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Sample records for ti-doped isotropic graphite

  1. Ti-doped isotropic graphite: A promising armour material for plasma-facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rosales, C.; López-Galilea, I.; Ordás, N.; Adelhelm, C.; Balden, M.; Pintsuk, G.; Grattarola, M.; Gualco, C.

    2009-04-01

    Finely dispersed Ti-doped isotropic graphites with 4 at.% Ti have been manufactured using synthetic mesophase pitch 'AR' as raw material. These new materials show a thermal conductivity at room temperature of ˜200 W/mK and flexural strength close to 100 MPa. Measurement of the total erosion yield by deuterium bombardment at ion energies and sample temperatures for which pure carbon shows maximum values, resulted in a reduction of at least a factor of 4, mainly due to dopant enrichment at the surface caused by preferential erosion of carbon. In addition, ITER relevant thermal shock loads were applied with an energetic electron beam at the JUDITH facility. The results demonstrated a significantly improved performance of Ti-doped graphite compared to pure graphite. Finally, Ti-doped graphite was successfully brazed to a CuCrZr block using a Mo interlayer. These results let assume that Ti-doped graphite can be a promising armour material for divertor plasma-facing components.

  2. Ti-doped isotropic graphite: A promising armour material for plasma-facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Rosales, C. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Paseo de Manuel Lardizabal, 15, E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain)], E-mail: cgrosales@ceit.es; Lopez-Galilea, I.; Ordas, N. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Paseo de Manuel Lardizabal, 15, E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Adelhelm, C.; Balden, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pintsuk, G. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Grattarola, M.; Gualco, C. [Ansaldo Ricerche S.p.A., I-16152 Genoa (Italy)

    2009-04-30

    Finely dispersed Ti-doped isotropic graphites with 4 at.% Ti have been manufactured using synthetic mesophase pitch 'AR' as raw material. These new materials show a thermal conductivity at room temperature of {approx}200 W/mK and flexural strength close to 100 MPa. Measurement of the total erosion yield by deuterium bombardment at ion energies and sample temperatures for which pure carbon shows maximum values, resulted in a reduction of at least a factor of 4, mainly due to dopant enrichment at the surface caused by preferential erosion of carbon. In addition, ITER relevant thermal shock loads were applied with an energetic electron beam at the JUDITH facility. The results demonstrated a significantly improved performance of Ti-doped graphite compared to pure graphite. Finally, Ti-doped graphite was successfully brazed to a CuCrZr block using a Mo interlayer. These results let assume that Ti-doped graphite can be a promising armour material for divertor plasma-facing components.

  3. Ti-doped isotropic graphite: A promising armour material for plasma-facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Rosales, C.; Lopez-Galilea, I.; Ordas, N.; Adelhelm, C.; Balden, M.; Pintsuk, G.; Grattarola, M.; Gualco, C.

    2009-01-01

    Finely dispersed Ti-doped isotropic graphites with 4 at.% Ti have been manufactured using synthetic mesophase pitch 'AR' as raw material. These new materials show a thermal conductivity at room temperature of ∼200 W/mK and flexural strength close to 100 MPa. Measurement of the total erosion yield by deuterium bombardment at ion energies and sample temperatures for which pure carbon shows maximum values, resulted in a reduction of at least a factor of 4, mainly due to dopant enrichment at the surface caused by preferential erosion of carbon. In addition, ITER relevant thermal shock loads were applied with an energetic electron beam at the JUDITH facility. The results demonstrated a significantly improved performance of Ti-doped graphite compared to pure graphite. Finally, Ti-doped graphite was successfully brazed to a CuCrZr block using a Mo interlayer. These results let assume that Ti-doped graphite can be a promising armour material for divertor plasma-facing components.

  4. Improvement of thermal shock resistance of isotropic graphite by Ti-doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Galilea, I.; Ordas, N.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Lindig, S.

    2009-01-01

    Ti-doped isotropic graphite is a promising candidate material for the strike point area of the ITER divertor due to its reduced chemical erosion by hydrogen bombardment and its high thermal shock resistance, mainly due the catalytic effect of TiC on the graphitization leading to an increase of thermal conductivity and to higher mechanical strength. Several manufacturing parameters such as oxidative stabilization treatment, carbonization cycle, graphitization temperature and dwell time during graphitization have been investigated in order to establish a relationship between these parameters and the final properties.

  5. Improvement of thermal shock resistance of isotropic graphite by Ti-doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Galilea, I. [Inmaculada Lopez-Galilea, CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Po de Manuel Lardizabal, 15 E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain)], E-mail: ilopez@ceit.es; Ordas, N.; Garcia-Rosales, C. [Inmaculada Lopez-Galilea, CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Po de Manuel Lardizabal, 15 E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Lindig, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2009-04-30

    Ti-doped isotropic graphite is a promising candidate material for the strike point area of the ITER divertor due to its reduced chemical erosion by hydrogen bombardment and its high thermal shock resistance, mainly due the catalytic effect of TiC on the graphitization leading to an increase of thermal conductivity and to higher mechanical strength. Several manufacturing parameters such as oxidative stabilization treatment, carbonization cycle, graphitization temperature and dwell time during graphitization have been investigated in order to establish a relationship between these parameters and the final properties.

  6. Improvement of thermal shock resistance of isotropic graphite by ti-doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Galilea, I.; Ordas, N.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Lindig, S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Carbon fiber reinforced carbon (CFC) is the present candidate material for the strike point area of the ITER divertor due to its ability to withstand excessive heat loads during ELMs and plasma disruptions. However, chemical erosion of carbon under hydrogen bombardment from the plasma involves serious disadvantages for this application (replacement and safety problems due to tritium co-deposition). In addition, the manufacturing process of present CFC candidate materials is long and complex resulting in high costs, and CFC materials are inherently anisotropic. Doping of carbon with small amounts (several at. %) of titanium has proved to be effective in reducing chemical erosion while maintaining or even improving the mechanical properties. furthermore, TiC as dopant contributes to increase significantly the thermal conductivity and consequently the thermal shock resistance, due to the catalytic effect of this carbide on the graphitization. The aim of this work is to improve substantially the thermal shock resistance of fine-grained isotropic graphite by doping it with small amounts of TiC, reducing at the same time the chemical erosion. By this way Ti-doped graphites could be competitive with present CFC candidate materials for next step fusion devices. To achieve this, a synthetic naphthalene-derived mesophase pitch named AR is used as carbon precursor; this raw material exhibits excellent graphitizability, high chemical purity and consistent quality. Due to the low viscosity at the softening point of AR, resulting in swelling during the carbonization treatment, it is necessary to modify the initial viscosity of AR by an adequate oxidative stabilization treatment. As dopant, TiC powder with 130 nm average particle size is added. The influence of several manufacturing parameters such as oxidative stabilization treatment, carbonization cycle, graphitization temperature and dwell time during graphitization have been investigated in

  7. Improvement of thermal shock resistance of isotropic graphite by ti-doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Galilea, I.; Ordas, N.; Garcia-Rosales, C. [Navarrra Univ., CEPT, San Sebastian (Spain); Lindig, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Carbon fiber reinforced carbon (CFC) is the present candidate material for the strike point area of the ITER divertor due to its ability to withstand excessive heat loads during ELMs and plasma disruptions. However, chemical erosion of carbon under hydrogen bombardment from the plasma involves serious disadvantages for this application (replacement and safety problems due to tritium co-deposition). In addition, the manufacturing process of present CFC candidate materials is long and complex resulting in high costs, and CFC materials are inherently anisotropic. Doping of carbon with small amounts (several at. %) of titanium has proved to be effective in reducing chemical erosion while maintaining or even improving the mechanical properties. furthermore, TiC as dopant contributes to increase significantly the thermal conductivity and consequently the thermal shock resistance, due to the catalytic effect of this carbide on the graphitization. The aim of this work is to improve substantially the thermal shock resistance of fine-grained isotropic graphite by doping it with small amounts of TiC, reducing at the same time the chemical erosion. By this way Ti-doped graphites could be competitive with present CFC candidate materials for next step fusion devices. To achieve this, a synthetic naphthalene-derived mesophase pitch named AR is used as carbon precursor; this raw material exhibits excellent graphitizability, high chemical purity and consistent quality. Due to the low viscosity at the softening point of AR, resulting in swelling during the carbonization treatment, it is necessary to modify the initial viscosity of AR by an adequate oxidative stabilization treatment. As dopant, TiC powder with 130 nm average particle size is added. The influence of several manufacturing parameters such as oxidative stabilization treatment, carbonization cycle, graphitization temperature and dwell time during graphitization have been investigated in

  8. Erosion of pyrolytic graphite and Ti-doped graphite due to high flux irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuka, Yusuke; Ohashi, Junpei; Ueda, Yoshio; Isobe, Michiro; Nishikawa, Masahiro

    1997-01-01

    The erosion of pyrolytic graphite and titanium doped graphite RG-Ti above 1,780 K was investigated by 5 keV Ar beam irradiation with the flux from 4x10 19 to 1x10 21 m -2 ·s -1 . The total erosion yields were significantly reduced with the flux. This reduction would be attributed to the reduction of RES (radiation enhanced sublimation) yield, which was observed in the case of isotropic graphite with the flux dependence of RES yield of φ -0.26 (φ: flux) obtained in our previous work. The yield of pyrolytic graphite was roughly 30% higher than that of isotropic graphite below the flux of 10 20 m -2 ·s -1 whereas each yield approached to very close value at the highest flux of 1x10 21 m -2 ·s -1 . This result indicated that the effect of graphite structure on the RES yield, which was apparent in the low flux region, would disappear in the high flux region probably due to the disordering of crystal structure. In the case of irradiation to RG-Ti at 1,780 K, the surface undulations evolved with a mean height of about 3 μm at 1.2x10 20 m -2 ·s -1 , while at higher flux of 8.0x10 20 m -2 ·s -1 they were unrecognizable. These phenomena can be explained by the reduction of RES of graphite parts excluding TiC grains. (author)

  9. Isotropic nuclear graphites; the effect of neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lore, J.; Buscaillon, A.; Mottet, P.; Micaud, G.

    1977-01-01

    Several isotropic graphites have been manufactured using different forming processes and fillers such as needle coke, regular coke, or pitch coke. Their properties are described in this paper. Specimens of these products have been irradiated in the fast reactor Rapsodie between 400 to 1400 0 C, at fluences up to 1,7.10 21 n.cm -2 PHI.FG. The results show an isotropic behavior under neutron irradiation, but the induced dimensional changes are higher than those of isotropic coke graphites although they are lower than those of conventional extruded graphites made with the same coke

  10. Statistics of fracture in two grades of isotropic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, C.R.; Montgomery, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    Properties in large billets of graphite used in critical applications demand a high level of quality assurance. Therefore, it must be determined if sample test results represent the properties of the entire billet. Flexure tests were performed on specimens from 27 populations in each grade with respect to billet, position, and orientation to establish the confidence levels for estimation of overall variance and mean strength in the billet. Comparisons of tensile and brittle ring to flexure strengths were made. Homogeneity of variance was found to be a tenable hypothesis; however, estimates of the billet mean strength were not as confidently predicted by the samples. (orig.)

  11. Statistics of fracture in two grades of isotropic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C. R.; Montgomery, S. C.

    1990-04-01

    Properties in large billets of graphite used in critical applications demand a high level of quality assurance. Therefore, it must be determined if sample test results represent the properties of the entire billet. Flexure tests were performed on specimens from 27 populations in each grade with respect to billet, position, and orientation to establish the confidence levels for estimation of overall variance and mean strength in the billet. Comparisons of tensile and brittle ring to flexure strengths were made. Homogeneity of variance was found to be a tenable hypothesis; however, estimates of the billet mean strength were not as confidently predicted by the samples.

  12. Change in physical properties of high density isotropic graphites irradiated in the ?JOYO? fast reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, T.; Kaito, T.; Onose, S.; Shibahara, I.

    1995-08-01

    Thirteen kinds of isotropic graphites with different density and maximum grain size were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor "JOYO" to fluences from 2.11 to 2.86 × 10 26 n/m 2 ( E > 0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 549 to 597°C. Postirradiation examination was carried out on the dimensional changes, elastic modulus, and thermal conductivity of these materials. Dimensional change results indicate that the graphites irradiated at lower fluences showed shrinkage upon neutron irradiation followed by increase with increasing neutron fluences, irrespective of differences in material parameters. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increased by two to three times the unirradiated values. The large scatter found in Poisson's ratio of unirradiated materials became very small and a linear dependence on density was obtained after irradiation. The thermal conductivity decreased to one-fifth to one-tenth of unirradiated values, with a negligible change in specific heat. The results of postirradiation examination indicated that the changes in physical properties of high density, isotropic graphites were mainly dominated by the irradiation condition rather than their material parameters. Namely, the effects of irradiation induced defects on physical properties of heavily neutron-irradiated graphites are much larger than that of defects associated with as-fabricated specimens.

  13. Change in physical properties of high density isotropic graphites irradiated in the ''JOYO'' fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, T.; Kaito, T.; Onose, S.; Shibahara, I.

    1995-01-01

    Thirteen kinds of isotropic graphites with different density and maximum grain size were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor ''JOYO'' to fluences from 2.11 to 2.86x10 26 n/m 2 (E>0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 549 to 597 C. Postirradiation examination was carried out on the dimensional changes, elastic modulus, and thermal conductivity of these materials. Dimensional change results indicate that the graphites irradiated at lower fluences showed shrinkage upon neutron irradiation followed by increase with increasing neutron fluences, irrespective of differences in material parameters. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increased by two to three times the unirradiated values. The large scatter found in Poisson's ratio of unirradiated materials became very small and a linear dependence on density was obtained after irradiation. The thermal conductivity decreased to one-fifth to one-tenth of unirradiated values, with a negligible change in specific heat. The results of postirradiation examination indicated that the changes in physical properties of high density, isotropic graphites were mainly dominated by the irradiation condition rather than their material parameters. Namely, the effects of irradiation induced defects on physical properties of heavily neutron-irradiated graphites are much larger than that of defects associated with as-fabricated specimens. (orig.)

  14. High heat flux experiment on isotropic graphite using pulsed laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizaki, Hiroshi; Tokunaga, Kazutoshi; Fukuda, Shigehisa; Yoshida, Naoaki; Muroga, Takeo.

    1989-01-01

    In order to examine the plasma-withstanding behavior of isotropic graphite which is the leading favorite material for the first wall of nuclear fusion reactors, the pulsed thermal loading experiment was carried out by using a laser. As the result of analyzing the gas which was emitted during the pulsed thermal loading, together with the formation and release of various hydrocarbon gases, also the formation of carbon clusters due to the sublimation of carbon was observed. The vacuum characteristics and the dependence on thermal loading condition and surface treatment condition of these released gases were determined, and the problems and the way of improvement in its application to nuclear fusion reactors were elucidated. Since the isotropic graphite is of low atomic number, the radiation loss in plasma is small, and the improvement of the plasma parameters can be expected. Besides, the heat resistance and high temperature stability in vacuum are good, and the induced radioactivity is low. On the other hand, the quantity of gas occlusion is much, various hydrocarbon gases are formed at high temperature, and the wear due to sublimation arises by very high thermal loading. The experimental method, the observation of graphite surface by SEM, and the effect of carbon coating due to thermal decomposition are reported. (K.I.)

  15. The tensile deformation behavior of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite posterior to hydrostatic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoda, S.; Eto, M.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of prehydrostatic loading on microstructural changes and tensile deformation behavior of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite have been examined. Scanning electron micrographs show that formation of microcracks associated with delamination between basal planes occurs under hydrostatic loading. Hydrostatic loading on specimens results in the decrease in tensile strength and increase in residual strain generated by the applied tensile stress at various levels, indicating that the graphite material is weakened by hydrostatic loading. A relationship between residual strain and applied tensile stress for graphite hydrostatically-loaded at several pressure levels can be approximately expressed as element of= (AP + B) sigmasup(n) over a wide range hydrostatic pressure, where element of, P and sigma denote residual strain, hydrostatic pressure and applied tensile stress, respectively; A, B and n are constant. The effects of prehydrostatic loading on the tensile stress-strain behavior of the graphite were examined in more detail. The ratio of stress after hydrostatic loading to that before hydrostatic loading on the stress-strain relationship remains almost unchanged irrespective of strain. (orig.)

  16. On the isotropic elastic constants of graphite nodules in ductile cast iron: Analytical and numerical micromechanical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andriollo, Tito; Hattel, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive description of the mechanical behavior of nodules in ductile iron is still missing in the published literature. Nevertheless, experimental evidence exists for the importance of such graphite particles during macroscopic material deformation, especially under compressive loading...... mesoscopic moduli in agreement with Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio recorded for common ferritic ductile iron grades. This suggests that graphite nodules may not be considered isotropic at the microscopic scale, at least from a mechanical viewpoint....

  17. Effects of Crack Measurement Methods on The Determination of Fracture Toughness of IG-110 Isotropic Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Kim, Dae Jong; Jang, Chang Heui

    2010-02-01

    This report represents experimental data on the differences in the fracture toughness values due to different crack length measurement methods, i.e. direct current potential drop method (DCPD), traveling microscope method (TM), and dye penetration method (DP). SENB specimens made of IG-11 fine grained isotropic graphite (specimen size: 200(L) x 20(W) x 15(B) mm 3 ) were used. Results on crack length estimation showed that the TM and the DP methods resulted in similar crack length changing behaviors, and the crack length estimated by DCPD was the shortest. Comparisons of crack growth resistance curves (K R curves) showed that the DCPD showed the lowest and a decreasing K R curve with a crack extension. Both the curves from TM and DP showed increasing K R curves with a crack extension, but the curve from DP was unstable. The K R curve estimated from TM appeared to be the most stable one

  18. Effect of nonlinear stress-strain relationship on bending strength of isotropic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Taketoshi; Oku, Tatsuo

    1978-05-01

    Four-point bending tests were made on rectangular isotropic 7477PT graphite specimens of different sizes to observe the relation between load and outermost fiber strain. Analytical methods, allowing for nonlinear stress-strain relationships different between tension and compression, were developed for calculating the fiber stress distribution in a beam and the failure probability based on the Weibull statistical theory for bending fracture. With increase of the stress, the stress-strain curves for tension deviate from the linearity and also from those for compression. The true bending strengths of the rectangular bars are 10 -- 20 percent lower than elastic bending strengths. Revised Weibull theory gives failure probability distributions agreeing with measured ones, compared with the theory based on elastic behavior. (auth.)

  19. An evaluation on fatigue crack growth in a fine-grained isotropic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Hongtao; Sun Libin [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li Chenfeng [College of Engineering, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Shi Li [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang Haitao, E-mail: wanght@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The propagation of micro- and macro-fatigue cracks in IG-11 graphite was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The curves of the fatigue crack growth rate versus the SIF range show three stages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fatigue microcrack propagation is very sensitive to graphite's microstructures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Graphite's microstructures have no significant impact on fatigue macrocrack growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fatigue fracture surface indicates the fracture mechanism of the IG-11 graphite. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is to investigate the mechanism of fatigue crack propagation in IG-11 graphite, and determine the crack growth rate in relation to the stress level. Experimental studies were performed at both micro and macro scales. For fatigue microcrack propagation, single-edge-notch specimens were chosen for testing and the fatigue crack growth was measured in situ with a scanning electron microscope. For fatigue macrocrack propagation, CT specimens were used and the fatigue crack growth was measured with a high-accuracy optic microscope. Combining the two groups of experimental results, the following conclusions are derived: (1) The heterogeneous microstructures of the graphite material have significant impact on the fatigue microcrack growth, while their influence on fatigue macrocrack growth is very limited. (2) The relationship between the fatigue crack growth rate and the crack-tip stress intensity factor range can be expressed in the form of Paris formulae, which contains three stages: an initial rising part with a small slope, an abrupt rise with a very large acceleration, and a short final part with a small slope. (3) The fatigue fracture surface of the graphite material contains considerable sliding of leaf-shape graphite flakes combined with small cotton-shape plastic deformations. These sliding traces are approximately aligned at 45 Degree-Sign , showing the

  20. An evaluation on fatigue crack growth in a fine-grained isotropic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongtao; Sun Libin; Li Chenfeng; Shi Li; Wang Haitao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The propagation of micro- and macro-fatigue cracks in IG-11 graphite was studied. ► The curves of the fatigue crack growth rate versus the SIF range show three stages. ► The fatigue microcrack propagation is very sensitive to graphite's microstructures. ► Graphite's microstructures have no significant impact on fatigue macrocrack growth. ► The fatigue fracture surface indicates the fracture mechanism of the IG-11 graphite. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is to investigate the mechanism of fatigue crack propagation in IG-11 graphite, and determine the crack growth rate in relation to the stress level. Experimental studies were performed at both micro and macro scales. For fatigue microcrack propagation, single-edge-notch specimens were chosen for testing and the fatigue crack growth was measured in situ with a scanning electron microscope. For fatigue macrocrack propagation, CT specimens were used and the fatigue crack growth was measured with a high-accuracy optic microscope. Combining the two groups of experimental results, the following conclusions are derived: (1) The heterogeneous microstructures of the graphite material have significant impact on the fatigue microcrack growth, while their influence on fatigue macrocrack growth is very limited. (2) The relationship between the fatigue crack growth rate and the crack-tip stress intensity factor range can be expressed in the form of Paris formulae, which contains three stages: an initial rising part with a small slope, an abrupt rise with a very large acceleration, and a short final part with a small slope. (3) The fatigue fracture surface of the graphite material contains considerable sliding of leaf-shape graphite flakes combined with small cotton-shape plastic deformations. These sliding traces are approximately aligned at 45°, showing the main cause of the fatigue fracture is the shear stress. There are also a large amount of secondary cracks inside unit cells and on cell walls

  1. Effects of fast-neutron damage from 0 to 42 x 1021 neutrons/CM2 on the physical properties of near-isotropic grades of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, W.H.; Kennedy, C.R.; Eatherly, W.P.

    1975-01-01

    The characterization of property changes in various grades of near-isotropic, ''binderless'' grades of graphite as functions of fluence accumulated at 715 0 C from 0 to 42 x 10 21 neutrons/cm 2 (E greater than 50 keV) was made. Generally, the average coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) from 20 to 600 0 C and the room-temperature values for strengths, fracture strains, Young's moduli, shear moduli, and calculated figures of merit (FOM) for resistance to thermal shock all ultimately decreased with fluence. (U.S.)

  2. Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gilpin R.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Olson, Donald W.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Graphite is a form of pure carbon that normally occurs as black crystal flakes and masses. It has important properties, such as chemical inertness, thermal stability, high electrical conductivity, and lubricity (slipperiness) that make it suitable for many industrial applications, including electronics, lubricants, metallurgy, and steelmaking. For some of these uses, no suitable substitutes are available. Steelmaking and refractory applications in metallurgy use the largest amount of produced graphite; however, emerging technology uses in large-scale fuel cell, battery, and lightweight high-strength composite applications could substantially increase world demand for graphite.Graphite ores are classified as “amorphous” (microcrystalline), and “crystalline” (“flake” or “lump or chip”) based on the ore’s crystallinity, grain-size, and morphology. All graphite deposits mined today formed from metamorphism of carbonaceous sedimentary rocks, and the ore type is determined by the geologic setting. Thermally metamorphosed coal is the usual source of amorphous graphite. Disseminated crystalline flake graphite is mined from carbonaceous metamorphic rocks, and lump or chip graphite is mined from veins in high-grade metamorphic regions. Because graphite is chemically inert and nontoxic, the main environmental concerns associated with graphite mining are inhalation of fine-grained dusts, including silicate and sulfide mineral particles, and hydrocarbon vapors produced during the mining and processing of ore. Synthetic graphite is manufactured from hydrocarbon sources using high-temperature heat treatment, and it is more expensive to produce than natural graphite.Production of natural graphite is dominated by China, India, and Brazil, which export graphite worldwide. China provides approximately 67 percent of worldwide output of natural graphite, and, as the dominant exporter, has the ability to set world prices. China has significant graphite reserves, and

  3. Structure, microstructure and photoluminescence of nanocrystalline Ti-doped gahnite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrankić, M.; Gržeta, B.; Mandić, V.; Tkalčec, E.; Milošević, S.; Čeh, M.; Rakvin, B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ti-doped gahnite samples with 0–11.6 at.% Ti were synthesized for the first time. ► The samples had crystallite size of 16.6–20.5 nm and lattice strain of 0.07–0.26%. ► Titanium entered the gahnite structure as Ti 4+ , substituting for octahedral Al 3+ . ► Ti-doped gahnite showed the UV absorption and blue emission under UV excitation. - Abstract: A series of Ti-doped ZnAl 2 O 4 (gahnite) samples with doping levels of 0, 1.8, 3.8, 5.4 and 11.6 at.% Ti in relation to Al were prepared by a sol–gel technique. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), EPR spectroscopy, UV–vis reflectance spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) studies. Diffraction patterns indicated that all samples were nanocrystalline, with a spinel-type structure, space group Fd3 ¯ m. Titanium doping of gahnite caused an increase of unit-cell parameter and diffraction line broadening. The structure of samples was refined by the Rietveld method, simultaneously with the analysis of diffraction line broadening. TEM investigations confirmed that samples had spinel-type structure, and showed that samples contained evenly shaped particles of about 20 nm in size. Ti-doped samples exhibited strong absorption at wavelength exc = 308 nm.

  4. Effects of high temperature neutron irradiation on the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of fine-grained isotropic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, H.; Nomura, S.; Imai, H.; Oku, T.; Eto, M.

    1987-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on the dimensional change, coefficient of thermal expansion(CTE), thermal conductivity, corrosion rate, Young's modulus and strengths were studied for the candidate graphite material IG-110 of the experimental very high temperature gas-cooled reactor(VHTR) after irradiation at 585 - 1273 deg C to neutron fluences of up to about 3 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ) in the JMTR and JRR-2, and to about 7 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ) in the HFR. The results were compared with the irradiation behaviors of other graphites. Dimensional shrinkage was observed in the whole irradiation temperature range, showing lower value than 2 %. The shrinkage rate showed the minimum in the irradiation temperature of around 850 deg C, followed by the increase for the samples irradiated at higher temperatures. The dimensional stability of the material was clarified to be almost the same with that of H451 graphite. The CTE, thermal resistivity and Young's modulus increased in the early stage of irradiation and then only the CTE decreased while the thermal resistivity and Young's modulus levelled off with further irradiation. The neutron fluence showing the maximum CTE shifted to the lower fluence with increasing irradiation temperature. The increases of both thermal resistivity and Young's modulus were remarkable for the samples irradiated at lower temperatures. Compressive and bending strengths measured at room temperature increased after irradiation as well. The corrosion rate with water-vapor of 0.65 % in helium at high temperatures decreased owing to irradiation and the reduction was independent of irradiation temperature and neutron fluence. The activation energy for the reaction was estimated to be the same before and after irradiation. (author)

  5. Blue photoluminescence in Ti-doped alkaline-earth stannates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Ueda, Kazushige

    2007-01-01

    Blue photoluminescence properties of Ti-doped alkaline-earth stannates, A 2 (Sn 1- x Ti x )O 4 (A=Ca, Sr, Ba) (x=0.005-0.15), were examined at room temperature. These stannates showed intense broad emission bands peaking at 445 nm for Ca 2 SnO 4 , at 410 nm for Sr 2 SnO 4 , and at 425 nm for Ba 2 SnO 4 under UV excitation. Emission intensities were relatively insensitive to Ti concentration and no sharp concentration quenching was observed. Mixing alkaline-earth ions in the crystal structures did not increase the emission intensities in the A 2 (Sn 1- x Ti x )O 4 system. The excitation spectra of these stannates exhibited broad bands just below the fundamental absorption edges, implying that luminescence centers do not consist of the component elements in the host materials. It was suggested that the isolated TiO 6 complexes are possible luminescence centers in these materials, as previously proposed in other Ti-doped stannates such as Mg 2 SnO 4 and Y 2 Sn 2 O 7 . - Graphical abstract: Blue photoluminescence properties of Ti-doped alkaline-earth stannates, A 2 (Sn 1- x Ti x )O 4 (A=Ca, Sr, Ba) (x=0.005-0.15), were examined at room temperature. These stannates showed intense broad emission bands peaking at 445 nm for Ca 2 SnO 4 , at 410 nm for Sr 2 SnO 4 , and at 425 nm for Ba 2 SnO 4 under UV excitation

  6. The Formation of Lithiated Ti-Doped {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} Nanocrystalline Particles by Mechanical Milling of Ti-Doped Lithium Spinel Ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widatallah, H. M., E-mail: hisham@ictp.trieste.it [Khartoum University, Department of Physics (Sudan); Gismelseed, A. M.; Bouziane, K. [Sultan Qaboos University, Department of Physics (Oman); Berry, F. J. [Open University, Department of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Al Rawas, A. D.; Al-Omari, I. A.; Yousif, A. A.; Elzain, M. E. [Sultan Qaboos University, Department of Physics (Oman)

    2004-12-15

    The milling of spinel-related Ti-doped Li{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2.5}O{sub 4} for different times is studied with XRD, Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetic measurements. Milling converts the material to Li-Ti-doped {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocrystalline particles via an intermediate {gamma}-LiFeO{sub 2}-related phase. The role played by the dopant Ti-ion in the process is emphasized.

  7. The Formation of Lithiated Ti-Doped α-Fe2O3 Nanocrystalline Particles by Mechanical Milling of Ti-Doped Lithium Spinel Ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widatallah, H. M.; Gismelseed, A. M.; Bouziane, K.; Berry, F. J.; Al Rawas, A. D.; Al-Omari, I. A.; Yousif, A. A.; Elzain, M. E.

    2004-01-01

    The milling of spinel-related Ti-doped Li 0.5 Fe 2.5 O 4 for different times is studied with XRD, Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetic measurements. Milling converts the material to Li-Ti-doped α-Fe 2 O 3 nanocrystalline particles via an intermediate γ-LiFeO 2 -related phase. The role played by the dopant Ti-ion in the process is emphasized.

  8. Investigation of the Optoelectronic Properties of Ti-doped Indium Tin Oxide Thin Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nen-Wen Pu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available : In this study, direct-current magnetron sputtering was used to fabricate Ti-doped indium tin oxide (ITO thin films. The sputtering power during the 350-nm-thick thin-film production process was fixed at 100 W with substrate temperatures increasing from room temperature to 500 °C. The Ti-doped ITO thin films exhibited superior thin-film resistivity (1.5 × 10−4 Ω/cm, carrier concentration (4.1 × 1021 cm−3, carrier mobility (10 cm2/Vs, and mean visible-light transmittance (90% at wavelengths of 400–800 nm at a deposition temperature of 400 °C. The superior carrier concentration of the Ti-doped ITO alloys (>1021 cm−3 with a high figure of merit (81.1 × 10−3 Ω−1 demonstrate the pronounced contribution of Ti doping, indicating their high suitability for application in optoelectronic devices.

  9. Investigation of the Optoelectronic Properties of Ti-doped Indium Tin Oxide Thin Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Nen-Wen; Liu, Wei-Sheng; Cheng, Huai-Ming; Hu, Hung-Chun; Hsieh, Wei-Ting; Yu, Hau-Wei; Liang, Shih-Chang

    2015-09-21

    : In this study, direct-current magnetron sputtering was used to fabricate Ti-doped indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films. The sputtering power during the 350-nm-thick thin-film production process was fixed at 100 W with substrate temperatures increasing from room temperature to 500 °C. The Ti-doped ITO thin films exhibited superior thin-film resistivity (1.5 × 10 - ⁴ Ω/cm), carrier concentration (4.1 × 10 21 cm - ³), carrier mobility (10 cm²/Vs), and mean visible-light transmittance (90%) at wavelengths of 400-800 nm at a deposition temperature of 400 °C. The superior carrier concentration of the Ti-doped ITO alloys (>10 21 cm - ³) with a high figure of merit (81.1 × 10 - ³ Ω - ¹) demonstrate the pronounced contribution of Ti doping, indicating their high suitability for application in optoelectronic devices.

  10. Behaviour of Ti-doped CFCs under thermal fatigue tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Centeno, A. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (CSIC), Apdo. 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain); Pintsuk, G.; Linke, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Gualco, C. [Ansaldo Energia, I-16152 Genoa (Italy); Blanco, C., E-mail: clara@incar.csic.es [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (CSIC), Apdo. 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain); Santamaria, R.; Granda, M.; Menendez, R. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (CSIC), Apdo. 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    In spite of the remarkable progress in the design of in-vessel components for the divertor of the first International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), a great effort is still put into the development of manufacturing technologies for carbon armour with improved properties. Newly developed 3D titanium-doped carbon fibre reinforced composites and their corresponding undoped counterparts were brazed to a CuCrZr heat sink to produce actively cooled flat tile mock-ups. By exposing the mock-ups to thermal fatigue tests in an electron beam test facility, the material behaviour and the brazing between the individual constituents in the mock-up was qualified. The mock-ups with titanium-doped CFCs exhibited a significantly improved thermal fatigue resistance compared with those undoped materials. The comparison of these mock-ups with those produced using pristine NB31, one of the reference materials as plasma facing material for ITER, showed almost identical results, indicating the high potential of Ti-doped CFCs due to their improved thermal shock resistance.

  11. Morphology and thermal stability of Ti-doped copper nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xiaoyan; Wu Zhiguo; Li Huajun; Geng Baisong; Li Chun; Yan Pengxun

    2007-01-01

    A weakly Ti-doped copper nitride (Cu 3 N) film was prepared by cylindrical magnetron sputtering. The XPS results indicate that Ti atoms do not substitute for the Cu atoms but probably locate at the grain boundaries. The columnar grains size is about half of that of the undoped Cu 3 N film and the surface is smoother. For weakly Ti-doped Cu 3 N films, a dense layer appears on top of the columnar crystals. The RMS of the Cu film formed by annealing of the weakly Ti-doped Cu 3 N film is more than twice larger than that of the film before annealing. Compared with the undoped Cu 3 N film, it possesses fine thermal stability both in vacuum and in atmosphere

  12. Morphology and structure of Ti-doped diamond films prepared by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuejie; Lu, Pengfei; Wang, Hongchao; Ren, Yuan; Tan, Xin; Sun, Shiyang; Jia, Huiling

    2018-06-01

    Ti-doped diamond films were deposited through a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) system for the first time. The effects of the addition of Ti on the morphology, microstructure and quality of diamond films were systematically investigated. Secondary ion mass spectrometry results show that Ti can be added to diamond films through the MPCVD system using tetra n-butyl titanate as precursor. The spectra from X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the images from scanning electron microscopy of the deposited films indicate that the diamond phase clearly exists and dominates in Ti-doped diamond films. The amount of Ti added obviously influences film morphology and the preferred orientation of the crystals. Ti doping is beneficial to the second nucleation and the growth of the (1 1 0) faceted grains.

  13. Synthesis of Ti-doped DLC film on SS304 steels by Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc (FCVA) technique for tribological improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bootkul, D.; Saenphinit, N.; Supsermpol, B.; Aramwit, C.; Intarasiri, S.

    2014-08-01

    Currently, stainless steels are widely used in various industrial applications due to their excellence in toughness and corrosion resistance. But their resistance to wear needs to be improved for appropriate use in tribological applications. The Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc (FCVA) is a superior technique for forming a high-density film structure of amorphous carbon, especially for a tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) type, because it can produce a plasma of highly energetic ions that can penetrate into a growing coating, resulting in densification of the film. However, this technique tends to generate high internal stress, due to serious accumulation of energy in the film structure that then leads to film delamination. In general, there are numerous solutions that have been used to reduce the internal stress. DLC with various additive elements such as Ti, Cr or W as strong-carbide-forming (SCF) metals is one of the popular methods to provide attractive combinations of properties of wear resistance and film adhesion as well as reducing the internal stress. The present study was focused on investigation of titanium-doped DLC coating on SS304 steel, mainly for adhesion improvement in optimizing for tribological applications. The synthesized films were formed by the FCVA technique at normal substrate temperature. In the experimental set-up, the films were produced by mixing the titanium and carbon ions generated by dual cathode plasma source operating in synchronous pulsed mode. Their compositions were adjusted by varying the relative duration of the pulse length from each cathode. Titanium doping concentration was varied from pure DLC deposition as the control group to titanium and graphite trigger pulses ratios of 1:16, 1:12, 1:10, 1:8 and 1:4, as the Ti-doped DLC group. The results showed that by increasing titanium trigger pulses ratio from 1:16, 1:12, 1:10 and 1:8, respectively, the film adhesion was increased while the wear rate did not change significantly as

  14. Optical and electrochromic properties of sol-gel deposited Ti- doped vanadium oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezer, N.; Sabuncu, S.

    1997-01-01

    Because of the yellowish color, vanadium oxide films in the as deposited state is not as favorable as transparent coatings for most elector chromic devices. an interesting possibility to alter the yellowish colours is the doping with other non-absorbing metal oxides. Ti doped vanadium oxide films with various amounts of titanium were synthesized and investigated as transparent counter electrodes for electrochromic transmissive device application. Electrochromic titanium doped vanadium pentoxide (V sub 2 O 5) coatings were prepared by the sol-gel dip coating technique. The coating solutions were synthesized from vanadium tri(isopropoxide) precursors. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies showed that the sol-gel deposited doped films heat treated at temperatures below 350 degree centigrade, were amorphous, whereas hose heat treated at higher temperatures were slight y crystalline. The optical and electrochemical properties of the Ti doped vanadium oxide films has been investigated in 0.1 m LiClO sub 4 propylene carbonate solution color changes by dropping were noted for all investigated films exhibits good electrochemical cycling (CV) measurements also showed that Ti doped V sub 2 O sub 5 films exhibits good electrochemical cycling reversibility, 'in situ' optical measurement revealed that those films exhibits good electrochemical cycling the spectra range 300 < lambda < 800 nm and change color between yellow and light green. The change in visible transmittance was 25 % for 5% Ti doped film. (author)

  15. Synthesis and electrochemical properties of Ti-doped DLC films by a hybrid PVD/PECVD process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Yeong Ju; Zhang, Teng Fei; Son, Myoung Jun; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2018-03-01

    Low electrical conductivity and poor adhesion to metallic substrates are the main drawbacks of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films when used in electrode applications. In this study, Ti-doped DLC films with various Ti contents were synthesized on metal Ti substrates by a hybrid PVD/PECVD process, where PECVD was used for deposition of DLC films and PVD was used for Ti doping. The effects of the Ti doping ratio on the microstructure, adhesion strength, and electrical and electrochemical properties of the DLC films were systematically investigated. An increase in the Ti content led to increased surface roughness and a higher sp2/sp3 ratio of the Ti-DLC films. Ti atoms existed as amorphous-phase Ti carbide when the Ti doping ratio was less than 2.8 at.%, while the nanocrystalline TiC phase was formed in DLC films when the Ti doping ratio was exceeded 4.0 at.%. The adhesion strength, electrical resistivity, electrochemical activity and reversibility of the DLC films were greatly improved by Ti doping. The influence of Ti doping ratio on the electrical and electrochemical properties of the DLC films were also investigated and the best performance was obtained at a Ti content of 2.8 at.%.

  16. The influence of Ti doping and annealing on Ce_2Ti_2O_7 flash memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Chyuan Haur; Chen, Su Zhien; Luo, Yang; Chiu, Wang Ting; Chiu, Shih Wei; Chen, I Chien; Lin, Chan-Yu; Chen, Hsiang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Ce_2Ti_2O_7 flash memories have been fabricated. • Material quality can be improved by annealing. • The memory performance can be enhanced by Ti doping. • Ti doping and annealing can reinforce crystallization. - Abstract: In this research, a CeO_2 film with Ti doping was used as a trapping layer in metal oxide high-K-oxide-Si (MOHOS)-type memory devices. Since incorporation of Ti atoms into the film could fix dangling bonds and defects, the Ce_2Ti_2O_7 trapping layer with annealing treatment could have a larger memory window and a faster programming/erasing speed. To confirm the origin, multiple material analyses indicate that annealing at an appropriate temperature and Ti doping could enhance crystallization. The Ce_2Ti_2O_7-based memory device is promising for future industrial flash memory applications.

  17. NaF-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of Ti-doped hematite nanocubes with enhanced photoelectrochemical activity for water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Chong; Zhu, Zezhou; Wang, Sibo; Hou, Yidong, E-mail: ydhou@fzu.edu.cn

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: An enhanced photoelectrochemical activity for water splitting was achieved over porous Ti-doped α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocubes. - Highlights: . • Ti-doped hematite nanocubes were successfully prepared by NaF-assisted hydrothermal deposition and subsequent annealing. • Ti-doped α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocubes showed an enhanced PEC activity with an IPCE of 25.2% at 340 nm at 1.23 V vs. RHE. • The enhanced activity of Ti-doped hematite nanocubes can be ascribed to high surface area and fast charge transportation. - Abstract: Ti-doped α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocubes on FTO substrate was prepared by hydrothermal deposition β-FeOOH onto FTO glass with a solution of FeCl{sub 3}, TiOCl{sub 2} and NaF, followed by an appropriate annealing. In comparison to Ti-doped α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods Ti-doped α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocubes showed an enhanced photoelectrochemical activity for water splitting, with a remarkable IPCE of 25.2% at 340 nm at the potential of 1.23 V vs. RHE. The hematite films were studied in detail by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV–vis absorption spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. On the basis of the obtained results, the improved performance of Ti-doped α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocubes can be ascribed to the porous structure, good electrical conductivity and fast charge transportation of hematite.

  18. Electronic and magnetic properties of digitally Ti doped InP: A first principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, Gul; Cho, Sunglae; Hong, Soon Cheol

    2008-01-01

    Using the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method within the generalized gradient approximation, we study the electronic and the magnetic properties of digitally Ti doped InP. It is quite interesting that digitally Ti-doped InP system shows half metallic ferromagnetism even though both bulk zinc blende TiP and InP are paramagnetic. We also investigate the electronic and the magnetic properties as a function of spacer layer thickness. Their properties such as exchange coupling constant and atomic projected density of states are more or less independent of the InP thickness. Spin density contour maps indicate that the spin-polarization is confined within the TiP plane. The system may show a highly anisotropic property in spin-polarized transport. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Brazing graphite to graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of graphite

  20. Effect of Metal (Mn, Ti) Doping on NCA Cathode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Dao Yong; Fan, Zhi Yu; Dong, Yong Xiang; Baasanjav, Erdenebayar; Jun, Hang-Bae; Jin, Bo; Jin, En Mei; Jeong, Sang Mun

    2018-01-01

    NCA (LiNi0.85Co0.10Al0.05-x MxO2, M=Mn or Ti, x < 0.01) cathode materials are prepared by a hydrothermal reaction at 170°C and doped with Mn and Ti to improve their electrochemical properties. The crystalline phases and morphologies of various NCA cathode materials are characterized by XRD, FE-SEM, and particle size distribution analysis. The CV, EIS, and galvanostatic charge/discharge test are employed to determine the electrochemical properties of the cathode materials. Mn and Ti doping res...

  1. Competing magnetic fluctuations in Sr3Ru2O7 probed by Ti doping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hooper, J.; Fang, M.H.; Zhou, M.

    2007-01-01

    We report the effect of nonmagnetic Ti4+ impurities on the electronic and magnetic properties of Sr3Ru2O7. Small amounts of Ti suppress the characteristic peak in magnetic susceptibility near 16 K and result in a sharp upturn in specific heat. The metamagnetic quantum phase transition and related...... anomalous features are quickly smeared out by small amounts of Ti. These results provide strong evidence for the existence of competing magnetic fluctuations in the ground state of Sr3Ru2O7. Ti doping suppresses the low-temperature antiferromagnetic interactions that arise from Fermi surface nesting...

  2. Special graphites; Graphites speciaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [French] Ameliorer les proprietes du graphite nucleaire pour empilements et ouvrir de nouveaux domaines d'application au graphite constituent une part importante de l'effort entrepris en commun par le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) et la compagnie PECHINEY. Des procedes nouveaux de fabrication de carbones et graphites speciaux ont ete mis au point: graphite forge, pyrocarbone, graphite de haute densite, agglomeration de poudres de graphite par craquage de gaz naturel, graphites impermeables. Les proprietes physiques de ces produits ainsi que leur reaction avec differents gaz oxydants sont decrites. Les premiers resultats d'irradiation sont aussi donnes. (auteurs)

  3. Effect of Mo and Ti doping concentration on the structural and optical properties of ZnS nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Hina; Ali, Rai Nauman; Zhu, Xingqun; Xiang, Bin

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we report the effect of single phase Mo and Ti doping concentration on the structural and optical properties of the ZnS nanoparticles. The structural and optical properties of the as-synthesized samples have been examined by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-visible near infrared absorption spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. TEM characterizations reveal a variation in the doped ZnS nanoparticle size distribution by utilizing different dopants of Mo and Ti. In absorption spectra, a clear red shift of 14 nm is observed with increasing Mo concentration as compared to pure ZnS nanoparticles, while by increasing Ti doping concentration, blue shift of 14 nm is obtained. Moreover, it demonstrates that the value of energy band gap decreases from 4.03 eV to 3.89 eV in case of Mo doping. However, the value of energy band gap have shown a remarkable increase from 4.11 eV to 4.27 eV with increasing Ti doping concentration. Our results provide a new pathway to understand the effect of Mo and Ti doping concentrations on the structural and optical properties of ZnS nanoparticles as it could be the key to tune the properties for future optoelectronic devices.

  4. Ti-doped hydrogenated diamond like carbon coating deposited by hybrid physical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na Rae; Sle Jun, Yee; Moon, Kyoung Il; Sunyong Lee, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Diamond-like carbon films containing titanium and hydrogen (Ti-doped DLC:H) were synthesized using a hybrid technique based on physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The film was deposited under a mixture of argon (Ar) and acetylene gas (C2H2). The amount of Ti in the Ti-doped DLC:H film was controlled by varying the DC power of the Ti sputtering target ranging from 0 to 240 W. The composition, microstructure, mechanical and chemical properties of Ti-doped DLC:H films with varying Ti concentrations, were investigated using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nano indentation, a ball-on-disk tribometer, a four-point probe system and dynamic anodic testing. As a result, the optimum composition of Ti in Ti-doped DLC:H film using our hybrid method was found to be a Ti content of 18 at. %, having superior electrical conductivity and high corrosion resistance, suitable for bipolar plates. Its hardness value was measured to be 25.6 GPa with a low friction factor.

  5. Structural Characterization and Magnetic Properties of Undoped and Ti-Doped ZnO Nanoparticles Prepared by Modified Oxalate Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekane Peter Etape

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ti-doped zinc oxide and pure zinc oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by a modified oxalate route using Averrhoa carambola fruit juice as a natural source of oxalate. The characteristics of the precursors have been investigated by FTIR, TGA, and XRD. The results from the investigation revealed that the precursors are zinc oxalate and Ti-doped zinc oxalate which readily decompose at 450°C. The as-prepared precursors were calcined at 450°C for 4 hours, and the decomposition products have been characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, and VSM. XRD results revealed crystallinity with hexagonal wurtzite structure, while the average grain size was found to be 26 nm for Ti-doped ZnO and 29 nm for ZnO, using calculations based on Debye-Scherrer equation. Furthermore, the morphological studies by SEM showed particle agglomeration, while the presence of Ti3+ in the zinc oxide lattice is indicated by EDS analysis. Finally the hysteresis loop from VSM results shows that Ti-doped ZnO exhibits ferromagnetism.

  6. Preparation and characterization of Ti-doped MgO nanopowders by a modified coprecipitation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Qiao Xueliang; Chen Jianguo; Tan Fatang

    2008-01-01

    Ti-doped MgO nanopowders were prepared via a chemical coprecipitation method using acetic acid as a modifier in the presence of the surfactant polyethylene glycol (PEG 400). The as-obtained products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that titanium atoms have been successfully incorporated into the crystal lattice of MgO with periclase structure. The modifier, acetic acid, can significantly reduce the particle size, and improve size distribution and dispersion of nanoparticles. In addition, the effect of doped titanium on the structure and morphology of magnesium oxide was also investigated

  7. Effect of Metal (Mn, Ti Doping on NCA Cathode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dao Yong Wan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available NCA (LiNi0.85Co0.10Al0.05-x MxO2, M=Mn or Ti, x < 0.01 cathode materials are prepared by a hydrothermal reaction at 170°C and doped with Mn and Ti to improve their electrochemical properties. The crystalline phases and morphologies of various NCA cathode materials are characterized by XRD, FE-SEM, and particle size distribution analysis. The CV, EIS, and galvanostatic charge/discharge test are employed to determine the electrochemical properties of the cathode materials. Mn and Ti doping resulted in cell volume expansion. This larger volume also improved the electrochemical properties of the cathode materials because Mn4+ and Ti4+ were introduced into the octahedral lattice space occupied by the Li-ions to expand the Li layer spacing and, thereby, improved the lithium diffusion kinetics. As a result, the NCA-Ti electrode exhibited superior performance with a high discharge capacity of 179.6 mAh g−1 after the first cycle, almost 23 mAh g−1 higher than that obtained with the undoped NCA electrode, and 166.7 mAh g−1 after 30 cycles. A good coulombic efficiency of 88.6% for the NCA-Ti electrode is observed based on calculations in the first charge and discharge capacities. In addition, the NCA-Ti cathode material exhibited the best cycling stability of 93% up to 30 cycles.

  8. Process for the preparation of isotropic petroleum coke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kegler, W.H.; Huyser, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a process for preparing isotropic coke from oil residue charge. It includes blowing air into the residue until it reaches a softening temperature of around 49 to 116 deg C, the deferred coking of the residue having undergone blowing at a temperature of around 247 to 640 deg C, at a pressure between around 1.38x10 5 and 1.72x10 6 Pa, and the recovery of isotropic coke with a thermal expansion coefficient ratio under 1.5 approximately. The isotropic coke is used for preparing hexagonal graphite bars for nuclear reactor moderators [fr

  9. Special graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, P.

    1964-01-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [fr

  10. Synthesis and photoluminescence of Cr-, Ni-, Co-, and Ti-doped ZnSe nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huy, Bui The [Anastro Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Nhatrang Institute of Technology and Research Application, 2 Hungvuong, Nhatrang (Viet Nam); Seo, Min-Ho; Kumar, Avvaru Praveen [Anastro Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hyuk [Department of Chemistry, Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong-Ill, E-mail: yilee@changwon.ac.kr [Anastro Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-05

    Highlights: • The chain length, structure of surfactants operated the size nanoparticles. • Ni{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}, and Ti{sup 3+} did not create any new centers in the structure of ZnSe. • Doping may have influenced the nanoparticles size because of the Zn replacement. • The TM ions change in ligand field caused the influence on fluorescence intensity. -- Abstract: We developed a facile strategy to synthesize transition metal (TM; Ni, Cr, Co, and Ti)-doped ZnSe nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous media using a chemical co-precipitation method. Co-precipitation was performed in the presence of one of four different surfactants, namely mercaptoacetic acid (MAA), 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA), thioglycerol (TGC), or (3-mercaptopropyl) trimethoxysilane (MPTMS). Surface morphology, chemical, and crystalline properties of the TM-doped ZnSe NPs were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Optical features were characterized by UV–visible and photoluminescence spectroscopies. The influence of various experimental parameters, including the amount of TM and the ratio of precursors, as well as different types of surfactants on the photoluminescence properties of TM-doped ZnSe NPs was investigated systematically. TM-doped ZnSe NPs were excited in the UV region and exhibited photoluminescence in the visible region. Intensity was affected by the concentration of the TM. The results showed that MPA had a stronger influence on photoluminescence than MAA, TGC, and MPTMS. The photoluminescence intensity of TM-doped ZnSe NPs was 30% higher than that of undoped ZnSe NPs.

  11. Density functional theory calculations on the adsorption of formaldehyde and other harmful gases on pure, Ti-doped, or N-doped graphene sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong-ping; Luo, Xue-gang; Lin, Xiao-yang; Lu, Xiong; Leng, Yang; Song, Hong-tao

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the interaction mechanisms of CO, NO, SO 2 , and HCHO with graphene are important in developing graphene-based sensors for gas detection and removal. In this study, the effects of doped Ti or N atom on the interaction of these gases with graphene were investigated by density functional theory calculations. Analyses of adsorption energy, electron density difference, and density of states indicated that the doped Ti atom could greatly improve the interaction of gas molecules with graphene. The Ti-doped graphene sheet demonstrated selective gas absorption. The order of interaction between the gas molecules and the Ti-doped graphene sheet was as follows: SO 2 > NO > HCHO > CO. By contrast, the N-doped graphene sheet did not exhibit apparent selective gas absorption. These results imply that the Ti-doped graphene sheet is more effective than the N-doped graphene sheet in detecting and removing gas molecules because of its high selectivity.

  12. Density functional theory calculations on the adsorption of formaldehyde and other harmful gases on pure, Ti-doped, or N-doped graphene sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hong-ping, E-mail: zhp1006@126.com [Engineering Research Center of Biomass Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, Sichuan 621010 (China); Luo, Xue-gang, E-mail: lxg@swust.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center of Biomass Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, Sichuan 621010 (China); Lin, Xiao-yang, E-mail: xylin-2004@163.com [Engineering Research Center of Biomass Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, Sichuan 621010 (China); Lu, Xiong, E-mail: luxiong_2004@163.com [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, Sichuan (China); Leng, Yang, E-mail: meleng@ust.hk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Song, Hong-tao, E-mail: yinyishushengsht@163.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Understanding the interaction mechanisms of CO, NO, SO{sub 2}, and HCHO with graphene are important in developing graphene-based sensors for gas detection and removal. In this study, the effects of doped Ti or N atom on the interaction of these gases with graphene were investigated by density functional theory calculations. Analyses of adsorption energy, electron density difference, and density of states indicated that the doped Ti atom could greatly improve the interaction of gas molecules with graphene. The Ti-doped graphene sheet demonstrated selective gas absorption. The order of interaction between the gas molecules and the Ti-doped graphene sheet was as follows: SO{sub 2} > NO > HCHO > CO. By contrast, the N-doped graphene sheet did not exhibit apparent selective gas absorption. These results imply that the Ti-doped graphene sheet is more effective than the N-doped graphene sheet in detecting and removing gas molecules because of its high selectivity.

  13. Enhanced photoelectrochemical performance of Ti-doped hematite thin films prepared by the sol-gel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian Xiaojuan; Yang Xin; Liu Shangjun; Xu Ying; Jiang Chunping; Chen Jinwei [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, No.24 South Section 1, Yihuan Road, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wang Ruilin, E-mail: rlwang26@yahoo.com.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, No.24 South Section 1, Yihuan Road, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Ti-doped {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films were successfully prepared on FTO substrates by the sol-gel route. Hematite film was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The XRD data showed {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} had a preferred (1 1 0) orientation which belonged to the rhombohedral system. Interestingly, the grains turned into worm-like shape after annealed at high temperature. The IPCE could reach 32.6% at 400 nm without any additional potential vs. SCE. Titanium in the lattice can affect the photo electro chemical performance positively by increasing the conductivity of the thin film. So the excited electrons and holes could live longer, rather than recombining with each other rapidly as undoped hematite. And the efficient carrier density on the Ti-doped anode surface was higher than the undoped anode, which contribute to the well PEC performance.

  14. Final report on graphite irradiation test OG-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.J.; Beavan, L.A.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of dimensional, thermal expansivity, thermal conductivity, Young's modulus, and tensile strength measurements on specimens of nuclear graphites irradiated in capsule OG-2. About half the irradiation space was allocated to H-451 near-isotropic petroleum-coke-based graphite or its subsized prototype grade H-429. Most of these specimens had been previously irradiated. Virgin specimens of another near-isotropic graphite, grade TS-1240, were irradiated. Some previously irradiated specimens of needle-coke-based H-327 graphite and pitch-coke-based P 3 JHAN were also included

  15. The influence of Ti doping and annealing on Ce{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} flash memory devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Chyuan Haur [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chang Gung University, No. 259, Wenhua 1st Rd., Guishan Dist., Taoyuan City 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kidney Research Center, Department of Nephrology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Su Zhien [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chang Gung University, No. 259, Wenhua 1st Rd., Guishan Dist., Taoyuan City 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kidney Research Center, Department of Nephrology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan, ROC (China); Luo, Yang; Chiu, Wang Ting; Chiu, Shih Wei; Chen, I Chien [Department of Applied Materials and Optoelectronic Engineering, National Chi Nan University, No. 1, University Rd., Puli, Nantou Country 54561, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Chan-Yu [Kidney Research Center, Department of Nephrology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Hsiang, E-mail: hchen@ncnu.edu.tw [Department of Applied Materials and Optoelectronic Engineering, National Chi Nan University, No. 1, University Rd., Puli, Nantou Country 54561, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Ce{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} flash memories have been fabricated. • Material quality can be improved by annealing. • The memory performance can be enhanced by Ti doping. • Ti doping and annealing can reinforce crystallization. - Abstract: In this research, a CeO{sub 2} film with Ti doping was used as a trapping layer in metal oxide high-K-oxide-Si (MOHOS)-type memory devices. Since incorporation of Ti atoms into the film could fix dangling bonds and defects, the Ce{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} trapping layer with annealing treatment could have a larger memory window and a faster programming/erasing speed. To confirm the origin, multiple material analyses indicate that annealing at an appropriate temperature and Ti doping could enhance crystallization. The Ce{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}-based memory device is promising for future industrial flash memory applications.

  16. A Ti-doped γ-Fe2O3/SDS nano-photocatalyst as an efficient adsorbent for removal of methylene blue from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbagheri, Naghmeh Sadat; Sabbaghi, Samad

    2018-05-01

    Synthetic dyes are among the most important environmental pollutants in wastewaters. Consequently, elimination of the synthetic dyes from wastewaters using non-toxic materials and eco-friendly technologies has been of considerable interests. In this study, magnetically separable Ti-doped γ-Fe 2 O 3 photocatalysts were synthesized for the removal of methylene blue (MB) from a dye-contaminated aqueous solution (as a model of dye-polluted wastewaters). Compared to the pristine γ-Fe 2 O 3 , the 1.78 v% Ti-doped γ-Fe 2 O 3 significantly increased the adsorption of MB by 57% in the dark condition as a result of the improved BET surface area in this photocatalyst. Moreover, the contact time required for the photocatalytic degradation of MB by the 1.78 v% Ti-doped γ-Fe 2 O 3 decreased due to the higher concentration of charge carriers in this photocatalyst than that of the pristine γ-Fe 2 O 3 . The effect of different experimental parameters on the adsorption property and photocatalytic activity of the 1.78 v% Ti-doped γ-Fe 2 O 3 photocatalyst showed that the solution pH had a remarkable influence on the removal performance of this photocatalyst. Surface treatment of the 1.78 v% Ti-doped γ-Fe 2 O 3 with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) resulted in the formation of a negatively charged Ti-doped γ-Fe 2 O 3 /SDS photocatalyst, which showed a higher tendency for the adsorption and removal of MB than the untreated photocatalyst. Moreover, the MB removal efficiency of this photocatalyst was among the best performances that have been reported for the γ-Fe 2 O 3 -based photocatalysts. The synthesized photocatalysts were characterized by various techniques, and a plausible mechanism for the removal of MB from aqueous solutions by the Ti-doped γ-Fe 2 O 3 /SDS photocatalyst was purposed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Thin Film growth and characterization of Ti doped ZnO by RF/DC magnetron sputtering

    KAUST Repository

    Baseer Haider, M.

    2015-01-01

    Thin film Ti doped ZnO (Ti-ZnO) film were grown on sapphire (0001) substrate by RF and DC magnetron sputtering. Films were grown at a substrate temperature of 250 °C with different Ti/Zn concentration. Surface chemical study of the samples was performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the stoichiometry and Ti/Zn ratio for all samples. Surface morphology of the samples were studied by atomic force microscopy. X-ray diffraction was carried out to determine the crystallinity of the film. No secondary phases of TixOy was observed. We observed a slight increase in the lattice constant with the increase in Ti concentration in ZnO. No ferromagnetic signal was observed for any of the samples. However, some samples showed super-paramagnetic phase. © 2015 Materials Research Society.

  18. Vapour pressure of caesium over nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faircloth, R.L.; Pummery, F.C.W.

    1976-01-01

    The vapour pressure of caesium over a fine-grained isotropic moulded gilsocarbon nuclear graphite intended for use in the manufacture of fuel tubes for the high temperature reactor has been determined as a function of temperature and concentration by means of the Knudsen effusion technique. The concentration range 0 to 10 μg caesium/g graphite was investigated and it was concluded that a Langmuir adsorption situation exists under these conditions. (author)

  19. Fracture behavior of nuclear graphites under tensile impact loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugachi, Hirokazu; Ishiyama, Shintaro; Eto, Motokuni

    1994-01-01

    Impact tensile strength test was performed with two kinds of HTTR graphites, fine grained isotropic graphite, IG-11 and coarse grained near isotropic graphite, PGX and deformation and fracture behavior under the strain rate of over 100s -1 was measured and the following results were derived: (1) Tensile strength for IG-11 graphite does not depend on the strain rate less than 1 s -1 , but over 1 s -1 , tensile strength for IG-11 graphite increase larger than that measured under 1 s -1 . At the strain rate more than 100 s -1 , remarkable decrease of tensile strength for IG-11 graphite was found. Tensile strength of PGX graphite does not depend on the strain rate less than 1 s -1 , but beyond this value, the sharp tensile strength decrease occurs. (2) Under 100 s -1 , fracture strain for both graphites increase with increase of strain rate and over 100 s -1 , drastic increase of fracture strain for IG-11 graphite was found. (3) At the part of gage length, volume of specimen increase with increase of tensile loading level and strain rate. (4) Poisson's ratio for both graphites decrease with increase of tensile loading level and strain rate. (5) Remarkable change of stress-strain curve for both graphites under 100 s -1 was not found, but over 100 s -1 , the slope of these curve for IG-11 graphite decrease drastically. (author)

  20. Artificial graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.

    1984-01-01

    Artificial graphites are obtained by agglomeration of carbon powders with an organic binder, then by carbonisation at 1000 0 C and graphitization at 2800 0 C. After description of the processes and products, we show how the properties of the various materials lead to the various uses. Using graphite enables us to solve some problems, but it is not sufficient to satisfy all the need of the application. New carbonaceous material open application range. Finally, if some products are becoming obsolete, other ones are being developed in new applications [fr

  1. Isotropic oscillator: spheroidal wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardoyan, L.G.; Pogosyan, G.S.; Ter-Antonyan, V.M.; Sisakyan, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    Solutions of the Schroedinger equation are found for an isotropic oscillator (10) in prolate and oblate spheroidal coordinates. It is shown that the obtained solutions turn into spherical and cylindrical bases of the isotropic oscillator at R→0 and R→ infinity (R is the dimensional parameter entering into the definition of prolate and oblate spheroidal coordinates). The explicit form is given for both prolate and oblate basis of the isotropic oscillator for the lowest quantum states

  2. The isotropic Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raine, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    This introduction to contemporary ideas in cosmology differs from other books on the 'expanding Universe' in its emphasis on physical cosmology and on the physical basis of the general theory of relativity. It is considered that the remarkable degree of isotropy, rather than the expansion, can be regarded as the central observational feature of the Universe. The various theories and ideas in 'big-bang' cosmology are discussed, providing an insight into current problems. Chapter headings are: quality of matter; expanding Universe; quality of radiation; quantity of matter; general theory of relativity; cosmological models; cosmological tests; matter and radiation; limits of isotropy; why is the Universe isotropic; singularities; evolution of structure. (U.K.)

  3. Absolute, time-resolved emission of non-LTE L-shell spectra from Ti-doped aerogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, C.A.; Feldman, U.; Weaver, J.L.; Seely, J.F.; Constantin, C.; Holland, G.; Lee, R.W.; Chung, H.-K.; Scott, H.A.

    2006-01-01

    Outstanding discrepancies between data and calculations of laser-produced plasmas in recombination have been observed since the 1980s. Although improvements in hydrodynamic modeling may reduce the discrepancies, there are indications that non-LTE atomic kinetics may be the dominant cause. Experiments to investigate non-LTE effects were recently performed at the NIKE KrF laser on low-density Ti-doped aerogels. The laser irradiated a 2mm diameter, cylindrical sample of various lengths with a 4-ns square pulse to create a volumetrically heated plasma. Ti L-shell spectra spanning a range of 0.47-3keV were obtained with a transmission grating coupled to Si photodiodes. The diagnostic can be configured to provide 1-dimensional spatial resolution at a single photon energy, or 18 discrete energies with a resolving power, λ/δλ of 3-20. The data are examined and compared to calculations to develop absolute emission measurements that can provide new tests of the non-LTE physics

  4. Absolute, time-resolved emission of non-LTE L-shell spectra from Ti-doped aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, C.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-21, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)]. E-mail: tinaback@llnl.gov; Feldman, U. [Artep Inc. 2922 Excelsior Ct., Ellicott City, MD 21042 (United States); Weaver, J.L. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Drive, SW, Washington DC 20375 (United States); Seely, J.F. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Drive, SW, Washington DC 20375 (United States); Constantin, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-21, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Holland, G. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Drive, SW, Washington DC 20375 (United States); Lee, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-21, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Chung, H.-K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-21, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Scott, H.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-21, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    Outstanding discrepancies between data and calculations of laser-produced plasmas in recombination have been observed since the 1980s. Although improvements in hydrodynamic modeling may reduce the discrepancies, there are indications that non-LTE atomic kinetics may be the dominant cause. Experiments to investigate non-LTE effects were recently performed at the NIKE KrF laser on low-density Ti-doped aerogels. The laser irradiated a 2mm diameter, cylindrical sample of various lengths with a 4-ns square pulse to create a volumetrically heated plasma. Ti L-shell spectra spanning a range of 0.47-3keV were obtained with a transmission grating coupled to Si photodiodes. The diagnostic can be configured to provide 1-dimensional spatial resolution at a single photon energy, or 18 discrete energies with a resolving power, {lambda}/{delta}{lambda} of 3-20. The data are examined and compared to calculations to develop absolute emission measurements that can provide new tests of the non-LTE physics.

  5. Dependence of strength on particle size in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, E.P.; Kennedy, C.R.

    The strength to particle size relationship for specially fabricated graphites has been demonstrated and rationalized using fracture mechanics. In the past, similar studies have yielded empirical data using only commercially available material. Thus, experimental verification of these relationships has been difficult. However, the graphites of this study were fabricated by controlling the particle size ranges for a series of isotropic graphites. All graphites that were evaluated had a constant 1.85 g/cm 3 density. Thus, particle size was the only variable. This study also considered the particle size effect on other physical properties; coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), electrical resistivity, fracture strain, and Young's modulus

  6. A graphite foam reinforced by graphite particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J.J.; Wang, X.Y.; Guo, L.F.; Wang, Y.M.; Wang, Y.P.; Yu, M.F.; Lau, K.T.T. [DongHua University, Shanghai (China). College of Material Science and Engineering

    2007-11-15

    Graphite foam was obtained after carbonization and graphitization of a pitch foam formed by the pyrolysis of coal tar based mesophase pitch mixed with graphite particles in a high pressure and temperature chamber. The graphite foam possessed high mechanical strength and exceptional thermal conductivity after adding the graphite particles. Experimental results showed that the thermal conductivity of modified graphite foam reached 110W/m K, and its compressive strength increased from 3.7 MPa to 12.5 MPa with the addition of 5 wt% graphite particles. Through the microscopic observation, it was also found that fewer micro-cracks were formed in the cell wall of the modified foam as compared with pure graphite foam. The graphitization degree of modified foam reached 84.9% and the ligament of graphite foam exhibited high alignment after carbonization at 1200{sup o}C for 3 h and graphitization at 3000{sup o}C for 10 min.

  7. AlTiN layer effect on mechanical properties of Ti-doped diamond-like carbon composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang Xiaolu; Yang Huisheng; Gao Kewei; Wang Yanbin; Volinsky, Alex A.

    2011-01-01

    Ti/Ti-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC) and Ti/AlTiN/Ti-DLC composite coatings were deposited by magnetron sputtering on W18Cr4V high speed steel substrates. The effect of the AlTiN support layer on the properties of these composite coatings was investigated through microstructure and mechanical properties characterization, including hardness, elastic modulus, coefficient of friction and wear properties measured by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scratch and ball-on-disk friction tests. Ti and AlTiN interlayers have a columnar structure with 50-80 nm grains. The hardness and elastic modulus of Ti/Ti-DLC and Ti/AlTiN/Ti-DLC coatings is 25.9 ± 0.4, 222.2 ± 6.3 GPa and 19.3 ± 1, 205.6 ± 6.7 GPa, respectively. Adhesion of Ti-DLC, Ti/AlTiN/Ti-DLC and AlTiN/Ti-DLC coatings expressed as the critical lateral force is 26.5 N, 38.2 N, and 47.8 N, respectively. Substrate coefficient of friction without coatings is 0.44, and it is 0.1 for Ti/Ti-DLC and Ti/AlTiN/Ti-DLC coatings. Wear resistance of Ti/AlTiN/Ti-DLC composite coatings is much higher than Ti/Ti-DLC coatings based on the wear track width of 169.8 and 73.2 μm, respectively, for the same experimental conditions.

  8. Thermal Properties of G-348 Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEligot, Donald M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swank, W. David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cottle, David L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Valentin, Francisco I. [City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Fundamental measurements have been obtained in the INL Graphite Characterization Laboratory to deduce the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity for G-348 isotropic graphite, which has been used by City College of New York in thermal experiments related to gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Measurements of thermal diffusivity, mass, volume and thermal expansion were converted to thermal conductivity in accordance with ASTM Standard Practice C781-08 (R-2014). Data are tabulated and a preliminary correlation for the thermal conductivity is presented as a function of temperature from laboratory temperature to 1000C.

  9. Effect of Ti Doping to Maintain Structural Disorder in InOx-Based Thin-Film Transistors Fabricated by RF Magnetron Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Shinya

    2017-12-01

    The effect of Ti doping in an indium oxide (InOx)-based semiconductor is investigated for the thin-film transistor (TFT) property and crystal structure of the film. InOx and Ti-doped InOx (InTiOx) films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering under the same O2 partial pressure conditions were systematically compared. The TFT behavior of the InOx showed higher conductivity than that of the InTiOx and was drastically changed to metallic conduction after annealing at 150 °C. Under the annealing conditions when the electrical transition to the metallic behavior occurred, the InOx film was crystallized. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the shrinkage of the In2O3 unit cell is pronounced in the case of InOx films. Thus, Ti dopants may play the role as a suppressor for shrinkage of the unit cell, i.e. maintaining neighboring In-In distances, in addition to suppression of oxygen vacancies. The In-In distance, which is related to the overlapping of In 5 s orbitals, is considered to be one of the key factor for which InOx-based materials are utilized as conducting films or semiconducting channels.

  10. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  11. Acceptance test for graphite components and construction status of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyoku, T.; Ishihara, M.; Maruyama, S.; Shiozawa, S.; Tsuji, N.; Miki, T.

    1996-01-01

    In March, 1991, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started to constructed the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor(HTTR) which is a 30-MW(thermal) helium gas-cooled reactor with a core composed of prismatic graphite blocks piled on the core support graphite structures. Two types of graphite materials are used in the HTTR. One is the garde IG-110, isotropic fine grain graphite, another is the grade PGX, medium-to-fine grained molded graphite. These materials were selected on the basis of the appropriate properties required by the HTTR reactor design. Industry-wide standards for an acceptance test of graphite materials used as main components of a nuclear reactor had not been established. The acceptance standard for graphite components of the HTTR, therefore, was drafted by JAERI and reviewed by specialists outside JAERI. The acceptance standard consists of the material testing, non-destructive examination such as the ultrasonic and eddy current testings, dimensional and visual inspections and assembly test. Ultrasonic and eddy current testings are applied to graphite logs to detect an internal flaw and to graphite components to detect a surface flaw, respectively. The assembly test is performed at the works, prior to their installation in the reactor pressure vessel, to examine fabricating precision of each component and alignment of piled-up structures. The graphite components of the HTTR had been tested on the basis of the acceptance standard. It was confirmed that the graphite manufacturing process was well controlled and high quality graphite components were provided to the HTTR. All graphite components except for the fuel graphite blocks are to be installed in the reactor pressure vessel of the HTTR in September 1995. The paper describes the construction status of the HTTR focusing on the graphite components. The acceptance test results are also presented in this paper. (author). Figs

  12. The isotropic radio background revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Università di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, I–10125 Torino (Italy); Lineros, Roberto A. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular – CSIC/U. Valencia, Parc Científic, calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, E-46980 Paterna (Spain); Taoso, Marco, E-mail: fornengo@to.infn.it, E-mail: rlineros@ific.uv.es, E-mail: regis@to.infn.it, E-mail: taoso@cea.fr [Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cédex (France)

    2014-04-01

    We present an extensive analysis on the determination of the isotropic radio background. We consider six different radio maps, ranging from 22 MHz to 2.3 GHz and covering a large fraction of the sky. The large scale emission is modeled as a linear combination of an isotropic component plus the Galactic synchrotron radiation and thermal bremsstrahlung. Point-like and extended sources are either masked or accounted for by means of a template. We find a robust estimate of the isotropic radio background, with limited scatter among different Galactic models. The level of the isotropic background lies significantly above the contribution obtained by integrating the number counts of observed extragalactic sources. Since the isotropic component dominates at high latitudes, thus making the profile of the total emission flat, a Galactic origin for such excess appears unlikely. We conclude that, unless a systematic offset is present in the maps, and provided that our current understanding of the Galactic synchrotron emission is reasonable, extragalactic sources well below the current experimental threshold seem to account for the majority of the brightness of the extragalactic radio sky.

  13. The isotropic radio background revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco; Lineros, Roberto A.; Taoso, Marco

    2014-01-01

    We present an extensive analysis on the determination of the isotropic radio background. We consider six different radio maps, ranging from 22 MHz to 2.3 GHz and covering a large fraction of the sky. The large scale emission is modeled as a linear combination of an isotropic component plus the Galactic synchrotron radiation and thermal bremsstrahlung. Point-like and extended sources are either masked or accounted for by means of a template. We find a robust estimate of the isotropic radio background, with limited scatter among different Galactic models. The level of the isotropic background lies significantly above the contribution obtained by integrating the number counts of observed extragalactic sources. Since the isotropic component dominates at high latitudes, thus making the profile of the total emission flat, a Galactic origin for such excess appears unlikely. We conclude that, unless a systematic offset is present in the maps, and provided that our current understanding of the Galactic synchrotron emission is reasonable, extragalactic sources well below the current experimental threshold seem to account for the majority of the brightness of the extragalactic radio sky

  14. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  15. Plastic strain caused by contraction of pores in polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, Ikuo; Yoda, Shinichi; Konishi, Takashi.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of porosity on mechanical properties and deformation behavior of four isotropic polycrystalline graphites were studied. The pore size distributions of the graphites were measured using a conventional mercury penetration technique. The average pore radius of ISO-88 graphite was about one-tenth of that of ISEM-1, IG-11 or IG-15 graphites. Young's modulus of the graphites decreased with increasing porosity. The stress-strain curve of each graphite was measured in its lateral and axial directions. Young's modulus of graphite decreased with increasing load. The plastic strain at a given compressive load was calculated from the stress-strain curve and the initial gradient of the unloading curve at the load. The ratio of lateral plastic strain to axial plastic strain for the graphites was less than 0.5, indicating that the volume of the graphites decreased during compressive loading. By assuming that the volume change was caused by contraction of pores, plastic strain associated with contraction of pores was calculated from the axial plastic strain and lateral plastic strain by slips along the basal planes. The plastic strain increased with increasing axial plastic strain and porosity of graphite. (author)

  16. Process for purifying graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausius, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for purifying graphite comprising: comminuting graphite containing mineral matter to liberate at least a portion of the graphite particles from the mineral matter; mixing the comminuted graphite particles containing mineral matter with water and hydrocarbon oil to form a fluid slurry; separating a water phase containing mineral matter and a hydrocarbon oil phase containing grahite particles; and separating the graphite particles from the hydrocarbon oil to obtain graphite particles reduced in mineral matter. Depending upon the purity of the graphite desired, steps of the process can be repeated one or more times to provide a progressively purer graphite

  17. Graphite core design in UK reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, M.W.

    1996-01-01

    The cores in the first power producing Magnox reactors in the UK were designed with only a limited amount of information available regarding the anisotropic dimensional change behaviour of Pile Grade graphite. As more information was gained it was necessary to make modifications to the design, some minor, some major. As the cores being built became larger, and with the switch to the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) with its much higher power density, additional problems had to be overcome such as increased dimensional change and radiolytic oxidation by the carbon dioxide coolant. For the AGRs a more isotropic graphite was required, with a lower initial open pore volume and higher strength. Gilsocarbon graphite was developed and was selected for all the AGRs built in the UK. Methane bearing coolants are used to limit radiolytic oxidation. (author). 5 figs

  18. Ellipsoidal basis for isotropic oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallies, W.; Lukac, I.; Pogosyan, G.S.; Sisakyan, A.N.

    1994-01-01

    The solutions of the Schroedinger equation are derived for the isotropic oscillator potential in the ellipsoidal coordinate system. The explicit expression is obtained for the ellipsoidal integrals of motion through the components of the orbital moment and Demkov's tensor. The explicit form of the ellipsoidal basis is given for the lowest quantum numbers. 10 refs.; 1 tab. (author)

  19. Characteristics of first loaded IG-110 graphite in HTTR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Hanawa, Satoshi; Ishihara, Masahiro

    2006-10-01

    IG-110 graphite is a fine-grained isotropic and nuclear-grade graphite with excellent resistivity on both irradiation and corrosion and with high strength. The IG-110 graphite is used for the graphite components of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) such as fuel and control rod guide blocks and support posts. In order to design and fabricate the graphite components in the HTTR, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (the Japan Atomic Energy Agency at present) had established the graphite structural design code and design data on the basis of former research results. After the design code establishment, the IG-110 graphite components were fabricated and loaded in the HTTR core. This report summarized the characteristics of the first loaded IG-110 graphite as basic data for surveillance test, measuring material characteristics changed by neutron irradiation and oxidation. By comparing the design data, it was shown that the first loaded IG-110 graphite had excellent strength properties and enough safety margins to the stress limits in the design code. (author)

  20. Induced piezoelectricity in isotropic biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, R L

    1976-01-01

    Isotropic material can be made to exhibit piezoelectric effects by the application of a constant electric field. For insulators, the piezoelectric strain constant is proportional to the applied electric field and for semiconductors, an additional out-of-phase component of piezoelectricity is proportional to the electric current density in the sample. The two induced coefficients are proportional to the strain-dependent dielectric constant (depsilon/dS + epsilon) and resistivity (drho/dS - rho), respectively. The latter is more important at frequencies such that rhoepsilonomega less than 1, often the case in biopolymers.Signals from induced piezoelectricity in nature may be larger than those from true piezoelectricity. PMID:990389

  1. How Isotropic is the Universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadeh, Daniela; Feeney, Stephen M; Pontzen, Andrew; Peiris, Hiranya V; McEwen, Jason D

    2016-09-23

    A fundamental assumption in the standard model of cosmology is that the Universe is isotropic on large scales. Breaking this assumption leads to a set of solutions to Einstein's field equations, known as Bianchi cosmologies, only a subset of which have ever been tested against data. For the first time, we consider all degrees of freedom in these solutions to conduct a general test of isotropy using cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization data from Planck. For the vector mode (associated with vorticity), we obtain a limit on the anisotropic expansion of (σ_{V}/H)_{0}Universe is strongly disfavored, with odds of 121 000:1 against.

  2. Isotropic Negative Thermal Expansion Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lingling; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2016-07-13

    Negative thermal expansion materials are important and desirable in science and engineering applications. However, natural materials with isotropic negative thermal expansion are rare and usually unsatisfied in performance. Here, we propose a novel method to achieve two- and three-dimensional negative thermal expansion metamaterials via antichiral structures. The two-dimensional metamaterial is constructed with unit cells that combine bimaterial strips and antichiral structures, while the three-dimensional metamaterial is fabricated by a multimaterial 3D printing process. Both experimental and simulation results display isotropic negative thermal expansion property of the samples. The effective coefficient of negative thermal expansion of the proposed models is demonstrated to be dependent on the difference between the thermal expansion coefficient of the component materials, as well as on the circular node radius and the ligament length in the antichiral structures. The measured value of the linear negative thermal expansion coefficient of the three-dimensional sample is among the largest achieved in experiments to date. Our findings provide an easy and practical approach to obtaining materials with tunable negative thermal expansion on any scale.

  3. Absorption spectra of AA-stacked graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, C W; Lee, S H; Chen, S C; Lin, M F; Shyu, F L

    2010-01-01

    AA-stacked graphite shows strong anisotropy in geometric structures and velocity matrix elements. However, the absorption spectra are isotropic for the polarization vector on the graphene plane. The spectra exhibit one prominent plateau at middle energy and one shoulder structure at lower energy. These structures directly reflect the unique geometric and band structures and provide sufficient information for experimental fitting of the intralayer and interlayer atomic interactions. On the other hand, monolayer graphene shows a sharp absorption peak but no shoulder structure; AA-stacked bilayer graphene has two absorption peaks at middle energy and abruptly vanishes at lower energy. Furthermore, the isotropic features are expected to exist in other graphene-related systems. The calculated results and the predicted atomic interactions could be verified by optical measurements.

  4. Phonon scattering in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.

    1976-04-01

    Effects on graphite thermal conductivities due to controlled alterations of the graphite structure by impurity addition, porosity, and neutron irradiation are shown to be consistent with the phonon-scattering formulation 1/l = Σ/sub i equals 1/sup/n/ 1/l/sub i/. Observed temperature effects on these doped and irradiated graphites are also explained by this mechanism

  5. Development of fracture toughness test method for nuclear grade graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C. H.; Lee, J. S.; Cho, H. C.; Kim, D. J.; Lee, D. J. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    lattice parameter of graphite due to the ion irradiation damage is developed. The effects of the testing variables on the measured fracture toughness are evaluated on the isotropic graphite. Through the microstructural observations, the various toughening mechanisms of the isotropic graphite are studied. Based on the test results and analyses, a reliable test method is proposed.

  6. Thermalization vs. isotropization and azimuthal fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrowczynski, Stanislaw

    2005-01-01

    Hydrodynamic description requires a local thermodynamic equilibrium of the system under study but an approximate hydrodynamic behaviour is already manifested when a momentum distribution of liquid components is not of equilibrium form but merely isotropic. While the process of equilibration is relatively slow, the parton system becomes isotropic rather fast due to the plasma instabilities. Azimuthal fluctuations observed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions are argued to distinguish between a fully equilibrated and only isotropic parton system produced in the collision early stage

  7. Fabrication and characterization of polyvinyl alcohol/metal (Ca, Mg, Ti) doped zirconium phosphate nanocomposite films for scaffold-guided tissue engineering application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Himani; Pal, Pallabi; Dhara, Santanu; Pathak, Amita

    2017-02-01

    Nanocomposite films of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and zirconium phosphate (ZrP)/doped ZrP (doped with Ca, Mg, Ti) nanoparticles have been developed by solvent casting method to assess their potential as matrix material in scaffold-guided tissue engineering application. The prepared ZrP and doped ZrP nanoparticles as well as the nanocomposite films were characterized by various spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. Nanoindentation studies revealed improved nanomechanical properties in the PVA/doped ZrP nanocomposite films (highest for PVA/Ti doped ZrP: hardness=262.4MPa; elastic modulus=5800MPa) as compared to the PVA/ZrP and neat PVA films. In-vitro cell culture experiments carried out to access the cellular viability, attachment, proliferation, and migration on the substrates, using mouse fibroblast (3T3) cell lines, inferred enhanced bioactivity in the PVA/doped ZrP nanocomposite films (highest for PVA/Ca doped ZrP) in contrast to PVA/ZrP and neat PVA films. Controlled biodegradability as well as swelling behavior, superior bioactivity and improved mechanical properties of the PVA/doped ZrP nanocomposite films make them promising matrix materials for scaffold-guided tissue engineering application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of Ta and Ti Doping on the High Field Performance of (Nb, Ta, Ti)3Sn Multifilamentary Wires based on Osprey Bronze with High Tin Content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abaecherli, V; Uglietti, D; Lezza, P; Seeber, B; Fluekiger, R; Cantoni, M; Buffat, P-A

    2006-01-01

    Ta and Ti are the most widely used additions for technical Nb 3 Sn multifilamentary superconductors. These elements are known to influence grain growth, grain morphology and chemical composition in the A15 layer, hence the current carrying properties of the wires over a wide magnetic field range. So far only few studies tried to compare systematically Ta and Ti doped and undoped Nb 3 Sn wires in the frame of the same work, down to a nanometric scale. We present an investigation on several multifilamentary (Nb, Ta, Ti) 3 Sn bronze route wires, fabricated at a laboratory scale, with various amounts of additives. The wires consist of fine filaments embedded in a Cu-Sn or Cu-Sn-Ti Osprey bronze with > 15 wt.% Sn and an external Cu stabilization. Microstructural observations are compared with the results of J c and n values measured up to 21 T at 4.2 and 2.2 K, and for longitudinal strains up to 0.5%. Non-Cu J c values up to 300 Amm -2 and n values up to 50 at 17 T and 4.2 K show clearly that wires with Ti addition to the bronze have a better performance with respect to wires with Ti additions to the filaments

  9. Characterization of nuclear graphite elastic properties using laser ultrasonic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan W.; Han, Karen; Olasov, Lauren R.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Spicer, James B.

    2015-05-01

    Laser ultrasonic methods have been used to characterize the elastic behaviors of commercially-available and legacy nuclear graphites. Since ultrasonic techniques are sensitive to various aspects of graphite microstructure including preferred grain orientation, microcrack orientation and porosity, laser ultrasonics is a candidate technique for monitoring graphite degradation and structural integrity in environments expected in high-temperature, gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Aspects of materials texture can be assessed by studying ultrasonic wavespeeds as a function of propagation direction and polarization. Shear wave birefringence measurements, in particular, can be used to evaluate elastic anisotropy. In this work, laser ultrasonic measurements of graphite moduli have been made to provide insight into the relationship between the microstructures and the macroscopic stiffnesses of these materials. In particular, laser ultrasonic measurements have been made using laser line sources to produce shear waves with specific polarizations. By varying the line orientation relative to the sample, shear wave birefringence measurements have been recorded. Results from shear wave birefringence measurements show that an isostatically molded graphite, such as PCIB, behaves isotropically, while an extruded graphite, such as H-451, displays significant ultrasonic texture. Graphites have complicated microstructures that depend on the manufacturing processes used, and ultrasonic texture in these materials could originate from grain orientation and preferred microcrack alignment. Effects on material isotropy due to service related microstructural changes are possible and the ultimate aim of this work is to determine the degree to which these changes can be assessed nondestructively using laser ultrasonics measurements.

  10. Macroscopic simulation of isotropic permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruckner, Florian; Abert, Claas; Vogler, Christoph; Heinrichs, Frank; Satz, Armin; Ausserlechner, Udo; Binder, Gernot; Koeck, Helmut; Suess, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Accurate simulations of isotropic permanent magnets require to take the magnetization process into account and consider the anisotropic, nonlinear, and hysteretic material behaviour near the saturation configuration. An efficient method for the solution of the magnetostatic Maxwell equations including the description of isotropic permanent magnets is presented. The algorithm can easily be implemented on top of existing finite element methods and does not require a full characterization of the hysteresis of the magnetic material. Strayfield measurements of an isotropic permanent magnet and simulation results are in good agreement and highlight the importance of a proper description of the isotropic material. - Highlights: • Simulations of isotropic permanent magnets. • Accurate calculation of remanence magnetization and strayfield. • Comparison with strayfield measurements and anisotropic magnet simulations. • Efficient 3D FEM–BEM coupling for solution of Maxwell equations.

  11. Empirical isotropic chemical shift surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czinki, Eszter; Csaszar, Attila G.

    2007-01-01

    A list of proteins is given for which spatial structures, with a resolution better than 2.5 A, are known from entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and isotropic chemical shift (ICS) values are known from the RefDB database related to the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank (BMRB) database. The structures chosen provide, with unknown uncertainties, dihedral angles φ and ψ characterizing the backbone structure of the residues. The joint use of experimental ICSs of the same residues within the proteins, again with mostly unknown uncertainties, and ab initio ICS(φ,ψ) surfaces obtained for the model peptides For-(l-Ala) n -NH 2 , with n = 1, 3, and 5, resulted in so-called empirical ICS(φ,ψ) surfaces for all major nuclei of the 20 naturally occurring α-amino acids. Out of the many empirical surfaces determined, it is the 13C α ICS(φ,ψ) surface which seems to be most promising for identifying major secondary structure types, α-helix, β-strand, left-handed helix (α D ), and polyproline-II. Detailed tests suggest that Ala is a good model for many naturally occurring α-amino acids. Two-dimensional empirical 13C α - 1 H α ICS(φ,ψ) correlation plots, obtained so far only from computations on small peptide models, suggest the utility of the experimental information contained therein and thus they should provide useful constraints for structure determinations of proteins

  12. Isotropic stars in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mak, M.K.; Harko, T.

    2013-01-01

    We present a general solution of the Einstein gravitational field equations for the static spherically symmetric gravitational interior space-time of an isotropic fluid sphere. The solution is obtained by transforming the pressure isotropy condition, a second order ordinary differential equation, into a Riccati type first order differential equation, and using a general integrability condition for the Riccati equation. This allows us to obtain an exact non-singular solution of the interior field equations for a fluid sphere, expressed in the form of infinite power series. The physical features of the solution are studied in detail numerically by cutting the infinite series expansions, and restricting our numerical analysis by taking into account only n=21 terms in the power series representations of the relevant astrophysical parameters. In the present model all physical quantities (density, pressure, speed of sound etc.) are finite at the center of the sphere. The physical behavior of the solution essentially depends on the equation of state of the dense matter at the center of the star. The stability properties of the model are also analyzed in detail for a number of central equations of state, and it is shown that it is stable with respect to the radial adiabatic perturbations. The astrophysical analysis indicates that this solution can be used as a realistic model for static general relativistic high density objects, like neutron stars. (orig.)

  13. A graphite nanoeraser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ze; Bøggild, Peter; Yang, Jia-rui

    2011-01-01

    We present here a method for cleaning intermediate-size (up to 50 nm) contamination from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and graphene. Electron-beam-induced deposition of carbonaceous material on graphene and graphite surfaces inside a scanning electron microscope, which is difficult to remove...... by conventional techniques, can be removed by direct mechanical wiping using a graphite nanoeraser, thus drastically reducing the amount of contamination. We discuss potential applications of this cleaning procedure....

  14. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  15. Eddy current testing on structures of nuclear-grade IG-110 graphite for acceptance test in HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Saikusa, Akio; Iyoku, Tatsuo

    1993-09-01

    Core and core support graphite structures in the HTTR are mainly made of IG-110 graphite which is fine-grained isotropic and nuclear-grade. Nondestructive inspection with eddy current testing is planned to be applied to these graphite structures. Eddy current testing is widely applied to metallic structures and its testing method has been already established. On the other hand, the characteristics of graphite are quite different in micro-structure from these of metals. Therefore, the eddy current testing method provided for metallic structures can not be applied directly to graphite structures. Thus the eddy current testing method and condition were established for the graphite structures made of IG-110 graphite. (author)

  16. Fabrication and characterization of polyvinyl alcohol/metal (Ca, Mg, Ti) doped zirconium phosphate nanocomposite films for scaffold-guided tissue engineering application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalita, Himani; Pal, Pallabi; Dhara, Santanu; Pathak, Amita

    2017-01-01

    Nanocomposite films of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and zirconium phosphate (ZrP)/doped ZrP (doped with Ca, Mg, Ti) nanoparticles have been developed by solvent casting method to assess their potential as matrix material in scaffold-guided tissue engineering application. The prepared ZrP and doped ZrP nanoparticles as well as the nanocomposite films were characterized by various spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. Nanoindentation studies revealed improved nanomechanical properties in the PVA/doped ZrP nanocomposite films (highest for PVA/Ti doped ZrP: hardness = 262.4 MPa; elastic modulus = 5800 MPa) as compared to the PVA/ZrP and neat PVA films. In-vitro cell culture experiments carried out to access the cellular viability, attachment, proliferation, and migration on the substrates, using mouse fibroblast (3T3) cell lines, inferred enhanced bioactivity in the PVA/doped ZrP nanocomposite films (highest for PVA/Ca doped ZrP) in contrast to PVA/ZrP and neat PVA films. Controlled biodegradability as well as swelling behavior, superior bioactivity and improved mechanical properties of the PVA/doped ZrP nanocomposite films make them promising matrix materials for scaffold-guided tissue engineering application. - Highlights: • PVA/ZrP (undoped/doped with Ca, Mg and Ti) nanocomposite scaffolds were developed. • The nanocomposites were prepared via solvent casting method. • PVA/doped ZrP films exhibited enhanced mechanical properties than PVA/undoped ZrP. • Excellent bioactivity was observed in the PVA/doped ZrP films than PVA/undoped ZrP.

  17. Fabrication and characterization of polyvinyl alcohol/metal (Ca, Mg, Ti) doped zirconium phosphate nanocomposite films for scaffold-guided tissue engineering application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalita, Himani [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Pal, Pallabi; Dhara, Santanu [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Pathak, Amita, E-mail: ami@chem.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India)

    2017-02-01

    Nanocomposite films of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and zirconium phosphate (ZrP)/doped ZrP (doped with Ca, Mg, Ti) nanoparticles have been developed by solvent casting method to assess their potential as matrix material in scaffold-guided tissue engineering application. The prepared ZrP and doped ZrP nanoparticles as well as the nanocomposite films were characterized by various spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. Nanoindentation studies revealed improved nanomechanical properties in the PVA/doped ZrP nanocomposite films (highest for PVA/Ti doped ZrP: hardness = 262.4 MPa; elastic modulus = 5800 MPa) as compared to the PVA/ZrP and neat PVA films. In-vitro cell culture experiments carried out to access the cellular viability, attachment, proliferation, and migration on the substrates, using mouse fibroblast (3T3) cell lines, inferred enhanced bioactivity in the PVA/doped ZrP nanocomposite films (highest for PVA/Ca doped ZrP) in contrast to PVA/ZrP and neat PVA films. Controlled biodegradability as well as swelling behavior, superior bioactivity and improved mechanical properties of the PVA/doped ZrP nanocomposite films make them promising matrix materials for scaffold-guided tissue engineering application. - Highlights: • PVA/ZrP (undoped/doped with Ca, Mg and Ti) nanocomposite scaffolds were developed. • The nanocomposites were prepared via solvent casting method. • PVA/doped ZrP films exhibited enhanced mechanical properties than PVA/undoped ZrP. • Excellent bioactivity was observed in the PVA/doped ZrP films than PVA/undoped ZrP.

  18. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  19. Graphite targets at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Rotating polycrystalline and stationary pyrolytic graphite target designs for the LAMPF experimental area are described. Examples of finite element calculations of temperatures and stresses are presented. Some results of a metallographic investigation of irradiated pyrolytic graphite target plates are included, together with a brief description of high temperature bearings for the rotating targets

  20. Thermal shock test of TiC and graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, H.; Okamura, J.; Son, P.; Miyake, M.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal shock tests were performed by pulse electron beam heating on chemically vapor deposited coatings of TiC on Poco graphite, bulk TiC, and several kinds of isotropic graphite. The specimens were heated at various power densities (10-45 MW/m 2 ) for various pulse durations (1-2 s) to examine the dependence of thermal failures on heating conditions. The TiC coating on graphite suffered cracking, surface melting and evaporation by the thermal pulse. The surface melting limit, defined as F τ 1/2 , where F is the minimum power density that causes surface melting for a specified pulse duration τ, was approximately 48 MWs 1/2 /m 2 for the TiC coating. The combined-Carbon/Titanium ratio of the coating after electron beam heating decreased with increasing power density and pulse duration. The bulk TiC specimens were so brittle that they fractured at heat load conditions where the coating showed no damage. The graphite specimens showed sublimation as a principal damage mechanism by the thermal pulse, and the sublimation weight loss decreased with increasing the thermal conductivity of the specimen. It was confirmed that the TiC coating on graphite had favorable resistance to thermal shock as compared to the bulk TiC and that graphite with high thermal conductivity is promising material as a high heat flux component. (orig.)

  1. Irradiation behavior of graphite shielding materials for FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Kaito, Takeji; Onose, Shoji; Shibahara, Itaru

    1994-01-01

    Thirteen kinds of isotropic graphites with different density and maximum grain size were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' to fluences from 2.11 to 2.86x10 26 n/m 2 (E>0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 549 to 597degC. Postirradiation examination was carried out on dimensional change, elastic modulus, and the thermal conductivity. The result of measurement of dimensional change indicated that the graphites irradiated at lower fluences showed shrinkage upon neutron irradiation followed by increase with increasing neutron fluences, irrespective of differences in material parameters. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increased to two to three times of unirradiated values. A large scatter found in Poisson's ratio of unirradiated materials became very small and a linear dependency on density was obtained after irradiation. The thermal conductivity decreased to one-fifth to one-tenth of unirradiated values, but the change in specific heat was negligibly small. The results of postirradiation examination indicated that the changes in physical properties of high density, isotropic graphites were mainly dominated by the irradiation condition rather than their material parameters. Namely, the effects of irradiation induced defects on physical properties of heavily neutron-irradiated graphites are much larger than that of defects associated with as-fabricated specimens. (author)

  2. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electrochemical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment, ECT of graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones with respect to the treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A small quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes.

  3. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electroche-- mical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment ECT graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones this is treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A sMall quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes

  4. Asymptomatic Intracorneal Graphite Deposits following Graphite Pencil Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Philip, Swetha Sara; John, Deepa; John, Sheeja Susan

    2012-01-01

    Reports of graphite pencil lead injuries to the eye are rare. Although graphite is considered to remain inert in the eye, it has been known to cause severe inflammation and damage to ocular structures. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with intracorneal graphite foreign bodies following a graphite pencil injury.

  5. Recent developments in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Overall, the HTGR graphite situation is in excellent shape. In both of the critical requirements, fuel blocks and support structures, adequate graphites are at hand and improved grades are sufficiently far along in truncation. In the aerospace field, GraphNOL N3M permits vehicle performance with confidence in trajectories unobtainable with any other existing material. For fusion energy applications, no other graphite can simultaneously withstand both extreme thermal shock and neutron damage. Hence, the material promises to create new markets as well as to offer a better candidate material for existing applications

  6. Graphite for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eatherly, W.P.; Clausing, R.E.; Strehlow, R.A.; Kennedy, C.R.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1987-03-01

    Graphite is in widespread and beneficial use in present fusion energy devices. This report reflects the view of graphite materials scientists on using graphite in fusion devices. Graphite properties are discussed with emphasis on application to fusion reactors. This report is intended to be introductory and descriptive and is not intended to serve as a definitive information source

  7. Positron annihilation study of graphite, glassy carbon and C60/C70 fullerene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Masayuki; Kajino, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Sadae; Iwata, Tadao; Kuramoto, Eiichi; Takenaka, Minoru.

    1992-01-01

    ACAR (Angular Correlation of Annihilation Radiation) and positron lifetime measurements have been made on, HOPG (Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite), isotropic fine-grained graphite, glassy carbons and C 60 /C 70 powder. HOPG showed marked bimodality along the c-axis and anisotropy in ACAR momentum distribution, which stem from characteristic annihilation between 'interlayer' positrons and π-electrons in graphite. ACAR curves of the isotropic graphite and glassy carbons are even narrower than that of HOPG perpendicular to the c-axis. Positron lifetime of 420 and 390 - 480 psec, much longer than that of 221 psec in HOPG, were observed for the isotropic graphite and glassy carbons respectively, which are due to positron trapping in structural voids in them. Positron lifetime and ACAR width (FWHM) can be well correlated to void sizes (1.7 to 5.0 nm) of glassy carbons which have been determined by small angle neutron (SAN) scattering measurements. ACAR curves and positron lifetime of C 60 /C 70 powder agree well with those of glassy carbons. This shows that positron wave functions extend, as in the voids of glassy carbons, much wider than open spaces of the octahedral interstices of the face-centered cubic (FCC) structure of C 60 crystal and strongly suggests positron trapping in the 'soccer ball' vacancy. Possible positron states in the carbon materials are discussed with a simple model of void volume-trapping. Preliminary results on neutron irradiation damage in HOPG are also presented. (author)

  8. Final report on graphite irradiation test OG-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.J.; Beavan, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    The results of dimensional, thermal expansivity, thermal conductivity, Young's modulus, and tensile strength measurements on graphite specimens irradiated in capsule OG-3 are presented. The graphite grades investigated included near-isotropic H-451 (three different preproduction lots), TS-1240, and SO818; needle coke H-327; and European coal tar pitch coke grades P 3 JHA 2 N, P 3 JHAN, and ASI2-500. Data were obtained in the temperature range 823 0 K to 1673 0 K. The peak fast neutron fluence in the experiment was 3 x 10 25 n/m 3 (E greater than 29 fJ)/sub HTGR/; the total accumulated fluence exceeded 9 x 10 25 n/m 2 on some H-451 specimens and 6 x 10 25 n/m 2 on some TS-1240 specimens. Irradiation-induced dimensional changes on H-451 graphite differed slightly from earlier predictions. For an irradiation temperature of about 1225 0 K, axial shrinkage rates at high fluences were somewhat higher than predicted, and the fluence at which radial expansion started (about 9 x 10 25 n/m 2 at 1275 0 K) was lower. TS-1240 graphite underwent smaller dimensional changes than H-451 graphite, while limited data on SO818 and ASI2-500 graphites showed similar behavior to H-451. P 3 JHAN and P 3 JHA 2 N graphites displayed anisotropic behavior with rapid axial shrinkage. Comparison of dimensional changes between specimens from three logs of H-451 and of TS-1240 graphites showed no significant log-to-log variations for H-451, and small but significant log-to-log variations for TS-1240. The thermal expansivity of the near-isotropic graphites irradiated at 865-1045 0 K first increased by 5 percent to 10 percent and then decreased. At higher irradiation temperatures the thermal expansivity decreased by up to 50 percent. Changes in thermal conductivity were consistent with previously established curves. Specimens which were successively irradiated at two different temperatures took on the saturation conductivity for the new temperature

  9. Isotropic Growth of Graphene toward Smoothing Stitching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Mengqi; Tan, Lifang; Wang, Lingxiang; Mendes, Rafael G; Qin, Zhihui; Huang, Yaxin; Zhang, Tao; Fang, Liwen; Zhang, Yanfeng; Yue, Shuanglin; Rümmeli, Mark H; Peng, Lianmao; Liu, Zhongfan; Chen, Shengli; Fu, Lei

    2016-07-26

    The quality of graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition still has very great disparity with its theoretical property due to the inevitable formation of grain boundaries. The design of single-crystal substrate with an anisotropic twofold symmetry for the unidirectional alignment of graphene seeds would be a promising way for eliminating the grain boundaries at the wafer scale. However, such a delicate process will be easily terminated by the obstruction of defects or impurities. Here we investigated the isotropic growth behavior of graphene single crystals via melting the growth substrate to obtain an amorphous isotropic surface, which will not offer any specific grain orientation induction or preponderant growth rate toward a certain direction in the graphene growth process. The as-obtained graphene grains are isotropically round with mixed edges that exhibit high activity. The orientation of adjacent grains can be easily self-adjusted to smoothly match each other over a liquid catalyst with facile atom delocalization due to the low rotation steric hindrance of the isotropic grains, thus achieving the smoothing stitching of the adjacent graphene. Therefore, the adverse effects of grain boundaries will be eliminated and the excellent transport performance of graphene will be more guaranteed. What is more, such an isotropic growth mode can be extended to other types of layered nanomaterials such as hexagonal boron nitride and transition metal chalcogenides for obtaining large-size intrinsic film with low defect.

  10. In-Situ Characterization of Isotropic and Transversely Isotropic Elastic Properties Using Ultrasonic Wave Velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pant, S; Laliberte, J; Martinez, M.J.; Rocha, B.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a one-sided, in situ method based on the time of flight measurement of ultrasonic waves was described. The primary application of this technique was to non-destructively measure the stiffness properties of isotropic and transversely isotropic materials. The method consists of

  11. Mechanical property characterization and impact resistance of selected graphite/PEEK composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Donald J.

    1994-01-01

    To use graphite polyetheretherketone (PEEK) material on highly curved surfaces requires that the material be drapable and easily conformable to the surface. This paper presents the mechanical property characterization and impact resistance results for laminates made from two types of graphite/PEEK materials that will conform to a curved surface. These laminates were made from two different material forms. These forms are: (1) a fabric where each yarn is a co-mingled Celion G30-500 3K graphite fiber and PEEK thermoplastic fiber; and (2) an interleaved material of Celion G30-500 3K graphite fabric interleaved with PEEK thermoplastic film. The experimental results from the fabric laminates are compared with results for laminates made from AS4/PEEK unidirectional tape. The results indicate that the tension and compression moduli for quasi-isotropic and orthotropic laminates made from fabric materials are at least 79 percent of the modulus of equivalent laminates made from tape material. The strength of fabric material laminates is at least 80 percent of laminates made from tape material. The evaluation of fabric material for shear stiffness indicates that a tape material laminate could be replaced by a fabric material laminate and still maintain 89 percent of the shear stiffness of the tape material laminate. The notched quasi-isotropic compression panel failure strength is 42 to 46 percent of the unnotched quasi-isotropic laminate strength. Damage area after impact with 20 ft-lbs of impact energy is larger for the co-mingled panels than for the interleaved panels. The inerleaved panels have less damage than panels made from tape material. Residual compression strength of quasi-isotropic panels after impact of 20 ft-lbs of energy varies between 33 percent of the undamaged quasi-isotropic material strength for the tape material and 38 percent of the undamaged quasi-isotropic material strength for the co-mingled fabric material.

  12. Carbon-14 Graphitization Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James; Collon, Philippe; Laverne, Jay

    2014-09-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a process that allows for the analysis of mass of certain materials. It is a powerful process because it results in the ability to separate rare isotopes with very low abundances from a large background, which was previously impossible. Another advantage of AMS is that it only requires very small amounts of material for measurements. An important application of this process is radiocarbon dating because the rare 14C isotopes can be separated from the stable 14N background that is 10 to 13 orders of magnitude larger, and only small amounts of the old and fragile organic samples are necessary for measurement. Our group focuses on this radiocarbon dating through AMS. When performing AMS, the sample needs to be loaded into a cathode at the back of an ion source in order to produce a beam from the material to be analyzed. For carbon samples, the material must first be converted into graphite in order to be loaded into the cathode. My role in the group is to convert the organic substances into graphite. In order to graphitize the samples, a sample is first combusted to form carbon dioxide gas and then purified and reduced into the graphite form. After a couple weeks of research and with the help of various Physics professors, I developed a plan and began to construct the setup necessary to perform the graphitization. Once the apparatus is fully completed, the carbon samples will be graphitized and loaded into the AMS machine for analysis.

  13. Melting temperature of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, V.N.; Savvatimskiy, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: Pulse of electrical current is used for fast heating (∼ 1 μs) of metal and graphite specimens placed in dielectric solid media. Specimen consists of two strips (90 μm in thick) placed together with small gap so they form a black body model. Quasy-monocrystal graphite specimens were used for uniform heating of graphite. Temperature measurements were fulfilled with fast pyrometer and with composite 2-strip black body model up to melting temperature. There were fulfilled experiments with zirconium and tungsten of the same black body construction. Additional temperature measurements of liquid zirconium and liquid tungsten are made. Specific heat capacity (c P ) of liquid zirconium and of liquid tungsten has a common feature in c P diminishing just after melting. It reveals c P diminishing after melting in both cases over the narrow temperature range up to usual values known from steady state measurements. Over the next wide temperature range heat capacity for W (up to 5000 K) and Zr (up to 4100 K) show different dependencies of heat capacity on temperature in liquid state. The experiments confirmed a high quality of 2-strip black body model used for graphite temperature measurements. Melting temperature plateau of tungsten (3690 K) was used for pyrometer calibration area for graphite temperature measurement. As a result, a preliminary value of graphite melting temperature of 4800 K was obtained. (author)

  14. Texture of low temperature isotropic pyrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelissier, Joseph; Lombard, Louis.

    1976-01-01

    Isotropic pyrocarbon deposited on fuel particles was studied by transmission electron microscopy in order to determine its texture. The material consists of an agglomerate of spherical growth features similar to those of carbon black. The spherical growth features are formed from the cristallites of turbostratic carbon and the distribution gives an isotropic structure. Neutron irradiation modifies the morphology of the pyrocarbon. The spherical growth features are deformed and the coating becomes strongly anisotropic. The transformation leads to the rupture of the coating caused by strong irradiation doses [fr

  15. Nuclear graphite ageing and turnaround

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Hall, G.N.; Smart, J.

    2001-01-01

    Graphite moderated reactors are being operated in many countries including, the UK, Russia, Lithuania, Ukraine and Japan. Many of these reactors will operate well into the next century. New designs of High Temperature Graphite Moderated Reactors (HTRS) are being built in China and Japan. The design life of these graphite-moderated reactors is governed by the ageing of the graphite core due to fast neutron damage, and also, in the case of carbon dioxide cooled reactors by the rate of oxidation of the graphite. Nuclear graphites are polycrystalline in nature and it is the irradiation-induced damage to the individual graphite crystals that determines the material property changes with age. The life of a graphite component in a nuclear reactor can be related to the graphite irradiation induced dimensional changes. Graphites typically shrink with age, until a point is reached where the shrinkage stops and the graphite starts to swell. This change from shrinkage to swelling is known as ''turnaround''. It is well known that pre-oxidising graphite specimens caused ''turnaround'' to be delayed, thus extending the life of the graphite, and hence the life of the reactor. However, there was no satisfactory explanation of this behaviour. This paper presents a numerical crystal based model of dimensional change in graphite, which explains the delay in ''turnaround'' in the pre-oxidised specimens irradiated in a fast neutron flux, in terms of crystal accommodation and orientation and change in compliance due to radiolytic oxidation. (author)

  16. Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

  17. Interactively variable isotropic resolution in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapp, Robert M; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Kachelriess, Marc; Wilharm, Sylvia; Kalender, Willi A

    2008-01-01

    An individual balancing between spatial resolution and image noise is necessary to fulfil the diagnostic requirements in medical CT imaging. In order to change influencing parameters, such as reconstruction kernel or effective slice thickness, additional raw-data-dependent image reconstructions have to be performed. Therefore, the noise versus resolution trade-off is time consuming and not interactively applicable. Furthermore, isotropic resolution, expressed by an equivalent point spread function (PSF) in every spatial direction, is important for the undistorted visualization and quantitative evaluation of small structures independent of the viewing plane. Theoretically, isotropic resolution can be obtained by matching the in-plane and through-plane resolution with the aforementioned parameters. Practically, however, the user is not assisted in doing so by current reconstruction systems and therefore isotropic resolution is not commonly achieved, in particular not at the desired resolution level. In this paper, an integrated approach is presented for equalizing the in-plane and through-plane spatial resolution by image filtering. The required filter kernels are calculated from previously measured PSFs in x/y- and z-direction. The concepts derived are combined with a variable resolution filtering technique. Both approaches are independent of CT raw data and operate only on reconstructed images which allows for their application in real time. Thereby, the aim of interactively variable, isotropic resolution is achieved. Results were evaluated quantitatively by measuring PSFs and image noise, and qualitatively by comparing the images to direct reconstructions regarded as the gold standard. Filtered images matched direct reconstructions with arbitrary reconstruction kernels with standard deviations in difference images of typically between 1 and 17 HU. Isotropic resolution was achieved within 5% of the selected resolution level. Processing times of 20-100 ms per frame

  18. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram; Patole, Archana

    2017-01-01

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a

  19. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of 137 Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of 137 Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000 0 C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ΔE of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon) 0 exp [-ΔE/RT] are about 4 x 10 -2 cm 2 /s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively

  20. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  1. Mapping of moveout in tilted transversely isotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Stovas, A.; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2013-01-01

    The computation of traveltimes in a transverse isotropic medium with a tilted symmetry axis tilted transversely isotropic is very important both for modelling and inversion. We develop a simple analytical procedure to map the traveltime function from a transverse isotropic medium with a vertical symmetry axis (vertical transversely isotropic) to a tilted transversely isotropic medium by applying point-by-point mapping of the traveltime function. This approach can be used for kinematic modelling and inversion in layered tilted transversely isotropic media. © 2013 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  2. Mapping of moveout in tilted transversely isotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Stovas, A.

    2013-09-09

    The computation of traveltimes in a transverse isotropic medium with a tilted symmetry axis tilted transversely isotropic is very important both for modelling and inversion. We develop a simple analytical procedure to map the traveltime function from a transverse isotropic medium with a vertical symmetry axis (vertical transversely isotropic) to a tilted transversely isotropic medium by applying point-by-point mapping of the traveltime function. This approach can be used for kinematic modelling and inversion in layered tilted transversely isotropic media. © 2013 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  3. Intercomparison of graphite irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, H; Perio, P; Seguin, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    While fast neutrons only are effective in damaging graphite, results of irradiations are more or less universally expressed in terms of thermal neutron fluxes. This paper attempts to correlate irradiations made in different reactors, i.e., in fluxes of different spectral compositions. Those attempts are based on comparison of 1) bulk length change and volume expansion, and 2) crystalline properties (e.g., lattice parameter C, magnetic susceptibility, stored energy, etc.). The methods used by various authors for determining the lattice constants of irradiated graphite are discussed. (author)

  4. Enhancement in electrical and magnetic properties with Ti-doping in Bi0.5La0.5Fe0.5Mn0.5O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul; Gupta, Prince Kumar; Kumar, Shiv; Joshi, Amish G.; Ghosh, A. K.; Patil, S.; Chatterjee, Sandip

    2017-04-01

    In this investigation, we have synthesized Bi0.5La0.5Fe0.5Mn0.5-xTixO3 (where x = 0 and 0.05) samples. The Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns shows that the systems crystallize in the orthorhombic phase with the Pnma space group. The observed Raman modes support the XRD results. The appearance of prominent A1-3 and weak E-2 modes in Bi0.5La0.5Fe0.5Mn0.45Ti0.05O3 indicates the presence of chemically more active Bi-O covalent bonds. Ferromagnetism of Bi0.5La0.5Fe0.5Mn0.5O3 is enhanced by Ti doping at the Mn-site, indicating that these particular samples might be interesting for device applications.

  5. The atomic structure and chemistry of Fe-rich steps on antiphase boundaries in Ti-doped Bi0.9Nd0.15FeO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian MacLaren

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Stepped antiphase boundaries are frequently observed in Ti-doped Bi0.85Nd0.15FeO3, related to the novel planar antiphase boundaries reported recently. The atomic structure and chemistry of these steps are determined by a combination of high angle annular dark field and bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging, together with electron energy loss spectroscopy. The core of these steps is found to consist of 4 edge-sharing FeO6 octahedra. The structure is confirmed by image simulations using a frozen phonon multislice approach. The steps are also found to be negatively charged and, like the planar boundaries studied previously, result in polarisation of the surrounding perovskite matrix.

  6. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  7. Observation of non-uniform erosion and deposition phenomena on graphite after plasma exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, D.; Grote, H.; Schneider, W.; Wienhold, P.; Seggern, J. von

    1999-01-01

    The modifications of fine grain isotropic graphite surfaces after plasma exposure have been investigated using surface analysis techniques with high spatial resolution in area and depth. The samples are graphite target tiles of ASDEX-upgrade and coated graphite collector samples exposed for special erosion/deposition experiments in the divertor plasma of ASDEX-upgrade or in the scrape-off plasma of TEXTOR-94. In addition, a graphite sample was exposed to a low temperature, clean deuterium plasma to study the modifications of the surface morphology during plasma exposure. The results give clear indications of non-uniform erosion and deposition processes. The change of the surface morphology during these processes is discussed. (orig.)

  8. Elastic representation surfaces of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriz, R.D.; Ledbetter, H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites exhibit high elastic anisotropy and unusual geometrical features in their elastic-property polar diagrams. From the five-component transverse-isotropic elastic-stiffness tensor we compute and display representation surfaces for Young's modulus, torsional modulus, linear compressibility, and Poisson's ratios. Based on Christoffel-equation solutions, we describe some unusual elastic-wave-surface topological features. Musgrave considered in detail the differences between phase-velocity and group-velocity surfaces arising from high elastic anisotropy. For these composites, we find effects similar to, but more dramatic than, Musgrave's. Some new, unexpected results for graphite/epoxy include: a shear-wave velocity that exceeds a longitudinal velocity in the plane transverse to the fiber; a wave that changes polarization character from longitudinal to transverse as the propagation direction sweeps from the fiber axis to the perpendicular axis

  9. Computations of Quasiconvex Hulls of Isotropic Sets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heinz, S.; Kružík, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2017), s. 477-492 ISSN 0944-6532 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-15264S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/12/0671 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : quasiconvexity * isotropic compact sets * matrices Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.496, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/MTR/kruzik-0474874.pdf

  10. Depression of nonlinearity in decaying isotropic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraichnan, R.H.; Panda, R.

    1988-01-01

    Simulations of decaying isotropic Navier--Stokes turbulence exhibit depression of the normalized mean-square nonlinear term to 57% of the value for a Gaussianly distributed velocity field with the same instantaneous velocity spectrum. Similar depression is found for dynamical models with random coupling coefficients (modified Betchov models). This suggests that the depression is dynamically generic rather than specifically driven by alignment of velocity and vorticity

  11. New criteria for isotropic and textured metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazacu, Oana

    2018-05-01

    In this paper a isotropic criterion expressed in terms of both invariants of the stress deviator, J2 and J3 is proposed. This criterion involves a unique parameter, α, which depends only on the ratio between the yield stresses in uniaxial tension and pure shear. If this parameter is zero, the von Mises yield criterion is recovered; if a is positive the yield surface is interior to the von Mises yield surface whereas when a is negative, the new yield surface is exterior to it. Comparison with polycrystalline calculations using Taylor-Bishop-Hill model [1] for randomly oriented face-centered (FCC) polycrystalline metallic materials show that this new criterion captures well the numerical yield points. Furthermore, the criterion reproduces well yielding under combined tension-shear loadings for a variety of isotropic materials. An extension of this isotropic yield criterion such as to account for orthotropy in yielding is developed using the generalized invariants approach of Cazacu and Barlat [2]. This new orthotropic criterion is general and applicable to three-dimensional stress states. The procedure for the identification of the material parameters is outlined. Illustration of the predictive capabilities of the new orthotropic is demonstrated through comparison between the model predictions and data on aluminum sheet samples.

  12. Electronic properties of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J.

    2010-10-01

    In this thesis, low-temperature magneto-transport (T ∼ 10 mK) and the de Haas-van Alphen effect of both natural graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) are examined. In the first part, low field magneto-transport up to B = 11 T is discussed. A Fourier analysis of the background removed signal shows that the electric transport in graphite is governed by two types of charge carriers, electrons and holes. Their phase and frequency values are in agreement with the predictions of the SWM-model. The SWM-model is confirmed by detailed band structure calculations using the magnetic field Hamiltonian of graphite. The movement of the Fermi at B > 2 T is calculated self-consistently assuming that the sum of the electron and hole concentrations is constant. The second part of the thesis deals with high field magneto-transport of natural graphite in the magnetic field range 0 ≤ B ≤ 28 T. Both spin splitting of magneto-transport features in tilted field configuration and the onset of the charge density wave (CDW) phase for different temperatures with the magnetic field applied normal to the sample plane are discussed. Concerning the Zeeman effect, the SWM calculations including the Fermi energy movement require a g-factor of g* equal to 2.5 ± 0.1 to reproduce the spin spilt features. The measurements of the charge density wave state confirm that its onset magnetic field can be described by a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-type formula. The measurements of the de Haas-van Alphen effect are in agreement with the results of the magneto-transport measurements at low field. (author)

  13. Harwell Graphite Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linacre, J.K.

    1970-01-01

    The calorimeter is of the steady state temperature difference type. It contains a graphite sample supported axially in a graphite outer jacket, the assembly being contained in a thin stainless steel outer can. The temperature of the jacket and the temperature difference between sample and jacket are measured by chromel-alumel thermocouples. The instrument is calibrated by means of an electric heater of low mass positioned on the axis of the sample. The resistance of the heater is known and both current through the heater and the potential across it may be measured. The instrument is filled with nitrogen at a pressure of one half atmosphere at room temperature. The calorimeter has been designed for prolonged operation at temperatures up to 600°C, and dose rates up to 1 Wg -1 , and instruments have been in use for periods in excess of one year

  14. A standard graphite block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivkovic, M; Zdravkovic, Z; Sotic, O [Department of Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1966-04-15

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 {+-}3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm{sup 3}; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb.

  15. A standard graphite block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivkovic, M.; Zdravkovic, Z.; Sotic, O.

    1966-04-01

    A graphite block was calibrated for the thermal neutron flux of the Ra-Be source using indium foils as detectors. Experimental values of the thermal neutron flux along the central vertical axis of the system were corrected for the self-shielding effect and depression of flux in the detector. The experimental values obtained were compared with the values calculated on the basis of solving the conservation neutron equation by the continuous slowing-down theory. In this theoretical calculation of the flux the Ra-Be source was divided into three resonance energy regions. The measurement of the thermal neutron diffusion length in the standard graphite block is described. The measurements were performed in the thermal neutron region of the system. The experimental results were interpreted by the diffusion theory for point thermal neutron source in the finite system. The thermal neutron diffusion length was calculated to be L= 50.9 ±3.1 cm for the following graphite characteristics: density = 1.7 g/cm 3 ; boron content = 0.1 ppm; absorption cross section = 3.7 mb

  16. Interbasis expansions for isotropic harmonic oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Shi-Hai, E-mail: dongsh2@yahoo.com [Departamento de Física, Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Edificio 9, Unidad Profesional Adolfo López Mateos, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico)

    2012-03-12

    The exact solutions of the isotropic harmonic oscillator are reviewed in Cartesian, cylindrical polar and spherical coordinates. The problem of interbasis expansions of the eigenfunctions is solved completely. The explicit expansion coefficients of the basis for given coordinates in terms of other two coordinates are presented for lower excited states. Such a property is occurred only for those degenerated states for given principal quantum number n. -- Highlights: ► Exact solutions of harmonic oscillator are reviewed in three coordinates. ► Interbasis expansions of the eigenfunctions is solved completely. ► This is occurred only for those degenerated states for given quantum number n.

  17. Isotropic Broadband E-Field Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béla Szentpáli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An E-field probe has been developed for EMC immunity tests performed in closed space. The leads are flexible resistive transmission lines. Their influence on the field distribution is negligible. The probe has an isotropic reception from 100 MHz to 18 GHz; the sensitivity is in the 3 V/m–10 V/m range. The device is an accessory of the EMC test chamber. The readout of the field magnitude is carried out by personal computer, which fulfils also the required corrections of the raw data.

  18. Gravitational instability in isotropic MHD plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkos, Alemayehu Mengesha

    2018-04-01

    The effect of compressive viscosity, thermal conductivity and radiative heat-loss functions on the gravitational instability of infinitely extended homogeneous MHD plasma has been investigated. By taking in account these parameters we developed the six-order dispersion relation for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves propagating in a homogeneous and isotropic plasma. The general dispersion relation has been developed from set of linearized basic equations and solved analytically to analyse the conditions of instability and instability of self-gravitating plasma embedded in a constant magnetic field. Our result shows that the presence of viscosity and thermal conductivity in a strong magnetic field substantially modifies the fundamental Jeans criterion of gravitational instability.

  19. Active isotropic slabs: conditions for amplified reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Liliana I.; Matteo, Claudia L.; Etcheverry, Javier; Duplaá, María Celeste

    2012-12-01

    We analyse in detail the necessary conditions to obtain amplified reflection (AR) in isotropic interfaces when a plane wave propagates from a transparent medium towards an active one. First, we demonstrate analytically that AR is not possible if a single interface is involved. Then, we study the conditions for AR in a very simple configuration: normal incidence on an active slab immersed in transparent media. Finally, we develop an analysis in the complex plane in order to establish a geometrical method that not only describes the behaviour of active slabs but also helps to simplify the calculus.

  20. Active isotropic slabs: conditions for amplified reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Liliana I; Duplaá, María Celeste; Matteo, Claudia L; Etcheverry, Javier

    2012-01-01

    We analyse in detail the necessary conditions to obtain amplified reflection (AR) in isotropic interfaces when a plane wave propagates from a transparent medium towards an active one. First, we demonstrate analytically that AR is not possible if a single interface is involved. Then, we study the conditions for AR in a very simple configuration: normal incidence on an active slab immersed in transparent media. Finally, we develop an analysis in the complex plane in order to establish a geometrical method that not only describes the behaviour of active slabs but also helps to simplify the calculus. (paper)

  1. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilova, Martina; Toy, Virginia; Rooney, Jeremy S.; Giorgetti, Carolina; Gordon, Keith C.; Collettini, Cristiano; Takeshita, Toru

    2018-02-01

    Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25 megapascal (MPa) and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s-1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  2. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kirilova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25  megapascal (MPa and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s−1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  3. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram

    2017-07-20

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a mechanical pressing operation to generate a bromine-graphite/metal composite material.

  4. Chemical stabilization of graphite surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bistrika, Alexander A.; Lerner, Michael M.

    2018-04-03

    Embodiments of a device, or a component of a device, including a stabilized graphite surface, methods of stabilizing graphite surfaces, and uses for the devices or components are disclosed. The device or component includes a surface comprising graphite, and a plurality of haloaryl ions and/or haloalkyl ions bound to at least a portion of the graphite. The ions may be perhaloaryl ions and/or perhaloalkyl ions. In certain embodiments, the ions are perfluorobenzenesulfonate anions. Embodiments of the device or component including stabilized graphite surfaces may maintain a steady-state oxidation or reduction surface current density after being exposed to continuous oxidation conditions for a period of at least 1-100 hours. The device or component is prepared by exposing a graphite-containing surface to an acidic aqueous solution of the ions under oxidizing conditions. The device or component can be exposed in situ to the solution.

  5. Acoustic reflection log in transversely isotropic formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronquillo Jarillo, G.; Markova, I.; Markov, M.

    2018-01-01

    We have calculated the waveforms of sonic reflection logging for a fluid-filled borehole located in a transversely isotropic rock. Calculations have been performed for an acoustic impulse source with the characteristic frequency of tens of kilohertz that is considerably less than the frequencies of acoustic borehole imaging tools. It is assumed that the borehole axis coincides with the axis of symmetry of the transversely isotropic rock. It was shown that the reflected wave was excited most efficiently at resonant frequencies. These frequencies are close to the frequencies of oscillations of a fluid column located in an absolutely rigid hollow cylinder. We have shown that the acoustic reverberation is controlled by the acoustic impedance of the rock Z = Vphρs for fixed parameters of the borehole fluid, where Vph is the velocity of horizontally propagating P-wave; ρs is the rock density. The methods of waveform processing to determine the parameters characterizing the reflected wave have been discussed.

  6. Temperature dependence of broadline NMR spectra of water-soaked, epoxy-graphite composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawing, David; Fornes, R. E.; Gilbert, R. D.; Memory, J. D.

    1981-10-01

    Water-soaked, epoxy resin-graphite fiber composites show a waterline in their broadline proton NMR spectrum which indicates a state of intermediate mobility between the solid and free water liquid states. The line is still present at -42 °C, but shows a reversible decrease in amplitude with decreasing temperature. The line is isotropic upon rotation of the fiber axis with respect to the external magnetic field.

  7. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  8. Irradiation-induced defects in graphite and glassy carbon studied by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, M.; Kajino, M.; Kuwahara, H.; Yamaguchi, S.; Kuramoto, E.; Takenaka, M.

    1992-01-01

    ACAR and positron lifetime measurements have been made on, HOPG, isotropic fine-grained graphites, glassy carbons and C 60 /C 70 . HOPG showed a marked bimodal ACAR distribution along the c-axis. By irradiation of 1.0 X 10 19 fast neutrons/cm 2 remarkable narrowing in the ACAR curves and disappearance of the bimodal distribution were observed. Lifetime in HOPG increased from 225 psec to 289 psec (positron-lifetime in vacancies and their small clusters) by the irradiation. The irradiation on isotropic graphites and glassy carbons, however, gave slight narrowing in ACAR curves and decrease in lifetimes (360 psec → 300psec). This suggests irradiation-induced vacancy trapping in crystallites. In C 60 /C 70 powder two lifetime components were detected: τ 1 =177psec, τ 2 =403psec (I 2 =58%). The former is less than the bulk lifetime of HOPG, while the latter being very close to lifetimes in the isotropic graphites and glassy carbons. This and recent 2D-ACAR study of HOPG surface [15] strongly suggest free and defect surface states around ''soccer ball'' cages

  9. Purification and preparation of graphite oxide from natural graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panatarani, C., E-mail: c.panatarani@phys.unpad.ac.id; Muthahhari, N.; Joni, I. Made [Instrumentation Systems and Functional Material Processing Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Universitas Padjadjaran, Padjadjaran University, Jl. Raya Bandung-Sumedang KM 21, Jatinangor, 45363, Jawa Barat (Indonesia); Rianto, Anton [Grafindo Nusantara Ltd., Belagio Mall Lantai 2, Unit 0 L3-19, Kawasan Mega Kuningan, Kav. B4 No.3, Jakarta Selatan (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    Graphite oxide has attracted much interest as a possible route for preparation of natural graphite in the large-scale production and manipulation of graphene as a material with extraordinary electronic properties. Graphite oxide was prepared by modified Hummers method from purified natural graphite sample from West Kalimantan. We demonstrated that natural graphite is well-purified by acid leaching method. The purified graphite was proceed for intercalating process by modifying Hummers method. The modification is on the reaction time and temperature of the intercalation process. The materials used in the intercalating process are H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and KMNO{sub 4}. The purified natural graphite is analyzed by carbon content based on Loss on Ignition test. The thermo gravimetricanalysis and the Fouriertransform infrared spectroscopy are performed to investigate the oxidation results of the obtained GO which is indicated by the existence of functional groups. In addition, the X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are also applied to characterize respectively for the crystal structure and elemental analysis. The results confirmed that natural graphite samples with 68% carbon content was purified into 97.68 % carbon content. While the intercalation process formed a formation of functional groups in the obtained GO. The results show that the temperature and reaction times have improved the efficiency of the oxidation process. It is concluded that these method could be considered as an important route for large-scale production of graphene.

  10. Management of UKAEA graphite liabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, M.

    2001-01-01

    The UK Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) is responsible for managing its liabilities for redundant research reactors and other active facilities concerned with the development of the UK nuclear technology programme since 1947. These liabilities include irradiated graphite from a variety of different sources including low irradiation temperature reactor graphite (the Windscale Piles 1 and 2, British Energy Pile O and Graphite Low Energy Experimental Pile at Harwell and the Material Testing Reactors at Harwell and Dounreay), advanced gas-cooled reactor graphite (from the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor) and graphite from fast reactor systems (neutron shield graphite from the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor and Dounreay Fast Reactor). The decommissioning and dismantling of these facilities will give rise to over 6,000 tonnes of graphite requiring disposal. The first graphite will be retrieved from the dismantling of Windscale Pile 1 and the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor during the next five years. UKAEA has undertaken extensive studies to consider the best practicable options for disposing of these graphite liabilities in a manner that is safe whilst minimising the associated costs and technical risks. These options include (but are not limited to), disposal as Low Level Waste, incineration, or encapsulation and disposal as Intermediate Level Waste. There are a number of technical issues associated with each of these proposed disposal options; these include Wigner energy, radionuclide inventory determination, encapsulation of graphite dust, galvanic coupling interactions enhancing the corrosion of mild steel and public acceptability. UKAEA is currently developing packaging concepts and designing packaging plants for processing these graphite wastes in consultation with other holders of graphite wastes throughout Europe. 'Letters of Comfort' have been sought from both the Low Level Waste and the Intermediate Level Waste disposal organisations to support the

  11. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, E. I.; Bubnenkov, I. A.; Dremov, V. V.; Samarin, S. I.; Pokrovsky, A. S.; Harkov, D. V.

    2013-01-01

    The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original res...

  12. A tilted transversely isotropic slowness surface approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Stovas, A.

    2012-05-09

    The relation between vertical and horizontal slownesses, better known as the dispersion relation, for transversely isotropic media with a tilted symmetry axis (TTI) requires solving a quartic polynomial equation, which does not admit a practical explicit solution to be used, for example, in downward continuation. Using a combination of the perturbation theory with respect to the anelliptic parameter and Shanks transform to improve the accuracy of the expansion, we develop an explicit formula for the vertical slowness that is highly accurate for all practical purposes. It also reveals some insights into the anisotropy parameter dependency of the dispersion relation including the low impact that the anelliptic parameter has on the vertical placement of reflectors for a small tilt in the symmetry angle. © 2012 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  13. Linearized holographic isotropization at finite coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atashi, Mahdi; Fadafan, Kazem Bitaghsir [Shahrood University of Technology, Physics Department (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafari, Ghadir [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    We study holographic isotropization of an anisotropic homogeneous non-Abelian strongly coupled plasma in the presence of Gauss-Bonnet corrections. It was verified before that one can linearize Einstein's equations around the final black hole background and simplify the complicated setup. Using this approach, we study the expectation value of the boundary stress tensor. Although we consider small values of the Gauss-Bonnet coupling constant, it is found that finite coupling leads to significant increasing of the thermalization time. By including higher order corrections in linearization, we extend the results to study the effect of the Gauss-Bonnet coupling on the entropy production on the event horizon. (orig.)

  14. Effective elastic properties of damaged isotropic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, U Sik

    1998-01-01

    In continuum damage mechanics, damaged solids have been represented by the effective elastic stiffness into which local damage is smoothly smeared. Similarly, damaged solids may be represented in terms of effective elastic compliances. By virtue of the effective elastic compliance representation, it may become easier to derive the effective engineering constants of damaged solids from the effective elastic compliances, all in closed form. Thus, in this paper, by using a continuum modeling approach based on both the principle of strain energy equivalence and the equivalent elliptical micro-crack representation of local damage, the effective elastic compliance and effective engineering constants are derived in terms of the undamaged (virgin) elastic properties and a scalar damage variable for both damaged two-and three-dimensional isotropic solids

  15. New bounds on isotropic Lorentz violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carone, Christopher D.; Sher, Marc; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Violations of Lorentz invariance that appear via operators of dimension four or less are completely parametrized in the Standard Model Extension (SME). In the pure photonic sector of the SME, there are 19 dimensionless, Lorentz-violating parameters. Eighteen of these have experimental upper bounds ranging between 10 -11 and 10 -32 ; the remaining parameter, k-tilde tr , is isotropic and has a much weaker bound of order 10 -4 . In this Brief Report, we point out that k-tilde tr gives a significant contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron and find a new upper bound of order 10 -8 . With reasonable assumptions, we further show that this bound may be improved to 10 -14 by considering the renormalization of other Lorentz-violating parameters that are more tightly constrained. Using similar renormalization arguments, we also estimate bounds on Lorentz-violating parameters in the pure gluonic sector of QCD

  16. Isotropic and anisotropic surface wave cloaking techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McManus, T M; Spada, L La; Hao, Y

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we compare two different approaches for surface waves cloaking. The first technique is a unique application of Fermat’s principle and requires isotropic material properties, but owing to its derivation is limited in its applicability. The second technique utilises a geometrical optics approximation for dealing with rays bound to a two dimensional surface and requires anisotropic material properties, though it can be used to cloak any smooth surface. We analytically derive the surface wave scattering behaviour for both cloak techniques when applied to a rotationally symmetric surface deformation. Furthermore, we simulate both using a commercially available full-wave electromagnetic solver and demonstrate a good level of agreement with their analytically derived solutions. Our analytical solutions and simulations provide a complete and concise overview of two different surface wave cloaking techniques. (paper)

  17. Isotropic and anisotropic surface wave cloaking techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, T. M.; La Spada, L.; Hao, Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we compare two different approaches for surface waves cloaking. The first technique is a unique application of Fermat’s principle and requires isotropic material properties, but owing to its derivation is limited in its applicability. The second technique utilises a geometrical optics approximation for dealing with rays bound to a two dimensional surface and requires anisotropic material properties, though it can be used to cloak any smooth surface. We analytically derive the surface wave scattering behaviour for both cloak techniques when applied to a rotationally symmetric surface deformation. Furthermore, we simulate both using a commercially available full-wave electromagnetic solver and demonstrate a good level of agreement with their analytically derived solutions. Our analytical solutions and simulations provide a complete and concise overview of two different surface wave cloaking techniques.

  18. Modification of structural graphite machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrenev, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    Studied are machining procedures for structural graphites (GMZ, MG, MG-1, PPG) most widely used in industry, of the article mass being about 50 kg. Presented are dependences necessary for the calculation of cross sections of chip suction tappers and duster pipelines in machine shops for structural graphite machining

  19. Hydrogen pumping and release by graphite under high flux plasma bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirooka, Y.; Leung, W.K.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; Labombard, B.; Nygren, R.; Wilson, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    Inert gas (helium or argon) plasma bombardment has been found to increase the surface gas adsorptivity of isotropic graphite (POCO-graphite), which can then getter residual gases in a high vacuum system. The inert gas plasma bombardment was carried out at a flux ∼ 1 x 10 18 ions s -1 cm -2 to a fluence of the order of 10 21 ions/cm 2 and at temperatures around 800 degree C. The plasma bombarding energy was varied between 100 and 200 eV. The gettering speed of the activated graphite surface is estimated to be as large as 25 liters s -1 cm -2 at total pressures between 10 -6 and 10 -7 torr. The gettering capacity estimated is 0.025 torr-liter/cm 2 at room temperature. The gettering capability of graphite can be easily recovered by repeating inert gas plasma bombardment. The activated graphite surface exhibits a smooth, sponge-like morphology with significantly increased pore openings, which correlates with the observed increase in the surface gas adsorptivity. The activated graphite surface has been observed to pump hydrogen plasma particles as well. From calibrated H-alpha measurements, the dynamic hydrogen retention capacity is evaluated to be as large as 2 x 10 18 H/cm 2 at temperatures below 100 degree C and at a plasma bombarding energy of 300 eV

  20. The irradiation induced creep of graphite under accelerated damage produced by boron doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocklehurst, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    The presence of boron enhances fast neutron irradiation damage in graphite by providing nucleation sites for interstitial loop formation. Doping with 11 B casues an increase in the irradiation induced macroscopic dimensional changes, which have been shown to result from an acceleration in the differential crystal growth rate for a given carbon atom displacement rate. Models of irradiation induced creep in graphite have centred around those in which creep is induced by internal stresses due to the anisotopic crystal growth, and those in which creep is activated by atomic displacements. A creep test on boron doped graphite has been performed in an attempt to establish which of these mechanisms is the determining factor. An isotropic nuclear graphite was doped to a 11 B concentration of 0.27 wt.%. The irradiation induced volume shrinkage rate at 750 0 C increased by a factor of 3 over that of the virgin graphite, in agreement with predictions from the earlier work, but the total creep strains were comparable in both doped and virgin samples. This observation supports the view that irradiation induced creep is dependent only on the carbon atom displacement rate and not on the internal stress level determined by the differential crystal growth rate. The implications of this result on the irradiation behaviour of graphite containing significant concentrations of boron are briefly discussed. (author)

  1. Glass-Graphite Composite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayzan, M.Z.H.; Lloyd, J.W.; Heath, P.G.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Hand, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    A summary is presented of investigations into the potential of producing glass-composite materials for the immobilisation of graphite or other carbonaceous materials arising from nuclear power generation. The methods are primarily based on the production of base glasses which are subsequently sintered with powdered graphite or simulant TRISO particles. Consideration is also given to the direct preparation of glass-graphite composite materials using microwave technology. Production of dense composite wasteforms with TRISO particles was more successful than with powdered graphite, as wasteforms containing larger amounts of graphite were resistant to densification and the glasses tried did not penetrate the pores under the pressureless conditions used. Based on the results obtained it is concluded that the production of dense glassgraphite composite wasteforms will require the application of pressure. (author)

  2. Evaluation of the oxidation behavior and strength of the graphite components in the VHTR, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eto, Motokuni; Kurosawa, Takeshi; Nomura, Shinzo; Imai, Hisashi

    1987-04-01

    Oxidation experiments have been carried out mainly on a fine-grained isotropic graphite, IG-110, at temperatures between 1173 and 1473 K in a water vapor/helium mixture. In most cases water vapor concentration was 0.65 vol% and helium pressure, 1 atm. Reaction rate and burn-off profile were measured using cylindrical specimens. On the basis of the experimental data the oxidation behavior of fuel block and core support post under the condition of the VHTR operation was estimated using the first-order or Langmuir-Hinshelwood equation with regard to water vapor concentration. Strength and stress-strain relationship of the graphite components with burn-off profiles estimated above were analyzed on the basis of the model for stress-strain relationship and strength of graphite specimens with density gradients. The estimation indicated that the integrity of the components would be maintained during normal reactor operation. (author)

  3. On the decay of homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrbek, L.; Stalp, Steven R.

    2000-08-01

    Decaying homogeneous, isotropic turbulence is investigated using a phenomenological model based on the three-dimensional turbulent energy spectra. We generalize the approach first used by Comte-Bellot and Corrsin [J. Fluid Mech. 25, 657 (1966)] and revised by Saffman [J. Fluid Mech. 27, 581 (1967); Phys. Fluids 10, 1349 (1967)]. At small wave numbers we assume the spectral energy is proportional to the wave number to an arbitrary power. The specific case of power 2, which follows from the Saffman invariant, is discussed in detail and is later shown to best describe experimental data. For the spectral energy density in the inertial range we apply both the Kolmogorov -5/3 law, E(k)=Cɛ2/3k-5/3, and the refined Kolmogorov law by taking into account intermittency. We show that intermittency affects the energy decay mainly by shifting the position of the virtual origin rather than altering the power law of the energy decay. Additionally, the spectrum is naturally truncated due to the size of the wind tunnel test section, as eddies larger than the physical size of the system cannot exist. We discuss effects associated with the energy-containing length scale saturating at the size of the test section and predict a change in the power law decay of both energy and vorticity. To incorporate viscous corrections to the model, we truncate the spectrum at an effective Kolmogorov wave number kη=γ(ɛ/v3)1/4, where γ is a dimensionless parameter of order unity. We show that as the turbulence decays, viscous corrections gradually become more important and a simple power law can no longer describe the decay. We discuss the final period of decay within the framework of our model, and show that care must be taken to distinguish between the final period of decay and the change of the character of decay due to the saturation of the energy containing length scale. The model is applied to a number of experiments on decaying turbulence. These include the downstream decay of turbulence in

  4. Isotropic compression of cohesive-frictional particles with rolling resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luding, Stefan; Benz, Thomas; Nordal, Steinar

    2010-01-01

    Cohesive-frictional and rough powders are the subject of this study. The behavior under isotropic compression is examined for different material properties involving Coulomb friction, rolling-resistance and contact-adhesion. Under isotropic compression, the density continuously increases according

  5. The revised geometric measure of entanglement for isotropic state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Ya

    2011-01-01

    Based on the revised geometric measure of entanglement (RGME), we obtain the analytical expression of isotropic state and generalize to n-particle and d-dimension mixed state case. Meantime, we obtain the relation about isotropic state E-tilde sin 2 (ρ) ≤ E re (ρ). The results indicate RGME is an appropriate measure of entanglement. (authors)

  6. Contact mechanics and friction for transversely isotropic viscoelastic materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokhtari, Milad; Schipper, Dirk J.; Vleugels, N.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.; Yoshimoto, S.; Hashimoto, H.

    2015-01-01

    Transversely isotropic materials are an unique group of materials whose properties are the same along two of the principal axes of a Cartesian coordinate system. Various natural and artificial materials behave effectively as transversely isotropic elastic solids. Several materials can be classified

  7. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latunde-Dada, S.; Cheesman, C.; Day, D.; Harrison, W.; Price, S.

    2011-03-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms-1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  8. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latunde-Dada, S; Cheesman, C; Day, D; Harrison, W; Price, S

    2011-01-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms -1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  9. Acoustic emission from polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, I.; Yoda, S.; Oku, T.; Miyamoto, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic emission was monitored from polycrystalline graphites with different microstructure (pore size and pore volume) subjected to compressive loading. The graphites used in this study comprised five brands, that is, PGX, ISEM-1, IG-11, IG-15, and ISO-88. A root mean square (RMS) voltage and event counts of acoustic emission for graphites were measured during compressive loading. The acoustic emission was measured using a computed-based data acquisition and analysis system. The graphites were first deformed up to 80 % of the average fracture stress, then unloaded and reloaded again until the fracture occured. During the first loading, the change in RMS voltage for acoustic emission was detected from the initial stage. During the unloading, the RMS voltage became zero level as soon as the applied stress was released and then gradually rose to a peak and declined. The behavior indicated that the reversed plastic deformation occured in graphites. During the second loading, the RMS voltage gently increased until the applied stress exceeded the maximum stress of the first loading; there is no Kaiser effect in the graphites. A bicrystal model could give a reasonable explanation of this results. The empirical equation between the ratio of σ AE to σ f and σ f was obtained. It is considered that the detection of microfracture by the acoustic emission technique is effective in macrofracture prediction of polycrystalline graphites. (author)

  10. Radiolytic graphite oxidation revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minshall, P.C.; Sadler, I.A.; Wickham, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    The importance of radiolytic oxidation in graphite-moderated CO 2 -cooled reactors has long been recognised, especially in the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors where potential rates are higher because of the higher gas pressure and ratings than the earlier Magnox designs. In all such reactors, the rate of oxidation is partly inhibited by the CO produced in the reaction and, in the AGR, further reduced by the deliberate addition of CH 4 . Significant roles are also played by H 2 and H 2 O. This paper reviews briefly the mechanisms of these processes and the data on which they are based. However, operational experience has demonstrated that these basic principles are unsatisfactory in a number of respects. Gilsocarbon graphites produced by different manufacturers have demonstrated a significant difference in oxidation rate despite a similar specification and apparent equivalence in their pore size and distribution, considered to be the dominant influence on oxidation rate for a given coolant-gas composition. Separately, the inhibiting influence of CH 4 , which for many years had been considered to arise from the formation of a sacrificial deposit on the pore walls, cannot adequately be explained by the actual quantities of such deposits found in monitoring samples which frequently contain far less deposited carbon than do samples from Magnox reactors where the only source of such deposits is the CO. The paper also describes the current status of moderator weight-loss predictions for Magnox and AGR Moderators and the validation of the POGO and DIFFUSE6 codes respectively. 2 refs, 5 figs

  11. Hydrogen pumping and release by graphite under high flux plasma bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirooka, Y.; Leung, W.K.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; LaBombard, B.; Nygren, R.; Wilson, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    Inert gas (helium or argon) plasma bombardment has been found to increase the surface gas adsorptivity of isotropic graphite (POCO-graphite), which can then getter residual gases in a high vacuum system. The inert gas plasma bombardment was carried out at a flux ≅ 1 x 10 18 ions s -1 cm -2 to a fluence of the order of 10 21 ions/cm 2 and at temperatures around 800 0 C. The gettering capability of graphite can be easily recovered by repeating inert gas plasma bombardment. The activated graphite surface exhibits a smooth, sponge-like morphology with significantly increased pore openings, which correlates with the observed increase in the surface gas adsorptivity. The activated graphite surface has been observed to pump hydrogen plasma particles as well. From calibrated H-alpha measurements, the dynamic hydrogen retention capacity is evaluated to be as large as 2 x 10 18 H/cm 2 at temperatures below 100 0 C and at a plasma bombarding energy of 300 eV. The graphite temperature was varied between 15 and 480 0 C. Due to the plasma particle pumping capability, hydrogen recycling from the activated graphite surface is significantly reduced, relative to that from a pre-saturated surface. A pre-saturated surface was also observed to reproducibly pump a hydrogen plasma to a concentration of 9.5 x 10 17 H/cm 2 . The hydrogen retention capacity of graphite is found to decrease with increasing temperature. A transient pumping mechanism associated with the sponge-like surface morphology is conjectured to explain the large hydrogen retention capacity. Hydrogen release behavior under helium and argon plasma bombardment was also investigated, and the result indicated the possibility of some in-pore retrapping effect. 43 refs., 11 figs

  12. Chemisputtering of interstellar graphite grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draine, B.T.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of erosion of interstellar graphite grains as a result of chemical reaction with H, N, and O is estimated using the available experiment evidence. It is argued that ''chemical sputtering'' yields for interstellar graphite grains will be much less than unity, contrary to earlier estimates by Barlow and Silk. Chemical sputtering of graphite grains in evolving H II regions is found to be unimportant, except in extremely compact (n/sub H/> or approx. =10 5 cm -3 ) H II regions. Alternative explanations are considered for the apparent weakness of the lambda=2175 A extinction ''bump'' in the direction of several early type stars

  13. Obtention of nuclear grade graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    The impurity level of natural graphite found in some of the most important mines of the State of Minas Gerais - Brasil is determined. It is also concerned with the development and use of natural graphite in nuclear reactors. Standard methods for chemical and instrumentsal analysis such as Spectrografic Determination by Emission, Spectrografic Determination by X-Rays, Spectrografic Determination by Atomic Asorption, Photometric Determination, and also chemical and physical methods for separation of impurities as well standard method for Estimating the Thermal Neutron Absorption Cross Section of graphite were employed. Some aditionals methods of purification to the ordinary treatment such as the use of metanol and halogens are also described. (Author) [pt

  14. How isotropic can the UHECR flux be?

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Matteo, Armando; Tinyakov, Peter

    2018-05-01

    Modern observatories of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) have collected over 104 events with energies above 10 EeV, whose arrival directions appear to be nearly isotropically distributed. On the other hand, the distribution of matter in the nearby Universe - and therefore presumably also that of UHECR sources - is not homogeneous. This is expected to leave an imprint on the angular distribution of UHECR arrival directions, though deflections by cosmic magnetic fields can confound the picture. In this work, we investigate quantitatively this apparent inconsistency. To this end we study observables sensitive to UHECR source inhomogeneities but robust to uncertainties on magnetic fields and the UHECR mass composition. We show, in a rather model-independent way, that if the source distribution tracks the overall matter distribution, the arrival directions at energies above 30 EeV should exhibit a sizeable dipole and quadrupole anisotropy, detectable by UHECR observatories in the very near future. Were it not the case, one would have to seriously reconsider the present understanding of cosmic magnetic fields and/or the UHECR composition. Also, we show that the lack of a strong quadrupole moment above 10 EeV in the current data already disfavours a pure proton composition, and that in the very near future measurements of the dipole and quadrupole moment above 60 EeV will be able to provide evidence about the UHECR mass composition at those energies.

  15. On isotropic cylindrically symmetric stellar models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, Brien C; Nolan, Louise V

    2004-01-01

    We attempt to match the most general cylindrically symmetric vacuum spacetime with a Robertson-Walker interior. The matching conditions show that the interior must be dust filled and that the boundary must be comoving. Further, we show that the vacuum region must be polarized. Imposing the condition that there are no trapped cylinders on an initial time slice, we can apply a result of Thorne's and show that trapped cylinders never evolve. This results in a simplified line element which we prove to be incompatible with the dust interior. This result demonstrates the impossibility of the existence of an isotropic cylindrically symmetric star (or even a star which has a cylindrically symmetric portion). We investigate the problem from a different perspective by looking at the expansion scalars of invariant null geodesic congruences and, applying to the cylindrical case, the result that the product of the signs of the expansion scalars must be continuous across the boundary. The result may also be understood in relation to recent results about the impossibility of the static axially symmetric analogue of the Einstein-Straus model

  16. Lagrangian statistics in compressible isotropic homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yantao; Wang, Jianchun; Shi, Yipeng; Chen, Shiyi

    2011-11-01

    In this work we conducted the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a forced compressible isotropic homogeneous turbulence and investigated the flow statistics from the Lagrangian point of view, namely the statistics is computed following the passive tracers trajectories. The numerical method combined the Eulerian field solver which was developed by Wang et al. (2010, J. Comp. Phys., 229, 5257-5279), and a Lagrangian module for tracking the tracers and recording the data. The Lagrangian probability density functions (p.d.f.'s) have then been calculated for both kinetic and thermodynamic quantities. In order to isolate the shearing part from the compressing part of the flow, we employed the Helmholtz decomposition to decompose the flow field (mainly the velocity field) into the solenoidal and compressive parts. The solenoidal part was compared with the incompressible case, while the compressibility effect showed up in the compressive part. The Lagrangian structure functions and cross-correlation between various quantities will also be discussed. This work was supported in part by the China's Turbulence Program under Grant No.2009CB724101.

  17. Nonlinear elastic inclusions in isotropic solids

    KAUST Repository

    Yavari, A.

    2013-10-16

    We introduce a geometric framework to calculate the residual stress fields and deformations of nonlinear solids with inclusions and eigenstrains. Inclusions are regions in a body with different reference configurations from the body itself and can be described by distributed eigenstrains. Geometrically, the eigenstrains define a Riemannian 3-manifold in which the body is stress-free by construction. The problem of residual stress calculation is then reduced to finding a mapping from the Riemannian material manifold to the ambient Euclidean space. Using this construction, we find the residual stress fields of three model systems with spherical and cylindrical symmetries in both incompressible and compressible isotropic elastic solids. In particular, we consider a finite spherical ball with a spherical inclusion with uniform pure dilatational eigenstrain and we show that the stress in the inclusion is uniform and hydrostatic. We also show how singularities in the stress distribution emerge as a consequence of a mismatch between radial and circumferential eigenstrains at the centre of a sphere or the axis of a cylinder.

  18. Radiation statistics in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva, C B; Coelho, P J; Malico, I

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of turbulence-radiation interaction (TRI) in statistically stationary (forced) homogeneous and isotropic turbulence is presented. A direct numerical simulation code was used to generate instantaneous turbulent scalar fields, and the radiative transfer equation (RTE) was solved to provide statistical data relevant in TRI. The radiation intensity is non-Gaussian and is not spatially correlated with any of the other turbulence or radiation quantities. Its power spectrum exhibits a power-law region with a slope steeper than the classical -5/3 law. The moments of the radiation intensity, Planck-mean and incident-mean absorption coefficients, and emission and absorption TRI correlations are calculated. The influence of the optical thickness of the medium, mean and variance of the temperature and variance of the molar fraction of the absorbing species is studied. Predictions obtained from the time-averaged RTE are also included. It was found that while turbulence yields an increase of the mean blackbody radiation intensity, it causes a decrease of the time-averaged Planck-mean absorption coefficient. The absorption coefficient self-correlation is small in comparison with the temperature self-correlation, and the role of TRI in radiative emission is more important than in radiative absorption. The absorption coefficient-radiation intensity correlation is small, which supports the optically thin fluctuation approximation, and justifies the good predictions often achieved using the time-averaged RTE.

  19. Radiation statistics in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, C B; Coelho, P J [Mechanical Engineering Department, IDMEC/LAETA, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Malico, I [Physics Department, University of Evora, Rua Romao Ramalho, 59, 7000-671 Evora (Portugal)], E-mail: carlos.silva@ist.utl.pt, E-mail: imbm@uevora.pt, E-mail: pedro.coelho@ist.utl.pt

    2009-09-15

    An analysis of turbulence-radiation interaction (TRI) in statistically stationary (forced) homogeneous and isotropic turbulence is presented. A direct numerical simulation code was used to generate instantaneous turbulent scalar fields, and the radiative transfer equation (RTE) was solved to provide statistical data relevant in TRI. The radiation intensity is non-Gaussian and is not spatially correlated with any of the other turbulence or radiation quantities. Its power spectrum exhibits a power-law region with a slope steeper than the classical -5/3 law. The moments of the radiation intensity, Planck-mean and incident-mean absorption coefficients, and emission and absorption TRI correlations are calculated. The influence of the optical thickness of the medium, mean and variance of the temperature and variance of the molar fraction of the absorbing species is studied. Predictions obtained from the time-averaged RTE are also included. It was found that while turbulence yields an increase of the mean blackbody radiation intensity, it causes a decrease of the time-averaged Planck-mean absorption coefficient. The absorption coefficient self-correlation is small in comparison with the temperature self-correlation, and the role of TRI in radiative emission is more important than in radiative absorption. The absorption coefficient-radiation intensity correlation is small, which supports the optically thin fluctuation approximation, and justifies the good predictions often achieved using the time-averaged RTE.

  20. Characterization of Ignalina NPP RBMK Reactors Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, P.J.; Neighbour, G.B.; Levinskas, R.; Milcius, D.

    2001-01-01

    The paper concentrates on the investigations of the initial physical properties of graphite used in production of graphite bricks of Ignalina NPP. These graphite bricks are used as nuclear moderator and major core structural components. Graphite bulk density is calculated by mensuration, pore volumes are measured by investigation of helium gas penetration in graphite pore network, the Young's modulus is determined using an ultrasonic time of flight method, the coefficient of thermal expansion is determined using a Netzsch dilatometer 402C, the fractured and machined graphite surfaces are studied using SEM, impurities are investigated qualitatively by EDAX, the degree of graphitization of the material is tested using X-ray diffraction. (author)

  1. Constitutive modeling and finite element procedure development for stress analysis of prismatic high temperature gas cooled reactor graphite core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Majumdar, Saurindranath; Srinivasan, Makuteswara

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Finite element procedure developed for stress analysis of HTGR graphite component. • Realistic fluence profile and reflector brick shape considered for the simulation. • Also realistic H-451 grade material properties considered for simulation. • Typical outer reflector of a GT-MHR type reactor considered for numerical study. • Based on the simulation results replacement of graphite bricks can be scheduled. -- Abstract: High temperature gas cooled reactors, such as prismatic and pebble bed reactors, are increasingly becoming popular because of their inherent safety, high temperature process heat output, and high efficiency in nuclear power generation. In prismatic reactors, hexagonal graphite bricks are used as reflectors and fuel bricks. In the reactor environment, graphite bricks experience high temperature and neutron dose. This leads to dimensional changes (swelling and or shrinkage) of these bricks. Irradiation dimensional changes may affect the structural integrity of the individual bricks as well as of the overall core. The present paper presents a generic procedure for stress analysis of prismatic core graphite components using graphite reflector as an example. The procedure is demonstrated through commercially available ABAQUS finite element software using the option of user material subroutine (UMAT). This paper considers General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) as a bench mark design to perform the time integrated stress analysis of a typical reflector brick considering realistic geometry, flux distribution and realistic irradiation material properties of transversely isotropic H-451 grade graphite

  2. Constitutive modeling and finite element procedure development for stress analysis of prismatic high temperature gas cooled reactor graphite core components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish, E-mail: smohanty@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Majumdar, Saurindranath [Argonne National Laboratory, South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Finite element procedure developed for stress analysis of HTGR graphite component. • Realistic fluence profile and reflector brick shape considered for the simulation. • Also realistic H-451 grade material properties considered for simulation. • Typical outer reflector of a GT-MHR type reactor considered for numerical study. • Based on the simulation results replacement of graphite bricks can be scheduled. -- Abstract: High temperature gas cooled reactors, such as prismatic and pebble bed reactors, are increasingly becoming popular because of their inherent safety, high temperature process heat output, and high efficiency in nuclear power generation. In prismatic reactors, hexagonal graphite bricks are used as reflectors and fuel bricks. In the reactor environment, graphite bricks experience high temperature and neutron dose. This leads to dimensional changes (swelling and or shrinkage) of these bricks. Irradiation dimensional changes may affect the structural integrity of the individual bricks as well as of the overall core. The present paper presents a generic procedure for stress analysis of prismatic core graphite components using graphite reflector as an example. The procedure is demonstrated through commercially available ABAQUS finite element software using the option of user material subroutine (UMAT). This paper considers General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) as a bench mark design to perform the time integrated stress analysis of a typical reflector brick considering realistic geometry, flux distribution and realistic irradiation material properties of transversely isotropic H-451 grade graphite.

  3. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in the science and technology. Structure and electrical properties, technological aspects of producing of high-strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry, so author concentrates on actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern science and technology. Translated from chapters 1 of monog...

  4. Mesostructure of graphite composite and its lifetime

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. Structure and electrical properties, as so technological aspects of producing of high strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry. Generally, the review relies, on the original results and concentrates on actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern nuclear p...

  5. Graphite surveillance in N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1991-09-01

    Graphite dimensional changes in N Reactor during its 24 yr operating history are reviewed. Test irradiation results, block measurements, stack profiles, top of reflector motion monitors, and visual observations of distortion are described. 18 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  6. Graphite oxidation in HTGR atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growcock, F.B.; Barry, J.J.; Finfrock, C.C.; Rivera, E.; Heiser, J.H. III

    1982-01-01

    On-going and recently completed studies of the effect of thermal oxidation on the structural integrity of HTGR candidate graphites are described, and some results are presented and discussed. This work includes the study of graphite properties which may play decisive roles in the graphites' resistance to oxidation and fracture: pore size distribution, specific surface area and impurity distribution. Studies of strength loss mechanisms in addition to normal oxidation are described. Emphasis is placed on investigations of the gas permeability of HTGR graphites and the surface burnoff phenomenon observed during recent density profile measurements. The recently completed studies of catalytic pitting and the effects of prestress and stress on reactivity and ultimate strength are also discussed

  7. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  8. Graphite selection for the PBMR reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Preston, S.D.

    2000-01-01

    A high temperature, direct cycle gas turbine, graphite moderated, helium cooled, pebble-bed reactor (PBMR) is being designed and constructed in South Africa. One of the major components in the PBMR is the graphite reflector, which must be designed to last thirty-five full power years. Fast neutron irradiation changes the dimensions and material properties of reactor graphite, thus for design purposes a suitable graphite database is required. Data on the effect of irradiation on nuclear graphites has been gathered for many years, at considerable financial cost, but unfortunately these graphites are no longer available due to rationalization of the graphite industry and loss of key graphite coke supplies. However, it is possible, using un-irradiated graphite materials properties and knowledge of the particular graphite microstructure, to determine the probable irradiation behaviour. Three types of nuclear graphites are currently being considered for the PBMR reflector: an isostatically moulded, fine grained, high strength graphite and two extruded medium grained graphites of moderately high strength. Although there is some irradiation data available for these graphites, the data does not cover the temperature and dose range required for the PBMR. The available graphites have been examined to determine their microstructure and some of the key material properties are presented. (authors)

  9. Investigating source processes of isotropic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Andrea

    explosion. In contrast, recovering the announced explosive yield using seismic moment estimates from moment tensor inversion remains challenging but we can begin to put error bounds on our moment estimates using the NSS technique. The estimation of seismic source parameters is dependent upon having a well-calibrated velocity model to compute the Green's functions for the inverse problem. Ideally, seismic velocity models are calibrated through broadband waveform modeling, however in regions of low seismicity velocity models derived from body or surface wave tomography may be employed. Whether a velocity model is 1D or 3D, or based on broadband seismic waveform modeling or the various tomographic techniques, the uncertainty in the velocity model can be the greatest source of error in moment tensor inversion. These errors have not been fully investigated for the nuclear discrimination problem. To study the effects of unmodeled structures on the moment tensor inversion, we set up a synthetic experiment where we produce synthetic seismograms for a 3D model (Moschetti et al., 2010) and invert these data using Green's functions computed with a 1D velocity mode (Song et al., 1996) to evaluate the recoverability of input solutions, paying particular attention to biases in the isotropic component. The synthetic experiment results indicate that the 1D model assumption is valid for moment tensor inversions at periods as short as 10 seconds for the 1D western U.S. model (Song et al., 1996). The correct earthquake mechanisms and source depth are recovered with statistically insignificant isotropic components as determined by the F-test. Shallow explosions are biased by the theoretical ISO-CLVD tradeoff but the tectonic release component remains low, and the tradeoff can be eliminated with constraints from P wave first motion. Path-calibration to the 1D model can reduce non-double-couple components in earthquakes, non-isotropic components in explosions and composite sources and improve

  10. Sudden Relaminarization and Lifetimes in Forced Isotropic Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkmann, Moritz F; Morozov, Alexander

    2015-09-25

    We demonstrate an unexpected connection between isotropic turbulence and wall-bounded shear flows. We perform direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence forced at large scales at moderate Reynolds numbers and observe sudden transitions from a chaotic dynamics to a spatially simple flow, analogous to the laminar state in wall bounded shear flows. We find that the survival probabilities of turbulence are exponential and the typical lifetimes increase superexponentially with the Reynolds number. Our results suggest that both isotropic turbulence and wall-bounded shear flows qualitatively share the same phase-space dynamics.

  11. Precession of elastic waves in vibrating isotropic spheres and transversely isotropic cylinders subjected to inertial rotation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Joubert, S

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available and Manufacturing TRANSVERSELY ISOTROPIC CYLINDER - 1 φ φ r z a x y Ω P P O u v w z ( )1 1 1 2 1 1 rrr rz rr zr r zrz zz rz u r r z r v r r z r w r r z r ϕ ϕϕ ϕϕ ϕϕ ϕ ϕ σσ σ σ σ ρ ϕ σσ σ σ ρ ϕ σσ σ σ ρ ϕ... ∂ ∂ ∂ + + + − = ∂ ∂ ∂ ∂∂ ∂ + + + = ∂ ∂ ∂ ∂∂ ∂ + + + = ∂ ∂ ∂ && && && 6 CSIR Material Science and Manufacturing TRANSVERSELY ISOTROPIC CYLINDER - 2 ( )1 1 1 2 1 1 rrr rz rr zr r zrz zz rz u r r z r v r r z r w r r z r ϕ ϕϕ ϕϕ ϕϕ ϕ ϕ σσ σ σ σ ρ ϕ σσ σ σ ρ ϕ σσ σ σ ρ ϕ...

  12. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Bratton, Rob; Marsden, Barry; Srinivasan, Makuteswara; Penfield, Scott; Mitchell, Mark; Windes, Will

    2008-01-01

    ) concepts, such as the NGNP, it is fully expected that the behavior of these graphites will conform to the recognized trends for near isotropic nuclear graphite. Thus, much of the data needed is confirmatory in nature. Theories that can explain graphite behavior have been postulated and, in many cases, shown to represent experimental data well. However, these theories need to be tested against data for the new graphites and extended to higher neutron doses and temperatures pertinent to the new Gen IV reactor concepts. It is anticipated that current and planned future graphite irradiation experiments will provide the data needed to validate many of the currently accepted models, as well as providing the needed data for design confirmation

  13. Weak convergence to isotropic complex [Formula: see text] random measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Li, Yunmeng; Sang, Liheng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we prove that an isotropic complex symmetric α -stable random measure ([Formula: see text]) can be approximated by a complex process constructed by integrals based on the Poisson process with random intensity.

  14. Metrical relationships in a standard triangle in an isotropic plane

    OpenAIRE

    Kolar-Šuper, R.; Kolar-Begović, Z.; Volenec, V.; Beban-Brkić, J.

    2005-01-01

    Each allowable triangle of an isotropic plane can be set in a standard position, in which it is possible to prove geometric properties analytically in a simplified and easier way by means of the algebraic theory developed in this paper.

  15. Efficient anisotropic wavefield extrapolation using effective isotropic models

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali; Ma, X.; Waheed, Umair bin; Zuberi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Isotropic wavefield extrapolation is more efficient than anisotropic extrapolation, and this is especially true when the anisotropy of the medium is tilted (from the vertical). We use the kinematics of the wavefield, appropriately represented

  16. Isotropic 2D quadrangle meshing with size and orientation control

    KAUST Repository

    Pellenard, Bertrand; Alliez, Pierre; Morvan, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    We propose an approach for automatically generating isotropic 2D quadrangle meshes from arbitrary domains with a fine control over sizing and orientation of the elements. At the heart of our algorithm is an optimization procedure that, from a coarse

  17. Scanning anisotropy parameters in horizontal transversely isotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Masmoudi, Nabil; Stovas, Alexey; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2016-01-01

    in reservoir characterisation, specifically in terms of fracture delineation. We propose a travel-time-based approach to estimate the anellipticity parameter η and the symmetry axis azimuth ϕ of a horizontal transversely isotropic medium, given an inhomogeneous

  18. Crack Tip Creep Deformation Behavior in Transversely Isotropic Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Young Wha; Yoon, Kee Bong

    2009-01-01

    Theoretical mechanics analysis and finite element simulation were performed to investigate creep deformation behavior at the crack tip of transversely isotropic materials under small scale creep (SCC) conditions. Mechanical behavior of material was assumed as an elastic-2 nd creep, which elastic modulus ( E ), Poisson's ratio (v ) and creep stress exponent ( n ) were isotropic and creep coefficient was only transversely isotropic. Based on the mechanics analysis for material behavior, a constitutive equation for transversely isotropic creep behavior was formulated and an equivalent creep coefficient was proposed under plain strain conditions. Creep deformation behavior at the crack tip was investigated through the finite element analysis. The results of the finite element analysis showed that creep deformation in transversely isotropic materials is dominant at the rear of the crack-tip. This result was more obvious when a load was applied to principal axis of anisotropy. Based on the results of the mechanics analysis and the finite element simulation, a corrected estimation scheme of the creep zone size was proposed in order to evaluate the creep deformation behavior at the crack tip of transversely isotropic creeping materials

  19. High temperature soldering of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, L.T.; Kravetskij, G.A.; Dergunova, V.S.

    1977-01-01

    The effect is studied of the brazing temperature on the strength of the brazed joint of graphite materials. In one case, iron and nickel are used as solder, and in another, molybdenum. The contact heating of the iron and nickel with the graphite has been studied in the temperature range of 1400-2400 ged C, and molybdenum, 2200-2600 deg C. The quality of the joints has been judged by the tensile strength at temperatures of 2500-2800 deg C and by the microstructure. An investigation into the kinetics of carbon dissolution in molten iron has shown that the failure of the graphite in contact with the iron melt is due to the incorporation of iron atoms in the interbase planes. The strength of a joint formed with the participation of the vapour-gas phase is 2.5 times higher than that of a joint obtained by graphite recrystallization through the carbon-containing metal melt. The critical temperatures are determined of graphite brazing with nickel, iron, and molybdenum interlayers, which sharply increase the strength of the brazed joint as a result of the formation of a vapour-gas phase and deposition of fine-crystal carbon

  20. Experience with graphite in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pick, M.A.; Celentano, G.; Deksnis, E.; Dietz, K.J.; Shaw, R.; Sonnenberg, K.; Walravens, M.

    1987-01-01

    During the current operational period of JET more than 50% of the internal area of the machine is covered in graphite tiles. This includes the 15 m 2 of carbon tiles installed in the new toroidal limiter, the 40 poloidal belts of graphite tiles covering the U-joints and bellows as well as a two metre high ring (-- 20 m 2 ) or carbon tiles on the inner wall of the Torus. A ring of tiles in the equatorial plane (3 tiles high) consists of carbon-carbon fibre tiles. Test bed results indicated that the fine grained graphite tiles cracked at ∼ 1 kW/cm 2 for 2s of irradiation whereas the carbon-carbon fibre tiles were able to sustain a flux, limited by the irradiation facility, of 3.5 kW for 3s without any damage. The authors report on the generally positive experience they have had had with the installed graphite during the present and previous in-vessel configurations. This includes the physical integrity of the tiles under severe conditions such as high energy run-away electron beams, plasma disruptions and high heat fluxes. They report on the importance of the precise positioning of the inner wall and x-point tiles at the very high power fluxes of JET and the effect of deviations on both graphite and carbon-fibre tiles

  1. Porous (Swiss-Cheese Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Abrahamson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Porous graphite was prepared without the use of template by rapidly heating the carbonization products from mixtures of anthracene, fluorene, and pyrene with a CO2 laser. Rapid CO2 laser heating at a rate of 1.8 × 106 °C/s vaporizes out the fluorene-pyrene derived pitch while annealing the anthracene coke. The resulting structure is that of graphite with 100 nm spherical pores. The graphitizablity of the porous material is the same as pure anthracene coke. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the interfaces between graphitic layers and the pore walls are unimpeded. Traditional furnace annealing does not result in the porous structure as the heating rates are too slow to vaporize out the pitch, thereby illustrating the advantage of fast thermal processing. The resultant porous graphite was prelithiated and used as an anode in lithium ion capacitors. The porous graphite when lithiated had a specific capacity of 200 mAh/g at 100 mA/g. The assembled lithium ion capacitor demonstrated an energy density as high as 75 Wh/kg when cycled between 2.2 V and 4.2 V.

  2. Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite Enhanced Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A thermally conductive composite material, a thermal transfer device made of the material, and a method for making the material are disclosed. Apertures or depressions are formed in aluminum or aluminum alloy. Plugs are formed of thermal pyrolytic graphite. An amount of silicon sufficient for liquid interface diffusion bonding is applied, for example by vapor deposition or use of aluminum silicon alloy foil. The plugs are inserted in the apertures or depressions. Bonding energy is applied, for example by applying pressure and heat using a hot isostatic press. The thermal pyrolytic graphite, aluminum or aluminum alloy and silicon form a eutectic alloy. As a result, the plugs are bonded into the apertures or depressions. The composite material can be machined to produce finished devices such as the thermal transfer device. Thermally conductive planes of the thermal pyrolytic graphite plugs may be aligned in parallel to present a thermal conduction path.

  3. Fracture criteria of reactor graphite under multiaxial stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, S.; Kawamata, K.; Kurumada, A.; Oku, T.

    1987-01-01

    New fracture criteria for graphite under multiaxial stresses are presented for designing core and support materials of a high temperature gas cooled reactor. Different kinds of fracture strength tests are carried out for a near isotropic graphite IG-11. Results show that, under the stress state in which tensile stresses are predominant, the maximum principal stress theory is seen as applicable for brittle fracture. Under the stress state in which compressive stresses are predominant there may be two fracture modes for brittle fracture, namely, slipping fracture and mode II fracture. For the former fracture mode the maximum shear stress criterion is suitable, but for the latter fracture mode a new mode II fracture criterion including a restraint effect for cracks is verified to be applicable. Also a statistical correction for brittle fracture criteria under multiaxial stresses is discussed. By considering the allowable stress values for safe design, the specified minimum ultimate strengths corresponding to a survival probability of 99% at the 95% confidence level are presented. (orig./HP)

  4. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N.; Radhika, R.; Kozakov, A.T.; Pandian, R.; Chakravarty, S.; Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient

  5. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  6. Characterization of radiation damage induced by swift heavy ions in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Christian

    2016-05-15

    Graphite is a classical material in neutron radiation environments, being widely used in nuclear reactors and power plants as a moderator. For high energy particle accelerators, graphite provides ideal material properties because of the low Z of carbon and its corresponding low stopping power, thus when ion projectiles interact with graphite is the energy deposition rather low. This work aims to improve the understanding of how the irradiation with swift heavy ions (SHI) of kinetic energies in the range of MeV to GeV affects the structure of graphite and other carbon-based materials. Special focus of this project is given to beam induced changes of thermo-mechanical properties. For this purpose the Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and glassy carbon (GC) (both serving as model materials), isotropic high density polycrystalline graphite (PG) and other carbon based materials like carbon fiber carbon composites (CFC), chemically expanded graphite (FG) and molybdenum carbide enhanced graphite composites (MoC) were exposed to different ions ranging from {sup 131}Xe to {sup 238}U provided by the UNILAC accelerator at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. To investigate structural changes, various in-situ and off-line measurements were performed including Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. Thermo-mechanical properties were investigated using the laser-flash-analysis method, differential scanning calorimetry, micro/nano-indentation and 4-point electrical resistivity measurements. Beam induced stresses were investigated using profilometry. Obtained results provided clear evidence that ion beam-induced radiation damage leads to structural changes and degradation of thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of graphite. PG transforms towards a disordered sp2 structure, comparable to GC at high fluences. Irradiation-induced embrittlement is strongly reducing the lifetime of most high-dose exposed accelerator components. For

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of shock compressed heterogeneous materials. II. The graphite/diamond transition case for astrophysics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineau, N.; Soulard, L.; Colombet, L.; Carrard, T.; Pellé, A.; Gillet, Ph.; Clérouin, J.

    2015-03-01

    We present a series of molecular dynamics simulations of the shock compression of copper matrices containing a single graphite inclusion: these model systems can be related to some specific carbon-rich rocks which, after a meteoritic impact, are found to contain small fractions of nanodiamonds embedded in graphite in the vicinity of high impedance minerals. We show that the graphite to diamond transformation occurs readily for nanometer-sized graphite inclusions, via a shock accumulation process, provided the pressure threshold of the bulk graphite/diamond transition is overcome, independently of the shape or size of the inclusion. Although high diamond yields (˜80%) are found after a few picoseconds in all cases, the transition is non-isotropic and depends substantially on the relative orientation of the graphite stack with respect to the shock propagation, leading to distinct nucleation processes and size-distributions of the diamond grains. A substantial regraphitization process occurs upon release and only inclusions with favorable orientations likely lead to the preservation of a fraction of this diamond phase. These results agree qualitatively well with the recent experimental observations of meteoritic impact samples.

  8. Raman characterization of bulk ferromagnetic nanostructured graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, Helena; Divine Khan, Ngwashi; Faccio, Ricardo; Araújo-Moreira, F.M.; Fernández-Werner, Luciana

    2012-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize bulk ferromagnetic graphite samples prepared by controlled oxidation of commercial pristine graphite powder. The G:D band intensity ratio, the shape and position of the 2D band and the presence of a band around 2950 cm -1 showed a high degree of disorder in the modified graphite sample, with a significant presence of exposed edges of graphitic planes as well as a high degree of attached hydrogen atoms.

  9. Fabrication of Graphene by Cleaving Graphite Chemically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shu-hua; ZHAO Xiao-ting; FAN Hou-gang; YANG Li-li; ZHANG Yong-jun; YANG Jing-hai

    2011-01-01

    Graphite was chemically cleaved to graphene by Billups Reaction,and the morphologies and microstructures of graphene were characterized by SEM,Raman and AFM.The results show that the graphite was first functionalized by l-iodododecane,which led to the cleavage of the graphene layer in the graphite.The second decoration cleaved the graphite further and graphene was obtained.The heights of the graphene layer were larger than 1 nm due to the organic decoration.

  10. Method of Joining Graphite Fibers to a Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Durwood M. (Inventor); Caron, Mark E. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor); Gleason, Brian P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of assembling a metallic-graphite structure includes forming a wetted graphite subassembly by arranging one or more layers of graphite fiber material including a plurality of graphite fibers and applying a layer of metallization material to ends of the plurality of graphite fibers. At least one metallic substrate is secured to the wetted graphite subassembly via the layer of metallization material.

  11. Exploration of coal-based pitch precursors for ultra-high thermal conductivity graphite fibers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, G.V. [Amoco Performance Products, Inc., Alpharetta, GA (United States)

    1996-12-27

    Goal was to explore the utility of coal-based pitch precursors for use in ultra high thermal conductivity carbon (graphite) fibers. From graphite electrode experience, it was established that coal-based pitches tend to form more highly crystalline graphite at lower temperatures. Since the funding was limited to year 1 effort of the 3 year program, the goal was only partially achieved. The coal-base pitches can form large domain mesophase in spite of high N and O contents. The mesophase reactivity test performed on one of the variants of coal-based pitch (DO84) showed that it was not a good candidate for carbon fiber processing. Optimization of WVU`s isotropic pitch process is required to tailor the pitch for carbon fiber processing. The hetero atoms in the coal pitch need to be reduced to improve mesophase formation.

  12. Photoemission study of K on graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennich, P.; Puglia, C.; Brühwiler, P.A.; Nilsson, A.; Sandell, A.; Mårtensson, N.; Rudolf, P.

    1999-01-01

    The physical and electronic structure of the dispersed and (2×2) phases of K/graphite have been characterized by valence and core-level photoemission. Charge transfer from K to graphite is found to occur at all coverages, and includes transfer of charge to the second graphite layer. A rigid band

  13. Separation medium containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A separation medium, such as a chromatography filling or packing, containing a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide has a surface that has been at least partially functionalized.

  14. NMR studies on graphite-methanol system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Akkad, T.M.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic relaxation times for protons of methanol on graphite have been studied. The perpendicular and the transversal magnetization as a function of temperature were measured. The results show that the presence of graphite slowed down the methanol movement compared with that in the pure alcohol, and that the methanol molecules are attached to the graphite surface via methyl groups. (author)

  15. Treatment and Disposal of the Radioactive Graphite Waste of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Junfeng

    2016-01-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) represent one of the Gen IV reactors in the future market, with efficient generation of energy and the supply of process heat at high temperature utilised in many industrial processes. HTGR development has been carried out within China’s National High Technology Research and Development Program. The first industrial demonstration HTGR of 200 MWe is under construction in Shandong Province China. HTGRs use ceramic-coated fuel particles that are strong and highly resistant to irradiation. Graphite is used as moderator and helium is used as coolant. The fuel particles and the graphite block in which they are imbedded can withstand very high temperature (up to ~1600℃). Graphite waste presents as the fuel element components of HTGR with up to 95% of the whole element beside the graphite blocks in the core. For example, a 200 MWe reactor could discharge about 90,000 fuel elements with 17 tonnes irradiated graphite included each year. The core of the HTGR in China consists of a pebble bed with spherical fuel elements. The UO 2 fuel kernel particles (0.5mm diameter) (triple-coated isotropic fuel particles) are coated by several layers including inner buffer layer with less dense pyrocarbon, dense pyro-carbon, SiC layer and outer layer of dense pyro-carbon, which can prevent the leaking of fission products (Fig. 1). Spherical fuel elements (60mm diameter) consist of a 50mm diameter inner zone and 5mm thick shell of fuel free zone [3]. The inner zone contains about 8300 triple-coated isotropic fuel particles of 0.92mm in diameter dispersed in the graphite matrix

  16. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert P. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Dean, Mark P.M. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Rahnejat, Kaveh C. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Saxena, Siddharth S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ellerby, Mark, E-mail: mark.ellerby@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC{sub 6} and YbC{sub 6} in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  17. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P.M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC 6 and YbC 6 in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition

  18. Graphite oral tattoo: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Renata Mendonça; Gouvêa Lima, Gabriela de Morais; Guilhermino, Marinaldo; Vieira, Mayana Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-10-16

    Pigmented oral lesions compose a large number of pathological entities, including exogenous pigmentat oral tattoos, such as amalgam and graphite tattoos. We report a rare case of a graphite tattoo on the palate of a 62-year-old patient with a history of pencil injury, compare it with amalgam tattoos, and determine the prevalence of oral tattoos in our Oral Pathology Service. We also compare the clinical and histological findings of grafite and amalgam tattoos. Oral tattoos affect women more frequently in the region of the alveolar ridge. Graphite tattoos occur in younger patients when compared with the amalgam type. Histologically, amalgam lesions represent impregnation of the reticular fibers of vessels and nerves with silver, whereas in cases of graphite tattoos, this impregnation is not observed, but it is common to observe a granulomatous inflammatory response, less evident in cases of amalgam tattoos. Both types of lesions require no treatment, but in some cases a biopsy may be done to rule out melanocytic lesions.

  19. 'In situ' expanded graphite extinguishant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qixin; Shou Yuemei; He Bangrong

    1987-01-01

    This report is concerning the development of the extinguishant for sodium fire and the investigation of its extinguishing property. The experiment result shows that 'in situ' expanded graphite developed by the authors is a kind of extinguishant which extinguishes sodium fire quickly and effectively and has no environment pollution during use and the amount of usage is little

  20. Thermal conductivity degradation of graphites due to neutron irradiation at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, L.L.; Burchell, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    Several graphites and carbon/carbon composites (C/C's) have been irradiated with fission neutrons near 150 C and at fluences up to a displacement level of 0.24 dpa. The unirradiated room temperature thermal conductivity of these materials varied from 114 W/m K for H-451 isotropic graphite, to 670 W/m K for a unidirectional FMI-1D C/C composite. At the irradiation temperature a saturation reduction in thermal conductivity was seen to occur at displacement levels of approximately 0.1 dpa. All materials were seen to degrade to approximately 10 to 14% of their original thermal conductivity after irradiation. The significant recovery of thermal conductivity due to post-irradiation isochronal anneals is also presented. (orig.)

  1. Study of the hydro-mechanical behaviour of expanded graphite gaskets; Etude du comportement et de l`etancheite de joints en graphite expnase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patron, E. [Electricite de France (EDF), Direction des Etudes et Recherches, 92 - Clamart (France)

    1997-12-31

    The poro-mechanical behaviour models developed by O. Coussy permit to consider various phenomena observed experimentally: thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings, plasticity, etc. The aim of this study is to implement the simplest poro-mechanical model (i.e. the isotropic linear poro-elastic model) to model the gasket hydro-mechanical behaviour. First, isotropic poro-elastic characteristics of expanded graphite have been estimated from these tests conducted at Departement Mecanique et Technologie des Composants (MTC) and data from literature. Then, analytical solutions of the tightness tests developed at the MTC Department have been carried out. These calculations provide a first estimation of porosity variations during a tightness tests with metal/metal contact or in elastic recovery, and during a `hot thermal transient`. Thickness controlled numerical calculations have proved the analytical calculations relevance. With regard to simulation of tests with metal/metal contact or `hot thermal transient`, stress controlled numerical calculations have pointed out: - a greater vertical displacement on the inner side of the graphite ring and - a z dependence of the radial displacement and thus a porous differential variation between the upper and lower faces of the ring. (author). 21 refs.

  2. Graphite nanoreinforcements in polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Hiroyuki

    Nanocomposites composed of polymer matrices with clay reinforcements of less than 100 nm in size, are being considered for applications such as interior and exterior accessories for automobiles, structural components for portable electronic devices, and films for food packaging. While most nanocomposite research has focused on exfoliated clay platelets, the same nanoreinforcement concept can be applied to another layered material, graphite, to produce nanoplatelets and nanocomposites. Graphite is the stiffest material found in nature (Young's Modulus = 1060 GPa), having a modulus several times that of clay, but also with excellent electrical and thermal conductivity. The key to utilizing graphite as a platelet nanoreinforcement is in the ability to exfoliate this material. Also, if the appropriate surface treatment can be found for graphite, its exfoliation and dispersion in a polymer matrix will result in a composite with not only excellent mechanical properties but electrical properties as well, opening up many new structural applications as well as non-structural ones where electromagnetic shielding and high thermal conductivity are requirements. In this research, a new process to fabricate exfoliated nano-scale graphite platelets was established (Patent pending). The size of the resulted graphite platelets was less than 1 um in diameter and 10 nm in thickness, and the surface area of the material was around 100 m2/g. The reduction of size showed positive effect on mechanical properties of composites because of the increased edge area and more functional groups attached with it. Also various surface treatment techniques were applied to the graphite nanoplatelets to improve the surface condition. As a result, acrylamide grafting treatment was found to enhance the dispersion and adhesion of graphite flakes in epoxy matrices. The resulted composites showed better mechanical properties than those with commercially available carbon fibers, vapor grown carbon fibers

  3. Graphite suspension in carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.

    1965-01-01

    Since 1963 the Atomic Division of SNECMA has been conducting, under a contract with the CEA, an experimental work with a two-component fluid comprised of carbon dioxide and small graphite particles. The primary purpose was the determination of basic engineering information pertaining to the stability and the flowability of the suspension. The final form of the experimental loop consists mainly of the following items: a light-phase compressor, a heavy-phase pump, an electrical-resistance type heater section, a cooling heat exchanger, a hairpin loop, a transparent test section and a separator. During the course of the testing, it was observed that the fluid could be circulated quite easily in a broad range of variation of the suspension density and velocity - density from 30 to 170 kg/m 3 and velocity from 2 to 24 m/s. The system could be restarted and circulation maintained without any difficulty, even with the heavy-phase pump alone. The graphite did not have a tendency to pack or agglomerate during operation. No graphite deposition was observed on the wall of the tubing. A long period run (250 hours) has shown the evolution of the particle dimensions. Starting with graphite of surface area around 20 m 2 /g (graphite particles about 1 μ), the powder surface area reaches an asymptotic value of 300 m 2 /g (all the particles less than 0.3 μ). Moisture effect on flow stability, flow distribution between two parallel channels, pressure drop in straight tubes, recompression ratio in diffusers were also investigated. (author) [fr

  4. Characterisation of Chlorine Behavior in French Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondel, A.; Moncoffre, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Bererd, N.; Petit, L.; Laurent, G.; Lamouroux, C.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine 36 is one of the main radionuclides of concern for French graphite waste disposal. In order to help the understanding of its leaching behaviour under disposal conditions, the respective impact of temperature, irradiation and gas radiolysis on chlorine release in reactor has been studied. Chlorine 36 has been simulated through chlorine 37 ion implantation in virgin nuclear graphite samples. Results show that part of chlorine is highly mobile in graphite in the range of French reactors operating temperatures in relation with graphite structural recovering. Ballistic damage generated by irradiation also promotes chlorine release whereas no clear impact of the coolant gas radiolysis was observed in the absence of graphite radiolytic corrosion. (author)

  5. Visualization and computer graphics on isotropically emissive volumetric displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Benjamin; Maciejewski, Ross; Chen, Min; Ebert, David S

    2009-01-01

    The availability of commodity volumetric displays provides ordinary users with a new means of visualizing 3D data. Many of these displays are in the class of isotropically emissive light devices, which are designed to directly illuminate voxels in a 3D frame buffer, producing X-ray-like visualizations. While this technology can offer intuitive insight into a 3D object, the visualizations are perceptually different from what a computer graphics or visualization system would render on a 2D screen. This paper formalizes rendering on isotropically emissive displays and introduces a novel technique that emulates traditional rendering effects on isotropically emissive volumetric displays, delivering results that are much closer to what is traditionally rendered on regular 2D screens. Such a technique can significantly broaden the capability and usage of isotropically emissive volumetric displays. Our method takes a 3D dataset or object as the input, creates an intermediate light field, and outputs a special 3D volume dataset called a lumi-volume. This lumi-volume encodes approximated rendering effects in a form suitable for display with accumulative integrals along unobtrusive rays. When a lumi-volume is fed directly into an isotropically emissive volumetric display, it creates a 3D visualization with surface shading effects that are familiar to the users. The key to this technique is an algorithm for creating a 3D lumi-volume from a 4D light field. In this paper, we discuss a number of technical issues, including transparency effects due to the dimension reduction and sampling rates for light fields and lumi-volumes. We show the effectiveness and usability of this technique with a selection of experimental results captured from an isotropically emissive volumetric display, and we demonstrate its potential capability and scalability with computer-simulated high-resolution results.

  6. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank; Joseph Lord; David Rohrbaugh; William Windes

    2012-10-01

    The NGNP Graphite R&D program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. The program is generating quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the new nuclear graphite grades. To determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic designs, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment is underway. This experiment is examining the properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences and compressive loads. Each experiment consists of over 400 graphite specimens that are characterized prior to irradiation and following irradiation. Six experiments are planned with the first, AGC-1, currently being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and pre-irradiation characterization of the second, AGC-2, completed. This data package establishes the readiness of 512 specimens for assembly into the AGC-2 capsule.

  7. Isotropic quantum walks on lattices and the Weyl equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Erba, Marco; Perinotti, Paolo

    2017-12-01

    We present a thorough classification of the isotropic quantum walks on lattices of dimension d =1 ,2 ,3 with a coin system of dimension s =2 . For d =3 there exist two isotropic walks, namely, the Weyl quantum walks presented in the work of D'Ariano and Perinotti [G. M. D'Ariano and P. Perinotti, Phys. Rev. A 90, 062106 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.062106], resulting in the derivation of the Weyl equation from informational principles. The present analysis, via a crucial use of isotropy, is significantly shorter and avoids a superfluous technical assumption, making the result completely general.

  8. 3D geometrically isotropic metamaterial for telecom wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malureanu, Radu; Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    of the unit cell is not infinitely small, certain geometrical constraints have to be fulfilled to obtain an isotropic response of the material [3]. These conditions and the metal behaviour close to the plasma frequency increase the design complexity. Our unit cell is composed of two main parts. The first part...... is obtained in a certain bandwidth. The proposed unit cell has the cubic point group of symmetry and being repeatedly placed in space can effectively reveal isotropic optical properties. We use the CST commercial software to characterise the “cube-in-cage” structure. Reflection and transmission spectra...

  9. Progress in radioactive graphite waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    Radioactive graphite constitutes a major waste stream which arises during the decommissioning of certain types of nuclear installations. Worldwide, a total of around 250 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite, comprising graphite moderators and reflectors, will require management solutions in the coming years. 14 C is the radionuclide of greatest concern in nuclear graphite; it arises principally through the interaction of reactor neutrons with nitrogen, which is present in graphite as an impurity or in the reactor coolant or cover gas. 3 H is created by the reactions of neutrons with 6 Li impurities in graphite as well as in fission of the fuel. 36 Cl is generated in the neutron activation of chlorine impurities in graphite. Problems in the radioactive waste management of graphite arise mainly because of the large volumes requiring disposal, the long half-lives of the main radionuclides involved and the specific properties of graphite - such as stored Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility and the potential for radioactive gases to be released. Various options for the management of radioactive graphite have been studied but a generally accepted approach for its conditioning and disposal does not yet exist. Different solutions may be appropriate in different cases. In most of the countries with radioactive graphite to manage, little progress has been made to date in respect of the disposal of this material. Only in France has there been specific thinking about a dedicated graphite waste-disposal facility (within ANDRA): other major producers of graphite waste (UK and the countries of the former Soviet Union) are either thinking in terms of repository disposal or have no developed plans. A conference entitled 'Solutions for Graphite Waste: a Contribution to the Accelerated Decommissioning of Graphite Moderated Nuclear Reactors' was held at the University of Manchester 21-23 March 2007 in order to stimulate progress in radioactive graphite waste management

  10. Voronoi-Tessellated Graphite Produced by Low-Temperature Catalytic Graphitization from Renewable Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Leyi; Zhao, Xiuyun; Burke, Luke T; Bennett, J Craig; Dunlap, Richard A; Obrovac, Mark N

    2017-09-11

    A highly crystalline graphite powder was prepared from the low temperature (800-1000 °C) graphitization of renewable hard carbon precursors using a magnesium catalyst. The resulting graphite particles are composed of Voronoi-tessellated regions comprising irregular sheets; each Voronoi-tessellated region having a small "seed" particle located near their centroid on the surface. This suggests nucleated outward growth of graphitic carbon, which has not been previously observed. Each seed particle consists of a spheroidal graphite shell on the inside of which hexagonal graphite platelets are perpendicularly affixed. This results in a unique high surface area graphite with a high degree of graphitization that is made with renewable feedstocks at temperatures far below that conventionally used for artificial graphites. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Graphite structure and magnetic parameters of flake graphite cast iron

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vértesy, G.; Uchimoto, T.; Takagi, T.; Tomáš, Ivan; Kage, H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 442, Nov (2017), s. 397-402 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic NDE * magnetic adaptive testing * cast iron * graphite structure * pearlite content Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 2.630, year: 2016

  12. Lagrangian statistics of particle pairs in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biferale, L.; Boffeta, G.; Celani, A.; Devenish, B.J.; Lanotte, A.; Toschi, F.

    2005-01-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the particle pair separation process in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. We use data from direct numerical simulations up to R????280 following the evolution of about two million passive tracers advected by the flow over a time span of about three decades. We

  13. Reconstruction of atomic effective potentials from isotropic scattering factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romera, E.; Angulo, J.C.; Torres, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    We present a method for the approximate determination of one-electron effective potentials of many-electron systems from a finite number of values of the isotropic scattering factor. The method is based on the minimum cross-entropy technique. An application to some neutral ground-state atomic systems has been done within a Hartree-Fock framework

  14. Geometry of the isotropic oscillator driven by the conformal mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galajinsky, Anton [Tomsk Polytechnic University, School of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2018-01-15

    Geometrization of a Lagrangian conservative system typically amounts to reformulating its equations of motion as the geodesic equations in a properly chosen curved spacetime. The conventional methods include the Jacobi metric and the Eisenhart lift. In this work, a modification of the Eisenhart lift is proposed which describes the isotropic oscillator in arbitrary dimension driven by the one-dimensional conformal mode. (orig.)

  15. Seeing is believing : communication performance under isotropic teleconferencing conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werkhoven, P.J.; Schraagen, J.M.C.; Punte, P.A.J.

    2001-01-01

    The visual component of conversational media such as videoconferencing systems communicates important non-verbal information such as facial expressions, gestures, posture and gaze. Unlike the other cues, selective gaze depends critically on the configuration of cameras and monitors. Under isotropic

  16. A simple mechanical model for the isotropic harmonic oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nita, Gelu M

    2010-01-01

    A constrained elastic pendulum is proposed as a simple mechanical model for the isotropic harmonic oscillator. The conceptual and mathematical simplicity of this model recommends it as an effective pedagogical tool in teaching basic physics concepts at advanced high school and introductory undergraduate course levels.

  17. Homogenization and isotropization of an inflationary cosmological model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrow, J.D.; Groen, Oe.; Oslo Univ.

    1986-01-01

    A member of the class of anisotropic and inhomogeneous cosmological models constructed by Wainwright and Goode is investigated. It is shown to describe a universe containing a scalar field which is minimally coupled to gravitation and a positive cosmological constant. It is shown that this cosmological model evolves exponentially rapidly towards the homogeneous and isotropic de Sitter universe model. (orig.)

  18. Isotropic gates in large gamma detector arrays versus angular distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacob, V.E.; Duchene, G.

    1997-01-01

    The quality of the angular distribution information extracted from high-fold gamma-gamma coincidence events is analyzed. It is shown that a correct quasi-isotropic gate setting, available at the modern large gamma-ray detector arrays, essentially preserves the quality of the angular information. (orig.)

  19. Higher gradient expansion for linear isotropic peridynamic materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šilhavý, Miroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 6 (2017), s. 1483-1493 ISSN 1081-2865 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : peridynamics * higher-grade theories * non-local elastic-material model * representation theorems for isotropic functions Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 2.953, year: 2016 http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1081286516637235

  20. Higher gradient expansion for linear isotropic peridynamic materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šilhavý, Miroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 6 (2017), s. 1483-1493 ISSN 1081-2865 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : peridynamics * higher-grade theories * non-local elastic-material model * representation theorems for isotropic functions Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 2.953, year: 2016 http:// journals .sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1081286516637235

  1. direct method of analysis of an isotropic rectangular plate direct

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    This work evaluates the static analysis of an isotropic rectangular plate with various the static analysis ... method according to Ritz is used to obtain the total potential energy of the plate by employing the used to ..... for rectangular plates analysis, as the behavior of the ... results obtained by previous research work that used.

  2. Transformation optics, isotropic chiral media and non-Riemannian geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsley, S A R

    2011-01-01

    The geometrical interpretation of electromagnetism in transparent media (transformation optics) is extended to include chiral media that are isotropic but inhomogeneous. It was found that such media may be described through introducing the non-Riemannian geometrical property of torsion into the Maxwell equations, and it is shown how such an interpretation may be applied to the design of optical devices.

  3. Isotropic cosmic expansion and the Rubin-Ford effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fall, S.M.; Jones, B.J.T.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that the Rubin-Ford data (Astrophys. J. Lett. 183:L111 (1973)), often taken as evidence for large scale anisotropic cosmic expansion, probably only reflect the inhomogeneous distribution of galaxies in the region of the sample. The data presented are consistent with isotropic expansion, an unperturbed galaxy velocity field, and hence a low density Universe. (author)

  4. Graphite moderated 252Cf source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo B, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D.; Vega C, H. R.

    2014-08-01

    The thorium molten salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a 252 Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the 252 Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator. (Author)

  5. Fission Product Sorptivity in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tompson, Jr., Robert V. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Loyalka, Sudarshan [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Ghosh, Tushar [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Viswanath, Dabir [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Walton, Kyle [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Haffner, Robert [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Both adsorption and absorption (sorption) of fission product (FP) gases on/into graphite are issues of interest in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). In the original proposal, we proposed to use packed beds of graphite particles to measure sorption at a variety of temperatures and to use an electrodynamic balance (EDB) to measure sorption onto single graphite particles (a few μm in diameter) at room temperature. The use of packed beds at elevated temperature is not an issue. However, the TPOC requested revision of this initial proposal to included single particle measurements at elevated temperatures up to 1100 °C. To accommodate the desire of NEUP to extend the single particle EDB measurements to elevated temperatures it was necessary to significantly revise the plan and the budget. These revisions were approved. In the EDB method, we levitate a single graphite particle (the size, surface characteristics, morphology, purity, and composition of the particle can be varied) or agglomerate in the balance and measure the sorption of species by observing the changes in mass. This process involves the use of an electron stepping technique to measure the total charge on a particle which, in conjunction with the measured suspension voltages for the particle, allows for determinations of mass and, hence, of mass changes which then correspond to measurements of sorption. Accommodating elevated temperatures with this type of system required a significant system redesign and required additional time that ultimately was not available. These constraints also meant that the grant had to focus on fewer species as a result. Overall, the extension of the original proposed single particle work to elevated temperatures added greatly to the complexity of the proposed project and added greatly to the time that would eventually be required as well. This means that the bulk of the experimental progress was made using the packed bed sorption systems. Only being able to recruit one

  6. Graphite for high-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, W.; Leushacke, D.F.; Nickel, H.; Theymann, W.

    1976-01-01

    The different graphites necessary for HTRs are being developed, produced and tested within the Federal German ''Development Programme Nuclear Graphite''. Up to now, batches of the following graphite grades have been manufactured and fully characterized by the SIGRI Company to demonstrate reproducibility: pitch coke graphite AS2-500 for the hexagonal fuel elements and exchangeable reflector blocks; special pitch coke graphite ASI2-500 for reflector blocks of the pebble-bed reactor and as back-up material for the hexagonal fuel elements; graphite for core support columns. The material data obtained fulfill most of the requirements under present specifications. Production of large-size blocks for the permanent side reflector and the core support blocks is under way. The test programme covers all areas important for characterizing and judging HTR-graphites. In-pile testing comprises evaluation of the material for irradiation-induced changes of dimensions, mechanical and thermal properties - including behaviour under temperature cycling and creep behaviour - as well as irradiating fuel element segments and blocks. Testing out-of-pile includes: evaluation of corrosion rates and influence of corrosion on strength; strength measurements; including failure criteria. The test programme has been carried out extensively on the AS2-graphite, and the results obtained show that this graphite is suitable as HTGR fuel element graphite. (author)

  7. AGC-3 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the third Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-3) irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule is third in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The general design of AGC-3 test capsule is similar to the AGC-2 test capsule, material property tests were conducted on graphite specimens prior to loading into the AGC-3 irradiation assembly. However the 6 major nuclear graphite grades in AGC-2 were modified; two previous graphite grades (IG-430 and H-451) were eliminated and one was added (Mersen’s 2114 was added). Specimen testing from three graphite grades (PCEA, 2114, and NBG-17) was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and specimen testing for two grades (IG-110 and NBG-18) were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from May 2011 to July 2013. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-3 irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule design requires "matched pair" creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-3 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce "matched pairs" of graphite samples above and below the AGC-3 capsule elevation mid-point to

  8. Analysis of Symmetric Reinforcement of Quasi-Isotropic Graphite-Epoxy Plates with a Circular Cutout under Uniaxial Tensile Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    DISTRIBUTION LIST ............... 111 . •6 a’. . .’. ’’. ’’2"-;’,".".,:’..."-’’:’ .-.-. .-;.: ś " - "." "-" - ,".-",’-’-"...--..’%° -,’:’, LISr OF...Locations anld Szrain a 10,000 psi (Par Field) ... .. ..... . ... 96 W, :- .% .... 7 ".’ , .9. LISr OF FIGURES 2.1 Reinforcement Configuration, Iype 1

  9. Environmentally benign graphite intercalation compound composition for exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

    2014-06-17

    A carboxylic-intercalated graphite compound composition for the production of exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, or nano-scaled graphene platelets. The composition comprises a layered graphite with interlayer spaces or interstices and a carboxylic acid residing in at least one of the interstices, wherein the composition is prepared by a chemical oxidation reaction which uses a combination of a carboxylic acid and hydrogen peroxide as an intercalate source. Alternatively, the composition may be prepared by an electrochemical reaction, which uses a carboxylic acid as both an electrolyte and an intercalate source. Exfoliation of the invented composition does not release undesirable chemical contaminants into air or drainage.

  10. Electrochemical Ultracapacitors Using Graphitic Nanostacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical ultracapacitors (ECs) have been developed using graphitic nanostacks as the electrode material. The advantages of this technology will be the reduction of device size due to superior power densities and relative powers compared to traditional activated carbon electrodes. External testing showed that these materials display reduced discharge response times compared to state-of-the-art materials. Such applications are advantageous for pulsed power applications such as burst communications (satellites, cell phones), electromechanical actuators, and battery load leveling in electric vehicles. These carbon nanostructures are highly conductive and offer an ordered mesopore network. These attributes will provide more complete electrolyte wetting, and faster release of stored charge compared to activated carbon. Electrochemical capacitor (EC) electrode materials were developed using commercially available nanomaterials and modifying them to exploit their energy storage properties. These materials would be an improvement over current ECs that employ activated carbon as the electrode material. Commercially available graphite nanofibers (GNFs) are used as precursor materials for the synthesis of graphitic nanostacks (GNSs). These materials offer much greater surface area than graphite flakes. Additionally, these materials offer a superior electrical conductivity and a greater average pore size compared to activated carbon electrodes. The state of the art in EC development uses activated carbon (AC) as the electrode material. AC has a high surface area, but its small average pore size inhibits electrolyte ingress/egress. Additionally, AC has a higher resistivity, which generates parasitic heating in high-power applications. This work focuses on fabricating EC from carbon that has a very different structure by increasing the surface area of the GNF by intercalation or exfoliation of the graphitic basal planes. Additionally, various functionalities to the GNS

  11. Pyrolytic graphite gauge for measuring heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Robert C. (Inventor); Ewing, Mark E. (Inventor); Shipley, John L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A gauge for measuring heat flux, especially heat flux encountered in a high temperature environment, is provided. The gauge includes at least one thermocouple and an anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body that covers at least part of, and optionally encases the thermocouple. Heat flux is incident on the anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body by arranging the gauge so that the gauge surface on which convective and radiative fluxes are incident is perpendicular to the basal planes of the pyrolytic graphite. The conductivity of the pyrolytic graphite permits energy, transferred into the pyrolytic graphite body in the form of heat flux on the incident (or facing) surface, to be quickly distributed through the entire pyrolytic graphite body, resulting in small substantially instantaneous temperature gradients. Temperature changes to the body can thereby be measured by the thermocouple, and reduced to quantify the heat flux incident to the body.

  12. Attenuation of thermal neutron through graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Ismaail, H.; Fathaallah, M.; Abbas, Y.; Habib, N.; Wahba, M.

    2004-01-01

    Calculation of the nuclear capture, thermal diffuse and Bragg scattering cross-sections as a function of graphite temperature and crystalline from for neutron energies from 1 me V< E<10 eV were carried out. Computer programs have been developed which allow calculation for the graphite hexagonal closed-pack structure in its polycrystalline form and pyrolytic one. I The calculated total cross-section for polycrystalline graphite were compared with the experimental values. An overall agreement is indicated between the calculated values and experimental ones. Agreement was also obtained for neutron cross-section measured for oriented pyrolytic graphite at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. A feasibility study for use of graphite in powdered form as a cold neutron filter is details. The calculated attenuation of thermal neutrons through large mosaic pyrolytic graphite show that such crystals can be used effectively as second order filter of thermal neutron beams and that cooling improve their effectiveness

  13. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  14. Dynamics of graphite flake on a liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, K.; Tsuda, D.; Kaneta, Y.; Harada, R.; Ishikawa, M.; Sasaki, N.

    2006-11-01

    One-directional motion, where graphite flakes are driven by a nanotip on an octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS) liquid surface, is presented. A transition from quasiperiodic to chaotic motions occurs in the dynamics of a graphite flake when its velocity is increased. The dynamics of graphite flakes pulled by the nanotip on an OMCTS liquid surface can be treated as that of a nanobody on a liquid.

  15. Sealing nuclear graphite with pyrolytic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Shanglei; Xu, Li; Li, Li; Bai, Shuo; Yang, Xinmei; Zhou, Xingtai

    2013-01-01

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) coatings were deposited on IG-110 nuclear graphite by thermal decomposition of methane at ∼1830 °C. The PyC coatings are anisotropic and airtight enough to protect IG-110 nuclear graphite against the permeation of molten fluoride salts and the diffusion of gases. The investigations indicate that the sealing nuclear graphite with PyC coating is a promising method for its application in Molten Salt Reactor (MSR)

  16. Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, E. H. T.; Kalish, R.; Kulik, J.; Kauffmann, Y.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes can be deposited by applying energetic carbon bombardment. The present work shows the possibility of structuring graphitic planes perpendicular to the substrate in following two distinct ways: (i) applying sufficiently large carbon energies for deposition at room temperature (E>10 keV), (ii) utilizing much lower energies for deposition at elevated substrate temperatures (T>200 deg. C). High resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to probe the graphitic planes. The alignment achieved at elevated temperatures does not depend on the deposition angle. The data provides insight into the mechanisms leading to the growth of oriented graphitic planes under different conditions.

  17. Production of nuclear graphite in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legendre, P.; Mondet, L.; Arragon, Ph.; Cornuault, P.; Gueron, J.; Hering, H.

    1955-01-01

    The graphite intended for the construction of the reactors is obtained by the usual process: confection of a cake from coke of oil and tar, cooked (in a electric oven) then the product of cook is graphitized, also by electric heating. The use of the air transportation and the control of conditions cooking and graphitization have permitted to increase the nuclear graphite production as well as to better control their physical and mechanical properties and to reduce to the minimum the unwanted stains. (M.B.) [fr

  18. AC induction field heating of graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, James W.; Rios, Orlando; Kisner, Roger

    2017-08-22

    A magneto-energy apparatus includes an electromagnetic field source for generating a time-varying electromagnetic field. A graphite foam conductor is disposed within the electromagnetic field. The graphite foam when exposed to the time-varying electromagnetic field conducts an induced electric current, the electric current heating the graphite foam. An energy conversion device utilizes heat energy from the heated graphite foam to perform a heat energy consuming function. A device for heating a fluid and a method of converting energy are also disclosed.

  19. Nuclear graphite for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    The cores and reflectors in modern High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTRs) are constructed from graphite components. There are two main designs; the Pebble Bed design and the Prism design. In both of these designs the graphite not only acts as a moderator, but is also a major structural component that may provide channels for the fuel and coolant gas, channels for control and safety shut off devices and provide thermal and neutron shielding. In addition, graphite components may act as a heat sink or conduction path during reactor trips and transients. During reactor operation, many of the graphite component physical properties are significantly changed by irradiation. These changes lead to the generation of significant internal shrinkage stresses and thermal shut down stresses that could lead to component failure. In addition, if the graphite is irradiated to a very high irradiation dose, irradiation swelling can lead to a rapid reduction in modulus and strength, making the component friable.The irradiation behaviour of graphite is strongly dependent on its virgin microstructure, which is determined by the manufacturing route. Nevertheless, there are available, irradiation data on many obsolete graphites of known microstructures. There is also a well-developed physical understanding of the process of irradiation damage in graphite. This paper proposes a specification for graphite suitable for modern HTRs. (author)

  20. Structural analysis of polycrystalline (graphitized) materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremenko, M.M.; Kravchik, A.E.; Osmakov, A.S.

    1993-01-01

    Specific features of the structure of polycrystal carbon materials (CM), characterized by high enough degree of structural perfection and different genesis are analyzed. From the viewpoint of fine and supercrystallite structure analysis of the most characteristic groups of graphitized CM: artificial graphites, and natural graphites, as well, has been carried out. It is ascertained that in paracrystal CM a monolayer of hexagonally-bound carbon atoms is the basic element of the structure, and in graphitized CM - a microlayer. The importance of the evaluation of the degree of three-dimensional ordering of the microlayer is shown

  1. Principle design and data of graphite components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Oku, Tatsuo

    2004-01-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) constructed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is a graphite-moderated and helium-gas-cooled reactor with prismatic fuel elements of hexagonal blocks. The reactor internal structures of the HTTR are mainly made up of graphite components. As well known, the graphite is a brittle material and there were no available design criteria for brittle materials. Therefore, JAERI had to develop the design criteria taking account of the brittle fracture behavior. In this paper, concept and key specification of the developed graphite design criteria is described, and also an outline of the quality control specified in the design criteria is mentioned

  2. Low temperature vapor phase digestion of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-04-18

    A method for digestion and gasification of graphite for removal from an underlying surface is described. The method can be utilized to remove graphite remnants of a formation process from the formed metal piece in a cleaning process. The method can be particularly beneficial in cleaning castings formed with graphite molding materials. The method can utilize vaporous nitric acid (HNO.sub.3) or vaporous HNO.sub.3 with air/oxygen to digest the graphite at conditions that can avoid damage to the underlying surface.

  3. The Fracture Toughness of Nuclear Graphites Grades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, Timothy D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Erdman, III, Donald L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lowden, Rick R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunter, James A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hannel, Cara C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    New measurements of graphite mode I critical stress intensity factor, KIc (commonly referred to as the fracture toughness) and the mode II critical shear stress intensity, KIIc, are reported and compared with prior data for KIc and KIIc. The new data are for graphite grades PCEA, IG-110 and 2114. Variations of KIc and acoustic emission (AE) data with graphite texture are reported and discussed. The Codes and Standards applications of fracture toughness, KIc, data are also discussed. A specified minimum value for nuclear graphite KIc is recommended.

  4. Electrolysis of acidic sodium chloride solution with a graphite anode. I. Graphite electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, L.J.J.; Hoogland, J.G.

    1969-01-01

    A graphite anode evolving Cl from a chloride soln. is slowly oxidized to CO and CO2. This oxidn. causes a change in the characteristics of the electrode in aging, comprising a change of the nature of the graphite surface and an increase of the surface area. It appears that a new graphite electrode

  5. Isotropic Optical Mouse Placement for Mobile Robot Velocity Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungbok Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the isotropic placement of multiple optical mice for the velocity estimation of a mobile robot. It is assumed that there can be positional restriction on the installation of optical mice at the bottom of a mobile robot. First, the velocity kinematics of a mobile robot with an array of optical mice is obtained and the resulting Jacobian matrix is analysed symbolically. Second, the isotropic, anisotropic and singular optical mouse placements are identified, along with the corresponding characteristic lengths. Third, the least squares mobile robot velocity estimation from the noisy optical mouse velocity measurements is discussed. Finally, simulation results for several different placements of three optical mice are given.

  6. Study of open systems with molecules in isotropic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yasushi; Matsuzaki, Masayuki

    2018-05-01

    We are interested in dynamics of a system in an environment, or an open system. Such phenomena as crossover from Markovian to non-Markovian relaxation and thermal equilibration are of our interest. Open systems have experimentally been studied with ultra cold atoms, ions in traps, optics, and cold electric circuits because well-isolated systems can be prepared here and thus the effects of environments can be controlled. We point out that some molecules solved in isotropic liquid are well isolated and thus they can also be employed for studying open systems in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments. First, we provide a short review on related phenomena of open systems that helps readers to understand our motivation. We, then, present two experiments as examples of our approach with molecules in isotropic liquids. Crossover from Markovian to non-Markovian relaxation was realized in one NMR experiment, while relaxation-like phenomena were observed in approximately isolated systems in the other.

  7. Self-confinement of finite dust clusters in isotropic plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloshevsky, G V; Hassanein, A

    2012-05-01

    Finite two-dimensional dust clusters are systems of a small number of charged grains. The self-confinement of dust clusters in isotropic plasmas is studied using the particle-in-cell method. The energetically favorable configurations of grains in plasma are found that are due to the kinetic effects of plasma ions and electrons. The self-confinement phenomenon is attributed to the change in the plasma composition within a dust cluster resulting in grain attraction mediated by plasma ions. This is a self-consistent state of a dust cluster in which grain's repulsion is compensated by the reduced charge and floating potential on grains, overlapped ion clouds, and depleted electrons within a cluster. The common potential well is formed trapping dust clusters in the confined state. These results provide both valuable insights and a different perspective to the classical view on the formation of boundary-free dust clusters in isotropic plasmas.

  8. Geometrical considerations in analyzing isotropic or anisotropic surface reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonot, Lionel; Obein, Gael

    2007-05-10

    The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) represents the evolution of the reflectance with the directions of incidence and observation. Today BRDF measurements are increasingly applied and have become important to the study of the appearance of surfaces. The representation and the analysis of BRDF data are discussed, and the distortions caused by the traditional representation of the BRDF in a Fourier plane are pointed out and illustrated for two theoretical cases: an isotropic surface and a brushed surface. These considerations will help characterize either the specular peak width of an isotropic rough surface or the main directions of the light scattered by an anisotropic rough surface without misinterpretations. Finally, what is believed to be a new space is suggested for the representation of the BRDF, which avoids the geometrical deformations and in numerous cases is more convenient for BRDF analysis.

  9. Isotropic gates and large gamma detector arrays versus angular distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacob, V.E.; Duchene, G.

    1997-01-01

    Angular information extracted from in-beam γ ray measurements are of great importance for γ ray multipolarity and nuclear spin assignments. In our days large Ge detector arrays became available allowing the measurements of extremely weak γ rays in almost 4π sr solid angle (e.g., EUROGAM detector array). Given the high detector efficiency it is common for the mean suppressed coincidence multiplicity to reach values as high as 4 to 6. Thus, it is possible to gate on particular γ rays in order to enhance the relative statistics of a definite reaction channel and/or a definite decaying path in the level scheme of the selected residual nucleus. As compared to angular correlations, the conditioned angular distribution spectra exhibit larger statistics because in the latter the gate-setting γ ray may be observed by all the detectors in the array, relaxing somehow the geometrical restrictions of the angular correlations. Since the in-beam γ ray emission is anisotropic one could inquire that gate setting as mentioned above, based on anisotropic γ ray which would perturb the angular distributions in the unfolded events. As our work proved, there is no reason to worry about this if the energy gate runs over the whole solid angle in an ideal 4π sr detector, i.e., if the gate is isotropic. In real quasi 4π sr detector arrays the corresponding quasi isotropic gate preserves the angular properties of the unfolded data, too. However extraction of precise angular distribution coefficient especially a 4 , requires the consideration of the deviation of the quasi isotropic gate relative to the (ideal) isotropic gate

  10. Electromagnetic illusion with isotropic and homogeneous materials through scattering manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Fan; Mei, Zhong Lei; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2015-01-01

    A new isotropic and homogeneous illusion device for electromagnetic waves is proposed. This single-shelled device can change the fingerprint of the covered object into another one by manipulating the scattering of the composite structure. We show that an electrically small sphere can be disguised as another small one with different electromagnetic parameters. The device can even make a dielectric sphere (electrically small) behave like a conducting one. Full-wave simulations confirm the performance of proposed illusion device. (paper)

  11. Liquid crystalline states of surfactant solutions of isotropic micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagdassarian, C.; Gelbart, W.M.; Ben-Shaul, A.

    1988-01-01

    We consider micellar solutions whose surfactant molecules prefer strongly to form small, globular aggregates in the absence of intermicellar interactions. At sufficiently high volume fraction of surfactant, the isotropic phase of essentially spherical micelles is shown to be unstable with respect to an orientationally ordered (nematic) state of rodlike aggregates. This behavior is relevant to the phase diagrams reported for important classes of aqueous amphiphilic solutions

  12. Monopole-fermion systems in the complex isotropic tetrad formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal'tsov, D.V.; Ershov, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The interaction of fermions of arbitrary isospin with regular magnetic monopoles and dyons of the group SU(2) and also with point gravitating monopoles and dyons of the Wu-Yang type described by the Reissner-Nordstrom metric are studied using the Newman-Penrose complex isotropic tetrad formalism. Formulas for the bound-state spectrum and explicit expressions for the zero modes are obtained and the Rubakov-Callan effect for black holes is discussed

  13. Hydrogen storage in graphitic nanofibres

    OpenAIRE

    McCaldin, Simon Roger

    2007-01-01

    There is huge need to develop an alternative to hydrocarbons fuel, which does not produce CO2 or contribute to global warming - 'the hydrogen economy' is such an alternative, however the storage of hydrogen is the key technical barrier that must be overcome. The potential of graphitic nanofibres (GNFs) to be used as materials to allow the solid-state storage of hydrogen has thus been investigated. This has been conducted with a view to further developing the understanding of the mechanism(s) ...

  14. The Isotropic Radio Background and Annihilating Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Belikov, Alexander V. [Institut d' Astrophysique (France); Jeltema, Tesla E. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Linden, Tim [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Profumo, Stefano [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Slatyer, Tracy R. [Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Observations by ARCADE-2 and other telescopes sensitive to low frequency radiation have revealed the presence of an isotropic radio background with a hard spectral index. The intensity of this observed background is found to exceed the flux predicted from astrophysical sources by a factor of approximately 5-6. In this article, we consider the possibility that annihilating dark matter particles provide the primary contribution to the observed isotropic radio background through the emission of synchrotron radiation from electron and positron annihilation products. For reasonable estimates of the magnetic fields present in clusters and galaxies, we find that dark matter could potentially account for the observed radio excess, but only if it annihilates mostly to electrons and/or muons, and only if it possesses a mass in the range of approximately 5-50 GeV. For such models, the annihilation cross section required to normalize the synchrotron signal to the observed excess is sigma v ~ (0.4-30) x 10^-26 cm^3/s, similar to the value predicted for a simple thermal relic (sigma v ~ 3 x 10^-26 cm^3/s). We find that in any scenario in which dark matter annihilations are responsible for the observed excess radio emission, a significant fraction of the isotropic gamma ray background observed by Fermi must result from dark matter as well.

  15. Superfluid H3e in globally isotropic random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Ryusuke; Aoyama, Kazushi

    2009-02-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies of superfluid H3e in aerogels with a global anisotropy created, e.g., by an external stress have definitely shown that the A -like phase with an equal-spin pairing in such aerogel samples is in the Anderson-Brinkman-Morel (ABM) (or axial) pairing state. In this paper, the A -like phase of superfluid H3e in globally isotropic aerogel is studied in detail by assuming a weakly disordered system in which singular topological defects are absent. Through calculation of the free energy, a disordered ABM state is found to be the best candidate of the pairing state of the globally isotropic A -like phase. Further, it is found through a one-loop renormalization-group calculation that the coreless continuous vortices (or vortex-Skyrmions) are irrelevant to the long-distance behavior of disorder-induced textures, and that the superfluidity is maintained in spite of lack of the conventional superfluid long-range order. Therefore, the globally isotropic A -like phase at weak disorder is, like in the case with a globally stretched anisotropy, a glass phase with the ABM pairing and shows superfluidity.

  16. Isotropic transmission of magnon spin information without a magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Arabinda; Tian, Chang; Adeyeye, Adekunle Olusola

    2017-07-01

    Spin-wave devices (SWD), which use collective excitations of electronic spins as a carrier of information, are rapidly emerging as potential candidates for post-semiconductor non-charge-based technology. Isotropic in-plane propagating coherent spin waves (magnons), which require magnetization to be out of plane, is desirable in an SWD. However, because of lack of availability of low-damping perpendicular magnetic material, a usually well-known in-plane ferrimagnet yttrium iron garnet (YIG) is used with a large out-of-plane bias magnetic field, which tends to hinder the benefits of isotropic spin waves. We experimentally demonstrate an SWD that eliminates the requirement of external magnetic field to obtain perpendicular magnetization in an otherwise in-plane ferromagnet, Ni 80 Fe 20 or permalloy (Py), a typical choice for spin-wave microconduits. Perpendicular anisotropy in Py, as established by magnetic hysteresis measurements, was induced by the exchange-coupled Co/Pd multilayer. Isotropic propagation of magnon spin information has been experimentally shown in microconduits with three channels patterned at arbitrary angles.

  17. Depth migration in transversely isotropic media with explicit operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzcategui, Omar [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The author presents and analyzes three approaches to calculating explicit two-dimensional (2D) depth-extrapolation filters for all propagation modes (P, SV, and SH) in transversely isotropic media with vertical and tilted axis of symmetry. These extrapolation filters are used to do 2D poststack depth migration, and also, just as for isotropic media, these 2D filters are used in the McClellan transformation to do poststack 3D depth migration. Furthermore, the same explicit filters can also be used to do depth-extrapolation of prestack data. The explicit filters are derived by generalizations of three different approaches: the modified Taylor series, least-squares, and minimax methods initially developed for isotropic media. The examples here show that the least-squares and minimax methods produce filters with accurate extrapolation (measured in the ability to position steep reflectors) for a wider range of propagation angles than that obtained using the modified Taylor series method. However, for low propagation angles, the modified Taylor series method has smaller amplitude and phase errors than those produced by the least-squares and minimax methods. These results suggest that to get accurate amplitude estimation, modified Taylor series filters would be somewhat preferred in areas with low dips. In areas with larger dips, the least-squares and minimax methods would give a distinctly better delineation of the subsurface structures.

  18. Lattice Boltzmann model for three-dimensional decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hui; Tao Wenquan; Zhang Yan

    2009-01-01

    We implement a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence based on an analogous Galerkin filter and focus on the fundamental statistical isotropic property. This regularized method is constructed based on orthogonal Hermite polynomial space. For decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence, this regularized method can simulate the isotropic property very well. Numerical studies demonstrate that the novel regularized LBM is a promising approximation of turbulent fluid flows, which paves the way for coupling various turbulent models with LBM

  19. Mixed graphite cast iron for automotive exhaust component applications

    OpenAIRE

    De-lin Li

    2017-01-01

    Both spheroidal graphite iron and compacted graphite iron are used in the automotive industry. A recently proposed mixed graphite iron exhibits a microstructure between the conventional spheroidal graphite iron and compacted graphite iron. Evaluation results clearly indicate the suitability and benefits of mixed graphite iron for exhaust component applications with respect to casting, machining, mechanical, thermophysical, oxidation, and thermal fatigue properties. A new ASTM standard speci...

  20. Nuclear graphite waste management. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of the seminar was to bring together the specialists dealing with various aspects of radioactive graphite waste management to exchange and review information on the decommissioning, characterisation, processing and disposal of irradiated graphite from reactor cores and other graphite waste associated with reactor operation. The seminar covered radioactive graphite characterisation, the effect of irradiation on graphite components, Wigner energy, radioactive graphite waste treatment, conditioning, interim storage and long term disposal options. Individual papers presented at the seminar were indexed separately

  1. Analysis of Wigner energy release process in graphite stack of shut-down uranium-graphite reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Bespala, E. V.; Pavliuk, A. O.; Kotlyarevskiy, S. G.

    2015-01-01

    Data, which finding during thermal differential analysis of sampled irradiated graphite are presented. Results of computational modeling of Winger energy release process from irradiated graphite staking are demonstrated. It's shown, that spontaneous combustion of graphite possible only in adiabatic case.

  2. Mixed graphite cast iron for automotive exhaust component applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-lin Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Both spheroidal graphite iron and compacted graphite iron are used in the automotive industry. A recently proposed mixed graphite iron exhibits a microstructure between the conventional spheroidal graphite iron and compacted graphite iron. Evaluation results clearly indicate the suitability and benefits of mixed graphite iron for exhaust component applications with respect to casting, machining, mechanical, thermophysical, oxidation, and thermal fatigue properties. A new ASTM standard specification (A1095 has been created for compacted, mixed, and spheroidal graphite silicon-molybdenum iron castings. This paper attempts to outline the latest progress in mixed graphite iron published.

  3. Methodology of characterization of radioactive graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, G.; Rodriguez, M.; Lara, E.; Magro, E.; Gascon, J. L.; Leganes, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Since the dismantling of Vandellos I, ENRESA has promoted the precise knowledge of the inventory of irradiated graphite (graphite-i) through establishing methodologies for radiological characterization of the vector of radionuclides of interest and their correlations as the primary means of characterization strategy to establish the safer management of this material in its life cycle. (Author)

  4. Significance of primary irradiation creep in graphite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erasmus, C

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally primary irradiation creep is introduced into graphite analysis by applying the appropriate amount of creep strain to the model at the initial time-step. This is valid for graphite components that are subjected to high fast neutron flux...

  5. Inhibition of oxidation in nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winston, Philip L.; Sterbentz, James W.; Windes, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Graphite is a fundamental material of high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors, providing both structure and neutron moderation. Its high thermal conductivity, chemical inertness, thermal heat capacity, and high thermal structural stability under normal and off-normal conditions contribute to the inherent safety of these reactor designs. One of the primary safety issues for a high-temperature graphite reactor core is the possibility of rapid oxidation of the carbon structure during an off-normal design basis event where an oxidising atmosphere (air ingress) can be introduced to the hot core. Although the current Generation IV high-temperature reactor designs attempt to mitigate any damage caused by a postulated air ingress event, the use of graphite components that inhibit oxidation is a logical step to increase the safety of these reactors. Recent experimental studies of graphite containing between 5.5 and 7 wt% boron carbide (B 4 C) indicate that oxidation is dramatically reduced even at prolonged exposures at temperatures up to 900 deg. C. The proposed addition of B 4 C to graphite components in the nuclear core would necessarily be enriched in B-11 isotope in order to minimise B-10 neutron absorption and graphite swelling. The enriched boron can be added to the graphite during billet fabrication. Experimental oxidation rate results and potential applications for borated graphite in nuclear reactor components will be discussed. (authors)

  6. Metal/graphite - composites in fusion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staffler, R.; Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.

    1989-01-01

    Metal/graphite composites have been well known in medical industry for many years. X-ray tubes used in modern radiography, particularly in computerized tomography are equipped with rotating targets able to absorb a maximum of heat in a given time. Modern rotating targets consist of a refractory metal/graphite composite. Today the use of graphite as a plasma facing material is one predominant concept in fusion engineering. Depending on the thermal load, the graphite components have to be directly cooled (i.e. divertor plates) or inertially cooled (i.e. firstwall tiles). In case of direct cooling a metallurgical joining such as high temperature brazing between graphite and a metallic cooling structure shows the most promising results /1/. Inertially cooled graphite tiles have to be joined to a metallic backing plate in order to get a stable attachment to the supporting structure. The main requirements on the metallic partner of a metal/graphite composite used in the first wall area are: high melting point, high thermal strength, high thermal conductivity, low vapor pressure and a thermal expansion matching that of graphite. These properties are typical for the refractory metals such as molybdenum, tungsten and their alloys. 4 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  7. Metal/graphite - composites in fusion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staffler, R.; Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.

    1995-01-01

    Metal/graphite composites have been well known in medical industry for many years. X-ray tubes used in modern radiography, particulary in computerized tomography are equipped with rotating targets able to absorb a maximum of heat in a given time. Modern rotating targets consist of a refractory metal/graphite composite. Today the use of graphite as a plasma facing material is one predominant concept in fusion engineering. Depending on the thermal load, the graphite components have to be directly cooled (i.e. divertor plates) or inertially cooled (i.e. firstwall tiles). In case of direct cooling a metallurgical joining such as high temperature brazing between graphite and a metalic cooling structure shows the most promising results /1/. Inertially cooled graphite tiles have to be joined to a metallic backing plate in order to get a stable attachment to the supporting structure. The main requirements on the metallic partner of a metal/graphite composite and in the first wall area are: high melting point, high thermal strength, high thermal conductivity, low vapour pressure and a thermal expansion matching that of graphite. These properties are typical for the refractory metals such as molybdenum, tungsten and their alloys. (author)

  8. Tire containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A tire, tire lining or inner tube, containing a polymer composite, made of at least one rubber and/or at least one elastomer and a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g.

  9. Effect of graphite target power density on tribological properties of graphite-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dan; Jiang, Bailing; Li, Hongtao; Du, Yuzhou; Yang, Chao

    2018-05-01

    In order to improve the tribological performance, a series of graphite-like carbon (GLC) films with different graphite target power densities were prepared by magnetron sputtering. The valence bond and microstructure of films were characterized by AFM, TEM, XPS and Raman spectra. The variation of mechanical and tribological properties with graphite target power density was analyzed. The results showed that with the increase of graphite target power density, the deposition rate and the ratio of sp2 bond increased obviously. The hardness firstly increased and then decreased with the increase of graphite target power density, whilst the friction coefficient and the specific wear rate increased slightly after a decrease with the increasing graphite target power density. The friction coefficient and the specific wear rate were the lowest when the graphite target power density was 23.3 W/cm2.

  10. Hydrogen storage in graphite nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C.; Tan, C.D.; Hidalgo, R.; Baker, R.T.K.; Rodriguez, N.M. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    1998-08-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNF) are a type of material that is produced by the decomposition of carbon containing gases over metal catalyst particles at temperatures around 600 C. These molecularly engineered structures consist of graphene sheets perfectly arranged in a parallel, perpendicular or at angle orientation with respect to the fiber axis. The most important feature of the material is that only edges are exposed. Such an arrangement imparts the material with unique properties for gas adsorption because the evenly separated layers constitute the most ordered set of nanopores that can accommodate an adsorbate in the most efficient manner. In addition, the non-rigid pore walls can also expand so as to accommodate hydrogen in a multilayer conformation. Of the many varieties of structures that can be produced the authors have discovered that when gram quantities of a selected number of GNF are exposed to hydrogen at pressures of {approximately} 2,000 psi, they are capable of adsorbing and storing up to 40 wt% of hydrogen. It is believed that a strong interaction is established between hydrogen and the delocalized p-electrons present in the graphite layers and therefore a new type of chemistry is occurring within these confined structures.

  11. Methane generated from graphite--tritium interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, D.O.; Walthers, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    When hydrogen isotopes are separated by cryogenic distillation, as little as 1 ppM of methane will eventually plug the still as frost accumulates on the column packings. Elemental carbon exposed to tritium generates methane spontaneously, and yet some dry transfer pumps, otherwise compatible with tritium, convey the gas with graphite rotors. This study was to determine the methane production rate for graphite in tritium. A pump manufacturer supplied graphite samples that we exposed to tritium gas at 0.8 atm. After 137 days we measured a methane synthesis rate of 6 ng/h per cm 2 of graphite exposed. At this rate methane might grow to a concentration of 0.01 ppM when pure tritium is transferred once through a typical graphite--rotor transfer pump. Such a low methane level will not cause column blockage, even if the cryogenic still is operated continuously for many years

  12. Chemical sputtering of graphite by H+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busharov, N.P.; Gorbatov, E.A.; Gusev, V.M.; Guseva, M.I.; Martynenko, Y.V.

    1976-01-01

    In a study of the sputtering coefficient S for the sputtering of graphite by 10-keV H + ions as a function of the graphite temperature during the bombardment, it is found that at T> or =750degreeC the coefficient S is independent of the target temperature and has an anomalously high value, S=0.085 atom/ion. The high rate of sputtering of graphite by atomic hydrogen ions is shown to be due to chemical sputtering of the graphite, resulting primarily in the formation of CH 4 molecules. At T=1100degreeC, S falls off by a factor of about 3. A model for the chemical sputtering of graphite is proposed

  13. Graphite selection for the FMIT test cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1982-06-01

    This document provides the basis for procuring a grade of graphite, at minimum cost, having minimum dimensional changes at low irradiation temperatures (nominal range 90 to 140 0 C). In light of those constraints, the author concludes that the most feasible approach is to attempt to reproduce a grade of graphite (TSGBF) which has exhibited a high degree of dimensional stability during low-temperature irradiations and on which irradiation-induced changes in other physical properties have been measured. The effects of differences in raw materials, especially coke morphology, and processing conditions, primarily graphitization temperture are briefly reviewed in terms of the practicality of producing a new grade of graphite with physical properties and irradiation-induced changes which would be very similar to those of TSGBF graphite. The production history and physical properties of TSGBF are also reviewed; no attempt is made, to project changes in dimensions or physical properties under the projected irradiation conditions

  14. Comparison between isotropic linear-elastic law and isotropic hyperelastic law in the finite element modeling of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perruisseau-Carrier, A; Bahlouli, N; Bierry, G; Vernet, P; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P

    2017-12-01

    Augmented reality could help the identification of nerve structures in brachial plexus surgery. The goal of this study was to determine which law of mechanical behavior was more adapted by comparing the results of Hooke's isotropic linear elastic law to those of Ogden's isotropic hyperelastic law, applied to a biomechanical model of the brachial plexus. A model of finite elements was created using the ABAQUS ® from a 3D model of the brachial plexus acquired by segmentation and meshing of MRI images at 0°, 45° and 135° of shoulder abduction of a healthy subject. The offset between the reconstructed model and the deformed model was evaluated quantitatively by the Hausdorff distance and qualitatively by the identification of 3 anatomical landmarks. In every case the Hausdorff distance was shorter with Ogden's law compared to Hooke's law. On a qualitative aspect, the model deformed by Ogden's law followed the concavity of the reconstructed model whereas the model deformed by Hooke's law remained convex. In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrate that the behavior of Ogden's isotropic hyperelastic mechanical model was more adapted to the modeling of the deformations of the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; W. David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-08-01

    This report described the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the second Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-2) irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule is the second in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. Similar to the AGC-1 specimen pre-irradiation examination report, material property tests were conducted on specimens from 18 nuclear graphite types but on an increased number of specimens (512) prior to loading into the AGC-2 irradiation assembly. All AGC-2 specimen testing was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) from October 2009 to August 2010. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-2 irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule design requires “matched pair” creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-2 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce “matched pairs” of graphite samples above and below the AGC-2 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

  16. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane; Allen, Todd

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission products

  17. Intra-connected three-dimensionally isotropic bulk negative index photonic metamaterial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guney, Durdu; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas

    2010-01-01

    Isotropic negative index metamaterials (NIMs) are highly desired, particularly for the realization of ultra-high resolution lenses. However, existing isotropic NIMs function only two-dimensionally and cannot be miniaturized beyond microwaves. Direct laser writing processes can be a paradigm shift toward the fabrication of three-dimensionally (3D) isotropic bulk optical metamaterials, but only at the expense of an additional design constraint, namely connectivity. Here, we demonstrate with a proof-of-principle design that the requirement connectivity does not preclude fully isotropic left-handed behavior. This is an important step towards the realization of bulk 3D isotropic NIMs at optical wavelengths.

  18. Friction and wear studies of graphite and a carbon-carbon composite in air and in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.C.; Sheehan, J.E.

    1980-10-01

    Sliding friction and wear tests were conducted on a commercial isotropic graphite and a carbon-carbon composite in air, purified helium, and a helium environment containing controlled amounts of impurities simulating the primary coolant chemistry of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The friction and wear characteristics of the materials investigated were stable and were found to be very sensitive to the testing temperature. In general, friction and wear decreased with increasing temperature in the range from ambient to 950 0 C. This temperature dependence is concluded to be due to chemisorption of impurities to form lubricating films and oxidation at higher temperatures, which reduce friction and wear. Graphite and carbon-carbon composites are concluded to be favorable candidate materials for high-temperature sliding service in helium-cooled reactors

  19. Effects of fatigue and environment on residual strengths of center-cracked graphite/epoxy buffer strip panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Catherine A.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of fatigue, moisture conditioning, and heating on the residual tension strengths of center-cracked graphite/epoxy buffer strip panels were evaluated using specimens made with T300/5208 graphite epoxy in a 16-ply quasi-isotropic layup, with two different buffer strip materials, Kevlar-49 or S-glass. It was found that, for panels subjected to fatigue loading, the residual strengths were not significantly affected by the fatigue loading, the number of repetitions of the loading spectrum, or the maximum strain level. The moisture conditioning reduced the residual strengths of the S-glass buffer strip panels by 10 to 15 percent below the ambient results, but increased the residual strengths of the Kevlar-49 buffer strip panels slightly. For both buffer strip materials, the heat increased the residual strengths of the buffer strip panels slightly over the ambient results.

  20. On a hierarchical construction of the anisotropic LTSN solution from the isotropic LTSN solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foletto, Taline; Segatto, Cynthia F.; Bodmann, Bardo E.; Vilhena, Marco T.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present a recursive scheme targeting the hierarchical construction of anisotropic LTS N solution from the isotropic LTS N solution. The main idea relies in the decomposition of the associated LTS N anisotropic matrix as a sum of two matrices in which one matrix contains the isotropic and the other anisotropic part of the problem. The matrix containing the anisotropic part is considered as the source of the isotropic problem. The solution of this problem is made by the decomposition of the angular flux as a truncated series of intermediate functions and replace in the isotropic equation. After the replacement of these into the split isotropic equation, we construct a set of isotropic recursive problems, that are readily solved by the classic LTS N isotropic method. We apply this methodology to solve problems considering homogeneous and heterogeneous anisotropic regions. Numerical results are presented and compared with the classical LTS N anisotropic solution. (author)

  1. Scanning anisotropy parameters in horizontal transversely isotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Masmoudi, Nabil

    2016-10-12

    The horizontal transversely isotropic model, with arbitrary symmetry axis orientation, is the simplest effective representative that explains the azimuthal behaviour of seismic data. Estimating the anisotropy parameters of this model is important in reservoir characterisation, specifically in terms of fracture delineation. We propose a travel-time-based approach to estimate the anellipticity parameter η and the symmetry axis azimuth ϕ of a horizontal transversely isotropic medium, given an inhomogeneous elliptic background model (which might be obtained from velocity analysis and well velocities). This is accomplished through a Taylor\\'s series expansion of the travel-time solution (of the eikonal equation) as a function of parameter η and azimuth angle ϕ. The accuracy of the travel time expansion is enhanced by the use of Shanks transform. This results in an accurate approximation of the solution of the non-linear eikonal equation and provides a mechanism to scan simultaneously for the best fitting effective parameters η and ϕ, without the need for repetitive modelling of travel times. The analysis of the travel time sensitivity to parameters η and ϕ reveals that travel times are more sensitive to η than to the symmetry axis azimuth ϕ. Thus, η is better constrained from travel times than the azimuth. Moreover, the two-parameter scan in the homogeneous case shows that errors in the background model affect the estimation of η and ϕ differently. While a gradual increase in errors in the background model leads to increasing errors in η, inaccuracies in ϕ, on the other hand, depend on the background model errors. We also propose a layer-stripping method valid for a stack of arbitrary oriented symmetry axis horizontal transversely isotropic layers to convert the effective parameters to the interval layer values.

  2. Graphite Oxidation Thermodynamics/Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propp, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    The vulnerability of graphite-matrix spent nuclear fuel to oxidation by the ambient atmosphere if the fuel canister is breached was evaluated. Thermochemical and kinetic data over the anticipated range of storage temperatures (200 to 400 C) were used to calculate the times required for a total carbon mass loss of 1 mgcm-2 from a fuel specimen. At 200 C, the time required to produce even this small loss is large, 900,000 yr. However, at 400 C the time required is only 1.9 yr. The rate of oxidation at 200 C is negligible, and the rate even at 400 C is so small as to be of no practical consequence. Therefore, oxidation of the spent nuclear fuel upon a loss of canister integrity is not anticipated to be a concern based upon the results of this study

  3. Low cost sic coated erosion resistant graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, M.F.; Nicholls, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    The development of materials with unique and improved properties using low cost processes is essential to increase performance and reduce cost of the solid rocket motors. Specifically advancements are needed for boost phase nozzle. As these motors operate at very high pressure and temperatures, the nozzle must survive high thermal stresses with minimal erosion to maintain performance. Currently three material choices are being exploited; which are refractory metals, graphite and carbon-carbon composites. Of these three materials graphite is the most attractive choice because of its low cost, light weight, and easy forming. However graphite is prone to erosion, both chemical and mechanical, which may affect the ballistic conditions and mechanical properties of the nozzle. To minimize this erosion high density graphite is usually preferred; which is again very expensive. Another technique used to minimize the erosion is Pyrolytic Graphite (PG) coating inside the nozzle. However PG coating is prone to cracking and spallation along with very cumbersome deposition process. Another possible methodology to avoid this erosion is to convert the inside surface of the rocket nozzle to Silicon Carbide (SiC), which is very erosion resistant and have much better thermal stability compared to graphite and even PG. Due to its functionally gradient nature such a layer will be very adherent and resistant to spallation. The current research is focused on synthesizing, characterizing and oxidation testing of such a converted SiC layer on commercial grade graphite. (author)

  4. Effects of isotropic alpha populations on tokamak ballooning stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spong, D.A.; Sigmar, D.J.; Tsang, K.T.; Ramos, J.J.; Hastings, D.E.; Cooper, W.A.

    1986-12-01

    Fusion product alpha populations can significantly influence tokamak stability due to coupling between the trapped alpha precessional drift and the kinetic ballooning mode frequency. Careful, quantitative evaluations of these effects are necessary in burning plasma devices such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and the Joint European Torus, and we have continued systematic development of such a kinetic stability model. In this model we have considered a range of different forms for the alpha distribution function and the tokamak equilibrium. Both Maxwellian and slowing-down models have been used for the alpha energy dependence while deeply trapped and, more recently, isotropic pitch angle dependences have been examined

  5. Anisotropy in "isotropic diffusion" measurements due to nongaussian diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj; Olesen, Jonas Lynge; Ianuş, Andrada

    2017-01-01

    Designing novel diffusion-weighted NMR and MRI pulse sequences aiming to probe tissue microstructure with techniques extending beyond the conventional Stejskal-Tanner family is currently of broad interest. One such technique, multidimensional diffusion MRI, has been recently proposed to afford...... model-free decomposition of diffusion signal kurtosis into terms originating from either ensemble variance of isotropic diffusivity or microscopic diffusion anisotropy. This ability rests on the assumption that diffusion can be described as a sum of multiple Gaussian compartments, but this is often...

  6. Isotropic 2D quadrangle meshing with size and orientation control

    KAUST Repository

    Pellenard, Bertrand

    2011-12-01

    We propose an approach for automatically generating isotropic 2D quadrangle meshes from arbitrary domains with a fine control over sizing and orientation of the elements. At the heart of our algorithm is an optimization procedure that, from a coarse initial tiling of the 2D domain, enforces each of the desirable mesh quality criteria (size, shape, orientation, degree, regularity) one at a time, in an order designed not to undo previous enhancements. Our experiments demonstrate how well our resulting quadrangle meshes conform to a wide range of input sizing and orientation fields.

  7. Observation of transverse patterns in an isotropic microchip laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.F.; Lan, Y.P.

    2003-01-01

    An isotropic microchip laser is used to study the characteristics of high-order wave functions in a two-dimensional (2D) quantum harmonic oscillator based on the identical functional forms. With a doughnut pump profile, the spontaneous transverse modes are found to, generally, be elliptic and hyperbolic transverse modes. Theoretical analyses reveal that the elliptic transverse modes are analogous to the coherent states of a 2D harmonic oscillator; the formation of hyperbolic transverse modes is a spontaneous mode locking between two identical Hermite-Gaussian modes

  8. Homogenous isotropic invisible cloak based on geometrical optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingbo; Zhou, Ji; Kang, Lei

    2008-10-27

    Invisible cloak derived from the coordinate transformation requires its constitutive material to be anisotropic. In this work, we present a cloak of graded-index isotropic material based on the geometrical optics theory. The cloak is realized by concentric multilayered structure with designed refractive index to achieve the low-scattering and smooth power-flow. Full-wave simulations on such a design of a cylindrical cloak are performed to demonstrate the cloaking ability to incident wave of any polarization. Using normal nature material with isotropy and low absorption, the cloak shows light on a practical path to stealth technology, especially that in the optical range.

  9. Channel uranium-graphite reactor mounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polushkin, K.K.; Kuznetsov, A.G.; Zheleznyakov, B.N.

    1981-01-01

    According to theoretical principles of general engineering technology the engineering experience of construction-mounting works at the NPP with channel uranium-graphite reactors is systematized. Main parameters and structural features of the 1000 MW channel uranium-graphite reactors are considered. The succession of mounting operations, premounting equipment and pipelines preparation and mounting works technique are described. The most efficient methods of fitting, welding and machining of reactor elements are recommended. Main problems of technical control service are discussed. A typical netted diagram of main equipment of channel uranium-graphite reactors mounting is given

  10. Synthesis of soluble graphite and graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, K F; Billups, W E

    2013-01-15

    Because of graphene's anticipated applications in electronics and its thermal, mechanical, and optical properties, many scientists and engineers are interested in this material. Graphene is an isolated layer of the π-stacked hexagonal allotrope of carbon known as graphite. The interlayer cohesive energy of graphite, or exfoliation energy, that results from van der Waals attractions over the interlayer spacing distance of 3.34 Å (61 meV/C atom) is many times weaker than the intralayer covalent bonding. Since graphene itself does not occur naturally, scientists and engineers are still learning how to isolate and manipulate individual layers of graphene. Some researchers have relied on the physical separation of the sheets, a process that can sometimes be as simple as peeling of sheets from crystalline graphite using Scotch tape. Other researchers have taken an ensemble approach, where they exploit the chemical conversion of graphite to the individual layers. The typical intermediary state is graphite oxide, which is often produced using strong oxidants under acidic conditions. Structurally, researchers hypothesize that acidic functional groups functionalize the oxidized material at the edges and a network of epoxy groups cover the sp(2)-bonded carbon network. The exfoliated material formed under these conditions can be used to form dispersions that are usually unstable. However, more importantly, irreversible defects form in the basal plane during oxidation and remain even after reduction of graphite oxide back to graphene-like material. As part of our interest in the dissolution of carbon nanomaterials, we have explored the derivatization of graphite following the same procedures that preserve the sp(2) bonding and the associated unique physical and electronic properties in the chemical processing of single-walled carbon nanotubes. In this Account, we describe efficient routes to exfoliate graphite either into graphitic nanoparticles or into graphene without

  11. Adsorption of lead over graphite oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanipekun, Opeyemi; Oyefusi, Adebola; Neelgund, Gururaj M; Oki, Aderemi

    2014-01-24

    The adsorption efficiency and kinetics of removal of lead in presence of graphite oxide (GO) was determined using the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The GO was prepared by the chemical oxidation of graphite and characterized using FTIR, SEM, TGA and XRD. The adsorption efficiency of GO for the solution containing 50, 100 and 150 ppm of Pb(2+) was found to be 98%, 91% and 71% respectively. The adsorption ability of GO was found to be higher than graphite. Therefore, the oxidation of activated carbon in removal of heavy metals may be a viable option to reduce pollution in portable water. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Interface structure between tetraglyme and graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Taketoshi; Araki, Yuki; Umeda, Kenichi; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Okazaki, Ken-ichi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Abe, Takeshi; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2017-09-01

    Clarification of the details of the interface structure between liquids and solids is crucial for understanding the fundamental processes of physical functions. Herein, we investigate the structure of the interface between tetraglyme and graphite and propose a model for the interface structure based on the observation of frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy in liquids. The ordering and distorted adsorption of tetraglyme on graphite were observed. It is found that tetraglyme stably adsorbs on graphite. Density functional theory calculations supported the adsorption structure. In the liquid phase, there is a layered structure of the molecular distribution with an average distance of 0.60 nm between layers.

  13. Status of Chronic Oxidation Studies of Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mee, Robert W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Graphite will undergo extremely slow, but continuous oxidation by traces of moisture that will be present, albeit at very low levels, in the helium coolant of HTGR. This chronic oxidation may cause degradation of mechanical strength and thermal properties of graphite components if a porous oxidation layer penetrates deep enough in the bulk of graphite components during the lifetime of the reactor. The current research on graphite chronic oxidation is motivated by the acute need to understand the behavior of each graphite grade during prolonged exposure to high temperature chemical attack by moisture. The goal is to provide the elements needed to develop predictive models for long-time oxidation behavior of graphite components in the cooling helium of HTGR. The tasks derived from this goal are: (1) Oxidation rate measurements in order to determine and validate a comprehensive kinetic model suitable for prediction of intrinsic oxidation rates as a function of temperature and oxidant gas composition; (2) Characterization of effective diffusivity of water vapor in the graphite pore system in order to account for the in-pore transport of moisture; and (3) Development and validation of a predictive model for the penetration depth of the oxidized layer, in order to assess the risk of oxidation caused damage of particular graphite grades after prolonged exposure to the environment of helium coolant in HTGR. The most important and most time consuming of these tasks is the measurement of oxidation rates in accelerated oxidation tests (but still under kinetic control) and the development of a reliable kinetic model. This report summarizes the status of chronic oxidation studies on graphite, and then focuses on model development activities, progress of kinetic measurements, validation of results, and improvement of the kinetic models. Analysis of current and past results obtained with three grades of showed that the classical Langmuir-Hinshelwood model cannot reproduce all

  14. Geometric Models for Isotropic Random Porous Media: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Models for random porous media are considered. The models are isotropic both from the local and the macroscopic point of view; that is, the pores have spherical shape or their surface shows piecewise spherical curvature, and there is no macroscopic gradient of any geometrical feature. Both closed-pore and open-pore systems are discussed. The Poisson grain model, the model of hard spheres packing, and the penetrable sphere model are used; variable size distribution of the pores is included. A parameter is introduced which controls the degree of open-porosity. Besides systems built up by a single solid phase, models for porous media with the internal surface coated by a second phase are treated. Volume fraction, surface area, and correlation functions are given explicitly where applicable; otherwise numerical methods for determination are described. Effective medium theory is applied to calculate physical properties for the models such as isotropic elastic moduli, thermal and electrical conductivity, and static dielectric constant. The methods presented are exemplified by applications: small-angle scattering of systems showing fractal-like behavior in limited ranges of linear dimension, optimization of nanoporous insulating materials, and improvement of properties of open-pore systems by atomic layer deposition of a second phase on the internal surface.

  15. Large Deformation Constitutive Laws for Isotropic Thermoelastic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plohr, Bradley J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Plohr, Jeeyeon N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-25

    We examine the approximations made in using Hooke's law as a constitutive relation for an isotropic thermoelastic material subjected to large deformation by calculating the stress evolution equation from the free energy. For a general thermoelastic material, we employ the volume-preserving part of the deformation gradient to facilitate volumetric/shear strain decompositions of the free energy, its first derivatives (the Cauchy stress and entropy), and its second derivatives (the specific heat, Grueneisen tensor, and elasticity tensor). Specializing to isotropic materials, we calculate these constitutive quantities more explicitly. For deformations with limited shear strain, but possibly large changes in volume, we show that the differential equations for the stress components involve new terms in addition to the traditional Hooke's law terms. These new terms are of the same order in the shear strain as the objective derivative terms needed for frame indifference; unless the latter terms are negligible, the former cannot be neglected. We also demonstrate that accounting for the new terms requires that the deformation gradient be included as a field variable

  16. Isotropic extensions of the vacuum solutions in general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil); Martin-Moruno, Prado [Victoria University of Wellington (New Zealand); Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Spacetimes described by spherically symmetric solutions of Einstein's equations are of paramount importance both in astrophysical applications and theoretical considerations. And among those, black holes are highlighted. In vacuum, Birkhoff's theorem and its generalizations to non-asymptotically flat cases uniquely fix the metric as the Schwarzschild, Schwarzschild-de Sitter or Schwarzschild-anti-de Sitter geometries, the vacuum solutions of the usual general relativity with zero, positive or negative values for the cosmological constant, respectively. In this work we are mainly interested in black holes in a cosmological environment. Of the two main assumptions of the cosmological principle, homogeneity is lost when compact objects are considered. Nevertheless isotropy is still possible, and we enforce this condition. Within this context, we investigate spatially isotropic solutions close - continuously deformable - to the usual vacuum solutions. We obtain isotropic extensions of the usual spherically symmetric vacuum geometries in general relativity. Exact and perturbative solutions are derived. Maximal extensions are constructed and their causal structures are discussed. The classes of geometries obtained include black holes in compact and non-compact universes, wormholes in the interior region of cosmological horizons, and anti-de Sitter geometries with excess/deficit solid angle. The tools developed here are applicable in more general contexts, with extensions subjected to other constraints. (author)

  17. ISOTROPIC LUMINOSITY INDICATORS IN A COMPLETE AGN SAMPLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Rieke, George H.; Rigby, Jane R.

    2009-01-01

    The [O IV] λ25.89 μm line has been shown to be an accurate indicator of active galactic nucleus (AGN) intrinsic luminosity in that it correlates well with hard (10-200 keV) X-ray emission. We present measurements of [O IV] for 89 Seyfert galaxies from the unbiased revised Shapley-Ames (RSA) sample. The [O IV] luminosity distributions of obscured and unobscured Seyferts are indistinguishable, indicating that their intrinsic AGN luminosities are quite similar and that the RSA sample is well suited for tests of the unified model. In addition, we analyze several commonly used proxies for AGN luminosity, including [O III] λ5007 A, 6 cm radio, and 2-10 keV X-ray emission. We find that the radio luminosity distributions of obscured and unobscured AGNs show no significant difference, indicating that radio luminosity is a useful isotropic luminosity indicator. However, the observed [O III] and 2-10 keV luminosities are systematically smaller for obscured Seyferts, indicating that they are not emitted isotropically.

  18. Superhydrophilic graphite surfaces and water-dispersible graphite colloids by electrochemical exfoliation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yueh-Feng [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China); Chen, Shih-Ming; Lai, Wei-Hao [Materials and Chemical Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Chutung, Hsinchu, 31040 Taiwan (China); Sheng, Yu-Jane [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106 Taiwan (China); Tsao, Heng-Kwong [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China)

    2013-08-14

    Superhydrophilic graphite surfaces and water-dispersible graphite colloids are obtained by electrochemical exfoliation with hydrophobic graphite electrodes. Such counterintuitive characteristics are caused by partial oxidation and investigated by examining both graphite electrodes and exfoliated particles after electrolysis. The extent of surface oxidation can be explored through contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscope, electrical sheet resistance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, zeta-potential analyzer, thermogravimetric analysis, UV-visible, and Raman spectroscopy. The degree of wettability of the graphite anode can be altered by the electrolytic current and time. The water contact angle declines generally with increasing the electrolytic current or time. After a sufficient time, the graphite anode becomes superhydrophilic and its hydrophobicity can be recovered by peeling with adhesive tape. This consequence reveals that the anodic graphite is oxidized by oxygen bubbles but the oxidation just occurs at the outer layers of the graphite sheet. Moreover, the characteristics of oxidation revealed by UV peak shift, peak ratio between D and G bands, and negative zeta-potential indicate the presence of graphite oxide on the outer shell of the exfoliated colloids. However, thermogravimetric analysis for the extent of decomposition of oxygen functional groups verifies that the amount of oxygen groups is significantly less than that of graphite oxide prepared via Hummer method. The structure of this partially oxidized graphite may consist of a graphite core covered with an oxidized shell. The properties of the exfoliated colloids are also influenced by pH of the electrolytic solution. As pH is increased, the extent of oxidation descends and the thickness of oxidized shell decreases. Those results reveal that the degree of oxidation of exfoliated nanoparticles can be manipulated simply by controlling pH.

  19. Performance of AC/graphite capacitors at high weight ratios of AC/graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongyu [IM and T Ltd., Advanced Research Center, Saga University, 1341 Yoga-machi, Saga 840-0047 (Japan); Yoshio, Masaki [Advanced Research Center, Department of Applied Chemistry, Saga University, 1341 Yoga-machi, Saga 840-0047 (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    The effect of negative to positive electrode materials' weight ratio on the electrochemical performance of both activated carbon (AC)/AC and AC/graphite capacitors has been investigated, especially in the terms of capacity and cycle-ability. The limited capacity charge mode has been proposed to improve the cycle performance of AC/graphite capacitors at high weight ratios of AC/graphite. (author)

  20. Management of radioactive waste in nuclear power: handling of irradiated graphite from water-cooled graphite reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anfimov, S.S.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper an radioactive waste processing of graphite from graphite moderated nuclear reactors at its decommissioning is discussed. Methods of processing of irradiated graphite are presented. It can be concluded that advanced methods for graphite radioactive waste handling are available nowadays. Implementation of these methods will allow to enhance environmental safety of nuclear power that will benefit its progress in the future

  1. A Graphite Isotope Ratio Method: A Primer on Estimating Plutonium Production in Graphite Moderated Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesh, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    The Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM) is a technique used to estimate the total plutonium production in a graphite-moderated reactor. The cumulative plutonium production in that reactor can be accurately determined by measuring neutron irradiation induced isotopic ratio changes in certain impurity elements within the graphite moderator. The method does not require detailed knowledge of a reactor's operating history, although that knowledge can decrease the uncertainty of the production estimate. The basic premise of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method is that the fluence in non-fuel core components is directly related to the cumulative plutonium production in the nuclear fuel

  2. Synthesis of graphene nanoplatelets from peroxosulfate graphite intercalation compounds

    OpenAIRE

    MELEZHYK A.V.; TKACHEV A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic exfoliation of expanded graphite compound obtained by cold expansion of graphite intercalated with peroxodisulfuric acid was shown to allow the creation of graphene nanoplatelets with thickness of about 5-10 nm. The resulting graphene material contained surface oxide groups. The expanded graphite intercalation compound was exfoliated by ultrasound much easier than thermally expanded graphite. A mechanism for the cleavage of graphite to graphene nanoplatelets is proposed. It include...

  3. Graphite reactor physics; Physique des piles a graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, P; Cogne, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Noc, B [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1964-07-01

    The study of graphite-natural uranium power reactor physics, undertaken ten years ago when the Marcoule piles were built, has continued to keep in step with the development of this type of pile. From 1960 onwards the critical facility Marius has been available for a systematic study of the properties of lattices as a function of their pitch, of fuel geometry and of the diameter of cooling channels. This study has covered a very wide field: lattice pitch varying from 19 to 38 cm. uranium rods and tubes of cross-sections from 6 to 35 cm{sup 2}, channels with diameters between 70 and 140 mm. The lattice calculation methods could thus be checked and where necessary adapted. The running of the Marcoule piles and the experiments carried out on them during the last few years have supplied valuable information on the overall evolution of the neutronic properties of the fuel as a function of irradiation. More detailed experiments have also been performed in Marius with plutonium-containing fuels (irradiated or synthetic fuels), and will be undertaken at the beginning of 1965 at high temperature in the critical facility Cesar, which is just being completed at Cadarache. Spent fuel analyses complement these results and help in their interpretation. The thermalization and spectra theories developed in France can thus be verified over the whole valid temperature range. The efficiency of control rods as a function of their dimensions, the materials of which they are made and the lattices surrounding them has been measured in Marius, and the results compared with calculation on the one hand and with the measurements carried out in EDF 1 on the other. Studies on the control proper of graphite piles were concerned essentially with the risks of spatial instability and the means of detecting and controlling them, and with flux distortions caused by the control rods. (authors) [French] Entreprise il y a dix ans a l'occasion de la construction des piles de Marcoule, l'etude de la

  4. Seismic research on graphite reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Shigang; Sun Libin; Zhang Zhengming

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reactors with graphite core structure include production reactor, water-cooled graphite reactor, gas-cooled reactor, high-temperature gas-cooled reactor and so on. Multi-body graphite core structure has nonlinear response under seismic excitation, which is different from the response of general civil structure, metal connection structure or bolted structure. Purpose: In order to provide references for the designing and construction of HTR-PM. This paper reviews the history of reactor seismic research evaluation from certain countries, and summarizes the research methods and research results. Methods: By comparing the methods adopted in different gas-cooled reactor cores, inspiration for our own HTR seismic research was achieved. Results and Conclusions: In this paper, the research ideas of graphite core seismic during the process of designing, constructing and operating HTR-10 are expounded. Also the project progress of HTR-PM and the research on side reflection with the theory of similarity is introduced. (authors)

  5. Review: BNL Tokamak graphite blanket design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The BNL minimum activity graphite blanket designs are reviewed, and three are discussed in the context of an experimental power reactor (EPR) and commercial power reactor. Basically, the three designs employ a 30 cm or thicker graphite screen. Bremsstrahlung energy is deposited on the graphite surface and re-radiated away as thermal radiation. Fast neutrons are slowed down in the graphite, depositing most of their energy, which is then radiated to a secondary blanket with coolant tubes, as in types A and B, or removed by intermittent direct gas cooling (type C). In types A and B, radiation damage to the coolant tubes in the secondary blanket is reduced by one or two orders of magnitude, while in type C, the blanket is only cooled when the reactor is shut down, so that coolant cannot quench the plasma. (Auth.)

  6. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    The development of the immobilization process for graphite fines has proceeded through a series of experimental programs. The experimental procedures and results from each series of experiments are discussed in this report

  7. Optical motion control of maglev graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masayuki; Abe, Jiro

    2012-12-26

    Graphite has been known as a typical diamagnetic material and can be levitated in the strong magnetic field. Here we show that the magnetically levitating pyrolytic graphite can be moved in the arbitrary place by simple photoirradiation. It is notable that the optical motion control system described in this paper requires only NdFeB permanent magnets and light source. The optical movement is driven by photothermally induced changes in the magnetic susceptibility of the graphite. Moreover, we demonstrate that light energy can be converted into rotational kinetic energy by means of the photothermal property. We find that the levitating graphite disk rotates at over 200 rpm under the sunlight, making it possible to develop a new class of light energy conversion system.

  8. Study on graphite samples for nuclear usage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, J.C.M.; Silva Roseira, M. da

    1994-01-01

    Available as short communication only. The graphite, due to its properties (mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, high-temperature stability, machinability etc.) have many industrial applications, and consequently, an important strategic value. In the nuclear area, it has been used as moderator and reflector of neutrons in the fission process of uranium. The graphite can be produced from many types of carbonaceous materials by a variety of process dominated by the manufactures. This is the reason why there are in the world market a lot of graphite types with different physical and mechanical properties. The present investigation studies some physical characteristics of the graphite samples destined to use in a nuclear reactor. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig, 1 tab

  9. Collective modes in superconducting rhombohedral graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauppila, Ville [O.V. Lounasmaa Laboratory, Aalto University (Finland); Hyart, Timo; Heikkilae, Tero [University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2015-07-01

    Recently it was realized that coupling particles with a Dirac dispersion (such as electrons in graphene) can lead to a topologically protected state with flat band dispersion. Such a state could support superconductivity with unusually high critical temperatures. Perhaps the most promising way to realize such coupling in real materials is in the surface of rhombohedrally stacked graphite. We consider collective excitations (i.e. the Higgs modes) in surface superconducting rhombohedral graphite. We find two amplitude and two phase modes corresponding to the two surfaces of the graphite where the superconductivity lives. We calculate the dispersion of these modes. We also derive the Ginzburg-Landau theory for this material. We show that in superconducting rhombohedral graphite, the collective modes, unlike in conventional BCS superconductors, give a large contribution to thermodynamic properties of the material.

  10. Large Scale Reduction of Graphite Oxide

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project seeks to develop an optical method to reduce graphite oxide into graphene efficiently and in larger formats than currently available. Current reduction...

  11. Analysis of picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Huang, C.Y.; Malvezzi, A.M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-01-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm -1 and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm -1 , the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nonosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence

  12. Elastic properties of graphite and interstitial defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayasse, J.-B.

    1977-01-01

    The graphite elastic constants C 33 and C 44 , reflecting the interaction of the graphitic planes, were experimentally measured as a function of irradiation and temperature. A model of non-central strength atomic interaction was established to explain the experimental results obtained. This model is valid at zero temperature. The temperature dependence of the elastic properties was analyzed. The influence of the elastic property variations on the specific heat of the lattice at very low temperature was investigated [fr

  13. Energy evaluations, graphite corrosion in Bugey I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisbois, J.; Fiche, C.

    1967-01-01

    Bugey I presents a problem of radiolytic corrosion of the graphite by the CO 2 under pressure at high temperature. This report aims to evaluate the energy transferred to the gas by a Bugey I core cell, in normal operating conditions. The water, the carbon oxides and the hydrogen formed quantities are deduced as the consumed graphite and methane. Experimental studies are realized in parallel to validate the presented results. (A.L.B.)

  14. High temperature tests for graphite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed within the framework of the EURISOL for facilities SPIRAL-II (GANIL, France) and SPES (LNL, Italy), and aims to investigate the anticipated strength properties of fine-grained graphite at elevated temperatures. It appears that the major parameters that affect to the lifetime of a graphite target of this IP are the temperature and heating time. High temperature tests were conducted to simulate the heating under the influence of a beam of heavy particles by passing thro...

  15. Graphite Composite Panel Polishing Fixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, John; Strojny, Carl; Budinoff, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The use of high-strength, lightweight composites for the fixture is the novel feature of this innovation. The main advantage is the light weight and high stiffness-to-mass ratio relative to aluminum. Meter-class optics require support during the grinding/polishing process with large tools. The use of aluminum as a polishing fixture is standard, with pitch providing a compliant layer to allow support without deformation. Unfortunately, with meter-scale optics, a meter-scale fixture weighs over 120 lb (.55 kg) and may distort the optics being fabricated by loading the mirror and/or tool used in fabrication. The use of composite structures that are lightweight yet stiff allows standard techniques to be used while providing for a decrease in fixture weight by almost 70 percent. Mounts classically used to support large mirrors during fabrication are especially heavy and difficult to handle. The mount must be especially stiff to avoid deformation during the optical fabrication process, where a very large and heavy lap often can distort the mount and optic being fabricated. If the optic is placed on top of the lapping tool, the weight of the optic and the fixture can distort the lap. Fixtures to support the mirror during fabrication are often very large plates of aluminum, often 2 in. (.5 cm) or more in thickness and weight upwards of 150 lb (68 kg). With the addition of a backing material such as pitch and the mirror itself, the assembly can often weigh over 250 lb (.113 kg) for a meter-class optic. This innovation is the use of a lightweight graphite panel with an aluminum honeycomb core for use as the polishing fixture. These materials have been used in the aerospace industry as structural members due to their light weight and high stiffness. The grinding polishing fixture consists of the graphite composite panel, fittings, and fixtures to allow interface to the polishing machine, and introduction of pitch buttons to support the optic under fabrication. In its

  16. Structure and functionality of bromine doped graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Rashid; Kemper, A F; Cao, Chao; Cheng, H P

    2013-04-28

    First-principles calculations are used to study the enhanced in-plane conductivity observed experimentally in Br-doped graphite, and to study the effect of external stress on the structure and functionality of such systems. The model used in the numerical calculations is that of stage two doped graphite. The band structure near the Fermi surface of the doped systems with different bromine concentrations is compared to that of pure graphite, and the charge transfer between carbon and bromine atoms is analyzed to understand the conductivity change along different high symmetry directions. Our calculations show that, for large interlayer separation between doped graphite layers, bromine is stable in the molecular form (Br2). However, with increased compression (decreased layer-layer separation) Br2 molecules tend to dissociate. While in both forms, bromine is an electron acceptor. The charge exchange between the graphite layers and Br atoms is higher than that with Br2 molecules. Electron transfer to the Br atoms increases the number of hole carriers in the graphite sheets, resulting in an increase of conductivity.

  17. A finite-density calculation of the surface tension of isotropic-nematic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, B.G.; McMullen, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    The surface tension of the isotropic-nematic interface in a fluid of intermediate-sized hard particles is studied and calculated. The transition from isotropic to nematic is fixed to occur in a continuous fashion by varying the biaxiality of the model particles. A reversal in the preferred orientation of the bulk nematic relative to the isotropic-nematic interface suggests an oblique orientation of the bulk nematic. 32 refs., 8 figs

  18. Charged Particle Diffusion in Isotropic Random Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subedi, P.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Chuychai, P.; Parashar, T. N.; Chhiber, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Sonsrettee, W. [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Panyapiwat Institute of Management, Nonthaburi 11120 (Thailand); Blasi, P. [INAF/Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi, 5—I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Ruffolo, D. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Montgomery, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Dmitruk, P. [Departamento de Física Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Wan, M. [Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055 (China)

    2017-03-10

    The investigation of the diffusive transport of charged particles in a turbulent magnetic field remains a subject of considerable interest. Research has most frequently concentrated on determining the diffusion coefficient in the presence of a mean magnetic field. Here we consider the diffusion of charged particles in fully three-dimensional isotropic turbulent magnetic fields with no mean field, which may be pertinent to many astrophysical situations. We identify different ranges of particle energy depending upon the ratio of Larmor radius to the characteristic outer length scale of turbulence. Two different theoretical models are proposed to calculate the diffusion coefficient, each applicable to a distinct range of particle energies. The theoretical results are compared to those from computer simulations, showing good agreement.

  19. Isotropic Surface Remeshing without Large and Small Angles

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yiqun; Yan, Dong-Ming; Liu, Xiaohan; Tang, Chengcheng; Guo, Jianwei; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Wonka, Peter

    2018-01-01

    We introduce a novel algorithm for isotropic surface remeshing which progressively eliminates obtuse triangles and improves small angles. The main novelty of the proposed approach is a simple vertex insertion scheme that facilitates the removal of large angles, and a vertex removal operation that improves the distribution of small angles. In combination with other standard local mesh operators, e.g., connectivity optimization and local tangential smoothing, our algorithm is able to remesh efficiently a low-quality mesh surface. Our approach can be applied directly or used as a post-processing step following other remeshing approaches. Our method has a similar computational efficiency to the fastest approach available, i.e., real-time adaptive remeshing [1]. In comparison with state-of-the-art approaches, our method consistently generates better results based on evaluations using different metrics.

  20. Circular random motion in diatom gliding under isotropic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutiérrez-Medina, Braulio; Maldonado, Ana Iris Peña; Guerra, Andrés Jiménez; Rubio, Yadiralia Covarrubias; Meza, Jessica Viridiana García

    2014-01-01

    How cells migrate has been investigated primarily for the case of trajectories composed by joined straight segments. In contrast, little is known when cellular motion follows intrinsically curved paths. Here, we use time-lapse optical microscopy and automated trajectory tracking to investigate how individual cells of the diatom Nitzschia communis glide across surfaces under isotropic environmental conditions. We find a distinct kind of random motion, where trajectories are formed by circular arcs traveled at constant speed, alternated with random stoppages, direction reversals and changes in the orientation of the arcs. Analysis of experimental and computer-simulated trajectories show that the circular random motion of diatom gliding is not optimized for long-distance travel but rather for recurrent coverage of limited surface area. These results suggest that one main biological role for this type of diatom motility is to efficiently build the foundation of algal biofilms. (paper)

  1. Redshift and lateshift from homogeneous and isotropic modified dispersion relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Christian

    2018-05-01

    Observables which would indicate a modified vacuum dispersion relations, possibly caused by quantum gravity effects, are a four momentum dependence of the cosmological redshift and the existence of a so called lateshift effect for massless or very light particles. Existence or non-existence of the latter is currently analyzed on the basis of the available observational data from gamma-ray bursts and compared to predictions of specific modified dispersion relation models. We consider the most general perturbation of the general relativistic dispersion relation of freely falling particles on homogeneous and isotropic spacetimes and derive the red- and lateshift to first order in the perturbation. Our result generalizes the existing formulae in the literature and we find that there exist modified dispersion relations causing both, one or none of the two effects to first order.

  2. Isotropic covariance functions on graphs and their edges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderes, E.; Møller, Jesper; Rasmussen, Jakob Gulddahl

    We develop parametric classes of covariance functions on linear networks and their extension to graphs with Euclidean edges, i.e., graphs with edges viewed as line segments or more general sets with a coordinate system allowing us to consider points on the graph which are vertices or points...... on an edge. Our covariance functions are defined on the vertices and edge points of these graphs and are isotropic in the sense that they depend only on the geodesic distance or on a new metric called the resistance metric (which extends the classical resistance metric developed in electrical network theory...... functions in the spatial statistics literature (the power exponential, Matérn, generalized Cauchy, and Dagum classes) are shown to be valid with respect to the resistance metric for any graph with Euclidean edges, whilst they are only valid with respect to the geodesic metric in more special cases....

  3. Uhlmann's geometric phase in presence of isotropic decoherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tidstroem, Jonas; Sjoeqvist, Erik

    2003-01-01

    Uhlmann's mixed state geometric phase [Rep. Math. Phys. 24, 229 (1986)] is analyzed in the case of a qubit affected by isotropic decoherence treated in the Markovian approximation. It is demonstrated that this phase decreases rapidly with increasing decoherence rate and that it is most fragile to weak decoherence for pure or nearly pure initial states. In the unitary case, we compare Uhlmann's geometric phase for mixed states with that occurring in standard Mach-Zehnder interferometry [Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2845 (2000)] and show that the latter is more robust to reduction in the length of the Bloch vector. We also describe how Uhlmann's geometric phase in the present case could in principle be realized experimentally

  4. Isotropic radio background from quark nugget dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, Kyle; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R., E-mail: arz@physics.ubc.ca

    2013-07-09

    Recent measurements by the ARCADE2 experiment unambiguously show an excess in the isotropic radio background at frequencies below the GHz scale. We argue that this excess may be a natural consequence of the interaction of visible and dark matter in the early universe if the dark matter consists of heavy nuggets of quark matter. Explanation of the observed radio band excess requires the introduction of no new parameters, rather we exploit the same dark matter model and identical normalization parameters to those previously used to explain other excesses of diffuse emission from the centre of our galaxy. These previously observed excesses include the WMAP Haze of GHz radiation, keV X-ray emission and MeV gamma-ray radiation.

  5. Third-harmonic generation in isotropic media by focused pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasgal, Richard S.; Band, Y.B.

    2004-01-01

    For focused pulses of light in isotropic nonlinear media, third-harmonic generation can be strongly affected by group-velocity mismatch between the fundamental and third-harmonic. There is a characteristic time determined by the group-velocity mismatch and the Rayleigh range of the focused pulse. The dynamics depend on two dimensionless quantities, namely the ratio of the characteristic time to the pulse duration and the phase-velocity mismatch times the Rayleigh range. Pulses shorter than the characteristic time have physics described by simple analytic formulas. Pulses near the characteristic time have an intermediate behavior given by an explicit but more complicated formula. Pulses longer than the characteristic time tend to the continuous-wave case

  6. X-ray and Moessbauer investigations of isotropic barium ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirichok, P.P.; Pashchenko, V.A.; Dem'yaniv, T.O.; Ryabova, G.N.; Lisovskij, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    Using the methods of X-ray and γ-resonance spectroscopy the crystal chemical and magnetic structure of isotropic barium hexaferrites is studied. compacting pressure the lattice parameter c of ferrite of the BaOx5.7Fe 2 O 3 is decreased and the diffraction line width on its X-ray p attern is increased. Due to increasing the isoststical compacting pressure quadrupole splitting of the γ-resonance absorption spectrum of 57 Fe nuclei in tetrahedral positions 4f 1 and in positions 2a decreases. The sintering temperature growth leads to increasing the lattice parameter c and diffraction line widths and decreasing the effeutive field values and isomeric s hifts on 57 Fe nuclei. Isostatical compacting pressure does not affect the electron configuration of iron ions

  7. Negative refraction of inhomogeneous waves in lossy isotropic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, V Yu; Nakajima, T

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically study negative refraction of inhomogeneous waves at the interface of lossy isotropic media. We obtain explicit (up to the sign) expressions for the parameters of a wave transmitted through the interface between two lossy media characterized by complex permittivity and permeability. We show that the criterion of negative refraction that requires negative permittivity and permeability can be used only in the case of a homogeneous incident wave at the interface between a lossless and lossy media. In a more general situation, when the incident wave is inhomogeneous, or both media are lossy, the criterion of negative refraction becomes dependent on an incidence angle. Most interestingly, we show that negative refraction can be realized in conventional lossy materials (such as metals) if their interfaces are properly oriented. (paper)

  8. Deriving the equations of motion of porous isotropic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pride, S.R.; Gangi, A.F.; Morgan, F.D.

    1992-01-01

    The equations of motion and stress/strain relations for the linear dynamics of a two-phase, fluid/solid, isotropic, porous material have been derived by a direct volume averaging of the equations of motion and stress-strain relations known to apply in each phase. The equations thus obtained are shown to be consistent with Biot's equations of motion and stress/strain relations; however, the effective fluid density in the equation of relative flow has an unambiguous definition in terms of the tractions acting on the pore walls. The stress/strain relations of the theory correspond to 'quasistatic' stressing (i.e., inertial effects are ignored). It is demonstrated that using such quasistatic stress/strain relations in the equations of motion is justified whenever the wavelengths are greater than a length characteristic of the averaging volume size. 37 refs., 2 figs

  9. Waterlike glass polyamorphism in a monoatomic isotropic Jagla model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Limei; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Debenedetti, Pablo G; Stanley, H Eugene

    2011-02-14

    We perform discrete-event molecular dynamics simulations of a system of particles interacting with a spherically-symmetric (isotropic) two-scale Jagla pair potential characterized by a hard inner core, a linear repulsion at intermediate separations, and a weak attractive interaction at larger separations. This model system has been extensively studied due to its ability to reproduce many thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural anomalies of liquid water. The model is also interesting because: (i) it is very simple, being composed of isotropically interacting particles, (ii) it exhibits polyamorphism in the liquid phase, and (iii) its slow crystallization kinetics facilitate the study of glassy states. There is interest in the degree to which the known polyamorphism in glassy water may have parallels in liquid water. Motivated by parallels between the properties of the Jagla potential and those of water in the liquid state, we study the metastable phase diagram in the glass state. Specifically, we perform the computational analog of the protocols followed in the experimental studies of glassy water. We find that the Jagla potential calculations reproduce three key experimental features of glassy water: (i) the crystal-to-high-density amorphous solid (HDA) transformation upon isothermal compression, (ii) the low-density amorphous solid (LDA)-to-HDA transformation upon isothermal compression, and (iii) the HDA-to-very-high-density amorphous solid (VHDA) transformation upon isobaric annealing at high pressure. In addition, the HDA-to-LDA transformation upon isobaric heating, observed in water experiments, can only be reproduced in the Jagla model if a free surface is introduced in the simulation box. The HDA configurations obtained in cases (i) and (ii) are structurally indistinguishable, suggesting that both processes result in the same glass. With the present parametrization, the evolution of density with pressure or temperature is remarkably similar to the

  10. Elastic field of approaching dislocation loop in isotropic bimaterial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Wenwang; Xu, Shucai; Zhang, Jinhuan; Xia, Re; Qian, Guian

    2015-01-01

    A semi-analytical solution is developed for calculating interface traction stress (ITS) fields due to elastic modulus mismatch across the interface plane of isotropic perfectly bounded bimaterial system. Based on the semi-analytical approaches developed, ITS is used to correct the bulk elastic field of dislocation loop within infinite homogenous medium, and to produce continuous displacement and stress fields across the perfectly-bounded interface. Firstly, calculation examples of dislocation loops in Al–Cu bimaterial system are performed to demonstrate the efficiency of the developed semi-analytical approach; Then, the elastic fields of dislocation loops in twinning Cu and Cu–Nb bimaterial are analyzed; Finally, the effect of modulus mismatch across interface plane on the elastic field of bimaterial system is investigated, it is found that modulus mismatch has a drastic impact on the elastic fields of dislocation loops within bimaterial system. (paper)

  11. Isotropic radio background from quark nugget dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, Kyle; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent measurements by the ARCADE2 experiment unambiguously show an excess in the isotropic radio background at frequencies below the GHz scale. We argue that this excess may be a natural consequence of the interaction of visible and dark matter in the early universe if the dark matter consists of heavy nuggets of quark matter. Explanation of the observed radio band excess requires the introduction of no new parameters, rather we exploit the same dark matter model and identical normalization parameters to those previously used to explain other excesses of diffuse emission from the centre of our galaxy. These previously observed excesses include the WMAP Haze of GHz radiation, keV X-ray emission and MeV gamma-ray radiation

  12. A spatially homogeneous and isotropic Einstein-Dirac cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finster, Felix; Hainzl, Christian

    2011-04-01

    We consider a spatially homogeneous and isotropic cosmological model where Dirac spinors are coupled to classical gravity. For the Dirac spinors we choose a Hartree-Fock ansatz where all one-particle wave functions are coherent and have the same momentum. If the scale function is large, the universe behaves like the classical Friedmann dust solution. If however the scale function is small, quantum effects lead to oscillations of the energy-momentum tensor. It is shown numerically and proven analytically that these quantum oscillations can prevent the formation of a big bang or big crunch singularity. The energy conditions are analyzed. We prove the existence of time-periodic solutions which go through an infinite number of expansion and contraction cycles.

  13. Isotropic Surface Remeshing without Large and Small Angles

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yiqun

    2018-05-18

    We introduce a novel algorithm for isotropic surface remeshing which progressively eliminates obtuse triangles and improves small angles. The main novelty of the proposed approach is a simple vertex insertion scheme that facilitates the removal of large angles, and a vertex removal operation that improves the distribution of small angles. In combination with other standard local mesh operators, e.g., connectivity optimization and local tangential smoothing, our algorithm is able to remesh efficiently a low-quality mesh surface. Our approach can be applied directly or used as a post-processing step following other remeshing approaches. Our method has a similar computational efficiency to the fastest approach available, i.e., real-time adaptive remeshing [1]. In comparison with state-of-the-art approaches, our method consistently generates better results based on evaluations using different metrics.

  14. Temperature Dependence of the Viscosity of Isotropic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadzyn, J.; Czechowski, G.; Lech, T.

    1999-04-01

    Temperature dependence of the shear viscosity measured for isotropic liquids belonging to the three homologous series: 4-(trans-4'-n-alkylcyclohexyl) isothiocyanatobenzenes (Cn H2n+1 CyHx Ph NCS; nCHBT, n=0-12), n-alkylcyanobiphenyls (CnH2n+1 Ph Ph CN; nCB, n=2-12) and 1,n-alkanediols (HO(CH2)nOH; 1,nAD, n=2-10) were analysed with the use of Arrhenius equation and its two modifications: Vogel--Fulcher and proposed in this paper. The extrapolation of the isothermal viscosity of 1,n-alkanediols (n=2-10) to n=1 leads to an interesting conclusion concerning the expected viscosity of methanediol, HOCH2OH, the compound strongly unstable in a pure state.

  15. Anisotropic to Isotropic Phase Transitions in the Early Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajaib M. A.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We attempt to develop a minimal formalism to describe an anisotropic to isotropic tran- sition in the early Universe. Assuming an underlying theory that violates Lorentz in- variance, we start with a Dirac like equation, involving four massless fields, and which does not exhibit Lorentz invariance. We then perform transformations that restore it to its covariant form along with a mass term for the fermion field. It is proposed that these transformations can be visualized as waves traveling in an anisotropic media. The trans- formation it = ℏ ! is then utilized to transit to a statistical thermodynamics system and the partition function then gives a better insight into the character of this transition. The statistical system hence realized is a two level system with each state doubly degenerate. We propose that modeling the transition this way can help explain the matter antimatter asymmetry of the Universe.

  16. Mechanical metamaterials at the theoretical limit of isotropic elastic stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, J. B.; Wadley, H. N. G.; McMeeking, R. M.

    2017-02-01

    A wide variety of high-performance applications require materials for which shape control is maintained under substantial stress, and that have minimal density. Bio-inspired hexagonal and square honeycomb structures and lattice materials based on repeating unit cells composed of webs or trusses, when made from materials of high elastic stiffness and low density, represent some of the lightest, stiffest and strongest materials available today. Recent advances in 3D printing and automated assembly have enabled such complicated material geometries to be fabricated at low (and declining) cost. These mechanical metamaterials have properties that are a function of their mesoscale geometry as well as their constituents, leading to combinations of properties that are unobtainable in solid materials; however, a material geometry that achieves the theoretical upper bounds for isotropic elasticity and strain energy storage (the Hashin-Shtrikman upper bounds) has yet to be identified. Here we evaluate the manner in which strain energy distributes under load in a representative selection of material geometries, to identify the morphological features associated with high elastic performance. Using finite-element models, supported by analytical methods, and a heuristic optimization scheme, we identify a material geometry that achieves the Hashin-Shtrikman upper bounds on isotropic elastic stiffness. Previous work has focused on truss networks and anisotropic honeycombs, neither of which can achieve this theoretical limit. We find that stiff but well distributed networks of plates are required to transfer loads efficiently between neighbouring members. The resulting low-density mechanical metamaterials have many advantageous properties: their mesoscale geometry can facilitate large crushing strains with high energy absorption, optical bandgaps and mechanically tunable acoustic bandgaps, high thermal insulation, buoyancy, and fluid storage and transport. Our relatively simple

  17. Nested structures approach in designing an isotropic negative-index material for infrared

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new generic approach for designing isotropic metamaterial with nested cubic structures. As an example, a three-dimensional isotropic unit cell design "Split Cube in Cage" (SCiC) is shown to exhibit an effective negative refractive index on infrared wavelengths. We report on the refra......We propose a new generic approach for designing isotropic metamaterial with nested cubic structures. As an example, a three-dimensional isotropic unit cell design "Split Cube in Cage" (SCiC) is shown to exhibit an effective negative refractive index on infrared wavelengths. We report...

  18. Production of nuclear graphite in France; Production de graphite nucleaire en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legendre, P; Mondet, L [Societe Pechiney, 74 - Chedde (France); Arragon, Ph; Cornuault, P; Gueron, J; Hering, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    The graphite intended for the construction of the reactors is obtained by the usual process: confection of a cake from coke of oil and tar, cooked (in a electric oven) then the product of cook is graphitized, also by electric heating. The use of the air transportation and the control of conditions cooking and graphitization have permitted to increase the nuclear graphite production as well as to better control their physical and mechanical properties and to reduce to the minimum the unwanted stains. (M.B.) [French] Le graphite destine a la construction des reacteurs est obtenu par le procede usuel: confection d'une pate a partir de coke de petrole et de brai, cuisson de cette pate (au four electrique) puis graphitation du produit cuit, egalement par chauffage electrique. L'usage du transport pneumatique et le controle des conditions cuisson et de graphitation ont permit d'augmenter la production de graphite nucleaire ainsi que de mieux controler ses proprietes physiques et mecaniques et de reduire au minimum les souillures accidentelles. (M.B.)

  19. Temperature distribution in graphite during annealing in air cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Avila, C.R. de.

    1989-01-01

    A model for the evaluation temperature distributions in graphite during annealing operation in graphite. Moderated an-cooled reactors, is presented. One single channel and one dimension for air and graphite were considered. A numerical method based on finite control volumes was used for partioning the mathematical equations. The problem solution involves the use of unsteady equations of mass, momentum and energy conservation for air, and energy conservation for graphite. The source term was considered as stored energy release during annealing for describing energy conservation in the graphite. The coupling of energy conservation equations in air and graphite is performed by the heat transfer term betwen air and graphite. The results agree with experimental data. A sensitivity analysis shown that the termal conductivity of graphite and the maximum inlet channel temperature have great effect on the maximum temperature reached in graphite during the annealing. (author)

  20. Graphite matrix materials for nuclear waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1981-06-01

    At low temperatures, graphites are chemically inert to all but the strongest oxidizing agents. The raw materials from which artificial graphites are produced are plentiful and inexpensive. Morover, the physical properties of artificial graphites can be varied over a very wide range by the choice of raw materials and manufacturing processes. Manufacturing processes are reviewed herein, with primary emphasis on those processes which might be used to produce a graphite matrix for the waste forms. The approach, recommended herein, involves the low-temperature compaction of a finely ground powder produced from graphitized petroleum coke. The resultant compacts should have fairly good strength, low permeability to both liquids and gases, and anisotropic physical properties. In particular, the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficients and the thermal conductivity should be advantageous for this application. With two possible exceptions, the graphite matrix appears to be superior to the metal alloy matrices which have been recommended in prior studies. The two possible exceptions are the requirements on strength and permeability; both requirements will be strongly influenced by the containment design, including the choice of materials and the waste form, of the multibarrier package. Various methods for increasing the strength, and for decreasing the permeability of the matrix, are reviewed and discussed in the sections in Incorporation of Other Materials and Elimination of Porosity. However, it would be premature to recommend a particular process until the overall multi-barrier design is better defined. It is recommended that increased emphasis be placed on further development of the low-temperature compacted graphite matrix concept

  1. Method of producing exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z.

    2010-11-02

    The present invention provides a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., graphite and graphite oxide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm. The method comprises (a) dispersing particles of graphite, graphite oxide, or a non-graphite laminar compound in a liquid medium containing therein a surfactant or dispersing agent to obtain a stable suspension or slurry; and (b) exposing the suspension or slurry to ultrasonic waves at an energy level for a sufficient length of time to produce separated nano-scaled platelets. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  2. EEL Calculations and Measurements of Graphite and Graphitic-CNx Core-Losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seepujak, A; Bangert, U; Harvey, A J; Blank, V D; Kulnitskiy, B A; Batov, D V

    2006-01-01

    Core EEL spectra of MWCNTs (multi-wall carbon nanotubes) grown in a nitrogen atmosphere were acquired utilising a dedicated STEM equipped with a Gatan Enfina system. Splitting of the carbon K-edge π* resonance into two peaks provided evidence of two nondegenerate carbon bonding states. In order to confirm the presence of a CN x bonding state, a full-potential linearised augmented plane-wave method was utilised to simulate core EEL spectra of graphite and graphitic-CN x compounds. The simulations confirmed splitting of the carbon K-edge π* resonance in graphitic-CN x materials, with the pristine graphite π* resonance remaining unsplit. The simulations also confirmed the increasing degree of amorphicity with higher concentrations (25%) of substitutional nitrogen in graphite

  3. Removal of 14C from Irradiated Graphite for Graphite Recycle and Waste Volume Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Windes, Will; Marsden, Barry

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the research presented here was to identify the chemical form of 14 C in irradiated graphite. A greater understanding of the chemical form of this longest-lived isotope in irradiated graphite will inform not only management of legacy waste, but also development of next generation gas-cooled reactors. Approximately 250,000 metric tons of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide, with the largest single quantity originating in the Magnox and AGR reactors of UK. The waste quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation I gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 14 C, with a half-life of 5730 years.

  4. Gas transport in graphitic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoinkis, E.

    1995-02-01

    The characterization of the gas transport properties of porous solids is of interest in several fields of science and technology. Many catalysts, adsorbents, soils, graphites and carbons are porous. The gas transport through most porous solids can be well described by the dusty gas model invented by Evans, Watson and Mason. This model includes all modes of gas tranport under steady-state conditions, which are Knudsen diffusion, combined Knudsen/continuum diffusion and continuum diffusion, both for gas pairs with equal and different molecular weights. In the absence of a pressure difference gas transport in a pore system can be described by the combined Knudsen/continuum diffusion coefficient D 1 for component 1 in the pores, the Knudsen diffusion coefficient D 1K in the pores, and the continuum diffusion coefficient D 12 for a binary mixture in the pores. The resistance to stationary continuum diffusion of the pores is characterized by a geometrical factor (ε/τ) 12 = (ε/τ)D 12 , were D 12 is the continuum diffusion coefficient for a binary mixture in free space. The Wicke-Kallenbach method was often used to measure D 1 as function of pressure. D 12 and D 1K can be derived from a plot 1/D 1 νs P, and ε/τcan be calculated since D 12 is known. D 1K and the volume of dead end pores can be derived from transient measurements of the diffusional flux at low pressures. From D 1K the expression (ε/τ c ) anti l por may be calculated, which characterizes the pore system for molecular diffusion, where collisions with the pore walls are predominant. (orig.)

  5. Influence of Metal-Coated Graphite Powders on Microstructure and Properties of the Bronze-Matrix/Graphite Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-hua; Li, Pu; Tang, Qi; Zhang, Yan-qing; He, Jian-sheng; He, Ke

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the bronze-matrix/x-graphite (x = 0, 1, 3 and 5%) composites were fabricated by powder metallurgy route by using Cu-coated graphite, Ni-coated graphite and pure graphite, respectively. The microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosive behaviors of bronze/Cu-coated-graphite (BCG), bronze/Ni-coated-graphite (BNG) and bronze/pure-graphite (BPG) were characterized and investigated. Results show that the Cu-coated and Ni-coated graphite could definitely increase the bonding quality between the bronze matrix and graphite. In general, with the increase in graphite content in bronze-matrix/graphite composites, the friction coefficients, ultimate density and wear rates of BPG, BCG and BNG composites all went down. However, the Vickers microhardness of the BNG composite would increase as the graphite content increased, which was contrary to the BPG and BCG composites. When the graphite content was 3%, the friction coefficient of BNG composite was more stable than that of BCG and BPG composites, indicating that BNG composite had a better tribological performance than the others. Under all the values of applied loads (10, 20, 40 and 60N), the BCG and BNG composites exhibited a lower wear rate than BPG composite. What is more, the existence of nickel in graphite powders could effectively improve the corrosion resistance of the BNG composite.

  6. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpeux S; Cacciaguerra T; Duclaux L

    2005-01-01

    Taking into account the problems caused by the treatment of nuclear wastes, the molten salts breeder reactors are expected to a great development. They use a molten fluorinated salt (mixture of LiF, BeF 2 , ThF 4 , and UF 4 ) as fuel and coolant. The reactor core, made of graphite, is used as a neutrons moderator. Despite of its compatibility with nuclear environment, it appears crucial to improve the stability and inertness of graphite against the diffusion of chemicals species leading to its corrosion. One way is to cover the graphite surface by a protective impermeable deposit made of glassy carbon obtained by the pyrolysis of phenolic resin or polyvinyl chloride precursors. The main difficulty in the synthesis of glassy carbon is to create exclusively, in the primary pyrolysis product, a micro-porosity of about twenty Angstroms which closes later at higher temperature. Therefore, the evacuation of the volatile products occurring mainly between 330 and 600 C, must progress slowly to avoid the material to crack. In this study, the optimal parameters for the synthesis of glassy carbon as well as glassy carbon deposits on nuclear-type graphite pieces are discussed. Both thermal treatment of phenolic and PVC resins have been performed. The structure and micro-texture of glassy carbon have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and helium pycno-metry. Glassy carbon samples (obtained at 1200 C) show densities ranging from 1.3 to 1.55 g/cm 3 and closed pores with nano-metric size (∼ 5 to 10 nm) appear clearly on the TEM micrographs. Then, a thermal treatment to 2700 C leads to the shrinkage of the entangled graphene ribbons, in good agreement with the proposed texture model for glassy carbon. Glassy carbon deposits on nuclear graphite have been developed by an impregnation method. The uniformity of the deposit depends clearly on the surface texture and the chemistry of the graphite substrate. The deposit regions where

  7. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delpeux, S.; Cacciaguerra, T.; Duclaux, L. [Orleans Univ., CRMD, CNRS, 45 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Taking into account the problems caused by the treatment of nuclear wastes, the molten salts breeder reactors are expected to a great development. They use a molten fluorinated salt (mixture of LiF, BeF{sub 2}, ThF{sub 4}, and UF{sub 4}) as fuel and coolant. The reactor core, made of graphite, is used as a neutrons moderator. Despite of its compatibility with nuclear environment, it appears crucial to improve the stability and inertness of graphite against the diffusion of chemicals species leading to its corrosion. One way is to cover the graphite surface by a protective impermeable deposit made of glassy carbon obtained by the pyrolysis of phenolic resin [1,2] or polyvinyl chloride [3] precursors. The main difficulty in the synthesis of glassy carbon is to create exclusively, in the primary pyrolysis product, a micro-porosity of about twenty Angstroms which closes later at higher temperature. Therefore, the evacuation of the volatile products occurring mainly between 330 and 600 C, must progress slowly to avoid the material to crack. In this study, the optimal parameters for the synthesis of glassy carbon as well as glassy carbon deposits on nuclear-type graphite pieces are discussed. Both thermal treatment of phenolic and PVC resins have been performed. The structure and micro-texture of glassy carbon have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and helium pycno-metry. Glassy carbon samples (obtained at 1200 C) show densities ranging from 1.3 to 1.55 g/cm{sup 3} and closed pores with nano-metric size ({approx} 5 to 10 nm) appear clearly on the TEM micrographs. Then, a thermal treatment to 2700 C leads to the shrinkage of the entangled graphene ribbons (Fig 1), in good agreement with the proposed texture model for glassy carbon (Fig 2) [4]. Glassy carbon deposits on nuclear graphite have been developed by an impregnation method. The uniformity of the deposit depends clearly on the surface texture and the chemistry

  8. Hydrogen adsorption on and solubility in graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanashenko, S.L.; Wampler, W.R.

    1996-01-01

    The experimental data on adsorption and solubility of hydrogen isotopes in graphite over a wide range of temperatures and pressures are reviewed. Langmuir adsorption isotherms are proposed for the hydrogen-graphite interaction. The entropy and enthalpy of adsorption are estimated, allowing for effects of relaxation of dangling sp 2 bonds. Three kinds of traps are proposed: edge carbon atoms of interstitial loops with an adsorption enthalpy relative to H 2 gas of -4.4 eV/H 2 (unrelaxed, Trap 1), edge carbon atoms at grain surfaces with an adsorption enthalpy of -2.3 eV/H 2 (relaxed, Trap 2), and basal plane adsorption sites with an enthalpy of +2.43 eV/H 2 (Trap 3). The adsorption capacity of different types of graphite depends on the concentration of traps which depends on the crystalline microstructure of the material. The number of potential sites for the 'true solubility' (Trap 3) is assumed to be about one site per carbon atom in all types of graphite, but the endothermic character of this solubility leads to a negligible H inventory compared to the concentration of hydrogen in type 1 and type 2 traps for temperatures and gas pressures used in the experiments. Irradiation with neutrons or carbon atoms increases the concentration of type 1 and type 2 traps from about 20 and 200 appm respectively for unirradiated (POCO AXF-5Q) graphite to about 1500 and 5000 appm, respectively, at damage levels above 1 dpa. (orig.)

  9. Irradiation-induced amorphization process in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hiroaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1996-04-01

    Effects of the element process of irradiation damage on irradiation-induced amorphization processes of graphite was studied. High orientation thermal decomposed graphite was cut about 100 nm width and used as samples. The irradiation experiments are carried out under the conditions of electronic energy of 100-400 KeV, ion energy of 200-600 KeV, ionic species Xe, Ar, Ne, C and He and the irradiation temperature at from room temperature to 900 K. The critical dose ({phi}a) increases exponentially with increasing irradiation temperature. The displacement threshold energy of graphite on c-axis direction was 27 eV and {phi}a{sup e} = 0.5 dpa. dpa is the average number of displacement to atom. The critical dose of ion irradiation ({phi}a{sup i}) was 0.2 dpa at room temperature, and amorphous graphite was produced by less than half of dose of electronic irradiation. Amorphization of graphite depending upon temperature is discussed. (S.Y.)

  10. Modification of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence by solid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wontae

    2005-12-01

    Particle-laden flows are prevalent in natural and industrial environments. Dilute loadings of small, heavy particles have been observed to attenuate the turbulence levels of the carrier-phase flow, up to 80% in some cases. We attempt to increase the physical understanding of this complex phenomenon by studying the interaction of solid particles with the most fundamental type of turbulence, which is homogeneous and isotropic with no mean flow. A flow facility was developed that could create air turbulence in a nearly-spherical chamber by means of synthetic jet actuators mounted on the corners. Loudspeakers were used as the actuators. Stationary turbulence and natural decaying turbulence were investigated using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry for the base flow qualification. Results indicated that the turbulence was fairly homogeneous throughout the measurement domain and very isotropic, with small mean flow. The particle-laden flow experiments were conducted in two different environments, the lab and in micro-gravity, to examine the effects of particle wakes and flow structure distortion caused by settling particles. The laboratory experiments showed that glass particles with diameters on the order of the turbulence Kolmogorov length scale attenuated the fluid turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and dissipation rate with increasing particle mass loadings. The main source of fluid TKE production in the chamber was the speakers, but the loss of potential energy of the settling particles also resulted in a significant amount of production of extra TKE. The sink of TKE in the chamber was due to the ordinary fluid viscous dissipation and extra dissipation caused by particles. This extra dissipation could be divided into "unresolved" dissipation caused by local velocity disturbances in the vicinity of the small particles and dissipation caused by large-scale flow distortions from particle wakes and particle clusters. The micro-gravity experiments in NASA's KC-135

  11. An Isotropic Light Sensor for Measurements of Visible Actinic Flux in Clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hage, J.C.H. van der; Roode, S.R. de

    1999-01-01

    A low-cost isotropic light sensor is described consisting of a spherical diffuser connected to a single photodiode by a light conductor. The directional response to light is isotropic to a high degree. The small, lightweight, and rugged construction makes this instrument suitable not only for

  12. Dislocation density and graphitization of diamond crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantea, C.; Voronin, G.A.; Zerda, T.W.; Gubicza, J.; Ungar, T.

    2002-01-01

    Two sets of diamond specimens compressed at 2 GPa at temperatures varying between 1060 K and 1760 K were prepared; one in which graphitization was promoted by the presence of water and another in which graphitization of diamond was practically absent. X-ray diffraction peak profiles of both sets were analyzed for the microstructure by using the modified Williamson-Hall method and by fitting the Fourier coefficients of the measured profiles by theoretical functions for crystallite size and lattice strain. The procedures determined mean size and size distribution of crystallites as well as the density and the character of the dislocations. The same experimental conditions resulted in different microstructures for the two sets of samples. They were explained in terms of hydrostatic conditions present in the graphitized samples

  13. Capacitive behavior of highly-oxidized graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszewski, Mateusz; Mianowski, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    Capacitive behavior of a highly-oxidized graphite is presented in this paper. The graphite oxide was synthesized using an oxidizing mixture of potassium chlorate and concentrated fuming nitric acid. As-oxidized graphite was quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed with respect to the oxygen content and the species of oxygen-containing groups. Electrochemical measurements were performed in a two-electrode symmetric cell using KOH electrolyte. It was shown that prolonged oxidation causes an increase in the oxygen content while the interlayer distance remains constant. Specific capacitance increased with oxygen content in the electrode as a result of pseudo-capacitive effects, from 0.47 to 0.54 F/g for a scan rate of 20 mV/s and 0.67 to 1.15 F/g for a scan rate of 5 mV/s. Better cyclability was observed for the electrode with a higher oxygen amount.

  14. Reactivity of lithium exposed graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harilal, S.S.; Allain, J.P.; Hassanein, A.; Hendricks, M.R.; Nieto-Perez, M.

    2009-01-01

    Lithium as a plasma-facing component has many attractive features in fusion devices. We investigated chemical properties of the lithiated graphite surfaces during deposition using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy. In this study we try to address some of the known issues during lithium deposition, viz., the chemical state of lithium on graphite substrate, oxide layer formation mechanisms, Li passivation effects over time, and chemical change during exposure of the sample to ambient air. X-ray photoelectron studies indicate changes in the chemical composition with various thickness of lithium on graphite during deposition. An oxide layer formation is noticed during lithium deposition even though all the experiments were performed in ultrahigh vacuum. The metal oxide is immediately transformed into carbonate when the deposited sample is exposed to air.

  15. Reduced graphite oxide in supercapacitor electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Belén; Vretenár, Viliam; Kotrusz, Peter; Hulman, Martin; Centeno, Teresa A

    2015-05-15

    The current energy needs have put the focus on highly efficient energy storage systems such as supercapacitors. At present, much attention focuses on graphene-like materials as promising supercapacitor electrodes. Here we show that reduced graphite oxide offers a very interesting potential. Materials obtained by oxidation of natural graphite and subsequent sonication and reduction by hydrazine achieve specific capacitances as high as 170 F/g in H2SO4 and 84F/g in (C2H5)4NBF4/acetonitrile. Although the particle size of the raw graphite has no significant effect on the physico-chemical characteristics of the reduced materials, that exfoliated from smaller particles (materials may suffer from a drop in their specific surface area upon fabrication of electrodes with features of the existing commercial devices. This should be taken into account for a reliable interpretation of their performance in supercapacitors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sensing capabilities of graphite based MR elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, T F; Li, W H; Deng, Y M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents both experimental and theoretical investigations of the sensing capabilities of graphite based magnetorheological elastomers (MREs). In this study, eight MRE samples with varying graphite weight fractions were fabricated and their resistance under different magnetic fields and external loadings were measured with a multi-meter. With an increment of graphite weight fraction, the resistance of MRE sample decreases steadily. Higher magnetic fields result in a resistance increase. Based on an ideal assumption of a perfect chain structure, a mathematical model was developed to investigate the relationship between the MRE resistance with external loading. In this model, the current flowing through the chain structure consists of both a tunnel current and a conductivity current, both of which depend on external loadings. The modelling parameters have been identified and reconstructed from comparison with experimental results. The comparison indicates that both experimental results and modelling predictions agree favourably well

  17. Cluster Ion Implantation in Graphite and Diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Cluster ion beam technique is a versatile tool which can be used for controllable formation of nanosize objects as well as modification and processing of surfaces and shallow layers on an atomic scale. The current paper present an overview and analysis of data obtained on a few sets of graphite...... and diamond samples implanted by keV-energy size-selected cobalt and argon clusters. One of the emphases is put on pinning of metal clusters on graphite with a possibility of following selective etching of graphene layers. The other topic of concern is related to the development of scaling law for cluster...... implantation. Implantation of cobalt and argon clusters into two different allotropic forms of carbon, namely, graphite and diamond is analysed and compared in order to approach universal theory of cluster stopping in matter....

  18. Graphite based Schottky diodes formed semiconducting substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Todd; Tongay, Sefaattin; Hebard, Arthur

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate the formation of semimetal graphite/semiconductor Schottky barriers where the semiconductor is either silicon (Si), gallium arsenide (GaAs) or 4H-silicon carbide (4H-SiC). The fabrication can be as easy as allowing a dab of graphite paint to air dry on any one of the investigated semiconductors. Near room temperature, the forward-bias diode characteristics are well described by thermionic emission, and the extracted barrier heights, which are confirmed by capacitance voltage measurements, roughly follow the Schottky-Mott relation. Since the outermost layer of the graphite electrode is a single graphene sheet, we expect that graphene/semiconductor barriers will manifest similar behavior.

  19. Graphite moderated reactor for thermoelectric generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akazawa, Issei; Yamada, Akira; Mizogami, Yorikata

    1998-01-01

    Fuel rods filled with cladded fuel particles distributed and filled are buried each at a predetermined distance in graphite blocks situated in a reactor core. Perforation channels for helium gas as coolants are formed to the periphery thereof passing through vertically. An alkali metal thermoelectric power generation module is disposed to the upper lid of a reactor container while being supported by a securing receptacle. Helium gas in the coolant channels in the graphite blocks in the reactor core absorbs nuclear reaction heat, to be heated to a high temperature, rises upwardly by the reduction of the specific gravity, and then flows into an upper space above the laminated graphite block layer. Then the gas collides against a ceiling and turns, and flows down in a circular gap around the circumference of the alkali metal thermoelectric generation module. In this case, it transfers heat to the alkali metal thermoelectric generation module. (I.N.)

  20. Nondestructive evaluation of nuclear-grade graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunerth, D. C.; McJunkin, T. R.

    2012-05-01

    The material of choice for the core of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactors being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant Program is graphite. Graphite is a composite material whose properties are highly dependent on the base material and manufacturing methods. In addition to the material variations intrinsic to the manufacturing process, graphite will also undergo changes in material properties resulting from radiation damage and possible oxidation within the reactor. Idaho National Laboratory is presently evaluating the viability of conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques to characterize the material variations inherent to manufacturing and in-service degradation. Approaches of interest include x-ray radiography, eddy currents, and ultrasonics.

  1. Electrostatic Manipulation of Graphene On Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untiedt, Carlos; Rubio-Verdu, Carmen; Saenz-Arce, Giovanni; Martinez-Asencio, Jesús; Milan, David C.; Moaied, Mohamed; Palacios, Juan J.; Caturla, Maria Jose

    2015-03-01

    Here we report the use of a Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) under ambient and vacuum conditions to study the controlled exfoliation of the last layer of a graphite surface when an electrostatic force is applied from a STM tip. In this work we have focused on the study of two parameters: the applied voltage needed to compensate the graphite interlayer attractive force and the one needed to break atomic bonds to produce folded structures. Additionally, we have studied the influence of edge structure in the breaking geometry. Independently of the edge orientation the graphite layer is found to tear through the zig-zag direction and the lifled layer shows a zig-zag folding direction. Molecular Dinamics simulations and DFT calculations have been performed to understand our results, showing a strong correlation with the experiments. Comunidad Valenciana through Prometeo project.

  2. THE EFFECT OF APPLIED STRESS ON THE GRAPHITIZATION OF PYROLYTIC GRAPHITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragg, R H; Crooks, D D; Fenn, Jr, R W; Hammond, M L

    1963-06-15

    Metallographic and x-ray diffraction studies were made of the effect of applied stress at high temperature on the structure of pyrolytic graphite (PG). The dominant factor was whether the PG was above or below its graphitization temperature, which, in turn, was not strongly dependent on applied stress. Below the graphitization temperature, the PG showed a high proportion of disordered layers (0.9), a fairly large mean tilt angle (20 deg ) and a small crystailite size (La --150 A). Fracture occurred at low stress and strain and the materiai exhibited a high apparent Young's modulus ( approximates 4 x 10/sup 6/ psi). Above the graphitization temperature, graphitization was considerably enhanced by strain up to about 8%. The disorder parameter was decreased from a zero strain value of 0.3 to 0.l5 with strain, the mean tilt angle was decreased to 4 deg , and a fivefold increase in crystallite size occurred. When the strainenhanced graphitization was complete, the material exhibited a low apparent modulus ( approximates 0.5 x 10/sup 6/ psi) and large plastic strains (>100%) for a constant stress ( approximates 55 ksi). Graphitization was shown to be a spontaneous process that is promoted by breaking cross-links thermally, and the process is furthered by chemical attack and plastic strain. (auth)

  3. Brazed graphite/refractory metal composites for first-wall protection elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmid, I.; Croessmann, C. D.; Salmonson, J. C.; Whitley, J. B.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.; Kneringer, G.; Nickel, H.

    1991-03-01

    The peak surface heat flux deposition on divertor elements of near term fusion devices is expected to exceed 10 MW/m 2. The needed reliability of brazed plasma interactive components, particularly under abnormal operating conditions with peak surface temperatures well beyond 1000°C, makes refractory metallic substrates and brazes with a high melting point very attractive. TZM, a high temperature alloy of molybdenum, and isotropic graphite, materials very closely matched in their thermal expansion, were brazed with four high-temperature brazes. The brazes used were Zr, 90Ni/10Ti, 90Cu/10Ti and 70Ag/27Cu/3Ti (nominal composition prior to brazing, wt%). The resulting composite tiles of 50 × 50 mm2 with a TZM thickness of 5 mm and a graphite thickness of 10 mm have been tested in high heat flux simulation for their thermal fatigue properties. Up to 600 loading cycles were carried out with an average heat flux of 10 MW/m 2 for 0.5 s pulses. The maximum surface temperature was 1100°C. In support of the experiment, the thermal response and temperature gradients of the samples were investigated using a finite element model.

  4. Brazed graphite/refractory metal composites for first-wall protection elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smid, I.; Croessmann, C.D.; Salmonson, J.C.; Whitley, J.B.; Nickel, H.

    1991-01-01

    The peak surface heat flux deposition on divertor elements of near term fusion devices is expected to exceed 10 MW/m 2 . The needed reliability of brazed plasma interactive components, particularly under abnormal operating conditions with peak surface temperatures well beyond 1000deg C, makes refractory metallic substrates and brazes with a high melting point very attractive. TZM, a high temperature alloy of molybdenum, and isotropic graphite, materials very closely matched in their thermal expansion, were brazed with four high-temperature brazes. The brazes used were Zr, 90Ni/10Ti, 90Cu/10Ti and 70Ag/27Cu/3Ti (nominal composition prior to brazing, wt%). The resulting composite tiles of 50x50 mm 2 with a TZM thickness of 5 mm and a graphite thickness of 10 mm have been tested in high heat flux simulation for their thermal fatigue properties. Up to 600 loading cycles were carried out with an average heat flux of 10 MW/m 2 for 0.5 s pulses. The maximum surface temperature was 1100deg C. In support of the experiment, the thermal response and temperature gradients of the samples were investigated using a finite element model. (orig.)

  5. Brazed graphite/refractory metal composites for first-wall protection elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smid, I.; Croessmann, C. D.; Salmonson, J. C.; Whitley, J. B.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.; Kneringer, G.; Nickel, H.

    1995-01-01

    The peak surface heat flux deposition on divertor elements of near term fusion devices is expected to exceed 10 MW/m 2 . The needed reliability of brazed plasma interactive components, particularly under abnormal operating conditions with peak surface temperatures well beyond 1000 degree C, makes refractory metallic substrates and brazes with a high melting point very attractive. TZM, a high temperature alloy of molybdenum, and isotropic graphite, materials very closely matched in their thermal expansion, were brazed with four high-temperature brazes. The brazes used were Zr, 90Ni/10Ti, 90Cu/10Ti and 70Ag/27Cu/3Ti (nominal composition prior to brazing, wt%). The resulting composite tiles of 5O X 50 mm 2 with a TZM thickness of 5 mm and a graphite thickness of 10 mm have been tested in high heat flux simulation for their thermal fatigue properties. Up to 600 loading cycles were carried out with an average heat flux of 10 MW/m 2 for 0.5 s pulses. The maximum surface temperature was 1100 degree C. In support of the experiment, the thermal response and temperature gradients of the samples were investigated using a finite element model. (author)

  6. Brazed graphite/refractory metal composites for first wall protection elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smid, I.; Croessmann, C. D.; Salmonson, J. C.; Whitley, J. B.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N; Kneringer, G.; Nickel, H.

    1995-01-01

    The peak surface heat flux deposition on divertor elements of near term fusion devices is expected to exceed 10 MW/m 2 . The needed reliability of brazed plasma interactive components, particularly under abnormal operating conditions with peak surface temperatures well beyond 1000 degree C, makes refractory metallic substrates and brazes with a high melting point very attractive. TZM, a high temperature alloy of molybdenum, and isotropic graphite, materials very closely matched in their thermal expansion, were brazed with four high-temperature brazes. The brazes used were Zr, 90Ni/10Ti, 90Cu/10Ti and 70Ag/27Cu/10Ti (nominal composition prior to brazing, wt%). The resulting composite tiles of 50 x 50 mm with a TZM thickness of 5 mm and a graphite thickness of 10 mm have been tested in high heat flux simulation for their thermal fatigue properties. Up to 600 loading cycles were carried out with the experimental parameters chosen to cover NET/ITER design specifications. In support of the experiment, the thermal response and temperature gradients of the samples were investigated using a finite element model. (author)

  7. Cyclic fatigue of near-isotopic graphite: influence of stress cycle and neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.J.

    1977-11-01

    Near-isotropic graphites H-451 and PGX were tested in uniaxial cyclic fatigue, and fatigue life (S-N) curves were generated to a maximum of 10 5 cycles. The stress ratio, R (minimum stress during a cycle divided by maximum stress) ranged from -1 to +0.5. With R = - 1, the homologous stress limits (maximum applied fatigue stress divided by the tensile strength) for 50% specimen survival to 10 5 cycles averaged 0.63 in the axial direction and 0.74 in the radial direction. Corresponding homologous stress limits for 99% specimen survival (99/95 tolerance limits) were 0.48 and 0.53. Higher R-values resulted in longer fatigue lives and increased stress limits. H-451 graphite specimens irradiated with fast neutrons at 1173 to 1263 0 K at fluences of up to 10 26 n/m 2 (equivalent fission fluence) showed fatigue stress limits of about twice the unirradiated levels when the unirradiated tensile strength was used as the basis for normalization

  8. Cementation of Nuclear Graphite Using Geopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girke, N.A.; Steinmetz, H-J.; Bukaemsky, A.; Bosbach, D.; Hermann, E.; Griebel, I.

    2016-01-01

    Geopolymers are solid aluminosilicate materials usually formed by alkali hydroxide or alkali silicate activation of solid precursors such as coal fly ash, calcined clay and/or metallurgical slag. Today the primary application of geopolymer technology is in the development of alternatives to Portland-based cements. Variations in the ratio of aluminium to silicon, and alkali to silicon or addition of structure support, produce geopolymers with different physical and mechanical properties. These materials have an amorphous three-dimensional structure that gives geopolymers certain properties, such as fire and acid resistance, low leach rate, which make them an ideal substitute for ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in a wide range of applications especially in conditioning and storage of radioactive waste. Therefore investigations have been initiated on how and to which amount graphite as a hydrophobic material can be mixed with cement or concrete to form stable waste products and which concretes fulfil the necessary specifications best. As a result, geopolymers have been identified as a promising matrix for graphite containing nuclear wastes. With geopolymers, both favourable properties in the cementation process and a high long time structural stability of the products can be achieved. Investigations include: • direct mixing of graphite with geopolymers with or without sand as a mechanically stabilizing medium; • production of cement-graphite granulates as intermediate products and embedding of these granulates in geopolymer; • coating of formed graphite pieces with geopolymer.The report shows that carbon in the form of graphite can both be integrated with different grain size spectra as well as shaped in the hydraulic binder geopolymer and meets the requirements for a stable long-term immobilisation. (author)

  9. Graphite crystals grown within electromagnetically levitated metallic droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amini, Shaahin; Kalaantari, Haamun; Mojgani, Sasan; Abbaschian, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Various graphite morphologies were observed to grow within the electromagnetically levitated nickel–carbon melts, including primary flakes and spheres, curved surface graphite and eutectic flakes, as well as engulfed and entrapped particles. As the supersaturated metallic solutions were cooled within the electromagnetic (EM) levitation coil, the primary graphite flakes and spheres formed and accumulated near the periphery of the droplet due to EM circulation. The primary graphite islands, moreover, nucleated and grew on the droplet surface which eventually formed a macroscopic curved graphite crystal covering the entire liquid. Upon further cooling, the liquid surrounding the primary graphite went under a coupled eutectic reaction while the liquid in the center formed a divorced eutectic due to EM mixing. This brought about the formation of graphite fine flakes and agglomerated particles close to the surface and in the center of the droplet, respectively. The graphite morphologies, growth mechanisms, defects, irregularities and growth instabilities were interpreted with detailed optical and scanning electron microscopies.

  10. Expansion and exfoliation of graphite to form graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Patole, Shashikan P.; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.

    2017-01-01

    Graphene production methods are described based on subjecting non- covalent graphite intercalated compounds, such as graphite bisulfate, to expansion conditions such as shocks of heat and/or microwaves followed by turbulence-assisted exfoliation

  11. A 2-D nucleation-growth model of spheroidal graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacaze, Jacques; Bourdie, Jacques; Castro-Román, Manuel Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of recent experimental investigations, in particular by transmission electron microscopy, suggests spheroidal graphite grows by 2-D nucleation of new graphite layers at the outer surface of the nodules. These layers spread over the surface along the prismatic direction of graphite which is the energetically preferred growth direction of graphite when the apparent growth direction of the nodules is along the basal direction of graphite. 2-D nucleation-growth models first developed for precipitation of pure substances are then adapted to graphite growth from the liquid in spheroidal graphite cast irons. Lateral extension of the new graphite layers is controlled by carbon diffusion in the liquid. This allows describing quantitatively previous experimental results giving strong support to this approach.

  12. Coordinated Isotopic and TEM Studies of Presolar Graphites from Murchison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croat, T. K.; Stadermann, F. J.; Zinner, E.; Bernatowicz, T. J.

    2004-03-01

    TEM and NanoSIMS investigations of the same presolar Murchison KFC graphites revealed high Zr, Mo, and Ru content in refractory carbides within the graphites. Along with isotopically light carbon, these suggest a low-metallicity AGB source.

  13. London forces in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Poperenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite with terrace steps was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy with high spatial resolution. Spots with positive and negative charges were found in the vicinity of the steps. Values of the charges depended both on the microscope needle scan velocity and on its motion direction. The observed effect was theoretically explained with account of London forces that arise between the needle tip and the graphite surface. In this scheme, a terrace step works as a nanoscale diode for surface electric currents.

  14. Large Scale Reduction of Graphite Oxide Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos; Mackey, Paul; Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop an optical method to reduce graphite oxide into graphene efficiently and in larger formats than currently available. Current reduction methods are expensive, time-consuming or restricted to small, limited formats. Graphene has potential uses in ultracapacitors, energy storage, solar cells, flexible and light-weight circuits, touch screens, and chemical sensors. In addition, graphite oxide is a sustainable material that can be produced from any form of carbon, making this method environmentally friendly and adaptable for in-situ reduction.

  15. Chemical atomization of graphite by H+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busharov, I.P.; Gorbatov, E.A.; Gusev, V.M.; Guseva, M.I.; Martynenko, Yu.V.

    A simple model of the mechanism of chemical atomization is given, on whose basis a decrease in chemical atomization is qualitatively predicted for high temperatures. Mass spectrometric investigations of the atomization products cited, which found CH 4 and CH 3 molecules during the irradiation of graphite and H + ions thereby confirmed the presence of chemical atomization. A relationship of S and temperature of graphite T during irradiation was obtained which showed a decrease in the coefficient of atomization of a high temperature. (U.S.)

  16. The electrochemical properties of graphite and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeager, E.; Gupta, S.; Molla, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon and graphite are often used as supports for electrocatalysts, but also have an electrocatalytic function in such electrode reactions as O 2 reduction in alkaline electrolytes, Cl 2 generation in brine and SOCl 2 reduction in lithium-thionyl chloride batteries. These catalytic functions involve specific chemical functional groups bound to the carbon and graphite surfaces. The factors controlling O 2 reduction with various types of carbon electrodes of both low and high surface area are reviewed. Of particular importance is the role of hydrogen peroxide. The role of the functionality of the carbon in the electrocatalysis will be discussed

  17. Radiation creep of graphite. An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackstone, R [Commission of the European Communities, Petten (Netherlands). Joint Nuclear Research Center

    1977-03-01

    Graphite, a class of materials with many unique and unusual properties, shows a remarkably high creep ductility under irradiation. As this behaviour compensates to some extent some of the more worrying radiation effects, such as dimensional changes and their strong temperature dependence, it is a property of large technological interest. There are various ways of observing and measuring in-pile creep of graphite, varying in degree of sophistication and in cost, in accuracy and in the type of data that is generated. This paper attempts to review briefly the various experimental methods, and the knowledge generated so far. An indication is given of the areas in which further knowledge is wanted.

  18. Radiation creep of graphite. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, R.

    1977-01-01

    Graphite, a class of materials with many unique and unusual properties, shows a remarkably high creep ductility under irradiation. As this behavior compensates to some extent some of the more worrying radiation effects, such as dimensional changes and their strong temperature dependence, it is a property of large technological interest. There are various ways of observing and measuring in-pile creep of graphite, varying in degree of sophistication and in cost, in accuracy and in the type of data that is generated. This paper attempts to review briefly the various experimental methods, and the knowledge generated so far. An indication is given of the areas in which further knowledge is wanted

  19. Radiation creep of graphite. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, R.

    1977-01-01

    Graphite, a class of materials with many unique and unusual properties, shows a remarkably high creep ductility under irradiation. As this behaviour compensates to some extent some of the more worrying radiation effects, such as dimensional changes and their strong temperature dependence, it is a property of large technological interest. There are various ways of observing and measuring in-pile creep of graphite, varying in degree of sophistication and in cost, in accuracy and in the type of data that is generated. This paper attempts to review briefly the various experimental methods, and the knowledge generated so far. An indication is given of the areas in which further knowledge is wanted. (Auth.)

  20. Electrical properties of Egyptian natural graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shazly, O.; El-Wahidy, E.F.; Elanany, N.; Saad, N.A.

    1992-06-01

    The electrical properties of Egyptian natural graphite flakes, obtained from the graphite schists of Wadi Bent, Eastern Desert, were measured. The flakes were ground and compressed into pellets. The standard four probe dc method was used to measure the temperature dependence of the electric resistivity from room temperature down to 12 K. The transverse and longitudinal magnetoresistance were measured in the low magnetic field range at temperatures 300 K, 77 K and 12 K. The transverse magnetoresistance data was used to estimate the average mobility, assuming a simple two-band model. (author). 20 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  1. Direct reading spectrochemical analysis of nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca Adell, M.; Becerro Ruiz, E.; Alvarez Gonzalez, F.

    1964-01-01

    A description is given about the application of a direct-reading spectrometer the Quantometer, to the determination of boron. calcium, iron, titanium and vanadium in nuclear grade graphite. for boron the powdered sample is mixed with 1% cupric fluoride and excited in a 10-amperes direct current arc and graphite electrodes with a crater 7 mm wide and 10 mm deep. For the other elements a smaller crater has been used and dilution with a number of matrices has been investigated; the best results are achieved by employing 25% cupric fluoride. The sensitivity limit for boron is 0,15 ppm. (Author) 21 refs

  2. Graphite target for the spiral project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putaux, J.C.; Ducourtieux, M.; Ferro, A.; Foury, P.; Kotfila, L.; Mueller, A.C.; Obert, J.; Pauwels, N.; Potier, J.C.; Proust, J.; Loiselet, M.

    1996-01-01

    A study of the thermal and physical properties of graphite targets for the SPIRAL project is presented. The main objective is to develop an optimized set-up both mechanically and thermally resistant, presenting good release properties (hot targets with thin slices). The results of irradiation tests concerning the mechanical and thermal resistance of the first prototype of SPIRAL target with conical geometry are presented. The micro-structural properties of the graphite target is also studied, in order to check that the release properties are not deteriorated by the irradiation. Finally, the results concerning the latest pilot target internally heated by an electrical current are shown. (author)

  3. Monte Carlo calculation of standard graphite block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljubenov, V.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents results of calculation of neutron flux space and energy distribution in the standard graphite block (SGB) obtained by the MCNP TM code. VMCCS nuclear data library, based on the ENDF / B-VI release 4 evaluation file, is used. MCNP model of the SGB considers detailed material, geometric and spectral properties of the neutron source, source carrier, graphite moderator medium, aluminium foil holders and proximate surrounding of SGB Geometric model is organised to provide the simplest homogeneous volume cells in order to obtain the maximum acceleration of neutron history tracking (author)

  4. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy of isotropic and anisotropic metallic nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Hernandez, R C; Gleason-Villagran, R; Cheang-Wong, J C; Crespo-Sosa, A; Rodriguez-Fernandez, L; Lopez-Suarez, A; Oliver, A; Reyes-Esqueda, J A [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D. F. 04510 (Mexico); Torres-Torres, C [Seccion de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion, ESIME-Zacatenco, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D. F. 07338 (Mexico); Rangel-Rojo, R, E-mail: reyes@fisica.unam.mx [CICESE/Depto. de Optica, A.P. 360, Ensenada, B. C. 22860 (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we studied the nonlinear absorption and refraction of isotropic and anisotropic metallic nanocomposites, which consist of Au and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in matrices of SiO{sub 2}. We performed this study at different wavelengths using the Z-scan technique in the picosecond regime. The wavelengths were selected accordingly to the absorption spectra of the nanocomposites, choosing wavelengths into the inter- and intra-band transitions regions, including the surface plasmon (SP) resonance, as well as in the transparent region. For the anisotropic nanocomposites, the polarization and the incident angle were varied in order to evaluate the different components of the third order susceptibility tensor, {chi}{sup (3)}. We observed dramatic changes of sign for both, nonlinear refraction and absorption, when passing from Au to Ag and/or varying the wave length. The results accentuate the importance of the hot-electrons contribution to the nonlinear optical response at this temporal regime, when compared to inter-band and intra-band transitions contributions.

  5. An efficient Helmholtz solver for acoustic transversely isotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2017-11-11

    The acoustic approximation, even for anisotropic media, is widely used in current industry imaging and inversion algorithms mainly because P-waves constitute the majority of the energy recorded in seismic exploration. The resulting acoustic formulas tend to be simpler, resulting in more efficient implementations, and depend on less medium parameters. However, conventional solutions of the acoustic wave equation with higher-order derivatives suffer from S-wave artifacts. Thus, we propose to separate the quasi-P wave propagation in anisotropic media into the elliptic anisotropic operator (free of the artifacts) and the non-elliptic-anisotropic components, which form a pseudo-differential operator. We, then, develop a separable approximation of the dispersion relation of non-elliptic-anisotropic components, specifically for transversely isotropic (TI) media. Finally, we iteratively solve the simpler lower-order elliptical wave equation for a modified source function that includes the non-elliptical terms represented in the Fourier domain. A frequency domain Helmholtz formulation of the approach renders the iterative implementation efficient as the cost is dominated by the Lower-Upper (LU) decomposition of the impedance matrix for the simpler elliptical anisotropic model. Also, the resulting wavefield is free of S-wave artifacts and has balanced amplitude. Numerical examples show that the method is reasonably accurate and efficient.

  6. Magnetic hysteresis measurements of thin films under isotropic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Patrick; Dubey, Archana; Geerts, Wilhelmus

    2000-10-01

    Nowadays, ferromagnetic thin films are widely applied in devices for information technology (credit cards, video recorder tapes, floppies, hard disks) and sensors (air bags, anti-breaking systems, navigation systems). Thus, with the increase in the use of magnetic media continued investigation of magnetic properties of materials is necessary to help in determining the useful properties of materials for new or improved applications. We are currently interested in studying the effect of applied external stress on Kerr hysteresis curves of thin magnetic films. The Ni and NiFe films were grown using DC magnetron sputtering with Ar as the sputter gas (pAr=4 mTorr; Tsub=55-190 C). Seed and cap layers of Ti were used on all films for adhesion and oxidation protection, respectively. A brass membrane pressure cell was designed to apply in-plane isotropic stress to thin films. In this pressure cell, gas pressure is used to deform a flexible substrate onto which a thin magnetic film has been sputtered. The curvature of the samples could be controlled by changing the gas pressure to the cell. Magneto-Optical in-plane hysteresis curves at different values of strain were measured. The results obtained show that the stress sensitivity is dependent on the film thickness. For the 500nm NiFe films, the coercivity strongly decreased as a function of the applied stress.

  7. Scalar Statistics along Inertial Particle Trajectory in Isotropic Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ya-Ming, Liu; Zhao-Hui, Liu; Hai-Feng, Han; Jing, Li; Han-Feng, Wang; Chu-Guang, Zheng

    2009-01-01

    The statistics of a passive scalar along inertial particle trajectory in homogeneous isotropic turbulence with a mean scalar gradient is investigated by using direct numerical simulation. We are interested in the influence of particle inertia on such statistics, which is crucial for further understanding and development of models in non-isothermal gas-particle flows. The results show that the scalar variance along particle trajectory decreases with the increasing particle inertia firstly; when the particle's Stokes number S t is less than 1.0, it reaches the minimal value when S t is around 1.0, then it increases if S t increases further. However, the scalar dissipation rate along the particle trajectory shows completely contrasting behavior in comparison with the scalar variance. The mechanical-to-thermal time scale ratios averaged along particle, p , are approximately two times smaller than that computed in the Eulerian frame r, and stay at nearly 1.77 with a weak dependence on particle inertia. In addition, the correlations between scalar dissipation and now structure characteristics along particle trajectories, such as strain and vorticity, are also computed, and they reach their maximum and minimum, 0.31 and 0.25, respectively, when S t is around 1.0. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  8. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy of isotropic and anisotropic metallic nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Hernandez, R C; Gleason-Villagran, R; Cheang-Wong, J C; Crespo-Sosa, A; Rodriguez-Fernandez, L; Lopez-Suarez, A; Oliver, A; Reyes-Esqueda, J A; Torres-Torres, C; Rangel-Rojo, R

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we studied the nonlinear absorption and refraction of isotropic and anisotropic metallic nanocomposites, which consist of Au and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in matrices of SiO 2 . We performed this study at different wavelengths using the Z-scan technique in the picosecond regime. The wavelengths were selected accordingly to the absorption spectra of the nanocomposites, choosing wavelengths into the inter- and intra-band transitions regions, including the surface plasmon (SP) resonance, as well as in the transparent region. For the anisotropic nanocomposites, the polarization and the incident angle were varied in order to evaluate the different components of the third order susceptibility tensor, χ (3) . We observed dramatic changes of sign for both, nonlinear refraction and absorption, when passing from Au to Ag and/or varying the wave length. The results accentuate the importance of the hot-electrons contribution to the nonlinear optical response at this temporal regime, when compared to inter-band and intra-band transitions contributions.

  9. Three-dimensional magnetospheric equilibrium with isotropic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1995-05-01

    In the absence of the toroidal flux, two coupled quasi two-dimensional elliptic equilibrium equations have been derived to describe self-consistent three-dimensional static magnetospheric equilibria with isotropic pressure in an optimal (Ψ,α,χ) flux coordinate system, where Ψ is the magnetic flux function, χ is a generalized poloidal angle, α is the toroidal angle, α = φ - δ(Ψ,φ,χ) is the toroidal angle, δ(Ψ,φ,χ) is periodic in φ, and the magnetic field is represented as rvec B = ∇Ψ x ∇α. A three-dimensional magnetospheric equilibrium code, the MAG-3D code, has been developed by employing an iterative metric method. The main difference between the three-dimensional and the two-dimensional axisymmetric solutions is that the field-aligned current and the toroidal magnetic field are finite for the three-dimensional case, but vanish for the two-dimensional axisymmetric case. With the same boundary flux surface shape, the two-dimensional axisymmetric results are similar to the three-dimensional magnetosphere at each local time cross section

  10. Random isotropic one-dimensional XY-model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, L. L.; Vieira, A. P.

    1998-01-01

    The 1D isotropic s = ½XY-model ( N sites), with random exchange interaction in a transverse random field is considered. The random variables satisfy bimodal quenched distributions. The solution is obtained by using the Jordan-Wigner fermionization and a canonical transformation, reducing the problem to diagonalizing an N × N matrix, corresponding to a system of N noninteracting fermions. The calculations are performed numerically for N = 1000, and the field-induced magnetization at T = 0 is obtained by averaging the results for the different samples. For the dilute case, in the uniform field limit, the magnetization exhibits various discontinuities, which are the consequence of the existence of disconnected finite clusters distributed along the chain. Also in this limit, for finite exchange constants J A and J B, as the probability of J A varies from one to zero, the saturation field is seen to vary from Γ A to Γ B, where Γ A(Γ B) is the value of the saturation field for the pure case with exchange constant equal to J A(J B) .

  11. An efficient Helmholtz solver for acoustic transversely isotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    The acoustic approximation, even for anisotropic media, is widely used in current industry imaging and inversion algorithms mainly because P-waves constitute the majority of the energy recorded in seismic exploration. The resulting acoustic formulas tend to be simpler, resulting in more efficient implementations, and depend on less medium parameters. However, conventional solutions of the acoustic wave equation with higher-order derivatives suffer from S-wave artifacts. Thus, we propose to separate the quasi-P wave propagation in anisotropic media into the elliptic anisotropic operator (free of the artifacts) and the non-elliptic-anisotropic components, which form a pseudo-differential operator. We, then, develop a separable approximation of the dispersion relation of non-elliptic-anisotropic components, specifically for transversely isotropic (TI) media. Finally, we iteratively solve the simpler lower-order elliptical wave equation for a modified source function that includes the non-elliptical terms represented in the Fourier domain. A frequency domain Helmholtz formulation of the approach renders the iterative implementation efficient as the cost is dominated by the Lower-Upper (LU) decomposition of the impedance matrix for the simpler elliptical anisotropic model. Also, the resulting wavefield is free of S-wave artifacts and has balanced amplitude. Numerical examples show that the method is reasonably accurate and efficient.

  12. Stochastic isotropic hyperelastic materials: constitutive calibration and model selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, L. Angela; Woolley, Thomas E.; Goriely, Alain

    2018-03-01

    Biological and synthetic materials often exhibit intrinsic variability in their elastic responses under large strains, owing to microstructural inhomogeneity or when elastic data are extracted from viscoelastic mechanical tests. For these materials, although hyperelastic models calibrated to mean data are useful, stochastic representations accounting also for data dispersion carry extra information about the variability of material properties found in practical applications. We combine finite elasticity and information theories to construct homogeneous isotropic hyperelastic models with random field parameters calibrated to discrete mean values and standard deviations of either the stress-strain function or the nonlinear shear modulus, which is a function of the deformation, estimated from experimental tests. These quantities can take on different values, corresponding to possible outcomes of the experiments. As multiple models can be derived that adequately represent the observed phenomena, we apply Occam's razor by providing an explicit criterion for model selection based on Bayesian statistics. We then employ this criterion to select a model among competing models calibrated to experimental data for rubber and brain tissue under single or multiaxial loads.

  13. Line-scanning tomographic optical microscope with isotropic transfer function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajdátsy, Gábor; Dudás, László; Erdélyi, Miklós; Szabó, Gábor

    2010-01-01

    An imaging method and optical system, referred to as a line-scanning tomographic optical microscope (LSTOM) using a combination of line-scanning technique and CT reconstruction principle, is proposed and studied theoretically and experimentally. In our implementation a narrow focus line is scanned over the sample and the reflected light is measured in a confocal arrangement. One such scan is equivalent to a transverse projection in tomography. Repeating the scanning procedure in several directions, a number of transverse projections are recorded from which the image can be obtained using conventional CT reconstruction algorithms. The resolution of the image is independent of the spatial dimensions and structure of the applied detector; furthermore, the transfer function of the system is isotropic. The imaging performance of the implemented confocal LSTOM was compared with a point-scanning confocal microscope, based on recorded images. These images demonstrate that the resolution of the confocal LSTOM exceeds (by 15%) the resolution limit of a point-scanning confocal microscope

  14. STS Observations of Landau Levels at Graphite Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Matsui, T.; Kambara, H.; Niimi, Y.; Tagami, K.; Tsukada, M.; Fukuyama, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements were made on surfaces of two different kinds of graphite samples, Kish graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), at very low temperatures and in high magnetic fields. We observed a series of peaks in the tunnel spectra, which grow with increasing field, both at positive and negative bias voltages. These are associated with Landau quantization of the quasi two-dimensional electrons and holes in graphite in magnetic fields perpendicular...

  15. Electronic structure of incident carbon ions on a graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Masato; Takeuchi, Takae; Yamamoto, Masao.

    1997-01-01

    The electronic structure of an incident carbon ion on a graphite surface is discussed on the basis of ab initio molecular orbital calculations. A carbon cation forms a covalent bond with the graphite, and a carbon nonion is attracted to the graphite surface through van der Waals interaction. A carbon anion has no stable state on a graphite surface. The charge effects of incident ions become clear upon detailed examination of the electronic structure. (author)

  16. Mesocarbon microbead based graphite for spherical fuel element to inhibit the infiltration of liquid fluoride salt in molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yajuan, E-mail: yajuan.zhong@gmail.com [Center for Thorium Molten Salt Reactor System, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); CAS Key Laboratory of Carbon Materials, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Zhang, Junpeng [CAS Key Laboratory of Carbon Materials, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Lin, Jun, E-mail: linjun@sinap.ac.cn [Center for Thorium Molten Salt Reactor System, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Xu, Liujun [Center for Thorium Molten Salt Reactor System, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Feng; Xu, Hongxia; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Haitao; Li, Ziwei; Zhu, Zhiyong [Center for Thorium Molten Salt Reactor System, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Guo, Quangui [CAS Key Laboratory of Carbon Materials, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB) and quasi-isostatic pressing method were used to prepare MCMB based graphite (MG) for spherical fuel element to inhibit the infiltration of liquid fluoride salt in molten salt reactor (MSR). Characteristics of mercury infiltration and molten salt infiltration in MG were investigated and compared with A3-3 (graphite for spherical fuel element in high temperature gas cooled reactor) to identify the infiltration behaviors. The results indicated that MG had a low porosity about 14%, and an average pore diameter of 96 nm. Fluoride salt occupation of A3-3 (average pore diameter was 760 nm) was 10 wt% under 6.5 atm, whereas salt gain did not infiltrate in MG even up to 6.5 atm. It demonstrated that MG could inhibit the infiltration of liquid fluoride salt effectively. Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of MG lies in 6.01 × 10{sup −6} K{sup −1} (α{sub ∥}) and 6.15 × 10{sup −6} K{sup −1} (α{sub ⊥}) at the temperature range of 25–700 °C. The anisotropy factor of MG calculated by CTE maintained below 1.02, which could meet the requirement of the spherical fuel element (below 1.30). The constant isotropic property of MG is beneficial for the integrity and safety of the graphite used in the spherical fuel element for a MSR.

  17. Mesocarbon microbead based graphite for spherical fuel element to inhibit the infiltration of liquid fluoride salt in molten salt reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Yajuan; Zhang, Junpeng; Lin, Jun; Xu, Liujun; Zhang, Feng; Xu, Hongxia; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Haitao; Li, Ziwei; Zhu, Zhiyong; Guo, Quangui

    2017-01-01

    Mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB) and quasi-isostatic pressing method were used to prepare MCMB based graphite (MG) for spherical fuel element to inhibit the infiltration of liquid fluoride salt in molten salt reactor (MSR). Characteristics of mercury infiltration and molten salt infiltration in MG were investigated and compared with A3-3 (graphite for spherical fuel element in high temperature gas cooled reactor) to identify the infiltration behaviors. The results indicated that MG had a low porosity about 14%, and an average pore diameter of 96 nm. Fluoride salt occupation of A3-3 (average pore diameter was 760 nm) was 10 wt% under 6.5 atm, whereas salt gain did not infiltrate in MG even up to 6.5 atm. It demonstrated that MG could inhibit the infiltration of liquid fluoride salt effectively. Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of MG lies in 6.01 × 10 −6 K −1 (α ∥ ) and 6.15 × 10 −6 K −1 (α ⊥ ) at the temperature range of 25–700 °C. The anisotropy factor of MG calculated by CTE maintained below 1.02, which could meet the requirement of the spherical fuel element (below 1.30). The constant isotropic property of MG is beneficial for the integrity and safety of the graphite used in the spherical fuel element for a MSR.

  18. Effect of thermal annealing on property changes of neutron-irradiated non-graphitized carbon materials and nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Hideto

    1991-06-01

    Changes in dimension of non-graphitized carbon materials and nuclear graphite, and the bulk density, electrical resistivity, Young's modulus and thermal expansivity of nuclear graphite were studied after neutron irradiation at 1128-1483 K and the successive thermal annealing up to 2573 K. Carbon materials showed larger and anisotropic dimensional shrinkage than that of nuclear graphite after the irradiation. The irradiation-induced dimensional shrinkage of carbon materials decreased during annealing at temperatures from 1773 to 2023 K, followed by a slight increase at higher temperatures. On the other hand, the irradiated nuclear graphite hardly showed the changes in length, density and thermal expansivity under the thermal annealing, but the electrical resistivity and Young's modulus showed a gradual decrease with annealing temperature. It has been clarified that there exists significant difference in the effect of thermal annealing on irradiation-induced dimensional shrinkage between graphitized nuclear graphite and non-graphitized carbon materials. (author)

  19. Oxidation behavior of IG and NBG nuclear graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Woong-Ki; Kim, Byung-Joo [Jeonju Institute of Machinery and Carbon Composites Palbokdong-2ga, 817, Jeonju, Jeollabuk-do 561-844 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung-Seon; Chi, Se-Hwan [Dept. of Nuclear Hydrogen Project, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Jin, E-mail: sjpark@inha.ac.k [Dept. of Chemistry, Inha Univ., 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Water contact angles on nuclear graphite before and after oxidation treatments: the pictures show the contact angles obtained under deionized water on oxidation-treated and untreated nuclear graphite. The water contact angles are decreased after oxidation due to the increase in the hydrophilic. Display Omitted Research highlights: The average pore size of graphites shows an increase after the oxidation treatments. They also show that oxidation produces the surface functional groups on the graphite surfaces. The surface area of each graphite behaves in a unique manner. - Abstract: This work studies the oxidation-induced characteristics of four nuclear graphites (NBG-17, NBG-25, IG-110, and IG-430). The oxidation characteristics of the nuclear graphites were measured at 600 {sup o}C. The surface properties of the oxidation graphites were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and contact angle methods. The N{sub 2}/77 K adsorption isotherm characteristics, including the specific surface area and micropore volume, were investigated by means of BET and t-plot methods. The experimental results show an increase in the average pore size of graphites; they also show that oxidation produces the surface functional groups on the graphite surfaces. The surface area of each graphite behaves in a unique manner. For example the surface area of NBG-17 increases slightly whereas the surface area of IG-110 increases significantly. This result confirms that the original surface state of each graphite is unique.

  20. Influence of irradiation on high-strength graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgil'ev, Yu.S.; Grebennik, V.N.; Kalyagina, I.P.

    1989-01-01

    To ensure efficiency of the graphite elements of the construction of the masonry of reactors, the graphite must possess high radiation stability, strength, and heat resistance. In this connection, the physical properties of graphites based on uncalcined petroleum coke with a binder - high-temperature hard coal pitch - the amount of which reaches 40% are considered in this paper

  1. Porous graphite electrodes for rechargeable ion-transfer batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, P; Scheifele, W; Haas, O [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The influence of preparation pressure and pore-forming additives on the properties of graphite-based, Li{sup +}-intercalating electrodes for ion-transfer batteries have been investigated. The electrochemical performance of graphite electrodes could be improved by adjusting the porosity. Specific charge of >300 Ah/kg (with respect to the graphite mass) could be achieved. (author) 4 figs., 2 refs.

  2. Preparation of graphite derivatives by selective reduction of graphite oxide and isocyanate functionalization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumar, A. R. S. S.; Piana, Francesco; Mičušík, M.; Pionteck, J.; Banerjee, S.; Voit, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 182, 1 October (2016), s. 237-245 ISSN 0254-0584 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : graphite oxide * surface modification * conductive nanoparticles Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.084, year: 2016

  3. Ion irradiation to simulate neutron irradiation in model graphites: Consequences for nuclear graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Ammar, M. R.; Simon, P.; Deldicque, D.; Sainsot, P.

    2017-10-01

    Due to its excellent moderator and reflector qualities, graphite was used in CO2-cooled nuclear reactors such as UNGG (Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz). Neutron irradiation of graphite resulted in the production of 14C which is a key issue radionuclide for the management of the irradiated graphite waste. In order to elucidate the impact of neutron irradiation on 14C behavior, we carried out a systematic investigation of irradiation and its synergistic effects with temperature in Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG) model graphite used to simulate the coke grains of nuclear graphite. We used 13C implantation in order to simulate 14C displaced from its original structural site through recoil. The collision of the impinging neutrons with the graphite matrix carbon atoms induces mainly ballistic damage. However, a part of the recoil carbon atom energy is also transferred to the graphite lattice through electronic excitation. The effects of the different irradiation regimes in synergy with temperature were simulated using ion irradiation by varying Sn(nuclear)/Se(electronic) stopping power. Thus, the samples were irradiated with different ions of different energies. The structure modifications were followed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman microspectrometry. The results show that temperature generally counteracts the disordering effects of irradiation but the achieved reordering level strongly depends on the initial structural state of the graphite matrix. Thus, extrapolating to reactor conditions, for an initially highly disordered structure, irradiation at reactor temperatures (200 - 500 °C) should induce almost no change of the initial structure. On the contrary, when the structure is initially less disordered, there should be a "zoning" of the reordering: In "cold" high flux irradiated zones where the ballistic damage is important, the structure should be poorly reordered; In "hot" low flux irradiated zones where the ballistic

  4. Polyphase diffusion of fission products in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannert, V.

    1989-05-01

    The report attempts to give an introduction into the subject of fission product transport in nuclear graphite and results in an extended proposal of a transport-model. Beginning with a rough description of the graphite in question, an idea about the physical transport-phenomena in graphite is developed. Some of the basic experimental methods, especially techniques of porosimetry, determination of sorption-isotherms and of course several transport-experiments, are briefly described and their results are discussed. Some of the most frequent transport models are introduced and assessed with the criteria emphasized in this report. An extended model is proposed including the following main ideas: The transport of the fission-products is regarded as a two-phase-diffusion process through the open pores of the graphite. The two phases are: surface-diffusion and gas-diffusion. A time-dependent coupling of the two diffusion-phases by sorption-isotherms and a concentration-dependence of the surface diffusion coefficient, also related to the physical behaviour of the sorption-isotherms, are the basic properties of the proposed model. (orig./HP) [de

  5. US graphite reactor D ampersand D experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, S.M.K.; Williams, N.C.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the results of the U.S. Graphite Reactor Experience Task for the Decommissioning Strategy Plan for the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit 1 Study. The work described in this report was performed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE)

  6. Analysis of a T-10 graphite limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, D.; Laux, M.; Lingertat, J.; Pech, P.; Reiner, H.D.; Strusny, H.; Wolff, H.

    1981-01-01

    Parts of a T-10 graphite limiter used during ohmic heated discharges have been investigated. Erosion and deposition phenomena have been studied by morphological and elemental surface analysis methods. From the results estimates of the plasma parameters near the limiter surface have been made. (orig.)

  7. Raw materials for reflector graphite (for reactors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmi, G.; Mindermann, D.

    1992-01-01

    The manufacturing concept for the core components of German high temperature reactor (HTR) types of graphite was previously entirely directed to the use of German tar coke (St coke). As the plants for producing this material no longer complied technically with the current environmental protection requirements, one had to assume that they would soon be shut down. To prevent bottlenecks in the erection of future HTR plants, alternative cokes produced by modern processes by Japanese manufacturers were checked for their suitability for the manufacture of reactor graphite. This report describes the investigations carried out on these materials from the safe delayed coking process. The project work, apart from analysis of the main data of the candidate coke considered, included the processing of the raw materials into directly and secondarily extruded graphite rods on the laboratory scale, including characterisation. As the results show, the material data achieved with the previous raw material can be reproduced with Japanese St coke. The tar coke LPC-A from the Nippon Steel Chemical Co., Ltd was decided on as the new standard coke for manufacturing reflector graphite. (orig.) With 15 tabs., 2 figs [de

  8. Formation of dislocation dipoles in irradiated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwase, Keisuke

    2005-01-01

    Recently, we have proposed a dislocation dipole accumulation model to explain the irradiation-induced amorphization of graphite. However, the structure of dislocation dipole in the hexagonal networks is still an open question at the atomic-level. In this paper, we propose a possible formation process of the dislocation dipole

  9. Functional interface of polymer modified graphite anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaba, S.; Ozeki, T.; Okushi, K. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan)

    2009-04-01

    Graphite electrodes were modified by polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Their electrochemical properties were examined in 1 mol dm{sup -3} LiClO{sub 4} ethylene carbonate:dimethyl carbonate (EC:DMC) and propylene carbonate (PC) solutions as an anode of lithium ion batteries. Generally, lithium ions hardly intercalate into graphite in the PC electrolyte due to a decomposition of the PC electrolyte at ca. 0.8 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}, and it results in the exfoliation of the graphene layers. However, the modified graphite electrodes with PAA, PMA, and PVA demonstrated the stable charge-discharge performance due to the reversible lithium intercalation not only in the EC:DMC but also in the PC electrolytes since the electrolyte decomposition and co-intercalation of solvent were successfully suppressed by the polymer modification. It is thought that these improvements were attributed to the interfacial function of the polymer layer on the graphite which interacted with the solvated lithium ions at the electrode interface. (author)

  10. Functional interface of polymer modified graphite anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaba, S.; Ozeki, T.; Okushi, K.

    Graphite electrodes were modified by polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Their electrochemical properties were examined in 1 mol dm -3 LiClO 4 ethylene carbonate:dimethyl carbonate (EC:DMC) and propylene carbonate (PC) solutions as an anode of lithium ion batteries. Generally, lithium ions hardly intercalate into graphite in the PC electrolyte due to a decomposition of the PC electrolyte at ca. 0.8 V vs. Li/Li +, and it results in the exfoliation of the graphene layers. However, the modified graphite electrodes with PAA, PMA, and PVA demonstrated the stable charge-discharge performance due to the reversible lithium intercalation not only in the EC:DMC but also in the PC electrolytes since the electrolyte decomposition and co-intercalation of solvent were successfully suppressed by the polymer modification. It is thought that these improvements were attributed to the interfacial function of the polymer layer on the graphite which interacted with the solvated lithium ions at the electrode interface.

  11. Removal of iron from impure graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growcock, F.B.; Heiser, J.

    1979-01-01

    Iron-impregnated and ash-rich graphites have been purified by leaching with gaseous I 2 at 900 0 C. With addition of H 2 , the rate of removal of impurity iron can be markedly increased and becomes comparable to that obtained with Cl 2 . I 2 has an advantage in that it can also volatilize Ca and perhaps Ba and Sr

  12. Structural strength of core graphite bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, K.; Futakawa, M.

    1987-01-01

    A HTR core consists of fuel, hot plenum, reflector and thermal barrier blocks. Each graphite block is supported by three thin cylindrical graphite bars called support post. Static and dynamic core loads are transmitted by the support posts to the thermal barrier blocks and a support plate. These posts are in contact with the blocks through hemispherical post seats to absorb the relative displacement caused by seismic force and the difference of thermal expansion of materials at the time of the start-up and shutdown of a reactor. The mixed fracture criterion of principal stress and modified Mohr-Coulomb's theory as well as the fracture criterion of principal stress based on elastic stress analysis was discussed in connection with the application to HTR graphite components. The buckling fracture of a support post was taken in consideration as one of the fracture modes. The effect that the length/diameter ratio of a post, small rotation and the curvature of post ends and seats exerted on the fracture strength was studied by using IG-110 graphite. Contacting stress analysis was carried out by using the structural analysis code 'COSMOS-7'. The experimental method, the analysis of buckling strength and the results are reported. The fracture of a support post is caused by the mixed mode of bending deformation, split fracture and shearing fracture. (Kako, I.)

  13. Thermoexpanded graphite modification by titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semko, L.S.; Gorbik, P.P.; Chujko, O.O.; Kruchek, Ya.Yi.; Dzyubenko, L.S.; Orans'ka, O.Yi.

    2006-01-01

    A method of the synthesis of thermoexpanded graphite (TEG) powders coated by titanium dioxide is developed. The conversion of n-buthylorthotitanate into TiO 2 on the TEG surface is investigated. The optimal parameters of the synthesis and the structure of titanium dioxide clusters on the TEG surface are determined

  14. GRAPHITIZED STEELS IN MACHINE-BUILDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Akimov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that graphitized steels in some cases due to its intermediate disposition by structure and characteristics among low-carbon steels and cast irons, can provide the necessary combination of characteristics of construction material and consequently to increase safety and durability of details of metallurgical and machinebuilding industry machines.

  15. Metal/graphite-composite materials for fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Fischer, W.; Reheis, N.; Staffler, R.; Samm, U.; Winter, J.

    1995-01-01

    The utilization of graphite as a structural material depends to an important extent on the availability of a joining technique suitable for the production of reliable large scale metal/graphite-composites. This study has been conducted to evaluate vacuum brazes and procedures for graphite and metals which can be used in fusion applications up to about 1500 degree C. The braze materials included: AgCuTi, CuTi, NiTi, Ti, ZrTi, Zr. Brazing temperatures ranged from 850 degree C to 1900 degree C. The influence of graphite quality on wettability and pore-penetration of the braze has been investigated. Screening tests of metal/graphite-assemblies with joint areas exceeding some square-centimeters have shown that they can only successfully be produced when graphite is brazed to a metal, such as tungsten or molybdenum with a coefficient of thermal expansion closely matching that of graphite. Therefore all experimental work on evaluation of joints has been concentrated on molybdenum/graphite brazings. The tensile strength of molybdenum/graphite-composites compares favorably with the tensile strength of bulk graphite from room temperature close to the melting temperature of the braze. In electron beam testing the threshold damage line for molybdenum/graphite-composites has been evaluated. Results show that even composites with the low melting AgCuTi-braze are expected to withstand 10 MW/m 2 power density for at least 10 3 cycles. Limiter testing in TEXTOR shows that molybdenum/graphite-segments with 3 mm graphite brazed on molybdenum-substrate withstand severe repeated TEXTOR plasma discharge conditions without serious damage. Results prove that actively cooled components on the basis of a molybdenum/graphite-composite can sustain a higher heat flux than bulk graphite alone. (author)

  16. Direct numerical simulation of droplet-laden isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Michael S.

    Interaction of liquid droplets with turbulence is important in numerous applications ranging from rain formation to oil spills to spray combustion. The physical mechanisms of droplet-turbulence interaction are largely unknown, especially when compared to that of solid particles. Compared to solid particles, droplets can deform, break up, coalesce and have internal fluid circulation. The main goal of this work is to investigate using direct numerical simulation (DNS) the physical mechanisms of droplet-turbulence interaction, both for non-evaporating and evaporating droplets. To achieve this objective, we develop and couple a new pressure-correction method with the volume-of-fluid (VoF) method for simulating incompressible two-fluid flows. The method's main advantage is that the variable coefficient Poisson equation that arises in solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for two-fluid flows is reduced to a constant coefficient equation. This equation can then be solved directly using, e.g., the FFT-based parallel Poisson solver. For a 10243 mesh, our new pressure-correction method using a fast Poisson solver is ten to forty times faster than the standard pressure-correction method using multigrid. Using the coupled pressure-correction and VoF method, we perform direct numerical simulations (DNS) of 3130 finite-size, non-evaporating droplets of diameter approximately equal to the Taylor lengthscale and with 5% droplet volume fraction in decaying isotropic turbulence at initial Taylor-scale Reynolds number Relambda = 83. In the droplet-laden cases, we vary one of the following three parameters: the droplet Weber number based on the r.m.s. velocity of turbulence (0.1 ≤ Werms ≤ 5), the droplet- to carrier-fluid density ratio (1 ≤ rhod/rho c ≤ 100) or the droplet- to carrier-fluid viscosity ratio (1 ≤ mud/muc ≤ 100). We derive the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) equations for the two-fluid, carrier-fluid and droplet-fluid flow. These equations allow

  17. The suite of analytical benchmarks for neutral particle transport in infinite isotropically scattering media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornreich, D.E.; Ganapol, B.D.

    1997-01-01

    The linear Boltzmann equation for the transport of neutral particles is investigated with the objective of generating benchmark-quality evaluations of solutions for homogeneous infinite media. In all cases, the problems are stationary, of one energy group, and the scattering is isotropic. The solutions are generally obtained through the use of Fourier transform methods with the numerical inversions constructed from standard numerical techniques such as Gauss-Legendre quadrature, summation of infinite series, and convergence acceleration. Consideration of the suite of benchmarks in infinite homogeneous media begins with the standard one-dimensional problems: an isotropic point source, an isotropic planar source, and an isotropic infinite line source. The physical and mathematical relationships between these source configurations are investigated. The progression of complexity then leads to multidimensional problems with source configurations that also emit particles isotropically: the finite line source, the disk source, and the rectangular source. The scalar flux from the finite isotropic line and disk sources will have a two-dimensional spatial variation, whereas a finite rectangular source will have a three-dimensional variation in the scalar flux. Next, sources emitting particles anisotropically are considered. The most basic such source is the point beam giving rise to the Green's function, which is physically the most fundamental transport problem, yet may be constructed from the isotropic point source solution. Finally, the anisotropic plane and anisotropically emitting infinite line sources are considered. Thus, a firm theoretical and numerical base is established for the most fundamental neutral particle benchmarks in infinite homogeneous media

  18. Mechanical and electronic properties of monolayer and bilayer phosphorene under uniaxial and isotropic strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ting; Han, Yang; Dong, Jinming

    2014-11-14

    The mechanical and electronic properties of both the monolayer and bilayer phosphorenes under either isotropic or uniaxial strain have been systematically investigated using first-principles calculations. It is interesting to find that: 1) Under a large enough isotropic tensile strain, the monolayer phosphorene would lose its pucker structure and transform into a flat hexagonal plane, while two inner sublayers of the bilayer phosphorene could be bonded due to its interlayer distance contraction. 2) Under the uniaxial tensile strain along a zigzag direction, the pucker distance of each layer in the bilayer phosphorene can exhibit a specific negative Poisson's ratio. 3) The electronic properties of both the monolayer and bilayer phosphorenes are sensitive to the magnitude and direction of the applied strains. Their band gaps decrease more rapidly under isotropic compressive strain than under uniaxial strain. Also, their direct-indirect band gap transitions happen at the larger isotropic tensile strains compared with that under uniaxial strain. 4) Under the isotropic compressive strain, the bilayer phosphorene exhibits a transition from a direct-gap semiconductor to a metal. In contrast, the monolayer phosphorene initially has the direct-indirect transition and then transitions to a metal. However, under isotropic tensile strain, both the bilayer and monolayer phosphorene show the direct-indirect transition and, finally, the transition to a metal. Our numerical results may open new potential applications of phosphorene in nanoelectronics and nanomechanical devices by external isotropic strain or uniaxial strain along different directions.

  19. THE ISOTROPIC DIFFUSION SOURCE APPROXIMATION FOR SUPERNOVA NEUTRINO TRANSPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebendoerfer, M.; Whitehouse, S. C.; Fischer, T.

    2009-01-01

    Astrophysical observations originate from matter that interacts with radiation or transported particles. We develop a pragmatic approximation in order to enable multidimensional simulations with basic spectral radiative transfer when the available computational resources are not sufficient to solve the complete Boltzmann transport equation. The distribution function of the transported particles is decomposed into a trapped particle component and a streaming particle component. Their separate evolution equations are coupled by a source term that converts trapped particles into streaming particles. We determine this source term by requiring the correct diffusion limit for the evolution of the trapped particle component. For a smooth transition to the free streaming regime, this 'diffusion source' is limited by the matter emissivity. The resulting streaming particle emission rates are integrated over space to obtain the streaming particle flux. Finally, a geometric estimate of the flux factor is used to convert the particle flux to the streaming particle density, which enters the evaluation of streaming particle-matter interactions. The efficiency of the scheme results from the freedom to use different approximations for each particle component. In supernovae, for example, reactions with trapped particles on fast timescales establish equilibria that reduce the number of primitive variables required to evolve the trapped particle component. On the other hand, a stationary-state approximation considerably facilitates the treatment of the streaming particle component. Different approximations may apply in applications to stellar atmospheres, star formation, or cosmological radiative transfer. We compare the isotropic diffusion source approximation with Boltzmann neutrino transport of electron flavor neutrinos in spherically symmetric supernova models and find good agreement. An extension of the scheme to the multidimensional case is also discussed.

  20. Traveltime approximations for transversely isotropic media with an inhomogeneous background

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2011-05-01

    A transversely isotropic (TI) model with a tilted symmetry axis is regarded as one of the most effective approximations to the Earth subsurface, especially for imaging purposes. However, we commonly utilize this model by setting the axis of symmetry normal to the reflector. This assumption may be accurate in many places, but deviations from this assumption will cause errors in the wavefield description. Using perturbation theory and Taylor\\'s series, I expand the solutions of the eikonal equation for 2D TI media with respect to the independent parameter θ, the angle the tilt of the axis of symmetry makes with the vertical, in a generally inhomogeneous TI background with a vertical axis of symmetry. I do an additional expansion in terms of the independent (anellipticity) parameter in a generally inhomogeneous elliptically anisotropic background medium. These new TI traveltime solutions are given by expansions in and θ with coefficients extracted from solving linear first-order partial differential equations. Pade approximations are used to enhance the accuracy of the representation by predicting the behavior of the higher-order terms of the expansion. A simplification of the expansion for homogenous media provides nonhyperbolic moveout descriptions of the traveltime for TI models that are more accurate than other recently derived approximations. In addition, for 3D media, I develop traveltime approximations using Taylor\\'s series type of expansions in the azimuth of the axis of symmetry. The coefficients of all these expansions can also provide us with the medium sensitivity gradients (Jacobian) for nonlinear tomographic-based inversion for the tilt in the symmetry axis. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  1. Traveltime approximations for transversely isotropic media with an inhomogeneous background

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2011-01-01

    A transversely isotropic (TI) model with a tilted symmetry axis is regarded as one of the most effective approximations to the Earth subsurface, especially for imaging purposes. However, we commonly utilize this model by setting the axis of symmetry normal to the reflector. This assumption may be accurate in many places, but deviations from this assumption will cause errors in the wavefield description. Using perturbation theory and Taylor's series, I expand the solutions of the eikonal equation for 2D TI media with respect to the independent parameter θ, the angle the tilt of the axis of symmetry makes with the vertical, in a generally inhomogeneous TI background with a vertical axis of symmetry. I do an additional expansion in terms of the independent (anellipticity) parameter in a generally inhomogeneous elliptically anisotropic background medium. These new TI traveltime solutions are given by expansions in and θ with coefficients extracted from solving linear first-order partial differential equations. Pade approximations are used to enhance the accuracy of the representation by predicting the behavior of the higher-order terms of the expansion. A simplification of the expansion for homogenous media provides nonhyperbolic moveout descriptions of the traveltime for TI models that are more accurate than other recently derived approximations. In addition, for 3D media, I develop traveltime approximations using Taylor's series type of expansions in the azimuth of the axis of symmetry. The coefficients of all these expansions can also provide us with the medium sensitivity gradients (Jacobian) for nonlinear tomographic-based inversion for the tilt in the symmetry axis. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  2. Cosmological simulations of isotropic conduction in galaxy clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Britton; O'Shea, Brian W.; Voit, G. Mark; Ventimiglia, David; Skillman, Samuel W.

    2013-01-01

    Simulations of galaxy clusters have a difficult time reproducing the radial gas-property gradients and red central galaxies observed to exist in the cores of galaxy clusters. Thermal conduction has been suggested as a mechanism that can help bring simulations of cluster cores into better alignment with observations by stabilizing the feedback processes that regulate gas cooling, but this idea has not yet been well tested with cosmological numerical simulations. Here we present cosmological simulations of 10 galaxy clusters performed with five different levels of isotropic Spitzer conduction, which alters both the cores and outskirts of clusters, though not dramatically. In the cores, conduction flattens central temperature gradients, making them nearly isothermal and slightly lowering the central density, but failing to prevent a cooling catastrophe there. Conduction has little effect on temperature gradients outside of cluster cores because outward conductive heat flow tends to inflate the outer parts of the intracluster medium (ICM), instead of raising its temperature. In general, conduction tends reduce temperature inhomogeneity in the ICM, but our simulations indicate that those homogenizing effects would be extremely difficult to observe in ∼5 keV clusters. Outside the virial radius, our conduction implementation lowers the gas densities and temperatures because it reduces the Mach numbers of accretion shocks. We conclude that, despite the numerous small ways in which conduction alters the structure of galaxy clusters, none of these effects are significant enough to make the efficiency of conduction easily measurable, unless its effects are more pronounced in clusters hotter than those we have simulated.

  3. Quantifying microstructural dynamics and electrochemical activity of graphite and silicon-graphite lithium ion battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Patrick; Westhoff, Daniel; Feinauer, Julian; Eller, Jens; Marone, Federica; Stampanoni, Marco; Schmidt, Volker; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-09-01

    Despite numerous studies presenting advances in tomographic imaging and analysis of lithium ion batteries, graphite-based anodes have received little attention. Weak X-ray attenuation of graphite and, as a result, poor contrast between graphite and the other carbon-based components in an electrode pore space renders data analysis challenging. Here we demonstrate operando tomography of weakly attenuating electrodes during electrochemical (de)lithiation. We use propagation-based phase contrast tomography to facilitate the differentiation between weakly attenuating materials and apply digital volume correlation to capture the dynamics of the electrodes during operation. After validating that we can quantify the local electrochemical activity and microstructural changes throughout graphite electrodes, we apply our technique to graphite-silicon composite electrodes. We show that microstructural changes that occur during (de)lithiation of a pure graphite electrode are of the same order of magnitude as spatial inhomogeneities within it, while strain in composite electrodes is locally pronounced and introduces significant microstructural changes.

  4. Nuclear graphite wear properties and estimation of graphite dust production in HTR-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xiaowei, E-mail: xwluo@tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, Xiaoxin; Shi, Li; Yu, Xiaoyu; Yu, Suyuan

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Graphite dust. • The wear properties of graphite. • Pebble bed. • High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor. • Fuel element. - Abstract: The issue of the graphite dust has been a research focus for the safety of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs), especially for the pebble bed reactors. Most of the graphite dust is produced from the wear of fuel elements during cycling of fuel elements. However, due to the complexity of the motion of the fuel elements in the pebble bed, there is no systematic method developed to predict the amount the graphite dust in a pebble bed reactor. In this paper, the study of the flow of the fuel elements in the pebble bed was carried out. Both theoretical calculation and numerical analysis by Discrete Element Method (DEM) software PFC3D were conducted to obtain the normal forces and sliding distances of the fuel elements in pebble bed. The wearing theory was then integrated with PFC3D to estimate the amount of the graphite dust in a pebble bed reactor, 10 MW High Temperature gas-cooled test Reactor (HTR-10).

  5. Graphite oxidation and structural strength of graphite support column in VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byung Ha; No, Hee Cheno; Kim, Eung Soo; Oh, Chang H.

    2009-01-01

    The air-ingress event by a large pipe break is an important accident considered in design of very high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR). Core-collapse prediction is a main safety issue. Structural failure model are technically required. The objective of this study is to develop structural failure model for the supporting graphite material in the lower plenum of the GT-MHR (gas-turbine-modular high temperature reactor). Graphite support column is important for VHTR structural integrity. Graphite support columns are under the axial load. Critical strength of graphite column is related to slenderness ratio and bulk density. Through compression tests for fresh and oxidized graphite columns we show that compressive strength of IG-110 was 79.46 MPa. And, the buckling strength of IG-110 column was expressed by the empirical formula: σ 0 =σ straight-line - C L/r, σ straight-line =91.31 MPa, C=1.01. The results of uniform and non-uniform oxidation tests show that the strength degradation of oxidized graphite column is expressed in the following non-dimensional form: σ/σ 0 =exp(-kd), k=0.111. Also, from the results of the uniform oxidation test with a complicated-shape column, we found out that the above non-dimensional equation obtained from the uniform oxidation test is applicable to a uniform oxidation case with a complicated-shape column. (author)

  6. Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, Mohamed

    2012-10-19

    Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900°C or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

  7. Graphite waste incineration in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiroy, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    French gas-cooled reactors belonging to the Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Electricite de France (EDF), Hifrensa (Spain), etc., commissioned between the 1950s and 1970s, have generated large quantities of graphite wastes, mainly in the form of spent fuel sleeves. Furthermore, some of these reactors scheduled for dismantling in the near future (such as the G2 and G3 reactors at Marcoule) have cores consisting of graphite blocks. Consequently, a fraction of the contaminated graphite, amounting to 6000 t in France for example, must be processed in the coming years. For this processing, incineration using a circulating fluidized bed combustor has been selected as a possible solution and validated. However, the first operation to be performed involves recovering this graphite waste, and particularly, first of all, the spent fuel sleeves that were stored in silos during the years of reactor operation. Subsequent to the final shutdown of the Spanish gas-cooled reactor unit, Vandellos 1, the operating utility Hifrensa awarded contracts to a Framatome Iberica SA/ENSA consortium for removing, sorting, and prepackaging of the waste stored in three silos on the Vandellos site, essentially graphite sleeves. On the other hand, a program to validate the Framatome fluidized bed incineration process was carried out using a prototype incinerator installed at Le Creusot, France. The validation program included 22 twelve-hour tests and one 120-hour test. Particular attention was paid to the safety aspects of this project. During the performance of the validation program, a preliminary safety assessment was carried out. An impact assessment was performed with the help of the French Institute for Protection and Nuclear Safety, taking into account the preliminary spectra supplied by the CEA and EDF, and the activities of the radionuclides susceptible of being released into the atmosphere during the incineration. (author). 4 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  8. Graphitization in Carbon MEMS and Carbon NEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swati

    Carbon MEMS (CMEMS) and Carbon NEMS (CNEMS) are an emerging class of miniaturized devices. Due to the numerous advantages such as scalable manufacturing processes, inexpensive and readily available precursor polymer materials, tunable surface properties and biocompatibility, carbon has become a preferred material for a wide variety of future sensing applications. Single suspended carbon nanowires (CNWs) integrated on CMEMS structures fabricated by electrospinning of SU8 photoresist on photolithographially patterned SU8 followed by pyrolysis are utilized for understanding the graphitization process in micro and nano carbon materials. These monolithic CNW-CMEMS structures enable the fabrication of very high aspect ratio CNWs of predefined length. The CNWs thus fabricated display core---shell structures having a graphitic shell with a glassy carbon core. The electrical conductivity of these CNWs is increased by about 100% compared to glassy carbon as a result of enhanced graphitization. We explore various tunable fabrication and pyrolysis parameters to improve graphitization in the resulting CNWs. We also suggest gas-sensing application of the thus fabricated single suspended CNW-CMEMS devices by using the CNW as a nano-hotplate for local chemical vapor deposition. In this thesis we also report on results from an optimization study of SU8 photoresist derived carbon electrodes. These electrodes were applied to the simultaneous detection of traces of Cd(II) and Pb(II) through anodic stripping voltammetry and detection limits as low as 0.7 and 0.8 microgL-1 were achieved. To further improve upon the electrochemical behavior of the carbon electrodes we elucidate a modified pyrolysis technique featuring an ultra-fast temperature ramp for obtaining bubbled porous carbon from lithographically patterned SU8. We conclude this dissertation by suggesting the possible future works on enhancing graphitization as well as on electrochemical applications

  9. New procedure to design low radar cross section near perfect isotropic and homogeneous triangular carpet cloaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Zohreh; Atlasbaf, Zahra

    2016-10-01

    A new design procedure for near perfect triangular carpet cloaks, fabricated based on only isotropic homogeneous materials, is proposed. This procedure enables us to fabricate a cloak with simple metamaterials or even without employing metamaterials. The proposed procedure together with an invasive weed optimization algorithm is used to design carpet cloaks based on quasi-isotropic metamaterial structures, Teflon and AN-73. According to the simulation results, the proposed cloaks have good invisibility properties against radar, especially monostatic radar. The procedure is a new method to derive isotropic and homogeneous parameters from transformation optics formulas so we do not need to use complicated structures to fabricate the carpet cloaks.

  10. Isotropic harmonic oscillator plus inverse quadratic potential in N-dimensional spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyewumi, K.A.; Bangudu, E.A.

    2003-01-01

    Some aspects of the N-dimensional isotropic harmonic plus inverse quadratic potential were discussed. The hyperradial equation for isotropic harmonic oscillator plus inverse quadratic potential is solved by transformation into the confluent hypergeometric equation to obtain the normalized hyperradial solution. Together with the hyperangular solutions (hyperspherical harmonics), these form the complete energy eigenfunctions of the N-dimensional isotropic harmonic oscillator plus inverse quadratic potential and the energy eigenvalues are also obtained. These are dimensionally dependent. The dependence of radial solution on the dimensions or potential strength and the degeneracy of the energy levels are discussed. (author)

  11. Method of manufacturing a graphite coated fuel can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Koichi; Uchida, Shunsuke.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the close bondability and homogeneity of a graphite coating formed at the inner surface of a fuel can. Method: A coating containing graphite dispersed in a volatile organic solvent is used and a graphite coating is formed to the inner surface of a fuel can by way of a plunger method. After applying graphite coating, an inert gas is caused to flow at a certain flow rate to the inside of the fuel can horizontally rotaged so that gassification and evaporation of the volatile organic solvent contained in the graphite coating may be promoted. Since drying of the graphite coating coated to the inner surface of the fuel can thus be controlled, a graphite coating with satisfactory close bondability and homogeneity can be formed. (Kawakami, Y.)

  12. Ion irradiated graphite exposed to fusion-relevant deuterium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deslandes, Alec; Guenette, Mathew C.; Corr, Cormac S.; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Thomsen, Lars; Ionescu, Mihail; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Riley, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Graphite samples were irradiated with 5 MeV carbon ions to simulate the damage caused by collision cascades from neutron irradiation in a fusion environment. The ion irradiated graphite samples were then exposed to a deuterium plasma in the linear plasma device, MAGPIE, for a total ion fluence of ∼1 × 10 24 ions m −2 . Raman and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy were used to characterize modifications to the graphitic structure. Ion irradiation was observed to decrease the graphitic content and induce disorder in the graphite. Subsequent plasma exposure decreased the graphitic content further. Structural and surface chemistry changes were observed to be greatest for the sample irradiated with the greatest fluence of MeV ions. D retention was measured using elastic recoil detection analysis and showed that ion irradiation increased the amount of retained deuterium in graphite by a factor of four

  13. GRAPHITIZATION OF METASEDIMENTARY ROCKS IN THE WESTERN KONYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin KURT

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Paleozoic-Mesozoic metasedimentary rocks in the study area are metacarbonate, metachert, metapelite, metasandstone and metaconglomerate. Graphite layers are 1cm to 2m thick, extend laterally for tens of meters and are intercalated with metasedimentary rocks. Generally, the graphite is black in color, with a well developed cleavage which is concordant with the cleavage of the host rocks. In addition, the crystal and flake graphites formed in metasedimentary rocks are mostly aligned parallel to the cleavage planes. These metamorphic rocks are subjected to shearing and granulation providing structural control for the development of graphite. It was probably this phenomenon that first led to emphasize the relationship between graphite and metasedimentary rocks. Graphite mineralization has been controlled by bedding, microfractures and granulations. Briefly, the metamorphism has converted carbonaceous matter into graphite .

  14. Hydrophilization of graphite using plasma above/in a solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Shuhei; Kawahara, Kazuma; Takeuchi, Nozomi

    2018-01-01

    A hydrophilization method for graphite is required for applications such as conductive ink. In typical chemical oxidation methods for graphite have the problems of producing many defects in graphite and a large environmental impact. In recent years, the plasma treatment has attracted attention because of the high quality of the treated samples and the low environmental impact. In this study, we proposed an above-solution plasma treatment with a high contact probability of graphite and plasma since graphite accumulates on the solution surface due to its hydrophobicity, which we compared with a so-called solution plasma treatment. Graphite was hydrophilized via reactions with OH radicals generated by the plasma. It was confirmed that hydroxyl and carboxyl groups were modified to the graphite and the dispersibility was improved. The above-solution plasma achieved more energy-efficient hydrophilization than the solution plasma and it was possible to enhance the dispersibility by increasing the plasma-solution contact area.

  15. Crystallization degree change of expanded graphite by milling and annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Qunwei; Wu Jihuai; Sun Hui; Fang Shijun

    2009-01-01

    Expanded graphite was ball milled with a planetary mill in air atmosphere, and subsequently thermal annealed. The samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). It was found that in the milling initial stage (less than 12 h), the crystallization degree of the expanded graphite declined gradually, but after milling more than 16 h, a recrystallization of the expanded graphite toke place, and ordered nanoscale expanded graphite was formed gradually. In the annealing initial stage, the non-crystallization of the graphite occurred, but, beyond an annealing time, recrystallizations of the graphite arise. Higher annealing temperature supported the recrystallization. The milled and annealed expanded graphite still preserved the crystalline structure as raw material and hold high thermal stability.

  16. Progress in radioactive graphite waste management. Additional information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-06-01

    Radioactive graphite constitutes a major waste stream which arises during the decommissioning of certain types of nuclear installations. Worldwide, a total of around 250 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite, comprising graphite moderators and reflectors, will require management solutions in the coming years. 14 C is the radionuclide of greatest concern in nuclear graphite; it arises principally through the interaction of reactor neutrons with nitrogen, which is present in graphite as an impurity or in the reactor coolant or cover gas. 3 H is created by the reactions of neutrons with 6 Li impurities in graphite as well as in fission of the fuel. 36 Cl is generated in the neutron activation of chlorine impurities in graphite. Problems in the radioactive waste management of graphite arise mainly because of the large volumes requiring disposal, the long half-lives of the main radionuclides involved and the specific properties of graphite - such as stored Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility and the potential for radioactive gases to be released. Various options for the management of radioactive graphite have been studied but a generally accepted approach for its conditioning and disposal does not yet exist. Different solutions may be appropriate in different cases. In most of the countries with radioactive graphite to manage, little progress has been made to date in respect of the disposal of this material. Only in France has there been specific thinking about a dedicated graphite waste-disposal facility (within ANDRA): other major producers of graphite waste (UK and the countries of the former Soviet Union) are either thinking in terms of repository disposal or have no developed plans. A conference entitled 'Solutions for Graphite Waste: a Contribution to the Accelerated Decommissioning of Graphite Moderated Nuclear Reactors' was held at the University of Manchester 21-23 March 2007 in order to stimulate progress in radioactive graphite waste management

  17. Nucleation and growth characteristics of graphite spheroids in bainite during graphitization annealing of a medium carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J.X.; Wei, B.Q.; Li, D.D.; He, K.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure in bainite during graphitization annealing at 680 °C of Jominy-quenched bars of an Al-Si bearing medium carbon (0.4C wt%) steel has been studied and compared with that in martensite by using light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the graphitization process in bainite is different from that in martensite in many aspects such as the initial carbon state, the behavior of cementite, the nucleation-growth feature and kinetics of formation of graphite spheroids during graphitization annealing, and the shape, size and distribution of these graphite spheroids. The fact that the graphitization in bainite can produce more homogeneous graphite spheroids with more spherical shape and finer size in a shorter annealing time without the help of preexisting coring particles implies that bainite should be a better starting structure than martensite for making graphitic steel. - Highlights: • This article presents a microstructural characterization of formation of graphite spheroids in bainite. • Nucleation and growth characteristics of graphite spheroids formed in bainite and martensite are compared. • Bainite should be a better starting structure for making graphitic steel as results show.

  18. Investigation into the temperature dependence of isotropic- nematic phase transition of Gay- Berne liquid crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Avazpour

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Density functional approach was used to study the isotropic- nematic (I-N transition and calculate the values of freezing parameters of the Gay- Berne liquid crystal model. New direct and pair correlation functions of a molecular fluid with Gay- Berne pair potential were used. These new functions were used in density functional theory as input to calculate the isotropic- nematic transition densities for elongation at various reduced temperatures. It was observed that the isotropic- nematic transition densities increase as the temperature increases. It was found that the new direct correlation function is suitable to study the isotropic- nematic transition of Gay- Berne liquids. Comparison to other works showed qualitative agreement

  19. Classification of integrable Volterra-type lattices on the sphere: isotropic case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, V E

    2008-01-01

    The symmetry approach is used for classification of integrable isotropic vector Volterra lattices on the sphere. The list of integrable lattices consists mainly of new equations. Their symplectic structure and associated PDE of vector NLS type are discussed

  20. Mehler's formulae for isotropic harmonic oscillator wave functions and application in the Green function calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caetano Neto, E.S.

    1976-01-01

    A stationary Green function is calculated for the Schroedinger Hamiltonian of the multidimensional isotropic harmonic oscillator and for physical systems, which may, somehow, have their Hamiltonian reduced to one in the form of a harmonic oscillator, for any dimension [pt

  1. Isotropic blackbody cosmic microwave background radiation as evidence for a homogeneous universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Timothy; Clarkson, Chris; Bull, Philip

    2012-08-03

    The question of whether the Universe is spatially homogeneous and isotropic on the largest scales is of fundamental importance to cosmology but has not yet been answered decisively. Surprisingly, neither an isotropic primary cosmic microwave background (CMB) nor combined observations of luminosity distances and galaxy number counts are sufficient to establish such a result. The inclusion of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in CMB observations, however, dramatically improves this situation. We show that even a solitary observer who sees an isotropic blackbody CMB can conclude that the Universe is homogeneous and isotropic in their causal past when the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect is present. Critically, however, the CMB must either be viewed for an extended period of time, or CMB photons that have scattered more than once must be detected. This result provides a theoretical underpinning for testing the cosmological principle with observations of the CMB alone.

  2. Supersymmetry and the constants of motion of the two-dimensional isotropic harmonic oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres del Castillo, G.F.; Tepper G, T.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the constants of motion of the two-dimensional isotropic harmonic oscillator not related to the rotational invariance of the Hamiltonian can be derived using the ideas of supersymmetric quantum mechanics. (Author)

  3. The creep compliance, the relaxation modulus and the complex compliance of linear viscoelastic, homogeneous, isotropic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a study to obtain the creep compliance, the relaxation modulus and the complex compliance derived from the concept of mechanical resistance for the constitutive equation of a class of linear viscoelastic, homogeneous, isotropic materials

  4. A Dual Band Additively Manufactured 3D Antenna on Package with Near-Isotropic Radiation Pattern

    KAUST Repository

    Su, Zhen; Klionovski, Kirill; Bilal, Rana Muhammad; Shamim, Atif

    2018-01-01

    presents a novel 3D dual band near-isotropic wideband GSM antenna to fulfill these requirements. The antenna has been realized on the package of electronics through additive manufacturing to ensure efficient utilization of available space and lower cost

  5. Directional statistics-based reflectance model for isotropic bidirectional reflectance distribution functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Ko; Lombardi, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a novel parametric bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model that can accurately encode a wide variety of real-world isotropic BRDFs with a small number of parameters. The key observation we make is that a BRDF may be viewed as a statistical distribution on a unit hemisphere. We derive a novel directional statistics distribution, which we refer to as the hemispherical exponential power distribution, and model real-world isotropic BRDFs as mixtures of it. We derive a canonical probabilistic method for estimating the parameters, including the number of components, of this novel directional statistics BRDF model. We show that the model captures the full spectrum of real-world isotropic BRDFs with high accuracy, but a small footprint. We also demonstrate the advantages of the novel BRDF model by showing its use for reflection component separation and for exploring the space of isotropic BRDFs.

  6. Wave propagation in isotropic- or composite-material piping conveying swirling liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.L.C.; Bert, C.W.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis is presented for the propagation of free harmonic waves in a thin-walled, circular cylindrical shell of orthotropic or isotropic material conveying a swirling flow. The shell motion is modeled by using the dynamic orthotropic version of the Sanders improved first-approximation linear shell theory and the fluid forces are described by using inviscid incompressible flow theory. Frequency spectra are presented for pipes made of isotropic material and composite materials of current engineering interest. (Auth.)

  7. Electrochemical behaviour of rhenium-graphite electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varypaev, V.N.; Krasikov, V.L.

    1980-01-01

    Electrochemical behaviour of combination electrode from graphite with electrodeposited thin coating of electrolytic rhenium is studied. Solution of 0.5 m NaCl+0.04 m AlCl 3 served as an electrolite. Polarization galvanostatic curves of hydrogen evolution upon electrodes with conditional rhenium thickness of 3.5 and 0.35 μm, 35 and 3.5 nm are obtained. Possibility of preparation of rhenium-graphite cathode with extremely low rhenium consume, electro-chemical properties of which are simu-lar to purely rhenium cathode is shown. Such electrode is characterized with stable in time low cathode potential of hydrogen evolution in chloride electrolyte and during cathode polarization it is not affected by corrosion

  8. Graphite moderated {sup 252}Cf source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajo B, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Apdo. 89000, 1080A Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    The thorium molten salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a {sup 252}Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the {sup 252}Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator. (Author)

  9. Magnetic response of certain curved graphitic geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Davids, P.S.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    The quasi-particle energy spectra associated with some members of buckyfamily (curved graphitic geometries), in particular C 50 , C 60 , C 70 and related fullerenes as well as coaxial helical microtubules of graphite, are obtained analytically within the mean-field approximation. These energy spectra are then used to calculate various response functions. Specifically, we calculate the specific heat, magnetization and magnetic susceptibility in the presence of an external magnetic field at low temperatures. For a single microtubule an extra peak superimposed on the first de Haas van Alphen (dHvA) oscillation in magnetic susceptibility is found in the 50--170 Tesla range depending on the radius which is possibly accessible in special (explosive flux compression) experiments. Finally, we point to important potential applications of these novel mesoscopic structures in nanotechnology

  10. Imaging of tritium implanted into graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinowski, M.E.; Causey, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The extensive use of graphite in plasma-facing surfaces of tokamaks such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, which has planned tritium discharges, makes two-dimensional tritium detection techniques important in helping to determine torus tritium inventories. We have performed experiments in which highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples were first tritium implanted with fluences of ∼10 16 T/cm 2 at energies approx. 0 C resulted in no discernible motion of tritium along the basal plane, but did show that significant desorption of the implanted tritium occurred. The current results indicate that tritium in quantities of 10 12 T/cm 2 in tritiated components could be readily detected by imaging at lower magnifications

  11. Preparation of nanoporous carbons from graphite nanofibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung-Joo [Department of Green Chemistry and Environmental Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, PO Box 107, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Jin [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-14

    In this study we manufactured highly porous graphite nanofibres (GNFs) by physical activation in order to develop promising energy storage materials. The activation was performed at activation temperatures in the range of 800-1050 deg. C. The pore structures of the porous GNFs were analysed using N{sub 2}/77 K adsorption isotherms. After the activation, the porous GNFs showed a decrease in diameter and scratches on their surfaces, resulting from surface oxidation and the opening of the graphitic layers, respectively. It was found that the specific surface area of the porous GNFs prepared at 1050 deg. C was more than 2000 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} without loss of their fibre shape or serious increase in electrical resistivity. This result indicates that porous GNFs prepared under optimal conditions can have a much higher specific surface area and are promising materials for energy storage technologies.

  12. Spectroscopical determination of impurities in nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lordello, A.R.; Tognini, R.P.

    1975-01-01

    A spectrochemical method for the direct determination of B, Cd, Si, Hg, Fe, Mg, Mn, Cr, Ni, Al, Mo, Ti, Sr, Na, Zn, and As in nuclear grade graphite is described. A 9:1 ratio of graphite to copper difluoride is used in the preparation of samples and standards. The excitation is carried out in a d-c at 10 amperes. The copper fluoride used as spectrographic buffer serves to increase the volatilization rate of the impurities and to diminish the differences in the nature of the analytical and calibration samples. The relative standard deviations for the determination of the 16 trace elements, except Sr, Fe, Cd, Al and Si, are in the range of 8 - 20% in their appropriate calibration levels. For the latter five elements they are approximately 20-40%

  13. Effect of total pressure on graphite oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnette, R.D.; Hoot, C.G.

    1983-04-01

    Graphite corrosion in the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is calculated using two key assumptions: (1) the kinetic, catalysis, and transport characteristics of graphite determined by bench-scale tests apply to large components at reactor conditions and (2) the effects of high pressure and turbulent flow are predictable. To better understand the differences between laboratory tests and reactor conditions, a high-pressure test loop (HPTL) has been constructed and used to perform tests at reactor temperature, pressure, and flow conditions. The HPTL is intended to determine the functional dependence of oxidation rate and characteristics on total pressure and gas velocity and to compare the oxidation results with calculations using models and codes developed for the reactor

  14. Estimation of transversely isotropic material properties from magnetic resonance elastography using the optimised virtual fields method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Renee; Kolipaka, Arunark; Nash, Martyn P; Young, Alistair A

    2018-03-12

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has been used to estimate isotropic myocardial stiffness. However, anisotropic stiffness estimates may give insight into structural changes that occur in the myocardium as a result of pathologies such as diastolic heart failure. The virtual fields method (VFM) has been proposed for estimating material stiffness from image data. This study applied the optimised VFM to identify transversely isotropic material properties from both simulated harmonic displacements in a left ventricular (LV) model with a fibre field measured from histology as well as isotropic phantom MRE data. Two material model formulations were implemented, estimating either 3 or 5 material properties. The 3-parameter formulation writes the transversely isotropic constitutive relation in a way that dissociates the bulk modulus from other parameters. Accurate identification of transversely isotropic material properties in the LV model was shown to be dependent on the loading condition applied, amount of Gaussian noise in the signal, and frequency of excitation. Parameter sensitivity values showed that shear moduli are less sensitive to noise than the other parameters. This preliminary investigation showed the feasibility and limitations of using the VFM to identify transversely isotropic material properties from MRE images of a phantom as well as simulated harmonic displacements in an LV geometry. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Effect of graphite reflector on activation of fusion breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Cheol Woo; Lee, Young-Ouk; Lee, Dong Won; Cho, Seungyon; Ahn, Mu-Young

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The graphite reflector concept has been applied in the design of the Korea HCCR TBM for ITER and this concept is also a candidate design option for Korea Demo. • In the graphite reflector, C-14, B-11 and Be-10 are produced after an irradiation. Impurities in both case of beryllium and graphite is dominant in the shutdown dose after an irradiation. • Based on the evaluation, the graphite reflector is a good alternative of the beryllium multiplier in the view of induced activity and shutdown dose. But C-14 produced in the graphite reflector should be considered carefully in the view of radwaste management. - Abstract: Korea has proposed a Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) breeding blanket concept relevant to fusion power plants. Here, graphite is used as a reflector material by reducing the amount of beryllium multiplier. In this paper, activity analysis was performed and the effect of graphite reflector in the view of activation was compared to the beryllium multiplier. As a result, it is expected that using the graphite reflector instead of the beryllium multiplier decreases total activity very effectively. But the graphite reflector produces C-14 about 17.2 times than the beryllium multiplier. Therefore, C-14 produced in the graphite reflector is expected as a significant nuclide in the view of radwaste management.

  16. Theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanodiamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S Joon; Park, Jae-Gwan [Nano Science and Technology Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), PO Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul, 130-650 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-26

    We report on a theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanosize diamond (nanodiamond) in the metastable state. A nanodiamond annealed at a relatively lower temperature suffers morphological transition into a nanodiamond-graphite core-shell structure. Thermodynamic stability analysis of the nanodiamond showed that the phase diagram (relationship between the annealing temperature and radius) of the nanodiamond-graphite has three regimes: smaller nanodiamond, nanodiamond-graphite, and larger nanodiamond. These regimes of nanodiamond-graphite are due to an additional phase boundary from finding the maximum size of the nanodiamond which can be graphitized. In the theoretical analysis, the most probable and the maximum volume fractions of graphite in the nanodiamond were 0.76 and 0.84 respectively, which were independent of the annealing temperature and the initial radius of the nanodiamond. Therefore, the nanodiamond is not completely transformed into graphite by simple annealing at relatively lower process temperature and pressure. The highest graphitization probability decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Raman spectra for the F{sub 2g} vibration mode of nanodiamond were also calculated, and we found that the variation in properties of the spectral line was strongly dependent on the graphitization temperature and the initial size of the nanodiamond.

  17. Theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanodiamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S Joon; Park, Jae-Gwan

    2007-01-01

    We report on a theoretical analysis of the graphitization of a nanosize diamond (nanodiamond) in the metastable state. A nanodiamond annealed at a relatively lower temperature suffers morphological transition into a nanodiamond-graphite core-shell structure. Thermodynamic stability analysis of the nanodiamond showed that the phase diagram (relationship between the annealing temperature and radius) of the nanodiamond-graphite has three regimes: smaller nanodiamond, nanodiamond-graphite, and larger nanodiamond. These regimes of nanodiamond-graphite are due to an additional phase boundary from finding the maximum size of the nanodiamond which can be graphitized. In the theoretical analysis, the most probable and the maximum volume fractions of graphite in the nanodiamond were 0.76 and 0.84 respectively, which were independent of the annealing temperature and the initial radius of the nanodiamond. Therefore, the nanodiamond is not completely transformed into graphite by simple annealing at relatively lower process temperature and pressure. The highest graphitization probability decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Raman spectra for the F 2g vibration mode of nanodiamond were also calculated, and we found that the variation in properties of the spectral line was strongly dependent on the graphitization temperature and the initial size of the nanodiamond

  18. Graphite-graphite oxide composite electrode for vanadium redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenyue; Liu Jianguo; Yan Chuanwei

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A new composite electrode is designed for vanadium redox flow battery (VRB). → The graphite oxide (GO) is used as electrode reactions catalyst. → The excellent electrode activity is attributed to the oxygen-containing groups attached on the GO surface. → A catalytic mechanism of the GO towards the redox reactions is presumed. - Abstract: A graphite/graphite oxide (GO) composite electrode for vanadium redox battery (VRB) was prepared successfully in this paper. The materials were characterized with X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The specific surface area was measured by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method. The redox reactions of [VO 2 ] + /[VO] 2+ and V 3+ /V 2+ were studied with cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results indicated that the electrochemical performances of the electrode were improved greatly when 3 wt% GO was added into graphite electrode. The redox peak currents of [VO 2 ] + /[VO] 2+ and V 3+ /V 2+ couples on the composite electrode were increased nearly twice as large as that on the graphite electrode, and the charge transfer resistances of the redox pairs on the composite electrode are also reduced. The enhanced electrochemical activity could be ascribed to the presence of plentiful oxygen functional groups on the basal planes and sheet edges of the GO and large specific surface areas introduced by the GO.

  19. Determining the future for irradiated graphite disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; Wickham, A.J.; Hacker, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, proposals have been made for the long-term treatment of radioactive graphite waste which have ranged from sea dumping through incineration to land-based disposal, sometimes preceded by a variable period of 'safe storage' within the original reactor containment. Nuclear regulators are challenging the proposed length of 'safe storage' on the basis that essential knowledge may be lost. More recently, political constraints have further complicated the issue by eliminating disposal at sea and imposing a 'near-zero release' philosophy, while public opinion is opposed to land-based disposal and has induced a continual drive towards minimizing radioactivity release to the environment from disposal. This paper proposes that, despite various international agreements, it is time to review technically all options for disposal of irradiated graphite waste as a framework for the eventual decision-making process. It is recognized that the socio-economic and political pressures are high and therefore, given that all currently identified options satisfy the present safety limits, the need to minimize the objective risk is shown to be a minor need in comparison to the public's want of demonstrable control, responsiveness and ability to reverse/change the disposal options in the future. Further, it is shown that the eventual decision-making process for a post-dismantling option for graphite waste must optimize the beneficial attributes of subjective risk experienced by the general public. In addition, in advocating and preferred option to the general public, it is recommended that the industry should communicate at a level commensurate with the public understanding and initiate a process of facilitation which enables the public to arrive at their own solution and constituting a social exchange. Otherwise it is concluded that if the indecision over disposal options is allowed to continue then, by default, graphite will remain in long-term supervised storage. (author)

  20. Graphite-to-Graphene: Total Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzaglo, Matat; Bar, Ilan Pri; Varenik, Maxim; Shunak, Liran; Pevzner, Svetlana; Regev, Oren

    2017-02-01

    The rush to develop graphene applications mandates mass production of graphene sheets. However, the currently available complex and expensive production technologies are limiting the graphene commercialization. The addition of a protective diluent to graphite during ball-milling is demonstrated to result in a game-changer yield (>90%) of defect-free graphene, whose size is controlled by the milling energy and the diluent type. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Electron oxidation of graphite by fluorospecies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, G.L.

    1984-09-01

    The fluoride-ion affinity (A/sub F - /) of phosphorus pentafluoride was determined to be 100 kcal/mole from the heats of reaction of the Lewis bases SF 4 and ClO 2 F with PF 5 near room temperature. The fluoride-ion affinity of boron trifluoride was determined to be 92 kcal/mole from the heat of reaction of ClO 2 F with BF 3 . The crystal structure of ClO 2 BF 4 was determined and a precise lattice energy was calculated from this structure and used to determined A/sub F - /. Both PF 5 and BF 3 were found to react with graphite in the presence of fluorine gas to yield a variety of non-stoichiometric compounds. The fluoride-ion affinity of silicon tetrafluoride is not known, but it does not react with graphite and F 2 except at high pressures. These and previous results suggested a threshold in oxidizing power of intercalating species below which the oxidative intercalation reaction would not occur. The reduction of C/sub x/PF 6 by PF 3 proved that the reaction is thermodynamically controlled to some extent. The displacement of PF 5 in C/sub x/PF 6 by BF 3 (with a smaller A/sub F - /) suggested that two BF 3 molecules may have a larger fluoride-ion affinity than one PF 5 and that B 2 F 7 - may be a stable anion in graphite. Conductivity studies of PF/sub x/ and BF/sub y/ salts showed that a large drop in conductivity when the reaction reaches first stage is due in the most part to direct fluorination of carbon in graphite

  2. Temperature dependence of phonons in pyrolitic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockhouse, B.N.; Shirane, G.

    1977-01-01

    Dispersion curves for longitudinal and transverse phonons propagating along and near the c-axis in pyrolitic graphite at temperatures between 4 0 K and 1500 0 C have been measured by neutron spectroscopy. The observed frequencies decrease markedly with increasing temperature (except for the transverse optical ''rippling'' modes in the hexagonal planes). The neutron groups show interesting asymmetrical broadening ascribed to interference between one phonon and many phonon processes

  3. Atomic resolution images of graphite in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

  4. High thermoelectric performance of graphite nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Van-Truong; Saint-Martin, Jérôme; Dollfus, Philippe; Volz, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNFs) have been demonstrated to be a promising material for hydrogen storage and heat management in electronic devices. Here, by means of first-principles and transport simulations, we show that GNFs can also be an excellent material for thermoelectric applications thanks to the interlayer weak van der Waals interaction that induces low thermal conductance and a step-like shape in the electronic transmission with mini-gaps, which are necessary ingredients to achieve high ...

  5. Increase of the density of commercial graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, H.; Meyerstein, D.

    1977-12-01

    The increase of the density of commercial graphite of the type ATJ by polymerization of an impregnated monomer, followed by pyrolysis, is described. The monomer which was either styrene or acrylonitrile, was irradiated by a 60 Co source and pyrolized in a standard vacuum system. The irradiation dose for the polymerization of the monomer was determined. Suggestions for the establishment of the optimum conditions are offered

  6. Characterization of graphite dust produced by pneumatic lift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Kang, Feiyu [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Yang, Xiaoyong; Li, Weihua [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Suyuan, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Generation of graphite dust by pneumatic lift. • Determination of morphology and particle size distribution of graphite dust. • The size of graphite dust in this study is compared to AVR and THTR-300 results. • Graphite dust originates from both filler and binder of the matrix graphite. - Abstract: Graphite dust is an important safety concern of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR). The graphite dust could adsorb fission products, and the radioactive dust is transported by the coolant gas and deposited on the surface of the primary loop. The simulation of coagulation, aggregation, deposition, and resuspension behavior of graphite dust requires parameters such as particle size distribution and particle shape, but currently very limited data on graphite dust is available. The only data we have are from AVR and THTR-300, however, the AVR result is likely to be prejudiced by the oil ingress. In pebble-bed HTR, graphite dust is generally produced by mechanical abrasion, in particular, by the abrasion of graphite pebbles in the lifting pipe of the fuel handling system. Here we demonstrate the generation and characterization of graphite dust that were produced by pneumatic lift. This graphite dust could substitute the real dust in HTR for characterization. The dust, exhibiting a lamellar morphology, showed a number-weighted average particle size of 2.38 μm and a volume-weighted average size of 14.62 μm. These two sizes were larger than the AVR and THTR results. The discrepancy is possibly due to the irradiation effect and prejudice caused by the oil ingress accident. It is also confirmed by the Raman spectrum that both the filler particle and binder contribute to the dust generation.

  7. Actinides in irradiated graphite of RBMK-1500 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plukienė, R., E-mail: rita@ar.fi.lt; Plukis, A.; Barkauskas, V.; Gudelis, A.; Gvozdaitė, R.; Duškesas, G.; Remeikis, V.

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • Activation of actinides in the graphite of the RBMK-1500 reactor was analyzed. • Numerical modeling using SCALE 6.1 and MCNPX was used for actinide calculation. • Measurements of the irradiated graphite sample were used for model validation. • Results are important for further decommissioning process of the RBMK type reactors. - Abstract: The activation of graphite in the nuclear power plants is the problem of high importance related with later graphite reprocessing or disposal. The activation of actinide impurities in graphite due to their toxicity determines a particular long term risk to waste management. In this work the activation of actinides in the graphite constructions of the RBMK-1500 reactor is determined by nuclear spectrometry measurements of the irradiated graphite sample from the Ignalina NPP Unit I and by means of numerical modeling using two independent codes SCALE 6.1 (using TRITON-VI sequence) and MCNPX (v2.7 with CINDER). Both models take into account the 3D RBMK-1500 reactor core fragment with explicit graphite construction including a stack and a sleeve but with a different simplification level concerning surrounding graphite and construction of control roads. The verification of the model has been performed by comparing calculated and measured isotope ratios of actinides. Also good prediction capabilities of the actinide activation in the irradiated graphite have been found for both calculation approaches. The initial U impurity concentration in the graphite model has been adjusted taking into account the experimental results. The specific activities of actinides in the irradiated RBMK-1500 graphite constructions have been obtained and differences between numerical simulation results, different structural parts (sleeve and stack) as well as comparison with previous results (Ancius et al., 2005) have been discussed. The obtained results are important for further decommissioning process of the Ignalina NPP and other RBMK

  8. The roles of geometry and topology structures of graphite fillers on thermal conductivity of the graphite/aluminum composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C.; Chen, D.; Zhang, X.B. [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chen, Z., E-mail: zhe.chen@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhong, S.Y.; Wu, Y. [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ji, G. [Unité Matériaux et Transformations, CNRS UMR 8207, Université Lille 1, Villeneuve d' Ascq 59655 (France); Wang, H.W. [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Various graphite fillers, such as graphite particles, graphite fibers, graphite flakes and porous graphite blocks, have been successfully incorporated into an Al alloy by squeeze casting in order to fabricate graphite/Al composites with enhanced thermal conductivity (TC). Microstructural characterization by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy has revealed a tightly-adhered, clean and Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}-free interface between the graphite fillers and the Al matrix in all the as-fabricated composites. Taking the microstructural features into account, we generalized the corresponding predictive models for the TCs of these composites with the effective medium approximation and the Maxwell mean-field scheme, which both show good agreement with the experimental data. The roles of geometry and topology structures of graphite fillers on the TCs of the composites were further discussed. - Highlights: • The thermal enhancement of various graphite fillers with different topology structures. • Predictive models for the thermal conductivity of different topology structures. • Oriented flakes alignment has the high potentials for thermal enhancement.

  9. The utilization of a pressurized-graphite/water/oxygen mixture for irradiated graphite incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonini, G.; Perotin, J.P.; Charlot, P.

    1992-01-01

    The authors demonstrate the interest of the utilization of a pressurized-graphite/water/oxygen mixture in the incineration of irradiated graphite. The aqueous phase comes in the form of a three-dimensional system that traps pressurized oxygen, the pulverulent solid being dispersed at the liquid/gas interfaces. These three-phasic formulations give the following advantages: reduction of the apparent viscosity of the mixture in comparison with a solid/liquid mixture at the same solid concentration; reduction of the solid/liquid interactions; self-pulverizability. thus promoting reduction of the flame length utilization of conventional burners; reduction of the flue gas flow rate; complete thermal destruction of graphite. (author)

  10. 77 FR 51581 - Request for a License To Export Nuclear Grade Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Request for a License To Export Nuclear Grade Graphite Pursuant to... 27, 2012, graphite for of nuclear grade graphite to the XMAT424, 11006032. nuclear end use. graphite. Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics in China to test various types of nuclear grade graphite material in...

  11. Preparation of graphite derivatives by selective reduction of graphite oxide and isocyanate functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santha Kumar, Arunjunai Raja Shankar [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302, West Bengal (India); Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Piana, Francesco [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Organic Chemistry of Polymers, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062, Dresden (Germany); Mičušík, Matej [Polymer Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 845 41, Bratislava (Slovakia); Pionteck, Jürgen, E-mail: pionteck@ipfdd.de [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Banerjee, Susanta [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302, West Bengal (India); Voit, Brigitte [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Straße 6, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Organic Chemistry of Polymers, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    Heavily oxidized and ordered graphene nanoplatelets were produced from natural graphite by oxidation using a mixture of phosphoric acid, sulphuric acid, and potassium permanganate (Marcano's method). The atomic percentage of oxygen in the graphite oxide produced was more than 30% confirmed by XPS studies. The graphite oxide produced had intact basal planes and remains in a layered structure with interlayer distance of 0.8 nm, analyzed by WAXS. The graphite oxide was treated with 4,4′-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) (MDI) to produce grafted isocyanate functionalization. Introduction of these bulky functional groups widens the interlayer distance to 1.3 nm. In addition, two reduction methods, namely benzyl alcohol mediated reduction and thermal reduction were carried out on isocyanate modified and unmodified graphite oxides and compared to each other. The decrease in the oxygen content and the sp{sup 3} defect-repair were studied with XPS and RAMAN spectroscopy. Compared to the thermal reduction process, which is connected with large material loss, the benzyl alcohol mediated reduction process is highly effective in defect repair. This resulted in an increase of conductivity of at least 9 orders of magnitude compared to the graphite oxide. - Highlights: • Preparation of GO by Marcano's method results in defined interlayer spacing. • Treatment of GO with diisocyanate widens the interlayer spacing to 1.3 nm. • Chemical reduction of GO with benzyl alcohol is effective in defect repair. • Electrical conductivity increases by 9 orders of magnitude during chemical reduction. • The isocyanate functionalization is stable under chemical reducing conditions.

  12. Determination of Cl-36 in Irradiated Reactor Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, H.-F.; Schumann, D.; Stowasser, T.; Hartmann, E.; Kramer, A.

    2016-01-01

    Two of the three research reactors at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the reactors DIORIT and PROTEUS, contained reactor graphite. Whereas the former research reactor DIORIT has been dismantled completely the PROTEUS is subject to a future decommissioning. In case of the DIORIT the reactor graphite was conditioned applying a procedure developed at PSI. In this case the 36 Cl content had to be determined after the conditioning. The result is reported in this paper. The radionuclide inventory including 36 Cl of the graphite used in PROTEUS was measured and the results are reported in here. It has been proven that the graphite from PROTEUS has a radionuclide inventory near the detection limits. All determined radionuclide activities are far below the Swiss exemptions limits. The graphite from PROTEUS therefore poses no radioactive waste. In contrast, the 36 Cl content of graphite from DIORIT is well above the exemption limits. (author)

  13. Calculated bond properties of K adsorbed on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjortstam, O.; Wills, J.M.; Johansson, B.; Eriksson, O.

    1998-01-01

    The properties of the chemical bond of K adsorbed on a graphite(0001) surface have been studied for different coverages, by means of a full-potential slab method. Specific modifications of the Hamiltonian are performed in order to make it possible to study K on graphite in the disperse phase (dilute limit). It is found that K forms a metallic state when covering a graphite surface with a (2x2) coverage. For a (3x3) coverage as well as in the disperse phase K is found to form an ionic bond with graphite. It is shown that in the disperse phase, the hybridization between the K 4s level and graphite is weak. Our findings are consistent with recent experiments. Furthermore the cohesive energies of K adsorption on graphite are found to be larger in the (2x2) coverage compared to the (3x3) coverage. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  14. Physics experiments in graphite lattices (1962); Experiences sur les reseaux a graphite (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, P; Cogne, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    A review is made of the various experimental methods used to determine the physics of graphite, natural uranium lattices: integral lattice experiments; both absolute and differential, effective cross section measurements, both by activation methods and by analysis of irradiated fuels, fine structure measurements. A number of experimental results are also given. (authors) [French] On decrit les differentes methodes experimentales utilisees pour determiner les parametres physiques de reseaux a uranium-graphite. Il s'agit d'experiences globales: mesures absolues et relatives de laplaciens, mesures de sections efficaces effectives par activation et par analyses de combustibles irradies, mesures de structures fines. Un certain nombre de resultats experimentaux sont communiques. (auteurs)

  15. Mode II interlaminar fracture of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, L. A.; Gillespie, J. W.; Trethewey, B. R.

    1986-01-01

    The end notched flexure (ENF) specimen is employed in an investigation of the interlaminar fracture toughness in Mode II (skew symmetric shear) loading of unidirectional graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK composites. Important experimental parameters such as the influence of precracking and the data reduction scheme for the Mode II toughness are discussed. Nonlinear load-deflection response is significant for the tough thermoplastic resin composite but is also present for the brittle thermoset composite. The observed nonlinearities, which are highly rate dependent, are attributed to a combination of slow stable crack growth preceding unstable crack growth and material inelastic behavior in the process zone around the crack tip.

  16. Change in properties of graphite on stake of Obninsk NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgul'ev, Yu.S.; Gundorov, V.V.; Kalyagina, I.P.; Belinskaya, N.T.; Dolgov, V.V.; Komissarov, O.V.; Stuzhnev, Yu.A.

    1997-01-01

    The results of testing the graphite from the AM-1 reactor masonry at the Obninsk NPP for its operation period are discussed. It is shown that the masonry graphite state after 42 years of the reactor operation remains satisfactory in the most cells inspected. Separate cells requiring a repair resulted from oxidation are characterized by strength decreased by several times. The laws of radiation changes in graphite properties are analyzed. The conclusion on possibility of the further masonry operation is drawn

  17. A systematic study of acoustic emission from nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; McEnaney, B.

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring has been identified as a possible method to determine internal stresses in nuclear graphites using the Kaiser effect, i.e., on stressing a graphite that has been subject to a prior stress, the onset of AE occurs at the previous peak stress. For three nuclear graphites (PGA, IM1-24 and VNEC), AE was monitored during both monotonic and cyclic loading to failure in tensile, compressive and flexural test modes. For unirradiated graphites, the Kaiser effect was not found in cyclic loading, but a Felicity effect was observed, i.e., the onset of AE occurred below the previously applied peak stress. The Felicity effect was attributed to time-dependent relaxation and recovery processes and was characterized using a new parameter, the Recovery ratio. It was shown that AE can be used to monitor creep strain and creep recovery in graphites at zero load. The AE-time responses from these experiments were fitted to equations similar to those used for creep strain-time at elevated temperatures. The number of AE counts from irradiated graphites were greater than those from unirradiated graphites, subject to similar stresses, due to increases in porosity caused by radiolytic oxidation. A Felicity effect was also observed on cyclic loading of irradiated graphites, but no evidence for a Kaiser effect was found for irradiated graphites loaded monotonically to failure. Thus internal stresses in irradiated graphites could not be measured using AE. This was attributed to relaxation and recovery processes that occur between removing the irradiated graphite from the reactor and AE testing. This work indicated that AE monitoring is not a suitable technique for measuring internal stresses in irradiated graphite. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs, 6 tabs

  18. Huge magnetoresistance effect of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Youwei; Wang Zhiming; Ni Gang; Xing Dingyu; Xu Qingyu

    2004-01-01

    Graphite is a quasi-two-dimensional semimetal. However, for usual graphite the magnetoresistance is not so high due to its small crystal size and no preferred orientation. Huge positive magnetoresistance up to 85300% at 4.2 K and 4950% at 300 K under 8.15 T magnetic field was found in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. The mechanism of huge positive magnetoresistance is not only due to ordinary magnetoresistance but also due to magnetic-field-driven semimetal-insulator transition

  19. Development of integrated waste management options for irradiated graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Wareing

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The European Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project sought to develop best practices in the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of irradiated graphite including other irradiated carbonaceous waste such as structural material made of graphite, nongraphitized carbon bricks, and fuel coatings. Emphasis was given on legacy irradiated graphite, as this represents a significant inventory in respective national waste management programs. This paper provides an overview of the characteristics of graphite irradiated during its use, primarily as a moderator material, within nuclear reactors. It describes the potential techniques applicable to the retrieval, treatment, recycling/reuse, and disposal of these graphite wastes. Considering the lifecycle of nuclear graphite, from manufacture to final disposal, a number of waste management options have been developed. These options consider the techniques and technologies required to address each stage of the lifecycle, such as segregation, treatment, recycle, and ultimate disposal in a radioactive waste repository, providing a toolbox to aid operators and regulators to determine the most appropriate management strategy. It is noted that national waste management programs currently have, or are in the process of developing, respective approaches to irradiated graphite management. The output of the Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project is intended to aid these considerations, rather than dictate them.

  20. Surface coating of graphite pebbles for Korean HCCR TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youngmin [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Young-Hoon, E-mail: yunh2@dsu.ac.kr [Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yi-Hyun; Ahn, Mu-Young; Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A CVR-SiC coating was successfully formed on graphite pebbles for neutron reflector. • Dense and fine-grained surface morphologies of the SiC coatings were observed. • Oxidation resistance of the CVR-SiC-coated graphite pebbles was improved. - Abstract: The new concept of the recently modified Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) Test Blanket Module (TBM) is to adopt a graphite reflector in the form of a pebble bed. A protective SiC coating is applied to the graphite pebbles to prohibit their reaction with steam or air as well as dust generation during TBM operation. In this research, the chemical vapor reaction (CVR) method was applied to fabricate SiC-coated graphite pebbles in a silica source. Relatively dense CVR-SiC coating was successfully formed on the graphite pebbles through the reduction of the graphite phase with SiO gas that was simply created from the silica source at 1850 °C (2 h). The microstructural features, XRD patterns, pore-size distribution and oxidation behavior of the SiC-coated graphite pebbles were investigated. To develop the practical process, which will be applied for mass production hereafter, a novel alternative method was applied to form the layer of SiC coating on the graphite pebbles over the silica source.