment each increased the risk of progression in the biomechanically stressed compartment and reduced the risk of progression in the unloaded compartment. PMID:20511608

  2. Comparison of tibiofemoral joint space width measurements from standing CT and fixed flexion radiography.

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    Segal, Neil A; Frick, Eric; Duryea, Jeffrey; Nevitt, Michael C; Niu, Jingbo; Torner, James C; Felson, David T; Anderson, Donald D

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this project was to determine the relationship between medial tibiofemoral joint space width measured on fixed-flexion radiographs and the three-dimensional joint space width distribution on low-dose, standing CT (SCT) imaging. At the 84-month visit of the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study, 20 participants were recruited. A commercial SCT scanner for the foot and ankle was modified to image knees while standing. Medial tibiofemoral joint space width was assessed on radiographs at fixed locations from 15% to 30% of compartment width using validated software and on SCT by mapping the distances between three-dimensional subchondral bone surfaces. Individual joint space width values from radiographs were compared with three-dimensional joint space width values from corresponding sagittal plane locations using paired t-tests and correlation coefficients. For the four medial-most tibiofemoral locations, radiographic joint space width values exceeded the minimal joint space width on SCT by a mean of 2.0 mm and were approximately equal to the 61st percentile value of the joint space width distribution at each respective sagittal-plane location. Correlation coefficients at these locations were 0.91-0.97 and the offsets between joint space width values from radiographs and SCT measurements were consistent. There were greater offsets and variability in the offsets between modalities closer to the tibial spine. Joint space width measurements on fixed-flexion radiographs are highly correlated with three-dimensional joint space width from SCT. In addition to avoiding bony overlap obscuring the joint, a limitation of radiographs, the current study supports a role for SCT in the evaluation of tibiofemoral OA. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1388-1395, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Histomorphology and innate immunity during the progression of osteoarthritis: Does synovitis affect cartilage degradation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Qingguo; Yang, Meijuan; Yang, Lili; Wang, Weili; Ding, Haobin; Zhang, Dong; Xu, Jing; Tang, Xuezhang; Ding, Haitao; Wang, Qingfu

    2018-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common chronic degenerative disease that affects all joints. At present, the pathological processes and mechanisms of OA are still unclear. Innate immunity, a key player in damage to the structure of the joint and the mechanism by which the host attempts to repair OA, affects all pathological stages of the disease. In the present study, our aim was to assess changes in innate immunity during the pathological processes of OA in articular cartilage (AC) and the synovial membrane (SM), which are the major structures in joints, and to systematically examine the histological changes in AC and SM in mild, moderate and severe cases of OA, in order to further speculate about the manner in which the interactions of AC and SM are facilitated by innate immunity. Histological methods (including HE and Safranin O-fast green staining), immunofluorescent double staining, TUNEL stain, and Western blots were used to assess the morphological changes within AC and SM tissues in healthy and mild, moderate, or severe OA rats. Our results showed that the damage to AC and SM within the joints progressively worsened in different degrees during the course of the disease, and that the innate immune system was closely involved in the AC and SM during each stage of OA. These findings also confirmed that SM may affect the pathological changes in AC through the innate immune system, and therefore affect the progress of OA. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Osteoarthritis of the knee after meniscal resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradowski, P T; Lohmander, L S; Englund, M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine prevalence, incidence and progression of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a cohort of subjects with previous meniscectomy. METHODS: We assessed 221 subjects (177 men and 44 women) with weight bearing knee radiography twice (assessment A and B) with a follow-up time...... Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 or worse. RESULTS: At assessment A, we found tibiofemoral radiographic OA in 107 subjects' index knee (48%) of which 41 subjects (38%) had bilateral tibiofemoral OA. At assessment B, the corresponding figures were 151 (68%) and 71 (32%). At assessment A, we found...... patellofemoral OA in 32 subjects' index knee (14%) of which 11 (34%) had bilateral patellofemoral OA. At assessment B, the corresponding figures were 51 (23%) and 19 (37%). There was an increase of the sum of joint space narrowing (JSN) and osteophyte grades in the tibiofemoral joint of 144 subjects' index knee...

  5. Effect of the lower limb rotational alignment on tibiofemoral contact pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenawey, Mohamed; Liodakis, Emmanouil; Krettek, Christian; Ostermeier, Sven; Horn, Tatiana; Hankemeier, Stefan

    2011-11-01

    The effect of the rotational alignment of lower extremities on the tibiofemoral contact mechanics is not known. This study was designed to measure the contact area and pressure within medial and lateral tibiofemoral compartments following controlled serial rotational deformities through femoral and tibial shafts. Eight lower extremities of fresh frozen cadavers were used. Computed tomography was conducted to measure the rotational profile of the lower extremities. Through a medial parapatellar arthrotomy, pressure sensors were implanted into both tibiofemoral compartments. Femoral and tibial mid-shaft osteotomies were performed and stabilized by non-locked intramedullary nails and external fixators in neutral rotation. The contact area and pressure were measured under axial loading in neutral rotation and following serial malrotations from 40° external to 40° internal malrotation in 10° increments. Contact area was not affected by malrotations. Medial compartment contact pressure rose with external and decreased with internal malrotations whether femoral or tibial (P angle was associated with decreased medial pressure up to -32% at 10° of internal torsion and it increased with excessive external torsion. Furthermore, there was a strong positive correlation with the total rotational alignment as measured by the neck malleolar angle. A significant interaction could be detected between the rotational alignment of the lower extremity and medial tibiofemoral compartment contact pressures.

  6. Tissue material properties and computational modelling of the human tibiofemoral joint: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abby E. Peters

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how structural and functional alterations of individual tissues impact on whole-joint function is challenging, particularly in humans where direct invasive experimentation is difficult. Finite element (FE computational models produce quantitative predictions of the mechanical and physiological behaviour of multiple tissues simultaneously, thereby providing a means to study changes that occur through healthy ageing and disease such as osteoarthritis (OA. As a result, significant research investment has been placed in developing such models of the human knee. Previous work has highlighted that model predictions are highly sensitive to the various inputs used to build them, particularly the mathematical definition of material properties of biological tissues. The goal of this systematic review is two-fold. First, we provide a comprehensive summation and evaluation of existing linear elastic material property data for human tibiofemoral joint tissues, tabulating numerical values as a reference resource for future studies. Second, we review efforts to model tibiofemoral joint mechanical behaviour through FE modelling with particular focus on how studies have sourced tissue material properties. The last decade has seen a renaissance in material testing fuelled by development of a variety of new engineering techniques that allow the mechanical behaviour of both soft and hard tissues to be characterised at a spectrum of scales from nano- to bulk tissue level. As a result, there now exists an extremely broad range of published values for human tibiofemoral joint tissues. However, our systematic review highlights gaps and ambiguities that mean quantitative understanding of how tissue material properties alter with age and OA is limited. It is therefore currently challenging to construct FE models of the knee that are truly representative of a specific age or disease-state. Consequently, recent tibiofemoral joint FE models have been highly

  7. Tissue material properties and computational modelling of the human tibiofemoral joint: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Abby E; Akhtar, Riaz; Comerford, Eithne J; Bates, Karl T

    2018-01-01

    Understanding how structural and functional alterations of individual tissues impact on whole-joint function is challenging, particularly in humans where direct invasive experimentation is difficult. Finite element (FE) computational models produce quantitative predictions of the mechanical and physiological behaviour of multiple tissues simultaneously, thereby providing a means to study changes that occur through healthy ageing and disease such as osteoarthritis (OA). As a result, significant research investment has been placed in developing such models of the human knee. Previous work has highlighted that model predictions are highly sensitive to the various inputs used to build them, particularly the mathematical definition of material properties of biological tissues. The goal of this systematic review is two-fold. First, we provide a comprehensive summation and evaluation of existing linear elastic material property data for human tibiofemoral joint tissues, tabulating numerical values as a reference resource for future studies. Second, we review efforts to model tibiofemoral joint mechanical behaviour through FE modelling with particular focus on how studies have sourced tissue material properties. The last decade has seen a renaissance in material testing fuelled by development of a variety of new engineering techniques that allow the mechanical behaviour of both soft and hard tissues to be characterised at a spectrum of scales from nano- to bulk tissue level. As a result, there now exists an extremely broad range of published values for human tibiofemoral joint tissues. However, our systematic review highlights gaps and ambiguities that mean quantitative understanding of how tissue material properties alter with age and OA is limited. It is therefore currently challenging to construct FE models of the knee that are truly representative of a specific age or disease-state. Consequently, recent tibiofemoral joint FE models have been highly generic in terms of

  8. The relationship between patellofemoral and tibiofemoral morphology and gait biomechanics following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dempsey, Alasdair R.; Wang, Yuanyuan; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch

    2013-01-01

    osteoarthritis at arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy, underwent gait analysis and MRI on the operated knee once for each sub-cohort of 3 months, 2 years, or 4 years post-surgery. Cartilage volume, cartilage defects, and bone size were assessed from the MRI using validated methods. The 1st peak in the knee......Purpose To examine the relationship between tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joint articular cartilage and subchondral bone in the medial and gait biomechanics following partial medial meniscectomy. Methods For this cross-sectional study, 122 patients aged 30–55 years, without evidence of knee...... adduction moment, knee adduction moment impulse, 1st peak in the knee flexion moment, knee extension range of motion, and the heel strike transient from the vertical ground reaction force trace were identified from the gait data. Results Increased knee stance phase range of motion was associated...

  9. Is tibiofemoral subluxation correctable in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Denis; Khamaisy, Saker; Gladnick, Brian P; Paul, Sophia; Pearle, Andrew D

    2013-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe a method for measuring tibiofemoral subluxation in UKA, and to report the mean amount of tibiofemoral subluxation seen both preoperatively and postoperatively in a cohort of patients undergoing UKA. Two hundred thirty-five patients who received a medial UKA, and 39 patients who received a lateral UKA, were reviewed. In the medial UKA cohort, the mechanical alignment was corrected from 7.7° ± 5.9° preoperatively, to 2.9° ± 2.5° postoperatively, while the tibiofemoral subluxation was corrected from 4.5 mm ± 3.0 mm preoperatively, to 2.3 mm ± 2.7 mm postoperatively. In the lateral UKA cohort, the mechanical alignment was corrected from -5.5° ± 3.8° to -1.6° ± 3.4°, while the tibiofemoral subluxation was corrected from 4.3 mm ± 2.7 mm to 2.8 mm ± 2.5mm. This study presents a novel method for measurement of tibiofemoral subluxation, the mean amount of tibiofemoral subluxation present preoperatively, and the amount of correction that can be expected during both medial and lateral unicondylar knee arthroplasty. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tibiofemoral angle and its relation to ankle sprain occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pefanis, Nikolaos; Karagounis, Panagiotis; Tsiganos, Georgios; Armenis, Elias; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis

    2009-12-01

    The lack of a normal joint orientation generates translational or shear forces across the joint. These forces can put abnormally high strain on the cartilage and the surrounding capsuloligamentous tissues. Ankle joint structure can affect or be affected by bony malformations of the surrounding areas, including the knee and hip. The aim of the current study is to examine the possible relationship between the tibiofemoral (TFA) angle and other factors (anthropometric characteristics, medical history, and age) on the occurrence of ankle sprains because its value provides useful information for the anatomical alignment of the lower extremity. The study sample consisted of 45 high-level athletes, evenly distributed among 3 sports (basketball, soccer, and volleyball). TFA measurements were made on radiographs. The study lasted 2 years. A logistic regression was used to determine the importance of each factor on the probability in question. A significance level of P = .1 was used. The factors contributing more to an ankle sprain were a previous injury of the same type followed by body mass index (BMI) and age. On the contrary, TFA was proven to be statistically nonsignificant. When the BMI variable was substituted with body inertia propensity, a derived variable, the TFA remained statistically nonsignificant. TFA magnitude does not seem to be a determinant factor that could increase the probability of spraining an ankle.

  11. Diagnosis of osteoarthritis by cartilage surface smoothness quantified automatically from knee MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tummala, Sudhakar; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Karsdal, Morten A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We investigated whether surface smoothness of articular cartilage in the medial tibiofemoral compartment quantified from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be appropriate as a diagnostic marker of osteoarthritis (OA). Method: At baseline, 159 community-based subjects aged 21 to 81...... with normal or OA-affected knees were recruited to provide a broad range of OA states. Smoothness was quantified using an automatic framework from low-field MRI in the tibial, femoral, and femoral subcompartments. Diagnostic ability of smoothness was evaluated by comparison with conventional OA markers......, specifically cartilage volume from MRI, joint space width (JSW) from radiographs, and pain scores. Results: A total of 140 subjects concluded the 21-month study. Cartilage smoothness provided diagnostic ability in all compartments (P

  12. Self-reported knee joint instability is related to passive mechanical stiffness in medial knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-reported knee joint instability compromises function in individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis and may be related to impaired joint mechanics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between self-reported instability and the passive varus-valgus mechanical behaviour of the medial osteoarthritis knee. Methods Passive varus-valgus angular laxity and stiffness were assessed using a modified isokinetic dynamometer in 73 participants with medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. All participants self-reported the absence or presence of knee instability symptoms and the degree to which instability affected daily activity on a 6-point likert scale. Results Forward linear regression modelling identified a significant inverse relationship between passive mid-range knee stiffness and symptoms of knee instability (r = 0.27; P  0.05). Conclusions Conceivably, a stiffer passive system may contribute toward greater joint stability during functional activities. Importantly however, net joint stiffness is influenced by both active and passive stiffness, and thus the active neuromuscular system may compensate for reduced passive stiffness in order to maintain joint stability. Future work is merited to examine the role of active stiffness in symptomatic joint stability. PMID:24252592

  13. Does joint alignment affect the T2 values of cartilage in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Klaus M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Shepard, Timothy; Chang, Gregory; Wang, Ligong; Babb, James S.; Regatte, Ravinder [New York University Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Schweitzer, Mark [Ottawa Hospital, Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2010-06-15

    To assess the relationship between T2 values of femorotibial cartilage and knee alignment in patients with clinical symptoms of medial osteoarthritis (OA). Twenty-four patients (mean age {+-} standard deviation, 62.5 {+-} 9.9 years) with clinical symptoms of medial knee OA, 12 with varus and 12 with valgus alignment of the femorotibial joint, were investigated on 3T MR using a 2D multi-echo spin echo (MESE) sequence for T2 mapping. Analysis of covariance, Spearman correlation coefficients, exact Mann-Whitney tests, and Fisher's exact tests were used for statistical analysis. Overall the T2 values of cartilage in the medial compartment (median {+-} interquartile-range, 49.44 {+-} 6.58) were significantly higher (P = 0.0043) than those in the lateral compartment (47.15 {+-} 6.87). Patients with varus alignment (50.83 {+-} 6.30 ms) had significantly higher T2 values of cartilage (P < 0.0001) than patients with valgus alignment (46.20 {+-} 6.00 ms). No statistically significant association between the T2 values of cartilage (in either location) and the Kellgren Lawrence score was found in the varus or in the valgus group. T2 measurements were increased in medial knee OA patients with varus alignment, adding support to the theory of an association of OA and joint alignment. (orig.)

  14. Does joint alignment affect the T2 values of cartilage in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, Klaus M.; Shepard, Timothy; Chang, Gregory; Wang, Ligong; Babb, James S.; Regatte, Ravinder; Schweitzer, Mark

    2010-01-01

    To assess the relationship between T2 values of femorotibial cartilage and knee alignment in patients with clinical symptoms of medial osteoarthritis (OA). Twenty-four patients (mean age ± standard deviation, 62.5 ± 9.9 years) with clinical symptoms of medial knee OA, 12 with varus and 12 with valgus alignment of the femorotibial joint, were investigated on 3T MR using a 2D multi-echo spin echo (MESE) sequence for T2 mapping. Analysis of covariance, Spearman correlation coefficients, exact Mann-Whitney tests, and Fisher's exact tests were used for statistical analysis. Overall the T2 values of cartilage in the medial compartment (median ± interquartile-range, 49.44 ± 6.58) were significantly higher (P = 0.0043) than those in the lateral compartment (47.15 ± 6.87). Patients with varus alignment (50.83 ± 6.30 ms) had significantly higher T2 values of cartilage (P < 0.0001) than patients with valgus alignment (46.20 ± 6.00 ms). No statistically significant association between the T2 values of cartilage (in either location) and the Kellgren Lawrence score was found in the varus or in the valgus group. T2 measurements were increased in medial knee OA patients with varus alignment, adding support to the theory of an association of OA and joint alignment. (orig.)

  15. “Incidence and risk factors for clinically diagnosed knee, hip and hand osteoarthritis: influences of age, gender and osteoarthritis affecting other joints”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Judge, Andrew; Javaid, M Kassim; Cooper, Cyrus; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Arden, Nigel K

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Data on the incidence of symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) are scarce. We estimated incidence of clinical hip, knee and hand osteoarthritis, and studied the effect of prevalent OA on joint-specific incident OA. Methods SIDIAP contains primary care records for >5 million people from Catalonia (Spain). Participants aged ≥40 years with an incident diagnosis of knee, hip or hand OA between 2006 and 2010 were identified using ICD-10 codes. Incidence rates and female-to-male Rate Ratios (RR) for each joint site were calculated. Age, gender and body mass index-adjusted Hazard Ratios (HR) for future joint-specific OA according to prevalent OA at other sites were estimated using Cox regression. Results 3,266,826 participants were studied for a median of 4.45 years. Knee and hip OA rates increased continuously with age, and female-to-male RRs were highest at age 70-75 years. In contrast, female hand OA risk peaked at age 60-64 years, and corresponding female-to-male RR was highest at age 50-55. Adjusted HR for prevalent knee OA on risk of hip OA was 1.35 (99%CI 1.28-1.43); prevalent hip OA on incident knee OA 1.15 (1.08-1.23). Prevalent hand OA predicted both incident knee and hip OA: HR 1.20 (1.14-1.26) and 1.23 (1.13-1.34) respectively. Conclusions The effect of age is greatest in the elderly for knee and hip OA, but around the menopause for hand OA. OA clusters within individuals, with higher risk of incident knee and hip disease from prevalent lower limb and hand OA. PMID:23744977

  16. Quantitative wear particle analysis for osteoarthritis assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Meizhai; Lord, Megan S; Peng, Zhongxiao

    2017-12-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The aims of this study were (1) to quantitatively characterise the boundary and surface features of wear particles present in the synovial fluid of patients, (2) to select key numerical parameters that describe distinctive particle features and enable osteoarthritis assessment and (3) to develop a model to assess osteoarthritis conditions using comprehensive wear debris information. Discriminant analysis was used to statistically group particles based on differences in their numerical parameters. The analysis methods agreed with the clinical osteoarthritis grades in 63%, 50% and 61% of particles for no osteoarthritis, mild osteoarthritis and severe osteoarthritis, respectively. This study has revealed particle features specific to different osteoarthritis grades and provided further understanding of the cartilage degradation process through wear particle analysis - the technique that has the potential to be developed as an objective and minimally invasive method for osteoarthritis diagnosis.

  17. Partial lateral facetectomy plus Insall's procedure for the treatment of isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis: survival analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat, Ferran; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; León, Vicente; Ginés-Cespedosa, Alberto; Rigol, Pau

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the survival analysis of partial lateral facetectomy and Insall's procedure in patients with isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis, and to assess the risk and protective factors for failure of this procedure. From 1992 to 2004, all subjects with isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis who met the inclusion criteria and underwent this procedure were enrolled. Risk and protective factors for failure (failure considered as the need for total knee arthroplasty) were assessed by comparing obtained baseline data between failed and non-failed cases. Eighty-seven cases (mean (SD) age 61.8 (7.7) years, mean (SD) follow-up 9.6 (3.2) years) were included. Twenty-three failed cases were found. Mean (SD) survival time was 13.6 (0.5) years. At 13 years (last failure case), the cumulative survival was 59.3 %. Baseline medial tibiofemoral pain, genu flexum, and worst grade of tibiofemoral osteoarthritis were significant risk factors for failure (p < 0.0001, p = 0.02, p < 0.0001, respectively). In contrast, higher anatomical (p = 0.02) and total (p = 0.03) knee society score (KSS) scores, absence of knee effusion (p = 0.03), higher value of the Caton-Deschamps index (p = 0.03), and lateral position of the patella (p = 0.01) were all protective factors against failure. The treatment for isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis through partial lateral facetectomy and Insall's procedure demonstrated good long-term survival. The presence of preoperative medial tibiofemoral pain, genu flexum, and incipient tibiofemoral osteoarthritis increased the risk of failure of this procedure. In contrast, higher anatomical and total KSS scores, absence of knee effusion, higher value of the Caton-Deschamps index, and lateral position of the patella were found to protect against failure.

  18. Are the Kinematics of the Knee Joint Altered during the Loading Response Phase of Gait in Individuals with Concurrent Knee Osteoarthritis and Complaints of Joint Instability? A Dynamic Stereo X-ray Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Tashman, Scott; Gil, Alexandra B.; Klatt, Brian A.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley

    2011-01-01

    Background Joint instability has been suggested as a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis and a cause of significant functional declines in those with symptomatic disease. However, the relationship between altered knee joint mechanics and self-reports of instability in individuals with knee osteoarthritis remains unclear. Methods Fourteen subjects with knee osteoarthritis and complaints of joint instability and 12 control volunteers with no history of knee disease were recruited for this study. Dynamic stereo X-ray technology was used to assess the three-dimensional kinematics of the knee joint during the loading response phase of gait. Findings Individuals with concurrent knee osteoarthritis and joint instability demonstrated significantly reduced flexion and internal/external rotation knee motion excursions during the loading response phase of gait (P knee joint at initial contact was significantly different (P knee osteoarthritis and joint instability. However, the anteroposterior and mediolateral tibiofemoral joint positions at initial contact and the corresponding total joint translations were similar between groups during the loading phase of gait. Interpretations The rotational patterns of tibiofemoral joint motion and joint alignments reported for individuals with concurrent knee osteoarthritis and joint instability are consistent with those previously established for individuals with knee osteoarthritis. Furthermore, the findings of similar translatory tibiofemoral motion between groups suggest that self-reports of episodic joint instability in individuals with knee osteoarthritis may not necessarily be associated with adaptive alterations in joint arthrokinematics. PMID:22071429

  19. Extrusion of the medial meniscus in knee osteoarthritis assessed with a rotating clino-orthostatic permanent-magnet MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparo, Francesco; Revelli, Matteo; Piccazzo, Riccardo; Astengo, Davide; Camellino, Dario; Puntoni, Matteo; Muda, Alessandro; Rollandi, Gian Andrea; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Cimmino, Marco Amedeo

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the influence of weight-bearing on tibiofemoral osteoarthritis, including medial meniscal extrusion, by using a low-field (0.25 T) rotating clino-orthostatic permanent-magnet magnetic resonance (MR) scanner, and to analyse correlations of medial meniscal extrusion with the patient's Kellgren-Lawrence score, body mass index, and all the osteoarthritis features of the WORMS scoring system. Twenty-six patients (69.2% women and 30.8% men; mean age 67 ± 9.7 years) with medial tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis were prospectively enrolled and MR sequences were acquired in both clino- and orthostatic position. MR images were assessed by two independent radiologists, according to the WORMS scale. Medial meniscal extrusion was measured and its clino-orthostatic difference (∆MME) was calculated. Intra- and inter-observer agreement of the WORMS Global Score readings was high by Cohen's K test (>0.81). No significant clino-orthostatic changes in the scoring parameters of the medial tibiofemoral joint were shown by Wilcoxon's test. Medial meniscal extrusion measured on orthostatic images was significantly higher than that measured in clinostatic position (p < 0.0001). At univariate analysis, the Kellgren-Lawrence score, WORMS Global Score, cartilage loss, meniscal damage, and osteophytes were significantly correlated to ∆MME (p < 0.005). Using a multiple regression model, tibiofemoral cartilage loss was found to correlate independently with ∆MME (p = 0.0499). Medial meniscal extrusion, evaluated with an open-configuration, rotating MR scanner, increased from the clinostatic to the orthostatic position. ∆MME, a new meniscal parameter, correlated with several important features of medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis.

  20. Changes in Tibiofemoral Forces due to Variations in Muscle Activity during Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMers, Matthew S.; Pal, Saikat; Delp, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Muscles induce large forces in the tibiofemoral joint during walking and thereby influence the health of tissues like articular cartilage and menisci. It is possible to walk with a wide variety of muscle coordination patterns, but the effect of varied muscle coordination on tibiofemoral contact forces remains unclear. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of varied muscle coordination on tibiofemoral contact forces. We developed a musculoskeletal model of a subject walking with an instrumented knee implant. Using an optimization framework, we calculated the tibiofemoral forces resulting from muscle coordination that reproduced the subject’s walking dynamics. We performed a large set of optimizations in which we systematically varied the coordination of muscles to determine the influence on tibiofemoral force. Model-predicted tibiofemoral forces arising with minimum muscle activation matched in vivo forces measured during early stance, but were greater than in vivo forces during late stance. Peak tibiofemoral forces during late stance could be reduced by increasing the activation of the gluteus medius, uniarticular hip flexors, and soleus, and by decreasing the activation of the gastrocnemius and rectus femoris. These results suggest that retraining of muscle coordination could substantially reduce tibiofemoral forces during late stance. PMID:24615885

  1. Factors affecting osteoarthritis patients' self-reported goal-directed drug information-seeking behaviors after exposure to direct-to-consumer advertising from physicians and the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yifei; Farris, Karen B; Doucette, William R

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate appraisal of means (ie, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and affect) in predicting patients' goal-directed behaviors of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA)-prompted drug-information search from physicians and the internet. One thousand patients were randomly selected from a nationwide sample frame of 3000 osteoarthritis patients. A self-administered survey assessed exposure to DTCA, drug-information search as goal, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, affect, and osteoarthritis pain. After 6 weeks, another survey measured the behavior of drug-information search for respondents to the first survey. Study subjects were those who were exposed to DTCA in the previous month, and who set drug-information search as their goal. For each information source, a multiple regression analysis was conducted in which drug-information search was the dependent variable, and self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, affect, and osteoarthritis pain were the independent variables. Among 454 patients who were exposed to DTCA, 174 patients set drug-information search as their goal and were the study subjects. The regression for physicians was not statistically significant. The regression for the internet was significant, accounting for 15% of behavior variance. Self-efficacy was a strong predictor of goal-directed drug-information search from the internet. Appraisal of means was useful to predict the goal-directed behavior of DTCA-prompted drug-information search from the internet. For patients who set drug-information search as a goal, actions to promote drug-information search from the internet need to focus on self-efficacy.

  2. The diagnosis of osteoarthritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    their nutrition from the surrounding. fluid. The chondrocytes communicate via the fluid within the matrix by diffusion. The macromolecules give the cartilage the .... patients with osteoarthritis and a simple examination of the affected muscles and tendons is done to differentiate this from joint disease. Passive movement of the.

  3. The Content of the 14 Metals in Cancellous and Cortical Bone of the Hip Joint Affected by Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Dąbrowski, Mikołaj; Kowalski, Artur; Rogala, Piotr; Strzyżewski, Wojciech; Łabędź, Wojciech; Kanicky, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the content of particular elements Ca, Mg, P, Na, K, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mo, Cr, Ni, Ba, Sr, and Pb in the proximal femur bone tissue (cancellous and cortical bone) of 96 patients undergoing total hip replacement for osteoarthritis using ICP-AES and FAAS analytical techniques. The interdependencies among these elements and their correlations depended on factors including age, gender, place of residence, tobacco consumption, alcohol consumption, exposure to environmental pollution, physical activity, and type of degenerative change which were examined by statistical and chemometric methods. The factors that exerted the greatest influence on the elements in the femoral head and neck were tobacco smoking (higher Cr and Ni content in smokers), alcohol consumption (higher concentrations of Ni, Cu in people who consume alcohol), and gender (higher Cu, Zn, and Ni concentrations in men). The factors influencing Pb accumulation in bone tissue were tobacco, alcohol, gender, and age. In primary and secondary osteoarthritis of the hip, the content and interactions of elements are different (mainly those of Fe and Pb). There were no significant differences in the concentrations of elements in the femoral head and neck that could be attributed to residence or physical activity. PMID:26357659

  4. Effect of load, cadence, and fatigue on tibio-femoral joint force during a half squat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattin, H C; Pierrynowski, M R; Ball, K A

    1989-10-01

    Ten male university student volunteers were selected to investigate the 3D articular force at the tibio-femoral joint during a half squat exercise, as affected by cadence, different barbell loads, and fatigue. Each subject was required to perform a half squat exercise with a barbell weight centered across the shoulders at two different cadences (1 and 2 s intervals) and three different loads (15, 22 and 30% of the one repetition maximum). Fifty repetitions at each experimental condition were recorded with an active optoelectronic kinematic data capture system (WATSMART) and a force plate (Kistler). Processing the data involved a photogrammetric technique to obtain subject tailored anthropometric data. The findings of this study were: 1) the maximal antero-posterior shear and compressive force consistently occurred at the lowest position of the weight, and the forces were very symmetrically disposed on either side of this halfway point; 2) the medio-lateral shear forces were small over the squat cycle with few peaks and troughs; 3) cadence increased the antero-posterior shear (50%) and the compressive forces (28%); 4) as a subject fatigues, load had a significant effect on the antero-posterior shear force; 5) fatigue increased all articular force components but it did not manifest itself until about halfway through the 50 repetitions of the exercise; 6) the antero-posterior shear force was most affected by fatigue; 7) cadence had a significant effect on fatigue for the medio-lateral shear and compressive forces.

  5. Effect of radial meniscal tear on in situ forces of meniscus and tibiofemoral relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Yuta; Mae, Tatsuo; Fujie, Hiromichi; Shino, Konsei; Ohori, Tomoki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakata, Ken

    2017-02-01

    To clarify the effect of the radial tear of the lateral meniscus on the in situ meniscus force and the tibiofemoral relationship under axial loads and valgus torques. Ten intact porcine knees were settled to a 6-degree of freedom robotic system, while the force and 3-dimensional path of the knees were recorded via Universal Force Sensor (UFS) during 3 cycles of 250-N axial load and 5-Nm valgus torque at 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° of knee flexion. The same examination was performed on the following 3 meniscal states sequentially; 33, 66, and 100% width of radial tears at the middle segment of the lateral meniscus, while recording the force and path of the knees via UFS. Finally, all paths were reproduced after total lateral meniscectomy and the in situ force of the lateral meniscus were calculated with the principle of superposition. The radial tear of 100% width significantly decreased the in situ force of the lateral meniscus and caused tibial medial shift and valgus rotation at 30°-60° of knee flexion in both testing protocols. Under a 250-N axial load at 60° of knee flexion, the in situ force decreased to 36 ± 29 N with 100% width of radial tear, which was 122 ± 38 N in the intact state. Additionally, the tibia shifted medially by 2.1 ± 0.9 mm and valgusrotated by 2.5 ± 1.9° with the complete radial tear. However, the radial tear of 33 or 66% width had little effect on either the in situ force or the tibial position. A radial tear of 100% width involving the rim significantly decreased the in situ force of the lateral meniscus and caused medial shift and valgus rotation of the tibia, whereas a radial tear of up to 66% width produced only little change. The clinical relevance is that loss of meniscal functions due to complete radial tear can lead to abnormal stress concentration in a focal area of cartilage and can increase the risk of osteoarthritis in the future.

  6. Patellofemoral Osteoarthritis: Are We Missing an Important Source of Symptoms After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culvenor, Adam G; Crossley, Kay M

    2016-04-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a well-established risk factor for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Fifty to ninety percent of individuals will develop radiographic tibiofemoral OA within a decade after ACL injury and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Although less well recognized, radiographic patellofemoral OA is present in approximately 50% of individuals at more than 10 years after ACLR. This early-onset OA and its associated pain and functional limitations pose a particular challenge to younger adults with OA compared to an older OA population. Targeted interventions need to be developed to reduce the burden of early-onset OA following ACLR. Emerging evidence suggests that such interventions should target both the patellofemoral and tibiofemoral joints.

  7. Chondrogenic differentiation of human subchondral progenitor cells is affected by synovial fluid from donors with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krüger Jan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microfracture is a first-line treatment option for cartilage repair. In microfracture, subchondral mesenchymal cortico-spongious progenitor cells (CSP enter the defect and form cartilage repair tissue. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of joint disease conditions on the in vitro chondrogenesis of human CSP. Methods CSP were harvested from the subchondral bone marrow. CSP characterization was performed by analysis of cell surface antigen pattern and by assessing the chondrogenic, osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential, histologically. To assess the effect of synovial fluid (SF on chondrogenesis of CSP, micro-masses were stimulated with SF from healthy (ND, osteoarthritis (OA and rheumatoid arthritis donors (RA without transforming growth factor beta 3. Results CSP showed the typical cell surface antigen pattern known from mesenchymal stem cells and were capable of osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. In micro-masses stimulated with SF, histological staining as well as gene expression analysis of typical chondrogenic marker genes showed that SF from ND and OA induced the chondrogenic marker genes aggrecan, types II and IX collagen, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP and link protein, compared to controls not treated with SF. In contrast, the supplementation with SF from RA donors decreased the expression of aggrecan, type II collagen, COMP and link protein, compared to CSP treated with SF from ND or OA. Conclusion These results suggest that in RA, SF may impair cartilage repair by subchondral mesenchymal progenitor cells in microfracture, while in OA, SF may has no negative, but a delaying effect on the cartilage matrix formation.

  8. Preliminary study of highly cross-linked hyaluronic acid-based combination therapy for management of knee osteoarthritis-related pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Beniamino; Rottigni, Valentina; Iannitti, Tommaso

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyaluronic acid has been extensively used for treatment of knee osteoarthritis due to its anti-inflammatory properties and its ability to act as a synovial lubricant. Furthermore, it has found application in combination with other drugs in the dermatological field and in pre-clinical studies in animal models of osteoarthritis. Experimental evidence suggests that a combination of this macromolecule with other drugs may act as a slow-release depot. However, to date, to the best of our knowledge, no one has tested local intra-articular delivery of highly cross-linked hyaluronic acid combined with bisphosphonate or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for management of knee osteoarthritis pain in the clinical setting. The aim of the present randomized double-blind study was to investigate, for the first time, the effect of a highly cross-linked hyaluronic acid, Variofill®, alone or in combination with diclofenac sodium or sodium clodronate, for management of bilateral knee osteoarthritis-related pain. Methods Sixty-two patients with symptomatic bilateral medial tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis (Kellgren–Lawrence grade II and III) and pain in both knees corresponding to a daily visual analog scale (VAS) score ≥ 30 in the month before the beginning of the study were included in this investigation. Patients were divided into three groups: group 1, treated with an injection of hyaluronic acid alone (66 mg) into each knee; group 2, treated with an injection of hyaluronic acid (49.5 mg) plus diclofenac sodium (5 mg) into each knee; group 3, treated with an injection of hyaluronic acid (49.5 mg) plus sodium clodronate (5 mg) into each knee. Patients also underwent blood tests for measurement of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) immediately before and at 6-month follow-up. Results Hyaluronic acid alone and in combination with sodium clodronate or diclofenac sodium produced a significant improvement in mean VAS pain score at 3 and

  9. Changing Sagittal-Plane Landing Styles to Modulate Impact and Tibiofemoral Force Magnitude and Directions Relative to the Tibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokochi, Yohei; Ambegaonkar, Jatin P.; Meyer, Eric G.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Ground reaction force (GRF) and tibiofemoral force magnitudes and directions have been shown to affect anterior cruciate ligament loading during landing. However, the kinematic and kinetic factors modifying these 2 forces during landing are unknown. Objective: To clarify the intersegmental kinematic and kinetic links underlying the alteration of the GRF and tibiofemoral force vectors secondary to changes in the sagittal-plane body position during single-legged landing. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty recreationally active participants (age = 23.4 ± 3.6 years, height = 171.0 ± 9.4 cm, mass = 73.3 ± 12.7 kg). Intervention(s): Participants performed single-legged landings using 3 landing styles: self-selected landing (SSL), body leaning forward and landing on the toes (LFL), and body upright with flat-footed landing (URL). Three-dimensional kinetics and kinematics were recorded. Main Outcome Measure(s): Sagittal-plane tibial inclination and knee-flexion angles, GRF magnitude and inclination angles relative to the tibia, and proximal tibial forces at peak tibial axial forces. Results: The URL resulted in less time to peak tibial axial forces, smaller knee-flexion angles, and greater magnitude and a more anteriorly inclined GRF vector relative to the tibia than did the SSL. These changes led to the greatest peak tibial axial and anterior shear forces in the URL among the 3 landing styles. Conversely, the LFL resulted in longer time to peak tibial axial forces, greater knee-flexion angles, and reduced magnitude and a more posteriorly inclined GRF vector relative to the tibia than the SSL. These changes in LFL resulted in the lowest peak tibial axial and largest posterior shear forces among the 3 landing styles. Conclusions: Sagittal-plane intersegmental kinematic and kinetic links strongly affected the magnitude and direction of GRF and tibiofemoral forces during the impact phase of single-legged landing

  10. Automatic quantification of tibio-femoral contact area and congruity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tummala, Sudhakar; Nielsen, Mads; Lillholm, Martin

    2012-01-01

    distance between the local normal vectors (first-order features) scaled by the local normal curvatures (second-order features) along the local direction of principal knee motion in a local reference coordinate system formed by the directions of principal curvature and the surface normal vector....... The abilities of the CA and the CI for diagnosing osteoarthritis (OA) at different levels (disease severity was assessed using the Kellgren and Lawrence Index, KL) were cross-validated on 288 knees at baseline. Longitudinal analysis was performed on 245 knees. The precision quantified on 31 scan-rescan pairs...

  11. Prevalence of abnormalities in knees detected by MRI in adults without knee osteoarthritis: population based observational study (Framingham Osteoarthritis Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guermazi, Ali; Niu, Jingbo; Hayashi, Daichi; Roemer, Frank W; Englund, Martin; Neogi, Tuhina; Aliabadi, Piran; McLennan, Christine E; Felson, David T

    2012-08-29

    To examine use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of knees with no radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis to determine the prevalence of structural lesions associated with osteoarthritis and their relation to age, sex, and obesity. Population based observational study. Community cohort in Framingham, MA, United States (Framingham osteoarthritis study). 710 people aged >50 who had no radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis (Kellgren-Lawrence grade 0) and who underwent MRI of the knee. Prevalence of MRI findings that are suggestive of knee osteoarthritis (osteophytes, cartilage damage, bone marrow lesions, subchondral cysts, meniscal lesions, synovitis, attrition, and ligamentous lesions) in all participants and after stratification by age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and the presence or absence of knee pain. Pain was assessed by three different questions and also by WOMAC questionnaire. Of the 710 participants, 393 (55%) were women, 660 (93%) were white, and 206 (29%) had knee pain in the past month. The mean age was 62.3 years and mean BMI was 27.9. Prevalence of "any abnormality" was 89% (631/710) overall. Osteophytes were the most common abnormality among all participants (74%, 524/710), followed by cartilage damage (69%, 492/710) and bone marrow lesions (52%, 371/710). The higher the age, the higher the prevalence of all types of abnormalities detectable by MRI. There were no significant differences in the prevalence of any of the features between BMI groups. The prevalence of at least one type of pathology ("any abnormality") was high in both painful (90-97%, depending on pain definition) and painless (86-88%) knees. MRI shows lesions in the tibiofemoral joint in most middle aged and elderly people in whom knee radiographs do not show any features of osteoarthritis, regardless of pain.

  12. Normalisation method can affect gluteus medius electromyography results during weight bearing exercises in people with hip osteoarthritis (OA): a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Helen P; Huang, Xiaoli; Cummiskey, Andrew; Meldrum, Dara; Malone, Ailish

    2015-02-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) is used to assess muscle activation during therapeutic exercise, but data are significantly affected by inter-individual variability and requires normalisation of the sEMG signal to enable comparison between individuals. The purpose of this study was to compare two normalisation methods, a maximal method (maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC)) and non-maximal peak dynamic method (PDM), on gluteus medius (GMed) activation using sEMG during three weight-bearing exercises in people with hip osteoarthritis (OA) and healthy controls. Thirteen people with hip OA and 20 controls performed three exercises (Squat, Step-Up, Step-Down). Average root-mean squared EMG amplitude based on MVIC and PDM normalisation was compared between groups for both involved and uninvolved hips using Mann-Whitney tests. Using MVIC normalisation, significantly higher normalised GMed EMG amplitudes were found in the OA group during all Step-up and down exercises on the involved side (p=0.02-0.001) and most of the Step exercises on the uninvolved side (p=0.03-0.04), but not the Squat (p>0.05), compared to controls. Using PDM normalisation, significant between-group differences occurred only for Ascending Squat (p=0.03) on the involved side. MVIC normalisation demonstrated higher inter-trial relative reliability (ICCs=0.78-0.99) than PDM (ICCs=0.37-0.84), but poorer absolute reliability using Standard Error of Measurement. Normalisation method can significantly affect interpretation of EMG amplitudes. Although MVIC-normalised amplitudes were more sensitive to differences between groups, there was greater variability using this method, which raises concerns regarding validity. Interpretation of EMG data is strongly influenced by the normalisation method used, and this should be considered when applying EMG results to clinical populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Validity and reliability of radiographic knee osteoarthritis measures by arthroplasty surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Daniel L; Jiranek, William A; Hull, Jason R

    2013-01-01

    Most orthopedic surgeons do not routinely use radiographic classification systems to grade the extent of joint space narrowing in patients considered for total knee arthroplasty. The authors compared the validity and reliability of radiographic measures of tibiofemoral osteoarthritis by 2 experienced and 2 inexperienced orthopedic surgeons on individuals who subsequently underwent total knee arthroplasty. The Kellgren-Lawrence and the Osteoarthritis Research Society International classification systems were used by all surgeons to score the radiographs in 116 individuals in the Osteoarthritis Initiative, a federally funded cohort study of individuals with or at risk of knee osteoarthritis. Validity was judged based on comparison with the criterion centrally adjudicated consensus measures obtained by Osteoarthritis Initiative investigators. Weighted kappa, a chance corrected agreement index, was used to describe validity and reliability. Validity and intrarater reliability were substantial to almost perfect for 1 experienced and 1 inexperienced surgeon, with weighted kappas ranging from 0.76 to 0.96 for the surgical knees. The other experienced and inexperienced surgeons demonstrated moderate to substantial validity, with weighted kappas ranging from 0.43 to 0.70 and lower intrarater reliability. Interrater reliability was generally less than intrarater reliability. With minimal training, some surgeons can obtain valid and reliable measurements of knee osteoarthritis status in individuals who eventually undergo total knee arthroplasty. Measurement quality does not appear to be dependent on extent of surgeon experience. Some surgeons require additional training to become proficient in the radiographic classification systems, and future research should examine this issue. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Asymmetry of the knee extension deficit in standing affects weight-bearing distribution in patients with bilateral end-stage knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harato, Kengo; Nagura, Takeo; Matsumoto, Hideo; Otani, Toshiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Suda, Yasunori

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate weight-bearing distribution in patients with bilateral end-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to clarify the gait parameters affecting the weight-bearing distribution during both standing and walking using gait analysis. Twenty-five patients (averaged 71 years) with symptomatic bilateral end-stage medial knee OA participated in this study. They performed relaxed standing, placing one foot on a force plate and thereafter, level walking. First, knee resultant force was calculated on bilateral knees during standing. The knees in each patient were divided into Higher and Lower force side for the definition of dominant side limb. Second, gait parameters in each subject were compared between both sides. Each patient had large weight-bearing asymmetry, though passive range of motion, subjective pain level, femorotibial angle and radiographic disease severities were not significantly different between both sides. In standing, knees on Higher force side were significantly extended (11.2 ± 6.5°) than on Lower force side (14.4 ± 7.3°, P = 0.0086). Similarly, knees on Higher force side were also significantly extended at heel strike during gait. Besides, peak values of extension moment, knee adduction moment, knee adduction moment impulse and vertical force during gait were significantly greater on Higher force side. Ability to extend the knee in standing was considered to be an essential factor to decide loading condition. It is clinically important to examine the ability to extend the knee in standing when considering loading asymmetry during gait in patients with bilateral knee OA. III.

  15. Effects of a contoured articular prosthetic device on tibiofemoral peak contact pressure: a biomechanical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Roland; Thermann, Hajo; Paessler, Hans H.; Skrbensky, Gobert

    2007-01-01

    Many middle-aged patients are affected by localized cartilage defects that are neither appropriate for primary, nor repeat biological repair methods, nor for conventional arthroplasty. This in vitro study aims to determine the peak contact pressure in the tibiofemoral joint with a partial femoral resurfacing device (HemiCAP®, Arthrosurface Inc., Franklin, MA, USA). Peak contact pressure was determined in eight fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens using a Tekscan sensor placed in the medial compartment above the menisci. A closed loop robotic knee simulator was used to test each knee in static stance positions (5°/15°/30°/45°) with body weight ground reaction force (GRF), 30° flexion with twice the body weight (2tBW) GRF and dynamic knee-bending cycles with body weight GRF. The ground reaction force was adjusted to the living body weight of the cadaver donor and maintained throughout all cycles. Each specimen was tested under four different conditions: Untreated, flush HemiCAP® implantation, 1-mm proud implantation and 20-mm defect. A paired sampled t test to compare means (significance, P ≤ 0.05) was used for statistical analysis. On average, no statistically significant differences were found in any testing condition comparing the normal knee with flush device implantation. With the 1-mm proud implant, statistically significant increase of peak contact pressures of 217% (5° stance), 99% (dynamic knee bending) and 90% (30° stance with 2tBW) compared to the untreated condition was seen. No significant increase of peak contact pressure was evaluated with the 20-mm defect. The data suggests that resurfacing with the HemiCAP® does not lead to increased peak contact pressure with flush implantation. However, elevated implantation results in increased peak contact pressure and might be biomechanically disadvantageous in an in vivo application. PMID:17934718

  16. Diclofenac Topical (osteoarthritis pain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diclofenac topical gel (Voltaren) is used to relieve pain from osteoarthritis (arthritis caused by a breakdown of ... the knees, ankles, feet, elbows, wrists, and hands. Diclofenac topical liquid (Pennsaid) is used to relieve osteoarthritis ...

  17. Posttraumatic ankle osteoarthritis: How initial cartilage lesions, the deltoid ligament and hindfoot alignment affect the outcome of operatively treated ankle fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stufkens, S.A.S.

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority (70-78%) of ankle osteoarthritis is of posttraumatic origin. The quality of the reduction of intra-articular fractures is of paramount importance for a satisfactory outcome in all joints. Accordingly, the most important aspect of conservative or surgical treatment of ankle

  18. Relationships Between Tibiofemoral Contact Forces and Cartilage Morphology at 2 to 3 Years After Single-Bundle Hamstring Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and in Healthy Knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxby, David John; Bryant, Adam L; Wang, Xinyang; Modenese, Luca; Gerus, Pauline; Konrath, Jason M; Bennell, Kim L; Fortin, Karine; Wrigley, Tim; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Vertullo, Christopher J; Feller, Julian A; Whitehead, Tim; Gallie, Price; Lloyd, David G

    2017-08-01

    Prevention of knee osteoarthritis (OA) following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and reconstruction is vital. Risk of postreconstruction knee OA is markedly increased by concurrent meniscal injury. It is unclear whether reconstruction results in normal relationships between tibiofemoral contact forces and cartilage morphology and whether meniscal injury modulates these relationships. Since patients with isolated reconstructions (ie, without meniscal injury) are at lower risk for knee OA, we predicted that relationships between tibiofemoral contact forces and cartilage morphology would be similar to those of normal, healthy knees 2 to 3 years postreconstruction. In knees with meniscal injuries, these relationships would be similar to those reported in patients with knee OA, reflecting early degenerative changes. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Three groups were examined: (1) 62 patients who received single-bundle hamstring reconstruction with an intact, uninjured meniscus (mean age, 29.8 ± 6.4 years; mean weight, 74.9 ± 13.3 kg); (2) 38 patients with similar reconstruction with additional meniscal injury (ie, tear, repair) or partial resection (mean age, 30.6 ± 6.6 years; mean weight, 83.3 ± 14.3 kg); and (3) 30 ligament-normal, healthy individuals (mean age, 28.3 ± 5.2 years; mean weight, 74.9 ± 14.9 kg) serving as controls. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging to measure the medial and lateral tibial articular cartilage morphology (volumes and thicknesses). An electromyography-driven neuromusculoskeletal model determined medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces during walking. General linear models were used to assess relationships between tibiofemoral contact forces and cartilage morphology. In control knees, cartilage was thicker compared with that of isolated and meniscal-injured ACL-reconstructed knees, while greater contact forces were related to both greater tibial cartilage volumes (medial: R 2 = 0.43, β = 0

  19. Relationships Between Tibiofemoral Contact Forces and Cartilage Morphology at 2 to 3 Years After Single-Bundle Hamstring Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and in Healthy Knees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxby, David John; Bryant, Adam L.; Wang, Xinyang; Modenese, Luca; Gerus, Pauline; Konrath, Jason M.; Bennell, Kim L.; Fortin, Karine; Wrigley, Tim; Cicuttini, Flavia M.; Vertullo, Christopher J.; Feller, Julian A.; Whitehead, Tim; Gallie, Price; Lloyd, David G.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Prevention of knee osteoarthritis (OA) following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and reconstruction is vital. Risk of postreconstruction knee OA is markedly increased by concurrent meniscal injury. It is unclear whether reconstruction results in normal relationships between tibiofemoral contact forces and cartilage morphology and whether meniscal injury modulates these relationships. Hypotheses: Since patients with isolated reconstructions (ie, without meniscal injury) are at lower risk for knee OA, we predicted that relationships between tibiofemoral contact forces and cartilage morphology would be similar to those of normal, healthy knees 2 to 3 years postreconstruction. In knees with meniscal injuries, these relationships would be similar to those reported in patients with knee OA, reflecting early degenerative changes. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Three groups were examined: (1) 62 patients who received single-bundle hamstring reconstruction with an intact, uninjured meniscus (mean age, 29.8 ± 6.4 years; mean weight, 74.9 ± 13.3 kg); (2) 38 patients with similar reconstruction with additional meniscal injury (ie, tear, repair) or partial resection (mean age, 30.6 ± 6.6 years; mean weight, 83.3 ± 14.3 kg); and (3) 30 ligament-normal, healthy individuals (mean age, 28.3 ± 5.2 years; mean weight, 74.9 ± 14.9 kg) serving as controls. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging to measure the medial and lateral tibial articular cartilage morphology (volumes and thicknesses). An electromyography-driven neuromusculoskeletal model determined medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces during walking. General linear models were used to assess relationships between tibiofemoral contact forces and cartilage morphology. Results: In control knees, cartilage was thicker compared with that of isolated and meniscal-injured ACL-reconstructed knees, while greater contact forces were related to both

  20. The association between the Mediterranean diet and magnetic resonance parameters for knee osteoarthritis: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Nicola; La Tegola, Luciana; Crepaldi, Gaetano; Maggi, Stefania; Rogoli, Domenico; Guglielmi, Giuseppe

    2018-04-03

    The Mediterranean diet appears to be beneficial for osteoarthritis (OA), but the few data available regarding the association between the diet and the condition are limited to X-ray and clinical findings. The current study aimed to investigate the association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and knee cartilage morphology, assessed using magnetic resonance (MRI) in a cohort of North American participants. Seven hundred eighty-three participants in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (59.8% females; mean age 62.3 years) in possession of a MRI assessment (a coronal 3D FLASH with Water Excitation MR sequence of the right knee) were enrolled in our cross-sectional study. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was evaluated using a validated Mediterranean diet score (aMED). The strength of the association between aMED and knee MRI parameters was gauged using an adjusted linear regression analysis, expressed as standardized betas with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Using an adjusted linear regression analysis, each increase of one standard deviation (SD) in the aMED corresponded to a significant increase in the central medial femoral cartilage volume (beta = 0.12; 95%CI 0.09 to 0.15), in the mean central medial femoral cartilage thickness (beta = 0.13; 95%CI 0.01 to 0.17), in the cartilage thickness of the mean central medial tibiofemoral compartment (beta = 0.12; 95%CI 0.09 to 0.15), and in the cartilage volume of the medial tibiofemoral compartment (beta = 0.09; 95%CI 0.06 to 0.12). Higher adherence to a Mediterranean diet was found to be associated with a significant improvement in knee cartilage as assessed by MRI, even after adjusting for potential confounding factors.

  1. Glucosamine and chondroitin use in canines for osteoarthritis: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osteoarthritis is a slowly progressive and debilitating disease that affects canines of all breeds. Pain and decreased mobility resulting from osteoarthritis often have a negative impact on the affected canine's quality of life, level of comfort, daily functioning, activity, behaviour, and client-pet companionship. Despite limited and ...

  2. Higher dynamic medial knee load predicts greater cartilage loss over 12 months in medial knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennell, Kim L; Bowles, Kelly-Ann; Wang, Yuanyuan; Cicuttini, Flavia; Davies-Tuck, Miranda; Hinman, Rana S

    2011-10-01

    Mechanical factors, in particular increased medial knee joint load, are believed to be important in the structural progression of knee osteoarthritis. This study evaluated the relationship of medial knee load during walking to indices of structural disease progression, measured on MRI, in people with medial knee osteoarthritis. A longitudinal cohort design utilising a subset of participants (n=144, 72%) enrolled in a randomised controlled trial of lateral wedge insoles was employed. Medial knee load parameters including the peak knee adduction moment (KAM) and the KAM impulse were measured at baseline using three-dimensional gait analysis during walking. MRI at baseline and at 12 months was used to assess structural indices. Multiple regression with adjustment for covariates assessed the relationship between medial knee load parameters and the annual change in medial tibial cartilage volume. Binary logistic regression was used for the dichotomous variables of progression of medial tibiofemoral cartilage defects and bone marrow lesions (BML). A higher KAM impulse, but not peak KAM, at baseline was independently associated with greater loss of medial tibial cartilage volume over 12 months (β=29.9, 95% CI 6.3 to 53.5, p=0.01). No significant relationships were seen between medial knee load parameters and the progression of medial tibiofemoral cartilage defects or BML. This study suggests knee loading, in particular the KAM impulse, may be a risk factor for loss of medial tibial cartilage volume. As knee load is modifiable, load-modifying treatments may potentially slow disease progression.

  3. Tibiofemoral Instability After Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: Posterior-Stabilized Implants for Obese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Ata; Erdogan, Fahri; Erdogan, Ayse Ovul

    2017-09-01

    Tibiofemoral instability is a common complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), accounting for up to 22% of all revision procedures. Instability is the second most common cause of revision in the first 5 years after primary TKA. In this study, 13 knees with tibiofemoral instability after TKA were identified among 693 consecutive primary TKA procedures. Patient demographics, body mass index, clinical symptoms, previous deformity, previous knee surgery, complications, interval between index TKA and first tibiofemoral instability, causes of instability, and interval between index TKA and revision TKA were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical outcomes were assessed with the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale. All patients were women, and mean body mass index was 37.7 kg/m 2 (range, 27.2-52.6 kg/m 2 ). Mean interval between index TKA and first tibiofemoral instability was 23.4 months (range, 9-45 months), and mean interval between index TKA and revision TKA was 25.6 months (range, 14-48 months). All patients had posterior cruciate ligament-retaining implants. Of the 13 knees, 11 had flexion instability and 2 had global instability. In all patients, instability was caused by incompetence of the posterior cruciate ligament; additionally, 1 patient had undersized and malpositioned implants. In 4 knees, the polyethylene insert was broken as well. All patients underwent revision TKA. Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale score had improved from a mean of 35.8 (range, 30-46) to a mean of 68.3 (range, 66-76). All patients included in this study were female and obese. The main cause of instability was secondary posterior cruciate ligament rupture and incompetence. The use of posterior-stabilized implants for primary TKA may prevent secondary instability in obese patients. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(5):e812-e819.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Osteoarthritis prevalence following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review and numbers-needed-to-treat analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luc, Brittney; Gribble, Phillip A; Pietrosimone, Brian G

    2014-01-01

    To determine the prophylactic capability of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in decreasing the risk of knee osteoarthritis (OA) when compared with ACL-deficient patients, as well as the effect of a concomitant meniscectomy. We also sought to examine the influence of study design, publication date, and graft type as well as the magnitude of change in physical activity from preinjury Tegner scores in both cohorts. We searched Web of Science and PubMed databases from 1960 through 2012 with the search terms osteoarthritis, meniscectomy, anterior cruciate ligament, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and anterior cruciate ligament deficient. Articles that reported the prevalence of tibiofemoral or patellofemoral OA based on radiographic assessment were included. We calculated numbers needed to treat and relative risk reduction with associated 95% confidence intervals for 3 groups (1) patients with meniscal and ACL injury, (2) patients with isolated ACL injury, and (3) total patients (groups 1 and 2). A total of 38 studies met the criteria. Of these, 27 assessed the presence of tibiofemoral osteoarthritis in patients treated with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Overall, ACL reconstruction (ACL-R) yielded a numbers needed to treat to harm of 16 with a relative risk increase of 16%. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction along with meniscectomy yielded a numbers needed to treat to benefit of 15 and relative risk reduction of 11%. Isolated ACL-R showed a numbers needed to treat to harm of 8 and relative risk increase of 43%. Activity levels were decreased in both ACL-R (d = -0.90; 95% confidence interval = 0.77, 1.13) and ACL-deficient (d = -1.13; 95% confidence interval = 0.96, 1.29) patients after injury. The current literature does not provide substantial evidence to suggest that ACL-R is an adequate intervention to prevent knee osteoarthritis. With regard to osteoarthritis prevalence, the only patients benefiting from ACL-R were those

  5. Dietary supplements for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Philip J; Sperry, Morgan; Wilson, Amy Friedman

    2008-01-15

    A large number of dietary supplements are promoted to patients with osteoarthritis and as many as one third of those patients have used a supplement to treat their condition. Glucosamine-containing supplements are among the most commonly used products for osteoarthritis. Although the evidence is not entirely consistent, most research suggests that glucosamine sulfate can improve symptoms of pain related to osteoarthritis, as well as slow disease progression in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Chondroitin sulfate also appears to reduce osteoarthritis symptoms and is often combined with glucosamine, but there is no reliable evidence that the combination is more effective than either agent alone. S-adenosylmethionine may reduce pain but high costs and product quality issues limit its use. Several other supplements are promoted for treating osteoarthritis, such as methylsulfonylmethane, Harpagophytum procumbens (devil's claw), Curcuma longa (turmeric), and Zingiber officinale (ginger), but there is insufficient reliable evidence regarding long-term safety or effectiveness.

  6. Strong association of MRI meniscal derangement and bone marrow lesions in knee osteoarthritis: data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, G H; Hunter, D J; Nevitt, M; Lynch, J; McAlindon, T E

    2009-06-01

    Meniscal damage is common in knee Osteoarthritis (OA) and predictive of structural progression, suggesting that their disruption plays a role in the development of OA. The bone marrow lesion (BML) is associated with pain and is a strong risk factor for structural progression. These lesions are associated with abnormal loading in a knee joint. Therefore, our hypothesis was that in those with symptomatic knee OA, large BMLs would be associated with ipsi-compartmental meniscal derangement. This was a cross-sectional study of a subsample of the Osteoarthritis Initiative where one set of magnetic resonance (MR) images from each participant was scored for tibiofemoral BMLs and meniscal derangement. We performed chi-squared tests comparing the prevalence of large BMLs in those with ipsi-compartmental meniscal derangement and those without. 160 Participants had a mean age of 61 (+/-9.9), mean BMI of 30.3 (+/-4.7) and 50% were female. 79% of medial and 39% of lateral menisci showed MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) derangement. In those with medial meniscal MRI derangement, 44% had large medial BMLs while in those without medial meniscal derangement, 0% had large BMLs. Similar results were seen in the lateral compartment. Medial and lateral MRI meniscal derangement are highly prevalent in symptomatic knee OA and BMLs are highly associated with ipsi-compartmental MRI meniscal derangement.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the risk of other health conditions such as cardiovascular disease. Osteoarthritis is most common in middle age or ... to run in my family? What is the prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center Frequency Osteoarthritis is a very common ...

  8. Preliminary study of highly cross-linked hyaluronic acid-based combination therapy for management of knee osteoarthritis-related pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmieri B

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Beniamino Palmieri,1,2 Valentina Rottigni,1,2 Tommaso Iannitti2,31Department of General Surgery and Surgical Specialties, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia Medical School, Surgical Clinic, Modena, Italy; 2Poliambulatorio del Secondo Parere, Modena, Italy; 3Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY, USABackground: Hyaluronic acid has been extensively used for treatment of knee osteoarthritis due to its anti-inflammatory properties and its ability to act as a synovial lubricant. Furthermore, it has found application in combination with other drugs in the dermatological field and in pre-clinical studies in animal models of osteoarthritis. Experimental evidence suggests that a combination of this macromolecule with other drugs may act as a slow-release depot. However, to date, to the best of our knowledge, no one has tested local intra-articular delivery of highly cross-linked hyaluronic acid combined with bisphosphonate or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for management of knee osteoarthritis pain in the clinical setting. The aim of the present randomized double-blind study was to investigate, for the first time, the effect of a highly cross-linked hyaluronic acid, Variofill®, alone or in combination with diclofenac sodium or sodium clodronate, for management of bilateral knee osteoarthritis-related pain.Methods: Sixty-two patients with symptomatic bilateral medial tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis (Kellgren–Lawrence grade II and III and pain in both knees corresponding to a daily visual analog scale (VAS score ≥ 30 in the month before the beginning of the study were included in this investigation. Patients were divided into three groups: group 1, treated with an injection of hyaluronic acid alone (66 mg into each knee; group 2, treated with an injection of hyaluronic acid (49.5 mg plus diclofenac sodium (5 mg into each knee; group 3, treated with an injection of hyaluronic acid

  9. Clinical, radiological and ultrasonographic findings related to knee pain in osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith K W Chan

    Full Text Available Pain is the predominant symptom of knee osteoarthritis (OA and the main reason of disability. Ultrasound is now one of the new imaging modality in Musculoskeletal medicine and its role in assessing the pain severity in the knee osteoarthritis is evaluated in this study.(1 To study the correlation between ultrasonographic (US findings and pain score and (2 whether ultrasonographic findings show a better association of pain level than conventional X-rays in patients suffering from primary knee osteoarthritis.In this multi-center study, 193 patients with primary knee OA were asked to score their average knee pain using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis (WOMAC questionnaire;patients would then go for a radiological and an US evaluation of their painful knee. Findings from both imaging modalities will be studied with the associated pain score.Ultrasound showed that knee effusion has positive correlation with pain score upon walking (r = 0.217 and stair climbing (r = 0.194. Presence of suprapatellar synovitis had higher pain score on sitting (Spearman's Rank correlation  = 0.355. The medial(r = 0.170 and lateral meniscus protrusion (r = 0.201 were associated with pain score upon stair climbing.Our study found that both imaging modalities shown some significant association with the aspect of pain; neither one is clearly better but rather complementary to each other. A trend is found in both modalities: walking pain is related to pathologies of the either the lateral or medial tibiofemoral joint(TFJwhile stair climbing pain is related to both tibiofemoral joint pathologies and also to the patellofemoral joint (PFJ pathology. This suggested that biomechanical derangement is an important aspect in OA knee pain.

  10. TIBIOFEMORAL JOINT MOBILIZATION IN THE SUCCESSFUL MANAGEMENT OF PATELLOFEMORAL PAIN SYNDROME: A CASE REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Justin M; Emerson-Kavchak, Alicia J; Mischke, John J; Courtney, Carol A

    2016-06-01

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a common source of anterior knee pain. Controversy exists over the exact clinical findings which define PFPS, thus, diagnosis and management can be challenging for clinicians. There is paucity in the literature concerning joint mobilization as treatment for PFPS, particularly at the tibiofemoral joint, as standard management is currently focused on therapeutic exercise, orthotics, bracing and taping. Therefore, the purpose of this case report is to describe the effects of tibiofemoral joint mobilization in the successful treatment of an individual with chronic PFPS as it relates to pain, function and central processing of pain. Case Report. The subject was a 28-year-old female with a two year history of left anterior, inferior patellar knee pain consistent with chronic PFPS. She demonstrated diminished pressure pain threshold (PPT) and allodynia at the anterior knee, suggesting a component of central sensitization to her pain. She met several common diagnostic criteria for PFPS, however, only tibiofemoral anterior-posterior joint mobilization increased her pain. Subsequent treatment sessions (Visits 1-6) consisted of solely joint mobilization supplemented by instruction in a home exercise program (therapeutic exercise and balance training). As outcomes improved, treatment sessions (Visits 7-8) consisted of solely therapeutic exercise and balance training with focus on return to independent pain free functional activity. Improvements consistent with the minimally clinically important difference were noted on the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale, Numeric Pain Rating Scale, Global Rating of Change (GROC). Scores on the Fear Avoidance-Belief Questionnaire (6/24 to 2/24 PA, 31/42 to 5/42 W), PPT (119 to 386 kPa) and Step Down Test (11 to 40 steps) also demonstrated improvement. At a two month follow up, the subject reported continued improvement in functional activity, 0/10 pain and GROC = +5. This case describes the successful

  11. Modeling the Human Tibiofemoral Joint Using Ex Vivo Determined Compliance Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberto, Giuliano; Richard, Vincent; Dumas, Raphaël; Valentini, Pier Paolo; Pennestrì, Ettore; Lu, Tung-Wu; Camomilla, Valentina; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2016-06-01

    Several approaches have been used to devise a model of the human tibiofemoral joint for embedment in lower limb musculoskeletal models. However, no study has considered the use of cadaveric 6 × 6 compliance (or stiffness) matrices to model the tibiofemoral joint under normal or pathological conditions. The aim of this paper is to present a method to determine the compliance matrix of an ex vivo tibiofemoral joint for any given equilibrium pose. Experiments were carried out on a single ex vivo knee, first intact and, then, with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) transected. Controlled linear and angular displacements were imposed in single degree-of-freedom (DoF) tests to the specimen, and the resulting forces and moments were measured using an instrumented robotic arm. This was done starting from seven equilibrium poses characterized by the following flexion angles: 0 deg, 15 deg, 30 deg, 45 deg, 60 deg, 75 deg, and 90 deg. A compliance matrix for each of the selected equilibrium poses and for both the intact and ACL-deficient specimen was calculated. The matrix, embedding the experimental load-displacement relationship of the examined DoFs, was calculated using a linear least squares inversion based on a QR decomposition, assuming symmetric and positive-defined matrices. Single compliance matrix terms were in agreement with the literature. Results showed an overall increase of the compliance matrix terms due to the ACL transection (2.6 ratio for rotational terms at full extension) confirming its role in the joint stabilization. Validation experiments were carried out by performing a Lachman test (the tibia is pulled forward) under load control on both the intact and ACL-deficient knee and assessing the difference (error) between measured linear and angular displacements and those estimated using the appropriate compliance matrix. This error increased nonlinearly with respect to the values of the load. In particular, when an incremental posterior-anterior force

  12. Crystals, inflammation, and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Ann K

    2011-03-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) and basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals are common components of osteoarthritic joint fluids and tissues. Why these crystals form and how they contribute to joint damage in osteoarthritis remain unclear. With renewed interest in inflammation as a key component of osteoarthritis the role of calcium-containing crystals in this common disease warrants re-examination. There is ample evidence supporting a pathogenic role for inflammation in osteoarthritis, and the innate immune system likely participates in this inflammatory process. Recent work reinforces the almost universal existence of calcium-containing crystals in tissues from patients with end-stage osteoarthritis. Calcium-containing crystals may contribute to inflammation in osteoarthritis tissues through their direct interactions with components of the innate immune system, as well as by inducing or amplifying other inflammatory signals. There is increasing evidence that calcium-containing crystals contribute to osteoarthritis and their inflammatory properties may mediate detrimental effects through innate immunity signals. Calcium-containing crystals may thus represent important therapeutic targets in osteoarthritis.

  13. Genetics of digital osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michou, Laëtitia

    2011-07-01

    Genetic factors contribute to the development of digital osteoarthritis, whose heritability has been estimated at 48 to 65%. Among the manifestations of digital osteoarthritis, only Heberden's nodes are transmitted by Mendelian inheritance, as a dominant trait in women and a recessive trait in men. The other forms of digital osteoarthritis are multifactorial, with a major gene and a residual multifactorial component that probably interacts with environmental factors. Hindrances to molecular studies include the absence to date of a universally accepted definition of the phenotype and the late onset of the manifestations. Genetic association studies of selected class I and II HLA genes produced conflicting results. The T303M polymorphism of the MATN3 gene, which was initially described as associated with hand osteoarthritis, may be more closely linked to trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis than to digital osteoarthritis. Genome-wide scans have identified numerous loci linked to digital osteoarthritis. Replication has been achieved for some of these loci, most notably those located at 2p, 2q, 3p, 4q, and 7p. A recently published genome-wide association study showed that an A2BP1 gene polymorphism was significantly associated with hand osteoarthritis. Many candidate-gene studies found associations with AGC1, ASPN, ENPP1, HFE, KL, VDR, IL-1 cluster, and IL-6, although the results were not consistently reproducible. In one study, women with hand osteoarthritis had significant telomere shortening. Telomere shortening has also been reported in other age-related conditions. Copyright © 2010 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Patellofemoral and tibiofemoral forces during knee extension: simulations to strength training and rehabilitation exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Rico Bini

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Limited evidence has been shown on ways to optimize the mechanical design of machines in order to minimize knee loads. Objective: This study compared six computer simulated models of open kinetic knee extension exercises for patellofemoral pressure and tibiofemoral forces. Methods: A musculoskeletal model of the lower limb was developed using six different cam radius to change resistive forces. A default machine, a constant cam radius, a torque-angle model, a free-weight model and two optimized models were simulated. Optimized models reduced cam radius at target knee flexion angles to minimize knee forces. Cam radius, human force, tibiofemoral compressive and shear force, and patellofemoral pressure were compared for the six models using data from five knee flexion angles. Results: Large reductions in cam radius comparing the free-weight model to other models (73-180% were limited to the large human force for the constant cam model to other models (9-36%. Larger human force (13 -36% was estimated to perform knee extension using a constant cam radius compared other models without large effects in knee joint forces. Conclusion: Changes in cam design effected human without a potential impact in knee loads.

  15. Dynamic and static knee alignment at baseline predict structural abnormalities on MRI associated with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis after 2 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Armaghan; van Dieёn, Jaap H; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Baert, Isabel A C; Faber, Gert S; Luyten, Frank P; Verschueren, Sabine M P

    2017-09-01

    Dynamic and static varus alignment, both, have been reported as risk factors associated with structural progression of knee osteoarthritis. However the association of none of the static and dynamic alignment with structural, clinical, and functional progression associated with knee osteoarthritis has not been assessed yet in a longitudinal study. Forty-seven women with early and established medial knee osteoarthritis were evaluated. Static and dynamic alignment as well as MRI detected structural features, clinical, and functional characteristics of patients were assessed at baseline and at 2 years follow-up. Associations between baseline static and dynamic alignment with structural, functional, and clinical characteristics at the time of entry, as well as the changes over 2 years were evaluated. Both static and dynamic varus alignment at baseline were significantly associated with osteoarthritis related tibio-femoral joint structural abnormalities detected on MRI, at the time of entry. Only the magnitude of varus thrust at baseline was predictive of the changes in the presence of meniscal maceration over two years. None of the static or dynamic measures of knee joint alignment were associated with clinical characteristics associated with medial knee osteoarthritis. The key finding of this study is that both frontal plane dynamic and static alignment, are associated with structural abnormalities in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Genetics of Osteoarthritis: What a Pain!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Kerkhof (Hanneke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOsteoarthritis (OA) is a common, chronic disabling disease characterized by pain and disability, affecting mainly the elderly population. The American College of Rheumatology defined OA as “a heterogeneous group of conditions that lead to joint symptoms and signs which are associated

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of osteoarthritis in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innes, J.

    1995-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (also known as osteoarthrosis or degenerative joint disease) is a term covering a broad spectrum of poorly understood joint disorders. Although it is preferable to think of osteoarthritis as a disease process with a variety of initiating factors, it may, for the purposes of this article, be defined as a disorder of synovial joints characterised by aberrant repair and eventual degeneration of articular cartilage and also by the formation of new bone at the articular margins, sclerosis of subchondral bone and variable low grade synovial inflammation. While the apophyseal joints of the spine can also be affected, the association between osteoarthritis of these joints, disc disease and the clinical signs is unclear. Discussion will, therefore, be limited to the joints of the appendicular skeleton

  18. Contact sport and osteoarthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Molloy, Michael G

    2011-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease in the world and the single largest cause of disability for those over 18 years. It affects more than twice as many people as does cardiac disease, and increases in incidence and prevalence with age. Animal and human studies have shown no evidence of increased risk of hip or knee OA with moderate exercise and in the absence of traumatic injury, sporting activity has a protective effect. One age-matched case control study found recreational runners who ran 12-14 miles per week for up to 40 years had no increase in radiological or symptomatic hip or knee OA. However, higher rates of hip OA occur in contact sports than in age-matched controls, with the highest rate in professional players. Soccer players with torn anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) are more likely to develop knee OA than those with intact ACL. Early ACL repair reduces the risk of knee OA, but does not prevent it. Established injury prevention programmes have been refined to prevent injuries such as ACL rupture.

  19. Knee Joint Contact Mechanics during Downhill Gait and its Relationship with Varus/Valgus Motion and Muscle Strength in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Voycheck, Carrie A.; Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Tashman, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this exploratory study was to evaluate tibiofemoral joint contact point excursions and velocities during downhill gait and assess the relationship between tibiofemoral joint contact mechanics with frontal-plane knee joint motion and lower extremity muscle weakness in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Dynamic stereo X-ray was used to quantify tibiofemoral joint contact mechanics and frontal-plane motion during the loading response phase of downhill gait in 11 patients with knee OA and 11 control volunteers. Quantitative testing of the quadriceps and the hip abductor muscles was also performed. Group differences in contact mechanics and frontal-plane motion excursions were compared using analysis of covariance with adjustments for body mass index. Differences in strength were compared using independent sample t-tests. Additionally, linear associations between contact mechanics with frontal-plane knee motion and muscle strength were evaluated using Pearson's correlation coefficients. Results Patients with knee OA demonstrated larger medial/lateral joint contact point excursions (pvarus motion excursions (pvarus motion excursions (p<0.04) but not with quadriceps or hip abductor strength. Conclusion Altered contact mechanics in patients with knee OA may be related to compromised frontal-plane joint stability but not with deficits in muscle strength. PMID:27030846

  20. Knee joint contact mechanics during downhill gait and its relationship with varus/valgus motion and muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Voycheck, Carrie A; Gustafson, Jonathan A; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Tashman, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this exploratory study was to evaluate tibiofemoral joint contact point excursions and velocities during downhill gait and assess the relationship between tibiofemoral joint contact mechanics with frontal-plane knee joint motion and lower extremity muscle weakness in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Dynamic stereo X-ray was used to quantify tibiofemoral joint contact mechanics and frontal-plane motion during the loading response phase of downhill gait in 11 patients with knee OA and 11 control volunteers. Quantitative testing of the quadriceps and the hip abductor muscles was also performed. Patients with knee OA demonstrated larger medial/lateral joint contact point excursions (p knee OA compared to their control counterparts (p = 0.02). Additionally, patients with knee OA demonstrated significantly increased frontal-plane varus motion excursions (p knee OA were linearly associated with greater frontal-plane varus motion excursions (p knee OA may be related to compromised frontal-plane joint stability but not with deficits in muscle strength.

  1. Concurrent prediction of muscle and tibiofemoral contact forces during treadmill gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guess, Trent M; Stylianou, Antonis P; Kia, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    Detailed knowledge of knee kinematics and dynamic loading is essential for improving the design and outcomes of surgical procedures, tissue engineering applications, prosthetics design, and rehabilitation. This study used publicly available data provided by the "Grand Challenge Competition to Predict in-vivo Knee Loads" for the 2013 American Society of Mechanical Engineers Summer Bioengineering Conference (Fregly et al., 2012, "Grand Challenge Competition to Predict in vivo Knee Loads," J. Orthop. Res., 30, pp. 503-513) to develop a full body, musculoskeletal model with subject specific right leg geometries that can concurrently predict muscle forces, ligament forces, and knee and ground contact forces. The model includes representation of foot/floor interactions and predicted tibiofemoral joint loads were compared to measured tibial loads for two different cycles of treadmill gait. The model used anthropometric data (height and weight) to scale the joint center locations and mass properties of a generic model and then used subject bone geometries to more accurately position the hip and ankle. The musculoskeletal model included 44 muscles on the right leg, and subject specific geometries were used to create a 12 degrees-of-freedom anatomical right knee that included both patellofemoral and tibiofemoral articulations. Tibiofemoral motion was constrained by deformable contacts defined between the tibial insert and femoral component geometries and by ligaments. Patellofemoral motion was constrained by contact between the patellar button and femoral component geometries and the patellar tendon. Shoe geometries were added to the feet, and shoe motion was constrained by contact between three shoe segments per foot and the treadmill surface. Six-axis springs constrained motion between the feet and shoe segments. Experimental motion capture data provided input to an inverse kinematics stage, and the final forward dynamics simulations tracked joint angle errors for the left

  2. New perspectives on osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddis, C V

    1996-02-26

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common rheumatologic disease, afflicting tens of millions of U.S. citizens. It is not an inevitable consequence of aging; rather, it is a degenerative process acquired because of metabolic, mechanical, genetic, and other influences. It is characterized by progressive loss of cartilage and bony overgrowth. Because cartilage is not innervated, the pain of OA arises from secondary effects, such as joint capsule distention, stretching of periosteal nerve endings, and, possibly, synovial inflammation. Psychologic factors, including stress and depression, may influence the perception of pain by OA patients. The risk of OA apparently is not increased by normal joint use, but persons who participate in competitive sports or who play with abnormal or injured joints are at increased risk. Obesity increases OA risk, and weight loss has been found to decrease it. Some forms of premature OA appear to be inherited. The objective diagnosis of OA is made on the basis of radiography. However, many individuals with radiographic evidence of OA are asymptomatic in the affected joint. It is essential to ensure that pain in the affected joint is attributable to OA and not another cause. The management of OA should include physical medicine measures such as heat or cold therapy and often neglected environmental measures, such as reducing chair height and using shoe orthotics. Therapeutic exercise is beneficial for many patients and includes an initial warm-up with range of motion, muscle strengthening, and aerobic activity (such as swimming). A major question in the pharmacologic management of OA is whether nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are superior to analgesics in terms of symptomatic relief; studies indicate that they are not. The question is relevant because of the adverse effects of NSAID use, particularly in the elderly population.

  3. Acupuncture for peripheral joint osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manheimer, Eric; Cheng, K.; Linde, Klaus; Lao, Lixing; Yoo, Junghee; Wieland, Susan; van der Windt, Daniëlle Awm; Berman, Brian M.; Bouter, Lex M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peripheral joint osteoarthritis is a major cause of pain and functional limitation. Few treatments are safe and effective. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of acupuncture for treating peripheral joint osteoarthritis. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of

  4. Knee extensor strength and risk of structural, symptomatic and functional decline in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Culvenor, Adam G; Ruhdorfer, Anja; Juhl, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    -analysis revealed that lower knee extensor strength was associated with an increased risk of symptomatic (WOMAC-Pain: odds ratio [OR] 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10, 1.67) and functional decline (WOMAC-Function: OR 1.38, 95%CI 1.00, 1.89; chair-stand task: OR 1.03, 95%CI 1.03, 1.04), but not increased risk......OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the association between knee extensor strength and the risk of structural, symptomatic, or functional deterioration in individuals with or at risk of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). METHODS: We systematically identified and methodologically...... appraised all longitudinal studies (≥1-year follow-up) reporting an association between knee extensor strength and structural (tibiofemoral, patellofemoral), symptomatic (self-reported, knee replacement), or functional (subjective, objective) decline in individuals with or at risk of radiographic...

  5. Differences in zinc status between patients with osteoarthritis and osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovesen, Janne; Møller-Madsen, Bjarne; Nielsen, Poul Torben

    2009-01-01

    Zinc has been suggested to play an important role in the development of osteoporosis, whereas the influence of zinc on osteoarthritis has attracted much less attention. The aim of the study was to investigate and compare the zinc status and bone turnover, density, and biomechanical properties...... of osteoarthritic and osteoporotic patients. The study comprised 40 women who underwent hip replacement due to osteoarthritis or osteoporosis. Serum and urine zinc content, and bone resorption markers and serum bone formation markers were determined. The unaffected hip and the exarticulated affected femoral head...... that osteoporosis and osteoarthritis rarely occur in the same individual....

  6. Early knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favero, Marta; Ramonda, Roberta; Goldring, Mary B; Goldring, Steven R; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Concepts regarding osteoarthritis, the most common joint disease, have dramatically changed in the past decade thanks to the development of new imaging techniques and the widespread use of arthroscopy that permits direct visualisation of intra-articular tissues and structure. MRI and ultrasound allow the early detection of pre-radiographic structural changes not only in the peri-articular bone but also in the cartilage, menisci, synovial membrane, ligaments and fat pad. The significance of MRI findings such as cartilage defects, bone marrow lesions, synovial inflammation/effusions and meniscal tears in patients without radiographic signs of osteoarthritis is not fully understood. Nevertheless, early joint tissue changes are associated with symptoms and, in some cases, with progression of disease. In this short review, we discuss the emerging concept of early osteoarthritis localised to the knee based on recently updated knowledge. We highlight the need for a new definition of early osteoarthritis that will permit the identification of patients at high risk of osteoarthritis progression and to initiate early treatment interventions.

  7. Limited educational attainment and radiographic and symptomatic knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional analysis using data from the Johnston County (North Carolina) Osteoarthritis Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Leigh F; Shreffler, Jack; Siaton, Bernadette C; Helmick, Charles G; Schoster, Britta; Schwartz, Todd A; Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Renner, Jordan B; Jordan, Joanne M

    2010-01-01

    Applying a cross-sectional analysis to a sample of 2,627 African-American and Caucasian adults aged > or = 45 years from the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, we studied the association between educational attainment and prevalence of radiographic knee osteoarthritis and symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Age- and race-adjusted associations between education and osteoarthritis outcomes were assessed by gender-stratified logistic regression models, with additional models adjusting for body mass index, knee injury, smoking, alcohol use, and occupational factors. In an analysis of all participants, low educational attainment (educational attainment had 50% higher odds of having radiographic knee osteoarthritis and 65% higher odds of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis compared with those with higher educational attainment (> or = 12 years), by using fully adjusted models. In the subset of postmenopausal women, these associations tended to be weaker but little affected by adjustment for hormone replacement therapy. Men with low educational attainment had 85% higher odds of having symptomatic knee osteoarthritis by using fully adjusted models, but the association with radiographic knee osteoarthritis was explained by age. After adjustment for known risk factors, educational attainment, as an indicator of socioeconomic status, is associated with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis in both men and women and with radiographic knee osteoarthritis in women.

  8. Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS): Longitudinal MRI-based whole joint assessment of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Frank W; Frobell, Richard; Lohmander, L Stefan; Niu, Jingbo; Guermazi, Ali

    2014-05-01

    To develop a whole joint scoring system, the Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS), for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based assessment of acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and follow-up of structural sequelae, and to assess its reliability. Baseline and follow-up 1.5 T MRI examinations from 20 patients of the KANON study, a randomized controlled study comparing a surgical and non-surgical treatment strategy, were assessed for up to six longitudinal visits using a novel MRI scoring system incorporating acute structural tissue damage and longitudinal changes including osteoarthritis (OA) features. Joint features assessed were acute osteochondral injury, traumatic and degenerative bone marrow lesions (BMLs), meniscus morphology and extrusion, osteophytes, collateral and cruciate ligaments including ACL graft, Hoffa-synovitis and effusion-synovitis. Cross-sectional (baseline) and longitudinal (all time points and change) intra- and inter-observer reliability was calculated using weighted (w) kappa statistics and overall percent agreement on a compartmental basis (medial tibio-femoral, lateral tibio-femoral, patello-femoral). Altogether 87 time points were evaluated. Intra-observer reliability ranged between 0.52 (baseline, Hoffa-synovitis) and 1.00 (several features), percent agreement between 52% (all time points, Hoffa-synovitis) and 100% (several features). Inter-observer reliability ranged between 0.00 and 1.00, which is explained by low frequency of some of the features. Altogether, 73% of all assessed 142 parameters showed w-kappa values between 0.80 and 1.00 and 92% showed agreement above 80%. ACLOAS allows reliable scoring of acute ACL injury and longitudinal changes. This novel scoring system incorporates features that may be relevant for structural outcome not covered by established OA scoring instruments. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Glucosamine and chondroitin use in canines for osteoarthritis: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Bhathal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is a slowly progressive and debilitating disease that affects canines of all breeds. Pain and decreased mobility resulting from osteoarthritis often have a negative impact on the affected canine’s quality of life, level of comfort, daily functioning, activity, behaviour, and client-pet companionship. Despite limited and conflicting evidence, the natural products glucosamine hydrochloride (HCl and chondroitin sulfate are commonly recommended by veterinarians for treating osteoarthritis in dogs. There is a paucity of well-designed clinical veterinary studies investigating the true treatment effect of glucosamine and chondroitin. The purposes of this review article are to provide a brief background on glucosamine and chondroitin use in canine osteoarthritis and to critically review the available literature on the role of these products for improving clinical outcomes. Based on critical review, recommendations for practice are suggested and a future study design is proposed.

  10. Meniscal Allograft Transplantation Does Not Prevent or Delay Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis.

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    Catherine Van Der Straeten

    Full Text Available Meniscal tears are common knee injuries. Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT has been advocated to alleviate symptoms and delay osteoarthritis (OA after meniscectomy. We investigated (1 the long-term outcome of MAT as a treatment of symptomatic meniscectomy, (2 most important factors affecting survivorship and (3 OA progression.From 1989 till 2013, 329 MAT were performed in 313 patients. Clinical and radiographic results and MAT survival were evaluated retrospectively. Failure was defined as conversion to knee arthroplasty (KA or total removal of the MAT.Mean age at surgery was 33 years (15-57; 60% were males. No-to-mild cartilage damage was found in 156 cases, moderate-to-severe damage in 130. Simultaneous procedures in 118 patients included cartilage procedures, osteotomy or ACL-reconstruction. At a mean follow-up of 6.8 years (0.2-24.3years, 5 patients were deceased and 48 lost (14.6%, 186 MAT were in situ (56.5% whilst 90 (27.4% had been removed, including 63 converted to a KA (19.2%. Cumulative allograft survivorship was 15.1% (95% CI:13.9-16.3 at 24.0 years. In patients <35 years at surgery, survival was significantly better (24.1% compared to ≥35 years (8.0% (p = 0.017. In knees with no-to-mild cartilage damage more allografts survived (43.0% compared to moderate-to-severe damage (6.6% (p = 0.003. Simultaneous osteotomy significantly deteriorated survival (0% at 24.0 years (p = 0.010. 61% of patients underwent at least one additional surgery (1-11 for clinical symptoms after MAT. Consecutive radiographs showed significant OA progression at a mean of 3.8 years (p<0.0001. Incremental Kellgren-Lawrence grade was +1,1 grade per 1000 days (2,7yrs.MAT did not delay or prevent tibiofemoral OA progression. 19.2% were converted to a knee prosthesis at a mean of 10.3 years. Patients younger than 35 with no-to-mild cartilage damage may benefit from MAT for relief of symptoms (survivorship 51.9% at 20.2 years, but patients and healthcare payers

  11. Epidemiology of osteoarthritis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Sakeba N; Sharma, Leena

    2006-02-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis and is a leading cause of disability in the elderly. Given the anticipated increase in osteoarthritis prevalence, the need to identify risk factors for incident osteoarthritis, osteoarthritis progression, osteoarthritis-associated physical function decline, and disability is an especially high priority. Findings have implicated several factors, including genetic factors, aging, joint deformity and injury, obesity, and hormonal deficiencies in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. Recent studies have identified risk factors associated with progression of the disease including varus-valgus alignment, bone marrow edema lesions, varus thrust, a reduced hip abduction moment, and obesity. Predictors of function decline in osteoarthritis include lower self-efficacy, knee laxity, less aerobic exercise, worse joint proprioception, and greater knee pain.

  12. Osteoarthritis in the neonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weigel, W.; Hayek, W.H.; Bens, G.

    1979-01-01

    A fatally ending index case of sepsis osteoarthritis that was diagnosed retrospectively initiated this report. This patient had severe, asymmetrically distributed metaphyseal growthdisturbances, many long bones. In order to determine the features of early radiologic diagnosis we report the findings of 7 further patients with neonatal septic osteoarthritis with clinical and radiological follow-up. The most important observation for early radiologic diagnosis of osteoarthritis is the displacement of fat layers along the metaphysis. Other findings of the soft tissues have the same diagnostic value as bone destruction and subperiosteal new bone formation found one to three weeks later on roentgenfilms. Detecting early signs of osteoarthritis helps in localizing the focus for bacteriologic diagnosis, which is to be more successful than blood cultures. Diagnosing a joint empyema initiates surgical intervention for pressure relief in order to avoid necrosis of the epiphysis as seen in the femoral bone in septic arthritis of the hip joint. Early diagnosis and treatment to destruction of growing cartilage is necessary to avoid gross disturbances and length discrepancies of long bones. In cases of sepsis called 'babygram' and a repeat examination 10 to 14 days later is mandatory. (orig.) [de

  13. MULLIGANS MOBILISATION WITH MOVEMENT ( MWM RELIEVES PAIN AND IMPROVES FUNCTIONAL STATUS IN OSTEOARTHRITIS KNEE

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    Reepa Avichal Ughreja

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are several manual therapy techniques for limited and painful knee flexion, but there are very few evidence about the effectiveness of Mulligan’s Mobilisation With Movement (MWM in osteoarthritis of the knee. The objective of the study was to find the effect of MWM on pain and functional status in patients with osteoarthritis knee. Methods: 30 patients diagnosed with medial compartment tibiofemoral osteoarthritis of the knee were randomized into two groups ( experimental and control groups with 15 subjects in each group.The experimental group received medial glide MWM and medial rotation glide MWM in weight bearing and non-weight bearing positions after which the patients were asked to walk for a while. Conventional therapy in the form of shortwave diathermy (SWD, quadriceps strengthening and stretching of the calf and hamstrings was given to both the experimental and the control group. The intervention regimen lasted for seven days. Outcome measures were WOMAC score, VAS score and distance walked in 6-minute walk test. Result: The study showed significant improvement in VAS (p<0.05 in control group, p<0.001 in experimental group , WOMAC scale(p<0.05 in control group, p<0.001 in experimental group and distance walked in 6 minutes(p<0.05 in control group, p<0.001 in experimental group in both the groups, but all these improvements were highly significant in experimental group ( p< 0.001 than those in the control group. Conclusion: Mulligan’s MWM is significantly effective in relieving pain and improving functional status in osteoarthritis of the knee.

  14. Osteoarthritis Prevalence Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Systematic Review and Numbers-Needed-to-Treat Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luc, Brittney; Gribble, Phillip A.; Pietrosimone, Brian G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prophylactic capability of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in decreasing the risk of knee osteoarthritis (OA) when compared with ACL-deficient patients, as well as the effect of a concomitant meniscectomy. We also sought to examine the influence of study design, publication date, and graft type as well as the magnitude of change in physical activity from preinjury Tegner scores in both cohorts. Data Sources: We searched Web of Science and PubMed databases from 1960 through 2012 with the search terms osteoarthritis, meniscectomy, anterior cruciate ligament, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and anterior cruciate ligament deficient. Study Selection: Articles that reported the prevalence of tibiofemoral or patellofemoral OA based on radiographic assessment were included. We calculated numbers needed to treat and relative risk reduction with associated 95% confidence intervals for 3 groups (1) patients with meniscal and ACL injury, (2) patients with isolated ACL injury, and (3) total patients (groups 1 and 2). Data Extraction: A total of 38 studies met the criteria. Of these, 27 assessed the presence of tibiofemoral osteoarthritis in patients treated with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Data Synthesis: Overall, ACL reconstruction (ACL-R) yielded a numbers needed to treat to harm of 16 with a relative risk increase of 16%. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction along with meniscectomy yielded a numbers needed to treat to benefit of 15 and relative risk reduction of 11%. Isolated ACL-R showed a numbers needed to treat to harm of 8 and relative risk increase of 43%. Activity levels were decreased in both ACL-R (d = −0.90; 95% confidence interval = 0.77, 1.13) and ACL-deficient (d = −1.13; 95% confidence interval = 0.96, 1.29) patients after injury. Conclusions: The current literature does not provide substantial evidence to suggest that ACL-R is an adequate intervention to prevent knee osteoarthritis

  15. Estimation of the forces acting on the tibiofemoral joint during knee extension exercises

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    Rodrigo Rico Bini

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2008v10n1p35 The objectives of this study were to: (1 evaluate the resistive torque of an open kinetic chain strength-training machine for performing knee extensions, and (2 perform an analysis estimating internal forces in the tibiofemoral joint. During a fi rst phase of the study, measurements were taken of the machine under analysis (external forces, and then calculations were performed to estimate forces on the lower limb (internal forces. Equations were defi ned to calculate human force (HF, and the moment of muscular force (MMF. Perpendicular muscular force (MFp and joint force (JFp, axial muscular force (MF” and joint force (JF”, and total muscular force (MF and joint force (JF were all calculated. Five knee angles were analyzed (zero, 30, 45, 60, and 90 degrees. A reduction was observed in HF at higher knee angles, while MF and JF also increased at the same time. HF was always lower than the load selected on the machine, which indicates a reduced overload imposed by the machine. The reduction observed in MFp and JFp at higher knee angles indicates a lower tendency to shear the tibia in relation to the femur. At the same time, there was an increase in JF” due to higher MF”. The biomechanical model proposed in this study has shown itself adequate for the day-to-day needs of professionals who supervise orient strength training.

  16. In vivo cartilage contact deformation in the healthy human tibiofemoral joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, J T; Papannagari, R; Van de Velde, S K; Gross, C; Gill, T J; Felson, D T; Rubash, H E; Li, G

    2008-11-01

    In vivo cartilage contact deformation is instrumental for understanding human joint function and degeneration. This study measured the total deformation of contacting articular cartilage in the human tibiofemoral joint during in vivo weight-bearing flexion. Eleven healthy knees were magnetic resonance (MR) scanned and imaged with a dual fluoroscopic system while the subject performed a weight-bearing single-leg lunge. The tibia, femur and associated articulating cartilage were constructed from the MR images and combined with the dual fluoroscopic images to determine in vivo cartilage contact deformation from full extension to 120 degrees of flexion. In both compartments, minimum peak compartmental contact deformation occurred at 30 degrees of flexion (24 +/- 6% medial, 17 +/- 7% lateral) and maximum peak compartmental deformation occurred at 120 degrees of flexion (30 +/- 13% medial, 30 +/- 10% lateral) during the weight-bearing flexion from full extension to 120 degrees. Average medial contact areas and peak contact deformations were significantly greater than lateral compartment values (P In addition, cartilage thickness in regions of contact was on average 1.4- and 1.1-times thicker than the average thickness of the tibial and femoral cartilage surfaces, respectively (P line knowledge for investigating the effects of various knee injuries on joint contact biomechanics and the aetiology of cartilage degeneration.

  17. Squatting-Related Tibiofemoral Shear Reaction Forces and a Biomechanical Rationale for Femoral Component Loosening

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    Ashvin Thambyah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous gait studies on squatting have described a rapid reversal in the direction of the tibiofemoral joint shear reaction force when going into a full weight-bearing deep knee flexion squat. The effects of such a shear reversal have not been considered with regard to the loading demand on knee implants in patients whose activities of daily living require frequent squatting. In this paper, the shear reversal effect is discussed and simulated in a finite element knee implant-bone model, to evaluate the possible biomechanical significance of this effect on femoral component loosening of high flexion implants as reported in the literature. The analysis shows that one of the effects of the shear reversal was a switch between large compressive and large tensile principal strains, from knee extension to flexion, respectively, in the region of the anterior flange of the femoral component. Together with the known material limits of cement and bone, this large mismatch in strains as a function of knee position provides new insight into how and why knee implants may fail in patients who perform frequent squatting.

  18. Management of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, L G

    2001-11-01

    To review the classification, epidemiology, pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, and medical management of osteoarthritis. Selected studies, review articles, rheumatology primers, and clinical practice guidelines. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis and the second most common cause of long-term disability among adults in the United States. It is a heterogeneous condition causing pathogenic changes that are presumably irreversible; it should not be considered part of "normal aging." Medical management of OA includes various treatment modalities and should be based on the distribution and severity of joint involvement, as well as the presence of comorbid conditions. Treatment goals include decreasing stress on involved joints, limiting physical disability, maintaining or improving function, reducing pain, and avoiding drug toxicity.

  19. OSTEOARTHRITIS AND OBESITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Strebkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review highlights the impact of obesity on the development, progression, and severity of osteoarthritis (OA and discusses treatments for obesity in this disease. Weight loss in obese patients with OA is shown to lead to a reduction in clinical manifestations. Despite a great deal of performed investigations of the impact of non-drug therapy for obesity (diet, physical activity, their results are contradictory and call for further investigation

  20. Frontal plane kinematics in walking with moderate hip osteoarthritis: stability and fall risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, X.B.; Meijer, O.G.; Lin, J.H.; Wu, W.H.; Lin, X.C.; Liang, B.W.; van Dieen, J.H.; Bruijn, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hip abductor weakness and unilateral pain in patients with moderate hip osteoarthritis may induce changes in frontal plane kinematics during walking that could affect stability and fall risk. Methods In 12 fall-prone patients with moderate hip osteoarthritis, 12 healthy peers, and 12

  1. Unloading shoes for osteoarthritis of the knee: protocol for the SHARK randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinman, Rana S; Wrigley, Tim V; Metcalf, Ben R; Hunter, David J; Campbell, Penny; Paterson, Kade; Staples, Margaret P; Bennell, Kim L

    2014-02-21

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a common and disabling condition. Abnormalities in knee loading play an important role in disease pathogenesis, yet there are few non-surgical treatments for knee OA capable of reducing knee load. This two-arm randomised controlled trial is investigating the efficacy of specially-designed unloading shoes for the treatment of symptoms in people with knee OA. 164 people with symptomatic medial tibiofemoral joint OA will be recruited from the community and randomly allocated to receive either unloading shoes or control shoes. Unloading shoes have a specially-designed triple-density midsole where the medial side is softer than normal and the lateral side harder as well as a lateral wedge between the sole and sock-liner. Control shoes are standard athletic shoes and do not contain these features. Participants will be blinded to shoe allocation and will be instructed to wear the shoes as much as possible every day for 6 months, for a minimum of 4 hours per day. The primary outcomes are knee pain (numerical rating scale) and self-reported physical function (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index) measured at baseline and 6 months. Secondary outcomes include additional measures of knee pain, knee stiffness, participant global ratings of change in symptoms, quality-of-life and physical activity. The findings from this study will help determine whether specially-designed unloading shoes are efficacious in the management of knee OA. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry reference: ACTRN12613000851763.

  2. Peculiarities of osteoarthritis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Drahulian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Was received model of osteoarthritis in the rat line Wistar, by a one-time injection of CH3COOI acid into the knee joint. There changes in joint studied histological and clinical methods.On the 7-th day of the experiment was installed resemblance to similar changes in the joints of humans with acquired osteoarthritis

  3. Osteoarthritis 2012 year in review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Juhl, C B

    2012-01-01

    search was performed in Medline from July 2011 to 10 April 2012 using the terms 'osteoarthritis, knee', 'osteoarthritis, hip' rehabilitation, physical therapy, exercise therapy and preoperative intervention; both as text words and as MeSH terms where possible. Trials evaluating rehabilitation...

  4. Osteoarthritis : the role of synovitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortekaas, Marion Catharina

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a prevalent disease causing pain and disability. It’s aetiology is unknown and no curative treatment is available. Osteoarthritis research is complicated due to heterogeneity of the disease, slow progression and poor association of clinical features with radiographic

  5. Osteoarthritis, obesity and weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Henning; Leeds, A R; Christensen, Robin Daniel Kjersgaard

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is widely acknowledged as a risk factor for both the incidence and progression of osteoarthritis, and has a negative influence on outcomes. Loss of at least 10% of body weight, coupled with exercise, is recognized as a cornerstone in the management of obese patients with osteoarthritis...

  6. Variations in medial-lateral hamstring force and force ratio influence tibiofemoral kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalhoub, Sami; Fitzwater, Fallon G; Cyr, Adam J; Maletsky, Lorin P

    2016-10-01

    A change in hamstring strength and activation is typically seen after injuries or invasive surgeries such as anterior cruciate reconstruction or total knee replacement. While many studies have investigated the influence of isometric increases in hamstring load on knee joint kinematics, few have quantified the change in kinematics due to a variation in medial to lateral hamstring force ratio. This study examined the changes in knee joint kinematics on eight cadaveric knees during an open-chain deep knee bend for six different loading configurations: five loaded hamstring configurations that varied the ratio of a total load of 175 N between the semimembranosus and biceps femoris and one with no loads on the hamstring. The anterior-posterior translation of the medial and lateral femoral condyles' lowest points along proximal-distal axis of the tibia, the axial rotation of the tibia, and the quadriceps load were measured at each flexion angle. Unloading the hamstring shifted the medial and lateral lowest points posteriorly and increased tibial internal rotation. The influence of unloading hamstrings on quadriceps load was small in early flexion and increased with knee flexion. The loading configuration with the highest lateral hamstrings force resulted in the most posterior translation of the medial lowest point, most anterior translation of the lateral lowest point, and the highest tibial external rotation of the five loading configurations. As the medial hamstring force ratio increased, the medial lowest point shifted anteriorly, the lateral lowest point shifted posteriorly, and the tibia rotated more internally. The results of this study, demonstrate that variation in medial-lateral hamstrings force and force ratio influence tibiofemoral transverse kinematics and quadriceps loads required to extend the knee. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1707-1715, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by

  7. What's new in osteoarthritis pathogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G

    2016-02-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading musculoskeletal cause of disability in the Western society. Despite this, it is still difficult to gain a precise definition of what osteoarthritis actually is. The methods used for the study are narrative review and viewpoint focussing on the knee. It is well known that there is a modest correlation between X-ray changes and pain. Improvements in imaging have shown that osteoarthritis should be regarded as an umbrella term for a number of pathophysiological processes leading to pain and/or cartilage loss. If these are inside the joint (such as bone marrow lesions, cartilage defects or meniscal tear) then they can be considered osteoarthritis, while those outside the joint (such as obesity, weak muscles and vitamin D deficiency) could be considered the osteoarthritis syndrome. These improvements in basic science are leading to lesion-specific therapies indicating the importance of trying to pinpoint causes of pain in the individual. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  8. Test-retest reliability of tibiofemoral joint space width measurements made using a low-dose standing CT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segal, Neil A. [University of Kansas Medical Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Mailstop 1046, Kansas City, KS (United States); The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Bergin, John; Kern, Andrew; Findlay, Christian [The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Anderson, Donald D. [The University of Iowa, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2017-02-15

    To determine the test-retest reliability of knee joint space width (JSW) measurements made using standing CT (SCT) imaging. This prospective two-visit study included 50 knees from 30 subjects (66% female; mean ± SD age 58.2 ± 11.3 years; BMI 29.1 ± 5.6 kg/m{sup 2}; 38% KL grade 0-1). Tibiofemoral geometry was obtained from bilateral, approximately 20 fixed-flexed SCT images acquired at visits 2 weeks apart. For each compartment, the total joint area was defined as the area with a JSW <10 mm. The summary measurements of interest were the percentage of the total joint area with a JSW less than 0.5-mm thresholds between 2.0 and 5.0 mm in each tibiofemoral compartment. Test-retest reliability of the summary JSW measurements was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC 2,1) for the percentage area engaged at each threshold of JSW and root-mean-square errors (RMSE) were calculated to assess reproducibility. The ICCs were excellent for each threshold assessed, ranging from 0.95 to 0.97 for the lateral and 0.90 to 0.97 for the medial compartment. RMSE ranged from 1.1 to 7.2% for the lateral and from 3.1 to 9.1% for the medial compartment, with better reproducibility at smaller JSW thresholds. The knee joint positioning protocol used demonstrated high day-to-day reliability for SCT 3D tibiofemoral JSW summary measurements repeated 2 weeks apart. Low-dose SCT provides a great deal of information about the joint while maintaining high reliability, making it a suitable alternative to plain radiographs for evaluating JSW in people with knee OA. (orig.)

  9. Test-retest reliability of tibiofemoral joint space width measurements made using a low-dose standing CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segal, Neil A.; Bergin, John; Kern, Andrew; Findlay, Christian; Anderson, Donald D.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the test-retest reliability of knee joint space width (JSW) measurements made using standing CT (SCT) imaging. This prospective two-visit study included 50 knees from 30 subjects (66% female; mean ± SD age 58.2 ± 11.3 years; BMI 29.1 ± 5.6 kg/m 2 ; 38% KL grade 0-1). Tibiofemoral geometry was obtained from bilateral, approximately 20 fixed-flexed SCT images acquired at visits 2 weeks apart. For each compartment, the total joint area was defined as the area with a JSW <10 mm. The summary measurements of interest were the percentage of the total joint area with a JSW less than 0.5-mm thresholds between 2.0 and 5.0 mm in each tibiofemoral compartment. Test-retest reliability of the summary JSW measurements was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC 2,1) for the percentage area engaged at each threshold of JSW and root-mean-square errors (RMSE) were calculated to assess reproducibility. The ICCs were excellent for each threshold assessed, ranging from 0.95 to 0.97 for the lateral and 0.90 to 0.97 for the medial compartment. RMSE ranged from 1.1 to 7.2% for the lateral and from 3.1 to 9.1% for the medial compartment, with better reproducibility at smaller JSW thresholds. The knee joint positioning protocol used demonstrated high day-to-day reliability for SCT 3D tibiofemoral JSW summary measurements repeated 2 weeks apart. Low-dose SCT provides a great deal of information about the joint while maintaining high reliability, making it a suitable alternative to plain radiographs for evaluating JSW in people with knee OA. (orig.)

  10. Kinematic change of the meniscus and the tibiofemoral joint space in asymptomatic volunteers using a wide bore 3T closed MRI system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eugene; Kim, Yeo Ju; Kim, Mi Young; Cho, Soon Gu [Inha University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Choong-gu, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jang Gyu [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dae Hyung [Inha University Hospital, Clinical Trail Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ryuh Sup [Inha University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate kinematic changes in menisci and tibiofemoral joint spaces in extension and flexion using asymptomatic volunteers using a wide-bore 3-T closed MRI system. Twenty-two knees from asymptomatic volunteers were examined in knee extension and flexion using a 3-T MRI (sagittal 2D FSE T2-weighted sequence and sagittal 3D isotropic FSE proton density-weighted cube sequence). The meniscal positions, meniscal floating and flounce were evaluated. The widths of the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joint spaces and coronal tibiofemoral angles were measured. In the anteroposterior direction, meniscal extrusion was most frequently seen in the anterior horn of the medial menisci (100 %) in extensions (maximum 6.04 mm). Most of the menisci moved significantly to the posterior side from extension to flexion. The anteroposterior meniscal movement was the greatest for the anterior horn of the medial meniscus and least for the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. In the mediolateral direction, meniscal extrusion was seen in 52 % of the medial menisci in extensions (maximum 1.91 mm) and 29 % of lateral menisci in flexions (maximum 2.36 mm). From the extension to flexion, all medial and lateral menisci moved significantly to the lateral side. Meniscal floating was frequently observed in the posterior horn of medial menisci in extension. Meniscal flounce was frequently seen in lateral menisci in flexion with a widened lateral tibiofemoral joint space gap. The coronal tibiofemoral angle showed medial wedging in flexion, but not in extension. Wide-bore 3-T closed MRI revealed significant kinematic changes in the menisci and tibiofemoral joint spaces in asymptomatic volunteers. (orig.)

  11. A STUDY ON OSTEOARTHRITIS OF KNEE JOINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayyappan Nair

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. It is a degenerative disease where, load bearing synovial joints like hip and knee are affected. Usually bilateral, highest incidence is seen after 6th decade of life. It is also common in women post - menopausal age. Osteoarthritis of knee is more common in Asian population because of lifestyle habits like squatting and sitting cross legged. The aetiology of the disease can be multifactorial but usually it is an age associated disease due to wear and tear. The two types of osteoarthritis are, Primary osteoarthritis: It is more common. This occurs in old age due to wear and tear of the joints and Secondary osteoarthritis: In this there is an underlying primary joint disease which leads to degeneration. Any age group can be affected. Predisposing factors are, congenital malformation of joint, trauma, disease involving joints, malalignment, internal derangement and obesity. A sincere effort has been put in this study to understand the Osteoarthritis complications in the elderly population. This study is intended to help the practicing fellow orthopaedicians to understand and thus treat the patient more effectively. METHODS  The study was done in the Department of Orthopaedics, Travancore Medical College at Kollam.  The study was done from June 2014 to June 2016.  Three Hundred Twenty cases who attended in the Department of Orthopaedics were taken for the study.  Detailed History and Clinical Examination was conducted.  All the statistical analysis was done using the latest SPSS software 2015 (California. RESULTS In the present study, the mean age of the population was 62.67 years with a standard deviation of 11.739 years. Crepitus was present in eighty three cases; pain was the chief complaint and was present in two hundred and thirty eight cases. Stiffness was complained in two hundred and fourteen cases and in seventy one cases the patient complained of swelling. On

  12. Musculoskeletal loading in the symptomatic and asymptomatic knees of middle-aged osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sritharan, Prasanna; Lin, Yi-Chung; Richardson, Sara E; Crossley, Kay M; Birmingham, Trevor B; Pandy, Marcus G

    2017-02-01

    This study quantified the contributions by muscles, gravity, and inertia to the tibiofemoral compartment forces in the symptomatic (SYM) and asymptomatic (ASYM) limbs of varus mal-aligned medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and compared the results with healthy controls (CON). Muscle forces and tibiofemoral compartment loads were calculated using gait data from 39 OA patients and 15 controls aged 49 ± 7 years. Patients exhibited lower knee flexion angle, higher hip abduction, and knee adduction angles, lower internal knee flexion torque but higher external knee adduction moment. Muscle forces were highest in CON except hamstrings, which was highest in SYM. ASYM muscle forces were lowest for biceps femoris short head and gastrocnemius but otherwise intermediate between SYM and CON. In all subjects, vasti, hamstrings, gastrocnemius, soleus, gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, and gravity were the largest contributors to medial compartment force (MCF). Inertial contributions were negligible. Highest MCF was found in SYM throughout stance. Small increases in contributions from hamstrings, gluteus maximus, gastrocnemius, and gravity at the first peak; soleus and rectus femoris at the second peak; and soleus, gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and gravity during mid-stance summed to produce significantly higher total MCF. Compared to CON, the ASYM limb exhibited similar peak MCF but higher mid-stance MCF. In patients, diminished non-knee-spanning muscle forces did not produce correspondingly diminished MCF contributions due to the influence of mal-alignment. Our findings emphasize consideration of muscle function, lower-limb alignment, and mid-stance loads in developing interventions for OA, and inclusion of the asymptomatic limb in clinical assessments. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:321-330, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Association of varus thrust with prevalent patellofemoral osteoarthritis: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Hirotaka; Fukutani, Naoto; Yamamoto, Yuko; Hiraoka, Masakazu; Miyanobu, Kazuyuki; Jinnouchi, Masashi; Kaneda, Eishi; Isho, Takuya; Aoyama, Tomoki; Kuroki, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2017-10-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated (i) the association of varus thrust during gait with the presence of patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA) in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) and (ii) patellar alignment in the knees with varus thrust. Participants from orthopedic clinics (n=171; mean age, 73.4 years; 71.9% female) diagnosed with radiographic medial knee OA (Kellgren/Lawrence [K/L] grade ≥1) were included in this study, and underwent gait observation for varus thrust assessment using 2D video analysis. A radiographic skyline view was used to assess the presence of medial PFOA using the grading system from the Osteoarthritis Research Society International Atlas. The tibiofemoral joint K/L grade, patellar alignment (i.e., lateral shift and tilting angle), and knee pain intensity were also evaluated as covariates. Thirty-two (18.7%) of 171 patients exhibited varus thrust and they presented significantly higher knee pain (46.0±3.04mm vs. 32.4±2.73mm; P=0.024), a lower patellar tilting angle (P=0.024), and a higher prevalence of PFOA compared with those without varus thrust. A logistic regression analysis with adjustment of covariates showed that varus thrust was significantly associated with higher odds of the presence of mixed and medial PFOA, and trended to significantly associate with any PFOA, including lateral PFOA. This indicates that varus thrust was associated with PFOA in a compartment-nonspecific manner in patients with medial knee OA. Varus thrust may represent a clinical disease feature of more advanced and multicompartmental disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Insights into osteoarthritis from MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, York Kiat; Conaghan, Philip G

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has added a new dimension to the study of osteoarthritis, a long-known degenerative joint disease with limited therapeutic options. It has advanced our understanding of joint pathophysiology and identifying that osteoarthritis as a simple 'wear and tear' process of the articular cartilage has indeed become a thing of the past. Recent work has focused on the study and validation of MRI scoring/quantification systems, as well as the identification of MRI predictors of symptoms/disease progression. The latter may serve to identify patients at greater risk for osteoarthritis disease progression to be enrolled in clinical trials. Like all imaging tools, MRI use has its associated problems. Structural changes seen in patients with osteoarthritis are often seen in asymptomatic subjects and this makes an MRI definition of osteoarthritis less straightforward. The ability to pick up multiple structural abnormalities simultaneously and high sensitivity in delineating structural changes can makes interpretation of true pathology more complicated. Although there has been much progress in the field of MRI in osteoarthritis, there remain many clinical/technical issues that need to be addressed. Until more data are obtained from clinical trials, the question of whether MRI is useful in therapeutics intervention in osteoarthritis remains unanswered. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2011 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Osteoarthritis in Football

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, Gian M.; Preiss, Stefan; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Harder, Laurent P.; Maier, Dirk; Dvorák, Jirí

    2016-01-01

    Football is currently the most popular sporting activity in the world. Multiple reports have shown that a high incidence of osteoarthritis is found in football players. Evidence clearly shows that traumatic injury significantly predisposes players for such pathophysiology. Injuries are frequent in amateur as well as professional football players, with knee and ankle accounting for the most severe injuries. Many professional athletes lose playing time due to injuries and many are forced into early retirement. Posttraumatic osteoarthritis is a common finding among ex-football players with numbers well above the normal population. Today’s surgical techniques are advanced and capable of restoring the joint to a certain extent. However, a restitution ad integrum is reached only in very rare cases. Professional football players that return to play after serious injuries perform their extremely strenuous activity on morphologically compromised joints. Incomplete rehabilitation and pressure to return to play after an injurious event clearly put the athlete at an even higher risk for joint degeneration. Prevention strategies, improved surgical management, strict rehabilitation, as well as future aspects such as early suppression of inflammation, personalized medicine, and predictive genomics DNA profiling are needed to reduce incidence and improve the health perspectives of football players. PMID:28345409

  16. [Tissue engineering and osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Clemente; Garciadiego, David; Martínez, Valentín; Velasquillo, Cristina

    2007-10-01

    Articular cartilage lesions predispose to the development of early osteoarthritis. Most current surgical techniques give rise to the formation of fibrocartilage with biochemical and biomechanical properties inferior to those or articular cartilage. Tissue engineering could offer a modern alternative to the treatment of these lesions and in this way, prevent the development of early osteoarthritis in young active patients. Different tissue engineering approaches rely on the current use of autologous chondrocytes, or the potential use of mesenchymal stem cells. Other variables rely on the type of scaffold to use such as synthetic biodegradable polymers, fibrin or collagen-derived scaffolds of different sources, bovine, porcine, rat tail, etc, in the form of gels, sponges, mesh, etc, and all of these with or without growth factors. The use of autologous chondrocytes is a reality at the present time, whether injected under a periosteum patch or seeded on collagen. However, most investigators and biotech companies are in search of onestep surgical procedures, for which reason stem cells have to be kept in mind, as well as systems that will allow arthroscopic implantation. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier España S.L Barcelona. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Videofluoroscopy Instrument to Identify the Tibiofemoral Contact Point Migration for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Follow-up: CINARTRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simini, F.; Santos, D.; Francescoli, L.

    2016-04-01

    We measure the Tibiofemoral contact point migration to offer clinicians a tool to evaluate Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction. The design of the tool includes a C arm with fluoroscopy, image acquisition and processing system, interactive software and report generation for the clinical record. The procedure samples 30 images from the videofluoroscopy describing 2 seconds movements of hanging-to-full-extension of the knee articulation. A geometrical routine implemented in the original equipment (CINARTRO) helps capture tibial plateau and femoral condile profile by interaction with the user. The tightness or looseness of the knee is expressed by the migration given in terms of movement of the femur along the tibial plateau, as a percentage. We automatically create clinical reports in standard Clinical Document Architecture or CDA format. A special phantom was developed to correct the “pin cushion effect” in Rx images. Five cases of broken ACL patients were measured giving meaningful results for clinical follow up. Tibiofemoral contact point migration was measured as 60% of the tibial plateau, with standard deviation of 6% for healthy knees, 4% when injured and 1% after reconstruction.

  18. Treatment of isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis with lateral facetectomy plus Insall's realignment procedure: long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat, Ferran; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; León, Vicens; Ginés-Cespedosa, Alberto; Rigol, Pau

    2013-11-01

    To assess the long-term results of lateral facetectomy plus Insall's realignment procedure to treat isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis. All consecutive patients undergoing this procedure with a follow-up between 10 and 14 years were included in this study. Subjects were excluded if they had previous patellar dislocation, patellar fracture, tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (except mild cases) or follow-up 14 years. Failure cases (need for total knee arthroplasty) of this surgical procedure before 10 years of follow-up were considered in the overall failure rate. Clinical, functional and radiographic outcomes were obtained at baseline and compared to postoperative values. Forty-three patients (mean (SD) age 59.7 (8.1) years) had a follow-up between 10 and 14 years and were finally included in this study. The failure rate in the whole series and included patients was 26.4 and 16.3 %, respectively, for a mean (SD) follow-up of 9.2 (3.2) years and 11.7 (1.4) years, respectively. Patellofemoral pain (p < 0.0001), need for NSAIDs (p < 0.0001), longitudinal (p < 0.0001) and transversal (p < 0.0001) patellar glide tests, Zholen's sign (p = 0.0007) and knee effusion (p = 0.02) significantly improved in the follow-up. Postoperative Knee Society Score (KSS) anatomical (p < 0.0001), functional (p < 0.0001) and total (p < 0.0001) scores and Kujala's score (p = 0.001) were significantly higher compared to preoperative values. The patellar tilt (p = 0.001) and shift (p = 0.04) significantly improved postoperatively, whereas the patellofemoral osteoarthritis was not modified (n.s.) with respect to preoperative assessment. The lateral facetectomy plus Insall's realignment procedure was a successful treatment for isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis from a clinical, functional and radiographic point of view in the long-term follow-up.

  19. Knee osteoarthritis and perceived social support amongst patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic disease affecting the lives of patients and their families, with the family characteristics moderating the illness course. The perceived social support received by a patient helps in determining the health and functionality of the patient. Methods: A cross-sectional study was ...

  20. Knee osteoarthritis and perceived social support amongst patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temitope Ilori

    2016-06-29

    Jun 29, 2016 ... Background: Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic disease affecting the lives of patients and their families, with the family characteristics moderating the illness course. The perceived social support received by a patient helps in determining the health and functionality of the patient. Methods: A cross-sectional ...

  1. Genes and mediators of inflammation and development in osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Steffan Daniël

    2010-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) mainly affects the articular cartilage covering the bones. In this thesis we investigated the relation between levels of inflammatory mediators, genes involved in their regulation and the disease status of OA. We investigated the role of genetic variation at the interleukin(IL)-1

  2. Glucosamine and Chondroitin for Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... human efficacy and toxicity. Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics. 2011;510(1):11–18. Cahlin BJ, Dahlström ... Trabado M, et al. Glucosamine sulfate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis symptoms: a randomized, double-blind, ...

  3. Definition of osteoarthritis on MRI: results of a Delphi exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, D J; Arden, N; Conaghan, P G; Eckstein, F; Gold, G; Grainger, A; Guermazi, A; Harvey, W; Jones, G; Hellio Le Graverand, M P; Laredo, J D; Lo, G; Losina, E; Mosher, T J; Roemer, F; Zhang, W

    2011-08-01

    Despite a growing body of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) literature in osteoarthritis (OA), there is little uniformity in its diagnostic application. We envisage in the first instance the definition requiring further validation and testing in the research setting before considering implementation/feasibility testing in the clinical setting. The objective of our research was to develop an MRI definition of structural OA. We undertook a multistage process consisting of a number of different steps. The intent was to develop testable definitions of OA (knee, hip and/or hand) on MRI. This was an evidence driven approach with results of a systematic review provided to the group prior to a Delphi exercise. Each participant of the steering group was allowed to submit independently up to five propositions related to key aspects in MRI diagnosis of knee OA. The steering group then participated in a Delphi exercise to reach consensus on which propositions we would recommend for a definition of structural OA on MRI. For each round of voting, ≥60% votes led to include and ≤20% votes led to exclude a proposition. After developing the proposition one of the definitions developed was tested for its validity against radiographic OA in an extant database. For the systematic review we identified 25 studies which met all of our inclusion criteria and contained relevant diagnostic measure and performance data. At the completion of the Delphi voting exercise 11 propositions were accepted for definition of structural OA on MRI. We assessed the diagnostic performance of the tibiofemoral MRI definition against a radiographic reference standard. The diagnostic performance for individual features was: osteophyte C statistic=0.61, for cartilage loss C statistic=0.73, for bone marrow lesions C statistic=0.72 and for meniscus tear in any region C statistic=0.78. The overall composite model for these four features was a C statistic=0.59. We detected good specificity (1) but less optimal

  4. Development and validation of a subject-specific moving-axis tibiofemoral joint model using MRI and EOS imaging during a quasi-static lunge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dzialo, C M; Pedersen, P H; Simonsen, C W

    2018-01-01

    The aims of this study were to introduce and validate a novel computationally-efficient subject-specific tibiofemoral joint model. Subjects performed a quasi-static lunge while micro-dose radiation bi-planar X-rays (EOS Imaging, Paris, France) were captured at roughly 0°, 20°, 45°, 60°, and 90° o...

  5. Elektra prosthesis for trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klahn, A; Nygaard, Mads; Gvozdenovic, R

    2012-01-01

    We present a prospective follow-up of 39 Elektra prostheses in 37 patients (32 women and five men), with a mean age of 56.5 (range 46-71) years; 34 patients had osteoarthritis and three had rheumatoid arthritis. Patients were followed using clinical examination, including measurement of pain on a...... be the key problem in treating trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis using a total prosthesis....

  6. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darryl Blalock

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA. Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA.

  7. Genetics of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Fontenla, Cristina; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex disease caused by the interaction of multiple genetic and environmental factors. This review focuses on the studies that have contributed to the discovery of genetic susceptibility factors in OA. The most relevant associations discovered until now are discussed in detail: GDF-5, 7q22 locus, MCF2L, DOT1L, NCOA3 and also some important findings from the arcOGEN study. Moreover, the different approaches that can be used to minimize the specific problems of the study of OA genetics are discussed. These include the study of microsatellites, phenotype standardization and other methods such as meta-analysis of GWAS and gene-based analysis. It is expected that these new approaches contribute to finding new susceptibility genetic factors for OA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Physical activity and osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gates, L S; Leyland, K M; Sheard, S

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is increasingly recognised as an important factor within studies of osteoarthritis (OA). However, subjective methods used to assess PA are highly variable and have not been developed for use within studies of OA, which creates difficulties when comparing and interpreting PA...... data in OA research. The aim of this study was, therefore, to gain expert agreement on the appropriate methods to harmonise PA data among existing population cohorts to enable the investigation of the association of PA and OA. The definition of PA in an OA context and methods of harmonization were...... established via an international expert consensus meeting and modified Delphi exercise using a geographically diverse committee selected on the basis of individual expertise in physical activity, exercise medicine, and OA. Agreement was met for all aims of study: (1) The use of Metabolic Equivalent of Task...

  9. Increasing hip and knee flexion during a drop-jump task reduces tibiofemoral shear and compressive forces: implications for ACL injury prevention training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Liang-Ching; Ko, Yi-An; Hammond, Kyle E; Xerogeanes, John W; Warren, Gordon L; Powers, Christopher M

    2017-12-01

    Although most ACL injury prevention programmes encourage greater hip and knee flexion during landing, it remains unknown how this technique influences tibiofemoral joint forces. We examined whether a landing strategy utilising greater hip and knee flexion decreases tibiofemoral anterior shear and compression. Twelve healthy women (25.9 ± 3.5 years) performed a drop-jump task before and after a training session (10-15 min) that emphasised greater hip and knee flexion. Peak tibiofemoral anterior shear and compressive forces were calculated using an electromyography (EMG)-driven knee model that incorporated joint kinematics, EMG and participant-specific muscle volumes and patella tendon orientation measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Participants demonstrated a decrease in peak anterior tibial shear forces (11.1 ± 3.3 vs. 9.6 ± 2.7 N · kg -1 ; P = 0.008) and peak tibiofemoral compressive forces (68.4 ± 7.6 vs. 62.0 ± 5.5 N · kg -1 ; P = 0.015) post-training. The decreased peak anterior tibial shear was accompanied by a decrease in the quadriceps anterior shear force, while the decreased peak compressive force was accompanied by decreased ground reaction force and hamstring forces. Our data provide justification for injury prevention programmes that encourage greater hip and knee flexion during landing to reduce tibiofemoral joint loading.

  10. Measurements of Tibiofemoral Kinematics During Soft and Stiff Drop Landings Using Biplane Fluoroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Casey A.; Torry, Michael R.; Peterson, Daniel S.; Shelburne, Kevin B.; Giphart, J. Erik; Krong, Jacob P.; Woo, Savio L-Y.; Steadman, J. Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous laboratory studies of landing have defined landing techniques in terms of soft or stiff landings according to the degree of maximal knee flexion angle attained during the landing phase and the relative magnitude of the ground-reaction force. Current anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention programs are instructing athletes to land softly to avoid excessive strain on the anterior cruciate ligament. Purpose This study was undertaken to measure, describe, and compare tibiofemoral rotations and translations of soft and stiff landings in healthy individuals using biplane fluoroscopy. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods The in vivo, lower extremity, 3-dimensional knee kinematics of 16 healthy adults (6 male and 10 female) instructed to land softly and stiffly in different trials were collected in biplane fluoroscopy as they performed the landing from a height of 40 cm. Results Average and maximum relative anterior tibial translation (average, 2.8 ± 1.2 mm vs 3.0 ± 1.4 mm; maximum, 4.7 ± 1.6 mm vs 4.4 ± 0.8 mm), internal/external rotation (average, 3.7° ± 5.1° vs 2.7° ± 4.3°; maximum, 5.6° ± 5.5° vs 4.9° ± 4.7°), and varus/valgus (average, 0.2° ± 1.2° vs 0.2° ± 1.0°; maximum, 1.7° ± 1.2° vs 1.6° ± 0.9°) were all similar between soft and stiff landings, respectively. The peak vertical ground-reaction force was significantly larger for stiff landings than for soft landings (2.60 ± 1.32 body weight vs 1.63 ± 0.73; P < .001). The knee flexion angle total range of motion from the minimum angle at contact to the maximum angle at peak knee flexion was significantly greater for soft landings than for stiff (55.4° ± 8.8° vs 36.8° ± 11.1°; P < .01). Conclusion Stiff landings, as defined by significantly lower knee flexion angles and significantly greater peak ground-reaction forces, do not result in larger amounts of anterior tibial translation or knee rotation in either varus/valgus or internal

  11. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Semi-Quantitative Knee Ultrasound and Knee Radiography with MRI: Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlipská, Jana; Guermazi, Ali; Lehenkari, Petri; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Roemer, Frank W.; Arokoski, Jari P.; Kaukinen, Päivi; Liukkonen, Esa; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T.; Tervonen, Osmo; Koski, Juhani M.; Saarakkala, Simo

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative musculoskeletal disease highly prevalent in aging societies worldwide. Traditionally, knee OA is diagnosed using conventional radiography. However, structural changes of articular cartilage or menisci cannot be directly evaluated using this method. On the other hand, ultrasound is a promising tool able to provide direct information on soft tissue degeneration. The aim of our study was to systematically determine the site-specific diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative ultrasound grading of knee femoral articular cartilage, osteophytes and meniscal extrusion, and of radiographic assessment of joint space narrowing and osteophytes, using MRI as a reference standard. Eighty asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic subjects with mean age of 57.7 years were included in the study. Ultrasound performed best in the assessment of femoral medial and lateral osteophytes, and medial meniscal extrusion. In comparison to radiography, ultrasound performed better or at least equally well in identification of tibio-femoral osteophytes, medial meniscal extrusion and medial femoral cartilage morphological degeneration. Ultrasound provides relevant additional diagnostic information on tissue-specific morphological changes not depicted by conventional radiography. Consequently, the use of ultrasound as a complementary imaging tool along with radiography may enable more accurate and cost-effective diagnostics of knee osteoarthritis at the primary healthcare level. PMID:26926836

  12. The Kinematic and Static Analysis of the Tibio-Femoral Joint Based on a Novel Spatial Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggang Xu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available To reveal the characteristics of knee movement and tibio-femoral joint contact force, a novel single degree of freedom spatial mechanism is built to simulate the joint kinematics based on a three dimensional model of the human knee. The length changes of the three ligaments can be obtained by establishing and solving the kinematics spiral function. Based on this mechanism, a static model is built where linear springs are used to model the ligaments and whose stiffness coefficients are obtained by the finite element method. The main strength of the proposed model is that it associates the knee's flexion motion with internal/external rotation of the tibia based on the isometricity of the anterior cruciate ligament. This offers an efficient method to model and analyse the changes of ligament lengths and static kinematics after ligament reconstruction, which is crucial in designing knee recovery and rehabilitation equipment.

  13. Osteoarthritis after osteosynthesis of ankle injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, S.; Mechsner, K.; Langenscheidt, P.; Krankenhaus Spandau, Berlin

    1984-01-01

    98 patients were clinically and radiographically examined 2 to 9 years following the osteosynthesis of ankle fractures. The rate of secondary osteoarthritis was 70% including 40% of minor, 17% of medium and 13% of serious changes. Depending on the injured structures the frequency of posttraumatic osteoarthritis varies. Medium and serious radiology changes cause obvious dysfunction in 56% and 62% respectively. Joints free of Osteoarthritis one year after the injury will not develop secondary osteoarthritis later. (orig.) [de

  14. How does spa treatment affect cardiovascular function and vascular endothelium in patients with generalized osteoarthritis? A pilot study through plasma asymmetric di-methyl arginine (ADMA) and L-arginine/ADMA ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaarslan, Fatih; Ozkuk, Kagan; Seringec Karabulut, Serap; Bekpinar, Seldag; Karagulle, Mufit Zeki; Erdogan, Nergis

    2017-12-01

    The study aims to investigate the effect of spa treatment on vascular endothelium and clinical symptoms of generalized osteoarthritis. Forty generalized osteoarthritis (GOA) patients referred to a government spa hospital, and 40 GOA patients followed on university hospital locomotor system disease ambulatory clinics were included as study and control groups, respectively. Study group received spa treatment including thermal water baths, physical therapy modalities, and exercises. Control group was followed with home exercises for 15 days. Plasma ADMA, L-arginine, L-arginine/ADMA ratio, routine blood analyses, 6-min walking test, including fingertip O2 saturation, systolic/diastolic blood pressure, and pulse rate, were measured at the beginning and at the end of treatment. Groups were evaluated with VAS pain, patient, and physician global assessment; HAQ; and WOMAC at the beginning, at the end, and after 1 month of treatment. In study group, L-arginine and L-arginine/ADMA ratio showed statistically significant increase after treatment. Plasma ADMA levels did not change. There is no significant difference in intergroup comparison. Study group displayed statistically significant improvements in all clinical parameters. The study showed that spa treatment does not cause any harm to the vascular endothelium through ADMA. Significant increase in plasma L-arginine and L-arginine/ADMA ratio suggests that balneotherapy may play a preventive role on cardiovascular diseases. Balneotherapy provides meaningful improvements on clinical parameters of GOA.

  15. Age and osteoarthritis: are AGEs the link?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P.A.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common joint disease in the elderly. By far the most important risk factor for osteoarthritis is aging. Age-related changes in the articular cartilage may be responsible for age-related increase in the number of people with osteoarthritis. One of the most striking changes in

  16. SECONDARY OSTEOARTHRITIS IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Starodubtseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problems of comorbidities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Two or more RA-related conditions were diagnosed according to the results of the QUEST-RA program implemented in 34 countries. Osteoarthritis along with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and osteoporosis was detected among the most commonly diseases. Owing to expanded diagnostic capabilities, the recognition and treatment of the comorbidities have recently received much attention, as embodied in the draft Association of Rheumatologists of Russia Guidelines for RA management (2014; Part 1. The concept and major characteristics of secondary osteoarthritis in RA are analyzed. It is precisely the inflammatory process and underlying disease-related risk factors, including treatment, that have impact on the development of secondary osteoarthritis and patients’ quality of life as a whole. All this allows an inference about the mechanisms closely intertwined with the underlying disease for the development of secondary osteoarthritis, which initiates cartilage damage and further remodeling. Primary and secondary osteoarthritis was comparatively analyzed. Particular emphasis is placed on current cartilage biomarkers, their diagnostic value and role in monitoring the efficiency of treatment in clinical trials. The paper provides a comparative analysis of detectable serum and urine biomarkers according to the results of the complex analysis made by the National Institutes of Health. Particular attention is given to cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP. Foreign authors’ investigations suggest that there is a relationship between serum COMP levels and disease severity and joint X-ray changes. There is evidence for the efficacy of hyaluronic acid used in the treatment of secondary osteoarthritis in patients with RA. 

  17. Foot osteoarthritis: latest evidence and developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddy, Edward; Menz, Hylton B

    2018-04-01

    Foot osteoarthritis (OA) is a common problem in older adults yet is under-researched compared to knee or hand OA. Most existing studies focus on the first metatarsophalangeal joint, with evidence relating to midfoot OA being particularly sparse. Symptomatic radiographic foot OA affects 17% of adults aged 50 years and over. The first metatarsophalangeal joint is most commonly affected, followed by the second cuneometatarsal and talonavicular joints. Epidemiological studies suggest the existence of distinct first metatarsophalangeal joint and polyarticular phenotypes, which have differing clinical and risk factor profiles. There are few randomized controlled trials in foot OA. Existing trials provide some evidence of the effectiveness for pain relief of physical therapy, rocker-sole shoes, foot orthoses and surgical interventions in first metatarsophalangeal joint OA and prefabricated orthoses in midfoot OA. Prospective epidemiological studies and randomized trials are needed to establish the incidence, progression and prognosis of foot OA and determine the effectiveness of both commonly used and more novel interventions.

  18. Tai Chi for treating knee osteoarthritis: Designing a long-term follow up randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rones Ramel

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knee Osteoarthritis (KOA is a major cause of pain and functional impairment among elders. Currently, there are neither feasible preventive intervention strategies nor effective medical remedies for the management of KOA. Tai Chi, an ancient Chinese mind-body exercise that is reported to enhance muscle function, balance and flexibility, and to reduce pain, depression and anxiety, may safely and effectively be used to treat KOA. However, current evidence is inconclusive. Our study examines the effects of a 12-week Tai Chi program compared with an attention control (wellness education and stretching on pain, functional capacity, psychosocial variables, joint proprioception and health status in elderly people with KOA. The study will be completed by July 2009. Methods/Design Forty eligible patients, age > 55 yr, BMI ≤ 40 kg/m2 with tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (American College of Rheumatology criteria are identified and randomly allocated to either Tai Chi (10 modified forms from classical Yang style Tai Chi or attention control (wellness education and stretching. The 60-minute intervention sessions take place twice weekly for 12 weeks. The study is conducted at an urban tertiary medical center in Boston, Massachusetts. The primary outcome measure is the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC pain subscale at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes include weekly WOMAC pain, function and stiffness scores, patient and physician global assessments, lower-extremity function, knee proprioception, depression, self-efficacy, social support, health-related quality of life, adherence and occurrence of adverse events after 12, 24 and 48 weeks. Discussion In this article, we present the challenges of designing a randomized controlled trial with long-term follow up. The challenges encountered in this design are: strategies for recruitment, avoidance of selection bias, the actual practice of Tai Chi, and the maximization of adherence

  19. New horizons in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliviero, F; Ramonda, R; Punzi, L

    2010-09-17

    Osteoarthritis (OA), also known as degenerative joint disease, is the most frequent chronic musculoskeletal disease and the leading cause of disability in elderly persons. There are currently at least 27 million persons afflicted with OA in the United States, and the annual cost to society in medical care and wage loss is expected to reach nearly $100 billion dollars by 2020, with consequent increased spending on its diagnosis and treatment, side effect prevention, and loss of productivity. Despite this enormous burden, many aspects of OA are still unknown, with implications not only in terms of diagnosis and assessment but also with regard to therapy. Awareness of this state of affairs has attracted many researchers to this field, making OA one of the most actively studied sectors of rheumatology. Although some clinicians are unaware of recent advances, there is a large body of publications indicating that much has been achieved. Major progress has been made in formulating better definitions of risk factors, in particular in indicating the responsibility of biomechanical and genetic factors, and, with regard to pathogenesis, underlining the role of subchondral bone, cytokines and proteinases. Assessment of OA activity and its progression has been improved with the advent of biomarkers and new imaging procedures, in particular sonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but also of better clinical instruments, including more reliable patient questionnaires. Information from ongoing studies may improve the to some extent incomplete definition of OA phenotypes. Finally, promising new horizons have been opened up even with regard to the treatment of OA, which is still for the most part unsatisfactory except for surgical replacement therapy. Numerous new substances have been formulated and the findings of trials studying their effects are encouraging, although much has yet to be done.

  20. Extracellular vesicles in cartilage homeostasis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaki, Shigeru; Lotz, Martin K

    2018-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles carry bioactive molecules that can be transferred between cells and tissues. The purpose of this review is to describe how extracellular vesicles regulate functions of cells in cartilage and other joint tissues. The potential application of extracellular vesicles in the treatment of osteoarthritis and as biomarkers will also be discussed. Extracellular vesicles are found in synovial fluid, in articular cartilage and in the supernatants of synoviocytes and chondrocytes. Extracellular vesicles in cartilage have been proposed to be involved in cross talk between cells in joint tissues and to affect extracellular matrix turnover and inflammation. Extracellular vesicles from arthritic joints can promote abnormal gene expression and changes in cartilage extracellular matrix, including abnormal mineralization. Promising results were obtained in the therapeutic application of mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles for cartilage repair and experimental osteoarthritis. Extracellular vesicles have emerged as vehicles for the exchange of bioactive signaling molecules within cartilage and between joint tissues to promote joint homeostasis and arthritis pathogenesis. As the molecular content of extracellular vesicles can be customized, they offer utility in therapeutic applications.

  1. Radiographic joint space narrowing in osteoarthritis of the knee: relationship to meniscal tears and duration of pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Wing P. [Taipei Medical University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Huang, Guo-Shu [Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Hsu, Shu-Mei [Taipei Medical University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Department of Public Health, Taipei (China); Chang, Yue-Cune [Tamkang University, Department of Mathematics, Taipei County (China); Ho, Wei-Pin [Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Taipei (China)

    2008-10-15

    The objective of this study was to assess, with knee radiography, joint space narrowing (JSN) and its relationship to meniscal tears, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures, articular cartilage erosion, and duration of pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. A total of 140 patients who had knee osteoarthritis and underwent primary total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, with unicompartmental medial tibiofemoral JSN (grade 1 or greater) and normal lateral compartments, were recruited. Polytomous logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between JSN and risk factors. All patients with JSN were categorized as grade 1 (n=14, 10.0%), grade 2 (n=64, 45.7%), or grade 3 (n=62, 44.3%). Women presented with indications for a TKR at a younger age than men (mean age, 69 vs 73 years, P<0.05). There were 123 (87.9%) meniscal tears and 58 (41.4%) partial (insufficient or attenuated ACL fibers) and 10 (7.1%) complete ACL ruptures; 115 of 134 (85.8%) patients had moderate to severe cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN was correlated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears [odds ratio (OR) 6.00, 95% CI 1.29-27.96 for grade 2 vs grade 1 JSN] and duration of knee pain (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.01-1.53 for grade 3 vs grade 1 JSN). A higher grade of JSN was not correlated with a higher frequency of ACL rupture or articular cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN is associated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears and long duration of knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  2. Contrast-enhanced MRI of subchondral cysts in patients with or at risk for knee osteoarthritis: The MOST study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crema, M.D.; Roemer, F.W.; Marra, M.D.; Niu, J.; Lynch, J.A.; Felson, D.T.; Guermazi, A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was (1) to evaluate contrast enhancement patterns of subchondral cysts on magnetic resonance imaging and (2) to discuss possible radiological explanations of cyst enhancement based on existing theories of subchondral cyst formation in osteoarthritis. Materials and methods: The Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST) is a NIH-funded longitudinal observational study for individuals who have or are at high risk for knee osteoarthritis. All subjects with available non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI were included. The tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints were divided in 14 subregions. The presence and size of subchondral cysts and bone marrow edema-like lesions (BMLs) were scored semiquantitatively in each subregion on non-contrast-enhanced MRI from 0 to 3. Enhancement of subchondral cysts was evaluated on contrast-enhanced MRI as grade 0 (absent), grade 1 (partial enhancement), or grade 2 (full enhancement). The adjacent articular cartilage was scored in each subregion on non-enhanced MRI as grade 0 (intact), grade 1 (partial thickness loss), or grade 2 (full thickness loss). Results: Four hundred knees were included (1 knee per person, 5600 subregions). Subchondral cysts were detected in 260 subregions (4.6%). After intravenous contrast administration, 245 cysts (94.2%) showed full enhancement, 12 (4.6%) showed partial enhancement and 3 (1.2%) showed no enhancement. Enhancing BMLs were found in 237 (91.2%) subregions containing cysts, which were located adjacent or in the middle of BMLs. In 121 subregions (46.5%) having cysts, no adjacent full thickness cartilage loss was detected. Conclusion: Most subchondral cysts demonstrated full or partial contrast enhancement, and were located adjacent or in the midst of enhancing BMLs. As pure cystic lesions are not expected to enhance on MRI, the term 'subchondral cyst-like bone marrow lesion' might be appropriate to describe these lesions.

  3. Radiographic joint space narrowing in osteoarthritis of the knee: relationship to meniscal tears and duration of pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Wing P.; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Shu-Mei; Chang, Yue-Cune; Ho, Wei-Pin

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess, with knee radiography, joint space narrowing (JSN) and its relationship to meniscal tears, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures, articular cartilage erosion, and duration of pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. A total of 140 patients who had knee osteoarthritis and underwent primary total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, with unicompartmental medial tibiofemoral JSN (grade 1 or greater) and normal lateral compartments, were recruited. Polytomous logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between JSN and risk factors. All patients with JSN were categorized as grade 1 (n=14, 10.0%), grade 2 (n=64, 45.7%), or grade 3 (n=62, 44.3%). Women presented with indications for a TKR at a younger age than men (mean age, 69 vs 73 years, P<0.05). There were 123 (87.9%) meniscal tears and 58 (41.4%) partial (insufficient or attenuated ACL fibers) and 10 (7.1%) complete ACL ruptures; 115 of 134 (85.8%) patients had moderate to severe cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN was correlated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears [odds ratio (OR) 6.00, 95% CI 1.29-27.96 for grade 2 vs grade 1 JSN] and duration of knee pain (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.01-1.53 for grade 3 vs grade 1 JSN). A higher grade of JSN was not correlated with a higher frequency of ACL rupture or articular cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN is associated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears and long duration of knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  4. Joint Space Narrowing in Patients With Pisotriquetral Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Berg, Paul W L; Heeg, Erik; Strackee, Simon D; Streekstra, Geert J

    2017-09-01

    Patients with suspected pisotriquetral osteoarthritis may show joint space narrowing. However, the extent of joint space narrowing and its deviation from the joint space width (JSW) in normal anatomy is unknown. In this pathoanatomic study, we therefore compared the JSW in the pisotriquetral joint between osteoarthritic patient wrists and healthy wrists. We reviewed preoperative computed tomography (CT) scans of 8 wrists of patients with ulnar-sided wrist pain who underwent a pisiformectomy with confirmed pisotriquetral osteoarthritis at surgery. We also reviewed CT scans of 20 normal wrists from healthy volunteers serving as control group. Three-dimensional CT models of the pisiform and triquetrum were obtained from both affected and normal wrists, after which the minimum JSW was calculated in an automated fashion. In the patient group, the median (interquartile range) of the minimum JSW was 0.1 mm (0.0-0.2), and in the control group, 0.8 mm (0.3-0.9) ( P = .007). We showed that the pisotriquetral joint space in osteoarthritic patient wrists was significantly narrowed compared with healthy wrists. These results suggest that JSW evaluation has a potential diagnostic value in the work-up of patients with suspected pisotriquetral osteoarthritis. This is an interesting area for future clinical research, especially because no gold standard for diagnosing pisotriquetral osteoarthritis has been established yet.

  5. Chondrocyte deformations as a function of tibiofemoral joint loading predicted by a generalized high-throughput pipeline of multi-scale simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott C Sibole

    Full Text Available Cells of the musculoskeletal system are known to respond to mechanical loading and chondrocytes within the cartilage are not an exception. However, understanding how joint level loads relate to cell level deformations, e.g. in the cartilage, is not a straightforward task. In this study, a multi-scale analysis pipeline was implemented to post-process the results of a macro-scale finite element (FE tibiofemoral joint model to provide joint mechanics based displacement boundary conditions to micro-scale cellular FE models of the cartilage, for the purpose of characterizing chondrocyte deformations in relation to tibiofemoral joint loading. It was possible to identify the load distribution within the knee among its tissue structures and ultimately within the cartilage among its extracellular matrix, pericellular environment and resident chondrocytes. Various cellular deformation metrics (aspect ratio change, volumetric strain, cellular effective strain and maximum shear strain were calculated. To illustrate further utility of this multi-scale modeling pipeline, two micro-scale cartilage constructs were considered: an idealized single cell at the centroid of a 100×100×100 μm block commonly used in past research studies, and an anatomically based (11 cell model of the same volume representation of the middle zone of tibiofemoral cartilage. In both cases, chondrocytes experienced amplified deformations compared to those at the macro-scale, predicted by simulating one body weight compressive loading on the tibiofemoral joint. In the 11 cell case, all cells experienced less deformation than the single cell case, and also exhibited a larger variance in deformation compared to other cells residing in the same block. The coupling method proved to be highly scalable due to micro-scale model independence that allowed for exploitation of distributed memory computing architecture. The method's generalized nature also allows for substitution of any macro

  6. Chondrocyte Deformations as a Function of Tibiofemoral Joint Loading Predicted by a Generalized High-Throughput Pipeline of Multi-Scale Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibole, Scott C.; Erdemir, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    Cells of the musculoskeletal system are known to respond to mechanical loading and chondrocytes within the cartilage are not an exception. However, understanding how joint level loads relate to cell level deformations, e.g. in the cartilage, is not a straightforward task. In this study, a multi-scale analysis pipeline was implemented to post-process the results of a macro-scale finite element (FE) tibiofemoral joint model to provide joint mechanics based displacement boundary conditions to micro-scale cellular FE models of the cartilage, for the purpose of characterizing chondrocyte deformations in relation to tibiofemoral joint loading. It was possible to identify the load distribution within the knee among its tissue structures and ultimately within the cartilage among its extracellular matrix, pericellular environment and resident chondrocytes. Various cellular deformation metrics (aspect ratio change, volumetric strain, cellular effective strain and maximum shear strain) were calculated. To illustrate further utility of this multi-scale modeling pipeline, two micro-scale cartilage constructs were considered: an idealized single cell at the centroid of a 100×100×100 μm block commonly used in past research studies, and an anatomically based (11 cell model of the same volume) representation of the middle zone of tibiofemoral cartilage. In both cases, chondrocytes experienced amplified deformations compared to those at the macro-scale, predicted by simulating one body weight compressive loading on the tibiofemoral joint. In the 11 cell case, all cells experienced less deformation than the single cell case, and also exhibited a larger variance in deformation compared to other cells residing in the same block. The coupling method proved to be highly scalable due to micro-scale model independence that allowed for exploitation of distributed memory computing architecture. The method’s generalized nature also allows for substitution of any macro-scale and/or micro

  7. Osteoporosis and osteoarthritis: shared mechanisms and epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geusens, Piet P; van den Bergh, Joop P

    2016-03-01

    Osteoporosis and osteoarthritis are different diseases, with differences in risk factors, bone mineral density (BMD), BMI, phenotype, morbidity and mortality. We review new data on the role of bone metabolism in osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. The insights in the common convergent and divergent risk factors between osteoarthritis and osteoporosis have resulted in new findings on the role of BMD, BMI, falls, genetics and epigenetics in the pathophysiology of both diseases and on the increased fracture risk in osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. The relation between BMD, BMI and fracture risk in osteoarthritis is dependent on the stage, definition and location of the osteoarthritis and method of BMD measurement. It has been suggested that osteoarthritis should be further specified in terms of bone involvement. These new findings open the way to better understand the bone subtypes of osteoarthritis (osteoporotic, bone forming and erosive) and the common and different ways bone is involved in osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. Much can be expected from further prospective studies, when taking into account the heterogeneous nature of both osteoporosis and osteoarthritis.

  8. Efficacy of intra-articular hyaluronan (Synvisc® for the treatment of osteoarthritis affecting the first metatarsophalangeal joint of the foot (hallux limitus: study protocol for a randomised placebo controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landorf Karl B

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ of the foot, termed hallux limitus, is common and painful. Numerous non-surgical interventions have been proposed for this disorder, however there is limited evidence for their efficacy. Intra-articular injections of hyaluronan have shown beneficial effects in case-series and clinical trials for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. However, no study has evaluated the efficacy of this form of treatment using a randomised placebo controlled trial. This article describes the design of a randomised placebo controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of intra-articular hyaluronan (Synvisc® to reduce pain and improve function in people with hallux limitus. Methods One hundred and fifty community-dwelling men and women aged 18 years and over with hallux limitus (who satisfy inclusion and exclusion criteria will be recruited. Participants will be randomised, using a computer-generated random number sequence, to receive a single intra-articular injection of up to 1 ml hyaluronan (Synvisc® or sterile saline (placebo into the first MPJ. The injections will be performed by an interventional radiologist using fluoroscopy to ensure accurate deposition of the hyaluronan in the joint. Participants will be given the option of a second and final intra-articular injection (of Synvisc® or sterile saline according to the treatment group they are in either 1 or 3 months post-treatment if there is no improvement in pain and the participant has not experienced severe adverse effects after the first injection. The primary outcome measures will be the pain and function subscales of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire. The secondary outcome measures will be pain at the first MPJ (during walking and at rest, stiffness at the first MPJ, passive non-weightbearing dorsiflexion of the first MPJ, plantar flexion strength of the toe-flexors of the hallux, global

  9. Role of the endocannabinoid system in the emotional manifestations of osteoarthritis pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Porta, Carmen; Bura, S Andreea; Llorente-Onaindia, Jone; Pastor, Antoni; Navarrete, Francisco; García-Gutiérrez, María Salud; De la Torre, Rafael; Manzanares, Jorge; Monfort, Jordi; Maldonado, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in the emotional and cognitive alterations associated with osteoarthritis pain. The monosodium iodoacetate model was used to evaluate the affective and cognitive manifestations of osteoarthritis pain in type 1 (CB1R) and type 2 (CB2R) cannabinoid receptor knockout and wild-type mice and the ability of CB1R (ACEA) and CB2R (JWH133) selective agonists to improve these manifestations during a 3-week time period. The levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) were measured in plasma and brain areas involved in the control of these manifestations. Patients with knee osteoarthritis and healthy controls were recruited to evaluate pain, affective, and cognitive symptoms, as well as plasma endocannabinoid levels and cannabinoid receptor gene expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes. The affective manifestations of osteoarthritis were enhanced in CB1R knockout mice and absent in CB2R knockouts. Interestingly, both ACEA and JWH133 ameliorated the nociceptive and affective alterations, whereas ACEA also improved the associated memory impairment. An increase of 2-AG levels in prefrontal cortex and plasma was observed in this mouse model of osteoarthritis. In agreement, an increase of 2-AG plasmatic levels and an upregulation of CB1R and CB2R gene expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes were observed in patients with osteoarthritis compared with healthy subjects. Changes found in these biomarkers of the ECS correlated with pain, affective, and cognitive symptoms in these patients. The ECS plays a crucial role in osteoarthritis and represents an interesting pharmacological target and biomarker of this disease.

  10. Hand osteoarthritis, menopause and menopausal hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Fiona E

    2016-01-01

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the commonest musculoskeletal conditions, primarily affecting women over the age of 50, typically around the age of the menopause. Symptomatic disease can give rise to substantial pain, impairment of hand function and quality of life, leading to significant socioeconomic cost. There is currently no disease-modifying therapy, representing a huge unmet clinical need. The evidence for a relationship between hand OA and the menopause is summarised. Whether there is evidence for an effect of menopausal hormonal therapy on the incidence, prevalence or severity of symptomatic hand OA is critically reviewed, and gaps in our knowledge identified. Lastly, the potential mechanisms by which estrogen, or newer agents such as SERMs, might act to interfere with disease pathogenesis are overviewed. The need for specifically designed, controlled trials of agents in cohorts with symptomatic hand OA, refractory to standard symptomatic management is highlighted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Osteoarthritis in Young, Active, and Athletic Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adae O. Amoako

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is one of the most devastating chronic conditions that affect people around the world. Although the usual population associated with the condition is the elderly, who are mostly inactive, athletes and younger individuals are also susceptible. Depending on the population, the etiology may differ; injuries, occupational activities, and obesity appear to be the most common causes of OA in young and athletic populations. Diagnosing OA in athletes and young individuals is sometimes challenging because of their increased pain tolerance. However, the treatment of OA in these populations does not differ from its management in the general population. Several considerations need to be taken into account when choosing a treatment modality. The purpose of this review is to address OA in athletes and younger individuals and to discuss its presentation, diagnosis, and treatment.

  12. Treatment of osteoarthritis with mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Cao, Wei

    2014-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent joint diseases with prominent symptoms affecting the daily life of millions of middle aged and elderly people. Despite this, there are no successful medical interventions that can prevent the progressive destruction of OA joints. The onset of pathological changes in OA is associated with deviant activity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), the multipotent precursors of connective tissue cells that reside in joints. Current therapies for OA have resulted in poor clinical outcomes without repairing the damaged cartilage. Intra-articular delivery of culture-expanded MSCs has opened new avenues of OA treatment. Pre-clinical and clinical trials demonstrated the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of MSC therapy. The Wnt/β-catenin, bone morphogenetic protein 2, Indian hedgehog, and Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways have been demonstrated to be involved in OA and the mechanism of action of MSC therapies.

  13. Frontal Plane Tibiofemoral Alignment is Strongly Related to Compartmental Knee Joint Contact Forces and Muscle Control Strategies during Stair Ascent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Hunter J; Weinhandl, Joshua T; Fleenor, Kristina; Zhang, Songning

    2018-03-12

    Static frontal plane tibiofemoral alignment is an important factor in dynamic knee alignment and knee adduction moments. However, little is known about the relationship between alignment and compartment contact forces or muscle control strategies. The purpose of this study was to estimate medial (MCF) and lateral (LCF) compartment knee joint contact forces and muscle forces during stair ascent using a musculoskeletal model implementing subject specific knee alignments. Kinematic and kinetic data from 20 healthy individuals with radiographically confirmed varus or valgus knee alignments were simulated using alignment specific models to predict MCFs and LCFs. Muscle forces were determined using static optimization. Independent samples t-tests compared contact and knee and frontal plane hip muscle forces between groups during weight acceptance and during pushoff. The varus group exhibited increased weight acceptance peak MCFs, while the valgus group exhibited increased pushoff peak LCFs. The varus group utilized increased vasti muscle forces during weight acceptance and hip adductor forces during pushoff. The valgus group utilized increased hip abductor forces during pushoff. The alignment dependent contact forces provide evidence of the significance of frontal plane knee alignment in healthy individuals, which may be important in considering future knee joint health. The differing muscle control strategies between alignments detail specific neuromuscular responses to control frontal plane knee loads.

  14. An implant-free double-bundle reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: operative technique and influence on tibiofemoral kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünschel, Markus; Treffler, Florian; Ketelsen, Dominik; Lo, Jiahsuan; Müller, Otto; Suckel, Andreas

    2011-08-01

    Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament is a standard surgical procedure in sports traumatology. The widespread replacement method using hamstring tendons has an important shortcoming namely delayed or missing bony healing in contrast to patellar tendon grafts where implant-free fixation is established by using the adjacent bone blocks. The purpose of this study was to describe a new implant-free surgical procedure using hamstring tendon grafts and to analyse the influence on tibiofemoral kinematics in vitro. Nine human knee specimens with arthroscopically transected anterior cruciate ligaments were mounted on a dynamic knee simulator and weight-bearing muscle-loaded knee flexions were simulated while a robotic universal force sensor system was used to provide external tibial loads. Three different loading conditions were simulated including partial body weight only, an additional 50 N anterior tibial force or an additional Five Nm of internal rotational torque. After reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using a tibial bone block hybrid technique these three trials were repeated. The kinematics was measured with an ultrasonic measuring system and different loading and ligament conditions were examined. Graft tunnel placement was verified by computed tomography. Our fixation method achieved stability to anterior tibial drawer force whereas internal tibial rotation did not change before and after the reconstruction. Computed tomography confirmed anatomical graft and tunnel placement. The presented operative procedure is technically feasible and leads to reproducible results concerning knee joint kinematics and graft placement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Gene Therapy for Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) Gene Therapy Equine Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist (IL-1Ra) Post-traumatic OA (PTOA) Self...AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0498 TITLE: Gene Therapy for Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven C...COVERED 30Sept 2014 - 29 Sept 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Gene Therapy for Posttraumatic Osteoarthritis 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  16. MR findings in knee osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guermazi, Ali; Taouli, Bachir; Genant, Harry K.; Zaim, Souhil; Miaux, Yves; Peterfy, Charles G.

    2003-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability. Recent advances in drug discovery techniques and improvements in understanding the pathophysiology of osteoarthritic disorders have resulted in an unprecedented number of new therapeutic agents. Of all imaging modalities, radiography has been the most widely used for the diagnosis and management of the progression of knee OA. Magnetic resonance imaging is a relatively recent technique and its applications to osteoarthritis have been limited. Compared with conventional radiography, MR imaging offers unparalleled discrimination among articular soft tissues by directly visualizing all components of the knee joint simultaneously and therefore allowing the knee joint to be evaluated as a whole organ. In this article we present the MR findings in knee OA including cartilage abnormalities, osteophytes, bone edema, subarticular cysts, bone attrition, meniscal tears, ligament abnormalities, synovial thickening, joint effusion, intra-articular loose bodies, and periarticular cysts. (orig.)

  17. Obat Dan Suplemen Untuk Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Herowati, Rina

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one cause of disability activities in geriatrics. The goals of OA therapy are to control symptoms, minimize disability and improve the quality of life. Management of OA include non-pharmacological therapy, pharmacological therapy, and surgery. Pharmacological therapy is further classified into symptomatic therapy and disease modifying therapy. Acetaminophen, the first-line symptomatic therapy, is used by consider the risk of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular toxicity,...

  18. OSTEOARTHRITIS OF KNEE JOINT AND ITS RISK FACTOR IN POPULATION OF BIHAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In study of Orthopaedic diseases, Osteoarthritis (OA is one of the most prevalent condition resulting to disability particularly in population of old age people and is a leading cause of chronic disability. The knee is the commonest of the large joints in the body to be affected by Osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is a very chronic joint disorder in which there is progressive softening and disintegration of articular cartilage accompanied by new growth of cartilage and bone at the joint margins (Osteophytes and the capsular fibrosis. METHODS A total of 100 cases and 100 controls were taken in the Bihari Population. For each case, an age matched control of same sex was taken, who had no complaints pertaining to knee. RESULTS In this study, old age, female sex, obesity, hypertension, family history of knee pain, Indian toilet habits, history of knee trauma/disease, sitting cross-legged for longer period, sitting before Computer for long hours, using cell phone with improper body posture and increased frequency of knee bending were found to be predisposing factors for knee Osteoarthritis. CONCLUSION Keeping weight under control, modifying daily habits such as sitting cross-legged and squatting along with using western toilet can significantly reduce the toll of knee osteoarthritis. Any trauma to knee should be dealt with utmost care, so as to maintain joint congruity and to prevent its progression to osteoarthritis in future is also strongly recommended.

  19. Perfusion of subchondral bone marrow in knee osteoarthritis: A dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budzik, Jean-François, E-mail: Budzik.jean-francois@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Imaging Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); PMOI Physiopathology of Inflammatory Bone Diseases, EA 4490, Lille (France); Ding, Juliette, E-mail: Ding.juliette@gmail.com [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Imaging Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Norberciak, Laurène, E-mail: Norberciak.Laurene@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Biostatistics Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Pascart, Tristan, E-mail: Pascart.tristan@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Rheumatology Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Toumi, Hechmi, E-mail: hechmi.toumi@univ-orleans.fr [EA4708 I3MTO, Orleans Regional Hospital, University of Orleans, Orleans (France); Verclytte, Sébastien, E-mail: Verclytte.Sebastien@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Imaging Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Coursier, Raphaël, E-mail: Coursier.Raphael@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Orthopaedic Surgery Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France)

    2017-03-15

    The role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis is being given major interest, and inflammation is closely linked with vascularization. It was recently demonstrated that dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) could identify the subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes occurring in osteoarthritis in animals. These changes appeared before cartilage lesions were visible and were correlated with osteoarthritis severity. Thus the opportunity to obtain an objective assessment of bone vascularization in non-invasive conditions in humans might help better understanding osteoarthritis pathophysiology and finding new biomarkers. We hypothesized that, as in animals, DCE-MRI has the ability to identify subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes in human osteoarthritis. We performed knee MRI in 19 patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis. We assessed subchondral bone marrow vascularization in medial and lateral femorotibial compartments with DCE-MRI and graded osteoarthritis lesions on MR images. Statistical analysis assessed intra- and inter-observer agreement, compared DCE-MRI values between the different subchondral zones, and sought for an influence of age, sex, body mass index, and osteoarthritis garde on these values. The intra- and inter-observer agreement for DCE-MRI values were excellent. These values were significantly higher in the femorotibial compartment the most affected by osteoarthritis, both in femur and tibia (p < 0.0001) and were significantly and positively correlated with cartilage lesions (p = 0.02) and bone marrow oedema grade (p < 0.0001) after adjustment. We concluded that, as in animals, subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes assessed with DCE-MRI were correlated with osteoarthritis severity in humans.

  20. Osteoarthritis and Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Ayu Putri Purwanthi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common form of arthritis that affects cartilage joints and leads to disability. OA becomes the major public health problem, as it is the most leading cause of disability and morbidity worldwide. Treatment choices for OA can be classified into several categories such as non-pharmacologic, pharmacologic, surgical therapy, and cell-based therapy. There is no curative treatment for OA, while conventional treatments that are commonly used focus on alleviating the pain as the main symptom of the disease. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs that can be found in several tissues of human body offer a new strategy for OA treatment owing to their ability to differentiate into chondrocytes. This article provides an overview about the basic concept of osteoarthritis as well as an insight about the MSCs therapy, including their basic characteristics, source, and transplantation strategies in the OA area.

  1. Lateral trunk motion and knee pain in osteoarthritis of the knee: a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Esch, M.; Steultjens, M.P.M.; Harlaar, J.; van den Noort, J.C.; Knol, D.L.; Dekker, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patients with osteoarthritis of the knee may change their gait in an attempt to reduce loading of the affected knee, thereby reducing pain. Especially changes in lateral trunk motion may be potentially effective, since these will affect the position of the centre of mass relative to the

  2. Vitamin K, osteoarthritis, and joint pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of joint pain and lower extremity disability in older adults and there is no known cure. Vitamin K has been implicated on osteoarthritis because vitamin K dependent proteins are present in joint tissues, such as cartilage and bone. In order to function, vitamin K ...

  3. Concurrent prediction of ground reaction forces and moments and tibiofemoral contact forces during walking using musculoskeletal modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yinghu; Zhang, Zhifeng; Gao, Yongchang; Chen, Zhenxian; Xin, Hua; Zhang, Qida; Fan, Xunjian; Jin, Zhongmin

    2018-02-01

    Ground reaction forces and moments (GRFs and GRMs) measured from force plates in a gait laboratory are usually used as the input conditions to predict the knee joint forces and moments via musculoskeletal (MSK) multibody dynamics (MBD) model. However, the measurements of the GRFs and GRMs data rely on force plates and sometimes are limited by the difficulty in some patient's gait patterns (e.g. treadmill gait). In addition, the force plate calibration error may influence the prediction accuracy of the MSK model. In this study, a prediction method of the GRFs and GRMs based on elastic contact element was integrated into a subject-specific MSK MBD modelling framework of total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and the GRFs and GRMs and knee contact forces (KCFs) during walking were predicted simultaneously with reasonable accuracy. The ground reaction forces and moments were predicted with an average root mean square errors (RMSEs) of 0.021 body weight (BW), 0.014 BW and 0.089 BW in the antero-posterior, medio-lateral and vertical directions and 0.005 BW•body height (BH), 0.011 BW•BH, 0.004 BW•BH in the sagittal, frontal and transverse planes, respectively. Meanwhile, the medial, lateral and total tibiofemoral (TF) contact forces were predicted by the developed MSK model with RMSEs of 0.025-0.032 BW, 0.018-0.022 BW, and 0.089-0.132 BW, respectively. The accuracy of the predicted medial TF contact force was improved by 12% using the present method. The proposed method can extend the application of the MSK model of TKA and is valuable for understanding the in vivo knee biomechanics and tribological conditions without the force plate data. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Articular chondrocyte metabolism and osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leipold, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage matrix that occurs during osteoarthritis causes a measurable increase of cartilage proteoglycan components in the synovial fluid and sera, (2) to observe what effect intracellular cAMP has on the expression of matrix components by chondrocytes, and (3) to determine if freshly isolated chondrocytes contain detectable levels of mRNA for fibronectin. Canine serum keratan sulfate and hyaluronate were measured to determine if there was an elevation of these serum glycosaminoglycans in a canine model of osteoarthritis. A single intra-articular injection of chymopapain into a shoulder joint increased serum keratan sulfate 10 fold and hyaluronate less than 2 fold in 24 hours. Keratan sulfate concentrations in synovial fluids of dogs about one year old were unrelated to the presence of spontaneous cartilage degeneration in the joints. High keratan sulfate in synovial fluids correlated with higher keratan sulfate in serum. The mean keratan sulfate concentration in sera of older dogs with osteoarthritis was 37% higher than disease-free controls, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Treatment of chondrocytes with 0.5 millimolar (mM) dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) caused the cells to adopt a more rounded morphology. There was no difference between the amount of proteins synthesized by cultures treated with DBcAMP and controls. The amount of fibronectin (FN) in the media of DBcAMP treated cultures detected by an ELISA was specifically reduced, and the amount of {sup 35}S-FN purified by gelatin affinity chromatography decreased. Moreover, the percentage of FN containing the extra domain. A sequence was reduced. Concomitant with the decrease in FN there was an increase in the concentration of keratan sulfate.

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treating Articular Cartilage Defects and Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Yuan, Mei; Guo, Quan-yi; Lu, Shi-bi; Peng, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage damage and osteoarthritis are the most common joint diseases. Joints are prone to damage caused by sports injuries or aging, and such damage regularly progresses to more serious joint disorders, including osteoarthritis, which is a degenerative disease characterized by the thinning and eventual wearing out of articular cartilage, ultimately leading to joint destruction. Osteoarthritis affects millions of people worldwide. Current approaches to repair of articular cartilage damage include mosaicplasty, microfracture, and injection of autologous chondrocytes. These treatments relieve pain and improve joint function, but the long-term results are unsatisfactory. The long-term success of cartilage repair depends on development of regenerative methodologies that restore articular cartilage to a near-native state. Two promising approaches are (i) implantation of engineered constructs of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-seeded scaffolds, and (ii) delivery of an appropriate population of MSCs by direct intra-articular injection. MSCs may be used as trophic producers of bioactive factors initiating regenerative activities in a defective joint. Current challenges in MSC therapy are the need to overcome current limitations in cartilage cell purity and to in vitro engineer tissue structures exhibiting the required biomechanical properties. This review outlines the current status of MSCs used in cartilage tissue engineering and in cell therapy seeking to repair articular cartilage defects and related problems. MSC-based technologies show promise when used to repair cartilage defects in joints.

  6. The Effect of Glucosamine and/or Chondroitin Sulfate on the Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis: A GAIT Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawitzke, Allen D; Shi, Helen; Finco, Martha; Dunlop, Dorothy D; Bingham, Clifton O; Harris, Crystal L; Singer, Nora G; Bradley, John D; Silver, David; Jackson, Christopher G; Lane, Nancy E; Oddis, Chester V; Wolfe, Fred; Lisse, Jeffrey; Furst, Daniel E; Reda, Domenic J; Moskowitz, Roland W; Williams, H James; Clegg, Daniel O

    2010-01-01

    Objective Osteoarthritis of the knee causes significant morbidity and current medical treatment is limited to symptom relief, as therapies able to slow structural damage remain elusive. This study sought to evaluate the effect of glucosamine hydrochloride (glucosamine, G), sodium chondroitin sulfate (chondroitin sulfate, CS) (alone and in combination), celecoxib and placebo on progressive loss of joint space width (JSW). Methods A double-blind twenty-four month placebo-controlled study conducted at nine sites in the United States enrolled 572 participants from Glucosamine/chondroitin Arthritis Intervention Trial (GAIT) who satisfied radiographic criteria (Kellgren and Lawrence (K&L) Grade 2 or 3 changes and JSW of at least 2mm at baseline). Persons with primarily lateral compartment narrowing at any time point were excluded. Patients continued G 500mg three times daily, CS 400mg three times daily, the combination, celecoxib 200mg daily or placebo as randomized for GAIT. Minimum medial tibiofemoral JSW was measured at baseline, 12 and 24 months. The primary outcome measure was JSW change from baseline. Results The average JSW loss at 2 years for placebo, adjusted for design and clinical factors, was 0.16mm. No statistically significant difference for any treatment group compared to the placebo group was observed. Treatment effects for K&L Grade 2 knees, but not K&L Grade 3 knees showed a trend toward improvement relative to placebo. The study’s power was diminished by sample size, variance of JSW measurement and a smaller than expected loss in JSW. Conclusions At two years, no treatment achieved a predefined clinically important difference in JSW loss compared to placebo. However, patients with K&L Grade 2 osteoarthritis appear to have the greatest potential for modification by these treatments (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00032890). PMID:18821708

  7. Association of bilateral flat feet with knee pain and disability in patients with knee osteoarthritis: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Hirotaka; Ohi, Hiroshi; Isho, Takuya; Aoyama, Tomoki; Fukutani, Naoto; Kaneda, Eishi; Ohi, Kazuko; Abe, Kaoru; Kuroki, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2017-11-01

    This cross-sectional study examined the relationship of flat feet with knee pain, disability, and physical performance in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Orthopedic clinic participants (n = 95; age 61-91 years; 68.4% women) with Kellgren-Lawrence (K/L) grade ≥1 in the medial compartment underwent evaluation of navicular height and foot length for flat feet. Knee pain intensity, disability, and physical performance were evaluated using the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure, 10-m walk, timed up and go, and five-repetition chair stand tests. Of the 95 enrolled patients, 24 (25.3%) had bilateral flat feet, and significantly higher knee pain compared to patients with no flat feet (11.3 ± 8.23 points vs. 6.58 ± 6.37 points; p = 0.043). A ordinal logistic regression analysis showed that bilateral flat feet were significantly associated with increased knee pain (proportional odds ratio: 5.48, 95% confidence interval: 1.96, 15.3; p = 0.001) compared with no flat feet, adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, and tibiofemoral joint K/L grade, which is consistent across various different cutoffs of the definition of flat feet. Physical performance was similar between patients with and without bilateral flat feet. The presence of unilateral flat feet was not significantly associated with any outcome measures. These findings indicate that bilateral, but not unilateral, flat feet are associated with worse knee pain. A prospective study investigating a causal relationship between bilateral flat feet posture and knee pain as well as disability would be of particular interest to verify the potential adverse effect of altered foot posture. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2490-2498, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Adolescent knee pain and patellar dislocations are associated with patellofemoral osteoarthritis in adulthood: A case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conchie, Henry; Clark, Damian; Metcalfe, Andrew; Eldridge, Jonathan; Whitehouse, Michael

    2016-08-01

    There is a lack of information about the association between patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA) and both adolescent anterior knee pain (AKP) and previous patellar dislocations. This case-control study involved 222 participants from our knee arthroplasty database answering a questionnaire. One hundred and eleven patients suffering from PFOA were 1:1 matched by gender with a unicompartmental tibiofemoral arthritis control group. Multivariate correlation and binary logistic regression analysis were performed, with odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) calculated. An individual is 7.5 times more likely to develop PFOA if they have suffered from adolescent AKP (OR 7.5, 95% CIs 1.51 to 36.94). Additionally, experiencing a patellar dislocation increases the likelihood of development of PFOA, with an adjusted odds ratio of 3.2 (95% CIs 1.25 to 8.18). A 44-year difference in median age of first dislocation was also observed between the groups. This should bring into question the traditional belief that adolescent anterior knee pain is a benign pathology. Patellar dislocation is also a significant risk factor. These patients merit investigation, we encourage clinical acknowledgement of the potential consequences when encountering patients suffering from anterior knee pain or patellar dislocation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. The complexity of human walking: a knee osteoarthritis study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Kotti

    Full Text Available This study proposes a framework for deconstructing complex walking patterns to create a simple principal component space before checking whether the projection to this space is suitable for identifying changes from the normality. We focus on knee osteoarthritis, the most common knee joint disease and the second leading cause of disability. Knee osteoarthritis affects over 250 million people worldwide. The motivation for projecting the highly dimensional movements to a lower dimensional and simpler space is our belief that motor behaviour can be understood by identifying a simplicity via projection to a low principal component space, which may reflect upon the underlying mechanism. To study this, we recruited 180 subjects, 47 of which reported that they had knee osteoarthritis. They were asked to walk several times along a walkway equipped with two force plates that capture their ground reaction forces along 3 axes, namely vertical, anterior-posterior, and medio-lateral, at 1000 Hz. Data when the subject does not clearly strike the force plate were excluded, leaving 1-3 gait cycles per subject. To examine the complexity of human walking, we applied dimensionality reduction via Probabilistic Principal Component Analysis. The first principal component explains 34% of the variance in the data, whereas over 80% of the variance is explained by 8 principal components or more. This proves the complexity of the underlying structure of the ground reaction forces. To examine if our musculoskeletal system generates movements that are distinguishable between normal and pathological subjects in a low dimensional principal component space, we applied a Bayes classifier. For the tested cross-validated, subject-independent experimental protocol, the classification accuracy equals 82.62%. Also, a novel complexity measure is proposed, which can be used as an objective index to facilitate clinical decision making. This measure proves that knee osteoarthritis

  10. The diagnostic performance of anterior knee pain and activity-related pain in identifying knees with structural damage in the patellofemoral joint: the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanik, Joshua J; Neogi, Tuhina; Niu, Jingbo; Roemer, Frank W; Segal, Neil A; Lewis, Cora E; Nevitt, Michael; Guermazi, Ali; Felson, David T

    2014-08-01

    To determine the diagnostic test performance of location of pain and activity-related pain in identifying knees with patellofemoral joint (PFJ) structural damage. The Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study is a US National Institutes of Health-funded cohort study of older adults with or at risk of knee osteoarthritis. Subjects identified painful areas around the knee on a knee pain map and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index was used to assess pain with stairs and walking on level ground. Cartilage damage and bone marrow lesions were assessed from knee magnetic resonance imaging. We determined the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for presence of anterior knee pain (AKP), pain with stairs, absence of pain while walking on level ground, and combinations of tests in discriminating knees with isolated PFJ structural damage from those with isolated tibiofemoral joint (TFJ) or no structural damage. Knees with mixed PFJ/TFJ damage were removed from our analyses because of the inability to determine which compartment was causing pain. There were 407 knees that met our inclusion criteria. "Any" AKP had a sensitivity of 60% and specificity of 53%; and if AKP was the only area of pain, the sensitivity dropped to 27% but specificity rose to 81%. Absence of moderate pain with walking on level ground had the greatest sensitivity (93%) but poor specificity (13%). The combination of "isolated" AKP and moderate pain with stairs had poor sensitivity (9%) but the greatest specificity (97%) of strategies tested. Commonly used questions purported to identify knees with PFJ structural damage do not identify this condition with great accuracy.

  11. Intra-articular therapies for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shirley P; Hunter, David J

    2016-10-01

    Conventional medical therapies for osteoarthritis are mainly palliative in nature, aiming to control pain and symptoms. Traditional intra-articular therapies are not recommended in guidelines as first line therapy, but are potential alternatives, when conventional therapies have failed. Current and future intra-articular drug therapies for osteoarthritis are highlighted, including corticosteroids, hyaluronate, and more controversial treatments marketed commercially, namely platelet rich plasma and mesenchymal cell therapy. Intraarticular disease modifying osteoarthritis drugs are the future of osteoarthritis treatments, aiming at structural modification and altering the disease progression. Interleukin-1β inhibitor, bone morphogenic protein-7, fibroblast growth factor 18, bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist, human serum albumin, and gene therapy are discussed in this review. The evolution of drug development in osteoarthritis is limited by the ability to demonstrate effect. High quality trials are required to justify the use of existing intra-articular therapies and to advocate for newer, promising therapies. Challenges in osteoarthritis therapy research are fundamentally related to the complexity of the pathological mechanisms of osteoarthritis. Novel drugs offer hope in a disease with limited medical therapy options. Whether these future intra-articular therapies will provide clinically meaningful benefits, remains unknown.

  12. Does diabetes hide osteoarthritis pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaverton, Paul E; Peregoy, Jennifer; Fahlman, Lissa; Sangeorzan, Emmeline; Barrett, John P

    2012-04-01

    Clinical practice and research efforts related to the highly prevalent and disabling disease, osteoarthritis (OA), have long been hampered by an inadequate case definition. Much of the difficulty is due to a lack of agreement between X-rays evidence of OA and a patient's report of pain at that site. Such discordance between reported pain and radiographic evidence of OA has been attributed to several factors. This paper proposes another possible explanation, for at least a portion of such patients. It is hypothesized that an insidiously increasing diabetic neuropathy, particularly in the lower extremity, while first causing some pain, may gradually inhibit the ability to feel pain which might have otherwise been reported by those patients without neuropathy. Many of these patients with early stage glucose dysmetabolism will proceed to develop overt type 2 diabetes; however, the pain-inhibiting neuropathy caused by glucose metabolism dysfunction may manifest long before such a diagnosis. The high prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetic conditions, especially among the aged population, could mean that a substantial number of individuals with osteoarthritis will have both diseases to varying degrees over time. Validating and quantifying this hypothesized association would be useful to millions of persons and would significantly impact both research and clinical practice dealing with these major diseases of older persons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Treatment of patients with osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Negrín, Francisco; Medina Abellán, María D; Hermosa Hernán, Juan Carlos; de Felipe Medina, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic management of patients with osteoarthritis aims to decrease pain and inflammation, improve physical function, and to apply safe and effective treatments. A patient-centered approach implies the active participation of the patient in the design of the treatment plan and in timely and informed decision-making at all stages of the disease. The nucleus of treatment is patient education, physical activity and therapeutic exercise, together with weight control in overweight or obese patients. Self-care by the individual and by the family is fundamental in day-to-day patient management. The use of physical therapies, technical aids (walking sticks, etc.) and simple analgesics, opium alkaloids, and antiinflammatory drugs have demonstrated effectiveness in controlling pain, improving physical function and quality of life and their use is clearly indicated in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Conservative surgery and joint replacement is indicated when treatment goals are not achieved in specific patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14.  Adiponectin in early and chronic rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, Trine Bay

      Dato 31. januar 2006Title Adiponectin in early and chronic rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritisAuthors:Trine Bay Laurberg,Torkell Ellingsen,Jan Frystyk,Ib Hansen,Anette Jørgensen,Ulrik Tarp,Merete Lund Hetland,Kim Hørslev-Petersen,Nete Hornung,Jørgen Hjelm Poulsen,Allan Flyvbjerg......,Kristian Stengaard-PedersenBackground: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, chronic, autoimmune disease, which affects the joints with inflammation leading to destruction of cartilage and bone. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterised by low level of chronic inflammation, slow...

  15. Comparison of neuromuscular and quadriceps strengthening exercise in the treatment of varus malaligned knees with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennell Kim L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis of the knee involving predominantly the medial tibiofemoral compartment is common in older people, giving rise to pain and loss of function. Many people experience progressive worsening of the disease over time, particularly those with varus malalignment and increased medial knee joint load. Therefore, interventions that can reduce excessive medial knee loading may be beneficial in reducing the risk of structural progression. Traditional quadriceps strengthening can improve pain and function in people with knee osteoarthritis but does not appear to reduce medial knee load. A neuromuscular exercise program, emphasising optimal alignment of the trunk and lower limb joints relative to one another, as well as quality of movement performance, while dynamically and functionally strengthening the lower limb muscles, may be able to reduce medial knee load. Such a program may also be superior to traditional quadriceps strengthening with respect to improved pain and physical function because of the functional and dynamic nature. This randomised controlled trial will investigate the effect of a neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint loading, pain and function in individuals with medial knee joint osteoarthritis. We hypothesise that the neuromuscular program will reduce medial knee load as well as pain and functional limitations to a greater extent than a traditional quadriceps strengthening program. Methods/Design 100 people with medial knee pain, radiographic medial compartment osteoarthritis and varus malalignment will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of two 12-week exercise programs: quadriceps strengthening or neuromuscular exercise. Each program will involve 14 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist plus four unsupervised sessions per week at home. The primary outcomes are medial knee load during walking (the peak external knee adduction moment from 3D gait analysis, pain, and self

  16. Ten-Year Results of Medial Open-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy and Chondral Resurfacing in Severe Medial Osteoarthritis and Varus Malalignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Philipp; Geßlein, Markus; Schlumberger, Michael; Mayer, Philipp; Mayr, Raul; Oremek, Damian; Frank, Sebastian; Schulz-Jahrsdörfer, Martin; Richter, Jörg

    2018-03-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a widely used treatment option for medial osteoarthritis and varus malalignment, especially in young patients with early osteoarthritis. Limited outcome data are available for this procedure in severe osteoarthritis, and no long-term data are available using newer implants. To determine survivorship and functional results of medial open-wedge HTO combined with a chondral resurfacing (CR) procedure (abrasion plus microfracture) in severe medial osteoarthritis (Kellgren-Lawrence grade 3 and 4) and varus malalignment. Furthermore, factors that potentially influence the outcome were analyzed. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. From September 2005 to December 2008, all cases of HTO (fixation with an angular-stable internal fixator) combined with CR were prospectively surveyed with regard to survival (Kaplan-Meier-method, not requiring arthroplasty) and functional outcome (subjective International Knee Documentation Committee [IKDC] score). Cartilage regeneration at the time of hardware removal, tibial bone varus angle (TBVA), pre- and postoperative mechanical medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA), and postoperative alignment were analyzed with regard to the result. Seventy-nine knees were included (73 patients; mean age 50.9 ± 7.6 years). The follow-up rate was 90% at 10.0 ± 1.2 years (range, 8.3-12.1 years). Pre- and postoperative mechanical tibiofemoral axis were 9.6° ± 3.0° of varus and 0.6° ± 2.7° of valgus, respectively. Survival rate was 81.7% (95% CI, 72.5%-90.9%) at 10 years. Subjective IKDC score significantly improved from 44 ± 11 preoperatively to 70 ± 13 at one, 66 ± 15 at three, 66 ± 15 at five, and 65 ± 17 at ten years ( P 95°) with inferior functional outcome at final follow-up, respectively. Even in cases of severe medial osteoarthritis and varus malalignment, HTO in combination with a CR procedure is a good to excellent treatment option. The role of the CR procedure remains unclear. Although good results are

  17. A grounded patient-centered approach generated the personal and societal burden of osteoarthritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busija, Lucy; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Osborne, Richard H

    2013-09-01

    To develop a conceptual model to describe the burden of osteoarthritis in individuals with this condition and on the broader community. Six concept mapping workshops were undertaken: three with patients (n = 26) and three with health professionals (n = 27) in Australia and Sweden. The participants were asked to generate statements describing how osteoarthritis affects individuals with this condition and those around them. The results were used to construct an integrated theoretical model of the personal burden of osteoarthritis (PBO) and its extended version, the personal and societal burden of osteoarthritis (PSBO) model. We identified eight potentially independent aspects of PBO, including physical distress, fatigue, physical limitations, psychosocial distress, physical deconditioning, financial hardship, sleep disturbances, and lost productivity. Physical distress and impaired physical function combined to produce psychosocial problems, reduced work productivity, financial difficulties, and loss of physical fitness at the individual level, and increased health and welfare cost at the societal level. The PBO and PSBO models were developed directly from the views of patients and clinicians and provide new insights for managing the individual and societal burden of osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The discordance between clinical and radiographic knee osteoarthritis: A systematic search and summary of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croft Peter R

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have suggested that the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA are rather weakly associated with radiographic findings and vice versa. Our objectives were to identify estimates of the prevalence of radiographic knee OA in adults with knee pain and of knee pain in adults with radiographic knee OA, and determine if the definitions of x ray osteoarthritis and symptoms, and variation in demographic factors influence these estimates. Methods A systematic literature search identifying population studies which combined x rays, diagnosis, clinical signs and symptoms in knee OA. Estimates of the prevalence of radiographic OA in people with knee pain were determined and vice versa. In addition the effects of influencing factors were scrutinised. Results The proportion of those with knee pain found to have radiographic osteoarthritis ranged from 15–76%, and in those with radiographic knee OA the proportion with pain ranged from 15% – 81%. Considerable variation occurred with x ray view, pain definition, OA grading and demographic factors Conclusion Knee pain is an imprecise marker of radiographic knee osteoarthritis but this depends on the extent of radiographic views used. Radiographic knee osteoarthritis is likewise an imprecise guide to the likelihood that knee pain or disability will be present. Both associations are affected by the definition of pain used and the nature of the study group. The results of knee x rays should not be used in isolation when assessing individual patients with knee pain.

  19. Elevation of cartilage AGEs does not accelerate initiation of canine experimental osteoarthritis upon mild surgical damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P.A.J.M.; Degroot, J.; Barten-Van Rijbroek, A.D.; Zuurmond, A.-M.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Mastbergen, S.C.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a highly prevalent disease, age being the main risk factor. The age-related accumulation of advanced-glycation-endproducts (AGEs) adversely affects the mechanical and biochemical properties of cartilage. The hypothesis that accumulation of cartilage AGEs in combination with

  20. Lateral trunk lean and medializing the knee as gait strategies for knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbrands, T. A.; Pisters, M. F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/317999303; Theeven, P. J R; Verschueren, S.; Vanwanseele, B.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine (1) if Medial Thrust or Trunk Lean reduces the knee adduction moment (EKAM) the most during gait in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis, (2) if the best overall strategy is the most effective for each patient and (3) if these strategies affect ankle and hip kinetics.

  1. Lateral trunk lean and medializing the knee as gait strategies for knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F. Pisters; Drs. Ing. Tim Gerbrands; B. Vanwanseele; P.J.R. Theeven; S. Verschueren

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine (1) if Medial Thrust or Trunk Lean reduces the knee adduction moment (EKAM) the most during gait in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis, (2) if the best overall strategy is the most effective for each patient and (3) if these strategies affect ankle and hip

  2. Strength and voluntary activation in relation to functioning in patients with osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. D.M. van Leeuwen

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by pain, and problems with activities of daily life, especially if the hip or knee joint is affected. The aim of this project was to study associations between strength, voluntary activation and physical functioning in elderly patients with OA. People with OA of

  3. Osteoarthritis, Application of Physical Therapy Proceduers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijana Avdić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a group of overlapping disorders, which may have different aetiology but similar biological, morphologic and clinical outcome. In osteoarthritis, process will not encompass the joint cartilage only, but the entire joint, including sub-hondral bone, ligaments, capsule, and sinovial membrane and surrounding muscles. Osteoarthritis is a multi-factor disorder of sinovial joints, which occurs as result of mechanical and biological factors, which destabilise normal hondrocyte function, partitioning of cartilage, extra-cellular matrix and sub-hondral bone. The earliest changes, which are restricted to the joint cartilage surface only, do not cause any subjective feeling. The pain in arthrosis occurs (or re-occurs a bit later, Diagnosis will be determined based on clinical exam as well as signs and symptoms present. Symptomatic and functional treatment of osteoarthritis as one of rheumatic disorders must be taken throughout years, sometimes throughout a lifetime. It encompasses application of many medications and physical therapy procedures.

  4. Physiopathology and biomechanics of hip osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cutolo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Several factors seem to play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of hip osteoarthritis. Among these, an altered biomechanic and neuromuscular integrity of the hip joint should be considered. This is a review of the recent international literature concerning the role of loads and strengths acting on the hip joint, in order to better understand the pathogenesis and the physiopathology of the hip osteoarthritis. The study of these factors might be important to prevent the development of the osteoarthritis and might suggest the conservative treatment. In particular, the role of the balance among the muscles working in maintaining the equilibrium of the acting strengths is matter of discussion. The articular and neuromuscular dysfunction might induce an altered load distribution in the hip, particularly on the articular cartilage surface, and seems to favour the development of hip osteoarthritis...

  5. Lessons from animal models of osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, W.B. van den

    2008-01-01

    Animal models of osteoarthritis (OA) provide valuable insight into pathogenetic pathways. Although OA is not an inflammatory disease, synovial activation clearly plays a role. Matrix metalloproteinases 3 (stromelysin) and 13 (collagenase) appear crucial, and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with

  6. Efficacy of Curcuma for Treatment of Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kimberly; Sahy, William; Beckett, Robert D

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this review is to identify, summarize, and evaluate clinical trials to determine the efficacy of curcuma in the treatment of osteoarthritis. A literature search for interventional studies assessing efficacy of curcuma was performed, resulting in 8 clinical trials. Studies have investigated the effect of curcuma on pain, stiffness, and functionality in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Curcuma-containing products consistently demonstrated statistically significant improvement in osteoarthritis-related endpoints compared with placebo, with one exception. When compared with active control, curcuma-containing products were similar to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and potentially to glucosamine. While statistical significant differences in outcomes were reported in a majority of studies, the small magnitude of effect and presence of major study limitations hinder application of these results. Further rigorous studies are needed prior to recommending curcuma as an effective alternative therapy for knee osteoarthritis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Longitudinal use of complementary and alternative medicine among older adults with radiographic knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shibing; Dubé, Catherine E; Eaton, Charles B; McAlindon, Timothy E; Lapane, Kate L

    2013-11-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), a chronic and often painful disease for which there is no cure, accounts for more mobility issues in older adults than any other disease. Cross-sectional studies have found that arthritis is the most common reason for older adults to use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Although previous research has profiled the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of CAM users, few studies have provided information on variation in CAM use over time and most only considered use of any CAM, which was often a mixture of heterogeneous therapies. This study sought to describe the longitudinal patterns of CAM use among older adults with knee OA and to identify correlates and predictors of different commonly used CAM therapies. The Osteoarthritis Initiative included 1121 adults aged ≥65 years with radiographic tibiofemoral OA in one or both knees at baseline. Annual surveys captured current use of conventional therapies and 25 CAM modalities (grouped into 6 categories) for joint pain or arthritis at baseline and during the 4-year follow-up. We assessed longitudinal use of CAM modalities by summing the number of visits with participants reporting use of each modality. Correlates of CAM use under consideration included sociodemographic indicators, body mass index, overall measures of mental and physical well-being, and clinical indices of knee OA. Generalized estimation equations provided adjusted odds ratio estimates and 95% CIs. Nearly one-third of older adults reported using ≥1 CAM modality for treating OA at all assessments. With the exception of glucosamine and chondroitin (18%), few were persistent users of other CAM modalities. One in 5 of those using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or glucosamine and/or chondroitin were using them concurrently. Adjusted models revealed the following: (1) adults aged ≥75 years were less likely to use dietary supplements than those between ages 65 and 75 years; (2) persons with more severe knee

  8. The Founder's Lecture 2009: advances in imaging of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, Thomas Marc [University of California at San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The objective of this review article is to provide an update on new developments in imaging of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis over the past three decades. A literature review is presented that summarizes the highlights in the development of bone mineral density measurements, bone structure imaging, and vertebral fracture assessment in osteoporosis as well as MR-based semiquantitative assessment of osteoarthritis and quantitative cartilage matrix imaging. This review focuses on techniques that have impacted patient management and therapeutic decision making or that potentially will affect patient care in the near future. Results of pertinent studies are presented and used for illustration. In summary, novel developments have significantly impacted imaging of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis over the past three decades. (orig.)

  9. Self-efficacy and its application in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Marks

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis, a prevalent progressively disabling disease affecting one or both knee joints requires extensive self-management. Self-efficacy, a psychological attribute generally denoting one’s perceived belief about their ability to successfully perform a particular behavior, including health behaviors, is a significant predictor of psychological well-being, adherence to prescribed treatments, and pain coping mechanisms in persons with various forms of chronic disease, including arthritis. This paper examines the available peer-reviewed research published over the last 35 years detailing: i the concept of self-efficacy, ii the relationship between self-efficacy and adjustment to arthritis, iii the research concerning self-efficacy in the context of knee osteoarthritis disability, and iv some promising approaches for promoting the wellbeing of adults with knee osteoarthritis through the application of self-efficacy theory and other approaches. Based on this data, directions for future research and practice are offered.

  10. Seasonal variations in depression and osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Conrad M.

    1984-01-01

    Seasonal variations in consultations for depression and osteoarthritis were discovered in the 1980 morbidity data of five London practices with a total of 32,524 patients. Depression showed a bimodal pattern similar to that described from hospital data and national suicide statistics, but not previously recorded from general practice. Osteoarthritis also showed a bimodal pattern, with peaks in spring and autumn; this came as a surprise and needs confirmation from other studies. It may reflect...

  11. Reflections about Osteoarthritis and Curcuma longa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuri, Marina Cristina; Barbalho, Sandra Maria; Val, Raíssa Meira; Guiguer, Elen Landgraf

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic inflammatory degenerative process that affects joints such as the hands, hips, shoulders, feet, spine, and especially knees in millions of people worldwide. Some authors have shown that Curcuma longa components may exhibit benefic effects in the treatment of degenerative diseases as OA. This plant belongs to the family Zingiberaceae and it is popularly known as turmeric or saffron. This review intended to perform a retrospective search to identify studies involving humans and animal models. This review was based on articles linking OA and C. longa. Databases as Medline, Science Direct, and Lilacs were consulted and a retrospective search was carried out in order to identify studies involving humans and animal models. The curcuminoids from C. longa exhibit actions at different locations in the pathogenesis of OA once it may play an important role as anti-inflammatory, down-regulating enzymes as phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase-2, and lipoxygenases, and reducing tumor necrosis factor-alpha-and interleukins such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-8. They also act as inducer of apoptosis in synoviocytes, decreasing the inflammation process and may also reduce the synthesis of reactive oxygen species. For these reasons, new pharmaceutical technology and pharmacological studies should be proposed to determine the dose, the best delivery vehicle, pharmaceutical formulation and route of administration of this plant so its use as an adjunct in the treatment of OA may become a reality in clinical practice. PMID:28503046

  12. MR imaging of erosions in interphalangeal joint osteoarthritis: is all osteoarthritis erosive?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grainger, A.J.; Farrant, J.M.; O'Connor, P.J.; Tan, A.L.; Emery, P.; Tanner, S.; McGonagle, D.

    2007-01-01

    Erosive osteoarthritis is usually considered as an inflammatory subset of osteoarthritis (OA). However, an inflammatory component is now recognised in all subsets of OA, so this subgroup of erosive or inflammatory OA is more difficult to conceptualise. The aim of this study was to compare routine CR and MRI to investigate erosion numbers and morphology to determine whether hand OA in general is a more erosive disease than previously recognised. Fifteen patients with clinical (OA) of the small joints of the hand underwent MRI of one of the affected proximal interphalangeal (PIP) or distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints. Conventional radiographs (CR) of the hand were also obtained. The MR images were reviewed by two observers for the presence of central and marginal erosions. The site and morphology of any erosions was recorded. CR images of the same hand joint were scored independently for central and marginal erosions by the same observers. There was 100% agreement between the observers for scoring erosions on CR. Agreement for the MRI scores was also excellent (kappa = 0.84). MRI detected 37 erosions, of which only 9 were seen on CR. The increase in sensitivity using MRI was much greater for marginal erosions (1 detected on CR, 19 on MRI) than for central erosions (8 on CR, 18 on MRI). Using MRI 80% of joints examined showed 1 or more erosions compared with 40% using CR. If only marginal erosions were considered 80% of joints were still considered erosive by MRI criteria, but only 1 showed evidence of erosion on CR. Morphologically central erosions appeared to represent areas of subchondral collapse and pressure atrophy. In contrast, marginal erosions resembled those seen in inflammatory arthritides. Erosions, and particularly marginal erosions typical of those seen in inflammatory arthritis, are a more common feature of small joint OA than conventional radiographs have previously indicated. (orig.)

  13. Early osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, Henning; Kon, Elizaveta; Condello, Vincenzo; Peretti, Giuseppe M; Steinwachs, Matthias; Seil, Romain; Berruto, Massimo; Engebretsen, Lars; Filardo, Giuseppe; Angele, Peter

    2016-06-01

    There is an increasing awareness on the importance in identifying early phases of the degenerative processes in knee osteoarthritis (OA), the crucial period of the disease when there might still be the possibility to initiate treatments preventing its progression. Early OA may show a diffuse and ill-defined involvement, but also originate in the cartilage surrounding a focal lesion, thus necessitating a separate assessment of these two entities. Early OA can be considered to include a maximal involvement of 50 % of the cartilage thickness based on the macroscopic ICRS classification, reflecting an OARSI grade 4. The purpose of this paper was to provide an updated review of the current status of the diagnosis and definition of early knee OA, including the clinical, radiographical, histological, MRI, and arthroscopic definitions and biomarkers. Based on current evidence, practical classification criteria are presented. As new insights and technologies become available, they will further evolve to better define and treat early knee OA.

  14. Load distribution in early osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomoll, Andreas H; Angele, Peter; Condello, Vincenzo; Madonna, Vincenzo; Madry, Henning; Randelli, Pietro; Shabshin, Nogah; Verdonk, Peter; Verdonk, Rene

    2016-06-01

    Total knee replacement is an accepted standard of care for the treatment of advanced knee osteoarthritis with good results in the vast majority of older patients. The use in younger and more active populations, however, remains controversial due to concerns over activity restrictions, implant survival, and patient satisfaction with the procedure. It is in these younger patient populations that alternatives to arthroplasty are increasingly being explored. Historically, osteotomy was utilized to address unicompartmental pain from degeneration and overload, for example, after meniscectomy. Utilization rates of osteotomy have fallen in recent years due to the increasing popularity of partial and total knee arthroplasty. This article explores the indications and outcomes of traditional unloading osteotomy, as well as newer options that are less invasive and offer faster return to function.

  15. The subclinical phase of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, G E

    1987-05-01

    The clinical diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA) generally requires x-ray confirmation, fastening upon features such as narrowing of the joint and proliferative changes at the joint margins. In the formative phases, because of simple structural reasons, the joint may well not be narrowed and the proliferative changes and geodes may not as yet be apparent. Even symptomatic joint disease at this time may fail of diagnosis because the customary criteria have not yet been met. I submit that all OA is secondary, the inception being remote in time and, unless dramatic, being forgotten or never even noticed. An understanding of some of the mechanical features that characterize the progression to OA and the mechanism of pathogenesis should lead to earlier diagnosis and possible application of preventive measures.

  16. "Generalized osteoarthritis": a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Amanda E; Smith, Michael W; Golightly, Yvonne M; Jordan, Joanne M

    2014-06-01

    Given the conflicting definitions of "generalized osteoarthritis" (GOA) in the literature, we performed a systematic review of GOA definitions, risk factors, and outcomes. We searched the MEDLINE literature with the terms osteoarthritis, generalized, polyarticular, multiple joint, and multi-joint to obtain articles related to GOA, following evidence-based guidelines. Titles and abstracts of 948 articles were reviewed, with full-text review of 108. Data were extracted based on pre-specified criteria for 74 articles plus 24 identified through bibliographic review (n = 98). Twenty-four large cohorts (n ~ 30,000) were represented along with numerous clinical series (n ~ 9000), across 22 countries and 60 years (1952-2012). No less than 15 definitions of GOA were given in 30 studies with a stated GOA definition; at least 6 groups used a summed score of joints or radiographic grades. Prevalence estimates based on these GOA definitions were 1-80%, although most were 5-25%. Increased risk and progression of GOA was associated with age, female sex, and genetic/familial factors. Associations with increased body mass index or bone mineral density were not consistent. A study estimated the heritability of GOA at 42%. Collagen biomarker levels increased with the number of involved joints. Increased OA burden was associated with increased mortality and disability, poorer health, and function. While there remains no standard definition of GOA, this term is commonly used. The impact on health may be greater when OA is in more than one joint. A descriptive term, such as multi-joint or polyarticular OA, designating OA of multiple joints or joint groups is recommended. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. How to define responders in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Cyrus; Adachi, Jonathan D; Bardin, Thomas; Berenbaum, Francis; Flamion, Bruno; Jonsson, Helgi; Kanis, John A; Pelousse, Franz; Lems, Willem F; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Reiter, Susanne; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Rizzoli, René; Bruyère, Olivier

    2013-06-01

    Osteoarthritis is a clinical syndrome of failure of the joint accompanied by varying degrees of joint pain, functional limitation, and reduced quality of life due to deterioration of articular cartilage and involvement of other joint structures. Regulatory agencies require relevant clinical benefit on symptoms and structure modification for registration of a new therapy as a disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD). An international Working Group of the European Society on Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) and International Osteoporosis Foundation was convened to explore the current burden of osteoarthritis, review current regulatory guidelines for the conduct of clinical trials, and examine the concept of responder analyses for improving drug evaluation in osteoarthritis. The ESCEO considers that the major challenges in DMOAD development are the absence of a precise definition of the disease, particularly in the early stages, and the lack of consensus on how to detect structural changes and link them to clinically meaningful endpoints. Responder criteria should help identify progression of disease and be clinically meaningful. The ideal criterion should be sensitive to change over time and should predict disease progression and outcomes such as joint replacement. The ESCEO considers that, for knee osteoarthritis, clinical trial data indicate that radiographic joint space narrowing >0.5 mm over 2 or 3 years might be a reliable surrogate measure for total joint replacement. On-going research using techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and biochemical markers may allow the identification of these patients earlier in the disease process.

  18. Impact of ankle osteoarthritis on the energetics and mechanics of gait: the case of hemophilic arthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobet, Sébastien; Hermans, Cedric; Bastien, Guillaume J; Massaad, Firas; Detrembleur, Christine

    2012-07-01

    Osteoarthritis may affect joints in any part of the body, including the ankle. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of ankle osteoarthritis on the energetics and mechanics of gait, while taking into account the effect of slower speed generally adopted by patients with osteoarthritis. Using a motion analysis system, synchronous kinematic, kinetics, spatiotemporal, mechanics and metabolic gait parameters were measured in 10 patients diagnosed with ankle osteoarthritis consecutive to hemophilia. The subjects walked at a self-selected speed and their performance was compared to speed-matched normal values obtained in healthy control subjects. Speed-normalization using a Z-score transformation showed a significant increase in metabolic cost (Z=1.78; P=0.006) and decrease in mechanical work (Z=-0.97; P=0.009). As a consequence, muscular efficiency also decreased (Z=-0.97; P=0.001). These changes were associated with a surprising efficacy of the pendular mechanism, i.e., an improved recovery index (Z=0.97; P=0.004). Our findings suggest that patients with ankle osteoarthritis adopt a walking strategy which improves recovery through the pendular mechanism. This may be a compensatory mechanism in order to economize energy which would counterbalance the energy waste due to low muscle efficiency. These modifications are proportional to the impaired ankle function. Our data provides a quantitative baseline to better understand the dynamics of ankle osteoarthritis and determine the individual role that lower limb joints play in the multiple chronic joint affections. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and knives Mobile shower heads Bath seats and grab bars for the bathtub Other organizations Arthritis Foundation ... 01/08) Last Updated: April 1, 2014 This article was contributed by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: ...

  20. Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... activities, such as personal hygiene, household chores, or cooking may become a challenge. Treatment usually improves function. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your provider if you have symptoms of ...

  1. [Rating scale for osteoarthritis knee assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-González, Rubén; Pérez-Correa, Jesús; Gaytán-Morales, Lucio

    2006-01-01

    We undertook this study to develop a grading scale to assess knee osteoarthritis using the Bristol Score. Between August and November 2004, a clinimetrical, prospective, group-controlled, observational, cross-sectional and analytical study was done. The study sample was comprised of 55 patients, 35 years old and over, with clinical-radiographic diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis following the American Academy of Rheumatology criteria. The Bristol Score was used in 25 patients by two standardized orthopedic surgeons. Sensitivity, consistency and validity of the Bristol Score were determined. The new grading scale to assess osteoarthritis Magdalena de las Salinas H-1(MSH1) was used in 30 patients. Sensitivity, consistency and validity of the MSH1 were also determined. Both indexes were compared in these terms. An osteoarthritis radiographic score was developed to assess the validity of the MSH1. Inter-observer intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for the Bristol Score in its categories was total 0.62, function 0.84, pain 0.40 and movement 0.89. Inter-observer ICC for MSH1 in its categories was total 0.91, function 0.92, pain 0.79 and movement 0.86 (p Bristol Score was 0.51 (p = 0.002), with 80% agreement. The weighed kappa for the MSH1 was 0.81 (p Bristol Score and the osteoarthritis radiographic score was -0.29 (p = 0.049). Correlation between the MSH1 and the radiographic score of osteoarthritis was -0.62 (p Bristol Score and can be considered a reliable instrument to assess knee osteoarthritis.

  2. Hip abductor muscle volume in hip osteoarthritis and matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, A; Pizzari, T; English, D J; Kapakoulakis, T; Green, R A

    2016-10-01

    Hip abductor muscle strength and function is negatively impacted by the presence of hip osteoarthritis (OA). This study aimed to quantify differences in hip abductor muscle volume, fatty infiltration and strength in a unilateral hip OA population when compared to a control group. Impact of radiographic severity of OA on these variables was also examined. Volumes of gluteus maximus (GMax), medius (GMed) minimus (GMin) and tensor fascia lata (TFL) was measured using MRI and muscle volume asymmetry between limbs was calculated. Fatty infiltrate within muscles was graded using the Goutallier classification system. Hip abduction and rotation strength was tested using a dynamometer. Differences between groups or limbs were analysed using t-tests and differences in fatty infiltration using non-parametric tests. A statistically significant decrease in muscle volume was identified in GMax (P abduction and internal rotation strength was reduced in the OA group. Increased levels of fatty infiltration were identified in the affected limbs of the OA group for GMax (P = 0.01) and GMin (P = 0.04). Gluteal muscle atrophy, increased gluteal fatty infiltration and hip strength deficits were evident in the affected hips of OA participants. Since severity of OA was related to the extent of atrophy and fatty deposits, rehabilitation programs targeting these muscles could reverse or halt the progression of these structural and functional deficits. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Knee osteoarthritis and SPA therapy: assessment of joint function and quality of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, M; Filippelli, A

    2011-01-01

    In industrialized countries the increase in life expectancy of the population has led to an increase in chronic diseases such as osteoarthritis (OA). Knee osteoarthritis for the high disability and psychological stress, not considered adequately, has negative impact on the quality of life. In this pathology SPA therapy, in particular the sulphur mud-bath therapy, can provide a stage of the therapeutic strategy. However, studies on the impact of SPA therapy on the quality of life in knee osteoarthritis are insufficient. The aim research was to evaluate the effectiveness of SPA therapy on chronic pain, joint function and psychological distress that characterize knee osteoarthritis. The study has been performed on 44 subjects affected by knee Osteoarthritis, being 27 (61%) women and 17 (39%) men (mean age: 58±8.7 years, age range: 42-76 years). The investigated subjects were treated with a cycle of a combination of daily locally applied mud-packs and bicarbonate-sulphurous mineral bath water from Terme of Telese SpA (Benevento-Italy). At the beginning and at the end of the Spa therapy was evaluated the level of pain (using VAS scale), the degree of knee flexion (using goniometer), the level of anxiety and depression (using SDS Zung Test and SAS Zung test) and the impact of sulphurous mud-bath treatment on quality of life (using the algofunctional Lequesne indice). At the end of Spa therapy the results of our study have shown a significant (plife. The data from this investigation seem to indicate that the SPA therapy may be useful in improving joint function and quality of life in knee osteoarthritis.

  4. Ageing and Incidence of Osteoarthritis of the Knee Joint, Lumbar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was a significant difference in the distribution of osteoarthritis between gender and within the age groups (P=0.000). Osteoarthritis of the lumbar spine was the highest in males within the age groups of 61-65, followed by 45- 50, 56 - 60, and 51 - 55; whereas in the females, osteoarthritis of the knee joint was the ...

  5. [SECOT consensus on medial femorotibial osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, A; Silvestre, A; Carpintero, P

    2013-01-01

    A consensus, prepared by SECOT, is presented on the management of medial knee compartment osteoarthritis, in order to establish clinical criteria and recommendations directed at unifying the criteria in its management, dealing with the factors involved in the pathogenesis of medial femorotibial knee osteoarthritis, the usefulness of diagnostic imaging techniques, and the usefulness of arthroscopy. Conservative and surgical treatments are also analysed. The experts consulted showed a consensus (agreed or disagreed) in 65.8% of the items considered, leaving 14items where no consensus was found, which included the aetiopathogenesis of the osteoarthritis, the value of NMR in degenerative disease, the usefulness of COX-2 and the chondroprotective drugs, as well as on the ideal valgus tibial osteotomy technique. © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Osteoarthritis - histology and pathogenetic concepts; Arthrose - Histologie und pathogenetische Ansaetze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulzbacher, I. [Universitaetsklinik Wien (Austria). Klinisches Inst. fuer Klinische Pathologie

    2000-12-01

    Osteoarthitis is the most common joint disease affecting over 60% of the elderly population. It is characterized by the progressive erosion of articular cartilage leading to incapacity of movement. In the great majority of instances, osteoarthritis appears insidiously, without apparent initiating cause. This primary form is usually oligoarticular involving hip, knee, cervical vertebrae, interphalangeal joints of the fingers or tarsometatarsal joints of the feet. In case of an underlying systemic diasease or local injury the cartilage destruction is considered as secondary osteoarthritis. The pathogenesis of primary osteoarthritis suggests an intrinsic disease of cartilage in which biochemical and metabolic alterations result in its breakdown. Within the last decades different models were stablished which also concentrated on other joint structures such as bone or ligaments. Changes of the subchondral bone were found to precide cartilage damage suggesting a primary alteration of the subchondral region. Other studies concentrated on the metabolic activity of chondrocytes in healthy cartilage of osteoarthritis patients. The precise event that leads to these changes is still not clear. This review concentrates on the histological features in the course of the disease and tries to provide a summary on different pathogenetic concepts. (orig.) [German] Die Arthrosis deformans ist die haeufigste Gelenkerkrankung und betrifft ueber 60% der aelteren Population. Die Erkrankung ist durch fortschreitenden Knorpelverlust gekennzeichnet und fuehrt zu einer limitierteren Bewegungsfreiheit. In den meisten Faellen beginnt der Krankheitsverlauf heimtueckisch ohne ersichtlichen Grund. Diese primaere Form manifestiert sich oft polyartikulaer und betrifft vor allem die Huefte, das Knie, die Halswirbelsaeule, die interphalangealen Gelenke der Finger oder die tarsometatarsalen Gelenke. Bei einer zugrunde liegenden systemischen Erkrankung oder lokal destruierenden Faktoren ist der

  7. Physiotherapy Effects in Gait Speed in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Klejda; Kola, Irena; Dhamaj, Fregen; Shpata, Vjollca; Zallari, Kiri

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic degenerative disease, known as the most common cause of difficulty walking in older adults and subsequently is associated with slow walking. Also one of the main symptoms is a degenerative and mechanics type of pain. Pain is very noticeable while walking in rugged terrain, during ascent and descent of stairs, when changing from sitting to standing position as well as staying in one position for a long time. Many studies have shown that the strength of the quadriceps femoris muscle can affect gait, by improving or weakening it. Kinesio Tape is a physiotherapeutic technique, which reduces pain and increases muscular strength by irritating the skin receptors. AIM: The aims of this study was first to verify if the application of Kinesio Tape on quadriceps femoris muscle increases gait speed in patients with knee osteoarthritis and secondly if applying Kinesio Tape on quadriceps femoris muscle reduces pain while walking. METHOD: Seventy-four patients with primary knee osteoarthritis, aged 50 - 73 years, participated in this study. Firstly we observed the change of gait speed, while walking for 10 meters at normal speed for each patient, before, one day and three days after the application of Kinesio Tape on quadriceps femoris muscle, with the help of the 10 - meter walk test. Secondly, we observed the change of pain, while walking for 10 meters at normal speed for each patient, before, one day and three days after the application, with the help of Numerical Pain Rating Scale - NRS. RESULTS: Our results indicated that there was a significant increase in gait speed while walking for 10 meters one day and also three days after application of Kinesio Tape on quadriceps femoris muscle. Also, there was a significant reduction of pain level 1 and 3 days after application of Kinesio Tape, compared to the level of pain before its application. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicated that there was a significant decrease in pain and increase

  8. Development of bone marrow lesions is associated with adverse effects on knee cartilage while resolution is associated with improvement - a potential target for prevention of knee osteoarthritis: a longitudinal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Introduction To examine the relationship between development or resolution of bone marrow lesions (BMLs) and knee cartilage properties in a 2 year prospective study of asymptomatic middle-aged adults. Methods 271 adults recruited from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study, underwent a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) of their dominant knee at baseline and again approximately 2 years later. Cartilage volume, cartilage defects and BMLs were determined at both time points. Results Among 234 subjects free of BMLs at baseline, 33 developed BMLs over 2 years. The incidence of BMLs was associated with progression of tibiofemoral cartilage defects (OR 2.63 (95% CI 0.93, 7.44), P = 0.07 for medial compartment; OR 3.13 (95% CI 1.01, 9.68), P = 0.048 for lateral compartment). Among 37 subjects with BMLs at baseline, 17 resolved. Resolution of BMLs was associated with reduced annual loss of medial tibial cartilage volume (regression coefficient -35.9 (95%CI -65, -6.82), P = 0.02) and a trend for reduced progression of medial tibiofemoral cartilage defects (OR 0.2 (95% CI 0.04, 1.09), P = 0.06). Conclusions In this cohort study of asymptomatic middle-aged adults the development of new BMLs was associated with progressive knee cartilage pathology while resolution of BMLs prevalent at baseline was associated with reduced progression of cartilage pathology. Further work examining the relationship between changes and BML and cartilage may provide another important target for the prevention of knee osteoarthritis. PMID:20085624

  9. Evaluation of adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for treatment of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisbie, David D; Kisiday, John D; Kawcak, Chris E; Werpy, Natasha M; McIlwraith, C Wayne

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was the assessment of clinical, biochemical, and histologic effects of intraarticular administered adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for treatment of osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis was induced arthroscopically in the middle carpal joint of all horses, the contralateral joint being sham-operated. All horses received treatment on Day 14. Eight horses received placebo treatment and eight horses received adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction in their osteoarthritis-affected joint. The final eight horses were treated the in osteoarthritis-affected joint with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Evaluations included clinical, radiographic, synovial fluid analysis, gross, histologic, histochemical, and biochemical evaluations. No adverse treatment-related events were observed. The model induced a significant change in all but two parameters, no significant treatment effects were demonstrated, with the exception of improvement in synovial fluid effusion PGE2 levels with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells when compared to placebo. A greater improvement was seen with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells when compared to adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction and placebo treatment. Overall, the findings of this study were not significant enough to recommend the use of stem cells for the treatment of osteoarthritis represented in this model.

  10. Proximal Interphalangeal Joint Silicone Arthroplasty for Osteoarthritis: Midterm Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghshineh, Nima; Goyal, Kanu; Giugale, Juan M; Neral, Mithun K; Ferreira, Joel V; Buterbaugh, Glenn A; Imbriglia, Joseph E

    2018-04-01

    Osteoarthritis of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint affects a large percentage of the population and can lead to significant functional disability. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the midterm clinical effectiveness of PIP joint arthroplasty for nonrheumatic arthritis. A single-center retrospective cohort study evaluating preoperative and postoperative objective and subjective measures was conducted. Range of motion (ROM), Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scores, key pinch strength, grip strength, and satisfaction with respect to pain, deformity, function, and strength were measured. Forty-five fingers in 25 patients were followed up for a mean period of 42 months. Preoperative and postoperative mean ROM was equivalent at 59.1° and 59.2°, respectively. Postoperative grip and key pinch strength showed significant improvement and near normalization compared with contralateral extremity. Complication rate was 37% with 20% requiring revision surgery. Patients with diabetes mellitus had higher odds of requiring revision surgery. Pain scores improved from 7.4 to 1.9 on a visual analog scale. Overall satisfaction was high at 84%, and 91% of patients would have the surgery performed again. Silicone arthroplasty for osteoarthritis of the PIP remains a good option for pain relief. Our study presents midterm follow-up data that support significant pain relief, increased grip and key pinch strength, and high satisfaction associated with this implant.

  11. [Levels of pain and self-efficacy of individuals with osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Nurhan; Göriş, Songül; Demir, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive study was conducted to determine pain and self-efficacy levels of individuals with osteoarthritis. 83 patients, who were hospitalized in and admitted to physical therapy or rehabilitation outpatient clinic and had a primary diagnosis of osteoarthritis, were included in the study. The data of the study were collected by using patient information form, visual analog scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and arthritis self-efficacy scale. Pearson correlation analysis, t-test, and one-way analysis of variance were used to assess the data. A p value less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The most frequent complaints of 78.5% of the individuals with osteoarthritis were pain and limitation of movement. The pain experienced by 69.9% affected their daily life activities so much. VAS mean score of the participants was 5.7±2.3, their WOMAC mean score was 56.3±14.8, and their self-efficacy score was 103.7±29.5. Self-efficacy levels of those, who were men, had a higher educational level, were not housewives, were independent in daily life activities and did not have an additional chronic disease, were higher compared to the other groups (pcorrelation between self-efficacy scores and VAS and WOMAC scores and a positive correlation between VAS and WOMAC scores were found (pself-efficacy of the individuals with osteoarthritis was moderate and gender, educational level, status of independence, pain, and functional level affected self-efficacy.

  12. Lifetime Risk of Symptomatic Hand Osteoarthritis: The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jin; Barbour, Kamil E; Murphy, Louise B; Nelson, Amanda E; Schwartz, Todd A; Helmick, Charles G; Allen, Kelli D; Renner, Jordan B; Baker, Nancy A; Jordan, Joanne M

    2017-06-01

    Symptomatic hand osteoarthritis (OA) is a common condition that affects hand strength and function, and causes disability in activities of daily living. Prior studies have estimated that the lifetime risk of symptomatic knee OA is 45% and that of hip OA is 25%. The objective of the present study was to estimate the overall lifetime risk of symptomatic hand OA, and the stratified lifetime risk according to potential risk factors. Data were obtained from 2,218 adult subjects (ages ≥45 years) in the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, a population-based prospective cohort study among residents of Johnston County, North Carolina. Data for the present study were collected from 2 of the follow-up cycles (1999-2004 and 2005-2010). Symptomatic hand OA was defined as the presence of both self-reported symptoms and radiographic OA in the same hand. Lifetime risk, defined as the proportion of the population who will develop symptomatic hand OA in at least 1 hand by age 85 years, was estimated from models using generalized estimating equations. Overall, the lifetime risk of symptomatic hand OA was 39.8% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 34.4-45.3%). In this population, nearly 1 in 2 women (47.2%, 95% CI 40.6-53.9%) had an estimated lifetime risk of developing symptomatic hand OA by age 85 years, compared with 1 in 4 men (24.6%, 95% CI 19.5-30.5%). Race-specific symptomatic hand OA risk estimates were 41.4% (95% CI 35.5-47.6%) among whites and 29.2% (95% CI 20.5-39.7%) among African Americans. The lifetime risk of symptomatic hand OA among individuals with obesity (47.1%, 95% CI 37.8-56.7%) was 11 percentage points higher than that in individuals without obesity (36.1%, 95% CI 29.7-42.9%). These findings demonstrate the substantial burden of symptomatic hand OA overall and in sociodemographic and clinical subgroups. Increased use of public health and clinical interventions is needed to address its impact. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Prediction of medial tibiofemoral compartment joint space loss progression using volumetric cartilage measurements: Data from the FNIH OA biomarkers consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Demehri, Shadpour [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Guermazi, Ali [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Roemer, Frank W. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Hunter, David J. [Royal North Shore Hospital Sydney, Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, University of Sydney, and Rheumatology Department, Sydney (Australia); Dam, Erik B. [Biomediq, Copenhagen (Denmark); Zikria, Bashir [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kwoh, C.K. [University of Arizona, Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Investigating the association between baseline cartilage volume measurements (and initial 24th month volume loss) with medial compartment Joint-Space-Loss (JSL) progression (>0.7 mm) during 24-48th months of study. Case and control cohorts (Biomarkers Consortium subset from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI)) were defined as participants with (n=297) and without (n=303) medial JSL progression (during 24-48th months). Cartilage volume measurements (baseline and 24th month loss) were obtained at five knee plates (medial-tibial, lateral-tibial, medial-femoral, lateral-femoral and patellar), and standardized values were analysed. Multivariate logistic regression was used with adjustment for known confounders. Artificial-Neural-Network analysis was conducted by Multi-Layer-Perceptrons (MLPs) including baseline determinants, and baseline (1) and interval changes (2) in cartilage volumes. Larger baseline lateral-femoral cartilage volume was predictive of medial JSL (OR: 1.29 (1.01-1.64)). Greater initial 24th month lateral-femoral cartilage volume-loss (OR: 0.48 (0.27-0.84)) had protective effect on medial JSL during 24-48th months of study. Baseline and interval changes in lateral-femoral cartilage volume, were the most important estimators for medial JSL progression (importance values: 0.191(0.177-0.204), 0.218(0.207-0.228)) in the ANN analyses. Cartilage volumes (both at baseline and their change during the initial 24 months) in the lateral femoral plate were predictive of medial JSL progression. (orig.)

  14. Sensitivity and associations with pain and body weight of an MRI definition of knee osteoarthritis compared with radiographic Kellgren and Lawrence criteria: a population-based study in middle-aged females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiphof, D; Oei, E H G; Hofman, A; Waarsing, J H; Weinans, H; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A

    2014-03-01

    Is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) definition for tibiofemoral osteoarthritis [(TFOAMRI) (definite osteophyte and full-thickness cartilage loss (or a combination of these factors with other MRI osteoarthritis (OA) features)] more sensitive to detect structural OA compared with the Kellgren & Lawrence (K&L) grading? And which definition shows the strongest association with (1) knee pain at baseline, (2) persistent knee pain during 2-year follow-up, (3) new onset of knee pain ±2 years later, and (4) body mass index (BMI). Of 888 females of the open population Rotterdam Study, radiographs and MRI of both knees were assessed for knee OA defined by K&L ≥ 2 and TFOAMRI. Pain in or around the knee is measured at baseline and ±2 years later. GEE analyses are used for the associations. Of 1766 knees, 77 knees (4%) were diagnosed with K&L ≥ 2, whereas 160 knees (9%) met the TFOAMRI criteria. Only 43 knees met both definitions (34 knees were graded with K&L ≥ 2 and no TFOAMRI and 117 knees met only the TFOAMRI criteria). The association between the definitions and knee pain at baseline was higher when TFOAMRI was included [TFOAMRI alone: odds ratio (OR) = 2.83 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.84-4.36); TFOAMRI & K&L ≥ 2: OR = 6.28 (95% CI: 2.99-13.19)] than for K&L ≥ 2 alone (OR = 1.83 (95% CI: 0.63-5.32)). This was similar for the association between the definitions and persistent knee pain, and between the definitions and BMI. TFOAMRI detects more cases of knee OA than K&L ≥ 2. Together with a better content validity and at least equal construct validity, we conclude that the TFOAMRI definition for knee OA is more sensitive in detecting structural knee OA. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Hip and knee osteoarthritis. Conventional X-ray best and cheapest diagnostic method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boegård, Torsten; Jonsson, Kjell

    2002-10-31

    Osteoarthritis is a multifactorial disease affecting cartilage and subchondral bone. Conventional radiographs are inexpensive and readily available. The hip joint should be examined in weight-bearing with an anteroposterior and a right and left anterior oblique view, rotating the patient 55 degrees in each oblique view. Radiographically established osteoarthritis of the hip is present when the joint space width is less than 3 mm or less than the width in the contralateral hip joint. The femorotibial joint should be examined in a posteroanterior view in weight-bearing and in semiflexion with the central X-ray beam tangential to the medial tibial plateau and with the medial aspect of the foot parallel to the beam. A diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the femorotibial joint is established with the presence of osteophytes at the medial or lateral aspect of the joint. Joint space narrowing with a joint width less than 3 mm is a sign of severe disease. The femoropatellar joint should be examined in skyline view in standing with the X-ray beam parallel to the articular aspect of the patella. A diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the femoropatellar joint is established with a joint space width less than 5 mm. Conventional radiographs of the hip and knee joints are believed to remain the primary examination for detecting signs of degenerative disease in these joints, although MRI is a superior technique for revealing even small areas of degenerative changes.

  16. The canine bilateral groove model of osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Intema, F.; Groot, J. de; Elshof, B.; Vianen, M.E.; Yocum, S.; Zuurmond, A.; Mastbergen, S.C.; Lafeber, F.P.

    2008-01-01

    In studies aimed at local treatment of experimental osteoarthritis (OA) it is optimal to have an internal (untreated) OA control. Such an approach excludes interanimal variation, and allows paired statistical evaluation of treatment efficacy. For this purpose, we developed and characterized a

  17. Osteoarthritis in 2011: Many steps to climb

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-08-01

    Aug 1, 2011 ... The number of persons suffering from OA is increasing as people live longer, and as obesity escalates. Osteoarthritis-related .... improve joint range of motion and muscle strength, which may alleviate pain. In addition ... transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may significantly reduce pain and are worth.

  18. Current Australian physiotherapy management of hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Sallie M; Blackburn, Meagan S; McMahon, Kylie; Bennell, Kim L

    2010-12-01

    Symptomatic osteoarthritis can be a painful, costly and debilitating condition. Whilst there is a substantial body of literature surrounding osteoarthritis of the knee, there is less reported research on the hip joint, especially pertaining to physiotherapy intervention. This descriptive study aimed to describe current physiotherapy management of osteoarthritis of the hip by Australian physiotherapists in private practice and acute hospital settings. Cross-sectional survey. A questionnaire was administered to 364 public and private practitioners in the state of Victoria. A response rate of 66% was achieved. Physiotherapists working in the private and public sectors reported frequent use of manual therapy (78% and 87%, respectively), aquatic therapy (82% and 58%, respectively) and home exercise programmes (88% and 80%, respectively). Class-based physiotherapy is employed less frequently (44% and 28%, respectively). Strengthening exercises are the most common treatment technique. The widespread use of exercise and manual therapy in the management of osteoarthritis of the hip is highlighted. There was little difference in overall physiotherapy management between the public and private settings. The results identify interventions commonly used in clinical practice. The need for further research to evaluate the effectiveness of frequently used interventions is also highlighted. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Factors that influence outcome in experimental osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, P.M. van der

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease but an effective pharmacological therapy has not been developed yet. To identify targets for treatment and ways to interfere with OA development and progression both spontaneous and induced OA models are still needed. In this narrative

  20. Osteoarthritis cartilage histopathology: grading and staging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pritzker, K.P.; Gay, S.; Jimenez, S.A.; Ostergaard, K.; Pelletier, J.P.; Revell, P.A.; Salter, D.; Berg, W.B. van den

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Current osteoarthritis (OA) histopathology assessment methods have difficulties in their utility for early disease, as well as their reproducibility and validity. Our objective was to devise a more useful method to assess OA histopathology that would have wide application for clinical and

  1. How to define responders in osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooper, C.; Adachi, J.D.; Bardin, T; Berenbaum, F.; Flamion, B.; Jonsson, H.; Kanis, J.A.; Pelousse, F.; Lems, W.F.; Pelletier, J.P.; Martel-Pelletier, J.; Reiter, S.; Reginster, J.Y.; Rizzoli, R.; Bruyere, O.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis is a clinical syndrome of failure of the joint accompanied by varying degrees of joint pain, functional limitation, and reduced quality of life due to deterioration of articular cartilage and involvement of other joint structures. Scope: Regulatory agencies require

  2. A systematic review of ultrasonography in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, H I; Wakefield, R J; Conaghan, P G

    2009-05-01

    Ultrasonography has been increasingly utilised to aid the understanding and management of rheumatic conditions. In recent years there has been a focus on the validity and utility of ultrasonography in demonstrating joint pathology, although this has largely focused on inflammatory arthritis. To undertake a systematic review of the published literature evaluating ultrasonography as an assessment tool in osteoarthritis. Medline and Pubmed were searched to identify original manuscripts, published before June 2008, utilising ultrasonography to assess the joints of cohorts of subjects with osteoarthritis. Data were extracted from manuscripts meeting the inclusion criteria, with a particular focus on the pathology imaged, the definitions used, scoring systems and their metric properties. Forty-seven studies were identified that utilised ultrasonography to assess structural pathology in osteoarthritis. Doppler function was only assessed in 10 studies and contrast agents in one. There was heterogeneity with regard to the pathology examined, the definition of pathology, quantification and the reporting of these factors. There was also a lack of construct and criterion validity and data demonstrating reliability and sensitivity to change. Whereas there is increasing evidence of the validity of ultrasonography in detecting structural pathology in inflammatory arthritis, more work is required to develop standardised definitions of pathology and to demonstrate the validity of ultrasonography in osteoarthritis.

  3. Understanding and treating hand osteoarthritis: a challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stukstette, M.J.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of the hand is a condition prevalent in elderly men and women, and causes significant pain and limitations in daily function. International guidelines recommend that non-pharmacological treatment protocols should be composed multidisciplinary and should focus on different dimensions,

  4. Clinical algorithms to aid osteoarthritis guideline dissemination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meneses, S. R. F.; Goode, A. P.; Nelson, A. E

    2016-01-01

    Background: Numerous scientific organisations have developed evidence-based recommendations aiming to optimise the management of osteoarthritis (OA). Uptake, however, has been suboptimal. The purpose of this exercise was to harmonize the recent recommendations and develop a user-friendly treatmen...

  5. Proprioception in knee osteoarthritis: a narrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoop, J.; Steultjens, M.P.M.; van der Leeden, M.; van der Esch, M.; Thorstensson, C.A.; Roorda, L.D.; Lems, W.F.; Dekker, J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To give an overview of the literature on knee proprioception in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Method: A literature search was performed and reviewed using the narrative approach. Results: (1) Three presumed functions of knee proprioception have been described in the literature:

  6. The conservative treatment of ankle osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, A.G.H.

    2015-01-01

    In 70% to 78% of patients with ankle osteoarthritis (OA), they present themselves with the sequelae of a traumatic event in the past. Ankle trauma occurs in many patients at a relatively young age. Consequently, the expected life span of many patients with ankle OA is relatively long. Many treatment

  7. Improving shared decision making in osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Stacey, Dawn; Hawker, Gillian; Dervin, Geoff; Tomek, Ivan; Cochran, Nan; Tugwell, Peter; O’Connor, Annette M

    2008-01-01

    The burden of chronic pain for those who have it and their families is substantial, says Henry McQuay (doi: 10.1136/bmj.39520.699190.94), and these patients deserve better. Dawn Stacey and colleagues describe an example of quality improvement in practice for one group of people with chronic pain, those with osteoarthritis

  8. On how obesity links with osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yusuf, Erlangga

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor of osteoarthritis development and progression. Theoretically, obesity is a factor that can be modified. While obesity epidemic is difficult to reverse because we live in lipogenic environment, personal approach in modify obesity may avail. Therefore, understanding how

  9. Adaptation of subchondral bone in osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    2004-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic joint disease with pathological changes in the articulating cartilage and all other tissues that occupy the joint. Radin and coworkers have suggested the involvement of subchondral bone in the disease process. However, evidence for an essential role in the etiology has...

  10. Females overweight and osteoarthritis : a complex puzzle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.M. de Klerk (Bianca)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractEvery year many people consult their general practitioner (GP) for complaints related to the musculoskeletal system. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common progressive joint disease causing pain and disability. This disorder is frequently experienced by middle-aged and older people [1] and

  11. Fatigue in osteoarthritis: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    French Melissa R

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatigue is recognized as a disabling symptom in many chronic conditions including rheumatic disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA and lupus. Fatigue in osteoarthritis (OA is not routinely evaluated and has only been considered in a very limited number of studies. To date, these studies have focused primarily on patients with OA under rheumatological care, which represent the minority of people living with OA. The purpose of this study was to increase our understanding of the fatigue experience in community dwelling people with OA. Methods In 2004, 8 focus groups were conducted with 28 men and 18 women (mean age 72.3 with symptomatic hip or knee OA recruited from a population-based cohort. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire, which included demographics, measures of OA severity (WOMAC, depression (CES-D and fatigue (FACIT. Sessions were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. Two researchers independently reviewed the transcripts to identify themes. Findings were compared and consensus reached. Results Mean pain, disability, depression and fatigue scores were 8.7/20, 27.8/68, 15.4/60, and 30.9/52, respectively. Participants described their fatigue as exhaustion, being tired and "coming up against a brick wall". Participants generally perceived fatigue as different from sleepiness and distinguished physical from mental fatigue. Factors believed to increase fatigue included OA pain and pain medications, aging, various types of weather and poor sleep. Mental health was identified as both affecting fatigue and being affected by fatigue. Participants described fatigue as impacting physical function, and their ability to participate in social activities and to do household chores. Rest, exercise, and avoiding or getting assistance with activities were cited as ways of coping. Participants generally did not discuss their fatigue with anyone except their spouses. Conclusion Participants with OA described

  12. Varus thrust visualized during gait was associated with inverted foot in patients with knee osteoarthritis: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Hiroshi; Iijima, Hirotaka; Fukutani, Naoto; Aoyama, Tomoki; Kaneda, Eishi; Ohi, Kazuko; Ito, Hiromu; Matsuda, Shuichi; Kaoru, Abe

    2018-03-01

    The foot is speculated to play a role in knee joint kinematics. This exploratory cross-sectional study examined the association between static foot posture and the presence of varus thrust visualized during gait in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA). Patients (n = 88 patients and 134 knees; age, 61-91 years; 68.2% female) with Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) grade ≥1 in the medial compartment were included in this study and underwent gait observation for varus thrust. These patients' three-dimensional static foot posture while standing was evaluated and their tibiofemoral joint K/L grades and anatomical axis angles were also assessed as covariates. Knees with varus thrust (22 knees, 16.4%) on average had a 4° more inverted calcaneus relative to the floor than those without varus thrust (P varus thrust with adjustments for age, sex, body mass index, K/L grade, and anatomical axis angle. The other predictors, such as navicular height, navicular height/foot length, and rearfoot angle relative to the lower leg, were not significantly associated with varus thrust. These results suggest that patients with varus thrust had a different static rearfoot posture as compared with those without varus thrust, a finding that may indicate an important role of static rearfoot posture in the pathogenesis of varus thrust. Furthermore, investigating the potential influence of foot posture on the efficacy of biomechanical interventions, such as lateral wedge insole use, on varus thrust would be of particular interest in the further studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Increased cartilage volume after injection of hyaluronic acid in osteoarthritis knee patients who underwent high tibial osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chareancholvanich, Keerati; Pornrattanamaneewong, Chaturong; Narkbunnam, Rapeepat

    2014-06-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a surgical procedure used to correct abnormal mechanical loading of the knee joint; additionally, intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections have been shown to restore the viscoelastic properties of synovial fluid and balance abnormal biochemical processes. It was hypothesized that combining HTO with intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections would have benefit to improve the cartilage volume of knee joints. Forty patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) were randomly placed into 1 of 2 groups. The study group (n = 20) received 2 cycles (at 6-month intervals) of 5 weekly intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections after HTO operation. The control group (n = 20) did not receive any intra-articular injections after HTO surgery. Cartilage volume (primary outcome) was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pre-operatively and 1 year post-operatively. Treatment efficacy (secondary outcomes) was evaluated with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities OA Index (WOMAC) and by the comparison of the total rescue medication (paracetamol/diclofenac) used (weeks 6, 12, 24, 48). MRI studies showed a significant increase in total cartilage volume (p = 0.033), lateral femoral cartilage volume (p = 0.044) and lateral tibial cartilage volume (p = 0.027) in the study group. Cartilage volume loss was detected at the lateral tibial plateau in the control group. There were significant improvements after surgery in both groups for all subscales of WOMAC scores (p hyaluronic acid injections may be beneficial for increasing total cartilage volume and preventing the loss of lateral tibiofemoral joint cartilage after HTO. Therapeutic study, Level I.

  14. Risk factors of knee osteoarthritis, WHO-ILAR-COPCORD study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barghamdi M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: To evaluate the association between age, sex, BMI, waist/hip ratio, smoking, religion, ethnicity, education and knee osteoarthritis. "nMethods: Eligible subjects were randomly included from participants of Tehran COPCORD study, of whom 480 subjects with knee osteoarthritis were compared to 490 subjects without (case-control study. Using a questionnaire developed by COPCORD group (Asia & Oceania, we enquired about the risk factors of knee osteoarthritis i.e. age, sex, BMI, Waist/Hip ratio, religion, ethnicity, education and smoking. Knee osteoarthritis was defined using ACR criteria. Each knee was unit of analysis using GEE technique to evaluate these associations. "nResults: Age (OR; 1.096; CI95%: 1.091-1.1; P: 0.00 and sex (OR; 2.85; CI95%: 2.49-3.28; P: 0.00 showed significant association with knee osteoarthritis. Overweight (OR; 1.81; CI95%: 1.28-2.55; P: 0.00 and obesity (OR; 3.3; CI95%: 2.34-4.66; P: 0.00 both showed higher risk for knee osteoarthritis. The association between waist/hip ratio and knee osteoarthritis showed an OR of 5.28, CI95%: 0.89-31.44; P: 0.07. However, this association was only borderline significant. People with different religion or ethnicity and smokers had no extra risks for knee osteoarthritis. Higher education is a protective factor for knee osteoarthritis as people who had university education compared to people with no/primary education showed a lower risk for knee osteoarthritis (OR; 0.54; CI95%: 0.38-0.78; P: 0.00. "nConclusions: Our study confirmed that elderly, females, overweight and obese people are at higher risk to develop knee osteoarthritis as found in western societies. Higher education is a protective factor against knee osteoarthritis. Ethnicity, religion and smoking showed no extra risk of knee osteoarthritis.

  15. Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahpoor Maddah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The association of obesity and other metabolic conditions with osteoarthritis is under debate; however, a strong link between metabolic disturbances is suggested to contribute to increased incidences and progression of osteoarthritis. We examined the association of metabolic syndrome and its components with the incidence of knee osteoarthritis in Iranian population. A community-based study was conducted on a total of 625 Iranian volunteers with the complaint of knee pain. Weight-bearing and anteroposterior plain radiographs of both knees were taken on the day of admission. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed using the modified Adult Treatment Panel III of the National Cholesterol Education Program criteria. Prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome were 22.5% in males and 11.6% in females (P=0.002. The prevalence rate of knee osteoarthritis was 20.0% in males and 43.8% of females (P<0.001. In both genders, osteoarthritis group had higher serum levels of triglyceride and systolic blood pressure in comparison with non-osteoarthritis group. Women with osteoarthritis had higher Body Mass Index (BMI, however, this association was not observed in men. In females, the presence of osteoarthritis was significantly associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome, with the risk of metabolic syndrome in the osteoarthritis group at 2.187 fold the risk in the non-osteoarthritis group. But, the presence of osteoarthritis was not associated with metabolic syndrome in males. Metabolic syndrome mainly through high BMI is associated with knee osteoarthritis in the Iranian women, but neither metabolic syndrome nor any related components are associated with knee osteoarthritis in men.

  16. Redesigning care for chronic conditions: improving hospital-based ambulatory care for people with osteoarthritis of the hip and knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, C A; Amatya, B; Gordon, B; Tosti, T; Gorelik, A

    2010-06-01

    Osteoarthritis of the hip and knee is a highly prevalent chronic condition in Australia that commonly affects older people who have other comorbidities. We report the pilot implementation of a new chronic disease management osteoarthritis service, which was multidisciplinary, evidence-based, supported patient self-management and care coordination. A musculoskeletal coordinator role was pivotal to service redesign and osteoarthritis pathway implementation. Impact evaluation included: service utilization, patient and general practitioner service experience, a 'before and after' audit of clinician adherence to recommendations, and 3- and 6-month patient health outcomes (pain, physical function, patient and physician global health (Visual Analogue Scale), disability (Multi-Attribute Prioritisation Tool), Partners in Health Scale and body mass index). A total of 123 patients, median age of 66 years, were assessed. Documentation of osteoarthritis assessment and management improved for all parameters. At 3 months there were improvements in self-reported pain (P preferences for therapy. The cost implications for implementation were low. The osteoarthritis service model is feasible to implement, is well received by patients and staff, and provides a template for translation into other settings.

  17. Accumulation of Advanced Glycation End Products as a Molecular Mechanism for Aging as a Risk Factor in Osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, J. de; Verzijl, N.; Wenting-Wijk, M.J.G. van; Jacobs, K.M.G.; El, B. van; Roermund, P.M. van; Bank, R.A.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; TeKoppele, J.M.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    Objective. Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent and disabling chronic conditions affecting the elderly. Its etiology is largely unknown, but age is the most prominent risk factor. The current study was designed to test whether accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which

  18. Validity of summing painful joint sites to assess joint-pain comorbidity in hip or knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjin-Kam-Jet-Siemons, Liseth; ten Klooster, Peter M.; van de Laar, Mart A F J; van den Ende, Cornelia H.M.; Hoogeboom, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) have advocated the relevance of assessing the number of painful joint sites, other than the primary affected joint, in both research and clinical practice. However, it is unclear whether joint-pain comorbidities can

  19. Evaluation of education for people with osteoarthritis of the knee: recruitment and retention issues in study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Fiona; Triggs, Eric; Cadbury, Heather; Axford, John; Victor, Christina

    1998-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common and often disabling condition affecting older adults. Treatment using anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) often contributes to morbidity ( 1 ). It is a common reason for people seeking help from primary care ( 2 ). However, unfortunately management approaches often reflect the ageist view that OA is an inevitable consequence of ageing.

  20. Pes Anserine Bursitis in Symptomatic Osteoarthritis Patients: A Mesotherapy Treatment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggini, Raoul; Di Stefano, Alexandra; Dodaj, Ira; Scarcello, Laura; Bellomo, Rosa Grazia

    2015-08-01

    Pes anserine bursitis strongly affects quality of life in patients with osteoarthritis. Treatment includes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), physiotherapy, and injections of corticosteroid, with highly variable responses; recovery can take 10 days to 36 months. Mesotherapy is a minimally invasive technique consisting of subcutaneous injections of bioactive substances. The goal is to modulate the pharmacokinetics of the injected substance and prolong the effects at a local level. To evaluate the effects of mesotherapy with diclofenac for anserine bursitis associated with knee osteoarthritis. One hundred and seventeen patients with anserine bursitis associated with grade II Kellgren-Lawrence knee osteoarthritis, assessed by clinical, radiographic, and ultrasonographic examination, were evaluated and treated. They were randomly divided into two groups (A, mesotherapy; B, control). Group A completed nine sessions of mesotherapy with sodium diclofenac (25 mg/1 mL; Akis®, IBSA, Lugano, Switzerland), 1 mL for each session, three times per week. Group B received 21 oral administrations of sodium diclofenac (50 mg; Voltaren®, Novartis, Parsippany, NJ), once a day for 3 weeks. Primary outcome measures were pain intensity assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS), along with ability to perform activities of daily living, ability to participate in sports, level of pain, symptoms, and quality of life, as assessed by the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. These measures were performed before and after the treatment period and at 30 and 90 days' follow up. In both groups pain level decreased significantly after the treatment period. Ultrasonography showed a reduction of the hypoechoic area related to anserine bursitis only in group A. Administration of conventional NSAIDs (diclofenac) by mesotherapy is effective in managing anserine bursitis in knee osteoarthritis in the short term and mid-term. These observations could be of interest for efforts

  1. Glial activation in the collagenase model of nociception associated with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adães, Sara; Almeida, Lígia; Potes, Catarina S; Ferreira, Ana Rita; Castro-Lopes, José M; Ferreira-Gomes, Joana; Neto, Fani L

    2017-01-01

    Background Experimental osteoarthritis entails neuropathic-like changes in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Since glial activation has emerged as a key player in nociception, being reported in numerous models of neuropathic pain, we aimed at evaluating if glial cell activation may also occur in the DRG and spinal cord of rats with osteoarthritis induced by intra-articular injection of collagenase. Methods Osteoarthritis was induced by two injections, separated by three days, of 500 U of type II collagenase into the knee joint of rats. Movement-induced nociception was evaluated by the Knee-Bend and CatWalk tests during the following six weeks. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in satellite glial cells of the DRG was assessed by immunofluorescence and Western Blot analysis; the pattern of GFAP and activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) expression was also compared through double immunofluorescence analysis. GFAP expression in astrocytes and IBA-1 expression in microglia of the L3-L5 spinal cord segments was assessed by immunohistochemistry and Western Blot analysis. The effect of the intrathecal administration of fluorocitrate, an inhibitor of glial activation, on movement-induced nociception was evaluated six weeks after the first collagenase injection. Results GFAP expression in satellite glial cells of collagenase-injected animals was significantly increased six weeks after osteoarthritis induction. Double immunofluorescence showed GFAP upregulation in satellite glial cells surrounding ATF-3-positive neurons. In the spinal cord of collagenase-injected animals, an ipsilateral upregulation of GFAP and IBA-1 was also observed. The inhibition of glial activation with fluorocitrate decreased movement- and loading-induced nociception. Conclusion Collagenase-induced knee osteoarthritis leads to the development of nociception associated with movement of the affected joint and to the activation of glial cells in both the DRG and the spinal cord

  2. Pelvic movement strategies and leg extension power in patients with end-stage medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Signe; Jørgensen, Peter Bo; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: During movement tasks, patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis use compensatory strategies to minimise the joint load of the affected leg. Movement strategies of the knees and trunk have been investigated, but less is known about movement strategies of the pelvis during...... compartment knee osteoarthritis use greater pelvic movements during advanced functional performance tests, particularly when these involve descending tasks. Further studies should investigate if it is possible to alter these movement strategies by an intervention aimed at increasing strength and power...... advancing functional tasks, and how these strategies are associated with leg extension power. The aim of the study was to investigate pelvic movement strategies and leg extension power in patients with end-stage medial compartment knee osteoarthritis compared with controls. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 57...

  3. The pathophysiology and medical management of canine osteoarthritis : continuing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Vaughan-Scott

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis or degenerative joint disease is a condition characterised by degeneration of articular cartilage often associated with the formation of new bone at joint surfaces or margins. Commonly encountered in dogs, osteoarthritis may have a gradual onset, but may also occur acutely. Osteoarthritis can be a primary disease of joint cartilage, but is more often secondary to abnormal stresses on joints. This article describes the pathogenesis and progression of cartilage degeneration as well as the dietary, lifestyle and pharmacological management of osteoarthritis. Recent pharmacological developments allow the clinician not only to control clinical signs of the disease, but also to slow the progression of cartilage degeneration.

  4. Diagnostic value of hematological parameters in patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Hira

    2017-03-01

    Results: There were no significant differences in WBC, RDW, PLT, RPR levels between two groups. NLR and PLR values were significantly higher in the osteoarthritis group than in the control group. RBC, MPV and PDW values were significantly lower in the osteoarthritis group than in the control group (all . MPV and RBC were negatively correlated with ESR and CRP in osteoarthritis patients. Conclusion: Hematological inflammatory markers might be useful parameters that could be used in patients with osteoarthritis. [Cukurova Med J 2017; 42(1.000: 120-125

  5. Lessons from the proteomic study of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Romero, Cristina; Fernández-Puente, Patricia; Calamia, Valentina; Blanco, Francisco J

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common rheumatic pathology and one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. It is a very complex disease whose etiopathogenesis is not fully understood. Furthermore, there are serious limitations for its management, since it lacks specific and sensitive biomarkers for early diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic monitoring. Proteomic approaches performed in the last few decades have contributed to the knowledge on the molecular mechanisms that participate in this pathology and they have also led to interesting panels of putative biomarker candidates. In the next few years, further efforts should be made for translating these findings into the clinical routines. It is expected that targeted proteomics strategies will be highly valuable for the verification and qualification of biomarkers of osteoarthritis.

  6. Platelet-rich plasma for osteoarthritis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Knop

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We conducted a comprehensive and systematic search of the literature on the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP in the treatment of osteoarthritis, using the Medline, Lilacs, Cochrane and SciELO databases, from May 2012 to October 2013. A total of 23 studies were selected, with nine being controlled trials and, of these, seven randomized, which included 725 patients. In this series, the group receiving PRP showed improvement in pain and joint function compared to placebo and hyaluronic acid. The response lasted up to two years and was better in milder cases. However it was found that there is no standardization in the PRP production method, neither in the number, timing, and volume of applications. Furthermore, the populations studied were not clearly described in many studies. Thus, these results should be analyzed with caution, and further studies with more standardized methods would be necessary for a more consistent conclusion about the PRP role in osteoarthritis.

  7. Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collins, N J; Prinsen, C A C; Christensen, R

    2016-01-01

    in participants with knee injuries and/or osteoarthritis (OA). Methodological quality was evaluated using the COSMIN checklist. Where possible, meta-analysis of extracted data was conducted for all studies and stratified by age and knee condition; otherwise narrative synthesis was performed. RESULTS: KOOS has...... adequate internal consistency, test-retest reliability and construct validity in young and old adults with knee injuries and/or OA. The ADL subscale has better content validity for older patients and Sport/Rec for younger patients with knee injuries, while the Pain subscale is more relevant for painful......OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to synthesize evidence regarding measurement properties of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). DESIGN: A comprehensive literature search identified 37 eligible papers evaluating KOOS measurement properties...

  8. Gender difference in symptomatic radiographic knee osteoarthritis in the Knee Clinical Assessment – CAS(K: A prospective study in the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Rachel C

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent study of adults aged ≥50 years reporting knee pain found an excess of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (knee ROA in symptomatic males compared to females. This was independent of age, BMI and other clinical signs and symptoms. Since this finding contradicts many previous studies, our objective was to explore four possible explanations for this gender difference: X-ray views, selection, occupation and non-articular conditions. Methods A community-based prospective study. 819 adults aged ≥50 years reporting knee pain in the previous 12 months were recruited by postal questionnaires to a research clinic involving plain radiography (weight-bearing posteroanterior semiflexed, supine skyline and lateral views, clinical interview and physical examination. Any knee ROA, ROA severity, tibiofemoral joint osteoarthritis (TJOA and patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis (PJOA were defined using all three radiographic views. Occupational class was derived from current or last job title. Proportions of each gender with symptomatic knee ROA were expressed as percentages, stratified by age; differences between genders were expressed as percentage differences with 95% confidence intervals. Results 745 symptomatic participants were eligible and had complete X-ray data. Males had a higher occurrence (77% of any knee ROA than females (61%. In 50–64 year olds, the excess in men was mild knee OA (particularly PJOA; in ≥65 year olds, the excess was both mild and moderate/severe knee OA (particularly combined TJOA/PJOA. This male excess persisted when using the posteroanterior view only (64% vs. 52%. The lowest level of participation in the clinic was symptomatic females aged 65+. Within each occupational class there were more males with symptomatic knee ROA than females. In those aged 50–64 years, non-articular conditions were equally common in both genders although, in those aged 65+, they occurred more frequently in symptomatic

  9. T Cells in Osteoarthritis: Alterations and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yu-sheng; Luo, Wei; Zhu, Shou-an; Lei, Guang-hua

    2017-01-01

    Although osteoarthritis (OA) has been traditionally regarded as a non-inflammatory disease, reports increasingly suggest that it is inflammatory, at least in certain patients. OA patients often exhibit inflammatory infiltration of synovial membranes by macrophages, T cells, mast cells, B cells, plasma cells, natural killer cells, dendritic cells, granulocytes, etc. Although previous reviews have summarized the knowledge of inflammation in the pathogenesis of OA, as far as we know, no report r...

  10. Canine osteoarthritis and treatments: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie D. Bland

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Arthritis is a commonly occurring chronic illness in human and animals alike. Among all domestic and pet animal species, dogs suffer from arthritis more often because of excessive running or exercise, injury, and/or genetic predisposition. Presently, one in four of 77.2 million pet dogs in the United States are diagnosed with some form of arthritis. In dogs, osteoarthritis is more common than rheumatoid arthritis and pain is the number one observation. Osteoarthritis, also known as degenerative joint disease, is a slowly progressive inflammatory disease, which is characterized by degeneration of the cartilage, hypertrophy of bone at the margins, and changes in the synovial membrane, and that eventually results in pain and stiffness of joints. Alterations in joint structures, decreased flexibility, and severe pain ensues, due to lack of hydration and inflammation. Cells within the damaged joints release pro-inflammatory cytokines, which further the inflammatory process. This causes more breakdown of the cartilage collagen type II and proteoglycans, which results in a perpetual destructive cycle. This perpetuating cycle ultimately results in cartilage destruction, subchondral bone thickening, and synovial membrane inflammation. This review focuses on osteoarthritis, the disease, causes, treatments, and presents a glimpse of some new therapies under study.

  11. Management of knee osteoarthritis with cupping therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Ali Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to evaluate the effect of cupping therapy at a clinical setting for knee osteoarthritis. A randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted. Cupping was performed on 0-6 th day; 9-11 th day and 14 th day, i.e., 11 sittings follow-up to determine longer term carryover of treatment effects utilizing both objective and subjective assessment. The assessment was performed before and after treatment spreading over a period of 15 days. The results of this study shows significant and better results in the overall management of knee osteoarthritis, particularly in relieving pain, edema, stiffness and disability. The efficacy of treatment with cupping therapy in relieving signs and symptoms of knee osteoarthritis is comparable to that of acetaminophen 650 mg thrice a day orally, in terms of analgesia, anti-inflammatory and resolution of edema with minimal and temporary side-effects like echymosis and blister formation while as control drug has greater side-effects particularly on upper gastrointestinal tract. It is recommended that further studies are conducted with a larger study samples and of longer duration.

  12. Management of knee osteoarthritis with cupping therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Asim Ali; Jahangir, Umar; Urooj, Shaista

    2013-10-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of cupping therapy at a clinical setting for knee osteoarthritis. A randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted. Cupping was performed on 0-6(th) day; 9-11(th) day and 14(th) day, i.e., 11 sittings follow-up to determine longer term carryover of treatment effects utilizing both objective and subjective assessment. The assessment was performed before and after treatment spreading over a period of 15 days. The results of this study shows significant and better results in the overall management of knee osteoarthritis, particularly in relieving pain, edema, stiffness and disability. The efficacy of treatment with cupping therapy in relieving signs and symptoms of knee osteoarthritis is comparable to that of acetaminophen 650 mg thrice a day orally, in terms of analgesia, anti-inflammatory and resolution of edema with minimal and temporary side-effects like echymosis and blister formation while as control drug has greater side-effects particularly on upper gastrointestinal tract. It is recommended that further studies are conducted with a larger study samples and of longer duration.

  13. Efficacy of Magnetotherapy in knee osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Rodríguez-Gallo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is the most common of Artropathies, highly heterogeneous in their causes and clinical evolution which have a negative economical impact in terms of productivity in the presence of the problematic situation. An almost experimental prospective and longitudinal study was carried out with the objective of evaluating the efficacy of treatment with magnetic field in patients suffering from knee osteoarthritis in Rehabilitation Provincial Hospital Dr. Faustino Pérez Hernández in Sancti Spíritus. The universe is constituted by 126 patients who have knee osteoarthritis diagnosed from clinical and X-ray view by Rheumatology Services, so as orthopedics and Internal Medicine Services who attended the Rehabilitation Provincial Hospital. In order to work with statistical analysis, several variables were used such as: Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test (to determine the statistical differences using statistical significance levels (p=0.05. That’s why, as a conclusion knee Magneto therapy treatment is effective and better up the functional capacity and relief of pain.

  14. Clinical research on abdominal acupuncture plus conventional acupuncture for knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Chang-rong; Fan, Li; Fu, Wen-bin

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To probe the therapeutic effect of abdominal acupuncture plus conventional acupuncture on knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: PEMS3.1 software was used. The 105 patients with knee osteoarthritis were randomly divided into an abdominal acupuncture group, a conventional acupuncture group...... and a combined group (abdominal acupuncture plus conventional acupuncture). For the abdominal acupuncture group, the abdominal acupuncture was performed at Zhongwan (CV 12), Guanyuan (CV 4), Wailing (ST 26), Daheng (SP 15), Lower Rheumatism point and Qipang with needles retained for 30 minutes....... For the conventional acupuncture group, the acupuncture was practiced at Neixiyan (EX-LE4) and Dubi (ST 35) of the affected limb, Yanglingquan (GB 34), Liangqiu (ST 34), Xuehai (SP 10) and Xiyangguan (GB 33). For the combined group, both methods were applied. Treatment was given once a day, 6 times a week, for 4 weeks...

  15. Laser-induced micropore formation and modification of cartilage structure in osteoarthritis healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobol, Emil [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod, RussiabFederal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Photonic Technologies, Moscow, Russia; Baum, Olga [Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Photonic Technologies, Moscow, Russia; Shekhter, Anatoly [Sechenov First Medical University of Moscow, Institute of Regenerative Medicine, Moscow, Russia; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian [University of California, Center for Biophotonics, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Sacramento, California, United StateseMcGill University, Department of Bioengineering, Montreal, Canada; Shnirelman, Alexander [Concordia University, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Montreal, Canada; Alexandrovskaya, Yulia [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod, RussiabFederal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Photonic Technologies, Moscow, Russia; Sadovskyy, Ivan [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Argonne, Illinois, United States; Vinokur, Valerii [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Argonne, Illinois, United States

    2017-05-31

    Pores are vital for functioning of avascular tissues. Laser-induced pores play an important role in the process of cartilage regeneration. The aim of any treatment for osteoarthritis is to repair hyaline-type cartilage. The aims of this study are to answer two questions: (1) How do laser-assisted pores affect the cartilaginous cells to synthesize hyaline cartilage (HC)? and (2) How can the size distribution of pores arising in the course of laser radiation be controlled? We have shown that in cartilage, the pores arise predominately near chondrocytes, which promote nutrition of cells and signal molecular transfer that activates regeneration of cartilage. In vivo laser treatment of damaged cartilage of miniature pig joints provides cellular transformation and formation of HC. We propose a simple model of pore formation in biopolymers that paves the way for going beyond the trial-anderror approach when choosing an optimal laser treatment regime. Our findings support the approach toward laser healing of osteoarthritis.

  16. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyles CC

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cody C Wyles,1 Matthew T Houdek,2 Atta Behfar,3 Rafael J Sierra,21Mayo Medical School, 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 3Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Osteoarthritis (OA is a painful chronic condition with a significant impact on quality of life. The societal burden imposed by OA is increasing in parallel with the aging population; however, no therapies have demonstrated efficacy in preventing the progression of this degenerative joint disease. Current mainstays of therapy include activity modification, conservative pain management strategies, weight loss, and if necessary, replacement of the affected joint. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are a multipotent endogenous population of progenitors capable of differentiation to musculoskeletal tissues. MSCs have a well-documented immunomodulatory role, managing the inflammatory response primarily through paracrine signaling. Given these properties, MSCs have been proposed as a potential regenerative cell therapy source for patients with OA. Research efforts are focused on determining the ideal source for derivation, as MSCs are native to several tissues. Furthermore, optimizing the mode of delivery remains a challenge both for appropriate localization of MSCs and for directed guidance toward stemming the local inflammatory process and initiating a regenerative response. Scaffolds and matrices with growth factor adjuvants may prove critical in this effort. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current state of MSC-based therapeutics for OA and discuss potential barriers that must be overcome for successful implementation of cell-based therapy as a routine treatment strategy in orthopedics.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cell, osteoarthritis, treatment, regenerative medicine, cell therapy

  17. Novel Genetic Variants for Cartilage Thickness and Hip Osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaño-Betancourt, Martha C.; Evans, Dan S.; Ramos, Yolande F M; Boer, Cindy G.; Metrustry, Sarah; Liu, Youfang; den Hollander, Wouter; van Rooij, Jeroen; Kraus, Virginia B.; Yau, Michelle S.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Muir, Kenneth; Hofman, Albert; Doherty, Michael; Doherty, Sally; Zhang, Weiya; Kraaij, Robert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Maciewicz, Rose A.; Arden, Nigel; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Jordan, Joanne M.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Slagboom, Eline P.; Hart, Deborah J.; Lafeber, Floris; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Evangelou, Evangelos; Spector, Tim D.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Lane, Nancy E.; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Valdes, Ana M.; van Meurs, Joyce B J

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the most frequent and disabling diseases of the elderly. Only few genetic variants have been identified for osteoarthritis, which is partly due to large phenotype heterogeneity. To reduce heterogeneity, we here examined cartilage thickness, one of the structural components

  18. Novel Genetic Variants for Cartilage Thickness and Hip Osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Castaño Betancourt (Martha); D.S. Evans (Daniel); Y.F.M. Ramos (Yolande); Boer, C.G. (Cindy G.); S. Metrustry (Sarah); Liu, Y. (Youfang); W. den Hollander (Wouter); J. Van Rooij (Jeroen); Kraus, V.B. (Virginia B.); Yau, M.S. (Michelle S.); B.D. Mitchell (Braxton); Muir, K. (Kenneth); A. Hofman (Albert); M. Doherty (Michael); S. Doherty (Sally); W. Zhang (Weiya); R. Kraaij (Robert); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); Barrett-Connor, E. (Elizabeth); R.A. MacIewicz (Rose); N.K. Arden (Nigel); R.G.H.H. Nelissen (Rob); M. Kloppenburg (Margreet); Jordan, J.M. (Joanne M.); M.C. Nevitt (Michael); E. Slagboom (Eline); D. Hart (Deborah); F.P.J.G. Lafeber (Floris); U. Styrkarsdottir (Unnur); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); E. Evangelou (Evangelos); T.D. Spector (Timothy); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); N.E. Lane; I. Meulenbelt (Ingrid); A.M. Valdes (Ana Maria); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractOsteoarthritis is one of the most frequent and disabling diseases of the elderly. Only few genetic variants have been identified for osteoarthritis, which is partly due to large phenotype heterogeneity. To reduce heterogeneity, we here examined cartilage thickness, one of the structural

  19. Osteoarthritis: a look at pathophysiology and approach to new ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evidence suggests the involvement of a number of factors in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, like the proteases,pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitrous oxide, calcium crystals, leptin, angiogenesis and T cells and in turn using some of these to formulate some of the potential for new treatments for osteoarthritis.

  20. Effects of nutraceuticals on knee osteoarthritis: Systematic review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knee osteoarthritis is the most common form of joint disease and is a major cause of pain and physical disability among the elderly. Although, numerous treatments have been developed to treat osteoarthritis, no definitive treatments with high efficacy and low risk have been identified until now. In recent years, it has been ...

  1. Meta-analysis : Acupuncture for osteoarthritis of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manheimer, Eric; Linde, Klaus; Lao, Lixing; Bouter, Lex M.; Berman, Brian M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis is a major cause of pain and functional limitation. Purpose: To evaluate the effects of acupuncture for treating knee osteoarthritis. Data Sources: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases to January 2007. No language restrictions

  2. Development of Nanomedicines for Treatment of Posttraumatic Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    expression and provided sustained inhibition of osteoclast formation. 15. SUBJECT TERMS nanomedicine, PTOA, DMM, osteoarthritis, prodrug, glucocorticoid ...KEYWORDS: Nanomedicine, PTOA, DMM, osteoarthritis, prodrug, glucocorticoid , dexamethasone, HPMA copolymer 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS: What were the...Nothing to Report 5. CHANGES/PROBLEMS: Actual or anticipated problems or delays and actions or plans to resolve them The in vivo imaging

  3. Atraumatic medial collateral ligament oedema in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergin, D.; Keogh, C.; O'Connell, M.; Zoga, A.; Rowe, D.; Shah, B.; Eustace, S.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe and determine the prevalence of atraumatic medial collateral oedema identified in patients with medial compartment osteoarthritis. Design and patients: Sixty patients, 30 patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 to 4) and 30 age-matched patients with atraumatic knee pain without osteoarthritis, referred for MR imaging over a 2 year period were included in the study. In each case, severity of osteoarthritis was recorded on radiographs and correlated with the presence or absence of medial collateral ligament oedema at MR imaging. Results: Medial collateral oedema was identified in 27 of the 30 patients with osteoarthritis, of whom 14 had grade 1 oedema and 13 had grade 2 oedema compared with the presence of medial collateral ligament oedema (grade 1) in only two of the 30 control patients without osteoarthritis (P<<0.0001). Conclusion: Medial collateral oedema is common in patients with osteoarthritis in the absence of trauma. When identified, medial collateral ligament oedema should be considered to be a feature of osteoarthritis and should not be incorrectly attributed to an acute traumatic injury. (orig.)

  4. Ibadan Knee/Hip Osteoarthritis Outcome Measure: Process of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Ibadan Knee/Hip Osteoarthritis Outcome Measure (IKHOAM) was developed as a Nigerian-environment and culturefriendly instrument for the assessment of the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions in individuals with osteoarthritis of the knee and/or hip. This article outlines the steps involved in developing an ...

  5. Dynamic weight-bearing assessment of pain in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Christensen, Robin; Osborne, Richard

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the reliability, agreement and smallest detectable change in a measurement instrument for pain and function in knee osteoarthritis; the Dynamic weight-bearing Assessment of Pain (DAP). METHODS: The sample size was set to 20 persons, recruited from the outpatient osteoarthritis...

  6. Translation of the Ibadan Knee/Hip Osteoarthritis Outcome Measure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Ibadan Knee/Hip Osteoarthritis Outcome Measure (IKHOAM), a Nigerian culture and environmentfriendly clinical tool was developed at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria for measuring end results of care in patients with knee or Hip Osteoarthritis OA. Translated and validated Yoruba and Hausa versions of IKHOAM are ...

  7. [Manifestation of generalized osteoarthritis in a genealogically investigated population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irlenbusch, U; Forke, L; Fuhrmann, U; Lorenz, U; Stechel, A

    2010-08-01

    The definition of generalized osteoarthritis in the literature is just as controversial as the discussion about correlations between GOA and Heberden's nodes (HN). Therefore, both questions were investigated in patients with proven heredity in a genealogical study of 931 family members. In 106 patients with HN and 109 control subjects, 70 joints and spinal segments were investigated with respect to characteristic functional parameters. In addition, 44 joints and spinal segments were investigated radiologically. GOA affects both the small and large joints as well as the spine. This phenomenon is the more pronounced the more finger joints are affected by Heberden's and Bouchard's nodes. GOA affects the entire musculoskeletal system. The varying manifestation in individual joints and spinal segments is probably attributable to multifactorial local and systemic factors. In an earlier study, a genetic disposition with a maximum HA prevalence of 30% was identified in the study population. Since HA is considered a genetic marker for GOA, it can be assumed that the same is true of GOA prevalence.

  8. Current interventions in the management of knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Dinesh; Bejarano, Tatiana; Novo, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is progressive joint disease characterized by joint inflammation and a reparative bone response and is one of the top five most disabling conditions that affects more than one-third of persons > 65 years of age, with an average estimation of about 30 million Americans currently affected by this disease. Global estimates reveal more than 100 million people are affected by OA. The financial expenditures for the care of persons with OA are estimated at a total annual national cost estimate of $15.5-$28.6 billion per year. As the number of people >65 years increases, so does the prevalence of OA and the need for cost-effective treatment and care. Developing a treatment strategy which encompasses the underlying physiology of degenerative joint disease is crucial, but it should be considerate to the different age ranges and different population needs. This paper focuses on different exercise and treatment protocols (pharmacological and non-pharmacological), the outcomes of a rehabilitation center, clinician-directed program versus an at home directed individual program to view what parameters are best at reducing pain, increasing functional independence, and reducing cost for persons diagnosed with knee OA. PMID:23559821

  9. Current interventions in the management of knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Bhatia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is progressive joint disease characterized by joint inflammation and a reparative bone response and is one of the top five most disabling conditions that affects more than one-third of persons > 65 years of age, with an average estimation of about 30 million Americans currently affected by this disease. Global estimates reveal more than 100 million people are affected by OA. The financial expenditures for the care of persons with OA are estimated at a total annual national cost estimate of $15.5-$28.6 billion per year. As the number of people >65 years increases, so does the prevalence of OA and the need for cost-effective treatment and care. Developing a treatment strategy which encompasses the underlying physiology of degenerative joint disease is crucial, but it should be considerate to the different age ranges and different population needs. This paper focuses on different exercise and treatment protocols (pharmacological and non-pharmacological, the outcomes of a rehabilitation center, clinician-directed program versus an at home directed individual program to view what parameters are best at reducing pain, increasing functional independence, and reducing cost for persons diagnosed with knee OA.

  10. The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS: from joint injury to osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roos Ewa M

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS was developed as an extension of the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index with the purpose of evaluating short-term and long-term symptoms and function in subjects with knee injury and osteoarthritis. The KOOS holds five separately scored subscales: Pain, other Symptoms, Function in daily living (ADL, Function in Sport and Recreation (Sport/Rec, and knee-related Quality of Life (QOL. The KOOS has been validated for several orthopaedic interventions such as anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, meniscectomy and total knee replacement. In addition the instrument has been used to evaluate physical therapy, nutritional supplementation and glucosamine supplementation. The effect size is generally largest for the subscale QOL followed by the subscale Pain. The KOOS is a valid, reliable and responsive self-administered instrument that can be used for short-term and long-term follow-up of several types of knee injury including osteoarthritis. The measure is relatively new and further use of the instrument will add knowledge and suggest areas that need to be further explored and improved.

  11. Lateral trunk lean and medializing the knee as gait strategies for knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbrands, T A; Pisters, M F; Theeven, P J R; Verschueren, S; Vanwanseele, B

    2017-01-01

    To determine (1) if Medial Thrust or Trunk Lean reduces the knee adduction moment (EKAM) the most during gait in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis, (2) if the best overall strategy is the most effective for each patient and (3) if these strategies affect ankle and hip kinetics. Thirty patients with symptomatic medial knee osteoarthritis underwent 3-dimensional gait analysis. Participants received verbal instructions on two gait strategies (Trunk Lean and Medial Thrust) in randomized order after comfortable walking was recorded. The peaks and impulse of the EKAM and strategy-specific kinematic and kinetic variables were calculated for all conditions. Early stance EKAM peak was significantly reduced during Medial Thrust (-29%). During Trunk Lean, early and late stance EKAM peak and EKAM impulse reduced significantly (38%, 21% and -25%, respectively). In 79% of the subjects, the Trunk Lean condition was significantly more effective in reducing EKAM peak than Medial Thrust. Peak ankle dorsi and plantar flexion, knee flexion and hip extension and adduction moments were not significantly increased. Medial Thrust and Trunk Lean reduced the EKAM during gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Individual selection of the most effective gait modification strategy seems vital to optimally reduce dynamic knee loading during gait. No detrimental effects on external ankle and hip moments or knee flexion moments were found for these conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. PTH [1-34]-induced alterations of the subchondral bone provoke early osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, P; Cucchiarini, M; Wagenpfeil, S; Menger, M D; Madry, H

    2014-06-01

    To test the hypothesis that changes in the subchondral bone induced by parathyroid hormone (PTH [1-34]) reciprocally affect the integrity of the articular cartilage within a naïve osteochondral unit in vivo. Daily subcutaneous injections of 10 μg PTH [1-34]/kg were given to adult rabbits for 6 weeks, controls received saline. Blood samples were continuously collected to monitor renal function. The subchondral bone plate and subarticular spongiosa of the femoral heads were separately assessed by micro-computed tomography. Articular cartilage was evaluated by macroscopic and histological osteoarthritis scoring, polarized light microscopy, and immunohistochemical determination of type-I, type-II, type-X collagen contents, PTH [1-34] receptor and caspase-3 expression. Absolute and relative extents of hyaline and calcified articular cartilage layers were measured histomorphometrically. The correlation between PTH-induced changes in subchondral bone and articular cartilage was determined. PTH [1-34] enhanced volume, mineral density, and trabecular thickness within the subarticular spongiosa, and increased thickness of the calcified cartilage layer (all P PTH [1-34] led to cartilage surface irregularities and reduced matrix staining (both P PTH [1-34] cause broadening of the calcified cartilage layer, resulting in osteoarthritic cartilage degeneration. These findings identify a mechanism by which PTH-induced alterations of the normal subchondral bone microarchitecture may provoke early osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Chondroprotective Effects and Mechanisms of Dextromethorphan: Repurposing Antitussive Medication for Osteoarthritis Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv Weichien Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common joint disorder and primarily affects older people. The ideal anti-OA drug should have a modest anti-inflammatory effect and only limited or no toxicity for long-term use. Because the antitussive medication dextromethorphan (DXM is protective in atherosclerosis and neurological diseases, two common disorders in aged people, we examined whether DXM can be protective in pro-inflammatory cytokine-stimulated chondrocytes and in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA animal model in this study. Chondrocytes were prepared from cartilage specimens taken from pigs or OA patients. Western blotting, quantitative PCR, and immunohistochemistry were adopted to measure the expression of collagen II (Col II and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP. DXM significantly restored tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α-mediated reduction of collagen II and decreased TNF-α-induced MMP-13 production. To inhibit the synthesis of MMP-13, DXM blocked TNF-α downstream signaling, including I kappa B kinase (IKKα/β-IκBα-nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK-activator protein-1 (AP-1 activation. Besides this, DXM protected the CIA mice from severe inflammation and cartilage destruction. DXM seemed to protect cartilage from inflammation-mediated matrix degradation, which is an irreversible status in the disease progression of osteoarthritis. The results suggested that testing DXM as an osteoarthritis therapeutic should be a focus in further research.

  14. Automatic Knee Osteoarthritis Diagnosis from Plain Radiographs: A Deep Learning-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiulpin, Aleksei; Thevenot, Jérôme; Rahtu, Esa; Lehenkari, Petri; Saarakkala, Simo

    2018-01-29

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common musculoskeletal disorder. OA diagnosis is currently conducted by assessing symptoms and evaluating plain radiographs, but this process suffers from subjectivity. In this study, we present a new transparent computer-aided diagnosis method based on the Deep Siamese Convolutional Neural Network to automatically score knee OA severity according to the Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale. We trained our method using the data solely from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study and validated it on randomly selected 3,000 subjects (5,960 knees) from Osteoarthritis Initiative dataset. Our method yielded a quadratic Kappa coefficient of 0.83 and average multiclass accuracy of 66.71% compared to the annotations given by a committee of clinical experts. Here, we also report a radiological OA diagnosis area under the ROC curve of 0.93. Besides this, we present attention maps highlighting the radiological features affecting the network decision. Such information makes the decision process transparent for the practitioner, which builds better trust toward automatic methods. We believe that our model is useful for clinical decision making and for OA research; therefore, we openly release our training codes and the data set created in this study.

  15. [New physical methods in osteoarthritis treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczewska, Katarzyna; Klimkiewicz, Robert; Kubsik-Gidlewska, Anna; Jankowska, Agnieszka; Klimkiewicz, Paulina; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic disease in which the pathological processes start from the catabolism of cartilage extracellular matrix and next extend on the whole joint. Therefore, it is important to diagnose the disease and determining treatment, selecting individually for each patient. The main health problems presents by every patients is pain, which decreases the everyday functioning and quality of life. The paper presents the definition of the disease and new therapeutic methods which improve the quality of life, as well as reduce intensity of pain.

  16. EFFECTIVENESS OF MANUAL THERAPY VERSUS EXERCISE THERAPY FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS IN KARACHI PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Zakir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among musculoskeletal disorders knee Osteoarthritis (OA is exceedingly prevailing articular disorder affecting people and it is a major cause of disability and socioeconomic burden. It is more common in women than men. Entities with knee OA must often undergo a variety of problems, such as pain and tenderness in joints, movement limitation, crepitus on movement, swelling, recurrent effusion, and local inflammation which ultimately leads to limitation in physical function, like lack of ability to perform Activities of Daily Living (ADL or Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL. For reducing knee pain in osteoarthritis several conventional treatment methods are used world widely but most extensively used in our country are pharmacologic and physical therapy. The objective of the study is to find out the effectiveness of Manual therapy verses Exercise therapy for the management of knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Sixty patients including both male and female with mean age (51years and SD of (5.1 were enrolled in the study and divided randomly in to two groups. Those who were assigned as group A had received Manual therapy and those who were assigned as group B had received Exercise therapy. Participants had received three treatment sessions of 30 min per week for consecutive 4 weeks. OUTCOME MEASURE: WOMAC index score for pain, stiffness and physical function was used to evaluate the baseline score and treatment effects after 12 therapy sessions. Results: Study showed significant improvement in both groups before and after the treatment but in comparison manual therapy group showed significant results with respect to pain subscale (p=0.003 and physical function subscale (p=0.004. Conclusion: Significant difference found between manual therapy and exercise therapy treatment approaches in treating knee osteoarthritis. Findings of this study revealed the fact that short term treatment sessions of manual therapy were superior to

  17. Prevalence of Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction, With or Without Meniscectomy: An Evidence-Based Practice Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, Jennifer S; Sitler, Michael R; Driban, Jeffrey B

    2017-06-02

    Reference:  Claes S, Hermie L, Verdonk R, Bellemans J, Verdonk P. Is osteoarthritis an inevitable consequence of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction? A meta-analysis. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2013;21(9):1967-1976.   What is the prevalence of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) at a mean follow-up equal to or greater than 10 years after autologous anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, with or without meniscectomy?   The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) reporting guidelines were used to conduct this meta-analysis. Studies were identified by searching PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library dating from their earliest file until October 2010. Key terms applied for searching were anterior cruciate ligament or ACL, autologous, follow-up, long-term, outcome, reconstruction, results, treatment, and (osteo)arthritis or osteoarthrosis. The reference lists of included studies were also manually checked to ensure that relevant articles were not omitted.   The authors limited their search to English- and French-language journals. Included studies provided radiographic outcomes after autologous ACL reconstruction and had a mean follow-up of ≥10 years. Excluded studies evaluated ACL reconstruction with major concomitant surgical procedures (eg, meniscal allograft transplantation, high tibial osteotomy). In addition, data from 2 studies completed by the same research team with identical patient populations were limited to the article with the longest follow-up. Finally, manuscripts with inaccurate or incomplete data were excluded.   The following key characteristics of each study were extracted: type of study (prospective or retrospective); ACL surgical procedure (eg, open or arthroscopic bone-patellar tendon-bone graft); time frame of surgery; mean follow-up (in years) post-ACL reconstruction; total number of participants with radiographs; total number of participants with radiographic OA

  18. Pulsed electromagnetic field therapy for management of osteoarthritis-related pain, stiffness and physical function: clinical experience in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannitti, Tommaso; Fistetto, Gregorio; Esposito, Anna; Rottigni, Valentina; Palmieri, Beniamino

    2013-01-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) therapy has shown promising therapeutic effectiveness on bone- and cartilage-related pathologies, being also safe for management of knee osteoarthritis. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of a PEMF device for management of knee osteoarthritis in elderly patients. A total of 33 patients were screened, and 28 patients, aged between 60 and 83 and affected by bilateral knee osteoarthritis, were enrolled in this study. They received PEMF therapy on the right leg for a total of three 30-minute sessions per week for a period of 6 weeks, while the left leg did not receive any treatment and served as control. An intravenous drip containing ketoprofen, sodium clodronate, glucosamine sulfate, calcitonin, and ascorbic acid, for a total volume of 500 mL, was administered during PEMF therapy. At baseline and 3 months post-PEMF therapy, Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to assess knee pain and Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) was used to measure knee pain, stiffness and physical function. Changes in VAS and WOMAC scores were calculated for both knees as baseline minus post-treatment. A two sample Student's t-test, comparing change in knee-related VAS pain for PEMF-treated leg (49.8 ± 2.03) vs control leg (11 ± 1.1), showed a significant difference in favor of PEMF therapy (P PEMF-treated leg (8.5 ± 0.4, 3.5 ± 0.2, 38.5 ± 2.08, respectively) vs control leg (2.6 ± 0.2; 1.6 ± 0.1; 4.5 ± 0.5 respectively), also showed a significant difference in favor of PEMF therapy (P PEMF therapy improves pain, stiffness and physical function in elderly patients affected by knee osteoarthritis.

  19. Pathobiology of obesity and osteoarthritis: integrating biomechanics and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita I. Issa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a significant risk factor for developing osteoarthritis in weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing joints. Although the pathogenesis of obesity-associated osteoarthritis is not completely understood, recent studies indicate that pro-inflammatory metabolic factors contribute to an increase in osteoarthritis risk. Adipose tissue, and in particular infrapatellar fat, is a local source of pro-inflammatory mediators that are increased with obesity and have been shown to increase cartilage degradation in cell and tissue culture models. One adipokine in particular, leptin, may be a critical mediator of obesity-associated osteoarthritis via synergistic actions with other inflammatory cytokines. Biomechanical factors may also increase the risk of osteoarthritis by activating cellular inflammation and promoting oxidative stress. However, some types of biomechanical stimulation, such as physiologic cyclic loading, inhibit inflammation and protect against cartilage degradation. A high percentage of obese individuals with knee osteoarthritis are sedentary, suggesting that a lack of physical activity may increase the susceptibility to inflammation. A more comprehensive approach to understanding how obesity alters daily biomechanical exposures within joint tissues may provide new insight into the protective and damaging effects of biomechanical factors on inflammation in osteoarthritis.

  20. Laterality of radiographic osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Daigo; Ikeuchi, Kazuma; Kojima, Toshihisa; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Amano, Takafumi; Tsuboi, Masaki; Ishiguro, Naoki; Hasegawa, Yukiharu

    2017-05-01

    There are few reports of the laterality in radiological knee osteoarthritis (ROA). This study aimed to evaluate laterality in terms of the minimum joint space width (mJSW) and osteophyte areas (OFs) in a cross-sectorial general population screen and elucidate the association between laterality and risk of osteoarthritis. We enrolled 330 participants (mean age 64.6 years) and examined the presence of ROA (Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≧ 2) laterality in terms of the mJSW and OF on the medial tibia using auto-measuring software. Moreover, we examined the association between laterality and leg dominance. The right and left medial mJSWs were 4.02 ± 0.98 mm and 4.05 ± 1.01 mm, respectively, showing no laterality; the laterals were also similar. The participants who had osteophytes ≥1 mm 2 in the right, left, and bilateral knees were 15, 37, and 57 respectively, with osteophytes being significantly more common in the left knee. The OF was significantly larger in the left knee. Conversely, the medial and lateral mJSWs and OF did not differ according to leg dominance. The prevalence of ROA was higher and the OF was more pronounced in the left knee. However, the mJSW showed no laterality. Additionally, the mJSW and OF showed no differences according to leg dominance.

  1. Platelet-rich plasma for osteoarthritis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knop, Eduardo; Paula, Luiz Eduardo de; Fuller, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a comprehensive and systematic search of the literature on the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the treatment of osteoarthritis, using the Medline, Lilacs, Cochrane and SciELO databases, from May 2012 to October 2013. A total of 23 studies were selected, with nine being controlled trials and, of these, seven randomized, which included 725 patients. In this series, the group receiving PRP showed improvement in pain and joint function compared to placebo and hyaluronic acid. The response lasted up to two years and was better in milder cases. However it was found that there is no standardization in the PRP production method, neither in the number, timing, and volume of applications. Furthermore, the populations studied were not clearly described in many studies. Thus, these results should be analyzed with caution, and further studies with more standardized methods would be necessary for a more consistent conclusion about the PRP role in osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of total knee replacement practice: cost effectiveness analysis of data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferket, Bart S; Feldman, Zachary; Zhou, Jing; Oei, Edwin H; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Mazumdar, Madhu

    2017-03-28

    minimal loss of 0.008 (-0.056 to 0.043) QALYs compared with current practice. These findings were reproduced among patients with knee osteoarthritis from the MOST cohort and were robust against various scenarios including increased rates of total knee replacement and mortality and inclusion of non-healthcare costs but were sensitive to increased deterioration in quality of life without surgery. In a threshold analysis, total knee replacement would become cost effective in patients with SF-12 PCS scores ≤40 if the associated hospital admission costs fell below $14 000 given a cost effectiveness threshold of $200 000/QALY. Conclusion  Current practice of total knee replacement as performed in a recent US cohort of patients with knee osteoarthritis had minimal effects on quality of life and QALYs at the group level. If the procedure were restricted to more severely affected patients, its effectiveness would rise, with practice becoming economically more attractive than its current use. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Effects of In-Person and Distance Exercise Training on Outcomes of Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis among Elderly Individuals with Limited Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forouzan Farzad

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis is a common chronic disease of the musculoskeletal system in older adults. Aim: This study aimed to compare the effects of in-person and distance exercise training on the outcomes of knee injury and osteoarthritis among the elderly with limited literacy. Method: In this two-group randomized clinical trial with a pretest-posttest design, 60 elderly patients with knee injuries and osteoarthritis selected from two public parks in Mashhad during 2017-2018 were assigned to two groups of In-person and Distance training. The educational content, which included two stretching and three strength exercises for knee injury and osteoarthritis, was presented to the Distance group using booklets and multimedia. In the In-person group, the exercises were trained in eight 30-minute sessions, two days a week. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis questionnaire was completed before and two months after training the exercises. To analyze the data, Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were run in SPSS, version 16. Results: The mean ages of the In-person and Distance groups were 68.2±5.6 and 69.2±9.4 years, respectively. We found a significant difference in the outcomes of knee injury and osteoarthritis post-intervention between the In-person and Distance groups (13.8±14.0 vs. 5.0±2.6; P≤0.003. Implications for Practice: Both methods could affect the outcomes of knee osteoarthritis. The in-person method was superior to distance training. These exercises are recommended as safe and cost-effective methods that could be included in health promotion programs targeting older adults.

  4. [Degenerative osteoarthritis, osteoporosis and fractures: controversies and evidences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagès-Castellà, Aina; Prieto Alhambra, Daniel

    2013-09-07

    Osteoarthritis and osteoporosis are both common conditions in the elderly but their association has long remained obscure. Recently published studies show that patients with osteoarthritis have higher bone mass but no corresponding decrease in fracture risk. This has been proposed to be due to an increased rate of falls in these patients. Multi-disciplinary interventions, vitamin D supplementation and bisphosphonates can play a role on preventing fractures among osteoarthritis patients, but evidence on their efficacy is scarce and of poor quality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Topical herbal therapies for treating osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Melainie; Chrubasik, Sigrun

    2013-05-31

    Before extraction and synthetic chemistry were invented, musculoskeletal complaints were treated with preparations from medicinal plants. They were either administered orally or topically. In contrast to the oral medicinal plant products, topicals act in part as counterirritants or are toxic when given orally. To update the previous Cochrane review of herbal therapy for osteoarthritis from 2000 by evaluating the evidence on effectiveness for topical medicinal plant products. Databases for mainstream and complementary medicine were searched using terms to include all forms of arthritis combined with medicinal plant products. We searched electronic databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, ISI Web of Science, World Health Organization Clinical Trials Registry Platform) to February 2013, unrestricted by language. We also searched the reference lists from retrieved trials. Randomised controlled trials of herbal interventions used topically, compared with inert (placebo) or active controls, in people with osteoarthritis were included. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed the risk of bias of included studies and extracted data. Seven studies (six different medicinal plant interventions; 785 participants) were included. Single studies (five studies) and non-comparable studies (two studies) precluded pooling of results.Moderate evidence from a single study of 174 people with hand osteoarthritis indicated that treatment with Arnica extract gel probably results in similar benefits as treatment with ibuprofen (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) with a similar number of adverse events. Mean pain in the ibuprofen group was 44.2 points on a 100 point scale; treatment with Arnica gel reduced the pain by 4 points after three weeks: mean difference (MD) -3.8 points (95% confidence intervals (CI) -10.1 to 2.5), absolute reduction 4% (10% reduction to 3% increase). Hand function was 7

  6. Crosslinking of fibrinogen and fibronectin by free radicals : A possible initial step in adhesion formation in osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, LC; Zardeneta, G; Cordewener, FW; Liem, RSB; Schmitz, JP; de Bont, LGM; Milam, SB

    Purpose: Adhesion formation in osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) typically results in a sustained limitation of joint movement. We propose the hypothesis that free-radical-mediated crosslinking of proteins underlies this adhesion formation in affected joints. Free radicals may

  7. Taping reduces pain and disability in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, E. van den

    2004-01-01

    Question: Is taping of the knee effective in improving pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee? Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting University and private practices in Melbourne, Australia. Patients: Volunteers who responded to advertisements in local newspapers.

  8. Potential of Raloxifene in reversing osteoarthritis-like alterations in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-12-16

    jbiosci. J Biosci 38(1), March 2013, 135–147, * Indian Academy of Sciences. 135. Keywords. Agarose; cartilage; chondroprotective; in vitro models; osteoarthritis; Raloxifene. Abbreviations used: 2-D, two-dimensional; 3-D, ...

  9. Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Frank W; Frobell, Richard; Lohmander, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    and longitudinal changes including osteoarthritis (OA) features. Joint features assessed were acute osteochondral injury, traumatic and degenerative bone marrow lesions (BMLs), meniscus morphology and extrusion, osteophytes, collateral and cruciate ligaments including ACL graft, Hoffa-synovitis and effusion...

  10. Considerations of the Principles of Resistance Training in Exercise Studies for the Management of Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshull, Claire; Gleeson, Nigel

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the methodologic quality of resistance training interventions for the management of knee osteoarthritis. A search of the literature for studies published up to August 10, 2015, was performed on MEDLINE (OVID platform), PubMed, Embase, and Physiotherapy Evidence Database databases. Search terms associated with osteoarthritis, knee, and muscle resistance exercise were used. Studies were included in the review if they were published in the English language and met the following criteria: (1) muscle resistance training was the primary intervention; (2) randomized controlled trial design; (3) treatment arms included at least a muscle conditioning intervention and a nonexercise group; and (4) participants had osteoarthritis of the knee. Studies using preoperative (joint replacement) interventions with only postoperative outcomes were excluded. The search yielded 1574 results. The inclusion criteria were met by 34 studies. Two reviewers independently screened the articles for eligibility. Critical appraisal of the methodology was assessed according to the principles of resistance training and separately for the reporting of adherence using a specially designed scoring system. A rating for each article was assigned. There were 34 studies that described a strength training focus of the intervention; however, the principles of resistance training were inconsistently applied and inadequately reported across all. Methods for adherence monitoring were incorporated into the design of 28 of the studies, but only 13 reported sufficient detail to estimate average dose of exercise. These findings affect the interpretation of the efficacy of muscle resistance exercise in the management of knee osteoarthritis. Clinicians and health care professionals cannot be confident whether nonsignificant findings are because of the lack of efficacy of muscle resistance interventions, or occur through limitations in treatment prescription and patient adherence. Future research that

  11. The Gait Deviation Index Is Associated with Hip Muscle Strength and Patient-Reported Outcome in Patients with Severe Hip Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenlund, Signe; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Overgaard, Søren

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Gait Deviation Index summarizes overall gait 'quality', based on kinematic data from a 3-dimensional gait analysis. However, it is unknown which clinical outcomes may affect the Gait Deviation Index in patients with primary hip osteoarthritis. The aim of this study......) and with severe primary hip osteoarthritis underwent 3-dimensional gait analysis. Mean Gait Deviation Index, pain after walking and maximal isometric hip muscle strength (flexor, extensor, and abductor) were recorded. All patients completed the 'Physical Function Short-form of the Hip disability...... was to investigate associations between Gait Deviation Index as a measure of gait 'quality' and hip muscle strength and between Gait Deviation Index and patient-reported outcomes in patients with primary hip osteoarthritis. METHOD: Forty-seven patients (34 males), aged 61.1 ± 6.7 years, with BMI 27.3 ± 3.4 (kg/m2...

  12. Best performing definition of accelerated knee osteoarthritis: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driban, Jeffrey B; Stout, Alina C; Lo, Grace H; Eaton, Charles B; Price, Lori Lyn; Lu, Bing; Barbe, Mary F; McAlindon, Timothy E

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated agreement among several definitions of accelerated knee osteoarthritis (AKOA) and construct validity by comparing their individual associations with injury, age, obesity, and knee pain. We selected knees from the Osteoarthritis Initiative that had no radiographic knee osteoarthritis [Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) 0 or 1] at baseline and had high-quality quantitative medial joint space width (JSW) measures on two or more consecutive visits ( n = 1655 knees, 1143 participants). Quantitative medial JSW was based on a semi-automated method and was location specific ( x = 0.25). We compared six definitions of AKOA: stringent JSW (averaged): average JSW loss greater than 1.05 mm/year over 4 years; stringent JSW (consistent): JSW loss greater than 1.05 mm/year for at least 2 years; lenient JSW (averaged): average JSW loss greater than 0.25 mm/year over 4 years; lenient JSW (consistent): JSW loss greater than 0.25 mm/year for at least 2 years; comprehensive KL based: progression from no radiographic osteoarthritis to advance-stage osteoarthritis (KL 3 or 4; development of definite osteophyte and joint space narrowing) within 4 years; and lenient KL based: an increase of at least two KL grades within 4 years. Over 4 years the incidence rate of AKOA was 0.4%, 0.8%, 15.5%, 22.1%, 12.4%, and 7.2% based on the stringent JSW (averaged and consistent), lenient JSW (averaged and consistent), lenient KL-based definition, and comprehensive KL-based definition. All but one knee that met the stringent JSW definition also met the comprehensive KL-based definition. There was fair substantial agreement between the lenient JSW (averaged), lenient KL-based, and comprehensive KL-based definitions. A comprehensive KL-based definition led to larger effect sizes for injury, age, body mass index, and average pain over 4 years. A comprehensive KL-based definition of AKOA may be ideal because it represents a broader definition of joint deterioration compared with those focused on just joint

  13. What can we learn from osteoarthritis pain in companion animals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino Brown, Dorothy

    2017-01-01

    The lack of successful translation of basic research discoveries into safe and effective treatments for chronic pain patients has led to increased scrutiny of the preclinical models used in pain research, particularly for osteoarthritis, where there is a significant disconnect between the animal models used to study the structural versus symptomatic aspects of the disease. Companion dogs offer a unique opportunity to assess osteoarthritis pain in a physiologically relevant 'model' of the disease. Approximately 20% of the canine pet population spontaneously develops osteoarthritis, translating to at least 15 million dogs in the United States alone. As in humans, pathogenesis of canine osteoarthritis involves changes in all tissues of the synovial joint including articular cartilage, subchondral bone, and periosteum. The dominant symptom of osteoarthritis for both humans and dogs is pain, and the current therapeutic goal for both species is management of that pain and associated loss of function. To capture clinically and translationally relevant pain severity and pain impact data in the companion canine osteoarthritis 'model', clinical metrology instruments have been validated. These instruments, which assess changes in spontaneous pain-related behaviours, over extended periods of time, in the dog's home environment, are used to evaluate the efficacy of novel interventions for chronic pain in canine osteoarthritis studies. There is evidence that these results in companion dogs can reliably predict efficacy in humans. Across many classes of compounds in which there have been studies in companion animal chronic pain conditions and the same conditions in humans, the analogous results have been seen. In addition, many of the drugs used to treat pain in people are successfully used off-label to treat pain in dogs as well. If preliminary indications of predictability hold true, companion dogs may be embraced as a missing link in the translation of osteoarthritis treatment

  14. Osteoarthritis in Spain: A nationwide survey of medical specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaza, Rafael; Sancho, Carlos; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Benjamin

    2017-11-25

    To determine the reality of the resources and care needs in Spain for the management of patients with osteoarthritis. An online survey. Description of 190 responses to a structured questionnaire (141 orthopedic surgeons and 49 rheumatologists). Osteoarthritis has yet to receive appropriate medical attention and a patient management model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  15. Moving with Ease: Feldenkrais Method Classes for People with Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Robert; Cofr? Lizama, Luis Eduardo; Galea, Mary P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effects of Feldenkrais Method classes on gait, balance, function, and pain in people with osteoarthritis. Design. Prospective study with pre-/postmeasures. Setting. Community. Participants. Convenience sample of 15 community-dwelling adults with osteoarthritis (mean age 67 years) attending Feldenkrais Method classes. Intervention. Series of Feldenkrais Method classes, two classes/week for 30 weeks. Main outcome measures: Western Ontario and McMaster U...

  16. Intra-Articular Therapeutic Delivery for Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    loading and disease progression timeframe in a large animal model in order to outline a pathway to human clinical trials of the treatment method . Our...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0188 TITLE: Intra-Articular Therapeutic Delivery for Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert...Intra-Articular Therapeutic Delivery for Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-2-0188 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  17. Pain of osteoarthritis and bone uptake - is there a correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadhwa, S.S.; Carollan, M.; Abbati, D.; Chan, W.-L.; Bui, C.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In patients with osteoarthritis bone scintigraphy is consistently reported as demonstrating mild, moderate or severe arthritis, particularly for the medial compartment of the knee, depending on the degree of uptake. Numerous studies however have not demonstrated a correlation between severity of bone scan findings and severity of osteoarthritis (OA) demonstrated at surgery or arthroscopy. In fact, most studies have not demonstrated any correlation between OA as assessed with imaging and subsequent surgical findings. The only positive correlation for outcome of OA of the knee appears to be the severity of pain. In this pilot study we investigate if there is correlation between pain and scintigraphic findings in medial compartment OA. 69 patients (18 - 87 years) without history of recent knee trauma or previous surgery for insertion of knee prosthesis who presented for a bone scan for any reasons were studied. All patients were asked to quantify any knee pain on a simple 4 point score i.e. no pain, non limiting pain, pain limiting daily activity and rest pain. Uptake in the medial compartment of the knee was quantified by measuring the count ratio between the medial compartment and the corresponding distal femur. 45 patients reported no pain, 20 reported non-limiting pain while 4 reported limiting pain. No patient reported pain at rest. In general pain was bilateral with no major differences. The mean knee/femur ratio for patients with no pain was 1.46 +/- 0.95 (N=90). Knee/femur ratio for patients with non-limiting pain was 1.77 +/- 0.57 (N=40) and for those with limiting pain it was 2.36 +/- 1.82 (N=8). Although the results were not statistically significant there was a clear trend towards a rising knee/femur ratio with increasing pain. The number of patients with knee pain was small and further study concentrating on this group would be required to assess the significance of the trend findings. Further study particularly in patients with significant

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage regeneration in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjánsson, Baldur; Honsawek, Sittisak

    2017-09-18

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a slowly progressive disease where cartilage of the synovial joint degenerates. It is most common in the elderly where patients experience pain and reduce physical activity. In combination with lack of conventional treatment, patients are often left with no other choices than arthroplasty. Over the last years, multipotent stromal cells have been used in efforts to treat OA. Mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) are stromal cells that can differentiate into bone, fat, and cartilage cells. They reside within bone marrow and fat. MSCs can also be found in synovial joints where they affect the progression of OA. They can be isolated and proliferated in an incubator before being applied in clinical trials. When it comes to treatment, emphasis has hitherto been on autologous MSCs, but allogenic cells from healthy donors are emerging as another source of the cells. The first adaptations of MSCs revolved in the use of cell-rich matrix, delivered as invasive surgical procedure, which resulted in production of hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage. However, the demand for less invasive delivery of cells has prompted the use of direct intra-articular injections, wherein a large amount of suspended cells are implanted in the cartilage defect.

  19. Gait analysis in hip viscosupplementation for osteoarthritis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Di Lorenzo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hip is a site very commonly affected by osteoarthritis and the intra-articular administration of hyaluronic acid in the management of osteoarthritic pain is increasingly used. However, the debate about its usefulness is still ongoing, as not all results of clinical trials confirm its effectiveness. In order to achieve the best outcome, clinical assessment and treatment choices should be based on subjective outcome, pathological and mechanical findings that should be integrated with qualitative analysis of human movement. After viscosupplementation, clinical trials often evaluate as endpoint subjective outcomes (i.e. pain visual analogic scale and static imaging such as radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. In our clinical practice we use gait analysis as part of rehabilitation protocol to measure performance, enhancement and changes of several biomechanical factors. Taking advantage of available resources (BTS Bioengineering gait analysis Elite System we studied a patient’s gait after ultrasound guided hip injections for viscosupplementation. He showed an early clinical and biomechanical improvement during walking after a single intra articular injection of hyaluronic acid. Gait analysis parameters obtained suggest that the pre-treatment slower speed may be caused by antalgic walking patterns, the need for pain control and muscle weakness. After hip viscosupplementation, the joint displayed different temporal, kinetic and kinematic parameters associated with improved pain patterns.

  20. Strategies for the prevention of knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Arden, Nigel K

    2016-01-01

    . Instead, OA should be viewed as a chronic condition, where prevention and early comprehensive-care models are the accepted norm, as is the case with other chronic diseases. Joint injury, obesity and impaired muscle function are modifiable risk factors amenable to primary and secondary prevention......Osteoarthritis (OA) has been thought of as a disease of cartilage that can be effectively treated surgically at severe stages with joint arthroplasty. Today, OA is considered a whole-organ disease that is amenable to prevention and treatment at early stages. OA develops slowly over 10-15 years...... strategies. The strategies that are most appropriate for each patient should be identified, by selecting interventions to correct-or at least attenuate-OA risk factors. We must also choose the interventions that are most likely to be acceptable to patients, to maximize adherence to-and persistence with...

  1. Bradykinin and its role in osteoarthritis

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    L. De Falco

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA, the most common joint disorder, is a disease involving all the articular structures. It presents both degenerative and inflammatory aspects. Recently, the important role of Bradykinin (BK, a phlogistic mediator, has been proposed in the pathophysiology of OA. In our review, we summarized the currently available information on the mechanisms of action of BK in OA by linking its B2 receptors. Then, we analyzed the data about the effects of BK in synoviocytes and chondrocytes cultures. Furthermore, we described the action of B2 receptor antagonists (Icatibant and Fasitibant, presenting them as new promising symptom-anddisease- modifying agents in the treatment of OA. However, more in vitro, animal model and clinical studies, are needed to better understand the mechanisms of action as well as the efficacy and tolerability of the B2 receptor antagonists in OA.

  2. Imaging the degenerative lesions of osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, M.E.; Li, D.K.B.

    1985-01-01

    The importance of developing better diagnostic methods for osteoarthritis (OA) is highlighted. In this paper, magnetic resonance images were obtained with a Picker International Vista MR imager based on a 0.30 Tesla cryogenic magnetic operating at 0.15 Tesla. Examinations were performed with one knee. A small knee coil was utilized (15 cm field of view). Simultaneous multi-slice (eight, twelve or sixteen) examinations are routinely obtained in transverse, coronal, or sagittal planes. These slices are 10 mm thick and contiguous. Examination times ranged from 45 to 150 minutes depending upon the pulse sequences and number of sections and number of orientations obtained. Faster examination times were obtained with smaller knee coil because of its higher sensitivity, which allows for imaging with fewer averages. (Auth.)

  3. Cellular senescence in aging and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Wei Seong; Brittberg, Mats; Farr, Jack; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Gomoll, Andreas H; Hui, James Hoi Po; Richardson, James B; Roberts, Sally; Spector, Myron

    2016-12-01

    - It is well accepted that age is an important contributing factor to poor cartilage repair following injury, and to the development of osteoarthritis. Cellular senescence, the loss of the ability of cells to divide, has been noted as the major factor contributing to age-related changes in cartilage homeostasis, function, and response to injury. The underlying mechanisms of cellular senescence, while not fully understood, have been associated with telomere erosion, DNA damage, oxidative stress, and inflammation. In this review, we discuss the causes and consequences of cellular senescence, and the associated biological challenges in cartilage repair. In addition, we present novel strategies for modulation of cellular senescence that may help to improve cartilage regeneration in an aging population.

  4. Osteoarthritis year in review 2015: mechanics.

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    Varady, N H; Grodzinsky, A J

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the conceptual framework of multi-scale biomechanics, this narrative review highlights recent major advances with a focus on gait and joint kinematics, then tissue-level mechanics, cell mechanics and mechanotransduction, matrix mechanics, and finally the nanoscale mechanics of matrix macromolecules. A literature review was conducted from January 2014 to April 2015 using PubMed to identify major developments in mechanics related to osteoarthritis (OA). Studies of knee adduction, flexion, rotation, and contact mechanics have extended our understanding of medial compartment loading. In turn, advances in measurement methodologies have shown how injuries to both the meniscus and ligaments, together, can alter joint kinematics. At the tissue scale, novel findings have emerged regarding the mechanics of the meniscus as well as cartilage superficial zone. Moving to the cell level, poroelastic and poro-viscoelastic mechanisms underlying chondrocyte deformation have been reported, along with the response to osmotic stress. Further developments have emerged on the role of calcium signaling in chondrocyte mechanobiology, including exciting findings on the function of mechanically activated cation channels newly found to be expressed in chondrocytes. Finally, AFM-based nano-rheology systems have enabled studies of thin murine tissues and brush layers of matrix molecules over a wide range of loading rates including high rates corresponding to impact injury. With OA acknowledged to be a disease of the joint as an organ, understanding mechanical behavior at each length scale helps to elucidate the connections between cell biology, matrix biochemistry and tissue structure/function that may play a role in the pathomechanics of OA. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Human Endogenous Retrovirus W Activity in Cartilage of Osteoarthritis Patients

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    Signy Bendiksen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of viruses in osteoarthritis remains controversial because the prevalence of viral nucleic acid sequences in peripheral blood or synovial fluid from osteoarthritis patients and that in healthy control subjects are similar. Until now the presence of virus has not been analyzed in cartilage. We screened cartilage and chondrocytes from advanced and non-/early osteoarthritis patients for parvovirus B19, herpes simplex virus-1, Epstein Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, human herpes virus-6, hepatitis C virus, and human endogenous retroviruses transcripts. Endogenous retroviruses transcripts, but none of the other viruses, were detected in 15 out the 17 patients. Sequencing identified the virus as HERV-WE1 and E2. HERV-W activity was confirmed by high expression levels of syncytin, dsRNA, virus budding, and the presence of virus-like particles in all advanced osteoarthritis cartilages examined. Low levels of HERV-WE1, but not E2 envelope RNA, were observed in 3 out of 8 non-/early osteoarthritis patients, while only 3 out of 7 chondrocytes cultures displayed low levels of syncytin, and just one was positive for virus-like particles. This study demonstrates for the first time activation of HERV-W in cartilage of osteoarthritis patients; however, a causative role for HERV-W in development or deterioration of the disease remains to be proven.

  6. Self-management education programmes for osteoarthritis.

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    Kroon, Féline P B; van der Burg, Lennart R A; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Osborne, Richard H; Johnston, Renea V; Pitt, Veronica

    2014-01-15

    Self-management education programmes are complex interventions specifically targeted at patient education and behaviour modification. They are designed to encourage people with chronic disease to take an active self-management role to supplement medical care and improve outcomes. To assess the effectiveness of self-management education programmes for people with osteoarthritis. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PyscINFO, SCOPUS and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trial Registry Platform were searched, without language restriction, on 17 January 2013. We checked references of reviews and included trials to identify additional studies. Randomised controlled trials of self-management education programmes in people with osteoarthritis were included. Studies with participants receiving passive recipients of care and studies comparing one type of programme versus another were excluded. In addition to standard methods we extracted components of the self-management interventions using the eight domains of the Health Education Impact Questionnaire (heiQ), and contextual and participant characteristics using PROGRESS-Plus and the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ). Outcomes included self-management of osteoarthritis, participant's positive and active engagement in life, pain, global symptom score, self-reported function, quality of life and withdrawals (including dropouts and those lost to follow-up). We assessed the quality of the body of evidence for these outcomes using the GRADE approach. We included twenty-nine studies (6,753 participants) that compared self-management education programmes to attention control (five studies), usual care (17 studies), information alone (four studies) or another intervention (seven studies). Although heterogeneous, most interventions included elements of skill and technique acquisition (94%), health-directed activity (85%) and self-monitoring and insight (79

  7. Pulsed electromagnetic field therapy for management of osteoarthritis-related pain, stiffness and physical function: clinical experience in the elderly

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    Iannitti T

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Tommaso Iannitti,1,2 Gregorio Fistetto,2 Anna Esposito,2 Valentina Rottigni,2,3 Beniamino Palmieri2,3 1Department of Physiology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY, USA; 2Poliambulatorio del Secondo Parere, Modena, Italy; 3Department of General Surgery and Surgical Specialties, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia Medical School, Surgical Clinic, Modena, Italy Background: Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF therapy has shown promising therapeutic effectiveness on bone- and cartilage-related pathologies, being also safe for management of knee osteoarthritis. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of a PEMF device for management of knee osteoarthritis in elderly patients. Materials and methods: A total of 33 patients were screened, and 28 patients, aged between 60 and 83 and affected by bilateral knee osteoarthritis, were enrolled in this study. They received PEMF therapy on the right leg for a total of three 30-minute sessions per week for a period of 6 weeks, while the left leg did not receive any treatment and served as control. An intravenous drip containing ketoprofen, sodium clodronate, glucosamine sulfate, calcitonin, and ascorbic acid, for a total volume of 500 mL, was administered during PEMF therapy. At baseline and 3 months post-PEMF therapy, Visual Analog Scale (VAS was used to assess knee pain and Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC was used to measure knee pain, stiffness and physical function. Results: Changes in VAS and WOMAC scores were calculated for both knees as baseline minus post-treatment. A two sample Student’s t-test, comparing change in knee-related VAS pain for PEMF-treated leg (49.8 ± 2.03 vs control leg (11 ± 1.1, showed a significant difference in favor of PEMF therapy (P < 0.001. A two sample Student’s t-test comparing change in knee-related WOMAC pain, stiffness, and physical function for PEMF-treated leg (8.5 ± 0.4, 3.5 ± 0.2, 38

  8. Evaluation of Daily Living Activities of the Individuals with Osteoarthritis

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    Kenan Gümüş

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Osteoarthritis (OA is one of the most commonly seen joint diseases and chronic diseases. This research was conducted in order to evaluate daily living activities of the individuals who were diagnosed as OA. Materials and Methods: It is a descriptive research in which 200 individuals who were diagnosed as OA participated. A questionnaire form including personal descriptive information and patient’s knowledge about the disease, Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADLs and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale (IADLs were used as data collection tools. Data were statistically analyzed with descriptive statistics (numbers, means, standard deviation, median, percentages, Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test, Shapiro-Wilk Test, Kruskal-Wallis Variance Analysis, MannWhitney U Test, Cronbach’s Alpha Coefficient and Spearman’s Correlation Analysis. Results: 95.0% and 71.0% of the individuals told that they were independent while performing ADLs and IADLs, respectively. It was found that individuals who were female, at 77-89 years old, single, illiterate, housewife, had a low income level, had the disease for more than 15 years, had joint deformity and with an accompanying disease with OA or had an idea that OA affected ADLs had lower ADLs score than other groups (p<0.05. Individuals who were single, at 77-89 years old, illiterate, had joint deformity or who defined that OA affected ADLs and who received help while performing ADLs had lower ADLs score than other groups (p<0.05. Conclusions: It was concluded that individuals with OA should be helped, they should be supported in OA adaptation and the negative effects of the disease should be controlled. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2014;20: 117-24

  9. Time to Talk: 6 Things You Should Know about Dietary Supplements for Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z 6 Things You Should Know About Dietary Supplements for Osteoarthritis Share: Osteoarthritis is the most common ... Many people with OA report trying various dietary supplements, including glucosamine and chondroitin, alone or in combination, ...

  10. [Quality of life in patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernad-Pineda, M; de Las Heras-Sotos, J; Garcés-Puentes, M V

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the quality of life in patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis through self-assessment and those made by the physician. An observational and cross-sectional multicenter study in which 628 traumatologists or rheumatologists evaluated 1,849 patients with knee and/or hip osteoarthritis, aged ≥ 50 years old, and representative of 49 Spanish provinces. Each researcher evaluated three patients and also completed the SF-12v2 health questionnaire. The patients completed the WOMAC and SF-12v2 questionnaires. The patients were 68.5 ± 9.5 years old, 61.5% had knee osteoarthritis, 19% had hip osteoarthritis, and 19.5% in both locations. Older patients and those who had both knee and hip osteoarthritis had a poorer quality of life, according to patients and researchers. Physical health perceived by the researchers was better than patients reported (36.74 ± 8.6 and 35.21 ± 8.53; respectively, p<0.001), and the mental health score was similar between physicians and patients. Kellgren/Lawrence scale and test Timed Up & Go predict better the quality of life, assessed by WOMAC and SF-12v2 questionnaires. This is the Spanish study on quality of life in osteoarthritis of the knee and hip of larger amplitude and number of patients. These results could be considered as reference values of Spanish population aged ≥ 50 years with knee or hip osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Constructing osteoarthritis through discourse – a qualitative analysis of six patient information leaflets on osteoarthritis

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    Ong Bie

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health service policy in the United Kingdom emphasises the importance of self-care by patients with chronic conditions. Written information for patients about their condition is seen as an important aid to help patients look after themselves. From a discourse analysis perspective written texts such as patient information leaflets do not simply describe the reality of a medical condition and its management but by drawing on some sorts of knowledge and evidence rather than others help construct the reality of that condition. This study explored patient information leaflets on osteoarthritis (OA to see how OA was constructed and to consider the implications for self-care. Methods Systematic and repeated readings of six patient information leaflets on osteoarthritis to look for similarities and differences across leaflets, contradictions within leaflets and the resources called on to make claims about the nature of OA and its management. Results Biomedical discourse of OA as a joint disease dominated. Only one leaflet included an illness discourse albeit limited, and was also the only one to feature patient experiences of living with OA. The leaflets had different views on the causes of OA including the role of lifestyle and ageing. Most emphasised patient responsibility for preventing the progression of OA. Advice about changing behaviour such as diet and exercise was not grounded in lived experience. There were inconsistent messages about using painkillers, exercise and the need to involve professionals when making changes to lifestyle. Conclusion The nature of the discourse impacted on how OA and the respective roles of patients and professionals were depicted. Limited discourse on illness meant that the complexity of living with OA and its consequences was underestimated. Written information needs to shift from joint biology to helping patients live with osteoarthritis. Written information should incorporate patient

  12. Diclocor is superior to diclofenac sodium and quercetin in normalizing biochemical parameters in rats with collagen-induced osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanets, I A; Shebeko, S K; Popov, O S; Shalamay, A S

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate anti-inflammatory activity of Diclocor in the setting of collagen-induced osteoarthritis in rats in comparison with its active monocomponents-diclofenac sodium and quercetin. The study was conducted on the model of collagen-induced osteoarthritis and included measurement of sialic acids, glycoproteins, C-reactive protein, prostaglandin E2, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α, thromboxane B2, and leukotriene B4. Lastly, morphologic study with morphometry was also performed. Diclocor is superior to quercetin and diclofenac sodium by the degree of pharmacological effect on some of the studied parameters. The differences between the values were statistically significant. Diclocor is a promising corrector of inflammatory and destructive joint diseases. Owing to the presence of both diclofenac sodium and quercetin in its composition, Diclocor exhibits a complex mechanism of anti-inflammatory action affecting cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase ways of arachidonic acid biotransformation.

  13. Applications and Emerging Trends of Hyaluronic Acid in Tissue Engineering, as a Dermal Filler, and in Osteoarthritis Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhari, Amir; Berkland, Cory

    2013-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a naturally occurring biodegradable polymer with a variety of applications in medicine including scaffolding for tissue engineering, dermatological fillers, and viscosupplementation for osteoarthritis treatment. HA is available in most connective tissues in body fluids such as synovial fluid and the vitreous humor of the eye. HA is responsible for several structural properties of tissues as a component of extracellular matrix (ECM) and is involved in cellular signaling. Degradation of HA is a step-wise process that can occur via enzymatic or non-enzymatic reactions. A reduction in HA mass or molecular weight via degradation or slowing of synthesis affects physical and chemical properties such as tissue volume, viscosity, and elasticity. This review addresses the distribution, turnover, and tissue-specific properties of HA. This information is used as context for considering recent products and strategies for modifying the viscoelastic properties of HA in tissue engineering, as a dermal filler, and in osteoarthritis treatment. PMID:23507088

  14. Integrating lifestyle approaches into osteoarthritis care

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    Garver MJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Matthew J Garver,1 Brian C Focht,2 Sarah J Taylor3 1Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX, 2Department of Human Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 3School of Occupational Therapy, Texas Woman's University, Dallas, TX, USA Abstract: As the lifetime risk, societal cost, and overall functional impact of osteoarthritis (OA is imposing, it is imperative that clinicians provide an individualized care model for patients. Patients must be offered a multiplicity of care strategies and encouraged to embrace lifestyle approaches for self-managing the effects and symptoms of OA. Certainly, the attitude of the clinician and patient will directly influence receptivity and implementation of lifestyle approaches. This work proposes how the use of structured and routine assessments and cognitive therapy ideologies may complement a comprehensive treatment plan. Assessments described herein include objective and/or self-report measures of physical function, pain, attitude about social support, and sleep quality. Baseline assessments followed by systematic monitoring of the results may give patients and clinicians valuable insight into the effectiveness of the care plan. Empirical evidence from randomized trials with OA patients highlights the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral change strategies for addressing salient concerns for OA (pain control, mobility performance, and sleep quality. Cognitive restructuring can provide patients with renewed power in managing their disease. Cognitive therapy topics discussed presently include: 1 what is OA?, 2 effectiveness of exercise and FITT (frequency, intensity, time, and type principles for OA patients, 3 goal-setting and barriers, and 4 translating to independent care. Woven within the discussion about cognitive therapy are ideas about how the results from baseline assessments and group-mediated dynamics might assist more favorable outcomes. There are a plethora

  15. Severe Osteoarthritis of the Knee as an Early Symptom of Alkaptonuria: A Case Report

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    Alois Franz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Alkaptonuria (AKU is a very rare disease and occurs due to the deficiency of the enzyme homogentisate1, 2-dioxygenase (HGD which results in ochronosis, a term used to describe the dark pigmentation of the tissues. Alkaptonuria affects mostly the knee joint followed by the hip as major weight bearing joints, where the life quality of such patients is severely affected. Case Presentation: We present a case of Caucasian male who was suffering from severe osteoarthritis of the knee. Initially he underwent an arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in a nearby hospital. Fourteen months later we performed a total knee replacement using the Journey II CR prosthesis. We found a dark pigmentation of the inside of the knee (synovial tissue and cartilage. A positive urine test and a pathological specimen examination revealed the diagnosis of AKU. The patient had no complications after the surgery and underwent a standard rehabilitation program. Conclusions: Osteoarthritis could be the first manifestation of patients with AKU and the onset of the joint disease could be late and rapid.

  16. Osteoarthritis of the first carpometacarpal joint: a study of radiology and clinical epidemiology:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne-Holm, Stig; Jacobsen, J

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show an increased prevalence of osteoarthritis of the knee and hand with increased body mass index [BMI]. Osteoarthritis of the hip joint is not related to BMI. The connection between obesity and osteoarthritis cannot exclusively be explained by genetic factors or by the a...

  17. Sonographic Imaging of Meniscal Subluxation in Patients with Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis

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    Chun-Hung Ko

    2007-09-01

    Conclusion: Meniscal subluxation is a prominent feature on weight-bearing sonographic imaging in patients with radiographic osteoarthritis and could be considered as a risk factor for the development of knee osteoarthritis. By using musculoskeletal ultrasonography, one can detect this occult meniscal derangement early before the appearance of radiographic signs of osteoarthritis.

  18. Responsiveness of the OARSI-OMERACT osteoarthritis pain and function measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bond, M; Davis, A; Lohmander, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    To assess the responsiveness of the Intermittent and Constant Osteoarthritis Pain (ICOAP) measure, Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score Physical Function Short Form (HOOS-PS), and the Knee Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score Physical Function Short Form (KOOS-PS) in a pharmacol...

  19. Cartilage Degeneration and Alignment in Severe Varus Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Mukai, Shogo; Yabumoto, Hiromitsu; Tarumi, Eri; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between cartilage, ligament, and meniscus degeneration and radiographic alignment in severe varus knee osteoarthritis in order to understand the development of varus knee osteoarthritis. Fifty-three patients (71 knees) with primary varus knee osteoarthritis and who underwent total knee arthroplasty were selected for this study. There were 6 men and 47 women, with 40 right knees and 31 left knees studied; their mean age at operation was 73.5 years. The ligament, meniscus, degeneration of joint cartilage, and radiographic alignments were examined visually. The tibial plateau-tibial shaft angle was larger if the condition of the cartilage in the lateral femoral condyle was worse. The femorotibial angle and tibial plateau-tibial shaft angle were larger if the conditions of the lateral meniscus or the cartilage in the lateral tibial plateau were worse. Based on the results of this study, progression of varus knee osteoarthritis may occur in the following manner: medial knee osteoarthritis starts in the central portion of the medial tibial plateau, and accompanied by medial meniscal extrusion and anterior cruciate ligament rupture, cartilage degeneration expands from the anterior to the posterior in the medial tibial plateau. Bone attrition occurs in the medial tibial plateau, and the femoro-tibial angle and tibial plateau-tibial shaft angle increase. Therefore, the lateral intercondylar eminence injures the cartilage of the lateral femoral condyle in the longitudinal fissure type. Thereafter, the cartilage degeneration expands in the whole of the knee joints.

  20. Assessment of hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis: Variability of different methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troelsen, Anders; Elmengaard, Brian; Soeballe, Kjeld; Roemer, Lone; Kring, Soeren

    2010-01-01

    Background: Reliable assessment of hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis is crucial in young adults who may benefit from joint-preserving surgery. Purpose: To investigate the variability of different methods for diagnostic assessment of hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis. Material and Methods: By each of four observers, two assessments were done by vision and two by angle construction. For both methods, the intra- and interobserver variability of center-edge and acetabular index angle assessment were analyzed. The observers' ability to diagnose hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis were assessed. All measures were compared to those made on computed tomography scan. Results: Intra- and interobserver variability of angle assessment was less when angles were drawn compared with assessment by vision, and the observers' ability to diagnose hip dysplasia improved when angles were drawn. Assessment of osteoarthritis in general showed poor agreement with findings on computed tomography scan. Conclusion: We recommend that angles always should be drawn for assessment of hip dysplasia on pelvic radiographs. Given the inherent variability of diagnostic assessment of hip dysplasia, a computed tomography scan could be considered in patients with relevant hip symptoms and a center-edge angle between 20 deg and 30 deg. Osteoarthritis should be assessed by measuring the joint space width or by classifying the Toennis grade as either 0-1 or 2-3

  1. Stem cell-based therapies for osteoarthritis: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekman, Brian O; Guilak, Farshid

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative medicine offers the exciting potential of developing alternatives to total joint replacement for treating osteoarthritis. In this article, we highlight recent work that addresses key challenges of stem cell-based therapies for osteoarthritis and provide examples of innovative ways in which stem cells can aid in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Significant progress has been made in understanding the challenges to successful stem cell therapy, such as the effects of age or disease on stem cell properties, altered stem cell function due to an inflammatory joint environment and phenotypic instability in vivo. Novel scaffold designs have been shown to enhance the mechanical properties of tissue-engineered cartilage and have also improved the integration of newly formed tissue within the joint. Emerging strategies such as injecting stem cells directly into the joint, manipulating endogenous stem cells to enhance regenerative capacity and utilizing stem cells for drug discovery have expanded the potential uses of stem cells in treating osteoarthritis. Several recent studies have greatly advanced the development and preclinical evaluation of potential stem cell-based treatments for osteoarthritis through novel approaches focused on cell therapy, tissue engineering and drug discovery.

  2. Manual for guided home exercises for osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Nilza Aparecida de Almeida; Bittar, Simoni Teixeira; Pinto, Flávia Ribeiro de Souza; Ferreira, Mônica; Sitta, Robson Roberto

    2010-06-01

    Physiotherapy is one of the most important components of therapy for osteoarthritis of the knee. The objective of this prospective case series was to assess the efficiency of a guidance manual for patients with osteoarthritis of the knee in relation to pain, range of movement , muscle strength and function, active goniometry, manual strength test and function. Thirty-eight adults with osteoarthritis of the knee (>or= 45 years old) who were referred to the physiotherapy service at the university hospital (Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo) were studied. Patients received guidance for the practice of specific physical exercises and a manual with instructions on how to perform the exercises at home. They were evaluated for pain, range of movement, muscle strength and function. These evaluations were performed before they received the manual and three months later. Patients were seen monthly regarding improvements in their exercising abilities. The program was effective for improving muscle strength, controlling pain, maintaining range of movement of the knee joint, and reducing functional incapacity. A review of the literature showed that there are numerous clinical benefits to the regular practice of physical therapy exercises by patients with osteoarthritis of the knee(s) in a program with appropriate guidance. This study shows that this guidance can be attained at home with the use of a proper manual. Even when performed at home without constant supervision, the use of the printed manual for orientation makes the exercises for osteoarthritis of the knee beneficial.

  3. ASCOT: Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell Use for Osteoarthritis of the Thumb—First Carpometacarpal Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Christina; Sugrue, Conor; Carr, Emma; O’Reilly, Aine; O’Neill, Shane; Carroll, Sean M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The first carpometacarpal joint (CMCJ) in the hand is a commonly affected joint by osteoarthritis. It causes significant thumb base pain, limiting functional capacity. Microfracturing and application of autologous stem cells has been performed on large joints such as the knee but has never been evaluated for use in the smaller joints in the hand. Our aim was to determine the potential benefit of microfracturing and autologous bone marrow stem cells for treatment of osteoarthritis of the first CMCJ in the hand. Methods: All inclusion criteria were satisfied. Preoperative assessment by the surgeon, physiotherapist, and occupational therapist was performed. The first CMCJ was microfractured and the Bone Marrow Stem Cells were applied directly. Postoperatively, the patients were followed up for 1 year. Results: Fifteen patients met inclusion criteria; however, 2 patients were excluded due to postoperative cellulitis and diagnosis of De Quervain's tenosynovitis. The mean scores of the 13-patient preoperative and 1 year follow-up assessments are visual analog score at rest of 3.23–1.69 (P = 0.0292), visual analog score on activity of 7.92–4.23 (P = 0.0019), range of motion 45.77o–55.15o (P = 0.0195), thumb opposition score 7.62–9.23 (P = 0.0154), Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score of 51.67–23.08 (P = 0.0065). Strength improved insignificantly from 4.7 kg preoperatively to 5.53 kg at 12 months (P = 0.1257). All patients had a positive Grind test preoperatively and a negative test after 12 months. Conclusions: This innovative pilot study is a new approach to osteoarthritis of the thumb. PMID:29062653

  4. EVALUATION OF FUNCTIONAL RESULTS OF MEDIAL OPENING WEDGE HIGH TIBIAL OSTEOTOMY FOR UNICOMPARTMENTAL OSTEOARTHRITIS VARUS KNEE

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    Shyam Sundar Bakki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Osteoarthritis commonly affects the medial compartment of knee giving rise to varus deformity in majority of cases. Significant varus deformity further aggravates the pathology due to medialisation of the weight bearing line osteotomy of the proximal tibia realigns this weight bearing axis, thereby relieving pressure on the damaged medial compartment. OWHTO is a promising option in this scenario because it is associated with high accuracy in correcting the deformity and less number of complications when compared to lateral closing wedge HTO or UKA. In this study, we evaluate the functional outcome of HTO in patients with unicompartmental osteoarthritis. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a prospective study of patients who attended the orthopaedic outpatient clinic in Government Hospital, Kakinada, between August 2013 to August 2015. The patients were evaluated by clinical examination and weight bearing radiographs. The patients who were found to have unicompartmental osteoarthritis with knee pain not relieved by conservative management and who satisfy the inclusion criteria were selected. RESULTS Excellent results can be achieved by appropriate selection criteria and planning with long limb weight bearing radiographs. There is an excellent relief of pain, which can be achieved within first few months postoperatively, which is assessed by VAS score. The KSS- knee score is excellent in 35%, good in 40%, fair in 20% and poor in 5%. The KSS- function score is excellent in 30%, good in 45%, fair in 20% and poor in 5%. There is significant improvement in the range of movement of the knee joint postoperatively. CONCLUSION In this study, we conclude that medial OWHTO is the preferred modality for unicompartmental OA in those aged <60 years and in developing nations like India where squatting is an important function, it has major role as it can restore near normal knee function without disturbing anatomy.

  5. Phisical modalities on the functional performance in knee osteoarthritis: a sytematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Ferronato

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Despite recent advances in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA, few studies have evaluated the longitudinal effect of physical modalities in functional capacity in patients with knee OA. Thereby, since the physical components and pain can affect the functional performance of daily activities, the effect of these treatment’s form is still to be established. Objective: Evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic ultrasound, electrical stimulation and phototherapy in the functional performance, in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Articles present in the PubMed, Lilacs, SciELO and PEDro’s databases were evaluated. The used keywords were “pulsed ultrasound therapy”, “ultrasound therapy”, “electric stimulation” and “low level laser therapy” in combination with “knee osteoarthritis”. Were included in this presented review, randomized clinical studies using ultrasound, electrical and laser stimulation in subjects with knee osteoarthritis. To evaluate the methodological quality of the selected studies, was used the PEDro’s scale. The dependent variables of the study were: pain, physical function, joint stiffness, life quality and functional performance. Results: 268 studies were found, of these, 41 studies met eligibility criteria and were classified for analysis in full. The used methodology in the studies varied widely, however, in most cases there was improvement in functional performance of individuals with knee OA, with the use of physical modalities, for the pulsed ultrasound, continuous ultrasound, electrical stimulation and laser resourses. Conclusion: The physical modalities used in the studies demonstrated improvement in functional performance of individuals with knee OA.

  6. Aging and Osteoarthritis: An Inevitable Encounter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hügle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a major health burden of our time. Age is the most prominent risk factor for the development and progression of OA. The mechanistic influence of aging on OA has different facets. On a molecular level, matrix proteins such as collagen or proteoglycans are modified, which alters cartilage function. Collagen cross-linking within the bone results in impaired plasticity and increased stiffness. Synovial or fat tissue, menisci but also ligaments and muscles play an important role in the pathogenesis of OA. In the elderly, sarcopenia or other causes of muscle atrophy are frequently encountered, leading to a decreased stability of the joint. Inflammation in form of cellular infiltration of synovial tissue or subchondral bone and expression of inflammatory cytokines is more and more recognized as trigger of OA. It has been demonstrated that joint movement can exhibit anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Therefore physical activity or physiotherapy in the elderly should be encouraged, also in order to increase the muscle mass. A reduced stem cell capacity in the elderly is likely associated with a decrease of repair mechanisms of the musculoskeletal system. New treatment strategies, for example with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC are investigated, despite clear evidence for their efficacy is lacking.

  7. Extracellular Vesicles and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyang Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a type of chronic joint disease that is characterized by the degeneration and loss of articular cartilage and hyperplasia of the synovium and subchondral bone. There is reasonable knowledge about articular cartilage physiology, biochemistry, and chondrocyte metabolism. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of OA remain unclear and need urgent clarification to guide the early diagnosis and treatment of OA. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are small membrane-linking particles that are released from cells. In recent decades, several special biological properties have been found in EV, especially in terms of cartilage. Autophagy plays a critical role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Likewise, more and more research has gradually focused on the effect of autophagy on chondrocyte proliferation and function in OA. The synthesis and release of EV are closely associated with autophagy. At the same time, both EV and autophagy play a role in OA development. Based on the mechanism of EV and autophagy in OA development, EV may be beneficial in the early diagnosis of OA; on the other hand, the combination of EV and autophagy-related regulatory drugs may provide insight into possible OA therapeutic strategies.

  8. T2 map signal variation predicts symptomatic osteoarthritis progression: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

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    Zhong, Haoti; Miller, David J. [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Electrical Engineering, University Park, PA (United States); Urish, Kenneth L. [Magee Womens Hospital of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, The Bone and Joint Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-07-15

    The aim of this work is to use quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify patients at risk for symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) progression. We hypothesized that classification of signal variation on T2 maps might predict symptomatic OA progression. Patients were selected from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), a prospective cohort. Two groups were identified: a symptomatic OA progression group and a control group. At baseline, both groups were asymptomatic (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis [WOMAC] pain score total <10) with no radiographic evidence of OA (Kellgren-Lawrence [KL] score ≤ 1). The OA progression group (n = 103) had a change in total WOMAC score greater than 10 by the 3-year follow-up. The control group (n = 79) remained asymptomatic, with a change in total WOMAC score less than 10 at the 3-year follow-up. A classifier was designed to predict OA progression in an independent population based on T2 map cartilage signal variation. The classifier was designed using a nearest neighbor classification based on a Gaussian Mixture Model log-likelihood fit of T2 map cartilage voxel intensities. The use of T2 map signal variation to predict symptomatic OA progression in asymptomatic individuals achieved a specificity of 89.3 %, a sensitivity of 77.2 %, and an overall accuracy rate of 84.2 %. T2 map signal variation can predict symptomatic knee OA progression in asymptomatic individuals, serving as a possible early OA imaging biomarker. (orig.)

  9. Longitudinal change in quantitative meniscus measurements in knee osteoarthritis - data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloecker, Katja [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg and Nuremberg (Austria); Salzburg, Institute of Anatomy, Salzburg (Austria); BHS Linz, Department of Orthopaedics, Linz (Austria); Wirth, W.; Eckstein, F. [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg and Nuremberg (Austria); Salzburg, Institute of Anatomy, Salzburg (Austria); Chondrometrics GmbH, Ainring (Germany); Guermazi, A. [Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Boston Imaging Core Lab (BICL), Boston, MA (United States); Hitzl, W. [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg and Nuremberg, Research Office, Salzburg (Austria); Hunter, D.J. [University of Sydney, Royal North Shore Hospital and Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Sydney (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    We aimed to apply 3D MRI-based measurement technology to studying 2-year change in quantitative measurements of meniscus size and position. Forty-seven knees from the Osteoarthritis Initiative with medial radiographic joint space narrowing had baseline and 2-year follow-up MRIs. Quantitative measures were obtained from manual segmentation of the menisci and tibia using coronal DESSwe images. The standardized response mean (SRM = mean/SD change) was used as measure of sensitivity to longitudinal change. Medial tibial plateau coverage decreased from 34.8 % to 29.9 % (SRM -0.82; p < 0.001). Change in medial meniscus extrusion in a central image (SRM 0.18) and in the central five slices (SRM 0.22) did not reach significance, but change in extrusion across the entire meniscus (SRM 0.32; p = 0.03) and in the relative area of meniscus extrusion (SRM 0.56; p < 0.001) did. There was a reduction in medial meniscus volume (10 %; p < 0.001), width (7 %; p < 0.001), and height (2 %; p = 0.08); meniscus substance loss was strongest in the posterior (SRM -0.51; p = 0.001) and weakest in the anterior horn (SRM -0.15; p = 0.31). This pilot study reports, for the first time, longitudinal change in quantitative 3D meniscus measurements in knee osteoarthritis. It provides evidence of improved sensitivity to change of 3D measurements compared with single slice analysis. (orig.)

  10. Longitudinal change in quantitative meniscus measurements in knee osteoarthritis - data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloecker, Katja; Wirth, W.; Eckstein, F.; Guermazi, A.; Hitzl, W.; Hunter, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to apply 3D MRI-based measurement technology to studying 2-year change in quantitative measurements of meniscus size and position. Forty-seven knees from the Osteoarthritis Initiative with medial radiographic joint space narrowing had baseline and 2-year follow-up MRIs. Quantitative measures were obtained from manual segmentation of the menisci and tibia using coronal DESSwe images. The standardized response mean (SRM = mean/SD change) was used as measure of sensitivity to longitudinal change. Medial tibial plateau coverage decreased from 34.8 % to 29.9 % (SRM -0.82; p < 0.001). Change in medial meniscus extrusion in a central image (SRM 0.18) and in the central five slices (SRM 0.22) did not reach significance, but change in extrusion across the entire meniscus (SRM 0.32; p = 0.03) and in the relative area of meniscus extrusion (SRM 0.56; p < 0.001) did. There was a reduction in medial meniscus volume (10 %; p < 0.001), width (7 %; p < 0.001), and height (2 %; p = 0.08); meniscus substance loss was strongest in the posterior (SRM -0.51; p = 0.001) and weakest in the anterior horn (SRM -0.15; p = 0.31). This pilot study reports, for the first time, longitudinal change in quantitative 3D meniscus measurements in knee osteoarthritis. It provides evidence of improved sensitivity to change of 3D measurements compared with single slice analysis. (orig.)

  11. Oral herbal therapies for treating osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Melainie; Chrubasik, Sigrun

    2015-01-01

    Background Medicinal plant products are used orally for treating osteoarthritis. Although their mechanisms of action have not yet been elucidated in full detail, interactions with common inflammatory mediators provide a rationale for using them to treat osteoarthritic complaints. Objectives To update a previous Cochrane review to assess the benefits and harms of oral medicinal plant products in treating osteoarthritis. Search methods We searched electronic databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, ISI Web of Science, World Health Organization Clinical Trials Registry Platform) to 29 August 2013, unrestricted by language, and the reference lists from retrieved trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of orally consumed herbal interventions compared with placebo or active controls in people with osteoarthritis were included. Herbal interventions included any plant preparation but excluded homeopathy or aromatherapy products, or any preparation of synthetic origin. Data collection and analysis Two authors used standard methods for trial selection and data extraction, and assessed the quality of the body of evidence using the GRADE approach for major outcomes (pain, function, radiographic joint changes, quality of life, withdrawals due to adverse events, total adverse events, and serious adverse events). Main results Forty-nine randomised controlled studies (33 interventions, 5980 participants) were included. Seventeen studies of confirmatory design (sample and effect sizes pre-specified) were mostly at moderate risk of bias. The remaining 32 studies of exploratory design were at higher risk of bias. Due to differing interventions, meta-analyses were restricted to Boswellia serrata (monoherbal) and avocado-soyabean unsaponifiables (ASU) (two herb combination) products. Five studies of three different extracts from Boswellia serrata were included. High-quality evidence from two studies (85 participants) indicated that 90 days treatment with 100

  12. Gait Characteristics, Symptoms, and Function in Persons With Hip Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eitzen, I.; Fernandes, L.; Kallerud, H.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Longitudinal laboratory study. OBJECTIVES: (1) To compare gait characteristics between individuals with early-stage hip osteoarthritis who underwent total hip replacement (THR) and those who did not undergo THR, and (2) to evaluate whether gait characteristics, function, and symptoms...... declined among individuals who did not undergo THR during a 6- to 7-year follow-up. BACKGROUND: The natural history of symptoms, function, and gait changes secondary to hip osteoarthritis, including potential differences at an early stage of disease, is unknown. METHODS: Forty-three individuals (mean age......, 58.9 years) with radiographic and symptomatic hip osteoarthritis participated. Outcome measures included 3-D gait analysis; self-reported pain; stiffness, and function; hip range of motion; and the six-minute walk test. Baseline comparisons between individuals who later underwent THR and those who...

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Their Clinical Applications in Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Hsun; Liu, Hwan-Wun; Wu, Kun-Chi; Ding, Dah-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic degenerative joint disorder characterized by articular cartilage destruction and osteophyte formation. Chondrocytes in the matrix have a relatively slow turnover rate, and the tissue itself lacks a blood supply to support repair and remodeling. Researchers have evaluated the effectiveness of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for treating osteoarthritis. All sources of stem cells, including embryonic, induced pluripotent, fetal, and adult stem cells, have potential use in stem cell therapy, which provides a permanent biological solution. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow, adipose tissue, and umbilical cord show considerable promise for use in cartilage repair. MSCs can be sourced from any or all joint tissues and can modulate the immune response. Additionally, MSCs can directly differentiate into chondrocytes under appropriate signal transduction. They also have immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory paracrine effects. This article reviews the current clinical applications of MSCs and future directions of research in osteoarthritis.

  14. The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Lohmander, L Stefan

    2003-01-01

    : Pain, other Symptoms, Function in daily living (ADL), Function in Sport and Recreation (Sport/Rec), and knee-related Quality of Life (QOL). The KOOS has been validated for several orthopaedic interventions such as anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, meniscectomy and total knee replacement......The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was developed as an extension of the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index with the purpose of evaluating short-term and long-term symptoms and function in subjects with knee injury and osteoarthritis. The KOOS holds five separately scored subscales....... In addition the instrument has been used to evaluate physical therapy, nutritional supplementation and glucosamine supplementation. The effect size is generally largest for the subscale QOL followed by the subscale Pain. The KOOS is a valid, reliable and responsive self-administered instrument that can...

  15. Aquatic exercise for the treatment of knee and hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Else Marie; Juhl, Carsten B; Christensen, Robin

    2016-01-01

    that aquatic exercise may have advantages for people with osteoarthritis. This is an update of a published Cochrane review. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of aquatic exercise for people with knee or hip osteoarthritis, or both, compared to no intervention. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following...... CRITERIA: Randomized controlled clinical trials of aquatic exercise compared to a control group (e.g. usual care, education, social attention, telephone call, waiting list for surgery) of participants with knee or hip osteoarthritis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently selected...... trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias of the included trials. We analysed the pooled results using standardized mean difference (SMD) values. MAIN RESULTS: Nine new trials met the inclusion criteria and we excluded two earlier included trials. Thus the number of participants...

  16. Moving with ease: feldenkrais method classes for people with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Robert; Cofré Lizama, Luis Eduardo; Galea, Mary P

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effects of Feldenkrais Method classes on gait, balance, function, and pain in people with osteoarthritis. Design. Prospective study with pre-/postmeasures. Setting. Community. Participants. Convenience sample of 15 community-dwelling adults with osteoarthritis (mean age 67 years) attending Feldenkrais Method classes. Intervention. Series of Feldenkrais Method classes, two classes/week for 30 weeks. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis scale, Human Activity Profile, stair climbing test, 6-minute walk test, timed up-and-go test, Four Square Step Test (4SST), gait analysis, and assessment of quality of life (AQoL). Results. Participants improved on the 4SST and on some gait parameters. They also reported a greater ease of movement. Conclusions. A 30-week series of Feldenkrais classes held twice per week was feasible in the community setting. The lessons led to improvements in performance of the four square step test and changes in gait.

  17. Moving with Ease: Feldenkrais Method Classes for People with Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Webb

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effects of Feldenkrais Method classes on gait, balance, function, and pain in people with osteoarthritis. Design. Prospective study with pre-/postmeasures. Setting. Community. Participants. Convenience sample of 15 community-dwelling adults with osteoarthritis (mean age 67 years attending Feldenkrais Method classes. Intervention. Series of Feldenkrais Method classes, two classes/week for 30 weeks. Main outcome measures: Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis scale, Human Activity Profile, stair climbing test, 6-minute walk test, timed up-and-go test, Four Square Step Test (4SST, gait analysis, and assessment of quality of life (AQoL. Results. Participants improved on the 4SST and on some gait parameters. They also reported a greater ease of movement. Conclusions. A 30-week series of Feldenkrais classes held twice per week was feasible in the community setting. The lessons led to improvements in performance of the four square step test and changes in gait.

  18. Controversy: Hirudotherapy (Leech Therapy as an Alternative Treatment for Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Gunawan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common degenerative joint disease found in the elderly. Drug options that are recommended by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeon (AAOS are acetaminophen, NSAIDs, tramadol, capscaicin and intraarticular corticosteroids. However, there is concern for the possible side effects resulting from long term use of those medications. Researchers are searching for a safer treatment modality for OA. Leech therapy (hirudotheraphy is one of the therapies under investigation, given its purported analgesic and antiinflammatory properties. Key words: osteoarthritis, hirudotherapy, leech therapy, NSAIDSs, elderly, alternative terapy.

  19. Prevalence of hip osteoarthritis in chiropractic practice in denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Erik; Christensen, Henrik W; Overgaard, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to measure the prevalence of clinical and radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA) and first-time diagnosis of hip OA in consecutive patients presenting to chiropractic practices in Denmark and to report the components of the initial treatment rendered by the chiroprac......The purposes of this study were to measure the prevalence of clinical and radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA) and first-time diagnosis of hip OA in consecutive patients presenting to chiropractic practices in Denmark and to report the components of the initial treatment rendered...... by the chiropractic practitioner....

  20. Small animal models to understand pathogenesis of osteoarthritis and use of stem cell in cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piombo, Virginia

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common diseases, which affect the correct functionality of synovial joints and is characterized by articular cartilage degradation. Limitation in the treatment of OA is mostly due to the very limited regenerative characteristic of articular cartilage once is damaged. Small animal models are of particular importance for mechanistic analysis to understand the processes that affect cartilage degradation. Combination of joint injury techniques with the use of stem cells has been shown to be an important tool for understanding the processes of cartilage degradation and regeneration. Implementation of stem cells and small animal models are important tools to help researchers to find a solution that could ameliorate and prevent the symptoms of OA. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Effect of muscle strength and pain on hand function in patients with trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis. A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantero-Téllez, Raquel; Martín-Valero, Rocío; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    To assess the relationship between muscle strength (Jama), and pain (VAS) levels with hand function (DASH) in patients with trapeziometarcapal osteoarthritis. Cross-sectional study. Sample of 72 patients with osteoarthritis stage 2-3 (Eaton) and trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis. Patients were recruited when they came to the Hand Surgery Unit. Grip strength, pinch, pain and hand function were measured, and correlation and regression coefficients between them were obtained. For function, the most significant model (R(2)=0.83) included pain and strength. But it is tip to tip pinch force which has a stronger relationship with DASH (Standardized B: -57) questionnaire. Pain also influenced strength measured with the dynamometer but it was tip to tip pinch force that was the most affected. Findings confirm that there is a significant correlation between function referred by the patient and variables that can be measured in the clinic such as grip strength and pinch. The correlation between pain intensity and function was also significant, but tip to tip pinch strength had the greatest impact on the function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  2. Case definitions of knee osteoarthritis in 4,151 unselected subjects: relevance for epidemiological studies : The Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxafoss, Erling; Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper K

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aims of the present study were threefold: to examine the distribution of knee joint osteoarthritis in a large, standardized radiological study; to examine the relationships between self reported knee pain and radiological OA; and to examine the natural history of radio-morpholog......INTRODUCTION: The aims of the present study were threefold: to examine the distribution of knee joint osteoarthritis in a large, standardized radiological study; to examine the relationships between self reported knee pain and radiological OA; and to examine the natural history of radio...... correlated to the Kellgren and Lawrence severity of OA. In a subgroup with no features of radiological OA, a significant and linear decline in JSW with increasing age was found. CONCLUSION: We found a clear relationship between self-reported knee pain and radiological osteoarthritis. Pain was proportionally...

  3. Effect of a 16 weeks weight loss program on osteoarthritis biomarkers in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Else Marie; Christensen, R; Christensen, Pia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Changes in biomarkers for bone and cartilage in knee osteoarthritis (KOA) may reflect changes in tissue turnover induced by interventions. The aim of this study was to assess the effect on osteoarthritis biomarkers of an intensive weight loss intervention in obese KOA patients. METHODS......: 192 obese KOA patients followed a 16 weeks weight loss intervention (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00655941). Serum Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (sCOMP), Urine C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type II (uCTX-II) and type I (uCTX-I) were determined by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) at baseline...... and after 16 weeks. Patient-reported symptoms were assessed by the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) Questionnaire without the sports and recreation score (KOOS-4). Change from baseline was analyzed using Analysis of CoVariance (ANCOVA) adjusting for sex, age, and body mass index (BMI...

  4. Longitudinal study on osteoarthritis and bone metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Postiglione

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The relationship between Osteoarthritis (OA and Osteoporosis (OP is not well defined due to lacking in longitudinal data, mainly regarding correlations between biochemical factors and OA incidence. Aim of this paper was to investigate the predictive value for OA incidence of bone mass variations and of selected biochemical markers in healthy women participating in a population-based longitudinal study carried out in Naples (Italy. Subjects and Methods: High completion rate (85.2% and statistically adequate sample size were obtained: 139 women (45 to 79 years of age were examined and follow up visit was performed after two years (24±2 months, following the same protocol. Patients underwent medical examination, questionnaire, anthropometric measurements, blood sampling and urine collection. Bone mineral density (BMD measurement was performed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA at the lumbar spine (L1-L4 and femoral neck. Radiographs of dorsal and lumbar spine in lateral view were performed at basal and at 24 months visits; a team of three experts scored radiographs using Kellegren and Lawrence grading. Results: The score was calculated for two individual radiographic features (narrowing of the joint space, presence of osteophytes and as a global score. Results show a relevant percentage, 23% up, of subjects presenting both OA and OP. In the cross-sectional study the presence of osteophytosis correlates with anthropometric variables and PTH levels. In the longitudinal study results show a correlation between serum vitamin D and delta score for osteophytosis (β=0.02 p<0.05. Conclusions: Data obtained outline the importance of further studies on the pathogenetic link between OA and bone metabolism.

  5. Advances in treatment of achondroplasia and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klag, Kendra A; Horton, William A

    2016-04-15

    Achondroplasia (ACH) is the prototype and most common of the human chondrodysplasias. It results from gain-of-function mutations that exaggerate the signal output of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), a receptor tyrosine kinase that negatively regulates growth plate activity and linear bone growth. Several approaches to reduce FGFR3 signaling by blocking receptor activation or inhibiting downstream signals have been proposed. Five show promise in preclinical mouse studies. Two candidate therapies target the extracellular domain of FGFR3. The first is a decoy receptor that competes for activating ligands. The second is a synthetic blocking peptide that prevents ligands from binding and activating FGFR3. Two established drugs, statins and meclozine, improve growth of ACH mice. The strongest candidate therapy employs an analog of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), which antagonizes the mitogen-activated-protein (MAP) kinase pathway downstream of the FGFR3 receptor and may also act independently in the growth plate. Only the CNP analog has reached clinical trials. Preliminary results of Phase 2 studies show a substantial increase in growth rate of ACH children after six months of therapy with no serious adverse effects. A challenge for drug therapy in ACH is targeting agents to the avascular growth plate. The application of gene therapy in osteoarthritis offers insights because it faces similar technical obstacles. Major advances in gene therapy include the emergence of recombinant adeno-associated virus as the vector of choice, capsid engineering to target vectors to specific tissues, and development of methods to direct vectors to articular chondrocytes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Defining and evaluating a novel outcome measure representing end-stage knee osteoarthritis: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driban, Jeffrey B; Price, Lori Lyn; Lynch, John; Nevitt, Michael; Lo, Grace H; Eaton, Charles B; McAlindon, Timothy E

    2016-10-01

    We described a definition of end-stage knee osteoarthritis (esKOA) and evaluated its association with health outcomes and osteoarthritis risk factors. We included Osteoarthritis Initiative participants with or at risk for knee osteoarthritis who had complete baseline data. We defined esKOA by adapting a validated appropriateness algorithm for total knee replacement based on data from baseline and the first four follow-up visits. We performed person-based analyses, including both knees from all participants. Participants met the definition of esKOA at the visit at which ≥1 knee reached the esKOA criteria. We assessed differences in individual characteristics between groups at baseline and over time and tested if incident esKOA (outcome) was associated with osteoarthritis risk factors (e.g., age, maximum adult weight, and quadriceps strength). The cohort consisted of 3916 participants with mean age of 61 (SD = 9) years and mean body mass index of 28.4 (4.7) kg/m(2); 59 % were female and 9.7 % developed incident esKOA. Those with incident esKOA had poorer health outcomes at baseline and greater declines in health outcomes, with the exception of SF-12 mental health score. Five out of nine tested risk factors were associated with incident esKOA in unadjusted analyses, with older age (≥65 years; odds ratio = 1.44, 95 % confidence interval = 1.19 to 1.83) and quadriceps weakness (odds ratio = 0.78, 95 % confidence interval = 0.71 to 0.86) remaining significant in adjusted models. Older age and quadriceps weakness predicted esKOA. esKOA is also characterized by poor health-related outcomes. This definition of esKOA could be a new clinically relevant outcome measure for osteoarthritis research.

  7. Patterns and Influencing Factors of Medial Meniscus Tears in Varus Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Do; Youm, Yoon-Seok; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Cho, Hye-Yong; Kim, Kwang-Ho

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the patterns of medial meniscus (MM) tears in patients with varus knee osteoarthritis who underwent total knee arthroplasty and analyze the factors that could affect MM tears. The patients (365 knees, 268 patients) were classified into three groups; group I with MM posterior horn (PH) tear only; group II with MM root tear only; and group III with MMPH plus root tear. The following factors were evaluated: age, gender, body mass index, varus deviation of the mechanical axis, medial proximal tibial angle, posterior tibial slope (PTS), and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) integrity (normal, degeneration, and tear or absence). MM tears were identified in all knees. The patterns of the combined MMPH tears in group III were less complex than those in group I. Varus deviation and PTS were significantly greater in group III than groups I and II. In group III, there were significantly more cases of ACL tear or absence than groups I and II. The others showed no differences among three groups. Severe varus knee osteoarthritis was always accompanied by MM tears. Risk factors for MMPH plus root tears were severe varus deformity, great PTS, and ACL tear or absence.

  8. Laser-induced micropore formation and modification of cartilage structure in osteoarthritis healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Emil; Baum, Olga; Shekhter, Anatoly; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Shnirelman, Alexander; Alexandrovskaya, Yulia; Sadovskyy, Ivan; Vinokur, Valerii

    2017-09-01

    Pores are vital for functioning of avascular tissues. Laser-induced pores play an important role in the process of cartilage regeneration. The aim of any treatment for osteoarthritis is to repair hyaline-type cartilage. The aims of this study are to answer two questions: (1) How do laser-assisted pores affect the cartilaginous cells to synthesize hyaline cartilage (HC)? and (2) How can the size distribution of pores arising in the course of laser radiation be controlled? We have shown that in cartilage, the pores arise predominately near chondrocytes, which promote nutrition of cells and signal molecular transfer that activates regeneration of cartilage. In vivo laser treatment of damaged cartilage of miniature pig joints provides cellular transformation and formation of HC. We propose a simple model of pore formation in biopolymers that paves the way for going beyond the trial-and-error approach when choosing an optimal laser treatment regime. Our findings support the approach toward laser healing of osteoarthritis.

  9. Level and Determinants of Knowledge of Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis among Railway Workers in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurubaran Ganasegeran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis, an ancient malady greatly impairing modern population quality of life, has stimulated global attention to find effective modes of prevention and intervention. Purpose. This study aimed to assess factors affecting knowledge of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (knee OA among Malaysian railway workers. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 513 railway workers involving eight major states within Peninsular Malaysia using population-based sampling. The assessment instrument was a face-validated, prepiloted, self-administered instrument with sociodemographics and knowledge items on knee OA. Results. Mean (±SD age of the respondents was 41.4 (±10.7, with the majority aged 50 years or older (34.9%. Of the total respondents, 53.6% had low levels of knowledge of knee OA disease. Multivariate analysis found that four demographic predictors, age ≥50 years, family history of knee OA, self-awareness, and clinical diagnosis of the disease entity, were significantly associated with knowledge scores. Conclusion. The finding of a low level knee OA knowledge among Malaysian railway workers points to an urgent need for massive information to be disseminated among the workers at risk to foster primary prevention and self-care.

  10. Osteoarthritis-derived chondrocytes are a potential source of multipotent progenitor cells for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Tomoyuki; Sakai, Tadahiro; Hiraiwa, Hideki; Hamada, Takashi; Ono, Yohei; Nakashima, Motoshige; Ishizuka, Shinya; Matsukawa, Tetsuya; Yamashita, Satoshi; Tsuchiya, Saho; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2016-10-21

    The natural healing capacity of damaged articular cartilage is poor, rendering joint surface injuries a prime target for regenerative medicine. While autologous chondrocyte or mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) implantation can be applied to repair cartilage defects in young patients, no appropriate long-lasting treatment alternative is available for elderly patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Multipotent progenitor cells are reported to present in adult human articular cartilage, with a preponderance in OA cartilage. These facts led us to hypothesize the possible use of osteoarthritis-derived chondrocytes as a cell source for cartilage tissue engineering. We therefore analyzed chondrocyte- and stem cell-related markers, cell growth rate, and multipotency in OA chondrocytes (OACs) and bone marrow-derived MSCs, along with normal articular chondrocytes (ACs) as a control. OACs demonstrated similar phenotype and proliferation rate to MSCs. Furthermore, OACs exhibited multilineage differentiation ability with a greater chondrogenic differentiation ability than MSCs, which was equivalent to ACs. We conclude that chondrogenic capacity is not significantly affected by OA, and OACs could be a potential source of multipotent progenitor cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Intra-articular hyaluronic acid vs platelet-rich plasma in the treatment of hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sante, Luca; Villani, Ciro; Santilli, Valter; Valeo, Massimo; Bologna, Emmalisa; Imparato, Luca; Paoloni, Marco; Iagnocco, Annamaria

    2016-12-05

    To compare the efficacy of ultrasound-guided intra-articular (IA) treatment with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) versus viscosupplementation (hyaluronic acid HA) in hip osteoarthritis. METHODS: A total of 43 patients affected by monolateral severe hip osteoarthritis (OA) were included in the study. Patients were randomized to receive either intra-articular PRP (3 ml) or HA (30 mg/2 ml; 1,000-2,900 kDa), 3 injections in total - 1/week. Clinical assessments for each patient were made at baseline (T0), 4 (T1), and 16 weeks (T2) of follow-up. The primary efficacy outcome was pain reduction as measured by VAS and by WOMAC pain subscale. Data analysis revealed that, compared to T0, in the PRP-treated group VAS scores significantly decreased at T1 but not at T2, thereby indicating an early effect on pain which was not maintained at a longer term follow-up. In the HA group a significant decrease of both VAS and WOMAC values was registered only between T0 and T2. Intra-articular PRP had an immediate effect on pain that was not maintained at longer term follow-up when, on the contrary, the effects of intra-articular HA were evident.

  12. Level and determinants of knowledge of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis among railway workers in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganasegeran, Kurubaran; Menke, J Michael; Challakere Ramaswamy, Vasudeva Murthy; Abdul Manaf, Rizal; Alabsi, Aied M; Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman

    2014-01-01

    Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis, an ancient malady greatly impairing modern population quality of life, has stimulated global attention to find effective modes of prevention and intervention. This study aimed to assess factors affecting knowledge of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) among Malaysian railway workers. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 513 railway workers involving eight major states within Peninsular Malaysia using population-based sampling. The assessment instrument was a face-validated, prepiloted, self-administered instrument with sociodemographics and knowledge items on knee OA. Mean (± SD) age of the respondents was 41.4 (± 10.7), with the majority aged 50 years or older (34.9%). Of the total respondents, 53.6% had low levels of knowledge of knee OA disease. Multivariate analysis found that four demographic predictors, age ≥ 50 years, family history of knee OA, self-awareness, and clinical diagnosis of the disease entity, were significantly associated with knowledge scores. The finding of a low level knee OA knowledge among Malaysian railway workers points to an urgent need for massive information to be disseminated among the workers at risk to foster primary prevention and self-care.

  13. State-of-the-Art management of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibel, Kenton H; Hillstrom, Howard J; Halpern, Brian C

    2015-02-16

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis found in the United States' population and is also the most common disease of joints in adults throughout the world with the knee being the most frequently affected of all joints. As the United States' population ages along with the increasing trends in obesity prevalence in other parts of the world, it is expected that the burden of OA on the population, healthcare system, and overall economy will continue to increase in the future without making major improvements in managing knee OA. Numerous therapies aim to reduce symptoms of knee OA and continued research has helped to further understand the complex pathophysiology of its disease mechanism attempting to uncover new potential targets for the treatment of OA. This review article seeks to evaluate the current practices for managing knee OA and discusses emerging therapies on the horizon. These practices include non-pharmacological treatments such as providing patient education and self-management strategies, advising weight loss, strengthening programs, and addressing biomechanical issues with bracing or foot orthoses. Oral analgesics and anti-inflammatories are pharmacologicals that are commonly used and the literature overall supports that some of these medications can be helpful for managing knee OA in the short-term but are less effective for long-term management. Additionally, more prolonged use significantly increases the risk of serious associated side effects that are not too uncommon. Disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs are being researched as a treatment modality to potentially halt or slow disease progression but data at this time is limited and continued studies are being conducted to further investigate their effectiveness. Intra-articular injectables are also implemented to manage knee OA ranging from corticosteroids to hyaluronans to more recently platelet-rich plasma and even stem cells while several other injection therapies are

  14. Association of hip pain with radiographic evidence of hip osteoarthritis: diagnostic test study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, Michael C; Niu, Jingbo; Clancy, Mary M; Lane, Nancy E; Link, Thomas M; Vlad, Steven; Tolstykh, Irina; Jungmann, Pia M.; Felson, David T; Guermazi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Study question Is there concordance between hip pain and radiographic hip osteoarthritis? Methods In this diagnostic test study, pelvic radiographs were assessed for hip osteoarthritis in two cohorts: the Framingham Osteoarthritis Study (community of Framingham, Massachusetts) and the Osteoarthritis Initiative (a multicenter longitudinal cohort study of osteoarthritis in the United States). Using visual representation of the hip joint, participants reported whether they had hip pain on most days and the location of the pain: anterior, groin, lateral, buttocks, or low back. In the Framingham study, participants with hip pain were also examined for hip pain with internal rotation. The authors analysed the agreement between radiographic hip osteoarthritis and hip pain, and for those with hip pain suggestive of hip osteoarthritis they calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of radiographs as the diagnostic test. Study answer and limitations In the Framingham study (n=946), only 15.6% of hips in patients with frequent hip pain showed radiographic evidence of hip osteoarthritis, and 20.7% of hips with radiographic hip osteoarthritis were frequently painful. The sensitivity of radiographic hip osteoarthritis for hip pain localised to the groin was 36.7%, specificity 90.5%, positive predictive value 6.0%, and negative predictive value 98.9%. Results did not differ much for hip pain at other locations or for painful internal rotation. In the Osteoarthritis Initiative study (n=4366), only 9.1% of hips in patients with frequent pain showed radiographic hip osteoarthritis, and 23.8% of hips with radiographic hip osteoarthritis were frequently painful. The sensitivity of definite radiographic hip osteoarthritis for hip pain localised to the groin was 16.5%, specificity 94.0%, positive predictive value 7.1%, and negative predictive value 97.6%. Results also did not differ much for hip pain at other locations. What this

  15. Knee symptoms among adults at risk for accelerated knee osteoarthritis: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Julie; Eaton, Charles B; Lo, Grace H; Lu, Bing; Price, Lori Lyn; McAlindon, Timothy E; Barbe, Mary F; Driban, Jeffrey B

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if adults who develop accelerated knee osteoarthritis (KOA) have greater knee symptoms with certain activities than those with or without incident common KOA. We conducted a case-control study using data from baseline and the first four annual visits of the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Participants had no radiographic KOA at baseline (Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) = 1 knee developed advance-stage KOA (KL = 3 or 4) within 48 months, (2) common KOA: > = 1 knee increased in radiographic severity (excluding those with accelerated KOA), and (3) no KOA: no change in radiographic severity by 48 months. We focused on individual items from the WOMAC pain/function subscales and KOOS pain/symptoms subscales. The index visit was a year before a person met the definition for accelerated, common, or no KOA. To examine group difference in knee symptoms, we used ordinal logistic regression models for each symptom. Results are reported as odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Individuals who developed accelerated KOA were more likely to report greater difficulty with lying down (OR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.04 to 4.25), pain with straightening the knee fully (OR = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.08, 3.85), and pain walking (OR = 2.49, 95% CI = 1.38, 4.84) than adults who developed common KOA. Individuals who develop accelerated KOA report greater symptoms with certain activities than those with common KOA. Our results may help identify individuals at risk for accelerated KOA or with early-stage accelerated KOA.

  16. Association of Joint Inflammation With Pain Sensitization in Knee Osteoarthritis: The Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Tuhina; Guermazi, Ali; Roemer, Frank; Nevitt, Michael C; Scholz, Joachim; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Woolf, Clifford; Niu, Jingbo; Bradley, Laurence A; Quinn, Emily; Law, Laura Frey

    2016-03-01

    Pain sensitization is associated with pain severity in knee osteoarthritis (OA), but its cause in humans is not well understood. We examined whether inflammation, assessed as synovitis and effusion on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or mechanical load, assessed as bone marrow lesions (BMLs), was associated with sensitization in knee OA. Subjects in the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study, a National Institutes of Health-funded cohort of persons with or at risk of knee OA, underwent radiography and MRI of the knee, and standardized quantitative sensory testing (temporal summation and pressure pain threshold [PPT]) of the wrist and patellae at baseline and 2 years later. We examined the relation of synovitis, effusion, and BMLs to temporal summation and PPT cross-sectionally and longitudinally. There were 1,111 subjects in the study sample (mean age 67 years, mean body mass index 30 kg/m(2) , 62% female). Synovitis was associated with a significant decrease in PPT at the patella (i.e., more sensitized) over 2 years (adjusted β -0.30 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) -0.52, -0.08]). Effusion was similarly associated with a decrease in PPT at the wrist (adjusted β -0.24 [95% CI -0.41, -0.08]) and with risk of incident temporal summation at the patella (adjusted OR 1.54 [95% CI 1.01, 2.36]). BMLs were not associated with either quantitative sensory testing measure. Inflammation, as evidenced by synovitis or effusion, is associated with pain sensitization in knee OA. In contrast, BMLs do not appear to contribute to sensitization in knee OA. Early targeting of inflammation is a reasonable strategy to test for prevention of sensitization and through this, reduction of pain severity, in knee OA. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Quantitative measures of meniscus extrusion predict incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis--data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, K; Quinn, E; Niu, J; Guermazi, A; Roemer, F; Wirth, W; Eckstein, F; Felson, D

    2016-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that quantitative measures of meniscus extrusion predict incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis (KOA), prior to the advent of radiographic disease. 206 knees with incident radiographic KOA (Kellgren Lawrence Grade (KLG) 0 or 1 at baseline, developing KLG 2 or greater with a definite osteophyte and joint space narrowing (JSN) grade ≥1 by year 4) were matched to 232 control knees not developing incident KOA. Manual segmentation of the central five slices of the medial and lateral meniscus was performed on coronal 3T DESS MRI and quantitative meniscus position was determined. Cases and controls were compared using conditional logistic regression adjusting for age, sex, BMI, race and clinical site. Sensitivity analyses of early (year [Y] 1/2) and late (Y3/4) incidence was performed. Mean medial extrusion distance was significantly greater for incident compared to non-incident knees (1.56 mean ± 1.12 mm SD vs 1.29 ± 0.99 mm; +21%, P meniscus (25.8 ± 15.8% vs 22.0 ± 13.5%; +17%, P meniscus in incident medial KOA, or for the tibial plateau coverage between incident and non-incident knees. Restricting the analysis to medial incident KOA at Y1/2 differences were attenuated, but reached significance for extrusion distance, whereas no significant differences were observed at incident KOA in Y3/4. Greater medial meniscus extrusion predicts incident radiographic KOA. Early onset KOA showed greater differences for meniscus position between incident and non-incident knees than late onset KOA. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dynamic weight-bearing assessment of pain in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Christensen, Robin; Wæhrens, Eva E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) has suggested to asses pain after specific activities consistently in clinical trials on knee OA. The Dynamic weight-bearing Assessment of Pain (DAP) assesses pain during activity (30 s of performing repeated deep knee-bends from...... Coefficients. We hypothesized that no correlations would be excellent (

  19. Muscle strength, pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, M. P.; Dekker, J.; van Baar, M. E.; Oostendorp, R. A.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    Reduced muscle strength is regarded as a risk factor for pain and disability in osteoarthritis (OA). Currently, various indices for muscle strength are used when assessing determinants of pain and disability. The goal of the present study was to evaluate these indices of muscle strength. Isometric

  20. Treatment modalities for patients with varus medial knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Duivenvoorden (Tijs)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common joint disorders in the Western population, which causes pain, stiffness, loss of function and disability. In patients with OA the cartilage, located at the ends of long bones, is damaged. OA is most prevalent in the knee

  1. Magnitude of knee osteoarthritis and associated risk factors among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The point prevalence of knee osteoarthritis was 11.5%. Increasing age, female gender, marital status, low educational status, financial dependency, poor income, obesity, previous knee injury, epigastric pain, peptic ulcer disease, varus deformity of the knee, and poor health status were significantly associated with ...

  2. Conservative treatment of thumb base osteoarthritis : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaans, Anne J.; Van Minnen, L. Paul; Kon, Moshe; Schuurman, Arnold H.; Schreuders, A. R.; Vermeulen, Guus M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide a systematic review of randomized controlled trials regarding the conservative treatment of thumb base osteoarthritis (OA). Methods A systematic literature search was conducted in the electronic bibliographic databases Medline (Pubmed) and Embase (both starting year to May 2014)

  3. Underlying molecular mechanisms of DIO2 susceptibility in symptomatic osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bomer, N.; Den Hollander, W.T.H.F.; Ramos, Y.F.M.; Bos, S.D.; Van der Breggen, R.; Lakenberg, N.; Pepers, B.A.; Van Eeden, A.E.; Darvishan, A.; Tobi, E.W.; Duijnisveld, B.J.; Van den Akker, E.B.; Heijmans, B.T.; Van Roon-Mom, W.M.C.; Verbeek, F.J.; Osch, G.J.V.M.; Nelissen, R.G.H.H.; Slagboom, P.E.; Meulenbelt, I.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate how the genetic susceptibility gene DIO2 confers risk to osteoarthritis (OA) onset in humans and to explore whether counteracting the deleterious effect could contribute to novel therapeutic approaches. Methods: Epigenetically regulated expression of DIO2 was explored by

  4. Underlying molecular mechanisms of DIO2 susceptibility in symptomatic osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Bomer (Nils); W. den Hollander (Wouter); Y.F.M. Ramos (Yolande); S.D. Bos (Steffan); R. van der Breggen (Ruud); N. Lakenberg (Nico); B.A. Pepers (Barry); A.E. van Eeden (Annelies); A. Darvishan (Arash); E.W. Tobi (Elmar); B.J. Duijnisveld (Bouke); E.B. van den Akker (Erik); B.T. Heijmans (Bastiaan); W.M.C. van Roon-Mom (Willeke); F.J. Verbeek (Fons); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo); R.G.H.H. Nelissen (Rob); P.E. Slagboom (Eline); I. Meulenbelt (Ingrid)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To investigate how the genetic susceptibility gene DIO2 confers risk to osteoarthritis (OA) onset in humans and to explore whether counteracting the deleterious effect could contribute to novel therapeutic approaches. Methods: Epigenetically regulated expression of DIO2 was

  5. The Global Economic Cost of Osteoarthritis: How the UK Compares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To examine all relevant literature on the economic costs of osteoarthritis in the UK, and to compare such costs globally. Methods. A search of MEDLINE was performed. The search was expanded beyond peer-reviewed journals into publications by the department of health, national orthopaedic associations, national authorities and registries, and arthritis charities. Results. No UK studies were identified in the literature search. 3 European, 6 North American, and 2 Asian studies were reviewed. Significant variation in direct and indirect costs were seen in these studies. Costs for topical and oral NSAIDs were estimated to be £19.2 million and £25.65 million, respectively. Cost of hip and knee replacements was estimated to exceed £850 million, arthroscopic surgery for osteoarthritis was estimated to be £1.34 million. Indirect costs from OA caused a loss of economic production over £3.2 billion, £43 million was spent on community services and £215 million on social services for osteoarthritis. Conclusions. While estimates of economic costs can be made using information from non-published data, there remains a lack of original research looking at the direct or indirect costs of osteoarthritis in the UK. Differing methodology in calculating costs from overseas studies makes direct comparison with the UK difficult.

  6. Pattern of Osteoarthritis Seen In Physiotherapy Facilities in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of disability in the elderly. Studies on its prevalence and pattern in Nigeria are few. The aim of this retrospective study was to describe the pattern of OA seen in 10 physiotherapy facilities in Ibadan and Lagos. The University of Ibadan/University College Hospital Ethical Review ...

  7. Topical capsaicin for pain in osteoarthritis: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Vânia; Castro, João Paulo; Brito, Iva

    Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disorder worldwide. The predominant symptom, pain, is usually treated with acetaminophen or oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, although they are associated with a significant risk of side effects. Topical capsaicin may represent an effective and safe alternative. The aim of this review is to examine the evidence for the efficacy and safety profile of topical capsaicin in the management of pain caused by osteoarthritis. Databases were searched for articles published between 2004 and 2016, in Portuguese, English or Spanish, using the search terms "capsaicin" and "osteoarthritis". When compared to placebo, it was found that topical capsaicin has a good safety profile and efficacy in reducing osteoarthritis pain of the hand, knee, hip or shoulder. However, the studies have significant limitations, the most important the difficulty of blinding. It is attributed to this review the strength of recommendation B. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  8. Physiotherapy Effects in Gait Speed in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klejda Tani

    2018-03-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicated that there was a significant decrease in pain and increase of gait speed while walking for 10 meters. Kinesio Tape can be used in patients with knee osteoarthritis, especially when changing walking stereotypes is a long-term goal of the treatment.

  9. patterns of knee, hip and hand osteoarthritis in kenyatta national

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common chronic rheumatic disorders and is associated ... Obese participants were 41% and 32% were overweight. There were 89 (44.3%) participants with bilateral knee or hip disease while 112(55.7%) had unilateral .... We recommend studies to evaluate the impact.

  10. Protective effect of glucosamine cyclohexyl ester on osteoarthritis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the therapeutic effect of glucosamine cyclohexyl ester on osteoarthritis (OA) in a rat model. Methods: Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot assays were used to analyze the effect of glucosamine cyclohexyl ester on changes in mRNA and protein ...

  11. MRI-based semiquantitative scoring of joint pathology in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guermazi, Ali; Roemer, Frank W; Haugen, Ida K; Crema, Michel D; Hayashi, Daichi

    2013-04-01

    The use of MRI techniques to investigate tissue pathology has become increasingly widespread in osteoarthritis (OA) research. Semiquantitative assessment of the joints by expert interpreters of MRI data is a powerful tool that can increase our understanding of the natural history of this complex disease. Several reliable and validated semiquantitative scoring systems now exist and have been applied to large-scale, multicentre, cross-sectional and longitudinal observational epidemiological studies. Such approaches have advanced our understanding of the associations of different tissue pathologies with pain and improved the definition of joint alterations that lead to disease progression. Semiquantitative MRI outcome measures have also been applied in several clinical trials in OA. Indeed, interest in MRI-based semiquantitative scoring systems has led to the development of several novel scoring systems that can be applied to different joints: a knee synovitis scoring system based on contrast-enhanced MRI; the MRI Osteoarthritis Knee Score (MOAKS); the Hip Osteoarthritis MRI Score (HOAMS); and the Oslo Hand Osteoarthritis MRI score (OHOA-MRI). Although these new scoring systems offer theoretical advantages over pre-existing systems, whether they offer actual superiority with regard to reliability, responsiveness and validity remains to be seen.

  12. Osteoarthritis: an update with relevance for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Berenbaum, Francis; Lafeber, Floris P J G

    2011-06-18

    Osteoarthritis is thought to be the most prevalent chronic joint disease. The incidence of osteoarthritis is rising because of the ageing population and the epidemic of obesity. Pain and loss of function are the main clinical features that lead to treatment, including non-pharmacological, pharmacological, and surgical approaches. Clinicians recognise that the diagnosis of osteoarthritis is established late in the disease process, maybe too late to expect much help from disease-modifying drugs. Despite efforts over the past decades to develop markers of disease, still-imaging procedures and biochemical marker analyses need to be improved and possibly extended with more specific and sensitive methods to reliably describe disease processes, to diagnose the disease at an early stage, to classify patients according to their prognosis, and to follow the course of disease and treatment effectiveness. In the coming years, a better definition of osteoarthritis is expected by delineating different phenotypes of the disease. Treatment targeted more specifically at these phenotypes might lead to improved outcomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Benefits of antioxidant supplements for knee osteoarthritis: rationale and reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Ashok Kumar; Samson, Sue E

    2016-01-05

    Arthritis causes disability due to pain and inflammation in joints. There are many forms of arthritis, one of which is osteoarthritis whose prevalence increases with age. It occurs in various joints including hip, knee and hand with knee osteoarthritis being more prevalent. There is no cure for it. The management strategies include exercise, glucosamine plus chondroitin sulfate and NSAIDs. In vitro and animal studies provide a rationale for the use of antioxidant supplements for its management. This review assesses the reality of the benefits of antioxidant supplements in the management of knee osteoarthritis. Several difficulties were encountered in examining this issue: poorly conducted studies, a lack of uniformity in disease definition and diagnosis, and muddling of conclusions from attempts to isolate the efficacious molecules. The antioxidant supplements with most evidence for benefit for pain relief and function in knee osteoarthritis were based on curcumin and avocado-soya bean unsaponifiables. Boswellia and some herbs used in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine may also be useful. The benefits of cuisines with the appropriate antioxidants should be assessed because they may be more economical and easier to incorporate into the lifestyle.

  14. Self-management of chronic low back pain and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Stephen

    2010-04-01

    Chronic low back pain and osteoarthritis are two musculoskeletal problems that are highly prevalent in the general population, are frequently episodic and persistent, and are associated with high costs to society, both direct and indirect. This epidemiological picture provides the background that justifies the use of self-management strategies in managing these problems. For this Review, relevant systematic reviews were included that related to effectiveness; other study designs were included that addressed other aspects of the topic. The accepted definition of self-management includes liaison between health professionals and individuals with these problems, as well as independent health-promotion activities. Independent self-management strategies, such as exercise and self-medication, are practiced by individuals in the general population. Consistent evidence shows that self-management programs for osteoarthritis are effective in addressing pain and function, but effect sizes are small and might be clinically negligible. Educational programs for patients with back pain are effective in an occupational setting and if combined with an exercise program. Exercise is an effective strategy in the management of both chronic low back pain and osteoarthritis, although it is unclear what the optimum exercise is. Exercise, supported by advice and education, should be at the core of self-management strategies for chronic low back pain and osteoarthritis.

  15. Coping, pain, and disability in osteoarthritis: a longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, M. P.; Dekker, J.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    To establish the role of coping styles as prospective determinants of pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee or hip. Data from 71 patients with OA of the hip and 119 patients with OA of the knee were used. Using regression analysis, relationships were established

  16. Coping, pain, and disability in osteoarthritis : A longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, MPM; Dekker, J; Bijlsma, JWJ

    Objective. To establish the role of coping styles as prospective determinants of pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee or hip. Methods. Data from 71 patients with OA of the hip and 119 patients with OA of the knee were used. Using regression analysis, relationships

  17. Coping, pain and disability in osteoarthritis: a longitudinal study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, J.; Steultjens, M.P.; Bijlsma, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    This study aimed at establishing the role of coping styles as prospective determinants of pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee or hip. Data were used on 87 patients with OS of the hip and 129 patients with OA of the knee. Coping styles were assessed with a

  18. Stem cell injections in knee osteoarthritis : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, Haiko I. M. F. L.; Winters, Marinus; Haisma, Hidde J.; Koenis, Martinus J. J.; Tol, Johannes L.; Moen, Maarten H.

    Objective Stem cell injection for knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is an emerging new therapy, and we aimed to review its evidence of efficacy. Design Systematic review. Eligibility criteria Criteria for eligibility were randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCT on the efficacy of stem cell

  19. Stem cell therapy in osteoarthritis: a step too far?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease and, until now, no effective medical treatment has been developed, apart from total joint replacement in end-stage disease. Since mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) can on one hand be the source of newly formed cartilage, and on the other hand inhibit

  20. Adiposity and hand osteoarthritis: the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.W. de; Ioan-Facsinay, A.; Mutsert, R. de; Widya, R.L.; Loef, M.; Roos, A. de; Cessie, S. le; Heijer, M. den; Rosendaal, F.R.; Kloppenburg, M.; Smit, J.W.A.; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Obesity, usually characterized by the body mass index (BMI), is a risk factor for hand osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated whether adipose tissue and abdominal fat distribution are associated with hand OA. METHODS: The Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity (NEO) study is a

  1. Reliability of classification for post-traumatic ankle osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessen, Femke M. A. P.; Meijer, Diederik T.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Gevers Deynoot, Barend D. J.; Mallee, Wouter H.; Doornberg, Job N.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the most reliable classification system for clinical outcome studies to categorize post-traumatic-fracture-osteoarthritis. A total of 118 orthopaedic surgeons and residents-gathered in the Ankle Platform Study Collaborative Science of Variation

  2. Treatment of Symptomatic Varus Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M. van Raaij (Tom)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOsteoarthritis (OA) is the 6th leading cause of Years Lost to Disability (YLD) at global level, accounting for 3% of total global YLDs. Knee OA is the most common joint disorder, and in the Netherlands approximately 17% of the population aged 45 years and over suffer from knee OA. It

  3. Unicompartmental Osteoarthritis of the Knee: Diagnosis and Treatment of Malalignment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Brouwer (Reinoud)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractOsteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a common medical condition that is often seen in general practice and causes considerable pain and immobility. In the United States, approximately 6% of the population aged 30 years and older and 12% of the population aged 65 years and older suffer

  4. Obesity and disability in the symptomatic Irish knee osteoarthritis population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ambrose, N L

    2010-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a common disorder with significant social and financial implications. Obesity is the strongest modifiable risk factor of knee OA. There is little data on obesity in Irish knee OA populations and its relationship to other measures of disease severity.

  5. Pain in Osteoarthritis | Enohumah | African Journal of Biomedical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osteoarthritis (OA) has been described “as a condition characterized by userelated joint pain experienced on most days in any given month, for which no other cause is apparent”. The primary problem in OA is the damage to the articular cartilage which triggers a series of other events that culminate in pain and ...

  6. Non-surgical management of early knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kon, Elizaveta; Filardo, Giuseppe; Drobnic, Matej; Madry, Henning; Jelic, Mislav; van Dijk, Niek; Della Villa, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Conservative approach is usually the first choice for the management of the knee degeneration processes, especially in the phase of the disease recognized as early osteoarthritis (OA) with no clear lesions or associated abnormalities requiring to be addressed surgically. A wide spectrum of

  7. Viscosupplementation in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Viscosupplementation is a recognised mode of management of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, especially in patients who have failed treatment with NSAIDs. Objectives: To review the literature on viscosupplementation as well as assess its efficacy in Nigerians with OA of the knee. Methods: Patients presenting ...

  8. Pain in osteoarthritis: A review of literature | Enohumah | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a vast body of evidence to suggest that osteoarthritis is a heterogenous condition that involves not only the articular cartilage but also an adaptive response of the bone and the synovium to a variety of environmental, genetic and biomechanical stresses.5-11 There is also growing evidence pointing towards long ...

  9. Prevalence and pattern of osteoarthritis of the knee at National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of osteoarthritis of the knee and the risk factors associated with its development at National Orthopaedic Hospital Enugu. Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Setting: A regional orthopeadic centre in Nigeria. Subjects: Two thousand three hundred and ten adults aged 30 years ...

  10. Patterns of knee, hip and hand osteoarthritis in Kenyatta National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common chronic rheumatic disorders and is associated with significant morbidity and disability. Few studies examined the spectrum of rheumatic diseases in sub-Saharan Africa. Obesity is not only a risk factor for incidence of OA but also for the progression of the disease.

  11. patterns of knee, hip and hand osteoarthritis in kenyatta national

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PATTERNS OF KNEE, HIP AND HAND OSTEOARTHRITIS IN KENYATTA. NATIONAL HOSPITAL. H.A. Nour, MMed, G.O. Oyoo, FRCP (Edin), FACR, MBChB, MMed (Clin Rheum) Senior Lecturer, M.D. Joshi,. MBChB, MMed, Cert Clin Epid MPH-Epid, FACC, Associate Professor, Department of Clinical Medicine and.

  12. Total Hip Replacement as a Treatment Option for Osteoarthritis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As the age of the population increases, total hip arthroplasty as a treatment option for osteoarthritis will assume greater significance. The aim of this study is to document the problems encountered with total hip arthroplasty in treating patients with osfeoarthrifis ofthe hip at the National Orthropaedic Hospital, Dala Kanso ...

  13. Nutritional Factors and Osteoarthritis: A review article | Sanghi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research is ongoing on the beneficial properties of plant derived extracts for OA and nutraceuticals industries are accordingly making firm contribution to this sector. This article focuses the role of nutrients to slow down the progression of OA and their future aspects. Keywords: Osteoarthritis; Dietary factors; Nutrition; Review

  14. Protective effect of glucosamine cyclohexyl ester on osteoarthritis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the therapeutic effect of glucosamine cyclohexyl ester on osteoarthritis (OA) in a rat model. Methods: Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot assays were used to analyze the effect of glucosamine cyclohexyl ester on changes in mRNA and.

  15. Osteoarthritis: pathogenesis and therapeutic interventions for a whole joint disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Siebelt (Michiel)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Osteoarthritis (OA) is an invalidating disease characterized by progressive cartilage degradation. OA is the most prevalent arthritic disease and leading cause of disability that effects approximately 34% of the population in the United states over age 65. Also in

  16. Development and prevention of knee osteoarthritis: The load of obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Runhaar (Jos)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAccording to the World Health Organization, more than 150 million (± 2.5%) people suffer from osteoarthritis (OA ) worldwide. Above the age of 60 years, these figures even rise to 10% 2. In almost 30% of these cases, OA leads to moderate to severe disability. Thereby, it is the most

  17. Osteoarthritis of knees and obesity in Eastern Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, Abdullah I.; Al-Abdulwahab, Ahmed H.; Al-Mulhim, Abdulrahman S.

    2006-01-01

    Objective was to find out the prevalence and relation between osteoarthritis of knees and obesity in Al-Ahsa region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The study included 243 male and female patients diagnosed with osteoarthritis of knees of knees in between June 2001 to March 2003. All patients were recruited from the Physical Therapy Department, King Fahd Hofuf Hospital, Hofuf, KSA. The clinical diagnosis was supported plain x-rays of knees, and of other joint if needed. The weight and height of all patients were taken using one standard weight and height scale, and body mass index was also calculated and recorded. More than 90.53% of the patients referred with osteoarthritis of knees were obese or overweight. The mean body weight of all patients was 84.61 kg and the mean weight was 1.59 meters. Osteoarthritis of the knees was more in obese female than male patients with a female to male ratio of 2.37:1. Obesity is a disease. The aim of all health professionals and others in the community should be directed to the prevention of this disease and its risk to develop multiple complications. (author)

  18. Selection of knee radiographs for trials of structure-modifying drugs in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a prospective, longitudinal study of Lyon Schuss knee radiographs with the definition of adequate alignment of the medial tibial plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrozier, Thierry; Mathieu, Pierre; Piperno, Muriel; Favret, Huguette; Colson, Frédéric; Vignon, Martine; Conrozier, Sylvie; Vignon, Eric

    2005-05-01

    The quality of medial tibial plateau (MTP) alignment, which is assessed by measuring the distance between the anterior and posterior margins (intermargin distance [IMD]) of the tibial plateau, and the reproducibility of alignment in serial radiographs are suggested to be key elements in determining the accuracy and sensitivity to change in knee radiographs in patients with tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (OA). We evaluated the influence of both MTP alignment and radiograph superimposition on the sensitivity to change in radiographic joint space narrowing (JSN) in knee OA. The study group comprised 106 patients with knee pain (73 with OA). Lyon schuss radiographic images of the knee were obtained twice (at baseline [month 0] and 12 months later), using a standardized radiographic procedure. Computerized measurement of the IMD for the assessment of MTP alignment was compared with the grading of MTP alignment by 2 observers using a 5-point scale (excellent, good, fair, poor, bad). To obtain the rate of JSN, computerized measurement of the joint space width was performed at month 0 and month 12. The sensitivity of the joint space width to change over 1 year was evaluated by the standardized response mean (SRM). The mean (+/-SD) IMD was 1.2 +/- 0.9 mm. The correlation between scoring and computer measurement of MTP alignment was highly significant. The cutoff value for satisfactory alignment (excellent or good) was an IMD of 1.2 mm at month 0 and/or month 12. The quality of MTP alignment at both baseline and the end point highly influences the sensitivity to change in radiographic JSN in knee OA. To obtain relevant data, only radiographs showing an IMD of

  19. Mitochondrial Haplogroups Define Two Phenotypes of Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Moreno, Mercedes; Soto-Hermida, Angel; Oreiro, Natividad; Pértega, Sonia; Fenández-López, Carlos; Rego-Pérez, Ignacio; Blanco, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess a mitochondrion-related phenotype in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: Serum levels of the following OA-related biomarkers: matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1); MMP-3; MMP-13; myeloperoxidase (MPO); a peptide of the alpha-helical region of type II collagen, Coll2-1, and its nitrated form Coll2-1NO2; a C-terminal neoepitope generated by the collagenase-mediated cleavage of collagen type II triple helix, C2C; the C-propeptide of collagen type II, CPII; hyaluronic acid (HA); human cartilage glycoprotein 39, YKL-40; cartilage oligomeric matrix protein; and cathepsin K were analyzed in 48 OA patients and 52 healthy controls carrying the haplogroups H and J. Logistic regression models and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed to predict the onset of OA. Results: MMP-13 was the only biomarker significantly increased in OA patients compared to healthy controls in both haplogroups H and J. The collagen type II biomarkers, Coll2-1, Coll2-1NO2, the Coll2-1NO2/Coll2-1 ratio, C2C, CPII, and the C2C:CPII ratio were significantly increased in OA patients carrying haplogroup H compared to OA carriers of the haplogroup J. Two logistic regression models for diagnosis were constructed and adjusted for age, gender, and body mass index. For haplogroup H, the biomarkers significantly associated with OA were MMP-13 and Coll2-1; the area under the curve (AUC) of the ROC curve for this model was 0.952 (95% CI = 0.892–1.012). For haplogroup J, the only biomarker significantly associated with OA was MMP-13; the AUC for this model was 0.895 (95% CI = 0.801–0.989). Conclusion: The mitochondrial DNA haplogroups are potential complementary candidates for biomarkers of OA; their genotyping in conjunction with the assessment of classical protein molecular markers is recommended. PMID:22593743

  20. Comparison of lbuprofen with Acupuncture in Reducing Knee Osteoarthritis Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Emad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disease of humans. Acupuncture is one of the treatments for osteoarthritis. This study aimed to compare lbuprofen with acupuncture in the pain reduction in knee osteoarthritis. Materials & Methods: This is a clinical trial which was performed in Shiraz Medical School Clinics in 2007. Forty six patients with chronic pain due to the knee osteoarthritis were recruited using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. All the patients were randomly divided into two groups (A and B who received lbuprofen (1200 mg/day or acupuncture (2 sessions per week for 2 weeks, respectively. Evaluating measuring tools were pain intensity (based on VAS, ROM (based on degree and morning stiffness of the knee joint. Collected data were analyzed by Chi-Square test, using SPSS software. Results: Pain intensity at baseline, after the course of treatment and 3 weeks after the treatment in group A was 7.29 ± 0.61, 4.20±0.93 and 5.20± 1.32 cm, respectively while these figures for group B were 7.35±0.82, 3.43±0.96 and 4.93±1.32 cm, respectively (p<0.005. Also knee ROM degree in group A was 21.54±7.46, 13.08±5.60 and 15.38±3.2 and for group B was 20.36±7.19, 12.40±5.78 and 10.36±5.30, respectively (p=0.003. Knee morning stiffness improved more in group B. Conclusion: Result of this study showed that both modalities significantly reduced the pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis and improved ROM while morning stiffness improved more in group B.

  1. Quantifying varus and valgus thrust in individuals with severe knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosdian, L; Hinman, R S; Wrigley, T V; Paterson, K L; Dowsey, M; Choong, P; Bennell, K

    2016-11-01

    Varus-valgus thrust is a biomechanical characteristic linked to knee osteoarthritis disease progression. This study aimed to determine: i) direction of thrust in individuals awaiting total knee arthroplasty versus controls, ii) whether thrust and related parameters differed between groups, iii) differences between osteoarthritis patients awaiting surgery with varus and valgus thrust. 44 patients scheduled for surgery and 40 asymptomatic participants were recruited. varus-valgus thrust excursion and absolute thrust magnitude, quantified by 3D gait analysis. Few differences were found between the osteoarthritis group and controls. The osteoarthritis group as a whole had a more varus knee angle during early- (pvarus thrust osteoarthritis subgroup had a more varus knee angle in overall (p=0.012), early- (pvarus thrust controls. No differences were found between the valgus thrust osteoarthritis and control groups. The varus thrust osteoarthritis group had a greater varus peak knee angle in overall (pvarus static alignment (p=0.014), and lower quadriceps strength (p=0.035) than the valgus thrust osteoarthritis group. Those with severe osteoarthritis and a varus thrust have poorer biomechanics, more varus static knee alignment, and lower quadriceps strength compared to those with osteoarthritis with a valgus thrust. Further work is needed to determine if these findings impact total knee arthroplasty outcome. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Availability and use of neighborhood resources by older people with osteoarthritis : Results from the European Project on OSteoArthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pas, S; Schaap, L A; Castell, M.V; Cooper, C.; Denkinger, M.; Edwards, Mark H; Herbolsheimer, F.; Maggi, S.; Sánchez-Martinez, M; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peter, R.; Zambon, S.; Wiegersma, S.B.; Dekker, J; Dennison, Elaine M; Deeg, D J H

    This study examines the availability and use of neighborhood resources in relation to clinical lower limb osteoarthritis (LLOA) in older participants from six European countries. Of the 2757 participants (65-85 years), 22.7% had LLOA. Participants with LLOA made more use of places to sit (OR=2.50;

  3. Case definitions of knee osteoarthritis in 4,151 unselected subjects: relevance for epidemiological studies : The Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxafoss, Erling; Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper K

    2010-01-01

    -morphological change over age in individuals without radiological features of OA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study - COS is a substudy of the Copenhagen City Heart Study, a longitudinal regional health survey. From the third inclusion of the CCHS (1992-1994) 4,151 subjects were selected...

  4. Self-reported knee instability and activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis: results of the Amsterdam osteoarthritis cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Esch, M.; Knoop, J.; van der Leeden, M.; Voorneman, R.; Gerritsen, M.; Reiding, D.; Romviel, S.; Knol, D.L.; Lems, W.F.; Dekker, J.; Roorda, L.D.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether self-reported knee instability is associated with activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), in addition to knee pain and muscle strength. A cohort of 248 patients diagnosed with knee OA was examined. Self-reported knee

  5. Unilateral hip osteoarthritis: Its effects on preoperative lower limb muscle activation and intramuscular coordination patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, André; Stief, Felix; Lenarz, Katharina; Froemel, Dara; Lutz, Frederick; Barker, John; Meurer, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to test if patients with unilateral hip osteoarthritis (OA) show greater muscle activity asymmetry between their affected and non-affected limbs than healthy controls between their left and right limbs. Seventeen patients with unilateral hip OA (7 females, 10 males) and 17 age-matched healthy controls (7 females, 10 males) participated in this study. Both groups performed instrumented gait analysis at comparable speeds. Muscle activity was recorded simultaneously for the tibialis anterior (TA), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), vastus lateralis (VL), semitendinosus (ST), tensor fasciae latae (TFL), and gluteus medius (GLM) muscles. In hip OA patients, EMG data showed greater activity of the TA muscle in the non-affected limb, and greater TFL muscle activity in the affected limb. Compared to healthy controls, greater asymmetries between paired limbs were observed for the TA and GM muscles. Finally, the TFL muscle of the affected limb contributed more to the total limb muscle activity than did the non-affected limb. The observed alterations in TA and GM muscle activity in hip OA patients may be due to the greater peak braking and peak vertical forces measured in the non-affected limb. Contrary to this, greater TLF muscle activity of the affected limb indicates the demands put on stabilizing the hip during stance phase. Further studies are necessary to test whether leg length discrepancy affects muscle activation alterations between the affected and non-affected limb in unilateral hip OA patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficacy and safety of cross-linked hyaluronic acid single injection on osteoarthritis of the knee: a post-marketing Phase IV study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashaireh, Khaldoon; Naser, Ziad; Hawadya, Khaled Al; Sorour, Sorour; Al-Khateeb, Rami Nabeel

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and duration of action of viscosupplementation with Crespine® Gel over a 9-month period. The study was a post-marketing Phase IV study. A total of 109 participants with osteoarthritis of the knee (grades 1-4) in the tibio-femoral compartment were recruited in Jordan. Data were collected from each participant during the baseline visit. Each participant received Crespine® Gel injection, and follow-up visits took place at 3 months, 6 months, and 9 months post-injection. An assessment of participants by phone was conducted at 1 month, 2 months, 4 months, 5 months, 7 months, and 8 months post-injection. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index questionnaires were completed during each visit. A 72-hour visit questionnaire was used to assess the safety of the injection. Statistical analysis included a two-sided 95% confidence interval for the difference between pain scores across visits, and the percent change from baseline was calculated. The full analysis included 84 participants who gave their informed consent and finished the necessary baseline and follow-up visits needed to assess efficacy and safety. Peak improvement was noted at 5 months post-injection, when pain and physical performance scores had decreased to 2.60 and 9.90, respectively, and the stiffness score was 0.33. The peak improvement in stiffness was noted at 8 months post-injection, when the stiffness score had decreased to 0.32. Significant improvements were still apparent at 9 months post-injection, when the pain score was 3.36, the stiffness score was 0.42, and the physical performance score was 11.5. All side effects were local and transient, and included pain, swelling, and redness of the knee. Most side effects were treated. Hyaluronan should be encouraged as an alternative or adjunct treatment to oral analgesics to reduce their required doses, and delay potential future surgical intervention.

  7. The effect of glucosamine and/or chondroitin sulfate on the progression of knee osteoarthritis: a report from the glucosamine/chondroitin arthritis intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawitzke, Allen D; Shi, Helen; Finco, Martha F; Dunlop, Dorothy D; Bingham, Clifton O; Harris, Crystal L; Singer, Nora G; Bradley, John D; Silver, David; Jackson, Christopher G; Lane, Nancy E; Oddis, Chester V; Wolfe, Fred; Lisse, Jeffrey; Furst, Daniel E; Reda, Domenic J; Moskowitz, Roland W; Williams, H James; Clegg, Daniel O

    2008-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee causes significant morbidity and current medical treatment is limited to symptom relief, while therapies able to slow structural damage remain elusive. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate (CS), alone or in combination, as well as celecoxib and placebo on progressive loss of joint space width (JSW) in patients with knee OA. A 24-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, conducted at 9 sites in the United States as part of the Glucosamine/Chondroitin Arthritis Intervention Trial (GAIT), enrolled 572 patients with knee OA who satisfied radiographic criteria (Kellgren/Lawrence [K/L] grade 2 or grade 3 changes and JSW of at least 2 mm at baseline). Patients with primarily lateral compartment narrowing at any time point were excluded. Patients who had been randomized to 1 of the 5 groups in the GAIT continued to receive glucosamine 500 mg 3 times daily, CS 400 mg 3 times daily, the combination of glucosamine and CS, celecoxib 200 mg daily, or placebo over 24 months. The minimum medial tibiofemoral JSW was measured at baseline, 12 months, and 24 months. The primary outcome measure was the mean change in JSW from baseline. The mean JSW loss at 2 years in knees with OA in the placebo group, adjusted for design and clinical factors, was 0.166 mm. No statistically significant difference in mean JSW loss was observed in any treatment group compared with the placebo group. Treatment effects on K/L grade 2 knees, but not on K/L grade 3 knees, showed a trend toward improvement relative to the placebo group. The power of the study was diminished by the limited sample size, variance of JSW measurement, and a smaller than expected loss in JSW. At 2 years, no treatment achieved a predefined threshold of clinically important difference in JSW loss as compared with placebo. However, knees with K/L grade 2 radiographic OA appeared to have the greatest potential for modification by these treatments.

  8. Three-Dimensional Quantitative Morphometric Analysis (QMA for In Situ Joint and Tissue Assessment of Osteoarthritis in a Preclinical Rabbit Disease Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn S Stok

    Full Text Available This work utilises advances in multi-tissue imaging, and incorporates new metrics which define in situ joint changes and individual tissue changes in osteoarthritis (OA. The aims are to (1 demonstrate a protocol for processing intact animal joints for microCT to visualise relevant joint, bone and cartilage structures for understanding OA in a preclinical rabbit model, and (2 introduce a comprehensive three-dimensional (3D quantitative morphometric analysis (QMA, including an assessment of reproducibility. Sixteen rabbit joints with and without transection of the anterior cruciate ligament were scanned with microCT and contrast agents, and processed for histology. Semi-quantitative evaluation was performed on matching two-dimensional (2D histology and microCT images. Subsequently, 3D QMA was performed; including measures of cartilage, subchondral cortical and epiphyseal bone, and novel tibio-femoral joint metrics. Reproducibility of the QMA was tested on seven additional joints. A significant correlation was observed in cartilage thickness from matching histology-microCT pairs. The lateral compartment of operated joints had larger joint space width, thicker femoral cartilage and reduced bone volume, while osteophytes could be detected quantitatively. Measures between the in situ tibia and femur indicated an altered loading scenario. High measurement reproducibility was observed for all new parameters; with ICC ranging from 0.754 to 0.998. In conclusion, this study provides a novel 3D QMA to quantify macro and micro tissue measures in the joint of a rabbit OA model. New metrics were established consisting of: an angle to quantitatively measure osteophytes (σ, an angle to indicate erosion between the lateral and medial femoral condyles (ρ, a vector defining altered angulation (λ, α, β, γ and a twist angle (τ measuring instability and tissue degeneration between the femur and tibia, a length measure of joint space width (JSW, and a slope and

  9. Can stimulating massage improve joint repositioning error in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Hans; Henriksen, Marius; Bartels, Else M

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of massage applied to the thigh muscles on joint repositioning error (JRE) in patients suffering from osteoarthritis (OA).We hypothesized that stimulating massage of the muscles around an osteoarthritic knee joint, could improve...... of rheumatology, were randomly allocated to either receive massage and a week later, act as controls or vice versa. The applied massage consisted of stimulating massage of the quadriceps femoris, sartorious, gracilus, and hamstrings muscles for 10 min on the affected leg. Participants had their JRE measured...... before and immediately after the 10 min massage and control sessions. Data were analyzed by using paired t-test. RESULTS: No significant change in JRE was observed (95% CI: -0.62 degrees to 0.85 degrees, p = 0.738). CONCLUSION: Massage has no effect on the immediate joint repositioning error in patients...

  10. Randomised controlled trial of extraarticular gold bead implantation for treatment of knee osteoarthritis: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nejrup, Kirsten; Olivarius, Niels de Fine; Jacobsen, Judith L.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this double-blind, randomised, controlled trial was to determine if implanting gold beads at five acupuncture points around the knee joint improves 1-year outcomes for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Participants were 43 adults aged 18-80 years with pain...... and stiffness from non-specific OA of the knee for over a year. The intervention was blinded implantation of gold beads at five acupuncture points around the affected knee through a hypodermic needle, or needle insertion alone. Primary outcome measures were knee pain, stiffness and function assessed...... acupuncture had greater relative improvements in self-assessed outcomes. The treatment was well tolerated. This 1-year pilot study indicates that extraarticular gold bead implantation is a promising treatment modality for patients with OA of the knee. The new treatment should be tested in a larger trial...

  11. Osteoarthritis in the XXIst century: risk factors and behaviours that influence disease onset and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Aiello, Flavia Concetta; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Di Rosa, Michelino; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-03-16

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a growing public health problem across the globe, affecting more than half of the over 65 population. In the past, OA was considered a wear and tear disease, leading to the loss of articular cartilage and joint disability. Nowadays, thanks to advancements in molecular biology, OA is believed to be a very complex multifactorial disease. OA is a degenerative disease characterized by "low-grade inflammation" in cartilage and synovium, resulting in the loss of joint structure and progressive deterioration of cartilage. Although the disease can be dependent on genetic and epigenetic factors, sex, ethnicity, and age (cellular senescence, apoptosis and lubricin), it is also associated with obesity and overweight, dietary factors, sedentary lifestyle and sport injuries. The aim of this review is to highlight how certain behaviors, habits and lifestyles may be involved in the onset and progression of OA and to summarize the principal risk factors involved in the development of this complicated joint disorder.

  12. An ultrasound score for knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riecke, B. F.; Christensen, Robin Daniel Kjersgaard; Torp-Pedersen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To develop standardized musculoskeletal ultrasound (MUS) procedures and scoring for detecting knee osteoarthritis (OA) and test the MUS score's ability to discern various degrees of knee OA, in comparison with plain radiography and the 'Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score' (KO...... of the knees, the score detected all aspects of knee OA with relevant precision. (C) 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  13. The Incidence of Primary Hip Osteoarthritis in Active Duty US Military Servicemembers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-15

    the hip and knee joint in retired football players. Acta Orthop Scand 1980;51:925–7. 36. Kujala UM, Kaprio J, Sarno S. Osteoarthritis of weightbearing...The Incidence of Primary Hip Osteoarthritis in Active Duty US Military Servicemembers DANIELLE L. SCHER,1 PHILIP J. BELMONT, JR.,1 SALLY MOUNTCASTLE...2 AND BRETT D. OWENS1 Objective. Although multiple studies have reported the prevalence of primary hip osteoarthritis (OA), little has been reported

  14. Association of C-reactive protein positivity among groups of patients with knee osteoarthritis in Erbil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Ahmed Pirdawood

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disease and a leading cause of disability. Increased circulating levels of C-reactive protein have been associated with prevalent knee osteoarthritis. This study aimed to assess the association between C- reactive protein positivity in patients with knee osteoarthritis in Erbil Methods: Data from100 participants in this case-control study were enrolled from May 1st to December 1st, 2015 in Rizgary Teaching Hospital in Erbil city. Data were divided into two groups. The cases included 50 patients (17 male and 33 female with a mean age of 58.9 ±3.8 years and diagnosed with primary knee osteoarthritis of one or both knee joints. Controls included 50 persons (17 male and 33 female with a mean age of 58.1 ±3.9 years without knee osteoarthritis and matched for age, sex, and body mass index. C-reactive protein qualitatively measured. Patients were radiologically assessed by Kellgren and Lawrence grading scale (grade 0-4. Results: C-reactive protein was positive in 41 out of 50 (82% of knee osteoarthritis patients compared to 3 out of 50 (6% of healthy controls (P = 0.001. C- reactive protein positivity among knee osteoarthritis patients were significantly associated with body mass index, positive family history of knee osteoarthritis, duration of diseases, and Kellgren and Lawrence grade (P 0.05. Conclusion: C-reactive protein positivity was significantly associated with knee osteoarthritis compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, body mass index, positive family history of knee osteoarthritis, early osteoarthritis, and Kellgren and Lawrence grade II, were significantly associated with positive C-reactive protein in knee osteoarthritis.

  15. Glial activation in the collagenase model of nociception associated with osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Ad?es, Sara; Almeida, L?gia; Potes, Catarina S; Ferreira, Ana Rita; Castro-Lopes, Jos? M; Ferreira-Gomes, Joana; Neto, Fani L

    2017-01-01

    Background Experimental osteoarthritis entails neuropathic-like changes in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Since glial activation has emerged as a key player in nociception, being reported in numerous models of neuropathic pain, we aimed at evaluating if glial cell activation may also occur in the DRG and spinal cord of rats with osteoarthritis induced by intra-articular injection of collagenase. Methods Osteoarthritis was induced by two injections, separated by three days, of 500 U of typ...

  16. Female hormonal factors and osteoarthritis of the knee, hip and hand: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, S M; Cicuttini, F M; Alyousef, B; Wang, Y

    2018-04-01

    Osteoarthritis is a leading cause of disability with no cure. The incidence of osteoarthritis is sexually dimorphic: women have a higher rate of osteoarthritis than men after the age of 50. Research has investigated the contribution of sex hormones, reproductive factors and hormone supplementation to osteoarthritis. It has been recognized that different joints are susceptible to different risk factors for osteoarthritis. We reviewed the evidence for the effect of endogenous sex hormones, reproductive factors and hormone supplementation on joint-specific osteoarthritis of the knee, hip and hand. Although the role of these hormonal factors in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis is complex, data suggest that endogenous hormones and reproductive factors have a role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, especially knee osteoarthritis, with uncertainty for the effect of exogenous hormones. From the available data, it is hard to conclude whether this is a direct effect of hormonal factors, or whether other factors related to these hormonal factors, i.e. obesity and inflammation, have a role in this association. Further studies should consider the mediation effect of body weight and inflammation, change in body weight throughout life, circulatory levels of all endogenous hormones and circulatory levels of hormones after hormone supplementation in this complex relationship.

  17. Prevention and management of knee osteoarthritis and knee cartilage injury in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hideki; Nakagawa, Takumi; Nakamura, Kozo; Engebretsen, Lars

    2011-04-01

    Articular cartilage defects in the knee of young or active individuals remain a problem in orthopaedic practice. These defects have limited ability to heal and may progress to osteoarthritis. The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis among athletes is higher than in the non-athletic population. The clinical symptoms of osteoarthritis are joint pain, limitation of range of motion and joint stiffness. The diagnosis of osteoarthritis is confirmed by the symptoms and the radiological findings (narrowing joint space, osteophyte formation and subchondral sclerosis). There is no strong correlation between symptoms and radiographic findings. The aetiology of knee osteoarthritis is multifactorial. Excessive musculoskeletal loading (at work or in sports), high body mass index, previous knee injury, female gender and muscle weakness are well-known risk factors. The high-level athlete with a major knee injury has a high incidence of knee osteoarthritis. Cartilage injuries are frequently observed in young and middle-aged active athletes. Often this injury precedes osteoarthritis. Reducing risk factors can decrease the prevalence of knee osteoarthritis. The prevention of knee injury, especially anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus injury in sports, is important to avoid progression of knee osteoarthritis.

  18. Influence of Isometric Exercise Training on Quadriceps Muscle Architecture and Strength in Obese Subjects with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed S Mahmoud

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Obese individuals have reduced quadriceps muscle strength relative to body mass that may increase the rate of progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of isometric exercise training on quadriceps muscle architecture and strength in obese subjects with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Fortyfour obese male subjects aged 40–65 years diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were randomly assigned into group A (n=32 and group B (n=12. Group A subjects performed a 12-week isometric exercise program. Group B subjects did not participate in any exercise program and maintained their ordinary activities for the same period. Both groups received the same conventional physical therapy program including hot packs and therapeutic ultrasonic. Muscle thickness, pennation angles and fascicle length of the vastus lateralis (VL muscle of the affected knee were measured at rest by B-mode ultrasonography. Maximal voluntary isometric knee extension torque (MVIC of the affected knee was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Knee pain and function were evaluated using visual analogue pain scale (VAS and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC. All variables were evaluated before and the end of the intervention period for both groups. Results: at the end of the program, group A subjects showed significant improvements compared with group B subjects regarding MVIC and muscle architecture parameters (p<0.05. Also, there was significant improvement in post-test VAS and WOMAC scores in group A subjects compared to group B subjects (p<0.05. Conclusion: A 12-week quadriceps isometric training program improves knee pain and quadriceps muscle strength and architecture in obese subjects with knee OA. These results indicate that isometric training should be regarded as a proper exercise intervention for obese patients with knee OA.

  19. Resurfacing hemiarthroplasty compared to stemmed hemiarthroplasty for glenohumeral osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe V; Olsen, Bo S; Sorensen, Anne Kathrine

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to conduct a randomised, clinical trial comparing stemmed hemiarthroplasty and resurfacing hemiarthroplasty in the treatment of glenohumeral osteoarthritis. METHODS: A total of 40 shoulders (35 patients) were randomised to stemmed hemiarthroplasty or resurfacing...... hemiarthroplasty and evaluated three and 12 months postoperatively using the Constant-Murley score (CMS) and Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder (WOOS) index. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences in age, gender or pre-operative scores except for WOOS at baseline. Two patients...... to be inferior to those of stemmed hemiarthroplasty. It is unclear whether this reflects a real difference in effect or baseline differences due to the limited number of randomised patients. We suggest there is a need for a larger, more definitive trial....

  20. Definition and classification of early osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyten, Frank P; Denti, Matteo; Filardo, Giuseppe; Kon, Elizaveta; Engebretsen, Lars

    2012-03-01

    With the emerging interest in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, new treatment modalities being developed for joint disorders including joint surface lesions and articular cartilage defects. The clinical outcome of these novel approaches appears rather unpredictable and is due to many reasons but definitely also linked to the patient profile. As a typical example, symptomatic articular cartilage lesions can be presented in an otherwise normal joint, or associated with several other joint tissue alterations including meniscal lesions and abnormalities of the underlying bone. The outcome of novel treatments may well be influenced by the status of the whole joint, and the potential to develop osteoarthritis. To better identify the patients at risk and responders to certain treatments, it is of use to define and most importantly classify patients with "early osteoarthritis". Here, classification criteria for this group of patients are presented, allowing a more defined and accurate inclusion in clinical trials in the future.

  1. Associations between muscle perfusion and symptoms in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandak, E; Boesen, M; Bliddal, H

    2015-01-01

    a relatively rapid decline (washout pattern) relative to the total number of voxels within the muscle VOI. CONCLUSIONS: More widespread perfusion in the peri-articular knee muscles was associated with less pain in patients with KOA. These results give rise to investigations of the effects of exercise on muscle......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between muscle perfusion in the peri-articular knee muscles assessed by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and symptoms in patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). DESIGN: In a cross-sectional setting, muscle perfusion...... was quantified by DCE-MRI in KOA. Regions of interest (ROI) were drawn around the peri-articular muscles, summed and averaged into one single "Total Muscle Volume" volume of interest (VOI). Symptoms were assessed via the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) (0: worst; 100: best). RESULTS: DCE...

  2. Degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis: an epidemiological perspective: the Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Rovsing, Hans

    2007-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional epidemiological survey of 4151 participants of the Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study. OBJECTIVE: To identify prevalences and individual risk factors for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study has...... registered health parameters since 1976. In 1993, standardized, lateral radiographs of the lumbar spine were recorded. There were 1533 men and 2618 women. METHODS: Statistical correlations were made between degenerative spondylolisthesis, and physical, occupational, and general epidemiological data. RESULTS......: A total of 254 cases of lumbar slip were found (males 2.7%, females 8.4%). In females, no significant relationship between age at menopause or childbirths and the presence of degenerative spondylolisthesis were found. In women, relationships between body mass index (BMI) in 1976 and L4 olisthesis (P = 0...

  3. Application for proteomic techniques in studying osteoarthritis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharbi, Myriam; Deberg, Michelle; Henrotin, Yves

    2011-01-01

    After the genomic era, proteomic corresponds to a wide variety of techniques that study the protein content of cells, tissue, or organism and that allow the isolation of protein of interest. It offers the choice between gel-based and gel-free methods or shotgun proteomics. Applications of proteomic technology may concern three principal objectives in several biomedical or clinical domains of research as in osteoarthritis: (i) to understand the physiopathology or underlying mechanisms leading to a disease or associated with a particular model, (ii), to find disease-specific biomarker, and (iii) to identify new therapeutic targets. This review aimed at gathering most of the data regarding the proteomic techniques and their applications to osteoarthritis research. It also reported technical limitations and solutions, as for example for sample preparation. Proteomics open wide perspectives in biochemical research but many technical matters still remain to be solved.

  4. Clinical, radiographic and scintigraphic aspects of the trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaziyama, Helena Hideko Seguchi

    1996-01-01

    Trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis occurs mainly in women during the menopausal period. It is related to manual activities and is usually bilateral. The onset is insidious and the evolution is slow and progressive. It is characterized by of strength and pain in the basis of the thumb resulting in limitation of the use and function of the hand. The diagnosis of this condition is based on the physical examination. The manouver of compression axial-rotation of the trapezimetacarpal joint is a common positive finding. Typical findings of osteoarthritis are present in the radiological studies. Scintigraphic images have a predictive value. The early diagnosis is important to avoid the risk factors and to prevent disabilities of the hand. (author)

  5. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Severe Valgus Osteoarthritis Excellent Early Results in a 90-Year-Old Patient with a Valgus Deformity of 47°

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros Ismailidis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Grade III valgus deformity (tibiofemoral alignment > 20° is present in only 0.5% of patients receiving total knee arthroplasty. Furthermore, cases with a valgus deformity exceeding 40° are even rarer. Since they mostly affect elderly, polymorbid patients, successful outcome means a great challenge. We report on a case of a 90-year-old patient with a valgus deformity of 47°. The patient was preoperatively restricted to a wheel chair, unable to walk, and only able to stand for a few seconds. The maximal knee flexion was 100°, and there was an extension deficit of 15°. The WOMAC score was 91; the EQ-5D-5L Index was 0.048. She was treated with a constrained hinged prosthesis. Postoperatively, the axis was 6° valgus. After 3 months of rehabilitation, she was independent using a wheeled walker. The maximal flexion of the knee was 110° and there was no extension deficit. The WOMAC score was 45; the EQ-5D-5L Index was 0.813. This case demonstrates the possibility of a satisfactory result and an improvement in quality of life and mobility with a plausible timetable and with reasonable use of resources even in advanced age and severe valgus deformity.

  6. [Osteoarthritis and fitness to work, a delicate balance to maintain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Coguic, Virginie

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis, in most cases, is not caused by one's occupation. However, its presence and its consequences can limit the fitness to work of the people concerned. Nurses practising in occupational health support employees and help to develop occupational health policies to prevent the consequences of the risk of unfitness following the deterioration in an employee's health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. The genetics and functional analysis of primary osteoarthritis susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Reynard, Louise N.; Loughlin, John

    2013-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association scans (GWASs) along with several adequately powered candidate gene studies have yielded a number of risk alleles for osteoarthritis (OA). This number is now sufficiently large to allow conclusions to be drawn regarding the nature of genetic susceptibility, including the fact that the risk alleles have variable effects depending on sex, ethnicity and on the skeletal site of the disease. Several of the alleles that have emerged from the GWASs are within or close t...

  8. Adipokine hormones and hand osteoarthritis: radiographic severity and pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Massengale

    Full Text Available Obesity's association with hand osteoarthritis cannot be fully explained by mechanical loading. We examined the relationship between adipokines and radiographic hand osteoarthritis severity and pain.In a pilot study of 44 hand osteoarthritis patients (39 women and 5 men, serum adipokine concentrations and hand x-ray Kallman-scores were analyzed using linear regression models. Secondary analyses examined correlates of hand pain.The cohort had a mean age of 63.5 years for women and 72.6 for men; mean (standard deviation Kallman-scores were 43.3(17.4 for women and 46.2(10.8 for men. Mean body-mass-index was 30 kg/m(2 for women and men. Mean leptin concentration was 32.2 ng/ml (women and 18.5 ng/ml (men; mean adiponectin-total was 7.9 ng/ml (women and 5.3 ng/ml (men; mean resistin was 7.3 ng/ml (women and 9.4 ng/ml (men. No association was found between Kallman-scores and adipokine concentrations (R(2 = 0.00-0.04 unadjusted analysis, all p-values>0.22. Secondary analyses showed mean visual-analog-scale pain of 4.8(2.4 for women and 6.6(0.9 for men. Leptin, BMI, and history of coronary artery disease were found to be associated with visual-analog-scale scores for chronic hand pain (R(2 = 0.36 unadjusted analysis, p-values≤0.04.In this pilot study, we found that adipokine serum concentrations were not associated with hand osteoarthritis radiographic severity; the most important correlates of joint damage were age and disease duration. Leptin serum concentration, BMI, and coronary artery disease were associated with the intensity of chronic hand OA pain.

  9. Segmentation of the Knee for Analysis of Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerfass, Peter; Museyko, Oleg; Bousson, Valérie; Laredo, Jean-Denis; Kalender, Willi A.; Engelke, Klaus

    Osteoarthritis changes the load distribution within joints and also changes bone density and structure. Within typical timelines of clinical studies these changes can be very small. Therefore precise definition of evaluation regions which are highly robust and show little to no interand intra-operator variance are essential for high quality quantitative analysis. To achieve this goal we have developed a system for the definition of such regions with minimal user input.

  10. Coping, pain and disability in osteoarthritis: a longitudinal study.

    OpenAIRE

    Dekker, J.; Steultjens, M.P.; Bijlsma, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    This study aimed at establishing the role of coping styles as prospective determinants of pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee or hip. Data were used on 87 patients with OS of the hip and 129 patients with OA of the knee. Coping styles were assessed with a questionnaire, pain was assessed with a VAS, and disability was assessed using an observational method. Regression analysis was used to analyze relationships between the use of active and passive coping style...

  11. Randomized controlled trial of diclofenac sodium gel in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, H Richard; Haselwood, Douglas; Longley, Selden; Gold, Morris S; Altman, Roy D

    2009-12-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have dose-related adverse effects. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may offer local efficacy with low systemic drug levels. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of topical diclofenac sodium 1% gel (DSG) in mild to moderate symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. In a randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled trial, 492 adults aged >or=35 years with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis of >or=6 months' duration were randomized to DSG 4 g (n = 254) or vehicle (n = 238) 4 times daily for 12 weeks. Primary efficacy outcomes at week 12 were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale, WOMAC physical function subscale, and global rating of disease. Secondary outcomes included these outcomes assessed after 1, 4, and 8 weeks, and pain on movement assessed using a 100-mm visual analog scale. All adverse events were recorded. At week 12, the DSG group had significant decreases versus the vehicle group in mean WOMAC pain (P = 0.01), mean WOMAC physical function (P = 0.001), and mean global rating of disease (P < 0.001). Efficacy outcomes significantly favored DSG versus vehicle beginning at week 1. Application site reactions occurred in 5.1% and 2.5% of patients in the DSG and vehicle groups, respectively. The incidence of gastrointestinal disorders was 5.9% with DSG and 5.0% with vehicle. Over a 3-month treatment period, topical treatment with DSG achieved statistically and clinically significant improvements of pain and measures of physical function in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  12. Inhibition of Chondrocyte Hypertrophy of Osteoarthritis by Disruptor Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    generated the disruptor peptides conjugated with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and/or Pen. Primary chondrocytes were treated with 10 M of disruptor...were stained with Safranin-O and Fast green . Arrow indicates cartilage loss. 7 PTHrP-induced PTHR coupling to G protein subunits will be...vitro and protect cartilage damage in a mouse OA model. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Osteoarthritis; Parathyroid hormone-related protein ; PTH receptor; Beta

  13. Mesenchymal stem cell injections improve symptoms of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Yong-Gon; Jo, Seung-Bae; Kwon, Oh-Ryong; Suh, Dong-Suk; Lee, Seung-Woo; Park, Sung-Ho; Choi, Yun-Jin

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and imaging results of patients who received intra-articular injections of autologous mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. The study group comprised 18 patients (6 men and 12 women), among whom the mean age was 54.6 years (range, 41 to 69 years). In each patient the adipose synovium was harvested from the inner side of the infrapatellar fat pad by skin incision extension at the arthroscopic lateral portal site after the patient underwent arthroscopic debridement. After stem cells were isolated, a mean of 1.18 × 10(6) stem cells (range, 0.3 × 10(6) to 2.7 × 10(6) stem cells) were prepared with approximately 3.0 mL of platelet-rich plasma (with a mean of 1.28 × 10(6) platelets per microliter) and injected into the selected knees of patients. Clinical outcome was evaluated with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, the Lysholm score, and the visual analog scale (VAS) for grading knee pain. We also compared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data collected both preoperatively and at the final follow-up. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores decreased significantly (P stem cells injected. The results of our study are encouraging and show that intra-articular injection of infrapatellar fat pad-derived mesenchymal stem cells is effective for reducing pain and improving knee function in patients being treated for knee osteoarthritis. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The truth behind subchondral cysts in osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audrey, Han Xinyun; Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah Bin; Andrew, Tan Hwee Chye

    2014-01-01

    Subchondral cysts have always been taught to be one of the cardinal radiological features of knee osteoarthritis but are not well understood. We aimed to evaluate the radiological prevalence and epidemiology of subchondral cysts in patients with knee osteoarthritis to determine if they are truly a cardinal radiological feature. All patients of a single surgeon with symptoms of knee osteoarthritis were selected for this study. All patients had failed a trial of conservative therapy and were planned for total knee arthroplasty. Patients with symptoms of and documentary evidence of inflammatory arthritis, other neurological and orthopaedic problems causing functional deficits were excluded from this study. A total of 806 plain radiographs were analyzed with the aid of an atlas for the presence of narrowed joint space, osteophytes, subchondral sclerosis and subchondral cysts. The radiological prevalence of each feature was then calculated. Demographics and pre-operative measurements were compared between patients with and without radiological evidence of subchondral cysts. Subchondral cysts were only present in 30.6% of the study population. Narrowed joint space was present in 99.5%, osteophytes in 98.1% and subchondral sclerosis in 88.3% of all radiographs. The differences in prevalence were statistically significant. There was a higher proportion of females in patients with radiological evidence of subchondral cysts. These patients also had a greater varus deformity preoperatively. With a radiological prevalence of 30.6%, subchondral cysts should not be considered a cardinal radiological feature of osteoarthritis. Subchondral cysts may be associated with the female gender and genu varum.

  15. Clinical efficacy of radiation synovectomy in digital joint osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kampen, Willm Uwe; Hellweg, Leif; Massoudi-Nickel, Schirin; Czech, Norbert; Henze, Eberhard [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Kiel (Germany); Brenner, Winfried [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Nuclear Medicine (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    Radiation synovectomy was developed for local treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, the long-term efficacy of radiation synovectomy was retrospectively evaluated in patients with osteoarthritis (activated arthrosis) of the digital joints using an algofunctional score. Fifty-three digital joints in 29 patients (mean age 64.8 years) were treated by intra-articular injection of{sup 169}Er citrate. All joints were painful despite pharmacotherapy and showed an elevated blood pool pattern in a pretherapeutic three-phase bone scan, indicative for local synovitis. The patients were asked to classify their complaints with respect to different daily manual activities on a ten-step pain scale from 1 (total disability) to 10 (lack of any impairment) prior to and after treatment, with a mean follow-up of 41 months. Local signs of osteoarthritis such as joint swelling or pain were additionally evaluated and were scored from progression of complaints to excellent improvement based on patient self-evaluation. All patients reported a pronounced improvement in their manual activities. The mean total score of 4.73{+-}0.58 for all activities prior to treatment increased significantly to 6.79{+-}0.47 after radiation synovectomy (p<0.05). The best results were obtained in the thumb base joints, whereas distal interphalangeal joints were frequently resistant to therapy. Radiation synovectomy is highly effective in digital joint osteoarthritis with concomitant local synovitis. (orig.)

  16. OARSI-FDA initiative: defining the disease state of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, N E; Brandt, K; Hawker, G; Peeva, E; Schreyer, E; Tsuji, W; Hochberg, M C

    2011-05-01

    To respond to a pre-specified set of questions posed by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on defining the disease state to inform the clinical development of drugs, biological products, and medical devices for the prevention and treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). An Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) Disease State working group was established, comprised of representatives from academia and industry. The Working Group met in person and by teleconference on several occasions from the Spring of 2008 through the Autumn of 2009 to develop consensus-based, evidence-informed responses to these questions. A report was presented at a public forum in December 2009 and accepted by the OARSI Board of Directors in the Summer of 2010. An operational definition of OA was developed incorporating current understanding of the condition. The structural changes that characterize OA at the joint level were distinguished from the patients' experience of OA as the 'disease' and 'illness', respectively. Recommendations were made regarding the evaluation of both in future OA clinical trials. The current poor understanding of the phenotypes that characterize OA was identified as an important area for future research. The design and conduct of clinical trials for new OA treatments should address the heterogeneity of the disease, treatment-associated structural changes in target joints and patient-reported outcomes. Copyright © 2011 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Stem cell therapies for treating osteoarthritis: prescient or premature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, Deanne J; Banks, Tania A

    2014-12-01

    There has been unprecedented interest in recent years in the use of stem cells as therapy for an array of diseases in companion animals. Stem cells have already been deployed therapeutically in a number of clinical settings, in particular the use of mesenchymal stem cells to treat osteoarthritis in horses and dogs. However, an assessment of the scientific literature highlights a marked disparity between the purported benefits of stem cell therapies and their proven abilities as defined by rigorously controlled scientific studies. Although preliminary data generated from clinical trials in human patients are encouraging, therapies currently available to treat animals are supported by very limited clinical evidence, and the commercialisation of these treatments may be premature. This review introduces the three main types of stem cells relevant to veterinary applications, namely, embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells, and draws together research findings from in vitro and in vivo studies to give an overview of current stem cell therapies for the treatment of osteoarthritis in animals. Recent advances in tissue engineering, which is proposed as the future direction of stem cell-based therapy for osteoarthritis, are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Osteoarthritis Severity Determination using Self Organizing Map Based Gabor Kernel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anifah, L.; Purnomo, M. H.; Mengko, T. L. R.; Purnama, I. K. E.

    2018-02-01

    The number of osteoarthritis patients in Indonesia is enormous, so early action is needed in order for this disease to be handled. The aim of this paper to determine osteoarthritis severity based on x-ray image template based on gabor kernel. This research is divided into 3 stages, the first step is image processing that is using gabor kernel. The second stage is the learning stage, and the third stage is the testing phase. The image processing stage is by normalizing the image dimension to be template to 50 □ 200 image. Learning stage is done with parameters initial learning rate of 0.5 and the total number of iterations of 1000. The testing stage is performed using the weights generated at the learning stage. The testing phase has been done and the results were obtained. The result shows KL-Grade 0 has an accuracy of 36.21%, accuracy for KL-Grade 2 is 40,52%, while accuracy for KL-Grade 2 and KL-Grade 3 are 15,52%, and 25,86%. The implication of this research is expected that this research as decision support system for medical practitioners in determining KL-Grade on X-ray images of knee osteoarthritis.

  19. Metabolomics as a promising tool for early osteoarthritis diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.B. de Sousa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the main cause of disability worldwide, due to progressive articular cartilage loss and degeneration. According to recent research, OA is more than just a degenerative disease due to some metabolic components associated to its pathogenesis. However, no biomarker has been identified to detect this disease at early stages or to track its development. Metabolomics is an emerging field and has the potential to detect many metabolites in a single spectrum using high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR techniques or mass spectrometry (MS. NMR is a reproducible and reliable non-destructive analytical method. On the other hand, MS has a lower detection limit and is more destructive, but it is more sensitive. NMR and MS are useful for biological fluids, such as urine, blood plasma, serum, or synovial fluid, and have been used for metabolic profiling in dogs, mice, sheep, and humans. Thus, many metabolites have been listed as possibly associated to OA pathogenesis. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the studies in animal models and humans, regarding the use of metabolomics as a tool for early osteoarthritis diagnosis. The concept of osteoarthritis as a metabolic disease and the importance of detecting a biomarker for its early diagnosis are highlighted. Then, some studies in plasma and synovial tissues are shown, and finally the application of metabolomics in the evaluation of synovial fluid is described.

  20. Clinical efficacy of radiation synovectomy in digital joint osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kampen, Willm Uwe; Hellweg, Leif; Massoudi-Nickel, Schirin; Czech, Norbert; Henze, Eberhard; Brenner, Winfried

    2005-01-01

    Radiation synovectomy was developed for local treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, the long-term efficacy of radiation synovectomy was retrospectively evaluated in patients with osteoarthritis (activated arthrosis) of the digital joints using an algofunctional score. Fifty-three digital joints in 29 patients (mean age 64.8 years) were treated by intra-articular injection of 169 Er citrate. All joints were painful despite pharmacotherapy and showed an elevated blood pool pattern in a pretherapeutic three-phase bone scan, indicative for local synovitis. The patients were asked to classify their complaints with respect to different daily manual activities on a ten-step pain scale from 1 (total disability) to 10 (lack of any impairment) prior to and after treatment, with a mean follow-up of 41 months. Local signs of osteoarthritis such as joint swelling or pain were additionally evaluated and were scored from progression of complaints to excellent improvement based on patient self-evaluation. All patients reported a pronounced improvement in their manual activities. The mean total score of 4.73±0.58 for all activities prior to treatment increased significantly to 6.79±0.47 after radiation synovectomy (p<0.05). The best results were obtained in the thumb base joints, whereas distal interphalangeal joints were frequently resistant to therapy. Radiation synovectomy is highly effective in digital joint osteoarthritis with concomitant local synovitis. (orig.)

  1. Rapidly destructive osteoarthritis of the hip joint: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMurtrie A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip is a rare and incompletely understood disorder with scarce literature about variations in natural history within a population. Methods A series of cases from North Wales with rapid progressive joint destruction and extensive subchondral bone loss in the femoral head and acetabulum are presented. Radiographic findings mimicked those of other disorders such as septic arthritis, rheumatoid and seronegative arthritis, primary osteonecrosis with secondary osteoarthritis, or neuropathic osteoarthropathy, but none of the patients had clinical, pathologic, or laboratory evidence of these entities. Results Rapid progression of hip pain and disability was a consistent clinical feature. The average duration of symptoms was 1.4 years. Radiographs obtained at various intervals before surgery (average 14 months in 18 patients documented rapid hip destruction, involvement being unilateral in 13 cases. All patients underwent total hip arthroplasty, and osteoarthritis was confirmed at pathologic examination. Conclusion The authors postulate that these cases represent an uncommon subset of osteoarthritis and regular review, both clinically and radiologically, are required to assess speed of progression and prevent rapid loss of bone stock without the surgeon being aware. These cases are unsuitable for being placed on long waiting list due to technical difficulties in delayed surgery and compromised outcome following surgery.

  2. Rapidly destructive osteoarthritis of the hip joint: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Sameer; Batra, Meenakshi; McMurtrie, A; Sinha, A K

    2008-01-11

    Rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip is a rare and incompletely understood disorder with scarce literature about variations in natural history within a population. A series of cases from North Wales with rapid progressive joint destruction and extensive subchondral bone loss in the femoral head and acetabulum are presented. Radiographic findings mimicked those of other disorders such as septic arthritis, rheumatoid and seronegative arthritis, primary osteonecrosis with secondary osteoarthritis, or neuropathic osteoarthropathy, but none of the patients had clinical, pathologic, or laboratory evidence of these entities. Rapid progression of hip pain and disability was a consistent clinical feature. The average duration of symptoms was 1.4 years. Radiographs obtained at various intervals before surgery (average 14 months) in 18 patients documented rapid hip destruction, involvement being unilateral in 13 cases. All patients underwent total hip arthroplasty, and osteoarthritis was confirmed at pathologic examination. The authors postulate that these cases represent an uncommon subset of osteoarthritis and regular review, both clinically and radiologically, are required to assess speed of progression and prevent rapid loss of bone stock without the surgeon being aware. These cases are unsuitable for being placed on long waiting list due to technical difficulties in delayed surgery and compromised outcome following surgery.

  3. [Platelet-rich plasma in knee osteoarthritis treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simental-Mendía, Mario Alberto; Vílchez-Cavazos, José Félix; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    The biological changes that commonly cause degenerative articular cartilage injuries in the knee are primarily associated to misalignment of the joint and metabolic changes related to age, as occurs in osteoarthritis. Furthermore, the capacity for cartilage self-regeneration is quite limited due to the lack of vascularity of the tissue. To date there is no ideal treatment capable to stimulate cartilage regeneration; thus there is a need to seek alternative therapies for the treatment of such conditions. The number of publications demonstrating the therapeutic and regenerative benefits of using platelet-rich plasma as a treatment for knee osteoarthritis has been increasing in recent years. In spite of encouraging results, there are still only a few randomised control studies with strong clinical evidence, lacking clarity on points such as the optimum formulation or the mechanism of action of platelet-rich plasma. Up to this point and based on the results of clinical studies, not all patients can benefit from this therapy. It is important to consider aspects such as the age and grade of cartilage degeneration. The aim of the present paper is to review the recent scientific literature on the treatment of knee osteoarthritis with platelet-rich plasma, and the biological bases of this therapy, as well as presenting the current opinion on this subject. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of gait performance of knee osteoarthritis patients after total knee arthroplasty with different assistive devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Tereso

    Full Text Available IntroductionNowadays Knee Osteoarthritis (KOA affects a large percentage of the elderly, and one solution is to perform a Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA. In this paper, one intends to study the gait and posture of these patients after the TKA, while walking with three assistive devices (ADs (crutches, standard walker (SW and rollator with forearm supports (RFS.MethodsEleven patients were evaluated in 2 phases: 5 days and 15 days after surgery. This evaluation was conducted with two inertial sensors, one attached to the operated leg ankle, to measure spatiotemporal parameters, and the other at the sacrum, to measure posture and fall risk-related parameters. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA with repeated measures was performed to detect group differences.ResultsThe MANOVA results show that all spatiotemporal parameters are significantly different (p0.05. The interaction between time and ADs only affects significantly the velocity (p<0.05. In terms of fall risk parameters, time only significantly affects the antero-posterior direction (p<0.05 and ADs affects significantly root mean square in medio-lateral direction (p<0.05. In terms of interaction between time and ADs, there are no statistical significant differences.ConclusionThis study concludes that depending on the state of recovery of the patient, different ADs should be prescribed. On the overall, standard walker is good to give stability to the patient and RFS allows the patient to present a gait pattern closer to a natural gait.

  5. Case definitions of knee osteoarthritis in 4,151 unselected subjects: relevance for epidemiological studies. The Copenhagen osteoarthritis study

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    Laxafoss, Erling; Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper K.; Sonne-Holm, Stig [Copenhagen University Hospital of Hvidovre (Denmark). Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

    2010-09-15

    The aims of the present study were threefold: to examine the distribution of knee joint osteoarthritis in a large, standardized radiological study; to examine the relationships between self reported knee pain and radiological OA; and to examine the natural history of radio-morphological change over age in individuals without radiological features of OA. The Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study - COS is a substudy of the Copenhagen City Heart Study, a longitudinal regional health survey. From the third inclusion of the CCHS (1992-1994) 4,151 subjects were selected for subsequent standardized radiography of the pelvis, the knees, the hands, the wrists, and the lumbar spine. Images were analyzed and knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) was classified according to the radiographic atlas of Kellgren and Lawrence. Joint space width (JSW) was measured at three sites within both the medial and the lateral compartment. For the entire cohort the prevalence of radiological knee joint OA of all grades was 38.7% for men and 44.2% for women. Age stratification documented increasing knee joint OA both in regard to prevalence and morphological severity. Knee pain was universally correlated to the Kellgren and Lawrence severity of OA. In a subgroup with no features of radiological OA, a significant and linear decline in JSW with increasing age was found. We found a clear relationship between self-reported knee pain and radiological osteoarthritis. Pain was proportionally related to the severity of change. We also demonstrated a significant diminishing of joint space width with increasing age in individuals without apparent radiological degeneration. (orig.)

  6. Prevalence and pattern of knee osteoarthritis in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Muiruri

    knee OA and their health-care seeking behaviour. Design: Cross ... in the elderly (1). It is a leading cause of disability, little could be done. Therefore, people with 0A in this affecting 60-70% of the population older than 60 years. category may elude ..... refused in some households for fear of being screened for Human ...

  7. Clinical and Radiographic Features of Knee Osteoarthritis of Elderly Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahli, Hana; Tekaya, Aicha Ben; Daas, Selim; Mahmoud, Ines; Tekaya, Rawdha

    2017-04-25

    Knee osteoarthritis is a common pathology, characterized by a prevalence that increases with age. Absence of anatomo-clinical correlation its management complex, particularly in a geriatric setting where it is not well studied. The aim of the present study is to investigate the epidemio-clinical profile, functional impairment and radiographic features of knee osteoarthritis in the old patients versus younger patients (<65 years). Cross-sectional study including patients who were monitored for 6 months at a rheumatology department for knee osteoarthritis. Epidemio-clinical, anthropometric and radiographic data were gathered. A comparison was made of these various characteristics between patients of over 65 years of age (group1; n=56) and those under 65 (group2; n=56). The mean age of the group1's patients was 71±5 with a clear feminine predominance. Comorbidity was observed in two thirds of cases. More than half of them were overweight. Gonalgia had been evolving for approximately 8.4±9.2 years and was bilateral in 82.6% of the cases and of mechanical type in 94.6% of the cases. The patients experienced an average pain scale of 65.2mm. Pain had an anterior site in major of cases. An axial deviation of the lower limbs were observed in 60.7% of the cases and a limited mobility of the knees in 48.2% of the cases. The mean value of Lequesne index was 11.02±4.8. The walking distance was not limited in 37.5% of the cases. Radiographically, knee osteoarthritis was bilateral in all cases and stage4 was observed 50% of the cases. Comparative study showed that elderly patients had a smaller waist size (p=0.003), a longer course of gonalgia (p<0.0001), a widespread site of pain (p=0.004), and a more frequent limitation of walking distance (p<0.0001) as well as more axial deviation (p<0.0001) and joint mobility limitation (p=0.005). Gonalgia manifesting during rest was more frequent in elderly patients (p=0.001). In addition, impaired functioning (p=0.001) and the stage of

  8. Understanding knee osteoarthritis from the patients' perspective: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Terés, Victoria; Moix-Queraltó, Jenny; Pujol-Ribera, Enriqueta; Lumillo-Gutiérrez, Iris; Mas, Xavier; Batlle-Gualda, Enrique; Gobbo-Montoya, Milena; Jodar-Fernández, Lina; Berenguera, Anna

    2017-05-30

    No studies of Health Coach Interventions for knee OA sufferers that include patients' perspectives have been published. The study assesses current clinical practice and primary care professionals' advice from the patients' perspective, in order to obtain a participative design for a complex intervention based on coaching psychology. Moreover, wants to analyse the experiences, perceptions, cognitive evaluation, values, emotions, beliefs and coping strategies of patients with knee osteoarthritis, and secondly the impact of these factors in the Self-management of this condition. It is an interpretative qualitative study. The study included patients with diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis (OA) from 4 primary health care centres in Barcelona. A theoretical sampling based on a prior definition of participants' characteristics was carried out. Ten semi-structured interviews with knee OA patients were carried out. A content thematic analysis was performed following a mixed-strategy text codification in Lazarus framework and in emerging codes from the data. The results are structured in two blocks: Experiences and perceptions of informants and Experiences of knee osteoarthritis according to the Lazarus model. Regarding experiences and perceptions of informants: Some participants reported that the information was mostly provided by health professionals. Informants know which food they should eat to lose weight and the benefits of weight loss. Moreover, participants explained that they like walking but that sometimes it is difficult to put into practice. Regarding experiences of knee osteoarthritis according Lazarus model: Cognitive evaluation is influenced by cognitive distortions such as obligation, guilt, dramatization and catastrophism. Family is the value most associated with wellbeing. Helping others is another recurring value. Emotions: Most participants explain that they feel anxiety, irritability or sadness. Beliefs: To some, physiotherapy helps them feel less pain

  9. Body mass index and progressive hand osteoarthritis: data from the Oslo hand osteoarthritis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, K; Slatkowsky-Christensen, B; van der Heijde, D; Kvien, T K; Hagen, K B; Haugen, I K

    2015-01-01

    Few longitudinal studies have studied the association between body mass index (BMI) and hand osteoarthritis (OA). We aimed to explore the association between BMI and progressive hand OA in a longitudinal study of the Oslo hand OA cohort. Participants with existing hand OA had hand radiographs and BMI data taken at baseline and 7-year follow-up (n = 103). The radiographs were read according to the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) scale. First, we examined the association between baseline BMI and incident OA (KL grade ≥ 2) in joints without OA at baseline (adjusted for age and sex) using generalized estimating equation (GEE) analyses. Second, we examined whether changes in BMI from baseline to follow-up were associated with increasing KL sum score from baseline to follow-up using linear regression. We repeated the analyses using changes in number of joints with symptomatic OA and patient-reported pain and physical function as the outcome. The mean (SD) age at baseline was 61.6 (5.6) years and 91 (94%) of the cohort were women. The mean (SD) BMI was 25.7 (4.0) kg/m(2) at baseline and the mean (SD) BMI change was 1.1 (2.0) kg/m(2). There was no relationship between baseline BMI and development of more joints with OA during follow-up. Similarly, there was no association between change in BMI and hand OA progression, increasing hand pain or disability. In the Oslo hand OA cohort, higher BMI was not related to hand OA progression.

  10. Quantitative measures of meniscus extrusion predict incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis – data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, K.; Quinn, E.; Niu, J.; Guermazi, A.; Roemer, F.; Wirth, W.; Eckstein, F.; Felson, D.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective To test the hypothesis that quantitative measures of meniscus extrusion predict incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis (KOA), prior to the advent of radiographic disease. Methods 206 knees with incident radiographic KOA (Kellgren Lawrence Grade (KLG) 0 or 1 at baseline, developing KLG 2 or greater with a definite osteophyte and joint space narrowing (JSN) grade ≥1 by year 4) were matched to 232 control knees not developing incident KOA. Manual segmentation of the central five slices of the medial and lateral meniscus was performed on coronal 3T DESS MRI and quantitative meniscus position was determined. Cases and controls were compared using conditional logistic regression adjusting for age, sex, BMI, race and clinical site. Sensitivity analyses of early (year [Y] 1/2) and late (Y3/4) incidence was performed. Results Mean medial extrusion distance was significantly greater for incident compared to non-incident knees (1.56 mean ± 1.12 mm SD vs 1.29 ± 0.99 mm; +21%, P meniscus (25.8 ± 15.8% vs 22.0 ± 13.5%; +17%, P meniscus in incident medial KOA, or for the tibial plateau coverage between incident and non-incident knees. Restricting the analysis to medial incident KOA at Y1/2 differences were attenuated, but reached significance for extrusion distance, whereas no significant differences were observed at incident KOA in Y3/4. Conclusion Greater medial meniscus extrusion predicts incident radiographic KOA. Early onset KOA showed greater differences for meniscus position between incident and non-incident knees than late onset KOA. PMID:26318658

  11. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC in Persian Speaking Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H Ebrahimzadeh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis of the knee is the most common chronic joint disease that involves middle aged and elderly persons. There are different clinical instruments to quantify the health status of patients with knee osteoarthritis and one example is the WOMAC score that has been translated and adapted into different languages. The purpose of this study was cultural adaptation, validation and reliability testing of the Persian version of the WOMAC index in Iranians with knee osteoarthritis.   Methods: We translated the original WOMAC questionnaire into Persian by the forward and backward technique, and then its psychometric study was done on 169 native Persian speaking patients with knee degenerative joint disease. Mean age of patients was 53.9 years. The SF-36 and KOOS were used to assess construct validity. Results: Reliability testing resulted in a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.917, showing the internal consistency of the questionnaire to be a reliable tool. Inter-correlation matrix among different scales of the Persian WOMAC index yielded a highly significant correlation between all subscales including stiffness, pain, and physical function. In terms of validity, Pearson`s correlation coefficient was significant between three domains of the WOMAC with PF, RP, BP, GH, VT, and PCS dimensions of the SF-36 health survey (P

  12. Omega3 Fatty Acids Intake Versus Diclofenac in Osteoarthritis Induced in Experimental rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed M. El-Seweidy

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background:Osteoarthritis(OAis a degenerative joint disease, characterized by abnormal remodeling pattern of joints driven by inflammatory mediators within the affected joints. Its symptoms are many like pain, stiffness,and decreased function. Objective:The present study mainly focused on the anti-inflammatory effect of omega 3 fatty acids (F.As versus diclofenac, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug in OA induced in rats Design: Intraarticular injection of monosodiumiodoacetate(MIA 24.6 mg/kg in 0.6 ml saline was used to induce OA. Diclofenac and omega-3 F. These were administered orally, daily for 21 days and after 24 hours of OA induction.Results:Osteoarthritis induction resulted in an increase in serum levels of IL-6(479.5%,TNF-α(545.5%, and CRP(754.2% along with IL-10 level decrease(70.3% as compared to normal group. Diclofenac intake demonstrated significant increase of IL-6 (24.9%,CRP (88.6%,and TNF-α(25.2% compared to the OA control group. Omega 3 FAs intake showed significant reduction in inflammatory markers along with IL-10 increase, in comparison toOA group.Both treatment demonstrated a significant increase in TIMP2 along with decreased MMP2 and MPO in comparison with OA control.Positive correlation of IL-6 with MPO(r = 0.7,P=0.002, and negative one with IL-10(r = 0.9,p<0.0001 and TIMP2 (r = -0.5,p<0.008 was observed.Interleukin-10 was negatively correlated with MMP2(r = -0.5, p<0.007 and MPO (r=-0.8,p<0.0001.Conclusion:Data derived from biochemical and histopathological results, indicated that omega3 FAs may be expressed as a natural anti-inflammatory agent of a significant potential in OA with evident remarkable effect.

  13. A gain of function mutation in TNFRSF11B encoding osteoprotegerin causes osteoarthritis with chondrocalcinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Yolande F M; Bos, Steffan D; van der Breggen, Ruud; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Ye, Kai; Lameijer, Eric-Wubbo E M W; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Slagboom, P Eline; Meulenbelt, Ingrid

    2015-09-01

    To identify pathogenic mutations that reveal underlying biological mechanisms driving osteoarthritis (OA). Exome sequencing was applied to two distant family members with dominantly inherited early onset primary OA at multiple joint sites with chondrocalcinosis (familial generalised osteoarthritis, FOA). Confirmation of mutations occurred by genotyping and linkage analyses across the extended family. The functional effect of the mutation was investigated by means of a cell-based assay. To explore generalisability, mRNA expression analysis of the relevant genes in the discovered pathway was explored in preserved and osteoarthritic articular cartilage of independent patients undergoing joint replacement surgery. We identified a heterozygous, probably damaging, read-through mutation (c.1205A=>T; p.Stop402Leu) in TNFRSF11B encoding osteoprotegerin that is likely causal to the OA phenotype in the extended family. In a bone resorption assay, the mutant form of osteoprotegerin showed enhanced capacity to inhibit osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Expression analyses in preserved and affected articular cartilage of independent OA patients showed that upregulation of TNFRSF11B is a general phenomenon in the pathophysiological process. Albeit that the role of the molecular pathway of osteoprotegerin has been studied in OA, we are the first to demonstrate that enhanced osteoprotegerin function could be a directly underlying cause. We advocate that agents counteracting the function of osteoprotegerin could comply with new therapeutic interventions of OA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Molecular Links Between Diabetes and Osteoarthritis: The Role of Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Flavia Concetta; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Imbesi, Rosa; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Loreto, Carla; Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and osteoarthritis (OA) are two of the most relevant and common chronic diseases affecting older people. Both DM and OA are considered metabolic diseases due to their high correlation with the capacity of the body to metabolize some nutritive substances such as glucose, fat, vitamins and also the response to oxidative molecules. We searched PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, and authors' bibliographies in order to extract articles regarding the relationship between DM and OA. The main purpose of this review is to investigate the molecules involved in the onset and progression of both DM and OA and the beneficial role of physical activity. The main focus is on the importance of glucose metabolism and its derivatives in the pathogenesis of OA and DM. Advanced glycation end-product (AGEs), sorbitol and diacylglycerol (DAG) are glucose derivatives which promote the activation of several pathways, most of them involved in the activation of inflammatory processes. The possible link between DM and OA is represented by the inflammatory process deriving from the increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, we investigated the biological mechanisms and the clinical findings that confirm a beneficial effect of physical activity in both DM and OA. Thus a tailored and adapted physical activity can be used in the treatment of both diseases as a part of a correct and healthy lifestyle. For this reason we strongly suggest the scientific community to introduce mild physical activity as part of our lifestyle to prevent metabolism diseases and osteoarthritis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Nocturnal knee pain increases with the severity of knee osteoarthritis, disturbing patient sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Eiji; Tsuda, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Yuji; Maeda, Shugo; Inoue, Ryo; Chiba, Daisuke; Okubo, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Ippei; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Ishibashi, Yasuyuki

    2014-07-01

    Sleep disturbances frequently accompany chronic pain from osteoarthritis (OA). Effective management of sleep disturbances may require successful treatment of chronic pain, a key factor in the clinical evaluation of knee OA. However, the relationship between the severity of knee OA and sleep quality is unclear. Our purpose was to correlate the prevalence of nocturnal knee pain with different OA severity levels and to determine its influence on sleep quality. Subjects included 1,214 local volunteers with mean ± SD age 58.1 ± 13.0 years. The existence and severity of knee OA were determined by the Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) grade, and joint space widths were measured. The presence of nocturnal knee pain and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Scores (KOOS) were assessed by self-completed questionnaires. Sleep quality was evaluated by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Knee-related factors affecting sleep quality were detected using statistical methods. The prevalence of nocturnal knee pain was 3.6%, 6.9%, 19.4%, 32.7%, and 75.0% in K/L grades 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Also, prevalence significantly increased with OA severity (P Sleep problems also increased with K/L grade (P = 0.038), and KOOS quality of life (QOL) was significantly lower in those with OA and sleep problems. Logistic regression showed that sleep problems were related to joint space narrowing (P = 0.016) and nocturnal knee pain (P = 0.039). Severe OA also disturbed onset and maintenance of sleep. The prevalence of nocturnal knee pain and sleep problems increased with the severity of OA, impacting QOL. These results suggest the necessity of appropriate nocturnal pain control. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  16. The effect of exercise therapy on knee osteoarthritis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejati, Parisa; Farzinmehr, Azizeh; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar

    2015-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common musculoskeletal disease among old individuals which affects ability for sitting on the chair, standing, walking and climbing stairs. Our objective was to investigate the short and long-term effects of the most simple and the least expensive exercise protocols in combination to conventional conservative therapy for knee OA. It was a single blind RCT study with a 12-months follow-up. Totally, 56 patients with knee OA were assigned into 2 random groups. The patients in exercise group received exercise for knee muscles in combination with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and 10 sessions acupuncture and physiotherapy modalities. Non-exercise group received similar treatments except exercise program. The changes in patients' pain and functional status were evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS), knee and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) questionnaire and functional tests (4 steps, 5 sit up, and 6 min walk test) before and after treatment (1 and 3 months after intervention), and 1 year later at the follow-up. The results showed that the patients with knee OA in exercise group had significant improvement in pain, disability, walking, stair climbing, and sit up speed after treatment at first and second follow-up when compared with their initial status and when compared with non-exercise group. At third follow up (1 year later) there was significant difference between groups in VAS and in three items of KOOS questionnaire in functional status. Non aerobic exercises for muscles around knee can augment the effect of other therapeutic interventions like medical therapy, acupuncture, and modalities for knee OA.

  17. Structural and Anatomic Restoration of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Is Associated With Less Cartilage Damage 1 Year After Surgery: Healing Ligament Properties Affect Cartilage Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiapour, Ata M.; Fleming, Braden C.; Murray, Martha M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Abnormal joint motion has been linked to joint arthrosis after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, the relationships between the graft properties (ie, structural and anatomic) and extent of posttraumatic osteoarthritis are not well defined. Hypotheses: (1) The structural (tensile) and anatomic (area and alignment) properties of the reconstructed graft or repaired ACL correlate with the total cartilage lesion area 1 year after ACL surgery, and (2) side-to-side differences in anterior-posterior (AP) knee laxity correlate with the total cartilage lesion area 1 year postoperatively. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Sixteen minipigs underwent unilateral ACL transection and were randomly treated with ACL reconstruction or bridge-enhanced ACL repair. The tensile properties, cross-sectional area, and multiplanar alignment of the healing ACL or graft, AP knee laxity, and cartilage lesion areas were assessed 1 year after surgery. Results: In the reconstructed group, the normalized graft yield and maximum failure loads, cross-sectional area, sagittal and coronal elevation angles, and side-to-side differences in AP knee laxity at 60° of flexion were associated with the total cartilage lesion area 1 year after surgery (R 2 > 0.5, P 0.5, P ligament or graft and AP laxity values were closer to those of the contralateral ACL-intact knee. Reconstructed grafts had a significantly larger normalized cross-sectional area and sagittal elevation angle (more vertical) when compared with repaired ACLs (P < .02). Conclusion: The tensile properties, cross-sectional area, and multiplanar alignment of the healing ACLs or grafts and AP knee laxity in reconstructed knees were associated with the extent of tibiofemoral cartilage damage after ACL surgery. Clinical Relevance: These data highlight the need for novel ACL injury treatments that can restore the structural and anatomic properties of the torn ACL to those of the native ACL in an

  18. Infrapatellar fat pad-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from osteoarthritis patients: In vitro genetic stability and replicative senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Simona; Guidotti, Serena; Lilli, Nicoletta Libera; Cattini, Luca; Mariani, Erminia

    2017-05-01

    Different sources of mesenchymal stromal cells can be considered for regenerative medicine applications. Here we analyzed human adipose-derived stromal cells from infrapatellar fat pad (IFPSC) of osteoarthritis patients, representing a very interesting candidate for cartilage regeneration. No data are available concerning IFPSC stability after in vitro expansion. Indeed, replicative potential and multipotency progressively decrease during culture passages while DNA damage and cell senescence increase, thus possibly affecting clinical applications. To investigate whether in vitro expansion influences the genetic stability and replicative senescence of IFPSC, we performed long-term cultures and comparatively analyzed cells at different culture passages. Stromal vascular fraction was harvested from infrapatellar fat pad of 11 osteoarthritis patients undergoing knee replacement surgery. Cell recovery, growth kinetics, surface marker profile, and differentiation ability in inductive culture conditions were recorded. Genetic integrity maintenance was estimated by microsatellite instability analysis and mismatch repair gene expression, whereas telomere length and telomerase activity were assessed to evaluate replicative senescence. Anchorage-dependent growth was tested by soft agar culture. IFPSC displayed a phenotype similar to mesenchymal stromal cells from subcutaneous fat and showed differentiation ability. No microsatellite instability was documented even at advanced culture times in accordance to a sustained expression of mismatch repair genes, thus highlighting stability of short repeated sequences in the genome. No significant telomere attrition nor telomerase activity were documented during culture and cells did not lose anchorage-dependent growth ability. The presented data support the suitability and safety of in vitro expanded IFPSC from osteoarthritis patients for applications in regenerative medicine approaches. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society

  19. Group education and exercise is feasible in knee and hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren Thorgaard; Odgaard, Anders; Rasmussen, Jens Ole

    2012-01-01

    Clinical practice does not reflect current clinical guidelines recommending an early multimodal non-surgical treatment for knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of such an initiative (Good Life with osteoArthritis in Denmark (GLA:D) in persons ...

  20. Dietary intake of fiber and risk of knee osteoarthritis in two U.S. prospective cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: Dietary fiber reduces body weight and inflammation both of which are linked with knee osteoarthritis (OA). We examined the association between fiber intake and risk of knee OA. Methods: We used data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) of 4796 participants and Framingham Offspring Os...

  1. Structural joint changes, malalignment, and laxity in osteoarthritis of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Esch, M.; Steultjens, M.; Wieringa, H.; Dinant, H.; Dekker, J.

    2005-01-01

    To assess the relationship between (i) structural joint changes (i.e. joint space narrowing and osteophyte formation) and laxity and (ii) joint malalignment and laxity in osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. A cross-sectional study was carried out on 35 outpatients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

  2. Knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis: the effect of self-reported instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Robinson, Megan E.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Tashman, Scott; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis has been previously associated with a stereotypical knee-stiffening gait pattern and reduced knee joint motion variability due to increased antagonist muscle co-contractions and smaller utilized arc of motion during gait. However, episodic self-reported instability may be a sign of excessive motion variability for a large subgroup of patients with knee osteoarthritis. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in knee joint motion variability during gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis with and without self-reported instability compared to a control group of older adults with asymptomatic knees. Methods Forty-three subjects, 8 with knee osteoarthritis but no reports of instability (stable), 11 with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported instability (unstable), and 24 without knee osteoarthritis or instability (control) underwent Dynamic Stereo X-ray analysis during a decline gait task on a treadmill. Knee motion variability was assessed using parametric phase plots during the loading response phase of decline gait. Findings The stable group demonstrated decreased sagittal-plane motion variability compared to the control group (p=0.04), while the unstable group demonstrated increased sagittal-plane motion variability compared to the control (p=0.003) and stable groups (pknee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis without self-reported instability supports previous research. However, presence of self-reported instability is associated with increased knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis and warrants further investigation. PMID:25796536

  3. Recommendations for standardization and phenotype definitions in genetic studies of osteoarthritis: The TREAT-OA consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Kerkhof (Hanneke); I. Meulenbelt (Ingrid); T. Akune (Toru); N.K. Arden (Nigel); A. Aromaa (Arpo); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); C. Cooper (Charles); J. Dai; M. Doherty (Michael); S. Doherty (Sally); D. Felson; A. Gonzalez (Antonio); A. Gordon; A. Harilainen (Arsi); D.J. Hart; V.B. Hauksson (Valdimar); M. Heliovaara (Markku); A. Hofman (Albert); S. Ikegawa; T. Ingvarsson (Torvaldur); Q. Jiang; H. Jonsson; I. Jonsdottir (Ingileif); H. Kawaguchi; M. Kloppenburg (Margreet); U.M. Kujala (Urho); N.E. Lane; P. Leino-Arjas (Päivi I.); L.S. Lohmander (Stefan); F.P. Luyten (Frank); K.N. Malizos (Konstantinos); M. Nakajima; M.C. Nevitt (Michael); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); D. Shi; E. Slagboom (Eline); T.D. Spector (Timothy); K. Stefansson (Kari); A. Sudo (Akihiro); A. Tamm; A.E. Tamm (Aile); A. Tsezou (Aspasia); A. Uchida; A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.M. Wilkinson (Mark); N. Yoshimura; A.M. Valdes (Ana Maria); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); A.J. Carr (Andrew Jonathan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To address the need for standardization of osteoarthritis (OA) phenotypes by examining the effect of heterogeneity among symptomatic (SOA) and radiographic osteoarthritis (ROA) phenotypes. Methods: Descriptions of OA phenotypes of the 28 studies involved in the TREAT-OA

  4. Identification of DIO2 as a new susceptibility locus for symptomatic osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Meulenbelt (Ingrid); J. Min (Josine); S.D. Bos (Steffan); N. Riyazi (Naghmeh); J.J. Houwing-Duistermaat (Jeanine); H.J. van der Wijk; H.M. Kroon (Herman); M. Nakajima; S. Ikegawa (Shiro); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); W.M. van der Deure (Wendy); T.J. Visser (Theo); A.B. Seymour (Albert); N. Lakenberg (Nico); R. van der Breggen (Ruud); D. Kremer (Dennis); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); M. Kloppenburg (Margreet); J. Loughlin (John); P.E. Slagboom (Eline)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractOsteoarthritis [MIM 165720] is a common late-onset articular joint disease for which no pharmaceutical intervention is available to attenuate the cartilage degeneration. To identify a new osteoarthritis susceptibility locus, a genome-wide linkage scan and combined linkage association

  5. Combining valgus knee brace and lateral foot wedges reduces external forces and moments in osteoarthritis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jafarnezhadgero, Amir Ali; Oliveira, Anderson S.; Mousavi, Seyed Hamed; Madadi-Shad, Morteza

    Osteoarthritis progression can be related to the external knee adduction and flexion moments during walking. Lateral foot wedges and knee braces have been used as treatment for osteoarthritis, but little is known about their influence on knee joint moments generated in the sagittal and frontal

  6. Clinical research on abdominal acupuncture plus conventional acupuncture for knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Chang-rong; Fan, Li; Fu, Wen-bin

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To probe the therapeutic effect of abdominal acupuncture plus conventional acupuncture on knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: PEMS3.1 software was used. The 105 patients with knee osteoarthritis were randomly divided into an abdominal acupuncture group, a conventional acupuncture group and a...

  7. The association between obesity and functioning of patients with osteoarthritis of hip or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhof, C.; Pisters, M.F.; Dekker, J.; Bakker, D.H. de

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the association between obesity and functioning of patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. Relevance: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common joint disorder, which has a major impact on functioning in daily life. OA accounts for more disability among the elderly than any other

  8. Multi directional intertrochanteric osteotomy for primary and secondary osteoarthritis--results after 15 to 29 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkamp, D.; Eijer, H.; Patt, T. W.; Marti, R. K.

    2006-01-01

    Between 1974 and 1987, 276 intertrochanteric osteotomies were performed in 217 patients. In 48 hips the osteotomy was done for idiopathic osteoarthritis. In 166 hips the osteoarthritis was secondary to acetabular dysplasia, in 23 to trauma, in 14 to slipped capital femoral epiphysis, in five to

  9. Exercise induced effects on muscle function and range of motion in patients with hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bieler, Theresa; Siersma, Volkert; Magnusson, S Peter

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patients with hip osteoarthritis have impairments in muscle function (muscle strength and power) and hip range of motion (ROM), and it is commonly believed that effective clinical management of osteoarthritis should address these impairments to reduce pain and disability. ...

  10. aging and incidence of osteoarthritis of knee joint, lumber and cerv

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MYSELF

    SUMMARY. It has been observed that the most frequently reported disorder of the elderly is osteoarthritis associated with ageing. The elderly thus tend to use health services more often. This study examined the incidence, age and gender distribution of osteoarthritis of the knee joint, lumbar and cervical spine among the ...

  11. Do metabolic factors add to the effect of overweight on hand osteoarthritis? The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Dahaghin; S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); B.W. Koes (Bart); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); H.A.P. Pols (Huib)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: As hand joints are non-weight bearing, the association between overweight and hand osteoarthritis (HOA) is critical to understanding how overweight may associate with osteoarthritis (OA) apart from axial load. Overweight might be associated with the occurrence of OA through

  12. Iterative Development and Reliability of the OMERACT Hand Osteoarthritis MRI Scoring System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugen, Ida K; Østergaard, Mikkel; Eshed, Iris

    2014-01-01

    To develop and test the interreader reliability of the OMERACT Hand Osteoarthritis Magnetic Resonance Scoring System (HOAMRIS) for assessment of structural and inflammatory hand OA features in the interphalangeal joints.......To develop and test the interreader reliability of the OMERACT Hand Osteoarthritis Magnetic Resonance Scoring System (HOAMRIS) for assessment of structural and inflammatory hand OA features in the interphalangeal joints....

  13. Efficacy of a single ultrasound-guided injection for the treatment of hip osteoarthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Atchia, Ismaël

    2011-01-01

    Intra-articular injection is effective for osteoarthritis, but the best single injection strategy is not known, nor are there established predictors of response. The objectives of this study were to assess and predict response to a single ultrasound-guided injection in moderate to severe hip osteoarthritis.

  14. Hip disability and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS)--validity and responsiveness in total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsdotter, Anna K; Lohmander, L Stefan; Klässbo, Maria

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate if physical functions usually associated with a younger population were of importance for an older population, and to construct an outcome measure for hip osteoarthritis with improved responsiveness compared to the Western Ontario McMaster osteoarthritis score...

  15. Investigation of depression, anxiety and quality of life in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Alyne Hevellen; Godoy, Priscilla Brandi Gomes; Oliveira, Nara Rejane Cruz de; Diniz, Roger Amorim Santos; Diniz, Ricardo Edésio Amorim Santos; Padovani, Ricardo da Costa; Silva, Regina Cláudia Barbosa da

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) affects the articular cartilage and subchondral bone, compromising the joint as a whole. The knee joint is characterized as one of the main sites of involvement of OA and the most significant risk factors for developing the disease are aging, overweight and female gender. OA is considered one of the most frequent causes of disability, which may affect the quality of life of the patients, favoring the onset of mental disorders. To investigate whether anxiety and depression symptoms are more significant in women with OA, when compared with women without this diagnosis, and to what extent this rheumatic disease affects the quality of life of these patients. The study included 75 women, mean age 67 years; 40 were diagnosed with knee OA and 35 without this diagnosis. The following instruments were used: State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and SF-36, a quality of life questionnaire. Women with knee OA have higher rates of depression and anxiety when compared to controls; in addition, they have a lower quality of life. We believe that the treatment of patients with OA should consider the combination of pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, counseling and family support, in order to achieve a better quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Pterosin B prevents chondrocyte hypertrophy and osteoarthritis in mice by inhibiting Sik3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahara, Yasuhito; Takemori, Hiroshi; Okada, Minoru; Kosai, Azuma; Yamashita, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Tomohito; Fujita, Kaori; Itoh, Yumi; Nakamura, Masahiro; Fuchino, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Nobuo; Fukui, Naoshi; Watanabe, Akira; Kimura, Tomoatsu; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common debilitating joint disorder. Risk factors for osteoarthritis include age, which is associated with thinning of articular cartilage. Here we generate chondrocyte-specific salt-inducible kinase 3 (Sik3) conditional knockout mice that are resistant to osteoarthritis with thickened articular cartilage owing to a larger chondrocyte population. We also identify an edible Pteridium aquilinum compound, pterosin B, as a Sik3 pathway inhibitor. We show that either Sik3 deletion or intraarticular injection of mice with pterosin B inhibits chondrocyte hypertrophy and protects cartilage from osteoarthritis. Collectively, our results suggest Sik3 regulates the homeostasis of articular cartilage and is a target for the treatment of osteoarthritis, with pterosin B as a candidate therapeutic. PMID:27009967

  17. Surgical treatment for atlantooccipital osteoarthritis: a case report of two patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Hiroyuki; Kepler, Christopher; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Rawlins, Bernard A

    2011-07-01

    Although rarely discussed in the literature and difficult to evaluate on plain radiographs, atlantooccipital osteoarthritis can be a source of persistent suboccipital pain. Our objective in this report is to describe two cases with atlantooccipital (O-C1) osteoarthritis treated with posterior occipitocervical fusion. Two patients presented with unilateral suboccipital pain, which was refractory to conservative treatment. One patient suffered from long-standing rheumatoid arthritis while the other patient did not have pertinent medical issues. After non-diagnostic plain film imaging, CT scan demonstrated unilateral osteoarthritis of the atlantooccipital and atlantoaxial joint in both patients who subsequently underwent posterior O-C2 fusion with resolution of their preoperative symptoms. This is, to our knowledge, the first case report which specifically focused on surgical treatment of atlantooccipital osteoarthritis. Occipitocervical fusion is a treatment option for patients with atlantooccipital osteoarthritis when suboccipital pain is not responsive to conservative treatment.

  18. Prevalence of radiographic primary hip and knee osteoarthritis in a representative Central European population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Gábor; Koroknai, Gabriella; Ács, Barnabás; Than, Péter; Bellyei, Árpád; Illés, Tamás

    2011-07-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the radiographic prevalence of hip and knee osteoarthritis and compare our results with prevalence data reported by other studies, as no similar study had been performed in Hungary previously. Our aim was also to investigate the usefulness of the different radiological scoring methods for the definition of osteoarthritis. Patients who earlier reported complaints and gave written consent were asked to participate in a clinical follow-up. In the 682 participants Harris hip score, visual analogue pain scale values for both joints, Knee Society score and knee functional score were calculated. Weight-bearing radiographs were taken of both joints. Kellgren-Lawrence radiological evaluation was performed and osteoarthritis prevalence was defined. Hip osteoarthritis was found in 109 cases (16.49%), and knee osteoarthritis was found in 111 cases (16.54%). Harris hip score, Knee Society score, functional score and visual analogue scale values were significantly worse in people with radiographically proven osteoarthritis compared to the control group (p osteoarthritis prevalence of both joints was found in those with increased body mass index values. Age also plays a significant role in the development of both hip and knee osteoarthritis. No significant difference was observed between male and female participants regarding osteoarthritis prevalence. The Kellgren-Lawrence score with a cut-off value of 2 or more is a useful evaluation method for the detection of osteoarthritis prevalence in epidemiological studies; according to our observations, in clinical practice a cut-off value of three or more is more relevant.

  19. Efficacy and safety of diacerein in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Alekseeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diacerein (D belongs to a class of symptomatic slow-acting agents, has an original mechanism of action, and is widely used as a diseasemodifying antirheumatic drug to treat osteoarthritis (OA in Russia and many countries of the world. The ability of the drug to affect the main symptoms and progression of OA has been shown in a number of well-organized clinical trials.Objective: to evaluate the efficacy and safety of D in patients with knee OA.Patients and methods. An open-label trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of D (diaflex in patients with knee OA was conducted in accordance with the multicenter program «Osteoarthrosis: Assessment of Progression in Real Clinical Practice». The trial included 80 patients of both sexes with Stage II–III knee OA; mean age, 60.8±6.8 years (47–75 years; mean body mass index, 31.8±5.9 kg/m2; disease duration, 10.3±5.7 years (2–30 years. The duration of the trial was 9 months (6 months of therapy and 3 months of follow-up.Results. There was a statistically significant reduction in visual analog scale pain on walking just 1 month after therapy initiation (57.1±9.7 and 44.7±13.9 mm; p<0.0001 and a further significant improvement throughout the 6-month therapy. Pain did not increase after the drug was discontinued (the follow-up period was 3 months. The same pattern was observed in the assessment of the WOMAC index (pain during early therapy, 243.8±73.9; pain at the end of therapy, 137.5±78.9; stiffness, 97.8±41.1 and 57.7±38.6; functional failure, 875.8±250.4 and 525±305.7 respectively; p<0.0001. Statistically significantly improved quality of life indicators measured by EQ-5D were noted throughout the follow-up period: 0.43±0.23 at the beginning of therapy, 0.61±0.14 at its end, and 0.63±0.11 at 3 months following treatment completion (p<0.0001. By the time of therapy completion, 71.3% of the patients completely refused to take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. Both

  20. Body Mass Index and Western Ontario & McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung in November 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainna Binti Mohamad Dat

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis is one of the major disabilities among elderly. One of its well-recognized potent risk factors is obesity. The aim of this study was to identify the body mass index and severity of knee osteoarthritis patients who were treated in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. Methods: A descriptive study was carried out to 9 patients of the Medical Rehabilitation Policlinic at Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung in November 2012. Patients were diagnosed as having knee Osteoarthritis based on American College of Rheumatology clinical classification. Exclusion criteria were patient having previous trauma in spine and lower limb, having bleeding disorder like hemophilia, incomplete data in medical records and incomplete data in questionnaire. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC was used to measure the intensity of pain, stiffness, and functional difficulty. The weight (kg and height (cm of the patients were measured and the Body Mass Index was calculated by Weight (kg/Height² (m. The data were analyzed using frequency distribution. Results: The patients who came to the Medical Rehabilitation Policlinic had ranged in age from 57 to78 years, mostly female with knee Osteoarthritis bilateral. Out of 9 patients, 5 patients were overweight, followed by normal BMI and obese type I. Patient with obese type 1 had the highest WOMAC score. Conclusions: Most of the patients with knee osteoarthritis bilateral are overweight and the patient with obese type 1 has the highest WOMAC score.

  1. Radiographic predictability of cartilage damage in medial ankle osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jeong-Seok; Shim, Jae-Chan; Suh, Jin-Soo; Lee, Woo-Chun

    2010-08-01

    Radiographic grading has been used to assess and select between treatment options for ankle osteoarthritis. To use radiographic grading systems in clinical practice and scientific studies one must have reliable systems that predict the fate of the cartilage. We therefore asked whether (1) radiographic grading of ankle osteoarthritis is reliable and (2) grading reflects cartilage damage observed during arthroscopy. We then (3) determined the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of the radiographic findings. We examined 74 ankles with medial osteoarthritis and 24 with normal articular cartilage based on arthroscopy. Arthroscopic findings were graded according to the modified Outerbridge grades and all radiographs were graded using the modified Kellgren-Lawrence, Takakura et al., and van Dijk et al. grading systems. The reliability of each radiographic grading system was evaluated. We correlated the radiographic grades and severity of cartilage damage for each radiographic grading system. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of spurs and joint space narrowing with or without talar tilting then were determined. The interobserver weighted kappa ranged from 0.58 to 0.89 and the intraobserver weighted kappa from 0.51 to 0.85. The correlation coefficients for the Kellgren-Lawrence, Takakura et al., and van Dijk et al. grades were 0.53, 0.42, and 0.42, respectively. Ankles with medial joint space narrowing (Stage 2 of Takakura et al. and van Dijk et al. grades) showed varying severity of cartilage damage. The positive predictive value of cartilage damage increased from 77% for medial joint space narrowing regardless of the presence of talar tilting to 98% for medial joint space narrowing with talar tilting. Our observations suggest the inclusion of talar tilting in grading schemes enhances the assessment of cartilage damage. Level II, diagnostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of level of evidence.

  2. Multiplexed mass spectrometry monitoring of biomarker candidates for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Puente, Patricia; Calamia, Valentina; González-Rodríguez, Lucía; Lourido, Lucía; Camacho-Encina, María; Oreiro, Natividad; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina; Blanco, Francisco J

    2017-01-30

    The methods currently available for the diagnosis and monitoring of osteoarthritis (OA) are very limited and lack sensitivity. Being the most prevalent rheumatic disease, one of the most disabling pathologies worldwide and currently untreatable, there is a considerable interest pointed in the verification of specific biological markers for improving its diagnosis and disease progression studies. Considering the remarkable development of targeted proteomics methodologies in the frame of the Human Proteome Project, the aim of this work was to develop and apply a MRM-based method for the multiplexed analysis of a panel of 6 biomarker candidates for OA encoded by the Chromosome 16, and another 8 proteins identified in previous shotgun studies as related with this pathology, in specimens derived from the human joint and serum. The method, targeting 35 different peptides, was applied to samples from human articular chondrocytes, healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage, synovial fluid and serum. Subsequently, a verification analysis of the biomarker value of these proteins was performed by single point measurements on a set of 116 serum samples, leading to the identification of increased amounts of Haptoglobin and von Willebrand Factor in OA patients. Altogether, the present work provides a tool for the multiplexed monitoring of 14 biomarker candidates for OA, and verifies for the first time the increased amount of two of these circulating markers in patients diagnosed with this disease. We have developed an MRM method for the identification and relative quantification of a panel of 14 protein biomarker candidates for osteoarthritis. This method has been applied to analyze human articular chondrocytes, articular cartilage, synovial fluid, and finally a collection of 116 serum samples from healthy controls and patients suffering different degrees of osteoarthritis, in order to verify the biomarker usefulness of the candidates. HPT and VWF were validated as increased in OA

  3. Objectively Measured Physical Activity and Risk of Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jin; Barbour, Kamil E; Nevitt, Michael C; Helmick, Charles G; Hootman, Jennifer M; Murphy, Louise B; Cauley, Jane A; Dunlop, Dorothy D

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to examine the association between objectively measured physical activity and risk of developing incident knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a community-based cohort of middle-age and older adults. We used data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative, an ongoing prospective cohort study of adults 45 to 83 yr of age at initial enrollment with elevated risk of symptomatic knee OA. Moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was measured by a uniaxial accelerometer for seven continuous days in two data collection cycles and was categorized as inactive (<10 min·wk), low activity (10-<150 min·wk), and active (≥150 min·wk). Incident knee OA based on radiographic and symptomatic OA and joint space narrowing were analyzed as outcomes over 4 yr of follow-up. Participants free of the outcome of interest in both knees at study baseline were included (sample sizes ranged from 694 to 1331 for different outcomes). We estimated hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). In multivariate analyses, active MVPA participation was not significantly associated with risk of incident radiographic knee OA (HR = 1.52, 95% CI = 0.68-3.40), symptomatic knee OA (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 0.44-3.09), or joint space narrowing (HR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.37-2.06) when compared with inactive MVPA participation. Similar results were found for participants with low activity MVPA. MVPA was not associated with the risk of developing incident knee OA or joint space narrowing over 4 yr of follow-up among Osteoarthritis Initiative participants who are at increased risk of knee OA.

  4. Wearable Sensor-Based Rehabilitation Exercise Assessment for Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Hui Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the knee joint bears the full weight load of the human body and the highest pressure loads while providing flexible movement, it is the body part most vulnerable and susceptible to osteoarthritis. In exercise therapy, the early rehabilitation stages last for approximately six weeks, during which the patient works with the physical therapist several times each week. The patient is afterwards given instructions for continuing rehabilitation exercise by him/herself at home. This study develops a rehabilitation exercise assessment mechanism using three wearable sensors mounted on the chest, thigh and shank of the working leg in order to enable the patients with knee osteoarthritis to manage their own rehabilitation progress. In this work, time-domain, frequency-domain features and angle information of the motion sensor signals are used to classify the exercise type and identify whether their postures are proper or not. Three types of rehabilitation exercise commonly prescribed to knee osteoarthritis patients are: Short-Arc Exercise, Straight Leg Raise, and Quadriceps Strengthening Mini-squats. After ten subjects performed the three kinds of rehabilitation activities, three validation techniques including 10-fold cross-validation, within subject cross validation, and leave-one-subject cross validation are utilized to confirm the proposed mechanism. The overall recognition accuracy for exercise type classification is 97.29% and for exercise posture identification it is 88.26%. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed mechanism which can help patients perform rehabilitation movements and progress effectively. Moreover, the proposed mechanism is able to detect multiple errors at once, fulfilling the requirements for rehabilitation assessment.

  5. The Relationship between Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis of the Knee: A Report of 2 Cases with Suspected Osteonecrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Horikawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Knee specimens of two osteoporotic patients who underwent unilateral knee arthroplasty for suspected osteonecrosis of the knee were examined histologically. Preoperative findings of magnetic resonance images in both patients were consistent with the diagnosis of osteonecrosis of the medial femoral condyles, although plain X-rays showed minimal degenerative changes. In both patients, preoperative bone mineral densities of the femoral condyle and proximal tibia of the affected side were lower than those of the unaffected side. Pathological examination of the resected femoral condyle and proximal tibia showed almost intact joint cartilage, healing of the collapsed subchondral bone, and significant trabecular bone loss. Histologically, no evidence of osteonecrosis, including empty lacunae of the trabecular bone, was observed. These findings indicated that subchondral bone collapse caused by osteoporosis, but not osteonecrosis, initiated the osteoarthritic change of the affected knee. This report emphasizes that there may be cases of progressive local osteoarthritis caused by fracture of subchondral bone because of osteoporosis.

  6. An inexpensive and innovative correction of medial compartmental osteoarthritis knee joint by high tibial lateral closed wedge osteotomy in a rural set up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad DV, Arun AA, Tushar Chaudhari, Sagar Jawale, Shakthi Panda, Abhinav Jadhav, Deepak Dathrange

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis of Knee joint with Varus deformity causes considerable disability. Operative treatment aims at shifting the mechanical load bearing axis to the less affected compartment of the knee to relieve the symptoms. Exclusion Criteria: Non-walkers due to generalized arthropathies / medical comorbidities, Flexion deformity > 10 degrees, Range of motion 1cm lateral subluxation in standing A-P X rays of both knees. Methodology: 32 (12 Males and 20 Females cases of Medial compartment osteoarthritis presenting in our OPD between 2008-2012 were treated by HTOand cortical screw and SS wire fixation (TBW Technique. Results: Evaluation of results was done based on knee rating scale by Japanese orthopaedic association. 22 cases were Excellent, 8 cases were good. One case of failure, an iatrogenic intracondylar fracture of Tibia, and another secondary haematoma under the suture line, aspirated and complete healing was achieved. Patients had good range of motion, were able to squat and sit cross legged comfortably. Conclusion: HTO by Closed Medial wedge osteotomy and fixation with cortical screw and SS wire provides a good alternative to unicompartmental knee Arthroplasty and even Total knee Arthroplasty (may be up to 10-15 years in patients with Medial compartmental osteoarthritis. It is a cost effective technique with the use of minimum hardware and early postoperative mobilization in patients who cannot afford Knee Arthroplasty in a Rural set up.

  7. A structural study of bone changes in knee osteoarthritis by synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhupakorn, Bura; Thienpratharn, Suwittaya; Kidkhunthod, Pinit

    2017-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degeneration of articular cartilage and thickening of subchondral bone. The present study investigated the changing of biochemical components of cartilage and bone compared between normal and OA people. Using Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniquesincluding X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were employed for the bone changes in kneeosteoarthritisstudies. The bone samples were collected from various osteoarthritis patients with both male and female in the ages range between 20 and 74 years old. SR-XRF results excited at 4240 eV for Ca elements show a majority three main groups, based on their XRF intensities, 20-36 years, 40-60 years and over 70 years, respectively. By employing XAS techniques, XANES features can be used to clearly explain in term of electronic transitions occurring in bone samples which are affected from osteoarthritis symptoms. Moreover, a structural change around Ca ions in bone samples is obviously obtained by EXAFS results indicating an increase of Ca-amorphous phase when the ages increase.

  8. Radionuclide joint imaging in osteoarthritis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Jingjing

    1988-01-01

    31 knee joints of 17 patients were studied with radinuclide joint imaging (RJI). The knees were afficted with primary osteoarthritis associated with various deformity. In comparison with the normal group, RJI of the group of osteoarthritiis showed increased radioactivity in medial compartment of the femorotibial articulation. The ratio of medial to lateral condyle activity was increased. The difference between the two groups was singificant (P < 0.01). In the 'hot patella' groups, the ratio of the activity of the patella to that of the femoral condyle was also increased. The difference between the group and the normals was significant (P < 0.01). Clinical evaluation of RJI was discussed

  9. Weight loss for overweight patients with knee or hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Robin; Hansen, Julie Bolvig; Lund, Hans

    2017-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows:  To determine the benefits and harms associated with weight loss in overweight individuals with knee or hip osteoarthritis in terms of pain, physical function, quality of life, and safety.  Further we will have...... an explicit focus on quality of the weight loss intervention (including magnitude and intensity) (Herbert 2005), to see whether there is a dose-response relationship at the trial (i.e. group) level....

  10. Daily affect relations in fibromyalgia patients reveal positive affective disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finan, Patrick H; Zautra, Alex J; Davis, Mary C

    2009-05-01

    To examine daily positive affective disturbance in the context of negative affect (NA) and pain among patients with fibromyalgia (FM) to determine a) if FM patients experience a deficit in daily positive affect (PA) relative to osteoarthritis (OA) patients; b) if FM patients differ from OA patients in the day-to-day relations of PA and NA; and c) if patients diagnosed with both OA and FM differ from patients with either OA-only or FM-only with respect to major outcomes. A total of 260 women with physician-diagnosed OA (n = 106), FM (n = 53), or OA/FM (n = 101) completed a 30-day electronic diary. Participants were assessed once daily on levels of PA, NA, and pain. Multilevel models indicated that FM patients had less overall PA than OA patients and exhibited a stronger inverse PA-NA relation. Analyses further suggest that the OA/FM group may have been the most impaired of the three included in our study. This group was responsible for a lagged effect of PA on both affects, whereby high PA days resulted in low next-day PA and high next-day NA. FM patients exhibit a PA disturbance compared with OA patients. This disturbance is reflected by an overall deficit in PA and an inability to sustain PA in the face of pain and NA. Patients with both OA and FM may represent a subgroup of FM that is at particular risk for dysregulation of PA.

  11. Proprioception, laxity, muscle strength and activity limitations in early symptomatic knee osteoarthritis: results from the CHECK cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holla, Jasmijn F M; van der Leeden, Marike; Peter, Wilfred F H; Roorda, Leo D; van der Esch, Martin; Lems, Willem F; Gerritsen, Martijn; Voorneman, Ramon E; Steultjens, Martijn P M; Dekker, Joost

    2012-10-01

    To establish whether proprioception and varus-valgus laxity moderate the association between muscle strength and activity limitations in patients with early symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. A cross-sectional study. A sample of 151 participants with early symptomatic knee osteoarthritis from the Cohort Hip and Cohort Knee study. Regression analyses were performed to establish the associations between muscle strength, proprioception (knee joint motion detection threshold in the anterior--posterior direction), varus-valgus laxity and activity limitations (self-reported and performance-based). Interaction terms were used to establish whether proprioception and laxity moderated the association between muscle strength and activity limitations. Proprioception moderated the association between muscle strength and activity limitations: the negative association between muscle strength and activity limitations was stronger in participants with poor proprioception than in participants with accurate proprioception (performance-based activity limitations p = 0.02; self-reported activity limitations p = 0.08). The interaction between muscle strength and varus-valgus laxity was not significantly associated with activity limitations. The results of the present study support the theory that in the absence of adequate proprioceptive input, lower muscle strength affects a patient's level of activities to a greater degree than in the presence of adequate proprioceptive input.

  12. Evaluation of clinical and radiographic measures and reliability of the quadriceps angle measurement in elderly women with knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Ramos Amorim

    Full Text Available Introduction Knees osteoarthritis (OA is a complex degenerative disease with intra-articular changes affecting the amplitude of the quadriceps angle (Q. To measure this variable, it is necessary to use reliable protocols aiming at methodological reproducibility. The objective was to evaluate the intra-examiner and inter-examiner reliability of clinical and radiographic measures of the Q angle and to investigate the relationship between the degree of OA and the magnitude of this angle in the elderly. Materials and methods 23 volunteers had the Q angle measured by two evaluators at 48-h interval. Clinical measurements were collected by using the universal goniometer in the same position adopted in the radiographic examination. Results The intra-examiner reliability was good (0.722 to 0.763 for radiographic measurements and low (0.518 to 0.574 for clinical assessment, while inter-examiner reliability was moderate (0.634 for radiographic measurements and low (0.499 to the clinics. The correlation analysis between the radiographic values with the OA classification showed no correlation between them (p = 0.824 and r = -0.024. Conclusion Clinically, it is suggested that the radiographic examination is preferable to evaluate the Q angle of elderly women with knee osteoarthritis. Moreover, the magnitude of this angle did not correlate with the degree of impairment of OA in this population.

  13. Age-related degeneration of articular cartilage in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis: molecular markers of senescent chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a natural process by which every single living organism approaches its twilight of existence in a natural way. However, aging is also linked to the pathogenesis of a number of complex diseases. This is the case for osteoarthritis (OA), where age is considered to be a major risk factor of this important and increasingly common joint disorder. Half of the world's population, aged 65 and older, suffers from OA. Although the relationship between the development of OA and aging has not yet been completely understood, it is thought that age-related changes correlate with other risk factors. The most prominent hypothesis linking aging and OA is that chondrocytes undergo premature aging due to several factors, such as excessive mechanical load or oxidative stress, which induce the so called "stress-induced senescent state", which is ultimately responsible for the onset of OA. This review focuses on molecular markers and mechanisms implicated in chondrocyte aging and the pathogenesis of OA. We discuss the most important age-related morphological and biological changes that affect articular cartilage and chondrocytes. We also identify the main senescence markers that may be used to recognize molecular alterations in the extracellular matrix of cartilage as related to senescence. Since the aging process is strongly associated with the onset of osteoarthritis, we believe that strategies aimed at preventing chondrocyte senescence, as well as the identification of new increasingly sensitive senescent markers, could have a positive impact on the development of new therapies for this severe disease.

  14. The relationship between foot and ankle symptoms and risk of developing knee osteoarthritis: data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, K L; Kasza, J; Hunter, D J; Hinman, R S; Menz, H B; Peat, G; Bennell, K L

    2017-05-01

    To investigate whether foot and/or ankle symptoms increase the risk of developing (1) knee symptoms and (2) symptomatic radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). 1020 Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) participants who were at-risk of knee OA, but were without knee symptoms or radiographic knee OA, were investigated. Participants indicated the presence and laterality of foot/ankle symptoms at baseline. The main outcome was development of knee symptoms (pain, aching or stiffness in and around the knee on most days of the month for at least 1 month in the past year). A secondary outcome was development of symptomatic radiographic knee OA (symptoms plus Kellgren and Lawrence [KL] grade ≥2), over the subsequent 4 years. Associations between foot/ankle symptoms and study outcomes were assessed by logistic regression models. Foot/ankle symptoms in either or both feet significantly increased the odds of developing knee symptoms (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10 to 2.19), and developing symptomatic radiographic knee OA (adjusted OR 3.28, 95% CI 1.69 to 6.37). Based on laterality, contralateral foot/ankle symptoms were associated with developing both knee symptoms (adjusted OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.68) and symptomatic radiographic knee OA (adjusted OR 3.08, 95% CI 1.06 to 8.98), whilst bilateral foot/ankle symptoms were associated with developing symptomatic radiographic knee OA (adjusted OR 4.02, 95% CI 1.76 to 9.17). In individuals at-risk of knee OA, the presence of contralateral foot/ankle symptoms in particular increases risk of developing both knee symptoms and symptomatic radiographic knee OA. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Location-specific hip joint space width for progression of hip osteoarthritis--data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratzlaff, C; Van Wyngaarden, C; Duryea, J

    2014-10-01

    To establish the performance of a location-specific computer-assisted quantitative measure of hip joint space width (JSW), by measuring responsiveness in those with hip osteoarthritis (OA) and pain and those without. Secondary purposes included investigating the most responsive location and comparison to minimum joint space width (mJSW). nested case-control. from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), a longitudinal cohort study of knee OA. All participants had standardized standing anterior-posterior (AP) pelvis radiographs at baseline and 48 months. Case definition (1): subjects with a total hip replacement (THR) after the 48 month visit (n = 27) were selected and matched (1:1) on sex and age to subjects without a THR. Case definition (2): subjects with a THR at any point after baseline (n = 79) were selected and the contralateral (CL) hip was designated the case hip, and subjects were matched (1:1) as above. Pain: the CL hip group were examined for the presence/absence of pain. Measurements of superior hip JSW were made at three fixed locations relative to a landmark-based line, facilitated by software. The standardized response mean (SRM) was used to examine sensitivity to change from baseline to 48 months. Paired t-tests were used to compare cases and controls. Significant differences were observed between cases and controls and those with and without pain. The location-specific measure outperformed mJSW in all analyses, with SRM ranging from 0.53 (contralateral hip) to 1.06 (THR hip). The superior-medial location was most responsive. A new computer-assisted location-specific measure of hip JSW may provide a superior method to mJSW for radiographic OA progression. The superior-medial location was the most responsive. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biological Basis for the Use of Botanicals in Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salahuddin Ahmed

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA of the knee and hip is a debilitating disease affecting more women than men and the risk of developing OA increases precipitously with aging. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA, the most common form of inflammatory joint diseases, is a disease of unknown etiology and affects ∼1% of the population worldwide, and unlike OA, generally involves many joints because of the systemic nature of the disease. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are the first drugs of choice for the symptomatic treatment of both OA and RA. Because of the risks associated with the use of NSAIDs and other limitations, the use of alternative therapies, such as acupuncture and medicinal herbs, is on the rise and according to reports ∼60–90% of dissatisfied arthritis patients are likely to seek the option of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. This paper reviews the efficacy of some of the common herbs that have a history of human use and their anti-inflammatory or antiarthritic properties have been evaluated in animal models of inflammatory arthritis, in studies employing well defined and widely accepted in vitro models that use human chondrocytes/cartilage explants or in clinical trials. Available data suggests that the extracts of most of these herbs or compounds derived from them may provide a safe and effective adjunctive therapeutic approach for the treatment of OA and RA. This, in turn, argues for trials to establish efficacy and optimum dosage of these compounds for treating human inflammatory and degenerative joint diseases.

  17. Expressing pain and fatigue: a new method of analysis to explore differences in osteoarthritis experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; French, Melissa; Dieppe, Paul; Hawker, Gillian

    2009-03-15

    To apply a new method of analysis to 2 large qualitative datasets in order to examine differences in osteoarthritis (OA) experience according to the affected joint (knee or hip) and sex. A secondary analysis of qualitative data from 2 studies was conducted. Study 1 comprised 28 focus groups with 50 men and 80 women (ages 47-92 years). Study 2 comprised 14 focus groups with 32 men and 56 women (ages 56-91 years). All participants had symptomatic OA. In Study 1, secondary analysis using comparative keyword analysis (CKA) compared relative frequencies of words uttered by participants experiencing knee pain with words used by participants experiencing hip pain. In Study 2, CKA compared words used by men with words used by women. Subsequent analysis explored the contexts in which participants used key words. All participants in Study 1 described concerns with their bodies, activity limitations, and pain management, but details of their concerns differed. People with knee pain focused on stairs, weight, and stiffness, while those with hip pain were concerned with sidedness and groin pain. In Study 2, both men and women discussed activity and interaction with spouses. However, men used more factual words, especially relating to enumeration, while women offered more explanation without prompting from others. CKA provides productive inroads into qualitative datasets. Understanding the different ways that affected joints are discussed, and sex differences in descriptions of OA, may lead to improvements in clinical assessment tools, better targeting of interventions, and enhanced communication between health care professionals and patients.

  18. The Relationship between Chondromalacia Patella, Medial Meniscal Tear and Medial Periarticular Bursitis in Patients with Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resorlu, Mustafa; Doner, Davut; Karatag, Ozan; Toprak, Canan Akgun

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa) in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears. Radiological findings of 100 patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary diagnosis of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. The first radiologist assessed all patients in terms of osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tear. The second radiologist was blinded to these results and assessed the presence of bursitis in all patients. Mild osteoarthritis (grade I and II) was determined in 55 patients and severe osteoarthritis (grade III and IV) in 45 cases. At retropatellar cartilage evaluation, 25 patients were assessed as normal, while 29 patients were diagnosed with mild chondromalacia patella (grade I and II) and 46 with severe chondromalacia patella (grade III and IV). Medial meniscus tear was determined in 51 patients. Severe osteoarthritis and chondromalacia patella were positively correlated with meniscal tear (p bursitis in the medial compartment (p = 0.038). Presence of medial periarticular bursitis was positively correlated with severity of osteoarthritis but exhibited no correlation with chondromalacia patella (p = 0.023 and p = 0.479, respectively). Evaluation of lateral compartment bursae revealed lateral collateral ligament bursitis in 2 patients and iliotibial bursitis in 5 patients. We observed a greater prevalence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee in patients with severe osteoarthritis and medial meniscus tear.

  19. Meniscectomy as a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Rocco; Del Buono, Angelo; Osti, Leonardo; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    This review defines the recognized risk factors responsible for the development of knee osteoarthritis after surgical management of meniscal tears. We performed a literature search using Medline, Ovid, Cochrane and Google Scholar using the keywords: 'Meniscal tears', 'meniscectomy', 'osteoarthritis', 'complications' and 'risk factors'. Thirty-two published studies were identified. In the long term, osteoarthritis develops in the knee of patients undergoing surgery for meniscal tears. The Coleman methodology score showed great heterogeneity in terms of patient characteristics and outcome assessment. Amount of meniscus removed, duration of pre-operative symptoms and lateral meniscectomy show strong statistical association to onset of knee osteoarthritis. We did not find univocal findings defining the risk factors responsible for the development of post-operative knee osteoarthritis. There is a need for standardized clinical and imaging validated scale to improve definition of post-operative knee osteoarthritis to allow easier and more reliable comparison of outcomes in different studies. Appropriately powered randomized controlled trials reporting clinical and imaging-related outcomes in patients undergoing arthroscopic minimally invasive procedures and meniscal suturing should be performed. Comparing imaging findings of patients undergoing arthroscopic partial and open meniscectomy, a lower incidence of knee osteoarthritic evolution was detected after arthroscopy. The amount of removed meniscus is the most important predictor factor for the development of osteoarthritis. Minimally invasive procedures seem to reduce the incidence of long-term osteoarthritic changes of the knee compared with more invasive open and or arthroscopic procedures.

  20. [Definition and classification of basal joint osteoarthritis. A critical analysis and proposals. Treatment options].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comtet, J J; Gazarian, A; Fockens, W

    2001-02-01

    Several definitions and classifications of basal joint osteoarthritis exist. Each of them can be criticized. The authors propose to define basal thumb osteoarthritis as osteoarthritis of the trapezometacarpal joint associated or not with lesions of scapho-trapezio-trapezoid and/or metacarpophalangeal joints. The proposed classification is derived from the Eaton-Littler classification. Stage O is identical to stage I of the Eaton-Littler classification: trapeziometacarpal instability without cartilage lesions. Stage I is osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint only, without metacarpophalangeal deformity. Stage II is trapeziometacarpal osteoarthrites combined with reductible hyperextension deformity of the metacarpophalangeal joint. Stage III is trapeziometacarpal osteoarthrites combined with irreductible metacarpophalangeal deformity. Stage IV is identical to stage IV of the Eaton-Littler classification: combined trapeziometacarpal and scapho-trapezio-trapezoid osteoarthritis. The advantage of the proposed classification is that basal joint osteoarthritis is not only defined as real or potential (stage O) osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint, but also includes precise evaluation of two other joints at the base of the thumb. This classification can be a guide for treatment options.