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Sample records for tibial intramedullary canal

  1. Intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrö, A; Lamppu, M; Böstman, O

    1995-01-01

    Sixty-four displaced tibial shaft fractures were treated using intramedullary nailing, either primarily or after an attempt at conservative treatment, which consisted of closed reduction under anaesthesia and immobilisation in a long-leg plaster cast. There were 37 closed and 27 open fractures. Three patients had a fracture of both tibiae. The median time period from the intramedullary nailing of the closed solitary fractures to union was about the same after primary nailing as after delayed nailing. Although the fractures were different in these groups, it is possible that the time spent in conservative treatment before intramedullary nailing brings no additional benefits. The incidence of deep infection in open fractures after primary nailing was 1/16. The fractures, in which an acceptable position could not be maintained using conservative methods, were mainly spiral in configuration and located in the distal third or at the junction of the middle and distal thirds of the tibia.

  2. The accuracy of intramedullary tibial guide of sagittal alignment of PCL-substituting total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyuk-Soo; Kang, Seung-Baik; Jo, Chris H; Kim, Sun-Hong; Lee, Jung-Ha

    2010-10-01

    Experimental and clinical studies on the accuracy of the intramedullary alignment method have produced different results, and few have addressed accuracy in the sagittal plane. Reported deviations are not only attributable to the alignment method but also to radiological errors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the intramedullary alignment method in the sagittal plane using computed tomography (CT) and 3-dimensional imaging software. Thirty-one TKAs were performed using an intramedullary alignment method involving the insertion of a long 8-mm diameter rod into the medullary canal to the distal metaphysis of the tibia. All alignment instruments were set to achieve an ideal varus/valgus angle of 0° in the coronal plane and a tibial slope of 0° in the sagittal plane. The accuracy of the intramedullary alignment system was assessed by measuring the coronal tibial component angle and sagittal tibial slope angles, i.e., angles between the tibial anatomical axis and the tangent to the medial and lateral tibial plateau or the cut-surface. The mean coronal tibial component angle was 88.5° ± 1.2° and the mean tibial component slope in the sagittal plane was 1.6° ± 1.2° without anterior slope. Our intramedullary tibial alignment method, which involves passing an 8-mm diameter long rod through the tibial shaft isthmus, showed good accuracy (less than 3 degrees of variation and no anterior slope) in the sagittal plane in neutral or varus knees.

  3. Safe surgical technique: intramedullary nail fixation of tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelle, Boris A; Boni, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Statically locked, reamed intramedullary nailing remains the standard treatment for displaced tibial shaft fractures. Establishing an appropriate starting point is a crucial part of the surgical procedure. Recently, suprapatellar nailing in the semi-extended position has been suggested as a safe and effective surgical technique. Numerous reduction techiques are available to achieve an anatomic fracture alignment and the treating surgeon should be familiar with these maneuvers. Open reduction techniques should be considered if anatomic fracture alignment cannot be achieved by closed means. Favorable union rates above 90 % can be achieved by both reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing. Despite favorable union rates, patients continue to have functional long-term impairments. In particular, anterior knee pain remains a common complaint following intramedullary tibial nailing. Malrotation remains a commonly reported complication after tibial nailing. The effect of postoperative tibial malalignment on the clinical and radiographic outcome requires further investigation.

  4. Elastic Stable Intramedullary Nailing for Treatment of Pediatric Tibial Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep Gurung; Dipendra KC; Roshni Khatri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tibia fractures in the skeletally immature patient can usually be treated with above knee cast or patellar tendon bearing cast. The purpose of our study was to evaluate epidemiology and outcome of Elastic stable intramedullary nailing fixation of pediatric tibial shaft fractures treated at our institution. Methods: Over a period of one year, fifty pediatric patients of tibial shaft fractures, with average age of 9.68 yr (SD=2.37), were treated with elastic stable intramedul...

  5. Randomized trial of reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon; Tornetta, Paul; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Sanders, David; Walter, Stephen D.; Gregory Tennent Sanders, David W.; Macleod, Mark D.; Carey, Timothy; Leitch, Kellie; Bailey, Stuart; Gurr, Kevin; Konito, Ken; Bartha, Charlene; Low, Isolina; MacBean, Leila V.; Ramu, Mala; Reiber, Susan; Strapp, Ruth; Tieszer, Christina; Kreder, Hans J.; Stephen, David J. G.; Axelrod, Terry S.; Yee, Albert J. M.; Richards, Robin R.; Finkelstein, Joel; Ford, Michael; Gofton, Wade; Murnaghan, John; Schatztker, Joseph; Bulmer, Beverly; Conlan, Lisa; Laflamme, G. Yves; Berry, Gregory; Beaumont, Pierre; Ranger, Pierre; Laflamme, Georges-Henri; Gagnon, Sylvain; Malo, Michel; Fernandes, Julio; Poirier, Marie-France; McKee, Michael D.; Waddell, James P.; Bogoch, Earl R.; Daniels, Timothy R.; McBroom, Robert R.; Vicente, Milena R.; Storey, Wendy; Wild, Lisa M.; McCormack, Robert; Perey, Bertrand; Goetz, Thomas J.; Pate, Graham; Penner, Murray J.; Panagiotopoulos, Kostas; Pirani, Shafique; Dommisse, Ian G.; Loomer, Richard L.; Stone, Trevor; Moon, Karyn; Zomar, Mauri; Webb, Lawrence X.; Teasdall, Robert D.; Birkedal, John Peter; Martin, David Franklin; Ruch, David S.; Kilgus, Douglas J.; Pollock, David C.; Harris, Mitchel Brion; Wiesler, Ethan Ron; Ward, William G.; Shilt, Jeffrey Scott; Koman, Andrew L.; Poehling, Gary G.; Kulp, Brenda; Creevy, William R.; Stein, Andrew B.; Bono, Christopher T.; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Brown, T. Desmond; Pacicca, Donna; Sledge, John B.; Foster, Timothy E.; Voloshin, Ilva; Bolton, Jill; Carlisle, Hope; Shaughnessy, Lisa; Obremskey, William T.; LeCroy, C. Michael; Meinberg, Eric G.; Messer, Terry M.; Craig, William L.; Dirschl, Douglas R.; Caudle, Robert; Harris, Tim; Elhert, Kurt; Hage, William; Jones, Robert; Piedrahita, Luis; Schricker, Paul O.; Driver, Robin; Godwin, Jean; Kregor, Philip James; Tennent, Gregory; Truchan, Lisa M.; Sciadini, Marcus; Shuler, Franklin D.; Driver, Robin E.; Nading, Mary Alice; Neiderstadt, Jacky; Vap, Alexander R.; Vallier, Heather A.; Patterson, Brendan M.; Wilber, John H.; Wilber, Roger G.; Sontich, John K.; Moore, Timothy Alan; Brady, Drew; Cooperman, Daniel R.; Davis, John A.; Cureton, Beth Ann; Mandel, Scott; Orr, R. Douglas; Sadler, John T. S.; Hussain, Tousief; Rajaratnam, Krishan; Petrisor, Bradley; Drew, Brian; Bednar, Drew A.; Kwok, Desmond C. H.; Pettit, Shirley; Hancock, Jill; Sidorkewicz, Natalie; Cole, Peter A.; Smith, Joel J.; Brown, Gregory A.; Lange, Thomas A.; Stark, John G.; Levy, Bruce A.; Swiontkowski, Marc F.; Garaghty, Mary J.; Salzman, Joshua G.; Schutte, Carol A.; Tastad, Linda; Vang, Sandy; Seligson, David; Roberts, Craig S.; Malkani, Arthur L.; Sanders, Laura; Dyer, Carmen; Heinsen, Jessica; Smith, Langan; Madanagopal, Sudhakar; Frantz-Bush, Linda; Coupe, Kevin J.; Tucker, Jeffrey J.; Criswell, Allen R.; Buckle, Rosemary; Rechter, Alan Jeffrey; Sheth, Dhiren Shaskikant; Urquart, Brad; Trotscher, Thea; Anders, Mark J.; Kowalski, Joseph M.; Fineberg, Marc S.; Bone, Lawrence B.; Phillips, Matthew J.; Rohrbacher, Bernard; Stegemann, Philip; Mihalko, William M.; Buyea, Cathy; Augustine, Stephen J.; Jackson, William Thomas; Solis, Gregory; Ero, Sunday U.; Segina, Daniel N.; Berrey, Hudson B.; Agnew, Samuel G.; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Campbell, Lakina C.; Derting, Lynn; McAdams, June; Goslings, J. Carel; Ponsen, Kees Jan; Luitse, Jan; Kloen, Peter; Joosse, Pieter; Winkelhagen, Jasper; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Teague, David C.; Davey, Joseph; Sullivan, J. Andy; Ertl, William J. J.; Puckett, Timothy A.; Pasque, Charles B.; Tompkins, John F.; Gruel, Curtis R.; Kammerlocher, Paul; Lehman, Thomas P.; Puffinbarger, William R.; Carl, Kathy L.; Weber, Donald W.; Jomha, Nadr M.; Goplen, Gordon R.; Masson, Edward C. O.; Beaupre, Lauren A.; Greaves, Karen E.; Schaump, Lori N.; Jeray, Kyle J.; Goetz, David R.; Westberry, David E.; Broderick, J. Scott; Moon, Bryan S.; Tanner, Stephanie L.; Powell, James N.; Buckley, Richard E.; Elves, Leslie; Connolly, Stephen; Abraham, Edward P.; Steele, Trudy; Ellis, Thomas; Herzberg, Alex; Brown, George A.; Crawford, Dennis E.; Hart, Robert; Hayden, James; Orfaly, Robert M.; Vigland, Theodore; Vivekaraj, Maharani; Bundy, Gina L.; Miclau, Theodore; Matityahu, Amir; Coughlin, R. Richard; Kandemir, Utku; McClellan, R. Trigg; Lin, Cindy Hsin-Hua; Karges, David; Cramer, Kathryn; Watson, J. Tracy; Moed, Berton; Scott, Barbara; Beck, Dennis J.; Orth, Carolyn; Puskas, David; Clark, Russell; Jones, Jennifer; Egol, Kenneth A.; Paksima, Nader; France, Monet; Wai, Eugene K.; Johnson, Garth; Wilkinson, Ross; Gruszczynski, Adam T.; Vexler, Liisa

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There remains a compelling biological rationale for both reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing for the treatment of tibial shaft fractures. Previous small trials have left the evidence for either approach inconclusive. We compared reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing with

  6. Complex Tibial Fractures: Tips and Tricks for Intramedullary Nail Fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Githens

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramedullary nailing of metaphyseal and segmental tibia fractures can be technically challenging for a variety of reasons. Restoring length, alignment and rotation of the injured limb requires careful preoperative planning and meticulous attention to surgical technique, while avoiding common pitfalls. Understanding the deforming forces on the fracture segments and normal tibial osteology provides a background for recognizing the most common pitfalls when nailing these fractures. Many adjuncts for obtaining and maintaining fracture reduction while nailing have been described, including extended positioning, use of the femoral distractor, blocking screws, and provisional plating. We discuss these techniques as well as the role of intramedullary fixation for treating metaphyseal fractures with articular extension. The purpose of this paper is to describe the background and technique for a variety of operative tips and tricks to facilitate intramedullary nailing of metaphyseal and segmental tibia fractures.

  7. Safe surgical technique: intramedullary nail fixation of tibial shaft fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Zelle, Boris A.; Boni, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Statically locked, reamed intramedullary nailing remains the standard treatment for displaced tibial shaft fractures. Establishing an appropriate starting point is a crucial part of the surgical procedure. Recently, suprapatellar nailing in the semi-extended position has been suggested as a safe and effective surgical technique. Numerous reduction techiques are available to achieve an anatomic fracture alignment and the treating surgeon should be familiar with these maneuvers. Open reduction ...

  8. Intramedullary nailing in segmental tibial fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, G C; Sotgiu, F; Lepori, M; Guido, P

    1981-10-01

    Thirty-eight consecutive segmental fractures of the tibia were treated by intramedullary nailing with the Küntscher-Herzog nail. Twenty-two fractures were closed and sixteen were open. Reaming of the medullary cavity was performed and adequate fixation was ensured by use of a plaster cast. Weight-bearing was allowed after thirty-days for closed fractures and sixty days for open fractures. All of the closed fractures healed without malunion or infection. Of the patients with open fractures, one had an infection; one, non-union; and one, malunion. In all cases but one, union was slower at the distal fracture.

  9. Intramedullary nailing in distal tibial fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Arroquy

    2015-11-01

    Methods The inclusion criteria of this study were skeletally mature patients with displaced fractures of the distal tibia treated with intramedullary nail with a minimum follow up of one year. Gustilo III open fractures and type C fractures of the AO classification (complete articular Stroke were excluded. The sample comprised 35 patients remained. The follow-up was 29.2 months. We evaluated the time of consolidation, malunion and complications. The functional results were described according to the AOFAS score. Results Of the 35 patients with fracture of the distal third of the tibia all of them presented fracture healing. The average time to union was 17.2 weeks (range: 11-26. Of the total sample, 5 patients had delayed union, requiring dynamic nail on average at 12 weeks. The malunion was present in 4 (11.4% patients. We found no  difference (p = 0.201 in the time to union between fractures associated with fractures of the fibula treated (13sem or not (17sem. The AOFAS score was 86 points. Conclusion Intramedullary nailing with multiple distal locks like a good alternative treatment for distal tibia fractures AO type A or B, with low complication rate and a high rate of consolidation.

  10. Nonreamed interlocked intramedullary tibial nailing. One community's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duwelius, P J; Schmidt, A H; Rubinstein, R A; Green, J M

    1995-06-01

    Forty-nine acute displaced tibial fractures (31 closed, 18 open: 5 Grade I, 7 Grade II, 4 Grade IIIA, and 2 Grade IIIB) were treated in 1 community with a standard operative protocol using a distractor without a fracture table, and an unreamed interlocked tibial nail. Forty-six fractures healed (94%). Complications included 3 nonunions (6%), 2 deep infections (4%), 9 delayed unions (18%), 4 angular malunions (8%), 2 rotatory malunions (4%), and 12 interlocking screws bent or broke (24%). Twenty-eight patients (57%) required at least 1 additional operation to obtain union, most commonly dynamization of a statically locked nail. The authors conclude that unreamed tibial nails provide adequate stabilization of displaced tibial fractures and can be used in the management of most open or closed tibial fractures. However, static locking is required in axially unstable fractures. Early dynamization or exchange nailing and bone grafting should be considered to hasten union and avoid screw failure. The distractor is an excellent adjunctive technique for reduction and alignment of tibial shaft fractures during intramedullary nailing.

  11. Outcome of intramedullary interlocking SIGN nail in tibial diaphyseal fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.; Javed, S.; Khan, G.N.; Aziz, A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the outcome of intramedullary interlocking surgical implant generation network (SIGN) nail in diaphyseal tibial fractures in terms of union and failure of implant (breakage of nail or interlocking screws). Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Orthopaedics and Spinal Surgery, Ghurki Trust Teaching Hospital, Lahore Medical and Dental College, Lahore, from September 2008 to August 2009. Methodology: Fifty patients aged 14 - 60 years, of either gender were included, who had closed and Gustilo type I and II open fractures reported in 2 weeks, whose closed reduction was not possible or was unsatisfactory and fracture was located 7 cm below knee joint to 7 cm above ankle joint. Fractures previously treated with external fixator, infected fractures and unfit patients were excluded. All fractures were fixed with intramedullary interlocking SIGN nail and were followed clinically and radiographically for union and for any implant failure. Results: Forty one (88%) patients had united fracture within 6 months, 5 (10%) patients had delayed union while 4 (8%) patients had non-union. Mean duration for achieving union was 163 + 30.6 days. Interlocking screws were broken in 2 patients while no nail was broken in any patient. Conclusion: Intramedullary interlocking nailing is an effective measure in treating closed and grade I and II open tibial fractures. It provides a high rate of union less complications and early return to function. (author)

  12. Elastic Stable Intramedullary Nailing for Treatment of Pediatric Tibial Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Gurung

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tibia fractures in the skeletally immature patient can usually be treated with above knee cast or patellar tendon bearing cast. The purpose of our study was to evaluate epidemiology and outcome of Elastic stable intramedullary nailing fixation of pediatric tibial shaft fractures treated at our institution. Methods: Over a period of one year, fifty pediatric patients of tibial shaft fractures, with average age of 9.68 yr (SD=2.37, were treated with elastic stable intramedullary nail. Demographic data, union and complication rate were evaluated. Results: There were 36 closed and 14 open fractures. The average time to union was 11.6 weeks  (SD=2.65 for close and  14.3 weeks (SD=2.62 for open fracture. There were no instances of growth arrest, remanipulations, or refracture. Conclusion: We conclude that flexible intramedullary fixation is an easy and effective method of management of both open and closed unstable fractures of the tibia in children.

  13. [Closed intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verret, G

    1995-08-01

    To assess patient outcome after nailing of the tibial shaft with the unreamed AO/ASIF nail. A retrospective study of 54 nailed fractures of the tibial shaft treated between 1990 and 1994. Follow-up was done at the outpatient clinic and included measurements of the lower limbs and x-rays. The study was conducted at the Hôpital de l'Enfant-Jésus, Québec, a centre specializing in trauma care. Fifty-four acute displaced fractures of the tibial shaft occurring in 52 patients were studied. Nailing with the Synthes AO/ASIF unreamed locked nails. Time to bone fusion, rate of infection, incidence of deformity and failure rate of the implants, especially the lock screws. The majority of fractures were associated with a high-speed trauma (40/54 or 74% of cases) and 18 (33%) were open fractures. Osteitis developed in one (1.8%) open type IIIA fracture. Bone fusion was observed clinically and radiologically after 29 weeks on average; none of the fractures presented residual deformity on rotation of more than 5 degrees or a difference in length of more than 1 cm or a frontal or sagittal displacement of more than 10 degrees. A single case of pseudoarthrosis was noted. One or more lock screws became deformed or broke in 16 (34%) tibias; however, this did not lead to any reduction loss. Four compartment syndromes were diagnosed. Excellent results were obtained with respect to limb alignment and length. Loss of joint mobility was minimal. The number of lock screw failures indicates that a delayed weight bearing could prevent this complication, especially when an interfragment space remains after the nail placement.

  14. [Tibial intramedullary nailing without open drilling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuner, E H; Serif el-Nasr, M S; Münst, P; Staiger, M

    1993-10-01

    By means on the basis of a prospective study of 33 osteosynthesis with the unreamed tibia nail (UTN) the following conclusions were found: 1. A technical simple, intramedullary solid strength bearing device in only two diameters is available, therefore costs for stock keeping are low. Systematic interlocking of the nail is necessary. Regarding the multiplicity of indication as well as the mechanical character the UTN is close to the principle of the internal fixator. 2. As a result of its solid constitution remarkable hollow cavities do not exist, so that retention of hematoma or secretions is limited (prophylaxis of infection). 3. In case of a closed nailing procedure the less rigid fracture fixation is favourable for the biology of the bone healing (fracture hematoma, less traumatic procedure without reaming of the medullary cavity, etc.). 4. The frequently observed breakage of interlocking bolts leads spontaneously to a dynamisation favourable as to time and therefore to a better bone healing process (callus formation). 5. Time intervals of bony fractures consolidation are significantly shorter compared to the exclusive osteosynthesis with the external fixator [3]. 6. The unreamed tibia nail is an implant for both primary stabilisation of closed diaphyseal fractures of the tibia with soft tissue injury and for secondary procedure/treatment for example after external fixator osteosynthesis or initial non-operative treatment. Early change of procedure seems to be of importance.

  15. Extramedullary versus intramedullary tibial cutting guides in megaprosthetic total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karade Vikas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a standard total knee replacement, tibial component alignment is a key factor for the long term success of the surgery. The purpose of this study is to compare the accuracy of extramedullary and intramedullary tibial cutting guides used in indigenous and imported implants respectively, in positioning of the tibial components in megaprosthetic knee replacements. Methods A comparative study of the accuracy of extramedullary and intramedullary tibial cutting guides was carried out in 92 megaprosthetic knee replacements for distal femoral tumors. For the proximal tibia cut for tibial component placement, an extramedullary guide was used in 65 patients and an intramedullary guide was used in 27 patients. Tibial component alignment angles were measured in postoperative X-rays with the help of CAD software. Results There was more varus placement in coronal plane with extramedullary cutting guide (−1.18 +/− 2.4 degrees than the intramedullary guide (−0.34 +/− 2.31 degrees but this did not reach statistical significance. The goal of 90 +/− 2 degrees alignment of tibial component was achieved in 54% of patients in the extramedullary group versus 67% in the intramedullary group. In terms of sagittal plane alignment, extramedullary guide showed less accurate results (2.09 +/− 2.4 degrees than intramedullary guide (0.50 +/− 3.80 degrees for tibial component alignment, though 78% of patients were aligned within the goal of 0–5 degrees of tibial slope angle in extramedullary group versus 63% in intramedullary group. The mean error in the measurements due to rotation of the knee during taking the X-rays was less than 0.1 degrees and distribution of the X-rays with the rotation of knee was similar in both the groups. Conclusions Overall, in megaprosthetic knee replacement intramedullary guides gave more accurate results in sagittal plane and exhibited similar variability as of extramedullary guides in coronal plane.

  16. Tibia-based referencing for standard proximal tibial radiographs during intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; Choxi, Ankeet A; Dhulipala, Sravan C; Evans, Jason M; Mir, Hassan R

    2013-11-01

    Limited information exists to define standard tibial radiographs. The purpose of this study was to define new landmarks on the proximal tibia for standard anteroposterior and lateral radiographs. In 10 cadaveric knees, fibular head bisection was considered the anteroposterior image, and femoral condyle overlap the lateral image. In another 10 knees, a "twin peaks" anteroposterior view, showing the sharpest profile of the tibial spines, was used. The "flat plateau" lateral image was obtained by aligning the femoral condyles then applying a varus adjustment with overlap of the tibial plateaus. Medial peritendinous approaches were performed, and an entry reamer used to open the medullary canal. A priori analysis showed good to excellent intra-/inter-observer reliability with the new technique (intra-class correlation coefficient ICC 0.61-0.90). The "twin peaks" anteroposterior radiograph was externally rotated 2.7±2.1° compared to the standard radiograph with fibular head bisection. Portal position and incidence of damage to intra-articular structures did not significantly differ between groups (P>.05). The "twin peaks" anteroposterior view and "flat plateau" lateral view can safely be used for nail entry portal creation in the anatomic safe zone. Tibia-based radiographic referencing is useful for intramedullary nailing cases in which knee or proximal tibiofibular joint anatomy is altered.

  17. Comparison of functional bracing and locked intramedullary nailing in the treatment of displaced tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, A; Benterud, J G; Høgevold, H E; Ekeland, A; Strømsøe, K

    1992-04-01

    Thirty-five displaced tibial shaft fractures, treated with functional bracing were compared with 43 similar fractures, treated with locked intramedullary nailing. There were 22 excellent/good results in the brace group and 38 in the nail group. There was one infection in the brace group and three in the nailed group. There were five delayed unions and two nonunions in the brace group and one delayed union in the nail group. The functional results in the nailed group were better than the braced group but locked intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures require special resources and training. Locked intramedullary nailing fullfils all the functional criteria for acceptable fracture care.

  18. The effect of retained intramedullary nails on tibial bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J C; Lindsey, R W; Hipp, J A; Gugala, Z; Rianon, N; LeBlanc, A

    2008-07-01

    Intramedullary nailing has become a standard treatment for adult tibial shaft fractures. Retained intramedullary nails have been associated with stress shielding, although their long-term effect on decreasing tibial bone mineral density is currently unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine if retained tibial intramedullary nails decrease tibial mineral density in patients with successfully treated fractures. Patients treated with statically locked intramedullary nails for isolated, unilateral tibia shaft fractures were studied. Inclusion required that fracture had healed radiographically and that the patient returned to the pre-injury activity level. Data on patient demographic, fracture type, surgical technique, implant, and post-operative functional status were tabulated. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to measure bone mineral density in selected regions of the affected tibia and the contralateral intact tibia. Image reconstruction software was employed to ensure symmetry of the studied regions. Twenty patients (mean age 43; range 22-77 years) were studied at a mean of 29 months (range 5-60 months) following intramedullary nailing. There was statistically significant reduction of mean bone mineral density in tibiae with retained intramedullary nails (1.02 g/cm(2) versus 1.06 g/cm(2); P=0.04). A significantly greater decrease in bone mineral density was detected in the reamed versus non-reamed tibiae (-7% versus +6%, respectively; Pnails. Intramedullary reaming appears to be a factor potentiating the reduction of tibia bone mineral density in long-term nail retention.

  19. Intramedullary versus extramedullary alignment of the tibial component in the Triathlon knee

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cashman, James P

    2011-08-20

    Abstract Background Long term survivorship in total knee arthroplasty is significantly dependant on prosthesis alignment. Our aim was determine which alignment guide was more accurate in positioning of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty. We also aimed to assess whether there was any difference in short term patient outcome. Method A comparison of intramedullary versus extramedullary alignment jig was performed. Radiological alignment of tibial components and patient outcomes of 103 Triathlon total knee arthroplasties were analysed. Results Use of the intramedullary was found to be significantly more accurate in determining coronal alignment (p = 0.02) while use of the extramedullary jig was found to give more accurate results in sagittal alignment (p = 0.04). There was no significant difference in WOMAC or SF-36 at six months. Conclusion Use of an intramedullary jig is preferable for positioning of the tibial component using this knee system.

  20. Intramedullary versus extramedullary alignment of the tibial component in the Triathlon knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Synnott Keith

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long term survivorship in total knee arthroplasty is significantly dependant on prosthesis alignment. Our aim was determine which alignment guide was more accurate in positioning of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty. We also aimed to assess whether there was any difference in short term patient outcome. Method A comparison of intramedullary versus extramedullary alignment jig was performed. Radiological alignment of tibial components and patient outcomes of 103 Triathlon total knee arthroplasties were analysed. Results Use of the intramedullary was found to be significantly more accurate in determining coronal alignment (p = 0.02 while use of the extramedullary jig was found to give more accurate results in sagittal alignment (p = 0.04. There was no significant difference in WOMAC or SF-36 at six months. Conclusion Use of an intramedullary jig is preferable for positioning of the tibial component using this knee system.

  1. Treatment of tibial fractures by reaming and intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, L B; Johnson, K D

    1986-07-01

    We treated 112 fractures of the tibia by manipulative reduction, reaming of the medullary canal, and fixation of the fracture fragments with an intramedullary nail. Seventy-six of the fractures were acute, and eight of these were second or third-degree open fractures. The other thirty-six fractures had a non-union, osteotomy for malunion, or failure of other types of treatment. Follow-up of 100 fractures showed union in all but one, which was in a drug abuser who had an amputation due to infection. The main complication was infection, which was successfully treated in six of seven fractures. The method of treatment, employing either closed or open technique and recently making use of interlocking bolts to stabilize one or both principal fracture fragments on the nail, is an excellent one for unstable acute fractures and for secondary procedures in fractures that are not associated with infection. The infection rate was increased with the open surgical technique. The few contraindications to its use are described.

  2. Is intact fibula a disadvantage in treatment of tibial diaphysis fracture with intramedullary nailing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabukçuoğlu, Yavuz; Sökücü, Sami; Özcan, Çağrı; Beng, Kubilay; Lapçin, Osman; Demir, Bilal

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare solitary tibial diaphysis fractures and tibial diaphysis fractures associated with fibula fracture treated with the intramedullary nailing method. Records of 254 patients diagnosed with tibial diaphysis fracture and treated with intramedullary nailing between 2010 and 2013 were examined and 30 patients were included in the study. Group 1 comprised patients with solitary tibial diaphysis fracture, and Group 2 was made up of patients with tibial diaphysis fractures associated with fibula fracture. Patients in both groups were compared in terms of time to surgery, duration of surgical tourniquet, time to union, and varus, valgus, recurvatum, and antecurvatum deformities of the tibia at final follow-up. No statistically significant difference was found between the 2 groups in time to surgery, duration of surgical tourniquet, time to union, or varus, valgus, recurvatum, and antecurvatum deformities. Results indicated that intact fibula in tibial diaphysis fracture treated with intramedullary nailing was not a disadvantage; it did not affect rate of union or lead to loss of reduction, non-union, or malunion.

  3. Local and Widespread Hyperalgesia After Isolated Tibial Shaft Fractures Treated with Intramedullary Nailing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter; Elsøe, Rasmus; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    postoperatively after intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fracture. METHODS: A total of 39 patients were included in this 12-month follow-up study. After 6 weeks, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively the pain intensity was measured on a visual analog scale (VAS) and the pressure pain sensitivity was assessed...

  4. Comparison of Tibial Intramedullary Nailing Guided by Digital Technology Versus Conventional Method: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Xu, Xian; Li, Xu; Wu, Wei; Cai, Junfeng; Lu, Qingyou

    2017-06-12

    BACKGROUND This prospective study aimed to compare clinical effects of intramedullary nailing guided by digital and conventional technologies in treatment of tibial fractures. MATERIAL AND METHODS Thirty-two patients (mean age 43 years, 18 males and 14 females) who were treated for tibial fractures from October 2010 to October 2012 were enrolled. They were sequentially randomized to receive intramedullary nailing guided by either digital technology (digital group, n=16) or conventional technology (conventional group, n=16). The operation time, fluoroscopy times, fracture healing time, distance between the actual and planned insertion point, postoperative lower limb alignment, and functional recovery were recorded for all patients. RESULTS The mean operation time in the digital group was 43.1±6.2 min compared with 48.7±8.3 min for the conventional technology (P=0.039). The fluoroscopy times and distance between the actual and planned insertion point were significantly lower in the digital group than in the conventional group (both Pdigital technology. No difference was found in fracture healing time and good postoperative lower limb alignment between the digital and conventional groups (P=0.083 and P=0.310), as well as the effective rate (100% vs. 87.50%, P=0.144). CONCLUSIONS Intramedullary nailing guided by digital technology has many advantages in treatment of tibial fractures compared to conventional technology, including shorter operation time, reduced fluoroscopy times, and decreased distance between the actual and planned insertion point of the intramedullary nail.

  5. Meta-analysis of reamed versus unreamed intramedullary nailing for open tibial fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Open fractures of the tibial diaphysis are usually caused by high-energy trauma and associated with severe bone and soft tissue injury. Reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing are often used for treatment of tibial injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of reamed versus unreamed intramedullary nailing for open tibial fractures (OTF). Methods A meta-analysis was conducted according to the guidelines of the Cochrane Collaboration using databases containing the Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMbase, Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese VIP information, and WanFang Database. Randomized and semi-randomized controlled clinical trials of both reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing for OTF treatment were analyzed using Reviewer Manager (RevMan5.0) software. Results A total of 695 references were initially identified from the selected databases. However, only four studies were assessed, matching all the eligibility criteria conducted by two independent reviewers. The result showed that there was no statistical difference in healing rate, secondary surgery rate, implant failure rate, osteofascial compartment syndrome, and infection during the postoperative period between reamed and unreamed nails in OTF. Conclusions Findings of this study suggest that there was no statistical difference between reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing in clinical treatment of OTF. However, the result of this meta-analysis should be cautiously accepted due to some limitations, and further studies are still needed. PMID:25149501

  6. Advances in Intramedullary Nailing: Suprapatellar Nailing of Tibial Shaft Fractures in the Semiextended Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelle, Boris A; Boni, Guilherme; Hak, David J; Stahel, Philip F

    2015-12-01

    Reamed locked intramedullary nailing remains the standard treatment for displaced tibial shaft fractures. Supra-patellar tibial nailing in the semiextended position has been suggested as a safe and effective surgical technique that allows mitigating certain challenges of the standard subpatellar approach. Suprapatellar nailing seems to facilitate achieving and maintaining fracture reduction, particularly in proximal third tibia fractures. Preliminary investigations have suggested that this technique is associated with a low rate of complications, including a reduced incidence of postoperative anterior knee pain. Further clinical investigations are necessary to establish overall complication rates and long-term subjective outcomes. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Treatment of low-energy tibial shaft fractures: plaster cast compared with intramedullary nailing

    OpenAIRE

    Toivanen, J.A.K.; Honkonen, S.E.; Koivisto, A.-M.; Järvinen, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed data from 87 patients who had displaced closed or open grade I simple or spiral wedge tibial shaft fractures caused by low-energy impact. Fifty-four patients were treated with plaster cast and 33 with intramedullary locking nail (IMLN). Delayed union only occurred in 8 patients after plaster cast treatment. Forty-two patients in the IMLN group and one in the plaster cast group suffered from anterior knee pain. Final treatment outcome, healing time, hospitalization time and duratio...

  8. Anterior Knee Pain after Tibial Intra-medullary Nailing: Is it Predictable?

    OpenAIRE

    Soraganvi, PC; Anand-Kumar, BS; Rajagopalakrishnan, R; Praveen-Kumar, BA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Intramedullary nailing has been used frequently for the treatment of tibial diaphyseal fractures. Chronic anterior knee pain has been considered the most frequent post-operative complication of this technique. We investigated the relationship between anterior knee pain and position of nail tip in proximal tibia. Methods: 103 patients were selected among patients who underwent interlocking nailing in our institution. Patients with other factors that might ...

  9. Removal of interlocking intramedullary nail for relieve of knee pain after tibial fracture repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaodong; Wu, Xiaotao; Liu, Lei; Wang, Chen

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of intramedullary nail removal after tibial fracture repair. Sixty patients at our hospital were enrolled in a prospective study and divided into moderate/severe knee pain (visual analog scale (VAS) ≥ 4) and mild/no knee pain (VAS knee and ankle pain, the range of motion of the knee and ankle, and Johner-Wruhs criteria before, 6 weeks after operation, and at the last follow-up. Fifty-seven patients were followed for a mean of 8.4 (2-17) months. In patients with moderate or severe knee pain intramedullary nail removal led to significant pain reductions ( p anterior border of tibia (knee pain. Knee pain VAS scores significantly lowered 6 weeks postoperatively and at the last follow-up, compared to before the operation ( p pain VAS scores, range of motion, and Johner-Wruhs criteria ( p > 0.05). For patients complaining knee pain after interlocking intramedullary nailing of tibial fractures, especially with a short distance from the tip of the nail tail to the tibial plateau (anterior border of the tibia (pain significantly.

  10. [Use of the orthofix intramedullary nail in tibial shaft fractures. A review of 22 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Juárez, José Dolores; Aguilera Zepeda, José Manuel; Bienvenu, Alfonso Tohen; Encalada Díaz, Melchor Iván; Sheldon, Oscar Dáivila

    2007-01-01

    Tibial shaft fractures are common since they account for 9% of all fractures. Intramedullary nailing is described in the literature as the gold standard for their treatment and the most recent research emphasizes minimum exposure. To present the clinical and radiological course of closed, unreamed intramedullary fixation for tibial shaft fractures in a group of patients seen at Medica Sur Hospital. Twenty-two male patients with a diagnosis of tibial shaft fracture were analyzed retrospectively; mean age was 28 years. In all of them the Orthofix nail was inserted through the patellar tendon, with a closed approach and without reaming the medullary cavity. Twenty patients had closed fractures (90.90%) and 2 patients had open fractures (9.09%). The mean time to starting ambulation with protected weight bearing was two weeks in 18 patients (81.81%); with full weight bearing, six weeks in 13 patients (91%). The mean time to full weight bearing without crutches was 10 weeks in 21 patients (95.45%). Mean radiographic grade III-IV healing time was 16 weeks. Complications were: delayed union in two patients (9.09%), compartmental syndrome, in one patient (4.45%). The Orthofix interlocking intramedullary nail placed with a closed approach provides immediate stability due to the proximal and distal locking. Patient rehabilitation is quicker, with total mobility, providing an early stimulation for callus formation and the added benefit of sparing the endosteal blood supply.

  11. Locked intramedullary nailing for displaced tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, A; Ekeland, A; Strømsøe, K; Follerås, G; Thoresen, B O

    1990-09-01

    We analysed the results of 93 tibial shaft fractures treated with the Grosse-Kempf locked nail. Twenty-six fractures were comminuted, 19 were open grade I to II, and 54 were located outside the middle third of the tibia. The deep infection rate was 3.2%. There were only two poor results. The use of this method is recommended and discussed.

  12. Irreducible tibial pilon fracture caused by incarceration of the fibula in the tibial medullary canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellanti, Prasad; Hammad, Yassir; Kosutic, Damir; Grieve, Philip P

    2012-01-01

    Fractures can be irreducible for several reasons, including soft tissue or bone fragment interposition. We report an unusual fracture configuration of a comminuted tibial pilon fracture in which the distal fibular shaft fragment was occupying the medullary canal of the proximal tibial shaft fragment and inhibiting reduction and fixation. To the best of our knowledge, this has not been previously reported in a published study. Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment of tibial diaphysis fractures with reamed and locked intramedullary nailing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Coşar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of reamed and locked intramedullary nailing for tibial diaphysis fractures.Materials and methods: The study included 38 patients (26 males, 12 females who were treated with reamed and locked intramedullary nailing for tibial diaphysis fractures. Fractures were classified according to Gustilo-Anderson classification and functional results were assessed using the Johner-Wrush criteria.Results: The mean age was 36 years (range 18-61. There were 21 AO/ASIF type A, 16 type B, and 1 type C fractures. Twenty-four fracture were closed (63.1% and 14 (36.9% were open fractures. According to the Gustilo-Anderson classification, 9 were grade I, 4 patients grade II, and one grade IIIA open fractures. Intramedullary nailing was performed following open reduction in 18 patients, and closed reduction in 20. The mean time to surgery was 9.4 days and the mean follow-up was 29 months. Union was achieved in all patients within a mean of 17.6 weeks. Anterior knee pain developed in 18 patients and infection developed in three patients. Angular deformity less than 10º was developed 12 patients (31.6%. There were screw breakacge and synostosis in four and two patients respectively. According to the Johner-Wrush criteria, functional results were very good in 23 patients (60.5%, good in 12 patients (31.6% and fair in 3 (7.9% patients.Conclusion: Treatment of tibial diaphysis fractures with reamed and locked intramedullary nailing gives satisfactory results. It should be considered as first choice in the treatment of these fractures. J Clin Exp Invest 2011;2(2:168-74

  14. Anterior Knee Pain after Tibial Intra-medullary Nailing: Is it Predictable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraganvi PC

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intramedullary nailing has been used frequently for the treatment of tibial diaphyseal fractures. Chronic anterior knee pain has been considered the most frequent post-operative complication of this technique. We investigated the relationship between anterior knee pain and position of nail tip in proximal tibia. Methods: 103 patients were selected among patients who underwent interlocking nailing in our institution. Patients with other factors that might cause anterior knee pain were excluded. In all patients intramedullary nailing was done using transpatellar approach. The patients were evaluated in two groups, 42 patients had anterior knee pain (Group A, whereas 61 patients did not have pain (Group B. The distance from nail tip from tibial plateau was measured on lateral radiographs. Nail prominence from anterior tibial cortex was also measured. Results: The two groups were similar with respect to gender and follow up period. Out of 42 patients who had knee pain 21 (50% had nail tip within proximal third distance from plateau to tibial tuberosity. Twenty-four patients (42% among knee pain group had nail prominence of more than 5mm from anterior tibial cortex followed by 12 patients (29% within 5mm and 12 patients (29% nail tip buried within the anterior cortex. Conclusion: A greater incidence of knee pain was found when nail was prominent more than 5mm and when it is in the proximal third distance from tibial plateau to tuberosity. Patients should be aware of high incidence of knee pain when the nail tip is placed in proximal third and prominence of more than 5mm.

  15. A novel intramedullary nail for micromotion stimulation of tibial fractures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dailey, Hannah L

    2011-09-20

    BACKGROUND: Animal studies and clinical trials have suggested that early application of controlled axial micromotion can accelerate healing of long bone fractures compared to rigid fixation. However, experimental investigations of micromotion constructs have been limited to external fixators, which have a higher incidence of complications than intramedullary nails. The purpose of this study was to assess whether a novel intramedullary nail design can generate stimulatory micromotion under minimal weight-bearing loads typical of the early healing period. METHODS: Eight cadaver tibiae were reamed, osteotomised, and implanted with commercially-available IM nails fitted with a custom insert that allowed 1mm of axial micromotion after proximal\\/distal interlocking. Specimens were mounted in a materials testing machine and subjected to cyclic axial loading while interfragmentary motion was measured using an extensometer. Implants were also tested in standard statically-locked mode. FINDINGS: The average force required to cause distraction of the fracture gap in micromotion mode was 37.0 (SD 21.7) N. The mean construct stiffness was 1046.8 (SD 193.6) N\\/mm in static locking mode and 512.4 (SD 99.6) N\\/mm in micromotion mode (significantly different, P<0.001). INTERPRETATION: These results support the development of a micromotion-enabled IM nail because the forces required to cause interfragmentary movements are very low, less than the weight of the hanging shank and foot. In contrast to rigid-fixation nails, which require significant weight-bearing to induce interfragmentary motion, the micromotion-enabled nail may allow movement in non-weight-bearing patients during the early healing period when the benefits of mechanical stimulation are most critical.

  16. Current practice in the intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon H; Tornetta, Paul; Swiontkowski, Marc F; Hanson, Beate; Sprague, Sheila; Syed, Amena; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2002-10-01

    Tibial fractures are the most common of all long bone fractures. Although many tibial fractures may be managed conservatively, a certain subset, including unstable fractures and open fractures, require operative stabilization. Intramedullary nails have become the popular choice of implant in the treatment of tibial shaft fractures. The variability in outcomes with tibial shaft fractures may reflect technical aspects of the surgical procedure and perioperative care regimens among surgeons. Identifying the distribution of surgeons' preferences in nailing technique, and the rationale for their choices, will aid in focusing educational activities for the orthopedic community and planning future clinical trials. Our objectives were to clarify surgeons' opinions regarding technical aspects of surgery and perioperative care after intramedullary nailing of closed and open tibial shaft fractures, and to identify predictors of surgeons' preferences in technique and perioperative care. This study was a cross-sectional survey using focus groups, key informants, and sampling to redundancy strategies to develop a survey to examine surgeons' preferences in the treatment of tibial shaft fractures. The survey was pilot tested for clarity and content validity. We mailed this survey in July 2000 to 577 orthopedic surgeons who have an interest in trauma care. These were members of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, or European AO International affiliated trauma centers. We used several strategies to improve response rates including personalized cover letters, stamped return envelopes, follow-up telephone calls, and repeat mailing of questionnaires. Main outcome measures included technical issues such as reduction, exposure, intramedullary reaming, and interlocking screws; and factors associated with surgeons' preferences such as age, fellowship, academic practice, and geographic location. Four hundred forty-four surgeons (77%) responded

  17. Intramedullary nailing without interlocking screws for femoral and tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreb, Dieuwertje L; Blokhuis, Taco J; van Wessem, Karlijn J P; Bemelman, Mike; Lansink, Koen W W; Leenen, Luke P H

    2013-08-01

    Intramedullary fixation is the treatment of choice for diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia. Locking the implant can sometimes be cumbersome and time consuming. In our institution, fractures with axial and rotational stability are treated with intramedullary nailing without interlocking. All consecutive patients presented in the University Medical Center Utrecht from October 2003 to August 2009 with acute traumatic diaphyseal fractures of the tibia or femur that were considered axial and rotational stable were included. They underwent internal fixation using intramedullary nails without interlocking. Patient records were evaluated for duration of surgery, perioperative complications, consolidation time and re-operations. Twenty-nine long bone fractures were treated in 27 patients: 20 men and 7 women, with an average age of 28.9 years (range 15.6-54.4). There were 12 femoral fractures and 17 tibial fractures. Sixteen fractures were closed and 13 were open (10 Gustilo 1, 3 Gustilo 2). The mean operating time was 43 min (range 18-68 min) for tibial fractures and 55 min (range 47-150 min) for femoral fractures. Postoperative complications occurred in six patients. Two patients (three fractures) were lost to follow-up. Healing occurred in 25 of the 26 remaining fractures (96 %) without additional interventions. One tibia was secondarily converted to a standard locked nail because of axial and rotational instability. All patients returned to their pre-injury level of activity. The use of intramedullary nailing without interlocking is associated with minimal complications in selected fractures. The advantages include a short operating time and the simplicity of its application.

  18. A comparison of effi cacy of femoral and tibial fractures healing treated by static and dynamic intramedullary nails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đemil Omerović

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intramedullary nailing is synthesis and  consolidation of fracture fragments with the main goalto gain strength and permanent placement of the implants. Two techniques of intramedullary osteosynthesis are used: with dynamic or with static intramedullary nail. Dynamization include conversion of static nail by removing screws from the longest fragment. The aim of this study is to determine whether there is a difference in the speed and quality of healing of the type A and B fractures of the femur and tibia treated by static or dynamic intramedullary nails and to compare the results.Methods: The study was conducted on a total of 129 patients with closed fractures of the diaphysis of the femur and tibia type A and type B. Patients were divided into two groups, based on the applied operating method, static or dynamic intramedullary osteosynthesis.Results: The average number of weeks of healing femoral and tibial fractures was slightly in advantage of static intramedullary osteosynthesis, it was 17.08 weeks (SD=3.382. The average number of weeks of healing in 23 patients with fractures of the femur, treated by dynamic intramedullary osteosynthesis was 17.83 (SD=2.978.Conclusion: We can conclude that static intramedullary nailing osteosynthesis unable movements between fragments which directly stimulates bone formation and formation of minimal callus. Static intramedullary ostesinthesys resolve the problem of stabilizing the fracture, limb shortening and rotation of fragments.

  19. Intramedullary nailing and functional bracing of tibial shaft fractures: 167 cases followed for minimum 2 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santos de la Fuente, F J; López Arévalo, R; Tena Carrillo, C; Ramos Salguero, J C; Fernández Medina, J M

    1998-10-01

    We treated 167 diaphyseal tibial fractures without reaming and with intramedullary fixation, using an unlocked Küntscher nail. The patients were followed for a minimum of 2 years. The mean time to union was 16 weeks. There were no serious complications, but 1 case of nonunion, 1 case of deep infection and 2 cases of clinically relevant malalignment. Migration of the nail was observed in 11 cases. We conclude that this treatment is simple and gives satisfactory results in diaphyseal fractures after low- or mid-energy trauma.

  20. Surgical stabilization for open tibial fractures in children: External fixation or elastic stable intramedullary nail - which method is optimal?

    OpenAIRE

    Rohan A Ramasubbu; Benjamin M Ramasubbu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Management of open tibial fractures is well documented in adults, with existing protocols outlining detailed treatment strategies. No clear guidelines exist for children. Surgical stabilization of tibial fractures in the pediatric population requires implants that do not disrupt the open epiphyses (growth plate). Both elastic stable intramedullary nails and external fixation can be used. The objective of this study was to identify the optimal method of surgical stabilization in th...

  1. Can Tibial Shaft Fractures Bear Weight After Intramedullary Nailing? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Steven C; Galos, David K; Taormina, David P; Crespo, Alexander; Egol, Kenneth A; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2016-07-01

    To examine the potential benefits and risks associated with weight-bearing after intramedullary (IM) nailing of unstable tibial shaft fractures. Randomized controlled trial. Two New York State level 1 trauma centers, one level 2 trauma center, and 1 tertiary care orthopaedic hospital in a large urban center in New York City. Eighty-eight patients with 90 tibial shaft fractures were enrolled. The following were used as inclusion criteria: (1) skeletally mature adult patients 18 years of age or older, (2) displaced fractures of tibial diaphysis (OTA type 42) treated with operative intervention, and (3) radiographs, including injury, operative, and completion of follow-up. Sixty-eight patients with 70 tibial shaft fractures completed follow-up. All patients were treated with locked IM nailing. Patients were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: immediate weight-bearing-as-tolerated (WBAT) or non-weight-bearing for the first 6 postoperative weeks (NWB). Fracture union or treatment failure/revision surgery. There was no statistical difference in the observed time to union between groups (WBAT = 22.1 ± 11.7 weeks vs. NWB = 21.3 ± 9.9 weeks; P = 0.76). Rates of complications did not statistically differ between groups. No fracture loss of reduction leading to malunion was encountered. Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment scores for all domains did not statistically differ between groups. Immediate weight-bearing after IM nailing of tibial shaft fractures is safe and is not associated with an increase in adverse events or complications. Patients should be allowed to bear weight as tolerated after IM nailing of OTA subtype 42-A and 42-B tibial shaft fractures. Therapeutic Level I. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  2. Reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing for the treatment of open and closed tibial fractures: a subgroup analysis of randomised trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Deting; Zheng, Qiang; Li, Hang; Qian, Shengjun; Zhang, Bo

    2009-01-01

    The choice between reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing for the treatment of open and closed tibial fractures is an ongoing controversy. We carried out a comprehensive search strategy. Six eligible randomised controlled trials were included. Three reviewers independently assessed methodological quality and extracted outcome data. Analyses were performed using Review Manager 5.0. The results showed lower risks of tibial fracture nonunion and implant failures with reamed nails compared to unreamed nails in closed tibial fractures [relative risk (RR): 0.41, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.21–0.89, P = 0.008 for nonunion and RR: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.22–0.56, P reamed and unreamed nails in open tibial fractures. In conclusion, our study recommended reamed nails for the treatment of closed tibial fractures. But the choice for open tibial fractures remains uncertain. PMID:19841919

  3. Influence of nail prominence and insertion point on anterior knee pain after tibial intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Lin, Kai-Cheng; Yang, Shan-Wei; Tarng, Yih-Wen; Hsu, Chien-Jen; Renn, Jenn-Huei

    2014-03-01

    Chronic anterior knee pain is the most common complication after tibial nail insertion. Its etiology remains unknown, and multifactorial sources have been suggested. The authors believe that nail prominence and the insertion point of the nail are important in the development of anterior knee pain. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the roles of the insertion point and nail prominence in anterior knee pain after tibial intramedullary nailing using a transtendinous approach and a common nail type. A total of 108 patients with tibial shaft fractures underwent reamed intramedullary nailing using a transtendinous approach between 2006 and 2009. Mean follow-up was 26.8±5.0 months. A visual analog scale (0-100) was used to estimate anterior knee pain severity while patients performed 7 activities retrospectively. Radiographic assessments, including nail prominence and insertion point, were performed. Sixty (55.6%) patients experienced knee pain (group P) and 48 (44.4%) did not (group N). Significant differences were not found between the groups with respect to demographics, nail diameters, or fracture classifications. Less superior and more anterior nail prominences in radiographic assessments were significantly associated with anterior knee pain. When the insertion point was over the bottom half of the anterior cortex, the influence of anterior nail prominence was more obvious. Nail removal resulted in diminished pain during the 7 assessed activities. Nail insertion should be over the bottom half of the anterior cortex, with minimal anterior nail prominence. If anterior knee pain occurs, removal of the nail should be considered. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Reamed interlocking intramedullary nailing for the treatment of tibial diaphyseal fractures and aseptic nonunions. Can we expect an optimum result?

    OpenAIRE

    Chalidis, Byron E.; Petsatodis, George E.; Sachinis, Nick C.; Dimitriou, Christos G.; Christodoulou, Anastasios G.

    2009-01-01

    The need for reaming and the number of locking screws to be used in intramedullary (IM) tibial nailing of acute fractures as well as routine bone grafting of tibial aseptic nonunions have not been clearly defined. We describe the results of reamed interlocked IM nails in 233 patients with 247 tibial fractures (190 closed, 27 open and 30 nonunions). Ninety-six percent of the fractures were united at review after an average of 4.9?years. No correlation was found between union and nail diameter ...

  5. Role of the fibula in the stability of diaphyseal tibial fractures fixed by intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, John G; Daly, Charles J; Harty, James A; Dailey, Hannah L

    2016-10-01

    For tibial fractures, the decision to fix a concomitant fibular fracture is undertaken on a case-by-case basis. To aid in this clinical decision-making process, we investigated whether loss of integrity of the fibula significantly destabilises midshaft tibial fractures, whether fixation of the fibula restores stability to the tibia, and whether removal of the fibula and interosseous membrane for expediency in biomechanical testing significantly influences tibial interfragmentary mechanics. Tibia/fibula pairs were harvested from six cadaveric donors with the interosseous membrane intact. A tibial osteotomy fracture was fixed by reamed intramedullary (IM) nailing. Axial, torsion, bending, and shear tests were completed for four models of fibular involvement: intact fibula, osteotomy fracture, fibular plating, and resected fibula and interosseous membrane. Overall construct stiffness decreased slightly with fibular osteotomy compared to intact bone, but this change was not statistically significant. Under low loads, the influence of the fibula on construct stability was only statistically significant in torsion (large effect size). Fibular plating stiffened the construct slightly, but this change was not statistically significant compared to the fibular osteotomy case. Complete resection of the fibula and interosseous membrane significantly decreased construct torsional stiffness only (large effect size). These results suggest that fixation of the fibula may not contribute significantly to the stability of diaphyseal tibial fractures and should not be undertaken unless otherwise clinically indicated. For testing purposes, load-sharing through the interosseous membrane contributes significantly to overall construct mechanics, especially in torsion, and we recommend preservation of these structures when possible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Rotational Mal-Alignment after Reamed Intramedullary Nailing for tibial shaft fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sher Baz; Mohib, Yasir; Rashid, Rizwan Haroon; Rashid, Haroonur

    2016-10-01

    Intra-medullary (IM) nailing is standard of care for unstable tibial shaft fractures. Malrotation is very common but it is under-recognised, inpart because of variation in normal anatomy and partly due to difficulty in accurately assessing rotation. This study was planned to evaluate the frequency of rotational mal-alignment after reamed tibia IMnailing. This cross-sectional study was conducted at Aga khan University Hospital, Karachi, and comprised patients with tibia shaft fractures managed with IMnailing from January to December 2014. All the patients were assessed intra-operatively for rotational alignment using the knee and ankle fluoroscopic images. There were 81 patients with a mean age of 38±16.9 years. There were 64(79%) male patients. Overall the incidence of malrotation was in 20(24.7%) cases. Rotational mal-alignment is one of the preventable complications after IMnailing which can be assesed intra-operatively under fluoroscope.

  7. [Effect of interlocking intramedullary nail in treatment of open tibial and fibula fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jianfei; Zhao, Yinsong; He, Xueyu; Zhou, Yang

    2009-03-01

    To determine the effect of interlocking intramedullary nail in treatment of open tibial and fibula fractures and analyze the method to promote the bone union. From December 2003 to June 2006, thirty-five patients with open tibial and fibula fracture were treated with emergency debridement, interlocked intramedullary fixation for tibia and fixed fibula at the same time. During operation, the bone marrow was collected and grafted into the fracture gaps. Among them, there were 27 males and 8 females, involving in 22 left legs and 13 right legs. Their ages ranged from 19 to 65 years, with an average of 34.7 years. The location of fracture was the middle of the tibia and fibula in 16 cases, the distal 1/3 of the tibia and fibula in 12 cases and the proximal 1/3 in 7 cases. According to the Gustilo classification of open injuries, there were 7 cases of type I, 19 cases of type II, 8 cases of type III a and 1 case of type III b. The mean range of knee motion was 48.3 degrees (45-70 degrees). The mean time from injury to operation was 4.3 hours (50 minutes to 7 hours). The mean operation time was 94 minutes (60-132 minutes) and the mean blood loss was 122 mL (100-350 mL). The wound healed by first intention in 32 patients. Incision was sutured in 2 cases of type III a fractures after operation 4 days, gastrocnemius flap graft was performed in 1 case of type III b fracture 1 week after operation. They all achieve good healing. No fractures split off, no iatrogenic nerve and vascular injury occurred, no osteofascial compartment syndromes or deep vein thrombus happened. Tension blisters appeared in 1 case of type II fracture after operation and subsided after 5 days. Patients were followed up for 14-43 months (mean 22 months). The X-ray films showed that fracture union was observe in 30 cases after 14 weeks of operation, in 3 cases after 18 weeks and in 1 case after 22 weeks of operation. The fractures union time was 15.2 weeks on average. About 2 cm nonunion in lateral

  8. Anterior knee pain after tibial intramedullary nailing using a medial paratendinous approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Si Young; Chang, Ho Geun; Byun, Jae Chul; Kim, Tae Young

    2012-03-01

    To determine the incidence, severity, and etiology of anterior knee pain after tibial intramedullary (IM) nailing using a medial paratendinous approach and to investigate the association between anterior knee pain and functional impairment. Retrospective study with current clinical and radiographic assessments. Level I trauma center. Forty-five patients with unilateral, tibial diaphyseal fractures treated with tibial IM nailing between August 2005 and January 2009. The mean follow-up was 22.3 months (range, 12-52 months). All patients underwent tibial IM nailing using a medial paratendinous approach. Anterior knee pain based on a visual analog scale and functional outcomes based on the Tegner activity score and the modified Lysholm score. Of the 45 patients, 16 (36%) were painless (N group), 16 (36%) had mild pain (M group), and 13 (28%) had moderate to severe pain (MS group). No group differences were found with respect to age, sex, body mass index, mode of injury, or type of fracture. With regard to nail prominence, superior nail prominence was greater in the MS group than in the other two groups (P = 0.042). There were no significant differences among the three groups in terms of anterior nail prominence (P = 0.221). The nail-apex distance in the MS group was significantly greater than in the other two groups (P = 0.033), and no significant difference was found between the N and M groups. The descending order of the activities with respect to severity of knee pain was kneeling, squatting, running, and stair ascending. Visual analog scale analysis revealed that the MS group had significantly more severe pain for all eight activities examined than the M group. At latest follow-up, the Tegner activity score was significantly lower in the MS group than in the other two groups (P = 0.008), and there were statistically significant intergroup differences in the modified Lysholm score (P Anterior knee pain after tibial IM nailing using a medial paratendinous approach

  9. Reamed interlocking intramedullary nailing for the treatment of tibial diaphyseal fractures and aseptic nonunions. Can we expect an optimum result?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalidis, Byron E; Petsatodis, George E; Sachinis, Nick C; Dimitriou, Christos G; Christodoulou, Anastasios G

    2009-10-01

    The need for reaming and the number of locking screws to be used in intramedullary (IM) tibial nailing of acute fractures as well as routine bone grafting of tibial aseptic nonunions have not been clearly defined. We describe the results of reamed interlocked IM nails in 233 patients with 247 tibial fractures (190 closed, 27 open and 30 nonunions). Ninety-six percent of the fractures were united at review after an average of 4.9 years. No correlation was found between union and nail diameter (P = 0.501) or the number of locking screws used (P = 0.287). Nail dynamization was effective in 82% of fractures. Locking screw(s) breakage was associated with nonunion in 25% of cases. Bone grafting during IM nailing was found not to increase the healing rate in tibial nonunions (P = 0.623). None of the IM nails were removed or revised due to infection. A dropped hallux and postoperative compartment syndrome were found in 0.8 and 1.6% of cases, respectively. Anterior knee pain was reported in 42% of patients but nail removal did not alleviate the symptoms in almost half. This series confirms the place of reamed intramedullary nailing for the vast majority of tibial diaphyseal fractures. It provides an optimum outcome and minimizes the need for supplementary bone grafting in aseptic nonunions.

  10. A comparative study of intramedullary interlocking nailing and minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis in extra articular distal tibial fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Arup K Daolagupu; Ashwani Mudgal; Vikash Agarwala; Kaushik K Dutta

    2017-01-01

    Background: Extraarticular distal tibial fractures are among the most challenging fractures encountered by an orthopedician for treatment because of its subcutaneous location, poor blood supply and decreased muscular cover anteriorly, complications such as delayed union, nonunion, wound infection, and wound dehiscence are often seen as a great challenge to the surgeon. Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) and intramedullary interlocking nail (IMLN) are two well-accepted and effectiv...

  11. Intramedullary nailing of proximal and distal one-third tibial shaft fractures with intraoperative two-pin external fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Robert W; Kapotas, James S; Virkus, Walter W

    2009-04-01

    Fractures of the proximal and distal one thirds of the tibial shaft have historically higher malunion rates than those of the midshaft. This retrospective case series evaluates the postoperative radiographic outcome of intramedullary nailing of proximal and distal one-third tibial shaft fractures using intraoperative two-pin external fixation, often referred to as traveling traction. Between 2000 and 2005, 15 consecutive patients with proximal third and 27 consecutive patients with distal third displaced extra-articular fractures of the tibia were treated with statically locked intramedullary nailing and supplementary intraoperative two-pin rectangular frame external fixation. The external fixation was removed once the proximal and distal locking screws were in place. The alignment of the fractures was determined using standard postoperative anteroposterior and lateral radiographs. Postoperatively, 14 of 15 patients with proximal fractures and 25 of 27 patients with distal fractures had less than 5 degrees of angular deformity in both the coronal and sagittal planes and less than 1 cm shortening. Statically locked intramedullary nailing with simultaneous intraoperative traveling traction external fixation as treatment for proximal and distal one-third extra-articular tibial shaft fractures is successful in achieving a high rate of acceptable postoperative alignment.

  12. [Fractures of the tibial shaft treated by blind intramedullary nailing. A review of 521 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, Y; Aubriot, J H; Lamotte, N

    1977-09-01

    The authors have studied a series of 521 fractures of the tibia treated by blind intramedullary nailing without reaming. Union by the 120th day was obtained in 93.3% of cases. Malunion was uncommon and was related to an inadequate initial reduction. A secondary procedure was only necessary in two cases of malunion. In closed fractures, no case suffered infection. In compound fractures, 4.3% became infected (5 osteitis, 4 septic non-union) but all cases were cured by secondary procedures. Aseptic non-union occurred in 2.3% of cases. The authors recommend the use of nails of at least 8 mm diameter driven down to the region of the lower articular surface. In patients with a narrow medullary canal, or in fractures of the lower third of the tibia, the authors consider that reaming would have given better results. In other types of fracture reaming is more hazardous than useful.

  13. Management of aseptic non-unions of the distal third of the tibial diaphysis using static interlocking intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begkas, Dimitrios; Katsenis, Dimitrios; Pastroudis, Alexandros

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the management of aseptic non-unions of the distal third of the tibial diaphysis, using static interlocking intramedullary nailing. Between January 2005 and November 2012, a total number of 42 patients who underwent surgery at our hospital for aseptic non-unions of the distal third of the tibial diaphysis, were included in our study. Preoperatively, all the patients were tested for the presence of infection of non-union. The post-operative follow up was based on clinical and radiological findings. Union was achieved in 41 (98%) patients, at a mean time of 5.8 months (four-eight months). One (2%) patient developed infection of the wound four weeks after the operation. A small decrease of the tibial length, of about one cm was seen in three (7%) patients. Pain of the patellar tendon, at the entry point of the nail, was observed in six (14%) patients, without impacting the range of motion of the knee. In two (5%) patients, a decrease in dorsiflexion of the ankle joint occurred, of about ten degrees angle. Static interlocking intramedullary nailing is the preferable technique in the management of aseptic non-unions of the distal third of the tibial diaphysis, because it provides high union rate and few postoperative complications. A good preoperative evaluation for infections, use of proper surgical technique with respect to soft tissues, use of autogenous bone grafts and early mobilization of patients, are the keys to success of this method.

  14. Reamed intramedullary exchange nailing in the operative treatment of aseptic tibial shaft nonunion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hierholzer, Christian; Friederichs, Jan; Glowalla, Claudio; Woltmann, Alexander; Bühren, Volker; von Rüden, Christian

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a standardized treatment protocol regarding the rate of secondary bone union, complications, and functional outcome. This study was started as a prospective study in a single Level I Trauma Centre between 2003 and 2012. The study group consisted of 188 patients with the diagnosis of an aseptic tibial shaft nonunion. Exchange nailing was performed following a standardized surgical protocol. Long-term follow-up was analyzed for rate of bone healing and functional outcome. Osseous healing was achieved in 182 out of 188 patients (97 %). In 165 out of 188 patients (88 %), bone healing was observed timely and uneventfully after a single exchange nailing procedure. An open approach was necessary in 32 patients (17 %). Twenty-three patients (12 %) required additional therapy such as extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Post-operative complications were observed in seven patients (4 %). Almost all patients demonstrated osseous healing within 12 months, with the majority of osseous healing occurring within six months. A relevant shortening of the fractured tibia was observed in 20 out of 188 patients (11 %). After a median follow-up of 23 months (range 12-45 months), outcome was evaluated using the assessment system of Friedman/Wyman. In summary, 154 out of 188 patients (82 %) had a good functional long-term result. Reamed intramedullary exchange nailing including correction of axis alignment is a safe and effective treatment of aseptic tibial shaft nonunion with a high rate of bone healing and a good radiological and functional long-term outcome.

  15. Surgical stabilization for open tibial fractures in children: External fixation or elastic stable intramedullary nail - which method is optimal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubbu, Rohan A; Ramasubbu, Benjamin M

    2016-09-01

    Management of open tibial fractures is well documented in adults, with existing protocols outlining detailed treatment strategies. No clear guidelines exist for children. Surgical stabilization of tibial fractures in the pediatric population requires implants that do not disrupt the open epiphyses (growth plate). Both elastic stable intramedullary nails and external fixation can be used. The objective of this study was to identify the optimal method of surgical stabilization in the treatment of open tibial fractures in children. MEDLINE and Embase were searched from their inception to March 2014 using the following advanced search terms (Key words): "open tibia fracture," "fracture fixation," "external fixation," "intramedullary," and "bone nail." Only studies in English and pertaining to children with open fractures treated with elastic stable intramedullary nails or external fixation between 1994 and 2014 were included. Twelve clinical studies were critically appraised. Due to a paucity in the literature coupled with a nonsystematic presentation of results, it proved to be very difficult in extracting relevant results from the studies. This was further added by a variation in outcome measures. Consequently, the results we obtained were difficult to draw conclusions from. There is no conclusive evidence or best practice guidelines for their management. Thus, as is highlighted in this study, more research is needed to determine the optimum treatment strategy for this common pediatric injury. The existing literature is of poor quality; consisting mainly of retrospective reviews of patients' medical records, charts, and radiographs. Carefully designed, high-quality prospective cohort studies utilizing a nationalized multi-hospital approach are needed to improve understanding before protocols and guidelines can be developed and implemented.

  16. Elastic stable intramedullary nailing for severely displaced distal tibial fractures in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kaiying; Cai, Haiqing; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Yunlan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) has became a well-accepted method of osteosynthesis of diaphyseal fractures in the skeletally immature patient for many advantages, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the preliminary results of this minimally invasive treatment for severely displaced distal tibial diaphyseal metaphyseal junction (DTDMJ) fractures. This study was carried out over a 6-year period. Twenty-one severely displaced DTDMJ fractures treated using ESIN were evaluated clinically and radiographically. Complications were assessed: the patients were evaluated with regard to nonunion, malunion, infection, growth arrest, leg length discrepancy, implant irritation, and joint function. Mean age at the time of surgery was 7.8 years (range between 5.3 and 14.8 years), mean body weight 34.1 kg, all fractures were transverse or mild oblique type, including 3 open fractures, 5 multifragmented fractures, and 4 fractures associated with polytrauma; 6 cases were treated with antegrade ESIN of tibia while 15 cases need combined retrograde fibula and antegrade tibia fixation treatments. Follow-ups were ranging from 11 to 36 months, 19 fractures showed both clinical and radiographic evidence of healing within 5 months; all cases had full range motion of knee and ankle with symmetrical foot progress angle. Nail removal was at a mean 7.1 months, at final follow-up, no growth arrest or disturbances occurred. Five patients had complications; leg length discrepancy had decreased yet affected 2 patients, 2 cases showed delayed union, and 1 case developed restricted dorsal extension at the metatarsophalangeal joint of the hallux. ESIN is the treatment of choice for pediatric severely displaced DTDMJ fractures that cannot be reduced by closed reduction or ones that cannot be casted. The advantages include faster fracture healing, excellent functional and cosmetic results, safe and reliable surgical technique, and lower severe complication rate. PMID

  17. Displaced Tibial Shaft Fractures With Intact Fibula in Children: Nonoperative Management Versus Operative Treatment With Elastic Stable Intramedullary Nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavese, Federico; Botnari, Alexei; Andreacchio, Antonio; Marengo, Lorenza; Samba, Antoine; Dimeglio, Alain; Pereira, Bruno; Mansour, Mounira; Rousset, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of displaced tibial shaft fractures with intact fibula in children after nonoperative management and operative treatment by elastic stable intramedullary nailing. A study was performed on 80 consecutive children, 56 males, 24 females from 2 Institutions, with displaced and closed tibial shaft fracture with intact fibula. All patients underwent regular clinical and radiographic follow-up visits for at least 2 years after injury. In total, 26 patients (group A-Institution I) were treated surgically by elastic stable intramedullary nailing and 54 patients (18 patients from group B-Institution I and 36 patients from group C-Institution II) were treated nonoperatively with closed reduction and casting. groups A, B, and C did not significantly differ on sex (P=0.37), side (P=0.54), and fracture site (P=0.14).Valgus deformity was significantly controlled in group A patients only (P=0.001); during follow-up in group B patients (P=0.017), and showed no significant change between pretreatment images and last follow-up in group C patients (P=0.71). Procurvatum deformity was significantly controlled in group A patients only (P=0.001); it showed no significant improvement after conservative treatment in group B (P=0.73) and C patients (P=0.8). Recurvatum was significantly improved in group A (Pfracture of tibial diaphysis without associated fibula fracture.On the basis of the findings reported here, it is not contraindicated to operate skeletally immature patients with displaced fracture of tibial diaphysis without associated fibula fracture. However, results were essentially the same and either method is a satisfactory choice for pediatric tibia shaft fractures with an intact fibula. In particular, we found that conservative treatment was as efficacious as surgical treatment apart from the length of time for immobilization. Level III.

  18. Percutaneous clamping of spiral and oblique fractures of the tibial shaft: a safe and effective reduction aid during intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinge, Cory A; Beltran, Michael J; Dollahite, Henry A; Huber, Florian G

    2015-06-01

    The reduction of tibial shaft fractures during intramedullary nailing is important if limb alignment is to be restored and successful clinical outcomes are expected. We have used a percutaneously applied (or open) clamp or clamps to achieve and maintain reduction during nailing of all amendable tibial shaft fractures. In this article, we describe the technique and preliminary results comparing closed, simple spiral and oblique tibial shaft fractures (OTA 42-A1 and A2) managed with percutaneous clamp-assisted nailing (CAN) versus nailing using manual reduction (MRN) held by the surgical team. In the MRN group, there were an increased fracture gap (P = 0.04) and trends toward malalignment (P = 0.07) and healing time (P = 0.06) compared with the CAN group. There were also trends in clinical; no wound complications occurred in either group. We have found that percutaneous CAN of closed, simple spiral and oblique tibial shaft fractures seems safe and allows for early predictable union with reproducible alignment compared with nailing using MRN.

  19. Intragrade intramedullary nailing of an open tibial shaft fracture in a patient with concomitant ipsilateral total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Nicholas; Goyal, Kanu; Tarkin, Ivan

    2015-03-01

    Open tibial shaft fracture occurring below an ipsilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a unique injury pattern that presents an additional degree of complexity to an already challenging treatment algorithm. Tibial shaft fracture is a surgical emergency requiring respect for the soft-tissue envelope and consideration of the biomechanical and biologic factors involved in healing. Treatment with an intramedullary nail relative to other types of internal or external fixation methods optimizes these factors and minimizes the risks of nonunion, malunion, infection, soft-tissue compromise, and reoperation, which are prevalent after this fracture. However, tibial shaft fracture associated with an ipsilateral TKA complicates standard treatment principles and increases the risks after surgery. In many instances, this type of injury pattern in a patient with medical comorbidities that would impede fracture and wound healing would make a limb amputation the preferred method of treatment. However, in this case report, we examine treatment options for an open tibial shaft fracture in the setting of an ipsilateral TKA and propose a method of limb salvage in a patient with medical comorbidities sustaining this injury pattern.

  20. A comparative study of intramedullary interlocking nailing and minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis in extra articular distal tibial fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daolagupu, Arup K; Mudgal, Ashwani; Agarwala, Vikash; Dutta, Kaushik K

    2017-01-01

    Extraarticular distal tibial fractures are among the most challenging fractures encountered by an orthopedician for treatment because of its subcutaneous location, poor blood supply and decreased muscular cover anteriorly, complications such as delayed union, nonunion, wound infection, and wound dehiscence are often seen as a great challenge to the surgeon. Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) and intramedullary interlocking nail (IMLN) are two well-accepted and effective methods, but each has been historically related to complications. This study compares clinical and radiological outcome in extraarticular distal tibia fractures treated by intramedullary interlocking nail (IMLN) and minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO). 42 patients included in this study, 21 underwent IMLN and 21 were treated with MIPO who met the inclusion criteria and operated between June 2014 and May 2015. Patients were followed up for clinical and radiological evaluation. In IMLN group, average union time was 18.26 weeks compared to 21.70 weeks in plating group which was significant ( P plating group. Lesser complications in terms of implant irritation, ankle stiffness, and infection, were seen in interlocking group as compared to plating group. Average functional outcome according to American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society score was measured which came out to be 96.67. IMLN group was associated with lesser duration of surgery, earlier weight bearing and union rate, lesser incidence of infection and implant irritation which makes it a preferable choice for fixation of extra-articular distal tibial fractures. However, larger randomized controlled trials are required for confirming the results.

  1. (Sample) size matters! An examination of sample size from the SPRINT trial study to prospectively evaluate reamed intramedullary nails in patients with tibial fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Tornetta, Paul; Rampersad, Shelly-Ann; Sprague, Sheila; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Sanders, David W.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Walter, Stephen; Guyatt, Gordon; Buckingham, Lisa; Leece, Pamela; Viveiros, Helena; Mignott, Tashay; Ansell, Natalie; Sidorkewicz, Natalie; Agel, Julie; Bombardier, Claire; Berlin, Jesse A.; Bosse, Michael; Browner, Bruce; Gillespie, Brenda; O'Brien, Peter; Poolman, Rudolf; Macleod, Mark D.; Carey, Timothy; Leitch, Kellie; Bailey, Stuart; Gurr, Kevin; Konito, Ken; Bartha, Charlene; Low, Isolina; MacBean, Leila V.; Ramu, Mala; Reiber, Susan; Strapp, Ruth; Tieszer, Christina; Kreder, Hans; Stephen, David J. G.; Axelrod, Terry S.; Yee, Albert J. M.; Richards, Robin R.; Finkelstein, Joel; Holtby, Richard M.; Cameron, Hugh; Cameron, John; Gofton, Wade; Murnaghan, John; Schatztker, Joseph; Bulmer, Beverly; Conlan, Lisa; Laflamme, Yves; Berry, Gregory; Beaumont, Pierre; Ranger, Pierre; Laflamme, Georges-Henri; Jodoin, Alain; Renaud, Eric; Gagnon, Sylvain; Maurais, Gilles; Malo, Michel; Fernandes, Julio; Latendresse, Kim; Poirier, Marie-France; Daigneault, Gina; McKee, Michael M.; Waddell, James P.; Bogoch, Earl R.; Daniels, Timothy R.; McBroom, Robert R.; Vicente, Milena R.; Storey, Wendy; Wild, Lisa M.; McCormack, Robert; Perey, Bertrand; Goetz, Thomas J.; Pate, Graham; Penner, Murray J.; Panagiotopoulos, Kostas; Pirani, Shafique; Dommisse, Ian G.; Loomer, Richard L.; Stone, Trevor; Moon, Karyn; Zomar, Mauri; Webb, Lawrence X.; Teasdall, Robert D.; Birkedal, John Peter; Martin, David Franklin; Ruch, David S.; Kilgus, Douglas J.; Pollock, David C.; Harris, Mitchel Brion; Wiesler, Ethan Ron; Ward, William G.; Shilt, Jeffrey Scott; Koman, Andrew L.; Poehling, Gary G.; Kulp, Brenda; Creevy, William R.; Stein, Andrew B.; Bono, Christopher T.; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Brown, T. Desmond; Pacicca, Donna; Sledge, John B.; Foster, Timothy E.; Voloshin, Ilva; Bolton, Jill; Carlisle, Hope; Shaughnessy, Lisa; Ombremsky, William T.; LeCroy, C. Michael; Meinberg, Eric G.; Messer, Terry M.; Craig, William L.; Dirschl, Douglas R.; Caudle, Robert; Harris, Tim; Elhert, Kurt; Hage, William; Jones, Robert; Piedrahita, Luis; Schricker, Paul O.; Driver, Robin; Godwin, Jean; Hansley, Gloria; Obremskey, William Todd; Kregor, Philip James; Tennent, Gregory; Truchan, Lisa M.; Sciadini, Marcus; Shuler, Franklin D.; Driver, Robin E.; Nading, Mary Alice; Neiderstadt, Jacky; Vap, Alexander R.; Vallier, Heather A.; Patterson, Brendan M.; Wilber, John H.; Wilber, Roger G.; Sontich, John K.; Moore, Timothy Alan; Brady, Drew; Cooperman, Daniel R.; Davis, John A.; Cureton, Beth Ann; Mandel, Scott; Orr, R. Douglas; Sadler, John T. S.; Hussain, Tousief; Rajaratnam, Krishan; Petrisor, Bradley; Drew, Brian; Bednar, Drew A.; Kwok, Desmond C. H.; Pettit, Shirley; Hancock, Jill; Cole, Peter A.; Smith, Joel J.; Brown, Gregory A.; Lange, Thomas A.; Stark, John G.; Levy, Bruce; Swiontkowski, Marc F.; Garaghty, Mary J.; Salzman, Joshua G.; Schutte, Carol A.; Tastad, Linda Toddie; Vang, Sandy; Seligson, David; Roberts, Craig S.; Malkani, Arthur L.; Sanders, Laura; Gregory, Sharon Allen; Dyer, Carmen; Heinsen, Jessica; Smith, Langan; Madanagopal, Sudhakar; Coupe, Kevin J.; Tucker, Jeffrey J.; Criswell, Allen R.; Buckle, Rosemary; Rechter, Alan Jeffrey; Sheth, Dhiren Shaskikant; Urquart, Brad; Trotscher, Thea; Anders, Mark J.; Kowalski, Joseph M.; Fineberg, Marc S.; Bone, Lawrence B.; Phillips, Matthew J.; Rohrbacher, Bernard; Stegemann, Philip; Mihalko, William M.; Buyea, Cathy; Augustine, Stephen J.; Jackson, William Thomas; Solis, Gregory; Ero, Sunday U.; Segina, Daniel N.; Berrey, Hudson B.; Agnew, Samuel G.; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Campbell, Lakina C.; Derting, Lynn; McAdams, June; Goslings, J. Carel; Ponsen, Kees Jan; Luitse, Jan; Kloen, Peter; Joosse, Pieter; Winkelhagen, Jasper; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Teague, David C.; Davey, Joseph; Sullivan, J. Andy; Ertl, William J. J.; Puckett, Timothy A.; Pasque, Charles B.; Tompkins, John F.; Gruel, Curtis R.; Kammerlocher, Paul; Lehman, Thomas P.; Puffinbarger, William R.; Carl, Kathy L.; Weber, Donald W.; Jomha, Nadr M.; Goplen, Gordon R.; Masson, Edward; Beaupre, Lauren A.; Greaves, Karen E.; Schaump, Lori N.; Jeray, Kyle J.; Goetz, David R.; Westberry, Davd E.; Broderick, J. Scott; Moon, Bryan S.; Tanner, Stephanie L.; Powell, James N.; Buckley, Richard E.; Elves, Leslie; Connolly, Stephen; Abraham, Edward P.; Eastwood, Donna; Steele, Trudy; Ellis, Thomas; Herzberg, Alex; Brown, George A.; Crawford, Dennis E.; Hart, Robert; Hayden, James; Orfaly, Robert M.; Vigland, Theodore; Vivekaraj, Maharani; Bundy, Gina L.; Miclau, Theodore; Matityahu, Amir; Coughlin, R. Richard; Kandemir, Utku; McClellan, R. Trigg; Lin, Cindy Hsin-Hua; Karges, David; Cramer, Kathryn; Watson, J. Tracy; Moed, Berton; Scott, Barbara; Beck, Dennis J.; Orth, Carolyn; Puskas, David; Clark, Russell; Jones, Jennifer; Egol, Kenneth A.; Paksima, Nader; France, Monet; Wai, Eugene K.; Johnson, Garth; Wilkinson, Ross; Gruszczynski, Adam T.; Vexler, Liisa

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate sample size and power in randomized trials can result in misleading findings. This study demonstrates the effect of sample size in a large clinical trial by evaluating the results of the Study to Prospectively evaluate Reamed Intramedullary Nails in Patients with Tibial fractures (SPRINT)

  2. [The relationship between anterior knee pain occurring after tibial intramedullary nailing and the localization of the nail in the proximal tibia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzümcügil, Onat; Doğan, Ahmet; Yalçinkaya, Merter; Kabukçuoğlu, Yavuz S

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the development of postoperative anterior knee pain and the location of the nail in the proximal tibia in patients treated with locked intramedullary nailing for tibial diaphyseal fractures. Thirty patients were selected among those who underwent locked intramedullary nailing for tibial diaphyseal fractures, with exclusion of all other factors that might be associated with postoperative anterior knee pain. In all the patients, intramedullary nailing was performed using the transtendinous approach and both proximal and distal locking. The patients were evaluated in two groups: 10 patients (3 women, 7 men; mean age 38 + or - 14 years) had anterior knee pain, whereas 20 patients (5 women, 15 men; mean age 35 + or - 12 years) did not. The distances from the nail to the tibial plateau and anterior tibial cortex were measured on the lateral x-rays after a mean follow-up of 56.6 months and 45.2 months in patients with and without anterior knee pain, respectively. The two groups were similar with respect to gender and follow-up period (p>0.05). The mean distances from the nail to the tibial plateau and anterior tibial cortex were -11.5 + or - 7.9 mm and 3.7 + or - 5.4 mm, respectively, in patients with anterior knee pain. The corresponding distances were -8.8 + or - 7.3 mm and 6.5 + or - 4.7 mm in patients without knee pain. Neither of the distances showed a significant difference between the two groups (p>0.05). Our findings suggest that the distances from the nail to the tibial plateau and anterior tibial cortex do not have any role in the development of postoperative anterior knee pain.

  3. "Clothesline technique" for proximal tibial shaft fracture fixation using conventional intramedullary nail: a simple, useful, and inexpensive technique to prevent fracture malalignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belangero, William Dias; Santos Pires, Robinson Esteves; Livani, Bruno; Rossi, Felipe Lins; de Andrade, Andre Luis Lugnani

    2018-01-23

    Treatment of proximal tibial shaft fractures is always challenging. Despite the development of modern techniques, the literature still shows high complication rates, especially regarding proximal fragment malalignment. It is well known that knee position in flexion during tibial nailing is responsible for extension and valgus deformities of the proximal fragment. Unlike in tibial shaft fractures, nails do not reduce proximal tibial fractures due to the medullary canal width. This study aims to describe a simple, useful, and inexpensive technique to prevent valgus and extension deformities when treating proximal tibial fractures using conventional nails: the so-called clothesline technique.

  4. A prospective, randomized study of intramedullary nails inserted with and without reaming for the treatment of open and closed fractures of the tibial shaft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkemeier, C G; Schmidt, A H; Kyle, R F; Templeman, D C; Varecka, T F

    2000-01-01

    To determine if there are differences in healing, complications, or number of procedures required to obtain union among open and closed tibia fractures treated with intramedullary (IM) nails inserted with and without reaming. Prospective, surgeon-randomized comparative study. Level One trauma center. Ninety-four consecutive patients with unstable closed and open (excluding Gustilo Grade IIIB and IIIC) fractures of the tibial shaft treated with IM nail insertion between November 1, 1994, and June 30, 1997. Interlocked IM nail insertion with and without medullary canal reaming. Time to union, type and incidence of complications, and number of secondary procedures performed to obtain union. For open fractures, there were no significant differences in the time to union or number of additional procedures performed to obtain union in patients with reamed nail insertion compared with those without reamed insertion. A higher percentage of closed fractures were healed at four months after reamed nail insertion compared with unreamed insertion (p = 0.040), but there was not a difference at six and twelve months. More secondary procedures were needed to obtain union after unreamed nail insertion for the treatment of closed tibia fractures, but the difference was not statistically significant given the limited power of our study (p = 0.155). Broken screws were seen only in patients treated with smaller-diameter nails inserted without reaming, and the majority occurred in patients who were noncompliant with weight-bearing restrictions. There were no differences in rates of infection or compartment syndrome. Our findings support the use of reamed insertion of IM nails for the treatment of closed tibia fractures, which led to earlier time to union without increased complications. In addition, canal reaming did not increase the risk of complications in open tibia fractures.

  5. Role of the fibula in the stability of diaphyseal tibial fractures fixed by intramedullary nailing

    OpenAIRE

    Galbraith, John G.; Daly, Charles J.; Harty, James A.; Dailey, Hannah L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: For tibial fractures, the decision to fix a concomitant fibular fracture is undertaken on a case-by-case basis. To aid in this clinical decision-making process, we investigated whether loss of integrity of the fibula significantly destabilises midshaft tibial fractures, whether fixation of the fibula restores stability to the tibia, and whether removal of the fibula and interosseous membrane for expediency in biomechanical testing significantly influences tibial interfragmentary m...

  6. Decreased QOL and muscle strength are persistent 1 year after intramedullary nailing of a tibial shaft fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter; Elsoe, Rasmus; Laessoe, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    was measured with the questionnaire Eq5D-5L and compared to norm data from a reference population. Recordings of pain and contralateral muscle strength (isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) for knee flexion and extension were collected at 6 weeks, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Ipsilateral MVCs......INTRODUCTION:To evaluate the development in patient-reported quality of life (QOL) and muscle strength in the period from surgery to 12 months postoperatively after intramedullary nailing of a tibial shaft fracture. MATERIALS AND METHODS:The design was a prospective, follow-up cohort study. QOL...... compared to the reference population. Six and 12 months after surgery patients demonstrated decreased muscle strength in the injured leg compared to the non-injured leg for knee extension and flexion (P muscle strength during knee...

  7. Loss of bone strength after intramedullary nailing. Torsion tests of tibial osteotomies in rabbits.

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    Kaartinen, E; Paavolainen, P; Holmström, T; Slätis, P

    1985-12-01

    Rigid intramedullary nailing was used in 75 rabbits to stabilize a transverse osteotomy of the midshaft of the tibia. In 36 additional rabbits intramedullary nailing was performed without osteotomy. No additional external immobilization was used postoperatively. After removal of the nail the mechanical strength of the tibiofibular bones was tested torsiometrically in 30 osteotomized and 18 non-osteotomized animals from 3 to 24 weeks after the operation. At 3 weeks the torsional load fractured all osteotomized bones through the osteotomy line. At later stages a spiral fracture occurred either crossing or close to the osteotomy area, usually distal to the tibiofibular junction. The increase in mechanical strength of the osteotomized bones reached a maximum at 6 weeks and then decreased. The strength of the non-osteotomized nailed bones also decreased slightly. The results suggest that rigid intramedullary nailing, although providing good conditions for early consolidation of experimental osteotomy, leads secondarily to deterioration of the mechanical properties of tubular bone.

  8. Intramedullary fixation of tibial shaft fractures using an expandable nail: early results of 54 acute tibial shaft fractures.

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    Steinberg, Ely L; Geller, David S; Yacoubian, Shahan V; Shasha, Nadav; Dekel, Shmuel; Lorich, Dean G

    2006-05-01

    To evaluate and present our experience using the expandable nail system for the treatment of acute tibial shaft fractures. Retrospective study. Two level-1 trauma centers-University teaching hospitals. Fifty-four consecutive patients were treated by this nail system for acute tibial shaft fracture. Two nail diameters were used, 8.5 mm and 10 mm. Operation, hospitalization and healing times, reaming versus nonreaming, isolated versus multiple injuries, and reoperations were recorded and analyzed statistically. Follow-up was obtained either until fracture healing or for a minimum of 1 year with an average of 14 months (12 to 24). All fractures healed in an average time of 72 days (21 to 204). The average healing times for patients treated with 8.5-mm and 10-mm nails were 77.2 days (27 to 204) and 63.4 days (21 to 121), respectively. Average operative time was 103 minutes (40 to 185) if reamed and 56 minutes (30 to 80) if unreamed. Average healing times were 65.4 days (21 to 190) if reamed and 79.5 days (42 to 204) if unreamed. There were 11 complications (20.4%) related to the nailing: 3 deep infections, 2 superficial infections, 2 bone shortenings of 1 cm secondary to nail protrusion in the knee, 1 compartment syndrome, 1 fracture propagation, 1 distal malalignment, and 1 delayed union. Hardware was removed in 6 patients (3 infections, 2 patients' request and 1 protrusion into the knee), and 1 additional patient underwent exchange nailing due to a delayed union. The expandable nail offers the theoretical advantages of improved load sharing and rotational control without the need for interlocking screws. This study demonstrates satisfactory healing and alignment for the treatment of tibial shaft fractures using this device. However, caution must be exercised when using this nail in cases of significant comminution and in cases where the fracture pattern involves the more proximal or distal aspect of the tibial shaft.

  9. Immediate versus delayed intramedullary nailing for open fractures of the tibial shaft: A multivariate analysis of factors affecting deep infection and fracture healing

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    Yokoyama Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate contributing factors affecting deep infection and fracture healing of open tibia fractures treated with locked intramedullary nailing (IMN by multivariate analysis. Materials and Methods: We examined 99 open tibial fractures (98 patients treated with immediate or delayed locked IMN in static fashion from 1991 to 2002. Multivariate analyses following univariate analyses were derived to determine predictors of deep infection, nonunion, and healing time to union. The following predictive variables of deep infection were selected for analysis: age, sex, Gustilo type, fracture grade by AO type, fracture location, timing or method of IMN, reamed or unreamed nailing, debridement time (≤6 h or> 6 h, method of soft-tissue management, skin closure time (≤1 week or> 1 week, existence of polytrauma (ISS< 18 or ISS≥18, existence of floating knee injury, and existence of superficial/pin site infection. The predictive variables of nonunion selected for analysis was the same as those for deep infection, with the addition of deep infection for exchange of pin site infection. The predictive variables of union time selected for analysis was the same as those for nonunion, excluding of location, debridement time, and existence of floating knee and superficial infection. Results: Six (6.1%; type II Gustilo n=1, type IIIB Gustilo n=5 of the 99 open tibial fractures developed deep infections. Multivariate analysis revealed that timing or method of IMN, debridement time, method of soft-tissue management, and existence of superficial or pin site infection significantly correlated with the occurrence of deep infection ( P < 0.0001. In the immediate nailing group alone, the deep infection rate in type IIIB + IIIC was significantly higher than those in type I + II and IIIA ( P = 0.016. Nonunion occurred in 17 fractures (20.3%, 17/84. Multivariate analysis revealed that Gustilo type, skin closure time, and

  10. [Ankle para-articular tibial fracture. Is osteosynthesis with the unreamed intramedullary nail adequate?].

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    Richter, D; Hahn, M P; Laun, R A; Ekkernkamp, A; Muhr, G; Ostermann, P A

    1998-05-01

    In a prospective study, 53 fractures of the distal fifth of the tibia were stabilized by unreamed nailing. Additional involvement of the ankle joint occurred in 18 patients. 50 patients returned for follow-up. In 30 patients tibia and fibula were fractured at the same (distal) level; in 20 patients the fracture of the fibula was located more proximally. In 12 patients the fractures extended into the tibial pilon. Severe soft tissue damage was seen in 24 fractures (18 open, 6 closed). Ninety percent of all fractures healed uneventfully without further surgical intervention after unreamed nailing. In two patients the unreamed nail had to be exchanged for a reamed tibial nail. Bone grafting and secondary dynamization of the nail by removal of a proximal interlocking bolt were performed in one case each. Thirty-one fractures healed in anatomical position. Valgus or varsus angulation of less than 5 degrees occurred in 18 patients. One fracture healed with rotatory angulation of 15 degrees. The highest rate of complications (22%) was seen in patients with distal fractures of the fibula without additional plating (of the fibula). There was no deep infection. Tibial fractures close to the ankle joint can be managed by unreamed nailing. Distal fractures of the fibula should be stabilized by additional plating. Because of the unreamed technique of implantation this procedure can also be used in grade II or III open fractures.

  11. Architecture of the femoral medullary canal and working length for intramedullary nailing. Biomechanic indications for dynamic nailing.

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    Steriopoulos, K; Psarakis, S A; Savakis, C; Papakitsou, E; Christakis, D; Velivasakis, E

    1997-10-01

    We classified human femoral intramedullary architecture into 3 types. The cortex in the first type is thick and the medullary canal narrow with an even and smooth translation towards the metaphysis. In the second type, the cortex is thin and the canal wider, also evenly distributed along the entire length, while in the third type the canal narrows just distal to the subtrochanteric region and similarly a few centimeters distally. Some medullary canals of the second type do not allow dynamic nailing, while canals of the third type presents some difficulties for unreamed nails. Most medullary canals belong to the first and second type and only few belong to type three. We performed comparative experimental loading in 11 pairs of cadaveric fractured femora fixed with static and dynamic nailing. Dynamic nailing was found to behave as safely as static ones in the presence of a sound femoral shaft central and peripheral to the fracture with a length twice the diameter of the femur at the fracture level. This could be checked intraoperatively with gentle rotation under image intensifier. In a clinical series, dynamic nailing was performed in about one quarter of the patients with femoral shaft fractures (18 of 72 patients) with excellent results.

  12. Use of oral anticoagulants after intramedullary nailing of femur and tibial fractures in trauma department

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    A. K. Dulaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors evaluated of the effectiveness of new oral anticoagulants in patients with diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia.We analyzed the effectiveness of thromboprophylaxis in 85 patients with diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia in the early postoperative period. Patients were divided into 3 groups: group 1 - patients, who was taking enoxaparin, group 2 - dabigatran etexilate, group 3 - rivaroxaban. We evaluated the frequency of thromboembolic complications and bleeding for 4 weeks after intramedullary nailing of femur and tibia.The lowest frequency of postoperative bleeding was observed in patients treated with dabigatran etexilate. In addition, the minimum frequency of complications was observed among patients of the second group of the study (9.7% in the group receiving dabigatran etexilati compared with 27.8% for the combined group I and III.Statistically significant differences between groups of patients taking oral or parenteral anticoagulants was not obtained.

  13. Intramedullary bone fragment obstructing passage of reaming guide wire with iatrogenic fractured tibia.

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    Nag, Suman; Lall, Hitesh; Jain, Vijay Kumar; Bansal, Pankaj; Khare, Rahul; Mittal, Deepak

    2010-02-01

    Reamed interlocking intramedullary fixation is the treatment of choice for displaced tibial shaft fractures in adults. In most cases it can be performed without difficulty; however, technical difficulties may be encountered during nailing in some cases. This article describes a case of closed nailing for a tibial shaft fracture in which intramedullary guide wire was obstructed by a small intramedullary bone fragment in the distal fracture segment. Forceful reaming and insertion of the nail led to a break in the cortex of the distal fragment and bending of guide wire. Finally, open reduction and intramedullary nailing was performed to retrieve the guide wire and intramedullary bone fragment and fix the tibia.A comminuted fracture with multiple close fragments in proximity to the fracture site should be preoperatively scrutinized to look for intramedullary bone fragment or a fragment that could be pushed in the intramedullary canal during the intramedullary nailing. The surgeon can then anticipate the potential operative difficulty that may be encountered during closed nailing of such a fracture; and the patient can be counseled, as open nailing is a safer and viable option. Finally it is pertinent that even if this fracture type is overlooked, catastrophe can be avoided by properly following all the steps of intramedullary nailing. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. [Distal tibial fracture--an indication for osteosynthesis with the unreamed intramedullary nail?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, D; Ostermann, P A; Ekkernkamp, A; Hahn, M P; Muhr, G

    1997-01-01

    In a prospective study, 50 fractures of the distal fifth of the tibia with additional involvement of the ankle joint in 18 patients were stabilized by unreamed nailing. In all, 90% of all fractures healed uneventfully without further surgical intervention after unreamed nailing, the highest ratio of complications (22%) being seen in all patients with distal fractures of the fibula without additional plating (of the fibula). Tibial fractures close to the ankle joint can be managed by unreamed nailing; distal fractures of the fibula should be additionally stabilized by fibular plating.

  15. Individual risk factors for deep infection and compromised fracture healing after intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures: a single centre experience of 480 patients.

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    Metsemakers, W-J; Handojo, K; Reynders, P; Sermon, A; Vanderschot, P; Nijs, S

    2015-04-01

    Despite modern advances in the treatment of tibial shaft fractures, complications including nonunion, malunion, and infection remain relatively frequent. A better understanding of these injuries and its complications could lead to prevention rather than treatment strategies. A retrospective study was performed to identify risk factors for deep infection and compromised fracture healing after intramedullary nailing (IMN) of tibial shaft fractures. Between January 2000 and January 2012, 480 consecutive patients with 486 tibial shaft fractures were enrolled in the study. Statistical analysis was performed to determine predictors of deep infection and compromised fracture healing. Compromised fracture healing was subdivided in delayed union and nonunion. The following independent variables were selected for analysis: age, sex, smoking, obesity, diabetes, American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) classification, polytrauma, fracture type, open fractures, Gustilo type, primary external fixation (EF), time to nailing (TTN) and reaming. As primary statistical evaluation we performed a univariate analysis, followed by a multiple logistic regression model. Univariate regression analysis revealed similar risk factors for delayed union and nonunion, including fracture type, open fractures and Gustilo type. Factors affecting the occurrence of deep infection in this model were primary EF, a prolonged TTN, open fractures and Gustilo type. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed polytrauma as the single risk factor for nonunion. With respect to delayed union, no risk factors could be identified. In the same statistical model, deep infection was correlated with primary EF. The purpose of this study was to evaluate risk factors of poor outcome after IMN of tibial shaft fractures. The univariate regression analysis showed that the nature of complications after tibial shaft nailing could be multifactorial. This was not confirmed in a multiple logistic regression model, which

  16. A new, lateral, continuous, combined, femoral–sciatic nerve approach via a single skin puncture for postoperative analgesia in intramedullary tibial nail insertion

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    Imbelloni LE

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni,1,2 Carlos Rava,1,3 Marildo A Gouveia21Faculdade de Medicina Nova Esperança, 2Institute for Regional Anesthesia, 3Complexo Hospitalar de Mangabeira Governador Tarcisio Burity, João Pessoa, BrazilBackground: The prevalence of anterior knee pain following intramedullary tibial nail insertion is high. Continuous peripheral nerve blockade is an alternative method of pain control to opiods. This case illustrates the use of femoral nerve and sciatic nerve peripheral catheters with an elastomeric infusion pump for major intramedullary nailing surgery.Case report: A 36-year-old male with fractures to the left leg bones presented for placement of an intramedullary nail under spinal anesthesia. At the end of the procedure, access to the lateral femoral and sciatic continuous nerve block was achieved by using a stimulator connected to a 110 mm 18G Tuohy needle. Postoperative analgesia was provided with a 40-hour infusion of 0.1% bupivacaine (400 mL at a rate of 10 mL hour-1 with an elastomeric pump. Anesthetic dispersion and contrast were investigated. The analog scale remained with scores below 3 during the 40 hours after surgery, and boluses were not necessary.Conclusion: The use of a femoral and sciatic nerve peripheral catheter offered an alternative to conventional pain control. Continuous femoral–sciatic peripheral blockade via a skin puncture with an infusion of 0.1% bupivacaine with elastomeric pumps is a safe and effective procedure in adults.Keywords: local anesthetic, bupivacaine, continuous peripheral nerve block, orthopedic surgery, tibia, elastomeric pump

  17. Displaced isolated fractures of the tibial shaft treated with either a cast or intramedullary nailing. An outcome analysis of matched pairs of patients.

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    Bone, L B; Sucato, D; Stegemann, P M; Rohrbacher, B J

    1997-09-01

    A study of ninety-nine patients who had a unilateral, displaced, isolated closed fracture of the tibial shaft was performed to determine the effect of the type of treatment on the clinical outcome. Forty-seven patients were managed with closed intramedullary nailing with reaming, and fifty-two were managed with closed reduction and a cast. The two groups were comparable with regard to the ages of the patients, the locations and amounts of displacement of the fractures, and the number of patients who had a history of smoking. The time to union was shorter in the patients who had been managed with intramedullary nailing than in those who had been managed with a cast (mean, eighteen compared with twenty-six weeks; p = 0.02). A non-union occurred in one patient (2 per cent) who had been managed with nailing and in five patients (10 per cent) who had been managed with a cast. There were no infections in either group. Removal of the nail was performed electively in twenty-six patients. Twenty-five patients who had been managed with nailing and twenty-five who had been managed with a cast were followed for a mean of 4.4 years. With use of the Iowa Knee Evaluation and the Ankle-Evaluation Rating System, the patients who had had nailing had mean scores of 96 points (range, 68 to 100 points) and 97 points (range, 74 to 100 points) for the knee and the ankle, respectively, compared with 89 points (range, 62 to 100 points) and 84 points (range, 62 to 100 points) for those who had been managed with a cast (p nailing than after treatment with a cast (a mean of 85 points [range, 27 to 99 points] compared with a mean of 74 points [range, 20 to 97 points]; p treatment of displaced closed fractures of the tibial shaft with closed intramedullary nailing with reaming provides functional results that are superior to those obtained with use of a cast.

  18. A comparative study of intramedullary interlocking nailing and minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis in extra articular distal tibial fractures

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    Arup K Daolagupu

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: IMLN group was associated with lesser duration of surgery, earlier weight bearing and union rate, lesser incidence of infection and implant irritation which makes it a preferable choice for fixation of extra-articular distal tibial fractures. However, larger randomized controlled trials are required for confirming the results.

  19. The percutaneous use of a pointed reduction clamp during intramedullary nailing of distal third tibial shaft fractures.

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    Forman, Jordanna M; Urruela, Adriana M; Egol, Kenneth A

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this retrospective chart and radiographic review is to describe an effective reduction technique during intramedullary nailing of distal metaphyseal tibia fractures with the use of a pointed percutaneous clamp. Between 2007 and 2010, 100 patients who sustained 102 tibia fractures were definitively treated with an intramedullary nail at one of two medical centers. Diaphyseal fractures and injuries with an associated disruption of the distal tibiofibular joint were excluded from our study. A total of 27 patients with 27 distal metaphyseal tibia fractures (OTA types 42-A, 43-A, and 43-B) were included. All 27 patients underwent IM nailing of their fractures with anatomic reduction achieved using a percutaneously placed pointed reduction clamp prior to insertion of the IM implant. Fracture alignment and angular deformity was assessed using goniometric measurement functions on the PACS system (GE, Waukeshau, WI) obtained from preoperative and postoperative anteroposterior and lateral images for all subjects. Malalignment was defined as more than 5 degrees of angulation in any plane. Fourteen of the fractures were classified as OTA 42-A, 9 were OTA 43-A, and 4 were OTA 43-B. Analysis of post-closed reduction, preoperative anteroposterior radiographs revealed a mean of 7.9 degrees of coronal plane (range: 0.9 degrees-26 degrees) angulation. Post closed reduction preoperative lateral radiographs revealed a mean of 6.8 degrees sagittal plane (range: 0 degrees-24.6 degrees) angulation. Postoperative anteroposterior and lateral radiographs showed the distal segment returned to its anatomical alignment with a mean angulation of 0.5 degrees (range, 0 degrees-3.5 degrees) and 0.7 degrees (range, 0 degrees-4.2 degrees) of varus/ valgus and apex anterior/posterior angulation, respectively. These results showed an acceptable postopertative alignment in all 27 distal third fractures. No intra-operative or postoperative complications were noted in the study group. This

  20. Effect of Pulsed Wave Low-Level Laser Therapy on Tibial Complete Osteotomy Model of Fracture Healing With an Intramedullary Fixation

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    Mostafavinia, Atarodalsadat; Masteri Farahani, Reza; Abbasian, Mohammadreza; Vasheghani Farahani, Mohammadmehdi; Fridoni, Mohammadjavad; Zandpazandi, Sara; Ghoreishi, Seyed Kamran; Abdollahifar, Mohammad Amin; Pouriran, Ramin; Bayat, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fractures pose a major worldwide challenge to public health, causing tremendous disability for the society and families. According to recent studies, many in vivo and in vitro experiments have shown the positive effects of PW LLLT on osseous tissue. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of infrared pulsed wave low-level laser therapy (PW LLLT) on the fracture healing process in a complete tibial osteotomy in a rat model, which was stabilized by an intramedullary pin. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was conducted at Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran. We performed complete tibial osteotomies in the right tibias for the population of 15 female rats. The rats were divided randomly into three different groups: I) Control rats with untreated bone defects; II) Rats irradiated by a 0.972 J/cm2 PW LLLT; and III) Rats irradiated by a 1.5 J/cm2 PW LLLT. The right tibias were collected six weeks following the surgery and a three-point bending test was performed to gather results. Immediately after biomechanical examination, the fractured bones were prepared for histological examinations. Slides were examined using stereological method. Results: PW LLLT significantly caused an increase in maximum force (N) of biomechanical repair properties for osteotomized tibias in the first and second laser groups (30.0 ± 15.9 and 32.4 ± 13.8 respectively) compared to the control group (8.6 ± 4.5) LSD test, P = 0.019, P = 0.011 respectively). There was a significant increase in the osteoblast count of the first and second laser groups (0.53 ± 0.06, 0.41 ± 0.06 respectively) compared to control group (0.31 ± 0.04) (LSD test, P = 0001, P = 0.007 respectively). Conclusions: This study confirmed the efficacy of PW LLLT on biomechanical strength, trabecular bone volume, callus volume, and osteoblast number of repairing callus in a complete tibial osteotomy animal model at a relatively late stage of the bone

  1. [Treatment results of aseptic non-unions of long bones with medullary canal reaming followed by intramedullary nailing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasiuk, Michał; Kmieciak, Marek

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents results of treatment of 46 consecutive patients with pseudoarthroses of the long bones treated with closed intramedullary reaming followed by intramedullary nailing. There were 22 nonunions of the tibia, 15 of the femur, 3 of the humerus and 6 of the forearm. The union occurred in 40 cases, among them in 3 of 4 treated atrophic, that gives 87% success. None of treated pseudoarthrosis of the humerus united.

  2. Intramedullary Tibial Nailing Reduces the Attachment Area and Ultimate Load of the Anterior Medial Meniscal Root: A Potential Explanation for Anterior Knee Pain in Female Patients and Smaller Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPrade, Matthew D; LaPrade, Christopher M; Hamming, Mark G; Ellman, Michael B; Turnbull, Travis Lee; Rasmussen, Matthew T; Wijdicks, Coen A; LaPrade, Robert F

    2015-07-01

    Intramedullary (IM) nailing is the treatment of choice among orthopaedic surgeons for tibial shaft fractures. However, because of the close proximity of the nail's insertion site to the anterior medial (AM) meniscal root on the tibial plateau, there is increased risk of iatrogenic injury to the meniscal root during nailing. To quantify the area of the AM meniscal root footprint damaged by IM tibial reaming and determine its subsequent effects on the ultimate failure load in female versus male knees. Controlled laboratory study. Twelve matched pairs (6 male and 6 female pairs; average age, 50.2 years) of human cadaveric knees were randomly assigned to native and reamed groups. In the reamed group, knees were reamed within the "safe zone" according to current guidelines for IM tibial nail insertion (3 mm lateral to the center of the tibial tubercle and adjacent to the anterior margin of the tibial plateau). The attachment areas and ultimate failure load were quantified and compared with paired knees in the native group. Intra-articular reaming within the "safe zone" for IM tibial nail insertion did not significantly decrease the AM root attachment area or ultimate failure load in male specimens, as only 2 of the 6 knees were damaged by reaming. In contrast, all 6 of the AM roots in the female knees were damaged by reaming, and on average, reaming decreased the female AM root attachment area by 19% and significantly decreased ultimate failure load by 37% (P = .028). There was a strong negative correlation (R(2) = 0.77) between reamed tunnel-AM root overlap area and medial-lateral width in female but not in male knees. Standard reaming for an IM tibial nail induced significant damage to the AM meniscal root in smaller, female specimens, whereas larger, male specimens were not affected. These findings may suggest that improvements in current guidelines and surgical techniques are warranted to prevent iatrogenic injury to the AM meniscal root during intramedullary

  3. Open fractures of the tibia treated by immediate intramedullary tibial nail insertion without reaming: a prospective study.

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    Kakar, S; Tornetta, P

    2007-03-01

    Does immediate tibial nail insertion without reaming as part of protocol-driven management provide a safe and effective treatment for open tibia fractures? Prospective cohort. Level 1 trauma center. A consecutive series of 161 patients with Gustilo grade I-IIIb open tibia fractures. Emergent incision and debridement of the wound with immediate tibial nail insertion without reaming, repeat incision and debridement, and soft-tissue coverage within 14 days. Time to union, number of secondary procedures performed to obtain union, implant failures, and the type and incidence of complications. One hundred and forty-three fractures were followed to union. Follow up averaged 2.2 years (0.6-5.5 years). Seventy-six fractures united in less than 6 months, 35 took between 6 and 9 months, and 32 took longer than 9 months. Twenty-five additional procedures were needed to obtain union in 16 of the delayed unions (12 nail exchanges, 4 bone grafts, 9 dynamizations). Complications included 3 patients with cellulitis, 1 superficial infection, 4 deep infections (1 grade I, 2 grade II, 1 grade IIIb), 3 loose screws, 2 broken screws, 5 malunions greater than 5 degrees, and 30 patients with decreased ankle motion when compared with the uninjured side. Not counting the ankle loss of motion, 18 complications occurred in 143 fractures (13%). Twenty-nine patients (20%) had complaints of minor knee pain and 30 (21%) had occasional fracture site pain after activity despite clinical and radiographic evidence of union. Eleven patients (8%) considered themselves completely disabled. Five patients were not treated by the standard protocol and are not included in the previously listed statistics; 3 were grade IIIB that did not have adequate coverage by 14 days, and 2 were grade II injuries that did not have a second debridement. Four of these 5 patients developed a complication. Protocol-driven management emphasizing meticulous soft-tissue management and the use of immediate tibial nailing without

  4. The effect of intact fibula on functional outcome of reamed intramedullary interlocking nail in open and closed isolated tibial shaft fractures: A prospective study.

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    Balaji, S Muthukumar; Chandra, P Madhu; Devadoss, Sathish; Devadoss, A

    2016-01-01

    Isolated tibial shaft (ITS) fracture with intact fibula is a common injury but records often fail to mention it. Our primary aim was to study the effect of the intact fibula in ITS fractures in closed and open injuries and that these fractures can unite without a primary fibulectomy. 56 patients who sustained an ITS fracture with an intact fibula who underwent closed or open reduction and reamed intramedullary interlocking nailing (IM IL nail) for closed and open fractures between August 2008 and April 2014 were included in this study. Four patients were lost to followup. One patient died due to causes not related to the surgery. At the time of final followup, 51 patients with 51 ITS fractures were available for the analysis. There were 33 closed and 18 open fractures. Patients were followed up at 4 weekly intervals until radiological signs of union were noted. They were assessed for functional outcome using the IOWA knee and ankle score systems at the time of final followup. The average time to union was 19.7 weeks. Closed fractures united in 17.7 weeks as compared to 23.5 weeks for open fractures (P fractures failed to unite (2 open). The functional outcome as per the knee score and ankle score evaluation system was 93.13 and 92.54, respectively. The knee scores were 93.81 and 91.8 for closed and open ITS fractures, respectively (P > 0.05). Similarly, the ankle scores were 94.96 and 88.1 for closed and open ITS fractures, respectively (P fracture with intact fibula is a common occurrence, and they can be treated safely with reamed IM nailing that provides good union rates and the excellent functional result even in open fractures.

  5. Locking intramedullary nailing with and without reaming for open fractures of the tibial shaft. A prospective, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, J F; O'Brien, P J; Blachut, P A; Meek, R N; Broekhuyse, H M

    1997-03-01

    Ninety-one patients who had ninety-four open fractures of the tibial shaft were randomized into two treatment groups. Fifty fractures (nine type-I, eighteen type-II, sixteen type-IIIA, and seven type-IIIB fractures, according to the classification of Gustilo et al.) were treated with nailing after reaming, and forty-four fractures (five type-I, sixteen type-II, nineteen type-IIIA, and four type-IIIB fractures) were treated with nailing without reaming. The average diameter of the nail was 11.5 millimeters (range, nine to fourteen millimeters) in the group treated with reaming and 9.2 millimeters (range, eight to ten millimeters) in the group treated without reaming. Follow-up information was adequate for forty-five patients (forty-seven fractures) who had been managed with reaming and forty patients (forty-one fractures) who had been managed without reaming. No clinically important differences were found between the two groups with regard to the technical aspects of the procedure or the rate of early postoperative complications. The average time to union was thirty weeks (range, thirteen to seventy-two weeks) in the group treated with reaming and twenty-nine weeks (range, thirteen to fifty weeks) in the group treated without reaming. Four (9 per cent) of the fractures treated with reaming and five (12 per cent) of the fractures treated without reaming did not unite (p = 0.73). There were two infections in the group treated with reaming and one in the group treated without reaming. Significantly more screws broke in the group treated without reaming (twelve; 29 per cent) than in the group treated with reaming (four; 9 per cent) (p = 0.014). There was no difference between the two groups with regard to the frequency of broken nails (two nails that had been inserted after reaming broke, compared with one that had been inserted without reaming). The functional outcome, in terms of pain in the knee, range of motion, return to work, and recreational activity, did not

  6. Study to prospectively evaluate reamed intramedually nails in patients with tibial fractures (S.P.R.I.N.T.: Study rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgeons agree on the benefits of operative treatment of tibial fractures – the most common of long bone fractures – with an intramedullary rod or nail. Rates of re-operation remain high – between 23% and 60% in prior trials – and the two alternative nailing approaches, reamed or non-reamed, each have a compelling biological rationale and strong proponents, resulting in ongoing controversy regarding which is better. Methods/Design The objective of this trial was to assess the impact of reamed versus non-reamed intramedullary nailing on rates of re-operation in patients with open and closed fractures of the tibial shaft. The study to prospectively evaluate reamed intramedullary nails in tibial fractures (S.P.R.I.N.T was a multi-center, randomized trial including 29 clinical sites in Canada, the United States and the Netherlands which enrolled 1200 skeletally mature patients with open (Gustilo Types I-IIIB or closed (Tscherne Types 0–3 fractures of the tibial shaft amenable to surgical treatment with an intramedullary nail. Patients received a statically locked intramedullary nail with either reamed or non-reamed insertion. The first strategy involved fixation of the fracture with an intramedullary nail following reaming to enlarge the intramedullary canal (Reamed Group. The second treatment strategy involved fixation of the fracture with an intramedullary nail without prior reaming of the intramedullary canal (Non-Reamed Group. Patients, outcome assessors, and data analysts were blinded to treatment allocation. Peri-operative care was standardized, and re-operations before 6 months were proscribed. Patients were followed at discharge, 2 weeks post-discharge, and at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post surgery. A committee, blinded to allocation, adjudicated all outcomes. Discussion The primary outcome was re-operation to promote healing, treat infection, or preserve the limb (fasciotomy for compartment syndrome after

  7. Study to prospectively evaluate reamed intramedually nails in patients with tibial fractures (S.P.R.I.N.T.): study rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon; Tornetta, Paul; Schemitsch, Emil; Swiontkowski, Marc; Sanders, David; Walter, Stephen D

    2008-06-23

    Surgeons agree on the benefits of operative treatment of tibial fractures - the most common of long bone fractures - with an intramedullary rod or nail. Rates of re-operation remain high - between 23% and 60% in prior trials - and the two alternative nailing approaches, reamed or non-reamed, each have a compelling biological rationale and strong proponents, resulting in ongoing controversy regarding which is better. The objective of this trial was to assess the impact of reamed versus non-reamed intramedullary nailing on rates of re-operation in patients with open and closed fractures of the tibial shaft. The study to prospectively evaluate reamed intramedullary nails in tibial fractures (S.P.R.I.N.T) was a multi-center, randomized trial including 29 clinical sites in Canada, the United States and the Netherlands which enrolled 1200 skeletally mature patients with open (Gustilo Types I-IIIB) or closed (Tscherne Types 0-3) fractures of the tibial shaft amenable to surgical treatment with an intramedullary nail. Patients received a statically locked intramedullary nail with either reamed or non-reamed insertion. The first strategy involved fixation of the fracture with an intramedullary nail following reaming to enlarge the intramedullary canal (Reamed Group). The second treatment strategy involved fixation of the fracture with an intramedullary nail without prior reaming of the intramedullary canal (Non-Reamed Group). Patients, outcome assessors, and data analysts were blinded to treatment allocation. Peri-operative care was standardized, and re-operations before 6 months were proscribed. Patients were followed at discharge, 2 weeks post-discharge, and at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post surgery. A committee, blinded to allocation, adjudicated all outcomes. The primary outcome was re-operation to promote healing, treat infection, or preserve the limb (fasciotomy for compartment syndrome after nailing). The primary outcome was a composite comprising the following

  8. TIBIAL SHAFT FRACTURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kodi Edson; Ferreira, Ramon Venzon

    2011-01-01

    The long-bone fractures occur most frequently in the tibial shaft. Adequate treatment of such fractures avoids consolidation failure, skewed consolidation and reoperation. To classify these fractures, the AO/OTA classification method is still used, but it is worthwhile getting to know the Ellis classification method, which also includes assessment of soft-tissue injuries. There is often an association with compartmental syndrome, and early diagnosis can be achieved through evaluating clinical parameters and constant clinical monitoring. Once the diagnosis has been made, fasciotomy should be performed. It is always difficult to assess consolidation, but the RUST method may help in this. Radiography is assessed in two projections, and points are scored for the presence of the fracture line and a visible bone callus. Today, the dogma of six hours for cleaning the exposed fracture is under discussion. It is considered that an early start to intravenous antibiotic therapy and the lesion severity are very important. The question of early or late closure of the lesion in an exposed fracture has gone through several phases: sometimes early closure has been indicated and sometimes late closure. Currently, whenever possible, early closure of the lesion is recommended, since this diminishes the risk of infection. Milling of the canal when the intramedullary nail is introduced is still a controversial subject. Despite strong personal positions in favor of milling, studies have shown that there may be some advantage in relation to closed fractures, but not in exposed fractures.

  9. Treatment of fractures of the tibial diaphysis using external fixator compared with locked intramedullary nails Tratamento das fraturas diafisárias da tíbia com fixador externo comparado com a haste intramedular bloqueada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Tavares Cardozo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare efficiency of external fixator in modular form with unilateral and uniplanar intramedullary locked seeking definitive treatment of fractures of the tibia diaphysis. METHODS: Orthopedic surgical treatments were compared to 50 patients with definite diafisária fracture of the tibia, through the use of the external fixator, modular and intramedullary locked. The fractures were treated at emergency hospital school of Orthopedics and Traumatology service in the period from January 2007 to January 2011, with a variation of 15 to 48 weeks. RESULTS: this study has proven functional results and excellent consolidation when locked intramedullary rods were used and the versatility and speed of application of external fixator reaching the necessary stabilization of bony fragments. Consolidation of fractures was obtained in 95 cases when using the intramedullary locked and 90 cases undergoing external fixation. CONCLUSIONS: the definitive treatment of tibial diaphysis fractures by external fixator modular presented themselves as valid alternative treatment in patients who could not be submitted for early conversion to internal osteosynthesis or when the intramedullary nails are not available to the surgeon. OBJETIVO: Comparar a eficiência de fixador externo modular na forma uniplanar e unilateral com haste intramedular bloqueada (HIB buscando tratamento definitivo das fraturas diafisárias da tíbia. MÉTODOS: Foram comparados os tratamentos cirúrgicos ortopédicos definitivos de 50 pacientes com fratura diafisária da tíbia, por meio do uso do fixador externo modular e da haste intramedular bloqueada. As fraturas foram tratadas no setor de emergência de um hospital-escola pelo serviço de ortopedia e traumatologia de janeiro de 2007 a janeiro de 2011, com variação de 15 a 48 semanas. RESULTADOS: Este estudo comprovou resultados funcionais e de consolidação excelentes quando usada a haste intramedular bloqueada e a

  10. [Locked plating with minimally invasive percutaneous plate osteosynthesis versus intramedullary nailing of distal extra-articular tibial fracture: a retrospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qi; Ni, Jie; Peng, Li-bin; Yu, Da-xin; Yuan, Xiao-ming

    2013-12-17

    To compare the efficacies of minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPPO) and interlocking intramedullary nailing (IMN) in the treatment of extra-articular fractures of distal tibia. Retrospective reviews were conducted for 126 patients with extra-articular distal tibia fractures. Treatment was either MIPPO (n = 61) or IMN (n = 65). The outcomes were assessed by comparing operating duration, time to union, the last follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score and complication rate. The average follow-up period was 23.7 (12-53) months. In the minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis group, there were deep infections (n = 2), superficial infections (n = 5), delayed union (n = 2), malunion (n = 2) and knee joint pain (n = 10) were observed. In addition, the average operating duration (85.9 ± 18.9 min), average time to union (17.3 ± 3.8 weeks) and average AOFAS (83.2 ± 11.9) were analyzed. In the interlocking intramedullary nailing group, there were delayed union (n = 3), malunion (n = 12) and knee joint pain (n = 22). And the average operating duration (83.3 ± 15.7 min), average time to union (16.5 ± 3.1 weeks) and average AOFAS (84.9 ± 12.0) were analyzed. No statistical significance existed in operating duration, time to union and the last follow-up AOFAS between two groups (P > 0.05). However, the rates of malformation and knee joint pain were higher in the intramedullary nail group than those in the plate group. And the difference was statistically significant (P = 0.015, P = 0.025). Both MIPPO and IMN are effective for extra-articular fractures of distal tibia. However, the former has the advantage of lowers rate of malformation and knee joint pain. Therefore a surgeon should consider the degree of injury while managing extra-articular fracture of distal tibia.

  11. Outcome of displaced distal tibial metaphyseal fractures in children between 6 and 15 years of age treated by elastic stable intramedullary nails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravino, Mattia; Canavese, Federico; De Rosa, Vincenzo; Marengo, Lorenza; Samba, Antoine; Rousset, Marie; Mansour Khamallah, Mounira; Andreacchio, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    From June 1995 to August 2012, 18 children were treated surgically using elastic stable intramedullary nails for displaced closed fractures of the distal metaphysis of the tibia. The patients were followed radiographically and clinically on a regular basis until union was clinically and radiographically achieved. Thirteen boys and five girls with a mean age at trauma of 11 ± 2.9 years (range 6-15) were included in the study. Radiographically, all fractures healed without evidence of delayed union, re-fracture, hardware migration. All patients were pain free at last follow-up and all regained full, normal activities including sports. IV.

  12. Effect of unreamed, limited reamed, and standard reamed intramedullary nailing on cortical bone porosity and new bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupel, T M; Weinberg, J A; Aksenov, S A; Schemitsch, E H

    2001-01-01

    To compare the effects of unreamed nail insertion and reamed nail insertion with limited and standard canal reaming on cortical bone porosity and new bone formation. A canine segmental tibial fracture was created in fifteen adult dogs. The tibiae were stabilized with a statically locked 6.5-millimeter intramedullary nail without prior canal reaming (n = 5), after limited reaming to 7.0 millimeters (n = 5), or after standard canal reaming to 9.0 millimeters (n = 5). Porosity, new bone formation, and the mineral apposition rate of cortical bone were directly compared between the three nailing techniques. A significant increase in cortical bone porosity and new bone formation was seen in all three groups of experimental animals compared with the control tibiae. The overall lowest porosity levels were measured in the limited reamed group, with similar porosity levels measured in the unreamed and standard reamed groups. Porosity was lower in the limited reamed group in the entire cortex of the segmental and distal cross sections, as well as the endosteal, anterior, and posterior cortices along the length of the tibia. Overall, there was no difference in the amount of new bone formation or the mineral apposition rate between the three groups of animals at eleven weeks after surgery. The results of this study suggest that limited intramedullary reaming is a biologically sound alternative for the treatment of tibial diaphyseal fractures in which the circulation is already compromised.

  13. Effectiveness and complications of SIGN intramedullary interlocking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Interlocking intramedullary nailing is the current state-of-the-art management of the shaft fractures of long bones. Objective: To assess the functional outcome of SIGN nailing of femoral and tibial fractures at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital. Design: Retrospective analytical, study over a three year period ...

  14. Nonreamed locking intramedullary nailing for open fractures of the tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonatus, T; Olson, S A; Lee, S; Chapman, M W

    1997-06-01

    The use of nonreamed interlocking tibial nails in the management of open fractures of the tibial shaft has gained wide acceptance. This technique has been reported to have reproducible good results with a low incidence of complications in Type I, Type II, and Type IIIA open tibial shaft fractures. The use of nonreamed nails in Type IIIB fractures continues to be a source of controversy. The treatment of 72 open fractures of the tibial shaft with nonreamed interlocking intramedullary nailing is detailed. There were 27 Type I, 22 Type II, 11 Type IIIA, and 12 Type IIIB open tibial shaft fractures. There were three (4.2%) deep infections; one Type II, one Type IIIA, and one Type IIIB. Forty-nine fractures (68%) united by 6 months, all fractures had united by 12 months. The use of nonreamed locking intramedullary nailing in Types I, II, IIIA, and IIIB open fractures of the tibial shaft is supported.

  15. Interlocking intramedullary nailing with and without reaming for the treatment of closed fractures of the tibial shaft. A prospective, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blachut, P A; O'Brien, P J; Meek, R N; Broekhuyse, H M

    1997-05-01

    One hundred and fifty-two patients who had 154 closed fractures of the shaft of the tibia were prospectively randomized to management with interlocking intramedullary nailing either with or without reaming. Thirteen patients who had been randomized to treatment without reaming were switched to the group that had reaming because of technical reasons; these patients were excluded from the analysis of the results. An additional five patients were lost to follow-up. Thus, seventy-two patients (seventy-three fractures) who had been managed with nailing with reaming and sixty-three patients (sixty-three fractures) who had been managed with nailing without reaming were available for follow-up at an average of twelve months (range, three to thirty-three months) postoperatively. The two groups were similar with regard to demographics and the configurations of the fractures. The average total duration of the procedures performed without reaming was eleven minutes shorter than that of the procedures done with reaming (p = 0.0013). The duration of fluoroscopy was not significantly different between the two groups (p = 0.35, Mann-Whitney test). The average estimated blood loss was identical for the two groups. Seventy fractures (96 per cent) that were treated with nailing with reaming and fifty-six (89 per cent) that were treated with nailing without reaming united without the need for an additional operation (p = 0.19). Because of the small sample size, the study has insufficient power (34.7 per cent) to detect this difference if it is real. There was only one deep infection, which developed after nailing without reaming. The nail fractured after one procedure with reaming. A screw fractured after two procedures with reaming and after ten without reaming (p = 0.012); multiple screws fractured after three procedures in the latter group. Malunion occurred after three nailing procedures with reaming and after two without reaming. Four malunions were of very proximal fractures and

  16. Conservative management or closed nailing for tibial shaft fractures. A randomised prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, G J; Keddell, R G; Penny, I D

    1991-01-01

    We performed a prospective randomised trial on matched groups of patients with displaced tibial shaft fractures to compare conservative treatment with closed intramedullary nailing. The results showed conclusively that intramedullary nailing gave more rapid union with less malunion and shortening. Nailed patients had less time off work with a more predictable and rapid return to full function. We therefore consider that closed intramedullary nailing is the most efficient treatment for displaced fractures of the tibial shaft.

  17. The tibial nerve compression test for the diagnosis of lumbar spinal canal stenosis-A simple and reliable physical examination for use by primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Shu; Nakano, Atsushi; Kin, Akihiro; Baba, Ichiro; Kurokawa, Yoshitaka; Neo, Masashi

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and suitability of the 'Tibial Nerve Compression Test (TNCT)' as a screening tool for lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS). A total of 108 consecutive patients admitted to our hospital for surgical treatment or diagnosis of LSS were included in this study. Fifty healthy volunteers were examined as a control group. The severity of tenderness was scored (tenderness score) and measured on a visual analogue scale (P-VAS score). These scores were compared between the LSS and control groups. Moreover, they were compared before and after the operation among operated patients. The positive tenderness rate was significantly higher (92.6% [100/108]) in the LSS group than in the control group (30% [15/50]). The sensitivity and specificity of TNCT (95% confidence interval) were 0.93 (0.88-0.96) and 0.70 (0.61-0.77), respectively. Positive tenderness rates and P-VAS scores were significantly higher in the LSS group (p Test is a useful screening tool for LSS diagnosis in a primary care setting. Level II, diagnostic study. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Provisional plating of Type III open tibia fractures prior to intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Robert P; Nork, Sean E; Barei, David P; Mills, William J

    2005-07-01

    Intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures is the preferred treatment of most displaced, unstable tibial shaft fractures. In open tibia fractures, direct exposure of the fracture segments for irrigation and debridement is required prior to fracture stabilization. We propose a method of provisional stabilization using commonly available implants placed through the associated traumatic open wound prior to intramedullary nailing. This technique, particularly helpful to surgeons operating with limited assistance, employs a temporarily applied 3.5-mm dynamic compression plate or limited contact dynamic compression plate implant secured with unicortical screws, allowing reaming and intramedullary nailing of a reduced, stabilized tibia fracture.

  19. Improving tibial component coronal alignment during total knee arthroplasty with use of a tibial planing device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shantanu; D'Lima, Darryl D; Fait, James M; Colwell, Clifford W

    2007-02-01

    The outcomes of knee arthroplasty have been shown to be affected by component alignment. Intramedullary and extramedullary alignment instrumentation are fairly effective for achieving the desired mean tibial component coronal alignment. However, there are outliers representing >3 degrees of varus or valgus alignment with respect to the anatomic tibial shaft axis. We measured the efficacy of a custom tibial planing device for reducing the outliers in tibial alignment. We designed a tibial planing tool in an effort to improve tibial alignment. In one cohort (100 knees), we used traditional intramedullary alignment instrumentation to make the tibial bone cut. In a second cohort (120 knees), we used intramedullary alignment instrumentation to make the cut and also used a custom tool to check the cut and to correct an inexact cut. Tibial tray alignment relative to the long axis of the tibial shaft was measured in the coronal and sagittal planes on postoperative radiographs. The target coronal alignment was 90 degrees with respect to the tibial shaft axis (with alignment). A total of 100 anteroposterior radiographs and sixty-five lateral radiographs were analyzed for the group that was treated with traditional instrumentation alone, and a total of 120 anteroposterior radiographs and fifty-five lateral radiographs were analyzed for the group that was treated with use of the custom tibial planing device. The mean coronal alignment of the tibial component was 89.5 degrees +/- 2.1 degrees in the group that was treated with traditional instrumentation alone and 89.6 degrees +/- 1.4 degrees in the group that was treated with use of the custom planing device. Although the mean coronal alignment was not significantly different, the number of outliers was substantially reduced when the custom planing device was used. All 120 components that had been aligned with use of the custom planing device were within 3 degrees of the target coronal alignment, compared with only eighty

  20. The risk of iatrogenic injury to anterior tibial artery variations during tibial nail distal interlocking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanter, Nathan J; Inouye, Sandra E; Beiser, Christopher W

    2017-01-01

    Tibial intramedullary nailing remains a common tibial fracture fixation method. Tibial nailing indications continue to expand. Neurovascular complications from tibial nailing have been described; however, the proximity of distal tibial locking bolts to the anterior tibial artery (ATA) variants has not. 52 cadaveric legs were dissected identifying three common ATA variants. Each ATA variant received an intraluminal wire to facilitate fluoroscopic identification. Three different intramedullary tibial nails were inserted in each of the three ATA variant specimens. With fluoroscopy, the proximity of the distal locking holes of each tibial nail to the intraluminal wire representing the ATA variant course was measured. Of the 40 measurements, the intraluminal wire was directly in the bolt insertional path in 8 of 40 (20%) and within 5 mm in 16 of 40 (40%). All specimens had the wire cross the locking bolt insertional path at least once in each of the nails. The ATA variant taking a more lateral course deep to the extensor digitorum longus and peroneus tertius to overlay the lateral malleolus had the highest occurrence of measurements less than 5 mm. The close proximity of tibial nail distal locking bolt holes to ATA variants presents a risk for iatrogenic vascular injury during insertion. The coronal locking bolts pose the greatest iatrogenic risk to the most laterally positioned ATA variant.

  1. Complications during removal of stainless steel versus titanium nails used for intramedullary nailing of diaphyseal fractures of the tibia

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Seyhan; Olcay Guler; Mahir Mahirogullari; Ferdi Donmez; Arel Gereli; Serhat Mutlu

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: Intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice for fractures of the tibial shaft, which might necessitate the nail removal due to complications in the long-term. Although considered as a low-risk procedure, intramedullary nail removal is also associated with certain complications. Here, we compared the most commonly used stainless steel and titanium nails with respect to the complications during removal and clinical outcome for intramedullary nailing of diaphyseal fractures of ...

  2. Complications during removal of stainless steel versus titanium nails used for intramedullary nailing of diaphyseal fractures of the tibia

    OpenAIRE

    Seyhan, Mustafa; Guler, Olcay; Mahirogullari, Mahir; Donmez, Ferdi; Gereli, Arel; Mutlu, Serhat

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice for fractures of the tibial shaft, which might necessitate the nail removal due to complications in the long-term. Although considered as a low-risk procedure, intramedullary nail removal is also associated with certain complications. Here, we compared the most commonly used stainless steel and titanium nails with respect to the complications during removal and clinical outcome for intramedullary nailing of diaphyseal fractures of t...

  3. Static or dynamic intramedullary nailing of femur and tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omerovic, Djemil; Lazovic, Faruk; Hadzimehmedagic, Amel

    2015-04-01

    The basic principle of non-surgical fracture treatment is to restore the original anatomical position of fractured fragments by different techniques, without direct access to the bone and without further traumatizing of tissues. Intramedullary nailing is synthesis and consolidation of fracture fragments with the main goal to gain strength and permanent placement of the implants. Two techniques of intramedullary osteosynthesis are used: with dynamic or with static intramedullary nail. Dynamization include conversion of static nail by removing screws from the longest fragment. The aim of this study is to determine whether there is a difference in the speed and quality of healing of the type A and B fractures of the femur and tibia treated by static or dynamic intramedullary nails and to compare the results. The study was conducted at the Clinic for Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Clinical Center University Sarajevo from January 2004 to June 2009. The study was retrospective-prospective, manipulative, controlled and it was conducted on a total of 129 patients with closed fractures of the diaphysis of the femur and tibia type A and type B, with different segments of bone, regardless of sex and age structure, with the exception of children under 14 years of age. Precisely there were 47 patients with femoral fractures and 82 patients with tibial fractures. The average number of weeks of healing femoral and tibial fractures was slightly in advantage of static intramedullary osteosynthesis, it was 17.08 weeks (SD=3.382). The average number of weeks of healing in 23 patients with fractures of the femur, treated by dynamic intramedullary osteosynthesis was 17.83 (SD=2.978). We can conclude that static intramedullary nailing osteosynthesis unable movements between fragments which directly stimulates bone formation and formation of minimal callus. Static intramedullary osteosynthesis resolve the problem of stabilizing the fracture, limb shortening and rotation of fragments.

  4. Comparative study between reamed versus unreamed interlocking intramedullary nailing in compound fractures of shaft tibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash Puri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tibia is the commonest bones to sustain open injury because of subcutaneous position. Treatment of open fractures requires simultaneous management of both skeletal and soft tissue injury. Intramedullary nailing with reaming is generally considered to be contraindicated for open fractures tibia, because it damages the endosteal blood supply which will lead to non-union, deep infection. However, recent studies with or without reaming in open fracture tibia shows no influence in healing of fracture. Purpose: To compare the clinical and radiological results of intramedullary interlocking nailing of open fractures of the tibial shaft after reaming versus unreamed medullary canal. Materials and Methods: Between 2008 and 2011, we have treated 40 patients with compound tibia fracture (type I, II, IIIA by simultaneous care of wound and skeletal injury. Primary fixation for fracture stabilization was done by closed intramedullary interlock nailing either reamed or unreamed; the allocation to the two groups made on alternating basis. Wound was managed by thorough debridement with primary/delayed primary closure by suturing, split thickness skin grafting or fasciocutaneous flap cover. Active, non-weight bearing exercises were started from next post-op day. Partial weight bearing after suture removal was started on 12 th day. Further follow-up was done at 6 weeks interval for union. Results: Open fractures of shaft of tibia treated with unreamed/reamed interlocking nailing gave excellent results. In present series, 19 fractures (95% treated by unreamed and 19 (95% fractures treated by reamed technique, united within 6 months of injury. Delay in union was noticed in one patient treated by unreamed technique who had segmental and extensive soft tissue injury and in reamed nailing there was one patient with deep infection, which was treated with antibiotic coated nail. Conclusion: Time to complete union was similar in both groups. Adequate

  5. Eight years' clinical experience with the Orthofix tibial nailing system in the treatment of tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babis, George C; Benetos, Ioannis S; Karachalios, Theofilos; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2007-02-01

    Intramedullary nailing has become a popular and effective procedure for the treatment of most tibial fractures. However, concerns regarding difficulties with reduction, the use and extent of intramedullary reaming, and hardware failure are probably the only constraints to its widespread use. In this prospective study, we present the clinical and radiographic results of the Orthofix tibial nailing system used in the treatment of tibial shaft fractures. One hundred and fifteen fresh tibial fractures in the same number of patients with a mean age of 37.5 years (17-85 years) were treated with operative stabilisation using the Orthofix tibial nailing system. All of the operations took place in a conventional operating theatre, on a simple tranlucent operating table and with manual reduction of the fracture. In the majority of the cases closed reduction and conventional reaming were performed and the mean duration of the operation was 38 min. Fracture healing occurred at 16 weeks (11-30 weeks) and was confirmed both clinically and radiographically. In six cases (two severely comminuted and four segmental fractures) delayed union occurred, however there were no tibial non-unions necessitating re-operation. There were no substantial differences in time to fracture union or in the rate of complications related to minimal open reduction. In addition, there seem to be more benefits than risks in the use of power intramedullary reaming during intramedullary fixation of tibial shaft fractures. In conclusion, most tibial shaft fractures can effectively and safely be treated using this type of locking intramedullary nailing device, with relatively few complications, and with satisfactory long-term clinical results.

  6. Intramedullary capillary haemangioma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelleher, T

    2012-02-03

    Intramedullary capillary haemangioma is extremely rare and only four cases have been previously reported. We describe a further case, outlining the clinical, radiological, surgical and pathological features.

  7. Anterior knee pain after unreamed intramedullary nailing of the tibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Fanian

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: Tibial shaft fracture is the most common type of long bone fractures, and intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice. Anterior knee pain (AKP is the most common complication of tibial nailing. The exact etiology of AKP is unknown, and the reported incidence is between 10-86%. Since many activities of daily living of Iranians need kneeling, squatting, and tailor position, knee pain can effectively limit these activities. We decided to evaluate knee pain in patients with tibial shaft fractures treated with unreamed intramedullary nailing in our hospital.
    • METHODS: We evaluated 232 patients between 16-77 year-old with tibial shaft fractures treated with intramedullary nailing from 2005 to 2007 with six months follow up period.
    • RESULTS: According to visual analogue scale (0-10, 165 (71.1% patients had no pain. Anterior knee pain was mild in 54 (28.9% cases; 12 (5.2% cases had moderate pain, and one patient (0.4% experienced severe pain. The most severe pain was felt in kneeling position and the mildest pain was felt in resting position.
    • CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of moderate to severe AKP in patients who had intramedullary nailing for tibial shaft fractures was relatively low. In view of medicolegal litigation, patients should be aware of this complication.
    • KEYWORDS: Tibia, fracture, knee pain, trauma, internal fixation.

  8. Multiple fracture of medullary tube during intramedullary nailing of long bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakharia, M R; Lehto, S A; Mohler, D G

    2000-01-01

    Intramedullary nailing is an accepted treatment for the fixation of femoral and tibial shaft fractures. There is a low but significant incidence of intraoperative complications during intramedullary nailing. During this procedure, a medullary tube may be used to exchange the bent olive-tipped reaming guidewire for the straight guidewire. A review of the literature found only one report of a fracture of the medullary tube. Two cases in which the medullary tube fractured into multiple pieces are presented.

  9. Significance of the position of the proximal tip of the tibial nail: An important factor related to anterior knee pain

    OpenAIRE

    Tahririan, Mohammad Ali; Ziaei, Ehsan; Osanloo, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice for the majority of tibial shaft fractures and anterior knee pain is the most common complication of this surgery; however, its etiology is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess the predicting factors related to anterior knee pain following tibial nailing. Materials and Methods: Patients with isolated, unilateral tibial shaft fracture who had undergone tibial nailing were identified retrospectively. Data includ...

  10. Diaphyseal humeral fractures and intramedullary nailing: Can we improve outcomes?

    OpenAIRE

    Christos Garnavos

    2011-01-01

    While intramedullary nailing has been established as the treatment of choice for diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia, its role in the management of diaphyseal humeral fractures remains controversial. The reasons include not only the complicated anatomy and unique biomechanical characteristics of the arm but also the fact that surgical technique and nail designs devised for the treatment of femoral and tibial fractures are being transposed to the humerus. As a result there is no consen...

  11. Compartment syndrome after intramedullary nailing of the tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischenko, G J; Goodman, S B

    1990-01-01

    Three patients had compartment syndrome of the leg after tibial intramedullary nailing with reaming. They were all treated successfully with emergency fasciotomy. A prospective study was done of seven additional patients who had continual monitoring of the pressure in the deep posterior compartment during tibial intramedullary nailing with reaming. In five of them, the procedure was performed three weeks or less after injury and in the remaining two, the nailing was performed later for the treatment of non-union. Two pressure peaks in the deep posterior compartment were noted: one after strong longitudinal traction was applied and the fracture was reduced and the other during intramedullary reaming. Intraoperative pressure of thirty millimeters of mercury or more were recorded in three of the seven patients. In the treatment of tibial fractures, operative procedures that involve forceful traction for a long time may predispose the patient to compartment syndrome in the leg. Close clinical observation of such patients is needed. When there is a high risk of compartment syndrome, monitoring of the pressure in the compartment may be prudent.

  12. A STUDY ON ROLE OF INTERLOCK NAILING IN THE MANAGEMENT OF TIBIAL DIAPHYSEAL FRACTURES

    OpenAIRE

    Venkateswara Rao; Chinta Shyam; Anvesh

    2015-01-01

    Tibial fractures are one of the commonest orthopedic injuries. Tibial fractures are one of the commonest orthopedic injuries. In the past several years there has been a trend towards by use of small diameter nails without remaining in the management of unstable tibial shaft fractures. However it is important to remember that many closed fractures with less severe soft tissue injury, Treatment with an intramedullary nail with reaming allows placement of larger implan...

  13. A CLINICAL STUDY OF SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF DIAPHYSEAL FRACTURES OF TIBIA WITH INTRAMEDULLARY INTERLOCKING NAIL

    OpenAIRE

    Radhakrishna; Shivananda; Santhosh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intramedullary interlocking is currently considered the treatment of choice for tibial shaft fractures, with high rates of fracture union, advantage of early stabilization which decreases the morbidity and mortality rate in patients, allows early mobilization, reduces the incidence of infection, malunion, non-union or implant failure. OBJECTIVES: To assess and study diaphyseal fractures of tibia and to evaluate the functional outcome of patients with tibial shaft fracture treated ...

  14. Management of segmental tibial fractures | Motsitsi | East and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three currently favored methods of treatment are intramedullary locking nail , external Fixators (with their different constructs and versatility) and Plaster of Paris. It is important to note that more than two-thirds of segmental tibial fractures will require more than one surgical intervention. The surgeon therefore, needs to plan ...

  15. An economic analysis of management strategies for closed and open grade I tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Jason W; Bhandari, Mohit; Sprague, Sheila; Johnson-Masotti, Ana P; Gafni, Amiram

    2005-10-01

    Closed and open grade I (low-energy) tibial shaft fractures are a common and costly event, and the optimal management for such injuries remains uncertain. We explored costs associated with treatment of low-energy tibial fractures with either casting, casting with therapeutic ultrasound, or intramedullary nailing (with and without reaming) by use of a decision tree. From a governmental perspective, the mean associated costs were USD 3,400 for operative management by reamed intramedullary nailing, USD 5,000 for operative management by non-reamed intramedullary nailing, USD 5,000 for casting, and USD 5,300 for casting with therapeutic ultrasound. With respect to the financial burden to society, the mean associated costs were USD 12,500 for reamed intramedullary nailing, USD 13,300 for casting with therapeutic ultrasound, USD 15,600 for operative management by non-reamed intramedullary nailing, and USD 17,300 for casting alone. Our analysis suggests that, from an economic standpoint, reamed intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice for closed and open grade I tibial shaft fractures. Considering financial burden to society, there is preliminary evidence that treatment of low-energy tibial fractures with therapeutic ultrasound and casting may also be an economically sound intervention.

  16. Removal of a Broken Cannulated Intramedullary Nail: Review of the Literature and a Case Report of a New Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr A. Abdelgawad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonunion of long bones fixed with nails may result in implant failure. Removal of a broken intramedullary nail may be a real challenge. Many methods have been described to allow for removal of the broken piece of the nail. In this paper, we are reviewing the different techniques to extract a broken nail, classifying them into different subsets, and describing a new technique that we used to remove a broken tibial nail with narrow canal. Eight different categories of implant removal methods were described, with different methods within each category. This classification is very comprehensive and was never described before. We described a new technique (hook captured in the medulla by flexible nail introduced from the locking hole which is a valuable technique in cases of nail of a small diameter where other methods cannot be used because of the narrow canal of the nail. Our eight categories for broken nail removal methods simplify the concepts of nail removal and allow the surgeon to better plan for the removal procedure.

  17. [Treatment of Tibial Shaft Fractures with the Stable Angle Tibial Nail Targon TX].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielnicki, M; Prokop, A

    2016-10-01

    Tibial shaft fractures are among the most common long bone fractures in humans. The incidence is 1-2 per 100,000. The gold standard of treatment for AO type 42 A-C fractures is a locking intramedullary nail. The development of new implants has extended the indications for this minimally invasive technique, so that now AO types 41 and 43 can also be treated with special nails. Fixed-angle screw anchors increase primary stability and supplemental locking devices located proximally and distally extend the spectrum of use to metaphyseal fractures. The cannulated Targon TX titanium nail can be introduced, either with or without reaming. Using an operative video, the treatment of a tibial fracture with an intramedullary nail is demonstrated in stages and the operative steps further illustrated on artificial bone. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Prognostic factors for predicting outcomes after intramedullary nailing of the tibia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schemitsch, Emil H.; Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon; Sanders, David W.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Tornetta, Paul; Walter, Stephen D.; Zdero, Rad; Goslings, J. C.; Teague, David; Jeray, Kyle; McKee, Michael D.; Sprague, Sheila; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Buckingham, Lisa; Leece, Pamela; Viveiros, Helena; Mignott, Tashay; Ansell, Natalie; Sidorkewicz, Natalie; Agel, Julie; Bombardier, Claire; Berlin, Jesse A.; Bosse, Michael; Browner, Bruce; Gillespie, Brenda; Jones, Alan; O'Brien, Peter; Poolman, Rudolf; Kreder, Hans J.; Stephen, David J. G.; Axelrod, Terry S.; Yee, Albert J. M.; Richards, Robin R.; Finkelstein, Joel; Gofton, Wade; Murnaghan, John; Schatztker, Joseph; Ford, Michael; Bulmer, Beverly; Conlan, Lisa; Laflamme, G. Yves; Berry, Gregory; Beaumont, Pierre; Ranger, Pierre; Laflamme, Georges-Henri; Gagnon, Sylvain; Malo, Michel; Fernandes, Julio; Poirier, Marie-France; Waddell, James P.; Bogoch, Earl R.; Daniels, Timothy R.; McBroom, Robert R.; Vicente, Milena R.; Storey, Wendy; Wild, Lisa M.; McCormack, Robert; Perey, Bertrand; Goetz, Thomas J.; Pate, Graham; Penner, Murray J.; Panagiotopoulos, Kostas; Pirani, Shafique; Dommisse, Ian G.; Loomer, Richard L.; Stone, Trevor; Moon, Karyn; Zomar, Mauri; Webb, Lawrence X.; Teasdall, Robert D.; Birkedal, John Peter; Martin, David Franklin; Ruch, David S.; Kilgus, Douglas J.; Pollock, David C.; Harris, Mitchel Brion; Wiesler, Ethan Ron; Ward, William G.; Shilt, Jeffrey Scott; Koman, Andrew L.; Poehling, Gary G.; Kulp, Brenda; Creevy, William R.; Stein, Andrew B.; Bono, Christopher T.; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Brown, Desmond; Pacicca, Donna; Sledge, John B.; Foster, Timothy E.; Voloshin, Ilva; Bolton, Jill; Carlisle, Hope; Shaughnessy, Lisa; Obremskey, William T.; LeCroy, C. Michael; Meinberg, Eric G.; Messer, Terry M.; Craig, William L.; Dirschl, Douglas R.; Caudle, Robert; Harris, Tim; Elhert, Kurt; Hage, William; Jones, Robert; Piedrahita, Luis; Schricker, Paul O.; Driver, Robin; Godwin, Jean; Kregor, Philip James; Tennent, Gregory; Truchan, Lisa M.; Sciadini, Marcus; Shuler, Franklin D.; Driver, Robin E.; Nading, Mary Alice; Neiderstadt, Jacky; Vap, Alexander R.; Vallier, Heather A.; Patterson, Brendan M.; Wilber, John H.; Wilber, Roger G.; Sontich, John K.; Moore, Timothy Alan; Brady, Drew; Cooperman, Daniel R.; Davis, John A.; Cureton, Beth Ann; Mandel, Scott; Orr, R. Douglas; Sadler, John T. S.; Hussain, Tousief; Rajaratnam, Krishan; Petrisor, Bradley; Drew, Brian; Bednar, Drew A.; Kwok, Desmond C. H.; Pettit, Shirley; Hancock, Jill; Cole, Peter A.; Smith, Joel J.; Brown, Gregory A.; Lange, Thomas A.; Stark, John G.; Levy, Bruce A.; Swiontkowski, Marc F.; Garaghty, Mary J.; Salzman, Joshua G.; Schutte, Carol A.; Tastad, Linda; Vang, Sandy; Seligson, David; Roberts, Craig S.; Malkani, Arthur L.; Sanders, Laura; Dyer, Carmen; Heinsen, Jessica; Smith, Langan; Madanagopal, Sudhakar; Frantz-Bush, Linda; Coupe, Kevin J.; Tucker, Jeffrey J.; Criswell, Allen R.; Buckle, Rosemary; Rechter, Alan Jeffrey; Sheth, Dhiren Shaskikant; Urquart, Brad; Trotscher, Thea; Anders, Mark J.; Kowalski, Joseph M.; Fineberg, Marc S.; Bone, Lawrence B.; Phillips, Matthew J.; Rohrbacher, Bernard; Stegemann, Philip; Mihalko, William M.; Buyea, Cathy; Augustine, Stephen J.; Jackson, William Thomas; Solis, Gregory; Ero, U.; Segina, Daniel N.; Berrey, Hudson B.; Agnew, Samuel G.; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Campbell, Lakina C.; Derting, Lynn; McAdams, June; Ponsen, Kees Jan; Kloen, Peter; Joosse, Pieter; Winkelhagen, Jasper; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Teague, David C.; Davey, Joseph; Sullivan, J. Andy; Ertl, William J. J.; Puckett, Timothy A.; Pasque, Charles B.; Tompkins, John F.; Gruel, Curtis R.; Kammerlocher, Paul; Lehman, Thomas P.; Puffinbarger, William R.; Carl, Kathy L.; Weber, Donald W.; Jomha, Nadr M.; Goplen, Gordon R.; Masson, Edward; A, Lauren; Schaump, Lori N.; Jeray, Kyle J.; Goetz, David R.; Westberry, David E.; Broderick, J. Scott; Moon, Bryan S.; Tanner, Stephanie L.; Powell, James N.; Buckley, Richard E.; Elves, Leslie; John, Saint; Connolly, Stephen; Abraham, Edward P.; Steele, Trudy; Ellis, Thomas; Herzberg, Alex; Brown, George A.; Crawford, Dennis E.; Hart, Robert; Hayden, James; Orfaly, Robert M.; Vigland, Theodore; Vivekaraj, Maharani; Bundy, Gina L.; Miclau, Theodore; Matityahu, Amir; Coughlin, R. Richard; Kandemir, Utku; McClellan, R. Trigg; Lin, Cindy Hsin-Hua; Karges, David; Cramer, Kathryn; Watson, J. Tracy; Moed, Berton; Scott, Barbara; Beck, Dennis J.; Orth, Carolyn; Puskas, David; Clark, Russell; Jones, Jennifer; Egol, Kenneth A.; Paksima, Nader; Wai, Eugene K.; Johnson, Garth; Wilkinson, Ross; Gruszczynski, Adam T.; Vexler, Liisa

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of negative postoperative outcomes after long-bone fracture treatment may help to optimize patient care. We recently completed the Study to Prospectively Evaluate Reamed Intramedullary Nails in Patients with Tibial Fractures (SPRINT), a large, multicenter trial of reamed and unreamed

  19. A Novel Closed Method to Retrieve Broken Teflon Tube During Intramedullary Nailing in Proximal Humeral Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuk Fai Lau

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Broken medullary tubes have been used for intramedullary (IM nailing of femoral and tibial fractures. In these reported cases, fragments of the medullary tube were retrieved by opening the fracture sites or left in situ, which might jeopardize periosteal blood supply. We herein present the case of a 58-year-old woman who underwent IM nailing for proximal humeral fracture, which was complicated by breakage of the medullary tube intraoperatively. Different instruments including guide rods, straight forceps, and cement extract hook were used to retrieve the retained fragments from the medullary canal, but these attempts were unsuccessful. Finally, the fragments were successfully removed using an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL ENDOBUTTON depth gauge. This case highlights that medullary tubes can break during humeral IM nailing, which could be minimized by ensuring integrity of the medullary tube prior to surgery and disposing medullary tubes with more than 100 exposures. A novel method of using ACL ENDOBUTTON depth gauge to retrieve retained tube fragments is recommended because of its long and slim design.

  20. Reaming as an adjuvant to irrigation on bacterial presence and propagation: an open, cadaveric intramedullary fracture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archdeacon, Michael T; Kazemi, Namdar; Romanowski, James R; Mobberley-Schuman, Paula S; Weiss, Alison A

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the effect of intramedullary reaming on bacterial presence and propagation in an open, cadaveric intramedullary fracture model. Twelve fresh-frozen human cadaveric femurs were osteotomized and inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus, the open, cadaveric intramedullary fracture model. Low-pressure pulsed lavage irrigation was performed to irrigate the osteotomy sites. The specimens were divided into two groups of six paired specimens: CNT, irrigation only; and REAM, irrigation coupled with intramedullary reaming. Intramedullary contents were cultured at the osteotomy site and in 1-cm increments through the distal femoral metaphysis. Mean bacterial colony-forming units were compared between groups using analysis of variance. A statistically significant higher bacterial colony-forming unit count was noted at the osteotomy site (bacterial presence) in the CNT group compared with the REAM group. In terms of bacterial propagation, when compared with the sterile osteotomy site, the CNT group demonstrated significant bacterial propagation only at the 1.1- to 2.0-cm increment and the REAM group demonstrated no significant propagation. In comparing bacterial propagation between the CNT and the REAM groups, no significant differences were noted at any distal increment. In this open, cadaveric intramedullary fracture model, low-pressure pulse lavage coupled with intramedullary reaming demonstrated significantly less bacterial presence at the osteotomy site compared with irrigation without reaming. Additionally, intramedullary reaming does not appear to significantly propagate bacteria into the intramedullary canal nor into the distal metaphysis. These observations might have clinical significance.

  1. [Locked intramedullary nailing in treatment of femur and tibia delayed union and pseudoarthrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Krzysztof; Gaździk, Tadeusz Szymon; Jaworski, Jerzy Mirosław; Gajda, Tomasz

    2004-01-01

    Five patients treated operatively on account of tibia and femur shaft delayed union and pseudoarthrosis were re-operated by locked intramedullary nailing. The method permits stable bone fixation. Intramedullary canal reaming stimulates bone union, as it refreshes fracture site and is a source of bone graft. Intramedullary nail covers anatomical axis of bone and, in the case of femur, is close to its mechanical axis. It diminishes the risk of implant breakage. The method permits active and efficient rehabilitation. Some fractures stabilised with external fixator or operated by Zespol or Polfix method can be re-operated by close technic. It shortens time of operation and diminishes its aggressiveness. In our opinion locked intramedullary nailing is an efficient method in treatment of tibia and femur shaft delayed union and pseudoarthrosis.

  2. Distal tibial fractures: evaluation of different fixation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöstl, Julian; Tiefenböck, Thomas Manfred; Hofbauer, Marcus; Winnisch, Markus; Lang, Nikolaus; Hajdu, Stefan; Sarahrudi, Kambiz

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was the comparison of the most commonly used surgical techniques (external fixation, intramedullary nailing, and plate fixation) for the treatment of distal tibial fractures (AO/OTA classification 42-A, B, C or 43-A, B1). A retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent surgical treatment for distal tibial fractures between 1992 and 2011 was performed. A total of 93 patients (52 male/41 female) met inclusion criteria. Statistically significant differences were found regarding the consolidation time of the intramedullary-nailing (147.32 ± 91.16 days) and the plate-fixation group (135.75 ± 110.75 days) versus the external-fixation group (163.12 ± 96.79 days; P = 0.001; P = 0.01). Significant differences were also observed in the range of motion (ROM) of the ankle joint in the intramedullary-nailing and plate-fixation group versus the ROM in the external-fixation group (P = 0.044; P = 0.025). The overall complication rate was 13/93 (14 %). Out of 66 patients treated with intramedullary nailing, 8 (12 %) suffered from complications. Out of the 15 patients treated with plate and 12 patients with external fixation, 2 (13 %) and 3 (25 %) showed complications, respectively. Our results demonstrate advantages in terms of shorter mobilization time and a better ROM of the ankle joint for intramedullary nailing and plate fixation compared with external fixation. Due to our results, we suggest internal fixation (intramedullary nailing or plate fixation) whenever patient's condition and the local fracture situation allow it.

  3. Treatment of lower extremity long bone nonunion with expandable intramedullary nailing and autologous bone grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yunfei; Bai, Yushu; Xu, Shuogui; Liu, Xinwei; Wang, Panfeng; Wu, Dajiang; Zhang, Chuncai; Li, Ming

    2011-07-01

    Nonunion of long bones in lower limbs is a common complication of orthopedic trauma that can be extremely debilitating. This retrospective study describes our experience using expandable intramedullary nails and autologous bone grafting in treating lower limb long bone nonunion with bone defects. Nineteen patients (mean age 38.9 years, range 18-61) with lower limb long bone nonunion and defects caused by femoral or tibial fracture types were as follows: A2 (3 femoral, 1 tibial), A3 (1 femoral, 2 tibial), B2 (3 femoral, 4 tibial), and B3 (1 femoral, 4 tibial). Expandable intramedullary nailing and autologous bone (iliac and/or fibular) grafting were used for the treatment. Postoperative bone healing as determined by analysis of standard anteroposterior and lateral X-ray films every 4 weeks. Complications were noted. The average number of previous surgeries was 1.9 (range 1-4). The mean duration from original injury to treatment was 17.6 months (range 9-40 months). Femoral shaft nonunion healed on average of 26.5 weeks (range 16-60 weeks) after surgery, while tibial shaft nonunion healed on average of 23.6 weeks (range 12-40 weeks) after surgery. Class I healing occurred in all but two patients who experienced chronic postoperative osteomyelitis and delayed wound healing, respectively. Two patients complained of postoperative donor site pain. The use of expandable intramedullary nails and autologous bone grafts was an effective method for repair of nonunion of lower limb fractures combining with bone defects with minimal complications.

  4. Study of Ender’s Nailing in Paediatric Tibial Shaft Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Himanshu G. Ladani

    2015-01-01

    Background: Closed reduction & plaster is standard and effective form of treatment in majority of paediatric tibial shaft fractures. Operative intervention is necessary in unstable fractures, open fractures, poly trauma patients and compartment syndrome or severe soft tissue compromise. Historically, external fixation and plating were the treatment options available, but having complications like infection, overgrowth and refracture. Reamed locked intramedullary nails pose unnecessary risk to...

  5. Tibial lengthening for unilateral Crowe type-IV developmental dysplasia of the hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wan

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Tibial lengthening may effectively correct gait and satisfactorily improve body image in young patients with unilateral Crowe type-IV DDH. Mono-lateral external fixator allows for accelerated postoperative rehabilitation and optimal preservation of ankle movements. Lengthening along with intramedullary nails may significantly reduce the external fixation time and the risk of fixator-related complications.

  6. Partial resection of the PCL insertion site during tibial preparation in cruciate-retaining TKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyen, Hans; Van Opstal, Nick; Bellemans, Johan

    2013-12-01

    Based on the anatomy of the tibial PCL insertion site, we hypothesized that at least part of it is damaged while performing a standard tibial cut in a PCL-retaining total knee replacement. The purpose of this study was to determine and quantify the amount of resection of the tibial PCL attachment with a 9 mm tibial cut with 3 degrees of posterior slope. Twenty cadaver tibias were used. The borders of the PCL footprint were demarcated, and calibrated digital pictures were taken in order to determine the surface area. A standard tibial intramedullary guide was used to prepare and perform a tibial cut at a depth of 9 mm with 3 degrees posterior slope. After the tibial cut was made, a second digital picture was taken using the same methodology to measure the surface area of the remaining PCL insertion. The mean surface area of the intact tibial PCL footprint before the cut was 148.9 ± 25.8 mm(2) and after the tibial cut 47.1 ± 28.0 mm(2). On average, 68.8 ± 15.3 % of the surface area of the PCL insertion was removed. The results of this study, therefore, indicate that the conventional technique for tibial preparation in cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty can result in damage or removal of a significant part of the tibial PCL insertion.

  7. Intramedullary nailing in the treatment of open fractures of the tibia and fibula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, F J; Hodgkinson, A H; Harvey, P M

    1975-10-01

    Intramedullary nailing of thirty acute displaced open fractures of the tibia and fibula resulted in union with only one superficial infection. The low incidence of sepsis is attributed to the use of the curved malleable Hodgkinson tibial nail which requires no reaming, renders the operation less difficult and traumatic, and interferes minimally with bone vascularity. Fibular nailing was an effective means of stabilizing nine of the twelve fractures close to the ankle joint.

  8. [Removal of a broken massive tibial intramedullary nail].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frima, A J; Karthaus, A J

    1998-12-01

    A problem has arisen when replacing the reamed tibia nail by the massive unreamed tibia nail. In case of nail fracture it is difficult to remove the distal fragment from the medullary cavity. It may also occur that the connecting screw between the insertion handle and the nail breaks off at the edge of the implant, which much complicates removal of the nail. The authors have developed a technique to remove the implant without having to saw a fissure in the marrow. A concave instrument is slid over the part of the nail left behind after which the two are connected by means of a K wire. This method has been successfully applied in 2 patients.

  9. [Removal of a massive broken tibial intramedullary nail].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frima, A J; Karthaus, A J

    1998-03-01

    A problem arose when the reamed tibia nail was replaced by a massive unreamed tibia nail. Of the nail fractures, it is difficult to remove the distal fragment from the medullary cavity. It may also happen that the connecting screw between the insertion handle and the nail breaks off at the edge of the implant, which complicates removal of the nail. The authors have developed a technique for removing the implant without having to saw a fissure in the marrow. A concave instrument is slid over the part of the nail left behind after which the two are connected by means of a K wire. This method has been successfully applied in two patients.

  10. Treatment of femoral shaft fractures with a titanium intramedullary nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Gun-Il; Shin, Seong-Ryong

    2002-08-01

    Ninety-nine femoral shaft fractures were treated with locked intramedullary nails made from titanium alloy. One of the distal interlocking screws failed in six fractures (6%) and both screws failed in two fractures (2%). Delayed union was associated with all of the eight fractures that had locking screw failure. Young, heavier patients who had nails of small diameter had an increased risk of screw failure. Additional surgery was needed when both screws failed. The authors still use this nail, but currently prefer to ream the medullary canal more so that larger nails can be inserted. Decisions concerning weightbearing are made on an individual basis for each patient, and currently full weightbearing is delayed for young, active, and heavy patients. Two distal interlocking screws should be inserted for treatment of femoral shaft fracture when a Ti locked intramedullary nail is used.

  11. Treatment of comminuted tibial shaft fractures in four dogs with the use of interlocking nail connected with type I external fixator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piórek, A; Adamiak, Z; Jaskólska, M; Zhalniarovich, Y

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of comminuted tibial shaft fractures in canine patients is burdened by significant risk which involves bone healing complications, such as delayed bone union. Complications may result from iatrogenic damage to blood vessels during fracture stabilization. To minimize this risk, treatment methods increasingly often rely on the concept of biological osteosynthesis. One of such methods involves the treatment of fractures with the use of new hybrid fixator consisted of an interlocking nail connected with type I external fixator. Connection of the nail with external fixator has been recently developed to maximize treatment efficiency. This manner of stabilization increases bone-fixator construct strength on forces acting in the place of fracture. It also enables fracture fixation with minimal damage of the blood supply of bone fragments. This article describes surgical procedure of stabilization of comminuted tibial bone fractures in four dogs by the use of interlocking nail connected with external fixator type I, discusses and evaluates the results of clinical treatment with the involvement of the said fixator. To control bone consolidation process the radiograms were taken in 6 and 8 week of healing. In all cases, the reviewed methods of clinical treatment were successful in producing bone union after eight week of healing. During the whole period of observations no complication was observed. In all cases the intramedullary nail were left in the medullary canal after the healing process was finished. The fixator supported quick restoration of limb function after treatment.

  12. Influence of sagittal plane malpositioning of the patella on anterior knee pain after tibia intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkmen, Ismail; Saglam, Yavuz; Turkmensoy, Fatih; Kemah, Bahattin; Kara, Adnan; Unay, Koray

    2017-01-01

    Anterior knee pain (AKP) is one of the most common complications after tibia intramedullary surgery. We evaluated changes in patellar tendon length after tibia intramedullary nailing surgery using a transtendinous approach and assessed the importance of nail position in relation to the anterior tibial cortex and joint line. Two surgeons blinded to patients' pain status measured both the knee Insall-Salvati and Caton-Deschamps indexes on 30° flexion lateral knee X-rays of 33 patients. Superior nail prominence (the distance from the proximal tip of the nail to the tibial plateau) and anterior nail prominence (the distance from the anterior tip of the nail to the anterior tibial cortex) were measured on the CT. Clinical assessment showed that 10 patients (30 %) had AKP at the last follow-up. HSS and Lysholm scores and the incidence of AKP were similar between patients whose IM nails were removed and those who still had them. HSS score, Insall-Salvati, and Caton-Deschamps indexes were significantly lower in the operated extremity than in the healthy limb at last follow-up. No association was demonstrated between AKP and nail position in relation to the anterior tibial cortex or tibial plateau. According to our study, although the patellar tendon shortened significantly on the affected side compared with the contralateral side, these measurements did not correlate with the presence or absence of pain. AKP and functional knee scores after tibia IM nailing using a transtendinous approach were not associated with nail position in relation to the anterior tibial cortex or tibial plateau. Level 3 (Case control study).

  13. Technique tip: use of anterior cruciate ligament jig for hindfoot fusion by calcanio-talo-tibial nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Syed; Sarkar, Jay

    2012-08-01

    The use of intramedullary nail fixation for tibio-talo-calcaneal fusion is gaining popularity. There is chance of failure of procedure following faulty operative technique specially alignment. The article describes a useful application of tibial tunnel jig in inserting the calcanio-talo-tibial guide wire. There is precision of few millimeters in the exit point of guide wire on talus. The authors believe that this helps in better positioning of nail and hence better alignment and better operative outcome.

  14. Intra-medullary tubercular abscess with spinal dysraphism: An unusual case

    OpenAIRE

    Bhanage, Ashok; Katkar, Anand; Ghate, Prajakta; Ratta, Bhagwant

    2015-01-01

    Spinal intramedullary tubercular abscess itself is a rare entity. Very few cases have been reported. We report a case of a 4-month-old female with a dermal sinus in lower back since birth, intermittent fever for 2 months, acute onset paraparesis and bowel bladder involvement showing an intramedullary contrast enhancing lesion extending from D11 to S2 level with low lying conus, and a subcutaneous tract in lower back at S2 level extending from skin up to the sacral canal on magnetic resonance ...

  15. Biomechanics of intramedullary fracture fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, R F

    1985-11-01

    Intramedullary rodding allows excellent control of bending forces on long bone fractures when adequate sized rods are used. This is made possible by reaming when necessary. Torsional stability is poor if adequate bone nail contact is not obtained and there is little bone fragment interdigitation. This can be optimized with the interlocking system, especially with proximal and distal fractures. Intramedullary rods allow transmission of compressive load so there must be adequate bone to bone contact without comminution to prevent shortening. If a great deal of comminution is present, an interlocking system must be used to resist compressive loads. The interlocked devices have not been proven to be a detriment to union and indeed are a semi-rigid fixation system when used in comminuted shaft fractures. The strength of an osteosynthesis with an intramedullary rod depends on the geometry of the rod and the geometry of the fracture complex. Both locked and nonlocked intramedullary rods perform extremely well when one understands the mechanical principles involved in intramedullary rodding and pays close attention to detail.

  16. Comparison of three fixations for tibial plateau fractures by biomechanical study and radiographic observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-wei; Liu, Guo-dong; Ou, Shan; Jiang, Xie-yuan; Fei, Jun; Wu, Li-jun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the fixation effects of three fixation devices for tibial plateau fracture (AO/OTA classification 41 A1). Sixteen human cadaver tibial specimens were randomly divided into four groups. An A1 fracture model was established. The fractures were subsequently fixed by axial controlled intramedullary nail, external fixation and steel plate fixation. Each specimen was subjected to axial compression, torsion test and three-point bending test. Then a rat model was used to evaluate the therapeutic effect of these three fixations by evaluation of callus formation time and healing time. It was found that the axial controlled intramedullary nail group obtained superior biomechanical properties of resistance ability of bending, torsional and axial compressive, compared with external fixation and steel plate group. In animal experiments, the axial controlled intramedullary nail group had a significant shorter callus occurrence and healing time than steel plate and external fixator group. The axial controlled intramedullary nail fixation has a superior biomechanical characteristic and fixation effect for tibial plateau fractures than steel plate and external fixator. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. TIBIAL LANDMARKS IN ACL ANATOMIC REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Demesсhenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to identify anatomical landmarks on tibial articular surface to serve as reference in preparing tibial canal with respect to the center of ACL footprint during single bundle arthroscopic repair.Materials and methods. Twelve frozen knee joint specimens and 68 unpaired macerated human tibia were studied using anatomical, morphometric, statistical methods as well as graphic simulation.Results. Center of the tibial ACL footprint was located 13,1±1,7 mm anteriorly from posterior border of intercondylar eminence, at 1/3 of the distance along the line connecting apexes of internal and external tubercles and 6,1±0,5 mm anteriorly along the perpendicular raised to this point.Conclusion. Internal and external tubercles, as well as posterior border of intercondylar eminence can be considered as anatomical references to determine the center of the tibial ACL footprint and to prepare bone canals for anatomic ligament repair.

  18. Humeral Shaft Fracture: Intramedullary Nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konda, Sanjit R; Saleh, Hesham; Fisher, Nina; Egol, Kenneth A

    2017-08-01

    This video demonstrates the technique of intramedullary nailing for a humeral shaft fracture. The patient is a 30-year-old man who sustained a gunshot wound to his right arm. The patient was indicated for humeral nailing given the comminuted nature of the diaphysis and to allow for minimal skin incisions. Other relative indications include soft-tissue compromise about the arm precluding a large surgical exposure. This video presents a case of a comminuted humeral shaft fracture treated with an intramedullary nail. Anatomic reduction and stable fixation was obtained with this technique. This case demonstrates a soft-tissue sparing technique of humeral shaft fixation using a humeral intramedullary nail. The technique is easy to perform and has significant benefits in minimizing surgical exposure, decreasing operative time, and decreasing blood loss. In the correct clinical setting, humeral nailing provides an expeditious form of fixation that restores length, alignment, and rotation of the fracture humeral diaphysis.

  19. Comparison of our self-designed rotary self-locking intramedullary nail and interlocking intramedullary nail in the treatment of long bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bailian; Xiong, Ying; Deng, Hong; Gu, Shao; Jia, Fu; Li, Qunhui; Wang, Daxing; Gan, Xuewen; Liu, Wei

    2014-07-21

    The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical effects of our self-designed rotary self-locking intramedullary nail (RSIN) and interlocking intramedullary nail (IIN) for long bone fractures. A retrospective study was performed in 1,704 patients who suffered bone fractures and underwent RSIN or IIN operation in our hospital between March 1999 and March 2013, including 494 with femoral fractures, 572 with humeral fractures, and 638 with tibial fractures. Among them, 634 patients were followed up for more than 1 year. The operative time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative complications, healing rate, and the excellent and good rate of functional recovery were compared between two groups. Compared with IIN group, RSIN group exhibited significantly shorter operative time and less intraoperative blood loss no matter for humeral, femoral, or tibial fractures (all p fractures (both p fracture. In IIN group, nail breakage or loosening occurred in 7 patients with femoral fractures and 16 patients with tibial fractures, radial nerve injury was observed in 8 patients with humeral fractures, and incision infection was present in 2 patients with humeral fractures and 1 patient with femoral fracture. The complication rate of IIN group was significantly higher than that of RSIN group (p fractures.

  20. Use and abuse of flexible intramedullary nailing in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascombes, Pierre; Haumont, Thierry; Journeau, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) has became a well-accepted method of osteosynthesis of diaphyseal fractures in children and adolescents for many reasons including the following: no need for postoperative cast, primary bone union with avoidance of growth plate injury, and minimum invasive surgery. The principle is to introduce 2 elastic nails, titanium or stainless steel, into the medullary canal through a metaphyseal approach. The bended nails must have their maximum of curve at the level of the fracture, and their orientation, most often face to face, is in charge of the reduction and, so far, the stabilization, of the fracture. The usual size of the nails is equal to 0.4 times the diameter of the medullary canal. As far as possible, a bigger diameter is better than a thinner one. Most fractures of the femur are treated with a bipolar retrograde ESIN when some distal fractures need an antegrade subtrochanteric approach. Forearm fractures need a combined retrograde radial and antegrade ulnar through the posterolateral part of the olecranon. Humerus and tibial diaphyseal fractures may also be treated with ESIN. Complications are mainly caused by technical errors including too-thin nails, asymmetry of the frame, and malorientation of the implants. Nonunion was never observed in fractures of the femur and the forearm; osteomyelitis rate is 2%, and mean overgrowth of the femur is less than 10 mm before the age of 10 years. Indications of ESIN are fractures of the diaphysis: all the fractures of the femur between the age of 6 years and the end of growth except for the severe open grade III fractures, all the unstable fractures of the forearm, and some unstable fractures of the humerus and the tibia during adolescence or before the end of growth. In addition, ESIN is indicated in polytraumatism and multiple injuries. The good results of this reliable technique are obtained when surgeons have a good knowledge of it, especially in the understanding of the

  1. Fatigue behavior of Ilizarov frame versus tibial interlocking nail in a comminuted tibial fracture model: a biomechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stahel Philip F

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment options for comminuted tibial shaft fractures include plating, intramedullary nailing, and external fixation. No biomechanical comparison between an interlocking tibia nail with external fixation by an Ilizarov frame has been reported to date. In the present study, we compared the fatigue behaviour of Ilizarov frames to interlocking intramedullary nails in a comminuted tibial fracture model under a combined loading of axial compression, bending and torsion. Our goal was to determine the biomechanical characteristics, stability and durability for each device over a clinically relevant three month testing period. The study hypothesis was that differences in the mechanical properties may account for differing clinical results and provide information applicable to clinical decision making for comminuted tibia shaft fractures. Methods In this biomechanical study, 12 composite tibial bone models with a comminuted fracture and a 25 mm diaphyseal gap were investigated. Of these, six models were stabilized with a 180-mm four-ring Ilizarov frame, and six models were minimally reamed and stabilized with a 10 mm statically locked Russell-Taylor Delta™ tibial nail. After measuring the pre-fatigue axial compression bending and torsion stiffness, each model was loaded under a sinusoidal cyclic combined loading of axial compression (2.8/28 lbf; 12.46/124.6 N and torque (1.7/17 lbf-in; 0.19/1.92 Nm at a frequency of 3 Hz. The test was performed until failure (implant breakage or ≥ 5° angulations and/or 2 cm shortening occurred or until 252,000 cycles were completed, which corresponds to approximately three months testing period. Results In all 12 models, both the Ilizarov frame and the interlocking tibia nail were able to maintain fracture stability of the tibial defect and to complete the full 252,000 cycles during the entire study period of three months. A significantly higher stiffness to axial compression and torsion was

  2. Locking internal fixator with minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis for the proximal and distal tibial fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TONG Da-ke

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To investigate the efficacy of the locking internal fixator (LIF, which includes the locking compression plate (LCP and the less invasive stable system (LISS, in the proximal and distal tibial fractures. Methods: We did a retrospective study on a total of 98 patients with either proximal or distal tibial fractures from January 2003 to January 2007, who had received the opera- tion with LIF by the minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO technique. The data consisted of 43 proximal tibial fractures (type AO41C3 and 55 distal tibial fractures (type AO43C3. Results: No complications were observed in all patients after operation. The mean healing time was 8.4 months (range 5-14 months. Only two cases of delayed union occurred at postoperative 10 months. No infections were reported after the definitive surgery even in the cases of open fractures. All patients reached a full range of motion at postoperative 6 to 9 months and regained the normal functions of knee and ankle joints. Conclusion: Using LIF in MIPO technique is a reliable approach towards the proximal and distal tibial fractures that are not suitable for intramedullary nailing. Key words: Internal fixator; Tibial fractures; Fracture fixation, intramedullary; Bone plates

  3. Treatment of distal tibial fractures: plate versus nail: a retrospective outcome analysis of matched pairs of patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, K.W.; Biert, J.; Kampen, A. van

    2007-01-01

    A study of 24 patients who sustained an extra-articular fracture of the distal third of the tibial shaft was performed to determine the effect of the type of treatment, open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) or closed reduction and intramedullary (IM) nailing, on the occurrence of malalignment.

  4. [Value of intramedullary locked nailing in distal fractures of the tibia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnevialle, P; Savorit, L; Combes, J M; Rongières, M; Bellumore, Y; Mansat, M

    1996-01-01

    This study is a retrospective analysis of 38 extra-articular distal tibial fractures treated by intramedullary locked nailing. 38 patients with a distal metaphyseal extra-articular fracture (43 A AO type) or with minimal ankle joint extension were managed. There was 26 men and 12 women with a mean age of 32.3 years, 10 fractures were open. The fractures were transverse or oblique in 13 cases, with torsional or flexion wedge in 12 cases and spiroïd in 13 cases. In only 2 cases was the fibula intact. AO classification was not useful because many fractures began more proximally than the limit described by Müller. All the fractures were fixed by closed locked intramedullary nailing : the nail was cut just after the distal hole and impacted close to the subchondral plate. In 7 cases the fibula was fixed too. There was no postoperative complication in 27 cases. Three patients had a transient nerve palsy (one tibial nerve and two common fibular nerve). In ten cases the nail was dynamized. One patient had a non union but healed with a new dynamic nail. Two patients had a delayed union and healed after dynamization and osteotomy of the fibula. The mean time to union was 5 months (2 to 8). 8 patients had a varus or a valgus deformity of 3 to 6 degrees. 11 patients suffered from anterior knee pain and in 5 patients the fracture site was painful. In 18 patients a CT scan was performed : 6 had a rotational deformity from 4 to 26 degrees, and 2 a tibial lengthening (discrepancy of 7 and 9 mm). Closed intramedullary nailing is a safe and effective method for the treatment of distal metaphyseal tibial fractures. The authors propose a new classification.

  5. Hindfoot Valgus following Interlocking Nail Treatment for Tibial Diaphysis Fractures: Can the Fibula Be Neglected?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Uzun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We evaluated whether intramedullary nail fixation for tibial diaphysis fractures with concomitant fibula fractures (except at the distal one-third level managed conservatively with an associated fibula fracture resulted in ankle deformity and assessed the impact of the ankle deformity on lower extremity function. Methods. Sixty middle one-third tibial shaft fractures with associated fibular fractures, except the distal one-third level, were included in this study. All tibial shaft fractures were anatomically reduced and fixed with interlocking intramedullary nails. Fibular fractures were managed conservatively. Hindfoot alignment was assessed clinically. Tibia and fibular lengths were compared to contralateral measurements using radiographs. Functional results were evaluated using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS and the Foot and Ankle Disability Index Score (FADI. Results. Anatomic union, defined as equal length in operative and contralateral tibias, was achieved in 60 fractures (100%. Fibular shortening was identified in 42 fractures (68%. Mean fibular shortening was 1.2 cm (range, 0.5–2 cm. Clinical exams showed increased hindfoot valgus in 42 fractures (68%. The mean KOOS was 88.4, and the mean FADI score was 90. Conclusion. Fibular fractures in the middle or proximal one-third may need to be stabilized at the time of tibial intramedullary nail fixation to prevent development of hindfoot valgus due to fibular shortening.

  6. [The results of the treatment of tibia shaft fractures in relation to the method of intramedullary nailing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bołtuć, Witold; Golec, Edward

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the results of treatment of tibial shaft fracture related to the method of intramedullary union with or without reaming of the marrow cavity. The clinical material was obtained from the traumatic-orthopaedic surgery department and rehabilitation department of the County Hospital in Dabrowa Tarnowska. A group of 128 patients treated with intramedullary blocking stabilization was evaluated. The clinical, radiological and functional indicators were assessed. The results of the study showed that the method of surgical union of tibial shaft fracture with the reaming of the marrow cavity was more favourable with regard to the assessed clinical and radiological parameters, complications concerning synostosis, infections and deviations of the long axis. The functional results were dependent, to a large degree, on the patients' age, and to some degree on the adopted operational technique.

  7. Intramedullary nailing with reaming to treat non-union of the tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledge, S L; Johnson, K D; Henley, M B; Watson, J T

    1989-08-01

    The records of fifty-one patients who were treated by intramedullary nailing with reaming for non-union of the tibia were retrospectively reviewed. The fractures had been treated initially by closed reduction and immobilization in a cast, external fixation followed by immobilization in a cast, fixation by pins incorporated in a plaster cast, minimum internal fixation and immobilization in a cast, dynamic compression plating, or intramedullary nailing with or without reaming. After the initial treatment had failed, intramedullary nailing with reaming was done to gain union. Although closed nailing of the tibia was preferred, in thirty-three patients, the site of the non-union was opened to improve alignment by performing an osteotomy or to remove failed hardware. Bone grafts from the iliac crest were used in ten patients, and a fibular ostectomy or osteotomy was done in thirty-three. Of thirty-four open fractures (fourteen grade I, seven grade II, and thirteen grade III), eight were infected at the time of intramedullary nailing. The average time of the diagnosis of a non-union was 9.6 months; the average length of follow-up after nailing was twenty months. In forty-nine (96 per cent) of the fifty-one patients, tibial union occurred at an average of seven months postoperatively. Complications included persistent infection (three patients), acquired infection after intramedullary nailing with reaming (three patients), fracture of the nail that necessitated an additional operation (two patients), shortening of more than one centimeter (two patients), malrotation of more than 15 degrees (one patient), peroneal palsy (one patient), and amputation (one patient). When used to treat non-union of the tibia, intramedullary nailing with reaming can produce union as effectively as other alternatives, while enabling the patient to function more normally without external immobilization or walking aids.

  8. Ankle fusion with a retrograde locked intramedullary nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Xu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To assess the value of ankle fusion with a retrograde locked intramedullary nail in the treatment of sequela of lower extremity compartment syndrome. Methods: Thirty-five cases of equinus deformity follow-ing tibiofibular compartment syndrome treated by means of ankle fusion with a retrograde locked intramedullary nail from January 2001 to December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. The complications, the time needed for bony fu-sion of the ankle joint assessed by anteroposterior and lateral X-ray photographs as well as patients’ subjective evalua-tion were recorded and analysed. Results: Among the 35 patients, 15 had previously undergone surgical treatment twice on the same limb, 13 had thrice and 7 had to be operated on four times before ankle fusion. An anterior midpoint approach to the ankle joint was adopted in 29 cases, while anterior midpoint ap-proach plus a small incision on the posterior ankle joint was made in 17 cases, whereas lateral approach in 6 cases. Tar-sus joint fusion was performed on 4 cases. The follow-up period ranged 6-124 months, averaged 40.6 months. Bone grafting was not performed in this series. Preoperative tibial shaft fracture occurred in one patient and was healed after conservative treatment. Incision dehiscence located at pre-vious Achilles tendon incision was found in two patients. As a result, one received an intramedullary nail emplace-ment at calcaneoplantar part while the wound at anterosuperior part of the other one was healed by dressing change. Two patients failed to bony union 5 months postoperatively, in which one healed 10 weeks after retrieval of proximal tibial nail and another by iliac grafting. Terminal necrosis of the toe due to blood supply dysfunction was not found in this series. All the patients were satisfied with the ankle joint function postoperatively. The time for bony union on X-rays was 9.8 weeks on average. Except for one patient who demanded removal of

  9. Influence of knee flexion and atraumatic mobilisation of infrapatellar fat pad on incidence and severity of anterior knee pain after tibial nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Andrija; Korac, Zelimir; Bozic, Nenad-Bozo; Stedul, Ivan

    2013-09-01

    We evaluated the incidence and aetiology of anterior knee pain (AKP) in a series of patients that underwent intramedullary nailing for stabilisation of tibial fractures. During the preparation of the entry site no excision of the infrapatellar fat was allowed and electrical haemostasis was kept at the lowest level. Medullary canal was reamed and the nails inserted in position of knee flexion over 100 degrees. All fractures were fixed using medial paratendinous approach. Functional outcome was measured using Lysholm knee score. The knee range of movement and return to previous level of activity were also documented and analysed. Mean follow up was 38.9 months (range 12-84 months). In total 60 patients with 62 tibial shaft fractures were analysed. The mean age at the time of final follow up was 49.4 years (range 20-87). In 22 (35.5%) a newly developed and persisting pain in the anterior region of the operated knee was reported. According to VAP scale, the pain was mild (VAS 1-3) in 12 cases (19.4%) and moderate (VAS 4-6) in 10 (16.1%). In 16 cases (73%) the pain was noticed 6-12 months after injury and subjectively related to return to full range of working and recreational activities. The mean Lysholm knee score in the group without AKP was 90.8. In the AKP group with mild pain it was 88.4 and in the group with moderate AKP it was 79.9. Complete return to previous professional and recreational activities occurred in 49/60 patients (81.7%). Content with the treatment regarding expectations in recovery dynamics and return to desired level of activity was present in 98.3% of patients; one patient was unsatisfied with the treatment. Our results indicate that respecting the physiological motion of Hoffa pad and menisci during knee flexion, accompanied with atraumatic mobilisation of retrotendinous fat, reduces incidence and severity of anterior knee pain following intramedullary fixation of tibial shaft fractures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Carbon fiber intramedullary nails reduce artifact in postoperative advanced imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimel, Melissa N.; Hwang, Sinchun; Riedel, Elyn R.; Healey, John H.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed whether radiolucent carbon fiber reinforced-polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) intramedullary nails decreased hardware artifact on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in vitro and in an oncologic patient population. In vitro and clinical evaluations were done. A qualitative assessment of metal artifact was performed using CFR-PEEK and titanium nail MRI phantoms. Eight patients with a femoral or tibial prophylactic CFR-PEEK nail were retrospectively identified. All patients had postoperative surveillance imaging by MRI, CT, and were followed for a median 20 months (range, 12-28 months). CFR-PEEK images were compared to images from a comparative group of patients with titanium femoral intramedullary nails who had a postoperative MRI or CT. A musculoskeletal-trained radiologist graded visualization of the cortex, corticomedullary junction, and bone-muscle interface, on T1-weighted (T1W), STIR, and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted fat-saturated (T1W FS) sequences of both groups with a five-point scale, performing independent reviews 4 months apart. Statistical analysis used the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and a weighted kappa. Substantially less MRI signal loss occurred in the CFR-PEEK phantom than in the titanium phantom simulation, particularly as the angle increased with respect to direction of the static magnetic field. CFR-PEEK nails had less MRI artifact than titanium nails on scored T1W, STIR, and contrast-enhanced T1W FS MRI sequences (p ≤ 0.03). The mean weighted kappa was 0.64, showing excellent intraobserver reliability between readings. CFR-PEEK intramedullary nail fixation is a superior alternative to minimize implant artifact on MRI or CT imaging for patients requiring long bone fixation. (orig.)

  11. Diaphyseal humeral fractures and intramedullary nailing: Can we improve outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnavos, Christos

    2011-01-01

    While intramedullary nailing has been established as the treatment of choice for diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia, its role in the management of diaphyseal humeral fractures remains controversial. The reasons include not only the complicated anatomy and unique biomechanical characteristics of the arm but also the fact that surgical technique and nail designs devised for the treatment of femoral and tibial fractures are being transposed to the humerus. As a result there is no consensus on many aspects of the humeral nailing procedure, e.g., the basic nail design, nail selection criteria, timing of the procedure, and the fundamental principles of the surgical technique (e.g., antegrade/retrograde, reamed/unreamed, and static/dynamic). These issues will be analyzed and discussed in the present article. Proposals aiming to improve outcomes include the categorization of humeral nails in two distinct groups: “fixed” and “bio”, avoidance of reaming for the antegrade technique and utilization of “semi-reaming” for the retrograde technique, guidelines for reducing complications, setting the best “timing” for nailing and criteria for selecting the most appropriate surgical technique (antegrade or retrograde). Finally, suggestions are made on proper planning and conducting clinical and biomechanical studies regarding the use of intramedullary nailing in the management of humeral shaft fractures. PMID:21559099

  12. Diaphyseal humeral fractures and intramedullary nailing: Can we improve outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnavos, Christos

    2011-05-01

    While intramedullary nailing has been established as the treatment of choice for diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia, its role in the management of diaphyseal humeral fractures remains controversial. The reasons include not only the complicated anatomy and unique biomechanical characteristics of the arm but also the fact that surgical technique and nail designs devised for the treatment of femoral and tibial fractures are being transposed to the humerus. As a result there is no consensus on many aspects of the humeral nailing procedure, e.g., the basic nail design, nail selection criteria, timing of the procedure, and the fundamental principles of the surgical technique (e.g., antegrade/retrograde, reamed/unreamed, and static/dynamic). These issues will be analyzed and discussed in the present article. Proposals aiming to improve outcomes include the categorization of humeral nails in two distinct groups: "fixed" and "bio", avoidance of reaming for the antegrade technique and utilization of "semi-reaming" for the retrograde technique, guidelines for reducing complications, setting the best "timing" for nailing and criteria for selecting the most appropriate surgical technique (antegrade or retrograde). Finally, suggestions are made on proper planning and conducting clinical and biomechanical studies regarding the use of intramedullary nailing in the management of humeral shaft fractures.

  13. Diaphyseal humeral fractures and intramedullary nailing: Can we improve outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Garnavos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While intramedullary nailing has been established as the treatment of choice for diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia, its role in the management of diaphyseal humeral fractures remains controversial. The reasons include not only the complicated anatomy and unique biomechanical characteristics of the arm but also the fact that surgical technique and nail designs devised for the treatment of femoral and tibial fractures are being transposed to the humerus. As a result there is no consensus on many aspects of the humeral nailing procedure, e.g., the basic nail design, nail selection criteria, timing of the procedure, and the fundamental principles of the surgical technique (e.g., antegrade/retrograde, reamed/unreamed, and static/dynamic. These issues will be analyzed and discussed in the present article. Proposals aiming to improve outcomes include the categorization of humeral nails in two distinct groups: "fixed" and "bio", avoidance of reaming for the antegrade technique and utilization of "semi-reaming" for the retrograde technique, guidelines for reducing complications, setting the best "timing" for nailing and criteria for selecting the most appropriate surgical technique (antegrade or retrograde. Finally, suggestions are made on proper planning and conducting clinical and biomechanical studies regarding the use of intramedullary nailing in the management of humeral shaft fractures.

  14. Reaming does not add significant time to intramedullary nailing of diaphyseal fractures of the tibia and femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crist, Brett D; Wolinsky, Philip R

    2009-10-01

    Reamed intramedullary nailing is the current gold standard for the treatment of diaphyseal fractures of the femur and tibia. Current concepts of orthopedic damage control surgery for patients with multiple injuries have placed an emphasis on appropriate surgical timing, limiting blood loss, and the duration of the initial operative procedure(s). Proponents of unreamed nailing have stated that reaming places polytraumatized patients "at risk," in part because it adds to the length of the surgical procedure and may exacerbate the severity of a patient's pulmonary injury. The purpose of this study was to determine how many minutes reaming actually takes and what percentage of operative time reaming comprises during intramedullary nailing of femoral and tibial shaft fractures. Intraoperative timing data were collected prospectively on a total of 52 patients with 54 fractures (21 femoral and 33 tibial) who underwent reamed intramedullary nailing of acute closed or open femoral or tibial shaft fractures over a 10-month period. Total operating room, surgical, and reaming times were collected. The average reaming time for femur and tibia fractures was 6.9 minutes and 7 minutes, respectively. On average, reaming accounted for 4.9% of the surgical time and 3.2% of the total operating room time for femur fractures and 4.9% of the surgical time and 3.4% of the total operating room for tibia fractures. Our results show that reaming comprises a small percentage of the operative time and the total time a patient spends in the operating room.

  15. No difference in the long term final functional outcome after nailing or cast bracing of high energy displaced tibial shaft fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Batta, Vineet; Dwyer, Amitabh J; Gulati, Aashish; Prakash, Jeevan; Mam, Maharaj K; John, Bobby

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cast bracing (CB) has been a well established method of treating tibial shaft fractures. Majority of the recent literature on treatment of tibial shaft fractures have upheld intramedullary nailing (IMN) as the treatment of choice. Most of these studies are from the west, in public funded health set ups and in hospitals with very low rates of infection. This has lead to bewilderment in the minds of surgeons wishing to opt for conservative treatment in countries with scarcit...

  16. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction by bone imprisonment | Zejjari ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The posterior tibial tendon showed longitudinal laceration was sutured and the internal retromalleolar canal was closed. The race and the freedom of the tendon were considered satisfactory by the end of surgery. The evolution was marked by the disappearance of pain, recovery of a satisfactory sport and professional ...

  17. Asymmetry in gait pattern following tibial shaft fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter; Læssøe, Uffe; Rasmussen, Sten

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Despite the high number of studies evaluating the outcomes following tibial shaft fractures, the literature lacks studies including objective assessment of patients' recovery regarding gait pattern. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether gait patterns at 6 and 12...... months post-operatively following intramedullary nailing of a tibial shaft fracture are different compared with a healthy reference population. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study design was a prospective cohort study. The primary outcome measurement was the gait patterns at 6 and 12 months post......-operatively measured with a 6-metre-long pressure-sensitive mat. The mat registers footprints and present gait speed, cadence as well as temporal and spatial parameters of the gait cycle. Gait patterns were compared to a healthy reference population. RESULTS: 49 patients were included with a mean age of 43.1 years (18...

  18. Surgical treatment of refractory tibial stress fractures in elite dancers: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Ryan G; Dhotar, Herman S; Rose, Donald J; Egol, Kenneth

    2009-06-01

    Treatment of tibial stress fractures in elite dancers is centered on rest and activity modification. Surgical intervention in refractory cases has important implications affecting the dancers' careers. Refractory tibial stress fractures in dancers can be treated successfully with drilling and bone grafting or intramedullary nailing. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Between 1992 and 2006, 1757 dancers were evaluated at a dance medicine clinic; 24 dancers (1.4%) had 31 tibial stress fractures. Of that subset, 7 (29.2%) elite dancers with 8 tibial stress fractures were treated operatively with either intramedullary nailing or drilling and bone grafting. Six of the patients were followed up closely until they were able to return to dance. One patient was available only for follow-up phone interview. Data concerning their preoperative treatment regimens, operative procedures, clinical union, radiographic union, and time until return to dance were recorded and analyzed. The mean age of the surgical patients at the time of stress fracture was 22.6 years. The mean duration of preoperative symptoms before surgical intervention was 25.8 months. Four of the dancers were male and 3 were female. All had failed nonoperative treatment regimens. Five patients (5 tibias) underwent drilling and bone grafting of the lesion, and 2 patients (3 tibias) with completed fractures or multiple refractory stress fractures underwent intramedullary nailing. Clinical union was achieved at a mean of 6 weeks and radiographic union at 5.1 months. Return to full dance activity was at an average of 6.5 months postoperatively. Surgical intervention for tibial stress fractures in dancers who have not responded to nonoperative management allowed for resolution of symptoms and return to dancing with minimal morbidity.

  19. A biomechanical study on flexible intramedullary nails used to treat pediatric femoral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jason K; Werner, Frederick W; Dhawan, Raman; Evans, Peter J; Kelley, Sean; Webster, Dwight A

    2005-11-01

    Flexible intramedullary nails have been indicated to treat femoral fractures in pediatric patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the stability of simulated transverse fractures after retrograde intramedullary flexible nail fixation. Various nail diameter combinations were tested using composite femurs in bending, torsion, and a combined axial/bending test where a vertical compressive force was applied to the femoral head. The cross-sectional percent area fill of the nails within the femurs was also determined. In 4 point bending, the greatest repair stiffness was 12% of the intact stiffness. In torsion, the greatest stiffness was 1% of the intact stiffness for either internal or external rotation. The greatest repair stiffness was 80% of the intact stiffness for a compressive load applied to the femoral head. Nail combinations with single nail diameters greater than 40% of the mid-shaft canal width, as measured from an AP radiograph, prevented the fracture from being reduced and left a posterior gap. Flexible intramedullary nails may be of value in the treatment of pediatric femoral fractures, but care must be taken to insert nails that are correctly sized for the canal and to protect the healing fracture from high torsional and bending loads.

  20. Setscrew distal locking for intramedullary nails: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köse, N; Günal, I; Wang, X; Athanasiou, K A; Agrawal, C M; Mabrey, J D

    2000-08-01

    This biomechanical study was undertaken to examine the effectiveness of setscrew distal locking in a static intramedullary (IM) femoral nail on the stability of fixation of femoral shaft fractures. Fifteen fresh-frozen cadeveric femora were randomly separated into three groups of five bones and transversely sectioned immediately distal to the isthmus. After the insertion of the large-diameter nails, distal locking was obtained by conventional method in the first group. In the second group, set-screw design was used in which two transverse screws penetrated only the lateral cortex of the femur and compressed the nail in the intramedullary canal. No distal locking was used in the third group. All instrumented femurs were mounted on a servohydraulic testing machine and tested in both rotations (20 degrees) and axial compression (amplitude: 1,000 Newton). Loading-versus-displacement data, acquired at a ten-Hertz sampling rate, were calibrated and used to calculate maximum torque, stiffness, and energy capacity to failure. Maximum displacement and axial stiffness also were determined. Mean maximum torque at 10 degrees for each group were 15.3+/-4.8 newton-meters for the interlocking group, 8.5 +/-1.2 newton-meters for the setscrew group, and 3.6+/-2.7 newton-meters for the nonlocked femora. At 20 degrees of rotational displacement, the torque measured 37.4+/-2.6 newton-meters; 15.0+/-4.0 newton-meters; and 5.3+/-3.1 newton-meters, respectively (p 0.05). The setscrew design provided 87 percent of the torsional rigidity of the interlocking group. In the axial compression test, mean maximum shortening was 1.1+/-0.3 millimeters in the interlocking group and 1.4+/-0.6 millimeters in the setscrew group (p > 0.05). The mean stiffness on longitudinal compression provided by the interlocking screws and the setscrews was 918 and 860 newton-meters per millimeter, respectively. The distal setscrew design provides adequate distal fixation of intramedullary nail for patients in the

  1. Angle stable interlocking screws improve construct stability of intramedullary nailing of distal tibia fractures: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, J; J, Horn; Linke, B; B, Linke; Höntzsch, D; D, Höntzsch; Gueorguiev, B; B, Gueorguiev; Schwieger, K; K, Schwieger

    2009-07-01

    Intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice for most displaced tibial shaft fractures. The ability to maintain a mechanically stable fixation becomes more difficult the further the fracture extends distally or proximally or when unreamed tibial nails are used. We assumed that a new angular stable locking option would provide improved stability and reduced interfragmentary movements in a distal tibia in vitro fracture model. Left and right bones of 8 pairs of human cadaveric tibiae were randomly assigned to either a group with conventional locked or a group with angular stable locked intramedullary nails. Nails of 10-mm-diameter were used after reaming up to 11 mm. A transverse distal osteotomy was performed and the specimens were tested mechanically under eccentric axial load. A video optical measurement system was used to determine the angular displacement of the osteotomy gap during loading. Construct stiffness, maximum load of the bone-nail construct and gap angle at 0.5 kN load were measured. The group with the angular stable locking option showed significantly higher stiffness values and reduced fracture gap motion compared to the group with conventional locked nails. A new angular stable locking option of intramedullary nails provides higher stability in terms of construct stiffness and reduced interfragmentary movements in a distal tibia in vitro fracture model.

  2. Rotary self-locking intramedullary nail for long tubular bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhong-lian; Yang, Hai-long; Xu, Jian-kun; Xia, Xue; Wang, Xin-jia; Song, Jian-xin; Hu, Jun

    2013-10-01

    Intramedullary nails had been widely used in the treatment of long-bone fractures because of less interference of fractures and center bearing biomechanical advantage. However, it had been also found many shortcomings such as broken nails, delayed healing and was modified in order to achieve better efficacy and reduce complications. The aim of the present study is to compare the efficacy of rotary self-locking intramedullary nails (RSIN) with that of interlocking intramedullary nails (IIN) in the treatment of long-bone fractures. A retrospective study investigated 129 cases with long-bone fractures (36 with femoral fracture, 81 with tibial fracture, and 12 with humeral fracture). The fractures were fixed using either an RSIN or IIN. All patients underwent followup for 12-30 months. All patients in both groups achieved a clinical fracture healing standard and the postoperative affected limb muscle strength and joint function were well restored. The RSIN group required a shorter operative time and the fracture healed faster. There was no significant difference in the hospital stay, intraoperative blood loss or postoperative complications between the two groups. RSIN is used to treat long-bone fractures. Its healing efficacy is equivalent to the IIN. Moreover, the RSIN method is simpler and causes less tissue damage than the IIN, therefore having the advantage of accelerated healing.

  3. Intra-medullary tubercular abscess with spinal dysraphism: An unusual case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanage, Ashok; Katkar, Anand; Ghate, Prajakta; Ratta, Bhagwant

    2015-01-01

    Spinal intramedullary tubercular abscess itself is a rare entity. Very few cases have been reported. We report a case of a 4-month-old female with a dermal sinus in lower back since birth, intermittent fever for 2 months, acute onset paraparesis and bowel bladder involvement showing an intramedullary contrast enhancing lesion extending from D11 to S2 level with low lying conus, and a subcutaneous tract in lower back at S2 level extending from skin up to the sacral canal on magnetic resonance imaging of the spine. Drainage of abscess and biopsy revealed tubercular infection on histopathology. The patient made a good recovery with anti-tubercular treatment and physiotherapy. The source of tubercular infection could not be established. The baby had received Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination at birth and the possibility of vaccination associated tubercular infection could not be ruled out.

  4. A forward-striking technique for reducing fracture gaps during intramedullary nailing: A technical note with clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seung-Jae; So, Sang-Yeon; Yoon, Yong-Cheol; Cho, Won-Tae; Oh, Jong-Keon

    2015-12-01

    A residual postoperative fracture gap between major bone fragments following intramedullary nailing of long-bone fractures is recognised as one of the major risk factors for delayed union and non-union. The most common method for reducing a fracture gap after nail insertion is through application of the backstroke technique. We introduce forward-striking as a new and simple technique that can be used to reduce fracture gaps during cephalomedullary or intramedullary nailing. The forward-striking technique was used in 20 patients with subtrochanteric or femoral shaft fractures and three patients with tibial shaft fractures who underwent cephalomedullary or intramedullary nailing at two university teaching hospitals between February 2013 and March 2014. Bone union was achieved in all cases, with a mean time of 5.7 months (range, 3-9 months). No major complications, including, non-union, implant failure, or infection, were encountered during the follow-up period. A forward-striking technique is simple, convenient, and highly efficient in terms of reducing fracture gaps during cephalomedullary or intramedullary nailing. The advantage of this technique is that it carries no risk of deforming the proximal interlocking screw, prevents excessive protrusion of the nail, and enables the lag screw to be placed into the optimal lag screw position relative to the femoral head at the time of cephalomedullary nailing. The forward-striking technique is particularly useful if no compression screw system is available. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Retrograde Tibial Nailing: a minimally invasive and biomechanically superior alternative to angle-stable plate osteosynthesis in distal tibia fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently, antegrade intramedullary nailing and minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) represent the main surgical alternatives in distal tibial fractures. However, neither choice is optimal for all bony and soft tissue injuries. The Retrograde Tibial Nail (RTN) is a small-caliber prototype implant, which is introduced through a 2-cm-long incision at the tip of the medial malleolus with stab incisions sufficient for interlocking. During this project, we investigated the feasibility of retrograde tibial nailing in a cadaver model and conducted biomechanical testing. Methods Anatomical implantations of the RTN were carried out in AO/OTA 43 A1-3 fracture types in three cadaveric lower limbs. Biomechanical testing was conducted in an AO/OTA 43 A3 fracture model for extra-axial compression, torsion, and destructive extra-axial compression. Sixteen composite tibiae were used to compare the RTN against an angle-stable plate osteosynthesis (Medial Distal Tibial Plate, Synthes®). Statistical analysis was performed by Student's t test. Results Retrograde intramedullary nailing is feasible in simple fracture types by closed manual reduction and percutaneous reduction forceps, while in highly comminuted fractures, the use of a large distractor can aid the reduction. Biomechanical testing shows a statistically superior stability (p nail meets the requirements of maximum soft tissue protection by a minimally invasive surgical approach with the ability of secure fracture fixation by multiple locking options. Retrograde tibial nailing with the RTN is a promising concept in the treatment of distal tibia fractures. PMID:24886667

  6. Prognostic Factors for Predicting Outcomes After Intramedullary Nailing of the Tibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemitsch, Emil H.; Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon; Sanders, David W.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Tornetta, Paul; Walter, Stephen D.; Zdero, Rad; Goslings, J.C.; Teague, David; Jeray, Kyle; McKee, Michael D.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon; Sanders, David W.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Tornetta, Paul; Walter, Stephen D.; Zdero, Rad; Goslings, J.C.; Teague, David; Jeray, Kyle; McKee, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Prediction of negative postoperative outcomes after long-bone fracture treatment may help to optimize patient care. We recently completed the Study to Prospectively Evaluate Reamed Intramedullary Nails in Patients with Tibial Fractures (SPRINT), a large, multicenter trial of reamed and unreamed intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fractures in 1226 patients. Using the SPRINT data, we conducted an investigation of baseline and surgical factors to determine any associations with an increased risk of adverse events within one year of intramedullary nailing. Methods: Using multivariable logistic regression analysis, we investigated fifteen baseline and surgical factors for any associations with an increased risk of negative outcomes. Results: There was an increased risk of negative events in patients with a high-energy mechanism of injury (odds ratio [OR] = 1.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05 to 2.35), a stainless steel compared with a titanium nail (OR = 1.52; 95% CI, 1.10 to 2.13), a fracture gap (OR = 2.40; 95% CI, 1.47 to 3.94), and full weight-bearing status after surgery (OR = 1.63; 95% CI, 1.00 to 2.64). There was no increased risk with the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, late or early time to surgery, or smoking status. Open fractures had a higher risk of events among patients treated with reamed nailing (OR = 3.26; 95% CI, 2.01 to 5.28) but not in patients treated with unreamed nailing (OR = 1.50; 95% CI, 0.92 to 2.47). Patients with open fractures who had wound management either without any additional procedures or with delayed primary closure had a decreased risk of events compared with patients who required subsequent, more complex reconstruction (OR = 0.18 [95% CI, 0.09 to 0.35] and 0.29 [95% CI, 0.14 to 0.62], respectively). Conclusions: We identified several baseline fracture and surgical characteristics that may increase the risk of adverse events in patients with tibial shaft fractures. Surgeons should consider the

  7. REPARATIVE OSTEOGENESIS DURING TREATMENT OF FRACTURE UNDER TRANSOSSEOUS OSTEOSYNTHESIS AND INTRAMEDULLARY INSERTION OF WIRES WITH HYDROXYAPATITE COATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iurii M. Irianov, Arnold V. Popkov, Nikolay A. Kiryanov, Tatiana Iu. Karaseva, Evgenii A. Karasev

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The problem of improving medical care for patients with the locomotor system injuries is very important especially last time. Material and Methods: Canine open comminuted tibial fractures modelled experimentally, wires with hydroxyapatite coating inserted intramedullary, osteosynthesis performed with the Ilizarov fixator. Regenerated bones investigated 14-360 days after surgery using the techniques of light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray electron probe microanalysis for histologic sections . Results: It has been found that a zone of active reparative osteo- and angiogenesis forms around the wires, as well as a bone sheath with the properties of osteogenesis conductor and inductor. Fracture consolidation occurs early according to the primary type without cartilaginous and connective tissue formation in bone adhesion. Presented morphological characteristics endovasal angiogenesis. Conclusion: The results of the study evidence of the positive effect of intramedullary wires with hydroxyapatite coating on the course and intensity of reparative osteogenesis during fracture healing

  8. [Angle-stable fixation of intramedullary nails using the Angular Stable Locking System® (ASLS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höntzsch, D; Blauth, M; Attal, R

    2011-12-01

    Greater stability in intramedullary osteosynthesis using angle-stable fixation with intramedullary nails and proximal locking screws. A novel screw-and-sleeve system (ASLS®, Synthes GmbH, Oberdorf, Switzerland) is applied using normal cannulated nails. Decisions can be made intraoperatively. This technology widens the range of indications for intramedullary nailing: The smaller and less stable the fragment requiring fixation, the greater the indication for angular stable fixation of the proximal and/or distal fragment. Femoral, tibial and humeral fractures, intramedullary osteosynthesis in osteoporotic bone and ante- and retrograde nailing. Particularly in the case of retrograde nailing, sustained prevention of nail toggling is achieved. None. Drill with the first drill bit, which has the same core diameter as the screw shaft. Drill the cortex to the external diameter of the sleeve. Place the sleeve on the tip of the screw. The screw-sleeve combination is then advanced through the larger near hole until the sleeve-covered screw tip sits in the locking hole of the intramedullary fixation nail. Advance the screw. As the screw diameter becomes larger, the sleeve expands resulting in an angular stable locking effect. The screw is then advanced until the head of the screw sits on the exposed surface of the cortex. The hole is filled with the expanded part of the screw shaft beneath the screw head. The necessary 1-3 turns are cut by the self-tapping flute on the screw. According to experience to date, this form of angle-stable fixation enables earlier and/or greater partial mobilization or earlier full mobilization. In all other respects, the guidelines for aftercare in intramedullary nailing apply. A multi-center pilot study has shown the technique to be reproducible and simple. There have been no complications using this technique to date. Biomechanical laboratory studies have demonstrated that stability with respect to axial and torsional loading is statically and

  9. Open tibial fractures: faster union after unreamed nailing than external fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, K A; Loohagen, G; Einarsdottir, H

    1999-10-01

    Unreamed intramedullary nailing is an alternative to external fixation in the treatment of open tibial fractures. We compared a prospective series of thirty-one patients managed with a solid nail with static interlocking without intramedullary reaming, with a retrospective series of thirty-one patients managed by external fixation. The protocol for soft tissue treatment was the same throughout the study period. Most fractures were caused by high energy trauma and included Grade I to III B injuries. The fracture wound infection rate was equal in both groups; there were two deep and three superficial infections in the nail group and three deep and two superficial infections in the external fixation group. In addition, eleven patients in the external fixation group had severe pin track infections. The mean time to union was five months in the nail group and eight months in the external fixation group. The incidence of delayed union was twice as high in the external fixation group as in the nail group. The number of surgical procedures performed to promote union was three times higher in the external fixation group. The malunion rate did not differ between the groups. Although the treatment groups are not fully comparable, the results indicate that intramedullary nailing is superior to external fixation in the treatment of most open tibial fractures.

  10. Tibial Plateau Fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsøe, Rasmus

    This PhD thesis reported an incidence of tibial plateau fractures of 10.3/100,000/year in a complete Danish regional population. The results reported that patients treated for a lateral tibial plateau fracture with bone tamp reduction and percutaneous screw fixation achieved a satisfactory level...... of radiological outcomes and a level of health related quality of life (Eq5d) below but not significantly different from the Danish reference population at a mean of 5.2 years follow-up. Furthermore, a knee injury-specific questionnaire (KOOS) reported a level of disability close to a reference population...... with only the subgroup Sport significantly below the age matched reference population. The thesis reports a level of health related quality of life (Eq5d) and disability (KOOS) significantly below established reference populations for patients with bicondylar tibial plateau fracture treated with a ring...

  11. Complications during removal of stainless steel versus titanium nails used for intramedullary nailing of diaphyseal fractures of the tibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Seyhan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice for fractures of the tibial shaft, which might necessitate the nail removal due to complications in the long-term. Although considered as a low-risk procedure, intramedullary nail removal is also associated with certain complications. Here, we compared the most commonly used stainless steel and titanium nails with respect to the complications during removal and clinical outcome for intramedullary nailing of diaphyseal fractures of the tibia. Patients and methods: Sixty-two patients (26 females, 36 males were included in this retrospective study. Of the removed nails, 24 were of stainless steel and 38 of titanium. Preoperative and intraoperative parameters, such as implant discomfort, anterior knee pain, operating time and amount of bleeding, and postoperative outcomes were evaluated for each patient. Results: Titanium nail group had more, but not statistically significant, intraoperative complications than stainless steel group during the removal of nails (p = .4498. Operating time and amount of intraoperative bleeding were significantly higher in titanium group than stainless steel group (p = .0306 and p < .001, respectively. Preoperative SF-36 physical component and KSS scores were significantly lower in patients who had removal of titanium nails than those of stainless steel nails, whereas there was no difference in terms of postoperative SF-36 and KSS scores. Conclusion: In conclusion, although greater bone contact with titanium increases implant stability, nail removal is more difficult, resulting in more longer surgical operation and more intraoperative bleeding. Therefore, we do not recommend titanium nail removal in asymptomatic patients. Keywords: Fractures of tibial shaft, Removal of intramedullary nailing, Stainless steel nail, Titanium nail

  12. Reducing intraoperative duration and ionising radiation exposure during the insertion of distal locking screws of intramedullary nails: a small-scale study comparing the current fluoroscopic method against radiation-free, electromagnetic navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimwood, Darren; Harvey-Lloyd, Jane

    2016-12-01

    Intramedullary nailing is the standard surgical treatment for mid-diaphyseal fractures of long bones; however, it is also a high radiation dose procedure. Distal locking is regularly cited as a demanding element of the procedure, and there remains a reliance on X-ray fluoroscopy to locate the distal holes. A recently developed electromagnetic navigation (EMN) system allows radiation-free distal locking, with a virtual on-screen image. To compare operative duration, fluoroscopy time and radiation dose when using EMN over fluoroscopy, for the distal locking of intramedullary nails. Consecutive patients with mid-diaphyseal fractures of the tibia and femur, treatable with intramedullary nails, were prospectively enrolled during a 9-month period. The sample consisted of 29 individuals, 19 under fluoroscopic guidance and 10 utilising EMN. Participants were allocated depending on the type of intramedullary nail used and surgeon's preference. These were further divided into tibial and femoral subcategories, relative to the fracture site. EMN reduced fluoroscopy time by 49 (p = 0.038) and 28 s during tibial and femoral nailings, respectively. Radiation dose was reduced by 18 cGy/cm 2 (p = 0.046) during tibial and 181 cGy/cm 2 during femoral nailings when utilising EMN. Operative duration was 11 min slower during tibial nailings using EMN, but 38 min faster in respect of femoral nailings. This study has evidenced statistically significant reductions in both fluoroscopy time and radiation dose when using EMN for the distal locking of intramedullary nails. It is expected that overall operative duration would also decrease in line with similar studies, with increased usage and a larger sample.

  13. Anterior gonalgic syndrome after intramedullary nailing: ultrasound and radiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, F; Binda, M; Lovisetti, G

    1998-01-01

    A total of 33 patients submitted to tibial intramedullary osteosynthesis for fracture (27 cases) and non-union were assessed by ultrasound and x-rays an average of 10.9 months after surgery. The route of access was patellar transtendineal in each case; the means of synthesis used was the Marchetti Vicenzi nail. In 19 patients (57.6%) there was anterior gonalgia. Radiologic assessment evaluated prominence of the nail, while nail-tendon impingement was examined by ultrasound. Nail-tendon impingement was frequently observed (24 cases, 72.7%); in cases such as these anterior pain in the knee was present in 17 patients: however, this fact did not achieve statistical significance. The patellar tendon was thickened as compared to the contralateral one, with disorganization of the fibrillar echotexture, but it was not shortened. The tendinous morphostructure did not reveal any relationship with anterior gonalgia. In none of the cases did we observe the formation of scarring nuromas. In the area of the Hoffa body reactive synovitis phenomena with structural hyperechogenicity, an unclear aspect of the posterior tendinous profile and calcifications were observed. Radiographic prominence of the nail was correlated with echographic impingement, but not with clinical findings. Removal of the instrumentation carried out in 8 patients characterized by anterior gonalgia did not lead to resolution of symptoms in 2 cases in which MRI study showed patellar tendinitis and in 1 case patellar chondropathy with irregularity of the Hoffa body in the second.

  14. Cervical Intramedullary Schwannoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Omar Navarro Fernández

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cervical intramedullary schwannomas are extraordinarily rare. Gross total resection is the best therapeutic option for these types of tumors. Although rare, intramedullary schwannomas should be considered as a differential diagnosis of intramedullary lesions since a good prognosis can be guaranteed to the majority of these patients. We present a case of a cervical intramedullary schwannoma surgically treated in a 19-year-old male patient who initially presented with motor neuron disease.

  15. Mapping of the anterior tibial profile to identify accurate reference points for sagittal alignment of tibial component in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinotti, G; Caruso, E; Orsina, L; La Torre, G; Ripani, F R

    2017-10-01

    Although standard instrumentation is the procedure most frequently used to implant a Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA), high rates of malalignment of tibial component are reported using this technique. Anatomical landmarks for sagittal alignment have been little investigated and the best reference axis, which parallels the mechanical axis, is yet to be established. Mapping the Anterior Tibial Profile (ATP) may allow the identification of segmental zones of the ATP parallel to the mechanical axis which can be used to align the extramedullary rod. An intramedullary rod was positioned in line with the mechanical axis in 47 dried cadaveric tibiae. The rod was connected to a cutting jig and to an extramedullary rod. Digitalized images of lateral view radiographs were taken and the distance between the ATP and the extramedullary rod was measured at 10-mm intervals and at interpolated distances corresponding to every 2% of the tibial length. Segmental portions of the ATP exhibit an alignment parallel to the mechanical axis between points located at 58% and 90% and at 62% and 88% of the tibial length. Points placed at 50% of tibial length and 5mm proximal to the ankle joint generate the longer axis parallel to the mechanical axis. The orientation of sagittal tibial cut may be improved by aligning the extramedullary rod parallel to the ATP at definite points. Points placed at 50% of the tibial length and 5mm proximal to the ankle joint may be preferred since they generate the longer axis parallel to the mechanical axis and are more easily identified at surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. canal24

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Canal system center lines in the Central Valley of California and adjacent areas captured from 1:24,000-scale USGS topographic maps. Updates and modifications made...

  17. Management of open fractures of the tibial shaft in multiple trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Boltuc

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The work presents the assessment of the results of treatment of open tibial shaft fractures in polytrauma patients. Materials and Methods: The study group comprised 28 patients who underwent surgical treatment of open fractures of the tibial shaft with locked intramedullary nailing. The mean age of the patients was 43 years (range from 19 to 64 years. The criterion for including the patients in the study was concomitant multiple trauma. For the assessment of open tibial fractures, Gustilo classification was used. The most common concomitant multiple trauma included craniocerebral injuries, which were diagnosed in 12 patients. In 14 patients, the surgery was performed within 24 h after the injury. In 14 patients, the surgery was delayed and was performed 8-10 days after the trauma. Results: The assessment of the results at 12 months after the surgery included the following features: time span between the trauma and the surgery and complications in the form of osteomyelitis and delayed union. The efficacy of gait, muscular atrophy, edema of the operated limb and possible disturbances of its axis were also taken under consideration. In patients operated emergently within 24 h after the injury, infected nonunion was observed in three (10.8% males. These patients had grade III open fractures of the tibial shaft according to Gustilo classification. No infectious complications were observed in patients who underwent a delayed operation. Conclusion: Evaluation of patients with open fractures of the tibial shaft in multiple trauma showed that delayed intramedullary nailing performed 8-10 days after the trauma, resulted in good outcome and avoided development of delayed union and infected nonunion. This approach gives time for stabilization of general condition of the patient and identification of pathogens from wound culture.

  18. Comparing hospital outcomes between open and closed tibia fractures treated with intramedullary fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Evan J; Kuang, Xiangyu; Pandarinath, Rajeev

    2017-07-01

    Tibial shaft fractures comprise a large portion of operatively treated long bone fractures, and present with the highest rate of open injuries. Intramedullary fixation has become the standard of care for both open and closed injuries. The rates of short term complications and hospital length of stay for open and closed fractures treated with intramedullary fixation is not fully known. Previous series on tibia fractures were performed at high volume centers, and data were not generalizable, further they did not report on length of stay and the impact of preoperative variables on infections, complications and reoperation. We used a large surgical database to compare these outcomes while adjusting for preoperative risk factors. Data were extracted from the ACS-NSQIP database from 2005 to 2014. Cases were identified based on CPT codes for intramedullary fixation and categorized as closed vs open based on ICD9 code. In addition to demographic and case data, primary analysis examined correlation between open and closed fracture status with infection, complications, reoperation and hospital length of stay. Secondary analysis examined preoperative variables including gender, race, age, BMI, and diabetes effect on outcomes. There were 272 cases identified. There were no significant demographic differences between open and closed tibia fracture cases. Open fracture status did not increase the rate of infection, 30day complications, reoperation, or length of stay. The only preoperative factor that correlated with length of stay was age. There was no correlation between BMI, presence of insulin dependent and nondependent diabetes, and any outcome measure. When considering the complication rates for open and closed tibial shaft fractures treated with intramedullary fixation, there is no difference between 30-day complication rate, length of stay, or return to the operating room. Our reported postoperative infection rates were comparable to previous series, adding validity to

  19. Intramedullary high intensity lesion on T2-weighted MR images in compressive cervical myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kameyama, Takashi; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Yanagi, Tsutomu; Yasuda, Takeshi; Hirose, Yoshikiyo (Nagoya Daini Red Hospital (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 147 patients with compressive lesion of the cervical spinal canal. Intramedullary high intensity lesions were observed on T2-weighted or proton density spin-echo images in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (20.0%) and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the cervical spine (25.7%), while such signal abnormality was not found in patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. Frequency of this finding was proportional to clinical severity of myelopathy and degree of spinal cord compression. The pathophysiological basis of such signal abnormality was presumed to vary from acute edema to chronic myelomalacia. In most cases showing intramedullary high intensity lesion, the spinal cord was compressed at multiple levels, but the high intensity was usually found at a signal level where the compression was maximum. There was a good correlation between the neurological level and the high intensity level on MR images. Thus, the intramedullary lesion on MR images is considered to be the main site of lesion responsible for the neurological symptoms. (author).

  20. Intramedullary high intensity lesion on T2-weighted MR images in compressive cervical myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameyama, Takashi; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Yanagi, Tsutomu; Yasuda, Takeshi; Hirose, Yoshikiyo

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 147 patients with compressive lesion of the cervical spinal canal. Intramedullary high intensity lesions were observed on T2-weighted or proton density spin-echo images in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (20.0%) and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the cervical spine (25.7%), while such signal abnormality was not found in patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. Frequency of this finding was proportional to clinical severity of myelopathy and degree of spinal cord compression. The pathophysiological basis of such signal abnormality was presumed to vary from acute edema to chronic myelomalacia. In most cases showing intramedullary high intensity lesion, the spinal cord was compressed at multiple levels, but the high intensity was usually found at a signal level where the compression was maximum. There was a good correlation between the neurological level and the high intensity level on MR images. Thus, the intramedullary lesion on MR images is considered to be the main site of lesion responsible for the neurological symptoms. (author)

  1. Robotic technique improves entry point alignment for intramedullary nailing of femur fractures compared to the conventional technique: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suero, Eduardo M; Westphal, Ralf; Citak, Musa; Hawi, Nael; Liodakis, Emmanouil; Krettek, Christian; Stuebig, Timo

    2017-08-11

    We aimed to test whether a robotic technique would offer more accurate access to the proximal femoral medullary cavity for insertion of an intramedullary nail compared to the conventional manual technique. The medullary cavity of ten femur specimens was accessed in a conventional fashion using fluoroscopic control. In ten additional femur specimens, ISO-C 3D scans were obtained and a computer program calculated the ideal location of the cavity opening based on the trajectory of the medullary canal. In both techniques, the surgeon opened the cavity using a drill and inserted a radiopaque tube that matched the diameter of the cavity. The mean difference in angle between the proximal opening and the medullary canal in the shaft of the femur was calculated for both groups. Robotic cavity opening was more accurate than the manual technique, with a mean difference in trajectory between the proximal opening and the shaft canal of 2.0° (95% CI 0.6°-3.5°) compared to a mean difference of 4.3° (95% CI 2.11°-6.48°) using the manual technique (P = 0.0218). The robotic technique was more accurate than the manual procedure for identifying the optimal location for opening the medullary canal for insertion of an intramedullary nail. Additional advantages may include a reduction in total radiation exposure, as only one ISO-C 3D scan is needed, as opposed to multiple radiographs when using the manual technique.

  2. TIBIAL SHAFT FRACTURES

    OpenAIRE

    Kojima, Kodi Edson; Ferreira, Ramon Venzon

    2015-01-01

    The long-bone fractures occur most frequently in the tibial shaft. Adequate treatment of such fractures avoids consolidation failure, skewed consolidation and reoperation. To classify these fractures, the AO/OTA classification method is still used, but it is worthwhile getting to know the Ellis classification method, which also includes assessment of soft-tissue injuries. There is often an association with compartmental syndrome, and early diagnosis can be achieved through evaluating clinical...

  3. Tension Band Plating for Chronic Anterior Tibial Stress Fractures in High-Performance Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbeda, Robert M; Sculco, Peter K; Urch, Ekaterina Y; Lazaro, Lionel E; Borens, Olivier; Williams, Riley J; Lorich, Dean G; Wellman, David S; Helfet, David L

    2015-07-01

    Anterior tibial stress fractures are associated with high rates of delayed union and nonunion, which can be particularly devastating to a professional athlete who requires rapid return to competition. Current surgical treatment strategies include intramedullary nailing, which has satisfactory rates of fracture union but an associated risk of anterior knee pain. Anterior tension band plating is a biomechanically sound alternative treatment for these fractures. Tension band plating of chronic anterior tibial stress fractures leads to rapid healing and return to physical activity and avoids the anterior knee pain associated with intramedullary nailing. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Between 2001 and 2013, there were 13 chronic anterior tibial stress fractures in 12 professional or collegiate athletes who underwent tension band plating after failing nonoperative management. Patient charts were retrospectively reviewed for demographics, injury history, and surgical details. Radiographs were used to assess time to osseous union. Follow-up notes and phone interviews were used to determine follow-up time, return to training time, and whether the patient was able to return to competition. Cases included 13 stress fractures in 12 patients (9 females, 3 males). Five patients were track-and-field athletes, 4 patients played basketball, 2 patients played volleyball, and 1 was a ballet dancer. Five patients were Division I collegiate athletes and 7 were professional or Olympic athletes. Average age at time of surgery was 23.6 years (range, 20-32 years). Osseous union occurred on average at 9.6 weeks (range, 5.3-16.9 weeks) after surgery. Patients returned to training on average at 11.1 weeks (range, 5.7-20 weeks). Ninety-two percent (12/13) eventually returned to preinjury competition levels. Thirty-eight percent (5/13) underwent removal of hardware for plate prominence. There was no incidence of infection or nonunion. Anterior tension band plating for chronic tibial stress

  4. Locking compression plate fixation of radial and tibial fractures in a young dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, C S; Montavon, P M

    2005-01-01

    A six-month-old, male Bernese Mountain Dog in which radius-ulna and tibia-fibula concomitant fractures were treated each with a 3.5 mm Locking Compression Plate (LCP) is presented. Both fractures were approached and plated medially. The tibial fracture had to be revised with a 4.5 mm intramedullary nail and a new 3.5 mm LCP at the second post-operative day because of fixation breakdown. The follow-up radiographs taken at days 14 and 53 revealed uneventful healing of both fractures. Implants were removed 53 days after surgery.

  5. Fraturas do planalto tibial Tibial plateau fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Kfuri Júnior

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available As fraturas do planalto tibial são lesões articulares cujos princípios de tratamento envolvem a redução anatômica da superfície articular e a restauração funcional do eixo mecânico do membro inferior. Contribuem para a tomada de decisões no tratamento dessas fraturas o perfil do paciente, as condições do envelope de tecidos moles, a existência de outros traumatismos associados e a infraestrutura disponível para abordagens cirúrgicas. Para as fraturas de alta energia, o tratamento estagiado, seguindo o princípio do controle de danos, tem como prioridade a manutenção do alinhamento do membro enquanto se aguarda a resolução das más condições de tecidos moles. Já nos traumas de baixa energia, desde que os tecidos moles não sejam um fator adverso, o tratamento deve ser realizado em tempo único, com osteossíntese definitiva. Fixação estável e movimento precoce são variáveis diretamente relacionadas com os melhores prognósticos. Desenvolvimentos recentes, como os implantes com estabilidade angular, substitutos ósseos e imagens tridimensionais para controle intraoperatório, deverão contribuir para cirurgias menos invasivas e melhores resultados.Tibial plateau fractures are joint lesions that require anatomical reduction of joint surface and functional restoration of mechanical axis of a lower limb. Patient profile, soft tissue conditions, presence of associated injuries and the available infrastructure for the treatment all contribute to the decision making about the best treatment for these fractures. High-energy fractures are usually approached in a staged manner respecting the principle of damage control, and are primarily targeted to maintain limb alignment while the resolution unfavorable soft tissue conditions is pending. Low-energy trauma can be managed on a single-stage basis, provided soft tissues are not an adverse factor, with open reduction and internal f-ixation. Stable fixation and early painless joint

  6. Systematic review shows lowered risk of nonunion after reamed nailing in patients with closed tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, S W; Teraa, M; Leenen, L P H; van der Heijden, G J M G

    2010-07-01

    Nonunion after intramedullary nailing (IMN) in patients with tibial shaft fractures occurs up to 16%. There is no agreement whether reaming prior to IMN insertion would reduce the nonunion rate. We aimed to compare the nonunion rate between reamed and unreamed IMN in patients with tibial shaft fractures. A systematic search was conducted in Pubmed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. The selected publications were: (1) randomised controlled trials; (2) comparing the nonunion rate; (3) in patients with tibial shaft fractures; (4) treated with either reamed or unreamed IMN. Seven studies that satisfied the criteria were identified. They showed that reamed IMN led to reduction of nonunion rate compared to unreamed IMN in closed tibial shaft fractures (risk difference ranging 7.0-20%, number needed to treat ranging 5-14), while the difference between compared treatments for open tibial shaft fractures was not clinically relevant. The evidence showed a consistent trend of reduced nonunion rate in closed tibial shaft fracture treated with reamed compared to unreamed IMN. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The locked flexible intramedullary humerus nail in pediatric femur and tibia shaft fractures: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienkowski, P; Harvey, E J; Reindl, R; Berry, G K; Benaroch, T E; Ouellet, J A

    2004-01-01

    There are several options for the treatment of long bone fractures in skeletally immature patients. Surgeon experience, type of fracture, and the possibility of damage to the physeal area dictate individual fracture management patterns. Notably, nail devices have not gained popularity in this patient group. Intramedullary locking nails have become the standard of care in adult patients due to decreased morbidity and mortality. A novel nail has been developed for humeral shaft fractures that uses a lateral starting position to avoid damage to the rotator cuff in humeral fracture fixation. This is possible because of the nail's transient flexibility during insertion. This study illustrates that it is feasible to insert this type of nail through multiple entry portals for both tibial and femoral fracture fixation, without damaging the physeal blood supply or growth areas.

  8. Comprehensive global evolution of intramedullary nailing of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    by infections, instability, metal electrolysis and fatigue failure all leading to disastrous results. He abandoned the procedure but predicted that intramedullary nailing .... micro-movements and intermittent compression during walking and muscular contractions because the nail only neutralizes twisting and flexion movements.

  9. Reoperation rates following intramedullary nailing versus external ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Open tibia fractures are among the most difficult to manage due to the lack of soft tissue coverage and poor blood supply. This is especially true in developing settings primarily due to a lack of resources. Both locked Intramedullary Nailing (IM) and External Fixation (EF) are two possible modalities for surgical ...

  10. reoperation rates following intramedullary nailing versus external

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3-5). In. Tanzania, controversy over the best treatment method for these fractures remain, as complication rates have been reported as high as 30% at referral trauma centers following surgical fixation (5,6). Intramedullary (IM) nailing or External ...

  11. Complications during removal of stainless steel versus titanium nails used for intramedullary nailing of diaphyseal fractures of the tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyhan, Mustafa; Guler, Olcay; Mahirogullari, Mahir; Donmez, Ferdi; Gereli, Arel; Mutlu, Serhat

    2018-02-01

    Intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice for fractures of the tibial shaft, which might necessitate the nail removal due to complications in the long-term. Although considered as a low-risk procedure, intramedullary nail removal is also associated with certain complications. Here, we compared the most commonly used stainless steel and titanium nails with respect to the complications during removal and clinical outcome for intramedullary nailing of diaphyseal fractures of the tibia. Sixty-two patients (26 females, 36 males) were included in this retrospective study. Of the removed nails, 24 were of stainless steel and 38 of titanium. Preoperative and intraoperative parameters, such as implant discomfort, anterior knee pain, operating time and amount of bleeding, and postoperative outcomes were evaluated for each patient. Titanium nail group had more, but not statistically significant, intraoperative complications than stainless steel group during the removal of nails (p = .4498). Operating time and amount of intraoperative bleeding were significantly higher in titanium group than stainless steel group (p = .0306 and p titanium nails than those of stainless steel nails, whereas there was no difference in terms of postoperative SF-36 and KSS scores. In conclusion, although greater bone contact with titanium increases implant stability, nail removal is more difficult, resulting in more longer surgical operation and more intraoperative bleeding. Therefore, we do not recommend titanium nail removal in asymptomatic patients.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of intramedullary meningioma of the spinal cord: case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covert, S.; Gandhi, D.; Goyal, M.; Woulfe, J.; Belanger, E.; Miller, W.; Modha, A.

    2003-01-01

    Intramedullary meningioma of the spinal cord is an extremely rare tumour. To the best of our knowledge, only 4 cases have been reported in the English literature, and limited information on imaging features is available. We present a further case and review the literature on this entity. Meningiomas are among the most common tumours that occur in the spinal canal, representing about 25% of all adult intraspinal tumours. They are commonly found in the thoracic segment of the spine and are most often intradural-extramedullary. Their location is explained by the way in which they develop. Meningiomas are derived from persistent arachnoid cell remnants in the spinal coverings, most commonly from arachnoid. They are usually adherent to, but do not arise from, dura. We present a case of intramedullary meningioma, a rare clinical entity, discuss the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and review the 4 cases that have been previously reported. (author)

  13. Study of Ender’s Nailing in Paediatric Tibial Shaft Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu G. Ladani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Closed reduction & plaster is standard and effective form of treatment in majority of paediatric tibial shaft fractures. Operative intervention is necessary in unstable fractures, open fractures, poly trauma patients and compartment syndrome or severe soft tissue compromise. Historically, external fixation and plating were the treatment options available, but having complications like infection, overgrowth and refracture. Reamed locked intramedullary nails pose unnecessary risk to the proximal tibial growth plate. Flexible intramedullary nailing in long bone fractures in children has gained wide spread popularity because of its clinical effectiveness & low risk of complications. Methodology: This is a study of 15 patients of unstable tibial shaft fractures in children treated with Ender’s nailing. 12 were closed & 3 were open grade I fractures with only punctured wounds. Age was ranging from 7 to 16 yrs. There were 8 middle third, one upper third and 6 distal third shaft tibia fractures. In all patients 3.5 Ender’s nails were used, two nails in 11 patients and three nails in 4 patients there was no post-operative wound infection. Average operative time was 40 minutes and average blood loss was 35 cc. Results: Average union time was 9 wks. All fractures united without 2nd operative intervention. In 2 patients there was some proximal migration of nails causing some knee irritation. In all patients implant removed 6 to 7 months after surgery. At final follow-up there were full knee & ankle movements. 2 patients had more than 50 malalignment in A-P or M-L plane. No rotational deformity, no limb length discrepancy or physical arrest. Conclusion: Ender’s nailing is an effective method of treatment in these cases, which allows rapid healing of tibial shaft fractures with an acceptable rate of complications. There is short learning curve with this treatment and implants are inexpensive.

  14. Pediatric Tibial Osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Brad; Street, Matthew; Leigh, Warren; Crawford, Haemish

    2016-01-01

    Osteomyelitis shows a strong predilection for the tibia in the pediatric population and is a significant source of complications. The purpose of this article is to retrospectively review a large series of pediatric patients with tibial osteomyelitis. We compare our experience with that in the literature to determine any factors that may aid diagnosis and/or improve treatment outcomes. A 10-year retrospective review was performed of clinical records of all cases of pediatric tibial osteomyelitis managed at the 2 children's orthopaedic departments in the Auckland region. The Osteomyelitis Database was used to identify all cases between 1997 and 2007, at Starship Children's Hospital, and 1998 and 2008 at Middlemore's Kids First Hospital. One hundred ninety-one patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, and had a review of clinical notes and relevant investigations. The average duration of symptoms before presentation to hospital was 5.7 days. Less than 40% of patients had a recent episode of trauma. Almost 60% of patients could not bear weight on admission. Over 40% of patients had a temperature above 38°C. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was elevated in 78% and the C-reactive protein was elevated in 90% of patients. In total, 42% of blood cultures and almost 75% of tissue cultures were positive, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most commonly cultured organism. X-rays, bone scans, and magnetic resonance imaging were all used to aid the diagnosis. About 43% of patients had surgery. Treatment length was an average of 2 weeks 6 days of intravenous antibiotics followed by 3 weeks 2 days of oral treatment. Six postsurgical complications and 46 readmissions were noted: 25 for relapse, with the remainder due to social and antibiotic-associated complications. Although generally diagnosed on presentation, pediatric tibial osteomyelitis can require more sophisticated investigations and prolonged management. Treatment with intravenous and oral antibiotics and surgical

  15. Collagen turnover after tibial fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joerring, S; Krogsgaard, M; Wilbek, H

    1994-01-01

    Collagen turnover after tibial fractures was examined in 16 patients with fracture of the tibial diaphysis and in 8 patients with fracture in the tibial condyle area by measuring sequential changes in serological markers of turnover of types I and III collagen for up to 26 weeks after fracture....... The markers were the carboxy-terminal extension peptide of type I procollagen (PICP), the amino-terminal extension peptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP), and the pyridinoline cross-linked carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP). The latter is a new serum marker of degradation of type I...... collagen. A group comparison showed characteristic sequential changes in the turnover of types I and III collagen in fractures of the tibial diaphysis and tibial condyles. The turnover of type III collagen reached a maximum after 2 weeks in both groups. The synthesis of type I collagen reached a maximum...

  16. Collagen turnover after tibial fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joerring, S; Krogsgaard, M; Wilbek, H

    1994-01-01

    Collagen turnover after tibial fractures was examined in 16 patients with fracture of the tibial diaphysis and in 8 patients with fracture in the tibial condyle area by measuring sequential changes in serological markers of turnover of types I and III collagen for up to 26 weeks after fracture...... collagen. A group comparison showed characteristic sequential changes in the turnover of types I and III collagen in fractures of the tibial diaphysis and tibial condyles. The turnover of type III collagen reached a maximum after 2 weeks in both groups. The synthesis of type I collagen reached a maximum...... after 2 weeks in the diaphyseal fractures and after 6 weeks in the condylar fractures. The degradation of type I collagen increased after 4 days and reached a maximum at 2 weeks in both groups. The interindividual variation was wide. On a group basis, the turnover of types I and III collagen had...

  17. Tibial shaft fractures - management and treatment options. A review of the current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, G; Strohm, P C; Südkamp, N P; Hammer, T O

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of tibial shaft fractures is still discussed controversial. In the present study current literature was reviewed with the objective to demonstrate current recommendations concerning tibial shaft fractures. Tibial shaft fractures are often caused by high-energy trauma with severe concomitant soft-tissue injuries. Solid bone union without hypertrophy, fast mobilization and full range of motion without further soft-tissue damages are the aims of the therapy. Non-displaced tibial shaft fractures in patients with good compliance can be treated conservatively. Deep venous thrombosis, compartment syndrome, soft tissue injury and chronic regional pain syndrome are the major risks of conservative treatment and need to be required. Operative treatment can be performed with several different implants. Intramedullary nailing with a huge biomechanical stability seems to be the implant of choice. Only rare indications for plate osteosynthesis can be found. The use of external fixation has declined even though external fixation is still the implant of choice in first line treatment of multiple trauma according to the damage control principles. Open fractures with precarious blood supply and weak soft tissue covering are vulnerable to complications and remain a challenge for every treating surgeon. Reconstruction of axis, length and rotation is essential for a good outcome. The choice of technique depends on fracture localization, type of fracture, history of concomitant disorders and soft tissue damage.

  18. Ingenious method of external fixator use to maintain alignment for nailing a proximal tibial shaft fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Prateek; Aggarwal, Sameer; Kumar, Vishal; Kumar Meena, Umesh; Saibaba, Balaji

    2015-09-01

    Fractures of the tibia are one of the most commonly seen orthopedic injuries. Most of them result from a high velocity trauma. While intramedullary nailing of tibial diaphyseal fractures is considered as the golden standard form of treatment for such cases, many metaphyseal and metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction fractures can also be managed by nailing. Maintenance of alignment of such fractures during surgical procedure is often challenging as the pull of patellar tendon tends to extend the proximal fragment as soon as one flexes the knee for the surgical procedure. Numerous technical modifications have been described in the literature for successfully nailing such fractures including semi extended nailing, use of medial plates and external fixators among others. In this study, it was aimed to report two cases in which we used our ingenious method of applying external fixator for maintaining alignment of the fracture and aiding in the entire process of closed intramedullary nailing of metaphyseal tibial fractures by the conventional method. We were able to get good alignment during and after the closed surgery as observed on post-operative radiographs and believe that further evaluation of this technique may be of help to surgeons who want to avoid other techniques.

  19. Open tibia fractures in the splenectomized trauma patient: results of treatment with locking, intramedullary fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterett, W I; Ertl, J P; Chapman, M W; Moehring, H D

    1995-04-01

    To confirm our clinical impression that patients with traumatic splenectomy had more complications in the treatment of open tibia fractures, we retrospectively reviewed the records of patients with open tibia fractures treated between 1989 and 1992. Eight patients with open tibia fractures and traumatic splenectomies were compared to 43 patients with open tibia fractures and intact spleens. The latter group typically underwent either exploratory laparotomy or peritoneal lavage. The two groups were similar with respect to age, mechanism of injury, fracture wound classification, and injury severity score (22.4 in the splenectomized patients, 18.6 in the control). All tibia fractures were treated with a nonreamed, cross-locked, titanium intramedullary nail, and all patients were treated according to the same protocol of antibiotic therapy. Patients were followed for two years or until roentgenographic and clinical union. The splenectomized patients had a significantly higher incidence of chronic osteomyelitis (25% vs. 4.6%), and the need for additional tibial surgeries to achieve union (75% vs. 16%). Time to union averaged 11.3 months in the splenectomized group and 7.6 months in the patients with intact spleens. The increased risk for chronic osteomyelitis and other complications of tibial fracture in the splenectomized patients should be taken as an argument favoring splenic, repair, when possible, rather than splenectomy in victims of blunt multiple trauma.

  20. Outcome of Interlocking Intramedullary Nailing in the Treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Fracture of the tibia is one of the commonest musculoskeletal injuries. The current practice is a locked intramedullary nailing of these fractures. This retrospective study aims to review the use of, and assess the clinical outcome of reamed locked antegrade intramedullary nailing of the tibia. Material and Methods: ...

  1. Open intramedullary nailing for segmental long bone fractures: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Closed, locked intramedullary nailing has been accepted as the gold standard in the care of femoral fractures, with reported union rates as high as 98–100%. Closed, locked intramedullary nailing often requires expensive equipment which is a challenge in developing countries. Segmental long bone fractures ...

  2. Fraturas da diáfise da tíbia Tibial shaft fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodi Edson Kojima

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A fratura de osso longo mais frequente é a da diáfise da tíbia, e seu tratamento adequado evita o aparecimento de falhas da consolidação, consolidação viciosa e reoperações. Para classificar a fratura ainda se utiliza a classificação AO/OTA, mas vale a pena conhecer a classificação de Ellis, que também inclui a avaliação da lesão das partes moles. A síndrome compartimental é uma associação frequente, e o diagnóstico precoce pode ser feito precocemente com avaliação dos parâmetros clínicos e uma monitorização clínica constante. Feito o diagnóstico, deve-se realizar a fasciotomia. A avaliação da consolidação sempre é difícil, mas o método de RUST pode ajudar nessa avaliação. Avalia-se a radiografia em duas projeções, dando-se pontos para a presença da linha de fratura e a presença de calo ósseo visível. Hoje em dia se discute o dogma das seis horas para a limpeza da fratura exposta. Considera-se de mais importância o início precoce da antibioticoterapia endovenosa e a gravidade da lesão. A questão do fechamento precoce ou tardio da lesão em uma fratura exposta passou por várias fases, com épocas se indicando o fechamento precoce e épocas o tardio. Atualmente se preconiza, sempre que possível, o fechamento precoce da lesão, pois isso diminui o risco de infecção. A fresagem do canal quando da introdução da haste intramedular ainda é um assunto controverso. Apesar de fortes posições pessoais a favor da fresagem, os estudos mostram haver alguma vantagem nas fraturas fechadas, mas não nas expostas.The long-bone fractures occur most frequently in the tibial shaft. Adequate treatment of such fractures avoids consolidation failure, skewed consolidation and reoperation. To classify these fractures, the AO/OTA classification method is still used, but it is worthwhile getting to know the Ellis classification method, which also includes assessment of soft-tissue injuries. There is often an

  3. Expanding nail or expanding femur? An adverse event with the expandable intramedullary nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Soham; Riley, Nicholas D; Sivaji, Chellappan K

    2010-01-01

    The expandable intramedullary nail is self-locking and has the advantage of reducing operating time and exposure to ionizing radiation. The nail is recommended for simple diaphyseal fractures involving the middle third of long bones, where the nail can bypass the fracture site by at least 5 cm. We encountered a unique complication with the expandable nail in a simple transverse shaft fracture at the junction of the middle and distal third of the left femur in an otherwise healthy 57-year-old man. The fracture was reduced and a 12-mm expandable nail was inserted. Following full expansion, intraoperative radiographs were obtained prior to closure. After six postoperative weeks, it was noted that the nail expanded the femoral canal, converting a simple fracture to a distally progressing comminuted fracture with a butterfly fragment. A review of the intraoperative radiographs showed slight widening of the medullary canal at the level of the fracture. As the alignment was satisfactory and callus was present, no further surgical intervention was considered. The patient was advised not to bear weight and was provided with a locked knee brace in extension to wear for six weeks. Radiographs at 12 weeks demonstrated good progress of healing with adequate callus and the patient was permitted to bear weight as tolerated and commence knee flexion. The fracture united satisfactorily at four months. This adverse experience emphasizes that caution should be exercised when expanding the nail, with close observation of the medullary canal diameter during the later stages of expansion.

  4. Flexible Intramedullary Nails for Femur Fractures in Pediatric Patients Heavier Than 100 Pounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaha, James; Cage, Jason M; Black, Sheena; Wimberly, Robert L; Shaha, Steven H; Riccio, Anthony I

    2018-02-01

    Flexible intramedullary nailing (FIMN) of femoral shaft fractures in children >100 pounds remains controversial. The purpose of this study is to assess the relationship between patient weight and alignment at radiographic union following Ender's FIMN of pediatric femoral shaft fractures. An IRB approved, retrospective review of all patients who sustained a femoral shaft fracture treated by retrograde, stainless-steel Ender's FIMN was performed at a level 1 pediatric trauma center from 2005 to 2012. Preoperative radiographs were analyzed to determine fracture pattern, location, and isthmic canal diameter. Patient weight was measured on presentation to the emergency room. Radiographs at bony union were reviewed to measure shortening, coronal angulation, and sagittal angulation. A total of 261 children underwent Ender's FIMN for femoral shaft fractures during the study period. There were 24 patients who weighed ≥100 lbs and 237 patients who weighed pounds with excellent radiographic outcomes and no increased risk for malunion. Therapeutic Level III.

  5. [Elastic intramedullary nailing of the tibia with the Marchetti-Vicenzi nail. 43 treated cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmansour, M B; Gottin, M; Rouvillain, J L; Larosa, G; Dib, C; Dintimille, H; Catonné, Y

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the results of tibial intramedullary nailing using an unreamed "Universal Elastic Bundle Nail". Forty-three intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft were done in 43 patients with recents fractures, from May 1993 and May 1996. There were 36 males and 7 females. The average age was 31.5 years (range 17-68 years). Thirty-three were injured in a traffic accident (20 motorcycles, 5 pedestrians and 8 car passengers), seven were injured in a home accident (fall) and three had a sport injury. There were 13 open fractures according to Gustilo: 5 grade I, 7 grade II and one grade III B. Eight fractures involved the proximal metaphyseal part of the tibia, 16 the distal metaphyseal part and 14 the tibial shaft; in five cases there were segmental fractures. According to AO classification there were: 10 fractures type A, 24 fractures type B and 9 fractures type C (5 segmental fractures). In 5 cases there were associated femoral fractures: three ipsilaterals and two controlaterals. All were treated in the same time: four by UEBN device and one by AO's nail. All the patients with type B and C fractures were positioned on a Maquet table with a boot traction or transcalcaneal pin traction (in the distal fractures). The nail was introduced after closed reduction through a vertical transpatellar tendon incision, without reaming procedure. Forty one fractures healed after an average time of 96 days (60-120). In 11 open fractures bone union occurred after 98 days (85-120). The distal fractures healed after a mean time of 86 days (60-120), proximal fractures in 123 days and mid shaft fractures in 98 days. In type A fractures bone union occurred after an average time of 68 days, while bone union occurred after a mean time of 100 days in type B and C fractures. Two patients with an open proximal type B fracture, had a delayed union: both healed after proximal screws removal. Two fractures healed with a valgus angulaton 5 degrees and 10 degrees. No

  6. Analysis of single-incision versus dual-incision fasciotomy for tibial fractures with acute compartment syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; McClure, D Jake; Mir, Hassan R

    2013-11-01

    To analyze the rate of postoperative infection and nonunion after tibial fractures in patients treated for acute compartment syndrome (ACS) using (1) single-incision versus (2) dual-incision fasciotomy technique. Retrospective. Level I trauma center. Review of all adult tibial fractures operatively treated (n = 2756) over a 12-year period identified 175 patients with concurrent ACS requiring fasciotomy. Of 60 patients treated with intramedullary nails, 36 patients had single-incision fasciotomy and 24 had dual-incision fasciotomy. Of 81 patients treated with plate fixation, 59 patients had single-incision fasciotomy and 22 had dual-incision fasciotomy. Tibial fixation with fasciotomy for ACS. Occurrence of postoperative infection and nonunion. Both fasciotomy groups were similar across recorded patient and treatment characteristics. Need for skin graft was similar between fasciotomy groups. For patients treated with intramedullary nail (n = 60), 1 infection (2.8%) occurred in single-incision group versus 2 (8.3%) in dual-incision group (P = 0.558). Seven nonunions (19.4%) occurred in single-incision group versus 3 (12.5%) in dual-incision group (P = 0.726). For plate fixation patients (n = 81), 15 infections (25.4%) occurred with single-incision fasciotomy versus 5 infections (22.7%) with dual-incision fasciotomy (P = 1.000). Seven nonunions (11.9%) occurred with single-incision group versus 4 nonunions (18.2%) with dual-incision group (P = 0.479). This is the first study to compare a single-incision fasciotomy technique to a dual-incision technique in the setting of tibial fractures with ACS, with similar infection and nonunion rates with either technique. The choice of fasciotomy technique can be based on surgeon experience or patient condition as opposed to a suspected elevated infection or nonunion risk with either technique. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  7. Accelerated tibial fracture union in the third trimester of pregnancy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mudussar A

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present a case of accelerated tibial fracture union in the third trimester of pregnancy. This is of particular relevance to orthopaedic surgeons, who must be made aware of the potentially accelerated healing response in pregnancy and the requirement for prompt treatment. Case presentation A 40 year old woman at 34 weeks gestational age sustained a displaced fracture of the tibial shaft. This was initially treated conservatively in plaster with view to intra-medullary nailing postpartum. Following an emergency caesarean section, the patient was able to fully weight bear without pain 4 weeks post injury, indicating clinical union. Radiographs demonstrated radiological union with good alignment and abundant callus formation. Fracture union occurred within 4 weeks, less than half the time expected for a conservatively treated tibial shaft fracture. Conclusion Long bone fractures in pregnancy require clear and precise management plans as fracture healing is potentially accelerated. Non-operative treatment is advisable provided satisfactory alignment of the fracture is achieved.

  8. Elastic stable intramedullary nailing in paediatric traumatology at Yopougon Teaching Hospital (Abidjan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T H Odéhouri-Koudou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Elastic stable intramedullary nailing has revolutionised the treatment of fractures in children. Aim : To report our experience with this current technique of management of fractures in children. Methods and Materials : A retrospective study of all children with fractures treated by this method from November 2003 to June 2006 at the Paediatric Surgery Department of Yopougon Teaching Hospital, Abidjan, Côte d′Ivoire. Data were recorded from their medical charts regarding demographics, fracture patterns, associated injuries, morbidity, and outcome. Results : A total of 38 children (14 boys; mean age, 11.7 years; range, 9-15 years with 41 fractures, sited at femur (n=15, humerus (n=8, tibia and fibula (n=6, forearm (n=7, and radial neck (n=5, associated with other injuries in 7 cases, were enrolled in the study. The mean interval for surgery was 6.8 days. Open reduction was required 5 times (12.1%. The hospital stay was in the range 5-12 days. Minor adverse events were 1 (2.4% early tibial loss of reduction, 3 (7.3% skin irritations and 2 (4.8% transient knee limitations. Complications (17.3% included 2 axial (4.8% and 1 rotational (2.4% femoral malunions below 15°; 3 elbow (7.3% and 1 knee stiffness (2.4% in openly reduced cases. Solid consolidation was achieved in all cases, with no disturbance in standard union times. At a mean follow-up period of 16 months (range, 9-28 months, all but 3 patients with opened joints recovered full range of motion, and none showed either limp and gait anomalies or re-fracture after removal of wires. Conclusion : Elastic stable intramedullary nailing in children fractures is easy to perform and has little complications if a proper technique is used.

  9. Primary Intradural Hemangiopericytoma With Intramedullary Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang-Wei Chou

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiopericytoma (HPC is a rare tumor of the central nervous system and is usually found intracranially. Intraspinal HPCs are very rare and mostly involve the extradural bony structures. Primary intradural HPC has only been reported in 10 cases, all of which occurred in the extramedullary region. Intramedullary invasion has never been reported. Here, we describe a case of primary intradural HPC of the thoracic spine that presented initially with paresthesia and paraplegia of both legs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracic spine showed an intradural dumbbell-shaped tumor at the T10 level. The initial impression was neurogenic tumor, meningioma, or metastasis. During operation, the tumor was found to have obvious intramedullary invasion. Gross-total removal was done, and the patient's neurological function improved; there was no recurrence at the 3-year follow-up. There is no consensus as to what constitutes the optimal treatment of HPC, but most neurosurgeons will advocate gross-total resection. A comparative analysis between intradural and extradural HPCs showed a higher chance of gross-total resection for intradural HPCs, while the recurrence rates showed no difference. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy remains uncertain. Due to the high risk of recurrence and metastasis of HPCs, close follow-up for a long period is mandatory. [J Chin Med Assoc 2009;72(10:536–541

  10. Alignment After Intramedullary Nailing of Distal Tibia Fractures Without Fibula Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giacomo, Anthony F; Tornetta, Paul

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of intramedullary nailing of distal tibia fractures using modern techniques, without fibula fixation, in obtaining and maintaining alignment. Retrospective case review. Level-I academic trauma center. One hundred thirty-two consecutive patients with distal tibia fractures. Intramedullary nail of distal tibia fracture, without fibula fixation, was performed in consecutive patients using modern reduction techniques. Malalignment and malunion were defined as >5 degrees of varus/valgus angulation or anterior/posterior angulation on the initial postoperative or final anteroposterior and lateral x-rays. There were 122 consecutive patients (86 men and 36 women) 16-93 years of age (average, 43 years) with 36 (30%) open and 85 (70%) closed fractures with complete follow-up. Mechanism of injury did not predict the presence or level of fibula fracture. Upon presentation, varus/valgus and procurvatum/recurvatum angulation was greatest when the fibula was fractured at the level of the tibia fracture (P = 0.001 and 0.028). The most common intraoperative reduction aids were nailing in relative extension, transfixion external fixation, and clamps at the fracture site. The OTA fracture type or level/presence of fibula fracture did not influence malalignment (P = 0.86 and 0.66), malunion (P = 0.81 and 0.79), or the change in alignment during union, which averaged 0.9 degrees. We found an overall low rate of both malalignment (2%) and malunion (3%) after intramedullary nailing of distal tibial shaft fracture without fibula fixation. We conclude that when modern nailing techniques are used, which allow for confirmation of reduction by visualization in fluoroscopy, from nail placement to distal interlocking, fibula fixation is not necessary to obtain or maintain alignment. Furthermore, standard 2 medial to lateral screws distally afford adequate stability to hold the reduction during union with a 0.9-degree difference in the initial postoperative and final

  11. Injury to the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve, a possible cause for anterior knee pain after tibial nailing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leliveld, M S; Verhofstad, M H J

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term incidence of infrapatellar nerve damage after tibial nailing and its relation to anterior knee pain. We retrospectively evaluated 71 patients in whom 72 isolated tibial shaft fractures were treated with an intramedullary nail. The mean follow-up time was 84 months. Twenty-seven patients (38%) complained of chronic anterior knee pain. Infrapatellar nerve damage was found in 43 patients (60%). Of the 27 patients with knee pain, 21 (78%) had sensory deficits in the distribution area of the infrapatellar nerve, compared to 22 of the 45 patients (49%) without knee pain (p=0.025). Patient and fracture characteristics showed no significant differences between the two groups. At time of follow-up a total of 33 nails were removed of which twelve were taken out because of knee pain. The pain persisted in seven of these twelve patients (58%). The incidence of iatrogenic damage to the infrapatellar nerve after tibial nailing is high and lasting. Injury to this nerve appears to be associated with anterior knee pain after tibial nailing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The treatment of intramedullary osteomyelitis of the femur and tibia using the Reamer-Irrigator-Aspirator system and antibiotic cement rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakaris, N; Gudipati, S; Tosounidis, T; Harwood, P; Britten, S; Giannoudis, P V

    2014-06-01

    Intramedullary infection in long bones represents a complex clinical challenge, with an increasing incidence due to the increasing use of intramedullary fixation. We report a prospective case series using an intramedullary reaming device, the Reamer-Irrigator-Aspirator (RIA) system, in association with antibiotic cement rods for the treatment of lower limb long bone infections. A total of 24 such patients, 16 men and eight women, with a mean age of 44.5 years (17 to 75), 14 with femoral and 10 with tibial infection, were treated in a staged manner over a period of 2.5 years in a single referral centre. Of these, 21 patients had had previous surgery, usually for fixation of a fracture (seven had sustained an open fracture originally and one had undergone fasciotomies). According to the Cierny-Mader classification system, 18 patients were classified as type 1A, four as 3A (discharging sinus tract), one as type 4A and one as type 1B. Staphylococcus species were isolated in 20 patients (83.3%). Local antibiotic delivery was used in the form of impregnated cement rods in 23 patients. These were removed at a mean of 2.6 months (1 to 5). Pathogen-specific antibiotics were administered systemically for a mean of six weeks (3 to 18). At a mean follow-up of 21 months (8 to 36), 23 patients (96%) had no evidence of recurrent infection. One underwent a planned trans-tibial amputation two weeks post-operatively due to peripheral vascular disease and chronic recalcitrant osteomyelitis of the tibia and foot. The combination of RIA reaming, the administration of systemic pathogen-specific antibiotics and local delivery using impregnated cement rods proved to be a safe and efficient form of treatment in these patients. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  13. Biomechanical considerations in intramedullary fixation of lower-extremity fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhofe, P D

    1992-08-01

    Since Gerhard Kuntscher's first cloverleaf design was introduced in the early 1940s, intramedullary nail geometry has become increasingly complex. Many design changes have been introduced, and these have had profound effects upon the mechanical performance of intramedullary devices, making them more versatile. The subset of long-bone fractures amenable to intramedullary fixation is expanding, largely because of these advancements in nail design. Selection of the appropriate nail and bone-nail construct for each fracture configuration requires a knowledge of basic biomechanical principles behind nail design and the implant-host interface. Appropriate clinical application of this knowledge not only ensures the best possible intramedullary fixation of long-bone fractures, but it also aids in avoiding some of the complications that may occur.

  14. Reliability of the radiographic union scale in tibial fractures (RUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Antonio Silva de Azevedo Filho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the inter- and intra observer reproducibility of the radiographic score of consolidation of the tibia shaft fractures. METHODS: Fifty-one sets of radiographs in anteroposterior (AP and profile (P of the tibial shaft treated with intramedullary nail were obtained. The analysis of X-rays was performed in two stages, with a 21-day interval between assessments by a group of nine evaluators. To evaluate the reproducibility of RUST score between the evaluators, the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC with a 95% confidence interval was used. ICC values range from +1, representing perfect agreement, to -1, complete disagreement. RESULTS: There was a significant correlation among all evaluators: ICC = 0.87 (95% CI 0.81 to 0.91. The intraobserver agreement proved to be substantial with ICC = 0.88 (95% CI 0.85 to 0.91 . CONCLUSION: This study confirms that the RUST scale shows a high degree of reliability and agreement.

  15. Interlocked intramedullary nailing for treatment of open femoral shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baixauli, F; Baixauli, E J; Sánchez-Alepuz, E; Baixauli, F

    1998-05-01

    Twenty-eight patients with open femoral shaft fractures treated by reamed intramedullary nailing were reviewed retrospectively. Nine patients had Gustilo Grade I injuries; 14, Grade II; and five, Grade IIIA. Twenty cases had static locking, two cases had dynamic locking, and six cases were not locked. Average time to union was 20 weeks. The infection and nonunion rates were 0%. The data suggest that interlocked reamed intramedullary nailing is a safe treatment option for treating open femoral shaft fractures.

  16. Tibial microdissection for diabetic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, V; Vincent, G; Ngongang, C; Ledent, G; Hubermont, G

    2012-02-01

    Few data are available focusing on controlled blunt microdissection during below-the-knee interventions as sole or synchronous technique coupled to subintimal angioplasty, particularly in the management of diabetic critical-ischemic foot wounds. We present two cases of targeted recanalizations in the tibial and pedal trunks for plantar and forefoot diabetic ischemic tissue defects, following an angiosome-model for perfusion.

  17. Recurrent intramedullary epidermoid cyst of conus medullaris.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fleming, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Spinal intramedullary epidermoid cyst is a rare condition. Recurrent epidermoid cyst in the spine cord is known to occur. The authors describe a case of recurrent conus medullaris epidermoid cyst in a 24-year-old female. She initially presented at 7 years of age with bladder disturbance in the form of diurnal enuresis and recurrent urinary tract infection. MRI lumbar spine revealed a 4 cm conus medullaris epidermoid cyst. Since the initial presentation, the cyst had recurred seven times in the same location and she underwent surgical intervention in the form of exploration and debulking. This benign condition, owing to its anatomical location, has posed a surgical and overall management challenge. This occurrence is better managed in a tertiary-care centre requiring multi-disciplinary treatment approach.

  18. Visibility of the central canal on MRI

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    Petit-Lacour, M.C.; Lasjaunias, P.; Iffenecker, C.; Benoudiba, F.; Hadj Rabia, M.; Doyon, D. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Faculte de Paris Sud (France); Hurth, M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculte Paris Sud, Kremlin-Bicetre (France)

    2000-10-01

    The central canal of the spinal cord is present at birth and becomes progressively obliterated. Cadaver studies have shown that it may persiste partially or completely. To our knowledge, this entity has not been described on MRI. We reviewed 794 MRI studies of the spinal cord, and found 12 patients (aged 14 to 65 years) who had an intramedullary cavity. The cavity was at the junction of the ventral {sup 1}/{sub 3} and dorsal {sup 2}/{sub 3} of the spinal cord, except at the level of the lumbar enlargement, where it was central. It was filiform in most cases, although sometimes fusiform (3 to 4 mm in diameter), and had regular contours. The cavity were thoracic in 69 % of cases. The clinical features were totally unrelated to the image, and there were no anatomical factors (Chiari malformation, dysraphism) predisposing to syringomyelia. The images were perfectly compatible with a persistent central canal, which we interpret as a variant of normal anatomy. Therefore it is important to regard these findings as normal, to avoid unnecessary treatment and follow-up. (orig.)

  19. Visibility of the central canal on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit-Lacour, M.C.; Lasjaunias, P.; Iffenecker, C.; Benoudiba, F.; Hadj Rabia, M.; Doyon, D.; Hurth, M.

    2000-01-01

    The central canal of the spinal cord is present at birth and becomes progressively obliterated. Cadaver studies have shown that it may persiste partially or completely. To our knowledge, this entity has not been described on MRI. We reviewed 794 MRI studies of the spinal cord, and found 12 patients (aged 14 to 65 years) who had an intramedullary cavity. The cavity was at the junction of the ventral 1 / 3 and dorsal 2 / 3 of the spinal cord, except at the level of the lumbar enlargement, where it was central. It was filiform in most cases, although sometimes fusiform (3 to 4 mm in diameter), and had regular contours. The cavity were thoracic in 69 % of cases. The clinical features were totally unrelated to the image, and there were no anatomical factors (Chiari malformation, dysraphism) predisposing to syringomyelia. The images were perfectly compatible with a persistent central canal, which we interpret as a variant of normal anatomy. Therefore it is important to regard these findings as normal, to avoid unnecessary treatment and follow-up. (orig.)

  20. Medial tibial “spackling” to lessen chronic medial tibial soft tissue irritation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ryan Martin, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a unique, utilitarian reconstructive treatment option known as tibial “spackling” for chronic, localized medial joint line pain corresponding with progressive radiographic peripheral medial tibial bone loss beneath a well-fixed revision total knee arthroplasty tibial baseplate. It is believed that this localized pain is due to chronic irritation of the medial capsule and collateral ligament from the prominent medial edge of the tibial component. In the setting of failed nonoperative treatment, our experience with utilizing bone cement to reconstruct the medial tibial bone defect and create a smooth medial tibial surface has been successful in eliminating chronic medial soft tissue irritation.

  1. Paediatric tibial shaft fractures treated by open reduction and stabilization with monolateral external fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, A-L; Apostolou, N; Vidal, C; Ferrero, E; Mazda, K; Ilharreborde, B

    2018-02-01

    Elastic stable intramedullary nailing is increasingly used for surgical treatment of tibial shaft fractures, but frequently requires immobilization and delayed full weight-bearing. Therefore, external fixation remains interesting. The aim was to report clinico-radiological outcomes of monolateral external fixation for displaced and unstable tibial shaft fractures in children. All tibial fractures consecutively treated by monolateral external fixation between 2008 and 2013 were followed. Inclusion criteria included skeletal immaturity and closed and open Gustilo I fractures caused by a direct impact. Patients were seen until two years postoperatively. Demographics, mechanism of injury, surgical data and complications were recorded. Anteroposterior and lateral side radiographs were performed at each visit. Full-limb 3D reconstructions using biplanar stereroradiography was performed for final limb length and alignment measures. A total of 45 patients (mean age 9.7 years ± 0.5) were included. In all, 17 were Gustilo I fractures, with no difference between open and closed fractures for any data. Mean time to full weight bearing was 18.2 days ± 0.7. After 15 days, 39 patients returned to school. Hardware removal (mean time to union 15.6 weeks ± 0.8) was performed during consultation under analgesic gas. There were no cases of nonunion. No fracture healed with > 10° of angulation (mean 5.1° ± 0.4°). Leg-length discrepancy > 10 mm was found for six patients. This procedure can be a safe and simple surgical treatment for children with tibial shaft fractures. Few complications and early return to school were reported, with the limitations of non-comparative study. IV.

  2. Does pulsed low intensity ultrasound allow early return to normal activities when treating stress fractures? A review of one tarsal navicular and eight tibial stress fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, J C; Brindle, T; Nyland, J; Caborn, D N; Johnson, D L

    1999-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy of daily pulsed low intensity ultrasound (LIUS) with early return to activities for the treatment of lower extremity stress fractures. Eight patients (2 males, 6 females) with radiographic and bone scan confirmed tibial stress fractures participated in this study. Additionally, a case report of a tarsal navicular stress fracture is described. All patients except one were involved in athletics. Prior to the study, subjects completed a 5 question, 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS) regarding pain level (10 = extreme pain, 1 = no pain) and were assessed for functional performance. Subjects received 20-minute LIUS treatments 5 times a week for 4 weeks. Subjects maintained all functional activities during the treatment period. Seven patients with posterior-medial stress fractures participated without a brace. Subjects were re-tested after 4 weeks of treatment. Mann-Whitney U tests (VAS data) and paired t-tests (functional tests) assessed statistical significance (psports was prescribed for the patients with the tibial stress fractures. The patient with the anterior tibial stress fracture underwent tibial intramedullary nailing at the conclusion of a season of play. In this uncontrolled experience, treatment of tibial stress fractures with daily pulsed LIUS was effective in pain relief and early return to vigorous activity without bracing for the patients with posterior-medial stress fractures.

  3. Radiation-free Insertion of Distal Interlocking Screw in Tibial and Femur Nailing: A Simple Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Ritesh Kumar; Mehta, Surender Mohan; Awasthi, Bhanu; Singh, Janith Lal; Kumar, Amit; Thakur, Lokesh; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Distal interlocking screw insertion in intramedullary nailing of long-bone fracture is a challenging task for orthopedic surgeons. It is difficult particularly when the surgeon is in his learning stage or when image intensifier is not available. We describe a radiation-free technique of distal interlocking screw insertion which is easy and practicable. In this technique, a same length nail is placed over the skin (outer nail) and through its distal-most screw hole, a 3.2 mm drill bit is inserted to drill the distal locking screw hole of the intramedullary nail (inner nail). With a small skin incision over the distal screw holes, the distal-most screw hole is identified; the bone window overlying the screw hole is widened with an awl and a locking bolt is inserted with a washer under direct visualization. The other distal interlocking screw is simply drilled by matching the other three holes of the outer and inner nails. We have operated 86 patients (39 femoral shaft fracture and 47 tibial shaft fracture) in 1 year where this technique was used. There were 41 open fracture and 45 closed fracture. Within 6 months of follow-up, bony union was achieved in 36 of 39 femur fractures and 45 of 47 tibial fractures. No unwanted complications were observed during the postoperative period and in follow-up. This method of radiation-free distal interlocking screw insertion is simple and can be used in third world country where image intensifier facility is not available. However, surgeons are encouraged to use image intensifier facility where the facility is available.

  4. Training effect of using Touch Surgery for intramedullary femoral nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugand, Kapil; Mawkin, Mala; Gupte, Chinmay

    2016-02-01

    Simulation in orthopaedic training is becoming increasingly popular and has been widely used in formal curricula. However, these resources are expensive and not easily accessible to every trainee. Other means of disseminating surgical education through virtual reality (VR) multimedia can act as useful adjunct to traditional methods of teaching. One validated VR platform is Touch Surgery, a cognitive task simulation and rehearsal app. The primary objective of this study was to identify the training effect of Touch Surgery intramedullary femoral nailing (IFN) modules using objective performance metrics over six consecutive attempts. Secondary objectives consisted of validated multiple choice questions (MCQ) testing before the first (pre) and after the sixth (post) attempts. 27 medical undergraduates were recruited to complete the decision-making process six consecutive times for four modules on the procedural steps of IFN. The modules consisted of (i) preparing the patient and equipment, (ii) femoral canal preparation, (iii) nail insertion and proximal locking, and (iv) distal locking and closure. Real-time objective performance metrics were obtained, stored electronically and analysed using the median and Bonett-Price 95% confidence intervals from the participants' attempts to assess training effect. Significance was calculated using the Mann-Whitney U test for independent data whilst the Wilcoxon signed ranked test was used for paired data. Significance was set as 2-tailed p-value <0.05. Median performance scores per attempt for all four modules demonstrated a significant improvement ranging from 58 to 115%. Scoring variability and distribution was reduced and more predictable per attempt. Logarithmic learning curves elicited strong positive correlations between the number of attempts and scoring. Mean scores for pre and post-study MCQs tests significantly improved from 83 to 94% in all modules. IFN modules on Touch Surgery app demonstrated a significant training

  5. Study to prospectively evaluate reamed intramedually nails in patients with tibial fractures (S.P.R.I.N.T.): Study rationale and design

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Background Surgeons agree on the benefits of operative treatment of tibial fractures – the most common of long bone fractures – with an intramedullary rod or nail. Rates of re-operation remain high – between 23% and 60% in prior trials – and the two alternative nailing approaches, reamed or non-reamed, each have a compelling biological rationale and strong proponents, resulting in ongoing controversy regarding which is better. Methods/Design The objective of this trial was to assess the impac...

  6. Tibial Torsion Among Filipinos: A Cadaveric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villamin CAC

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tibial torsion, the twisting of the tibia about its long axis, can affect rotational positioning in total knee replacement. This angle varies depending on the ethnicity of the subject. There are no published studies to date to determine the tibial torsion among Filipinos. In this study, 28 cadaveric limbs were examined. Our results show that the average tibial torsion among adult Filipinos is 28.9°.

  7. Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from prostate carcinoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieberson Robert E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Although vertebral and epidural metastases are common, intradural metastases and intramedullary spinal cord metastases are rare. The indications for the treatment of intramedullary spinal cord metastases remain controversial. We present the first biopsy-proven case of an intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Case presentation Our patient was a 68-year-old right-handed Caucasian man with a Gleason grade 4 + 3 prostate adenocarcinoma who had previously undergone a prostatectomy, androgen blockade and transurethral debulking. He presented with new-onset saddle anesthesia and fecal incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a spindle-shaped intramedullary lesion of the conus medullaris. Our patient underwent decompression and an excisional biopsy; the lesion’s pathology was consistent with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Postoperatively, our patient received CyberKnife® radiosurgery to the resection cavity at a marginal dose of 27Gy to the 85% isodose line. At three months follow-up, our patient remains neurologically stable with no new deficits or lesions. Conclusions We review the literature and discuss the indications for surgery and radiosurgery for intramedullary spinal cord metastases. We also report the novel use of stereotactic radiosurgery to sterilize the resection cavity following an excisional biopsy of the metastasis.

  8. [Treatment of femoral shaft fractures with expandable intramedullary nail].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilli, Feridun; Mahiroğullari, Mahir; Pehlivan, Ozcan; Keklikçi, Kenan; Kuşkucu, Mesih; Kiral, Ahmet; Avşar, Serdar

    2009-07-01

    Femoral shaft fractures are usually seen in the young population as a result of high energy traumas and are often accompanied by major organ injuries. In this paper, we aimed to assess the clinical results of expandable femoral intramedullary nails in the treatment of 20 femoral shaft fractures. The average age was 34.7. One fracture was the result of a gunshot wound, type 3A open fracture, and the other 19 fractures were closed. Under fluoroscopic control, all patients underwent elective closed reduction and internal fixation with intramedullary expandable femoral nails (Fixion, Disc-O-Tech; Israel). In case of failed or unacceptable closed reduction, open reduction was achieved with a second incision over the fracture site. Average operation time was 26.3 minutes. Full union was achieved in all patients. The shortest union time was 12 weeks and the longest 24 weeks, with an average of 15.2 weeks. Results in 15 patients (75%) were excellent, in 4 patients (20%) good and in 1 patient (5%) moderate according to Thorensen criteria. Use of expandable nails provides union without major complications and offers advantages such as less exposure to radiation as seen in distal locking of classical intramedullary nails. In conclusion, the good results of this study show that the expandable femoral intramedullary nail provides a successful option to classical intramedullary nails.

  9. Tibial tuberosity fractures in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Steven; Hosalkar, Harish; Cameron, Danielle B; Heath, Aaron; David Horn, B; Ganley, Theodore J

    2008-12-01

    Tibial tuberosity fractures in adolescents are uncommon. We retrospectively reviewed all tibial tuberosity fractures in adolescents (10-19) who presented to our level 1 pediatric trauma center over a 7-year period to review fracture morphology, mechanism of injury, fracture management including return to play, as well as complications. Additionally, we present a review of the literature and treatment algorithm. We reviewed the clinical charts and radiographs of consecutive patients with tibial tuberosity fractures between 01 January 2000 and 01 January 2007. Data parameters included the following: patients age and gender, involved side, injury classification, co-morbidities, mechanism of injury, treatment, return to activity and complications. Data were extracted and reviewed, and a treatment algorithm is proposed with some additional insights into the epidemiology of the injury. Nineteen patients met the inclusion criteria. There were 19 patients with 20 tibial tuberosity fractures. The mean age was 13.7 years. There were 18 males and 1 female patient. There were nine left-sided injuries and eleven right-sided including one patient with bilateral fractures. Mechanism of injuries included basketball injury (8), running injury (5), football injury (3), fall from a scooter (2), high jump (1) and fall (1). Co-morbidities included three patients with concurrent Osgood-Schlatter disease and one with osteogenesis imperfecta. All were treated with ORIF, including arthroscopic-assisted techniques in two cases. Complications included four patients with pre-operative presentation of compartment syndrome all requiring fasciotomy, one post-operative stiffness and one painful hardware requiring removal. Range of motion was started an average of 4.3 weeks post-operatively and return to play was an average of 3.9 months post-operatively. Although uncommon, tibial tuberosity fractures in adolescents are clinically important injuries. Early recognition and treatment (closed or open

  10. Significance of the position of the proximal tip of the tibial nail: An important factor related to anterior knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahririan, Mohammad Ali; Ziaei, Ehsan; Osanloo, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice for the majority of tibial shaft fractures and anterior knee pain is the most common complication of this surgery; however, its etiology is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess the predicting factors related to anterior knee pain following tibial nailing. Patients with isolated, unilateral tibial shaft fracture who had undergone tibial nailing were identified retrospectively. Data including age, sex, type of fracture, technique of surgery and location of the nail were collected and finally the association between the above variables and knee pain were analyzed via SPSS software. A total of 95 patients participated in the study. The mean age of the participants was 33.52 ± 1.62, 87 (91.6%) of whom were male and 74 (77.9%) had close fractures respectively. The method of surgery in 60 (63.2%) patients was paratendinous approach and in 35 (36.8%) was transtendinous. Twenty six (27.4%) of the patients had anterior knee pain. There were no significant differences between the two groups of patients with and without knee pain by age, sex, type of fracture and type of surgery (P = 0.952, 0.502, 0.212 and 0.745, respectively). Patients with protrusion of the nail from the anterior cortex had higher risk of developing knee pain after surgery (odds ratio: 2.76, confidence interval: 1.08, 7.08, P = 0.031). The results revealed a higher risk of developing anterior knee pain after tibial nailing in patients with protrusion of the nail from the anterior cortex.

  11. Spinal cord edema with contrast enhancement mimicking intramedullary tumor in patient with cervical myelopathy: A case report and a brief literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Chourmouzi, Danai; Karagiannidis, Apostolos; Kapetanakis, Stylianos

    2017-01-01

    Cervical myelopathy (CM) is a clinical diagnosis that may be associated with hyperintense areas on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. The use of contrast enhancement in such areas to differentiate between neoplastic and degenerative disease has rarely been described. We present a 41-year-old female with a 5-month course of progressive CM. The cervical MRI revealed spinal cord swelling, stenosis, and a hyperintense signal at the C5-C6 and C5-C7 levels. Both the neurologic and radiologic examinations were consistent with an intramedullary cervical cord tumor. To decompress the spinal canal, an anterior cervical discectomy and fusion was performed from C5 to C7 level. This resulted in immediate and significant improvement of the myelopathy. Postoperatively, over 1.5 years, the hyperintense, enhancing intramedullary lesion gradually regressed on multiple postoperative MRI scans. Spinal cord edema is occasionally seen on MR studies of the cervical spine in patients with degenerative CM. Contrast-enhanced MR studies may help differentiate hyperintense cord signals due to edema vs. atypical intramedullary tumors. Routine successive postoperative MRI evaluations are crucial to confirm the diagnosis of degenerative vs. neoplastic disease.

  12. Intramedullary conus metastasis from carcinoma lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavani, Sandip B.; Nadkarni, Trimurti D.; Goel, Naina A.

    2013-01-01

    A 46-year-old male presented with progressive paraparesis and sensory impairment in both lower limbs since 2 months. He had urinary and bowel incontinence. On examination he had flaccid paraplegia with a sensory level at 11th dorsal vertebral level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the lumbosacral spine showed an enhancing intramedullary lesion in the conus. The patient underwent excision of the conus mass. Histopathology confirmed the tumor to represent a poorly differentiated metastatic carcinoma from an unknown primary. A positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan of the whole body revealed hypermetabolic activity in the hilum of the right lung confirmed to be a lung carcinoma on a CT-guided biopsy. The patient was undergoing chemoradiation at 1 month follow-up. The author's literature search has yielded only four other case reports of conus metastasis of which only one is in English literature. The present case report and review of literature are presented. PMID:24381457

  13. Intramedullary cavernous hemangiomas, magnetic resonance studies in four patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrena, M.R.; Guelbenzu, S.; Garcia, S.; Bertrol, V.

    1998-01-01

    Intramedullary cavernous hemangiomas are vascular malformations that can be located throughout the entire central nervous system. They are more frequently found in brain than in spinal cord, where it is only possible to diagnose them by magnetic resonance (RM): We present four cases of intramedullary spinal cord cavernoma, three of which were located in the thoracic spine and one in cervical spine. Computed tomography was ineffective in their diagnosis. However, MR disclosed there presence of well-defined tumors producing a thickening of the spinal cord. The signal was heterogeneous in both T1 and T2-weighted images. There were low signal areas due to the presence of calcium and hemosiderin and high intensity signals provoked by methemoglobin within the lesions, which were scarcely enhanced by intravenous gadolinium administration. One of the lesions presented in the form of a large intramedullary hematoma. (Author) 8 refs

  14. Intramedullary holocord abscess secondary to infected dermoid cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassigny, Dorota; Fomekong, Edward; Koerts, Guus; Raftopoulos, Christian

    2018-01-01

    In the literature, less than ten cases of holocord intramedullary abscess in children have been described. A 15-month-old girl presented with flaccid paraplegia and dermal sinus in the sacral region. MRI highlighted an infected lumbar dermoid cyst. The child underwent surgery to remove the cyst and purulent collection. Five days after surgery, she developed upper limbs paresis. An MRI showed a holocord abscess. A catheter was inserted through a cervical myelotomy into the abscess for drainage with a good postoperative recovery. A rapid management, even for extended or recurrent intramedullary abscess, can prevent potential severe neurological dysfunctions.

  15. Incomplete linear tibial fractures in two horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.J.; Allhands, R.V.; Baker, G.J.; Boero, M.J.; Foreman, J.H.; Hyyppa, T.; Huhn, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Incomplete linear tibial fractures were identified in two horses with the aid of scintigraphy. Both horses were treated successfully by strict stall confinement, and both returned to normal athletic activity. Scintigraphy can be used to facilitate the generally difficult diagnosis of incomplete tibial fractures

  16. Medial tibial stress syndrome: a critical review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moen, Maarten H.; Tol, Johannes L.; Weir, Adam; Steunebrink, Miriam; de Winter, Theodorus C.

    2009-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is one of the most common leg injuries in athletes and soldiers. The incidence of MTSS is reported as being between 4% and 35% in military personnel and athletes. The name given to this condition refers to pain on the posteromedial tibial border during exercise,

  17. Sacral nerve stimulation increases activation of the primary somatosensory cortex by anal canal stimulation in an experimental model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Griffin, K M

    2011-08-01

    Sacral and posterior tibial nerve stimulation may be used to treat faecal incontinence; however, the mechanism of action is unknown. The aim of this study was to establish whether sensory activation of the cerebral cortex by anal canal stimulation was increased by peripheral neuromodulation.

  18. Risk factors for re-fracture in children with diaphyseal fracture of the forearm treated with elastic stable intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, Marie; Mansour, Mounira; Samba, Antoine; Pereira, Bruno; Canavese, Federico

    2016-02-01

    A retrospective study aims to investigate predisposing factors leading to re-fracture in patients with nails still in place and to identify potential correlations between nail size-to-medullary canal diameter ratio and re-fracture, working to the hypothesis that a higher ratio correlates with a higher risk of re-fracture. Rates of re-fracture with nail still in place after forearm elastic stable intramedullary nailing are higher in younger pediatric patients. Re-fractures occurred at a mean age of 6.7 years (range 5-8.7). While the role of body frame and bone medullary diameter remains unclear, there are grounds for adjusting treatment strategy for age, weight and bone medullary diameter to achieve effective outcome. History of previous forearm fracture and open treatment may also be further risk factors.

  19. Bioactivity and osteointegration of hydroxyapatite-coated stainless steel and titanium wires used for intramedullary osteosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkov, Arnold V; Gorbach, Elena N; Kononovich, Natalia A; Popkov, Dmitry A; Tverdokhlebov, Sergey I; Shesterikov, Evgeniy V

    2017-08-01

    A lot of research was conducted on the use of various biomaterials in orthopedic surgery. Our study investigated the effects of nanostructured calcium-phosphate coating on metallic implants introduced into the bone marrow canal. Stainless steel or titanium 2-mm wires (groups 1 and 2, respectively), and hydroxyapatite-coated stainless steel or titanium wires of the same diameter (groups 3 and 4, respectively) were introduced into the tibial bone marrow canal of 20 dogs (each group = 5 dogs). Hydroxyapatite coating was deposited on the wires with the method of microarc oxidation. Light microscopy to study histological diaphyseal transverse sections, scanning electron microscopy to study the bone marrow area around the implant and an X-ray electron probe analyzer to study the content of calcium and phosphorus were used to investigate bioactivity and osteointegration after a four weeks period. Osteointegration was also assessed by measuring wires' pull-off strength with a sensor dynamometer. Bone formation was observed round the wires in the bone marrow canal in all the groups. Its intensity depended upon the features of wire surfaces and implant materials. Maximum percentage volume of trabecular bone was present in the bone marrow canals of group 4 dogs that corresponded to a mean of 27.1 ± 0.14%, while it was only 6.7% in group 1. The coating in groups 3 and 4 provided better bioactivity and osteointegration. Hydroxyapatite-coated titanium wires showed the highest degree of bone formation around them and greater pull-off strength. Nanostructured hydroxyapatite coating of metallic wires induces an expressed bone formation and provides osteointegration. Hydroxyapatite-coated wires could be used along with external fixation for bone repair enhancement in diaphyseal fractures, management of osteogenesis imperfecta and correction of bone deformities in phosphate diabetes.

  20. Root canal irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, L.; Boutsioukis, C.; Jiang, L.M.; Macedo, R.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Chávez de Paz, L.E.; Sedgley, C.M.; Kishen, A.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of root canal irrigation are the chemical dissolution or disruption and the mechanical detachment of pulp tissue, dentin debris and smear layer (instrumentation products), microorganisms (planktonic or biofilm), and their products from the root canal wall, their removal out of the root

  1. The Root Canal Biofilm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, L.W.M.; Boutsioukis, C.; Jiang, L.M.; Macedo, R.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, Michel; Chávez de Paz, E.; Sedgley, C.M.; Kishen, A.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of root canal irrigation are the chemical dissolution or disruption and the mechanical detachment of pulp tissue, dentin debris and smear layer (instrumentation products), microorganisms (planktonic or biofilm), and their products from the root canal wall, their removal out of the root

  2. Intramedullary Cavernous Haemangioma Of Spinal Cord: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Intramedulary Cavernous Haemangioma Of Spinal Cord. Tadios Muni, Hagos Biluts. East and Central African Journal of Surgery Volume 9 Number 2 - December 2004. 56. Intramedullary Cavernous Haemangioma Of Spinal Cord: A case report and Literature. Review. 1Tadios Muni M.D, 2Hagos Biluts M.D.. 1Senior ...

  3. Intramedullary fixation of boxer's fractures: evaluation of functional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Material and methods: Between May 2005 and January 2006, 42 patients (40 men and 02 female) with 42 displaced fifth metacarpal neck fractures were treated at out institution by closed intramedullary Kirschner wires fixation. The assessment of patients was based on the time to union, the functional recovery and the ...

  4. Management of Bone Gaps with Intramedullary Autologous Fibular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 7 consecutive patients who presented with bone gaps that were managed with intramedullary non vascularised fibular strut graft. Method: Intramedulary Autologous fibular strut graft was used to breach the bone and the whole length augmented with cancellous graft and bridged with bone plate; external fixators or k wires.

  5. ediatric femoral shaft fractures treated by flexible intramedullary nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapil Mani, K C; Dirgha Raj, R C; Parimal, Acharya

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays pediatric femoral fractures are more commonly managed with operative treatment rather than conservative treatment because of more rapid recovery and avoidance of prolonged immobilization. Children between the ages of 5-13 years are treated either by traction plus hip spica and flexible/elastic stable retrograde intramedullary nail, or external fixators in the case of open fractures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcome of pediatric femoral shaft fractures treated by stainless steel flexible intramedullary nail in children between 5 and 13 years of age. There were 32 cases of femoral shaft fractures which were all fixed with stainless steel flexible intramedullary nail under fluoroscopy. Long leg cast was applied at the time of fixation. Partial weight bearing was started 2 weeks after surgery. Patients were evaluated in follow-up study to observe the alignment of fracture, infection, delayed union, nonunion, limb length discrepancy, motion of knee joint, and time to unite the fracture. We were able to follow up 28 out of 32 patients. The patients were 8.14 years of age on average. The mean hospital stay after operation was 4 days and fracture union time was 9.57 weeks. There were 3 cases of varus angulation, 2 cases of anterior angulation, and 4 cases of limb lengthening. Patients aged between 5 and 13 years treated with flexible intramedullary nail for closed femoral shaft fracture have rapid union and recovery, short rehabilitation period, less immobilization and psychological impact, and cost-effective.

  6. skeletal traction and intramedullary nailing cost-effectiveness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To our knowledge no similar study has been done in Africa. Objective:To determine the cost-effectiveness of skeletal traction compared to intramedullary nailing. Design: Prospective conventional sampling analytical study. Setting: Hospital based study in a referral and teaching institution - Kenyatta National Hospital,.

  7. Laboratory animal euthanasia using intra-medullary injection of air ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These animals must be euthanised with a minimum of physical and mental suffering. We describe intramedully injection of air as safe, ... Methodology: Thirty six pregnant Wister rats were euthanised by injecting 1ml of air into the medulla through foramen magnum. The time lag between the intramedullary injection of air and ...

  8. Clinical Outcomes after Open Locked Intramedullary Nailing of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... joint stiffness due to prolonged immobilization.[8,9] Open reduction and internal fixation have reduced some of these complications by enabling early mobilization of the patient after surgery. The gold standard for treating closed femoral shaft fractures currently is closed locked intramedullary nailing.[10-13] ...

  9. Congenital pseudoarthrosis of the tibia: treatment by intramedullary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital pseudoarthrosis of the tibia: treatment by intramedullary nailing without bone graft. ... In our opinion, the encouraging result obtained may justify proposing this procedure as a first choice option for the treatment of the scierotic form and so avoid the complexzity of autologous bone grafting in children. Nigerian ...

  10. Skeletal traction and intramedullary nailing cost-effectiveness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the operative group 24 patients had union with one delayed union while in the traction group 12 patients had union, 9 with mal union and 4 delayed union. Conclusion: Intramedullary nailing is more cost-effective than skeletal traction. It met the dominant strategy, because it was significantly less costly than skeletal ...

  11. Intramedullary cavernous haemangioma of spinal cord: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thoracic myelography done showed bilateral symmetrical funnelling of the contrast at the level of T5 with widening of the spinal cord, which are typical characteristics of an intramedullary mass of spinal cord. T2-T6 Laminectomy was done. Near total excision of a 4 by 2.5 cm intradural, intramedulary bluish black, necrotic, ...

  12. Clinical Outcomes after Open Locked Intramedullary Nailing of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Femoral shaft fractures are common injuries in adults. Closed locked intramedullary nailing is the recommended treatment for femoral shaft fractures due to its high union rate. Objective: The objective of this study is to determine the outcome of management of closed femoral shaft fractures in adult patients, ...

  13. The healing stages of an intramedullary implanted tibia: A stress strain comparative analysis of the calcification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filardi, Vincenzo

    2015-10-01

    The extended usage of unreamed tibial nailing resulted in reports of an increased rate of complications, especially for the distal portion of the tibia. Unreamed nailing favours biology at the expense of the achievable mechanical stability, it is therefore of interest to define the limits of the clinical indications for this method. Extra-articular fractures of the distal tibial metaphysis, meta-diaphyseal junction, and adjacent diaphysis are distinct in their management from impaction derived ''pilon'' type fractures and mid-diaphyseal fractures. The goals of this work were to gain a thorough understanding of the load-sharing mechanism between unreamed nail and bones in a fractured tibia. With this purpose a complete model of the human leg was realised, simulating a mid-diaphyseal fracture, classified as A2 type 1, according to the AO classification. The analysis of the entire chain allows to have a complete picture of the stress distribution and of the most stressed bones and soft tissues, but, more importantly can overcome problems connected with boundary conditions imposed at single bony components. Model consists of six bony structures: pelvis, femur, patella, fibula, tibia, and a simplified lump of the feet, configured in a standing up position. Their articular cartilage layers, were simulated by 3D membranes of opportune stiffness connecting the different segments. Moreover an unreamed intra-medullary nail Expert Tibial Nail (DePuy Synthes(®)) stabilized the fractured tibia. A load of 700 N has been applied at the top of pelvis and a part the feet, at the tip, was rigidly fixed. Five different contact interfaces have been imposed at the different bony surfaces in contact. Three different conditions were analysed: the initially healthy tibia, the A2 type 1 fractured tibia with the Expert tibial nail implanted, and the follow up stage after complete healing of tibia. Non-linear finite element analysis of the models were performed with Abaqus version 5

  14. Incidence and epidemiology of tibial shaft fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter; Elsøe, Rasmus; Hansen, Sandra Hope

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The literature lacks recent population-based epidemiology studies of the incidence, trauma mechanism and fracture classification of tibial shaft fractures. The purpose of this study was to provide up-to-date information on the incidence of tibial shaft fractures in a large and compl......Introduction: The literature lacks recent population-based epidemiology studies of the incidence, trauma mechanism and fracture classification of tibial shaft fractures. The purpose of this study was to provide up-to-date information on the incidence of tibial shaft fractures in a large...... the highest frequency between the age of 30 and 40. AO-type 42-A1 was the most common fracture type, representing 34% of all tibial shaft fractures. The majority of tibial shaft fractures occur during walking, indoor activity and sports. The distribution among genders shows that males present a higher...... frequency of fractures while participating in sports activities and walking. Women present the highest frequency of fractures while walking and during indoor activities. Conclusion: This study shows an incidence of 16.9/100,000/year for tibial shaft fractures. AO-type 42-A1 was the most common fracture type...

  15. MULTIPLE SPINAL CANAL MENINGIOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandigama Pratap Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningiomas of the spinal canal are common tumours with the incidence of 25 percent of all spinal cord tumours. But multiple spinal canal meningiomas are rare in compare to solitary lesions and account for 2 to 3.5% of all spinal meningiomas. Most of the reported cases are both intra cranial and spinal. Exclusive involvement of the spinal canal by multiple meningiomas are very rare. We could find only sixteen cases in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for single lesion. We analysed the literature, with illustration of our case. MATERIALS AND METHODS In September 2016, we performed a literature search for multiple spinal canal meningiomas involving exclusively the spinal canal with no limitation for language and publication date. The search was conducted through http://pubmed.com, a wellknown worldwide internet medical address. To the best of our knowledge, we could find only sixteen cases of multiple meningiomas exclusively confined to the spinal canal. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for solitary intradural extra medullary spinal canal meningioma at D4-D6 level, again presented with spastic quadriparesis of two years duration and MRI whole spine demonstrated multiple intradural extra medullary lesions, which were excised completely and the histopathological diagnosis was transitional meningioma. RESULTS Patient recovered from his weakness and sensory symptoms gradually and bladder and bowel symptoms improved gradually over a period of two to three weeks. CONCLUSION Multiple

  16. Spinal intramedullary cavernomas. Personal experience reffering to six cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacob G.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite cavernous malformations of the CNS are pathologically similar, intramedullary cavernous malformations are very rare lesions, increasingly recognized after introduction of magnetic resonance image, generating gradual neurological decline, with severe deficits or acute loss of spinal function. We report our experience on six patients with intramedullary cavernomas defining the spectrum of presenting symptoms and signs analyzing the role of surgery as a treatment for these lesions. We present our experience with 2 cervical and 4 thoracal spinal intramedullary cavernoma from 2010 to 2014 searching history, onset of clinical manifestation, neurological status, radiological findings, operation, and clinical outcome. Among 6 patients male were 2 cases; female 4 cases; mean age was 42 years (range 25-72 years; mean duration of symptoms were 1,5 years (range 5 days and 2 years with slowly progressive neurological decline. In two cases there was acute onset of neurological compromise. In all cases diagnosis was made on MRI and lesions were possible to be radically excised and gently extracted from the hemosiderin-stained bed inside of the spinal cord via a laminectomy and midline myelotomy with microsurgical techniques. The surgical outcome on a mean duration of follow up of 12 months were: for 4 cases - the patients neurological conditions remarkably improved 1 month later, for 2 cases no improvement were remarked. No recurrent hemorrhages were recorded. A follow-up MRI examination was made in all cases to confirm complete removal of the cavernous angioma. Spinal intramedullary cavernoma should be early recognized by MRI, can be positioned in a precarious position and generate significant neurologic deficits than cranial cavernomas. For symptomatic intramedullary cavernous malformations extended to the dorsal surface of the spinal cord, total resection with microsurgical techniques can offer good or excellent outcome, restoring neurological

  17. The effect of tibial plateau leveling osteotomy position on cranial tibial subluxation: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowaleski, Michael P; Apelt, Detlef; Mattoon, John S; Litsky, Alan S

    2005-01-01

    To compare centered versus distal tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) position on cranial tibial subluxation, postoperative tibial plateau angle (TPA), and tibial long axis shift (TLAS). In vitro biomechanical evaluation. Six pairs of canine cadaveric hind limbs. One limb of each pair was randomly assigned to the distal (TPLO-D) or centered (TPLO-C) osteotomy group. Cranial tibial subluxation (CTS) under load was quantified sequentially under 3 conditions: intact, after cranial cruciate ligament transection, and after TPLO; a corrected CTS value was also calculated. Postoperative TPA and TLAS were measured. Comparisons were made using 1-way repeated measures ANOVA with a Tukey's multiple comparison post hoc test for CTS, and a Wilcoxon's sign rank test for TPA and TLAS. Significance was set at Pcranial tibial thrust. The centered osteotomy position is geometrically more precise, and biomechanically more effective than the distal position.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terwey, B.; Koschorek, F.; Jensen, H.P.

    1985-12-01

    170 patients with suspected lesions of the cervical part of the medulla were examined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tomography. 27 cases revealed no pathological changes in the regions of the cervical medulla, the cervical canal and of the cervical spine. 143 cases produced pathological findings whose diagnoses determined therapeutical approach. Verified pathological changes comprised anomalies of the cranio-cervical junction like basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation, various types of cavity formation in the cervical medulla (syringomyelia, hydromyelia), demyelinization processes, intramedullary and extramedullary tumours, intervertebral disk degeneration processes, dislocation of intervertebral disks and spondylophytes with spinal stenoses. Sagittal sections in different functional positions allowed to demonstrate the biomechanical effects of extramedullary masses on the cervical medulla. However, proven tumours could not be differentiated successfully using histological methods. Nevertheless, NMR tomography will replace invasive methods like conventional cervical myelography and CT myelography in diagnostic clarification of diseases of the cervical medulla.

  19. Measurement of tibial torsion by computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jend, H.-H.; Heller, M.; Dallek, M.; Schoettle, H.

    1981-01-01

    A CT procedure for objective measurements of tibial torsion independent of axial rotation in the nearby joints is described. Transverse sections in defined planes of the tibia permit easy calculation of normal and abnormal congenital or posttraumatic angles of torsion. In 69 limbs normal tibial torsion was 40 0 +-9 0 . In a series of 42 limbs with complicated healing of a fracture of both bones of the leg it is shown that tibial maltorsion is a deformity which in most cases leads to arthrosis of the ankle joint. (Auth.)

  20. Measurement of tibial torsion by computer tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jend, H.H.; Heller, M.; Dallek, M.; Schoettle, H. (Hamburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.))

    1981-01-01

    A CT procedure for objective measurements of tibial torsion independent of axial rotation in the nearby joints is described. Transverse sections in defined planes of the tibia permit easy calculation of normal and abnormal congenital or posttraumatic angles of torsion. In 69 limbs normal tibial torsion was 40/sup 0/+-9/sup 0/. In a series of 42 limbs with complicated healing of a fracture of both bones of the leg it is shown that tibial maltorsion is a deformity which in most cases leads to arthrosis of the ankle joint.

  1. Repair of a transverse ilial fracture in a cat using an intramedullary pin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlt, K L; Shales, C

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes the novel use of an intramedullary pin in an eight-month-old cat to repair malunion of a right transverse ilial fracture that was causing pelvic canal diameter narrowing and constipation. A routine, right femoral head and neck ostectomy was performed due to the presence of a femoral head fracture with apparent femoral neck necrosis. Significant callus formation around the ilial fracture was removed in order to achieve satisfactory fracture reduction. A 2 mm Steinmann pin was passed in a retrograde fashion from the acetabular fracture towards the ischial tuberosity, and following removal of the trochar tip and reduction of the fracture, was driven normograde to end in the cranial ilial wing. The pin was bent at the ischium following cutting in an attempt to prevent cranial migration. Radiographic examination showed good fracture alignment and increased pelvic diameter by 31% The cat regained normal limb function and the constipation resolved. A transilial pin was utilised successfully in a cat to realign and stabilise a simple transverse ilial fracture following femoral head and neck ostectomy. This technique has the potential to be useful for stabilisation of feline caudal ilial body fractures, but should not be used where there is articular surface involvement unless the coxofemoral joint is not preserved. Further studies are required to assess this technique.

  2. [TIBIAL PERIOSTEAL FLAP PEDICLED WITH INTERMUSCULAR BRANCH OF POSTERIOR TIBIAL VESSELS COMBINED WITH AUTOLOGOUS BONE GRAFT FOR TIBIAL BONE DEFECT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yulong; Gao, Shunhong; Zhang, Jingyu; Dong, Huishuang; Zhang, Yunpeng; Fu, Jiansong

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of tibial periosteal flap pedicled with intermuscular branch of posterior tibial vessels combined with autologous bone graft in the treatment of tibial bone defects. Between January 2007 and December 2013, 19 cases of traumatic tibia bone and soft tissue defects were treated. There were 14 males and 5 females, aged from 18 to 49 years (mean, 28 years). The tibial fracture site located at the middle tibia in 6 cases and at the distal tibia in 13 cases. According to Gustilo type, 4 cases were rated as type III A, 14 cases as type III B, and 1 case as type III C (injury of anterior tibial artery). The length of bone defect ranged from 4.3 to 8.5 cm (mean, 6.3 cm). The soft tissue defects ranged from 8 cm x 5 cm to 17 cm x 9 cm. The time from injury to operation was 3 to 8 hours (mean, 4 hours). One-stage operation included debridement, external fixation, and vacuum sealing drainage. After formation of granulation tissue, the fresh wound was repaired with sural neurovascular flap or posterior tibial artery perforator flap. The flap size ranged from 10 cmx6 cm to 19 cm x 11 cm. In two-stage operation, tibial periosteal flap pedicled with intermuscular branch of posterior tibial vessels combined with autologous bone graft was used to repair tibial defect. The periosteal flap ranged from 6.5 cm x 4.0 cm to 9.0 cm x 5.0 cm; bone graft ranged from 4.5 to 9.0 cm in length. External fixation was changed to internal fixation. All flaps survived with soft texture, and no ulcer and infection occurred. All incisions healed by the first intention. All patients were followed up 18-40 months (mean, between normal and affected sides.The function of the knee an ankle joint was good without infection, malunion, and equinus. According to the Johner standard at last follow-up, the results were excellent in 15 cases, good in 3 cases, and fair in 1 case, with an excellent and good rate of 94.7%. Tibial periosteal flap pedicled with intermuscular branch of

  3. Design of canals

    CERN Document Server

    Swamee, P K

    2015-01-01

    The book presents firsthand material from the authors on design of hydraulic canals. The book discusses elements of design based on principles of hydraulic flow through canals. It covers optimization of design based on usage requirements and economic constraints. The book includes explicit design equations and design procedures along with design examples for varied cases. With its comprehensive coverage of the principles of hydraulic canal design, this book will prove useful to students, researchers, and practicing engineers. End-of-chapter pedagogical elements make it ideal for use in graduate courses on hydraulic structures offered by most civil engineering departments across the world.

  4. Comparative multicenter study of treatment of multi-fragmented tibial diaphyseal fractures with nonreamed interlocking nails and with bridging plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Hélio Jorge Alvachian; Sakaki, Marcos Hideyo; Silva, Jorge dos Santos; dos Reis, Fernando Baldy; Zumiotti, Arnaldo Valdir

    2006-08-01

    A prospective, randomized study to compare patients with closed, multi-fragmented tibial diaphyseal fractures treated using one of two fixation methods undertaken during minimally invasive surgery: nonreamed interlocking intramedullary nails or bridging plates. Forty-five patients were studied; 22 patients were treated with bridging plates, 23 with interlocking nails without reaming. All fractures were Type B and C (according to the AO classification). Clinical and radiographic healing occurred in all cases. No cases of infection occurred. The healing time for patients who received nails was longer (4.32 weeks on average) than the healing time for those who received plates (P = 0.026). No significant differences were observed between the two methods regarding ankle mobility for patients in the two groups. The healing time was shorter with the bridging plate technique, although no significant functional differences were found.

  5. Intramedullary nail fixation of non-traditional fractures: Clavicle, forearm, fibula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Niloofar; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2017-06-01

    Locked intramedullary fixation is a well-established technique for managing long-bone fractures. While intramedullary nail fixation of diaphyseal fractures in the femur, tibia, and humerus is well established, the same is not true for other fractures. Surgical fixations of clavicle, forearm and ankle are traditionally treated with plate and screw fixation. In some cases, fixation with an intramedullary device is possible, and may be advantageous. However, there is however a concern regarding a lack of rotational stability and fracture shortening. While new generation of locked intramedullary devices for fractures of clavicle, forearm and fibula are recently available, the outcomes are not as reliable as fixation with plates and screws. Further research in this area is warranted with high quality comparative studies, to investigate the outcomes and indication of these fractures treated with intramedullary nail devices compared to intramedullary nail fixation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Return to Sport After Tibial Shaft Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, Greg A. J.; Wood, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Acute tibial shaft fractures represent one of the most severe injuries in sports. Return rates and return-to-sport times after these injuries are limited, particularly with regard to the outcomes of different treatment methods. Objective: To determine the current evidence for the treatment of and return to sport after tibial shaft fractures. Data Sources: OVID/MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Collaboration Database, Web of Science, PEDro, SPORTDiscus, Scopus, and Google Sch...

  7. Revestimiento de canales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Woll

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available La maquinaria moderna alemana empleada para el revestimiento de canales de gran sección, presenta grandes ventajas de economía, rendimiento, regularidad e impermeabilidad de la construcción. Para la aplicación de esta maquinaria —inicialmente se ha procedido a la excavación del canal mediante el empleo de maquinaria ordinaria de desmonte y la maquinaria especial— comienza su trabajo con el enrase de las cotas previstas.

  8. Injury to the anterior tibial system during percutaneous plating of a proximal tibial fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Joshua L; Sciadini, Marcus F

    2012-07-01

    Minimally invasive osteosynthesis of proximal tibial fractures has grown in popularity in recent years. This article describes a patient with a Schatzker type VI proximal tibial fracture (AO/OTA type 41.C3) and previous compartment syndrome treated with definitive fixation 8 weeks after initial injury with a precontoured proximal tibial plate and a distal targeting device. Brisk bleeding occurred during percutaneous insertion of a cortical screw at the midshaft of the tibia. Surgical exploration revealed sidewall tearing of the anterior tibial artery and vein, which were clipped at the screw insertion site. After the bleeding was controlled, the patient had a strong palpable posterior tibial pulse with no palpable dorsalis pedis pulse, and the foot remained well perfused. Function of the deep peroneal nerve was normal postoperatively. Previous concerns regarding the percutaneous treatment of proximal tibial fractures have focused on the risks of damage to the superficial peroneal nerve from distal screws. Based on cadaveric studies, percutaneously and laterally based screw placement in the distal tibial metaphysis threatens injury to the anterior tibial system. However, with alterations to the normal anatomy caused by severe trauma, previously described safe zones may be changed and neurovascular structures may be exposed to risk in locations that were previously thought safe. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Primary unreamed intramedullary locked nailing in open fractures of tibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Vineet

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fractures of tibia are among the commonest fractures sustained in road traffic accidents. They are frequently open and contaminated. Unreamed nails are considered superior to external fixator in the management of open fractures of tibia. Method: Forty patients with open fractures of tibia, grade I, II, IIIa, IIIb were included in the study. They were managed by primary unreamed intramedullary nailing with adequate soft tissue management. Results: Functional results were excellent in 26 cases, good in 10 cases and fair in 4 cases. Four cases had delayed union. Average time of union was 16.9 weeks. Conclusion: Primary unreamed intramedullary nailing offers advantage of rigid fixation, low incidence of infection, non-union, good functional results and early return to work. An adequate soft tissue management is mandatory in treatment of these fractures.

  10. [Intramedullary osteosynthesis of distal metacarpal fractures with curved wires].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlageter, M; Winkel, R; Porcher, R; Haas, H G

    1997-07-01

    When intramedullary pinning is used to treat metacarpal fractures, as recently described by Förstner (1994) and Foucher (1995), the closed reduction technique developed by Jahss (1938) is applied in the same way as for conservative fracture treatment. It is not always possible to achieve complete anatomical reduction using this closed technique. The intramedullary pinning technique, that we have applied since 1989, involves a Kirschner wire which is bent at one end. Apart from reducing the fracture, the pre-set Kirschner wire serves as a butressing internal fixator. The elastic clamping of the wire acts as an internal wire spring splint, permitting early mobilisation. We have operated on 62 metacarpal fractures using the above-mentioned technique over a period of 6 years until 1995. Anatomic reduction was realized in 50 of 62 fractures. In the follow-up of 32 fractures, we noticed four complications: one infection, two paraesthesias, and one non-union.

  11. Total excision of intramedullary epidermoid cyst in one case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PU Ke

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical experience of total excision in a 14-year-old female with intramedullary epidermoid cyst was reported. The patient with L3-4 intramedullary epidermoid cyst underwent total excision through posterior median approach under microscopy. The patient was admitted for progressive strephexopodia and urinary and fecal incontinence. Preoperative imaging examination showed scoliosis, incontionous L4-S1 and abnormal signal of L3-4. Total excision and spinal remodeling were performed under intraoperative neurophysiological monitoning. Epidermoid cyst and its membrane were totally removed without aseptic meningitis after surgery, and the neurologic symptoms of the patient were gradually improved. Completely removing the membrane of epidermoid cyst is the key point to prevent recurrence and aseptic meningitis postoperatively. Dissection should be strictly in accordance with the boundaries of the membrane and the spinal cord, in order to avoid spinal cord injury.

  12. Locked intramedullary nailing in the treatment of femoral shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, K

    2000-03-30

    In treatment of femoral shaft fractures the most effective method should be chosen, one which makes rapid bone union possible and facilitates early and efficient rehabilitation. In our opinion locking intramedullary nailing fulfils these requirements. This is a technically demanding procedure that requires considerable experience on the part of the operating team. A knowledge of the physiology of fracture healing would appear to be the key to obtaining a good treatment outcome. Closed intramedullary nailing is a less invasive method of osteosynthesis because it does not require the fracture site to be opened. Familiarity with the various operative stages and good teamwork reduce operating time and X-ray exposure, and insure the best treatment outcome.

  13. Catastrophic Intramedullary Abscess Caused by a Missed Congenital Dermal Sinus

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    Dho, Yun-Sik; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Phi, Ji Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Congenital dermal sinus (CDS) is a type of occult spinal dysraphism characterized by a midline skin dimple. A 12-month-old girl presented with fever and ascending quadriparesis. She had a midline skin dimple in the upper sacral area that had been discovered in her neonatal period. Imaging studies revealed a holocord intramedullary abscess and CDS. Overlooking CDS or misdiagnosing it as benign sacrococcygeal dimple may lead to catastrophic infection and cause serious neurological deficits. The...

  14. MR imaging of intramedullary ischemia due to cervical spondylosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooms, G.; Mathurin, P.; Cornelis, G.; Hulcelle, P.

    1988-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed to assess the value of MR imaging for detecting intramedullary ischemia due to cervical spondylosis and to assess its clinical significance. One hundred consecutive unselected patients (70 men and 30 women, mean age = 62 years) were included in the study. All patients were treated surgically, either by anterior diskectomy and corporectomy or by posterior laminectomy. Clinical follow-up to 2 years was available for every patient. MR imaging was performed with a superconducting magnet (Philips Gyroscan S15) operating at 1.5T Sagittal T1-weighted (repetition time [TR] = 0.45 sec and echo time [TE] = 30 msec) and cardiac-gated T2-weighted (TR>1.2 sec and multiples TE of 50, 100 and 200 msc) imaging was performed in every patient. Cervical spondylosis was exquisitely demonstrated on MR images in every patient. With the sagittal plane, full extent and the degree of canalar stenosis were easily appreciated on T2-weighted images. A hyperintense intramedullary lesion was detected preoperatively in 24 of the patients and corresponded presumably to ischemic, edematous, and/or necrotic damage to the cord. It was usually located at the level or just below the level where the most severe canalar stenosis was demonstrated; it was identified only on T2-weighted images. In a comparison of the clinical outcome of the patients after surgery, there was a striking difference between the group of patients without and that with intramedullary lesions. In the first group, the relief of symptoms after surgery was partial or complete. In the other group, the clinical outcome was poor and symptom relief nearly absent. In conclusion, MR imaging is an exquisite modality for demonstrating necrotic intramedullary changes due to cervical spondylosis and thus may aid in determining the prognosis for surgery and clinical outcome of the patients

  15. Multiple intramedullary nailing of proximal phalangeal fractures of hand

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    Patankar Hemant

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proximal phalangeal fractures are commonly encountered fractures in the hand. Majority of them are stable and can be treated by non-operative means. However, unstable fractures i.e. those with shortening, displacement, angulation, rotational deformity or segmental fractures need surgical intervention. This prospective study was undertaken to evaluate the functional outcome after surgical stabilization of these fractures with joint-sparing multiple intramedullary nailing technique. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients with 35 isolated unstable proximal phalangeal shaft fractures of hand were managed by surgical stabilization with multiple intramedullary nailing technique. Fractures of the thumb were excluded. All the patients were followed up for a minimum of six months. They were assessed radiologically and clinically. The clinical evaluation was based on two criteria. 1. total active range of motion for digital functional assessment as suggested by the American Society for Surgery of Hand and 2. grip strength. Results: All the patients showed radiological union at six weeks. The overall results were excellent in all the patients. Adventitious bursitis was observed at the point of insertion of nails in one patient. Conclusion: Joint-sparing multiple intramedullary nailing of unstable proximal phalangeal fractures of hand provides satisfactory results with good functional outcome and fewer complications.

  16. Surgical intervention for a pediatric isolated intramedullary spinal aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozumi, Masayoshi; Imagama, Shiro; Ando, Kei; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Tsushima, Mikito; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Machino, Masaaki; Ota, Kyotaro; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-08-07

    To report the case of a pediatric patient with intramedullary spinal aneurysm. A 9-year-old boy presented with low back pain and subsequent gait disturbance. He had no history of trauma. After admission, MRI revealed an intramedullary spinal cord mass lesion surrounded by hemorrhage at the cervical-thoracic junction. Initial treatment was started with intravenous methylprednisolone and bed rest. Neurological deficit disappeared under careful observation for a few months. Surgical intervention was applied for diagnosis and resection of the mass lesion to prevent recurrent hemorrhage. Intraoperative ultrasound sonography helped to diagnose the lesion as a spinal cord aneurysm, prior to midline myelotomy. Monitoring of transcranial muscle evoked potentials helped to avoid spinal cord damage during surgery. There has been no evidence of spinal aneurysm on MRI for 3 years after surgery and no neurological deterioration. To our knowledge, this is a first report of an intramedullary spinal cord aneurysm at the cervical-thoracic junction in a pediatric patient. Careful observation after initial symptoms followed by surgical intervention was favorable in this case.

  17. Intramedullary arachnoid cyst in association with cervical spondylosis: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimizadeh, Abolfazl; Soufiani, Housain

    2013-10-01

    Intramedullary spinal arachnoid cysts are considered to be very rare, and only 11 cases have been reported previously. Development of such a cyst in association with marked cervical spondylosis has not been reported until recently. Brief review of reported cases and debate on likely treatment strategy when such a cyst is associated with symptomatic spondylosis. To report the first example of a cervicothoracic intramedullary arachnoid cyst along with a symptomatic cervical spondylosis. Evaluation of quadriparesis in a 58-year-old female resulted in detection of a cervical spondylotic stenosis that was accompanied with an intramedullary cystic lesion. Parallel management of both pathologies was through a wide laminectomy extending from the lower edge of C3 to T2 with subsequent fenestration and partial resection of the cyst wall via an appropriate dorsal entry root zone myelotomy. Cervicothoracic instrumentation from C3 down to T2 was done to prevent postlaminectomy deformity. Histopathological findings were consistent with the diagnosis of arachnoid cyst. Postoperatively, the patient exhibited marked improvement in neurologic status. Through the review of the current case, first example from the literature, we concluded that surgery should target toward the proper management of both pathologies in a single-stage operation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Surgical stabilization for open tibial fractures in children: External fixation or elastic stable intramedullary nail - which method is optimal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan A Ramasubbu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: There is no conclusive evidence or best practice guidelines for their management. Thus, as is highlighted in this study, more research is needed to determine the optimum treatment strategy for this common pediatric injury. The existing literature is of poor quality; consisting mainly of retrospective reviews of patients' medical records, charts, and radiographs. Carefully designed, high-quality prospective cohort studies utilizing a nationalized multi-hospital approach are needed to improve understanding before protocols and guidelines can be developed and implemented.

  19. Anatomic single-bundle ACL surgery: consequences of tibial tunnel diameter and drill-guide angle on tibial footprint coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Bracht, H; Verhelst, L; Stuyts, B; Page, B; Bellemans, J; Verdonk, P

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the consequences of differences in drill-guide angle and tibial tunnel diameter on the amount of tibial anatomical anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) footprint coverage and the risk of overhang of the tibial tunnel aperture over the edges of the native tibial ACL footprint. Twenty fresh-frozen adult human knee specimens with a median age of 46 years were used for this study. Digital templates mimicking the ellipsoid aperture of tibial tunnels with a different drill-guide angle and a different diameter were designed. The centres of these templates were positioned over the geometric centre of the tibial ACL footprint. The amount of tibial ACL footprint coverage and overhang was calculated. Risk factors for overhang were determined. Footprint coverage and the risk of overhang were also compared between a lateral tibial tunnel and a classic antero-medial tibial tunnel. A larger tibial tunnel diameter and a smaller drill-guide angle both will create significant more footprint coverage and overhang. In 45% of the knees, an overhang was created with a 10-mm diameter tibial tunnel with drill-guide angle 45°. Furthermore, a lateral tibial tunnel was found not to be at increased risk of overhang. A larger tibial tunnel diameter and a smaller drill-guide angle both will increase the amount of footprint coverage. Inversely, larger tibial tunnel diameters and smaller drill-guide angles will increase the risk of overhang of the tibial tunnel aperture over the edges of the native tibial ACL footprint. A lateral tibial tunnel does not increase the risk of overhang.

  20. Rapid-onset paraparesis and quadriparesis in patients with intramedullary spinal dermoid cysts: report of 10 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girishan, Shabari; Rajshekhar, Vedantam

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Intramedullary dermoid cysts are rare tumors of the spinal cord. Presentation with rapid onset of paraparesis or quadriparesis (onset within 2 weeks) is rarer still. The authors present their experience in the management and outcome of patients with such a presentation. METHODS Patient records between 2000 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed to identify those with intraspinal dermoid cysts who presented with rapid-onset paraparesis or quadriparesis. Their clinical, radiological, operative, and follow-up data were analyzed. RESULTS Of a total of 50 patients with intraspinal dermoid cysts managed during the study period, 10 (20%) presented with rapid-onset paraparesis or quadriparesis; 9 patients ranged in age from 8 months to 2 years, and 1 patient was 25 years old. A dermal sinus was seen in the lumbar region of 4 patients, the sacral region of 3, and the thoracic region of 1, and in 1 patient no sinus was found. All except 1 patient presented with rapid-onset paraparesis secondary to infection of the intramedullary dermoid cyst. One patient presented with rupture of a dermoid cyst with extension into the central canal up to the medulla. Early surgery was done soon after presentation in all except 2 patients. Among the 9 patients who underwent surgery (1 patient did not undergo surgery), total excision of the intramedullary dermoid cyst was done in 3 patients, near-total excision in 4 patients, and partial excision in 2 patients. Of the 9 patients who underwent surgery, 8 showed significant improvement in their neurological status, and 1 patient remained stable. The 1 patient who did not undergo surgery died as a result of an uncontrolled infection after being discharged to a local facility for management of wound infection. CONCLUSIONS Early recognition of a dermal sinus and the associated intraspinal dermoid cyst and timely surgical intervention can eliminate the chances of acute deterioration of neurological function. Even after an acute onset of

  1. A cadaver model evaluating femoral intramedullary reaming: a comparison between new reamer design (Pressure Sentinel) and a novel suction/irrigation reamer (RIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goplen, Gordon; Wilson, Janie Astephen; McAffrey, Michael; Deluzio, Kevin; Leighton, Ross

    2010-11-01

    To compare the intramedullary pressures developed during reaming of cadaveric femurs with the Synthes Reamer/Irrigator/Aspirator (RIA) reamer and the Zimmer Pressure Sentinel (PS) reamer, controlling for the force and speed of reaming. Fifteen matched pairs of frozen unpreserved femurs were used in the study. Two pressure transducers and two thermocouples were screwed into holes drilled into the femoral shaft. The femurs were stabilized in the vertical position by mechanically attaching them to a custom jig equipped with a load cell to detect the vertical component of force applied to the reamer. Proximally a linear voltage displacement transducer (LVDT) was attached to the reamer to record the continuous position of the reamer. All femurs were reamed to a diameter 2 mm larger than the narrowest point of the canal. Proximal and distal pressures, proximal and distal temperatures, applied vertical force and displacement were measured continuously throughout the reaming process. Maximum and minimum, and average proximal and distal pressures for each reamer were obtained and compared using paired t-tests. Averages were also calculated and compared in the same manner. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. The maximum, minimum and average intramedullary pressures during reaming were significantly lower with the RIA system than the PS reamer. In general, the pressures produced by the RIA system were consistently below atmospheric pressure for the majority of the reaming time. This was not true for the PS system. No appreciable temperature changes were observed during any of the trials. The RIA reaming system significantly reduces the intramedullary pressures produced during the reaming process compared to the PS reaming system. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Operative Versus Conservative Management of Displaced Tibial Shaft Fracture in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Matthew C; Nagle, David; Bastrom, Tracey; Linn, Michael S; Schwartz, Alexandra K; Pennock, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    Displaced tibial shaft fractures are common in adolescent patients, yet there is no standardized management strategy. We compared surgical fixation and closed reduction and casting (CRC) of these fractures to assess treatment outcomes and determine predictors of failure. We retrospectively reviewed all patients aged 12 to 18 who presented with a displaced tibial shaft fracture that required reduction over an 8-year period. Exclusion criteria included open fractures and lack of follow-up to radiographic union or to 6 months from the index procedure. Fractures were initially treated based on surgeon preference either with CRC or with immediate intramedullary nailing. Seventy-four patients met inclusion criteria: 57 were initially managed with CRC and 17 with operative fixation. Radiographic healing was defined as bridging of 3 cortices and adequacy of final alignment was defined as 20% (odds ratio=7.8, Palignment (92.5% vs. 72.4%, P=0.10) but required longer hospitalization (5.4 vs. 1.9 d, P<0.001) and had a higher incidence of anterior knee pain (20% vs. 0%, P<0.01). There was no significant difference between groups with respect to time to healing. Treatment outcomes between initial operative fixation and closed reduction of displaced tibia fractures in adolescents are similar, but patients must be counseled about the high failure rates with CRC. Predictors of CRC failure include initial fracture displacement and the presence of a fibula fracture-these variables should be considered when selecting a treatment method. Level III-Therapeutic study.

  3. Osteochondritis of the Distal Tibial Epiphysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firass EL Hajj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteochondritis of the distal tibial epiphysis is a very rare entity. 9 cases have been described in 7 articles and 8 other cases have been mentioned in textbooks. This paper describes the 10th case of osteochondritis of the distal tibial epiphysis and summarizes the clinical and radiological presentations of the 9 other cases. The etiology of this entity is well debated in the literature. We believe that it results from a vascular abnormality in the distal tibial epiphysis associated with a mechanical stress (trauma, excessive overload, etc.. Since it is a self-limited disease, the prognosis is good and the younger the patient is the better the prognosis will be. In general, this entity responds well to conservative treatment.

  4. Tibial Stress Injuries: Decisive Diagnosis and Treatment of "Shin Splints."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Christopher J.; Karlson, Kristine A.

    2002-01-01

    Tibial stress injuries, commonly called shin splints, often result when bone remodeling processes adopt inadequately to repetitive stress. Physicians who are caring for athletic patients must have a thorough understanding of this continuum of injuries, including medial tibial stress syndrome and tibial stress fractures, because there are…

  5. New Technique: A Novel Femoral Derotation Osteotomy for Malrotation following Intramedullary Nailing

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    S. Jagernauth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 19-year-old female patient sustained a closed spiral midshaft femoral fracture and subsequently underwent femoral intramedullary nail insertion. At followup she complained of difficulty in walking and was found to have a unilateral in-toeing gait. CT imaging revealed 30 degrees of internal rotation at the fracture site, which had healed. A circumferential osteotomy was performed distal to the united fracture site using a Gigli saw with the intramedullary femoral nail in situ. The static distal interlocking screws were removed and the malrotation was corrected. Two further static distal interlocking screws were inserted to secure the intramedullary nail in position. The osteotomy went on to union and her symptoms of pain, walking difficulty, and in-toeing resolved. Our paper is the first to describe a technique for derotation osteotomy following intramedullary malreduction that leaves the intramedullary nail in situ.

  6. Nutrient canal of the fibula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joo-Hyuk; Ehara, Shigeru; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu [Departments of Radiology, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Morioka (Japan); Horiguchi, Masahura [Department of Anatomy I, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Morioka (Japan)

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the radiological features of the nutrient canal in the fibula.Design and patients. One hundred and seventy-nine dried fibulae were studied regarding the type, number, location, and direction of the nutrient canal. They were classified into a usual type (type I: a radiolucent line confined to the cortex) and an atypical type (type II: a radiolucent line extending beyond the cortex).Results. Among the total of 230 nutrient canals seen on radiography, 197 (86%) were type I and 33 (14%) were type II. On CT scans, the ossified rim of the canal extended into the medullary cavity in type II canals. The most common site was the posteromedial aspect in both type I and type II canals. Type II canals were significantly more common in fibulae with two or three nutrient canals. The frequency of the upward direction was more common in type II canals.Conclusion. Nutrient canals with extension of the ossified rim into the medullary canal are the cause of linear lucency that may simulate a fracture. Their features are slightly different from those of usual canals. (orig.)

  7. Comparison of the operation of arthroscopic tibial inlay and traditional tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Daifeng; Xiao, Mochao; Lian, Yongyun; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To perform dual-bundle reconstruction of posterior cruciate ligament using full arthroscopic tibial inlay technology with self-designed tibia tunnel drilling system and to compare the effect of arthroscopic tibial inlay versus traditional technique for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Material and methods: 32 patients were randomly divided into experiment group (improved tibial inlay, n = 17) and control group (traditional tibial inlay, n = 15). Self-designed tibia tunne...

  8. Tibial and fibular developmental fields defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, N.J.; Haddad, M.C.; Hourani, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    Malformations of the lower limbs are rare and heterogeneous anomalies. To explain the diversity and complexity of these abnormalities, authors introduced the concept of tibial and fibular developmental fields. Defects in these fields are responsible for different malformations, which have been described, to our knowledge, in only one report in the radiology literature. We present a case of a newborn with femoral bifurcation, absent fibulae and talar bones, ankle and foot malformations, and associated atrial septal defect. Our case is an example of defects in both fibular and tibial developmental fields. (orig.)

  9. Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If you have lumbar spinal canal stenosis, your treatment will depend on how bad your symptoms are. If your pain is mild and you haven’t had it long, you can try an exercise program or a physical therapy program. This can strengthen your back muscles and ...

  10. Bilateral bifid mandibular canal

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikhi, Mahnaz; Badrian, Hamid; Ghorbanizadeh, Sajad

    2012-01-01

    One of the normal interesting variations that we may encounter in the mandible is bifid mandibular canal. This condition can lead to difficulties when performing mandibular anesthesia or during extraction of lower third molar, placement of implants, and surgery in the mandible. Therefore diagnosis of this variation is sometimes very important and necessary.

  11. Bilateral bifid mandibular canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Sheikhi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the normal interesting variations that we may encounter in the mandible is bifid mandibular canal. This condition can lead to difficulties when performing mandibular anesthesia or during extraction of lower third molar, placement of implants, and surgery in the mandible. Therefore diagnosis of this variation is sometimes very important and necessary.

  12. Comparative study between biologic plating and intramedullary nailing for the treatment of subtrochanteric fractures: Is biologic plating using LCP-DF superior to intramedullary nailing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Won Chul; Moon, Nam Hoon; Jang, Jae Hoon; Lee, Hee Jin; Suh, Kuen Tak

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the outcome measures of subtrochanteric fractures between biologic plating and intramedullary nailing and determine if biologic plating is superior to intramedullary nailing. Between March 2009 and December 2015, 81 patients with subtrochanteric fractures were enrolled (52 males and 29 females; 31 treated with biologic plating and 50 with intramedullary nailing). Biologic plating was conducted consecutively between May 2011 and March 2013 and intramedullary nailing was performed for the rest of period. Perioperative outcomes including operation time and blood loss during the operation; postoperative radiologic outcomes including union, time to union, coronal alignment, and shortening of the femur; and clinical outcomes including walking ability and pain were evaluated. The biologic plating group was compared with the intramedullary nailing group as a historical control. No significant differences were identified for bony union and time to union between the two different fixation methods Coronal alignment was significantly better in the biologic plating group than in the intramedullary nailing group (pbiologic plating for the treatment of subtrochanteric fractures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Intramedullary stabilisation of metastatic fractures of long bones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatek, S; Westphal, T; Bischoff, J; Schubert, S; Holmenschlager, F; Winckler, S

    2003-02-01

    Surgical treatment of metastatic fractures of long bones is mostly a palliative one. Intramedullary stabilisation without resection of metastases follows the aim of the palliative therapy concept. From 01.01.1995 to 30.08.2001 36 manifest and 4 impending long bone fractures were registered in 22 female and 16 male patients, with a mean age of 63 years. In addition, one revision was necessary due to persisting instability after humeral intramedullary bundle nailing. Pathological fractures were found in the humerus (n=11), femoral neck (n=6), per- and subtrochanteric region (n=12), femoral shaft (n=10) and tibia (n=2). Most of them were malignancies of the kidneys (n=13), bronchi (n=7) and breast (n=6). One patient with a solitary metastasis in the humerus received curative treatment by resection, open reduction and internal fixation. All other cases underwent palliative stabilisation. Metastatic lesions of the femoral neck were treated by resection and prosthetic replacement. The remaining fractures were stabilized intramedullarily without resection of metastases or use of bone cement. In 9 cases, a locking nail was implanted in the humerus, and one patient received humeral bundle nailing. In the lower extremities, we used a classic-nail or gamma-nail in 15 and a locking nail in 8 cases. Two moribund patients did not undergo surgery. No intraoperative complications occurred. 63 % of the patients with stabilisation of the leg were able to walk at the time of discharge. The mean survival time (Kaplan-Meier) of patients after palliative operation amounted to 161.5 days (95 % CI 92.7; 230.3). We found 6 postoperative complications: temporary palsy of the radial nerve (n=1), soft tissue infection (n=1), dislocation of the nail (n=2), loosening of the distal locking screw (n=1), proceeding osteolysis with high fracture risk (n=1). Intramedullary stabilisation without resection of metastases using locking nails meets the requirements of palliative therapy. This procedure

  14. Reamed intramedullary nailing of the femur: 551 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinsky, P R; McCarty, E; Shyr, Y; Johnson, K

    1999-03-01

    The care of the patient with the fractured femur entails a multiple surgical team approach. Healing of the fracture and expediency in the operating room are both important. We sought to determine the results of the treatment of fractures of the femoral shaft with interlocking femoral nails inserted with closed techniques, and to compare the outcomes of fractures nailed by using a fracture table with those stabilized with the leg draped free on a radiolucent table. Eight hundred eighty-two consecutive patients with fractures of the femoral shaft treated with a first-generation intramedullary nail at the authors' institution during the years 1986 to 1996 were identified. Five hundred fifty-one fractures in 515 patients met the inclusion criteria. Treatment with an intramedullary nail led to a union rate of 98.9%. There were six infections, all occurring in closed fractures. Thirty-eight percent of the fractures had hardware removed, most commonly because of pain. One nail and 13 locking bolts broke. Four hundred eighteen fractures had adequate radiographs available to assess fracture alignment. No fracture healed with more than 10 degrees of angulation in either plane. Forty-four fractures healed with more than 5 degrees of angulation. A distal third fracture was found to be associated with an increased incidence of malalignment. There were no differences in outcomes between fractures stabilized with or without a fracture table. Reamed intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures results in a low rate of nonunion, malunion, infection, and hardware failure. There is no difference in the outcomes of fractures treated with and without the use of a fracture table. This is particularly useful in the patient with multiple injuries for whom transfer to a fracture table may not be time effective.

  15. Free-hand versus novel specialised jig guidance for the passing of intramedullary wires in olecranon fracture fixation: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molony, Diarmuid C; Kennedy, Jim; Gheiti, Adrian; Mullett, J Hannan

    2011-04-01

    The treatment of olecranon fractures frequently involves the use of tension-band fixation. Although associated with high union rates, this method has a high incidence of morbidity associated with soft tissue compromise and limitation of range of movement requiring frequent re-operation for removal of metal. We describe the use of a simple jig to ensure intramedullary placement of longitudinal K-wires and compare the accuracy of placement of Kirschner (K)-wires using this device with the traditional free-hand method. We found the distance from the centre of the medullary canal, the range and standard deviations of K-wire positions to be significantly more precise when the jig was used. This has applications for the use of the device, both with standard metallic radio-opaque wires and potentially with bio-absorbable pins. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Locally administrated perindopril improves healing in an ovariectomized rat tibial osteotomy model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Zhao

    Full Text Available Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are widely prescribed to regulate blood pressure. High doses of orally administered perindopril have previously been shown to improve fracture healing in a mouse femur fracture model. In this study, perindopril was administered directly to the fracture area with the goal of stimulating fracture repair. Three months after being ovariectomized (OVX, tibial fractures were produced in Sprague-Dawley rats and subsequently stabilized with intramedullary wires. Perindopril (0.4 mg/kg/day was injected locally at the fractured site for a treatment period of 7 days. Vehicle reagent was used as a control. Callus quality was evaluated at 2 and 4 weeks post-fracture. Compared with the vehicle group, perindopril treatment significantly increased bone formation, increased biomechanical strength, and improved microstructural parameters of the callus. Newly woven bone was arranged more tightly and regularly at 4 weeks post-fracture. The ultimate load increased by 66.1 and 76.9% (p<0.01, and the bone volume over total volume (BV/TV increased by 29.9% and 24.3% (p<0.01 at 2 and 4 weeks post-fracture, respectively. These findings suggest that local treatment with perindopril could promote fracture healing in ovariectomized rats.

  17. Anterior tibial curved cortex is a reliable landmark for tibial rotational alignment in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joong Il; Jang, Jak; Lee, Ki Woong; Han, Hyuk Soo; Lee, Sahnghoon; Lee, Myung Chul

    2017-06-12

    Rotational alignment of the tibial component is important for long-term success of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This study aimed to compare five axes in normal and osteoarthritic (OA) knees to determine a reliable landmark for tibial rotational alignment in TKA. One hundred twenty patients with OA knees and 40 with normal knees were included. The angle between a line perpendicular to the surgical transepicondylar axis and each of five axes were measured on preoperative computed tomography. The five axes were as follows: a line from the center of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) to the medial border of the patellar tendon (PCL-PT), medial border of the tibial tuberosity (PCL-TT1), medial one-third of the tibial tuberosity (PCL-TT2), and apex of the tibial tuberosity (PCL-TT3), as well as the anteroposterior axis of the tibial prosthesis along the anterior tibial curved cortex (ATCC). For all five axes tested, the mean angles were smaller in OA knees than in normal knees. In normal knees, the angle of the ATCC axis had the smallest mean value and narrowest range (1.6° ± 2.8°; range, -1.7°-7.7°). In OA knees, the mean angle of the ATCC axis (0.8° ± 2.7°; range, -7.9°-9.2°) was larger than that of the PCL-TT1 axis (0.3° ± 5.5°; range, -19.7°-10.6°) (P = 0.461), while the angle of the ATCC axis had the smallest SD and narrowest range. The ATCC was found to be the most reliable and useful anatomical landmark for tibial rotational alignment in TKA.

  18. Catastrophic intramedullary abscess caused by a missed congenital dermal sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dho, Yun-Sik; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Phi, Ji Hoon

    2015-03-01

    Congenital dermal sinus (CDS) is a type of occult spinal dysraphism characterized by a midline skin dimple. A 12-month-old girl presented with fever and ascending quadriparesis. She had a midline skin dimple in the upper sacral area that had been discovered in her neonatal period. Imaging studies revealed a holocord intramedullary abscess and CDS. Overlooking CDS or misdiagnosing it as benign sacrococcygeal dimple may lead to catastrophic infection and cause serious neurological deficits. Therefore, further imaging work-up or consultation with a pediatric neurosurgeon is recommended following discovery of any atypical-looking dimples in the midline.

  19. A posterior tibial tendon skipping rope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sterkenburg, M. N.; Haverkamp, D.; van Dijk, C. N.; Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents an athletic patient with swelling and progressive pain on the posteromedial side of his right ankle on weight bearing. MRI demonstrated tenosynovitis and suspicion of a length rupture. On posterior tibial tendoscopy, there was no rupture, but medial from the tendon a tissue cord

  20. Efficacy and safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2/calcium phosphate matrix for closed tibial diaphyseal fracture: a double-blind, randomized, controlled phase-II/III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Thomas; Scheele, Wim; Bhandari, Mohit; Koval, Kenneth J; Sanchez, Eduardo Gomez; Christensen, Jared; Valentin, Alexandre; Huard, Francois

    2013-12-04

    Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) applied on an absorbable collagen sponge improves open tibial fracture-healing as an adjunct to unreamed intramedullary nail fixation. We evaluated rhBMP-2 and a new, injectable calcium phosphate matrix (CPM) formulation in acute closed tibial diaphyseal fractures treated with reamed intramedullary nail fixation. Patients were randomized (1:2:2:1) to receive standard of care, which consisted of definitive fracture fixation within seventy-two hours of injury with a locked intramedullary nail after reaming; standard of care and injection with 1.0 mg/mL of rhBMP-2/CPM; standard of care and injection with 2.0 mg/mL of rhBMP-2/CPM; or standard of care and injection with buffer/CPM, to evaluate the activity of the CPM delivery matrix and provide for sponsor and investigator blinding. The co-primary end points of the study were the effects of rhBMP-2/CPM on the time to fracture union (based on blinded assessment of radiographs) and the time to return to normal function (based on blinded assessment of the time to full weight-bearing without pain at the fracture site) compared with standard of care alone. Three hundred and sixty-nine patients were randomized and included in the intent-to-treat population. This study was terminated after an interim analysis (180 patients with six months of follow-up) revealed no shortening in the time to fracture union in the active treatment arms compared with the standard of care control (the SOC group). In the final primary analysis, the median time to radiographic fracture union was not significantly different for the SOC (13.1 weeks), 1.0-mg/mL rhBMP-2/CPM (13.0 weeks), 2.0-mg/mL rhBMP-2/CPM (15.9 weeks), or buffer/CPM (15.4 weeks) treatment groups. The median time to pain-free full weight-bearing was also not significantly different among the SOC (13.4 weeks), 1.0-mg/mL rhBMP-2/CPM (13.4 weeks), 2.0-mg/mL rhBMP-2/CPM (14.3 weeks), and buffer/CPM (16.4 weeks) treatment groups. In

  1. SUPRAPATELLAR VERSUS INFRAPATELLAR TIBIAL NAIL INSERTION- A PROSPECTIVE, RANDOMISED CONTROL PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreekumar K

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The standard for treating tibial shaft fractures are by intramedullary nails currently. After the procedure, one of the most frequent complication is knee pain, after consolidation even more chronically. Chronic knee pain can affect more than 50% of the cases, which was said by most authors. Alternative routes of inserting the nail is used, which includes by means of lateral patellar paratendon, medial patellar paratendon or transtendon to avoid the symptom. The aim of the study is to study the clinical and functional outcomes of suprapatellar versus infrapatellar tibial nail insertion. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a prospective study, which was done from January 2014 to February 2015 and 50 patients who were skeletally mature were selected and randomised into IP and SP nail insertion groups. They were also given informed consent and only after they agreed, they were taken into the study. The technique of nail insertion was revealed to both the surgeon and the patient at that time. Exclusion Criteria- Pregnant women, patients with intra-articular involvement, periprosthetic fractures, nonunions, ipsilateral injuries, previous knee injuries, history of gout, rheumatoid, osteoarthritis, spinal injury and incarceration. SP insertion was performed percutaneously with the help of a special cannula system. RESULTS A total of 50 patients were selected in this study. 31 SP and 19 IP. 10 SP and 2 IP did not show up for follow up examinations, so only 38 patients were present for 12 months. At last, there were 21 SP and 17 IP patients. The time from when the index procedure was done to follow up was 14.6 months, i.e. it ranged from 12-28 months. 12 were males and 9 were females with suprapatellar, 9 were males and 8 were females in infrapatellar. Average age of suprapatellar was 42 and that of infrapatellar was 44. Open fractures were 5 and closed fractures were 33. VAS score was 0.78 in suprapatellar and 1.87 in infrapatellar. Data analysis

  2. Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from colonic carcinoma presenting as Brown-Sequard syndrome: a case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kaballo, Mohammed A

    2011-08-02

    Abstract Introduction Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis is very rare. The majority are discovered incidentally during autopsy. Most symptomatic patients present with rapidly progressive neurological deficits and require immediate examination. Few patients demonstrate features of Brown-Séquard syndrome. Radiotherapy is the gold-standard of therapy for Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis. The overall prognosis is poor and the mortality rate is very high. We present what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis of colorectal carcinoma presenting as Brown-Séquard syndrome. Case presentation We present the case of a 71-year-old Caucasian man with colonic adenocarcinoma who developed Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis and showed features of Brown-Séquard syndrome, which is an uncommon presentation of Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis. Conclusion This patient had an Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis, a rare form of metastatic disease, secondary to colonic carcinoma. The metastasis manifested clinically as Brown-Séquard syndrome, itself a very uncommon condition. This syndrome is rarely caused by intramedullary tumors. This unique case has particular interest in medicine, especially for the specialties of medical, surgical and radiation oncology. We hope that it will add more information to the literature about these entities.

  3. Kinematically aligned total knee arthroplasty limits high tibial forces, differences in tibial forces between compartments, and abnormal tibial contact kinematics during passive flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Joshua D; Howell, Stephen M; Hull, Maury L

    2017-09-07

    Following total knee arthroplasty (TKA), high tibial forces, large differences in tibial forces between the medial and lateral compartments, and anterior translation of the contact locations of the femoral component on the tibial component during passive flexion indicate abnormal knee function. Because the goal of kinematically aligned TKA is to restore native knee function without soft tissue release, the objectives were to determine how well kinematically aligned TKA limits high tibial forces, differences in tibial forces between compartments, and anterior translation of the contact locations of the femoral component on the tibial component during passive flexion. Using cruciate retaining components, kinematically aligned TKA was performed on thirteen human cadaveric knee specimens with use of manual instruments without soft tissue release. The tibial forces and tibial contact locations were measured in both the medial and lateral compartments from 0° to 120° of passive flexion using a custom tibial force sensor. The average total tibial force (i.e. sum of medial + lateral) ranged from 5 to 116 N. The only significant average differences in tibial force between compartments occurred at 0° of flexion (29 N, p = 0.0008). The contact locations in both compartments translated posteriorly in all thirteen kinematically aligned TKAs by an average of 14 mm (p forces due to the soft tissue restraints were limited to 116 N, average differences in tibial forces between compartments were limited to 29 N, and a net posterior translation of the tibial contact locations was observed in all kinematically aligned TKAs during passive flexion from 0° to 120°, which are similar to what has been measured previously in native knees. While confirmation in vivo is warranted, these findings give surgeons who perform kinematically aligned TKA confidence that the alignment method and surgical technique limit high tibial forces, differences in tibial forces between

  4. Continuous Adductor Canal Blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monahan, Amanda M; Sztain, Jacklynn F; Khatibi, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It remains unknown whether continuous or scheduled intermittent bolus local anesthetic administration is preferable for adductor canal perineural catheters. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that scheduled bolus administration is superior or noninferior to a continuous infusion...... on cutaneous knee sensation in volunteers. METHODS: Bilateral adductor canal catheters were inserted in 24 volunteers followed by ropivacaine 0.2% administration for 8 hours. One limb of each subject was assigned randomly to a continuous infusion (8 mL/h) or automated hourly boluses (8 m...... tolerance of electrical current and quadriceps femoris maximum voluntary isometric contraction strength at baseline, hourly for 14 hours, and again after 22 hours. RESULTS: The 2 administration techniques provided equivalent cutaneous analgesia at 8 hours because noninferiority was found in both directions...

  5. Managing curved canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iram Ansari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dilaceration is the result of a developmental anomaly in which there has been an abrupt change in the axial inclination between the crown and the root of a tooth. Dilaceration can be seen in both the permanent and deciduous dentitions, and is more commonly found in posterior teeth and in maxilla. Periapical radiographs are the most appropriate way to diagnose the presence of root dilacerations. The controlled regularly tapered preparation of the curved canals is the ultimate challenge in endodontics. Careful and meticulous technique will yield a safe and sufficient enlargement of the curved canals. This article gives a review of the literature and three interesting case reports of root dilacerations.

  6. Primary intramedullary spinal cord tumour in pregnancy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Kyoko; Orisaka, Makoto; Yamamoto, Makoto; Nishijima, Koji; Yoshida, Yoshio

    2018-01-01

    Primary spinal cord tumours can lead to severe neurological complications and even death. Pregnant women often complain of discomfort of the lower limbs, which is usually caused by sciatica. Here we present the case of a pregnant woman, who was initially considered to have sciatica, but was finally diagnosed with a primary intramedullary spinal cord tumour. A 28-year-old pregnant woman presented to our hospital with inexplicable numbness in her lower limbs. She was initially considered to have sciatica, but acute deterioration of neurological symptoms and plain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings suggested malignancy. The patient was finally diagnosed with a primary intramedullary spinal cord tumour at the C3-Th5 region. An emergency caesarean section was performed, after which the spinal cord lesion was evaluated using contrast-enhanced MRI, positron emission tomography with 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-d-glucose integrated with computed tomography, and spinal angiography, and further treatment was initiated. However, while the patient's spinal cord tumour surgery was performed in early postpartum, her paraplegia and bladder and rectal disturbances remained unchanged even 1 year after surgery. Because of the low incidence of spinal cord tumours during pregnancy, no definite reports have been published on the treatment of pregnant patients with spinal cord tumours. Although safe imaging tests during pregnancy are limited, intervention in such patients should be performed as early as possible to avoid irreversible neurological deterioration.

  7. Distal femoral complications following antegrade intramedullary nail placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J. Fantry

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available While antegrade nailing for proximal and diaphyseal femur fractures is a commonly utilized fixation method with benefits including early mobilization and high rates of fracture union, both intraoperative and postoperative complications may occur. Intraoperative errors include leg length discrepancy, anterior cortical perforation, malreduction of the fracture, and neurovascular injury, and postoperative complications include nonunion, malunion, infection, and hardware failure. This case series reviews complications affecting the distal femur after intramedullary nailing including fracture surrounding a distal femoral interlocking screw (Case #1, nonunion after dynamization with nail penetration into the knee joint (Case #2, and anterior cortical perforation (Case #3. Prevention of intraoperative and postoperative complications surrounding intramedullary nailing requires careful study of the femoral anatomy and nail design specifications (radius of curvature, consideration of the necessity of distal interlocking screws, the need for close radiographic follow-up after nail placement with X-rays of the entire length of the nail, and awareness of possible nail penetration into the knee joint after dynamization.

  8. Semiextended position of intramedullary nailing of the proximal tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornetta, P; Collins, E

    1996-07-01

    Over a 24 month period, 30 patients with proximal tibia fractures who were reviewed consecutively were treated by nonreamed, statically locked, intramedullary nailing. There were 16 open, 13 segmental, and 7 comminuted fractures (Winquist III, IV). The average distance from the fracture to the proximal locking screws was 24 mm (range, 0-65 mm). All procedures were performed while the patient's affected leg was on a radiolucent table without traction. The last 25 fractures were nailed using a partial (2/3) medial parapatellar incision while the leg was semiextended. This approach allowed the patella to be subluxed laterally availing the trochlear groove for use as a conduit for nail placement. Using only 15 degrees knee flexion eliminated the extension force of the quadriceps on the proximal fragment, which otherwise would have tended to cause anterior angulation at the fracture site. In the first 5 patients, the average anterior angulation was 8 degrees (range, 5 degrees-15 degrees). Of the 25 patients who were treated while in the semiextended position, none had more than 5 degrees anterior angulation and 19 had no anterior angulation. Fractures of 3 of the 25 patients had greater than 5 degrees angulation in the coronal plane, 2 of which were nailed in the semiextended position. This technique greatly facilitates intramedullary nailing of proximal tibia fractures.

  9. Undetected iatrogenic lesions of the anterior femoral shaft during intramedullary nailing: a cadaveric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepherd Lane

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of undetected radiographically iatrogenic longitudinal splitting in the anterior cortex during intramedullary nailing of the femur has not been well documented. Methods Cadaveric study using nine pairs of fresh-frozen femora from adult cadavers. The nine pairs of femora underwent a standardized antegrade intramedullary nailing and the detection of iatrogenic lesions, if any, was performed macroscopically and by radiographic control. Results Longitudinal splitting in the anterior cortex was revealed in 5 of 18 cadaver femora macroscopically. Anterior splitting was not detectable in radiographic control. Conclusion Longitudinal splitting in the anterior cortex during intramedullary nailing of the femur cannot be detected radiographically.

  10. Dorsal intramedullary spinal epidermoid cysts: Report of two cases and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cincu Rafael

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramedullary epidermoid cysts of the spinal cord are rare tumors, especially those not associated with spinal dysraphism. About 50 cases have been reported in the literature. Of these, only seven cases have had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI studies. We report two cases of spinal intramedullary epidermoid cysts with MR imaging. Both were not associated with spina bifida. In one patient, the tumor was located at D4 vertebral level; while in the other, within the conus medullaris. The clinical features, MRI characteristics and surgical treatment of intramedullary epidermoid cyst are presented with relevant review of the literature.

  11. No difference in the long term final functional outcome after nailing or cast bracing of high energy displaced tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batta, Vineet; Dwyer, Amitabh J; Gulati, Aashish; Prakash, Jeevan; Mam, Maharaj K; John, Bobby

    2012-06-13

    Cast bracing (CB) has been a well established method of treating tibial shaft fractures. Majority of the recent literature on treatment of tibial shaft fractures have upheld intramedullary nailing (IMN) as the treatment of choice. Most of these studies are from the west, in public funded health set ups and in hospitals with very low rates of infection. This has lead to bewilderment in the minds of surgeons wishing to opt for conservative treatment in countries with scarcity of health resources. We therefore undertook this study to compare the two modalities in the scenario of the developing world. Sixty-eight consecutive patients were treated alternately with CB and IMN for high energy, displaced, closed and Gustilo Grade 1 open fractures of the tibial shaft, between 1995 and 2001. An average follow up at 4.3 years revealed no statistical difference in the final functional outcome as per Johner and Wruhs' criteria with modification to Indian lifestyle. IMN group had a) slightly shorter time to fracture union (mean 21.3 weeks versus 23.1 weeks for CB, p > 0.05), (b) lesser time off work (mean 17.6 weeks versus 25.6 weeks for CB, p treatment of CB group was less than half incurred by the IMN group (average USD 831 versus USD 2071 for nailed group, p tibial shaft fracture either with IMN or CB provided equally gratifying results with no statistical difference in final functional outcome. The economic cost to the patient in Indian conditions is significantly less with CB and therefore stands as an equally reliable treatment option, especially in countries with fewer resources.

  12. Mid-term results of the elastic intramedullary nailing in paediatric long bone shaft fractures: a prospective study of 102 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Ibrahim; Halici, Mehmet; Kafadar, Ibrahim H; Guney, Ahmet; Oner, Mithat; Gurbuz, Kağan; Karaman, Zehra F

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mid-term results of a large series of paediatric patients with long bone shaft fractures who were treated with elastic intramedullary nailing. Between November 2009 and November 2010, 108 long bone shaft fractures in 102 patients were treated with elastic intramedullary nails. The number of nails used, admission time, nail diameter/medullary canal diameter ratio of the nontraumatized extremity, weeks until radiological consolidation, weeks until full weight bearing for the femur and tibia shaft fractures, weeks until the nails were removed, number of radiographs from the diagnosis time to the removal time of nail(s), clinical complications and radiological results were recorded; the union rate, time to union, nonunion, delayed union, malrotation, malalignment, follow-up time and functional outcomes (Flynn outcome scoring) were also recorded. The mean follow-up time was 22.2 (14-30) months. The mean age of the patients was 9.6 (6-15) years for all cases. The mean nail removal time for all cases was 19.2 (17-29) weeks. Eighteen patients developed complications: six had insufficient reductions; two had refractures; four developed a deep infection; one had delayed union that needed revision; two had lower extremity length discrepancies of more than 15 mm; and three had skin impingements. The mean admission time was 19 (6-32) h; the mean number of radiographs from the diagnosis time to the removal time of nail(s) was 14 (8-20) for each fracture. All patients showed excellent or satisfactory results according to Flynn's criteria. The mean time to full weight bearing for the femur and tibia shaft fractures was 62.4 (52-88) days. A nail diameter/medullary canal diameter ratio of over 0.4 showed good results; short union time, less lower extremity length discrepancy and less malalignment were recorded. When patients were informed about possible complications as well as the advantages, almost all chose the operative approach

  13. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of alloys such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum and stainless steel. It is inserted into the medullary (bone marrow) canal of long bones for the fixation of fractures. (b) Classification. Class II. ...

  14. Canal plane dynamic visual acuity in superior canal dehiscence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janky, Kristen L; Zuniga, M Geraldine; Ward, Bryan; Carey, John P; Schubert, Michael C

    2014-06-01

    1) To characterize normal, horizontal active dynamic visual acuity (DVA) and passive canal plane head thrust DVA (htDVA) across ages to establish appropriate control data and 2) to determine whether horizontal active DVA and passive canal plane htDVA are significantly different in individuals with superior canal dehiscence syndrome (SCDS) before and after surgical repair in the acute (within 10 d) and nonacute stage (>6 wk). Prospective study. Tertiary referral center Patients diagnosed with SCDS (n = 32) and healthy control subjects (n = 51). Surgical canal plugging on a subset of patients. Static visual acuity (SVA), active horizontal DVA, and canal plane htDVA. Visual acuity (SVA, active DVA, and htDVA) declines with age. In SCDS, SVA and active DVA are not significantly affected in individuals after surgical canal plugging; however, htDVA in the plane of the affected canal is significantly worse after canal plugging. Age-based normative data are necessary for DVA testing. In SCDS, htDVA in the plane of the affected canal is normal before surgery but permanently reduced afterward.

  15. A patient specific finite element simulation of intramedullary nailing to predict the displacement of the distal locking hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Javad; Farahmand, Farzam; Behzadipour, Saeed; Yeganeh, Ali; Aghighi, Mohammad

    2018-05-01

    Distal locking is a challenging subtask of intramedullary nailing fracture fixation due to the nail deformation that makes the proximally mounted targeting systems ineffective. A patient specific finite element model was developed, based on the QCT data of a cadaveric femur, to predict the position of the distal hole of the nail postoperatively. The mechanical interactions of femur and nail (of two sizes) during nail insertion was simulated using ABAQUS in two steps of dynamic pushing and static equilibrium, for the intact and distally fractured bone. Experiments were also performed on the same specimen to validate the simulation results. A good agreement was found between the model predictions and the experimental observations. There was a three-point contact pattern between the nail and medullary canal, only on the proximal fragment of the fractured bone. The nail deflection was much larger in the sagittal plane and increased for the larger diameter nail, as well as for more distally fractured or intact femur. The altered position of the distal hole was predicted by the model with an acceptable error (mean: 0.95; max: 1.5 mm, in different tests) to be used as the compensatory information for fine tuning of proximally mounted targeting systems. Copyright © 2018 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Finite element analysis of tibial fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Christian Nai En; Mikkelsen, Mikkel Peter W; Hansen, Leif Berner

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Fractures of the tibial shaft are relatively common injuries. There are indications that tibial shaft fractures share characteristics in terms of site, type and local fracture mechanisms. In this study, we aimed to set up a mathematical, computer-based model using finite element...... of bony healing. The biomechanical results are the basis for fracture healing, biomechanical fall analysis and stability analysis of osteosynthesis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A finite element model of the bony part of the lower leg was generated on the basis of computed tomography data from the Visible Human...... Project. The data consisted of 21,219 3D elements with a cortical shell and a trabecular core. Three types of load of torsion, a direct lateral load and axial compression were applied. RESULTS: The finite element linear static analysis resulted in relevant fracture localizations and indicated relevant...

  17. Finite element analysis of tibial fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Christian Nai En; Mikkelsen, Mikkel Peter W; Hansen, Leif Berner

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Fractures of the tibial shaft are relatively common injuries. There are indications that tibial shaft fractures share characteristics in terms of site, type and local fracture mechanisms. In this study, we aimed to set up a mathematical, computer-based model using finite element...... analysis of the bones of the lower leg to examine if such a model is adequate for prediction of fracture locations and patterns. In future studies, we aim to use these biomechanical results to examine fracture prevention, among others, and to simulate different types of osteosynthesis and the process...... of bony healing. The biomechanical results are the basis for fracture healing, biomechanical fall analysis and stability analysis of osteosynthesis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A finite element model of the bony part of the lower leg was generated on the basis of computed tomography data from the Visible Human...

  18. Unstable trochanteric femoral fractures: extramedullary or intramedullary fixation. Review of literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, I. B.; Marti, R. K.; van der Werken, Chr

    2004-01-01

    For operative treatment of unstable trochanteric fractures two options exist: extramedullary or intramedullary stabilisation. A review of 18 international papers that compared two different treatment methods for trochanteric fractures, in prospective randomised clinical trials, is presented. In view

  19. Biomechanical Factors in Tibial Stress Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA. Background and Purpose. A stress fracture in the high performance collegiate athlete presents a difficult problem...et al. (1987) noted that varus malalignment (genu & tibial) was often present in athletes with stress fractures. This patient exhibits significant...force and neural potentiation in athletes . Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 22:2, S69, April, 1990. Ebbeling, C. J., Hamill, J., Freedson

  20. Anterior Tibial Artery Pseudoaneurysm: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Tor

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aneurysmsatic changes of the infrapopliteal arteries are rarely seen. They are pseudoaneurysms rather than true aneursyms. The most important cause of them is trauma. There is not a standart treatment for infrapopliteal aneursyms. In this study, we have evaluated a case operated for anterior tibial artery pseudoaneurysm developed after penetrant trauma and diagnosed two weeks later. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(3.000: 172-175

  1. Outcomes following combined intramedullary nail and plate fixation for complex tibia fractures: A multi-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Richard S; Bible, Jesse; Marcus, Matthew S; Donegan, Derek J; Bergmann, Karl A; Siebler, Justin C; Mir, Hassan R; Liporace, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant plate fixation as an adjunct to intramedullary nailing (IMN) of proximal third tibia fractures is a proven technique. Benefits include its role as a minimally invasive reduction aid, allowing for minimal soft tissue disruption. Expanding its indications as adjunct fixation to IMN throughout the tibia, we aimed to study outcomes in a multi-centre initiative. From May 1999 to March 2010, a total of 1302 operatively treated tibial fractures (including plateau and pilon fractures) with complete medical records were identified for review. Of these, 376 cases were treated via IMN, of which 30 cases were treated via combined IMN and plating, meeting inclusion criteria. Primary outcome was union rates, time to union, and complication rates. Secondary outcomes included mean alignment from the immediate postoperative period to the time of final follow-up. Twenty-seven out of 30 patients were available for follow-up. Twenty-five (93%) achieved bony union; the remaining two patients, sustained Type IIIA and B injuries respectively, went onto non-union secondary to deep infection and required multiple re-operations before achieving ultimate union. Mean time at final follow-up was 20 ± 10 months, 96% were ambulatory at full weight bearing status with no malunions. No significant changes in alignment in either the coronal or sagittal planes were noted at time of final follow-up. Combined IMN and plate fixation is a reliable tool not only in the treatment of fractures of the proximal tibia, but also for those fractures in the diaphysis and segmental fractures with proximal and/or distal metadiaphyseal extension with consistent ability to maintain high union rates and maintained alignment. However, longer-term follow-up and prospective trials will be necessary before coming to a definitive conclusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Retrospective analysis of AO 42A-B type tibia fractures treated with percutaneus locked plating and intramedullary nailing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgili, Fuat; Kılıç, Ayhan; Sökücü, Sami; Parmaksızoğlu, Atilla Sancar; Çepni, Kamil Serdar; Kabukçuoğlu, Yavuz Selim

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the results of AO 42A and 42B type tibia fractures treated with intramedullary nail (IMN) and percutaneus locking plate (PLP) were evaluated. The complications were examined, and it was questioned whether the type of fixation had an effect on union time and functional results. Forty-two patients with extraarticular distal tibial fractures were enrolled in this retrospective study. Eighteen patients were treated with closed IMN (Group I) and 24 patients were treated with PLP fixation (Group II). Mean age was 41 (range: 16-70) years; thirty-two of the patients were men. Fractures were classified according to the AO classification system. Union time, functional results and complications (malunion, malalignment, infection) were compared. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Surgery (AOFAS) scoring was used to compare functional results. The average follow-up period was 20 (12-32) months for Group I and 23 (13-36) months for Group II. The average union time was 16 (12-24) weeks in Group I and 19 (range: 16-24) weeks in Group II (p=0.002). The AOFAS scoring was 85 (range: 69-100) points in Group I and 81 (range: 60-95) points in Group II. The difference in AOFAS scoring was not significant (p=0.06). Two patients had nonunion in Group II. Two patients in Group I and three patients in Group II had malalignment. We suggest that IMN can provide early healing time. Although it is not statistically significant, complication rate was lower and functional results were better in patients treated with IMN.

  3. UNSTABLE FEMORAL FRACTURES TREATED WITH TITANIUM ELASTIC INTRAMEDULLARY NAILS, IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Soni, Jamil Faissal; Schelle, Gisele; Valenza, Weverley; Pavelec, Anna Carolina; Souza, Camila Deneka Arantes

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the indications, epidemiology, associated lesions, complications and prognosis among children with unstable femoral diaphysis fractures who were treated with titanium elastic intramedullary nails. Method: This was a retrospective analysis on 24 patients aged 5-12 years with unstable femoral diaphysis fractures who underwent surgical treatment with elastic titanium intramedullary nails at the Cajuru University Hospital, Curitiba-PR, between April 2002 and March 2008, wit...

  4. Do intramedullary implants improve survival in elderly patients with trochanteric fractures? A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermesan, D; Prejbeanu, R; Poenaru, D V; Petrescu, H; Apostol, E; Inchingolo, F; Dipalma, G; Abbinante, A; Caprio, M; Potenza, M A; Cagiano, R; Malcangi, G; Inchingolo, A D; Haragus, H

    2015-01-01

    There is currently no consensus regarding superiority of the intramedullary fixation over the sliding hip screw. Regional variation remains high and not backed up by solid evidence. Given these premises we aimed to analyze weather implant preference can influence the postoperative survival. Secondary objectives were determining the trend for implant choice and confounding factors associated with intramedullary nails compared to sliding hip screws. Retrospective data was obtained from patient charts with the main diagnosis of extracapsular/ trochanteric fractures, corresponding to ICD S72.1 codes. Between 2008-2012, 441 patients underwent osteosynthesis with a dynamic hip screw and 155 with intramedullary nail respectively. The living status was determined by comparing the patient identification number against the national population evidence records. The lifetable shows similar survival for both implants over the 5 year period. The yearly mortality was 19.4% for the dynamic hip screw and 21.8% for the intramedullary implant respectively, even though the later were used predominantly in older patients. This age difference is significant according to both parametric and non-parametric tests whereas duration of hospital stay are similar. We found a clear increase in the proportion of intramedullary implants, for a total of 11.2% over the 5 year period. There is no difference for the one year mortality and overall survival between sliding screw plates and intramedullary constructs. A clear increase in the use of intramedullary implants for trochanteric fractures was observed. This is even more apparent for older ages, presumably due to an higher surgeon confidence with the biomechanical stability of the intramedullary constructs.

  5. [Non-union of the clavicle after intramedullary nailing with a steel Kirschner wire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faymonville, C; Jubel, A; Schiffer, G

    2010-04-01

    Elastically stable intramedullary nailing is a safe surgical procedure used to treat mid-shaft clavicular fractures of types A and B according to the Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) classification. In the case reported intramedullary fixation with a Kirschner wire and an incorrectly performed surgical technique led to pseudoarthrosis (non-union). After revision surgery with an elastically stable titanium nail and a correct surgical technique, fracture healing was achieved.

  6. Clinical Outcome of Ream Versus Unream Intramedullary Nailing for Femoral Shaft Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Bagheri, Farshid; Sharifi, Seyed Reza; Mirzadeh, Navid Reza; Hootkani, Alireza; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohamad Hosein; Ashraf, Hami

    2013-01-01

    Background Stabilization of fractures with an intramedullary nail is a widespread technique in the treatment of femoral shaft fractures in adults; however, to ream or not to ream is still being debated. Objectives The primary objective of this study was to determine clinical results following unreamed versus ream intramedullary nailing of femoral fractures. Patients and Methods Between January 2008 and August 2009, 50 patients with femoral shaft fractures were treated with unreamed or reamed ...

  7. Delayed pseudoaneurysm caused by distal locking screw of a femoral intramedullary nail: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Deepa; Hauptfleisch, Jennifer; McNally, Martin

    2006-09-01

    Interlocked intramedullary nailing is an accepted technique in the management of closed femoral shaft fractures. If this technique is used in patients who are skeletally immature, the position of locking screws relative to soft tissues can alter with time. We present a case of an 11-year-old male who developed a delayed pseudoaneurysm 4 years after intramedullary nailing that was most likely produced by movement of the distal locking screws of his femoral nail in relation to the surrounding vascular structures.

  8. Systematic radiographic evaluation of tibial hemimelia with orthopedic implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan-List, Katia [Rochester General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Rochester, NY (United States); Klionsky, Nina B. [University of Rochester Medical Center, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY (United States); Golisano Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Rochester, NY (United States); Sanders, James O. [University of Rochester Medical Center, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY (United States); Golisano Children' s Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Rochester, NY (United States); Golisano Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Rochester, NY (United States); Katz, Michael E. [St. Mary' s Medical Center and Palm Beach Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, West Palm Beach, FL (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Tibial hemimelia is a rare lower-extremity pre-axial longitudinal deficiency characterized by complete or partial absence of the tibia. The reported incidence is 1 in 1 million live births. In this pictorial essay, we define tibial hemimelia and describe associated conditions and principles of preoperative imaging assessment for a child with tibial hemimelia. We also indicate the imaging findings that might influence the choice of treatment, describe the most widely used classification systems, and briefly discuss current treatment approaches. (orig.)

  9. Systematic radiographic evaluation of tibial hemimelia with orthopedic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan-List, Katia; Klionsky, Nina B.; Sanders, James O.; Katz, Michael E.

    2017-01-01

    Tibial hemimelia is a rare lower-extremity pre-axial longitudinal deficiency characterized by complete or partial absence of the tibia. The reported incidence is 1 in 1 million live births. In this pictorial essay, we define tibial hemimelia and describe associated conditions and principles of preoperative imaging assessment for a child with tibial hemimelia. We also indicate the imaging findings that might influence the choice of treatment, describe the most widely used classification systems, and briefly discuss current treatment approaches. (orig.)

  10. Efficacy and quality of life after transcutaneous posterior tibial neuromodulation for faecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Toscano, M; Vega, D; Fernandez-Cebrián, J M; Valle Martín, B; Jiménez-Almonacid, P; Rueda Orgaz, J A

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of transcutaneous neuromodulation of the posterior tibial nerve for faecal incontinence and to assess quality of life after the procedure. A prospective non-randomized cohort study was conducted in a tertiary centre from September 2010 to May 2013. All patients with faecal incontinence who met the inclusion criteria were included and were treated as outpatients during a 3-month period by unilateral neuromodulation of the posterior tibial nerve. The patients were followed 3-monthly for 1 year. Severity scales, a bowel diary and quality of life scales were evaluated prospectively before and after treatment. Twenty-seven patients of median age 67 (interquartile range 60-69) years and a male to female ratio of 1/6 were included. Faecal incontinence was for solid stools in 48.1% of patients with urgency in 55.6%. About one-third (34.6%) had a sphincter defect on ultrasound and reduction of anal canal pressure in 85.2%. There was a significant improvement in episodes of incontinence on the Wexner score and visual analogue scale assessment and a decrease in the number of episodes of incontinence per unit time. The Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life score was improved at the end of the follow-up. No adverse effects were observed. The cost of the treatment was €135 per patient. Transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve neuromodulation provides good treatment for faecal incontinence in terms of efficacy and quality of life. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  11. Monitoring and controlling intramedullary pressure increase in long bone instrumentation: a study on sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul N; Leditschke, Anne; McMahon, Damian; Sample, Roxanne R; Perriman, Diana; Prins, Anne; Brüssel, Thomas; Li, Rachel W

    2008-10-01

    Intramedullary reamed nailing causes elevation in intramedullary pressure and extravazation of intramedullary contents into the venous blood system. This study investigated the effect of an intramedullary suction system, recently developed in our laboratory, on the pressure and fat extravazation in isolated bovine bone and a sheep model. During reaming, the pressure with and without suction was recorded at each step of the procedure. Hemodynamic parameters of mean arterial blood pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary arterial CO(2) (PaCO(2)), heart rate, and oxygen saturation were monitored. Blood and lung tissue samples were collected for the examination of medullary fat intravazation. The increases of intramedullary pressure were dramatically reduced in the suction group (p sheep lung tissue in the nonsuction group. Total lipids in lung specimens was lower in the suction group (7.6 mg/g tissue) than in the nonsuction group (13.6 mg/g, p = 0.04). The suction system appears to control the surge in intramedullary pressure and therefore prevent fat embolism. (c) 2008 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  12. Reamed versus unreamed intramedullary nailing for the treatment of femoral fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, A-Bing; Zhang, Wei-Jiang; Guo, Wei-Jun; Wang, Xin-Hua; Jin, Hai-Ming; Zhao, You-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and objective: Intramedullary nailing is commonly used for treating femoral shaft fractures, one of the most common long bone fractures in adults. The reamed intramedullary nail is considered the standard implant for femoral fractures. This meta-analysis was performed to verify the superiority of reamed intramedullary nailing over unreamed intramedullary nailing in fractures of the femoral shaft in adults. Subgroup analysis of implant failure and secondary procedure was also performed. Methods: Electronic literature databases were used to identify relevant publications and included MEDLINE (Ovid interface), EMBASE (Ovid interface), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Wiley Online Library). The versions available on January 30, 2016, were utilized. Only human studies, which were designed as randomized controlled clinical trials, were included. Two authors independently evaluated the quality of original research publications and extracted data from the studies that met the criteria. Results: Around 8 randomized controlled trials involving 1078 patients were included. Reamed intramedullary nailing was associated with shorter time to consolidation of the fracture (SMD = –0.62, 95% CI = –0.89 to –0.35, P fractures using reamed intramedullary nailing is recommended. PMID:27442651

  13. INTRAMEDULLARY TUBERCULOMA OF THORACIC SPINAL CORD IN AN APPARENTLY HEALTHY NIGERIAN: CASE REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, A S; Adeleke, N A; Babalola, O M; Wahab, K W; Oyebanji, L O; Ahmed, A B; Omokanye, H K

    2015-01-01

    Spinal intramedullary is an uncommon form of tuberculosis causing spinal cord injury in this environment. We report a case of thoracic intramedullary tuberculoma in an immunocompetent male Nigerian with negative screening for tuberculosis. He presented with 8 months history of back pain and 2 months history of progressive weakness in both lower limbs. Physical examination revealed a well-nourished man with spastic paraplegia. Chest radiograph and CT scan were normal but Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracolumbar region showed cord oedema and circumscribed intramedullary lesions at D12 and L1 levels with target sign. The patient was promptly prepared and had D12 and L1 laminectomy and posterior myelotomy with excision of the intramedullary lesion. Histology showed granulomatous lesion with central caseation in keeping with a tuberculoma. He was treated with a 4-drug antituberculous regimen with physiotherapy and he made complete neurological recovery 8 months post-operatively. Intramedullary tuberculoma should be considered in differential diagnosis of intramedullary tumors in this environment. Treatment with antituberculous drugs results in good outcome.

  14. Radiographic quantitative assessment of cranial tibial subluxation before and after tibial plateau leveling osteotomy in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Stanley E; Lewis, Daniel D; Pozzi, Antonio; Seibert, Rachel L; Winter, Matthew D

    2011-03-01

    To determine the influence of stifle joint flexion angle, cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) integrity, tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO), and cranial tibial subluxation on the distance between the location of the origin and insertion of the CrCL (CrCL(d)) in dogs. 4 pairs of pelvic limbs from adult dog cadavers weighing 23 to 34 kg. Procedures-Mediolateral projection radiographs of each stifle joint were obtained with the joint flexed at 90°, 105°, 120°, 135°, and 150°. Radiopaque markers were then placed at the sites of origin and insertion of the CrCL. Afterward, radiography was repeated in the same manner, before and after CrCL transection, with and without TPLO. Following CrCL transection, radiographs were obtained before and after inducing overt cranial tibial subluxation. Interobserver variation in measuring the CrCL(d) without fiduciary markers was assessed. The effect of CrCL integrity, cranial tibial subluxation, flexion angle, and TPLO on CrCL(d) was also determined. Interobserver agreement was strong, with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.859. The CrCL(d) was significantly shorter (Cranial tibial subluxation caused a 25% to 40% increase in CrCL(d). No effect of TPLO on CrCL(d) was found, regardless of CrCL integrity, forced stifle joint subluxation, or flexion angle. Overt cranial tibial subluxation in CrCL-deficient stifle joints can be detected on mediolateral projection radiographs by comparing CrCL(d) on neutral and stressed joint radiographs at joint angles between 105° and 150°, regardless of whether a TPLO has been performed.

  15. Bactericidal properties of silver films on intramedullary implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, C.; Walker, C.; Cortes, E.; Hettinger, Jeffrey; Krchnavek, R.; Caputo, G. A.; Ostrum, R.

    2011-03-01

    We report on investigations of silver films on titanium and stainless steel substrates as anti-bacterial coatings for intramedullary nails used in orthopedic trauma. Silver films are deposited using a magnetron sputtering technique from a single elemental target. The deposition parameter (energy, pressure, and temperature) dependence of the silver film microstructure and adhesion will be presented. Preliminary measurements of the effectiveness of the silver films as a bactericide on S. aureus bacteria demonstrate that the films are effective destroying the bacteria. The process of this investigation will be presented. Preliminary transmission electron microscopy measurements will also presented which image healthy and damaged bacteria helping to identify the fundamental mechanism leading to the effectiveness of silver as an anti-bacterial coating. We acknowledge the support of Rowan University, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

  16. Spinal canal stenosis; Spinalkanalstenose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Boutchakova, M. [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte/Bremen-Ost, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Bremen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal by a combination of bone and soft tissues, which can lead to mechanical compression of spinal nerve roots or the dural sac. The lumbal spinal compression of these nerve roots can be symptomatic, resulting in weakness, reflex alterations, gait disturbances, bowel or bladder dysfunction, motor and sensory changes, radicular pain or atypical leg pain and neurogenic claudication. The anatomical presence of spinal canal stenosis is confirmed radiologically with computerized tomography, myelography or magnetic resonance imaging and play a decisive role in optimal patient-oriented therapy decision-making. (orig.) [German] Die Spinalkanalstenose ist eine umschriebene, knoechern-ligamentaer bedingte Einengung des Spinalkanals, die zur Kompression der Nervenwurzeln oder des Duralsacks fuehren kann. Die lumbale Spinalkanalstenose manifestiert sich klinisch als Komplex aus Rueckenschmerzen sowie sensiblen und motorischen neurologischen Ausfaellen, die in der Regel belastungsabhaengig sind (Claudicatio spinalis). Die bildgebende Diagnostik mittels Magnetresonanztomographie, Computertomographie und Myelographie spielt eine entscheidende Rolle bei der optimalen patientenbezogenen Therapieentscheidung. (orig.)

  17. Effect on dynamic mechanical stability and interfragmentary movement of angle-stable locking of intramedullary nails in unstable distal tibia fractures: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueorguiev, Boyko; Wähnert, Dirk; Albrecht, Daniel; Ockert, Ben; Windolf, Markus; Schwieger, Karsten

    2011-02-01

    Unstable distal tibia fractures are challenging injuries that require surgery. Increasingly, intramedullary nails are being used. However, fracture site anatomy may cause distal-fragment stabilization and fixation problems and lead to malunion/nonunion. We studied the influence of angle-stable nail locking on fracture gap movement and other biomechanical parameters. Eight pairs of fresh human cadaver tibiae were used. The bone mineral density (BMD) was determined. All tibiae were nailed with a Synthes Expert tibial nail. Within each pair, one tibia was randomized to receive conventional locking screws; the other, angle-stable screws with sleeves. A 7-mm osteotomy was created 10 mm above the upper distal locking screw, to simulate an AO 42-A3 fracture. Biomechanical testing involved nondestructive mediolateral and anteroposterior pure bending, followed by cyclic combined axial and torsional loading to catastrophic failure. The neutral zone was determined. Fracture gap movement was monitored with 3-D motion tracking. The angle-stable locked constructs had a significantly smaller mediolateral neutral zone (mean: 0.04 degree; p=0.039) and significantly smaller fracture gap angulation (p=0.043). The number of cycles to failure did not differ significantly between the locking configurations. BMD was a significant covariate affecting the number of cycles to failure (p=0.008). However, over the first 20,000 cycles, there was no significant correlation in the angle-stable construct. Angle-stable locking of the Expert tibial nail was associated with a significant reduction in the mediolateral neutral zone and in fracture gap movement. Angle-stable fixation also reduced the influence of BMD over the first 20,000 cycles.

  18. Treatment of humeral shaft fractures with antegrade intramedullary locking nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsourvakas, Stefanos; Alexandropoulos, Christos; Papachristos, Ioannis; Tsakoumis, Grigorios; Ameridis, Nikolaos

    2011-12-01

    Antegrade interlocked humeral nailing for stabilization of humeral fractures was introduced many years ago, and studies on this method in the orthopedic literature have shown mixed results. The purpose of this investigation was to document the clinical outcome and complications associated with the use of an antegrade intramedullary nail (T2, Stryker) for the humeral fractures. Between 2005 and 2008, 52 fractures of the humeral shaft were treated operatively with this intramedullary nail in our department. Eight patients were polytraumatized, and four patients had an open fracture. The mean age of patients was 51.7 years. Forty-eight patients had an adequate duration of clinical follow-up (a mean of 18 months) for analysis. Complications were recorded, and the time to union was measured. Shoulder and elbow functions were assessed using the Constant Score and the Morrey Score, respectively. Forty-six fractures healed, with a mean time to clinical union of 10.3 weeks. Two patients developed pseudarthroses. There were four adverse events: two proximal screws backed out, one superficial infection at the insertion point, and one fracture at the distal end of the nail. Ninety-one percentage of patients had an excellent or good shoulder function. Five further operations were necessary: two for treatment of pseudarthroses, two for removal the backed out proximal screws, and one wound debridement for superficial infection. Antegrade humeral nailing is a valid therapeutic option for stabilization of humeral shaft fractures. By strictly adhering to the operation technique, the number and the severity of complications can be reduced. When good fracture alignment and stability are obtained, uneventful bone healing with good functional results is the rule.

  19. [Antegrade femoral intramedullary nailing in a lateral position].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederichs, J; von Rüden, C; Hierholzer, C; Bühren, V

    2015-04-01

    Intramedullary nailing is the gold standard for the treatment of femoral shaft fractures; however, rotational malalignment remains a common complication. The patient can be positioned on the fracture table in a supine position or alternatively in the lateral decubitus position without any traction. The aim of this article is to describe an effective method to control intraoperative torsion of the femur. The surgical technique described in this article is the standard procedure for femoral shaft fractures and subtrochanteric fractures in this level 1 trauma center. The patient is positioned in a lateral position on a radiolucent table with free draping of the injured leg. Using the C-arm, reduction can be performed with this technique with precise placing of the nails and torsion can be exactly adjusted and controlled with the aid of the femoral neck axis, the distal locking holes and both parallel femoral condyles. The described technique represents an effective method for the intraoperative control of femoral torsion. With an acceptable and most probably clinically irrelevant bias, this technique is able to avoid significant rotational malalignment. It does not prolong the operative procedure and does not require additional navigation settings. It has also been shown to be helpful in the treatment of subtrochanteric fractures. The surgical technique of anterograde intramedullary nailing using the lateral decubitus position without any traction device and free draping of the injured leg represents a safe and reliable treatment concept and offers logistical advantages compared to the supine position of the patient on a fracture table. Together with other described methods of intraoperative torsional control of femoral fractures, the radiological technique described in this study is an easily applicable and safe method, which needs to be confirmed in clinical studies.

  20. A retrospective study of tibial plateau translation following tibial plateau levelling osteotomy stabilisation using three different plate types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbridge, N; Corr, S A; Grierson, J; Arthurs, G

    2011-01-01

    To retrospectively evaluate mediolateral translation of the proximal tibial segment (tibial plateau) after tibial plateau levelling osteotomy (TPLO), stabilised with three types of plate. Pre- and postoperative radiographs of 79 dogs that had TPLO surgery using three different types of plates were reviewed. Two plate types incorporated non-locking screws: Slocum (22 cases) and Orthomed Delta (33 cases) plates. The third plate type incorporated locking screws: Synthes TPLO Locking Compression Plate (LCP) (24 cases). The radiographs were viewed by three Diplomate surgeons who were blinded to the type of implant used. Medial or lateral translation of the proximal tibial plateau relative to the tibial diaphysis was assessed and measured at the lateral tibial cortex at the osteotomy site. Mean lateral translation of the tibial plateau was significantly greater when using the Synthes TPLO LCP with locking screws (+2.1 mm) compared to the non-locking Slocum (+0.4 mm) or Orthomed Delta (0.0 mm) plates. The use of the Synthes TPLO LCP will maintain a malalignment of the tibial plateau. Accurate alignment of the tibial plateau must be ensured prior to application of the Synthes TPLO LCP.

  1. Choroid Plexus in the Central Canal of the Spinal Cord Causing Recurrent Syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtaya, Anan; Sadek, Ahmed-Ramadan; Nicoll, James A R; Nader-Sepahi, Ali

    2018-03-01

    Syringomyelia is a fluid-filled cavitation within the substance of the spinal cord. This condition usually follows a primary pathology that disrupts the normal cerebrospinal fluid circulation or disturbs the microcirculation and cytoarchitecture of the spinal cord parenchyma. However, an etiology of recurrent syringomyelia resulting from an ectopic choroid plexus (CP) has not been discussed. Ectopic CP rests may be found within the central nervous system. Although there has been a single report, describing ectopic intramedullary spinal cord CP, to our knowledge, extra-cranial nonmalignant CP in the central canal of the spinal cord has not been reported. We report CP in the central canal of the spinal cord in a 23-year-old male patient who had developmental delay and diabetes mellitus type I who presented with dissociated sensory changes and muscle wastage predominantly on the right upper and lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a multiloculated spinal cord syringomyelia stretching from cervical (C3) to the conus medullaris causing recurrent neurologic deficits. A biopsy of the central canal spinal cord lesion revealed CP. Decompression and syringosubarachnoid shunt insertion stabilized the patient's neurology. Our illustrative case reveals the presence of CP in the central canal of the spinal cord that may suggest a role in the etiology of recurrent syringomyelia. Although management poses a challenge to neurosurgeons, prompt decompression and shunting of the syringomyelia remains a favorable approach with acceptable outcomes. Further investigation into the pathophysiology of central canal CP ectopic causing recurrent syringomyelia and its correlation with spinal cord development may help future treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Characteristics of the Femoral Canal Isthmus: An Anatomical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-yun Su

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To establish a new approach for measuring and locating the femoral intramedullary canal isthmus in 3-dimensional (3D space. Methods. Based on the computed tomography data from 204 Chinese patients, 3D models of the whole femur and the corresponding femoral isthmus tube were reconstructed using Mimics software (Materialise, Haasrode, Belgium. The anatomical parameters of the femur and the isthmus, including the femur length and radius, and the isthmus diameter and height, were measured accordingly. Results. The mean ratio of the isthmus height versus the femoral height was 55 ± 4.8%. The mean diameter of the isthmus was 10.49 ± 1.52 mm. The femoral length, the isthmus diameter, and the isthmus tube length were significantly larger in the male group. Significant correlations were observed between the femoral length and the isthmus diameter (r=0.24, p<0.01 and between the femoral length and the isthmus height (r=0.6, p<0.01. Stepwise linear regression analyses demonstrated that the femoral length and radius were the most important factors influencing the location and dimension of the femoral canal isthmus. Conclusion. The current study developed a new approach for measuring the femoral canal and for optimization of customer-specific femoral implants.

  3. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with tibial attachment preserving hamstring graft without implant on tibial side

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skand Sinha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tibial attachment preserving hamstring graft could prevent potential problems of free graft in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction such as pull out before graft-tunnel healing or rupture before ligamentization. Different implants have been reportedly used for tibial side fixation with this technique. We investigated short-term outcome of ACL reconstruction (ACLR with tibial attachment sparing hamstring graft without implant on the tibial side by outside in technique. Materials and Methods: Seventy nine consecutive cases of ACL tear having age of 25.7 ± 6.8 years were included after Institutional Board Approval. All subjects were male. The mean time interval from injury to surgery was of 7.5 ± 6.4 months. Hamstring tendons were harvested with open tendon stripper leaving the tibial insertion intact. The free ends of the tendons were whip stitched, quadrupled, and whip stitched again over the insertion site of hamstring with fiber wire (Arthrex. Single bundle ACLR was done by outside in technique and the femoral tunnel was created with cannulated reamer. The graft was pulled up to the external aperture of femoral tunnel and fixed with interference screw (Arthrex. The scoring was done by Lysholm, Tegner, and KT 1000 by independent observers. All cases were followed up for 2 years. Results: The mean length of quadrupled graft attached to tibia was 127.65 ± 7.5 mm, and the mean width was 7.52 ± 0.78 mm. The mean preoperative Lysholm score of 47.15 ± 9.6, improved to 96.8 ± 2.4 at 1 year. All cases except two returned to the previous level of activity after ACLR. There was no significant difference statistically between preinjury (5.89 ± 0.68 and postoperative (5.87 ± 0.67 Tegner score. The anterior tibial translation (ATT (KT 1000 improved from 11.44 ± 1.93 mm to 3.59 ± 0.89 mm. The ATT of operated knee returned to nearly the similar value as of the opposite knee (3.47 ± 1.16 mm. The Pivot shift test was negative in

  4. Histopathological examination of bone debris from reaming of interlocking intra-medullary nail fixation of long bone fractures with concomitant head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khallaf, Fathy G; Kehinde, Elijah O

    2015-12-01

    The aim of study was to test, for the presence of osteoblasts in the reaming debris of intramedullary nailing of femoral and tibial fracture in patients with and without severe head injury. Two groups of patients were studied. Group A (n = 32) had long bone fractures in addition to having head injuries. Group B (n = 35) had only long bone fractures. The fractures in the 2 groups of patients was treated by inter medullary nailing. Osteoblasts in the debris of the inter medullary nailing was compared between the 2 groups of patients. The results demonstrated that histopathological specimens from reaming debris of fractured femur and tibia in patients with head injury showed osteoblasts in (82.9%) and in (27.5%) of patients with isolated long bone fractures (p fractures and concomitant head injury confirm fast and adequate healing in these patients and the presence of plenty of osteoblasts in their reaming debris may reflect a proof of accelerated fracture healing environment.

  5. Reconstruction of bilateral tibial aplasia and split hand-foot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Tibial aplasia is of heterogeneous aetiology, the majority of reports are sporadic. We describe the reconstruction procedures in two subjects - a daughter and father manifested autosomal dominant (AD) inheritance of the bilateral tibial aplasia and split hand-foot syndrome. Materials and Methods: ...

  6. Tibial sequestrectomy in the management of Osgood-Schlatter disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trail, I A

    1988-01-01

    Two groups of patients with symptomatic Osgood-Schlatter disease were compared over a 4-5 year follow-up period. One group was treated surgically by tibial sequestrectomy and the other group was managed conservatively. Tibial sequestrectomy was found to offer no significant benefit over simple conservative methods of treatment. In addition, a significant complication rate was identified with this procedure.

  7. Tibial Plateau Fracture Characteristics: Reliability and Diagnostic Accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mellema, Jos J.; Doornberg, Job N.; Molenaars, Rik J.; Ring, David; Kloen, Peter; Babis, George C.; Jeray, Kyle J.; Prayson, Michael J.; Pesantez, Rodrigo; Acacio, Ramos; Verbeek, Diederik O.; Melvanki, Parag; Kreis, Barbara E.; Mehta, Samir; Meylaerts, S.; Wojtek, S.; Yeap, Ewe J.; Haapasalo, Heidi; Kristan, Anže; Coles, Chad; Marsh, J. Lawrence; Mormino, Matthew; Memon, Matthew; Tyllianakis, Minos; Schandelmaier, Peter; Jenkinson, R. J.; Neuhaus, Valentin; Shahriar, Chegini M. H.; Belangero, William D.; Leonidovich, Golovakha M.; Davenport, J. H.; Kabir, Koroush; Althausen, Peter L.; Weil, Yoram; Toom, Alar; Sa da Costa, Daniel; Koukoulias, Nikolaos; Manidakis, Nikolaos; van den Bogaert, Max; Patczai, Balázs; Grauls, Anthony; Kurup, Harish; van den Bekerom, Michel P.; Lansdaal, Joris R.; Vale, Mário; Ousema, Paul; Barquet, Antonio; Cross, Brian J.; Broekhuyse, Henry; Haverkamp, Daniel; Merchant, Milind; Harvey, Edward; Stojkovska Pemovska, Emilija; Frihagen, Frede; Seibert, Franz Josef; Garnavos, Christos; van der Heide, Huub; Villamizar, Harold Alonso; Harris, Ian; Borris, Lars C.; Brink, Ole; Choudhari, Pradeep; Swiontkowski, Marc; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Tosounidis, Theodoros; van Rensen, Inge; Martinelli, N.; Park, D. H.; Lasanianos, Nikolaos; Vide, J.; Engvall, A.; Zura, R. D.; Jubel, Axel; Kawaguchi, Alan; Goost, Hans; Bishop, Julius; Mica, Ladislav; Pirpiris, Marinis; van Helden, S. H.; Bouaicha, Samy; Schepers, T.; Havliček, Tomo; Giordano, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the interobserver reliability and diagnostic accuracy for 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT)-based evaluation of tibial plateau fracture characteristics. We hypothesized that recognition of specific tibial plateau fracture

  8. The influence of gluteus maximus on transverse plane tibial rotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preece, S.J.; Graham-Smith, P.; Nester, C.J.; Howard, D.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Herrington, L.; Bowker, P.

    There is a common clinical belief that transverse plane tibial rotation is controlled by the rearfoot. Although distal structures may influence the motion of the tibia, transverse plane tibial rotation could be determined by the proximal hip musculature. Cadaver studies have identified gluteus

  9. Coverage of extensive tibial bone exposure in burn patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Covering tibial bone exposure from third degree burns to the lower limbs is a challenging task for the plastic surgeon. We present our experience of covering tibial exposure from burns in three different patients, where four limbs were involved and three muscular flaps were used in conjunction with one another; i.e. the ...

  10. Posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertions: topographic anatomy and morphometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Gali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To provide anatomical and morphometric basis of the posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertions in order to assist the creation of anatomical tibial tunnels, in the ligament surgical reconstruction. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The topographic anatomy and morphometry of the posterior cruciate ligament's anterolateral and posteromedial bundles' tibial insertions were analyzed in 24 anatomical knee pieces. The pieces were photographed by a digital camera and the images obtained were studied by the software ImageJ, where the bundles' insertion areas were measured in square millimeters, and the length of structures and the distances between significant points were measured in millimeters. RESULTS: In 54.2% of the knees the insertion' shape was concave; in most pieces (41.6% the form of insertion was oval. The average posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertion total area was 88.33 ± 21.66 mm2; the average anterolateral bundle's tibial insertion area was 46.79 ± 14.10 mm2 and it was 41.54 ± 9.75 mm2 for the posteromedial bundle. CONCLUSIONS: The anterolateral bundle has a tibial insertion area larger than the posteromedial bundle; the insertion areas of those bundles in our study, were smaller than the ones found in the literature. The variations in the posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertion area suggest that there should be an indication for anatomical reconstructions of this ligament using single or double tibial tunnels according to individual characteristics.

  11. Increased external tibial torsion and osteochondritis dissecans of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bramer, J. A. M.; Maas, M.; Dallinga, R. J.; te Slaa, R. L.; Vergroesen, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    In the past, osteochondritis dissecans of the knee was associated with increased tibial exotorsion, established with a clinical measuring method. Now the gold standard for determining tibial torsion is computed tomography. The aim of the current study was to establish whether the abovementioned

  12. Ultrasound for the early diagnosis of tibial fracture healing after static interlocked nailing without reaming: clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moed, B R; Subramanian, S; van Holsbeeck, M; Watson, J T; Cramer, K E; Karges, D E; Craig, J G; Bouffard, J A

    1998-01-01

    Based on the results of a pilot study indicating the potential value of ultrasound (US) as a diagnostic tool for the early assessment of fracture healing and the related need for secondary operative procedures in patients treated by statically locked intramedullary (IM) nailing without reaming, a protocol was established for a larger scale prospective trial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of this follow-up trial. All skeletally mature patients admitted to the Henry Ford Hospital (Detroit, Michigan) from January 1993 to August 1994 who had sustained an acute fracture of the tibial shaft and who were treated by statically locked IM nailing, without reaming, were candidates for study. Forty-seven patients with fifty fractures that could be evaluated by US were included. The adopted determinants for fracture healing were complete disappearance of the IM nail on US examination performed at six weeks postoperatively, or progressive disappearance of the nail noted between the initial six-week study and a second nine-week US examination, both in conjunction with periosteal callus formation. Radiographs were obtained to monitor maintenance of reduction and to further evaluate fracture healing. Of thirty-eight fractures with a positive US (thirty-two at six weeks, six at nine weeks), thirty-seven healed uneventfully, a positive predictive value of 97 percent. Radiographic fracture healing was not evident until, on average, nineteen weeks after injury. The single false-positive fracture progressed to nonunion. Of the twelve fractures with negative US studies, ten underwent secondary procedures (nine dynamization, one bone graft), with four progressing to nonunion. Two patients refused secondary surgery; screw failure occurred in both. Otherwise, there were no hardware failures in this series. The results of this study indicate that US may provide important prognostic information concerning fracture healing after unreamed tibial nailing, upon which

  13. Therapeutical Management of the Tibial Plateau Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obada B.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed to identify the role of surgical treatment of tibial plateau fractures, its functional outcome and complications. Demographic data for the patients and details of current clinical and radiological follow-up findings were obtained to assess range of motion, clinical stability, alignment of the knee, and posttraumatic arthrosis (Kellgren/Lawrence score. 64 cases of tibial plateau fractures treated by different surgical methods and variuos implants type were studied from 2013 to 2015 and followed-up for minimum period of 6 months. The systematisation of the casuitry was made using Schatzker and AO classifications. The treatment methods consist of: percutaneous cannulated cancellous screws, ORIF with buttress plate with or without bone grafting, locking or nonlocking plates, external fixator. As complications we found: redepression 4 case, malunion 2 cases, knee stiffness 9, wound dehiscence in 1 cases and non-union or infection in none of our cases. The average flexion of the injured knee was significantly lower in comparison with the contralateral side (124.9°/135.2°. Knee stability did not differ statistically significantly. There were no signs of posttraumatic arthrosis in 45% of cases, mild signs in 30%, clear signs in 18%, and severe signs in 7%. As conclusion we found that surgical management of tibial plateau fractures will give excellent anatomical reduction and rigid fixation to restore articular congruity, facilitate early motion and reduce arthrosis risk and hence to achieve optimal knee function. The choice of optimal surgical methods, proper approach and implant is made in relation to fracture type according Schatzker and AO classification.

  14. Effects of counteracting external valgus moment on lateral tibial cartilage contact conditions and tibial rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriram, Duraisamy; Parween, Rizuwana; Lee, Yee Han Dave; Subburaj, Karupppasamy

    2017-07-01

    Knee osteoarthritis that prevalently occurs at the medial compartment is a progressive chronic disorder affecting the articular cartilage of the knee joint, and lead to loss of joint functionality. Valgus braces have been used as a treatment procedure to unload the medial compartment for patients with medial osteoarthritis. Valgus braces through the application of counteracting external valgus moment shift the load from medial compartment towards the lateral compartment. Previous biomechanical studies focused only on the changes in varus moments before and after wearing the brace. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of opposing external valgus moment applied by knee braces on the lateral tibial cartilage contact conditions using a 3D finite element model of the knee joint. Finite element simulations were performed on the knee joint model without and with the application of opposing valgus moment to mimic the unbraced and braced conditions. Lateral tibial cartilage contact pressures and contact area, and tibial rotation (varus-valgus and internal-external) were estimated for the complete walking gait cycle. The opposing valgus moment increased the maximum contact pressure and contact area on the lateral tibial cartilage compared to the normal gait moment. A peak contact pressure of 8.2 MPa and maximum cartilage loaded area of 28% (loaded cartilage nodes) on the lateral cartilage with the application of external valgus moment were induced at 50% of the gait cycle. The results show that the use of opposing valgus moment may significantly increase the maximum contact pressures and contact area on the lateral tibial cartilage and increases the risk of articular cartilage damage on the lateral compartment.

  15. Hood Canal Steelhead - Hood Canal Steelhead Supplementation Experiment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hood Canal Steelhead Project is a 17-year before-after-control-impact experiment that tests the effects of supplementation on natural steelhead populations in...

  16. Return to Sport After Tibial Shaft Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Greg A. J.; Wood, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Acute tibial shaft fractures represent one of the most severe injuries in sports. Return rates and return-to-sport times after these injuries are limited, particularly with regard to the outcomes of different treatment methods. Objective: To determine the current evidence for the treatment of and return to sport after tibial shaft fractures. Data Sources: OVID/MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Collaboration Database, Web of Science, PEDro, SPORTDiscus, Scopus, and Google Scholar were all searched for articles published from 1988 to 2014. Study Selection: Inclusion criteria comprised studies of level 1 to 4 evidence, written in the English language, that reported on the management and outcome of tibial shaft fractures and included data on either return-to-sport rate or time. Studies that failed to report on sporting outcomes, those of level 5 evidence, and those in non–English language were excluded. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Data Extraction: The search used combinations of the terms tibial, tibia, acute, fracture, athletes, sports, nonoperative, conservative, operative, and return to sport. Two authors independently reviewed the selected articles and created separate data sets, which were subsequently combined for final analysis. Results: A total of 16 studies (10 retrospective, 3 prospective, 3 randomized controlled trials) were included (n = 889 patients). Seventy-six percent (672/889) of the patients were men, with a mean age of 27.7 years. Surgical management was assessed in 14 studies, and nonsurgical management was assessed in 8 studies. Return to sport ranged from 12 to 54 weeks after surgical intervention and from 28 to 182 weeks after nonsurgical management (mean difference, 69.5 weeks; 95% CI, –83.36 to −55.64; P Fractures treated surgically had a return-to-sport rate of 92%, whereas those treated nonsurgically had a return rate of 67% (risk ratio, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.20 to 1.57; P displaced fractures

  17. Method for Constructing Standardized Simulated Root Canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Bongert, Udo; Weine, Franklin S.

    1990-01-01

    The construction of visual and manipulative aids, clear resin blocks with root-canal-like spaces, for simulation of root canals is explained. Time, materials, and techniques are discussed. The method allows for comparison of canals, creation of any configuration of canals, and easy presentation during instruction. (MSE)

  18. Rat tibial osteotomy model providing a range of normal to impaired healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Joan D; Weinhold, Paul; Brimmo, Olubusola; Dahners, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an inexpensive and easily implemented rat tibial osteotomy model capable of producing a range of healing outcomes. A saw blade was used to create a transverse osteotomy of the tibia in 89 Sprague-Dawley rats. A 0.89 mm diameter stainless steel wire was then inserted as an intramedullary nail to stabilize the fracture. To impair healing, 1, 2, or 3 mm cylindrical polyetheretherketone (PEEK) spacer beads were threaded onto the wires, between the bone ends. Fracture healing was evaluated radiographically, biomechanically, and histologically at 5 weeks. Means were compared for statistical differences by one-way ANOVA and Holm-Sidak multiple comparison testing. The mean number of "cortices bridged" for the no spacer group was 3.4 (SD ± 0.8), which was significantly greater than in the 1 mm (2.3 ± 1.4), 2 mm (0.8 ± 0.7), and 3 mm (0.3 ± 0.4) groups (p < 0.003). Biomechanical results correlated with radiographic findings, with an ultimate torque of 172 ± 53, 137 ± 41, 90 ± 38, and 24 ± 23 N/mm with a 0, 1, 2, or 3 mm defect, respectively. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that this inexpensive, technically straightforward model can be used to create a range of outcomes from normal healing to impaired healing, to nonunions. This model may be useful for testing new therapeutic strategies to promote fracture healing, materials thought to be able to heal critical-sized defects, or evaluating agents suspected of impairing healing. Copyright © 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  19. Intramedullary versus extramedullary fixation in the management of subtrochanteric femur fractures: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu PC

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pengcheng Liu,1,2,* Xing Wu,1,* Hui Shi,1,2 Run Liu,1 Hexi Shu,1 JinPeng Gong,1 Yong Yang,1 Qi Sun,1 Jiezhou Wu,1,2 Xiaoyang Nie,1 Ming Cai1 1Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University, School of Medicine, Shanghai, 2First Clinical Medical College, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Intramedullary and extramedullary fixation methods are used in the management of subtrochanteric femur fractures. However, whether intramedullary or extramedullary fixation is the primary treatment for subtrochanteric femur fractures in adults remains debatable.Level of evidence: Meta-analyses of prospective studies, level I.Materials and methods: The Cochrane library, Embase, Google Scholar, and PubMed databases were searched separately for all relevant studies published before January 1, 2015. No language restriction was applied. Prospective randomized controlled trials that compared intramedullary or extramedullary internal fixation to repair subtrochanteric femur fractures in adults were included. We determined intraoperative data, postoperative complications, fracture fixation complications, wound infection, hospital stay days, and final outcome measures to assess the relative effects of different internal fixation methods for the treatment of subtrochanteric femur fractures in adults.Results: Six studies were included in our meta-analysis. The relative risks (RRs of revision rate was 83% lower (RR, 0.17, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05 to 0.60; P=0.006, fixation failure rate was 64% lower (RR, 0.36, 95% CI, 0.12 to 1.08; P=0.07, non-union rate was 77% lower (RR, 0.23, 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.81; P=0.02 in the intramedullary group compared with the extramedullary group. No significant differences were found between the intramedullary group and extramedullary group for intraoperative data, postoperative complications, wound infection

  20. UNSTABLE FEMORAL FRACTURES TREATED WITH TITANIUM ELASTIC INTRAMEDULLARY NAILS, IN CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Jamil Faissal; Schelle, Gisele; Valenza, Weverley; Pavelec, Anna Carolina; Souza, Camila Deneka Arantes

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the indications, epidemiology, associated lesions, complications and prognosis among children with unstable femoral diaphysis fractures who were treated with titanium elastic intramedullary nails. This was a retrospective analysis on 24 patients aged 5-12 years with unstable femoral diaphysis fractures who underwent surgical treatment with elastic titanium intramedullary nails at the Cajuru University Hospital, Curitiba-PR, between April 2002 and March 2008, with a minimum follow-up of 36 months. The epidemiological data, angular deviations, leg shortening and bone consolidation were evaluated. The medical files of 113 cases operated between April 2002 and March 2008 were reassessed. From these, 24 cases of unstable femoral diaphysis fractures treated with elastic titanium intramedullary nails with retrograde insertion were included in the study. There were two bilateral fractures and two exposed fractures. Seven patients were female and 17 were male, and the mean age was 8.3 years. The following were presented at the end of the study: shortening, varus or valgus displacement, final retrocurvatum or antecurvatum of zero, and absence of delayed consolidation or pseudarthrosis. The elastic titanium intramedullary nails were easily placed and removed. We believe that using elastic titanium intramedullary nails is a good option for fixation of unstable femoral fractures in children.

  1. Surgical management of diaphyseal humeral nonunion after intramedullary nailing: Wave-plate fixation and autologous bone grafting without nail removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerber, Ariane; Marti, René; Jupiter, Jesse

    2003-01-01

    Six patients with a nonunion of the humeral diaphysis after intramedullary nailing were treated with a wave plate and autologous bone graft but without removal of the intramedullary implant. The mean duration of the nonunion was 19 months (range, 6-36 months). At a mean follow-up of 12 months

  2. Horizontal Canal Benign Positional Vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohtaram Najafi

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is a syndrome characterized by transient episodes of vertigo in association with rapid changes in head position in Dix-Halpike Maneuver. This kind of vertigo is thought to be caused by migration of otoconial debris into canals other than the posterior canal, such as the anterior or lateral canals. It is also theoretically possible for many aberrant patterns of BPPV to occur from an interaction of debris in several canals, location of debris within the canal, and central adaptation patterns to lesions. The symptoms of BPPV are much more consistent with free-moving densities (canaliths in the posterior SCC rather than fixed densities attached to the cupula. While the head is upright, the particles sit in the PSC at the most gravity-dependent position. The best method to induce and see vertigo and nystagmus in BPPV of the lateral semicircular canal is to rotate head 90°while patient is in the supine position, nystagmus would appear in the unaffected side weaker but longer than the affected side. canal paresis has been described in one third of the patients with BPPV. Adaptation which is one of the remarkable features of BPPV in PSC is rarely seen in LSC. Rotations of 270° or 360° around the yaw axis (the so-called barbecue maneuver toward the unaffected ear are popular methods for the treatment of geotropic HC-BPPV. These maneuvers consist of sequential head turning of 90° toward the healthy side while supine. With these maneuvers, the free-floating otoconial debris migrates in the ampullofugal direction, finally entering the utricle through the nonampullated end of the horizontal canal. This kind of vertigo recovers spontaneously more rapidly and suddenly.

  3. Intramedullary Venous Drainage System for Distal Fingertip Replantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purisa, Husrev; Ozturk, Muhammed Besir; Kabakas, Fatih; Mersa, Berkan; Ozcelik, Ismail Bulent; Sezer, Ilker

    2017-08-01

    The number of venous anastomoses performed during fingertip replantation is one of the most important factors affecting the success of replantation. However, because vessel diameters decrease in the zone 1 level, vessel anastomoses, especially vein anastomoses, are technically difficult and, thus, cannot be performed in most cases. Alternative venous drainage methods are crucial when any reliable vein repair is not possible. In the literature, so many artery-only replantation techniques have been defined, such as arteriovenous anastomoses, forming an arteriovenous or venocutaneous fistula, manual milking and massage, puncturing, and external bleeding via a fishmouth incision and using a medical leech. It has been shown that, in distal fingertip replantations, the medullary cavity may also be a good way for venous return. In this study, we introduce an alternative intramedullary venous drainage system we developed to facilitate venous drainage in artery-only fingertip replantations. The results of 24 fingertip replantations distal to the nail fold by using this system are presented with a literature review.

  4. Intramedullary osteosynthesis versus plate osteosynthesis in subtrochanteric fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnei, C; Popescu, Gh; Barbu, D; Capraru, F

    2011-01-01

    Due to an ever-aging population and a growing prevalence of osteoporosis and motor vehicle accidents, the number of subtrochanteric fractures is increasing worldwide. The choice of the appropriate implant continues to be critical for fixation of unstable hip fractures. The subtrochanteric region has certain anatomical and biomechanical features that can make fractures in this region difficult to treat. The preferred type of device is a matter of debate. Increased understandings of biomechanical characteristics of the hip and improvement of the implant materials have reduced the incidence of complications. The surgeons choose between the two methods according to Seinsheimer's classification and also to their personal preferences. As a general principle, the open reduction and internal fixation were performed in stable fractures, and the closed reduction and internal fixation were performed in unstable fractures. The advantages of intramedullary nailing consist in a small skin incision, lower operating times, preservation of fracture hematoma and the possibility of early weight bearing. The disadvantages consist in a difficult closed reduction due to important muscular forces, although the nail can be used as a reduction instrument, and higher implant cost. In open reduction internal fixation techniques, the advantage is represented by anatomical reduction which, in our opinion, is not necessary. The disadvantages are represented by: higher operating time, demanding surgery, large devascularization, higher infection rates, late weight bearing, medial instability, refracture after plate removal and inesthetic approach. PMID:22514563

  5. Study on Root Canal Preparation with Endo Motor Tecnika Vision and Sealing of Root Canal Filing

    OpenAIRE

    藤原, 治; 佐々木, 重夫; 天野, 義和; フジワラ, オサム; ササキ, シゲオ; アマノ, ヨシカズ; Osamu, FUJIWARA; Shigeo, SASAKI; Yoshikazu, AMANO

    2008-01-01

    Because root canal preparation in root canal treatment takes long time, various special contraangle handpiece are developed to promote efficiency of root canal preparation. Root canal are prepared with computerized micro motor handpiece. The purpose of this study is to examine the time of root canal preparation and the difference of sealing efficiency of root canal fillings between exclusive point and other point after preparation in the cases of files Endo and motor technika vision, and to f...

  6. Retreatment of a 6-Canalled Mandibular First Molar with Four Mesial Canals: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Ghabraei, Sholeh; Bolhari, Behnam; Ghorbanzadeh, Abdollah

    2010-01-01

    Successful root canal treatment requires adequate knowledge regarding morphologic variations in root canal system of teeth. This report describes a six-canalled mandibular first molar with four mesial root canals requiring endodontic retreatment. The two additional canals in the mesial root were found during retreatment with the aid of illumination and magnification. In conclusion, the possibility of atypical morphology and additional canals should never be overlooked.

  7. [Acute paraplegia and intramedullary cavitation in a patient with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, M; Presas, J L; Speiser, E; Klimovsky, S; Barro, A; Nogués, M

    1992-01-01

    This 42-year-old male patient voluntarily discontinued treatment for lung TBC and twenty days later developed acute paraplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a large intramedullary cavity extending from T2 to the conus medullaris. Having resumed anti-TBC treatment, the patient progressed favourably, despite any change in cavity size. Tuberculous meningitis may be complicated by the appearance of intramedullary cavities by two distinct mechanisms: 1) adhesive arachnoiditis at the skull base with obstruction of Luschka and Magendie foramina, followed by hydrocephalus and hydromyelia; and 2) spinal cord arachnoiditis with the development of arachnoidal and intramedullary cysts. In either case, symptoms are of late presentation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature of lung tuberculosis associated with syringomyelia but without basal arachnoiditis. Acute clinical presentation with paraplegia is exceptional.

  8. Medial migration of the intramedullary Gamma 3 nail - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Costa Pinheiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Intertrochanteric femur fractures are very common in patients over 65 years old, and are often associated with osteoporosis. Proximal femoral nails are preferred because of their biomechanical advantages in the treatment of these fractures, especially if the fracture is unstable. However, many complications associated with intramedullary fracture fixation have been described. The medial migration of the intramedullary gamma nail is a rare complication. The authors report an uncommon but potentially fatal complication, medial and intrapelvic migration of the intramedullary Gamma 3 nails, recorded after one month of osteosynthesis. This article aims to alert the orthopedic community to this rare complication, which may present a high risk of morbidity and mortality.

  9. Intramedullary nailing of the femur with an inflatable self-locking nail: comparison with locked nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepore, Luciano; Lepore, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola

    2003-01-01

    We report a comparative study between an inflatable expandable nail and a traditional locked intramedullary implant in closed fractures of the femoral shaft. We matched each of 43 patients who had undergone intramedullary fixation with an inflatable expandable nail with a patient of the same sex, age (within 2 years), and fracture who had undergone statically locked intramedullary fixation with traditional nails. The mean duration of surgery was significantly shorter in the patients who were treated with the inflatable expandable nail. There were no differences in average blood loss, transfusion requirements, or hospitalization. Five of the patients who underwent traditional nailing required dynamization to achieve union. The inflatable expandable nail allows effective management of diaphyseal fractures of the femur. Interlocking is not necessary, operative times are reduced, and exposure to ionizing radiation is minimized. At present, however, the inflatable expandable nail used in the this investigation is markedly more expensive than traditional devices.

  10. Triplane fracture of the proximal tibial epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinigaglia, Riccardo; Gigante, Cosimo; Basso, Giampaolo; Turra, Sisto

    2007-01-01

    Our purpose is to report a very rare case of proximal tibia triplane fracture, focusing the particular pattern of fracture and the long-term follow-up result. The triplane fracture is an exceptional fracture that occurs in the 3 planes (coronal, sagittal and transverse) close to the end of the growth period. A 15-year-old boy was admitted to our Center for a left femoral diaphyseal fracture and an ipsilateral lateral proximal tibia triplane fracture following a road accident. The femur was fixed with an intramedullary nail, the triplane fracture was anatomically reduced and percutaneously fixed. After 4 years follow-up, the knee was stable and with no complaints. Its range of motion was complete. Radiographs and MRI did not show any abnormality on the left leg and knee. In order to stabilize a proximal tibia triplane fracture a surgical internal fixation is usually required, with the possibility of a good long-term outcome also due to the growth potential remaining, if physeal arrest does not occur.

  11. Tibial bowing in children - what is normal? A radiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbinden, Isabella; Rutz, Erich; Jacobson, Jon A.; Magerkurth, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    To define osseous landmarks on tibia radiographs in order to establish age-related normal values characterizing physiological tibial bowing in children. Five hundred and twenty-six patients aged 0-17 years with normal radiographs of the lower legs were identified and retrospectively reviewed by two blinded radiologists. In anteroposterior (ap)/lateral (lat)-views, 3 lines defined tibial length and angulation. Line-A connecting proximal to distal corner of tibial metaphysic, lines B and C corresponding to corners of tibial metaphysis. Angle A/B defines proximal, A/C distal tibial-angulation. Tibial curvature is defined by distance of line-D parallel to A and tangential to tibial cortex. Normal values were calculated with linear-regression. Intra-/Interreader agreement were tested with a Bland-Altman-plot. Intrareader-agreement: Reader 1 showed a bias of -0.1, standard-deviation of bias was 1.9 and 95 %-limits-of-agreement -3.9- 3.7. Reader 2: -0.01, 2.4 and -4.7- 4.7. Interreader: 0.2, 1.6 and -2.9- 3.3. Angle-A/B ap was 80-100 , increasing with age (86.5-88); angle-AC ap was 82-107 (96.8-90.5), angle-AB lat was 81-107 (93.0-98.0); angle-AC lat was 76-102 (89.5-86.5); depth of curve ap was 0-11 % (8-3.5) and lat 2-13 %, (8.5-3.5). Age dependent tibial bowing can be assessed with this new measurement system and age-related normal-values characterizing physiological tibial bowing in children is established. (orig.)

  12. The anatomical tibial axis: reliable rotational orientation in knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, J P; Dixon, H; Dandachli, W; Iranpour, F

    2008-08-01

    The rotational alignment of the tibia is an unresolved issue in knee replacement. A poor functional outcome may be due to malrotation of the tibial component. Our aim was to find a reliable method for positioning the tibial component in knee replacement. CT scans of 19 knees were reconstructed in three dimensions and orientated vertically. An axial plane was identified 20 mm below the tibial spines. The centre of each tibial condyle was calculated from ten points taken round the condylar cortex. The tibial tubercle centre was also generated as the centre of the circle which best fitted eight points on the outside of the tubercle in an axial plane at the level of its most prominent point. The derived points were identified by three observers with errors of 0.6 mm to 1 mm. The medial and lateral tibial centres were constant features (radius 24 mm (SD 3), and 22 mm (SD 3), respectively). An anatomical axis was created perpendicular to the line joining these two points. The tubercle centre was found to be 20 mm (SD 7) lateral to the centre of the medial tibial condyle. Compared with this axis, an axis perpendicular to the posterior condylar axis was internally rotated by 6 degrees (SD 3). An axis based on the tibial tubercle and the tibial spines was also internally rotated by 5 degrees (sd 10). Alignment of the knee when based on this anatomical axis was more reliable than either the posterior surfaces or any axis involving the tubercle which was the least reliable landmark in the region.

  13. Patella height changes post high tibial osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Ghim Gooi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO is a well-described treatment in early medial compartmental osteoarthritis of the knee. However, two undesirable sequelae may follow –patella baja and changes in the posterior tibial slope (TS. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective study in patients who underwent HTO in our center between September 2009 and February 2017. Preoperative and 6-week postoperative long-leg weight bearing films and lateral knee radiographs were assessed. Pre- and postoperative radiological measurements include the Caton-Deschamps Index (CDI, the mechanical axis deviation (MAD, and the posterior TS. Independant t-test and Pearson correlation test were performed. Results: A total of 106 knees were recruited. The mean age was 48.8 ± 10.8 years. 66 (62.3% and 40 (37.7% knees were from males and females, respectively. The mean pre- and postoperative measurements was (−9.70° ± 3.67° to 0.08° ± 2.80° (−varus; +valgus for the MAD, (7.14° ± 1.78° to 8.72° ± 3.11° for posterior TS, and (0.93° ± 0.084° to 0.82° ± 0.13° for CDI (P ≤ 0.001 for all. The association between patella height change and the level of osteotomy (supra-tubercle vs. infra-tubercle was statistically significant (P < 0.001. A supra-tubercle osteotomy cut significantly lowering patella height (P = 0.011. There was otherwise no statistically significant correlations between patella height changes and the correction angle (P = 0.187 or posterior TS change (P = 0.744. Conclusions: A medial opening wedge HTO above the tibial tubercle was significantly associated with lowering patella height or reducing CDI postoperatively. Based on our results, we would recommend the use of an infra-tubercle osteotomy during the corrective surgery to prevent the complication of patella baja.

  14. Comparison of extramedullary and intramedullary devices for treatment of subtrochanteric femoral fractures at tertiary level center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Sanjay

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The treatment of subtrochanteric fractures is challenging and treatment modalities and implants are constantly evolving. This study attempts to revisit and compare extramedullary vs. intramedullary devices in relatively young population. Methods: Thirty patients with subtrochanteric fractures were enrolled and treated with extramedullary or intramedullary devices and follow-up continued one year for clinico-radiological assessment. Results: The mean age of patients was 37.53 years. Most were males between 21-40 years old. The dominant mode of injury was traffic accidents (66%. Fractures were classifi ed according to Russell-Taylor classifi cation. Forty percent were Russell-Taylor type IA, 37% type IB and 23% type IIA. Average time to surgery was 3.6 days from the time of admission to hospital. Mean duration of surgery was 45 minutes for intramedullary device (group A and 105 minutes for extramedullary device (group B. Average blood loss was 100 ml in group A and 200 ml in group B. Mean duration of radiation exposure was 130 seconds and 140 seconds for groups A and B, while average duration of hospital stay was 12 days and 16 days respectively. Excellent results were seen in 47% of cases in group A and 33% of cases in group B. Conclusion: Intramedullary device is a reliable implant for subtrochanteric fractures. It has high rates of union with minimal soft-tissue damage. Intramedullary fixation has biological and biomechanical advantages, but surgery is technically demanding. Gradual learning and patience is needed to make this method truly rewarding. Key words: Subtrochanteric fractures; Intramedullary; Dynamic hip screw

  15. Biomechanical Comparison of Intramedullary Screw Versus Low-Profile Plate Fixation of a Jones Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jeannie; Glisson, Richard R; Matsumoto, Takumi; Easley, Mark E

    2016-04-01

    Intramedullary screw fixation of fifth metatarsal Jones fractures often produces satisfactory results, however, nonunion and refracture rates are not negligible. The low-profile "hook" plate is an alternative fixation method that has been promoted to offer improved rotational control at the fracture site, but this remains to be proven. The purpose of this study was to document biomechanical performance differences between this type of plate and a contemporary solid, dual-pitch intramedullary screw in a cadaveric Jones fracture model. Simulated Jones fractures were created in 8 matched pairs of fresh-frozen cadaveric fifth metatarsals. One bone from each pair was stabilized using an intramedullary TriMed Jones Screw and the other using a TriMed Jones Fracture Plate (TriMed, Inc, Santa Clarita, CA). Controlled bending and torsional loads were applied. Bending stiffness and fracture site angulation, as well as torsional stiffness, peak torque, and fracture site rotation were quantified and compared. Intramedullary screw fixation demonstrated greater bending stiffness and less fracture site angulation than plate fixation during plantar-to-dorsal and lateral-to-medial bending. Torsional stiffness of screw-fixed metatarsals exceeded that of plate-fixed bones at initial loading; however, as rotation progressed, the plate resisted torque better than the screw. No difference in peak torque was demonstrable between fixation methods, but it was reached earlier in specimens fixed with screws and later in those fixed with plates as rotation progressed. In this cadaveric Jones fracture model, intramedullary screw fixation demonstrated bending stiffness and resistance to early torsional loading that was superior to that offered by plate fixation. Although low-profile "hook" plates offer an alternative for fixation of fifth metatarsal Jones fractures, intramedullary screw fixation may provide better resistance to bending and initiation of fracture site rotation. The influence of

  16. External skeletal fixation of the tibial shaft fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Milenković Saša; Mitković Milorad B.; Radenković Mile

    2005-01-01

    Aim. To present the possibility of a successful use of external skeletal fixation in treating the open and closed tibial shaft fractures with Mitković’s external fixator. Methods. External fixation was used in 115 patients with 118 fresh tibial shaft fractures, 82 males (71.3%) and 33 females (28.7%), average age 43.92 years (16−84). Open tibial shaft fractures were present in 37 (31.36%). All the fractures were treated with Mitković’s external fixator type M 20. Results. The results of exter...

  17. A novel jig arm to measure tibial plateau angle during tibial plateau leveling osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restle, Kyle N; Biskup, Jeffery J

    2017-10-01

    To determine the ability of a novel device attached to the proximal tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) jig pin to accurately predict intraoperative change in tibial plateau angle (TPA). In vitro cadaveric study. Left hindlimbs of adult dogs (n = 9). A modified Slocum tibial plateau leveling (TPL) jig with the Rotational Osteotomy Measuring Arm (ROMA) was placed on the tibia and a radial TPLO osteotomy was performed. Based on preoperative radiographic TPA measurements, the proximal segment was rotated using the traditional method of marking points on the osteotomy a specified distance apart. After rotation, the predicted TPA was recorded based on the ROMA. Postoperative TPA was measured on radiographs. The ability of the ROMA to predict postoperative TPA was compared to that of the traditional method. The average final TPA achieved with the traditional method was 6.4° (range, 3.0-10.0°). The ROMA predicted a final TPA of 5.8° (range, 3.8-10.1°). No significant difference was found between the TPA predicted based on the traditional method and ROMA method. The ROMA may be an alternative to the traditional method of measuring proximal segment rotation during TPLO procedure. Performing a TPLO with the ROMA may accurately predict the postoperative TPA while eliminating the need for measuring chord length, making reference marks, or referencing TPA charts for various osteotomy blade sizes. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  18. Permanent antibiotic impregnated intramedullary nail in diabetic limb salvage: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason B. Woods

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Managing complications after attempted hind foot and ankle arthrodesis with intramedullary nail fixation is a challenge. This situation becomes more problematic in the patient with diabetes mellitus and multiple comorbidities. Infection and subsequent osteomyelitis can be a devastating, limb threatening complication associated with these procedures. The surgeon must manage both the infectious process and the skeletal instability concurrently. This article provides a literature review and detailed management strategies for a modified technique of employing antibiotic impregnated polymethylmethacrylate-coated intramedullary nailing.

  19. Comparison of the operation of arthroscopic tibial inlay and traditional tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Daifeng; Xiao, Mochao; Lian, Yongyun; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    To perform dual-bundle reconstruction of posterior cruciate ligament using full arthroscopic tibial inlay technology with self-designed tibia tunnel drilling system and to compare the effect of arthroscopic tibial inlay versus traditional technique for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. 32 patients were randomly divided into experiment group (improved tibial inlay, n = 17) and control group (traditional tibial inlay, n = 15). Self-designed tibia tunnel drill system was used to produce intraoperative deep-limited bone tunnel. During follow-up, the location of the bone block and the healing situation were checked by knee X-ray and spiral CT scan. Blood loss, operation time and nerve vascular injuries were evaluated. Mean intraoperative blood loss was 123.53 ± 74.05 ml in the improved tibial inlay group compared with 332 ± 114.26 ml in the traditional tibial inlay group (t = 6.12, P inlay group compared with 346.37 ± 59.67 min in the traditional tibial inlay group (t = 5.19, P inlay technique compared with 14 negative cases and 2 positive cases of traditional tibial Inlay technique. The X-ray and spiral CT scan showed the location of the bone block were perfect and healed well with the patent who received improved tibial inlay technology after 12 weeks postoperatively. Accurate depth-limited bone tunnel can be produced by the tibia tunnel drill system with minor trauma, less bleeding and reducing of nerves or vessels and the recent clinical effects of PCL reconstruction were pretty good.

  20. Surgical tips of intramedullary nailing in severely bowed femurs in atypical femur fractures: Simulation with 3D printed model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jai Hyung; Lee, Yongkoo; Shon, Oog-Jin; Shon, Hyun Chul; Kim, Ji Wan

    2016-06-01

    The surgical management of atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) is complex in cases with severe bowing of the femur, being associated with a high rate of failure. Our first aim was to use preoperative templating and 3D printed model characterise the technical difficulties associated with use of current commercially available intramedullary nail (IMN) systems for the management of AFFs with severe bowing. Our second aim was to use outcomes of our 3D printing analysis to define technical criteria to overcome these problems. The modelled femur with 3D printing had an anterior bowing curvature radius of 772mm and an angle of lateral bowing of 15.4°. Nine commercially available IMN systems were evaluated in terms of position of the nail within the medullary canal, occurrence of perforation of femoral cortex by the distal tip of the nail, and location of the site of perforation relative to the knee joint. The following IMN systems were evaluated: unreamed femoral nail (UFN), cannulated femoral nail (CFN), Sirus nail, right and left expert Asian femoral nail (A2FN), right and left Zimmer Natural Nail (ZNN), proximal femoral nail anti-rotation (PFNA), and Zimmer Cephalomedullary Nail (CMN). Along the sagittal plane, the UFN, CFN and Sirus systems were acceptably contained within the medullary canal, as well as the "opposite side" A2FN and ZNN. Only the Sirus IMN system was contained along the coronal plane. The distal part of the all other IMN systems perforated the anterior cortex of the femur, at distances ranging between 2.8 and 11.7cm above the distal end of the femoral condyles. Using simulated fracture reduction in the 3D printed model, none of the 9 IMN systems provided acceptable anatomical reduction of the fracture. A residual gap in fragment position and translation was provided by the "opposite side" ZNN, followed by the UFN and Sirus systems. Commercially available IMN systems showed mismatch with severely bowed femurs. Our simulation supports that fit of these

  1. Corinth Canal, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The Isthmus of Corinth has played a very important role in the history of Greece. It is the only land bridge between the country's north (Attica) and south (Peloponnese). It is a 6 km wide tongue of land separating the Gulf of Corinth from the Saronic Sea. Populations, armies and commodities have got to move through it. In the 6th century BCE, the Greeks built the Diolkos, a 10 meter-wide stone roadway to pull ships across the Isthmus on wooden cylinders and wheeled vehicles. In 1882, a canal was started and completed 11 years later. It is 6343 meters long, 25 meters wide, and 8 meters deep. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Size: 25.3 by 37.7 kilometers (15.7 by 23.4 miles) Location: 37.9 degrees North latitude, 23 degrees East longitude Orientation: North at top Image

  2. Flexible intramedullary nailing for femoral diaphyseal fractures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojan Tamrakar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Although various treatment options are available for the treatment of femoral diaphyesal fractures in children, the titanium flexible nailing has gained popularity because it is safe, easy procedure with rapid recovery and high success rate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of titanium elastic nails in treating paediatric femoral diaphyesal fractures at Patan Hospital.Materials & Methods: There were 35 cases which were all fixed with titanium flexible intramedullary nail under image intensifier at the Patan hospital from January 2013 and December 2015. Patients were evaluated in follow-ups to observe the alignment of fracture, infection, delayed union, nonunion, limb length discrepancy, implant failure, range of movement of hip and knee joints, and time to unite the fracture. The final results were evaluated using criteria of titanium elastic nail (TEN outcome score described by Flynn et al.Results: The mean age of the patients was 8.51 years. Among 35 patients (22 boys and 13 girls, there were 19 mid-shaft fractures, nine proximal third fractures and seven distal third fractures. Fracture patterns were transverse (22, oblique (10, spiral (2, and comminuted (2. The mean time for fracture union was 8.17 weeks radiologically whereas 9.83 weeks clinically. According to TEN outcome score, excellent and good results were in 28 cases (80% and seven cases (20% respectively.Conclusion: Flexible titanium nailing is a safe and satisfactory treatment for diaphyseal femoral fractures in children, because it provides rapid recovery, short rehabilitation and immobilization as well as very high union rate with few complications.

  3. [Retrograde intramedullary nailing for periprosthetic fractures of the distal femur].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biber, R; Bail, H J

    2014-10-01

    Intramedullary stabilization of periprosthetic distal femoral fractures by interlocking nailing. Closed reduction by retrograde nail can be combined with the use of transmedullary support screws (TMS principle of Stedtfeld). Supracondylar fractures above stable knee arthroplasty (Rorabeck types I and II), femoral shaft fractures ipsilateral of stable hip and/or knee arthroplasty, contraindications for antegrade nailing Closed box design of femoral implant, intercondylar distance of the femoral component smaller than nail diameter, more than 40° flexion deficit of the knee, inability to place two bicortical distal interlocking screws. Relative contraindication: insufficient overlap with proximal implants Supine position and knee flexion of approximately 45°. Fluoroscopy should be possible between the knee and hip. Longitudinal skin incision into the pre-existing scar over the patellar tendon which is then split. The nail entry point is located in the intercondylar groove at the deepest point of Blumensaat's line, often predetermined by the femoral arthroplasty component. Reaming is rarely necessary. Transmedullary support screws may correct axial malalignment during nail insertion. Static interlocking in a direction from lateral to medial by the aiming device. Insertion of locking cap. Retrograde nailing normally allows full weight bearing. Range of motion does not need to be restricted. Out of 101 fractures treated between 2000 and 2013 with a Targon RF nail (Aesculap, Tuttlingen, Germany) 10 were periprosthetic, all were classified as Rorabeck type II and of these 6 fractures were metaphyseal and 4 were diaphyseal. In four cases proximal implants were present. The mean operative time for periprosthetic fracture fixation did not significantly differ from that for normal retrograde femoral nailing. There were no postoperative infections, fixation failures or delayed unions. There was one revision for secondary correction of maltorsion.

  4. Do Capacity Coupled Electric Fields Accelerate Tibial Stress Fracture Healing?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffman, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    A convenience sample based on availability of tibial stress fracture cases a% local Sports Medicine Clinics will be selected over 4 years until forty subjects (20 male, 20 female) have been treated...

  5. Do Capacitively Coupled Electric Fields Accelerate Tibial Stress Fracture Healing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffman, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    A convenience sample based on availability of tibial stress fracture cases at local Sports Medicine Clinics will be selected over 2-3 years until forty subjects (20 male, 20 female) have been treated...

  6. Do Capacitively Coupled Electric Fields Accelerate Tibial Stress Fracture Healing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffman, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    A convenience sample based on availability of tibial stress fracture cases at local Sports Medicine Clinics will be selected over 2-3 years until forty subjects (20 male, 20 female) have been treated...

  7. Management of Posterior Articular Depression in Tibial Plateau Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, John David; Della Rocca, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Fractures involving the posterior aspect of the tibial plateau are challenging fractures to treat. Articular depression in tibial plateau fractures is usually addressed by elevation of the fragment(s), filling the residual defect with bone graft or bone substitute, and "raft" support of the articular fracture reduction with screws through a medially and/or laterally based plate. Posterior tibial plateau articular depression presents unique challenges for obtaining and maintaining fracture reduction. To obtain the goals of anatomic reduction and stable fixation, a thorough understanding of the fracture, specific approaches, reduction techniques, and stabilization strategies is needed. This article reviews the most current strategies for treating tibial plateau fracture patients with posterior articular depression. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Ship canals and aquatic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, William I.; Smith, Stanford H.

    1971-01-01

    Through a combination of ecosystem homeostasis and the perversity of man and nature, oftentimes the significant biological changes effected by environmental modifications are not detected until long after the initial change has taken place. The immediate impact, which may range from the spectacular to the undetectable, is a deceptive measure of the long-term and often more important changes in the ecosystem. Two major engineering achievements illustrate this premise: (i) construction of the Erie Canal, which provided access from the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes, and the Welland Canal, which bypasses the block between Lakes Ontario and Erie created by Niagara Falls (Fig. 1), and (ii) construction of the Suez Canal between the Red Sea and the Mediterranean Sea.

  9. Retention of Root Canal Posts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, A; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Flury, S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the cement film thickness of a zinc phosphate or a resin cement on retention of untreated and pretreated root canal posts. Prefabricated zirconia posts (CosmoPost: 1.4 mm) and two types of luting cements (a zinc phosphate cement [DeTrey Zinc......] and a self-etch adhesive resin cement [Panavia F2.0]) were used. After removal of the crowns of 360 extracted premolars, canines, or incisors, the root canals were prepared with a parallel-sided drill system to three different final diameters. Half the posts did not receive any pretreatment. The other half...... received tribochemical silicate coating according to the manufacturer's instructions. Posts were then luted in the prepared root canals (n=30 per group). Following water storage at 37°C for seven days, retention of the posts was determined by the pull-out method. Irrespective of the luting cement...

  10. Do Capacity Coupled Electric Fields Accelerate Tibial Stress Fracture Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    USA Corresponding author Belinda R. Beck, Ph.D. Griffith University School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre Q...accelerate tibial stress fracture healing? Medicine and Science in Sport and Exercise , 31(5, Suppl. 1): 2006 2. Beck B.R., Bergman G., Arendt E...Predicting Recovery from Tibial Stress Fracture Medicine and Science in Sport and Exercise , 31(5, Suppl. 1): 2007 (submitted) 15 Presentations

  11. Physeal growth arrest after tibial lengthening in achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Bilateral tibial lengthening has become one of the standard treatments for upper segment-lower segment disproportion and to improve quality of life in achondroplasia. We determined the effect of tibial lengthening on the tibial physis and compared tibial growth that occurred at the physis with that in non-operated patients with acondroplasia. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of serial radiographs until skeletal maturity in 23 achondroplasia patients who underwent bilateral tibial lengthening before skeletal maturity (lengthening group L) and 12 achondroplasia patients of similar height and age who did not undergo tibial lengthening (control group C). The mean amount of lengthening of tibia in group L was 9.2 cm (lengthening percentage: 60%) and the mean age at the time of lengthening was 8.2 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 9.8 years. Results Skeletal maturity (fusion of physis) occurred at 15.2 years in group L and at 16.0 years in group C. The actual length of tibia (without distraction) at skeletal maturity was 238 mm in group L and 277 mm in group C (p = 0.03). The mean growth rates showed a decrease in group L relative to group C from about 2 years after surgery. Physeal closure was most pronounced on the anterolateral proximal tibial physis, with relative preservation of the distal physis. Interpretation Our findings indicate that physeal growth rate can be disturbed after tibial lengthening in achondroplasia, and a close watch should be kept for such an occurrence—especially when lengthening of more than 50% is attempted. PMID:22489887

  12. Displaced tibial shaft fractures treated with ASIF compression internal fixation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Larsen, T K; Petersen, O C

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-one tibial shaft fractures treated by ASIF compression osteosynthesis were seen at follow-up at a median time of 46 weeks after injury. Twenty-four were open fractures and the patients received prophylactic antibiotics. The median stay in hospital was 15 days for open fractures and 6 days...... for closed fractures. There were complications in 26 cases, with deep infection in 9 cases. At present we cannot advocate the use of ASIF compression osteosynthesis for displaced tibial fractures....

  13. Technical note: Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the presence of an intramedullary femoral nail using anteromedial drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Matthew; Lamplot, Joseph; Walley, Kempland C; DeAngelis, Joseph P; Ramappa, Arun J

    2017-05-18

    To describe an approach to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using autologous hamstring by drilling via the anteromedial portal in the presence of an intramedullary (IM) femoral nail. Once preoperative imagining has characterized the proposed location of the femoral tunnel preparations are made to remove all of the hardware (locking bolts and IM nail). A diagnostic arthroscopy is performed in the usual fashion addressing all intra-articular pathology. The ACL remnant and lateral wall soft tissues are removed from the intercondylar, to provide adequate visualization of the ACL footprint. Femoral tunnel placement is performed using a transportal ACL guide with desired offset and the knee flexed to 2.09 rad. The Beath pin is placed through the guide starting at the ACL's anatomic footprint using arthroscopic visualization and/or fluoroscopic guidance. If resistance is met while placing the Beath pin, the arthroscopy should be discontinued and the obstructing hardware should be removed under fluoroscopic guidance. When the Beath pin is successfully placed through the lateral femur, it is overdrilled with a 4.5 mm Endobutton drill. If the Endobutton drill is obstructed, the obstructing hardware should be removed under fluoroscopic guidance. In this case, the obstruction is more likely during Endobutton drilling due to its larger diameter and increased rigidity compared to the Beath pin. The femoral tunnel is then drilled using a best approximation of the graft's outer diameter. We recommend at least 7 mm diameter to minimize the risk of graft failure. Autologous hamstring grafts are generally between 6.8 and 8.6 mm in diameter. After reaming, the knee is flexed to 1.57 rad, the arthroscope placed through the anteromedial portal to confirm the femoral tunnel position, referencing the posterior wall and lateral cortex. For a quadrupled hamstring graft, the gracilis and semitendinosus tendons are then harvested in the standard fashion. The tendons are whip

  14. Close Intramedullary Interlocking Nailing Versus Locking Compression Plating In the Treatment of Closed Fracture Shaft of the Tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, I K; Datta, N K; Chowdhury, A Z; Das, K P; Tarik, M M; Faisal, M A

    2016-07-01

    Fracture of tibial shaft is the commonest site of long bone fractures due to its superficial location involving young or middle-age people. Proper management is an important issue regarding the future effective movements. In this study patients were grouped in closed Intra medullary interlocking nailing and locking compression plating. Post-operative follow up at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 12 weeks and 3 months thereafter up to 6 months were done. Each of the patients was evaluated clinically and radiologically by tucker criteria of Tuker et al. Patients were assessed for pain on full weight bearing and kneeling, shortening and range of motion of knee and ankle joints. Radiological assessment for union of fracture, alignment of fracture and angulations and position of nail and screws and infection were observed during follow up. A total number of 32 patients were selected but only 27 patients were available for follow up for a period of 6 months. They were grouped into Group A, consisting of 15 patients who took the treatment in the form of closed intramedullary interlocking nailing and Group B, consisting of 12 patients those underwent ORIF with locking compression plating. In both of the groups Motor Vehicle Accident was the main mechanism of trauma. Fracture involving the middle 3rd of the tibia is common in both the groups. During post-operative follow up, four patients in Group A complained anterior knee pain, one patient in Group B had superficial infection, most of the patients had no restriction of movement in the ankle and knee joints and a single patient in Group B showed 1.5cm shortening of the lower limb. Period of hospital stay and fracture union time were less in Group A, which was statistically significant. Both groups showed excellent result with minimum complications. So this study permits to conclude that close IM interlocking nailing and open reduction and internal fixation by locking compression plating is equally effective for the management of close

  15. [Custom-designed 3D tibial augmentation for knee replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirman, R; Vavrík, P; Horák, Z

    2009-02-01

    Reconstruction with the use of custom-made implants aims at optimal replacement of lost or damaged bone structures and restoration of their funkction. In this study the development and construction of a custom-made implant and the operative technique used for the treatment of an extensive tibial defect are described. The patient was a 65-year-old man treated for over 20 years for psoriatic arthritis and severe instability of the right knee, particularly in the frontal plane, with a worsening varus deformity. The radiogram showed an extensive destruction of the medial tibial condyle that also deeply involved the lateral condyle. The extent of defect made it impossible to use any commercial tibial augmentation. The geometry of the custom-designed implant for the medial tibial condyle was constructed on the basis of a 3D defect model and the shape of the medial tibial condyle of the collateral knee seen on CT scans. After its correct shape was verified on a plastic model, its coordinates were set in the software of a machine tool, and a titanium augmentation otherwise compatible with a standard knee replacement was produced.The use of such a custom implant to complete standard total knee arthroplasty has so far been demanding in terms of organisation and manufacture. Its production in the future could be facilitated by substituting titanium for plastic material such as poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK). Key words: custom-made implant, tibial augmentation, knee prosthesis.

  16. Unpredictable Root Canal Morphology: Expect the Unexpected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohez J Makani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A maxillary first molar with more than four canals is an interesting example of anatomic variations, especially when two of these canals are detected, with separate apical foramen in the distal root. The inability to locate the unexpected canals of various anatomical configuration and subsequently treat them , may lead to therapeutic failures. Endodontic retreatment is usually the modality of choice in such cases. This report describes a case of a maxillary first molar with five canals (two mesial canals in mesial root, two distal canals in two distal roots and a palatal canal in palatal root. Additionally it shows a rare anatomic configuration and emphasizes the importance of identifying additional canals.

  17. Radiation‑free Insertion of Distal Interlocking Screw in Tibial and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suhm N, Messmer P, Zuna I, Jacob LA, Regazzoni P. Fluoroscopic guidance versus surgical navigation for distal locking of intramedullary implants. A prospective, controlled clinical study. Injury 2004;35:567‑74. 15. Kirousis G, Delis H, Megas P, Lambiris E, Panayiotakis G. Dosimetry during intramedullary nailing of the tibia.

  18. Intramedullary rodding in type III osteogenesis imperfecta. Effects on neuromotor development in 10 children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbert, R. H.; Helders, P. J.; Keessen, W.; Pruijs, H. E.; Gooskens, R. H.

    1995-01-01

    We studied retrospectively gross motor development and the impact of intramedullary rodding in 10 children with type III osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). There was a pronounced delay in motor development and the order in achieving gross motor milestones differed from the normal developmental sequence.

  19. Metachronous brain and intramedullary spinal cord metastases from nonsmall-cell lung cancer: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chih Liu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A 44-year-old man had a brain tumor secondary to lung adenocarcinoma and underwent craniectomy to remove the brain tumor. After postoperative whole-brain radiation therapy, he underwent pneumonectomy followed by chemotherapy, mediastinal radiotherapy, and target therapy for lung cancer. Thirty-six months after the initial brain surgery, he suffered from neck pain and right upper limb numbness that rapidly progressed to upper extremity weakness and paralysis in 2 months. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an intramedullary spinal cord lesion at the C4 level. Laminectomy and gross intramedullary tumor removal were performed. The patient’s neurological function improved after the operation. Nevertheless, 4 months after the intramedullary tumor removal, he began to show multiple metastases. Unfortunately, the patient died from respiratory failure 8 months after diagnosis with intramedullary spinal cord metastasis. In this case, early diagnosis and aggressive surgical treatment combined with postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy might have provided this patient with a prolonged survival and better quality of life.

  20. Cervical high-intensity intramedullary lesions in achondroplasia : Aetiology, prevalence and clinical relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Patrick A.; Lubout, Charlotte M.; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L.

    2012-01-01

    In achondroplastic patients with slight complaints of medullary compression the cervical spinal cord regularly exhibits an intramedullary (CHII) lesion just below the craniocervical junction with no signs of focal compression on the cord. Currently, the prevalence of the lesion in the general

  1. Diffusion tensor imaging in inflammatory and neoplastic intramedullary spinal cord lesions: Focusing on fiber tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyo Jin; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Eugene; Kim, Sung Gon; Kang, Yu Suhn; Ahn, Joong Mo; Kang, Heung Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Inflammatory and neoplastic intramedullary spinal cord lesions have overlapping clinical features, and it is occasionally difficult to distinguish one from the other on conventional magnetic resonance imaging. We aimed to compare diffusion tensor imaging findings between inflammatory and neoplastic intramedullary spinal cord lesions, with a specific focus on patterns of fiber tracking. Diffusion tensor imaging was performed in patients with either inflammatory or neoplastic intramedullary spinal cord lesions. The fiber tracking patterns (categorized as “intact,” “displaced,” or “interrupted”) were compared between these two groups. Eight patients were included in the study: 5 patients with pathologically or clinically confirmed inflammatory lesions and 3 patients with pathologically or clinically confirmed neoplastic lesions. Among the 5 patients with inflammatory lesions, 2 patients exhibited the displaced pattern and 3 patients exhibited the intact pattern. Among the 3 patients with neoplastic lesions, 1 patient exhibited the intact pattern, 1 patient exhibited the displaced pattern, and 1 patient exhibited the interrupted pattern. In this study, inflammatory and neoplastic intramedullary spinal cord lesions were not clearly differentiated by fiber tracking; both conditions can present with overlapping features such as displaced fibers. The exclusion of inflammatory conditions based on the presence of displaced fibers in fiber tracking images should be avoided.

  2. The incidence of non-union following unreamed intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Moumni, M.; Leenhouts, P. A.; ten Duis, H. J.; Wendt, K. W.

    Introduction: Stabilisation. of fractures with an intramedullary nail is a widespread technique in the treatment of femoral shaft fractures in adults. To ream or not to ream is still debated. The primary objective of this Study was to determine the incidence of non-union following unreamed

  3. Comparison of non-compression and compression interlocking intramedullary nailing in rabbit femoral shaft osteotomy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baki, Mehmet Emre; Aldemir, Cengiz; Duygun, Fatih; Doğan, Ali; Kerimoğlu, Gökçen

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to compare non-compression and compression intramedullary nailing in an experimental femoral shaft osteotomy model in terms of radiological, histological, and biomechanical aspects. Twenty-four white New Zealand rabbits (average weight 4.3 kg; range 4 to 4.8 kg) were divided into three groups. A right femoral osteotomy was performed in all rabbits and all femurs were fixed with titanium compression interlocking intramedullary nail. After locking of nails, no compression was performed in group 1 while 0.5 mm and 1 mm compressions were performed in group 2 and 3, respectively. All rabbits were sacrificed four weeks after operation. Fracture sites were examined histologically and radiologically. Finite element analyses were performed. Radiological scores of groups 2 and 3 were significantly higher than group 1. There was no significant difference between groups 2 and 3 radiologically. Best histological scores were achieved in group 2. According to finite element analyses, osteotomy site in group 2 was exposed to 1240 N of load and 34.5 MPa of mean stress. Compression interlocking intramedullary nailing provides faster fracture healing than non-compression interlocking intramedullary nailing. Best histological fracture healing scores were obtained with 0.5 mm compression performed at the fracture site.

  4. Intramedullary tumours in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2: MRI features associated with a favourable prognosis

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    Rennie, A.T.M. [Department of Neuroradiology, West Wing, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: atmrennie@hotmail.com; Side, L. [Department of Clinical Genetics, Churchill Hospital, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Kerr, R.S.C. [Department of Neurosurgery, West Wing, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Anslow, P.; Pretorius, P. [Department of Neuroradiology, West Wing, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-15

    Aim: To assess the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and natural history of intramedullary tumours in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Materials and methods: Eleven NF2 patients with intramedullary spinal cord tumours were identified from the database of the multidisciplinary NF2 clinic. All the imaging studies of these patients were individually reviewed by two neuroradiologists to evaluate the size, number, location, imaging characteristics, and interval growth of the intramedullary tumours. Results: Two of the 11 patients had lesions that required surgery. Both these lesions were in the cervical region, and extended over three and five segments respectively. Nine patients with a mean imaging follow-up period of 77 months had lesions that remained stable, apart from the development of small peritumoral cysts in three. The lesions were well circumscribed, often multiple, usually less than 1 cm in diameter, and were most frequently found in the cervical cord. Conclusion: The majority of intramedullary tumours in NF2 patients are very slow growing and share certain MRI features that differ from those of progressive or symptomatic lesions.

  5. Treatment of distal tibia metaphyseal fractures; plating versus intramedullary nailing: a systematic review of recent evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, H J; Pidikiti, P

    2013-09-01

    Treatment of distal tibia metaphyseal fractures is challenging. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the recent literature regarding management of extra-articular distal tibia fractures with a view to compare the outcome of intramedullary nailing with plate fixation. Advanced literature search was performed using Medline (Ovid), Embase (Ovid) and Cochrane databases. Data were extracted regarding number of participants, fracture fixation devices, percentage of open fractures, malunions, nonunions, wound infections and metal removal etc. After inclusion, exclusion criteria, two RCTs and four retrospective comparative studies were deemed suitable for this review. The overall results showed relatively higher rate of infection in plating group as compared to intramedullary nailing. However malalignment was more common with intramedullary nailing. Both techniques can provide adequate treatments in appropriately selected patients. None of the studies had sufficient power to show clinically significant difference. Further studies are required to compare new locking plates with intramedullary nails. Copyright © 2013 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Percutaneous Intramedullary Screw Fixation of Distal Fibula Fractures: A Case Series and Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loukachov, Vladimir V.; Birnie, Merel F. N.; Dingemans, Siem A.; de Jong, Vincent M.; Schepers, Tim

    2017-01-01

    The current reference standard for unstable ankle fractures is open reduction and internal fixation using a plate and lag screws. This approach requires extensive dissection and wound complications are not uncommon. The use of intramedullary screw fixation might overcome these issues. The aim of our

  7. Intramedullary nailing and plate osteosynthesis for fractures of the distal metaphyseal tibia and fibula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishan, Ajay; Peshin, Chetan; Singh, Dara

    2009-12-01

    To assess the results of concurrent intramedullary nailing plus plate osteosynthesis for fractures of the distal tibia and fibula. 15 men and 10 women (mean age, 35 years) with concurrent fractures of the distal tibia and fibula underwent intramedullary nailing (for the tibia) and plate osteosynthesis (for the fibula). 17 fractures were type A1, 6 type A2, and 2 type A3. Compound type IIIB or more extensive fractures were excluded. The mean follow-up duration was 2 years. The mean time to bone union was 20 weeks. Six patients underwent dynamisation and 4 bone grafting. Two patients had malalignment (angulation of >5 degrees in any plane), but none was rotational. No patient had shortening, hardware breakdown, or deep-seated infection. Two patients had superficial cellulitis at the site of the distal locking screws. Concurrent intramedullary nailing and plate osteosynthesis for fractures of the distal tibia and fibula is effective in preventing malalignment. Plate osteosynthesis for the fibula provides additional stability even when a single distal locking bolt is used to fix the intramedullary nail to the tibia.

  8. In vitro comparison of tibial plateau leveling osteotomy with and without use of a tibial plateau leveling jig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerbach, Kay Ingo; Boeltzig, Christian Konrad Matthias; Reif, Ullrich; Wieser, Jan Carsten; Keller, Thomas; Grevel, Vera

    2007-02-01

    To evaluate the influence of a tibial plateau leveling jig on osteotomy orientation, fragment reduction, and postoperative tibial plateau angle (TPA) during tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO). In vitro experimental study. Large-breed canine cadavers (n=20). TPLO was performed on 40 hindlimbs using 4 methods. Group 1: Jig; dogs in dorsal recumbency with the osteotomy parallel to the distal jig pin. Groups 2-4: No jig; dogs in lateral recumbency with the osteotomy in a vertical orientation (group 2: tibia parallel to the table top; group 3: controlled superimposition of the femoral condyles; group 4: internal rotation of the tibia). Postoperative TPA, fragment reduction, and osteotomy orientation relative to the tibial plateau were compared. Positive or negative values denoted deviation from parallel relative to the tibial plateau. Postoperative TPA, fragment reduction, and proximodistal osteotomy orientation were not significantly different between groups. Craniocaudal osteotomy orientation was significantly different (Pjig is not essential for osteotomy orientation, tibial plateau rotation, or fragment reduction. Comparable results were achieved performing a vertical osteotomy with the tibia slightly internally rotated (10 degrees -15 degrees) and parallel to the table surface. TPLO without use of a jig reduces surgical trauma, is less time consuming, and reduces cost.

  9. "Dynamic" Rotational Canal Stenosis Caused by Osteoma of the Atlas: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Kohei; Ito, Kiyoshi; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The upper cervical canal stenosis is relatively rare compared to other cervical regions. We report a rare case of upper cervical canal stenosis caused by osteoma of C1 lamina related to dynamic factor of cervical rotation. A 43-year-old woman had a 2-year history of numbness and pain in the right hand. Because of aggravation of the numbness and loss of the fine movement and strength in the right hand, she visited our outpatient clinic. Computed tomographic (CT) scan revealed an ovoid bony lesion at the right side of the C1 lamina. And magnetic resonance (MR) imagings of the cervical spine showed intramedullary high intensity signals in T 2 -weighted imaging at a site slightly distant from the bony lesion. Rotational dynamic myelo-CT scan was performed because aggravation of the radiating pain was observed with neck rotation to the right. Dynamic CT scan of the craniocervical junction with neck rotation to the right revealed that the bony lesion was moved to the dorsal side and posteriorly compressed the spinal cord. The symptoms were relieved following surgical removal of this bony lesion. The histopathological examination was compatible for osteoma. The dynamic rotational factor for cervical canal stenosis should be taken in consideration, especially in dealing with upper cervical lesions.

  10. Erie Canal Technology: Stump Pullers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Many years ago I saw a picture of a huge set of wheels that was used to remove tree stumps during the construction of the Erie Canal (1817-1825) and was intrigued by its use of leverage, mechanical advantage, and torque. Figure 1 is a scale model of the device based on my memory of the (lost) picture and published accounts.

  11. The Dehiscent Facial Nerve Canal

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    Sertac Yetiser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accidental injury to the facial nerve where the bony canal defects are present may result with facial nerve dysfunction during otological surgery. Therefore, it is critical to know the incidence and the type of facial nerve dehiscences in the presence of normal development of the facial canal. The aim of this study is to review the site and the type of such bony defects in 144 patients operated for facial paralysis, myringoplasty, stapedotomy, middle ear exploration for sudden hearing loss, and so forth, other than chronic suppurative otitis media with or without cholesteatoma, middle ear tumors, and anomaly. Correlation of intraoperative findings with preoperative computerized tomography was also analyzed in 35 patients. Conclusively, one out of every 10 surgical cases may have dehiscence of the facial canal which has to be always borne in mind during surgical manipulation of the middle ear. Computerized tomography has some limitations to evaluate the dehiscent facial canal due to high false negative and positive rates.

  12. Anterior canal BPPV and apogeotropic posterior canal BPPV: two rare forms of vertical canalolithiasis

    OpenAIRE

    CALIFANO, L.; SALAFIA, F.; MAZZONE, S.; MELILLO, M.G.; CALIFANO, M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most frequent form of BPPV. It is characterized by a paroxysmal positioning nystagmus evoked through Dix-Hallpike and Semont positioning tests. Anterior canal BPPV (AC) is more rare than posterior canal BPPV; it presents a prevalent down beating positioning nystagmus, with a torsional component clockwise for the left canal, counterclockwise for the right canal. Due to the possible lack of the torsional component, it is...

  13. Analysis on anatomical references to assess the coronal alignment of tibial and femoral cuts in mega prosthetic knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karade, Vikas; Ravi, Bhallamudi

    2014-06-01

    In megaprosthetic knee replacement, surgeons use cutting guides that depend on anatomical references to determine the ideal cutting plane alignment. In this work, we investigated the accuracy of using femoral cortical surfaces and tibial canal portions as the references. The study aims to improve the design and use of the cutting guides. Sixty-one knee scanograms of 33 patients (mean age around 20 years) diagnosed with osteogenic sarcoma and undergoing distal femur megaprosthetic surgery were acquired. Angles between the selected anatomical references and axis perpendicular to the ideal cutting plane (anatomical axis for femur and mechanical axis for tibia) were measured for both femur and tibia, in coronal view. The smaller the magnitude of the angles, the better the anatomical reference is. At the central femoral region, on average, both lateral and medial cortical surfaces give accurate alignment of the ideal cutting plane (0.6° and 0.8°, respectively), with no significant difference (p > 0.01). At the distal region, the lateral cortical surface gives significantly better alignment compared to the medial cortical surface (p references, but only at the central region. For a tibial cut, the central anatomical axis is the best reference. IV.

  14. Primary intramedullary spinal cord lymphoma: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wuyang; Garzon-Muvdi, Tomas; Braileanu, Maria; Porras, Jose L; Caplan, Justin M; Rong, Xiaoming; Huang, Judy; Jallo, George I

    2017-03-01

    Primary intramedullary spinal cord lymphoma (PISCL) is a rare diagnosis with poorly understood disease progression. Clarification of the factors associated with survival in PISCL patients is warranted. We conducted a population-based cohort study utilizing prospectively collected data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Patients with histological diagnosis of primary lymphoma in spinal cord (C72.0) from 1973 to 2012 in the SEER database were included. Multivariable survival analysis between patient, lesion characteristics, and PISCL-related death was performed to adjust for confounding factors. We included 346 PISCL patients in our study. Average age was 56.5 ± 17.8 years, with 62.7% being male. Racial distribution of these patients was white (87.6%), black (8.0%), and other (4.3%). More than half (55.8%) of patients were married. The most prevalent histology of PISCL was diffuse B-cell (46.2%), and the majority (55.2%) were low stage (Ann Arbor stage I/II). Most patients (67.9%) received radiation therapy. Average survival interval of patients with PISCL-related death (n=135, 39.0%) was 27.8 months. General cumulative survival probability at 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years was 73.8%, 67.9%, and 63.1%, respectively. Multivariable accelerated failure time (AFT) regression showed follicular lymphoma (HR:0.25, P=.008) and more recent diagnosis (HR:0.96, P<.001) was positively associated with PISCL-related survival. Conversely, nonwhite race (HR:1.69, P=.046), older age (HR:1.02, P<.001), unmarried status (HR:2.14, P<.001), and higher stage (HR:1.54, P=.022) were negatively associated with survival. Age, race, marital status, tumor histology, tumor stage, and year of diagnosis were associated with survival of PISCL. While most PISCL-related deaths occur within a 1-year period, subsequent slow progression was observed after the first year of survival. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for

  15. Elastic robust intramedullary nailing for forearm fracture in children

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    Wasem, Jürgen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Forearm fractures are the most common fractures in children (23% of all fractures. Basically there are two treatment options available for diaphyseal forearm fractures in children: closed reduction with cast immobilisation (conservative therapy and the elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN. Treatment decision is influenced by the doctor's estimation of fracture instability. Stable fractures can be treated conservatively whereas instable forearm shaft fractures can be treated according the following three treatment strategies: 1. conservative therapy in an outpatient setting 2. conservative therapy in the operating room in attendance to change to ESIN in case that no stabilisation can be achieved with cast immobilisation 3. immediate treatment with ESIN in the operating room. Objectives: Aim of this Health Technology Assessment (HTA report is to assess and report the published evidence concerning effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ESIN as a treatment option for diaphyseal forearm fractures in children and to identify future research need. Important parameters for the assessment of effectiveness are objective parameters (axis deviation, losses of motion, and numbers of reductions in case of redislocations and subjective parameters (pain or impairment in quality of life. Furthermore, a health economic evaluation shall be done which refers to the costs of the different therapy strategies. Methods: An extensive, systematic literature search in medical, economic, and HTA literature databases was performed. Relevant data were extracted and synthesised. Results: Three cohort studies and seven case series have been identified. Controlled clinical studies, systematic reviews and/or HTA reports that gave evidence to answer the own study question have not been found. The identified studies partly differed in respect of defined indication for ESIN, study population and treatment strategies. For that reason comparability of results was

  16. [A minimally invasive technique of intramedullary femoral nailing using the RDS system. A new technique for insertion of retrograde femoral nail].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiletto, R J; Baacke, M

    2001-08-01

    A total of 72 patients with femoral fractures was treated between July 1997 and November 1999, 41 of them with retrograde intramedullary fixation. A minimally invasive technique was performed in 18 cases using a recently designed retrograde dilatator system (RDS) for the insertion of ACE-nail (DePuy), the reaming of the femoral canal and the locking of the distal screws. The mean age of the 18 patients (7 men and 11 women) was 49 (+/- 21) years. 8 type A, 6 type B and 4 type C fractures of the femoral shaft according to the AO classification were observed. 5 of the patients had sustained a severe polytrauma. The mean ISS of the total collective was 18 (+/- 19). No nail failed, no infection occurred, and no nerve palsies were recorded. The follow-up time was 10 (+/- 7) months. All fractures healed uneventfully. 16 patients were mobilized under full weight-bearing and regained a full range of motion without pain. In 2 cases of very old patients nursing was possible without pain. In 5 cases an implant removal was carried out in the same technique. The performed minimally invasive technique using the RDS minimizes damages to the patella ligament and the articular cartilage. It facilitates the control of rotational deformities and length discrepancies of the femur also under difficult conditions, e.g. polytrauma and obese patients.

  17. Displaced tibia shaft fractures in children treated by elastic stable intramedullary nailing: results and complications in children weighing 50 kg (110 lb) or more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marengo, Lorenza; Paonessa, Matteo; Andreacchio, Antonio; Dimeglio, Alain; Potenza, Alberto; Canavese, Federico

    2016-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of displaced tibia shaft fractures in children weighing 50 kg (110 lb) or more treated by elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN). Translation, sagittal and coronal angulations were assessed on plain radiographs in all the patients. Twenty-six out of 106 patients met the inclusion criteria. The average patient age at the time of injury was 13.5 ± 1.3 years (range 11.3-16.1). The mean patient weight was 57 ± 8 kg (range 50-80). This study demonstrates that the use of ESIN for displaced tibia shaft fractures in children and adolescents weighing 50 kg (110 lb) or more, or older than 13 years of age, is not contraindicated. In contrast to data in femoral shaft fractures, we did not find poorer outcomes in older or heavier patients. No correlation between nail size/medullary canal diameter ratio and outcome was observed.

  18. Tibial osteosynthesis in a guinea pig (Cavia porcellus

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    A.S. Macedo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A guinea pig was presented with left pelvic limb lameness after unknown trauma. Radiographs revealed complete oblique diaphyseal fracture of the distal third of the left tibia and fibula. The guinea pig was treated surgically with an intramedullary pin. The day after surgery the guinea pig was using the limb comfortably (grade 1/5 lameness. Callus formation was obtained 21 days after surgery without complications.

  19. Mandibular Second Premolar with Four Canals

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    Javad Ghiasi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A mandibular second premolar with four canals is an interesting example of anatomic variations. This report describes a case of a mandibular second premolar with three roots and four canals (one mesiobuccal, two distobuccal and one lingual. The canals were prepared using K-files and irrigated with NaOCl (5.25% and normal saline as the final irrigant. The canals were filled laterally with gutta percha and AH26 sealer (De Trey, Dentsply, Switzerland. This case shows a rare anatomic configuration and points out the importance of looking for additional canals.

  20. "Push-past" reaming as a reduction aid with intramedullary nailing of metadiaphyseal and diaphyseal femoral shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Joshua L; Munz, John W; Burgess, Andrew R

    2014-06-01

    Eccentric reaming of cortical bone near a fracture site can introduce malalignment when an intramedullary nail is placed. The authors describe a technique of reaming metadiaphyseal and diaphyseal femur fractures in which maintaining reduction at the fracture site is not necessary to obtain an excellent alignment of long bone fractures after intramedullary nailing. They have found that central reaming proximal and distal to, but not at, the fracture site allows for excellent reduction of long bone fractures when the intramedullary nail is passed. The reamer is stopped just before the fracture site and then "pushed" across the fracture prior to resumption of reaming. The authors present "push-past" reaming as a technical trick to facilitate reduction of femoral fractures treated with intramedullary nails and a consecutive series of 18 cases in which excellent postoperative alignment was achieved. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Intramedullary cervical spinal cord abscess by viridans group Streptococcus secondary to infective endocarditis and facilitated by previous local radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; López-Medrano, Francisco; García-Montero, María; Hornedo-Muguiro, Javier; Aguado, Jose-María

    2009-01-01

    The risk factors, microbial patterns, and prognosis of intramedullary abscess have varied with time. The development of an intramedullary abscess of the spinal cord (IASC) constitutes an exceptional complication of infective endocarditis (IE) in the post-antibiotic era. We present a case of cervical IASC by viridans group Streptococcus in a patient with mitral valve IE. We hypothesize that previous cervical radiotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma favoured the occurrence of this uncommon entity. This physiopathologic mechanism has not been previously reported.

  2. Comparative analysis of uniplanar external fixator and retrograde intramedullary nailing for ankle arthrodesis in diabetic Charcot′s neuroarthropathy

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    Nakul S Shah

    2011-01-01

    Results: All five (100% patients treated by intramedullary nailing achieved radiological union on an average follow-up of 16 weeks. The external fixation group had significantly higher rate of complications with one amputation, four non unions (66.7% and a delayed union which went on to full osseous union. Conclusion: The retrograde intramedullary nailing for tibio-talar arthrodesis in Charcot′s neuroarthropathy yielded significantly better outcomes as compared to the use of uniplanar external fixator.

  3. Attritional rupture of extensor pollicis longus: a rare complication following elastic stable intramedullary nailing of a paediatric radial fracture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sproule, James A

    2011-01-01

    Elastic stable intramedullary nail fixation has become established as an acceptable method of treatment for diaphyseal fractures of both forearm bones in the paediatric population. It is considered safe, minimally invasive and does not compromise physeal growth. We report a case of delayed rupture of extensor pollicis longus due to attrition over the sharp edges of a protruding nail end after elastic stable intramedullary nailing of a paediatric radial diaphyseal fracture.

  4. External skeletal fixation of the tibial shaft fractures

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    Milenković Saša

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To present the possibility of a successful use of external skeletal fixation in treating the open and closed tibial shaft fractures with Mitković’s external fixator. Methods. External fixation was used in 115 patients with 118 fresh tibial shaft fractures, 82 males (71.3% and 33 females (28.7%, average age 43.92 years (16−84. Open tibial shaft fractures were present in 37 (31.36%. All the fractures were treated with Mitković’s external fixator type M 20. Results. The results of external fixation were excellent or good in 94.07% of the cases, and bad in 5.08%. Pin tract infection appeared in 7 (5.93% patients. In only 3 cases an external fixator was removed and treatment continued with the functional braces. Nonunion occurred in 6 (5.08% patients, of which 4 were with open fractures (2 Gustilo type IIIB, 1 Gustilo type IIIA, 1 Gustilo type II and 2 with the segment fractures. Compartment syndrome was observed in 1 (0.85% patient with closed fracture. Malunion was found in 2 (1.69% patients. Conclusion. External fixation of tibial shaft fractures is a simple and effective method to enable the safe healing of fractures, early mobilization of the patients, early weight-bearing, as well as early rehabilitation. Fixation of tibial shaft fractures was unilateral with convergent pins orientation, and there was also a possibility of compression and distraction.

  5. [External skeletal fixation of the tibial shaft fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenković, Sasa; Mitković, Milorad; Radenković, Mile

    2005-01-01

    To present the possibility of a succesfful use of external skelatal fixation in treating the open and closed tibial shaft fractures with Mitković's external fixator. External fixation was used in 115 patients with 118 fresh tibial shaft fractures, 82 males (71.3%) and 33 females (28.7%), average age 43.92 years (16-84). Open tibial shaft fractures were present in 37 (31.36%). All the fractures were treated with Mitković's external fixator type M 20. The results of external fixation were excellent or good in 94.07% of the cases, and bad in 5.08%. Pin tract infection appeared in 7 (5.93%) patients. In only 3 cases an external fixator was removed and treatment continued with the functional braces. Nonunion occurred in 6 (5.08%) patients, of which 4 were with open fractures (2 Gustilo type IIIB, 1 Gustilo type IIIA, 1 Gustilo type II) and 2 with the segment fractures. Compartment syndrome was observed in 1 (0.85%) patient with closed fracture. Malunion was found in 2 (1.69%) patients. External fixation of tibial shaft fractures is a simple and effective method to enable the safe healing of fractures, early mobilization of the patients, early weight-bearing, as well as early rehabilitation. Fixation of tibial shaft fractures was unilateral with convergent pins orientation, and there was also a possibility of compression and distraction.

  6. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation for fecal incontinence: a video demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotouras, Alexander; Allison, Marion; Currie, Ann; Knowles, Charles H; Chan, Christopher L; Thaha, Mohamed A

    2012-06-01

    Fecal incontinence is an increasingly common condition with significant negative impact on quality on life and health care resources. It frequently presents a therapeutic challenge to clinicians. Emerging evidence suggests that percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation is an effective treatment for fecal incontinence with the added benefit of being minimally invasive and cost effective. Pursuant to the preliminary report of our early experience of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation in patients with fecal incontinence published in this journal in 2010, in this dynamic article, we now describe and demonstrate the actual technique that can be performed in a nurse-led clinic or outpatient or community setting. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation is a technically simple procedure that can potentially be performed in an outpatient or community setting. The overall early success rate of 68% following its use reported by our unit compares favorably with the success rate following other forms of neuromodulation, including sacral nerve stimulation. When completed, our long-term outcome data will provide further information on the efficacy of tibial nerve stimulation in a larger cohort of patients (n > 100). Future studies, including our currently planned randomized controlled trial of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation vs sham stimulation, will provide controlled efficacy data and may provide information on its exact mechanism of action.

  7. Spontaneous collapse of the tibial plateau: radiological staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpintero, P.; Leon, F.; Zafra, M.; Montero, R.; Carreto, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a radiological staging system for necrosis of the tibial plateau, similar to those already developed for the hip and the medial femoral condyle. We retrospectively studied the clinical case histories and radiographic findings of 14 patients (15 affected knees) with histologically proven osteonecrosis of the tibial plateau. Stage I was marked by normal radiograph, but increased uptake in bone scan and subchondral areas of abnormal marrow signal intensity in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as reported in other osteonecrosis sites. Stage II was characterised by cystic and sclerotic changes, and stage III fracture of the medial rim of the medial tibial plateau and tibial plateau collapse were present. Stage IV was marked by joint narrowing. These changes appeared earlier and were more pronounced when there was genu varum/valgum or involvement of the lateral tibial plateau. The radiological evolution of the disease appears to follow a four-stage course over a period of roughly one year from the onset of symptoms. (orig.)

  8. Reconstrucción tibial: transferencia sóleo-peroné ipsilateral. Tibialización peroneal Tibial reconstruction: ipsilateral soleus-fibula transfer. Fibular tibialization

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    E. Revelo Jiron

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Las transferencias óseas peroneales en forma libre o ipsilateral han sido propuestas para la reconstrucción de grandes defectos tibiales. Están también descritas varias modificaciones al respecto, siendo una de ellas la constitución de un colgajo compuesto soleo-peroné realizado como transferencia libre. En este estudio presentamos nuestra experiencia con esta variante, pero en forma ipsilateral. logrando la reconstrucción del defecto tibial por medio de la tibialización peroneal. Escogimos realizar un colgajo compuesto soleo-peroné ipsilateral a flujo anterógrado o retrogrado para la reconstrucción de una serie personal de 14 pacientes consecutivos, 13 hombre y 1 mujer, con edad media de 30 años, y con amplios defectos tibiales y de tejidos blandos causados por accidentes de transito en 12 casos, 1 por proyectil balístico y 1 por artefacto explosivo artesanal. El promedio de tamaño del defecto tibial fue de 9.4 cm. Elegimos la forma ipsilateral por no disponer de infraestructura adecuada para realizar una transferencia libre. La serie de estudio se realizó durante el periodo comprendido entre Abril de 1995 y Abril del 2005. Todos los colgajos sobrevivieron. Dos pacientes desarrollaron pseudoartrosis. El apoyo completo y la marcha en 12 pacientes, se logró en un periodo promedio de 9 meses. El seguimiento postoperatorio ha sido de 3 a 6 años. Doce pacientes se han incorporado a la vida activa. Discutimos algunos aspectos prácticos de la técnica como resultado de la experiencia quirúrgica obtenida de esta serie personal. Consideramos que el método es fiable, fácil de realizar y proporciona excelentes resultados.Fibular flaps such as in there free form or as ipsilateral transfers have been proposed for reconstruction of large tibial defects. Several modifications have been described for the use of this flap. In this study we will present our experience using the ipsilateral transfer of an osteomuscular soleous fibular flap

  9. Reamed versus unreamed intramedullary nailing for the treatment of femoral fractures: A meta-analysis of prospective randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, A-Bing; Zhang, Wei-Jiang; Guo, Wei-Jun; Wang, Xin-Hua; Jin, Hai-Ming; Zhao, You-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Intramedullary nailing is commonly used for treating femoral shaft fractures, one of the most common long bone fractures in adults. The reamed intramedullary nail is considered the standard implant for femoral fractures. This meta-analysis was performed to verify the superiority of reamed intramedullary nailing over unreamed intramedullary nailing in fractures of the femoral shaft in adults. Subgroup analysis of implant failure and secondary procedure was also performed. Electronic literature databases were used to identify relevant publications and included MEDLINE (Ovid interface), EMBASE (Ovid interface), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Wiley Online Library). The versions available on January 30, 2016, were utilized. Only human studies, which were designed as randomized controlled clinical trials, were included. Two authors independently evaluated the quality of original research publications and extracted data from the studies that met the criteria. Around 8 randomized controlled trials involving 1078 patients were included. Reamed intramedullary nailing was associated with shorter time to consolidation of the fracture (SMD = -0.62, 95% CI = -0.89 to -0.35, P fractures using reamed intramedullary nailing is recommended.

  10. Scalloping at the lumbosacral canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, R.

    1987-01-01

    Scalloping is an indentation of the dorsal side of the vertebral body (anterior wall of the lumbosacral or sacral canal) which typically involves several adjacent lumbal vertebral body segments and the anterior wall of the canalis sacralis. Occurrence without underlying disease is rare; it occurs most frequently with chondrodystrophy, neurofibromatosis, Morquio's syndrome, Hurler's syndrome, acromegaly, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan's syndrome, cysts, tumors and in peridural lipomas. (orig.) [de

  11. Scalloping at the lumbosacral canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, R.

    1987-07-01

    Scalloping is an indentation of the dorsal side of the vertebral body (anterior wall of the lumbosacral or sacral canal) which typically involves several adjacent lumbal vertebral body segments and the anterior wall of the canalis sacralis. Occurrence without underlying disease is rare; it occurs most frequently with chondrodystrophy, neurofibromatosis, Morquio's syndrome, Hurler's syndrome, acromegaly, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan's syndrome, cysts, tumors and in peridural lipomas.

  12. Advantage and limitations of a minimally-invasive approach and early weight bearing in the treatment of tibial shaft fractures with locking plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, P; Bonnomet, F; Ehlinger, M

    2012-09-01

    Intramedullary nailing is a common method of treating tibial shaft fractures. However, precise control of reduction at the proximal and distal quarters is difficult to achieve. The purpose of this study was to assess the results of plating using locking screws and the feasibility of a minimally-invasive approach. All patients with tibial shaft fracture treated by means of locking plates from January 2004 to October 2006. Thirty-two fractures were treated in 32 patients with a mean age of 43.8 years. Internal fixation with a locking plate and screw construct, using a minimally-invasive or standard approach. Surgical approach, time to weight bearing, complications and their type, time to bone union, alignment in the frontal and sagittal planes on anteroposterior and lateral radiographs. The minimally-invasive approach was performed in 28 cases and immediate full weight bearing allowed in 25 cases. At a mean follow-up of 27 months, two patients had died and two patients were lost to follow-up. The mean time to bone union was 9.1 weeks. Four cases had a complicated course: one infection, one compartment syndrome, one hardware breakage and one pseudarthrosis. Six cases ended up with valgus malunion exceeding 5° in the frontal plane, already present at the time of surgery. Where a minimally-invasive approach can be performed, immediate pain-free weight bearing can be allowed without further displacement at follow-up. The observed rate of malunion underlines the need for adequate reduction and shows that the rationale for success does not solely depend on the plate anatomic design but also on the skills of the operating surgeon. Level I university regional hospital Cohort study. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Tibial rotational osteotomy and distal tuberosity transfer for patella subluxation secondary to excessive external tibial torsion: surgical technique and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, M; Dwyer, T; Dolkart, O; Goldstein, Y; Steinberg, E L; Chakravertty, R; Cameron, J C

    2014-11-01

    Recurrent patella subluxation may be secondary to excessive external tibial torsion. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcome of patients undergoing tibial derotation osteotomy and tibial tuberosity transfer for recurrent patella subluxation in association with excessive external tibial torsion. A combined tibial derotation osteotomy and tibial tuberosity transfer was performed in 15 knees (12 patients) with recurrent patella subluxation secondary to excessive external tibial torsion. Clinical evaluation was carried out using preoperative and post-operative Knee Society Score (KSS), Kujala Patellofemoral score, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire, the short form-12 (SF-12) and a visual analogue score (VAS) pain scale. The median follow-up period was 84 months (range 15-156) and median patient age was 34 years (range 19-57 years). The median preoperative external tibial torsion was 62° (range 55°-70°), with a median rotational correction of 36° (range 30°-45°) after surgery. Significant improvement (p 45° who underwent tibial derotation osteotomy and tibial tuberosity transfer achieved a satisfactory outcome in terms of pain relief and improved function. A significant complication was seen in 2/15 patients. Case series, Level IV.

  14. Bilateral tibial agenesis and syndactyly in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Dona, Francesco; Murino, Carla; Della Valle, Giovanni; Fatone, Gerardo

    2016-07-19

    A three-year-old cat was referred to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Naples, Italy. The cat had severe pelvic limb deformity, and abnormal development of all four paws. Radiographs revealed bilateral tibial agenesis, syndactyly, and digital hypoplasia. No treatment was instituted because of the severity of the injury, the adaptation of the cat to the abnormal condition, and the owner's refusal to permit any treatment. Congenital limb deformities are rarely reported in the cat and tibial agenesis is considered a very rare disease. This congenital anomaly is well documented and classified in man, and it has been associated with other abnormalities in more complex syndromes. This paper reports clinical and radiographic findings in a cat affected by bilateral complete tibial agenesis associated with other congenital anomalies.

  15. Increased external tibial torsion in Osgood-Schlatter disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigante, Antonio; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Bonetti, Massimo G; Greco, Francesco

    2003-08-01

    We studied the relationship between Osgood-Schlatter disease and torsional abnormalities of the lower limb in 21 boys with this condition and 20 age- and sex-matched controls. 3 groups of knees (20 control knees, 21 symptomatic and 21 asymptomatic or less symptomatic knees) were subjected to clinical, radiographic and CT evaluation. We found no statistically significant differences between patients and controls, as regards femoral anteversion, patellar congruence angle, patellar tilt angle and anterior tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance, but the condylomalleolar angle and tibial torsion angle were greater in patients. We found no differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic or less symptomatic knees in any of the parameters. All the symptomatic knees were on the side preferentially involved in jumping and sprinting. This increase in external tibial torsion may play a role as a predisposing mechanical factor in the onset of Osgood-Schlatter disease in male athletes.

  16. Osteoarthritis Imaging by Quantification of Tibial Trabecular Bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marques, Joselene

    The pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) includes complex events in the whole joint. In this project, we combined machine-learning techniques in a texture analysis framework and evaluated it in a longitudinal study, where magnetic resonance images of knees were used to quantify the tibial trabecular...... bone in both a marker for OA diagnosis and another marker for prediction of tibial cartilage loss. By multiple-instance learning, we also investigated which region of the tibia provided the best prognosis for cartilage loss. The inferior part of the tibial bone was classified as the most relevant...... region and a preliminary radiological reading of the knees with high and low risks of cartilage loss suggested the prognosis marker captured aspects of the tibia vertical trabecularization to define the prognosis. Besides presenting a bone marker able to predict disease progression and diagnostic marker...

  17. Modified fracture brace for tibial fracture with varus angulation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, S F; Au, T L; Wong, A M; Lee, M Y

    1995-08-01

    Sarmiento introduced the functional fracture brace for the management of tibial shaft fracture in 1963. However, tibial angulation with varus deformity cannot be prevented or corrected by such a device. In this paper, a case of tibial shaft fracture with varus angulation treated with a modified below-knee fracture brace was reported.

  18. tibialization of the fibula in a child with chronic osteomyelitis of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    used in tibial reconstruction after resection of Ewing's sarcoma (6). A case report from Congo detailed how a 10-centimeter tibial bone loss was treated by inter- tibiofibula bone grafting, resulting in tibialization of the fibula. The patient was reviewed after 10 years; and the clinical result was satisfactory and stable (7).

  19. 75 FR 39632 - Regulated Navigation Area; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, Harvey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-12

    ..., Algiers Canal, New Orleans, LA; Correction ACTION: Interim rule; Correction. SUMMARY: In the Federal... Area; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, Harvey Canal, Algiers Canal, New...

  20. Tibial tuberosity excision for symptomatic Osgood-Schlatter disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, M J; Bhadreshwar, D R

    1995-01-01

    A modified Ferciot procedure was used to excise the tibial tubercle in patients with persistently symptomatic Osgood-Schlatter disease. Forty-two knees in 35 patients were reviewed at a mean follow-up of 5 years to assess outcome. The results revealed relief of pain in 95% of patients and reduction of prominence in 85.5% with minimal complication, in particular no evidence of genu recurvatum. The pathogenesis of the condition is outlined, and some of the theories and treatment modalities discussed. Tibial tubercle excision is recommended as the treatment of choice in those few cases that fail with conservative treatment.

  1. Ischial hypoplasia, tibial hypoplasia and facial abnormalities: a new syndrome?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, G.; Haga, Yoshihiko; Aoki, Katsuhiko; Hasegawa, Tomoko

    1998-01-01

    A child with facial abnormalities, short stature and a variety of skeletal alterations is reported. The facial abnormalities comprised low-set ears, short nose with a long philtrum, micrognathia and cleft palate. The skeletal alterations included ischial hypoplasia, malformations of the cervical spine, hypoplasia of the lesser trochanters, tibial hypoplasia with bowing of the lower legs, tibio-fibular diastasis with malformed distal tibial epiphyses, clubfeet and brachymesophalangy. The constellation of clinical and radiological findings in the present patient do not fit any known malformation syndrome. (orig.)

  2. Ischial hypoplasia, tibial hypoplasia and facial abnormalities: a new syndrome?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, G. [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo University School of Medicine (Japan); Haga, Yoshihiko [Department of Orthopaedics, Shizuoka Children`s Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan); Aoki, Katsuhiko [Department of Radiology, Shizuoka Children`s Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan); Hasegawa, Tomoko [Division of Clinical Genetics, Shizuoka Children`s Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    A child with facial abnormalities, short stature and a variety of skeletal alterations is reported. The facial abnormalities comprised low-set ears, short nose with a long philtrum, micrognathia and cleft palate. The skeletal alterations included ischial hypoplasia, malformations of the cervical spine, hypoplasia of the lesser trochanters, tibial hypoplasia with bowing of the lower legs, tibio-fibular diastasis with malformed distal tibial epiphyses, clubfeet and brachymesophalangy. The constellation of clinical and radiological findings in the present patient do not fit any known malformation syndrome. (orig.) With 4 figs., 8 refs.

  3. Tibial and fibular angles in homozygous sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akamaguna, A.I.; Odita, J.C.; Ugbodaga, C.I.; Okafor, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of the tibial and fibular angles made on ankle radiographs of 34 patients with sickle cell disease were compared with those of 36 normal Nigerians. Widening of the fibular angle, which is an indication of tibiotalar slant, was demonstrated in about 79% of sickle cell disease patients. By using fibular angle measurements as an objective method of assessing subtle tibiotalar slant, it is concluded that the incidence of this deformity is much higher among sickle cell disease patients than previously reported. The mean values of tibial and fibular angles in normal Nigerians are higher than has been reported amongst Caucasians. (orig.)

  4. Resultados funcionales y utilización del enclavado endomedular bloqueado en fracturas de tibia. [Functional results and use of locked intramedullary nailing in tibial shaft fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo S. Rotella

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In­tro­duc­ción El enclavado endomedular bloqueado en fracturas diafisarias de tibia probó ser un valioso método de tratamiento, y sus resultados superan a los de la osteosíntesis con placas y el enclavado endomedular elástico con clavos múltiples. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar los resultados funcionales con la utilización de este método en todas las lesiones en las que está indicada la estabilización con este tipo de implante, y con un seguimiento de 2 años. Material­ y­ Métodos Se estudiaron 112 pacientes tratados en el Servicio de Ortopedia y traumatología, desde marzo de 2000 hasta diciembre de 2009, sometidos a enclavado endomedular bloqueado como osteosíntesis primaria, con un seguimiento de 2 años. Las variables recabadas fueron: edad (años, sexo, infección, lesión vascular, deformidad, movilidad, dolor, marcha, actividad, tipo de fractura. Se realizó un análisis descriptivo de las variables involucradas en este estudio y de asociación mediante el puntaje de Jones y Wruhs. El nivel de confiabilidad utilizado fue del 5%. Resultados Ciento siete (96% de las 112 fracturas evaluadas tuvieron consolidación sin otros procedimientos, dentro de las 17 semanas. En la serie, hubo 5 casos de seudoartrosis, pero una fractura en tres niveles de la tibia consolidó en 32 semanas y una fractura de tercio distal consolidó en 24 semanas. Las complicaciones posoperatorias fueron escasas y, al finalizar el tratamiento, la mayoría de los pacientes regresó a sus actividades previas, tanto laborales como de la vida diaria. El índice de infección fue del 8,03%, con un seguimiento promedio de 27,48 meses. Conclusión En nuestra experiencia, es un método seguro, relativamente sencillo, con gran versatilidad y ofrece al paciente un confortable posoperatorio con muy buen resultado funcional. Por ello, lo consideramos de primera elección para tratar fracturas diafisarias de tibia.

  5. Restrictions in Quality of Life after Intramedullary Nailing of Tibial Shaft Fracture. A retrospective follow-up study of 223 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter; Lund, Hans; Læssøe, Uffe

    2014-01-01

    of follow-up was 7.9 years. Compared to reference population, the study group reported 44% higher incidence of knee pain, 39% higher incidence of ADL limitations, 58% higher incidence of limitations in QOL and 60% higher incidence of limitations during sports activities. Comparison of age related...... evident among the young participants. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE::Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence....

  6. The effect of intact fibula on functional outcome of reamed intramedullary interlocking nail in open and closed isolated tibial shaft fractures: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Muthukumar Balaji

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: ITS fracture with intact fibula is a common occurrence, and they can be treated safely with reamed IM nailing that provides good union rates and the excellent functional result even in open fractures.

  7. Results of Closed Intramedullary Nailing using Talwarkar Square Nail in Adult Forearm Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem A Lil

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate results of closed intramedullary nailing using Talwarkar square nails in adult forearm fractures. We prospectively evaluated 34 patients with both bone forearm fractures. The average time to union was 12.8 (SD +3.2 weeks with cast support for a mean of 8.2 weeks. Union was achieved in 31 out of 34 patients. Using the Grace and Eversmann rating system, 17 patients were excellent, 10 were good, and 4 had an acceptable result. Three patients had non-unions, 2 for the radius and one for the ulna. There were two cases of superficial infection, one subject had olecranon bursitis, and one case of radio-ulnar synostosis. Complication rates associated with the use of square nails were lower compared to plate osteosynthesis and locked intramedullary nails. To control rotation post- operatively, there is a need for application of an above-elbow cast after nailing.

  8. Ulnar interlocking intramedullary nail stabilization of a proximal radio-ulnar fracture in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatineau, Matthieu; Planté, Jérôme

    2010-12-01

    To report use of an ulnar interlocking intramedullary nail for repair of an open highly comminuted fracture of the proximal third of the antebrachium in a dog, caused by gunshot. Case report. 1.5-year old, 60 kg, neutered male Mastiff. An ulnar interlocking intramedullary nail was used to stabilize an open comminuted proximal antebrachial fracture and a cast applied for 4 weeks. Union by secondary bone healing occurred in 8 weeks. At 16 weeks, there was advanced remodeling of the radial and ulnar bony callus and fracture lines were no longer evident. Limb use was normal with normal pain free range of motion of the right elbow. Ulnar interlocking nail is a viable alternative treatment for highly comminuted fracture of the proximal third of the antebrachium in dogs. © Copyright 2010 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  9. Construct Failure in an Atypical Femoral Fracture treated with Intramedullary Nailing: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Bonifacio

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to document a rare case of construct failure in a 68-year old Filipina who sustained an atypical femoral fracture (AFF in her left subtrochanteric area. The patient previously had a 40-month history of alendronate 70mg + vitamin D 5600u therapy for osteoporosis and underwent closed intramedullary nailing for the AFF. Six months postoperatively, she began to experience progressive pain in her operated thigh. Radiographs revealed a broken nail at the proximal screw hole and non-union of the AFF. The patient was treated with exposure of the fracture site, removal of the broken device, exchange intramedullary nailing, and iliac bone grafting. She had radiographic and clinical union and was full weight bearing after three months.

  10. Robotic distal locking of intramedullary nailing: Technical description and cadaveric testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzica, Martin; Suero, Eduardo M; Westphal, Ralf; Citak, Musa; Liodakis, Emmanouil; Hawi, Nael; Petri, Max; Krettek, Christian; Stuebig, Timo

    2017-12-01

    Interlocked intramedullary nailing is the treatment of choice for femoral shaft fractures. However, distal locking is a technically challenging part of the procedure that can result in distal femoral malrotation and high radiation exposure. We have tested a robotic procedure for robotic distal locking based on the computation of a drilling trajectory on two calibrated fluoroscopic images. Twenty distal holes were attempted in ten cadaveric femur specimens. Successful screw hole drilling was achieved at the first attempt in each of the ten specimens (20 drill holes in total). No failures were recorded. The average total number of images needed was 6.5 +/- 3.6. The average computation time was 16.5+/- 16.0 seconds. Robotic distal locking was feasible in this test and can be integrated into a fully robotic intramedullary nailing procedure. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Closed Locked Intramedullary Nailing of Femoral Shaft Fractures in the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoster, Thomas A; Miller, Richard A

    2003-01-01

    A review was performed of all patients over the age of 60 years who were treated with a locked intramedullary nail for a femoral shaft fracture. There were 15 patients with 16 femoral shaft fractures. Four patients died perioperatively. Of the surviving 11 patients with 12 fractures, union occurred in 100 percent. Knee range of motion was greater than 100 degrees in 11 of the 12 knees. Nine of the 11 patients returned to their preoperative level of ambulation. Intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures in patients over the age of 60 years is an effective method of treatment. The mortality rate in elderly patients who sustain this injury is comparable to that seen after a femoral neck fracture in this age group. PMID:14575248

  12. Intramedullary fixation of fibular fractures with flexible titanium elastic nails: surgical technique and a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simovitch, Ryan W; Radkowski, Christopher A; Zura, Robert D

    2006-01-01

    Intramedullary fixation of fibular fractures has been reported in the literature. Its advantages include ease of fixation as well as minimal soft tissue disruption. Various implants have been described, including the Inyo nail and Rush rods. Several studies have examined their use in older people with osteoporotic bone as well as in instances where soft tissue preservation is of concern. To our knowledge, no technique has been described using flexible titanium elastic nails (TENS) (Synthes; Paoli, PA). We illustrate such a technique as well as a case report that demonstrates our experience. Insertion of flexible titanium elastic nails requires attention to detail with preservation of the peroneal tendons and their sheath. While such a construct cannot control rotation, it can preserve length as well as prevent varus and valgus displacement. Future endeavors could focus on the biomechanical principles of intramedullary fibular fixation with TENS nails.

  13. Clinical applications of free medial tibial flap with posterior tibial artery for head and neck reconstruction after tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qi; Fang, Jugao; Huang, Zhigang; Chen, Xiaohong; Hou, Lizhen; Zhang, Yang; Li, Pingdong; Ma, Hongzhi; Xu, Hongbo

    2017-06-01

    Tumor resection causes damage in the head and neck which creates problems in swallowing, chewing, articulation, and vision, all of which seriously affect patients' quality of life. In this work, we evaluated the application of a free medial tibial flap in reconstruction of head and neck defects after tumor resection. We discussed the anatomy, surgical technique, and the advantages and disadvantages of the flap. We found several benefits for the flap, such as, it is especially effective for the defects that require thin-layer epithelium to cover or the separated soft tissue defect; a two-team approach can be used because the donor site is far away from the head and neck; and the flap is easy to integrate because of the subcutaneous fat layer of the free medial tibial flap is thin and the flap is soft. Thus, the medial tibial flap could replace the forearm flap for certain applications.

  14. Comparison of intramedullary nail and plate fixation in distal tibia diaphyseal fractures close to the mortise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Umut; Sökücü, Sami; Demir, Bilal; Yıldırım, Timur; Ozcan, Cağrı; Kabukçuoğlu, Yavuz Selim

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the functional and radiological results of intramedullary nailing and plate fixation techniques in the surgical treatment of distal tibia diaphyseal fractures close to the ankle joint. Between 2005 and 2011, 55 patients (32 males, 23 females; mean age 42 years; range 15 to 72 years) who were treated with intramedullary nailing (21 patients) or plate fixation (34 patients) due to distal tibia diaphyseal fracture were included in the study. The average follow-up period was 27.6 months (range, 12-82 months). The patients were evaluated with regard to nonunion, malunion, infection, and implant irritation. The AOFAS (American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society) scale was used for the clinical evaluation. No statistically significant difference was found between the two surgical methods with respect to unification time, AOFAS score, accompanying fibula fracture, material irritation, and malunion. Nine patients had open fractures, and these patients were treated with plate fixation (p=0.100). Nonunion developed in three patients who were treated with plates. Infection occurred in one patient. Anterior knee pain was significantly higher in patients who were treated with intramedullary nails. There was no malunion in any patient. As the distal fragment is not long enough, plate fixation technique is usually preferred in the treatment of distal tibia diaphyseal fractures. In this study, we observed that if the surgical guidelines are followed carefully, intramedullary nailing is an appropriate technique in this kind of fracture. The malunion rates are not significantly increased, and it also has the advantages of being a minimally invasive surgery with fewer wound problems.

  15. The occult nature of intramedullary spinal cord metastases from renal cell carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zakaria, Zaitun

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCC) are characterised by a tendency to metastasise widely, often while remaining occult. Intramedullary spinal cord metastases (ISCM) from RCC may be the presenting feature of the disease or present at any time in the disease course. This case report discusses an ISCM from RCC which became manifested at the time of resection of the primary tumour. We review the literature published on ISCM from RCC from 1990 to date comparing disease characteristics and presentations.

  16. THE RESULT OF INTRAMEDULLARY NAILING WITH BONE GRAFTING OF TIBIA'S PATHOLOGIC FRACTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Shapovalov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors give the clinical case of successful surgical treatment of patient with tibia's pathologic fracture by intramedullary nailing with bone grafting. The disadvantages of such patients' treatment by plaster immobilization and by some invasive methods like vascular autografting by Ilizarov's method and bone plating were also discussed. The obvious benefits of proposed surgical treatment technique of observed patient category are shown.

  17. Comparative study between reamed versus unreamed interlocking intramedullary nailing in compound fractures of shaft tibia

    OpenAIRE

    Subhash Puri; Samar Kumar Biswas; Anil Salgia; Sahil Sanghi; Tushar Agarwal; Rohit Malhotra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tibia is the commonest bones to sustain open injury because of subcutaneous position. Treatment of open fractures requires simultaneous management of both skeletal and soft tissue injury. Intramedullary nailing with reaming is generally considered to be contraindicated for open fractures tibia, because it damages the endosteal blood supply which will lead to non-union, deep infection. However, recent studies with or without reaming in open fracture tibia shows no influence in heal...

  18. Rotation of intramedullary alignment rods affects distal femoral cutting plane in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maderbacher, Günther; Matussek, Jan; Keshmiri, Armin; Greimel, Felix; Baier, Clemens; Grifka, Joachim; Maderbacher, Hermann

    2018-02-17

    Intramedullary rods are widely used to align the distal femoral cut in total knee arthroplasty. We hypothesised that both coronal (varus/valgus) and sagittal (extension/flexion) cutting plane are affected by rotational changes of intramedullary femoral alignment guides. Distal femoral cuts using intramedullary alignment rods were simulated by means of a computer-aided engineering software in 4°, 6°, 8°, 10°, and 12° of valgus in relation to the femoral anatomical axis and 4° extension, neutral, as well as 4°, 8°, and 12° of flexion in relation to the femoral mechanical axis. This reflects the different angles between anatomical and mechanical axis in coronal and sagittal planes. To assess the influence of rotation of the alignment guide on the effective distal femoral cutting plane, all combinations were simulated with the rod gradually aligned from 40° of external to 40° of internal rotation. Rotational changes of the distal femoral alignment guides affect both the coronal and sagittal cutting planes. When alignment rods are intruded neutrally with regards to sagittal alignment, external rotation causes flexion, while internal rotation causes extension of the sagittal cutting plane. Simultaneously the coronal effect (valgus) decreases resulting in an increased varus of the cutting plane. However, when alignment rods are intruded in extension or flexion partly contradictory effects are observed. Generally the effect increases with the degree of valgus preset, rotation and flexion. As incorrect rotation of intramedullary alignment guides for distal femoral cuts causes significant cutting errors, exact rotational alignment is crucial. Coronal cutting errors in the distal femoral plane might result in overall leg malalignment, asymmetric extension gaps and subsequent sagittal cutting errors.

  19. The value of {sup 99m}Tc-HDP scan in the diagnosis of tibial avascular necrosis caused by thermal injury: a case with multi-image correlation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Yong Whee [Sung-Ae General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    Basic pathology in thermal injury is coagulative soft tissue necorsis that may occasionally be complicated by infection and later by scarring and vascular changes. Radiological features were discussed in detail by Resnick. The early changes consist of soft tissue defect, porosis and periostitis and the late changes include osteophytosis, periarticular calcification or ossification and arthropathy with ankylosis. Acromutilation can occur when small bones of the hand and foot are burned and scarred. This communication describes {sup 99m}Tc-HDP pnhole bone scan manifestations of thermal bone injuries observed in a case of skin-bone burns of the mid-tibial shaft that was complicated by infection, soft tissue scarring and osteonecrosis. Patient was a 49-year-old female thermal burn involving a mid-tibial shaft segment along with overlying skin. The injury was accidental to medullary rimming to fit intramedullary nail to fix fracture. The heat produced during drilling spread to burn the pretibial skin that is sparse in subcutaneous buffer tissue and vessels. The soft tissue burn was infected and healed by repeated skin grafts and scar over a period of 2 years. Concomitantly, the underlying bone was infected locally and treated but ensued in osteonecrosis that was accompanied by osteolysis. Indeed. pinhole {sup 99m}Tc-HDP scan played a unique role in this case in detecting that live lateral cortex had sustained the large dead bone that involved the main volume of the mid-tibial shaft. Importantly, the scan could confirm live cortex to have sustained dead bone uncollapsed. Anatomical and metabolic data gained from bone scanning prompted us to systematically scrutinize radiograph and CT to specifically identify the preserved lateral cortex. As mentioned the existence of healthy cortex is biomechanically and tactically vital to surgically replace and restore the devitalized bone.

  20. Stability of guest molecules in urea canal complexes by canal polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Fumio; Makuuchi, Keizo

    1995-01-01

    It was found that various organic materials are attracted into urea canal by hexanediol diacrylate (HDDA) and long chain compounds. This means that materials which does not form complex by itself are induced in canal by HDDA and long chain compounds. To include with stability perfumes, insecticides, attractants and repellents in urea canal, leaf alcohol was used as a model compound for guest molecules in the canal. The leaf alcohol from the canal released gradually over many days and the release was inhibited for 15 days by long chain compounds and for 30 days by polymerized HDDA after irradiation. After releasing, the leaf alcohol in the canal remained 25 % stable for long chain compounds and 40 % for polymerized HDDA. The dose required for stabilization of leaf alcohol in the urea canal by canal polymerization of HDDA was 30 kGy. (author)

  1. Minimally invasive surgical treatment for unstable fractures of the proximal phalanx: intramedullary screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Aurélio Aita

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical-functional parameters and quality of life of patients undergoing minimally invasive surgical treatment for extra-articular fractures of the proximal phalanx, using an intramedullary screw (Acutrak(r. METHODS: Between January 2011 and September 2014, a prospective study was conducted on 41 patients (48 fingers with unstable extra-articular fractures of the proximal phalanx, who underwent minimally invasive surgical treatment using an intramedullary screw (Acutrak(r. These patients were evaluated 12 months after the surgery by means of the DASH quality-of-life questionnaire, VAS pain scale, measurement of range of motion (ROM, in degrees and radiographic assessment. RESULTS: All the patients achieved adequate reduction and consolidation of their fractures. There were statistically significant improvements in quality of life on the DASH scale, pain on the VAS scale and range of motion. CONCLUSION: The minimally invasive technique for treating unstable extra-articular fractures of the proximal phalanx using an intramedullary screw (Acutrak(r is effective and safe, and it presents satisfactory clinical-functional results.

  2. [Evaluation of patients with humeral midshaft fractures treated with DCP plate vs. intramedullary nail UHN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Guevara, Jonathan; López-Cázares, Gerardo; Barragán-Hervella, Rodolfo Gregorio; Villegas-Rosas, José Saúl Alejandro; Alvarado-Ortega, Iván; Montiel-Jarquín, Álvaro José

    2016-01-01

    Humeral midshaft fractures should be surgically managed, so the knowledge of functionality, bone healing and pain of these treatments is required to obtain the expected results. The aim of this paper is to compare the results of patients with humeral midshaft fracture operated with intramedullary nails UHN vs. DCP plate. Comparative study, conducted during the period of June 2014 to June 2015, in patients with humeral midshaft fracture, incidents, operated with intramedullary nails UHN vs. DCP plate. Pain, functional and radiographic assessment were conducted by Andersen, UCLA and simple X ray test, respectively. There were 40 patients, 57.5% with DCP plate, 67.5% male, mean age was 42.38 years, mean operative time was 73.3 minutes, side affected 50% right, 87% had complete consolidation with DCP plate against 70.6% of the patients treated with intramedullary nails UHN. Radiographic consolidation was good for both treatments, functionality and pain patients had presented no statistically significant differences in both groups (p ≥ 0.05). Complications are in the range described worldwide for both treatments. Both treatments are effective for humeral diaphyseal lesions, however should be cautious and try to avoid the complications that can be serious is recommended.

  3. hlorhexidine-releasing implant coating on intramedullary nail reduces infection in a rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Shiels

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of internal intramedullary nails for long bone fracture fixation is a common practice among surgeons. Bacteria naturally attach to these devices, increasing the risk for wound infection, which can result in non- or malunion, additional surgical procedures and extended hospital stays. Intramedullary nail surface properties can be modified to reduce bacterial colonisation and potentially infectious complications. In the current study, a coating combining a non-fouling property with leaching chlorhexidine for orthopaedic implantation was tested. Coating stability and chlorhexidine release were evaluated in vitro. Using a rat model of intramedullary fixation and infection, the effect of the coating on microbial colonisation and fracture healing was evaluated in vivo by quantitative microbiology, micro-computed tomography, plain radiography, three-point bending and/or histology. Low dose systemic cefazolin was administered to increase the similarities to clinical practice, without overshadowing the effect of the anti-infective coating. When introduced into a contaminated wound, the non-fouling chlorhexidine-coated implant reduced the overall bacteria colonisation within the bone and on the implant, reduced the osteolysis and increased the radiographic union, confirming its potential for reducing complications in wounds at high risk of infection. However, when implanted into a sterile wound, non-union increased. Further studies are required to best optimise the anti-microbial effectiveness, while not sacrificing fracture union.

  4. Retrograde intramedullary fixation of long bone fractures through ipsilateral traumatic amputation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Scott C; Chi, Benjamin B; Gordon, Wade T; Potter, Benjamin K

    2015-06-01

    The technique of retrograde intramedullary fixation of fractures through open traumatic amputations has not been previously described. We performed a retrospective case series at a tertiary-care military hospital setting. Ten patients met inclusion criteria. All were male, and all were injured through improvised explosive device. Outcome measures included the incidence of fracture nonunion, osteomyelitis or acute infection, heterotopic ossification (HO), as well as successful prosthesis fitting and ambulation. Average time to fixation after injury and amputation closure was 11.7 and 12.2 days, respectively. Follow-up averaged 20.2 months. The radiographic union rate was 100%, and time to osseous union averaged 7.5 months. One patient had an amputation site infection requiring revision, but none of the nails was removed for infectious reasons. HO occurred in 7 patients, and 2 patients required revision for symptomatic HO. All patients were successfully fitted with prostheses and able to ambulate. To our knowledge, this is the only series in the literature to specifically describe retrograde intramedullary fixation of long bone fractures through the zone of traumatic amputation sites. The infectious risk is relatively low, whereas the union rate (100%) and successful prosthesis fitting are high. For patients with similar injuries, retrograde intramedullary fixation through the zone of amputation is a viable treatment option.

  5. [Assisting plate with reamed intramedullary nailing for segmental fractures of proximal-middle tibia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Wang, Qiu-Gen; Huang, Jian-Hua; Wang, Jian-Dong; Li, Fan; Gao, Wei; Li, Hao-Qing; Tao, Jie

    2013-10-18

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of combining reduction plating with reamed intramedullary nailing for segmental fractures of proximal-middle tibia. From June 2007 to October 2011, 31 patients with segmental fractures of proximal-middle tibia were admitted. There were 18 males and 13 females, with an average age of 45.2 years (range: 23-77 years), of whom, 9 were Gustilo I type open fractures and 22 were close fractures. All the patients were treated with assisting plate combined with reamed intramedullary nailing. The operation was performed averagely 35 h (range: 16-72 h) after injury. During the post-operation follow-up radiographic evaluation, the range of knee joint, and Johner-Wruhs scores were measured. All the patients were followed-up for 18.5 months (range: 17-24 months). No wound infection or osteofascial compartment syndrome happened. All the fractures healed after 5.1 months (range: 4-6 months). The proximal and distal fracture sites healed simultaneously. No malunion was found. In the last follow-up, the mean range of knee joint was 9°-0°-127°, and according to Johner-Wruhs scores, 19 were excellent, 10 good, and 2 fair. Assisting plate with reamed intramedullary nailing is a safe and effective alternative choice for segmental fractures of proximal-middle tibia, which can ease the difficulty of the procedure, improve the quantity of reduction and enhance the stability of the hardware.

  6. Pre-bent elastic stable intramedullary nail fixation for distal radial shaft fractures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yi-hua; Wang, Zhi-gang; Cai, Hai-qing; Yang, Jie; Xu, Yun-lan; Li, Yu-chan; Zhang, Yu-chen; Chen, Bo-chang

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the functional and radiographic outcomes of pre-bent elastic stable intramedullary nail in treatment of distal radial shaft fractures in children. From January 2006 to December 2008, 18 children with distal radial shaft fracture were treated by close reduction and internal fixation with a pre-bent elastic stable intramedullary nail. The age range was from 5 years to 15 years, with an average of 9 years and 8 months. The minimum follow-up was 12 months. All fractures maintained good alignment postoperatively, and 94.4% (17/18) of the patients regained a full range of rotation of the forearm. One patient has limitation of rotation to less than 10°, this had improved by final follow-up. Complications included soft tissue irritation at the site of nail insertion in one patient and transient scar hypersensitivity in another. Fixation with a pre-bent elastic stable intramedullary nail is an effective, safe and convenient method for treating distal radial shaft fractures in children. © 2010 Tianjin Hospital and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Paediatric diaphyseal femur fracture treated with intramedullary titanium elastic nail system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrawan Kumar Thapa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available noBackground & Objectives: Over the few years there has been a marked increase in the use of intramedullary fixation in the management of fracture of shaft of femur in children. The goals should be to stabilize the fracture, to control length and alignment, to promote bone healing and to minimize the morbidity and complications for the child. In this prospective study we intend to evaluate the functional and radiological outcome of diaphyseal fracture of shaft of femur treated with elastic intramedullary nail.Materials & Methods: All 56 patients with diaphyseal fracture shaft of femur were treated with titanium elastic nail and followed for period of 32 weeks.Results: The In this study, outcome was assessed by using Flynn’s criteria of titanium flexible nail outcome score and we found excellent result in 49 cases, satisfactory in six cases and poor in one case. We faced one major complication in form of implant failure and six minor complications inform of superficial wound infection.Conclusion: Elastic intramedullary nail used in treatment of diaphyseal fracture shaft of femur yield excellent functional and radiological outcome. It is easy and simple procedure has low rate of complication. It is physeal-protective, cost effective, does not involve heavy instrumentation and can be performed in small set up. It has minimal risk of infection and no risk of injury to the neurovascular structure.JCMS Nepal. 2015; 11(2:20-22

  8. MR imaging of intramedullary tumors of the spinal cord: comparison with surgical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Du Whan; Hwang, Hee Young; Lee, Hyeon Kyeong; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, In One; Kim, Hyen Jip; Chang, Kee Hyung

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the capability of MR imaging to localize intramedullary tumors of the spinal cord and to distinguish solid from cystic components. MR images of 12 patients with surgically-proven intramedullary spinal cord tumor were retrospectively reviewed and correlated with surgical findings. Histologic diagnosis consisted of 3 astrocytomas, 4 ependymomas, 2 gangliogliomas, and one case of lipoma, lymphoma, and glioblastoma multiform each. MR scans were obtained on a 2.0T or a 0.5T with T1-and T2-weighted spin-echo pulse sequences in sagittal and axial planes. Contrast enhancement was performed with Gd-DTPA in 9 patients. All tumors expanded the spinal cord and showed an extent of involvement ranging from 2 to 5 vertebral heights, except for the gangliogliomas which involved the spinal cord more extensively. Contrast enhancement was seen in all 9 patients. Intratumoral cavities were observed in 1 out of 3 astrocytomas and 2 gangliogliomas. Peritumoral syringomyelia was seen in 2 out of 4 ependymonas and 2 gangliogliomas. In most cases, the MR findings correlated well with the surgical findings with respect to the extent, distinctness of the tumor margin, intratumoral cavity, and associated syringomyelia. It is concluded that MR imaging is a very useful diagnostic tool in the evaluation of intramedullary spinal cord tumors

  9. [Fresh femoral shaft fractures treated with un-reamed intramedullary nail: 203 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y; Wang, M; Sun, L; An, G; Rong, G

    2000-06-01

    To discuss the experience treating fresh femoral shaft fractures with un-reamed intramedullary nail. 203 cases of fresh femoral shaft fractures who had been treated with un-reamed intramedullary nail from November. 1995 to January. 1999 were analyzed retrospectively. 18 cases were open, classified as Gustilo I, and. 185 cases were closed. Traction table and image intensifier were used during operation. Closed reduction, un-reamed and free hand distal locking technique were used. Active movements of nearby joints were encouraged and partial weight bearing of 10 - 15 kg were allowed right after operation. All 203 cases of fresh femoral shaft fractures got bone union within 4 - 6 months. No case of delayed union and infection happened. 1 distal locking screw was broken. All patients gained normal extremity functions. Un-reamed intramedullary nailing of fresh femoral shaft fracture has less damage to the local soft tissue and blood supply. It has a relative stable fracture fixation, and less interruption to the healing procedure. It is one of the best methods for treating femoral fracture.

  10. Female hydrocele of canal of nuck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sowmya Naveen; Bielamowicz, Kevin

    2010-08-01

    Hydrocele of the canal of Nuck is a very rare condition in females. The processus vaginalis within the inguinal canal forms "the canal of Nuck" in females, homologous to the processus vaginalis in males. Failure of obliteration of the processus vaginalis results in either a direct or an indirect inguinal hernia or if a sac of serous fluid is retained, it forms a hydrocele. Very little has been reported on this condition in the literature. We present a case of hydrocele of canal of Nuck in an 8-year-old female.

  11. A novel combined method of osteosynthesis in treatment of tibial fractures: a comparative study on sheep with application of rod-through-plate fixator and bone plating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tralman, G; Andrianov, V; Arend, A; Männik, P; Kibur, R T; Nõupuu, K; Uksov, D; Aunapuu, M

    2013-04-01

    The study compares the efficiency of a new bone fixator combining periostal and intramedullary osteosynthesis to bone plating in treatment of tibial fractures in sheep. Experimental osteotomies were performed in the middle third of the left tibia. Animals were divided into two groups: in one group (four animals) combined osteosynthesis (rod-through-plate fixator, RTP fixator) was applied, and in the other group (three animals) bone plating was used. The experiments lasted for 10 weeks during which fracture union was followed by radiography, and the healing process was studied by blood serum markers reflecting bone turnover and by histological and immunohistochemical investigations. In the RTP fixator group, animals started to load body weight on the operated limbs the next day after the surgery, while in the bone plating group, this happened only on the seventh day. In the RTP fixator group, consolidation of fractures was also faster, as demonstrated by radiographical, histological, and immunohistochemical investigations and in part by blood serum markers for bone formation. It can be concluded that application of RTP fixation is more efficient than plate fixation in the treatment of experimental osteotomies of long bones in sheep. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. The Effect of Malrotation of Tibial Component of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Tibial Insert during High Flexion Using a Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Osano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common errors of total knee arthroplasty procedure is a malrotation of tibial component. The stress on tibial insert is closely related to polyethylene failure. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of malrotation of tibial component for the stress on tibial insert during high flexion using a finite element analysis. We used Stryker NRG PS for analysis. Three different initial conditions of tibial component including normal, 15° internal malrotation, and 15° external malrotation were analyzed. The tibial insert made from ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene was assumed to be elastic-plastic while femoral and tibial metal components were assumed to be rigid. Four nonlinear springs attached to tibial component represented soft tissues around the knee. Vertical load was applied to femoral component which rotated from 0° to 135° while horizontal load along the anterior posterior axis was applied to tibial component during flexion. Maximum equivalent stresses on the surface were analyzed. Internal malrotation caused the highest stress which arose up to 160% of normal position. External malrotation also caused higher stress. Implanting prosthesis in correct position is important for reducing the risk of abnormal wear and failure.

  13. Rotational profile of lower limb and axis for tibial component alignment in varus osteoarthritic knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Shahnawaz; Seon, Jong Keun; Song, Eun Kyoo

    2012-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe the changes in tibial torsion and knee rotation in varus osteoarthritic knees and to check the reliability of reference axis, for tibial component placement, based on femoral transepicondylar axis in these patients. A secondary goal was to determine which reference axis based on proximal tibia is most accurate for determining tibial component rotation. Fifty-two varus osteoarthritic knees and 20 normal knees were analyzed using computed tomographic scan. Tibial torsion and knee rotation were significantly reduced in patients with osteoarthritis. Reference axis based on posterior tibial condyles was most accurate and least variable for tibial component alignment. A significant negative correlation was found between knee rotation and tibial axis based on transepicondylar axis (r = -0.485). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome : Diagnosis, Treatment and Outcome Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winters, M.

    2017-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), also known as shin splints, is one of the most common sports injuries. Although 20% of the jumping and running athletes have MTSS at some point while engaging in sporting activities, we know little about it. There is a lack of knowledge regarding making the

  15. Total knee arthroplasty after high tibial osteotomy. A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M. van Raaij (Tom); M. Reijman (Max); A. Furlan (Alessandro); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Previous osteotomy may compromise subsequent knee replacement, but no guidelines considering knee arthroplasty after prior osteotomy have been developed. We describe a systematic review of non-randomized studies to analyze the effect of high tibial osteotomy on total knee

  16. Functional treatment of tibial fractures with a custom made brace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M. Leeuwen

    1989-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of fracture treatment is rapid bone union with the preservation of perfect function, resulting in the patients' early return to normal daily activities with a minimum of complications. Many conservative and operative methods are used for the treatment of tibial fractures.

  17. Contact Stress Generation on the UHMWPE Tibial Insert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Petrović Savić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Total knee replacement (TKR is considered, during last years, as a very successful surgical technique for removing knee joint deformities and eliminating pain caused by cartilage damage. In literature, as primary causes for knee joint endoprothesis damage are cited complex movements which cause occurrences of complex stress conditions, sagital radius conformity, sliding, types of materials etc. Aim of this study is analysis of contact stresses that occur on tibial implant for 15°, 45° and 60° knee flexion and 50 kg, 75 kg, 100 kg and 125 kg weight. Knee joint prosthesis model and finite elements method (FEM analysis are done in software Catia V5. For this analysis we used ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE for tibial implant material and AISI 316, AISI 317, AISI 321, 17-4PH, CoCrMo, Ti6Al4V and SAE A-286 for femoral component materials. Results show that area of maximal contact stress is identified in medial and lateral part of tibial implant. Von Mises stress values vary regarding of flexion degree and weight, but values are approximate for types of chosen materials. Contact stress location corresponds to damage that occur on tibial implant during exploitation.

  18. Multichannel recording of tibial-nerve somatosensory evoked potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wassenberg, W. J. G. van; Kruizinga, W. J.; van der Hoeven, J. H.; Leenders, K. L.; Maurits, N. M.

    2008-01-01

    Study aims. -The topography of the peaks of tibial.-nerve somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) varies among healthy subjects, most likely because of differences in position and orientation of their cortical generator(s). Therefore, amplitude estimation with a standard one- or two-channel derivation

  19. MR imaging findings of medial tibial crest friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klontzas, Michail E., E-mail: miklontzas@gmail.com; Akoumianakis, Ioannis D., E-mail: ioannis.akoumianakis@gmail.com; Vagios, Ilias, E-mail: iliasvagios@gmail.com; Karantanas, Apostolos H., E-mail: akarantanas@gmail.com

    2013-11-01

    Objective: Medial tibial condyle bone marrow edema (BME), associated with soft tissue edema (STe) surrounding the medial collateral ligament, was incidentally observed in MRI examinations of young and athletic individuals. The aim of the present study was to 1. Prospectively investigate the association between these findings and coexistence of localized pain, and 2. Explore the possible contribution of the tibial morphology to its pathogenesis. Methods: The medial tibial condyle crest was evaluated in 632 knee MRI examinations. The angle and depth were measured by two separate evaluators. The presence of STe and BME was recorded. A third evaluator blindly assessed the presence of pain at this site. Results: BME associated with STe was found in 24 patients (with no history of previous trauma, osteoarthritis, tumor or pes anserine bursitis). The mean crest angle was 151.3° (95%CI 147.4–155.3°) compared to 159.4° (95%CI 158.8–160°) in controls (Mann–Whitney test, P < 0.0001). MRI findings were highly predictive of localized pain (sensitivity 92% specificity 99%, Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Friction at the medial tibial condyle crest is a painful syndrome. MRI is a highly specific and sensitive imaging modality for its diagnosis.

  20. MR imaging findings of medial tibial crest friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klontzas, Michail E.; Akoumianakis, Ioannis D.; Vagios, Ilias; Karantanas, Apostolos H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Medial tibial condyle bone marrow edema (BME), associated with soft tissue edema (STe) surrounding the medial collateral ligament, was incidentally observed in MRI examinations of young and athletic individuals. The aim of the present study was to 1. Prospectively investigate the association between these findings and coexistence of localized pain, and 2. Explore the possible contribution of the tibial morphology to its pathogenesis. Methods: The medial tibial condyle crest was evaluated in 632 knee MRI examinations. The angle and depth were measured by two separate evaluators. The presence of STe and BME was recorded. A third evaluator blindly assessed the presence of pain at this site. Results: BME associated with STe was found in 24 patients (with no history of previous trauma, osteoarthritis, tumor or pes anserine bursitis). The mean crest angle was 151.3° (95%CI 147.4–155.3°) compared to 159.4° (95%CI 158.8–160°) in controls (Mann–Whitney test, P < 0.0001). MRI findings were highly predictive of localized pain (sensitivity 92% specificity 99%, Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Friction at the medial tibial condyle crest is a painful syndrome. MRI is a highly specific and sensitive imaging modality for its diagnosis

  1. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction failure after tibial shaft malunion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFrance, Russell M; Gorczyca, John T; Maloney, Michael D

    2012-02-17

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is common, with >100,000 procedures performed each year in the United States. Several factors are associated with failure, including poor surgical technique, graft incorporation failure, overly aggressive rehabilitation, and trauma. Tibial shaft fracture is also common and frequently requires operative intervention. Failure to reestablish the anatomic alignment of the tibia may cause abnormal forces across adjacent joints, which can cause degenerative joint disease or attritional failure of the surrounding soft tissues. This article describes a case of ACL reconstruction failure after a tibial fracture that resulted in malunion. Excessive force across the graft from lower-extremity malalignment and improper tunnel placement likely contributed to the attritional failure of the graft. This patient required a staged procedure for corrective tibial osteotomy followed by revision ACL reconstruction. This article describes ACL reconstruction failure, tibial shaft malunions, their respective treatments, the technical details of each procedure, and the technical aspects that must be considered when these procedures are done in a staged manner by 2 surgeons. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Preliminary evaluation of the tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miles, James Edward; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Svalastoga, Eiliv Lars

    guide surgical treatment. The TTTG measures tibial tuberosity position relative to the axis of the femoral trochlea. A preliminary investigation of TTTG measurement was performed using the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) cadavers as a morphologically similar and homogenous substitute for dog cadavers. CT...

  3. Avulsion fracture of the tibial tubercle associated with patellar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a case of combined avulsion fracture of the tibial tubercle (AFTT) and avulsion of the patellar ligament in a 15-year-old boy. This injury was treated by open reduction and fixation of both lesions using staples with satisfactory results. This constellation of injury is rare but a high index of suspicion is needed when ...

  4. Epidemiology of open tibial fractures in a teaching hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: This is a prospective observational study of all open tibial fractures seen at the Accident and Emergency department of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH) over a twelve- month period (July 2002- June 2003). Data from a pre-designed proforma for the study was analyzed and descriptive ...

  5. The influence of gluteus maximus on transverse plane tibial rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Stephen J; Graham-Smith, Philip; Nester, Chris J; Howard, Dave; Hermens, Hermie; Herrington, Lee; Bowker, Peter

    2008-05-01

    There is a common clinical belief that transverse plane tibial rotation is controlled by the rearfoot. Although distal structures may influence the motion of the tibia, transverse plane tibial rotation could be determined by the proximal hip musculature. Cadaver studies have identified gluteus maximus as having the largest capacity for external rotation of the hip. This study was therefore undertaken to investigate the effect of gluteus maximus on tibial motion. Kinematic data were collected from the foot and tibia along with EMG data from gluteus maximus for 17 male subjects during normal walking. A number of kinematic parameters were derived to characterise early stance phase. Gluteus maximus function was characterised using RMS EMG and EMG on/off times. No differences in muscle timing were found to be associated with any of the kinematic parameters. In addition, no differences in gluteal activation levels were found between groups of subjects who had different amounts of tibial rotation. However, there was a significant difference (pgluteus maximus activation when groups were defined by the time taken to decelerate the tibia (time to peak internal velocity). Specifically, subjects with greater gluteus maximus activity had a lower time to decelerate the tibia. We suggest that a high level of gluteus maximus activity results in a larger external torque being applied to the femur, which ultimately leads to a more rapid deceleration of the tibia.

  6. Unilateral proximal focal femoral deficiency, fibular aplasia, tibial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-04-30

    Apr 30, 2014 ... Unilateral proximal focal femoral deficiency, fibular aplasia, tibial campomelia and oligosyndactyly in an Egyptian child – Probable. FFU syndrome. Rabah M. ... We report for the first time an Egyptian child with a rare unilateral .... 4th and 5th metatarsal bones are absent), absent middle phalanx of the 2nd ...

  7. Treatment of medial tibial stress syndrome: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winters, Marinus; Eskes, Michel; Weir, Adam; Moen, Maarten H.; Backx, Frank J. G.; Bakker, Eric W. P.

    2013-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is a common exercise-induced leg injury among athletes and military personnel. Several treatment options have been described in the literature, but it remains unclear which treatment is most effective. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the

  8. Injuries associated with fractured tibial shaft | Ikeanyi | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The commonest cause of the injuries was motorcycle accidents (25.7%) followed closely by motor vehicular accidents (25%). The most common associated injuries in order of frequency were: ipsilateral fibular fractures, ankle injuries, ipsilateral femoral fractures and pelvic fractures. Conclusion: Tibial shaft fractures are ...

  9. Intrinsic factors associated with medial tibial stress syndrome in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is the most common lower-leg injury in athletes, and is thought to be caused by bony overload. To prevent MTSS, both pathophysiological and aetiological factors specific to MTSS need to be identified. The intrinsic risk factors that contribute to the development of MTSS are ...

  10. IMPRESSION FRACTURE OF THE TIBIAL CONDYLES – TIPICAL CARVING SKIINJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Veselko

    2008-10-01

    In this paper we present typical mechanism of the fracture of the tibial condyle, due tosudden turn of the ski with carved edges. Mathematical model explains how the force transmitted to the knee multiplies due to sudden decrease of the carved turn radius, or due tosudden additional bowing of skies

  11. Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: reducing anterior tibial subluxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, Bart; Duerr, Eric R. H.; van Dijk, C. Niek; Fu, Freddie H.

    2016-01-01

    To measure and compare the amount of anterior tibial subluxation (ATS) after anatomic ACL reconstruction for both acute and chronic ACL-deficient patients. Fifty-two patients were clinically and radiographically evaluated after primary, unilateral, anatomic ACL reconstruction. Post-operative true

  12. Conventional trans-tibial versus anatomic medial portal technique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-12

    Oct 12, 2015 ... Aim: Method of femoral tunnel preparation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is controversial. In this study, we aimed to determine if there is any difference between the clinical outcomes of two most commonly used drilling techniques; which are conventional trans-tibial (TT) drilling of femoral ...

  13. Conventional trans‑tibial versus anatomic medial portal technique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we aimed to determine if there is any difference between the clinical outcomes of two most commonly used drilling techniques; which are conventional trans‑tibial (TT) drilling of femoral tunnel and anatomic preparation of femoral tunnel through medial portal (MP), in patients who underwent ACL reconstruction.

  14. Narrow, duplicated internal auditory canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, T. [Servico de Neurorradiologia, Hospital Garcia de Orta, Avenida Torrado da Silva, 2801-951, Almada (Portugal); Shayestehfar, B. [Department of Radiology, UCLA Oliveview School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Lufkin, R. [Department of Radiology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2003-05-01

    A narrow internal auditory canal (IAC) constitutes a relative contraindication to cochlear implantation because it is associated with aplasia or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve or its cochlear branch. We report an unusual case of a narrow, duplicated IAC, divided by a bony septum into a superior relatively large portion and an inferior stenotic portion, in which we could identify only the facial nerve. This case adds support to the association between a narrow IAC and aplasia or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. The normal facial nerve argues against the hypothesis that the narrow IAC is the result of a primary bony defect which inhibits the growth of the vestibulocochlear nerve. (orig.)

  15. A health economic analysis of the use of rhBMP-2 in Gustilo-Anderson grade III open tibial fractures for the UK, Germany, and France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Volker; Donell, Simon T; Chhabra, Amit; Bentley, Anthony; Eicher, Alexander; Schnettler, Reinhard

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cost savings from a societal perspective for recombinant human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in grade III A and B open tibial fractures treated with a locked intramedullary nail and soft-tissue management in the UK, Germany, and France. Health care system costs (direct health care costs) and costs for productivity losses (indirect health care costs) were calculated using the raw data from the Bone Morphogenetic Protein Evaluation Group in Surgery for Tibial Trauma "BESTT study". Return-to-work time for estimation of productivity losses was assumed to correspond with the time of fracture healing. For calculation of secondary interventions costs and productivity losses the respective 2007/2008 national tariffs for surgical procedures and average national wages for the UK, Germany, and France were used. For a 1 year perspective, overall treatment costs per patient after the initial surgery of the control vs. the rhBMP-2 group were 44,757 euros vs. 36,847 euros for the UK, 50,197 euros vs. 40,927 euros for Germany and 48,766 euros vs. 39,474 euros for France in favour of rhBMP-2 with overall savings overall savings per case of rhBMP-2 treatment of 7911 euros for the UK, 9270 euros for Germany, and 9291 euros for France which was mainly due to reduced productivity losses by significant faster fracture healing in the rhBMP-2 group (p=0.01). These savings largely offset the upfront price of rhBMP-2 of 2266 euros (1790 pounds) in the UK, euros 2970 in Germany, and 2950 euros in France. Total net savings can be estimated to be 9.6 million euros for the UK, 14.5 million euros for Germany, and 11.4 million euros for France. The results depend on the methodology used particularly for calculation of productivity losses and return-to-work time which was assumed to correspond with fracture healing time. In summary, despite the apparent high direct cost of rhBMP-2 in grade III A and B open tibial fractures, at a national

  16. Some History and Hydrology of the Panama Canal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pabst, Arthur

    2000-01-01

    At the request of the Panama Canal Commission (now Panama Canal Authority), the Hydrologic Engineering Center participated in the development of a model to simulate the existing operation of the Panama Canal System...

  17. Evaluation of Complications from Stainless-Steel Flexible Intramedullary Nailing in Children's Femoral Shaft Fractures and Recommendations for Continued Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Asif; Bhat, M Rafiq; Khursheed, Omar; Maqbool Wani, Mubashir; Ahmad Kawoosa, Altaf; Kotwal, Hilal Ahmad; Manzoor, Qazi Waris

    2017-05-10

    [b]Background.[/b] Flexible intramedullary nailing is currently considered the treatment of choice for femoral diaphyseal fractures in school-aged children. The purpose of our study was to critically evaluate and analyze the complications of stainless steel flexible intramedullary nailing in children's femoral shaft fractures. (mean age, 8.2 years) with a femoral shaft fracture treated with stainless steel flexible intramedullary nailing from January 1, 2009 to July 31, 2015 and evaluated for complications.[b]Results.[/b] All fractures united in a mean time of 9.2 weeks. Minor complications were noted in 19 patients, and major complications were noted in two patients. The Flynn score was excellent in 74 patients, satisfactory in 23 patients, and poor in three patients.[b]Conclusions.[/b] 1. Stainless steel flexible intramedullary nailing in children's femoral shaft fractures is associated with minimal complications. 2. These complications are not related to the alloy of the implant and are mostly due to the long nail end; these complications can be prevented easily. 3. Stainless steel flexible intramedullary nailing is also cost effective, and we recommend its use be enhanced for the treatment of femoral shaft fractures in children.

  18. Root canal morphology of upper and lower molars

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Zlatanovska, Katerina; Popovska, Lidija

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Diagnosis, treatment planning and knowledge of root canal morphology and its’ frequent variations is a basic requirement for endodontic success. The success of root canal therapy is dependent on the clinician’s knowledge of root canal morphology with goal to precisely locate all canals, properly clean, shape and obturate the canal space. Aim: The aim in our study was to to determine the root canal morphology in maxillary and mandibular molars. Material and method: A total...

  19. Root canal morphology of maxillar and mandibular molars

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Panova, Gordana; Zlatanovska, Katerina; Popovska, Lidija

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Diagnosis, treatment planning and knowledge of root canal morphology and its’ frequent variations is a basic requirement for endodontic success. The success of root canal therapy is dependent on the clinician’s knowledge of root canal morphology with goal to precisely locate all canals, properly clean, shape and obturate the canal space. Aim: The aim in our study was to to determine the root canal morphology in maxillary and mandibular molars. Material and method: A total...

  20. Bilateral duplication of the internal auditory canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weon, Young Cheol; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Choi, Sung Kyu; Koo, Ja-Won

    2007-01-01

    Duplication of the internal auditory canal is an extremely rare temporal bone anomaly that is believed to result from aplasia or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. We report bilateral duplication of the internal auditory canal in a 28-month-old boy with developmental delay and sensorineural hearing loss. (orig.)