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Sample records for thyroid disorders radioiodine

  1. Radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disorders: functional thyroid autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkelmann, S.

    2005-01-01

    In the last 15 years, several concepts have been developed to further improve the outcome of radioiodine therapy in functional thyroid autonomy. Results of radioiodine therapy in functional autonomy are considerably better than in Graves' disease. All of the currently-applied concepts offer healing rates of 75-100%, but they differ considerably in the hypothyreosis rates attained. The target volume can be precisely determined by sonography only in unifocal autonomy. In the case of multifocal and disseminated autonomy, the entire thyroid is taken as the target volume and the focal dose is reduced ('dosimetric compromise'). TcTUs-based dose concepts calculate the functionally autonomous volume from the TcTUs and replace the target volume by sonography, in the TcTUs-adapted dose concepts, sonographic target volume is left and the focal dose varied in dependence of the suppression uptake. The objective is to attain a high rate of success with a low rate of hypothyreosis. (orig.)

  2. Benign thyroid disorders, radioiodine therapy and diagnosis related groups (DRGs): aspects of cost/benefit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.

    2005-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of goiter and thyroid nodules in older patients is accompanied by an increasing frequency of treatment and cost. Cost-effectiveness is given for programs of prophylaxis (primary prevention, e.g. alimentary iodine supplementation), for programs of screening (secondary prevention. e.g. TSH-screening), and for therapeutic strategies to avoid complications of thyroid dysfunction (atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction, death for cardiac reasons) and to minimize iatrogenic complications (tertiary prevention). Examples of tertiary prevention are radioiodine-therapy of Graves' disease in patients who have an increased risk of relapse after antithyroid drugs (ATD), radioiodine therapy of ouvert or subclinical hyperthyroidism, and radioiodine therapy of large goiters in older patients or in patients suffering from a relevant co-morbidity. A cost-effectiveness-analysis for different therapeutic strategies of Graves' disease has been published using a lifelong time-horizon. The ablative radioiodine dose-regime is cost-effective as a first line therapy if the risk of relapse after ATD exceeds 60%. Cost-minimization-analysis, comparing resection of goiter and radioiodine, has shown lower cost of radioiodine therapy for toxic multinodular goiter up to 100 ml and for Graves' disease up to 60 ml goiter volume. Medical aspects (volume of goiter, uptake of nodules, regressive goiter, suspicion on malignancy, patients' age, co-morbidity, patients' decision) remain decisive for the choice of treatment. (orig.)

  3. Radioiodine therapy of thyroid autonomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiners, Christoph; Schneider, Peter [Clinic and Policlinic for Nuclear Medicine, University of Wuerzburg, Josef-Schneider-Strasse 2, 97080 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Over half a century, treatment of thyroid autonomy with an oral dose of iodine-131 has proven to be effective. The optimum management strategy for the patient is, however, still a matter of debate. The article provides an overview of the pathogenesis of functional autonomy and its clinical relevance. According to the guidelines on both sides of the Atlantic, radioiodine treatment is considered the most comfortable and economical approach to the treatment of the toxic nodular goitre. Some differences in the preparation procedures in the guidelines of the American and the German Society of Nuclear Medicine are discussed with respect to therapy results and the subtypes of thyroid autonomy. The results of studies are summarised concerning changes in thyroid function and thyroid volume after a course of radioiodine treatment. Therapy-related risks, such as immunogenic hypothyroidism or thyroid cancer, are discussed. {sup 131}I treatment of functional autonomy and hyperthyroidism is considered an effective and safe procedure. (orig.)

  4. Radioiodine therapy of thyroid autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, Christoph; Schneider, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Over half a century, treatment of thyroid autonomy with an oral dose of iodine-131 has proven to be effective. The optimum management strategy for the patient is, however, still a matter of debate. The article provides an overview of the pathogenesis of functional autonomy and its clinical relevance. According to the guidelines on both sides of the Atlantic, radioiodine treatment is considered the most comfortable and economical approach to the treatment of the toxic nodular goitre. Some differences in the preparation procedures in the guidelines of the American and the German Society of Nuclear Medicine are discussed with respect to therapy results and the subtypes of thyroid autonomy. The results of studies are summarised concerning changes in thyroid function and thyroid volume after a course of radioiodine treatment. Therapy-related risks, such as immunogenic hypothyroidism or thyroid cancer, are discussed. 131 I treatment of functional autonomy and hyperthyroidism is considered an effective and safe procedure. (orig.)

  5. Guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases (version 4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.; Moser, E.; Reiners, C.; Schneider, P.; Schober, O.

    2007-01-01

    Version 4 of the guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases includes an interdisciplinary consensus ondecision making for antithyroid drugs, surgical treatment and radioiodine therapy. The quantitative description of a specific goiter volume for radioiodine therapy or operation was cancelled. For patients with nodular goiter with or without autonomy, manifold circumstances are in favor of surgery (suspicion on malignancy, large cystic nodules, mediastinal goiter, severe compression of the trachea) or in favor of radioiodine therapy (treatment of autonomy, age of patient, co-morbidity, history of prior subtotal thyroidectomy, profession like teacher, speaker or singer). For patients with Graves' disease, radioiodine therapy or surgery are recommended in the constellation of high risk of relapse (first-line therapy), persistence of hyperthyroidism or relapse of hyperthyroidism. After counseling, the patient gives informed consent to the preferred therapy. The period after radioiodine therapy of benign disorders until conception of at least four months was adapted to the European recommendation. (orig.)

  6. Radioiodine treatment for malignant thyroid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Gertrud [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology

    2006-12-15

    Radioiodine treatment for thyroid disease has been given for half a decade in Sweden. The most common indication for treatment is hyperthyroidism, when iodine uptake is high. The situation in which radioiodine treatment is used in thyroid cancer is less favourable and measures therefore have to be taken to optimize the treatment. Treatment should be performed early in the course of the disease to achieve the highest possible differentiation. Before treatment the iodine and goitrogen intake should be kept low. Stimulation of the thyrocytes by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) should be high. It is conventionally achieved by thyroid hormone withdrawal rendering the patient hypothyroid, or by the recently available recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) which can be recommended for ablation of the thyroid remnant after thyroidectomy and for treatment of metastases in fragile patients unable to undergo hypothyroidism. Finally, stunning - the negative effect of a prior test dose from radioactive iodine - should be avoided.

  7. Radioiodine-treatment (RIT) of functional thyroidal autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meller, J.; Sahlmann, C.O.; Becker, W.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1942, therapy with radioiodine (RIT) has gained a major role in the treatment of benign thyroid disorders, notably hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease or toxic multinodular goitre (thyroid autonomy). In iodine deficient areas thyroid autonomy accounts for 40-50% of all cases with hyperthyroidism. RIT has become a cost-effective first-line procedure in autonomy-patients with latent or overt hyperthyroidism, especially in the absence of a large goitre, after thyroid surgery and in elderly patients with associated conditions who carry a high intra- or perioperative risk. Decisions concerning the definitive treatment of thyroid autonomy should take into account previous episodes of hyperthyroidism, objective parameters of risk stratification in euthyroid patients as well as concomitant diseases and the probability of iodine exposure in the future. In Central Europe the majority of investigators prefer to estimate the therapeutic activity individually by a radioiodine test. TCTUs (global 99m-Tc-pertechnetate thyroid uptake under suppression) - based dose concepts have been proven to be highly effective in the elimination of autonomy and carry a low (< 10%) risk of postradioiodtherapeutic hypothyroidism. Radioiodine therapy for autonomy has been found to be both effective and safe and without major early or late side effects. The most frequent complication is hypothyroidism requiring lifelong follow-up. (author)

  8. Radioiodine uptake measurements in thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadireshn, A.; Kapur, S.C.; Samuel, J.R.; Mahajan, M.K.

    1988-01-01

    Evaluation of thyroid function can be carried out by measuring the uptake of orally administered radioactive iodine. The results of the thyroid uptake measurements for the period 1982-1987 in Christian Medical College, Ludhiana are presented here. About 3000 patients were screened during the analysis period. (author)

  9. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma referred for radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Balawi, Ibrahim A.; Meir, Hadir M.; Yousef, Mohammad K.; Nayel, Hala A.; Al-Mobarak, Mohammad F.

    2001-01-01

    The current work was conducted to study the disease status and treatment results of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma referred for radioactive iodine therapy. Retrospective review of 78 patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma referred for radioiodine therapy in the Nuclear Medicine Unit, King Abdulaziz Hospital and Oncology Center, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Analysis of the clinicopathologic characteristics, age correlation to different risk factors, treatment protocol and results were performed. Seventy seven percent were female and the female to male ratio was 3.5:1. The age of patients ranged between 13-63 years with a median age of 36 years. Cervical lymph node involvement was detected in 22 patients (25%). Papillary carcinoma was encountered in 78 patients (90%) and follicular carcinoma in 9 patients (10%). Analysis of the clinicopathologic characteristics showed no statistically significant difference between patients in the different age groups except for extrathyroid extension and lymph node involvement. Patients older than 45 years had a statistically significant lower incidence of nodal involvement and higher incidence of extra thyroid extension (P<0.02). In the current study we used a high dose method (Radioiodine-131 dose 75-100mCi) for thyroid remnant ablation after thyroidectomy (total or near total) in 67 patients. An Iodine 131 dose of 150 mCi was used in 12 patients with radioiodine-avid cervical lymph nodes and in 3 patients with gross residual tumor. In 4 patients with distant metastases an Iodine 131 dose of 200 mCi was used. For the whole study group the 5 year overall survival and disease-free survival was 96% and 88%. The current study, as with many other retrospective studies, concluded that despite the fact that differentiated thyroid carcinoma is among the most curable cancers, some patients are still at high risk for recurrent disease and associated mortality. (author)

  10. Critical assessment of the test of 131I radioiodine uptake in the thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, J.; Roehling, S.; Vana, S.; Zamrazil, V.

    1979-01-01

    The value of radioiodine 131 I uptake by the thyroid gland was studied to differentiate the functional disorders of the thyroid gland by analysing a smaller group of patients using the classical method and the computer method for the evaluation of 2500 determinations. The conclusion may be drawn that the uptake of radioiodine was caused by a disturbance of the thyroid gland function only in a minority of cases whereas in the others it is dependent on the intake of iodine or of goitrogens. It is therefore not suitable as a screening method for the diagnosis of thyroid gland diseases. It is, however, useful for the differentation of various types of hyperthyroidism. (author)

  11. Radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.; Rajashekharrao, B.

    1999-01-01

    Radioiodine ( 131 I) therapy has been in use for the treatment of thyroid diseases. Although the use of 131 I has been in vogue for a long time, its use in therapy for well-differentiated thyroid cancer is still controversial. This is because, thyroid cancers (TC) are generally slow growing tumors, with low mortality and normal spans of survival. To record recurrence and mortality, long-term follow-up studies over a period of two to three decades are needed to establish definite conclusions on the acceptable modes of treatment. The most reliable conclusions regarding 131 I treatment are obtained from studies reported on a large series of patients followed over a period of 3 decades or more from a single institute with a more or less unchanged protocol of management

  12. Environmental radioiodine in thyroids of grazing animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Middlesworth, L.

    1990-01-01

    Animal thyroids are excellent indicators of environmental contamination from radioiodine, a fact largely unappreciated before 1954. From continuous monitoring of excised thyroids in Nal well-detectors, we know that high-altitude releases of mixed fission products caused increases of 10 3 to 10 5 times the minimal detectable level of 131 I (3.7 mBq/g) in sheep thyroids from the United States, Europe, Asia, Australia, and New Zealand. Within 6 weeks after high-altitude releases, sheep thyroids from different continents of the same hemisphere contained comparable concentrations of 131 I: more than 10 4 times greater concentrations than cow's milk and 5 x 10 3 times greater concentrations than human thyroids from similar areas. In contrast, during the low-altitude Chernobyl release, average 131 I concentrations in animal thyroids, at distances greater than 1,200 km from Chernobyl, were distributed as the inverse square of the distance from the source. 129 I concentrations measured since 1984 with a germanium well-detector in thyroids of sheep slaughtered in Birmingham, England, ranged from 3 to 50 mBq/g organ weight. Similar quantities of 125 I were present intermittently in thyroids of sheep slaughtered in Birmingham since 1986. The source of the 125 I, which is not a fission product, is not clear. For comparison, deer thyroids from the Savannah River Reservation, USA, contained 10 to 7 x 10 5 mBq 129 I/g. Although this isotope is not a biological hazard, it is a long-lived tracer of fission products

  13. Radioiodine and radiotherapy in the management of thyroid cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Radioiodine is an important adjuvant treatment in the management of resectable papillary and follicular thyroid cancers in all patients except those with the best prognostic features. External radiation is also an important adjuvant therapy in these patients, especially those with tumors that extend beyond the thyroid gland and invade the trachea, esophagus, nerves, and blood vessels; it is especially important in treating patients whose tumors do not concentrate radioiodine. Radioiodine may be curative in patients with microscopic distant metastases demonstrated by radioiodine scanning. Even unresectable primary papillary and follicular cancers may be eradicated by combined therapy with radioiodine and radiotherapy. Radioiodine plays no significant role in the treatment of medullary or anaplastic thyroid cancers, but external radiation may eradicate microscopic thyroid bed or nodal disease when persistent disease is indicated by elevated calcitonin levels in medullary thyroid cancer patients. Anaplastic thyroid cancers are usually unresectable and are not eradicated by conventional radiotherapy or by any of the novel radiation techniques, with or without chemotherapy. In all types of thyroid cancer, external radiotherapy may produce beneficial palliative results in patients with distant metastases, but the use of radioiodine should always be explored in papillary and follicular thyroid cancer patients. 30 references

  14. Benign thyroid disorders, radioiodine therapy and diagnosis related groups (DRGs): aspects of cost/benefit; Benigne Schilddruesenerkrankungen, Radioiodtherapie und Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs): Kosten-Nutzen-Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. zu Koeln (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    The increasing prevalence of goiter and thyroid nodules in older patients is accompanied by an increasing frequency of treatment and cost. Cost-effectiveness is given for programs of prophylaxis (primary prevention, e.g. alimentary iodine supplementation), for programs of screening (secondary prevention. e.g. TSH-screening), and for therapeutic strategies to avoid complications of thyroid dysfunction (atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction, death for cardiac reasons) and to minimize iatrogenic complications (tertiary prevention). Examples of tertiary prevention are radioiodine-therapy of Graves' disease in patients who have an increased risk of relapse after antithyroid drugs (ATD), radioiodine therapy of ouvert or subclinical hyperthyroidism, and radioiodine therapy of large goiters in older patients or in patients suffering from a relevant co-morbidity. A cost-effectiveness-analysis for different therapeutic strategies of Graves' disease has been published using a lifelong time-horizon. The ablative radioiodine dose-regime is cost-effective as a first line therapy if the risk of relapse after ATD exceeds 60%. Cost-minimization-analysis, comparing resection of goiter and radioiodine, has shown lower cost of radioiodine therapy for toxic multinodular goiter up to 100 ml and for Graves' disease up to 60 ml goiter volume. Medical aspects (volume of goiter, uptake of nodules, regressive goiter, suspicion on malignancy, patients' age, co-morbidity, patients' decision) remain decisive for the choice of treatment. (orig.)

  15. Reduction of thyroid volume following radioiodine therapy for functional autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luster, M.; Jacob, M.; Thelen, M.H.; Michalowski, U.; Deutsch, U.; Reiners, C.

    1995-01-01

    In a retrospective study we evaluated the data of 112 patients who underwent radioiodine treatment for functional autonomy of the thyroid at Essen University Hospital from 1988 to 1993. Therapeutic activities of radioiodine were administered after individual determination of activity for intended radiation doses (150-300 Gy) taking into consideration autonomously functioning volume, maximum uptake, and effective half-life. The achieved dose was calculated by means of measurement of the radioiodine kinetics during therapy. Depending on the type of autonomous function of the thyroid (solitary autonomously functioning nodule, multiple autonomously functioning nodules, autonomously functioning thyroid tissue) volume reductions between 39 and 46% were found approximately 6 months after treatment. (orig.) [de

  16. Disparity of radioiodine and radiothallium concentrations in chronic thyroiditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimaoka, K.; Parthasarathy, K.L.; Friedman, M.; Rao, U.

    1980-01-01

    Three cases of chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) presented with thyroid nodules, showed disparate uptakes of radioiodine and radiothallium. All patients were clinically euthyroid and had positive antithyroid antibody titers. On cytological and/or pathological examinations, they were consistent with chronic thyroiditis.

  17. Local reactions to radioiodine in the treatment of thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burmeister, L.A.; du Cret, R.P.; Mariash, C.N. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the rate of local complications resulting from radioiodine ablation of thyroid cancer in patients with a residual intact thyroid lobe to that in patients who had more extensive surgical treatment prior to radioiodine administration. We retrospectively studied 59 patients who had received 131I between 1979 and 1989. The patients were divided into two groups, depending on the extent of their previous surgical thyroid excision. Group 1 comprised 10 patients with a lobectomy or hemithyroidectomy before the ablative radioiodine dose, and Group 2 comprised 49 patients with more extensive thyroid excision (near-total or subtotal thyroidectomy) before the radioiodine treatment. Sixty percent of the 10 patients in Group 1 experienced some degree of neck pain or tenderness following radioiodine ablation of their residual thyroid. In one case, the local reaction was very severe and accompanied by the development of transient hyperthyroidism. There was only a 6% local complication rate in the patients who had undergone more extensive thyroid excision before ablative therapy (p less than 0.001), and none had a severe reaction. Patients with only unilateral surgical excision before radioiodine therapy have a higher rate of local complications than do patients treated with more extensive surgery prior to radioiodine ablation. If radioiodine is to be employed in such patients, they should be informed of this possible complication. Since evidence supports a dose effect in the pathogenesis of the complications, we recommend using a dose of less than 30 mCi for the initial ablation in these patients even though it may be necessary to repeat this dose to complete thyroid ablation.

  18. Local reactions to radioiodine in the treatment of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burmeister, L.A.; du Cret, R.P.; Mariash, C.N.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the rate of local complications resulting from radioiodine ablation of thyroid cancer in patients with a residual intact thyroid lobe to that in patients who had more extensive surgical treatment prior to radioiodine administration. We retrospectively studied 59 patients who had received 131I between 1979 and 1989. The patients were divided into two groups, depending on the extent of their previous surgical thyroid excision. Group 1 comprised 10 patients with a lobectomy or hemithyroidectomy before the ablative radioiodine dose, and Group 2 comprised 49 patients with more extensive thyroid excision (near-total or subtotal thyroidectomy) before the radioiodine treatment. Sixty percent of the 10 patients in Group 1 experienced some degree of neck pain or tenderness following radioiodine ablation of their residual thyroid. In one case, the local reaction was very severe and accompanied by the development of transient hyperthyroidism. There was only a 6% local complication rate in the patients who had undergone more extensive thyroid excision before ablative therapy (p less than 0.001), and none had a severe reaction. Patients with only unilateral surgical excision before radioiodine therapy have a higher rate of local complications than do patients treated with more extensive surgery prior to radioiodine ablation. If radioiodine is to be employed in such patients, they should be informed of this possible complication. Since evidence supports a dose effect in the pathogenesis of the complications, we recommend using a dose of less than 30 mCi for the initial ablation in these patients even though it may be necessary to repeat this dose to complete thyroid ablation

  19. Nationwide trends in surgery and radioiodine treatment for benign thyroid disease during iodization of salt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerqueira, C.; Knudsen, N.; Ovesen, L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Iodization of salt was introduced in Denmark in 1998 because of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency (ID). The aim of this study was to analyze the utilization rate of surgery and radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid disorders before and after the introduction of iodization, and to stu...

  20. Our experience with radioiodine therapy of thyroid functional autonomies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, Otakar

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In this paper the author presents his experience with radioiodine therapy of thyroid functional autonomies. The objectives of this study were to establish the efficacy and determine the adverse effects of radioiodine therapy of patients with thyroid functional autonomies. The main pathologic attribute of thyroid functional autonomies is the loss of regulation in the axis of hypothalamus-hypophysis-thyroid. The main cause of functional autonomy of the thyroid is iodine deficiency. Over a period of 30 years (1974-2004) 799 patients (age from 33 to 86 years; average age 58.7 years; the female: male ration was 7.4:1) with unifocal functional autonomy (UFA), multifocal functional autonomy (MFA) and disseminated functional autonomy (DFA) received at least one treatment of radioiodine. For diagnostics and the evaluation of radioiodine therapeutic effect of functional autonomies a thyroid scintigraphy is the basic and necessary procedure. In some patients a common scintigraphy with special imaging modulation, in some patients a scintigraphy after suppression or stimulation by means of thyroid hormones or TSH were done. We have also performed a thyroid ultrasonography, an assessment of a serum level of a total and free thyroxine, total triiodothyronine, TSH, radioiodine accumulation test, estimation of radioiodine effective half-life, in some patients TRH-TSH test. The follow-up examinations were done in all patients after 4-6 months, another examination after one year in 545 patients and after two years in 254 patients. One therapeutic dose received 733 patients (91.74%) and it was sufficient for an elimination of functional autonomies. Some patients were retreated if there was the evidence of small or no treatment effect and no elimination of functional autonomies. Two radioiodine treatments received 62 patients (7.76%) and three treatments 4 patients (0.5%). We advocate individual pre-therapeutic dosimetry to determine the activity necessary to achieve a

  1. Radioiodine-induced thyroid storm. Case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, M.T.; Kidd, G.S.; Dodson, L.E. Jr.; Hofeldt, F.D.

    1983-08-01

    Thyroid storm developed following radioiodine therapy in a 43-year-old man with Graves' disease, weight loss, myopathy, severe thyrotoxic hypercalcemia, and a pituitary adenoma. The hypercalcemia may have been a significant, and previously unreported, predisposing factor for the radioiodine-associated thyroid storm. This case and 15 other well-documented cases of radioiodine-associated storm found in the literature are reviewed, as are several other cases of less severe exacerbations of thyrotoxicosis associated with radioiodine therapy. Although not often seen, these complications are often fatal. High-risk patients, such as the elderly, those with severe thyrotoxicosis, and those with significant underlying diseases, may benefit from preventive measures such as the judicious use of thyrostatic medications during the periods before and after isotope administration.

  2. Radioiodine-induced thyroid storm. Case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, M.T.; Kidd, G.S.; Dodson, L.E. Jr.; Hofeldt, F.D.

    1983-01-01

    Thyroid storm developed following radioiodine therapy in a 43-year-old man with Graves' disease, weight loss, myopathy, severe thyrotoxic hypercalcemia, and a pituitary adenoma. The hypercalcemia may have been a significant, and previously unreported, predisposing factor for the radioiodine-associated thyroid storm. This case and 15 other well-documented cases of radioiodine-associated storm found in the literature are reviewed, as are several other cases of less severe exacerbations of thyrotoxicosis associated with radioiodine therapy. Although not often seen, these complications are often fatal. High-risk patients, such as the elderly, those with severe thyrotoxicosis, and those with significant underlying diseases, may benefit from preventive measures such as the judicious use of thyrostatic medications during the periods before and after isotope administration

  3. Radioiodine treatment in children with thyroid cancer from Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, C.; Biko, J.; Geworski, L.; Olthoff, M.; Demidchik, E.P.; Streffer, C.; Paretzke, H.; Voigt, G.; Kenigsberg, Y.; Bauer, W.; Heinemann, G.; Pfob, H.

    1996-01-01

    Between 1st of April 1993 and 15th of November 1995, 95 children from Belarus with most advanced stages of thyroid cancer have been treated totally 305 times with radioiodine in Germany. In spite of a high frequency of advanced tumor stages pT4 (82%), lymph node metastases (95%) and distant metastases (55%) in those selected children, the preliminary results of radioiodine treatment are promising. In 55% of the children complete remission and in 44% partial remission of thyroid cancer could be achieved. In no case progressive disease under treatment has been observed

  4. Guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases (version 4); Leitlinie zur Radioiodtherapie (RIT) bei benignen Schilddruesenerkrankungen (Version 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Dressler, J. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany). Abteilung fuer Nuklearmedizin; Gruenwald, F. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Leisner, B. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung des allgemeinen Krankenhauses St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany); Moser, E. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung der Radiologischen Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany); Reiners, C.; Schneider, P. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Schober, O. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2007-07-01

    Version 4 of the guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases includes an interdisciplinary consensus ondecision making for antithyroid drugs, surgical treatment and radioiodine therapy. The quantitative description of a specific goiter volume for radioiodine therapy or operation was cancelled. For patients with nodular goiter with or without autonomy, manifold circumstances are in favor of surgery (suspicion on malignancy, large cystic nodules, mediastinal goiter, severe compression of the trachea) or in favor of radioiodine therapy (treatment of autonomy, age of patient, co-morbidity, history of prior subtotal thyroidectomy, profession like teacher, speaker or singer). For patients with Graves' disease, radioiodine therapy or surgery are recommended in the constellation of high risk of relapse (first-line therapy), persistence of hyperthyroidism or relapse of hyperthyroidism. After counseling, the patient gives informed consent to the preferred therapy. The period after radioiodine therapy of benign disorders until conception of at least four months was adapted to the European recommendation. (orig.)

  5. Beyond radioiodine: novel therapies in advanced thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugen, Bryan R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Thyroid cancer is a relatively common endocrine malignancy. Fortunately, many patients do well with standard therapy including surgery and radioiodine. A minority of patients have poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma that is unresponsive to radioiodine therapy. Redifferentiation agents that 'reprogram ' these tumors to concentrate radioiodine would be of great value in treating patients with advanced thyroid cancer. The retinoid isotretinoin is the most extensively studied of these agents. It appears that 20-40% of patients respond to isotretinoin treatment by concentration of radioiodine in metastatic tumors, but the clinical utility of this redifferentiation is still unclear. In vitro studies suggest that the retinoid receptors RARβ and RXRγ are required for this effect. Abnormal DNA methylation may be an early event in thyroid tumorigenesis and methylation of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) may play a role in loss of iodine concentration in these tumors. Inhibitors of methylation (5-azacytidine, phenylacetate and sodium butyrate) have been shown to increase NIS expression and iodine uptake in cell culture models, but published trials in humans are not yet available. Histone acetylation is required for efficient transcription of genes necessary for differentiated function. Proteins that cause histone deacetylation inhibit gene transcription and differentiated function. Inhibitors of histone deacetylation (depsipeptide, trichostatin A) have been shown to increase NIS expression and iodine uptake in poorly differentiated and undifferentiated cell lines. Finally, commonly used agents such as thiazolidine diones (diabetes) and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (hypercholesterolemia) have shown promise in preliminary in vitro studies in advanced thyroid cancer cell lines. Our own work has focused on receptor-selective retinoids and thiazolidine diones as potential therapy in patients with advanced thyroid cancer based on nuclear hormone receptor

  6. Chronic myeloid leukaemia following radioiodine therapy for carcinoma thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bundi, R S; Scott, J S; Halnan, K E [Institute of Radiotherapeutics, Glasgow (UK)

    1977-01-01

    The majority of cases reported in the literature of leukemia following treatment of thyroid disease (thyrotoxicosis and carcinoma) are of acute variety. A description is given of the development of chronic myeloid leukemia in a case of carcinoma of the thyroid treated with radioiodine and megavoltage X-ray therapy. The case history contains details of radioiodine and X-ray doses administered over the years 1961 to 1972 to a male patient, on whom a right hemithyroidectomy was carried out in 1960. The results of blood counts are also recorded for the period up to 1973. The patient died, at 57, in 1974. A total of 860 mCi of /sup 131/I was administered and the first abnormal blood count was noted two months after the last therapeutic dose. Estimates have been made of blood and thyroid doses from /sup 131/I. There has been only one other report in the literature of the development of chronic myeloid leukemia following radioiodine therapy for carcinoma of the thyroid, and although the leukemogenic hazard of /sup 131/I cannot be ruled out for this patient, it is possible that the development of leukemia was coincidental rather than due to the radioiodine therapy.

  7. Thyroid emergencies following radioiodine therapy - Two case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasmine, Sufia; Haque, Fatema Sultana; Karim, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    Thyrotoxicosis and well differentiated thyroid carcinomas are the two most common pathological conditions where radioiodine is used. Patients with well differentiated thyroid carcinomas are the candidates for post operative radio iodine therapy. It is currently the most popular and frequently used method of treatment. Its use is safe and cost effective. The results are usually eventless but in some exceptional cases emergencies that occurred after administration of I-131. One emergency occurred after I-131 administration for Graves' disease and the second case happened after therapeutic application of I-131 for treatment of local recurrences of thyroid cancer.(author)

  8. Guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases (version 3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.; Dressler, J.; Gruenwald, F.; Leisner, B.; Moser, E.; Reiners, C.; Schneider, P.; Schober, O.

    2004-01-01

    The version 3 of the guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases presents first of all a revision of the version 2. The chapter indication for radioiodine therapy, surgical treatment or antithyroid drugs bases on an interdisciplinary consensus. The manifold criteria for decision making consider the entity of thyroid disease (autonomy, Graves' disease, goitre, goitre recurrence), the thyroid volume, suspicion of malignancy, cystic nodules, risk of surgery and co-morbidity, history of subtotal thyroidectomy, persistent or recurrent thyrotoxicosis caused by Graves' disease including known risk factors for relapse, compression of the trachea caused by goitre, requirement of direct therapeutic effect as well as the patient's preference. Because often some of these criteria are relevant, the guideline offers the necessary flexibility for individual decisions. Further topics are patients' preparation, counseling, dosage concepts, procedural details, results, side effects and follow-up care. The prophylactic use of glucocorticoids during radioiodine therapy in patients without preexisting ophthalmopathy as well as dosage and duration of glucocorticoid medication in patients with preexisting ophthalmopathy need to be clarified in further studies. The pragmatic recommendations for the combined use of radioiodine and glucocorticoids remained unchanged in the 3 rd version. (orig.) [de

  9. The imunocytochemical advances in prognosis of metastasis radioiodine resistant of papillary thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelyins'ka, G.V.

    2015-01-01

    The topical issues is the problem of prognosis of metastasis radioiodine resistant metastasis. We offered the methods of prognosis of metastasis radioiodine resistant of papillary thyroid carcinoma with the help of immunocytochemical detection of the cytokeratin 17 and thyroid peroxidase. With the purpose of prognosis of metastasis radioiodine resistibility the cytokeratin 17 is taped in punctates of primary papillary carcinomas. This approach allows predict response of metastases on radioiodine therapy to choose proper therapeutic approach

  10. Results of radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronath, A.

    1982-01-01

    The goal of this work is the quantification of therapy results of a radioiodine therapy with Iodine 131 on 367 patients with the following benign thyroid diseases: euthyroidal struma, hyperthyroidism, hyperthyroidal struma and autonomous adenoma. 1. Euthyroidal struma - subjective improvement and objective diminution of the struma by 63%, subjective or objective improvement by 21% of the patients. Including the probable successful therapies the success rate was all together 90.1%. 2. Hyperthyroidism - after one-time/more-time (18.6%) radioiodine therapy the success rate was 71.5/85.7% including latent (8.6/10.0%) and manifest (7.1/8.5%) hypothroidism. 3. Hyperthyroidal struma - after one-time/more-time (16.9%) radioiodine therapy the success rate was 74.7/90.1% including latent (-/5.7%) and manifest (1.4/2.8%) hypothyroidism. 4. Autonomous adenoma - after one-time/two-time (5.2%) radioiodine therapy the success rate was 80.5/84.6% including 15.5% latent hypothyroidism. The results will be discussed in comparison to published data and to operation and thyrostatic treatment. (TRV) [de

  11. Thyroid fractional deposition and half life of radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Minoru

    1974-01-01

    In order to measure the absorbed dose of radioiodine in the thyroid gland, which was incorporated by halation or ingestion, iodine intake (fa), 131 I thyroid uptake rate(fw), 131 I thyroid uptake rate compared to the rate in the whole body (f 2 ) and the half life of iodine in the thyroid gland(Teff) were examined. Thyroid fractional deposition of 131 I was compared between Japanese and European. The rate of 131 I which moved from the blood into the thyroid gland in children (f 2 ') and the effect of the iodine in meals on 131 I thyroid uptake (fw) were also studied. In Japanese, f 2 was 0.28 and the mean Teff was 6.9 +- 0.7 days in 11 Japanese adults. There was an individual difference in these biological parameter and the values in adults were different from those in children. A little difference in value between Japanese and European suggested to be caused by the greater amount of stable iodine in meals in Japanese. (Serizawa, K.)

  12. Use of recombinant human thyrotropin (rh TSH) as a method of preparation for radioiodine therapy in thyroid disorders; Utilisation de la thyreostimuline humaine recombinante dans la preparation au traitement par iode-131 des pathologies thyroidiennes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taieb, D.; Guillet, B.A.; Tessonnier, L.; Mundler, O. [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de la Timone, Service Central de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2008-02-15

    The introduction of recombinant human TSH (rh TSH) as a method of preparation for radioiodine therapy of follicular-derived thyroid tumors (benign and malignant) is a significant medical advance. Rh TSH has been approved for use in remnants ablation after total thyroidectomy for carcinoma. There are other potential uses for rh TSH that have not yet been licensed. The use of rh TSH allows to reduce administrated doses in goiters through an increase of iodine uptake and a more homogeneous distribution of radioiodine in the gland. Rh TSH also improves thyroid cancer patients quality of life by avoiding hypothyroidism. (authors)

  13. Radioiodine Treatment of Well-Differentiated thyroid cancer in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrenechea, E.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Well-differentiated thyroid cancer (DTCA) in children is quite different from the adult- onset disease in that they are more aggressive at the time of diagnosis and with metastases and has a higher risk for recurrence. Some studies claim it to be less lethal and hence treatment protocols may be different from that of the adult. This study was made to analyze the need for RAI therapy as one of the cornerstone of treatment aside from surgery and thyroid hormone suppression as well as to determine the behavior of WDTCA in children. Results: The incidence of DTCA is varied and ranges from 1-10% in several published series. In the Philippines where thyroid cancer in adults ranks 5th in mortality for both sexes, the incidence is likewise very low, around 0.5-1% for ages 18 years and below in a ten year study. It was predominantly a female population (74%) as compared to the males (26%). Fifteen cases were reviewed and included as most were given RAI (87%). Most presented as a solitary nodule and with lymph node metastases. Thirteen cases were papillary in nature and only two cases were follicular. The incidence of nodal metastases was 53% while lung metastases were seen in 20% of cases. Of the 13 cases that underwent RAI therapy, three cases of lung metastases needed repeat therapy. In the cases with lymph node metastases, 2 cases also had recurrence and which necessitated repeat RAI therapy. The two cases that did not get RAI therapy had progressive disease on follow- up after 5 and 7 years respectively from surgery. Discussion: Primary treatment for DTC should consist of surgery, radioiodine ablation and thyroid hormone suppression. We must rely on pediatric outcome studies and the high frequency of multifocal intrathyroidal disease, loco- regional spread and extra cervical metastases often seen as initial presentations of this particular group. The more advanced disease at diagnosis for children, propensity for recurrence as well as the greater radioiodine

  14. Optimizing radioiodine for ablation of residual thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal, C.S.

    1999-01-01

    The thyroid cancer (TC) has been studied in great detail in the form of the clinical experience during the past several decades. This has led to the retrospective analysis of various prognostic factors that have separated DTC into various risk groups. On one hand, the prognosis in the low-risk group is excellent with survival rate of 98 %, whereas the other end of the spectrum consists of high-risk group patients with poor survival, approximating only 50% at 10 years. Clearly, the understanding of the prognostic factors and risk groups is critically important in distinguishing a patient at low-risk from that at a high-risk which can make an impact in decision making regarding the extent of thyroidectomy and adjuvant treatment such as radioactive iodine ( 131 I) therapy

  15. Guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases (version 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. zu Koeln (Germany); Dressler, J. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany); Gruenwald, F. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Leisner, B. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin des Allg. Krankenhauses St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany); Moser, E. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin der Radiologischen Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany); Reiners, C.; Schneider, P. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany); Schober, O. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Muenster (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    The version 3 of the guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases presents first of all a revision of the version 2. The chapter indication for radioiodine therapy, surgical treatment or antithyroid drugs bases on an interdisciplinary consensus. The manifold criteria for decision making consider the entity of thyroid disease (autonomy, Graves' disease, goitre, goitre recurrence), the thyroid volume, suspicion of malignancy, cystic nodules, risk of surgery and co-morbidity, history of subtotal thyroidectomy, persistent or recurrent thyrotoxicosis caused by Graves' disease including known risk factors for relapse, compression of the trachea caused by goitre, requirement of direct therapeutic effect as well as the patient's preference. Because often some of these criteria are relevant, the guideline offers the necessary flexibility for individual decisions. Further topics are patients' preparation, counseling, dosage concepts, procedural details, results, side effects and follow-up care. The prophylactic use of glucocorticoids during radioiodine therapy in patients without preexisting ophthalmopathy as well as dosage and duration of glucocorticoid medication in patients with preexisting ophthalmopathy need to be clarified in further studies. The pragmatic recommendations for the combined use of radioiodine and glucocorticoids remained unchanged in the 3{sup rd} version. (orig.) [German] Die Version 3 der Leitlinie zur Radioiodtherapie (RIT) bei benignen Schilddruesenerkrankungen stellt im Wesentlichen eine redaktionelle Ueberarbeitung der Version 2 dar. Im Kapitel Indikation und Empfehlungen fuer eine Radioiodtherapie, eine Operation oder eine thyreostatische Therapie bei gutartigen Schilddruesenerkrankungen basiert die Leitlinie auf einem interdisziplinaer abgestimmten Konzept. Die Entscheidungskriterien sind multifaktoriell und beruecksichtigen die Art der Schilddruesenerkrankung (Autonomie, Morbus Basedow, Struma, Rezidivstruma

  16. Variants and pitfalls on radioiodine scans in pediatric patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostafa, Mohamed; Vali, Reza; Chan, Jeffrey; Omarkhail, Yusuaf; Shammas, Amer [University of Toronto, Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Medical Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-10-15

    Potentially false-positive findings on radioiodine scans in children with differentiated thyroid carcinoma can mimic functioning thyroid tissue and functioning thyroid carcinomatous tissue. Such false-positive findings comprise variants and pitfalls that can vary slightly in children as compared with adults. To determine the patterns and frequency of these potential false-positive findings on radioiodine scans in children with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. We reviewed a total of 223 radioiodine scans from 53 pediatric patients (mean age 13.3 years, 37 girls) with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Focal or regional activity that likely did not represent functioning thyroid tissue or functioning thyroid carcinomatous tissue were categorized as variants or pitfalls. The final diagnosis was confirmed by reviewing the concurrent and follow-up clinical data, correlative ultrasonography, CT scanning, serum thyroglobulin and antithyroglobulin antibody levels. We calculated the frequency of these variants and pitfalls from diagnostic and post-therapy radioiodine scans. The most common variant on the radioiodine scans was the thymic activity (24/223, 10.8%) followed by the cardiac activity (8/223, 3.6%). Salivary contamination and star artifact, caused by prominent thyroid remnant, were the most important observed pitfalls. Variants and pitfalls that mimic functioning thyroid tissue or functioning thyroid carcinomatous tissue on radioiodine scan in children with differentiated thyroid carcinoma are not infrequent, but they decrease in frequency on successive radioiodine scans. Potential false-positive findings can be minimized with proper knowledge of the common variants and pitfalls in children and correlation with clinical, laboratory and imaging data. (orig.)

  17. [Thyroid and cardiovascular disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyśko, Dorota; Gajek, Jacek

    2004-05-01

    In this study three problems concerning interactions between thyroid and cardiovascular system are discussed. Cardiac arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, pleural effusion, hyperlipidaemia, arterial hypertension may be consequences of thyroid disorders leading to inappropriate hormone secretion. During such illnesses as heart failure, myocardial infarction and in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery profound changes may occur in thyroid hormone metabolism known as sick euthyroid syndrome. Treatment with amiodarone may lead to changes in thyroid tests results and to development of hypothyroidism or thyrotoxicosis.

  18. Personalized Medicine Based on Theranostic Radioiodine Molecular Imaging for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging based personalized therapy has been a fascinating concept for individualized therapeutic strategy, which is able to attain the highest efficacy and reduce adverse effects in certain patients. Theranostics, which integrates diagnostic testing to detect molecular targets for particular therapeutic modalities, is one of the key technologies that contribute to the success of personalized medicine. Although the term "theranostics" was used after the second millennium, its basic principle was applied more than 70 years ago in the field of thyroidology with radioiodine molecular imaging. Differentiated thyroid cancer, which arises from follicular cells in the thyroid, is the most common endocrine malignancy, and theranostic radioiodine has been successfully applied to diagnose and treat differentiated thyroid cancer, the applications of which were included in the guidelines published by various thyroid or nuclear medicine societies. Through better pathophysiologic understanding of thyroid cancer and advancements in nuclear technologies, theranostic radioiodine contributes more to modern tailored personalized management by providing high therapeutic effect and by avoiding significant adverse effects in differentiated thyroid cancer. This review details the inception of theranostic radioiodine and recent radioiodine applications for differentiated thyroid cancer management as a prototype of personalized medicine based on molecular imaging.

  19. Thyroid-hormone concentrations after radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamagna, E.I.; Levine, G.A.; Hershman, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    Fourteen hyperthyroid patients (11 men, three women), ages 28 to 66, were followed with serial measurements of serum thyroid hormone levels for 1 mo after therapy with I-131. Twelve patients had diffuse toxic goiters (25 to 70 g in size); two patients had multinodular glands (40 to 100 g). The patients were taking no antithyroid medications; ten patients were treated with propranolol. All patients received the equivalent of 5000 rad, except the two with multinodular glands, who received larger doses. There was no consistent pattern of serum T 4 and T 3 levels after the I-131 therapy. For the entire group, there was no significant increase of the mean serum hormone concentration. One group (three patients) had a mean T 4 increase of 28% and a T 3 increase of 91% above baseline at Days 10--11. Seven patients had minimal increases of hormone levels at Days 2--3, and a third group (four paients) had no increase of thyroid hormones after I-131 therapy. The patients with no rise in hormone concentrations had smaller goiters than the other groups. There was no correlation of the dose of radioactive iodine, or of the initial hormone concentration, with the rises or declines of T 4 and T 3 levels after I-131 therapy. Radioiodine therapy caused no significant increase of serum T 4 and T 3 concentrations in the majority of patients

  20. Radioiodine therapy of hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules: usefulness of an implemented dose calculation algorithm allowing reduction of radioiodine amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavo, M; Bagnara, M C; Pomposelli, E; Altrinetti, V; Calamia, I; Camerieri, L; Giusti, M; Pesce, G; Reitano, C; Bagnasco, M; Caputo, M

    2013-09-01

    Radioiodine is a common option for treatment of hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules. Due to the expected selective radioiodine uptake by adenoma, relatively high "fixed" activities are often used. Alternatively, the activity is individually calculated upon the prescription of a fixed value of target absorbed dose. We evaluated the use of an algorithm for personalized radioiodine activity calculation, which allows as a rule the administration of lower radioiodine activities. Seventy-five patients with single hyperfunctioning thyroid nodule eligible for 131I treatment were studied. The activities of 131I to be administered were estimated by the method described by Traino et al. and developed for Graves'disease, assuming selective and homogeneous 131I uptake by adenoma. The method takes into account 131I uptake and its effective half-life, target (adenoma) volume and its expected volume reduction during treatment. A comparison with the activities calculated by other dosimetric protocols, and the "fixed" activity method was performed. 131I uptake was measured by external counting, thyroid nodule volume by ultrasonography, thyroid hormones and TSH by ELISA. Remission of hyperthyroidism was observed in all but one patient; volume reduction of adenoma was closely similar to that assumed by our model. Effective half-life was highly variable in different patients, and critically affected dose calculation. The administered activities were clearly lower with respect to "fixed" activities and other protocols' prescription. The proposed algorithm proved to be effective also for single hyperfunctioning thyroid nodule treatment and allowed a significant reduction of administered 131I activities, without loss of clinical efficacy.

  1. Stunning in radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease. Quantification and therapeutic relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krohn, T.; Meyer, P.T.; Knollmann, D.; Nowak, B.; Schaefer, W.M.; Ocklenburg, C.

    2008-01-01

    In radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease, a reduction of radioiodine uptake is known for consecutive administrations of 131I, which needs to be considered in therapy planning. Aim: Analysis of uptake reduction with regard on the time interval between radioiodine administration and the delivered dose to the thyroid tissue. Patients, methods: 200 patients were enrolled in the study and distributed into two groups (matched for diagnoses), each containing 32 patients with Graves' disease (target dose 250 Gy), 24 with focal (400 Gy), 44 with disseminated thyroid autonomy (150 Gy). In one group, a second fraction of radioiodine was given after 48 h (2d) due to an unexpected low radioiodine uptake or effective half-life, whereas in the other group the second fraction was given after 96 h (4d). Results: There was no significant difference between delivered doses due to the first fraction after four days: 2d: 86 ± 48 Gy (extrapolated) vs. 4d: 87 ± 41 Gy, p > 0.05. In 2d, delivered dose at time of second administration was significantly lower (51 μ 29 Gy) than in 4d (p < 0.01). The radioiodine uptake of the second fraction relative to the initial uptake was significantly lower in the 4d (4d: 63 ± 25% vs. 2d: 82 ± 24%, p < 0.01). In addition, a correlation between uptake reduction and delivered dose and an influence of the time interval between radioiodine administrations could be shown. Conclusions: Relative uptake of subsequent radioiodine fractions decreases with time after first administration and with increasing delivered dose to the thyroid. If a second fraction of 131I is given at an earlier time, the same therapeutic effect can be reached using lower amounts of activity, minimising radiation exposure and increasing efficiency of radioiodine therapy. (orig.)

  2. A method for the radiohalogenation of proteins resulting in decreased thyroid uptake of radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalutsky, M.R.; Narula, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    A procedure is described for the radioiodination of proteins using an iodinated derivative of N-succinimidyl 3-(tri-n-butylstannyl) benzoate (ATE). Adequate removal of unreacted ATE from [ 125 I]ATE was necessary for optimal protein radioiodination. Labelling efficiencies of greater than 60% could be obtained after a 20 min incubation of goat IgG with [ 125 I]ATE at 4 0 C. Paired-label experiments with goat IgG labeled with 125 I using ATE and 131 I using Iodogen demonstrated that use of the ATE reagent for protein labeling significantly reduced (P < 0.005) the thyroid uptake of radioiodine. (author)

  3. Preliminary study of attitude and knowledge of thyroid cancer patients to radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thongpraparn, Thonnapong; Pusuwan, Pawana; Tocharoenchai, Chiraporn; Siriphitukyotin, Oratai; Wongsawat, Wanwimon; Chaudakshetrin, Pachee; Putrasreni, Nucharee

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study is to survey the attitude and knowledge of radiation and radioiodine treatment in thyroid cancer patients. Fifty-two thyroid cancer patients who were prepared for radioactive iodine treatment at Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital were requested to fill the questionaires before and after receiving the information about radioiodine treatment. The questionaires consisted of 12 questions of which the first five were about the attitude to radiation and radioiodine treatment. The rest was about an information on radioiodine treatment. For data analysis, firstly the percentage of correct answer of each question was calculated and compared between pre- and post-test. Secondly all patients were categorized into 2 groups according to their education: upto high school, and undergraduate or higher. The attitude and the understanding about radioiodine treatment were analyzed in each group. The results show that post-test gives higher percentages of correct answers for all questions with an average of 29% improvement. For upto high school group, the attitude improves from 69.4% to 97.2% and the understanding about radioiodine treatment improves from 88.9% to 100%. Similarly, for the undergraduate or higher group,the attitude improves from 93.3% to 100% and the understanding about radioiodine treatment improves from 73.3% to 100%. It may be concluded that our education intervention is informative and the well-educated patients have better attitude to radiation

  4. The Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Thyroid Axis in Infants and Children: Protection from Radioiodines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Fisher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium iodide (KI is recommended as an emergency treatment for exposure to radioiodines, most commonly associated with nuclear detonation or mishaps at nuclear power plants. Protecting the thyroid gland of infants and children remains a priority because of increased incidence of thyroid cancer in the young exposed to radioiodines (such as 131I and 133I. There is a lack of clinical studies for KI and radioiodines in children or infants to draw definitive conclusions about the effectiveness and safety of KI administration in the young. In this paper, we compare functional aspects of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT axis in the young and adults and review the limited studies of KI in children. The HPT axis in the infant and child is hyperactive and therefore will respond less effectively to KI treatment compared to adults. Research on the safety and efficacy of KI in infants and children is needed.

  5. Therapeutic outcome after radioiodine and surgery treatment of toxic thyroid adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovski, Zlatko P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate late follow-up results in surgery and radioiodine treatment of toxic thyroid adenoma and compare incidence of hypothyroidism and recurrence hyperthyroidism in treated patients. Material and Methods: We observed 93 treated patients (77 female, 26 male, age range 18-76 years) with adenoma toxicum. 29 (32.2 %) patients underwent surgery (adenectomia), while 64 (67.8 %) patients received 131 I therapy (555-1100 MBq).The long term results of the treatment were followed 1-15 years after therapy (median 9,2 years). Results: Recurrent hyperthyroidism occurred in 4/29 (13.8%) patients after surgery adenectomia in comparison to 5/64 (7.8 %) patients after radioiodine therapy. The patients after enucleation of autonomous nodule of the thyroid show increase incidence of late recurrent hyperthyroidism. These results are likely to be due to persistent functional autonomy in the parenchyma surrounding the autonomous adenoma. Apparently this persistent autonomy could be successfully removed by radioiodine. Appear of hypothyroidism was observed in 6/64 (9.3 %) patients treated with 131 I, while after surgery had in 3/29 (10.3 %) patients. Incidence of hypothyroidism between operated patients and radioiodine treated patients was approximately the same. Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy is useful, economical and effective treatment of toxic thyroid adenoma that provides a safe protection in preventing late recurrent hyperthyroidism and is more successful therapy that surgery treatment. (author)

  6. Side effects and risks of radioiodine treatment of benign thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, W.; Hohenberger, W.; Wolf, F.; Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen

    1990-01-01

    Radioiodine treatment is considered to be the treatment of choice in benign thyroid diseases because of its very low side effects. Real and hypothetic risks and side effects have to be differentiated. Both may occur early and late after the treatment. Radioiodinethyroiditis in small volumes at high doses is very rare. Exacerbation of a thyroid storm (0.34%) as well as local compressions accompanied with reactive edema of the thyroid are early real side effects of radioiodine treatment. Late real side effects are failure of treatment (7-30% of thyrotoxicosis) and induction of hypothyroidism (4-20% of functional autonomy and increasing frequency in Graves' diseases with time). Late hypothetic risks are somatic (1-9/10000 bis 1-9/100000) or genetic (1-9/100000). An early risk might be the misdiagnosis of an additional thyroid carcinoma. (orig.) [de

  7. Paradoxical effects of radioiodine therapy in functional thyroid autonomy and mild immunothyropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkelmann, S.; Rudolph, F.; Prillwitz, A.; Groth, P.; Schuemichen, C.

    1998-01-01

    Aim: To examine all cases with Graves' disease after radioiodine therapy of autonomously functioning thyroid tissue (AFFT) in order to find the cause. Methods: We retrospectively studied 1428 pts who were treated between 11/93 and 3/97 with radioiodine for AFTT and who underwent at least one control examination. Results: 15 (1.1%) of all pts developed Graves' disease 8.4 (4-13) months after radioiodine therapy. There was no direct suggestion of Graves' disease (TRAK negative, no endocrine ophthalmopathy) in any pt at the time of radioiodine therapy. More detailed analysis of anamnestic data, however, revealed evidence that immunothyropathy predated radioiodine therapy in 11 of the 15 pts. Paradoxical effects of radioiodine therapy manifested as an increase in immunothyropathy 14 pts, a deterioration in metabolism in 11 pts and a first occurrence of endocrine ophthalmopathy in 5 pts. Conclusion: Exacerbation of preexisting, functional primarily insignificant immunothyropathia is held responsible in most cases for the observed paradoxical effects after radioiodine therapy, resulting in radiation-induced manifest Graves' disease; however no therapeutical consequences are recommended. (orig.) [de

  8. Radioiodine concentration by the thymus in differentiated thyroid carcinoma: report of five cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Maria Eduarda; Flamini, Rodrigo C.; Corbo, Rossana; Mamede, Marcelo [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear], e-mail: mamede@inca.gov.br

    2009-10-15

    The radioactive iodine has been used with great value as a diagnostic and therapeutic method in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma previously submitted to total thyroidectomy. False-positive whole-body scans may occur due to misinterpretation of the physiologic distribution of the radioisotope or lack of knowledge on the existence of other pathologies that could eventually present radioiodine uptake. Thymic uptake is an uncommon cause of false-positive whole-body scan, and the mechanism through which it occurs is not completely understood. The present paper reports five cases of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who presented a mediastinum uptake of radioiodine in a whole-body scan during follow-up. The patients had either histological or radiological confirmation of the presence of residual thymus gland. It is very important to know about the possibility of iodine uptake by the thymus in order to avoid unnecessary treatment, such as surgery or radioiodine therapy. (author)

  9. THE MANAGEMENT OF THYROID CARCINOMA--THE ROLE OF RADIO-IODINE (I-131)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Workman, James B.

    1963-06-15

    Experience from the management of 156 patients with proven thyroid cancer, followed from 1 to 11 years, is reported. Although no sweeping conclusions can be drawn, it appears that radioiodine continues to have a place in the overall management of most cases of this malignant disease. (auth)

  10. The Chernobyl accident: Thyroid exposure among the population due to radioiodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilin, Yu I; Shinkarev, S M [Biophysics Inst., Russian Federation State Science Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation); Stepanenko, V F [Medical Radiological Research Centre, Academy of Medical Sciences, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Domaratskij, V P; Moroz, G L [Scientific Research Inst. for Industrial and Marine Medicine, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Hrushtch, V T [State Scientific Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-09-01

    Different aspects of internal and external exposure to thyroid of inhabitants from the contaminated areas of Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine are discussed in the paper. In the case of consumption of contaminated foods contribution to total absorbed dose from internal radioiodine exposure was more than 90%, otherwise (in the case of only inhalation radioiodine intake), not lesser than 85%. {sup 131}I exposure to thyroid was the main contribution to internal exposure, and exposure to thyroid from short-lived radioiodines was significant only for the inhabitants who did not consume contaminated foods. Peculiarities of formation of ``measured`` doses are considered. Semiempirical model of relationships between the average internal thyroid dose received by people in the rural settlements and the ground-deposition density of radionuclides in these settlements is presented. It has been indicated the necessity of intensification of {sup 129}I measurements in soil. Practical efficiency of used countermeasures for majority people to reduce radioiodine intake is estimated as high as approximately 2 times and caused mainly by removing people from contaminated areas. 11 refs, 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  11. Radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, J.F. Jr.; Deliso, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    For over 40 years now, radioiodine ( 131 I) has remained one of the most useful radionuclide for diagnosis and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The wide application of radioiodine in the study of the thyroid gland and in the management of its disorders has been most rewarding. The medical literature is replete with reports of its efficacy, failures, and complications, but most of these studies have been conducted among Caucasian persons and in relatively affluent societies. Very few reports are available from the less developed and economically depressed areas of the world where thyroid disorders abound or and are even endemic. This chapter is an attempt to highlight the use of radioactive iodine therapy in the developing countries, particularly those in the Asian region

  12. Radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Jr, J F; Deliso, H B

    1993-12-31

    For over 40 years now, radioiodine ({sup 131}I) has remained one of the most useful radionuclide for diagnosis and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The wide application of radioiodine in the study of the thyroid gland and in the management of its disorders has been most rewarding. The medical literature is replete with reports of its efficacy, failures, and complications, but most of these studies have been conducted among Caucasian persons and in relatively affluent societies. Very few reports are available from the less developed and economically depressed areas of the world where thyroid disorders abound or and are even endemic. This chapter is an attempt to highlight the use of radioactive iodine therapy in the developing countries, particularly those in the Asian region

  13. The usefulness of 131I radioiodine to thyroid papillary carcinoma with extra thyroidal extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Shogo; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Naito, Yasushi; Fujiwara, Keizo; Hori, Shinya; Tona, Yosuke; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Extra thyroidal extension (ETE) of thyroid papillary carcinoma (PAC) is known as a risk factor of poor prognosis. The American Thyroid Association (ATA) Guideline recommends total thyroidectomy (TT) with radioiodine ablation for patients of PACs with ETE and we have been following this strategy for cases of PACs with ETE. In this paper, we retrospectively examined the patients of PACs with ETE in terms of the following two issues: Does 131 I total body scan ( 131 I-TBS) after TT enable us to detect subclinical distant metastases of PACs? and Can 131 I ablation eliminate microscopic remnants of PACs after TT? The subjects consisted of 68 patients who had PACs with ETE and underwent 131 I-TBS and/or 131 I ablation after TT in our hospital in the past 20 years. Tumor, nodes and metastasis (TNM) classifications of the patients were pT3:pT4=12:56, pN0:pN1a:pN1b=13:15:40, M0:M1=62:6. Twenty-two cases underwent only 131 I-TBS and 46 cases underwent 131 I-ablation. Fourteen cases diagnosed as M0 preoperatively had distant focus detected using 131 I-TBS. Including M1 cases, 20 out of 68 cases (29%) turned out to have clinical or subclinical distant lesions in our study. 131 I ablation eliminated thyroid bed in 18 out of 22 cases, and distant foci in 5 out of 13 cases. However, the distant lesions which had been apparent before operation (M1 cases) did not reach complete response (CR) by 131 I ablation. In 22 out of those 23 cases successfully treated with the ablation, serum-thyroglobulin level was almost undetected after therapy. The overall 10-year survival rate was 82% and the cause-specific survival rate was 91%. (author)

  14. Detection of radioiodine-induced cytogenetic alterations in circulating lymphocytes of thyroid patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasuba, V [Inst. for Medical Recearch and Occupational Health, Zagreb (Croatia). Laboratory for Mutagenesis; Konrady, A; Koeteles, G J [Frederic Joliot-Curie National Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Budapest (Hungary); Kusic, Z [Clinical Hospital Sestre Milosrdnice, Zagreb (Croatia). Dept. of Oncology and Nuclear Medicine

    1994-10-01

    Radioiodines are often used for experimental purposes and for diagnosis and therapy in clinical practice. Human population might also be exposed to radioiodines in nuclear accidents. The ionizing energy of radioiodine affects not only the thyroid where it concentrates but also other tissues, especially the lymphocytes during their circulation through and around the gland containing the radioisotopes. Therefore, it seemed to be of interest to carry out investigations concerning the cytogenetic alterations in blood lymphocytes of patients treated with iodine-131. The method of choice was the relatively easily performable micronucleus assay in cytokinesis-blocked cultures of human peripheral lymphocytes. The test was performed on blood samples of 30 patients before the radioisotope treatment and one, two and four days after, one as well as 6 and - in a few cases - 12 weeks later. The amounts of iodine-131 injected were dependent on the clinical practices to reach the therapeutic radiation doses for hyperthyroidism and adenomas and were in the range of 220 and 5180 MBq. it was observed that the micronucleus frequency increased in the treated hyperthyroid patients while in patients with toxic adenomas the radioiodine did not result in an increase or even as compared to the pretreatment values in a few cases decreased values were seen. The results suggest individual differences in radiosensitivity as well as that the frequency of cytogenetic alterations depend on the physiological or pathological conditions of the thyroid. The significance of this observation will be discussed for dose assessments by cytogenetic techniques due to internal radioiodine. (author).

  15. Metastatic Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma Secreting Thyroid Hormone and Radioiodine Avid without Stimulation: A Case Report and Literature Review

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    Syed A. Abid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This is an extremely rare case of a patient with metastatic follicular thyroid cancer who continued to produce thyroid hormone and was iodine scan positive without stimulation after thyroidectomy and radioiodine (I-131 therapy. Patient Findings. A 76-year-old Caucasian male was diagnosed with metastatic follicular thyroid carcinoma on lung nodule biopsy. Total thyroidectomy was performed and he was ablated with 160 mCi of I-131 after recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH stimulation. Whole body scan (WBS after treatment showed uptake in bilateral lungs, right sacrum, and pelvis. The thyroglobulin decreased from 2,063 to 965 four months after treatment but rapidly increased to 2,506 eleven months after I-131. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH remained suppressed and free T4 remained elevated after I-131 therapy without thyroid hormone supplementation. He was treated with an additional 209 mCi with WBS findings positive in lung and pelvis. Despite I-131, new metastatic lesions were noted in the left thyroid bed and large destructive lesion to the first cervical vertebrae four months after the second I-131 dose. Conclusions. This case is exceptional because of its rarity and also due to the dissociation between tumor differentiation and aggressiveness. The metastatic lesions continued to secrete thyroid hormone and remained radioiodine avid with rapid progression after I-131 therapy.

  16. Radioiodine retention in ovine thyroids in northwestern Greece following the reactor accident at Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioannides, K.G.; Pakou, A.A.; Papadopoulou, C.V.

    1991-01-01

    Iodine-131 concentrations were measured throughout the summer of 1986 in thyroids of lambs slaughtered at Ioannina (Northwestern Greece) following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear reactor. During the survey, 40 thyroids were collected. The highest level of 131I detected was 2471 +/- 339 Bq per thyroid. The thyroids of 20 lambs did not contain detectable 131I concentrations, while the contamination content of the others was greatly variable. The transport of 131I from pasture to thyroids of lambs has been described through a simple model for the retention of 131I in the glands. The transfer coefficient fT, expressing the steady-state equilibrium, was estimated to be 564 +/- 270 kg-1 d. This result reflects the sensitivity of animal thyroids as biological radioiodine monitors

  17. Sertraline can be useful pre radioiodine in patients with thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geber de Almeida, Mariana; Netto Campos Silva, Marcia

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Thyroid hormone withdrawal is a standard approach for increased TSH before radioiodine, in patients with thyroid cancer. However, some patients with hypothyroidism present clinical depression for long time, in spite of the euthyroid state. Sertraline is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, which increases the neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine, and enhances the serum TSH level. Objectives: To analyze the efficacy of sertraline to increase TSH and improved symptoms of depression in these patients. Methods: In 12 patients with thyroid cancer without previous depression, we used 50 mg of sertraline one month before and after radioiodine and compare with group control. The serum TSH levels were performed ten days before radioiodine and the patients were evaluated 20, 40 and 60 days after started levothyroxine (The Montgomery -Asberg depression rating scale). Results: TSH levels were 85 ± 10 mU/L in the group that used sertraline vs 69 ± 8 mU/L in group control (p < 0,01). The patients who used sertraline reversed depression in (30 ± 5 days - median ± SD), significantly more rapidly if compared with the control group (50 ± 10 days - median ± SD). Three patients that received sertraline and five patients of the control group, severe depression persists, in spite of euthyroid state. Conclusion: This study suggests that sertraline can be useful pre radioiodine to increase TSH, and helps to restore the quality of life and mood, in a short period of time. (author)

  18. The results of the radioiodine-therapy of benign thyroid diseases respecting the applied radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, C.

    1994-09-01

    452 patients with benign thyroid diseases had been explored after 6 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, 5 years and 10 years after undergone radioiodine treatment retrospectively with regard to the applied radiation dose. A relevant relation between the radiation dose and the rate of hypothyroidism could only be proved as a tendency. Treating hyperthyroidism with radioiodine, the rates of hypothyroidism after therapy were not caused by significantly higher radiation doses. Therefore suggestions to change the used radiation-doses basically cannot be made. The applied doses of radiation are sufficient to achieve a rather satisfactory effect in healing hyperthyroidism. Cases of malignancy after radioiodine therapy could not be found in this population. The effective half-life determination before therapy can be neglected, because there was found a significant difference between the pre-therapeutically estimated half-life and the post-therapeutically measured effective half-life of radioiodine. Instead, fixed values of effective half-life should be used for each group of benign thyroid diseases. The radiation therapy still seems to be an efficient treatment to cure benign thyroid diseases with rare side effects. It also can be applied to patients below the age of 40. Generally it is an alternative to drug-therapy or surgery, always considering the individual relation between gain and risk. In this respect good results can be obtained and a relapse of hyperthyroidism is hardly to expect. (author)

  19. Acute changes of peripheral thyroid hormone concentrations and serum thyroglobulin during radio-iodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, K.R.; Steinbaecher, M.; Heilig, B.

    1986-01-01

    TT3, FT3 and FT4 concentrations were measured in 28 patients with hyperthyroidism before and during therapy with radioiodine. In addition, in some patients serum thyroglobulin was evaluated, too. Only in the patients with immunogenic hyperthyroidism FT3, FT4 and serum TG were elevated significantly within the first two days after radioiodine application. In the residual patients with diffuse autonomy, autonomous adenoma, and multifocal autonomy during the whole time of investigation there was no significant increase of the respective values. From these data it can be deducted that hyperthyroid storm is more likely to be provoked in patients with immunogenic hyperthyroidism compared to thyroidal autonomy. (orig.) [de

  20. Clinical investigation of thyroid disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Current investigations of thyroid dysfunction available to the clinician are reviewed and correlated with disease processes. The aim is to provide a simplified guide to the investigation of thyroid disorders

  1. A dose-effect correlation for radioiodine ablation in differentiated thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flux, Glenn D; Chittenden, Sarah J; Buckley, Susan; Hindorf, Cecilia [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Physics, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Haq, Masud; Newbold, Kate; Harmer, Clive L [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Thyroid Unit, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the range of absorbed doses delivered to thyroid remnants, blood, and red marrow from fixed administrations of radioiodine and to ascertain whether the success of ablation is more dependent on these absorbed doses than on the administered activity. Twenty-three patients received 3,000 MBq radioiodine following near-total thyroidectomy. The maximum absorbed dose to remnants was calculated from subsequent single photon emission tomography scans. Absorbed doses delivered to blood and red marrow were calculated from blood samples and from whole-body retention measurements. The protein bound iodine (PBI) was also calculated. Maximum absorbed doses to thyroid remnants ranged from 7 to 570 Gy. Eighteen of the 23 patients had a successful ablation. A significant difference was seen between the absorbed doses delivered to thyroid remnants, blood, and red marrow for those patients that had a successful ablation compared to those with a failed ablation (p = 0.030, p = 0.043 and p = 0.048, respectively). The difference between the PBI values acquired at day 1 and day 6 were also indicative of response (p = 0.074). A successful ablation is strongly dependent on the absorbed dose to the thyroid remnant. Dosimetry-based personalized treatment can prevent both sub-optimal administrations, which entails further radioiodine therapy, and excessive administration of radioactivity, which increases the potential for radiation toxicity. (orig.)

  2. The role of multikinase inhibitors target therapy in radioiodine-resistant differentiated thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P O Rumyantsev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available About 5-15% of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC primary or within follow-up have had distant metastases or inoperable tumor mass that are resistant to radioiodine therapy as well as dramatically deteriorate survival prognosis. Other treatment modalities (radiotherapy, chemotherapy etc. also ineffective. Certain expectances are associated with target therapy with multikinase inhibitors with are selectively blocking onco-kinase molecular pathways. This review is devoted to analysis of those multikinase inhibitors which have been implemented in patients with radioiodine DTC. Comparative analysis of two most perspective multikinase inhibitors (sorafenib and lenvatinib with evaluation of efficacy and adverse effects was conducted. Both of them successfully underwent 3 rd phase of clinical trial and were recommended as treatment of choice in progressive radioiodine-resistant DTC patients.

  3. Can dosimetry help to predict euthyroidism after 131I radioiodine treatment of solitary thyroid nodule?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skanjeti, A.; Pia, A.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Introduction: recent SNM guidelines suggest to administer 3-8 MBq for each gram of thyroid tissue in order to reach a non hyperthyroid status, while EANM guidelines suggest to reach a dose of 100-400 Gy depending on type of disease. This second point of view is based on the principle that dosimetry, i.e. the metabolism of radioiodine within the thyroid can determine the outcome of radiation in the gland. However, although reasonable, it has not been shown unequivocally that dosimetry allows better outcome. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate whether dosimetry and parameters that consent a dose evaluation can be useful in order to predict outcome in hyperthyroid patients with solitary nodule and successfully treated with radioiodine. Material and methods. Thirty-one consecutive patients with solitary nodule and successfully treated with 131 I radioiodine were included. In 27 patients euthyroidism was durably reached during the follow up, while in 4 hypothyroid state was the final outcome. All of them underwent Radioiodine Uptake Test (RUT) with 5 measurements (6 h, 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, and 96 h), thyroid scintigraphy to estimate gland mass and radioiodine administration. Bi-compartmental model was used to estimate residence time and dose was estimated according to EANM guidelines based on administered activities of radioiodine. Uptake at 6 h, uptake at 24 h, mass gland, dose, age, residence time, activity and activity/mass were compared in patients with stable euthyroidism versus patients with hypothyroidism in the follow up. Results: only uptake at 6 h was different in these groups of patients (p=0.05 at Welch t-test), the logistic regression seemed to confirm the significant correlation (p=0.08) between uptake at 6 h and outcome of the treatment. The other parameters were not significantly correlated with the treatment effect. Conclusion: this pilot study, performed in a very small population, did not show any significant

  4. Influence of preceding diagnostic and therapeutic procedures on the radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendl, J.; Boerner, W.

    1991-01-01

    Before and until 3 weeks after application of nonionic CA iodine and the 20-min-technetium-thyroid-uptake was measured in serum and urine in 23 euthyroid patients, which were given intravenously nonionic CA during heart catheterization. Concerning the possible influence of iodine contamination on a subsequent radioiodine therapy the following aspects result from the study: the time interval between application of CA and therapy has to be at least 4-6 weeks to avoid dilution of the radioiodine by iodine being released from the contrast agents. The thyroid-uptake of Technetium or Iodine after administration of CA is not constant over time but reaches its original value only in a gradual way (60% of the initial value 3 weeks after the CA were given); that means, the iodine-uptake during, radioiodine therapy can be higher than it was at the time the dose was calculated. Concerning the possible influence of preceding therapeutic procedures on the therapy with radioiodine the pretreatment with antithyroid drugs plays the most important role. Antithyroid drugs of the thiourylene group have been shown by many study groups to have a radioprotective effect. Other large studies however could not demonstrate any effect of antithyroid medication on the results of radioiodine therapy. All studies so far existing have in common that they are not strongly randomized with regard to the patient groups, because generally only in severe cases of hyperthyroidism additional antithyroid drug treatment has been employed, therefore it might be the case that the radioprotective effect of antithyroid drugs may be caused only by selection artifacts. The contradictory results of the different studies justify the practical way in so far as there are no reasonable objections against the pretreatment with antithyroid drugs to restore euthyroidism before starting the therapy with radioiodine. (orig./MG) [de

  5. [Thyroid disorders during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, R

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid disorders may not only be the cause infertility but also increases the incidence of miscarriages and the morbidity of the pregnancies. During pregnancy the demand of thyroid hormones increases to about 30 - 50 % and the thyroid has to cope with this increase. In Germany the iodine intake has improved significantly during the last 20 years, but still is borderline low with an mean intake of about 120 microg iodide per day. Therefore it is still recommended that pregnant women are supplemented with about 100 - 150 microg of iodide during pregnancy and the time of breast-feeding, to avoid hypothyroidism of the foetus with concomitant delay of the brain development. Not only women with subclinical hypothyroidism, but only elevated TPO antibodies have a significant increase in early miscarriage and preterm delivery. An early supplementation with Levothyroxin despite euthyroidism might reduce these risks. Those women also more frequently develop postpartum thyroiditis. This risk can be reduced by a supplementation with selenium during and after pregnancy. Graves' disease is a rare disorder and only about 0,1 - 0,4 pregnancies are affected. The course of the disease is biphasic, with an exacerbation within the first trimester and an improvement thereafter, but a recurrence after delivery. Overt thyrotoxicosis has to be treated with propylthiouracil, to maintain euthyroidism during pregnancy. The TSH receptor antibodies are transferred to the foetus with the risk of thyrotoxicosis. Special care of the foetus is therefore necessary. Transient mild hyperthyroidism may occur in women with very high HCG levels during the first three months of pregnancy. This often is associated with hyperemesis gravidarum. Subclinical hypothyroidism of the mother will disturb the normal development of the foetus and therefore has to be treated even when TSH is within the upper normal level. Special care is necessary in women with elevated TPO antibodies, because these more often

  6. Non-medical exposure to radioiodines and thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindie, Elif; Leenhardt, Laurence; Aurengo, Andre; Vitaux, Francoise; Colas-Linhart, Nicole; Bok, B.; Grosclaude, Pascale; Galle, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident, which occurred 32 years after the accidental exposure of Marshall islanders, resulted in the exposure of neighbouring populations to a mixture of iodine isotopes and in an increased incidence of thyroid cancer. The highest thyroid doses were received by the youngest age groups. This review describes the existing evidence, and examines factors that may have increased the risk. It also stresses problems with contemporary thyroid measurements, and the lack of information on the sensitivity of the thyroid to short-lived iodine isotopes and iodine-131. Practical considerations for nuclear physicians, epidemiologists and thyroidologists are discussed in the light of this major accident. (orig.)

  7. Non-medical exposure to radioiodines and thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindie, Elif [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Hopital Saint-Antoine, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris (France); Leenhardt, Laurence; Aurengo, Andre [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris (France); Vitaux, Francoise [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, CHI Le Raincy-Montfermeil (France); Colas-Linhart, Nicole; Bok, B. [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Hopital Beaujon, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, 100 avenue du General Leclerc, 92110 Clichy (France); Grosclaude, Pascale [Reseau Francais des Registres de Cancers, Toulouse (France); Galle, Pierre [Service de Physique et Chimie Biologiques, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire d' Alfort (France)

    2002-08-01

    The Chernobyl accident, which occurred 32 years after the accidental exposure of Marshall islanders, resulted in the exposure of neighbouring populations to a mixture of iodine isotopes and in an increased incidence of thyroid cancer. The highest thyroid doses were received by the youngest age groups. This review describes the existing evidence, and examines factors that may have increased the risk. It also stresses problems with contemporary thyroid measurements, and the lack of information on the sensitivity of the thyroid to short-lived iodine isotopes and iodine-131. Practical considerations for nuclear physicians, epidemiologists and thyroidologists are discussed in the light of this major accident. (orig.)

  8. Detection system qualification for direct measurement of thyroid internal contamination by radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiberi, V.; Battisti, P.; Gualdrini, G.

    1999-01-01

    The work deals with a detection system qualification for direct measurements of thyroid internal contamination by radioiodine. The isotopes 131 I and 125 I are the most frequently used in nuclear medicine. Because of their volatility they are very dangerous for thyroid contamination by inhalation. The system has been projected to be easily and fast used and above all transportable where the control is necessary. These characteristic make it able to realise supervision programs of internal contamination by radioiodine. In fact due the very high control frequencies (each 15 days for 131 I), these programs are usually very expensive and demanding when they are executed in external measurement laboratories. The following steps are described: devices presentation, calculation of energy and efficiency parameters, minimum detectable activity, time system reliability, best operative conditions in the measurements. At the end an application example of the system is reported [it

  9. Focal Bronchiectasis Causing Abnormal Pulmonary Radioiodine Uptake in a Patient with Well-Differentiated Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ash Gargya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. False-positive pulmonary radioactive iodine uptake in the followup of differentiated thyroid carcinoma has been reported in patients with certain respiratory conditions. Patient Findings. We describe a case of well-differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma treated by total thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation therapy. Postablation radioiodine whole body scan and subsequent diagnostic radioiodine whole body scans have shown persistent uptake in the left hemithorax despite an undetectable stimulated serum thyroglobulin in the absence of interfering thyroglobulin antibodies. Contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography has confirmed that the abnormal pulmonary radioiodine uptake correlates with focal bronchiectasis. Summary. Bronchiectasis can cause abnormal chest radioactive iodine uptake in the followup of differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Conclusions. Recognition of potential false-positive chest radioactive iodine uptake, simulating pulmonary metastases, is needed to avoid unnecessary exposure to further radiation from repeated therapeutic doses of radioactive iodine.

  10. Thyroid volume reduction following radioiodine therapy in patients with autonomous goitre and Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dederichs, B.; Otte, R.; Klink, J.E.; Schicha, H.

    1996-01-01

    Aim: It is well known that radioiodine therapy (RITh) leads to a significant thyroid volume reduction (TVR). But until now only little data has been presented due to the course of time and the extent of TVR. Method: Therefore the data of 33 patients with Graves' disease (GD), 36 patients with multifocal (MAG) and 31 with solitary (SAG) autonomous goitre were analyzed retrospectively. Results: All the patients showed a highly significant (p [de

  11. The Effect of High Dose Radioiodine Therapy on Formation of Radiation Retinopathy During Thyroid Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülay Kaçar Güvel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Non-thyroidal complication of high-dose radioiodine therapy for thyroid carcinoma might cause salivary and lacrimal gland dysfunction, which may be transient or permanent in a dose-dependent manner. However, radiation retinopathy complicating 131I therapy, has not been previously well characterized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of retinal damage among patients who had received high doses of radioiodine treatment. Methods: Forty eyes of 20 patients (3 male, 17 female who received 250-1000 mCi during 131I therapy and on ophthalmological follow up for a year after the last treatment were included in the study. Mean age of the study group was 50 years (range 25-70 years. In ophthalmologic examination, visual acuity was measured in order to determine visual loss. Intraocular pressure was measured in all the patients. Then lens examination was carried out with slit lamp biomicroscopy in order to investigate cataract or partial lens opacities. Fundus observation was carried out through the dilated pupil with slit lamp biomicroscopy using 90 D noncontact lens. Result: The best corrected visual aquity with Snellen chart was found as 1.0 in 36 eyes (90% and between 0.6 and 0.9 (10% in 4 eyes (10%. At the biomicroscopic fundus examination, retinal hemorrhage consistent with radiation retinopathy, microaneurysm, microinfarction, edema or exudation, vitreus hemorrhage, partial or total optical disc pallor indicating papillopathy in the optic disc were not observed in any of the eyes. Conclusion: This result indicates that there is not any significant correlation between repeated high-dose radioiodine therapy and radiation retinopathy in differentiated thyroid carcinomas. Even though there is not a significant restriction in use of higher doses of radioiodine therapy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma, more extensive studies are needed in order to obtain more accurate data on possible occurrence of retinopathy.

  12. In-vivo isotope diagnosis and radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spesshardt, K. (Sankt-Vincentius-Krankenhaeuser, Karlsruhe (Germany, F.R.). Radiologische Abt. mit Strahlentherapie und Nuklearmedizin)

    1980-10-15

    In-vivo diagnoses of thyroid diseases can be carried out using /sup 123/I, /sup 131/I, and /sup 99/sup(m)Tc-pertechnetate. For the thyroid scintiscan, /sup 99/sup(m)Tc-pertechnetate or /sup 123/I are used. Some functional parameters can be determined using /sup 99/sup(m)Tc-pertechnetate, but iodine is more accurate, so that thyroid clearance examinations with /sup 123/I are rapidly gaining importance. However, the iodine turnover in the thyroid can only be determined by a several-days' test using /sup 131/I. The available techniques of diagnosis are employed in several steps. Most thyroid diseases can already be diagnosed on the basis of the hormone parameters and a thyroid scan; otherwise, a TRH test and suppression and functional studies will be necessary. Treatment of enthyroid struma is limited to inoperable cases with functional blockage or compression of the trachea. In the treatment of diffuse hyperthyroidism, doses should be exact enough to counteract the hyperthyroid metabolism without inducing hypothyroidism. With exact doses, a second radioiodine therapy will only be necessary in about 40% of all cases. High doses should not be applied in the treatment of hyperthyroidism unless it is a case of excessive clinical hyperthyroid somatics as the risk of hypothyroidism is high. The diagnostic problem of autonomous adenoma is the highly varying hormone activity. The intention of radioiodine therapy here is a functional elimination of the autonomous adenoma. Radioiodine resection is indicated in cases where there are several small autonomous adenomas or where the operability of the patient is limited.

  13. In-vivo isotope diagnosis and radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spesshardt, K.

    1980-01-01

    In-vivo diagnoses of thyroid diseases can be carried out using 123 I, 131 I, and 99 sup(m)Tc-pertechnetate. For the thyroid scintiscan, 99 sup(m)Tc-pertechnetate or 123 I are used. Some functional parameters can be determined using 99 sup(m)Tc-pertechnetate, but iodine is more accurate, so that thyroid clearance examinations with 123 I are rapidly gaining importance. However, the iodine turnover in the thyroid can only be determined by a several-days' test using 131 I. The available techniques of diagnosis are employed in several steps. Most thyroid diseases can already be diagnosed on the basis of the hormone parameters and a thyroid scan; otherwise, a TRH test and suppression and functional studies will be necessary. Treatment of enthyroid struma is limited to inoperable cases with functional blockage or compression of the trachea. In the treatment of diffuse hyperthyroidism, doses should be exact enough to counteract the hyperthyroid metabolism without inducing hypothyroidism. With exact doses, a second radioiodine therapy will only be necessary in about 40% of all cases. High doses should not be applied in the treatment of hyperthyroidism unless it is a case of excessive clinical hyperthyroid somatics as the risk of hypothyroidism is high. The diagnostic problem of autonomous adenoma is the highly varying hormone activity. The intention of radioiodine therapy here is a functional elimination of the autonomous adenoma. Radioiodine resection is indicated in cases where there are several small autonomous adenomas or where the operability of the patient is limited. (orig./MG) [de

  14. Radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaduban, M.

    1978-01-01

    The physical, chemical radiochemical and radiometric properties of radioiodine significant for the radiochemical analysis are summarized. The occurrence of iodine, especially in the biosphere organic part, the calculation of the amount of iodine radioisotopes formed under different conditions, the spectrometric and integral methods of measuring the radioactivity of the most important iodine radioisotopes, the methods of separating iodine and its respective chemical forms are described. (M.K.)

  15. Small-molecule MAPK inhibitors restore radioiodine incorporation in mouse thyroid cancers with conditional BRAF activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Debyani; Santos, Elmer; Ryder, Mabel; Knauf, Jeffrey A.; Liao, Xiao-Hui; West, Brian L.; Bollag, Gideon; Kolesnick, Richard; Thin, Tin Htwe; Rosen, Neal; Zanzonico, Pat; Larson, Steven M.; Refetoff, Samuel; Ghossein, Ronald; Fagin, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced human thyroid cancers, particularly those that are refractory to treatment with radioiodine (RAI), have a high prevalence of BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1) mutations. However, the degree to which these cancers are dependent on BRAF expression is still unclear. To address this question, we generated mice expressing one of the most commonly detected BRAF mutations in human papillary thyroid carcinomas (BRAFV600E) in thyroid follicular cells in a doxycycline-inducible (dox-inducible) manner. Upon dox induction of BRAFV600E, the mice developed highly penetrant and poorly differentiated thyroid tumors. Discontinuation of dox extinguished BRAFV600E expression and reestablished thyroid follicular architecture and normal thyroid histology. Switching on BRAFV600E rapidly induced hypothyroidism and virtually abolished thyroid-specific gene expression and RAI incorporation, all of which were restored to near basal levels upon discontinuation of dox. Treatment of mice with these cancers with small molecule inhibitors of either MEK or mutant BRAF reduced their proliferative index and partially restored thyroid-specific gene expression. Strikingly, treatment with the MAPK pathway inhibitors rendered the tumor cells susceptible to a therapeutic dose of RAI. Our data show that thyroid tumors carrying BRAFV600E mutations are exquisitely dependent on the oncoprotein for viability and that genetic or pharmacological inhibition of its expression or activity is associated with tumor regression and restoration of RAI uptake in vivo in mice. These findings have potentially significant clinical ramifications. PMID:22105174

  16. Clinical applications of radioiodine 131 (I131) in the thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Rivero, Levi; Turcios Trista, Silvia Elena; Velasco Mirabal, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Radioiodine 131 is a radioactive isotope that is successfully used for the diagnosis and the treatment of benign and malignant thyroid diseases. Its quality of selectively integrating to the thyroid metabolism and emitting a signal allows it to describe the gland functioning through capture studies, and to delimit the morphology and location of the tissues that capture iodine by means of scintigraphy. It is also a simple, safe and cost-effective radiotherapy used as first-line therapeutics in the control of hyperthyroidism. The dose and right time of application should be individualized according to the etiology and the clinic of each patient. Radioiodine 131 offers an efficient alternative to reduce the size of non-toxic goiter in addition to supporting the surgical treatment of the differentiated thyroid carcinoma and destroying with ablative doses the tissular remains and the metastatic lesions that can be detected during the gammagraphic follow-up. Radioiodine 131 depends on the fulfillment of safety regulations against radioactivity

  17. Clinical applications of radioiodine 131 (I131) in the thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Rivero Levi; Turcios Trista, Silvia Elena; Velasco Mirabal, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Radioiodine 131 is a radioactive isotope that is successfully used for the diagnosis and the treatment of benign and malignant thyroid diseases. Its quality of selectively integrating to the thyroid metabolism and emitting a signal allows it to describe the gland functioning through capture studies, and to delimit the morphology and location of the tissues that capture iodine by means of gammagraphy. It is also a simple, safe and cost-effective radiotherapy used as first-line therapeutics in the control of hyperthyroidism. The dose and right time of application should be individualized according to the etiology and the clinic of each patient. Radioiodine 131 offers an efficient alternative to reduce the size of non-toxic goiter in addition to supporting the surgical treatment of the differentiated thyroid carcinoma and destroying with ablative doses the tissular remains and the metastatic lesions that can be detected during the gammagraphic follow-up. Radioiodine 131 depends on the fulfillment of safety regulations against radioactivity

  18. Guide-line of the radio-iodine (131I) therapy in Graves' disease and thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Yutaka; Ikekubo, Katsuji

    2005-01-01

    Radio-iodine ( 131 I) therapy has been using in Graves' disease and well differentiated thyroid cancer. The rules of control in the discharge from radio-isotope hospital were notified in 1999 in Japan. Guideline of the 131 I therapy in Graves' disease and thyroid cancer were prepared by sub-group of Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine. (author)

  19. Radioiodine therapy in management of thyroid carcinoma - A review of 138 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, A.S.; Hossain, S.; Hafiz, N.; Taslima, D.A.; Rashid, H.

    2001-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas are being treated by using a widely accepted protocol of surgery and radioiodine therapy followed by supplementation of thyroid hormones in the Nuclear Medicine Centre (NMC), Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH) since 1990. In the present study 138 patients(Male-54, Female-84) with differentiated thyroid cancers received radioiodine therapy for ablation of residual thyroid tissue with a dose of 2.77-3.7 GBq (75-100 mCi), for lymph node metastases 5.55-6.5 GBq(150-175mCi), for lung metastases 5.55 GBq(150 mCi) and for bony metastases 7.4 GBq (200 mCi). Among 138 patients papillary carcinoma was observed in 94 cases (68%; Male-42, Female-52), follicular type was found in 30 cases (22%; Male-8, Female-22) and mixed type in 14 patients (10%, Male-4, Female-10). Single dose of 2.77-3.7 GBq(75-100 mCi) of radioiodine was received by all 138 patients. Among the unablated patients 62 received double doses totalling 9.25 GBq (250 mCi), 44 received three doses 12.95 GBq (350 mCi) and one patient received 8 doses 33.3 GBq (900 mCi). Out of 138 patients single dose ablated 76 cases and 62 remain unablated. Multiple doses ablated 28 patients and 34 still remain unablated and is under follow up. The success and failure in management of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer over 8 years period have been discussed here revealing a satisfactory outcome. (author)

  20. Radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer: AIIMS experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhy, A.K.; Nair, P.G.G.; ); Bal, C.S.; Pant, G.S.; Basu, A.K.

    1999-01-01

    After a slow start in late sixties, the procedure of 131 I therapy for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer (DTC) has gained increasing popularity with every passing year at All India Institute of Medical Sciences. This has become an integral part of TC management at AIIMS like at most other centres all over the world. There is a general consensus that near total thyroidectomy along with 131 I therapy and suppressive doses of thyroid hormones provide the best mode of treatment for DTC

  1. Changes in the thyroid hormone level and blood profile after radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogbac, R.V.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Exacerbation of hyperthyroidism has been reported to occur as early as 3 days after administration of radioiodine (I-131) therapy. The hematological effects of radioiodine also have been reported but mainly confined in thyroid cancer cases wherein high doses are administered. This study was undertaken to determine the possible acute changes in the thyroid hormone concentration and blood picture of patients one week after therapy. Twelve hyperthyroid patients (8 females, 4 males), with ages ranging from 27-56 years, were followed with measurements of serum thyroid hormone levels and blood profile a week after I-131 therapy. All patients were pretreated with antithyroid medications. Radioiodine doses given ranged from 8 mCi up to 16 mCi, all based from the computed dose of 160 uCi/g. Only two out of twelve (2/12) exhibited an increase in FT3 level. Two patients showed a decrease while the remaining 8 patients showed no significant difference. Six out of 12 (50%) exhibited an increase in FT4 level. Five patients showed a decrease while only one had no significant difference. Hematologically, there were 5/12, 1/12, 3/12, 5/12 and 1/12 patients who showed a decrease in hemoglobin, hematocrit, RBC, WBC and platelet counts, respectively. Four out of 12, 2/12, and 1/12 patients, however, showed an increase in hemoglobin, RBC and platelet, respectively. The rest exhibited no significant change. FT4 level was observed to be more affected than FT3 levels but there was no consistent pattern established. A significant decrease in WBC count was observed. Although a high percentage of decreased hemoglobin was noted, no pattern was established. Radioiodine therapy caused no significant increase of serum FT3 and FT4 concentrations in the majority of patients after one week of therapy. In the followup of patients, determination of complete blood count of patients is also important. (author)

  2. X-ray and radioiodine dose to thyroid follicular cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faw, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation doses to the epithelial cells of thyroid follicles have been calculated for internal exposure by radionuclides of iodine and by secondary radiations created as a result of interactions of externally administered x rays with iodine naturally occurring in the thyroid. Calculations were performed for the thyroids of subjects ranging from the newborn to the adult male. Results for internal radionuclides are reported as the dose rate to follicular-cell nuclei per unit specific activity of the radionuclide in the thyroid as a whole, i.e., as the specific ''S value'' as used in the MIRD method for internal dosimetry. Results for x rays are reported as the response function, i.e., the absorbed dose per unit fluence of primary x rays. Dose rates are subdivided into internal and external components, the former from radiations emitted within the colloid volume of any one follicle, and the latter from radiations emitted throughout the thyroid in follicles surrounding that one follicle. 37 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Thyroid cell irradiation by radioiodines: a new Monte Carlo electron track-structure code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, Christophe; Elbast, Mouhamad; Colas-Linhart, Nicole; Ting-Di Wu

    2007-01-01

    The most significant impact of the Chernobyl accident is the increased incidence of thyroid cancer among children who were exposed to short-lived radioiodines and 131-iodine. In order to accurately estimate the radiation dose provided by these radioiodines, it is necessary to know where iodine is incorporated. To do that, the distribution at the cellular level of newly organified iodine in the immature rat thyroid was performed using secondary ion mass microscopy (NanoSIMS 50 ). Actual dosimetric models take only into account the averaged energy and range of beta particles of the radio-elements and may, therefore, imperfectly describe the real distribution of dose deposit at the microscopic level around the point sources. Our approach is radically different since based on a track-structure Monte Carlo code allowing following-up of electrons down to low energies (∼= 10 eV) what permits a nanometric description of the irradiation physics. The numerical simulations were then performed by modelling the complete disintegrations of the short-lived iodine isotopes as well as of 131 I in new born rat thyroids in order to take into account accurate histological and biological data for the thyroid gland. (author)

  4. Radioiodine uptake and thyroid hormone levels on or off simultaneous carbimazole medication. A prospective paired comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, M.A.; Mueller-Brand, J.; Christ-Crain, M.; Mueller, B.

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To allow radioiodine (RAI) treatment in patients with need for anti-thyroid drug medication and low RAI uptakes we investigated the feasibility of discontinuing carbimazole for 3 days to enhance the RAI uptake without concurrent exacerbation of hyperthyroidism. Methods: We prospectively investigated RAI dynamics and thyroid hormone concentration in 12 patients with low RAI uptake ( 4 , T 3 and TSH were monitored. Results: Discontinuation of carbimazole for 3 days led to a significant increase of RAI uptake in all patients. We found an enhancement up to 4.9-fold compared to the measurement on carbimazole. The mean RAI uptake increased from 15.2±4.4% to 50.1±15.5% (p<0.001). The intrapersonal radioiodine half-life increased from 4.2±1.6 days to 5.4±0.7 days (p=0.13). Mean thyroid hormone concentration was not affected by the three day withdrawal of anti-thyroid drugs and no patient suffered from an aggravation of biochemical hyperthyroidism. Conclusion: A withdrawal of carbimazole for 3 days is long enough to provide sufficiently high RAI uptakes for RAI treatment in patients with low RAI uptakes and short enough to avoid the risk of exacerbation of hyperthyroidism. (orig.)

  5. Radioiodine uptake and thyroid hormone levels on or off simultaneous carbimazole medication. A prospective paired comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, M.A.; Mueller-Brand, J. [Inst. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital Basel (Switzerland); Christ-Crain, M.; Mueller, B. [Div. of Endocrinology, Univ. Hospital Basel (Switzerland)

    2005-02-01

    Aim: To allow radioiodine (RAI) treatment in patients with need for anti-thyroid drug medication and low RAI uptakes we investigated the feasibility of discontinuing carbimazole for 3 days to enhance the RAI uptake without concurrent exacerbation of hyperthyroidism. Methods: We prospectively investigated RAI dynamics and thyroid hormone concentration in 12 patients with low RAI uptake (<30%) under simultaneous carbimazole medication and 3 days after discontinuation. At both time points fT{sub 4}, T{sub 3} and TSH were monitored. Results: Discontinuation of carbimazole for 3 days led to a significant increase of RAI uptake in all patients. We found an enhancement up to 4.9-fold compared to the measurement on carbimazole. The mean RAI uptake increased from 15.2{+-}4.4% to 50.1{+-}15.5% (p<0.001). The intrapersonal radioiodine half-life increased from 4.2{+-}1.6 days to 5.4{+-}0.7 days (p=0.13). Mean thyroid hormone concentration was not affected by the three day withdrawal of anti-thyroid drugs and no patient suffered from an aggravation of biochemical hyperthyroidism. Conclusion: A withdrawal of carbimazole for 3 days is long enough to provide sufficiently high RAI uptakes for RAI treatment in patients with low RAI uptakes and short enough to avoid the risk of exacerbation of hyperthyroidism. (orig.)

  6. Effect of radioiodine therapy on pulmonary metastases from well-differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yongli; Jin Changqing; Chen Libo; Lu Hankui; Zhu Ruisen

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate effect of radioiodine therapy on pulmonary metastases from well-differentiated thyroid cancer. Methods: Fifty-eight cases of pulmonary metastases were studied utilizing chest X-ray, pulmonary function test and 99 Tc m -DTPA aerosol clearance examination. Results: The data of pulmonary function test were of no difference between groups of various radiation doses cumulation (P > 0.05). The differences of vital capacity (VC), fast vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1 ) were not remarkable between the two groups of male or female patients (P > 0.05), but the difference of maximal volume ventilation (MVV) was P 99 Tc m -DTPA aerosol clearance rates between various groups were of no difference (P > 0.05). Only for one female, 43 years old who had received an accumulative dose of 51.8 GBq radioiodine over an 8-yr period, her pulmonary function test showed evidence of restrictive lung disease, chest X-ray showed haziness and DTPA half-time clearance was 26.4 min, which is suggestive of interstitial fibrosis. Conclusion: The cumulative dose of radioiodine and gender of the patients had not statistically significant effects on the pulmonary function. Interstitial fibrosis must be carefully watched when the cumulative radioiodine dose is over 37 GBq

  7. Dosimetry in radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases. Background and practice; Dosimetrie bei Radioiodtherapie benigner Schilddruesenerkrankungen. Hintergrund und Durchfuehrung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockisch, A.; Sonnenschein, W.; Jentzen, W.; Hartung, V.; Goerges, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2008-09-15

    Radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases (focal = [toxic adenoma], multifocal, disseminated autonomy, Grave's disease or clinical relevant goitre) needs to be and can be performed individually for each patient. Most frequently a radioiodine test is performed applying a small activity of iodine-131 ({sup 131}I). The paper discusses some protocols for pre- or posttherapeutic dosimetry and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. All are based on the volumetry of the target tissue as well as the radioiodine kinetics in the target volume what may be represented by maximum uptake and half life of iodine retention in the thyroid. Possible disturbances and measuring uncertainties of these parameters are presented and discussed. In spite of the discussed uncertainties in dosimetry, due to its high therapeutic width radioiodine therapy is a very successful procedure to cure hyperthyroidism or to reduce goitre volume with only little side effects. (orig.)

  8. High versus low radioiodine activity in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer - A meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valachis, Antonis; Nearchou, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the meta-analysis was to estimate the effectiveness and toxicity of low activity radioiodine ablation versus high activity in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Design: A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by including all randomized trials of low activity versus high activity radioiodine ablation after thyroidectomy. Standard meta-analytic procedures were used to analyze the study outcomes. Results: Ten trials were considered eligible and were further analyzed. The pooled risk ratio (RR) of having a successful ablation for an activity of 1100 MBq versus 3700 MBq (seven trials, 1772 patients) was 0.94 (95% CI 0.85 - 1.04, p-value 0.21). The RR for successful ablation when only thyroid hormone withdrawal was used (five trials, 1116 patients) was 0.87 (95% CI 0.72 - 1.06, p-value 0.17) and it was comparable to RR when only recombinant-human TSH (rec-hTSH) (two trials, 812 patients) was used (1.00, 95% CI 0.93 - 1.07, p-value 0.92). Salivary dysfunction, nausea, and neck pain were significantly more frequent among patients with higher dose for ablation. Conclusion: Our meta-analysis provides some evidence from randomized trials that a lower activity of radioiodine ablation is as effective as higher dose after surgery in patients with DTC with lower toxicity

  9. Analysis on the childhood and adolescent differentiated thyroid cancer: clinical features and radioiodine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zequan; Luo Quanyong; Chen Libo; Ding Yin; Yu Yongli; Lu Hankui; Zhu Ruisen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Children with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) frequently present with more extensive disease than adults. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical features of child-hood and adolescent DTC and evaluate the outcome and safety of radioiodine treatment. Methods: The records of 38 childhood and adolescent DTC cases, with 28 females and 10 males (mean age: 16.4 years) were reviewed. At diagnosis, all had metastatic lesions with 38 at regional lymph nodes, 15 at lung, 2 at brain and bone. Twenty-three had a total thyroidectomy, 7 had subtotal thyroidectomy, 5 had lobectomy, and 3 had other treatment. All received post-operative radioiodine therapy. All had follow-up for at least one year. Results: At the time of follow-up, all were survive (with a median follow-up of 5.13 years). Four-teen patients had no evidence of disease, 16 had partial remission, and 8 were stable disease. Conclusions: DTC of the thyroid in childhood and adolescent has high risks of residual/recurrence and metastasis. Post-thyroidectomy oral administration of radioiodine was an effective and safety adjuvant therapy for outcomes. (authors)

  10. High versus low radioiodine activity in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer - A meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valachis, Antonis [Dept. of Oncology, Maelarsjukhuset., Eskilstuna (Sweden); Univ. of Uppsala,, (Sweden)], e-mail: Valachis@hotmail.com, Antonis.Valachis@akademiska.uu.se; Nearchou, Andreas [Dept, of Oncology, Maelarsjukhuset., Eskilstuna (Sweden); Univ. of Uppsala., Uppsala (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    Background: The purpose of the meta-analysis was to estimate the effectiveness and toxicity of low activity radioiodine ablation versus high activity in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Design: A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by including all randomized trials of low activity versus high activity radioiodine ablation after thyroidectomy. Standard meta-analytic procedures were used to analyze the study outcomes. Results: Ten trials were considered eligible and were further analyzed. The pooled risk ratio (RR) of having a successful ablation for an activity of 1100 MBq versus 3700 MBq (seven trials, 1772 patients) was 0.94 (95% CI 0.85 - 1.04, p-value 0.21). The RR for successful ablation when only thyroid hormone withdrawal was used (five trials, 1116 patients) was 0.87 (95% CI 0.72 - 1.06, p-value 0.17) and it was comparable to RR when only recombinant-human TSH (rec-hTSH) (two trials, 812 patients) was used (1.00, 95% CI 0.93 - 1.07, p-value 0.92). Salivary dysfunction, nausea, and neck pain were significantly more frequent among patients with higher dose for ablation. Conclusion: Our meta-analysis provides some evidence from randomized trials that a lower activity of radioiodine ablation is as effective as higher dose after surgery in patients with DTC with lower toxicity.

  11. Usefulness of recombinant human TSH aided radioiodine doses administered in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitoia, Fabian; El Tamer, Elias; Schere, Daniel B.; Passerieu, Mariano; Bruno, Oscar D.; Niepominiszcze, Hugo

    2006-01-01

    The published studies confirming the safety and efficacy of rh TSH for diagnostic purposes have led to an increased interest in its use for preparation for radioiodine (RI) dose administration in patients with recurrent or persistent differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). In order to establish the efficacy of RI therapy after rh TSH, we have reviewed 39 rh TSH-aided radioiodine treatments in a series of 28 DTC patients. Patients were divided into two groups: GI (n=17), with previous thyroid bed uptake and undetectable thyroglobulin (Tg) levels under levothyroxine treatment and GII (n=11), with proven metastatic local or distant disease. Median follow-up after the first rh TSH-aided radioiodine treatment was 32 ± 13 months (range 8 to 54 months). Sixteen patients (94%) in GI were rendered disease free and one patient was shown to have persistent disease. In GII, the post therapy whole body scan showed pathological uptakes in all cases: in four patients in lungs, in four in mediastinum and in three in lateral neck. In two patients with mediastinum uptake, Tg levels were undetectable after rh TSH. In the follow-up, two patients with lateral neck uptake were rendered disease free, four patients died (three due to thyroid cancer) and five out of the remaining patients have persistent disease. In conclusion, rh TSH aided therapy was helpful to eliminate normal thyroid bed remnants in 16/17 (94%) patients (GI). rh TSH stimulated Tg was undetectable in two patients with mediastinal metastasis. We believe that rh TSH is a good alternative to levothyroxine withdrawal for the treatment of DTC with radioactive iodine, increasing the quality of life in these patients. Caution should be recommended in the follow-up of unselected DTC patients only with stimulated Tg levels. (author) [es

  12. Radioiodine therapy of autonomously functioning thyroid nodules and of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guhlmann, C.A.; Rendl, J.; Boerner, W.

    1995-01-01

    We studied the effects of radioiodine therapy (RIT) for autonomously functioning thyroid nodules (AFTNs) and Graves' disease on thyroid function and size up to one year after RIT. In 230 patients with AFTNs, a dose of 300 Gy was effective in about 90% of the cases 6 months after RIT. Out of 65 patients suffering from Graves' disease, 5 patients (8%) had persisting hyperthyroidism 6 months after RIT with a dose of 150 Gy. This group consisted exclusively of patients with manifest hyperthyroidism at the time of RIT. As determined by ultrasonography 6 months after RIT, a reduction of thyroid size by about 40% and 60% was observed in patients with AFTNs and Graves' disease, respectively. (orig.) [de

  13. Scintigraphy in benign thyroid disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahlstedt, J.

    2004-01-01

    For diagnosis, therapy and prognosis of benign thyroidal disorders thyroidal scintigraphy has to be seen in full strength in relation to thyroid hormone metabolism and regulation. Thyroidal iodine avidity can easily be assessed by TcTU ( 99m Tc-thyroid-up-take 20 min p.inj.), as the well known standard measure for the service of goiter patients. TcTU and TSH show concordance, i.e. direct correlation, when thyroid regulation is intact, however there is no correlation, i.e. discordance, in disorders such as destruction, autonomy oder immunogenic stimulation. The strategy to evaluate concordance/discordance of TcTU and TSH in outpatient routine work (''one stop shop'') is demonstrated in a variety of clinical situations being not always conform to current guide lines and recommendations. (orig.)

  14. Age- and sex-dependent model for estimating radioiodine dose to a normal thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killough, G.G.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the derivation of an age- and sex-dependent model of radioiodine dosimetry in the thyroid and the application of the model to estimating the thyroid dose for each of 4215 patients who were exposed to 131 I in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In most cases, the available data consisted of the patient's age at the time of administration, the patient's sex, the quantity of activity administered, the clinically-determined uptake of radioiodine by the thyroid, and the time after administration at which the uptake was determined. The metabolic model is of the form A(t) = K[exp(-μ 1 t) -exp(-μ 2 t)] (μCi), where μ 1 = λ/sub r/ - λ/sub i//sup b/ (i = 1, 2), λ/sub r/ is the radiological decay-rate coefficient, and λ/sub i//sup b/ are biological removal rate coefficients. The values of λ/sub i//sup b/ are determined by solving a nonlinear equation that depends on assumptions about the time or maximum uptake an the eventual biological loss rate (through which age dependence enters). The value of K may then be calculated from knowledge of the uptakes at a particular time. The dosimetric S-factor (rad/μCi-day) is based on specific absorbed fractions for photons of energy ranging from 0.01 to 4.0 MeV for thyroid masses from 1.29 to 19.6 g; the functional form of the S-factor also involves the thyroid mass explicitly, through which the dependence on age and sex enters. An analysis of sensitivity of the model to uncertainties in the thyroid mass and the biological removal rate for several age groups is reported. 12 references, 5 figures, 5 tables

  15. Iodine deficiency and thyroid disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Michael B; Boelaert, Kristien

    2015-04-01

    Iodine deficiency early in life impairs cognition and growth, but iodine status is also a key determinant of thyroid disorders in adults. Severe iodine deficiency causes goitre and hypothyroidism because, despite an increase in thyroid activity to maximise iodine uptake and recycling in this setting, iodine concentrations are still too low to enable production of thyroid hormone. In mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency, increased thyroid activity can compensate for low iodine intake and maintain euthyroidism in most individuals, but at a price: chronic thyroid stimulation results in an increase in the prevalence of toxic nodular goitre and hyperthyroidism in populations. This high prevalence of nodular autonomy usually results in a further increase in the prevalence of hyperthyroidism if iodine intake is subsequently increased by salt iodisation. However, this increase is transient because iodine sufficiency normalises thyroid activity which, in the long term, reduces nodular autonomy. Increased iodine intake in an iodine-deficient population is associated with a small increase in the prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity; whether these increases are also transient is unclear. Variations in population iodine intake do not affect risk for Graves' disease or thyroid cancer, but correction of iodine deficiency might shift thyroid cancer subtypes toward less malignant forms. Thus, optimisation of population iodine intake is an important component of preventive health care to reduce the prevalence of thyroid disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamic changes and clinical significance of thyroid auto-antibodies before and after radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Zhiying; Zhu Li; Wang Zhenghua

    2005-01-01

    To study the changes and their clinical effect of serum levels of thyroid globulin auto-antibodies (TGAb), thyroid peroxidase auto-antibodies (TPOAb) during radioiodine treatment of Graves' disease, and to investigate early therapeutic effect of radioiodine and influence factors for early hypothyroidism, 334 patients were divided into a positive group (TGAb>115IU/mL, TPOAb>34IU/mL) and a negative group (TGAb 131 I treatment. The levels of FT 3 , FT 4 , TSH, TGAb and TPOAb in serum were measured before 131 I therapy and at the 3rd, 6th, 9th, 12th month after the treatment respectively. Within one year after radioiodine treatment, 23.8% patients (48 out of 202) in the positive group and 11.4% (15 out of 132) in the negative group suffered from early hypothyroidism (P 131 I could reduce the level of thyroid auto-antibodies and promote the improvement and recovery of autoimmunity status. (authors)

  17. Effect of radioiodine therapy on thyroid nodule size in patients with toxic adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkovaca, Z.; Mijatovic, J.; Skrobis, M.; Kovacevic, P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Autonomously functioning toxic adenomas are a common cause of hyperthyroidism. Surgery, radioiodine and percutaneous ethanol injection into the nodule are effective therapies. Radioiodine therapy is increasingly used as first line therapy especially in elderly patients. Radioactive iodine I-131 seems to be a good therapeutic option with low incidence of post-therapy hypothyroidism. The important therapeutic effect has also been the regression in nodule size. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of radioiodine therapy on the size of toxic adenomas. Forty-six patients with age range of 37-76 years (Mean age=60.9 years) were followed up for a period of 12 months after I-131 therapy for toxic adenomas. Thyroid hormone levels (T3, T4 and TSH) were determined. Each patient was subjected to ultrasound and radionuclide scanning of thyroid gland at 3,6 and 12 months following I-131 therapy. Successful treatment was defined as control of hyperthyroidism and reappearance of extra-glandular thyroid tissue on Thyroid scan, which were suppressed by the hyperactive nodule prior to therapy. The volumes of the thyroid pre and post-therapy were estimated by US using the formula of ellipsoid model (δ/2π6 x length x width x depth). The therapeutic dose of I-131 was calculated for each patient by the following formula: 12 mCi x 100/24 hrs RAIU. Patients received a single dose of I-131 and the range of administered I-131 dose was 825 1221 MBq. Results revealed that 42 patients (91%) became euthyroid in three months after I-131. All patients became euthyroid in 6 months. The adenomas were reduced in size from a mean of 18.23+11.21 ml to 7.38+3.48 ml during the 12 months follow up. This was highly significant (p<0.05, t=3.408). The extra-nodular thyroid volume did not change following therapy (12.2+7.4 ml pre-therapy vs. 11.8+7.1 ml post therapy at 12 months). The results of our study showed that I-131 can successfully treat not only the functional state of

  18. Radiation safety procedures in radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajashekharrao, B.; Samuel, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    During any administration of radioactive materials, it is imperative to always be conversant with any forbidden radiation health safety practices. This need is amplified when dealing with therapeutic amount of radionuclides. Among all the procedures dealing with the use of radiopharmaceuticals, it is easiest to think of 131 I, since this is the most widely used unsealed source of a radiopharmaceutical for treatment of thyroid cancer and hyperthyroidism and carries with it most of the problems associated with therapy applications

  19. Radioiodine (I-131) therapy in thyroid cancer differentiated type (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Carcinoma thyroid is not an uncommon malignancy in Pakistan because of its location in iodine deficient terrain. Painless palpable (solitary) thyroid nodule is the common presentation in majority (>90%) of the patients and > 25% cold nodules in females turned malignant on biopsy whereas in males >75% of cold nodules turned malignant on historical examination. The disease is more common in females as compared to males (3:1) and in females pure papillary carcinoma is more common whereas in males mostly follicular or mixed tumors are seen. Radical surgery (thyroidectomy) is not a routine surgical treatment in our country. In teaching hospitals the routine surgical procedure is lobectomy and Isthmectomy, whereas in DHQ Hospitals less surgical procedures, e.g. tumorectomy or partial labectomy etc. are done. Therefore, in view of limited/partial surgical ablation, I-131 ablation is mandatory for better and longer survival. We have treated 118 patients of thyroid carcinoma (Differential type) at our centre (AEMC) with therapeutic dose of Radioactive iodine (I-131) during the last 13 years with encouraging results (Disease free survival). (author)

  20. Outcome of radioiodine-131 therapy in hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules: a 20 years' retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, Claudia; Bencivelli, Walter; Vitti, Paolo; Grasso, Lucia; Pinchera, Aldo

    2005-03-01

    To investigate the risk of hypothyroidism after radioiodine (131I) treatment for hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules. Retrospective analysis of patients treated with 131I for hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules and followed up for a maximum of 20 years. A total of 346 patients treated with 131I in the years 1975-95, for a single hyperfunctioning nodule. Hypothyroidism was defined as TSH levels > 3.7 mU/l. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to analyse permanence of euthyroidism after 131I. A stepwise Cox proportional hazard model was used to identify factors influencing the progression to hypothyroidism. The cumulative incidence of hypothyroidism was 7.6% at 1 year, 28% at 5 years, 46% at 10 years and 60% at 20 years. Age (P thyroid and nodule size, thyroid status at diagnosis and degree of extranodular thyroid parenchymal suppression had no influence. In hyperthyroid patients with partial parenchymal suppression, however, previous MMI treatment was the most important prognostic factor (P hyperfunctioning nodule are hypothyroid. Factors increasing the risk of hypothyroidism are age, 131I uptake and MMI pretreatment. The prognostic value of this last factor, however, depends on the degree of suppression of the extranodular thyroid parenchyma at the scan.

  1. Experimental peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in radioiodine negative somatostatin receptor positive thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilica, B.; Kroiss, A.; Putzer, D.; Uprimmy, C.; Warwitz, B.; Kendler, D.; Waitz, D.; Virgolini, I.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Purpose: This retrospective analysis evaluated the time to progression (TTP), progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with radioiodine negative thyroid cancer who had undergone peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE, 177 Lu-DOTA-LAN, 90 Y-DOTA-TOC or 90 Y-DOTA-LAN after tumor progression. Methods: Data derived from twenty patients with either differentiated (n=15), anaplastic (n=1) or medullary (n=4) somatostatin receptor positive thyroid cancer who had received treatment with PRRT after tumor progression. TTP, PFS and OS were defined according to the clinical trial endpoints suggested by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration). Progressive disease was defined by sonography, FDG-PET, Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET, or CT (RECIST Criteria). Results: In 17 patients the median overall survival time after the first PRRT was 17.3 (range: 0.1 - 109.7) months. Three patients still alive are actually showing stable disease. The median of PFS in 20 Patients (6 with more than one PRRT-cycle or PRRT-substance) has been 10.9 (range: 0.1 - 44.0) months. The median TTP was 15.6 (range 4.4 to 29.2) months. Conclusion: PRRT appears to be useful in patients with somatostatin receptor positive but radioiodine negative thyroid cancer as a complementary palliative cytotoxic therapy. (authors)

  2. Pulmonary fibrosis in youth treated with radioiodine for juvenile thyroid cancer and lung metastases after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebestreit, Helge; Burkhardt, Antje; Biko, Johannes; Reiners, Christoph; Drozd, Valentina; Demidchik, Yuri; Trusen, Andreas; Beer, Meinrad

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this project was to systematically determine the prevalence and consequences of pulmonary fibrosis in youth with thyroid carcinoma and lung metastases from Belarus who were treated with radioiodine ( 131 I). A total of 69 patients treated for juvenile thyroid carcinoma and lung metastasis with 131 I were assessed. A group of 29 patients without lung metastases and prior 131 I treatment served as controls. The assessments included a CT scan of the lungs, extensive pulmonary function testing and an incremental cycle test to volitional fatigue with measurements of oxygen uptake (V. O 2 ), oxygen saturation and alveolar-arterial difference in oxygen partial pressure (ΔaaO 2 ). Five patients with lung metastases showed advanced pulmonary fibrosis on CT scans and also had poorer lung functions compared with the 62 patients with none or minor signs of fibrosis and the 29 controls. Furthermore, these five patients showed lower peak V.O 2 , lower oxygen saturation at peak exercise and higher exercise ΔaaO 2 . They were younger at the time of cancer diagnosis and had received chemotherapy more frequently than youth with pulmonary metastases who did not develop fibrosis. One of the five patients subsequently died from pulmonary fibrosis. Following the Chernobyl catastrophe, about 7% of children treated with radioiodine for thyroid carcinoma and lung metastases displayed pulmonary fibrosis which was associated with functional impairments. Based on the characteristics of affected individuals, the number of radioiodine courses may have to be limited, especially in young children, and chemotherapy should be avoided. (orig.)

  3. Length and cost of hospital stay of radioiodine ablation in thyroid cancer patients: comparison between preparation with thyroid hormone withdrawal and thyrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borget, I.; Chevalier, J.; Remy, H.; Ricard, M.; Schlumberger, M.; Allyn, M.; Pouvourville, G. de

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of thyroid cancer consists of thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation following thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) stimulation. Similar ablation rates were obtained with either thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW) or rhTSH. But with rhTSH, the elimination of radioiodine is more rapid, thus reducing its whole-body retention and potentially resulting in a shorter hospital stay. The aim of this study was to assess the financial impact of a reduced length of hospital stay with the use of rhTSH. This was a case-control study of thyroid cancer patients treated postoperatively with 3,700 MBq (100 mCi) radioiodine; 35 patients who received rhTSH were matched with 64 patients submitted to THW according to covariates influencing radioiodine retention. The length of hospitalization (LOH) was estimated for each method according to the threshold of radioiodine retention below which the patient can be discharged from the hospital. The economic analysis was conducted from a hospital perspective. Simulations were performed. For a threshold of 400 MBq, the LOH was 2.4 days and 3.5 days with rhTSH and THW, respectively, and the cost for an ablation stay was, respectively, 2,146 and 1,807 EUR. In the French context, 57% of the acquisition cost of rhTSH was compensated by the reduction of the length of hospitalization. By increasing the iodine excretion, rhTSH allows a shorter hospitalization length, which partially compensates its acquisition cost. (orig.)

  4. Recent advances in radioiodine use for the management of thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: It has been well accepted that radioiodine is useful in the management of patients with recurrent or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer. Although radioiodine has been used for more than 60 years in diagnosis and treatment, some improvements still appear continuously. Serum Thyroglobulin (Tg) and radioiodine whole body scans (WBS) are used to detect recurrent thyroid caner. Tg has been known to be more sensitive than WBS, and false negative WBS with elevated Tg are frequently found. However, the clinical importance of Tg negative cases with positive WBS has not been clarified. We found that 34 among 960 patients who showed negative Tg with positive post-therapy I-131 WBS had functioning metastases to extrathyroidal organs. Complementary use of radioiodine WBS is recommended to exclude Tg false negative cases. The retinoic acid (RA) is well known to induce the cellular re-differentiation and increase the expression of sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) in de-differentiated tumor cell. We performed RA treatment with I-131 in 40 patients with elevated serum Tg level but no focal iodine uptake in WBS. In 14 patients (35%), improved I-131 uptake was seen. Focal iodine uptakes were seen in 4 patients, and diffuse hepatic visualization without localized lesions were found in 10 patients. Maximal safe dose (MSD) administration based on bone marrow radiation allows the delivery of a large amount of I-131 to thyroid cancer tissue within the safety margin. We performed MSD therapy in 46 patients with differentiated thyroid cancers, which had persisted even after conventional fixed dose therapy. MSD was calculated according to the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center protocol using blood samples. Mean calculated MSD was 12.5±2.1 GBq (337.3±37.5 mCi). Of the 46 patients, 6 (13.0%) showed complete remission, 15 (32.6%) partial response, 19 stable disease, and 6 disease progression. Twenty-nine patients (63%) had a transient cytopenia after therapy. MSD therapy of

  5. Radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.V.; Hurley, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a clinical symptom complex caused by elevated thyroid hormone levels. Of the disorders in which it appears, the most common is Graves' disease; toxic nodular goiter (Plummer's disease) is considerably less frequent. Recent studies suggest that Graves' disease is autoimmune in origin and is probably caused by a genetic defect in immunoserveillance in which thyroid-stimulating antibodies interact with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor sites on thyroid follicular cell membranes to increase synthesis and secretion of thyroid hormones. Toxic nodular goiter is characterized by the secretion of increased amounts of thyroid hormone by localized autonomous areas of increased function within the thyroid gland. Other forms of hyperthyroidism are discussed. Radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism is described

  6. Age- and sex-dependent model for estimating radioiodine dose to a normal thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killough, G.G.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the derivation of an age- and sex-dependent model of radioiodine dosimetry in the thyroid and the application of the model to estimating the thyroid dose for each of 4215 patients who were exposed to 131 I in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The model was made to conform to these data requirements by the use of age-specific estimates of the biological half-time of iodine in the thyroid and an age- and sex-dependent representation of the mass of the thyroid. Also, it was assumed that the thyroid burden was maximum 24 hours after administration (the 131 I dose is not critically sensitive to this assumption). The metabolic model is of the form A(t) = K[exp(-μ 1 t) - exp(-μ 2 t)] (μCi), where μ 1 = lambda/sub r/ + lambda/sub i//sup b/ (i = 1, 2), lambda/sub r/ is the radiological decay-rate coefficient, and lambda/sub i//sup b/ are biological removal rate coefficients. The values of lambda/sub i//sup b/ are determined by solving a nonlinear equation that depends on assumptions about the time of maximum uptake and the eventual biological loss rate (through which age dependence enters). The value of K may then be calculated from knowledge of the uptake at a particular time. The dosimetric S-factor (rad/μCi-day) is based on specific absorbed fractions for photons of energy ranging from 0.01 to 4.0 MeV for thyroid masses from 1.29 to 19.6 g; the functional form of the S-factor also involves the thyroid mass explicitly, through which the dependence on age and sex enters. An analysis of sensitivity of the model to uncertainties in the thyroid mass and the biological removal rate for several age groups is reported. The model could prove useful in the dosimetry of very short-lived radioiodines. Tables of age- and sex-dependent coefficients are provided to enable readers to make their own calculations. 12 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Effect of environmental temperature on radioiodine uptake by the thyroid gland of rats during ontogenetic development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samel, M.

    1975-01-01

    Radioiodine uptake by the thyroid gland of young rats, aged 1 to 30 days, was studied at nest temperature (35degC) and at the temperature of the animal room (24degC). In animals younger than two weeks 131 I uptake was significantly lower at 24degC than at nest temperature. In older animals, these temperature differences did not result in significantly different uptake values. It is suggested that short-term cold does not activate the pituitary-thyroid gland axis in younger animals with unstable body temperature, and that functional changes in the circulatory system might be responsible for the differences observed in 131 I uptake. (author)

  8. Correlation of consecutive serum thyroglobulin levels during hormone withdrawal and failure of initial radioiodine ablation in thyroid cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyuk Jin; Kim, Sung Hoon; O, Joo Hyun; Lee, Yeong Joo; Kim, Hyoung Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Ye Young [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, College of Medicine, The Inje University Sanggye Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Ji Young [Dept. of Radiology, Incheon St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of thyroglobulin (Tg) kinetics during preparation of radioiodine ablation for prediction of initial radioiodine ablation failure in thyroid cancer patients. Thyroid cancer patients after total thyroidectomy who underwent radioiodine ablation with 3–4 weeks of hormone withdrawal between May 2011 and January 2012 were included. Consecutive serum Tg levels 5–10 days before ablation (Tg1) and on the day of ablation (Tg2) were obtained. The difference between Tg1 and Tg2 (ΔTg), daily change rate of Tg (ΔTg/day) and Tg doubling time (Tg-DT) were calculated. Success of initial ablation was determined by the results of the follow-up ultrasonography, diagnostic radioiodine scan and stimulated Tg level after 6 to 20 months. A total of 143 patients were included. Failed ablation was reported in 52 patients. Tg2 higher than 5.6 ng/ml and Tg-DT shorter than 4.2 days were significantly related to a high risk of ablation failure. ΔTg and ΔTg/day did not show significant correlation with ablation failure. Thyroglobulin kinetics on consecutive blood sampling during hormone withdrawal may be helpful in predicting patients with higher risk of treatment failure of initial radioiodine ablation therapy in thyroid cancer patients.

  9. Hepatic uptake of radioiodine in patients with thyroid cancer: the good, the bad and the aesthetically impaired

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, M.; Larcos, G.; Gruenewald, S.; Devadas, M.; Boyages, S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: There is debate over the prognostic significance of diffuse hepatic uptake (DHU) of radioiodine in patients with thyroid cancer (DTC). Accordingly we compared outcome in DTC patients with and without DHU and no abnormality on their radioiodine scan. We reviewed 408 studies in 198 patients who underwent radioiodine scanning (treatment or surveillance) for DTC over a five-year period. Of these 234 (57%) showed DHU; 100/408 showed no evidence of functioning thyroid tissue. These were 22 high dose I 131 treatments, 48 I 131 and 30 I 123 surveillance scans in 72 patients (54 women, 18 men, age: 43( 14 years; tumour type: 88% papillary, 10% follicular, 2% other; mean follow-up 12.2 (11.1 months). Outcome was assessed by clinical, pathological (thyroglobulin or histopathology) and/or radioiodine scanning. Of the 100 scans there were 17 (17%) that had DHU (group A) and 83 (83%) that were negative (group B). In group A, eight of 17 (47%) had or developed residual functioning thyroid tissue or DTC versus 29 of 83 (35%) in group B (p=ns). The only factor associated with DHU was high dose I 131 (p<0.001) but not the gender, age or type of cancer. We conclude that (a) DHU is common in patients with DTC; (b) if there is otherwise physiological distribution of radioiodine, DHU does not indicate an adverse short term outcome in DTC patients. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  10. Correlation of consecutive serum thyroglobulin levels during hormone withdrawal and failure of initial radioiodine ablation in thyroid cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hyuk Jin; Kim, Sung Hoon; O, Joo Hyun; Lee, Yeong Joo; Kim, Hyoung Woo; Seo, Ye Young; Ryu, Ji Young

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of thyroglobulin (Tg) kinetics during preparation of radioiodine ablation for prediction of initial radioiodine ablation failure in thyroid cancer patients. Thyroid cancer patients after total thyroidectomy who underwent radioiodine ablation with 3–4 weeks of hormone withdrawal between May 2011 and January 2012 were included. Consecutive serum Tg levels 5–10 days before ablation (Tg1) and on the day of ablation (Tg2) were obtained. The difference between Tg1 and Tg2 (ΔTg), daily change rate of Tg (ΔTg/day) and Tg doubling time (Tg-DT) were calculated. Success of initial ablation was determined by the results of the follow-up ultrasonography, diagnostic radioiodine scan and stimulated Tg level after 6 to 20 months. A total of 143 patients were included. Failed ablation was reported in 52 patients. Tg2 higher than 5.6 ng/ml and Tg-DT shorter than 4.2 days were significantly related to a high risk of ablation failure. ΔTg and ΔTg/day did not show significant correlation with ablation failure. Thyroglobulin kinetics on consecutive blood sampling during hormone withdrawal may be helpful in predicting patients with higher risk of treatment failure of initial radioiodine ablation therapy in thyroid cancer patients

  11. An eighteen year experience of differentiated thyroid carcinoma treatment with 131 radioiodine at the Military Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jofre, M J; Sierralta, M P [Military Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department, Santiago (Chile); Del Campo, G; Ide, A; Wiener, R [Department of Endocrinology of the Military Hospital, Santiago (Chile)

    2002-09-01

    An eighteen year experience of differentiated thyroid carcinoma treatment with 131 radioiodine at the Military Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department. Since the beginning of Nuclear Medicine, the thyroid gland has been an important subject for study. In the fifties, the complimentary use of 131 radioiodine after differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) surgery was postulated. The aim of the study was to analyze our experience of the management of patients with DTC. Material and methods: An 18-year retrospective analysis was made including 109 patients with previous diagnosis of DTC, 90 % females, mean age 47 +/- 17 y.o. (range: 19-85 y.o). Tumoral histology was 67 % papillary, 28 % follicular and 5% non-determined in the medical record. First doses of 131 radioiodine were between 50 and 200 mCi. In all, 156 radioiodine doses were given and 6 patients received 4 doses or more, with total doses between 300 and 570 mCi. Results: The distribution of first and total radioiodine doses is presented in the table below. Of the group of patients who received a first radioiodine dose of less than 100 mCi post surgery, 79% were treated before 1990. Those who received 150mCi or more had cervical ganglionar compromise, trachea invasion or subtotal thyroidectomy. In 50% of the patients who received 4 or more doses, the first two doses were 50 mCi. It is important to mention that there was one patient who received 8 radioiodine doses in 4 years , seven of them were 50 mCi ( total dose 438 mCi). This patient presented trachea and larynx invasion in the early stages, with a persistent focus in the left supraclavicular region. She later developed pulmonary fibrosis, for which she was treated with complimentary radiotherapy (30 Gy), before dying. Distribution of radioiodine doses is presented. Conclusion: It is important to emphasize the validity of a first 131 radioiodine dose after surgery of DTC patients of 100 mCi or more, to obtain the ablation of the remaining thyroid tissue. This

  12. An eighteen year experience of differentiated thyroid carcinoma treatment with 131 radioiodine at the Military Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jofre, M.J.; Sierralta, M.P.; Del Campo, G.; Ide, A.; Wiener, R.

    2002-01-01

    An eighteen year experience of differentiated thyroid carcinoma treatment with 131 radioiodine at the Military Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department. Since the beginning of Nuclear Medicine, the thyroid gland has been an important subject for study. In the fifties, the complimentary use of 131 radioiodine after differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) surgery was postulated. The aim of the study was to analyze our experience of the management of patients with DTC. Material and methods: An 18-year retrospective analysis was made including 109 patients with previous diagnosis of DTC, 90 % females, mean age 47 +/- 17 y.o. (range: 19-85 y.o). Tumoral histology was 67 % papillary, 28 % follicular and 5% non-determined in the medical record. First doses of 131 radioiodine were between 50 and 200 mCi. In all, 156 radioiodine doses were given and 6 patients received 4 doses or more, with total doses between 300 and 570 mCi. Results: The distribution of first and total radioiodine doses is presented in the table below. Of the group of patients who received a first radioiodine dose of less than 100 mCi post surgery, 79% were treated before 1990. Those who received 150mCi or more had cervical ganglionar compromise, trachea invasion or subtotal thyroidectomy. In 50% of the patients who received 4 or more doses, the first two doses were 50 mCi. It is important to mention that there was one patient who received 8 radioiodine doses in 4 years , seven of them were 50 mCi ( total dose 438 mCi). This patient presented trachea and larynx invasion in the early stages, with a persistent focus in the left supraclavicular region. She later developed pulmonary fibrosis, for which she was treated with complimentary radiotherapy (30 Gy), before dying. Distribution of radioiodine doses is presented. Conclusion: It is important to emphasize the validity of a first 131 radioiodine dose after surgery of DTC patients of 100 mCi or more, to obtain the ablation of the remaining thyroid tissue. This

  13. Side effects and risks of radioiodine treatment of benign thyroid diseases. Nebenwirkungen und Risiken bei der Radiojodtherapie gutartiger Schilddruesenerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, W.; Hohenberger, W.; Wolf, F. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik mit Poliklinik Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.). Chirurgische Klinik mit Poliklinik)

    1990-12-01

    Radioiodine treatment is considered to be the treatment of choice in benign thyroid diseases because of its very low side effects. Real and hypothetic risks and side effects have to be differentiated. Both may occur early and late after the treatment. Radioiodinethyroiditis in small volumes at high doses is very rare. Exacerbation of a thyroid storm (0.34%) as well as local compressions accompanied with reactive edema of the thyroid are early real side effects of radioiodine treatment. Late real side effects are failure of treatment (7-30% of thyrotoxicosis) and induction of hypothyroidism (4-20% of functional autonomy and increasing frequency in Graves' diseases with time). Late hypothetic risks are somatic (1-9/10000 bis 1-9/100000) or genetic (1-9/100000). An early risk might be the misdiagnosis of an additional thyroid carcinoma. (orig.).

  14. Efficiency of radioiodine therapy with a fix dose of I-131 in toxic thyroid adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovski, Z

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to estimate the results obtained using a fix dose of I-131 in the treatment of the solitary toxic thyroid adenoma. Material and Methods: We have performed radioiodine therapy m 64 patients, 49 female (50+ 1 7 yrs) and 15 male (43+-15 yrs) with solitary toxic thyroid adenoma. 45 patients received fix dose I-131 of 850 MBq, while 19 patients were treated with calculated (MBq/gr) dose 555-1100 MBq Previously 39(64%) patients were clinically hyperthyreotic and received thyreostatic meditication which were interruptecf one week before the administration of I-131. Those patients who were euthyreotic, TSH was suppressed(<0.25 MU/m1). 61(95.3%) patients received a single dose, while 3(4, 7%) patients needed two doses. Resulting thyroid matabolism and volume of nodules were evaluated 6-48 months after treatment. Results: From 45 radioiodine treated patients with fix dose 6(9, 8%) became hypothyroidism, 36(85, 3%) euthyroidism and 3(4, 9%) recurrent hyperthyroidism, in comparison with 19 treated patients with calculated I-131 dose: 2(10, 5%) hypothyroidism, 16(84, 3%) euthyroidism and 1(5, 2%) recurrent hyperthyroidism. The size of the nodules became unpalpable m 17(26, 2%), decreased evidently in 33(52, 5%) and remained unchanged in 14(21, 3%) of the treated patients. Conclusion: A fix dose of I-131 is simple, safe and efficient in the treatment of solitary toxic thyroid adenoma. There was not significant different in incidence of late follow-up results of hypothyroidism and recurrent hyperthyroidism between fix dose and calculated MBq/gr dose. (authors)

  15. Radioiodine (I-131) application in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanayakkara, D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) remains one of the curable of all cancers. All literature reviews and clinical experiences regarding I 131 use in DTC conclude the beneficial effects, better prognosis, longer survival time and an assurance for cure. The Overall prognosis of patients with DTC is excellent if treat scientifically, adequately and timely. The management of thyroid cancer depends on the resources available in different institutions. Nuclear Medicine unit (NMU), Faculty of Medicine Peradeniya, Sri Lanka is in the process of uplifting the services for thyroid cancer management. Clinical audit was carried out in NMU on patients who utilized the Nuclear Medicine facilities in the management of DTC. It is important to identify deficiencies in current practice to improve our services. During January 2004 to March 2005, 126 DTC patients were referred for radioiodine Whole body scan (WBS) and therapy. Their age, sex, histology, extent of surgery, adequacy of thyroxine suppression treatment, monitoring with serum thyroglobulin levels (Tg), WBS results and radioiodine therapy were analyzed. There were 104(82.5%) females and 22(17.5%) males giving sex ratio of 4.7: 1. The Mean age was 35.5 years (range 9-58 years). The commonest histological types were papillary carcinoma 55.5% (n=70), follicular carcinoma 35% (n=44) and follicular variant of papillary carcinoma 9.5% (n=12). Seventy five percent (n=95) had total thyroidectomy (TT), 17 %(n=21) had near total thyroidectomy (NTT) and 8%(n=10) had subtotal thyroidectomy (STT). Sixty-nine patients (54.8%) were on thyroid suppression therapy. Thirty-six patients (28.6%) were referred to the WBS soon after surgery without initiation of thyroxine treatment. Another twenty-one patients (16.6%) were not on thyroxine therapy since surgery. Serum thyroglobulin was assessed on 20.6% (n=26). WBS done using 3-4 mCi liquid radioiodine showed residual functioning thyroid tissues in 41% (n=52). Lymph nodes or bone

  16. Reciprocal changes in parathyroid hormone and thyroid function after radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.S.; Nussbaum, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is associated with negative calcium balance, normal to increased serum calcium concentrations, and decreased cortical bone mass. There is no agreement concerning serum PTH levels in such patients. In this study, we measured serum PTH concentrations using a newly developed sensitive 2-site immunoradiometric assay in 17 hyperthyroid patients before and after radioiodine therapy. The mean serum PTH and calcium concentrations were 28 +/- 15 (+/- SD) ng/L (normal range, 12-65 ng/L) and 2.4 +/- 0.5 mmol/L (normal range, 2.1-2.6 mmol/L) before therapy. After therapy serum PTH concentrations increased in 16 of the 17 patients. The increase in serum PTH was greater in the 9 patients who became hypothyroid rapidly (29 +/- 15 to 75 +/- 29 ng/L) compared with that in the 8 patients who became euthyroid gradually (26 +/- 16 to 45 +/- 24 ng/L). Serum PTH rose along with TSH as the patients became hypothyroid after radioiodine, and both serum PTH and TSH fell when L-T4 therapy was given. The reciprocal changes in serum PTH concentrations and thyroid function over time suggest a strong association of bone mineral metabolism and thyroid status

  17. Reciprocal changes in parathyroid hormone and thyroid function after radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, D.S.; Nussbaum, S.R.

    1989-06-01

    Hyperthyroidism is associated with negative calcium balance, normal to increased serum calcium concentrations, and decreased cortical bone mass. There is no agreement concerning serum PTH levels in such patients. In this study, we measured serum PTH concentrations using a newly developed sensitive 2-site immunoradiometric assay in 17 hyperthyroid patients before and after radioiodine therapy. The mean serum PTH and calcium concentrations were 28 +/- 15 (+/- SD) ng/L (normal range, 12-65 ng/L) and 2.4 +/- 0.5 mmol/L (normal range, 2.1-2.6 mmol/L) before therapy. After therapy serum PTH concentrations increased in 16 of the 17 patients. The increase in serum PTH was greater in the 9 patients who became hypothyroid rapidly (29 +/- 15 to 75 +/- 29 ng/L) compared with that in the 8 patients who became euthyroid gradually (26 +/- 16 to 45 +/- 24 ng/L). Serum PTH rose along with TSH as the patients became hypothyroid after radioiodine, and both serum PTH and TSH fell when L-T4 therapy was given. The reciprocal changes in serum PTH concentrations and thyroid function over time suggest a strong association of bone mineral metabolism and thyroid status.

  18. Heath-related quality of life in thyroid cancer patients following radioiodine ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Jean-françois

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited information about the medium to long-term health-related quality of life (QOL in thyroid cancer patients after initial therapy and the existing studies suffer from limitations. The aim of the study was to assess the determinants of medium-term QOL after the initial therapy. Methods Following a total thyroidectomy, 88 thyroid cancer patients received either rhTSH or hypothyroid-assisted radioiodine ablation (RRA using 3.7 GBq (100 mCi of radioiodine. QOL evaluation of the patients using the validated Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness & Therapy (FACIT was performed at the time of inclusion (t0 and later at the 9-month post-RRA (t1. Results 83 patients were eligible for the final evaluation. Medium-term FACIT scores were not statistically different between t0 and t1 patients. All but one domain of the QOL score was similar between t0 and t1. Using a multivariate analysis, only age and immediate postoperative QOL scores were found to be determinants of the overall medium term 9-month QOL scores. Analysis showed that 'high QOL levels' (baseline and 9-month and 'no depression', 'low anxiety levels', were associated with ' Conclusions The use of radioiodine ablation does not seem to affect the medium term QOL scores of patients. Medium-term QOL is mainly determined by pre-ablation QOL. The assessment of baseline QOL might be interesting to evaluate in order to adapt the treatment protocols, the preventive strategies, and medical information to patients for potentially improving their outcomes.

  19. Radioiodine therapy for Plummer's disease based on the thyroid uptake of technetium-99m pertechnetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meller, J.; Wisheu, S.; Behe, M.; Gratz, S.; Becker, W.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was the evaluation of a TcTUs (global technetium-99m pertechnetate thyroid uptake under suppression)-based approach in 370 patients with thyroid autonomy (Plummer's disease) treated by radioiodine therapy (RIT) under standardised conditions. The analysis included 370 patients (309 females, 61 males; mean age 64±11.6 years) treated for thyroid autonomy [unifocal (UFA), 36.8%; multifocal (MFA), 55.7%; disseminated (DISA), 7.6%]. During RIT all patients were under thyroid suppression (TSH 0.5 μU/l and/or TcTUs 4 μU/ml). A dose of 350-450 Gy to the autonomous tissue resulted in a success rate of 97% in the UFA group and 81% in the MFA/DISA group. Decrease in total thyroid volume and TcTUs did not differ significantly between successfully treated patients and patients with persistent autonomy. Multivariate analysis of all 370 patients identified four independent factors that negatively influenced the therapeutic success: high pretherapeutic thyroid volume (P=0.0001; odds ratio: 1.017), high pretherapeutic TcTUs values (P=0.0001; odds ratio: 1.378), multifocal/disseminated autonomy (P=0.0056; odds ratio: 3.245) and low target dose (P=0.017; odds ratio: 0.997). It is concluded that the high success rate in the treatment of UFA indicates the concept of TcTUs-based RIT to be valid, but that in the therapy of MFA/DISA the target se has to be corrected if the total thyroid volume exceeds a critical threshold. (orig.)

  20. Therapeutic implications of thymic uptake of radioiodine in thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, L.M.; Barrington, S.F.; Kettle, A.G.; O'Doherty, M.J.; Coakley, A.J.; Morrison, I.D.

    1998-01-01

    The management of 38 consecutive patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma in the period 1991-1996, who each received at least one therapy dose of iodine-131, was reviewed, looking in particular at those in whom anterior mediastinal uptake was demonstrated on scans taken 3 and 7 days post-therapy. Such activity was noted in ten patients. On the basis of clinical follow-up, thyroglobulin measurement and radiological and other scintigraphic imaging, in nine of the ten patients the anterior mediastinal activity was attributed to physiological thymic uptake. Of those nine, all were under 50 years of age; seven were considered disease free, one had residual disease in the neck and one had distant metastases. Physiological uptake by the thymus was more prominent on the 7-day scans and in patients with low tumour volumes. For appropriate patient management it is essential to recognise that physiological uptake of 131 I by the thymus in patients under 50 years of age is a potential cause of false-positive therapy scans. (orig.)

  1. Patient management in radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dressler, J.

    1997-01-01

    Benign thyroid disease ranks by far as the most frequent therapy in nuclear medicine. In Germany approximately 25 000 cases of hyperthyreosis are being treated in association with autonomy or Graves' disease, but also for the reduction of goiters or the correction of latent functional disturbances. In such indications radiotherapy is virtually free of risk as opposed to surgery and ranks more favorable in regard to costs and curative effects versus pharmacological long term treatment. Still regional varying therapeutical concepts and intentions are being pursued and trials of improvements described. There is consent in therapy that quality of treatment is closely linked to a specialized out-door platient preparation, individual hospital activity dosage and lifelong follow up including continued evaluation of therapeutical results. In this paper minimal requirements of outpatient measures before and after therapy are summarized which in Germany is only permitted on an inhospital patient basis. Considering basics of radioactive preventive law, scientific evidence of available results of therapeutical studies and a survey of German therapeutic centers, suggestions for a quality maintaining management in view of the most effective utilization for the limited available number of beds is presented for discussion. (orig.) [de

  2. Thyroid Disorders Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body breaks down food and either uses that energy immediately or stores it for the future. In other words, our thyroid hormones regulate our body's metabolism. Another gland, called the pituitary gland, actually controls how well the thyroid works. The pituitary gland ...

  3. Reduced radioiodine uptake at increased iodine intake and {sup 131}I-induced release of ''cold'' iodine stored in the thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meller, B.; Haase, A.; Richter, E.; Baehre, M. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Seyfarth, M. [Inst. of Clinical Chemistry, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Wenzel, B.E. [Clinic of Internal Medicine I, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Aim: the extent of urinary iodine excretion (UIE) provides information about iodine supply and release. In the present study we investigated correlations between UIE and radioiodine uptake (RIU) as well as effects of radioiodine therapy on UIE in patients with autonomous goitre. Patients, methods: In 197 consecutive patients with thyroid autonomy, UIE was measured twice during radioiodine test (RITe) and correlated with RIU. In 98 of these patients, thyroglobulin and thyroid volume (V) were determined prior to therapy. Individual changes in urinary iodine excretion ({delta}UIE) and TG ({delta}TG) could be investigated four weeks (4W) and six months (6M) after radioiodine therapy. Additionally, {delta}V was determined 6M after therapy. {delta}UIE, {delta}TG and {delta}V were correlated with target dose and target volume. Results: patients with higher iodine excretion exhibited significantly lower thyroidal radioiodine uptake values. Twofold increased UIE prior to therapy decreased radioiodine uptake by 25%. Compared with pretherapeutic values, UIE and TG were significantly increased four weeks after radioiodine therapy (p < 0.001). Median values of both parameters were found to be doubled. The product of target dose and target volume was not only correlated with a decrease of thyroid volume 6M after therapy, but also with an increase of UIE and TG in the early phase after therapy. Conclusions: it was confirmed that UIE during RITe is a measure for iodine intake and can be used to investigate the competition between stable iodine and radioiodine. The increase of UIE and TG four weeks after therapeutic administration of radioiodine can be explained by disintegrated thyroid follicles. The therapy-induced iodine release may be one important cause for the development of hyperthyroidism in some patients during the first weeks after radioiodine therapy. It may contribute to the known decrease of radioiodine uptake after preapplications of {sup 131}I in various thyroid

  4. Comparison between thyroid hormone withdrawal and recombinant human TSH administration before radioiodine treatment for advanced thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, Sabrina M.; Corbo, Rossana; Buescu, Alexandru; Carvalho, Denise P.; Vaisman, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Radioiodine treatment is traditionally performed after thyroid hormone withdrawal. However, induction of hypothyroidism is associated with physical and psychological symptoms and a possible induction of tumor growth. This is particularly harmful in patients with advanced thyroid cancer (ATC). The objective of this study was to compare the thyroxine withdrawal and the recombinant human TSH (rh TSH) administration in patients with non-radioiodine responsive ATC after retinoic acid (RA) therapy for induction of iodine uptake. Patients were treated with isotretinoin (1.0 to 1.5 mg/kg/d) for 5 weeks, then, thyroxine (LT 4 ) was discontinued 4 weeks before therapeutic dose (150 mCi). Based on the presence of a satisfactory response to RA (increased iodine uptake, reduction of serum thyroglobulin and tumor regression), another cycle of RA was offered, then rh TSH was used (0.9 mg in two consecutive days). A total of 8 patients (1 follicular, 1 poorly differentiated and 6 papillary carcinomas) were treated. In a patient with pituitary adenoma the endogenous TSH did not rise after T 4 withdrawal, and rh TSH was administered before radioiodine therapy. Although an increase in iodine uptake was observed after RA therapy in the patient with poorly differentiated cancer, the tumor continued to progress and patient died of respiratory insufficiency. Four out of 7 patients had at least a partial response and were selected for re-treatment. Post-therapeutic whole body scan was similar using both protocols, but patients had fewer side effects with rh TSH. One patient who had no compressive symptoms during LT 4 withdrawal did present dysphagia and dysphonia secondary to tumor swelling, 6 hours after the last rh TSH injection. Glucocorticoid was administered and symptoms were reversed after 10 days. Conclusion: Radioiodine uptake using rh TSH was comparable to T 4 withdrawal and is particularly useful when endogenous TSH cannot rise. However, the possibility of compressive

  5. Equivalent doses in thyroid tissue and residual body dose from radioiodine treatment of benign and malignant disorders of the thyroid as determined under therapeutic conditions. Bestimmung der Aequivalentdosen von Schilddruesengewebe und Restkoerper bei der Radiojodtherapie benigner und maligner Schilddruesenerkrankungen unter Therapiebedingungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schad, K.

    1989-11-08

    The doses actually administered to patients undergoing radiotherapy for hyperthyroidism (104), autonomous adenoma (16) and goiter without functional anomaly (22) averaged 90, 165 and 100 Sv. Attempts were made to elucidate the causes of deviations between the predetermined dose and that actually administered, which occurred quite irrespective of whether a one-staged or split-dose regimen was used. Significant differences were occasionally also seen between the individual doses of fractionation regimens in respect of their uptake and effective half-life in the thyroidal tissue. It was calculated that the mean body dose remaining after each administration of radioactivity amounted to 0.6 mSv/MBq. In the majority of patients examined, clinical follow-up observations could be made for periods ranging from 6 to 41 months. Records were kept of all the results obtained. Further analyses were made to assess the mean residual body dose of carcinoma bearers subjected to wholebody radioiodine scintigraphy in the follow-up (14 patients) as well as of patients, in which secondary radioiodine treatment was carried out after thyroidectomy (59 patients). This was found to vary between 0.05 and 0.07 mSv/MBq. The significant discrepancies formerly determined for uptake rate and effective half-life between the individual sessions of one treatment course were confirmed by these examinations. (VHE).

  6. Radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases: Graves' disease - current aspects; Radioiodtherapie gutartiger Schilddruesenerkrankungen: Morbus Basedow - aktuelle Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, M.J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Bonn (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    Radioiodine therapy is a reliable and cost-effective alternative to medical treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism. Current recommendations favour a risk-adapted therapeutic procedure. Medical treatment is preferred in patients with a low risk of relapse which are characterised by the combination of female gender, age of onset above 40 years, thyroid volume below 40 ml and TSH-receptor antibodies below 10 U/l. Because of the poor remission rate with medical treatment in patients at less than 40 years of age, male gender, thyroid volume above 40 ml and TSH receptor antibodies above 10 U/l, it is suggested that definitive treatment with radioiodine or surgery should be considered soon after disease presentation. Analysis of cost-effectiveness clearly favour ablative radioiodine treatment. Ablative treatment is even more favourable in terms of early resumption of a normal life style of the hyperthyroid patient. Recent publications suggest further an adaptation of the tissue-absorbed dose to the pre-treatment thyroid volume using Marinelli's formula to achieve thyroid ablation with a single radioiodine treatment. (orig.)

  7. Procedure guidelines for radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.; Eschner, W.; Luster, M.; Reiners, C.; Schober, O.; Muenster Univ.

    2007-01-01

    The procedure guideline for radioiodine therapy (RIT) of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 3) is the counterpart to the procedure guideline for 131 I whole-body scintigraphy (version 3) and specify the interdisciplinary guideline for thyroid cancer of the Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft concerning the nuclear medicine part. Recommendation for ablative 131 I therapy is given for all differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) >1 cm. Regarding DTC ≤1 cm 131 I ablation may be helpful in an individual constellation. Preparation for 131 I ablation requires low iodine diet for two weeks and TSH stimulation by withdrawal of thyroid hormone medication or by use of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH). The advantages of rhTSH (no symptoms of hypothyroidism, lowerblood activity) and the advantages of endogenous TSH stimulation (necessary for 131 I-therapy in patients with metastases, higher sensitivity of 131 I whole-body scan) are discussed. In most centers standard activities are used for 131 I ablation. If pretherapeutic dosimetry is planned, the diagnostic administration of 131 I should not exceed 1-10MBq, alternative tracers are 123 I or 124 I. The recommendations for contraception and family planning are harmonized with the recommendation of ATA and ETA. Regarding the best possible protection of salivary glands the evidence is insufficient to recommend a specific setting. To minimize the risk of dental caries due to xerostomia patients should use preventive strategies for dental hygiene. (orig.)

  8. Dose selection for radioiodine therapy of borderline hyperthyroid patients according to thyroid uptake of 99mTc-pertechnetate: applicability to unifocal thyroid autonomy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Joe, Alexius Y.; Biermann, Kim; Brockmann, Holger; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer; Wissmeyer, Michael; Juengling, Freimut D.; Krause, Thomas M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of applying a previously described dose strategy based on 99m Tc-pertechnetate thyroid uptake under thyrotropin suppression (TcTU s ) to radioiodine therapy for unifocal thyroid autonomy. A total of 425 consecutive patients (302 females, 123 males; age 63.1±10.3 years) with unifocal thyroid autonomy were treated at three different centres with 131 I, using Marinelli's formula for calculation of three different absorbed dose schedules: 100-300 Gy to the total thyroid volume according to the pre-treatment TcTU s (n=146), 300 Gy to the nodule volume (n=137) and 400 Gy to the nodule volume (n=142). Successful elimination of functional thyroid autonomy with either euthyroidism or hypothyroidism occurred at a mean of 12 months after radioiodine therapy in 94.5% of patients receiving 100-300 Gy to the thyroid volume, in 89.8% of patients receiving 300 Gy to the nodule volume and in 94.4% receiving 400 Gy to the nodule volume. Reduction in thyroid volume was highest for the 100-300 Gy per thyroid and 400 Gy per nodule strategies (36±19% and 38±20%, respectively) and significantly lower for the 300 Gy per nodule strategy (28±16%; p s can be used independently of the scintigraphic pattern of functional autonomous tissue in the thyroid. (orig.)

  9. Thyroid Disorders (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body ... and released into the kid's bloodstream. Why Do Kids Get Thyroid Disease? In most cases, doctors and ...

  10. Radioiodine treatment effects of lacrimal glands function in patients with thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fard Esfahani, A.; Akhzari, F.; Mirshekarpour, H.; Saghari, M.; Izadyar, S.; Esmaili, J.; Fallahi, B.; Beiki, D.; Takavar, A.

    2005-01-01

    There is a limited number of case reports published in the past decade confirming the radio-iodine presence in the tear. These observations as well as reported cases of salivary and lacrimal gland dysfunction after radioiodine therapy stimulated investigators to clarify whether lacrimal gland function can be affected post-radioiodine therapy. Hence we planned a historical cohort study to evaluate this effect. Methods: we studied 100 eyes of 50 patients who were referred to the nuclear medicine department of Dr. Shariati hospital from 01.1383 to 02.1384 and had received high doses (accumulative dose: 100-450mCi) of 1-131 treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma with their latest admission at least 3 months previously. Dry eye symptoms (obtained via a standard questionnaire) and Schirmer I test results (mm/5min) of this group were compared with those of an unexposed group (1 00 eyes of 50 individuals) matched by sex and age. Cases with another known cause(s) of dry eye were not included in either group. Results: 51% of the exposed eyes and 50% of the unexposed ones revealed at least one of the dry eye symptoms in the questionnaire. Data analysis showed no significant difference between the number of symptoms of two groups, but 2 symptoms (burning, unrelated to light and rythema) were significantly higher in the exposed eyes. From 9 exposed eyes complaining of erythema, Schirmer test result was abnormal only in 2 (one patient). Also among the 10 eyes with burning symptom (unrelated to light) one patient (2 eyes) revealed abnormal Schirmer test result. The study also demonstrated a significantly lower wetting amount of the Schirmer paper in exposed group compared to others. In the patients undergone radio-iodine therapy, results were 0-4 mm in 21%, 5-9 mm in 20% and 10 mm or more in 59%. These results were seen in the unexposed group in 6%, 17% and 77%, respectively. File review of the 21 exposed eyes with 0-4 mm Schirmer test results revealed presence of the

  11. The disease related deaths due to differentiated thyroid carcinomas treated multidisciplinary, including radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovic, Lj.; Kermeci, K.; Malesevic, M.; Mihailovic, J.; Srbovan, D.; Popadic, S.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To analyse the disease related deaths of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) patients treated multidisciplinary, including radioiodine. Patients and Methods: 364 DTC patients were treated from 1977 to the end of 2000. All patients were operated, treated by radioiodine and by hormonal therapy, external radiotherapy was applied in 22 and chemotherapy in 6 of them. 54 treated patients were lost from the follow-up. The course of disease and outcomes are known in 310 patients, among them 53 patients died. The disease related deaths occurred in 33 (10.6%) patients. Results: Between 33 patients whose deaths were in relation with DTC the disease progression was the cause of deaths in 30 (9.7% of treated) patients (the locoregional disease in 10, distant metastases /M1/ in 17, locoregional disease + M1 in 3 patients). From the late complications of treatment died 3 (1%) patients (all of them were in complete remission to the deaths). The mean survival of these 33 patients from the diagnosis to the end of the life was 6.9 years, median 5.1 years, range 2 months to 23.9 years. The five years survived 54.6% of them, 10 years 21.2% and more than 20 years 3%. M1 had 72.7% of patients (lung and/or bone M1 were present in 91.7% of them), N1 had 69.7% and in 30.3% local tumor was T4. In relation to all treated patients died 14.6% men compared to 9% women (p<0.05), 15.7% of patients 45 years old or older compared to 4.4% of younger then 45 years (p<0.001) and 21.3% of patients with follicular type of DTC compared to 7.3% with papillary type (p<0.001). From all patients without radioiodine accumulation in tumor tissue died 60%. Conclusion: The DTC related deaths were the consequence of M1 and less frequently the result of locoregional disease (T4 and/or N1) in about 1/10 of all treated patients. The deaths as result of the late complications of treatment were exceptional. The deaths were significantly more frequent between males, patients 45 years old or older and patients

  12. Autonomous Functioning Thyroid Nodule in a 4-year-old Male Child Treated with Radioiodine (I-131)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khare, Abhishek; Bhutani, Puneet; Chauhan, Suneel

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous functioning thyroid nodules that cause toxic manifestations (toxic adenomas) are benign monoclonal tumors characterized by their capacity to grow and produce thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) autonomously, i.e. in the absence of thyrotropin thyroid stimulating hormone. Toxic adenomas are a rare presentation of hyperthyroidism in the pediatric population. Radioiodine (I-131) has been widely used for therapy of patients with toxic adenomas and is now accepted as a safe and effective treatment even in the pediatric age group. The authors here present a case of a 4-year-old boy with a solitary hyperfunctioning thyroid nodule, who was successfully treated with radioiodine (I-131) and is presently on follow-up

  13. Disguised Thyroid Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, John M.; Catz, Boris

    1965-01-01

    In six cases of hyperthyroidism and two of chronic thyroiditis herein described, the initial features of the diseases were misinterpreted as attributable to other kinds of illness such as myocardial infarction, gastrointestinal malignant disease, malabsorption syndrome, psychosis, simple exophthalmos and endemic goiter. The characteristic signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism (in six patients) and chronic thyroiditis (in two patients) were present at the outset but were not identified. Intensive questioning and alertness were required to elicit these characteristics. The symptoms improved or disappeared after the true disease was controlled. In the studies of these cases, the usefulness of a number of laboratory tests was illustrated—thyroid suppression studies, 4 to 6-hour and 24-hour radioactive iodine uptake, T3 uptake by the red cells and determinations of 24-hour urine creatine, antithyroglobulin antibody titer and long-acting thyroid stimulating hormone. The manifestations of thyroid diseases are many and varied. The term “masked hyperthyroidism” may in part be a reflection of the “masked physician” unless he uses his clinical detective abilities. PMID:14347981

  14. Diet low in iodine as well as goitrogens (LILGD) enhanced radioiodine (I-131) uptake in treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaro, Erik; Gebre-Medhin, Mehari; Lindahl, Sten-AAke

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Low iodine diet (LID) is accepted as an adjuvant to post-thyroidectomy radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer since it is held to enhance radioiodine uptake in thyroid remnants and thyroid cancer tissue. However, in the few clinical investigations performed only an indirect and weak evidence of a positive effect of the LID has been demonstrated. Also we had discouraging experience in the application of a strict LID using the same design as in the present study. We therefore decided to investigate the effect of a diet low in iodine as well as in goitrogens (LILGD). Methods: Six patients with differentiated thyroid cancer entered the study and they were their own control. After thyroid hormone withdrawal (TSH > 30 m U/L) and on regular diet a diagnostic whole body scan was performed 24 h after administration of 50 MBq (1,4 mCi) 123 I. The day following diagnostic scan the patients were put on LILGD for 4 days prior and two days after radioiodine therapy. In LILGD beverages, fruits and vegetables containing flavonoids, glucosinolates, cyanides and thiocyanates were avoided and spices and smoking prohibited. Therapeutic radioiodine was administered one week after diagnostic procedures and in the morning after over-night fasting with an activity range of 3,7-5,4 GBq (100 -150 mCi) 131 I. A 24-h therapeutic whole body scan and calculations of percentage uptake U(24) were performed. Diagnostic (basal) D U(24)% and subsequent therapeutic T U(24)% uptake were compared and expressed as therapeutic/diagnostic uptake ratios T/D U(24). Results: A significant increase in therapeutic versus diagnostic uptake T/D U(24) was observed (mean 2,53, median 2,30, range 1,40 - 4,46, p 131 I uptake in radio-ablation of normal and thyroid cancer tissue. (author)

  15. Pretreatment with betamethasone of patients with Graves' disease given radioiodine therapy: thyroid autoantibody responses and outcome of therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamstedt, A.; Karlsson, A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of betamethasone on thyroid autoantibody responses and outcome of radioiodine therapy were determined over a period of 1 yr in a prospective randomized study of 40 patients with Graves' disease. Twenty patients were given placebo tablets, and 20 patients were treated with betamethasone from 3 weeks before until 4 weeks after 131 I therapy. At the time of inclusion in the study, the mean serum concentrations of TSH receptor antibodies, thyroid peroxidase antibodies, and thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) were increased in both groups. Three weeks of treatment with betamethasone reduced the thyroid peroxidase antibody and TgAb titers as well as the serum concentrations of thyroid hormones. A decrease in the TSH receptor antibody level was not statistically significant. After radioiodine therapy, transient increases in thyroid autoantibody levels were observed. The titers of the different antibodies generally changed in parallel. In some patients a detectable level of a given antibody was found only after the radioiodine treatment, and in two cases, TgAb did not appear at all, although the two other antibodies increased temporarily. Betamethasone delayed, but did not abolish, the 131 I-induced antibody peaks. Betamethasone also caused a reduction in the total serum immunoglobulin G, a reduction which persisted throughout the study period. When the study ended, 17 patients given placebo and 9 patients given betamethasone were receiving replacement therapy due to the development of hypothyroidism. These patients at this point in time had lower antibody levels than those not requiring T4. The results of this study demonstrate that betamethasone reduces and modifies the thyroid autoantibody responses as well as the outcome of radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease

  16. Sensitive TSH assay in the assessment of thyroid function and its value in the follow-up of hyperthyroidism treated with radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masjhur, J.S.; Ilyas, R.A.M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper confirms the value of ''sensitive'' TSH assay in thyroid function assessment of untreated subjects and those who have undergone radioiodine treatment for hyperthyroidism from 120 patients. (ELC). 3 tabs.; 1 fig.; 7 refs

  17. The influence of antithyroid drugs on the results of radioiodine therapy of thyroid functional autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valuevich, V.V.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the given research was the estimation of the influence of antithyroid medication on efficiency of radioiodine therapy (RIT) of nonimmune hyperthyroidism in patients with thyroid functional autonomy (FA). 100 patients with various clinical variants of thyroid FA were included in research and received treatment with radioactive iodine. From surveyed 2 groups of patients were formed. The first group consisted from 50 persons initially accepting during 4 months (2.5; 6) antithyroid drugs (ATD) which cancellation had been made, as a rule, 2 day prior to RIT, and the second included 50 persons not accepting ATD neither up to nor after RIT. 9 elderly and multimorbid patients from the first group continued to accept ATD within several months after RIT. Carbimazole (n=45) or methimazole (n=5) in a doze of 10 mg (5; 10) were used as antithyroid drugs. In 4 months (4; 5) after RIT the successful result (euthyrosis or hypothyroidism) was achieved in 48 (96%) patients accepting ATD, and in 47 (94%) patients who were not accepting last. The conclusion that antithyroid medication does not influence on efficiency of RIT of thyroid FA is made. It is revealed that frequency of hypothyroidism after RIT in patients of the first group was higher (36%), than in patients of the second group (20%). (authors)

  18. The superiority and benefits of whole body imaging after radioiodine -131 therapy over radioiodine 131 diagnostic imaging in management of thyroid carcinomas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleid, M A [Al-Mostansyria university, college of medicine P.O.Box 14132, Baghdad, (Iraq)

    1995-10-01

    A comparison between diagnostic and post therapeutic radioiodine imaging methods utilized in detection of thyroid metastases in 34 patients with well differentiated thyroid cancer was performed. The study revealed that the differences in detection on neck activity only between the two methods for papillary and follicular thyroid cancer were 35% and 27% respectively. While the overall detection percentages in both papillary and follicular thyroid cancers cases were 23% in diagnostic and 76% in post therapy scintigrams and the detection difference between the methods was 53% when all lesions throughout the body were seen on scintigram for only follicular thyroid cancer cases were counted, the detection percentage was increased up to 109%. It is clear that post therapeutic scans visualize an additional site activity not shown in diagnostic scans. There fore, post therapeutic imaging method is far superior to diagnostic imaging method and highly sensitive in visualization of thyroid metastases. On the other hand, this research also achieves many scientific and financial benefits. Therefore. This method should be adopted in management and follow up of well differentiated malignancies. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. The superiority and benefits of whole body imaging after radioiodine -131 therapy over radioiodine 131 diagnostic imaging in management of thyroid carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleid, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    A comparison between diagnostic and post therapeutic radioiodine imaging methods utilized in detection of thyroid metastases in 34 patients with well differentiated thyroid cancer was performed. The study revealed that the differences in detection on neck activity only between the two methods for papillary and follicular thyroid cancer were 35% and 27% respectively. While the overall detection percentages in both papillary and follicular thyroid cancers cases were 23% in diagnostic and 76% in post therapy scintigrams and the detection difference between the methods was 53% when all lesions throughout the body were seen on scintigram for only follicular thyroid cancer cases were counted, the detection percentage was increased up to 109%. It is clear that post therapeutic scans visualize an additional site activity not shown in diagnostic scans. There fore, post therapeutic imaging method is far superior to diagnostic imaging method and highly sensitive in visualization of thyroid metastases. On the other hand, this research also achieves many scientific and financial benefits. Therefore. This method should be adopted in management and follow up of well differentiated malignancies. 2 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Influence of treatment with radioiodine and propylthiouracil on thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bech, K.; Nistrup Madsen, S.

    1980-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins (TSAb) were measured in fifty-four patients with Graves' disease before treatment with either radioiodine (seventeen patients) or propylthiouracil (PTU) (thirty-seven patients) and followed during treatment. After radioiodine TSAb increased to levels exceeding pretreatment values, and became detectable in three of six originally TSAb negative patients. In most patients TSAb decreased during treatment with PTU, and became undetectable after a mean of 12 months in patients above 40 years, and after a mean of 6 months in patients below 40 years. In order to eliminate the presumed causative agent in Graves' disease, antithyroid treatment should be at least 18 months in patients above 40 years, and at least 12 months in patients below 40 years of age. In twenty-nine patients TSAb were measured at cessation of 2 years antithyroid drug therapy. Ten patients were TSAb positive and all except one relapsed. Five of nineteen TSAb negative patients relapsed. Although TSAb positivity predicts relapse, it is not an ideal index of prognosis after antithyroid therapy. (author)

  1. Thyroid disorders in India: An epidemiological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambika Gopalakrishnan Unnikrishnan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid diseases are common worldwide. In India too, there is a significant burden of thyroid diseases. According to a projection from various studies on thyroid disease, it has been estimated that about 42 million people in India suffer from thyroid diseases. This review will focus on the epidemiology of five common thyroid diseases in India: (1 hypothyroidism, (2 hyperthyroidism, (3 goiter and iodine deficiency disorders, (4 Hashimoto′s thyroiditis, and (5 thyroid cancer. This review will also briefly cover the exciting work that is in progress to ascertain the normal reference range of thyroid hormones in India, especially in pregnancy and children.

  2. Dose concepts and dosimetry for radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockisch, A.; Brandt-Mainz, K.; Goerges, R.

    1997-01-01

    Dose planning prior to radioiodine therapy of benign thyroidal disease is usually based on macrodosimetry. The paper shows that this assumption is acceptable. The common concepts for dose planning are given. The following target doses are nowadays widely accepted: 150 Gy for euthyroid goiter, 400 Gy for toxic adenoma, 150 Gy for disserminated autonomy, 200 Gy for hyperthyroid Grave's disease if posttherapeutic euthyroidism is intended, and 250 (to 300) Gy if the risk of recurrency is to be minimized ('ablative' concept). Finally, a surveyfis given concerning the precision in which the parameters relevant for the dose calcultion can be determined. For realistic favourable conditions, the dose can be determined with an accuracy of better than ±25%. (orig.) [de

  3. Differentiated thyroid cancer. New concept of radioiodine ablation; Differenziertes Schilddruesenkarzinom. Fortschritte bei der Radioiodablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Kobe, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Koeln (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Universitaetsklinikum Koeln (Germany), Zentrum fuer Integrierte Onkologie Koeln-Bonn; Luster, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Ulm (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2010-12-15

    Ablative radioiodine therapy is the treatment of choice in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, the only exception being the unifocal, very small papillary thyroid cancer. The TSH-stimulation can be achieved by a waiting period for 2-3 weeks after thyroidectomy without medication or by the use of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH). Both options lead to high success rates. 'Single dose cure' using activities between 1.85 and 3.7 GBq {sup 131}I is standard. Since 2010 rhTSH is approved by the EMA for the indications pT1-4, N0-1, cM0. Survey studies did not find any inferiority of ablation with rhTSH or iatrogenic hypothyroidism in the high-risk patient group. Renal clearance is not reduced after rhTSH administration, thus the {sup 131}I blood dose and the whole body doses are lower in patients under rhTSH. Comparing identical {sup 131}I activities after endogeneous or exogeneous stimulation, rhTSH will minimize the acute adverse effects of {sup 131}I. A short-term withdrawal of levothyroxine some days before rhTSH-injection lowers the iodine plasma level, which may be advantageous for the ablation success if lower 131I activities are used. A rhTSH-based diagnostic {sup 131}I whole-body scintigraphy 3-6 months after ablation is standard for therapy control. At this time, the rhTSH-stimulated thyroglobulin-level is essential for a personalized risk stratification. Tg-measurements by a second generation assay should be used for follow-up care. Metaanalyses have shown that radioiodine ablation lowers the mortality rate, the risk of locoregional recurrences and the risk of late metastasizing. Therefore, ablation has shown a clear benefit. (orig.)

  4. Foetal and neonatal thyroid disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radetti, G; Zavallone, A; Gentili, L; Beck-Peccoz, P; Bona, G

    2002-10-01

    Thyroid hormones have been shown to be absolutely necessary for early brain development. During pregnancy, both maternal and foetal thyroid hormones contribute to foetal brain development and maternal supply explains why most of the athyreotic newborns usually do not show any signs of hypothyroidism at birth. Foetal and/or neonatal hypothyroidism is a rare disorder. Its incidence, as indicated by neonatal screening, is about 1:4000. Abnormal thyroid development (i.e. agenesia, ectopic gland, hypoplasia) or inborn errors in thyroid hormone biosynthesis are the most common causes of permanent congenital hypothyroidism. Recent studies reported that mutations involving Thyroid Transcriptor Factors (TTF) such as TTF-1, TTF-2, PAX-8 play an important role in altered foetal thyroid development. Deficiency of transcriptor factor (Pit-1, Prop-1, LHX-3) both in mother and in the foetus represents another rare cause of foetal hypothyroidism. At birth clinical picture may be not always so obvious and typical signs appear only after several weeks but a delayed diagnosis could have severe consequences consisting of delayed physical and mental development. Even if substitutive therapy is promptly started some learning difficulties might still arise suggesting that intrauterine adequate levels of thyroid hormones are absolutely necessary for a normal neurological development. Placental transfer of maternal antithyroid antibodies inhibiting fetal thyroid function can cause transient hypothyroidism at birth. If the mother with thyroid autoimmune disease is also hypothyroid during pregnancy and she doesn't receive substitutive therapy, a worse neurological outcome may be expected for her foetus. Foetal and/or neonatal hyperthyroidism is a rare condition and its incidence has been estimated around 1:4000-40000, according to various authors. The most common causes are maternal thyroid autoimmune disorders, such as Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Rarer non autoimmune causes

  5. Radioiodine therapy effect on lacrimal gland function in patients with thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fard-Esfahani, A.; Mirshekarpour, H.; Fallahi, B.; Eftekhari, M.; Takavar, A.; Beiki, D.; Ansari-Gilani, K.; Saghari, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Objectives: There is a limited number of case reports published in the past decade confirming the radioiodine presence in the tear. These observations as well as reported cases of salivary and lacrimal gland dysfunction after radioiodine therapy stimulated investigators to clarify whether lacrimal gland function can be affected postradioiodine therapy. Hence we planned a historical cohort study. Methods: We studied 100 eyes of 50 patients who had received high doses (accumulative dose: 100-450mCi) of I-131 (exposed group) for treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma with their latest admission at least 3 months ago. Dry eye symptoms (obtained via a standard questionnaire) and Schirmer I test results (mm/5 min) of this exposed group were compared with those of an unexposed group (100 eyes of 50 individuals) matched by sex and age. Cases with any other known cause(s) of dry eye were not included in either group. Results: The study demonstrated a significantly lower wetting amount of the Schirmer paper in exposed group compared to unexposed one. In the group of patients who have undergone radio-iodine therapy, results were 0-4 mm in 21%, 5-9 mm in 20% and 10 mm or more in 59%. These results were seen in the unexposed group in 6%, 17% and 77% respectively. In evaluating the symptoms, 51% of the exposed eyes and 50% of the unexposed ones revealed at least one of the mentioned dry eye symptoms in the questionnaire. Data analysis showed no significant difference between the number of symptoms of the two groups, but 2 symptoms (burning, unrelated to light and erythema) were significantly higher in the exposed eyes. From 9 exposed eyes complaining of erythema, Schirmer test result was abnormal only in 2 (one patient). Also among the 10 eyes with burning symptom (unrelated to light) one patient (2 eyes) revealed abnormal Schirmer test result. Conclusion: Long-term reduction in the tear secretion from major and/or minor lacrimal glands is seen after high

  6. Influence of thyroid metabolism on radioiodine therapy in Graves` disease; Einfluss der Stoffwechsellage auf die Radioiodtherapie beim Morbus Basedow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerner, A.R. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizin; Weckesser, M.; Boy, C.; Schmidt, D.; Langen, K.J.; Mueller-Gaertner, H.W. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik]|[Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizin

    1997-12-01

    Radioiodine therapy is one of two definitive methods of treatment in Graves` disease beside near-total thyreoidectomy. Simple strategies like optimization of thyroid metabolism help to improve efficacy in radioiodine therapy thus lowering applied radioiodine doses, radiation exposure to the patient and to the environment and avoiding multiple vain therapeutic efforts. These strategies are likely to reduce costs at the same time. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Radioiodtherapie ist eine der beiden definitiven Therapiemethoden bei Morbus Basedow neben der nahezu totalen Thyreoidektomie. Ziel ist es, mit einfachen Methoden wie der optimalen Einstellung der Stoffwechsellage die Effizienz der Radioiodtherapie zu optimieren im Hinblick auf eine Reduktion der einzusetzenden Aktivitaet, der Gesamtstrahlenexposition fuer Patient und Umwelt und durch Vermeidung mehrfacher, vergeblicher therapeutischer Ansaetze. Diese Optimierung traegt auch zur Reduktion der Gesamtkrankheitskosten bei. (orig.)

  7. Whether antithyroid drugs influence on the outcome of radioiodine therapy of thyroid functional autonomy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valuyevich, Viktar V.; Danilova, Larisa I.; Kaiser, Klaus P.; Ostwald-Lenz, Elisabeth; Wieler, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of research was an estimation of the influence of antithyroid medication on efficiency of radioiodine therapy (RIT) in patients with thyroid functional autonomy (FA). 100 patients with various clinical variants of FA were included in research and received treatment with radioiodine. From them uni-focal autonomy (UFA) was diagnosed in 65 person, multifocal (MFA) in 14 and disseminated (DA) in 21. Among the patients included in research 8 had relapse of hyperthyroidism after initial operative treatment and 1 after RIT. The data in work are submitted as a median (1-st and 3-rd quartiles). The age of surveyed was 65.5 (54; 72.5), from them 63 persons were a female, 37 were a male. From surveyed 2 groups of patients were formed. The first group consisted from 50 person, initially accepting during 4 months (2.5; 6) antithyroid drugs (ATD) which cancellation had been made as a rule 2 day prior to RIT, and the second one included 50 person, not accepting ATD neither up to nor after RIT. 9 elderly and multi morbid patients from the first group continued to accept ATD within several months after RIT. Carbimazole (n=45) or methimazole (n=5) in a dose of 10 mg (5; 10) were used as ATD. Therapeutic activity of 131 I was calculated by means of Marinelli's formula. The target dose for UFA has made 400 Gy, for MFA and DA - 150 Gy. For calculation of thyroid uptake 24-hour radioiodine test was carried 2-3 day prior to RIT. Used activity of I-131 have made from 4.08 up to 58.89 mCi. Duration of inpatient stay has made 3 days (2; 5). In 4 months (4; 5) after RIT the successful result (euthyroidism or hypothyroidism) has been achieved in 48 (96 %) patients accepting ATD, and in 47 (94 %) patients who were not accepting last. Conclusion: The conclusion that antithyroid medication does not influence on the efficiency of RIT of FA was made. It was revealed that frequency of hypothyroidism after RIT in patients of the first group was higher (36 %) than in patients

  8. Lipoprotein(a Levels in Thyroid Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pop-Radu Cristina Corina

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the serum levels of Lipoprotein(a [Lp(a] in subjects with thyroid disorders, as well as to investigate their relationship with lipid profile and the markers of thyroid function and autoimmunity, admitting that elevated Lp(a levels and dyslipidemia caused by thyroid disorders synergistically increased the atherogenic process.

  9. New Molecular Targeted Therapy and Redifferentiation Therapy for Radioiodine-Refractory Advanced Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Pun Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the majority of papillary thyroid carcinoma could be successfully managed by complete surgical resection alone or resection followed by radioiodine ablation, a small proportion of patients may develop radioiodine-refractory progressive disease which is not amenable to surgery, local ablative treatment or other treatment modalities. The use of FDG-PET/CT scan for persistent/recurrent disease has improved the accuracy of restaging as well as cancer prognostication. Given that patients with RAI-refractory disease tend to do significantly worse than those with radioiodine-avid or non-progressive disease, an increasing number of phase I and II studies have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of new molecular targeted drugs such as the tyrosine kinase inhibitors and redifferentiation drugs. The overall response rate of these drugs ranged between 0–53%, depending on whether the patients had been previously treated with these drugs, performance status and extent of disease. However, drug toxicity remains a major concern in administration of target therapies. Nevertheless, there are also ongoing phase III studies evaluating the efficacy of these new drugs. The aim of the review was to summarize and discuss the results of these targeted drugs and redifferentiation agents for patients with progressive, radioiodine-refractory papillary thyroid carcinoma.

  10. Evil radioactivity. Subjective perception of radioactivity in patients with thyroid disease prior to treatment with radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenberg, L.S.; Beyer, T.; Mueller, S.P.; Goerges, R.; Bockisch, A.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: We assess the perspective of patients with thyroid disease towards radiation and radioactivity by means of a cultural-anthropological approach based on qualitative measures and quantitative scores. From the interviews with the patients we evaluate as to how much radioactivity is accepted as an abstract term or as a benefit within the medical context. Patients, methods: 68 patients with autonomously functioning thyroid lesions (35 women, 33 men, 32-81 years) were included in this study. All patients were interviewed in an open dialogue with the principal investigator. Patients were asked to describe their attitude towards radioactivity in general and towards radioiodine therapy in particular. Patients were asked to use a scoring system (1=positive, 5=negative) to quantify their attitudes. Results: The responses of all patients towards radioactivity in general were heterogeneous with most responses reflecting a negative perception. Many patients expressed their associated fears about atomic energy, malignant diseases and radioactive contamination. The scoring system reflected a mostly negative opinion base. However, patients became more positive once they assumed an immediate benefit of radioactivity for the treatment of their own disease (p=0.01). Conclusions: Knowing about significant differences in patient's perception about radioactivity in general or in the clinical context may help to optimise and tailor the initial, pre-therapeutical interview towards the patient. (orig.)

  11. Cytogenetic biodosimetry and dose-rate effect after radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvostunov, Igor K. [Russian Ministry of Health Care, A.F. Tsyb Medical Radiological Research Center, Branch of the National Medical Research Radiological Centre, Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation); Nagasaki University, Department of Radiation Molecular Epidemiology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki (Japan); Saenko, Vladimir A.; Yamashita, Shunichi [Nagasaki University, Department of Radiation Molecular Epidemiology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki (Japan); Krylov, Valeri; Rodichev, Andrei [Russian Ministry of Health Care, A.F. Tsyb Medical Radiological Research Center, Branch of the National Medical Research Radiological Centre, Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation)

    2017-08-15

    This study set out to investigate chromosomal damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of thyroid cancer patients receiving {sup 131}I for thyroid remnant ablation or treatment of metastatic disease. The observed chromosomal damage was further converted to the estimates of whole-body dose to project the adverse side effects. Chromosomal aberration analysis was performed in 24 patients treated for the first time or after multiple courses. Blood samples were collected before treatment and 3 or 4 days after administration of 2-4 GBq of {sup 131}I. Both conventional cytogenetic and chromosome 2, 4 and 12 painting assays were used. To account for dose-rate effect, a dose-protraction factor was applied to calculate the whole-body dose. The mean dose was 0.62 Gy (95% CI: 0.44-0.77 Gy) in the subgroup of patients treated one time and 0.67 Gy (95% CI: 0.03-1.00 Gy) in re-treated patients. These dose estimates are about 1.7-fold higher than those disregarding the effect of exposure duration. In re-treated patients, the neglected dose-rate effect can result in underestimation of the cumulative whole-body dose by the factor ranging from 2.6 to 6.8. Elevated frequency of chromosomal aberrations observed in re-treated patients before radioiodine therapy allows estimation of a cumulative dose received from all previous treatments. (orig.)

  12. Guidelines on radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Impact on clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biermann, M.; Pixberg, M.K.; Schober, O.; Doerr, U.; Dietlein, M.; Schlemmer, H.; Grimm, J.; Zajic, T.; Nestle, U.; Ladner, S.; Sepehr-Rezai, S.; Rosenbaum, S.; Puskas, C.; Fostitsch, P.; Heinecke, A.; Schuck, A.; Willich, N.; Schmid, K.W.; Dralle, H.

    2005-01-01

    Aim: For the examination of the impact on clinical practice of the guidelines for differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), treatment data from the ongoing multicenter study differentiated thyroid carcinoma (MSDS) were analyzed. Patients, methods: patients were randomized to adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (RTx) or no RTx in addition to standard therapy in TNM stages pT4 pNO/1/x MO/x (UICC, 5 th ed. 1997). All patients were to receive the same treatment regimen consisting of thyroidectomy, ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT), and a diagnostic 131 I whole-body scintigraphy (WBS) 3-4 months after RIT. Results: Of 339 eligible patients enrolled between January 2000 and March 2004, 273 could be analyzed. Guideline recommendations by the German Society for Nuclear Medicine from 1999 and 1992 were complied with within 28% and 82% with regard to the interval between surgery and RIT (4 vs. 4-6 weeks), in 33% and 84% with regard to 131 I activity for RIT (1-3 vs. 1-4 GBq; ±10%), and in 16% and 60% with regard to 131 I activity for WBS (100-300 vs. 100-400 MBq; ±10%). Conclusions: the 1999 guideline revision appears to have had little impact on clinical practice. Further follow-up will reveal if guideline compliance had an effect on outcomes. (orig.)

  13. Evil radioactivity. Subjective perception of radioactivity in patients with thyroid disease prior to treatment with radioiodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenberg, L.S. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Radiologisch-Nuklearmedizinische Gemeinschaftspraxis, Grevenbroich (Germany); Beyer, T.; Mueller, S.P.; Goerges, R.; Bockisch, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Hopfenbach, A. [Radiologisch-Nuklearmedizinische Gemeinschaftspraxis, Grevenbroich (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Aim: We assess the perspective of patients with thyroid disease towards radiation and radioactivity by means of a cultural-anthropological approach based on qualitative measures and quantitative scores. From the interviews with the patients we evaluate as to how much radioactivity is accepted as an abstract term or as a benefit within the medical context. Patients, methods: 68 patients with autonomously functioning thyroid lesions (35 women, 33 men, 32-81 years) were included in this study. All patients were interviewed in an open dialogue with the principal investigator. Patients were asked to describe their attitude towards radioactivity in general and towards radioiodine therapy in particular. Patients were asked to use a scoring system (1=positive, 5=negative) to quantify their attitudes. Results: The responses of all patients towards radioactivity in general were heterogeneous with most responses reflecting a negative perception. Many patients expressed their associated fears about atomic energy, malignant diseases and radioactive contamination. The scoring system reflected a mostly negative opinion base. However, patients became more positive once they assumed an immediate benefit of radioactivity for the treatment of their own disease (p=0.01). Conclusions: Knowing about significant differences in patient's perception about radioactivity in general or in the clinical context may help to optimise and tailor the initial, pre-therapeutical interview towards the patient. (orig.)

  14. [Postoperative radioiodine ablation in patients with low risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Juan J; Grande, Enrique; Iglesias, Pedro

    2015-01-06

    Most patients with newly diagnosed differentiated thyroid carcinoma have tumors with low risk of mortality and recurrence. Standard therapy has been total or near total thyroidectomy followed by postoperative radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA). Although RRA provides benefits, current clinical guidelines do not recommend it universally, since an increase in disease-free survival or a decrease in mortality in low risk patients has not been demonstrated so far. Advancements in our understanding of the biological behavior of thyroid cancer have been translated into the clinic in a personalized approach to the patients based on their individual risk of recurrence and mortality. Current evidence suggests that RRA is not indicated in most low-risk patients, especially those with papillary carcinomas smaller than 1cm, without extrathyroidal extension, unfavorable histology, lymph node involvement or distant metastases. Follow-up of these patients with serial measurements of serum thyroglobulin and neck ultrasound is adequate. Careful evaluation of all risk factors of clinical relevance will allow a more realistic assessment of each individual patient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Radioiodine dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J R [Biomedical Research Branch, Health Sciences Div., Chalk River, Ontario (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Lab.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of individual doses for radiation protection and for risk assessment purposes from a radioiodine intake requires a knowledge of the distribution and retention of the radioiodine (primarily in the thyroid), and a knowledge of the average energy deposited in each organ of interest per radioactive decay (S-factors). This paper reviews a model for distribution and retention used previously for adults, and extends the model to include all ages. The extended model also includes the effects of stable iodine intakes on radioiodine uptakes explicitly. Included in the paper is a tabulation of existing adult S-factors for selected radioiodines and the extension of S-factors for the thyroid to all age groups. Finally, doses per unit intake are calculated and tabulated. A discussion and some calculations of the effects of stable iodine intake on committed doses are given.

  16. Radioiodine dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of individual doses for radiation protection and for risk assessment purposes from a radioiodine intake requires a knowledge of the distribution and retention of the radioiodine (primarily in the thyroid), and a knowledge of the average energy deposited in each organ of interest per radioactive decay (S-factors). This paper reviews a model for distribution and retention used previously for adults, and extends the model to include all ages. The extended model also includes the effects of stable iodine intakes on radioiodine uptakes explicitly. Included in the paper is a tabulation of existing adult S-factors for selected radioiodines and the extension of S-factors for the thyroid to all age groups. Finally, doses per unit intake are calculated and tabulated. A discussion and some calculations of the effects of stable iodine intake on committed doses are given. (author)

  17. Dose selection for radioiodine therapy of borderline hyperthyroid patients according to thyroid uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate: applicability to unifocal thyroid autonomy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Joe, Alexius Y. [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Biermann, Kim; Brockmann, Holger; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Wissmeyer, Michael [Inselspital Bern, Department of Nuclear Medicine, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Juengling, Freimut D.; Krause, Thomas M. [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Inselspital Bern, Department of Nuclear Medicine, 3010 Bern (Switzerland)

    2006-05-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of applying a previously described dose strategy based on {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate thyroid uptake under thyrotropin suppression (TcTU{sub s}) to radioiodine therapy for unifocal thyroid autonomy. A total of 425 consecutive patients (302 females, 123 males; age 63.1{+-}10.3 years) with unifocal thyroid autonomy were treated at three different centres with {sup 131}I, using Marinelli's formula for calculation of three different absorbed dose schedules: 100-300 Gy to the total thyroid volume according to the pre-treatment TcTU{sub s} (n=146), 300 Gy to the nodule volume (n=137) and 400 Gy to the nodule volume (n=142). Successful elimination of functional thyroid autonomy with either euthyroidism or hypothyroidism occurred at a mean of 12 months after radioiodine therapy in 94.5% of patients receiving 100-300 Gy to the thyroid volume, in 89.8% of patients receiving 300 Gy to the nodule volume and in 94.4% receiving 400 Gy to the nodule volume. Reduction in thyroid volume was highest for the 100-300 Gy per thyroid and 400 Gy per nodule strategies (36{+-}19% and 38{+-}20%, respectively) and significantly lower for the 300 Gy per nodule strategy (28{+-}16%; p<0.01). A dose strategy based on the TcTU{sub s} can be used independently of the scintigraphic pattern of functional autonomous tissue in the thyroid. (orig.)

  18. Radioiodine uptake of undifferentiated thyroid cancer cells by adenovirus-mediated Na+/ I- symporter gene transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Y.; Lee, Y. J.; Shin, J. H.; Oh, H. J.; Chung, J. K.; Lee, M. C.; Cho, B. Y. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Seoul National, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K. H. [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    To increase radioiodine uptake on undifferentiated thyroid cancer cell (ARO cells) by adenovirus-mediated human Na+/I- symporter (hNIS) gene transfer. Recombinant adenovirus Ad-hNIS was manufactured successfully. After transfecting Ad-hNIS on ARO cells, in vitro I-125 uptake and efflux studies were performed. For in vivo studies, 1.510'8 p.f.u. (50 1) of Ad-hNIS was injected into xenograft ARO tumors on the R thigh of BALB/c nu/nu mice (n=12), and same amount of normal saline was injected into xenograft ARO tumors on the L thigh. Two, 3, 4 and 6 days after intratumoral injection of Ad-hNIS, I-131 images (3 mice per day) were taken and xenograft tumors on both thighs were all excised. Total RNA was extracted from each tumor tissue and RT-PCR was performed to confirm the hNIS expression of Ad-hNIS injected xenograft ARO tumors. I-125 uptake of Ad-hNIS transfected ARO cells was increased up to 233 folds at 120 minutes in vitro. I-125 efflux study revealed rapid washout of I-125 from Ad-hNIS transfected ARO cells. On dynamic image, I-131 uptake of Ad-hNIS injected ARO tumor was continuously increased until 60 minutes. Mean count ratios of xenograft ARO tumors (R/L) of 60 minutes I-131 images at 2, 3, 4 and 6 days after Ad-hNIS injection were 2.85, 2.54, 2.31, and 2.18, each. On RT-PCR, hNIS expression of Ad-hNIS transfected ARO xenograft tumors was confirmed. Radioiodine uptake was successfully increased in ARO cells by adenovirus-mediated hNIs gene transfer both in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Vitiligo and Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enke Baldini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo represents the most common cause of acquired skin, hair, and oral depigmentation, affecting 0.5–1% of the population worldwide. It is clinically characterized by the appearance of disfiguring circumscribed skin macules following melanocyte destruction by autoreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Patients affected by vitiligo usually show a poorer quality of life and are more likely to suffer from depressive symptoms, particularly evident in dark-skinned individuals. Although vitiligo is a non-fatal disease, exposure of affected skin to UV light increases the chance of skin irritation and predisposes to skin cancer. In addition, vitiligo has been associated with other rare systemic disorders due to the presence of melanocytes in other body districts, such as in eyes, auditory, nervous, and cardiac tissues, where melanocytes are thought to have roles different from that played in the skin. Several pathogenetic models have been proposed to explain vitiligo onset and progression, but clinical and experimental findings point mainly to the autoimmune hypothesis as the most qualified one. In this context, it is of relevance the strong association of vitiligo with other autoimmune diseases, in particular with autoimmune thyroid disorders, such as Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves’ disease. In this review, after a brief overview of vitiligo and its pathogenesis, we will describe the clinical association between vitiligo and autoimmune thyroid disorders and discuss the possible underlying molecular mechanism(s.

  20. The Change of the Salivary Function after the High Dose Radioiodine Treatment in the patients with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S. M.; Hong, S. W.; Lee, J. O.; Kang, T. W.

    1989-01-01

    The pain, swelling of salivary glands and dry mouth are not infrequent complication of the high dose radioiodine treatment in the patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. The purpose of this study was, by the dynamic salivary scintigraphy, to observe the change of the salivary function after the high dose (150-200 mCi) radioiodine treatment. From May 1987 to April 1988, the dynamic salivary scintigraphy with 5 mCi of 99m Tc-pertechnetate and gamma camera was performed before and 7 days after the radioiodine treatment in 7 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Just after the dynamic scintigraphy, the stimulation test with vitamin C solution of pH 3.0 and poststimulation scintigraphy were done, and the radioactivity uptake index, excretion fraction and salivary clearance after the stimulation were calculated for each gland. There was positive correlation between the radioactivity uptake index and excretion fraction after the stimulation. The salivary clearance after the stimulation was 18.96 ± 8.95 ml/min in the pretreatment state, and 14.37 ± 7.7 ml/min after the radioiodine treatment. After the radioiodine treatment, the radioactivity uptake index, excretion fraction and salivary clearance after the stimulation were significantly reduced in the parotid glands, but only the excretion fraction was reduced in the submandibular glands. The more the pretreatment salivary clearance after the stimulation was, the % change after the treatment was smaller. Further studies on the relation between the radiation dose in the salivary glands and the change of their function, and the long-term observation for the recovery of function are expected.

  1. Gastrointestinal Side Effects of the Radioiodine Therapy for the Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma Two Days after Prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashnehsaz, Mehran; Takavar, Abbas; Izadyar, Sina; Zakariaee, Seyed Salman; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Paydar, Reza; Geramifar, Parham

    2016-01-01

    Iodine-131 (I-131) therapy is one of the conventional approaches in the treatment of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). The radioiodine agents also accumulate in the other organs that cause pain and damage to the patients. Radioiodine therapy is associated with various gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities. In this study, GI side effects of the radioiodine therapy were investigated. GI toxicities of the radioiodine therapy were studied in 137 patients with histologically proven DTC in Jun-Nov 2014. All the patients were treated by radioiodine agents in the research institute of Shariati Hospital, Tehran, Iran. The patients were examined 48 h after prescription (before discharge) and their GI side effects were registered. Correlation of the age, gender, administered dose, administered dose per body weight as the independent factors, and GI side effects were analyzed using the Pearson correlation test with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. Regression coefficients and linearity of the variable were investigated by MATLAB software. Line fitting was performed using MATLAB curve-fitting toolbox. From the subjects, 38 patients had GI complaints (30.4%). Significant factors influencing GI side effects were dose per body weight and administered doses. There was no significant correlation between age and gender as the independent parameters and GI complaints. The most prevalent GI side effect was nausea that occurs in 26.4% of the patients. From the results, it could be concluded that the GI side effects could be prevented by administering a safe radioiodine dose value less than 5,550 MBq

  2. Clinical Utility of SPECT/CT Imaging Post-Radioiodine Therapy: Does It Enhance Patient Management in Thyroid Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Fahim U; Mohan, Hosahalli K

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate post-therapy iodine-131 single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography ((131)I-SPECT/CT) imaging in comparison to conventional planar (131)I whole-body imaging, and to assess its clinical impact on the management of patients. We retrospectively reviewed planar (131)I whole-body and (131)I-SPECT/CT imaging findings in 67 patients who underwent (131)I therapy for thyroid cancer. Two nuclear medicine physicians reviewed the scans independently. The foci of increased tracer uptake were identified in the neck, thorax and elsewhere. Within the neck, the foci of (131)I-increased uptake were graded qualitatively as probable or definite uptake in thyroid remnants and probable or definite uptake in the lymph nodes. Serum thyroglobulin level, histopathology and other imaging findings served as the reference standard. Of the 67 patients, 57 (85%) had radioiodine avid disease and 10 (15%) demonstrated non-radioiodine avid disease. Overall, post-therapy (131)I-SPECT/CT downstaged lymph node staging in 10 patients and upstaged it in 4 patients. This translated into a change of management for 9/57 (16%) patients with radioiodine avid disease. A change of management was observed in 5/10 patients with non-radioiodine avid disease confirmed in the post-(131)I-SPECT/CT study. Additionally, clinically significant findings such as incidental lung cancer, symptomatic pleural effusion and consolidation were also diagnosed in both groups of patients. In patients with thyroid cancer, (131)I-SPECT/CT is a valuable addition to standard post-therapy planar imaging. SPECT/CT also improved diagnostic confidence and provided crucial clinical information leading to change of management for a significant number of these patients.

  3. Function of thyroid and hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis in radioiodine treated thyrotoxic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helds, A.; Lerhs, E.; Bolshevica, J.; Ozols, V.

    1980-01-01

    431 thyrotoxic patients were examined at varying intervals after therapy with 131 I. Relapses of thyrotoxicosis were noted in 30 patients (7%), hypothyroidism in 63 patients (14.4%) and the remaining 338 were euthyroid. A peculiar clinical picture of postradiation hyperthyroidism was ascertained. The euthyroid patients had a lower protein bound iodine concentration than normal individuals (4.9 +- 1.7 and 6.0 +- 1.64 mg/100 ml, respectively) and a negative thyroid response after TRH stimulation in 87 per cent. (author)

  4. Radioiodine remnant ablation in differentiated thyroid cancer after combined endogenous and exogenous TSH stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrachimis, A; Schober, O; Riemann, B

    2012-01-01

    Radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) after (near-)total thyroidectomy (TE) is a key element in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). The use of exogenous TSH stimulation (rhTSH) prior to RRA has shown promising results as compared to conventional thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW). As yet, the efficacy of RRA after brief THW and single rhTSH administration has not been assessed. The study sample comprised 147 patients with DTC referred to our center between May 2008 and September 2010. All patients received TE with subsequent RRA. None of these 147 patients had evidence of distant metastasis. 93 patients had endogenous TSH stimulation 4-5 weeks after surgery (group I) and twenty-six received two rhTSH injections (group II). 28 patients were treated with a single rhTSH injection after a brief THW (group III). RRA-Efficacy was assessed three months after therapy by diagnostic whole-body scan and measurement of the tumour marker thyroglobulin (Tg) under TSH stimulation. Three categories of success were defined for remnant ablation. Based on the definition of successful remnant ablation no visible uptake and a Tg ≤ 2.0 ng/ml (category 1) was seen in 62/93 patients in group I, in 17/26 patients in group II (p = n.s.) and in 12/28 patients in group III (p 2.0 ng/ml (category 3) was found in 3/93 patients in group I and 1/26 patients in group II but in no patient in group III. The third strategy of remnant ablation using a single injection of rhTSH after a brief THW period resulted in a significant higher rate of patients with residual uptake in the thyroid bed and a Tg level below 2 ng/ml three months after remnant ablation in comparison to THW. However, the overall efficacy of the third protocol was not significantly different as compared to two rhTSH injections. Under the aspect of the supply shortage of rhTSH the combined endogenous and exogenous TSH stimulation may be an attractive alternative for remnant ablation in differentiated thyroid cancer.

  5. Thyroid cell irradiation by radioiodines: a new Monte Carlo electron track-structure code

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    Christophe Champion

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The most significant impact of the Chernobyl accident is the increased incidence of thyroid cancer among children who were exposed to short-lived radioiodines and 131-iodine. In order to accurately estimate the radiation dose provided by these radioiodines, it is necessary to know where iodine is incorporated. To do that, the distribution at the cellular level of newly organified iodine in the immature rat thyroid was performed using secondary ion mass microscopy (NanoSIMS50. Actual dosimetric models take only into account the averaged energy and range of beta particles of the radio-elements and may, therefore, imperfectly describe the real distribution of dose deposit at the microscopic level around the point sources. Our approach is radically different since based on a track-structure Monte Carlo code allowing following-up of electrons down to low energies (~ 10eV what permits a nanometric description of the irradiation physics. The numerical simulations were then performed by modelling the complete disintegrations of the short-lived iodine isotopes as well as of 131I in new born rat thyroids in order to take into account accurate histological and biological data for the thyroid gland.O impacto mais significante do acidente de Chernobyl é o crescimento da incidência de câncer de tireóide em crianças que foram expostas a radioiodos de vida curta e ao Iodo-131. Na estimativa precisa da dose de radiação fornecida por esses radioiodos, é necessário conhecer onde o iodo está incorporado. Para obtermos esse resultado, a distribuição em nível celular de iodo recentemente organificado na tireóde de ratos imaturos foi realizada usando microscopia de massa iônica secundária (NanoSIMS50. Modelos dosimétricos atuais consideram apenas a energia média das partículas beta dos radioelementos e pode, imperfeitamente descrever a distribuição real de dose ao nível microscópico em torno dos pontos pesquisados. Nossa abordagem

  6. Results of a TcTUs-optimized radioiodine therapy of multifocal and disseminated functional thyroid autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkelmann, S.; Endlicher, D.; Prillwitz, A.; Rudolph, F.; Groth, P.; Schuemichen, C.

    1999-01-01

    Aim: The presented study prospectively evaluates the efficacy of optimized radioiodine therapy in patients (pts) with multifocal (MFA) and disseminated (DISA) autonomy. The target dose was related to the total thyroid volume and was increased in moderate and nonlinear increments for 150 to 300 Gy dependent on the pretherapeutic Tc-99m pertechnetate thyroid uptake under suppression (TcTUs). Patients with focal autonomy were treated with a target dose independent of TcTUs and were used as control group. Methods: The data of 641 pts (518 women, 123 men) were evaluated, 466 pts with MFA or DISA and 175 pts with focal autonomy. In pts with MFA and DISA the target dose was increased in four steps: TcTUs 3-6%: 200 Gy, >6-12%: 250 Gy and >12%: 300 Gy. In pts with focal autonomy a fixed target dose of 300 or 400 Gy was applied. The radioactivity to be administered was calculated using a modified Marinelli formula. The follow-up examination was performed at the earliest after four, on average after eight months. Normalization of TSH was the only criterion for successful therapy. Results: The success rate in pts with latent or manifest hyperthyroidism in focal autonomy was 91.5%, thereby was not successful in 5.1% and hypothyroidism occurred in 3.4%. The average success rate in pts with MFA and DISA was 91.5%, therapy failed in 7.5% and a very low rate of 1% with hypothyroidism was seen. Conclusion: The presented optimized therapy concept with calculated, nonlinear increase of the target dose according to the TcTUs-level guaranteed even in MFA and DISA a high success rate comparable to that in focal autonomy along with a very low rate of hypothyroidism. (orig.) [de

  7. Hemostasis in Hypothyroidism and Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordookhani, Arash; Burman, Kenneth D

    2017-04-01

    There are contradictory results on the effect of hypothyroidism on the changes in hemostasis. Inadequate population-based studies limited their clinical implications, mainly on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). This paper reviews the studies on laboratory and population-based findings regarding hemostatic changes and risk of VTE in hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroid disorders. A comprehensive literature search was conducted employing MEDLINE database. The following words were used for the search: Hypothyroidism; thyroiditis, autoimmune; blood coagulation factors; blood coagulation tests; hemostasis, blood coagulation disorders; thyroid hormones; myxedema; venous thromboembolism; fibrinolysis, receptors thyroid hormone. The papers that were related to hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroid disorder and hemostasis are used in this review. Overt hypothyroidism is more associated with a hypocoagulable state. Decreased platelet count, aggregation and agglutination, von Willebrand factor antigen and activity, several coagulation factors such as factor VIII, IX, XI, VII, and plasminogen activator-1 are detected in overt hypothyrodism. Increased fibrinogen has been detected in subclinical hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroid disease rendering a tendency towards a hypercoagulability state. Increased factor VII and its activity, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 are among several findings contributing to a prothrombotic state in subclinical hypothyroidism. Overt hypothyroidism is associated with a hypocoagulable state and subclinical hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroid disorders may induce a prothrombotic state. However, there are contradictory findings for the abovementioned thyroid disorders. Prospective studies on the risk of VTE in various levels of hypofunctioning of the thyroid and autoimmune thyroid disorders are warranted.

  8. Radiation exposure and familial aggregation of cancers as risk factors for colorectal cancer after radioiodine treatment for thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubino, Carole; Adjadj, Elisabeth; Doyon, Francoise; Shamsaldin, Akhtar; Abbas, Tahaa Moncef; Caillou, Bernard; Colonna, Marc; Cecarreli, Claudia; Schvartz, Claire; Bardet, Stephane; Langlois, Christiane B.Sc.; Ricard, Marcel; Schlumberger, Martin; Vathaire, Florent de

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: In thyroid cancer patients, radioiodine treatment has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of colon carcinoma. The aim of this study in thyroid cancer patients was to evaluate the role of familial factors in the risk of colorectal cancer and their potential interaction with radioiodine exposure. Methods and Materials: We performed a case-control study on 15 colorectal cancer patients and 76 matched control subjects, nested in a cohort of 3708 thyroid cancer patients treated between 1933 and 1998. For each patient, the radiation dose delivered to the colon by radioiodine was estimated by use of standard tables. In those who received external radiation therapy, the average radiation doses delivered to the colon and rectum were estimated by use of DOS E g software. A complete familial history was obtained by face-to-face interviews, and a familial index was defined to evaluate the degree of familial aggregation. Results: The risk of colorectal cancer increased with familial aggregation of colorectal cancer (p = 0.02). After adjustment for the radiation dose delivered to the colon and rectum, the risk of colorectal cancer was 2.8-fold higher (95% CI, 1.0-8.0) for patients with at least one relative affected by colorectal cancer than for patients without such a family history (p = 0.05). The radiation dose delivered to the colon and rectum by 131 I and external radiation therapy was associated with an increase of risk near the significance threshold (p = 0.1). No significant interaction was found between radiation dose and having an affected relative (p = 0.9). Conclusions: The role of familial background in the risk of colorectal cancer following a differentiated thyroid carcinoma appears to increase with the radiation dose delivered to the colon and rectum. However, the study population was small and no interaction was found between these two factors

  9. Radioiodine Thyroid Remnant Ablation after Recombinant Human Thyrotropin or Thyroid Hormone Withdrawal in Patients with High-Risk Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabián Pitoia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To supplement limited relevant literature, we retrospectively compared ablation and disease outcomes in high-risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC patients undergoing radioiodine thyroid remnant ablation aided by recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH versus thyroid hormone withdrawal/withholding (THW. Our cohort was 45 consecutive antithyroglobulin antibody- (TgAb- negative, T3-T4/N0-N1-Nx/M0 adults ablated with high activities at three referral centers. Ablation success comprised negative (<1 μg/L stimulated serum thyroglobulin (Tg and TgAb, with absent or <0.1% scintigraphic thyroid bed uptake. “No evidence of disease” (NED comprised negative unstimulated/stimulated Tg and no suspicious neck ultrasonography or pathological imaging or biopsy. “Persistent disease” was failure to achieve NED, “recurrence,” loss of NED status. rhTSH patients (n=18 were oftener ≥45 years old and higher stage (P=0.01, but otherwise not different than THW patients (n=27 at baseline. rhTSH patients were significantly oftener successfully ablated compared to THW patients (83% versus 67%, P<0.02. After respective 3.3 yr and 4.5 yr mean follow-ups (P=0.02, NED was achieved oftener (72% versus 59% and persistent disease was less frequent in rhTSH patients (22% versus 33% (both comparisons P=0.03. rhTSH stimulation is associated with at least as good outcomes as is THW in ablation of high-risk DTC patients.

  10. Radioiodine thyroid remnant ablation after recombinant human thyrotropin or thyroid hormone withdrawal in patients with high-risk differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitoia, Fabián; Marlowe, Robert J; Abelleira, Erika; Faure, Eduardo N; Bueno, Fernanda; Schwarzstein, Diego; Lutfi, Rubén Julio; Niepomniszcze, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    To supplement limited relevant literature, we retrospectively compared ablation and disease outcomes in high-risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) patients undergoing radioiodine thyroid remnant ablation aided by recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) versus thyroid hormone withdrawal/withholding (THW). Our cohort was 45 consecutive antithyroglobulin antibody- (TgAb-) negative, T3-T4/N0-N1-Nx/M0 adults ablated with high activities at three referral centers. Ablation success comprised negative (<1 μg/L) stimulated serum thyroglobulin (Tg) and TgAb, with absent or <0.1% scintigraphic thyroid bed uptake. "No evidence of disease" (NED) comprised negative unstimulated/stimulated Tg and no suspicious neck ultrasonography or pathological imaging or biopsy. "Persistent disease" was failure to achieve NED, "recurrence," loss of NED status. rhTSH patients (n = 18) were oftener ≥45 years old and higher stage (P = 0.01), but otherwise not different than THW patients (n = 27) at baseline. rhTSH patients were significantly oftener successfully ablated compared to THW patients (83% versus 67%, P < 0.02). After respective 3.3 yr and 4.5 yr mean follow-ups (P = 0.02), NED was achieved oftener (72% versus 59%) and persistent disease was less frequent in rhTSH patients (22% versus 33%) (both comparisons P = 0.03). rhTSH stimulation is associated with at least as good outcomes as is THW in ablation of high-risk DTC patients.

  11. MR imaging of diffuse thyroid disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Masaaki; Fujii, Koichi; Ohnishi, Takuya; Higashikawa, Motoki; Araki, Yutaka; Hamada, Tatsumi; Ishida, Osamu

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 38 diffuse goiters, including 30 chronic thyroiditis and 8 Basedow disease. MR findings were analyzed as to degree of swelling, margin, internal structures including homogeneity and low intensity bands. With regard to signal intensity, thyroid-muscle-signal intensity ratios on T1 and T2-weighted images were measured in 19 normal thyroid glands, 30 chronic thyroiditis and 8 Basedow disease. Additionally thyroid-muscle-signal intensity ratios were compared between 19 hypothyroid glands and 11 euthyroid glands in chronic thyroiditis. Chronic thyroiditis tended to show lobulated margins, inhomogeneous intensity, and low intensity bands connecting with vessels or not. Basedow disease tended to display smooth margins, inhomogeneous intensity and low intensity bands connecting with vessels. Thyroid-muscle-signal intensity ratios of Basedow disease and chronic thyroiditis were significantly higher than those of normal thyroid gland at all sequences. In chronic thyroiditis thyroid-muscle-signal intensity ratios of euthyroid glands were significantly higher than those of hypothyroid glands. MR imaging could reflect pathologic features of diffuse goiters. Moreover, MR imaging is potentially contributory to speculate about thyroid function and degree of serious condition in diffuse thyroid disorders. (author)

  12. The relationship between 24 h/4 h radioiodine-131 uptake ratio and outcome after radioiodine therapy in 1402 patients with solitary autonomously functioning thyroid nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filesi, M.; Travascio, L.; Montesano, T.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of 24 h/4 h uptake ratio (UR) in response to radioiodine-131 ( 131 I) therapy in patients with autonomously functioning thyroid nodules (AFTN). A total of 1402 consecutive hyperthyroid patients were treated with 131 I, between 1958 and 2005. Therapeutic doses (D) were calculated according to the formula: D=weight of nodule x dose per gram of nodular tissue (q)/24 h 131 I uptake. The ratios of the 24 and 4 h uptake were retrospectively calculated and the patients were grouped according to outcome and q into three groups of UR (≤1.25; 1.26-1.68; ≥1.69) by means of terziles. Of the 1402 patients, 95 did not respond to 131 I treatment while 93/1307 developed hypothyroidism. Most non-responders (55.8%) had UR ≤1.25, while many hypothyroid patients (66.7%) had UR ≥1.69 (χ 2 : P 131 I treatment, increasing to 13.9% at 5 years and 26.2% at 10 years. The 131 I UR can predict the outcome of 131 I treatment in AFTN and may have utility in modifying treatment in some patients to limit post-radioiodine induced hypothyroidism and treatment failures in order to achieve euthyroidism. (author)

  13. Modification of Ca2+ - exchange in blood cells of cattles with radioiodine damage of thyroid gland after Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevchenko, A.S.; Kobyalko, V.O.; Shevchenko, T.S.; Lazarev, N.M.; Astasheva, N.P.; Aleksakhin, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    Increasing of Ca 2+ concentration in cytoplasm and of the rate of 45 Ca iflux into cows erythrocytes in 19-24 month efter Chernobyl accident was revealed. Correlation between Ca 2+ concentration in cytoplasm of erythrocytes and thyroxin content in plasma of cows with radioiodine damage of thyroid gland was found. Reduction of the rate of 45 Ga influx into erythrocytes in cows with radiation doses of 20-60 By on thyroid gland was shown in later time after accident (3-5 years). Changes in Ca 2+ permeability through membranes of erythrocytes and neutrophiles after injection of 131 I into calfs in doses of 300 Gy and more on thyroid gland was found

  14. Radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism in patients with low thyroid iodine uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchala, M.; Sowinski, J.; Dolata, M.; Skiba, A.; Gembicki, M.; Junik, R.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the effectiveness of radioactive 131I in hyperthyroid patients with confirmed lowered iodine uptake as compared to patients with an uptake of over 30%. We retrospectively analyzed 53 consecutive patients aged from 29 to 84 (mean age 60 years) suffering from hyperthyroidism caused by Graves disease or toxic nodular goitre. The patients were divided into 2 sub-groups: the 1 st with a maximum iodine uptake of 18.7 ± 3.2% (range, 11 - 23%) - 24 patients; the 2 nd with a maximum iodine uptake of 27.1 ± 2.1% (range, 24 - 30%) - 29 patients. The control group consisted of 50 patients treated with 131I with an iodine uptake of over 30%. Each patient was evaluated before, and 6 months after, treatment for fT3, fT4 and TSH with ECLIA; TRAb with RIA; ultrasound with a 7.5 MHz linear probe. The volume of the thyroid gland was determined using the Gutekunst method. All these factors underwent statistical analysis and were considered along with the results of clinical examinations. Clinical remission of hyperthyroidism was evident in 79.3% of both sub-groups, in total (83.3% and 75.3%, respectively). TSH was normalized in 62.3% of these patients (54.2% and 69.0%, respectively). The mean range of TSH levels increased from 0.081 mU/ml to 4.0 mU/ml after therapy; that is, from 0.087 mU/ml to 4.97 mU/ml in the 1 st sub-group and from 0.076 mU/ml to 3.3 mU/ml in the 2 nd sub-group. The volume of the thyroid gland was uniformly significantly lower, with a mean range of 40.5 ml before treatment and 21.7 ml afterwards.The results seen in both sub-groups were similar; only age and dose of radioiodine were slightly higher in the 1 st , while mean uptake was higher in the 2 nd . By comparison of these results to those of the control patients, we observed that the values of TSH, as well as thyroid volume and evidence of clinical remission, reflected those found in the control group.The mean dose of 131I was lower in the control group, that is 11.3 m

  15. Adjuvant thyroid remnant ablation in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma confined to the thyroid. A comparison of ablation success with different activities of radioiodine (I-131)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prpic, M.; Dabelic, N.; Stanicic, J.; Jukic, T.; Kusic, Z.; Milosevic, M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess efficiency of various I-131 activities on thyroid remnant ablation in thyroid cancer patients. The significance of patients' characteristics, pathologic features and levels of Tg were analyzed. This study included 259 consecutive differentiated thyroid cancer patients, with disease confined to the thyroid, treated with I-131 after total thyroidectomy. Patients were divided into the three groups: 80 patients receiving low [1110-1850 MBq (30-50 mCi)], 121 intermediate [2775 MBq (75 mCi)] and 58 high [3700 MBq (100 mCi)] postoperative I-131 activities. Six to eight months after the application of radioiodine, measurements of TSH, Tg, anti-Tg antibodies (in hypothyroid state) together with ultrasound exam and whole-body scintigraphy were performed. The ablation was significantly more effective (after the first application) in patients receiving 100 mCi of I-131-89.7% than in patients receiving lower activities (P=0.016). There was no significant difference in ablation rate between the 30-50 mCi (77.5%) and 75 mCi (70.2%) groups. In the group receiving 30-50 mCi, patients with solitary tumors had significantly higher ablation rate (P=0.038). In patients receiving 75 mCi ablation rates were higher among older patients (P=0.005), with infiltration of the single lobe (P=0.005), and with solitary tumor (P=0.012). The rates of successful ablation after the second application of I-131 (after 12-16 months) amounted to 96, 97 and 96% in the 30-50, 75 and 100 mCi groups, respectively. The activity of I-131 and age were independent factors for thyroid ablation failure after the first application of I-131 (model of binary logistic regression). The results of remnant ablation were satisfactory with all activities applied. Although after the first application of I-131 the activity of 100 mCi is significantly more effective in thyroid ablation than the administration of 30-50 mCi and 75 mCi, the ablation rates between all the three groups are

  16. Thyroid equivalent doses due to radioiodine-131 intake for evacuees from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokonami, Shinji; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Kashiwakura, Ikuo [Hirosaki University, Institute of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Hirosaki, Aomori (Japan); Hosoda, Masahiro [Hirosaki University, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hirosaki, Aomori (Japan); Akiba, Suminori [Kagoshima University, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Balonov, Mikhail [Protection Laboratory, Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-11-15

    A primary health concern among residents and evacuees in affected areas immediately after a nuclear accident is the internal exposure of the thyroid to radioiodine, particularly I-131, and subsequent thyroid cancer risk. In Japan, the natural disasters of the earthquake and tsunami in March 2011 destroyed an important function of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (F1-NPP) and a large amount of radioactive material was released to the environment. Here we report for the first time extensive measurements of the exposure to I-131 revealing I-131 activity in the thyroid of 46 out of the 62 residents and evacuees measured. The median thyroid equivalent dose was estimated to be 4.2 mSv and 3.5 mSv for children and adults, respectively, much smaller than the mean thyroid dose in the Chernobyl accident (490 mSv in evacuees). Maximum thyroid doses for children and adults were 23 mSv and 33 mSv, respectively. (author)

  17. Radioiodine therapy for combined disseminated and nodular thyroid autonomy. Results after using a correction term for the disseminated part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, H.; Dorn, R.; Otto, I.; Sciuk, J.; Wengenmair, H.; Kopp, J.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: in combined focal and disseminated thyroid autonomy a variety of concepts in the treatment with radioiodine are used. The difference lies mainly in the calculation of the autonomous volume. This retrospective study shows a new method of calculating the autonomous volume. Patients and methods: in 398 patients with combined thyroid autonomy and good correlation of scintigraphically hot nodules and lesions defined by ultrasound the volume of the nodules is ascertained from scintigraphic and ultrasound parameters and the volume of the disseminated autonomous tissue is assessed with a weighting factor (VF). This factor is the ratio of impulse density in a ROI over the disseminated volume divided by the corresponding impulse density over the nodular volume of the thyroid scintigraphy. The sum of nodular volume and weighted perinodular volume gives the total autonomous volume. A standard radioiodine test gives the maximum iodine-131-uptake and effective half-life to calculate the activity to obtain a treatment dose of 400 Gy. Results: the rate of success with and without thyrostatic medication was 97% with an 18.6% rate of hypothyroidism observed from 4 months post therapy onwards. Conclusion: the use of the weighting factor VF in the treatment of combined autonomy leads to an excellent rate of success in patients with good correlation of functional imaging and ultrasound findings. (orig.)

  18. Radioiodine remnant ablation of differentiated thyroid cancer does not further increase oxidative damage to membrane lipids - early effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarewicz Jacek

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Radioiodine (131I therapy is widely accepted as an essential part of therapeutic regimens in many cases of differentiated thyroid cancer. Radiation-induced oxidative damage to macromolecules is a well known phenomenon. Frequently examined process to evaluate oxidative damage to macromolecules is lipid peroxidation (LPO, resulting from oxidative damage to membrane lipids. The aim of the study was to examine serum LPO level in hypothyroid (after total thyroidectomy cancer patients subjected to ablative activities of 131I. Materials and methods The study was carried out in 21 patients (18 females and 3 males, average age 52.4 ± 16.5 years after total thyroidectomy for papillary (17 patients or follicular (4 patients thyroid carcinoma. Hypothyroidism was confirmed by increased TSH blood concentration (BRAHMS, Germany, measured before 131I therapy. Activity of 2.8 - 6.9 GBq of 131I was administered to the patients orally as sodium iodide (OBRI, Poland. Concentrations of malondialdehyde + 4-hydroxyalkenals (MDA + 4-HDA, as an index of LPO (LPO-586 kit, Calbiochem, USA, were measured in blood serum just before 131I administration (day "0" and on the days 1-4 after 131I therapy. Sera from 23 euthyroid patients served as controls. Correlations between LPO and TSH or 131I activity were calculated. Results Expectedly, serum LPO level, when measured before 131I therapy, was several times higher (p 131I therapy. LPO did not correlate with TSH concentration. In turn, negative correlation was found between 131I activity and LPO level on the day "2" after radioiodine treatment. Conclusions Radioiodine remnant ablation of differentiated thyroid cancer does not further increase oxidative damage to membrane lipids, at least early, after therapy.

  19. Inhibition of miR-146b expression increases radioiodine-sensitivity in poorly differential thyroid carcinoma via positively regulating NIS expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Luchuan; Lv, Bin; Chen, Bo [Department of General Surgery, Shandong University Qilu Hospital, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Guan, Ming [Department of General Surgery, Qihe People' s Hospital, Qihe, Shandong 251100 (China); Sun, Yongfeng [Department of General Surgery, Licheng District People' s Hospital, Jinan, Shandong 250115 (China); Li, Haipeng [Department of General Surgery, Caoxian People' s Hospital, Caoxian, Shandong 274400 (China); Zhang, Binbin; Ding, Changyuan; He, Shan [Department of General Surgery, Shandong University Qilu Hospital, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Zeng, Qingdong, E-mail: qingdz0201@163.com [Department of General Surgery, Shandong University Qilu Hospital, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China)

    2015-07-10

    Dedifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) with the loss of radioiodine uptake (RAIU) is often observed in clinical practice under radioiodine therapy, indicating the challenge for poor prognosis. MicroRNA (miRNA) has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in many diseases; yet, the role of miRNAs in RAIU has not been generally investigated. Based on recent studies about miRNA expression in papillary or follicular thyroid carcinomas, the expression profiles of several thyroid relative miRNAs were investigated in one DTC cell line, derived from normal DTC cells by radioiodine treatment. The top candidate miR-146b, with the most significant overexpression profiles in dedifferentiated cells, was picked up. Further research found that miR-146b could be negatively regulated by histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) in normal cells, indicating the correlation between miR-146b and Na{sup +}/I{sup −} symporter (NIS)-mediated RAIU. Fortunately, it was confirmed that miR-146b could regulate NIS expression/activity; what is more important, miR-146b interference would contribute to the recovery of radioiodine-sensitivity in dedifferentiated cells via positively regulating NIS. In the present study, it was concluded that NIS-mediated RAIU could be modulated by miR-146b; accordingly, miR-146b might serve as one of targets to enhance efficacy of radioactive therapy against poorly differential thyroid carcinoma (PDTC). - Highlights: • Significant upregulated miR-146b was picked up from thyroid relative miRNAs in DTC. • MiR-146b was negatively regulated by HDAC3 in normal thyroid carcinoma cells. • NIS activity and expression could be regulated by miR-146b in thyroid carcinoma. • MiR-146b inhibition could recover the decreased radioiodine-sensitivity of DTC cells.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of using recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone before radioiodine ablation for thyroid cancer treatment in Spanish hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, J A; Muros, M A

    In thyroid cancer treatment, the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) must be elevated before radioiodine ablation, either by exogenous (with recombinant human thyrotropin [rhTSH]) or endogenous stimulation by thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW). The use of rhTSH avoids hypothyroidism and favours the subsequent elimination of radioiodine, but involves the cost of the product. For this reason, a cost-effectiveness analysis was performed, taking into account all costs involved and the benefits associated with the use of this therapy. Using a Markov modelling with two analysis arms (rhTSH and THW), stratified into high (100mCi/3700 MBq) and low (30mCi/1110 MBq) radioiodine doses, and using 17 weekly cycles, the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) related to the use of rhTSH was determined. The clinical inputs included in the model were based on published studies and in a treatment survey conducted in Spain. Radioablation preparation with rhTSH is superior to THW, showing additional benefits (0.048 AVAC), as well as cost savings (-€614.16), with an incremental cost-effectiveness rate (ICER) of -€12,795/QALY. The univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses showed the result to be robust. The use of rhTSH previous to radioablation in Spain has cost savings, as well as a series of health benefits for the patient, making it highly cost-effective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  1. Isolation time determination of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma treated with therapeutic doses of 131 radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierralta, M.P.; Lillo, R.; Massardo, T.; Jofre, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Isolation time determination of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma treated with therapeutic doses of 131 radioiodine. Introduction: The coadyuvant treatment with 131 I had proven to be useful in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). Due to the physical characteristics of this radioisotope these patients must be absolutely isolated in order to reduce the radioactive exposure to other individuals. The aim of the study was to determine the time required to reach the maximum permissible radiation exposure level (0,25mR/h) to general public. Material between August 1999 and May 2000, 30 patients with DTC diagnosis in the University of Chile Clinical Hospital Nuclear Medicine Centre were studied, 25 women (83%) and 5 men (17%), mean age 45 years old (15-71 range). Tumoral histology was 86% papillary and 14% follicular types. Thirty one doses of 131 I were administered ( one patient received 2 doses): 24 of 100 mCi (77%), 5 of 150 mCi (16%) and 2 of 200 mCi (7%); afterwards the 1 m exposition rate in air was measured at neck level with a Geiger-Mueller detector. The procedure was repeated on day 4 and every day following until the predicted radiation exposure levels were reached. Results: The average exposure rate at day 0 ( after given the radiopharmaceutical) was 20,12 mR/h (4-32 range). At day 4 the average rate was 0,21 mR/h (0,08-0,34 ), and 61% (n=19) of the patients reached 0,25 mR/h within that day. On day 5 10% (n=3) reached 0,25 mR/h (0,25-0,26), on day 6 16% (n=5) reached 0,25 mR/h (0,2-0,28), on day 7 6% (n=2) reached 0,39 mR/h (0,25-0,48) and the remaining 7% on day 13 and day 17 (n=2). Conclusion After a treatment dose of 131 iodine over 60% of the cases can finish the isolation on day 4, and 90% on day 7. The measurement of 131 I uptake after 24 hours will help to determine the evolution of post treatment levels

  2. Isolation time determination of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma treated with therapeutic doses of 131 radioiodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierralta, M P [University of Chile Clinical Hospital Nuclear Medicine Centre, Santiago (Chile); Military Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department , Santiago (Chile); Lillo, R; Massardo, T [University of Chile Clinical Hospital Nuclear Medicine Centre, Santiago (Chile); Jofre, M J [Military Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department, Santiago (Chile)

    2002-09-01

    Isolation time determination of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma treated with therapeutic doses of 131 radioiodine. Introduction: The coadyuvant treatment with 131 I had proven to be useful in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). Due to the physical characteristics of this radioisotope these patients must be absolutely isolated in order to reduce the radioactive exposure to other individuals. The aim of the study was to determine the time required to reach the maximum permissible radiation exposure level (0,25mR/h) to general public. Material between August 1999 and May 2000, 30 patients with DTC diagnosis in the University of Chile Clinical Hospital Nuclear Medicine Centre were studied, 25 women (83%) and 5 men (17%), mean age 45 years old (15-71 range). Tumoral histology was 86% papillary and 14% follicular types. Thirty one doses of 131 I were administered ( one patient received 2 doses): 24 of 100 mCi (77%), 5 of 150 mCi (16%) and 2 of 200 mCi (7%); afterwards the 1 m exposition rate in air was measured at neck level with a Geiger-Mueller detector. The procedure was repeated on day 4 and every day following until the predicted radiation exposure levels were reached. Results: The average exposure rate at day 0 ( after given the radiopharmaceutical) was 20,12 mR/h (4-32 range). At day 4 the average rate was 0,21 mR/h (0,08-0,34 ), and 61% (n=19) of the patients reached 0,25 mR/h within that day. On day 5 10% (n=3) reached 0,25 mR/h (0,25-0,26), on day 6 16% (n=5) reached 0,25 mR/h (0,2-0,28), on day 7 6% (n=2) reached 0,39 mR/h (0,25-0,48) and the remaining 7% on day 13 and day 17 (n=2). Conclusion After a treatment dose of 131 iodine over 60% of the cases can finish the isolation on day 4, and 90% on day 7. The measurement of 131 I uptake after 24 hours will help to determine the evolution of post treatment levels.

  3. Prognostic Value of Tc99m-Pertechnetate Thyroid Scintigraphy in Radioiodine Therapy in a Cohort of Chinese Graves’ Disease Patients: A Pilot Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Hou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study is to assess the prognostic value of Tc99m-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy for predicting the outcomes of fixed low dose of radioiodine therapy (RIT in a cohort of Chinese Graves’ disease (GD patients. Materials and Methods. This is a retrospective study of GD patients who received RIT with a single dose of radioiodine (5 mCi. All the patients received Tc99m-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy prior to RIT. Thyroid mass, Tc99m-pertechnetate uptake, gender, age at diagnosis, duration of the disease, ophthalmopathy, and serum levels of FT4, FT3, TT4, and TT3 prior to RIT were analyzed as potential interference factors for outcomes of RIT. Results. One hundred and eighteen GD patients who completed RIT were followed up for 12 months. The outcomes (euthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and hyperthyroidism were found to be significantly associated with thyroid mass and Tc99m-pertechnetate uptake. Patients with thyroid mass ≤ 40.1 g or Tc99m-pertechnetate uptake ≤ 15.2% had higher treatment success. Conclusions. A fixed low dose of 5 mCi radioiodine seems to be practical and effective for the treatment of Chinese GD patients with thyroid mass ≤ 40.1 g and Tc99m-pertechnetate uptake ≤ 15.2%. This study demonstrates Tc99m-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy is an important prognostic factor for predicting the outcomes of RIT.

  4. Ratio of thyroid radioiodine uptake calculated via the physic decay rate of the standard radioactive source: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Yu; Zhou Luyi

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the difference of the ratio of thyroid radioiodine ( 131 I) uptake calculated by actually measuring counts of the standard radioactive source(method 1) and by computing counts of the standard radioactive source via physic half life of 131 I (method 2). Methods: Two hundred and nine consecutive patients with Graves' Disease were prospectively recruited. The ratio of thyroid 131 I uptake was calculated by two methods at 4 h and 24 h after administration of 1.48 MBq 131 I, respectively. Paired t-test was used to compare the difference between the two methods. Results: The ratio of thyroid 131 I uptake at 4h was (32±16)% and ( 35±10)% (t=1.98, P=0.20), at 24h (72±19)% and (69±24)% ( t=1.49, P=0.23), respectively, by the two methods. Conclusion: To calculate the ratio of thyroid 131 I uptake via the physic half life of the standard radioactive resource is feasible, and can both reduce the risk of ionizing radiation to technical staff and act as verifying method for quality control of thyroid function equipment. (authors)

  5. Reevaluation of the thyroidal radioactive iodine uptake test, with special reference to reversible primary hypothyroidism with elevated thyroid radioiodine uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, K.; Sato, K.; Ikenoue, H.; Yoshinari, M.; Nakagawa, M.; Kuroda, T.; Fujishima, M.

    1988-01-01

    The clinical significance of the thyroidal radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU) test was reevaluated in patients with various thyroid disorders. Compared with 262 normal subjects or 194 patients with euthyroid diffuse goiter with normal serum TSH levels, RAIU values were significantly higher in 100 patients with latent primary hypothyroidism (serum TSH, 5-40 mU/L). In 126 patients with overt primary hypothyroidism (serum TSH, greater than 40 mU/L), RAIU values were either extremely high (49 patients with reversible hypothyroidism and 10 patients with postpartum hypothyroidism) or low (67 patients with irreversible hypothyroidism). The increase in RAIU values in latent, or reversible overt hypothyroidism was TSH dependent, and there was a good correlation between RAIU values and serum TSH levels (r = 0.6203; P less than 0.001). In overt primary hypothyroidism, spontaneous recovery of thyroid function during iodide restriction alone occurred in 52 of 53 patients with RAIU values above 35%, in only 7 of 23 patients with RAIU values between 10-35%, and in none of 50 patients with RAIU below 10%. Thus, recovery was predicted by high RAIU values (P less than 0.001; prediction rate, 91.4%). Goiter was found in about 80% of the patients with reversible hypothyroidism, compared with only 34% of the patients with irreversible hypothyroidism. Recovery of thyroid function during iodide restriction also occurred in 71% of the patients with latent hypothyroidism. However, RAIU measurements did not predict the prognosis of patients with latent hypothyroidism. We conclude that iodine-induced reversible hypothyroidism is common in our patient population, and RAIU measurements may be helpful in determining the prognosis of patients with overt primary hypothyroidism

  6. Potential of the drug-regulation iodide uptake in patients for prevention of radioiodine-refractory papillary thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy Kirillovich Fomin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of retinoic acid derivatives and lithium salts for radioiodine-refractory prevention in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer during multistage radioiodine therapy.Materials and methodsThe retrospective analysis was performed using the diagnostic and treatment results of 40 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer that underwent 131I therapy, which on the basis of posttherapy whole-body scan had direct indications for subsequent course of radioiodine therapy. The patients were divided into two groups:the control group (20 patients, which conducted a second course of radioiodine therapy on the standard template and without special training$the main group (20 patients, who were administered Sedalia (900 mg per day for 8 days, p.o. and isotretinoin (1.2 mg/kg body weight for 60 days, p.o. to prevention of the 131I resistance.To evaluate the effectiveness of a repeated course of radioiodine therapy following parameters were used: the thyroglobulin (Tg and antibodies to thyroglobulin (Tg-Ab level in the serum, the posttherapy whole body scan in combination with SPECT-CT.ResultsWe have found, that radioactive iodine treatment was effective in 75% of the main group and 90% of patients in the control group. The remission was observed in 10% and 40% in the main and control group, respectively. The partial regression was considered as Tg and TG-Ab reduction, and was observed more in the study group. The resistance to 131I therapy was found in 20% and 10% in the main and control group, respectively, which was based on the fact of permanent Tg/Tg-Ab serum level and absence of the pathological foci iodine uptake on the whole-body scans. The disease progress was found in one patient in the main group.ConclusionThe use of retinoic acid derivatives and lithium salts, in an effort to prevent the resistance to 131I-theraphy pretend to be unjustified, because it does not lead to significant

  7. Supporting Treatment Decisions in Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma (DTC) under Radioiodine-131 Therapy: Role of Biological Dosimetry Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadel, A.M.; Chebel, G.M.; Di Giorgio, M.; Vallerga, M.B.; Taja, M.R.; Radl, A.; Bubniak, R.V.; Oneto, A.

    2010-01-01

    Radioiodine-131 therapy is applied in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), within the therapeutic scheme following thyroidectomy, for the ablation of thyroid remnants and treatment of metastatic disease. Several approaches for the selection of a therapeutic dose were applied. The aim of this therapy is to achieve a lethal dose in the tumor tissue, without exceeding the dose of tolerance in healthy tissues (doses greater than 2 Gy in bone marrow could lead to myelotoxicity). In this work, the treatment protocol used incorporates the assessment by biological dosimetry (BD) for estimating doses to whole body and bone marrow, to tailor patient's treatment. Biological Dosimetry prospective studies conducted on samples from patients with cumulative activities, before and after each therapeutic administration, allows to evaluate DNA damage and repair capacity in peripheral blood lymphocytes. (authors)

  8. Clinical Usefulness between High Dose Radioiodine Therapy and Helicobacter Pylori Infection after Total Thyroidectomy due to Well Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Kuk No; Lim, Seok Tae; Moon, Eun Ha; Kim, Jin Suk; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Helicobacter (H) pylori infection has been considered the most important cause of gastritis, dyspepsia, and gastroduodenal ulcer. Radioiodine can be accumulated in the remaining thyroid tissue, salivary gland, and stomach. We investigated if the high radiation induced by radioiodine in the stomach after high dose radioiodine therapy (HD-RIT) is effective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. One hundred ninety nine patients (M:F=33:166, age 46.7{+-}12.3 years) who had HD-RIT (dose 159.1{+-}25.9 mCi, range 120-250 mCi) after thyroidectomy due to well differentiated thyroid cancer were enrolled. To detect H. pylori infection, the urea breath tests (UBT) were performed at 1 hour before HD-RIT and at 4 weeks after HD-RIT. The results of UBT were classified as positive ({>=}50 dpm) or negative (<50 dpm), and analyzed its values. Of 199 patients, 103 (51.8%) patients had positive UBT before HD-RIT. Of these, 80 patients had follow-up UBT after HD-RIT. Among them, 76 (95.0%) patients had persistent positive UBT and only 4 (5.0%) patients were changed negative UBT. Among 76 patients with persistent positive UBT, 26 (34.2%) patients had increased the values of follow-up UBT, 49 (64.5%) had decreased them, and 1 (1.3%) had shown the same value. The different values of UBT between before and after HD-RIT were 62{+-}66.1 dpm in increased one of follow-up UBT, and 153.3{+-}157.1 dpm in decreased one of follow-up UBT. We conclude that the radiation induced by HD-RIT is ineffective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. However, it could be influential the degree or distribution of H. pylori infection.

  9. Clinical Usefulness between High Dose Radioiodine Therapy and Helicobacter Pylori Infection after Total Thyroidectomy due to Well Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Kuk No; Lim, Seok Tae; Moon, Eun Ha; Kim, Jin Suk; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter (H) pylori infection has been considered the most important cause of gastritis, dyspepsia, and gastroduodenal ulcer. Radioiodine can be accumulated in the remaining thyroid tissue, salivary gland, and stomach. We investigated if the high radiation induced by radioiodine in the stomach after high dose radioiodine therapy (HD-RIT) is effective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. One hundred ninety nine patients (M:F=33:166, age 46.7±12.3 years) who had HD-RIT (dose 159.1±25.9 mCi, range 120-250 mCi) after thyroidectomy due to well differentiated thyroid cancer were enrolled. To detect H. pylori infection, the urea breath tests (UBT) were performed at 1 hour before HD-RIT and at 4 weeks after HD-RIT. The results of UBT were classified as positive (≥50 dpm) or negative (<50 dpm), and analyzed its values. Of 199 patients, 103 (51.8%) patients had positive UBT before HD-RIT. Of these, 80 patients had follow-up UBT after HD-RIT. Among them, 76 (95.0%) patients had persistent positive UBT and only 4 (5.0%) patients were changed negative UBT. Among 76 patients with persistent positive UBT, 26 (34.2%) patients had increased the values of follow-up UBT, 49 (64.5%) had decreased them, and 1 (1.3%) had shown the same value. The different values of UBT between before and after HD-RIT were 62±66.1 dpm in increased one of follow-up UBT, and 153.3±157.1 dpm in decreased one of follow-up UBT. We conclude that the radiation induced by HD-RIT is ineffective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. However, it could be influential the degree or distribution of H. pylori infection

  10. Thyroid Disorders in Accra, Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    to enhance thyroid-targeted expression of sodium/iodide symporter. J Clin Endocrinol. Metab 89(5): 2344-2350. Mariotti, S, Cambuli, VM (2007) Cardiovascular risk in elderly hypothyroid patients. Thyroid 17. (11): 1067-1073. Mariotti, S, Franceschi, C, Cossarizza, A, Pinchera, A. (1995) The aging thyroid. Endocr Rev 16(6):.

  11. Modeling the absorbed dose to the common carotid arteries following radioiodine treatment of benign thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jeppe Lerche; Hedemann-Jensen, Per; Søgaard-Hansen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    External fractionated radiotherapy of cancer increases the risk of cardio- and cerebrovascular events, but less attention has been paid to the potential side effects on the arteries following internal radiotherapy with radioactive iodine (RAI), i.e. 131-iodine. About 279 per million citizens...... in the western countries are treated each year with RAI for benign thyroid disorders (about 140,000 a year in the EU), stressing that it is of clinical importance to be aware of even rare radiation-induced side effects. In order to induce or accelerate atherosclerosis, the dose to the carotid arteries has...

  12. Comparison of therapeutic efficacy and clinical parameters between recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone and thyroid hormone withdrawal in high-dose radioiodine treatment with differentiated thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Se Hun; Na, Chang Ju; Kim, Jeong Hun; Han, Yeon Hee; KIm, Hee Kwon; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee; Lim, Seok Tae [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    High-dose radioiodine treatment (HD-RIT) after injection of recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rh-TSH) has become widely used. This study compared the therapeutic efficacy of HD-RIT and clinical parameters between rh-TSH supplement and thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW) after total thyroidectomy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 266 patients (47 male and 219 female; age, 49.0 ± 10.9 years) with differentiated thyroid cancer detected from September 2011 to September 2012. Patients comprised THW (217, 81.6 %) and rh-TSH (49, 18.4 %). Inclusion criteria were: first HD-RIT; any TN stage; absence of distant metastasis. To evaluate the complete ablation of the remnant thyroid tissue or metastasis, we reviewed stimulated serum thyroglobulin (sTg), I-123 whole-body scan (RxWBS) on T4 off-state, and thyroid ultrasonography (US) or [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) 6–8 months after HD-RIT. We defined a complete ablation state when all three of the follow-up conditions were satisfied; <2.0 ng/ml of the sTg, I-123 RxWBS (−), and thyroid US or F-18 FDG PET/CT (−). If one of the three was positive, ablation was considered incomplete. We also compared various clinical biomarkers (body weight, body mass index, liver and kidney function) between THW and rh-TSH groups. The rates of complete ablation were 73.7 % (160/217) for the THW group and 73.5 % (36/49) for the rh-TSH group. There was no significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.970). The follow-up aspartate transaminase (p = 0.001) and alanine transaminase (p = 0.001) were significantly higher in the THW group. The renal function parameters of blood urea nitrogen (p = 0.001) and creatinine (p = 0.005) tended to increase in the THW group. The change of body weight was + Δ0.96 (±1.9) kg for the THW group and was decreased by -Δ1.39 (±1.5) kg for the rh-TSH group. The change

  13. Radioiodine therapy of thyroid functional autonomies: Experience at a single university referral hospital centre in Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, O.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results of I-131 therapy in patients suffering from various types of functional autonomies of the thyroid gland. The efficacy and adverse effects of radioiodine therapy are presented. Seven hundred ninety-nine patients (age range= 33 to 86 years; average age= 58.7 years; Male: Female = 7.4:1) with unifocal, multifocal and disseminated functional autonomies of thyroid gland were treated with at least one therapeutic dose of I-131. Baseline Tc-99m pertechnetate thyroid scans, radioactive iodine uptake studies and ultrasonography were performed in all cases prior to radio iodine therapy. Baseline serum total and free thyroxine (T-T4 and F-T4), total triiodothyronine (T-T3) and TSH levels were estimated in all cases. Effective half life of radio iodine in the thyroids was also determined in all patients prior to therapy and a few patients were subjected to TRH stimulation tests. Following treatment all patients were evaluated after a period of 4-6 months. Further follow up evaluations were done at one year in 545 patients and at two years in 254 patients. Complete elimination of functional autonomy was achieved in 733 (91.74%) patients with a single therapeutic dose of I-131, while 62 (7.76%) patients required two doses of I-131 and only 4 (0.5%) patients required three therapeutic doses of I-131. Following I-131 therapy, the suppression of TSH levels in serum disappeared in 607 (76%) of treated patients. An average volume reduction of 38% was noted in the thyroid gland following I-131. Side effects were minimal and only a few patients complained of transient neck pressure, pain and neck swelling. Postradiation hypothyroidism was diagnosed in 36 patients (4.5%). We conclude that radio iodine treatment is the most comfortable and economical approach to the treatment of the thyroid functional autonomies. The results of our approach show that the radioiodine therapy of the thyroid functional autonomies is safe, with low incidence of adverse effects

  14. The interpretation and management of thyroid disorders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    population reference range, will induce very pronounced TSH changes. ... An overview of the management of ... The interpretation and management of thyroid disorders ..... Tietz textbook of clinical cemistry and molecular diagnostics. 4th ed.

  15. Procedure guidelines for radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 3); Verfahrensanweisung zur Radioiodtherapie (RIT) beim differenzierten Schilddruesenkarzinom (Version 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Dressler, J. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Nuklearmedizinsiche Klinik der Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany); Eschner, W. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Medizinische Physik (DGMP) (Germany); Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Gruenwald, F. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Lassmann, M. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Medizinische Physik (DGMP) (Germany); Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Leisner, B. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Allgemeines Krankenhaus St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany); Luster, M.; Reiners, C. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Moser, E. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany); Schober, O. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Muenster Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2007-07-01

    The procedure guideline for radioiodine therapy (RIT) of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 3) is the counterpart to the procedure guideline for {sup 131}I whole-body scintigraphy (version 3) and specify the interdisciplinary guideline for thyroid cancer of the Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft concerning the nuclear medicine part. Recommendation for ablative {sup 131}I therapy is given for all differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) >1 cm. Regarding DTC {<=}1 cm {sup 131}I ablation may be helpful in an individual constellation. Preparation for {sup 131}I ablation requires low iodine diet for two weeks and TSH stimulation by withdrawal of thyroid hormone medication or by use of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH). The advantages of rhTSH (no symptoms of hypothyroidism, lowerblood activity) and the advantages of endogenous TSH stimulation (necessary for {sup 131}I-therapy in patients with metastases, higher sensitivity of {sup 131}I whole-body scan) are discussed. In most centers standard activities are used for {sup 131}I ablation. If pretherapeutic dosimetry is planned, the diagnostic administration of {sup 131}I should not exceed 1-10MBq, alternative tracers are {sup 123}I or {sup 124}I. The recommendations for contraception and family planning are harmonized with the recommendation of ATA and ETA. Regarding the best possible protection of salivary glands the evidence is insufficient to recommend a specific setting. To minimize the risk of dental caries due to xerostomia patients should use preventive strategies for dental hygiene. (orig.)

  16. A computer simulation study of optimal thyroid radiation protection during investigations involving the administration of radioiodine-labelled pharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, R.; Hammond, B.J.

    1978-01-01

    The administration of iodide for thyroid blocking is now known to carry its own risks, at least in certain categories of patients. A theoretical study has been made by computer simulation of the efficacy of various thyroid blocking regimes. In the case of injected 125 I- or 131 I-iodide, substantial thyroid protection may theoretically be achieved by a single oral dose of inorganic iodide, for example a 90% reduction in radiation dose is produced by only 20 mg iodide. Repeating the initial blocking dose is of little value. A single blocking dose, however, affords poor protection against radioiodine released from labelled plasma proteins. Both for short-lived proteins such as fibrinogen, and for the longer-lived proteins such as albumin, the optimum dosage schedule appears to be stable iodide given daily for two to three weeks. For instance, 10 mg daily for a fortnight will reduce thyroid irradiation by a factor of ten following injections of 125 I-fibrinogen. (author)

  17. The efficacy of radioiodine remnant ablation for differentiated thyroid carcinoma patients with an incomplete thyroidectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FU, Hongliang; MA, Chao; LI, Jianing; FENG, Fang; WU, Shuqi; YE, Zhiyi; WANG, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) for differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) patients with an incomplete thyroidectomy. The medical histories of post surgical DTC patients who accepted RRA between 2010 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Among them, 113 patients who had undergone a total or near-total thyroidectomy comprised the complete thyroidectomy group (CT group) and the remaining 40 patients who had undergone a lobectomy or sub-total thyroidectomy comprised the incomplete thyroidectomy group (ICT group). The difference in the patients’ age, gender, histology, serum TSH level and 24hr radioactive iodine uptake (RIU) between the two groups was analyzed by χ2 Test or ANOVA. The efficacy of RRA in ICT group was evaluated by comparing its rate of complete ablation after the first RRA and its cumulative rate of complete ablation after the second RRA to the rate of complete ablation after the first RRA in CT group respectively by χ2 Test. Of all the clinical characteristics, only serum TSH level and 24hr RIU have significant difference between two groups (P<0.01 for both). The rate of complete ablation after the first RRA was 67.26% in CT group. The rate of complete ablation after the first RRA and the cumulative rate of complete ablation after the second RRA was 27.50% and 67.50% respectively in ICT group. The ablative rate of the first RRA between the two groups was compared by χ2 Test and the difference was significant (P<0.01). The ablative rate of the first RRA in CT group was compared with the cumulative rate of the second RRA in ICT group and the difference was not significant (P=0.978). Although the efficacy of RRA in DTC patients with an incomplete thyroidectomy is not as good as that of patients with a complete thyroidectomy after the first RRA, a higher ablative rate can still be achieved after the second or third RRA.

  18. Serum thyroxine and age - rather than thyroid volume and serum TSH - are determinants of the thyroid radioiodine uptake in patients with nodular goiter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, S J; Fast, S; Nielsen, V E

    2011-01-01

    patients (146 females; age range: 22-87 yrs.) with nodular goiter (median 64 ml, range: 20-464 ml) selected for 131I therapy. Serum TSH was sub-normal in 42.4%. None were treated with anti-thyroid drugs. The thyroid RAIU was determined at 24h and 96h. The goiter volume was measured by ultrasound (n=127......Background: 131I therapy is widely used for treatment of non-toxic goiters. A limitation for this treatment is a low thyroid radioiodine uptake (RAIU), often encountered in these patients. Aim: To estimate the impact of various factors on the thyroid RAIU. Methods: We examined prospectively 170......), or by magnetic resonance imaging (n=43). Results: The 24h and the 96h RAIU were 34.2±9.8(SD)% (range:11.4-66.0%) and 34.0±10.0% (range:10.5-60.9%), respectively. Sixty-one patients had a 24h RAIU...

  19. [Thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffet, Camille; Groussin, Lionel

    2013-02-01

    The diagnosis of thyroiditis encompasses a broad spectrum of thyroid disorders. Analysis of signs and symptoms, biochemical changes, neck ultrasound characteristics and radioactive iodine uptake values allows an accurate diagnosis. Recent studies of the whole genome have helped to identify many susceptibility genes for autoimmune thyroiditis. However, none of these genes contribute to a significant increase in risk of developing this thyroiditis. Clinical awareness of the characteristic presentations of exceptional thyroiditis (acute suppurative thyroiditis, Riedel's thyroiditis) is an important issue. Selenium administration seems to be beneficial for reducing the incidence of thyroiditis. Finally, certain drug-induced thyroiditis remains a therapeutic challenge for the physician.

  20. Effect of radioiodine irradiation of thyroid gland in vitro with a dose of 4-5 Gy on iodide transport in thyrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paster, Yi.P.

    2000-01-01

    We study the influence of ouabain on the basal and thyrotropin-stimulated iodide uptake in thyroid gland preliminarily irradiated by radioiodine (absorbed dose: 4-5 Gy) in vitro. Newborn pig thyroid tissue was incubated in a medium, containing 37 kBq/ml of 131-iodine (absorbed dose: 4-5 Gy), washed and achieved by collagenase dissociation. Thyrocytes were incubated with thyrotropin (100.0 mE/ml), ouabain (0.1 mol/l), and 125-iodide (0.4 kBq/ml). Then cells were washed, stored at 4 degree C for 60 days, and the 125-iodide uptake was assessed. Ouabain depressed both the basal and thyrotropin-stimulated iodide uptakes by thyrocytes in vitro. After preliminary radioiodine irradiation of the thyroid tissue (absorbed dose: 4-5 Gy), ouabain stimulated both the basal and thyrotropin-stimulated iodide uptakes by thyrocytes

  1. Radioiodine therapy effects on offspring of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma; Efeitos da radioiodoterapia nas geracoes futuras de mulheres com carcinoma diferenciado de tireoide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Carmen Dolores Goncalves [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Endocrinologia]. E-mail: loloi@zaz.com.br; Antonucci, Jane [Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Medicina Nuclear; Correa, Nilson Duarte [Hospital dos Servidores do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear; Corbo, Rossana; Vaisman, Mario [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2004-02-01

    Radioiodine therapy has attained a significant role in the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer. The literature addressing possible secondary effects of {sup 131} I is limited, although there has been increasingly interest in this field. A more comprehensive understanding of the mutagenic effects of radiation on the offspring of women exposed to {sup 131} I is mandatory in view of the possibility of occurrence of miscarriages, congenital abnormalities and malignancies in these children. In this review, we found that many reports on safety of this type of treatment in female patients in reproductive age recommend that pregnancy should be avoided for at least one year after therapeutic administration of radioiodine. (author)

  2. Treatment of medulloblastoma using an oncolytic measles virus encoding the thyroidal sodium iodide symporter shows enhanced efficacy with radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutzen, Brian; Pierson, Christopher R; Russell, Stephen J; Galanis, Evanthia; Raffel, Corey; Studebaker, Adam W

    2012-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. Although the clinical outcome for medulloblastoma patients has improved significantly, children afflicted with the disease frequently suffer from debilitating side effects related to the aggressive nature of currently available therapy. Alternative means for treating medulloblastoma are desperately needed. We have previously shown that oncolytic measles virus (MV) can selectively target and destroy medulloblastoma tumor cells in localized and disseminated models of the disease. MV-NIS, an oncolytic measles virus that encodes the human thyroidal sodium iodide symporter (NIS), has the potential to deliver targeted radiotherapy to the tumor site and promote a localized bystander effect above and beyond that achieved by MV alone. We evaluated the efficacy of MV-NIS against medulloblastoma cells in vitro and examined their ability to incorporate radioiodine at various timepoints, finding peak uptake at 48 hours post infection. The effects of MV-NIS were also evaluated in mouse xenograft models of localized and disseminated medulloblastoma. Athymic nude mice were injected with D283med-Luc medulloblastoma cells in the caudate putamen (localized disease) or right lateral ventricle (disseminated disease) and subsequently treated with MV-NIS. Subsets of these mice were given a dose of 131 I at 24, 48 or 72 hours later. MV-NIS treatment, both by itself and in combination with 131 I, elicited tumor stabilization and regression in the treated mice and significantly extended their survival times. Mice given 131 I were found to concentrate radioiodine at the site of their tumor implantations. In addition, mice with localized tumors that were given 131 I either 24 or 48 hours after MV-NIS treatment exhibited a significant survival advantage over mice given MV-NIS alone. These data suggest MV-NIS plus radioiodine may be a potentially useful therapy for the treatment of medulloblastoma

  3. Treatment of medulloblastoma using an oncolytic measles virus encoding the thyroidal sodium iodide symporter shows enhanced efficacy with radioiodine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutzen Brian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. Although the clinical outcome for medulloblastoma patients has improved significantly, children afflicted with the disease frequently suffer from debilitating side effects related to the aggressive nature of currently available therapy. Alternative means for treating medulloblastoma are desperately needed. We have previously shown that oncolytic measles virus (MV can selectively target and destroy medulloblastoma tumor cells in localized and disseminated models of the disease. MV-NIS, an oncolytic measles virus that encodes the human thyroidal sodium iodide symporter (NIS, has the potential to deliver targeted radiotherapy to the tumor site and promote a localized bystander effect above and beyond that achieved by MV alone. Methods We evaluated the efficacy of MV-NIS against medulloblastoma cells in vitro and examined their ability to incorporate radioiodine at various timepoints, finding peak uptake at 48 hours post infection. The effects of MV-NIS were also evaluated in mouse xenograft models of localized and disseminated medulloblastoma. Athymic nude mice were injected with D283med-Luc medulloblastoma cells in the caudate putamen (localized disease or right lateral ventricle (disseminated disease and subsequently treated with MV-NIS. Subsets of these mice were given a dose of 131I at 24, 48 or 72 hours later. Results MV-NIS treatment, both by itself and in combination with 131I, elicited tumor stabilization and regression in the treated mice and significantly extended their survival times. Mice given 131I were found to concentrate radioiodine at the site of their tumor implantations. In addition, mice with localized tumors that were given 131I either 24 or 48 hours after MV-NIS treatment exhibited a significant survival advantage over mice given MV-NIS alone. Conclusions These data suggest MV-NIS plus radioiodine may be a potentially useful therapy for

  4. Thyroid stimulating antibodies, thyroglobulin antibodies and serum proteins during treatment of graves' disease with radioiodine or propylthouracil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, U; Bech, K; Johansen, K; Nistrup Madsen, S [Dept. of Internal Medicine and Endocrinology F, Herlev University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Date, J; Hyltoft Pedersen, P [Dept. of Clinical Chemistry, Odense University Hospital, (Denmark)

    1982-01-01

    The relation between serum concentrations of thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb), thyroid stimulating antibodies (TSAb) and serum immunoglobulins during treatment of Graves disease was studied in 36 consecutive patients treated randomly with 131-iodine (n=16) or propylthiouracil (n=20). The patients were investigated before treatment was started and on seven occasions within the following year. In the entire patient group 78% were positive for TSAb and 47% for TgAb. There was a significant correlation between TSAb and TgAb in 15 patients concomitantly positive. There were no significant changes in serum immunoglobulins during treatment in either group of patients. In the radioiodine-treated group of patients TgAb was reduced after one week, whereas TSAb showed insignificant variations. After 5-10 weeks both antibodies increased, for TgAb with a median peak level 3 times above the initial concentration. Of 16 patients treated with radioiodine five developed myxoedema and four of these were positive for TgAb. There was a relation between the development of myxoedema and the ratio between increases of TSAb and TgAb. Increase in the TSAb was not related to serum thyroglobulin (Tg) measured in TgAb-negative patients. Propylthiouracil showed minor effects on the studied variables, but with lower mean values of Tg, TgAb and TSAb at the end of the observation period. The results indicate an immunological relation between TSAb and TgAb, although differences between their courses exist in some situations.

  5. Thyroid Disorders and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mohamedali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones play a very important role regulating metabolism, development, protein synthesis, and influencing other hormone functions. The two main hormones produced by the thyroid are triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4. These hormones can also have significant impact on kidney disease so it is important to consider the physiological association of thyroid dysfunction in relation to chronic kidney disease (CKD. CKD has been known to affect the pituitary-thyroid axis and the peripheral metabolism of thyroid hormones. Low T3 levels are the most common laboratory finding followed by subclinical hypothyroidism in CKD patients. Hyperthyroidism is usually not associated with CKD but has been known to accelerate it. One of the most important links between thyroid disorders and CKD is uremia. Patients who are appropriately treated for thyroid disease have a less chance of developing renal dysfunction. Clinicians need to be very careful in treating patients with low T3 levels who also have an elevation in TSH, as this can lead to a negative nitrogen balance. Thus, clinicians should be well educated on the role of thyroid hormones in relation to CKD so that proper treatment can be delivered to the patient.

  6. Sustained ERK inhibition maximizes responses of BrafV600E thyroid cancers to radioiodine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagarajah, J.; Le, M.; Knauf, J.A.; Ferrandino, G.; Montero-Conde, C.; Pillarsetty, N.; Bolaender, A.; Irwin, C.; Krishnamoorthy, G.P.; Saqcena, M.; Larson, S.M.; Ho, A.L.; Seshan, V.; Ishii, N.; Carrasco, N.; Rosen, N.; Weber, W.A.; Fagin, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Radioiodide (RAI) therapy of thyroid cancer exploits the relatively selective ability of thyroid cells to transport and accumulate iodide. Iodide uptake requires expression of critical genes that are involved in various steps of thyroid hormone biosynthesis. ERK signaling, which is markedly

  7. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease based on tissue-absorbed dose calculations: effect of pre-treatment thyroid volume on clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Michael J; Joe, Alexius Y; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer; Palmedo, Holger [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Brink, Ingo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Freiburg (Germany); Krause, Thomas M [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital Bern (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    This study was performed with three aims. The first was to analyse the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with and without goitres under conditions of mild iodine deficiency using several tissue-absorbed doses. The second aim was to detect further parameters which might be predictive for treatment outcome. Finally, we wished to determine the deviation of the therapeutically achieved dose from that intended. Activities of 185-2,220 MBq radioiodine were calculated by means of Marinelli's formula to deliver doses of 150, 200 or 300 Gy to the thyroids of 224 patients with Graves' disease and goitres up to 130 ml in volume. Control of hyperthyroidism, change in thyroid volume and thyrotropin-receptor antibodies were evaluated 15{+-}9 months after treatment for each dose. The results were further evaluated with respect to pre-treatment parameters which might be predictive for therapy outcome. Thyroidal radioiodine uptake was measured every day during therapy to determine the therapeutically achieved target dose and its coefficient of variation. There was a significant dose dependency in therapeutic outcome: frequency of hypothyroidism increased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 67.7% after 300 Gy, while the frequency of persistent hyperthyroidism decreased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 8.1% after 300 Gy. Patients who became hypothyroid had a maximum thyroid volume of 42 ml and received a target dose of 256{+-}80 Gy. The coefficient of variation for the achieved target dose ranged between 27.7% for 150 Gy and 17.8% for 300 Gy. When analysing further factors which might influence therapeutic outcome, only pre-treatment thyroid volume showed a significant relationship to the result of treatment. It is concluded that a target dose of 250 Gy is essential to achieve hypothyroidism within 1 year after radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with goitres up to 40 ml in volume. Patients with larger goitres might need higher doses. (orig.)

  8. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease based on tissue-absorbed dose calculations: effect of pre-treatment thyroid volume on clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Joe, Alexius Y.; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer; Palmedo, Holger; Brink, Ingo; Krause, Thomas M.

    2002-01-01

    This study was performed with three aims. The first was to analyse the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with and without goitres under conditions of mild iodine deficiency using several tissue-absorbed doses. The second aim was to detect further parameters which might be predictive for treatment outcome. Finally, we wished to determine the deviation of the therapeutically achieved dose from that intended. Activities of 185-2,220 MBq radioiodine were calculated by means of Marinelli's formula to deliver doses of 150, 200 or 300 Gy to the thyroids of 224 patients with Graves' disease and goitres up to 130 ml in volume. Control of hyperthyroidism, change in thyroid volume and thyrotropin-receptor antibodies were evaluated 15±9 months after treatment for each dose. The results were further evaluated with respect to pre-treatment parameters which might be predictive for therapy outcome. Thyroidal radioiodine uptake was measured every day during therapy to determine the therapeutically achieved target dose and its coefficient of variation. There was a significant dose dependency in therapeutic outcome: frequency of hypothyroidism increased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 67.7% after 300 Gy, while the frequency of persistent hyperthyroidism decreased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 8.1% after 300 Gy. Patients who became hypothyroid had a maximum thyroid volume of 42 ml and received a target dose of 256±80 Gy. The coefficient of variation for the achieved target dose ranged between 27.7% for 150 Gy and 17.8% for 300 Gy. When analysing further factors which might influence therapeutic outcome, only pre-treatment thyroid volume showed a significant relationship to the result of treatment. It is concluded that a target dose of 250 Gy is essential to achieve hypothyroidism within 1 year after radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with goitres up to 40 ml in volume. Patients with larger goitres might need higher doses. (orig.)

  9. Clinical significance of thyroglobulin autoantibodies enhancement in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer after thyroidectomy and radioiodine therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Severskaya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to evaluate the clinical utility of antithyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb as a tumor marker in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC after thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation. Patients and methods. From 345 consecutive DTC patients after thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation we select ed 148 patients with elevated TgAb level (with distant metastasis n = 93, without distant metastasis n = 55. Serum TgAb concentration was measured before radioiodine ablation and then every time before 131I treatment (RIT or diagnostic 131I whole body scanning (WBS. Results were compared with serum thyroglobulin (Tg concentration, neck echography, lung and bone roentgenography and 131I WBS findings. Results. TgAb level was elevated in 21% DTC patients before 131I ablation. The other 22% with initially normal TgAb displayed their rising during followup. In absence of distant metastasis TgAb declined after 1 st–2 nd cycle of RIT (an average 8.9 months after 131I ablation. Persistance or rising of TgAb in the longer term was associated with detectable thyroid remnant, residual tumor or metastatic lymph nodes. In case of negative TgAb status after sugery an increase of TgAb during first 3–6 months after ablation indicated mostly a response to the rise of Tg antigen secondary to 131I ablation. A rise TgAb in the longer term (after 3rd–5th cycles of RIT indicated to residual or recurrent disease in 86% cases. In patients with distant metastasis there were no correlation between change in TgAb concentration and clinical sta tus, including the rate of regression of metastatic disease. But in case of low or undetectable Tg and permanent high TgAb level only TgAb indicated the presence of disease. Conclusion: persistence or rising TgAb in longer term after 131I ablation can serve as surrogate tumor marker of per sistent or recurrent disease. It is critical to measure TgAb concentration, especially in patients with low or unde tectable Tg, because

  10. First results of radioiodine therapy of multifocal and disseminated functional thyroid autonomy using a TcTUs-adapted dose concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oexle, C.; Reinhardt, M.; Moser, E.

    1998-01-01

    Aim: The presented study examines prospectively the efficiency of a dose concept for radioiodine therapy (RIT) adapted to the pretherapeutic 99m Tc-pertechnetate thyroid uptake under suppression (TcTU s ) in patients with multifocal (MFA) and disseminated (DISA) autonomy. This concept considers the total thyroid as target volume and uses target doses from 150 Gy to 300 Gy according to the TcTU s , which is as a measure for the 'autonomous volume' of the thyroid. Methods: The data of 75 patients (54 female, 21 male; age 71±9 years) with MFA or DISA were evaluated. RIT was performed on patients presenting with normal values for free triiodothyronine and thyroxine and endogenous suppression of the basal thyrotropin (TSH). The following target doses were used: For a TcTU s of 1,5-2,5% 150 Gy, for 2,51-3,5% 200 Gy, for 3,51-4,5% 250 Gy, and for >4,5% 300 Gy. The radiation dose to be administered was calculated using a modified Marinelli formula. The therapy was considered as successful when the basal TSH was above 0,5 mU/l and autonomous areas had disapeared in thyroid scintigraphy or the TcTU was below 1,5%, respectively. The average follow-up period was 8±4 months. Results: The success rates average to 92%. Only in one case a subsequent subclinical hypothyroidism and in a further case an immunogenic hyperthyroidism occured. Conclusion: The presented data indicate, that even patients with a marked autonomy (TcTU s >3,5%) can thus expected to be cured by of a onetime therapy with success rate of over 90% using the presented dose concept. The rate of early hypothyroidism can alltogether be estimated as very low. (orig.) [de

  11. Influence of preceding diagnostic and therapeutic procedures on the radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases. Einfluss vorangegangener diagnostischer und therapeutischer Massnahmen auf die Radiojodtherapie gutartiger Schilddruesenerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rendl, J.; Boerner, W. (Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin)

    1991-02-01

    Before and until 3 weeks after application of nonionic CA iodine and the 20-min-technetium-thyroid-uptake was measured in serum and urine in 23 euthyroid patients, which were given intravenously nonionic CA during heart catheterization. Concerning the possible influence of iodine contamination on a subsequent radioiodine therapy the following aspects result from the study: the time interval between application of CA and therapy has to be at least 4-6 weeks to avoid dilution of the radioiodine by iodine being released from the contrast agents. The thyroid-uptake of Technetium or Iodine after administration of CA is not constant over time but reaches its original value only in a gradual way (60% of the initial value 3 weeks after the CA were given); that means, the iodine-uptake during, radioiodine therapy can be higher than it was at the time the dose was calculated. Concerning the possible influence of preceding therapeutic procedures on the therapy with radioiodine the pretreatment with antithyroid drugs plays the most important role. Antithyroid drugs of the thiourylene group have been shown by many study groups to have a radioprotective effect. Other large studies however could not demonstrate any effect of antithyroid medication on the results of radioiodine therapy. All studies so far existing have in common that they are not strongly randomized with regard to the patient groups, because generally only in severe cases of hyperthyroidism additional antithyroid drug treatment has been employed, therefore it might be the case that the radioprotective effect of antithyroid drugs may be caused only by selection artifacts. The contradictory results of the different studies justify the practical way in so far as there are no reasonable objections against the pretreatment with antithyroid drugs to restore euthyroidism before starting the therapy with radioiodine. (orig./MG).

  12. Primary thyroid disorders in endogenous Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepomniszcze, Hugo; Pitoia, Fabian; Katz, Silvia B; Chervin, Raul; Bruno, Oscar D

    2002-09-01

    To study the prevalence of primary thyroid disorders in patients who underwent endogenous hypercortisolism. Retrospective evaluation of 59 patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) who had, at least, a record of thyroid palpation by expert endocrinologists and basal measurements of TSH by second generation assays. When available, tri-iodothyronine and thyroxine serum levels, TRH-TSH tests and anti-thyroid antibodies were also analyzed. There were two age- and gender-matched control groups. The 'goiter control group' comprised 118 healthy subjects who underwent thyroid palpation. The 'antibody control group' was composed of 40 individuals who attended the blood bank of our hospital. Antibodies against thyroperoxidase and measurements of TSH were analyzed in their blood samples. Available files of 83 CS patients admitted to our endocrine unit from 1985 to 1998 were examined. Fifty-nine patients (52 women and 7 men) with a mean age of 36.2 years (range 14-61 years) met the above requirements. Diagnosis of hypercortisolism had been established by a standard 1-mg overnight dexamethasone suppression test and urinary free cortisol (UFC). Etiological diagnosis involved dynamic testing, measurements of ACTH levels and imaging techniques. After treatment, all but one of the patients were cured or controlled of their hypercortisolism. This was established by the finding of subnormal serum cortisol concentrations and/or subnormal 24-h UFC levels. Primary thyroid disorders were defined by the presence of one or more of the following diagnostic criteria: (i) goiter, (ii) positive anti-thyroid antibodies and/or (iii) primary thyroid function abnormalities. Eighteen (30.5%) patients had goiter (diffuse in 78% and nodular in 22%), 14 (23.7%) had primary subclinical hypothyroidism and 5 (8.4%) had hyperthyroidism. In 41 patients evaluated for antithyroid antibodies, it was found that 23 (56.1%) had positive titers. In a group of patients in which thyroid autoantibodies were measured

  13. Sustained ERK inhibition maximizes responses of BrafV600E thyroid cancers to radioiodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajah, James; Le, Mina; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Ferrandino, Giuseppe; Montero-Conde, Cristina; Pillarsetty, Nagavarakishore; Bolaender, Alexander; Irwin, Christopher; Krishnamoorthy, Gnana Prakasam; Saqcena, Mahesh; Larson, Steven M; Ho, Alan L; Seshan, Venkatraman; Ishii, Nobuya; Carrasco, Nancy; Rosen, Neal; Weber, Wolfgang A; Fagin, James A

    2016-11-01

    Radioiodide (RAI) therapy of thyroid cancer exploits the relatively selective ability of thyroid cells to transport and accumulate iodide. Iodide uptake requires expression of critical genes that are involved in various steps of thyroid hormone biosynthesis. ERK signaling, which is markedly increased in thyroid cancer cells driven by oncogenic BRAF, represses the genetic program that enables iodide transport. Here, we determined that a critical threshold for inhibition of MAPK signaling is required to optimally restore expression of thyroid differentiation genes in thyroid cells and in mice with BrafV600E-induced thyroid cancer. Although the MEK inhibitor selumetinib transiently inhibited ERK signaling, which subsequently rebounded, the MEK inhibitor CKI suppressed ERK signaling in a sustained manner by preventing RAF reactivation. A small increase in ERK inhibition markedly increased the expression of thyroid differentiation genes, increased iodide accumulation in cancer cells, and thereby improved responses to RAI therapy. Only a short exposure to the drug was necessary to obtain a maximal response to RAI. These data suggest that potent inhibition of ERK signaling is required to adequately induce iodide uptake and indicate that this is a promising strategy for the treatment of BRAF-mutant thyroid cancer.

  14. Susceptibility to thyroid disorders in hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Luigi; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Muratori, Paolo; Lenzi, Marco; Granito, Alessandro; Ma, Yun; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Bianchi, Francesco B; Vergani, Diego

    2005-06-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disorders (AITDs) are reported, especially during interferon treatment, in chronic HCV infection, in which non-organ-specific autoantibodies (NOSAs) are common. We wondered whether seropositivity for NOSA is associated with susceptibility to AITDs. We evaluated thyroid function and antithyroglobulin and antithyroperoxidase antibodies in 348 Italian patients with chronic hepatitis C (34% NOSA-positive), 196 patients (33% NOSA-positive) of whom received interferon treatment. At baseline, thyroid disorders were significantly more frequent in liver/kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1)-positive patients (29% vs 9%, P LKM1-positive patients (50% vs 3%, P LKM1 positivity were predictors of AITD, but only the latter remained significant after logistic regression analysis. Cross-reactivity to all 7 linear epitopes encoding homologous amino acid sequences shared by the HCV polyprotein, CYP2D6 (the LKM1 autoantigen), and thyroperoxidase was detected in 86% LKM1-positive HCV patients with clinical thyroid disorders, but in none of the LKM1-positive or negative HCV patients without thyroid disease, and none of an HCV-negative control group comprising subjects with LKM1-positive autoimmune hepatitis or AITD without liver disease ( P LKM1 are susceptible to develop AITDs, in association with treatment. Molecular mimicry and epitope spreading are potential pathogenic mechanisms.

  15. Follow-up on thyroidal uptake after radioiodine therapy. How robust is the peri-therapeutic dosimetry?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschner, Wolfgang; Kobe, Carsten; Schicha, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy (RIT) for benign thyroid diseases in Germany requires the patient to stay in a nuclear medicine therapy ward for at least 48 hours and the dose to the thyroid to be computed from activity measurements performed during that stay. A major part of the total dose will be delivered after the patient's discharge from the hospital and thus has to be predicted through extrapolation with the effective half-life measured peri-therapeutically. We performed repeated thyroid uptake measurements on patients up to five months post therapy to investigate post-therapeutic changes in their effective half-lives and examine the dosimetric consequences. 12 patients (4 m, 8 f; age 36 - 76 y; 4 Graves' disease, 4 toxic adenoma, 3 toxic goitre, 1 non-toxic goitre) underwent late uptake measurements (1 - 7 meas., 13 - 154 d post administration, median 54 d, performed with thyroid probe resp. whole body counter at lower activities). Doses calculated from late measurements were compared to those predicted at discharge; half-lives calculated from the late measurement closest to the median delay (54 d) were compared to those determined at time of discharge. A cross-calibration between activity calibrator, thyroid probe, and whole body counter over an activity range from 52 MBq down to 45 Bq revealed linearity to within 6%, which was considered sufficient. In 9 out of 12 patients the achieved dose was within the range predicted at discharge. Averaged deviation between achieved and predicted dose was 3.1 ± 2.2% (median 2.5%, range 0.7% - 7.2%). Averaged deviation between post- and peri-therapeutic half-lives was 5.1 ± 3.9% (median 3.5%, range 1.3% - 12.5%). For n=5 patients discharged after 3 days, averaged deviations were greater (dose 4.0%, half-life 5.6%) than for those patients (n = 7) who stayed in the hospital for a minimum of 4 days (dose 2.5%, half-life 4.8%). Excretion of iodine from the thyroid remains practically unchanged for at least two months after RIT. The

  16. Radioiodine therapy and thyrostatic drugs and iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moka, D.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Cologne, Joseph Stelzmannstrasse 9, 50924 Koeln (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Radioiodine therapy is now the most common definite treatment for persistent hyperthyroidism. The outcome of radioiodine therapy depends mainly on the absorbed energy dose in the diseased thyroid tissue. The administered activity and the resulting target dose in the thyroid depend on both the biokinetics of radioiodine and the actual therapeutic effect of radioiodine in the thyroid. Thyrostatic drugs have a major influence on the kinetics of radioiodine in the thyroid and may additionally have a radioprotective effect. Pre-treatment with thyrostatic medication lowers the effective half-life and uptake of radioiodine. This can reduce the target dose in the thyroid and have a negative influence on the outcome of the therapy. Discontinuation of medication shortly before radioiodine administration can increase the absorbed energy dose in the thyroid without increasing the whole-body exposure to radiation as much as would a higher or second radioiodine administration. Furthermore, administration of non-radioactive iodine-127 2-3 days after radioiodine administration can also increase the effective half-life of radioiodine in the thyroid. Thus, improving the biokinetics of radioiodine will allow lower activities to be administered with lower effective doses to the rest of the body, while achieving an equally effective target dose in the thyroid. (orig.)

  17. Down's syndrome and thyroid disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinani, S; Carpenter, S

    1990-04-01

    The thyroid status of 106 adults with Down's syndrome was assessed. Six were previously diagnosed as hypothyroid and were already receiving thyroxine. A further 37 patients showed abnormal thyroid function. Biochemical evidence of hypothyroidism (T4 less than 50 nmol/l and T.S.H. greater than 4 mu/less than) was found in one person. Six patients were found to have an unequivocally elevated T.S.H. but normal T4 (T4 greater than 50 nmol/l and T.S.H. greater than 20 mu/l) and 29 were found to have a modest elevation of T.S.H. but normal T4 concentration (T4 greater than 50 nmol/l and T.S.H. between 4 and 20 mu/l). There was one patient with mild thyrotoxicosis (T4 = 180 nmol/l and T.S.H. less than 0.1 mu/l). Clinical findings were of little use in making a diagnosis of hypothyroidism in this group of patients. A raised level of thyroid microsomal auto-antibodies was found in about a third of the patients, this occurred more commonly in females and slightly more often in those with a raised thyroid stimulating hormone. The importance of this is discussed. Recommendations for regular biochemical screening are made.

  18. The Interpretation and Management of Thyroid Disorders | Dednam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This short review is intended to simplify the interpretation of thyroid function tests (TFTs) in general practice. The relationship between thyroid hormones and the use of TFTs, as well as thyroid antibodies, is discussed. An overview of the management of common thyroid disorders is included. Less common conditions, e.g. ...

  19. Lithium as adjuvant to radioiodine therapy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma: clinical and in vitro studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y. Y.; van der Pluijm, G.; Karperien, M.; Stokkel, M. P. M.; Pereira, A. M.; Morreau, J.; Kievit, J.; Romijn, J. A.; Smit, J. W. A.

    2006-01-01

    Lithium has been reported to increase radioactive iodine (RaI) doses in benign thyroid disease and in differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). It is not known whether lithium influences the outcome of RaI therapy in DTC. We therefore studied the clinical effects of RaI without and with lithium

  20. Combined use of radioiodine therapy and radiofrequency ablation in treating postsurgical thyroid remnant of differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Long

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Combined use of RAI therapy and radiofrequency ablation in treating excessive postsurgical thyroid remnant of DTC can be an effective approach and avoids re-operation. Long-term efficacy monitoring would further determine its feasibility.

  1. Greater Efficacy of Total Thyroidectomy versus Radioiodine Therapy on Hyperthyroidism and Thyroid-Stimulating Immunoglobulin Levels in Patients with Graves' Disease Previously Treated with Antithyroid Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautbally, Shakeel; Alexopoulou, Orsalia; Daumerie, Chantal; Jamar, François; Mourad, Michel; Maiter, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Aims We compared the effects of total thyroidectomy (TTx) and radioiodine (RAI) administration on the course of thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins (TSI) in patients with Graves' disease. Methods We retrospectively studied 80 patients initially treated with antithyroid drugs and requiring either RAI (8.3 ± 1.7 mCi of 131I; n = 40) or TTx (n = 40) as second-line therapy. Results The TTx and RAI groups were not different, except for larger goiter, higher FT3 and more frequent Graves' orbitopathy at diagnosis in the surgery group (p antithyroid drugs. PMID:24783007

  2. A dosimetric approach to patient-specific radioiodine treatment of Graves' disease with incorporation of treatment-induced changes in thyroid mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traino, A. Claudio; Di Martino, Fabio; Lazzeri, Mauro

    2004-01-01

    The traditional algorithms (Marinelli-Quimby and MIRD) used for the absorbed dose calculation in radionuclide therapy generally assume that the mass of the target organs does not change with time. In radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease this approximation may not be valid. In this paper a mathematical model of thyroid mass reduction during the clearance phase (30-35 days) after 131 I administration to patients with Graves' disease is presented. A new algorithm for the absorbed dose calculation is derived, taking into account the reduction of the mass of the gland resulting from the 131 I therapy. It is demonstrated that thyroid mass reduction has a considerable effect on the calculated radiation dose. Either the model of the thyroid mass reduction or the new equation for the absorbed dose calculation depend on a parameter k for each patient. This parameter can be calculated after the administration of a diagnostic amount of radioiodine activity (0.37-1.85 MBq). Thus, thyroid absorbed dose and thyroid mass reduction during the first month after therapy can be predicted before therapy administration. The absorbed dose values calculated by the new algorithm are compared to those calculated by the traditional Marinelli-Quimby and MIRD algorithms

  3. 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC in the diagnosis of differentiated thyroid carcinoma refractory to radioiodine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czepczyński, Rafał; Gryczyńska, Maria; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-01-01

    In majority of cases of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), the ablative radioiodine treatment shows high efficacy. In a small number of patients, mechanism of selective iodine uptake by the DTC cells is insufficient and alternative methods of diagnosis and treatment are needed. As demonstrated in vitro, DTC cells show expression of somatostatin recep-tors. Radiolabeled somatostatin analogs are widely used in the diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors. The aim of the study was to evaluate the utility of peptide receptor scintigraphy with the use of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC in the diagnosis of DTC in patients with elevated thyroglobulin concentrations (Tg), negative WBS and no effect of the consecutive radioiodine therapies. Whole body scintigraphy as well as SPECT of neck and chest were performed 3 and 24 h after i.v. administration of 740 MBq 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC. The obtained images were compared with other radionuclide and ra-diological imaging methods. Forty-three patients with DTC after surgery and ablative radioiodine treatment with negative WBS and elevated Tg were qualified. Patients' age: 18-83 years (mean 58.0). SRS showed foci of tracer accumulation in 29 cases (67.4%). Sensitivity was 69.0% specificity 78.6%. SRS correctly identified local recurrence in 8 pts., metastatic lymph nodes in 19 pts., lung metastases in 12 pts. and bone metastases in 5 pts. SRS showed high sensitivity in the detection of metastatic lymph nodes (100%) and bone metastases (83.3%) and lung metastases (63.2%). Positive SRS was found in pts. with higher Tg concentrations (130 ± 144 vs. 30 ± 54 ng/ml). Scintigraphy with the use of the studied technetium-99m-labeled somatostatin analog is useful in the evaluation of patients with advanced DTC. It shows relatively good sensitivity and specificity but not high enough to be recommended as a routine imaging method. The role of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in DTC is complementary to other imaging modalities.

  4. The management of metastatic radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer requires an integrated approach including both directed and systemic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooray, Shamil D; Topliss, Duncan J

    2017-01-01

    A 58-year-old man with metastatic radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) presented with left thigh and right flank numbness. He had known progressive and widespread bony metastases, for which he received palliative radiotherapy, and multiple bilateral asymptomatic pulmonary metastases. CT scan and MRI of the spine revealed metastases at right T10-L1 vertebrae with extension into the central canal and epidural disease at T10 and T11 causing cord displacement and canal stenosis but retention of spinal cord signal. Spinal surgery was followed by palliative radiotherapy resulting in symptom resolution. Two months later, sorafenib received approval for use in Australia and was commenced and up-titrated with symptomatic management of mild adverse effects. Follow-up CT scan three months after commencement of sorafenib revealed regression of pulmonary metastases but no evident change in most bone metastases except for an advancing lesion eroding into the right acetabulum. The patient underwent a right total hip replacement, intra-lesional curettage and cementing. After six months of sorafenib therapy, CT scanning showed enlarging liver lesions with marked elevation of serum thyroglobulin. Lenvatinib was commenced and sorafenib was ceased. He now has stable disease with a falling thyroglobulin more than 5 years after metastatic radioiodine-refractory DTC was diagnosed. In DTC, 5% of distant metastases become radioiodine-refractory, resulting in a median overall survival of 2.5-3.5 years. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy has recently been demonstrated to increase progression-free survival in these patients but poses some unique management issues and is best used as part of an integrated approach with directed therapy. Directed therapies may have greater potential to control localised disease and related symptoms when compared to systemic therapies.Consider TKI therapy in progressive disease where benefits outweigh risks.Active surveillance and

  5. Value of the Serum Thyroglobulin Level Alteration at the First High Dose Radioiodine Treatment in Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Hyun Yeol; Kim, In Joo; Kim, Yong Ki; Kim, Seong Jang; Jun, Sung Min; Kim, Bum Soo

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate if short-term serum thyroglobulin (Tg) elevation after radioiodine administration can predict successful radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) and whether comparable RRA effectiveness is exhibited between a group administered with recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) and a group experiencing thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW), in preparation for RRA. A retrospective chart review was performed on 39 patients in the rhTSH group and 46 patients in the THW group. They were treated for differentiated thyroid carcinoma by total or near total thyroidectomy, and referred for RRA between 2003 and 2006 (the rhTSH group) and between January and June of 2006 (the THW group). They were assessed for serum Tg levels just before I-131 administration (TgD0), reassessed 9 days later (TgD9), and again 6-12 months later. RRA was successful in 64 (37 from the THW group and 27 from the rhTSH group) of the total 85 patients. The success rates of RRA had no statistically significant differences between the two groups. In both groups, TgD9/TgD0 values were significantly higher in the RRA success group (the rhTSH group; P=0.03, the THW group; P=0.04). By combining cutoff values of TgD0 and TgD9/TgD0, the successful RRA value was determined to be 96.7% (29/30) with TgD0≤5.28 ng/mL and TgD9/TgD0>4.37 in both groups (the rhTSH group; 100% (16/16), the THW group; 92.9% (13/14)). Using logistic multivariate analysis, only TgD0 was independently associated with successful RRA. We may predict successful ablation by evaluating short-term serum Tg elevation after I-131 administration for RRA, in both rhTSH and THW patients

  6. Thyroid disorders in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshikiyo; Inoue, Keisuke; Sugihara, Toru; Oshima, Tetuya; Matsueda, Kazuhiro

    1984-01-01

    There was no difference in blood levels of thyroid stimulating hormones among atomic bomb survivors having normal thyroid function, irrespective of the exposure distance from the explosion. Of 336 atomic bomb survivors admitted to the hospital for health examinations, hyperthyroidism was seen in one patient, hypothyroidism in four, malignant struma in three, and benign tumor in one. The incidence of struma associated with positive antithyroidglobulin antibody tended to be high in atomic bomb survivors living within 1.0 km from the explosion. The overall study in patients visiting the department of internal medicine, in addition to the 336 survivors, revealed that the incidence of thyroid disorders, especially hypothyroidism, was high in survivors directly exposed to atomic bomb. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. Clinical experience of 2-hour I-131 thyroid uptake significance in considering the radioiodine Graves' disease treatment dose: A retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shammeri, I.; Al-Deen Mahmood, S.; Al-Mohannadi, S.; Ballani, N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: It has been noticed that Graves' disease patients with high turnover are likely to experience under dosage when calculating the radioiodine therapeutic dose. We aim to demonstrate our clinical experience of 2-h I-131 uptake% value in estimating the radioiodine dose for Graves' disease patients with rapid washout. Material and methods: We reviewed the medical records for 2080 Graves' disease patients who received radioiodine treatment(s). Patients were distinguished by 2-h I-131 thyroid uptake%: 249 patients (group I) exhibited a rapid washout (>25%), and 250 patients (group II control group) demonstrated normal uptake (6–15%); the age and sex were balanced for both groups. These cases were reviewed for the time taken to control the condition clinically (ideally 3 months is the time needed), the time taken to achieve hypothyroidism (average time is 6 months), and the number of repeated treatments for recurrent thyrotoxicosis or failure of treatment. Results: In 152/249 (61%) patients, the condition was not controlled in the 3 month period post treatment and subsequently they needed more frequent and closer follow up, as opposed to 47/250 patients (19%) in the control group-II. At 6 months, 119/249 (48%) patients in group-I had not achieved hypothyroidism, as opposed to 28/250 patients (11%) in group-II. Seventy-seven patients in group-I (31%) needed a second or third therapeutic dose, as opposed to 10/250 patients (4%) in group-II. Conclusion: We believe that a higher radioiodine dose with significant rapid washout in the thyroid gland of Graves' disease patients would give a greater treatment success rate. - Highlights: • We present our clinical experience of 2-h I-131 uptake% value in Graves' disease. • We reviewed records of hyperthyroid patients who received radioiodine treatment. • Two patients' groups were distinguished by normal and high 2-h I-131 uptake%. • The two groups showed different radioiodine treatment

  8. The Sonographic Features of the Thyroid Gland After Treatment with Radioiodine Therapy in Patients with Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Collette; Casey, Ruth; Bell, Marcia; Bergin, Diane; Murphy, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the typical sonographic features of the thyroid gland in patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism after radioiodine therapy (RIT). Thirty patients (21 female and 9 male) with a mean age of 53 y (standard deviation [SD] ± 11.3) and with previous Graves' disease who had been successfully treated with RIT were enrolled in the study. All were hypothyroid or euthyroid after treatment. The thyroid ultrasound was carried out by a single experienced operator with an 8-MHz linear transducer. Volume, vascularity, echogenicity and echotexture of the glands were noted. The presence of nodules and lymph nodes was also documented. The mean volumes of the right lobe were 2.4 mL ± 2.9 SD (0.6-14) and the left lobe were 1.8 mL ± 1.9 SD (0.4-9.1), with a mean total volume of 4.2 mL ± 4.7 SD (1.3-19.1). Of those who had a pre-treatment ultrasound (23%), the percentage reduction in volume was 87% (p < 0.05); 93% of the glands were hypovascular, with the remaining 7% showing normal vascularity. The glands were hyperechoic and of coarse echotexture. Overall, the sonographic features of the post-RIT gland included a significantly reduced mean total volume of 4.2 mL, hypovascularity, coarse echotexture and hyperechogenicity. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. GATE based Monte Carlo simulation of planar scintigraphy to estimate the nodular dose in radioiodine therapy for autonomous thyroid adenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammes, Jochen; Schmidt, Matthias; Schicha, Harald; Eschner, Wolfgang [Universitaetsklinikum Koeln (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Pietrzyk, Uwe [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Neurowissenschaften und Medizin (INM-4); Wuppertal Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich C - Physik

    2011-07-01

    The recommended target dose in radioiodine therapy of solitary hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules is 300-400 Gy and therefore higher than in other radiotherapies. This is due to the fact that an unknown, yet significant portion of the activity is stored in extranodular areas but is neglected in the calculatory dosimetry. We investigate the feasibility of determining the ratio of nodular and extranodular activity concentrations (uptakes) from post-therapeutically acquired planar scintigrams with Monte Carlo simulations in GATE. The geometry of a gamma camera with a high energy collimator was emulated in GATE (Version 5). A geometrical thyroid-neck phantom (GP) and the ICRP reference voxel phantoms 'Adult Female' (AF, 16 ml thyroid) and 'Adult Male' (AM, 19 ml thyroid) were used as source regions. Nodules of 1 ml and 3 ml volume were placed in the phantoms. For each phantom and each nodule 200 scintigraphic acquisitions were simulated. Uptake ratios of nodule and rest of thyroid ranging from 1 to 20 could be created by summation. Quantitative image analysis was performed by investigating the number of simulated counts in regions of interest (ROIs). ROIs were created by perpendicular projection of the phantom onto the camera plane to avoid a user dependant bias. The ratio of count densities in ROIs over the nodule and over the contralateral lobe, which should be least affected by nodular activity, was taken to be the best available measure for the uptake ratios. However, the predefined uptake ratios are underestimated by these count density ratios: For an uptake ratio of 20 the count ratios range from 4.5 (AF, 1 ml nodule) to 15.3 (AM, 3 ml nodule). Furthermore, the contralateral ROI is more strongly affected by nodular activity than expected: For an uptake ratio of 20 between nodule and rest of thyroid up to 29% of total counts in the ROI over the contralateral lobe are caused by decays in the nodule (AF 3 ml). In the case of the 1 ml nodules this

  10. GATE based Monte Carlo simulation of planar scintigraphy to estimate the nodular dose in radioiodine therapy for autonomous thyroid adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammes, Jochen; Pietrzyk, Uwe; Schmidt, Matthias; Schicha, Harald; Eschner, Wolfgang

    2011-12-01

    The recommended target dose in radioiodine therapy of solitary hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules is 300-400Gy and therefore higher than in other radiotherapies. This is due to the fact that an unknown, yet significant portion of the activity is stored in extranodular areas but is neglected in the calculatory dosimetry. We investigate the feasibility of determining the ratio of nodular and extranodular activity concentrations (uptakes) from post-therapeutically acquired planar scintigrams with Monte Carlo simulations in GATE. The geometry of a gamma camera with a high energy collimator was emulated in GATE (Version 5). A geometrical thyroid-neck phantom (GP) and the ICRP reference voxel phantoms "Adult Female" (AF, 16ml thyroid) and "Adult Male" (AM, 19ml thyroid) were used as source regions. Nodules of 1ml and 3ml volume were placed in the phantoms. For each phantom and each nodule 200 scintigraphic acquisitions were simulated. Uptake ratios of nodule and rest of thyroid ranging from 1 to 20 could be created by summation. Quantitative image analysis was performed by investigating the number of simulated counts in regions of interest (ROIs). ROIs were created by perpendicular projection of the phantom onto the camera plane to avoid a user dependant bias. The ratio of count densities in ROIs over the nodule and over the contralateral lobe, which should be least affected by nodular activity, was taken to be the best available measure for the uptake ratios. However, the predefined uptake ratios are underestimated by these count density ratios: For an uptake ratio of 20 the count ratios range from 4.5 (AF, 1ml nodule) to 15.3 (AM, 3ml nodule). Furthermore, the contralateral ROI is more strongly affected by nodular activity than expected: For an uptake ratio of 20 between nodule and rest of thyroid up to 29% of total counts in the ROI over the contralateral lobe are caused by decays in the nodule (AF 3 ml). In the case of the 1ml nodules this effect is smaller: 9-11% (AF

  11. GATE based Monte Carlo simulation of planar scintigraphy to estimate the nodular dose in radioiodine therapy for autonomous thyroid adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammes, Jochen; Schmidt, Matthias; Schicha, Harald; Eschner, Wolfgang; Pietrzyk, Uwe; Wuppertal Univ.

    2011-01-01

    The recommended target dose in radioiodine therapy of solitary hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules is 300-400 Gy and therefore higher than in other radiotherapies. This is due to the fact that an unknown, yet significant portion of the activity is stored in extranodular areas but is neglected in the calculatory dosimetry. We investigate the feasibility of determining the ratio of nodular and extranodular activity concentrations (uptakes) from post-therapeutically acquired planar scintigrams with Monte Carlo simulations in GATE. The geometry of a gamma camera with a high energy collimator was emulated in GATE (Version 5). A geometrical thyroid-neck phantom (GP) and the ICRP reference voxel phantoms 'Adult Female' (AF, 16 ml thyroid) and 'Adult Male' (AM, 19 ml thyroid) were used as source regions. Nodules of 1 ml and 3 ml volume were placed in the phantoms. For each phantom and each nodule 200 scintigraphic acquisitions were simulated. Uptake ratios of nodule and rest of thyroid ranging from 1 to 20 could be created by summation. Quantitative image analysis was performed by investigating the number of simulated counts in regions of interest (ROIs). ROIs were created by perpendicular projection of the phantom onto the camera plane to avoid a user dependant bias. The ratio of count densities in ROIs over the nodule and over the contralateral lobe, which should be least affected by nodular activity, was taken to be the best available measure for the uptake ratios. However, the predefined uptake ratios are underestimated by these count density ratios: For an uptake ratio of 20 the count ratios range from 4.5 (AF, 1 ml nodule) to 15.3 (AM, 3 ml nodule). Furthermore, the contralateral ROI is more strongly affected by nodular activity than expected: For an uptake ratio of 20 between nodule and rest of thyroid up to 29% of total counts in the ROI over the contralateral lobe are caused by decays in the nodule (AF 3 ml). In the case of the 1 ml nodules this effect is smaller: 9

  12. A prospective clinical trial to assess the efficacy of radioiodine ablation as an alternative to completion thyroidectomy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer undergoing sub-total thyroidectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal, C.S.; Kumar, Ajay; Pant, G.S.; Chandra, Prem; Dwivedi, S.N.

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a prospective clinical trial to evaluate whether radioiodine ablation can be an effective alternative to completion thyroidectomy in patients undergoing sub-total thyroidectomy and if yes, the optimum activity of 131 I and frequency of ablation. A total of 85 patients (F-63; M-22) with mean age of 37.9±12.3 years were recruited in this study. The pre-ablation mean 24 hour radioiodine neck uptake, effective half-life, residual thyroid tissue weight and TSH values were 13.9±8.5%, 4.5±0.9 days, 9.6±3.6 g and 11.7±6.4 μIU/ml, respectively. Thyroid tissue was completely ablated in 50 patients (58.8%, 95% CI:50-68%) after mean 1st administered activity of 32.3±10.7 mCi of 131 I and the cumulative ablation rate was 91.8% after two doses of 131 I. During mean follow-up duration of 49 months no local/distant recurrence has been observed so far in this cohort. It appears that radioiodine ablation may be an attractive alternative to completion thyroidectomy and an activity as low as 35 mCi may achieve reasonable ablation

  13. Radioiodine (131I) in animal thyroids during nuclear tests in both hemispheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Middlesworth, L.

    1975-01-01

    In mid-1974 a small increase of 131 I was observed in animal thyroids following a nuclear test in China. In late 1974 there was no public announcement of an atmospheric nuclear test in the Northern Hemisphere, but 131 I was readily measured in animal thyroids. This latter increase occurred while animals in the Southern Hemisphere accumulated 131 I from nuclear tests in the Southern Hemisphere. It is suggested that in late 1974 the Northern Hemisphere was contaminated by either late fallout from tests in June or by interhemispheric mixing or by a combination of these sources. (author)

  14. The clinical significance of the early presence hyperthyroidism from into hyperthyroidism by thyroid antibody due to the radioiodine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Huaju; Ma Yuqin; Xu Yaoling; Liu Junqing; Zhang Huafang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To observe the levels of TMAb, TGAb, TRAb in the serum of patients with hyperthyroidism before the treatment of radioiodine ( 131 I) and investigate the clinical significance of the early hypothyroidism after 131 I treatment. Methods: According to the levels of thyroid auto-antibodies, 622 patients with hyperthyroidism were divided into four groups: group A 54 cases with negative TMAb, TGAb and TRAb, group B 176 cases with nagative TMAb and TGAb and positive TRAb, group C 78 caese with positive TMAb, TGAb and negative TRAb, Group D, 314 cases with positive TMAb TGAb and TRAb. The rate of early hypothyroidism were observed regularly after 1 3 1 I therapy in each group. Results: The rates of early hypothyroidism were 11.11% in group A, 13.64% in group B, 26.92% in group C and 23.57% in group D, Both the rates in group A and group B are lower than those in group C and group D (P 0.05). Conclusion: The levels of TMAb, TGAb in are serum in an important influencing factor on the rate of the early hypothyroidism after 131 I therapy for patients with hyperthyroidism, while the level of TRAb is of no importance. (authors)

  15. Hemostasis in Hypothyroidism and Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ordookhani, Arash; Burman, Kenneth D.

    2017-01-01

    Context There are contradictory results on the effect of hypothyroidism on the changes in hemostasis. Inadequate population-based studies limited their clinical implications, mainly on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). This paper reviews the studies on laboratory and population-based findings regarding hemostatic changes and risk of VTE in hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroid disorders. Evidence Acquisition A comprehensive literature search was conducted employing MEDLINE database. T...

  16. Radioiodine therapy in skeletal metastases from well-differentiated thyroid cancer: a Johannesburg experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Sindy Perumal

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim.The purpose of this study was to examine the outcome of patients with skeletal metastases from well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma and analyse the effect of variables that influence the prognosis of this disease. Method. We retrospectively reviewed 352 patients treated and followed-up at the Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital’s thyroid cancer clinic from 1982 - 1999. Findings. Skeletal metastases were diagnosed in 24 (6.8%, 17 at presentation to the thyroid clinic, and 7 at follow-up. Patients’ ages ranged from 30 - 77 years (mean 53.9 years and the female:male ratio was 3.8:1. Based on the original pathology reports from resected tumours, 9 were papillary and 15 were follicular cancers. Twenty-three of the 24 patients underwent thyroid surgery as the initial management – total thyroidectomy in 18, subtotal thyroidectomy in 3, and lobectomy plus neck dissection in one. The diagnosis of thyroid cancer was based on lobectomy in a single subject. Radioactive iodine (RAI was used as part of the original treatment; external radiation therapy (XRT was mainly used to alleviate severe symptoms. Twenty-one patients (87.5% were treated with RAI; 11 (45.8% received radiotherapy. Seven patients died – 4 from neurological disease directly associated with bone metastases. Of the 17 surviving patients, 2 appeared to be disease-free, 8 were asymptomatic despite overt bony disease, and 7 had persistent symptoms which much improved in 5. Bone metastases were uncommon, and follicular cancer predominated in this survey. Conclusion. RAI therapy improves quality of life in most patients. There is a place for XRT.

  17. HiLo: Multicentre randomized phase III clinical trial of high vs low dose radioiodine, with or without recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rhTSH), for remnant ablation for differentiated thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallick, U. [Freeman Hospital, Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Harmer, C.; Clarke, S.; Moss, L.; Nicol, A.; Clarke, P.; Smellie, J.; McCready, R.; Farnell, K.; Franklyn, J.; John, R.; Nutting, C.; Yap, B.; Lemon, C.; Wadlsey, J.; Gerrard, G.; Roques, T.; Macias, E.; Whitaker, S.; Abdul-Hamid, A.; Alvarez, P.; Kadalayil, L.; Hackshaw, A.

    2012-07-01

    Recommended treatment for most patients with differentiated thyroid cancer is surgery followed by radioiodine ablation. Current practice in many centres is to use a high administered activity of 3.7 GBq (100 mCi). However, a lower activity (1.1 GBq or 30 mCi) has advantages including a shorter stay in hospital isolation and lower risk of side effects, including the risk of a second cancer. Also, Thyrogen (rhTSH) allows patients to continue thyroid hormone replacement during ablation, avoiding symptoms of hypothyroidism and also reduces total body radiation dose. We conducted a large randomized factorial multi centre trial to simultaneously address whether ablation success rates are similar using (i) either 1.1 GBq or 3.7 GBq, and (ii) either Thyrogen or thyroid hormone withdrawal. It is the first ever national prospective trial in thyroid cancer in the UK. Final results will be available in 2011

  18. Thyroid gland disorder emergencies: thyroid storm and myxedema coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Although thyroid dysfunction will develop in more than 12% of the US population during their lifetimes, true thyroid emergencies are rare. Thyroid storm and myxedema coma are endocrine emergencies resulting from thyroid hormone dysregulation, usually coupled with an acute illness as a precipitant. Careful assessment of risk and rapid action, once danger is identified, are essential for limiting morbidity and mortality related to thyroid storm and myxedema coma. This article reviews which patients are at risk, explains thyroid storm and myxedema coma, and describes pharmacological treatment and supportive cares.

  19. Management of hypothyroidism after radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism and thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andres-Barrenchea, Emerita C.

    2003-01-01

    Radioactive iodine (RAI) has been in use for over 40 years to treat hyperthyroidism and thyroid cancer. There is common knowledge that the aim in hyperthyroidism is to produce normal thyroid functions or render the patient euthyroid. It is the choice in properly selected patients as it is safe, convenient and there is rapid elimination of goiter and symptoms. In thyroid cancer, namely - papillary and follicular or well-differentiated ones, it ablates residual thyroid tissues not removed totally by surgery. This has, in all studies, improved life expectancy. The most important aspect in the use of I-131 for hyperthyroidism is to stress to the patient the need for constant follow-up and the recognition of the signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism which is inevitible. Recurrent hyperthyroidism and iatrogenic hypothyroidism are two problems which interact in such a way that trying to solve one leads to exacerbation of the other. Cure follows a logarithmic relationship to activity or absorbed dose, while the hypothyroidism follows a linear relationship. Even though we calculate point for point the administered dose (fixed or preferred dose) hypothyroidism still occurs. Dose calculation schemes have been discussed and it follows that the higher the dose is, the higher the percentage of cure is but the higher the chance is for eventual hypothyroidism. Diagnosis of hypothyroidism is based on clinical history that the patient received RAI for toxicosis, plus signs and symptoms of weight gain, hoarseness, sleepy, sluggish, muscle cramps, fatigue, poor memory and concentration, dry skin, constipation, depression, menstrual irregularities as menorrhagia or amenorrhea and infertility. Physical examination would reveal bradycardia, non-palpable thyroid gland, slow speech, cool dry skin and delayed relaxation of deep tendon reflexes. Biochemical parameters would show as elevated TSH, low T4 and low T3. Management of thyroid hormone replacement involves using levothyroxine sodium

  20. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease based on tissue-absorbed dose calculations: effect of pre-treatment thyroid volume on clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Joe, Alexius Y.; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer; Palmedo, Holger [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Brink, Ingo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Freiburg (Germany); Krause, Thomas M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital Bern (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    This study was performed with three aims. The first was to analyse the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with and without goitres under conditions of mild iodine deficiency using several tissue-absorbed doses. The second aim was to detect further parameters which might be predictive for treatment outcome. Finally, we wished to determine the deviation of the therapeutically achieved dose from that intended. Activities of 185-2,220 MBq radioiodine were calculated by means of Marinelli's formula to deliver doses of 150, 200 or 300 Gy to the thyroids of 224 patients with Graves' disease and goitres up to 130 ml in volume. Control of hyperthyroidism, change in thyroid volume and thyrotropin-receptor antibodies were evaluated 15{+-}9 months after treatment for each dose. The results were further evaluated with respect to pre-treatment parameters which might be predictive for therapy outcome. Thyroidal radioiodine uptake was measured every day during therapy to determine the therapeutically achieved target dose and its coefficient of variation. There was a significant dose dependency in therapeutic outcome: frequency of hypothyroidism increased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 67.7% after 300 Gy, while the frequency of persistent hyperthyroidism decreased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 8.1% after 300 Gy. Patients who became hypothyroid had a maximum thyroid volume of 42 ml and received a target dose of 256{+-}80 Gy. The coefficient of variation for the achieved target dose ranged between 27.7% for 150 Gy and 17.8% for 300 Gy. When analysing further factors which might influence therapeutic outcome, only pre-treatment thyroid volume showed a significant relationship to the result of treatment. It is concluded that a target dose of 250 Gy is essential to achieve hypothyroidism within 1 year after radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with goitres up to 40 ml in volume. Patients with larger goitres might need higher doses

  1. Graves' disease and toxic nodular goiter - radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schicha, H.; Dietlein, M.

    2002-01-01

    At the 15th conference on the human thyroid in Heidelberg in 2001 the following aspects of the radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disorders were presented: General strategies for therapy of benign thyroid diseases, criterions for conservative or definitive treatment of hyperthyroidism as first line therapy and finally preparation, procedural details, results, side effects, costs and follow-up care of radioiodine therapy as well as legal guidelines for hospitalization in Germany. The diagnosis Graves' hyperthyroidism needs the decision, if rather a conservative treatment or if primary radioiodine therapy is the best therapeutic approach. In the USA 70-90% of these patients are treated with radioiodine as first line therapy, whereas in Germany the conservative therapy for 1-1.5 years is recommended for 90%. This review describes subgroups of patients with Graves' disease showing a higher probability to relapse after conservative treatment. Comparing benefits, adverse effects, costs, and conveniences of both treatment strategies the authors conclude that radioiodine therapy should be preferred as first line therapy in 60-70% of the patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism. (orig.) [de

  2. Dose selection for radioiodine therapy of borderline hyperthyroid patients with multifocal and disseminated autonomy on the basis of {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate thyroid uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Mallek, Dirk von; Manka-Waluch, Agnieszka; Palmedo, Holger [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Bonn (Germany); Joe, Alexius; Zimmerlin, Martina [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Krause, Thomas M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital Bern (Switzerland)

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise radioiodine therapy of diffuse and nodular toxic goitre by calculation of the radiation dose delivered to the thyroid on the basis of the pretreatment technetium-99m pertechnetate thyroid uptake under thyrotropin suppression (TcTU{sub s}). The TcTU{sub s} value serves as a substitute for the non-suppressible iodine turnover and the functional autonomous mass. Marinelli's formula was used to calculate tissue absorbed doses of 150 Gy, 200 Gy, 250 Gy and 300 Gy to the thyroids of 438 patients with multifocal and disseminated autonomy. The mean age of patients was 70{+-}9 years, and the mean thyroid volume was 54{+-}26 ml. Two hundred and sixty-one of the patients had at least one documented previous episode of overt hyperthyroidism. Tissue absorbed doses were adapted to the pretreatment TcTU{sub s}: 150 Gy for a TcTU{sub s} of 1.5%-2.49%, 200 Gy for a TcTU{sub s} of 2.5%-3.49%, 250 Gy for a TcTU{sub s} of 3.5%-4.49% and 300 Gy for a TcTU{sub s} of {>=}4.5%. Normalisation of TcTU{sub s} and thyrotropin (TSH), thyroid volume reduction and frequency of hypothyroidism and recurrent hyperthyroidism were evaluated 1 year after a single radioiodine therapy. The presented dose strategy resulted in normalisation of TcTU{sub s} in 96% and an increase in TSH to the normal range in 92%. Recurrent hyperthyroidism was observed in only five patients. Thyroid volume decreased from 54{+-}26 before treatment to 34{+-}20 ml, a mean reduction of 37%. The frequency of hypothyroidism, at 0.9%, was encouragingly low. Dose selection in accordance with pretreatment TcTU{sub s} can be recommended for elimination of functional autonomous tissue with a single radioiodine therapy in patients of advanced age with enlarged thyroid glands and relevant autonomous masses who are at risk of developing iodine-induced hyperthyroidism. (orig.)

  3. Dose selection for radioiodine therapy of borderline hyperthyroid patients with multifocal and disseminated autonomy on the basis of 99mTc-pertechnetate thyroid uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Mallek, Dirk von; Manka-Waluch, Agnieszka; Palmedo, Holger; Joe, Alexius; Zimmerlin, Martina; Krause, Thomas M.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise radioiodine therapy of diffuse and nodular toxic goitre by calculation of the radiation dose delivered to the thyroid on the basis of the pretreatment technetium-99m pertechnetate thyroid uptake under thyrotropin suppression (TcTU s ). The TcTU s value serves as a substitute for the non-suppressible iodine turnover and the functional autonomous mass. Marinelli's formula was used to calculate tissue absorbed doses of 150 Gy, 200 Gy, 250 Gy and 300 Gy to the thyroids of 438 patients with multifocal and disseminated autonomy. The mean age of patients was 70±9 years, and the mean thyroid volume was 54±26 ml. Two hundred and sixty-one of the patients had at least one documented previous episode of overt hyperthyroidism. Tissue absorbed doses were adapted to the pretreatment TcTU s : 150 Gy for a TcTU s of 1.5%-2.49%, 200 Gy for a TcTU s of 2.5%-3.49%, 250 Gy for a TcTU s of 3.5%-4.49% and 300 Gy for a TcTU s of ≥4.5%. Normalisation of TcTU s and thyrotropin (TSH), thyroid volume reduction and frequency of hypothyroidism and recurrent hyperthyroidism were evaluated 1 year after a single radioiodine therapy. The presented dose strategy resulted in normalisation of TcTU s in 96% and an increase in TSH to the normal range in 92%. Recurrent hyperthyroidism was observed in only five patients. Thyroid volume decreased from 54±26 before treatment to 34±20 ml, a mean reduction of 37%. The frequency of hypothyroidism, at 0.9%, was encouragingly low. Dose selection in accordance with pretreatment TcTU s can be recommended for elimination of functional autonomous tissue with a single radioiodine therapy in patients of advanced age with enlarged thyroid glands and relevant autonomous masses who are at risk of developing iodine-induced hyperthyroidism. (orig.)

  4. Influence of dose, age at the onset of disease and ultrasonographic findings of the thyroid gland on the early outcome of the radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugrinska, A.; Pop Gjorceva, D.; Muratovska, L.; Crcareva, B.; Stojanovski, S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Aim of the study: Estimation of the early effects of the treatment of hyperthyroidism with radioactive iodine in correlation with the radioiodine dose, the age at the onset of disease and ultrasonographic (US) findings of the thyroid. Material and methods: Retrospective analysis of the files of 80 patients that underwent a radioactive iodine treatment from the period of 1987 till 2006 because of a diffuse hyperthyroid goiter was performed. The patients were divided in two groups. Group C consisted of patients who were treated with calculated doses from 60-100μC/ml gland volume and group NC who received higher, non-calculated doses. According to age at the onset of disease patients were divided in two groups- group A younger than 40 years and group B older than 40 years. According to the US findings of the thyroid prior to radioiodine therapy patients were divided in two groups group N with predominantly normal US findings and group H with predominantly hypoechoic structure. Results: One year after the application of radioactive iodine 58% of the patients from the group C still remained hyperthyroid, 29% became euthyroid and only 13% developed early hypothyroidism. In the NC group only 7% remained hyperthyroid, 40% were euthyroid, while 54% of the patients developed early hypothyroidism. The occurrence of early hypothyroidism was significantly more frequent in NC than in C group (58% vs. 32%, p<0.05). The age was predictor for the probability of development of early hypothyroidism in C group: only 13% younger in group A, but 46% older patients from group B developed an early hypothyroidism. In the NC group the age was not a predictive factor. In 44 patients there were available records on the US findings prior to radioiodine therapy. In the N group patients that received calculated dose of radioiodine therapy remained euthyroid in 86%, while the patients that received non-calculated dose achieved euthyroidism only in 30%.In the H group there was no

  5. Hyperthyroidism in the presence of panhypopituitarism. Thyroid crisis and hypothyroidism following radioiodine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, G.T.; Blahd, W.H.

    1974-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism developed in a patient eight years after the onset of panhypopituitarism following deep x-ray therapy to a nasopharyngeal tumor invading the pituitary. The patient experienced thyroid crisis five days after radioactive iodine therapy for hyperthyroidism; and, three years later, primary hypothyroidism developed in addition to previously obscure pituitary TSH deficiency. This is believed to be the first such case reported. In the management of this patient, a most unusual sequence of endocrine abnormalities occurred. (U.S.)

  6. Fetus dose estimation in thyroid cancer post-surgical radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mianji, Fereidoun A.; Karimi Diba, Jila; Babakhani, Asad

    2015-01-01

    Unrecognised pregnancy during radioisotope therapy of thyroid cancer results in hardly definable embryo/fetus exposures, particularly when the thyroid gland is already removed. Sources of such difficulty include uncertainty in data like pregnancy commencing time, amount and distribution of metastasized thyroid cells in body, effect of the thyroidectomy on the fetus dose coefficient etc. Despite all these uncertainties, estimation of the order of the fetus dose in most cases is enough for medical and legal decision-making purposes. A model for adapting the dose coefficients recommended by the well-known methods to the problem of fetus dose assessment in athyrotic patients is proposed. The model defines a correction factor for the problem and ensures that the fetus dose in athyrotic pregnant patients is less than the normal patients. A case of pregnant patient undergone post-surgical therapy by I-131 is then studied for quantitative comparison of the methods. The results draw a range for the fetus dose in athyrotic patients using the derived factor. This reduces the concerns on under- or over-estimation of the embryo/fetus dose and is helpful for personal and/or legal decision-making on abortion. (authors)

  7. Radioiodine-induced changes in lymphocyte subsets in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tofani, A.; Sciuto, R.; Cioffi, R.P.; Pasqualoni, R.; Rea, S.; Festa, A.; Maini, C.L. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Regina Elena Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Gandolfo, G.M.; Arista, M.C. [Department of Clinical Pathology, Regina Elena Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)

    1999-08-01

    This study evaluated changes in lymphocyte subsets in patients with thyroid carcinoma who received iodine-131 for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Twenty thyroid cancer patients were entered in the study after total thyroidectomy: ten patients (group A) underwent whole-body scintigraphy with 185 MBq of {sup 131}I and the other ten (group B) received 3700 MBq of {sup 131}I therapy. All patients were in a hypothyroid state at the time of administration of {sup 131}I and started l-thyroxine 150 {mu}g/day 3 days after {sup 131}I administration. Free and bound triiodothyronine and thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyroglobulin, thyroglobulin antibodies, thyroid peroxidase/microsomal antibodies, white blood cell, lymphocyte counts and lymphocyte subsets were serially determined at baseline and at days 2, 7, 15, 30 and 60 after {sup 131}I administration. Twenty healthy age- and sex-matched individuals were used as a reference population for lymphocyte subset values. In group A only a reduction in NK cells at days 7 (P=0.043) and 15 (P=0.037) was observed. In group B, patients showed a delayed reduction in the total lymphocyte count at days 15, 30 and 60 (P=0.008, 0.004 and 0.018, respectively), and a decrease in B cells throughout the study (at days 7, 15, 30 and 60: P=0.006, 0.0017, 0.0017 and 0.0017 respectively). A transient decrease in NK cells was observed at days 15 (P=0.025) and 30 (P=0.008). Among T cells, the helper phenotype (CD4+) was mainly affected, resulting in a reduction in the CD4+/CD8+ ratio at day 60 (P=0.046). Comparing the two groups, the numbers of B lymphocytes at day 30 (P=0.023) and NK cells at days 2 (P=0.037) and 30 (P=0.023) were significantly lower in group B. Neither group showed any clinical sign of immunosuppression during the follow-up period. In patients with thyroid cancer the sensitivity of lymphocytes to the effects of {sup 131}I administered for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes depends upon lymphocyte phenotype and {sup

  8. Paradoxical effects of radioiodine therapy in functional thyroid autonomy and mild immunothyropathy; Paradoxe Effekte der Radiojodtherapie bei funktioneller Schilddruesenautonomie und milder Immunthyreopathie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkelmann, S.; Rudolph, F.; Prillwitz, A.; Groth, P.; Schuemichen, C. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1998-01-01

    Aim: To examine all cases with Graves` disease after radioiodine therapy of autonomously functioning thyroid tissue (AFFT) in order to find the cause. Methods: We retrospectively studied 1428 pts who were treated between 11/93 and 3/97 with radioiodine for AFTT and who underwent at least one control examination. Results: 15 (1.1%) of all pts developed Graves` disease 8.4 (4-13) months after radioiodine therapy. There was no direct suggestion of Graves` disease (TRAK negative, no endocrine ophthalmopathy) in any pt at the time of radioiodine therapy. More detailed analysis of anamnestic data, however, revealed evidence that immunothyropathy predated radioiodine therapy in 11 of the 15 pts. Paradoxical effects of radioiodine therapy manifested as an increase in immunothyropathy 14 pts, a deterioration in metabolism in 11 pts and a first occurrence of endocrine ophthalmopathy in 5 pts. Conclusion: Exacerbation of preexisting, functional primarily insignificant immunothyropathia is held responsible in most cases for the observed paradoxical effects after radioiodine therapy, resulting in radiation-induced manifest Graves` disease; however no therapeutical consequences are recommended. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Erfassung von Pat. mit einer nach Radiojodtherapie wegen einer funktionellen Autonomie aufgetretenen Immunhyperthyreose sowie deren Ursachen. Methoden: Wir untersuchten in einer retrospektiven Studie 1428 Pat., die im Zeitraum 11/93 bis 3/97 wegen einer funktionellen Autonomie mit Radiojod behandelt wurden und die sich mindestens einer Kontrolluntersuchung unterzogen hatten. Ergebnisse: 15 (1,1%) der Pat. entwickelten 8,4 (4-13) Monate nach Radiojodtherapie eine postradiogene Immunhyperthyreose. Bei allen 15 Pat. lag zum Zeitpunkt der Radiojodtherapie kein direkter Hinweis auf eine Immunhyperthyreose vor (TRAK neg., keine endokrine Orbitopathie). Bei einer genauen Analyse anamnestischer Daten fanden sich jedoch bei 11 der 15 Pat. erste Hinweise auf das Vorliegen

  9. [Summary of the practice guideline 'Thyroid disorders' (first revision) from the Dutch College of General Practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout, J. van; Wessels, P.; Rijswijk, E. van; Boer, A.M; Wiersma, A.; Goudswaard, A.N.

    2007-01-01

    --The practice guideline 'Thyroid disorders' developed by the Dutch College of General Practitioners replaces the practice guideline 'Functional thyroid disorders' from 1996. Recommendations for palpable thyroid disorders have been added. --Hypothyroidism can often be treated by the general

  10. Approach to and Treatment of Thyroid Disorders in the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaleontiou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Thyroid gland dysfunction is prevalent in older adults and may be associated with significant morbidity if misdiagnosed and left untreated. Due to a decreased number of symptoms at presentation, an increased susceptibility to adverse events if not treated, and a greater likelihood of harm from treatment, the diagnosis and management of thyroid disorders in older adults can be challenging. This review focuses on the epidemiology, clinical presentation, risks/complications, and management of thyroid disorders (including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer) in older adults. PMID:22443977

  11. Contributions of short-lived radioiodines to thyroid doses received by evacuees from the Chernobyl area estimated using early in vivo activity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balonov, M.; Kaidanovsky, G.; Zvonova, I.; Kovtun, A.; Bouville, A.; Luckyanov, L.; Voilleque, P.

    2003-01-01

    A series of in-vivo gamma spectrometric measurements of 65 people, evacuated from Pripyat 1.5 days after the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4 explosion was performed in St. Petersburg, Russia, as early as 30 April 1986. The historical spectra and interviews were recently processed and the results used for thyroid dose estimation. Activities of 131 I in thyroid and 132 Te in lungs were determined easily; for estimation of 132 I and 133 I activities in thyroid, sophisticated methods of spectra processing were developed. According to thyroid measurement data, the mean ratio of 133 I/ 131 I activities (at the time of the accident) inhaled by residents of Pripyat was 2.0. The mean ratio of thyroid dose from 133 I inhalation to that caused by 131 I amounts to 0.3, which confirms accuracy of dose estimates based on the evolution of the Chernobyl accident. The mean ratio of 132 I activity in thyroid to that of 132 Te in lungs was assessed from the human measurement data to be 0.2, which is in reasonable agreement with the metabolic properties of these radionuclides. The mean ratio of thyroid dose from 132 I originating from 132 Te deposited in lungs to the dose caused by 131 I was 0.13 ± 0.02 for Pripyat residents who did not take KI pills and 0.9 ± 0.1 for persons who took KI pills. Thus, the contribution of short-lived radioiodines to total thyroid dose of Pripyat residents, which was on average 30% for persons who did not apply stable iodine prophylaxis, and about 50% for persons who took KI pills on 26-27 April, should be accounted for in the assessment of thyroid health effects. (author)

  12. Role of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in diagnostic iodine-131 scintigraphy before initial radioiodine ablation in differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Bhattacharya, Anish; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2005-01-01

    The study was performed to evaluate the incremental value of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) over planar radioiodine imaging before radioiodine ablation in the staging, management and stratification of risk of recurrence (ROR) in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients. Totally, 83 patients (21 male, 62 female) aged 17–75 (mean 39.9) years with DTC were included consecutively in this prospective study. They underwent postthyroidectomy planar and SPECT/CT scans after oral administration of 37–114 MBq iodine-131 (I-131). The scans were interpreted as positive, negative or suspicious for tracer uptake in the thyroid bed, cervical lymph nodes and sites outside the neck. In each case, the findings on planar images were recorded first, without knowledge of SPECT/CT findings. Operative and pathological findings were used for postsurgical tumor–node–metastasis staging. The tumor staging was reassessed after each of these two scans. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography localized radioiodine uptake in the thyroid bed in 9/83 (10.8%) patients, neck nodes in 24/83 (28.9%) patients and distant metastases in 8/83 (9.6%) patients in addition to the planar study. Staging was changed in 8/83 (9.6%), ROR in 11/83 (13.2%) and management in 26/83 (31.3%) patients by the pretherapy SPECT/CT in comparison to planar imaging. SPECT/CT had incremental value in 32/83 patients (38.5%) over the planar scan. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography is feasible during a diagnostic I-131 scan with a low amount of radiotracer. It improved the interpretation of pretherapy I-131 scintigraphy and changed the staging and subsequent patient management

  13. Determination of the most appropriate method for extrapolating overall survival data from a placebo-controlled clinical trial of lenvatinib for progressive, radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tremblay G

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gabriel Tremblay,1 Christopher Livings,2 Lydia Crowe,2 Venediktos Kapetanakis,2 Andrew Briggs3 1Global Health Economics and Health Technology Assessment, Eisai Inc., Woodcliff Lake, NJ, USA; 2Health Economics, Decision Resources Group, Bicester, Oxfordshire, 3Health Economics and Health Technology Assessment, Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK Background: Cost-effectiveness models for the treatment of long-term conditions often require information on survival beyond the period of available data. Objectives: This paper aims to identify a robust and reliable method for the extrapolation of overall survival (OS in patients with radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer receiving lenvatinib or placebo. Methods: Data from 392 patients (lenvatinib: 261, placebo: 131 from the SELECT trial are used over a 34-month period of follow-up. A previously published criterion-based approach is employed to ascertain credible estimates of OS beyond the trial data. Parametric models with and without a treatment covariate and piecewise models are used to extrapolate OS, and a holistic approach, where a series of statistical and visual tests are considered collectively, is taken in determining the most appropriate extrapolation model. Results: A piecewise model, in which the Kaplan–Meier survivor function is used over the trial period and an extrapolated tail is based on the Exponential distribution, is identified as the optimal model. Conclusion: In the absence of long-term survival estimates from clinical trials, survival estimates often need to be extrapolated from the available data. The use of a systematic method based on a priori determined selection criteria provides a transparent approach and reduces the risk of bias. The extrapolated OS estimates will be used to investigate the potential long-term benefits of lenvatinib in the treatment of radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer patients and

  14. Preparation of radioiodinated insulin and thyroid stimulating hormone using 1,3,4,6-tetrachloro-3. cap alpha. , 6. cap alpha. -diphenylglycouril (iodogen) for radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, M R.A.; Gupte, J H; Jyotsna, T; Mani, R S

    1987-11-01

    Radioiodinated insulin and thyroid stimulating hormones were prepared using 1,3,4,6-tetrachloro-3..cap alpha.., 6..cap alpha..-diphenylglycouril (iodogen). Conditions of iodination like concentration of iodogen, reaction time, etc. were optimized to get maximum yield. Stability studies of iodogen coated tubes were carried out over a period of time. The dependence of iodination yield on varying amounts of activity and protein concentration were investigated. Iodination yield over a range of pH was also studied. The radiolabelled hormones prepared by this method were used in radioimmunoassay and compared with tracers prepared by the Chloramine-T method. (author) 16 refs.; 5 tabs.

  15. Relationship between serum TSH and the responsiveness of toxic solitary autonomous thyroid nodules to radioiodine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, U; Kirkegaard, B C

    1998-01-01

    hypothyroidism both had detectable serum TSH at the time of 131I treatment. No other clinical parameter seemed to influence the outcome. CONCLUSION: There is no clinically significant effect of circulating TSH on the response of toxic solitary autonomous thyroid nodules to 131I therapy. However, keeping...... the patients subclinically hyperthyroid when receiving 131I treatment may possibly result in a reduced frequency of hypothyroidism.......) were euthyroid, three (8%) had responded insufficiently and required further antithyroid therapy, and two (5%) had developed hypothyroidism. No significant difference in the response pattern between patients with suppressed or detectable serum TSH could be demonstrated. The two patients who developed...

  16. Comparison of the Influence on the Liver Function Between Thyroid Hormone Withdrawal and rh-TSH Before High-Dose Radioiodine Therapy in Patients with Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yeon-Hee; Lim, Seok Tae; Yun, Kuk-No; Yim, Sung Kyun; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong; Sohn, Myung-Hee [Chonbuk National Univ. Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    An elevated thyroid stimulating hormone level (TSH) is essential to stimulate the uptake of radioiodine into thyroid remnants and metastases and metastases of thyroid cancer when a patient under-goes high-dose radioiodine therapy. Nowadays, recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rh-TSH) is increasingly used instead of the classic method of thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW). However, beyond the therapeutic effects, clinical differences between the two methods have not yet been clearly demonstrated. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of the two methods, especially on liver function. We identified 143 evaluable patients who were further divided into two groups: THW and rh-TSH. We first reviewed the aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, which were measured during the admission period for total thyroidectomy. We called these liver enzyme levels 'base AST' and 'base ALT.' We also assessed other chemistry profiles, including AST, ALT, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total bilirubin (TB), and triglyceride (TG), which were measured on admission day for high-dose radioiodine therapy. We called these liver enzyme levels 'follow-up AST'and 'follow-up ALT.' We compared the changes in base and follow-up liver enzyme levels and the other chemistry profiles between the two groups. The base AST and base ALT levels of the two groups were within normal range, and there was no significant difference between the two groups. In contrast to these base liver enzyme levels, follow-up AST and ALT levels than did the rh-TSH group. Patients in the THW group. Patients in the THW group also had higher levels of total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol than did the patients in the rh-TSH group. However there were no statistically significant differences in ALP, total bilirubin, and triglyceride levels between the two groups. In this retrospective analysis of liver

  17. Thyroid disorders in mild iodine deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurberg, P; Nøhr, S B; Pedersen, K M; Hreidarsson, A B; Andersen, S; Bülow Pedersen, I; Knudsen, N; Perrild, H; Jørgensen, T; Ovesen, L

    2000-11-01

    Comparative epidemiologic studies in areas with low and high iodine intake and controlled studies of iodine supplementation have demonstrated that the major consequence of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency for the health of the population is an extraordinarily high occurrence of hyperthyroidism in elderly subjects, especially women, with risk of cardiac arrhythmias, osteoporosis, and muscle wasting. The hyperthyroidism is caused by autonomous nodular growth and function of the thyroid gland and it is accompanied by a high frequency of goiter. Pregnant women and small children are not immediately endangered but the consequences of severe iodine deficiency for brain development are grave and a considerable safety margin is advisable. Moreover, a shift toward less malignant types of thyroid cancer and a lower radiation dose to the thyroid in case of nuclear fallout support that mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency should be corrected. However, there is evidence that a high iodine intake may be associated with more autoimmune hypothyroidism, and that Graves' disease may manifest at a younger age and be more difficult to treat. Hence, the iodine intake should be brought to a level at which iodine deficiency disorders are avoided but not higher. Iodine supplementation programs should aim at relatively uniform iodine intake, avoiding deficient or excessive iodine intake in subpopulations. To adopt such a strategy, surveillance programs are needed.

  18. Radiation absorbed dose and expected risk in head and neck tissues after thyroid radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamed, A [National Center for Nuclear and Radiation Control, AEA., Cairo (Egypt); Farag, H I [National Cancer instiute, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); Saleh, A [Al-hussien Hospital, Al-Azhar University, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    Measurement of absorbed dose in head and neck phantom after applying I-131 therapeutic dose for the treatment of thyroid malignancies was conducted. The measurement were carried out at several sites of phantom using TL dosimeters. The absorbed doses were also measured on the skin of four patients during their administration of I-131 therapeutic doses 1.332 GBq (36 mci) I-131. The measurements were taken over 69 hours exposure at different sites of phantom. The same measurements were carried out on the four patients. At five sites of the patients head and neck, the absorbed dose were measured and compared with that measured on the phantom. The values measured are discussed in the light of the published individual absorbed doses in the organs by ICRP tables. High absorbed doses were absorbed in the different sites of the head and neck during the I-131 therapy (0.14-9.68 mGy/mCi). 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Twenty-five years after Chernobyl: outcome of radioiodine treatment in children and adolescents with very high-risk radiation-induced differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiners, Christoph; Biko, Johannes; Haenscheid, Heribert; Hebestreit, Helge; Kirinjuk, Stalina; Baranowski, Oleg; Marlowe, Robert J; Demidchik, Ewgeni; Drozd, Valentina; Demidchik, Yuri

    2013-07-01

    After severe reactor emergencies with release of radioactive iodine, elevated thyroid cancer risk in children and adolescents is considered the main health consequence for the population exposed. We studied thyroid cancer outcome after 11.3 years' median follow-up in a selected, very high-risk cohort, 234 Chernobyl-exposed Belarusian children and adolescents undergoing postsurgical radioiodine therapy (RIT) in Germany. Cumulatively 100 children with or (without; n = 134) distant metastasis received a median 4 (2) RITs and 16.9 (6.6) GBq, corresponding to 368 (141) MBq/kg iodine-131. Outcomes were response to therapy and disease status, mortality, and treatment toxicity. Of 229 patients evaluable for outcome, 147 (64.2%) attained complete remission [negative iodine-131 whole-body scan and TSH-stimulated serum thyroglobulin (Tg) 10 μg/L, decrease from baseline in radioiodine uptake intensity in ≥ 1 focus, in tumor volume or in Tg). Except for 2 recurrences (0.9%) after partial remission, no recurrences, progression, or disease-specific mortality were noted. One patient died of lung fibrosis 17.5 years after therapy, 2 of apparently thyroid cancer-unrelated causes. The only RIT side effect observed was pulmonary fibrosis in 5 of 69 patients (7.2%) with disseminated lung metastases undergoing intensive pulmonary surveillance. Experience of a large, very high-risk pediatric cohort with radiation-induced differentiated thyroid carcinoma suggests that even when such disease is advanced and initially suboptimally treated, response to subsequent RIT and final outcomes are mostly favorable.

  20. Thyroid Patient Salivary Radioiodine Transit and Dysfunction Assessment Using Chewing Gums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkalides, Demetrios

    2016-11-01

    Radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction is the most frequent side-effect of I-131 thyroid therapy. Here, a novel saliva sampling method with ordinary chewing gums administered to the patients at appropriate time intervals post-treatment (TIPT) was used to relate this effect to chewing gum saliva activity (CGSA) content. Saliva samples were acquired after the oral administration of prescribed I-131 activity (radioactivity administered [RA]) to 19 differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and 16 hyperthyroidism patients of the radioisotope unit (RIU) during 2014 and 2015. The error of this saliva collecting process was found to be 1.2%-2.05%, and so, the method was considered satisfactory. For each patient, the CGSA was plotted against the TIPT producing a curve, R(t). On this, two functions were fitted: a linear on the first few rising data points and a gamma variate over the peak of the R(t). From these, several parameters related to the radioactivity oral transit were calculated and the total radioactivity administered (TRA) during all past treatments of each patient was obtained from RIU records. The patients were asked to report any swelling, dry mouth, taste-smell change, or pain and were graded as a morbidity score (MS) describing the quality of life of each. The peak radioactivity in the saliva samples, R max , was found to be proportional to RA and was plotted against the CGSA extrapolated at 24 and 36 hours. The linear fits produced were used to estimate the salivary glands' activity average effective half-life (16.3 hours). The MS of DTC patients was found to depend linearly both on R max and TRA (MS = 0.0032 × R max - 0.7107 and MS = 0.1862 × TRA +0.66, respectively). Both lines were used to extrapolate symptom thresholds. The measurement of R max in DTC patients proved very useful for individualized radiation protection, and the dependence of MS on TRA should be used when additional treatments are considered for repeat DTC patients.

  1. Determination of the most appropriate method for extrapolating overall survival data from a placebo-controlled clinical trial of lenvatinib for progressive, radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Gabriel; Livings, Christopher; Crowe, Lydia; Kapetanakis, Venediktos; Briggs, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness models for the treatment of long-term conditions often require information on survival beyond the period of available data. This paper aims to identify a robust and reliable method for the extrapolation of overall survival (OS) in patients with radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer receiving lenvatinib or placebo. Data from 392 patients (lenvatinib: 261, placebo: 131) from the SELECT trial are used over a 34-month period of follow-up. A previously published criterion-based approach is employed to ascertain credible estimates of OS beyond the trial data. Parametric models with and without a treatment covariate and piecewise models are used to extrapolate OS, and a holistic approach, where a series of statistical and visual tests are considered collectively, is taken in determining the most appropriate extrapolation model. A piecewise model, in which the Kaplan-Meier survivor function is used over the trial period and an extrapolated tail is based on the Exponential distribution, is identified as the optimal model. In the absence of long-term survival estimates from clinical trials, survival estimates often need to be extrapolated from the available data. The use of a systematic method based on a priori determined selection criteria provides a transparent approach and reduces the risk of bias. The extrapolated OS estimates will be used to investigate the potential long-term benefits of lenvatinib in the treatment of radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer patients and populate future cost-effectiveness analyses.

  2. Incidental findings of intense radioiodine uptake in struma ovarii and bilateral nonlactating breasts simultaneously on postablation "1"3"1I SPECT/CT for papillary thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Hye Kyung; Kim, Mi Ra

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman diagnosed with papillary thyroid carcinoma was referred for "1"3"1I therapy following total thyroidectomy. She was given 4,810 MBq (130 mCi) of "1"3"1I following 4 weeks of thyroid hormone withdrawal. A post therapy scan showed intense, focal activity in the pelvis and intense, diffuse activity on both sides of the chest, which was localized to the right ovary and both breasts on SPECT/CT examination. She had bilateral nipple pain and a history of antidopaminergic drugs as combination medication for her rheumatoid arthritis and prokinetics during radioiodine therapy. On a "1"2"3I whole-body scan 9 months later after stopping the drugs, bilateral breast uptake was not visible; however, right ovarian focal uptake was still visualized. Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed, and revealed struma ovarii with substantial internal necrosis due to radioiodine therapy. This case is interesting as two rare entities, "1"3"1I therapy-related struma ovarii and drug-related breast uptake, were simultaneously visualized

  3. Quality of life changes and clinical outcomes in thyroid cancer patients undergoing radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) with recombinant human TSH (rhTSH): a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taïeb, D; Sebag, F; Cherenko, M; Baumstarck-Barrau, K; Fortanier, C; Farman-Ara, B; De Micco, C; Vaillant, J; Thomas, S; Conte-Devolx, B; Loundou, A; Auquier, P; Henry, J F; Mundler, O

    2009-07-01

    Recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) has become the modality of choice for radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) in low-risk thyroid cancer patients. The aims of the present prospective randomized study were to evaluate the impact of TSH stimulation procedure (hypothyroidism vs. rhTSH) on quality of life (QoL) of thyroid cancer patients undergoing RRA and to evaluate efficacy of both procedures. L-T4 was initiated in both groups after thyroidectomy. After randomization, L-T4 was discontinued in hypothyroid (hypo) group and continued in rhTSH group. A measure of 3.7 GBq of radioiodine was given to both groups. The functional assessment of chronic illness therapy-fatigue (FACIT-F) was administered from the early postoperative period to 9 months. Socio-demographic parameters, anxiety and depression scales were also evaluated (CES-D, BDI and Spielberger state-trait questionnaires). At 9 months, patients underwent an rhTSH stimulation test, diagnostic (131)I whole body scan (dxWBS) and neck ultrasonography. A total of 74 patients were enrolled for the study. There was a significant decrease in QoL from baseline (t0) to t1 (RRA period) in the hypothyroid group with significant differences in FACIT-F TOI (P hypothyrodism. However, there is a wide heterogeneity in the clinical impact of hypothyroidism.

  4. Incidental findings of intense radioiodine uptake in struma ovarii and bilateral nonlactating breasts simultaneously on postablation {sup 131}I SPECT/CT for papillary thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Hye Kyung; Kim, Mi Ra [Haeundae Paik HospitalUniversity of Inje, College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    A 52-year-old woman diagnosed with papillary thyroid carcinoma was referred for {sup 131}I therapy following total thyroidectomy. She was given 4,810 MBq (130 mCi) of {sup 131}I following 4 weeks of thyroid hormone withdrawal. A post therapy scan showed intense, focal activity in the pelvis and intense, diffuse activity on both sides of the chest, which was localized to the right ovary and both breasts on SPECT/CT examination. She had bilateral nipple pain and a history of antidopaminergic drugs as combination medication for her rheumatoid arthritis and prokinetics during radioiodine therapy. On a {sup 123}I whole-body scan 9 months later after stopping the drugs, bilateral breast uptake was not visible; however, right ovarian focal uptake was still visualized. Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed, and revealed struma ovarii with substantial internal necrosis due to radioiodine therapy. This case is interesting as two rare entities, {sup 131}I therapy-related struma ovarii and drug-related breast uptake, were simultaneously visualized.

  5. An Evaluation by TSH Radioimmunoassay on Familial Thyroid Disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Yeul

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence of thyroid disorders is connected with iodine deficiency, defective synthesis or releasing of thyroid hormone and endemicity. Genetic factors are known as a single gene defects, interaction of multiple genes with environmental factors, as well as chromosomal aberrations. Diofnosis thyroid disorders is enforced by 13I uptake test, thyroid scanning with 131 I or 99m Tc and serum radioimmunoassays of T3, T4, free T4 and TSH. They were largely classified as hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, simple goiter and normal. The pedigree of 58 families was drawn by propositus, and then the correlation between thyroid disorders and TSH levels was analyzed. The results are as follows: 1) The offsprings and their mothers of 15 families were hypothyroidism, THS level was 5 folds for offsprings and 4 folds for mothers in comparison with control group. 2) 13 families were hyperthyroidism in siblings but their mothers were normal in thyroid function, TSH level of the siblings was lower than control group. 3) Though the offsprings and their mothers of 10 families were similar to TSH level of control group, they are all simple goiter, familial thyroid disorders, in other thyroid function test. The familial thyroid disorders suggested that these transmitted from mothers to offsprings with X-linked dominant or autosomal dominant inheritance.

  6. Central hypothyroidism - a neglected thyroid disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Rodari, Giulia; Giavoli, Claudia; Lania, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    Central hypothyroidism is a rare and heterogeneous disorder that is characterized by a defect in thyroid hormone secretion in an otherwise normal thyroid gland due to insufficient stimulation by TSH. The disease results from the abnormal function of the pituitary gland, the hypothalamus, or both. Moreover, central hypothyroidism can be isolated or combined with other pituitary hormone deficiencies, which are mostly acquired and are rarely congenital. The clinical manifestations of central hypothyroidism are usually milder than those observed in primary hypothyroidism. Obtaining a positive diagnosis for central hypothyroidism can be difficult from both a clinical and a biochemical perspective. The diagnosis of central hypothyroidism is based on low circulating levels of free T 4 in the presence of low to normal TSH concentrations. The correct diagnosis of both acquired (also termed sporadic) and congenital (also termed genetic) central hypothyroidism can be hindered by methodological interference in free T 4 or TSH measurements; routine utilization of total T 4 or T 3 measurements; concurrent systemic illness that is characterized by low levels of free T 4 and normal TSH concentrations; the use of the sole TSH-reflex strategy, which is the measurement of the sole level of TSH, without free T 4 , if levels of TSH are in the normal range; and the diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism based on TSH analysis without the concomitant measurement of serum levels of T 4 . In this Review, we discuss current knowledge of the causes of central hypothyroidism, emphasizing possible pitfalls in the diagnosis and treatment of this disorder.

  7. Transient Hypothyroidism after Radioiodine for Graves' Disease: Challenges in Interpreting Thyroid Function Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Michael T; Doi, Suhail A R

    2016-03-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism and is often managed with radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy. With current dosing schemes, the vast majority of patients develop permanent post-RAI hypothyroidism and are placed on life-long levothyroxine therapy. This hypothyroidism typically occurs within the first 3 to 6 months after RAI therapy is administered. Indeed, patients are typically told to expect life-long thyroid hormone replacement therapy to be required within this timeframe and many providers expect this post-RAI hypothyroidism to be complete and permanent. There is, however, a small subset of patients in whom a transient post-RAI hypothyroidism develops which, initially, presents exactly as the typical permanent hypothyroidism. In some cases the transient hypothyroidism leads to a period of euthyroidism of variable duration eventually progressing to permanent hypothyroidism. In others, persistent hyperthyroidism requires a second dose of RAI. Failure to appreciate and recognize the possibility of transient post-RAI hypothyroidism can delay optimal and appropriate treatment of the patient. We herein describe five cases of transient post-RAI hypothyroidism which highlight this unusual sequence of events. Increased awareness of this possible outcome after RAI for Graves' disease will help in the timely management of patients. © 2016 Marshfield Clinic.

  8. Transient Hypothyroidism after Radioiodine for Graves’ Disease: Challenges in Interpreting Thyroid Function Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Michael T.; Doi, Suhail A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Graves’ disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism and is often managed with radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy. With current dosing schemes, the vast majority of patients develop permanent post-RAI hypothyroidism and are placed on life-long levothyroxine therapy. This hypothyroidism typically occurs within the first 3 to 6 months after RAI therapy is administered. Indeed, patients are typically told to expect life-long thyroid hormone replacement therapy to be required within this timeframe and many providers expect this post-RAI hypothyroidism to be complete and permanent. There is, however, a small subset of patients in whom a transient post-RAI hypothyroidism develops which, initially, presents exactly as the typical permanent hypothyroidism. In some cases the transient hypothyroidism leads to a period of euthyroidism of variable duration eventually progressing to permanent hypothyroidism. In others, persistent hyperthyroidism requires a second dose of RAI. Failure to appreciate and recognize the possibility of transient post-RAI hypothyroidism can delay optimal and appropriate treatment of the patient. We herein describe five cases of transient post-RAI hypothyroidism which highlight this unusual sequence of events. Increased awareness of this possible outcome after RAI for Graves’ disease will help in the timely management of patients. PMID:26864507

  9. The long-term hazards of the treatment of thyroid cancer with radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmonds, C.J.; Smith, T.

    1986-01-01

    Two-hundred and fifty-eight patients treated with high-activity 131 I for thyroid cancer and on prolonged follow-up have been reviewed to determine long-term hazards and their relation to the radiation dose received. The expectation of life of those dying from causes other than cancer was slightly reduced in the female patients. A small, significant excess of deaths from cancer of the bladder and from leukemia was found which, assuming that these were due to radiation, gave inferred risk-rates respectively of 0.4 and 4.9 deaths per 10 4 PYG (patient-year-grays) to the bladder wall and red marrow. Of 31 younger patients (eight male, 23 female), four of the marriages have been infertile. The fertile marriages produced a total of 44 live births. Considerable gonad irradiation (estimated 0.8-2.7 Gy) was compatible with apparently normal fertility. Despite the high level of irradiation of the salivary glands, no malignancies and only one adenoma was found. Impaired pulmonary function occurred in only one of the patients who had diffuse bilateral metastases. In this patient, tumour in the lung was persistent throughout, so that radiation was probably not alone responsible. (author)

  10. Status of thyroidal radioiodine (I-131) uptake and urinary iodine in Bangladesh population: A re-look following implementation of universal iodination of salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, F.; Sultana Haque, F.; Karim, M.A.; Faruque, O.; Ali, L.; Azad Khan, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    Iodide plays a central role in thyroid physiology and in the production of thyroid hormones, which are essential for normal vertebrate growth and development. Radioiodine uptake test is one of the oldest radionuclide investigations for evaluation of thyroid function. On the other hand useful information about the nutritional status of a population can be obtained by measuring the prevalence of deficiency in a population. The main aim of this study was to find out the present status of urinary iodine and thyroid uptake status of people living in and around Dhaka City (Bangladesh). The present study was carried out over a period of three years from 1999 to 2002 involving 300 subjects inclusive of 216 females and 84 males. Efforts were made to randomly include people from a broad spectrum of social and economic strata, starting from people belonging to the lowest to the highest income groups; as well as people representing the urban, rural and suburban populations. Urinary iodine levels and 24 hour percentage radioiodine uptake by the thyroid were estimated in all subjects included in this study. Subsequently patients were grouped into four categories based on the values of their percentage 24-hour radioiodine uptake; e.g., Group-A (N-99) with lowest uptake (0-5%), Group-B (N=100) with uptake ranging between 5-10%, Group-C (N=73) with uptake ranging between 10-30% and Group D (N=28) with uptake above 30%. The median 24 hours RAIU values in groups A, B, C and D were 3, 7, 23 and 34% respectively. The corresponding mean urinary iodine levels in the four groups were 43.31, 33.95, 12.97 and 9.35μgm/dl respectively. The results have shown that 1.04, 3.48, 16.72 and 78.74% people studied had levels of urinary iodine indicating severe, moderate, mild or no iodine deficiency respectively as per the WHO Criteria (Severe: <2 μgm /dl, Moderate: 2-4.9 μgm /dl, mild: 5.0-9.9μgm /dl, normal: ≥ 10 μgm /dl). It may be noted that the normal values of Thyroidal I-131 uptake were

  11. Pre-therapeutic blood dosimetry in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma using 124-iodine. Predicted blood doses correlate with changes in blood cell counts after radioiodine therapy and depend on modes of TSH stimulation and number of preceding radioiodine therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartung-Knemeyer, V.; Nagarajah, J.; Jentzen, W.; Ruhlmann, M.; Freudenberg, L.S.; Stahl, A.R.; Bockisch, A.; Rosenbaum-Krumme, S.J.

    2012-01-01

    Pre-therapeutic blood dosimetry prior to a high-dose radioiodine therapy (RAIT) is recommended and a blood dose of 2 Gy is considered to be safe. In this study, changes in the blood cell count after radioiodine therapy of high risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) were analyzed and compared with the results of the pre-therapeutic blood dosimetry using 124 I. Moreover, the influence of different modes of TSH stimulation and the number of preceding radioiodine therapies on the blood dose were assessed. 198 patients with locally advanced or metastasized DTC received a pre-therapeutic blood dosimetry using 124 I. To analyze the influence of the modes of TSH stimulation and the number of preceding RAITs on blood dose subgroups were built as follows: patients with endogenous TSH stimulation versus patients with exogenous TSH stimulation and patients with no preceding RAIT versus patients with at least one preceding RAIT. In 124/198 patients subsequent RAIT was performed. In 73/124 patients, hemograms were performed from day 2 to 12 month after RAIT. There was no high-grade bone marrow toxicity (id est (i.e.) ≥grade 3) in patients receiving less than 2 Gy blood dose-independent of the therapeutic history. Within the first month after radioiodine therapy, there was an overall decrease in the white blood cell and platelet counts. The erythrocyte count was essentially stable. There was a correlation between cell count decrease and predicted blood doses (Spearman's correlation coefficient >-0.6 each) for the white cell line and the platelets. With regard to the subgroups, the blood dose per administered 131 I activity (BDpA) was significantly higher in patients with endogenous TSH stimulation (median 0.08 Gy/GBq) than in patients with exogenous TSH stimulation (0.06 Gy/GBq) and in patients with no previous RAIT (0.08 Gy/GBq) compared to patients who had previously undergone at least one RAIT (0.07 Gy/GBq). The range of BDpA among DTC patients is rather wide. Our

  12. Glucocorticoid administration for Graves' hyperthyroidism treated by radioiodine. A questionnaire survey among members of the European Thyroid Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazarus, J. H.; Bartalena, L.; Marcocci, C.; Kahaly, G. J.; Krassas, G.; Wiersinga, W. M.; Baldeschi, L.; Boboridis, K.; Boschi, A.; Currò, N.; Daumerie, C.; Dickinson, A. J.; Eckstein, A.; Kendall-Taylor, P.; Lane, C. M.; Ludgate, M. E.; Mann, K.; Marinò, M.; Mourits, M. P.; Nardi, M.; Neoh, C.; Orgiazzi, J.; Pearce, S.; Perros, P.; Pinchera, A.; Pitz, S.; Salvi, M.; Sivelli, P.; Stahl, M.; von Arx, G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Glucocorticoid prophylaxis is required in some instances after radioiodine (RAI) treatment for Graves' hyperthyroidism to prevent progression of Graves' orbitopathy (GO). However, no randomized clinical trial has been performed to ascertain the optimum glucocorticoid therapy. Aim and

  13. The anti-thyroid antibody and I-131 uptake in thyroid disorder patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faridul Alam; Fatema Sultana Haque; Mohammad Abdul Karim; Liaquat Ali; Omer Faruque; Azad Khan, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    The problem of thyroid disorder is extensive in Bangladesh, even more than that of other developing countries. The high incidence rate of goiter is reduced after universal iodine supplement. This study has been undertaken to study the an-thyroid anti-body level among the thyroid disorder population (anti-TPO and anti-thyrogobulin antibody) and TSAb among Graves' disease and sub-acute thyroiditis. This study was performed over 300 persons of them 150 have some type of thyroid (patient) disorder and 150 have got no clinical thyroid disorder (volunteer). We also studied TSH receptor anti-body (TSAb) in 112 Graves' disease patients and 86 patients with sub-acute thyroiditis. All the patient had I-131 Uptake in 24 hours. Among the patient 42(28%) had elevated anti-TPO, 12(8%) had borderline and 96(64%) had normal anti-TPO. It was found the uptake percentage of this group of patient hade slight lower than average uptake of our population. 13±5% It was found that 28(18.6%) had elevated anti thyrogobulin anti-body, 9 (6.2%) had borderline and 113(75.3%) had normal level anti thyrogobulin anti-body. It was also that found the uptake percentage of this group of patient had slight lower than average uptake of our population. We also found that 21% patient had elevated both the antibodies. Among the normal volunteer 24(16%) had elevated anti-TPO, 8 (5.3%) had borderline and 118(78.7%) had normal level of anti-TPO. Thyroid 1-131 uptake was 15±4%. It was found that 14(9.3%) had elevated anti thyrogobulin anti-body, 6(4.1%) had borderline and 130 (76.6%) had normal level of anti thyrogobulin anti-body. Among the normal volunteer 6% had elevated both the antibodies. It was found 91% patient Graves' disease had positive TSAb and 92% of' sub-acute thyroiditis has negative TSAb, I-131 uptake was 31±8% among this group of patient.. Thyroid stimulating antibody is found in 91% of Graves' disease and very few patient with sub-acute thyroiditis. The uptake of I-131 in sub

  14. Risk of Hematologic Malignancies After Radioiodine Treatment of Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Remco J; Sidana, Surbhi; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Advani, Anjali S; Gerds, Aaron T; Carraway, Hetty E; Angelini, Dana; Kalaycio, Matt; Nazha, Aziz; Adelstein, David J; Nasr, Christian; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Majhail, Navneet S; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Mukherjee, Sudipto

    2017-12-18

    Purpose To investigate the risk and outcomes of second hematologic malignancies (SHMs) in a population-based cohort of patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer (WDTC) treated or not with radioactive iodine (RAI). Methods Patients with WDTC were identified from SEER registries. Competing risk regression analysis was performed to calculate the risks of SHMs that occurred after WDTC treatment and outcomes after SHM development were assessed. Results Of 148,215 patients with WDTC, 53% received surgery alone and 47% received RAI. In total, 783 patients developed an SHM after a median interval of 6.5 years (interquartile range, 3.3 to 11.2 years) from WDTC diagnosis. In multivariable analysis, compared with those undergoing thyroidectomy alone, RAI treatment was associated with an increased early risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia (AML; hazard ratio, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.13 to 2.82; P = .01) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML; hazard ratio, 3.44; 95% CI, 1.87 to 6.36; P < .001). This increased risk of AML and CML after RAI treatment was seen even in low-risk and intermediate-risk WDTC tumors. Occurrence of AML but not CML in patients with WDTC was associated with shorter median overall survival compared with matched controls (8.0 years v 31.0 years; P = .001). In addition, AML developing after RAI trended toward inferior survival compared with matched controls with de novo AML (median overall survival, 1.2 years v 2.9 years; P = .06). Conclusion Patients with WDTC treated with RAI had an increased early risk of developing AML and CML but no other hematologic malignancies. AML that arises after RAI treatment has a poor prognosis. RAI use in patients with WDTC should be limited to patients with high-risk disease features, and patients with WDTC treated with adjuvant RAI should be monitored for myeloid malignancies as part of cancer surveillance.

  15. Iodine intake as a determinant of thyroid disorders in populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, Peter; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Ovesen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Depending on the availability of iodine, the thyroid gland is able to enhance or limit the use of iodine for thyroid hormone production. When compensation fails, as in severely iodine-deficient populations, hypothyroidism and developmental brain damage will be the dominating disorders. This is, out...... of all comparison, the most serious association between disease and the level of iodine intake in a population. In less severe iodine deficiency, the normal thyroid gland is able to adapt and keep thyroid hormone production within the normal range. However, the prolonged thyroid hyperactivity associated...... with such adaptation leads to thyroid growth, and during follicular cell proliferation there is a tendency to mutations leading to multifocal autonomous growth and function. In populations with mild and moderate iodine deficiency, such multifocal autonomous thyroid function is a common cause of hyperthyroidism...

  16. Oral manifestations of thyroid disorders and its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalu Chandna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The thyroid is the major regulator of metabolism and affects all of the bodily functions. Thyroid dysfunction is the second most common glandular disorder of the endocrine system which may rear its head in any system in the body including the mouth. The oral cavity is adversely affected by either an excess or deficiency of these hormones. Before treating a patient who has thyroid disorder, the endocrinologist needs to be familiar with the oral manifestations of thyroid dysfunctions. The patient with a thyroid dysfunction, as well as the patient taking medications for it, requires proper risk management before considering dental treatment by the dentist. Thus, communication of dentist with endocrinologist must be bidirectional, to maintain patient′s oral and thyroid health.

  17. Patient management in radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease; Radiojodtherapie gutartiger Schilddruesenerkrankungen: Ambulante Vorbereitung und Nachsorge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dressler, J. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    Benign thyroid disease ranks by far as the most frequent therapy in nuclear medicine. In Germany approximately 25 000 cases of hyperthyreosis are being treated in association with autonomy or Graves` disease, but also for the reduction of goiters or the correction of latent functional disturbances. In such indications radiotherapy is virtually free of risk as opposed to surgery and ranks more favorable in regard to costs and curative effects versus pharmacological long term treatment. Still regional varying therapeutical concepts and intentions are being pursued and trials of improvements described. There is consent in therapy that quality of treatment is closely linked to a specialized out-door platient preparation, individual hospital activity dosage and lifelong follow up including continued evaluation of therapeutical results. In this paper minimal requirements of outpatient measures before and after therapy are summarized which in Germany is only permitted on an inhospital patient basis. Considering basics of radioactive preventive law, scientific evidence of available results of therapeutical studies and a survey of German therapeutic centers, suggestions for a quality maintaining management in view of the most effective utilization for the limited available number of beds is presented for discussion. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die mit Abstand haeufigste nuklearmedizinische Therapie betrifft die gutartigen Schilddruesenerkrankungen. In Deutschland werden jaehrlich etwa 25 000 Hyperthyreosen bei Autonomie oder Morbus Basedow, aber auch Strumen zur Verkleinerung oder Beseitigung einer latenten Funktionsstoerung behandelt. Die Radiojodtherapie ist bei den genannten Indikationen gegenueber der Operation praktisch risikofrei, gegenueber einer medikamentoesen Langzeitbehandlung kurativ und kostenguenstiger. Nach wie vor werden regional variierende Behandlungskonzepte und -ziele verfolgt und Optimierungsversuche beschrieben. Einigkeit besteht bei den Therapeuten, dass die

  18. Incidence of radiation-induced Graves' disease in patients treated with radioiodine for thyroid autonomy before and after introduction of a high-sensitivity TSH receptor antibody assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkelmann, Simone; Wolf, Ricarda; Koch, Annedore; Kittner, Christian; Groth, Peter; Schuemichen, Carl

    2004-01-01

    Autoimmune hyperthyroidism may occur several months after radioiodine therapy (RIT) for functional thyroid autonomy. Exacerbation of pre-existing subclinical Graves' disease (GD) has been held responsible for this phenomenon. Determination of TSH receptor antibody using solubilised porcine epithelial cell membranes is insensitive and may have failed to diagnose GD in these patients before RIT. Following the introduction of a more sensitive assay, using the human TSH receptor as an antigen, it has been expected that the incidence of radiation-induced GD after RIT for functional thyroid autonomy will be reduced. In a first group of 1,428 patients treated between November 1993 and March 1997 (group I) we used the porcine TRAb assay to exclude GD, while in a second group comprising 1,408 patients treated between January 2000 and December 2001 (group II), GD was excluded using the human TRAb assay. A matched control group of 231 patients was derived from group II. In group I a total of 15 (1.05%) patients developed obvious or suspected radiation-induced GD, while in group II 17 (1.2%) did so; the interval until development of GD was 8.4 and 8.8 months, respectively, after RIT. Serum anti-thyroid peroxidase levels before RIT were elevated in 36.4% of group I patients and 47.1% of group II patients, but in only 5.6% of the control group. Other non-specific signs of mild immunopathy of the thyroid were seen retrospectively in 73.3%, 64.7% and 16.0% of the patients in these three groups, respectively. In conclusion, the introduction of a high-sensitivity TRAb assay did not reduce the incidence of autoimmune hyperthyroidism occurring late after RIT for functional thyroid autonomy, but mild immunopathy of the thyroid is seen more frequently in these patients and seems to be a predisposing factor in the development of radiation-induced GD. (orig.)

  19. Multifactorial analysis on the short-term side effects occurring within 96 hours after radioiodine-131 therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Tamotsu; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Kinuya, Seigo; Taki, Junichi; Nakajima, Kenichi; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa; Higuchi, Takahiro

    2004-01-01

    This study was performed to clarify factors that might influence short-term side effects occurring within 96 hours after administration of 131 I for patients with thyroid carcinoma. In 71 patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma, short-term side effects including gastrointestinal complaints, salivary gland swelling with pain, change in taste and headache were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were given domperidone for prevention of gastrointestinal complaints and advised to consume sour foods to promote discharge of radioiodine from the salivary glands. Selected factors possibly affecting the incidence of side effects were dose per body weight, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), effective half-life of 131 I, sex, age, 131 I accumulation into the stomach and salivary glands, and edema prior to radioiodine administration. The factors were evaluated by multivariate analyses. Incidence of gastrointestinal complaints, salivary gland swelling with pain, change in taste and headache was 65.2%, 50.0%, 9.8% and 4.4%, respectively. In gastrointestinal complaints, the incidence of appetite loss, nausea and vomiting was 60.9%, 40.2% and 7.6%, respectively. The gastrointestinal complaints increased significantly in the patients dosed above 55.5 MBq/kg and with TSH elevation. For salivary gland swelling with pain, female patients displayed a significantly higher incidence than males. No statistically significant factors were detected for change in taste or headache. Significant factors influencing short-term side effects were dose per body weight and TSH values for gastrointestinal complaints, and female sex for salivary gland swelling with pain. Our preliminary experience suggests that the most frequent gastrointestinal complaints can be prevented with ramosetron. (author)

  20. Clinical Usefulness of F-18 FDG PET/CT in papillary thyroid cancer with negative radioiodine scan and elevated thyroglobulin level or positive anti-thyroglobulin antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Su Jung; Jung, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sun Seong; Park, Yun Soo; Lee, Seok Mo [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Kyun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Elevated thyroglobulin (Tg) levels, along with a negative radioiodine scan, present a clinical problem for the diagnosis of recurrence in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) patients. The purpose of this study was to assess (1) the usefulness of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for PTC patients with negative diagnostic radioiodine scan and elevated serum Tg level or positive anti-thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb), and (2) the effect of endogenous thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) stimulation (ETS) on detecting recurrence in these circumstances. Eighty-four patients with negative diagnostic radioiodine scan and elevated serum Tg or positive TgAb under ETS were included. Correlation with clinicopathological features and recurrence, detectability of FDG PET/CT and cut-off value of serum Tg for recurrence in PTC patients with these circumstance were assessed. In addition, detectability of F-18 FDG PET/CT under ETS and suppression were compared. In Cox regression analysis, only serum Tg level was significantly associated with recurrence (P<0.001, HR  = 1.13; 95 % CI, 1.061–1.208). The cut-off level of Tg was 21.5 ng/mL (AUC, 0.919; P < 0.001) for discriminating the recurrence in the patients with positive PET/CT finding. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of F-18 FDG PET/CT for detecting recurrence were 64 %, 94 %, 86 %, 81 %, and 83 %. In the analysis of F-18 FDG PET/CT under ETS, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy was 64 %, 94 %, 88 %, 81 % and 83 %. Those under TSH suppression were 67 %, 92 %, 80 %, 85 % and 83 %. F-18 FDG PET/CT, although less sensitive, showed high specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy and therefore can be useful for the patients with negative diagnostic radioiodine scan and elevated serum Tg or positive TgAb. In addition, FDG PET/CT under ETS does not seem to have an additive role in detecting recurrence in these patients.

  1. The influence of saliva flow stimulation on the absorbed radiation dose to the salivary glands during radioiodine therapy of thyroid cancer using 124I PET(/CT) imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jentzen, Walter; Schmitz, Jochen; Freudenberg, Lutz; Eising, Ernst; Bockisch, Andreas; Stahl, Alexander; Balschuweit, Dorothee; Hilbel, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    A serious side effect of high-activity radioiodine therapy in the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer is radiogenic salivary gland damage. This damage may be diminished by lemon-juice-induced saliva flow immediately after 131 I administration. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of chewing lemon slices on the absorbed (radiation) doses to the salivary glands. Ten patients received (pretherapy) 124 I PET(/CT) dosimetry before their first radioiodine therapy. The patients underwent a series of six PET scans at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 48 and ≥96 h and one PET/CT scan at 24 h after administration of 27 MBq 124 I. Blood samples were also collected at about 2, 4, 24, 48, and 96 h. Contrary to the standard radioiodine therapy protocol, the patients were not stimulated with lemon juice. Specifically, the patients chewed no lemon slices during the pretherapy procedure and neither ate food nor drank fluids until after completion of the last PET scan on the first day. Organ absorbed doses per administered 131 I activity (ODpAs) as well as gland and blood uptake curves were determined and compared with published data from a control patient group, i.e. stimulated per the standard radioiodine therapy protocol. The calculations for both groups used the same methodology. A within-group comparison showed that the mean ODpA for the submandibular glands was not significantly different from that for the parotid glands. An intergroup comparison showed that the mean ODpA in the nonstimulation group averaged over both gland types was reduced by 28% compared to the mean ODpA in the stimulation group (p=0.01). Within each gland type, the mean ODpA reductions in the nonstimulation group were statistically significant for the parotid glands (p=0.03) but not for the submandibular glands (p=0.23). The observed ODpAs were higher in the stimulation group because of increased initial gland uptake rather than group differences in blood kinetics. The 124 I PET(/CT) salivary gland

  2. Thyroid autoimmunity in bipolar disorder: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuti, Margherita; Carvalho, André F; Köhler, Cristiano A; Murru, Andrea; Verdolini, Norma; Guiso, Giovanni; Samalin, Ludovic; Maes, Michael; Stubbs, Brendon; Perugi, Giulio; Vieta, Eduard; Pacchiarotti, Isabella

    2017-10-15

    Accumulating evidence points to the pathophysiological relevance between immune dysfunction and mood disorders. High rates of thyroid dysfunction have been found in patients with bipolar disorder (BD), compared to the general population. A systematic review of the relationship between BD and thyroid autoimmunity was performed. Pubmed, EMBASE and PsycINFO databases were searched up till January 28th, 2017. This review has been conducted according to the PRISMA statements. Observational studies clearly reporting data among BD patients and the frequency of autoimmune thyroid pathologies were included. 11 original studies met inclusion criteria out of 340 titles first returned from the global search. There is evidence of increased prevalence of circulating thyroid autoantibodies in depressed and mixed BD patients, while there is no evidence showing a positive relationship between BD and specific autoimmune thyroid diseases. There is a controversy about the influence of lithium exposure on circulating thyroid autoantibodies, even if most of studies seem not to support this association. A study conducted on bipolar twins suggests that autoimmune thyroiditis is related to the genetic vulnerability to develop BD rather than to the disease process itself. Females are more likely to develop thyroid autoimmunity. The samples, study design and outcomes were heterogeneous. Thyroid autoimmunity has been suggested to be an independent risk factor for bipolar disorder with no clear association with lithium exposure and it might serve as an endophenotype for BD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Aplicaciones clínicas del radioyodo 131 (I131 en las enfermedades del tiroides Clinical applications of radioiodine 131 (I131 in the thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levi González Rivero

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El radioyodo 131 es un isótopo radioactivo que se emplea exitosamente en el diagnóstico y tratamiento de las enfermedades benignas y malignas del tiroides. Su propiedad de integrarse selectivamente al metabolismo del tiroides y emitir una señal, le permite describir el funcionamiento glandular mediante estudios de captación, y delimitar la morfología y localización de los tejidos que capten yodo, a través de la gammagrafía. Es además una radioterapia sencilla, segura y coste-efectiva, usada como primera línea terapéutica en el control del hipertiroidismo, cuya dosis y momento de aplicación debería individualizarse según la etiología y la clínica de cada paciente. El radioyodo 131 ofrece una alternativa eficaz para reducir el tamaño del bocio no tóxico; además, respalda el tratamiento quirúrgico del carcinoma diferenciado del tiroides, y destruye a dosis ablativa los restos tisulares y las lesiones metastásicas que puede identificar durante el seguimiento gammagráfico. El empleo de radioyodo 131 está sujeto al cumplimiento de regulaciones de protección contra la radioactividad.Radioiodine 131 is a radioactive isotope that is successfully used for the diagnosis and the treatment of benign and malignant thyroid diseases. Its quality of selectively integrating to the thyroid metabolism and emitting a signal allows it to describe the gland functioning through capture studies, and to delimit the morphology and location of the tissues that capture iodine by means of gammagraphy. It is also a simple, safe and cost-effective radiotherapy used as first-line therapeutics in the control of hyperthyroidism. The dose and right time of application should be individualized according to the etiology and the clinic of each patient. Radioiodine 131 offers an efficient alternative to reduce the size of non-toxic goiter in addition to supporting the surgical treatment of the differentiated thyroid carcinoma and destroying with ablative doses

  4. Thyroid disorders associated with pregnancy: etiology, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, John H

    2005-01-01

    Pregnancy has an effect on thyroid economy with significant changes in iodine metabolism, serum thyroid binding proteins, and the development of maternal goiter especially in iodine-deficient areas. Pregnancy is also accompanied by immunologic changes, mainly characterized by a shift from a T helper-1 (Th1) lymphocyte to a Th2 lymphocyte state. Thyroid peroxidase antibodies are present in 10% of women at 14 weeks' gestation, and are associated with (i) an increased pregnancy failure (i.e. abortion), (ii) an increased incidence of gestational thyroid dysfunction, and (iii) a predisposition to postpartum thyroiditis. Thyroid function should be measured in women with severe hyperemesis gravidarum but not in every patient with nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. Graves hyperthyroidism during pregnancy is best managed with propylthiouracil administered throughout gestation. Thyroid-stimulating hormone-receptor antibody measurements at 36 weeks' gestation are predictive of transient neonatal hyperthyroidism, and should be checked even in previously treated patients receiving thyroxine. Postpartum exacerbation of hyperthyroidism is common, and should be evaluated in women with Graves disease not on treatment. Radioiodine therapy in pregnancy is absolutely contraindicated. Hypothyroidism (including subclinical hypothyroidism) occurs in about 2.5% of pregnancies, and may lead to obstetric and neonatal complications as well as being a cause of infertility. During the last few decades, evidence has been presented to underpin the critical importance of adequate fetal thyroid hormone levels in order to ensure normal central and peripheral nervous system maturation. In iodine-deficient and iodine-sufficient areas, low maternal circulating thyroxine levels have been associated with a significant decrement in child IQ and development. These data suggest the advisability of further evaluation for a screening program early in pregnancy to identify women with hypothyroxinemia, and

  5. Treatment room length-of-stay and patient throughput with radioiodine thyroid remnant ablation in differentiated thyroid cancer: comparison of thyroid-stimulating hormone stimulation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo Casas, Juan Antonio; Mena Bares, Luisa M; Gálvez, María Angeles; Marlowe, Robert J; Latre Romero, José M; Martínez-Paredes, María

    2011-09-01

    We sought to empirically compare treatment room length-of-stay and patient throughput for recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH)-aided thyroid remnant ablation with thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW)-aided ablation in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). We retrospectively reviewed charts of all eligible (near) totally thyroidectomized patients with DTC undergoing ablation and 1-year ablation success evaluation at our tertiary referral centre from January 2003 to February 2009 (N=274). M1 disease caused exclusion unless discovered by a postablation scan or present when rhTSH was the only tolerable stimulation method. We extracted data on the length-of-stay, defined as the time between treatment room admission and discharge, and patient throughput, defined as patients ablated per treatment room per week. The treatment room discharge criterion was a whole-body dose rate of less than 60 μSv/h at 50 cm. The treatment groups (rhTSH, n=187; THW, n=87) had mostly statistically similar characteristics, but differed in primary tumour status distribution. In addition, at ablation, the rhTSH patients had a greater prevalence of prior diagnostic scintigraphy, higher mean serum TSH, and shorter interval since surgery, and received a 5.6% larger mean ablation activity. On average, rhTSH patients had a significantly lower peak whole-body dose rate (57.1 vs. 83.4 μSv/h at 50 cm; P<0.0001) and a significantly shorter treatment room stay than did the THW patients (1.41 vs. 2.02 days; P<0.001). rhTSH use allowed significantly more patients to be ablated per room per week (2.7 vs. 1.2; P<0.001). Relative to THW, rhTSH use to aid ablation reduced mean treatment room length-of-stay by almost one-third and more than doubled the average weekly patient throughput, both of which were significant differences.

  6. Combination of ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation and radioiodine therapy in benign thyroid disease. A 3-month follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkusuz, H.; Happel, C.; Koch, D.A.; Gruenwald, F. [Frankfurt University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2016-01-15

    Pilot studies of combined therapies treating benign nodular goiters reported promising results. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of combined microwave ablation (MWA) and radioiodine therapy (RIT) with a special focus on thyroid function at the 3-month follow-up. 15 patients (median age: 55 years) with a large goiter and benign thyroid nodules or Graves' disease were treated with the combined therapy. Serum levels of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), thyrotropin (TSH), thyroglobuline (Tg) and, additionally, antibody levels against thyroglobulin (TgAb), thyrotropin receptors (TRAb) and thyroid peroxidase (TPOAb) were measured at enrollment, post MWA and at the 3-month follow-up (3MFU). Furthermore, the goiter volume, I-131 dose and hospitalization time were analyzed to evaluate effectiveness. MWA was operated under local anesthesia with a system working in a wavelength field of 902 to 928 MHz. TSH, T4, T3 and Tg did not change at 3MFU, except for in two patients in whom the initial TSH levels improved to normal thyroid functioning levels at follow-up. One of the patients developed a high TRAb-level that receded back into the normal range. At 3MFU, the combined therapy showed a mean thyroid volume reduction of 26.4 ml ± 7.9 ml (30.5 % ± 4.6 % (p < 0.05)). By utilizing the combined therapy, administered activity could be reduced by 26.6 % ± 4.8 % (p < 0.05) and hospitalization time by 30.9 % ± 19.9 % (p < 0.05). The data confirmed the effectiveness of the combination of MWA with RIT. The combined therapy is an innovative and conservative approach and could become a safe alternative to surgery for the treatment of very large benign nodular goiters. Due to the short follow-up and the limited number of patients, further studies will be necessary.

  7. Ablative therapy with radioiodine in the postoperative management of differentiated thyroid carcinoma, a retrospective observational study of the justified indication of the therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto Herrera, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    The validity of the indication of treatment with I131 as part of the management of differentiated thyroid cancer, was analyzed in patients older than 16 years attended in Hospital San Juan de Dios and Hospital Mexico, who received this therapy, during the years 2006-2009. The medical records of the selected patients were reviewed and registered in the SPSS statistical program. The following variables were obtained: name, file number, age, gender, type of cancer, maximum diameter of the tumor, presence of one of 2 or more tumor foci in the surgical piece, hospital of origin, value of T, N and M according to the TNM staging, MACIS scale score and staging according to the MACIS score. The most common differentiated carcinoma in the studied population was papillary carcinoma. A little less than half of the patients, had the criteria to receive radioiodine therapy according to that established by the ATA, same result when said population was subjected to European criteria Criteria to receive radioiodine dictated by the American school as the European one were fulfilled in the majority of patients with stage 2. Compliance with indication or non-indication of treatment was maintained without significant difference between papillary and follicular carcinomas [es

  8. Usefulness of radioiodine scanning in patients with moderate/high risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma in whom thyroglobulin after thyroxin withdrawal is undetectable after initial treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosario, Pedro Weslley S.; Cardoso, Ludmilla David; Fagundes, Tales Alvarenga; Reis, Janice Sepulveda; Maia, Frederico F. Ribeiro; Purisch, Saulo

    2004-01-01

    We selected 92 patients without anti thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb), in whom thyroglobulin (Tg) after L-thyroxin withdrawal was undetectable ( 1.5 cm; and lymph nodes metastases in 43 (46.7%), local invasion in 26 (28.2%) or distant metastases in 23 (25%). Control whole-body scanning was negative in 78.2% of the cases and showed cervical uptake in the others. Cases presenting thyroid bed uptake in the absence of tumor recurrence did not receive radioiodine and Tg remained undetectable one year after the initial evaluation in all. Cervical uptake was not observed in 4/13 cases on repeated scan. In contrast, even in the absence of uptake and with undetectable Tg, 7 patients with recurrence confirmed by ultrasound (US) received surgical treatment. US showed 92.8% sensitivity for the detection of local-regional disease. The present study suggests that even moderate/high-risk patients without TgAb and with undetectable T g levels (off T 4 ) do not require radioiodine scanning after initial treatment and can be evaluated by cervical US. (author)

  9. Screening for thyroid disorders in asymptomatic adults from Brazilian populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Benseñor

    Full Text Available Advances in thyroid disorder diagnosis have created new thyroid disorder categories such as subclinical hyperthyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism. In the 1980s, immunometric assaying for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH emerged and became defined as the most cost-effective test in thyroid disorder screening. The second step in the screening of thyroid disorders is to determine free thyroxine (FT4, and cost-effective methods for its detection are now available. Using TSH and FT4, it is possible to determine four situations: clinical hyperthyroidism, clinical hypothyroidism, subclinical hyperthyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism. Subclinical hypothyroidism can be a strong indicator of risk for atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction in elderly women. Cardiovascular mortality among Brazilian women is one of the highest in the Western world. The best-known risk factors for cardiovascular diseases are high blood pressure, smoking, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia. Although these are recognized as primary risk factors, there are other risk factors that could be identified as primordial risk factors. This may be the case for subclinical hypothyroidism. Early detection of thyroid disorders in women over fifty could be a highly cost-effective option in the prevention of cardiovascular disorders among Brazilian women.

  10. Thyroid disorders in atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, M.; Neriishi, K.; Akahoshi, M.; Suzuki, G.; Nakashima, E.; Nagataki, S.; Eguchi, K.

    2003-01-01

    It is known from several studies, including those from RERF that radiation exposure can cause thyroid tumors (Socolow, N Engl J Med. 1963;268:406, Parker, Ann Intern Med. 1974;80:600). Effects of radiation on autoimmune thyroid disease are not well understood. We have conducted thyroid disease screening on a population of 2856 individuals from the Adult Health Study (AHS) cohort of atomic-bomb survivors for the period of 1984-1987. This study, which for logistical reasons involved survivors only from Nagasaki, revealed a statistically significant relationship between radiation dose and prevalence of solid nodules, including cancer, and that of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Nagataki, JAMA. 1994;272:364). Because the previous thyroid study was conducted only in Nagasaki, the new comprehensive thyroid disease screening study has been ongoing in Hiroshima and Nagasaki AHS participants since March 2000. For about 4,000 participants in Hiroshima and Nagasaki AHS cohort, thyroid ultrasonography, aspiration biopsy of nodules, thyroid function test, thyroid autoantibody (thyroid peroxidase antibody and thyroglobulin antibody) test by highly sensitive assay using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay were performed for the diagnosis of thyroid diseases. Analysis of data from the 1874 people examined through July 2001 (915 people from Hiroshima, 959 people from Nagasaki) provides evidence that thyroid cancer increases with radiation dose. The prevalence of positive result for thyroid autoantibody test is increased in the people exposed to relative low dose of radiation (0.01-0.99 Sv). Examination and measurements was completed in February 2003 for all patients. The analysis of these data is providing new and more complete insights into relationships between thyroid diseases and low doses of radiation

  11. Detection system qualification for direct measurement of thyroid internal contamination by radioiodine; Qualificazione di un sistema di rilevazione trasportabile per misure dirette di contaminazione interna di radioiodio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiberi, V.; Battisti, P.; Gualdrini, G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1999-07-01

    The work deals with a detection system qualification for direct measurements of thyroid internal contamination by radioiodine. The isotopes {sup 131}I and {sup 125}I are the most frequently used in nuclear medicine. Because of their volatility they are very dangerous for thyroid contamination by inhalation. The system has been projected to be easily and fast used and above all transportable where the control is necessary. These characteristic make it able to realise supervision programs of internal contamination by radioiodine. In fact due the very high control frequencies (each 15 days for {sup 131}I), these programs are usually very expensive and demanding when they are executed in external measurement laboratories. The following steps are described: devices presentation, calculation of energy and efficiency parameters, minimum detectable activity, time system reliability, best operative conditions in the measurements. At the end an application example of the system is reported. [Italian] Il presente lavoro consiste nella qualificazione di un sistema di rivelazione per misure dirette di contaminazione interna da radioiodio in tiroide, progettato per essere maneggevole, di semplice e rapido impiego e trasportabile sul luogo dove e' richiesta la misura. Il sistema e' stato studiato per la realizzazione di programmi di sorveglianza della contaminazione interna da radioiodio che, richiedendo frequenze di controllo elevate (quindicinali per lo {sup 131}I), sono estremamente impegnativi ed onerosi, soprattutto se i controlli vengono effettuati in centri di misura esterni. Dopo la determinazione dei parametri della calibrazione in energia ed efficienza, la minima attivita' rivelabile, l'affidabilita' del sistema nel tempo e le condizioni operative ottimali da adottare in sede di misura, viene verificata la piena affidabilita' del sistema in un programma di sorveglianza della contaminazione interna da radioiodio.

  12. Radiopharmaceuticals for thyroid imaging: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, H.

    1979-01-01

    A review of radiopharmaceuticals which have been used for thyroid imaging was made with special emphasis on palpable thyroid nodules. An attempt was made to evaluate cold nodules derived from imaging methods using radioiodine or Tc-99m pertechnetate, followed by a successive application of another radiopharmaceutical. An attempt was also made to understand the patho-physiology of various thyroid disorders. The latter was based on the accumulated cases with discordant images between radioiodine and Tc-99m pertechnetate, and also on the iodine content within the gland by means of fluorescent techniques. Better radiopharmaceuticals are anxiously awaited in order to realize the distinction between benign and malignant thyroid disorders at the preoperative decision-making stage

  13. Efficacy of 131I SPECT/CT in the initial nodal staging in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma at the first ablative radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisiel, N.; Garcia-Burillo, A.; Barios, M.; Dellepiane, F.; Castell-Conesa, J.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Background: after the first radioiodine ablative dose, planar Whole-Body Scanning (WBS) offers the possibility for detecting thyroid remnant, loco-regional node involvement and distant metastases. Nevertheless, available anatomic information is scarce and the high activity of thyroid remnants can interfere with the detection of cervical lymphatic nodes. Objective: to determine the additional value of the SPECT-CT over planar WBS, performed seven days after ablative treatment with 131 I, in patients who were operated on for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer (DTC). Methods: from January 2009 to December 2012, 132 patients with DTC were admitted for radio-ablation with 131 I after thyroidectomy. All of them underwent WBS seven days after ablation, and 91 had an additional SPECT-CT, 71 women and 20 men, with ages ranged from 15 to 89 years (mean, age 54 years). All patients had histological confirmed DTC (73 papillary, 17 follicular -2 cases with double tumour, papillary and follicular-, and 1 insular type). In addition to the thyroidectomy, lymph node dissection was performed in 54 patients (59%): 20 patients were classified as N0 and 29 as N1. The remaining 42 patients were classified as Nx. Planar and tomographic images were independently evaluated by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. Results: 195 cervical focal uptake were observed in the 91 planar WBSs. No additional foci were observed in SPECT-CT. Findings: Planar WBS........... SPECT-CT........... Number of Foci Thyroid remnant...... Thyroid remnant..........51........... LNM...........0 Indeterminate.......... Thyroid remnant..........84............. LNM............5 LNM............ Thyroid remnant.........12............ Indeterminate.............0............ LNM..........43. Total Number of Foci............. 195. Compared to the nodal staging prior to ablation based on the histopathological diagnosis, we had an upstaging from N0 to N1 in 4 of 20 patients and from Nx to

  14. Effectiveness of L-thyroxine treatment on TSH suppression during pregnancy in patients with a history of thyroid carcinoma after total thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krhin, Blaz; Besic, Nikola

    2012-01-01

    There are scarce data about the optimal increase of L-thyroxine dose during pregnancy in patients with a history of thyroid carcinoma. The first aim of the study was to find out if routine therapeutic measures enable adequate TSH suppression in pregnancy. The other aim was to find out the optimal dose of L-thyroxine for TSH suppression in pregnant women. In this retrospective observational study, we analysed 36 pregnancies of 32 women with a history of thyroid carcinoma. Before pregnancy, all of them underwent total thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation of thyroid remnant, and they were on suppressive doses of L-thyroxine. Thyroid function tests were obtained before, during and after pregnancy. Mean L-thyroxine dose before pregnancy, in the first, second and, third trimester and after delivery was 149, 147, 155, 165 and 158 micrograms daily, respectively. TSH concentration remained suppressed in 9 pregnancies, it was within normal range in 22 and elevated in 5 pregnancies. The mean dose of L-thyroxine in patients with suppressed TSH before pregnancy, in the first, second and, third trimester and after delivery was 154, 154, 164, 160 and 161 micrograms daily, respectively. When the dose had to be changed, the mean increase of the dose was 31.5 micrograms daily. The range of changes in TSH concentration during pregnancy in the patients who have been on suppressive L-thyroxine therapy before conception is quite wide. TSH was adequately suppressed in only 25% of pregnancies. The dose of L-thyroxine in patients with suppressed TSH in the first, second and third trimester was 154, 164 and 160 micrograms daily, respectively

  15. PREVALENCE OF THYROID DISORDERS IN PREGNANCY AT A TEACHING HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guntoory Indira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Thyroid disorders are the second most common endocrinological disorders seen in pregnant women. Thyroid hormone plays a crucial role in pregnancy both in the development of a healthy baby and in maintaining the health of the mother. Several studies have shown a rising prevalence of thyroid disease in India and in South Asian countries. The diagnosis of thyroid disease in pregnancy is difficult as many of the signs and symptoms of thyroid disease are also common to pregnancy. The aim of the study is to determine the prevalence of thyroid disease in pregnant women. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a hospital-based cross-sectional study. 333 antenatal women were screened in their first visit to the antenatal clinic by serum TSH, fT3, fT4. Statistical analysis of the results was done. RESULTS 283 women out of 333 antenatal women screened were found to be euthyroid. 50 women were detected to be having thyroid disorder. 45 women had subclinical hypothyroidism, one woman had overt hypothyroidism and four women had subclinical hyperthyroidism. 4 women had hypothyroidism prior to pregnancy. The overall prevalence of thyroid disorders in pregnancy in our study was found to be 16.21%. CONCLUSION The prevalence was found to be high in our study and in several studies from India and in its neighbouring countries. This is probably due to iodine deficiency being prevalent in several areas in our country. The prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism is high. This all the more stresses the need for universal screening of pregnant women for thyroid disease in our country.

  16. Genetic disorders of thyroid metabolism and brain development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, Manju A; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Normal thyroid metabolism is essential for human development, including the formation and functioning of the central and peripheral nervous system. Disorders of thyroid metabolism are increasingly recognized within the spectrum of paediatric neurological disorders. Both hypothyroid and hyperthyroid disease states (resulting from genetic and acquired aetiologies) can lead to characteristic neurological syndromes, with cognitive delay, extrapyramidal movement disorders, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and neuromuscular manifestations. In this review, the neurological manifestations of genetic disorders of thyroid metabolism are outlined, with particular focus on Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome and benign hereditary chorea. We report in detail the clinical features, major neurological and neuropsychiatric manifestations, molecular genetic findings, disease mechanisms, and therapeutic strategies for these emerging genetic ‘brain-thyroid’ disorders. PMID:24665922

  17. Radioiodine dosimetry and prediction of consequences of thyroid exposure of the Russian population following the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvonova, I.A.; Balonov, M.I.

    1993-01-01

    In the early period after the Chernobyl accident, analysis of patterns of 131 I exposure of the human thyroid showed that contaminated milk was the basic source of 131 I intake among the inhabitants of Russia. The equipment and techniques used for measurement of the 131 I content in the thyroids of these individuals are described in this work. A model of the 131 I intake, taking into account protective actions, and a method of thyroid dose calculation are discussed. The mean thyroid dose and frequency distributions of the thyroid doses to inhabitants of towns and villages of the Bryansk, Tula and Orel regions of Russia are presented. The mean dose to the thyroids of children living in the villages was 2 to 5 times higher than the dose to adult thyroids; for children living in the towns, the mean dose was 1.5 to 12 times higher. The mean thyroid mass in adult inhabitants of the Bryansk region was 27 g, which exceeded the value for a standard man (20 g) and was taken into account in the dosimetric calculations. The technique for reconstructing the mean and individual thyroid doses was based on the correlation between thyroid dose and several parameters: Surface 137 Cs activity in soil, dose rate in air in May of 1986, 131 I content in local milk, milk consumption rate, and 134 Cs + 137 Cs content in the body. The collective thyroid dose to inhabitants of the most contaminated regions of Russia is estimated and a thyroid cancer rate prognosis is derived. The need for intensified medical care for the critical group - children of preschool age during 1986 - is based on a significant increase in the number of projected thyroid cancers and adenomas. 32 refs., 10 figs., 15 tabs

  18. Radioiodine uptake in inactive pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakheet, S.M.; Powe, J.; Al Suhaibani, H.; Hammami, M.M.; Bazarbashi, M.

    1999-01-01

    Radioiodine may accumulate at sites of inflammation or infection. We have seen such accumulation in six thyroid cancer patients with a history of previously treated pulmonary tuberculosis. We also review the causes of false-positive radioiodine uptake in lung infection/inflammation. Eight foci of radioiodine uptake were seen on six iodine-123 diagnostic scans. In three foci, the uptake was focal and indistinguishable from thyroid cancer pulmonary metastases from thyroid cancer. In the remaining foci, the uptake appeared nonsegmental, linear or lobar, suggesting a false-positive finding. The uptake was unchanged, variable in appearance or non-persistent on follow-up scans and less extensive than the fibrocystic changes seen on chest radiographs. In the two patients studied, thyroid hormone level did not affect the radioiodine lung uptake and there was congruent gallium-67 uptake. None of the patients had any evidence of thyroid cancer recurrence or of reactivation of tuberculosis and only two patients had chronic intermittent chest symptoms. Severe bronchiectasis, active tuberculosis, acute bronchitis, respiratory bronchiolitis, rheumatoid arthritis-associated lung disease and fungal infection such as Allescheria boydii and aspergillosis can lead to different patterns of radioiodine chest uptake mimicking pulmonary metastases. Pulmonary scarring secondary to tuberculosis may predispose to localized radioiodine accumulation even in the absence of clinically evident active infection. False-positive radioiodine uptake due to pulmonary infection/inflammation should be considered in thyroid cancer patients prior to the diagnosis of pulmonary metastases. (orig.)

  19. [Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allelein, S; Feldkamp, J; Schott, M

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland are considered to be the most frequent cause of thyroid gland disorders. Autoimmune thyroid diseases consist of two subgroups: autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) and Graves' disease. The AIT is the most common human autoimmune disease. Infiltration of the thyroid gland with cytotoxic T‑cells can lead to an initial thyrotoxicosis und during the course to hypothyroidism due to destruction of the thyroid gland. Substitution with Levothyroxine is indicated for manifest hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism with increased thyroid antibodies with the intention of normalizing the serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Graves' disease is characterized by the appearance of stimulating TSH receptor antibodies leading to hyperthyroidism. Endocrine ophthalmopathy may also occur. Ablative therapy with radioiodine therapy or thyroidectomy is administered to patients with Graves' disease without remission after at least 1 year of antithyroid drug therapy.

  20. Metabolic disorders and nutritional status in autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kawicka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the authors of epidemiological studies have documented that autoimmune diseases are a major problem of modern society and are classified as diseases of civilization. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs are caused by an abnormal immune response to autoantigens present in the thyroid gland – they often coexist with other autoimmune diseases. The most common dysfunctions of the thyroid gland are hypothyroidism, Graves-Basedow disease and Hashimoto’s disease. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis can be the main cause of primary hypothyroidism of the thyroid gland. Anthropometric, biochemical and physicochemical parameters are used to assess the nutritional status during the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. Patients with hypothyroidism are often obese, whereas patients with hyperthyroidism are often afflicted with rapid weight loss. The consequence of obesity is a change of the thyroid hormones’ activity; however, weight reduction leads to their normalization. The activity and metabolic rate of thyroid hormones are modifiable. ATDs are associated with abnormalities of glucose metabolism and thus increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2. Celiac disease (CD also increases the risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. Malnutrition or the presence of numerous nutritional deficiencies in a patient’s body can be the cause of thyroid disorders. Coexisting deficiencies of such elements as iodine, iron, selenium and zinc may impair the function of the thyroid gland. Other nutrient deficiencies usually observed in patients suffering from ATD are: protein deficiencies, vitamin deficiencies (A, C, B6, B5, B1 and mineral deficiencies (phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chromium. Proper diet helps to reduce the symptoms of the disease, maintains a healthy weight and prevents the occurrence of malnutrition. This article presents an overview of selected documented studies and scientific reports on the

  1. [Metabolic disorders and nutritional status in autoimmune thyroid diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawicka, Anna; Regulska-Ilow, Bożena; Regulska-Ilow, Bożena

    2015-01-02

    In recent years, the authors of epidemiological studies have documented that autoimmune diseases are a major problem of modern society and are classified as diseases of civilization. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are caused by an abnormal immune response to autoantigens present in the thyroid gland - they often coexist with other autoimmune diseases. The most common dysfunctions of the thyroid gland are hypothyroidism, Graves-Basedow disease and Hashimoto's disease. Hashimoto's thyroiditis can be the main cause of primary hypothyroidism of the thyroid gland. Anthropometric, biochemical and physicochemical parameters are used to assess the nutritional status during the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. Patients with hypothyroidism are often obese, whereas patients with hyperthyroidism are often afflicted with rapid weight loss. The consequence of obesity is a change of the thyroid hormones' activity; however, weight reduction leads to their normalization. The activity and metabolic rate of thyroid hormones are modifiable. ATDs are associated with abnormalities of glucose metabolism and thus increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2. Celiac disease (CD) also increases the risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. Malnutrition or the presence of numerous nutritional deficiencies in a patient's body can be the cause of thyroid disorders. Coexisting deficiencies of such elements as iodine, iron, selenium and zinc may impair the function of the thyroid gland. Other nutrient deficiencies usually observed in patients suffering from ATD are: protein deficiencies, vitamin deficiencies (A, C, B6, B5, B1) and mineral deficiencies (phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chromium). Proper diet helps to reduce the symptoms of the disease, maintains a healthy weight and prevents the occurrence of malnutrition. This article presents an overview of selected documented studies and scientific reports on the relationship of metabolic

  2. Radio-iodine in thyroid glands of swans, farm animals and humans, also in algae and river water from the Thames Valley, England

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, J.R.; Lloyd, M.K.

    1986-01-01

    A highly sensitive counting system has been used to measure radio-iodine in environmental samples from the Thames Valley. Iodine-125 and occasionally iodine-131 have been found in the thyroid glands of most of the swans that have died on the River Thames, the River Wey and the Grand Union Canal, and in algae and water samples from the Thames and many of its tributaries. The presence of this activity is ascribed to the waste discarded into the drainage system by hospitals and research laboratories, reaching the rivers via the effluent from sewage treatment works. The Thames is used as a source of drinking water, particularly in London and its western approaches. Weed and water samples collected from river water abstraction points, reservoirs, tap water supplies, and animal water troughs fed from this supply all contained low levels of iodine-125. The drinking water route can account for the iodine-125 found in the thyroids of farm animals from west Surrey and in a few people living in London. The amounts found constitute a trivial radiation dose to man and animals as they are far below the acceptable limit of exposure for man.

  3. Interactions between thyroid disorders and kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Basu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several interactions between thyroid and kidney functions in each other organ′s disease states. Thyroid hormones affect renal development and physiology. Thyroid hormones have pre-renal and intrinsic renal effects by which they increase the renal blood flow and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR. Hypothyroidism is associated with reduced GFR and hyperthyroidism results in increased GFR as well as increased renin - angiotensin - aldosterone activation. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is characterized by a low T3 syndrome which is now considered a part of an atypical nonthyroidal illness. CKD patients also have increased incidence of primary hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism. The physiological benefits of a hypothyroid state in CKD, and the risk of CKD progression with hyperthyroidism emphasize on a conservative approach in the treatment of thyroid hormone abnormalities in CKD. Thyroid dysfunction is also associated with glomerulonephritis often by a common autoimmune etiology. Several drugs could affect both thyroid and kidney functions. There are few described interactions between thyroid and renal malignancies. A detailed knowledge of all these interactions is important for both the nephrologists and endocrinologists for optimal management of the patient.

  4. Thyroid disorders in mild iodine deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, P; Nøhr, S B; Pedersen, K M

    2000-01-01

    in elderly subjects, especially women, with risk of cardiac arrhythmias, osteoporosis, and muscle wasting. The hyperthyroidism is caused by autonomous nodular growth and function of the thyroid gland and it is accompanied by a high frequency of goiter. Pregnant women and small children are not immediately...... endangered but the consequences of severe iodine deficiency for brain development are grave and a considerable safety margin is advisable. Moreover, a shift toward less malignant types of thyroid cancer and a lower radiation dose to the thyroid in case of nuclear fallout support that mild-to-moderate iodine...

  5. Thyroid-related neurological disorders and complications in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi-Munshi, Debika; Taplin, Craig E

    2015-04-01

    Thyroid hormones exert critical roles throughout the body and play an important and permissive role in neuroendocrine, neurological, and neuromuscular function. We performed a PubMed search through June 2014 with search terms including "hypothyroidism," "hyperthyroidism," "neurological complications," "neuropathy," "myopathy," "congenital hypothyroidism," and "encephalopathy." Relevant publications reviewed included case series, individual case reports, systematic reviews, retrospective analyses, and randomized controlled trials. The neurological outcomes of congenital hypothyroidism were reviewed, along with the clinical features of associated neuromuscular syndromes of both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, including other autoimmune conditions. Evidence for, and pathophysiological controversies surrounding, Hashimoto encephalopathy was also reviewed. The establishment of widespread newborn screening programs has been highly successful in attenuating or preventing early and irreversible neurological harm resulting from congenital thyroid hormone deficiency, but some children continue to display neuromuscular, sensory, and cognitive defects in later life. Acquired disorders of thyroid function such as Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves' disease are associated with a spectrum of central nervous system and/or neuromuscular dysfunction. However, considerable variation in clinical phenotype is described, and much of our knowledge of the role of thyroid disease in childhood neurological disorders is derived from adult case series. Early and aggressive normalization of thyroxine levels in newborn infants with congenital hypothyroidism is important in minimizing neurological sequelae, but maternal thyroid hormone sources are also critically important to the early developing brain. A spectrum of neurological disorders has been reported in older children with acquired thyroid disease, but the frequency with which these occur remains poorly defined in the literature, and

  6. Clinical Significance of Autoantibodies in Some Thyroid Disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Kyu; Han, Sang Ho; Kim, Young Ju; Song, Jun Ho; Lee, Man Ho; Chung, Eul Sun; Lee, Sang Jong

    1984-01-01

    Clinical measurement of thyroid autoantibodies in sera of some thyroid disorders have been widely applied since about twenty years ago. We investigated the incidence and titers of both antimicrosomal and antithyroglobulin antibodies in forty eight cases with controls and one hundred and thirty three patients with some form of thyroid disorders. The results were as follows; 1) In controls, antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 2% but antithyroglobulin antibodies were all negative. 2) In a series of one hundred and thirty three patients with thyroid disease, antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 44% but antithyroglobulin antibodies were positive in only 15%. 3) The rate disclosing the positive results of antimicrosomal antibodies were 71% in Hashimoto disease, 60% in Graves' disease, and 38% in primary hypothyroidism, respectively. On the other hand, the positive results of antithyroglobulin antibodies showed 21% in Graves' disease, 19% in primary hypothyroidism, and 18% in Hashimoto, disease, respectively. Though there were relatively high rate of both antimicrosomal and antithyroglobulin antibodies in patients with nodular goiter, they were only seven cases in our series. 4) The rate with the extremely high titers of antimicrosomal and antithyroglobulin antibodies (>1 : 160 2 ) was 83% and 67% in Hashimoto's disease, 50% and 67% in primary hypothyroidism, and 41% and 18% in Graves' disease. Accordingly, the thyroid autoantibodies, were commonly found higher positive rate in patients with Hashimoto disease, primary hypothyroidism, and Graves' disease. Among these disorders, the extremely high positive rate of the thyroid autoantibodies was found in patients with Hashimoto's disease.

  7. Thyroid disorders and radio iodine therapy: dental perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batra, Arika; Krishnan, Manu; Tiwari, Brijesh; Singh, Sanjana; Sharma, Anu

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid disorders; hyper/hypothyroidism/thyroiditis/neoplasms are widely prevalent endocrine disorders. Oral manifestations of hyperthyroidism are increased susceptibility to caries, periodontal disease, maxillary/mandibular osteoporosis, premature shedding of deciduous teeth and early eruption of permanent teeth, sjogren and burning mouth syndromes. Undiagnosed/untreated hyperthyroidism often precipitates as 'Thyroid storm' during a stressful episode of surgical intervention/trauma. Hypothyroidism shows macroglossia, micrognathia, dysgeusia, thick lips, delayed eruption of teeth, poor periodontal health, enamel hypoplasia, anterior open bite, delayed wound healing and subnormal growth of jaws. Its congenital variant has underdeveloped mandible/overdeveloped maxilla, shortening of skull base and flaring of nostrils. Stomatodynia predominates in subacute thyroiditis. Radioactive iodine ( 131 I) is a common mode of therapy for thyrotoxicosis and carcinomas; where its beta radiations cause destruction of thyroid follicles. Since all forms of iodine are actively taken up by the salivary glands, salivary dysfunction is a consequent of 131 I therapy. It usually presents as xerostomia, mucositis, stomatitis, glossitis and dysguesia. Though reversible and dose-dependent to some extent, damage to bone marrow and gonads are also reported. It follows that thyroid disorders and its therapy with radio iodine show wide ranging side effects: both dental and general. In this context, this paper explains a novel method to evaluate these changes through salivary biochemistry, dental indices and periodontal markers. (author)

  8. Thyroid Disorders in Children and Adolescents: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Patrick; Lord, Katherine; Bauer, Andrew J

    2016-10-01

    Normal thyroid gland function is critical for early neurocognitive development, as well as for growth and development throughout childhood and adolescence. Thyroid disorders are common, and attention to physical examination findings, combined with selected laboratory and radiologic tools, aids in the early diagnosis and treatment. To provide a practical review of the presentation, evaluation, and treatment of thyroid disorders commonly encountered in a primary care practice. We performed a literature review using the PubMed database. Results focused on reviews and articles published from January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2015. Articles published earlier than 2010 were included when appropriate for historical perspective. Our review emphasized evidence-based management practices for the clinician, as well as consensus statements and guidelines. A total of 479 articles for critical review were selected based on their relevance to the incidence, pathophysiology, laboratory evaluation, radiological assessment, and treatment of hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, thyroid nodules, and thyroid cancer in children and adolescents. Eighty-three publications were selected for inclusion in this article based on their relevance to these topics. The primary care physician is often the first health care professional responsible for initiating the evaluation of a thyroid disorder in children and adolescents. Patients may be referred secondary to an abnormal newborn screening, self-referred after a caregiver raises concern, or identified to be at risk of a thyroid disorder based on findings from a routine well-child visit. Irrespective of the path of referral, knowledge of the signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and thyroid nodules, as well as the general approach to evaluation and management, will help the primary care physician complete an initial assessment and determine which patients would benefit from referral to a pediatric endocrinologist. Early

  9. High-dose radioiodine treatment for differentiated thyroid carcinoma is not associated with change in female fertility or any genetic risk to the offspring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Ajay; Tripathi, Madhavi; Chandrashekar, Narayana; Phom, Hentok; Murali, Nadig R.; Chandra, Prem; Pant, Gauri S.

    2005-01-01

    Background: We tried to evaluate the female fertility and genetic risk to the offspring from the exposure to high-dose 131 I by assessing the pregnancy outcomes and health status of the children of female patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who had received therapeutic doses of 131 I. Materials and Methods: From 1967 to 2002, a total of 1,282 women had been treated with 131 I. Of these patients, 692 (54%) were in the reproductive age group (18-45 years). Forty women had a total of 50 pregnancies after high-dose 131 I. Age at presentation ranged from 16 to 36 years (mean, 23 ± 4 years). Histopathology was papillary thyroid cancer in 32 cases and follicular thyroid cancer in 8 cases. Results: Single high-dose therapy was given in 30 cases, 2 doses were given in 7 cases, 3 doses were given in 2 cases, and four doses were given in 1 case in which lung metastases had occurred. In 37 patients (92%), disease was successfully ablated before pregnancy. Ovarian absorbed-radiation dose calculated by the MIRD method ranged from 3.5 to 60 cGy (mean, 12 ± 11 cGy). The interval between 131 I therapy and pregnancy varied from 7 to 120 months (37.4 ± 28.2 months). Three spontaneous abortions occurred in 2 women. Forty-seven babies (20 females and 27 males) were born. Forty-four babies were healthy with normal birth weight and normal developmental milestones. Twenty women delivered their first baby after 131 I therapy. The youngest child in our series is 11 months of age, and the oldest is 8.5 years of age. Conclusions: Female fertility is not affected by high-dose radioiodine treatment, and the therapy does not appear to be associated with any genetic risks to the offspring

  10. Behavior and awareness of thyroid cancer patients in Korea having non-hospitalized low-dose radioiodine treatment with regard to radiation safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seog Gyun; Paeng, Jin Chul; Eo, Jae Seon; Shim, Hye Kyung; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Lee, Dong Soo [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    With the recent increase in incidence of thyroid cancer, non-hospitalized low-dose (NH-LD) radioiodine treatment (RIT) has also increased rapidly. The radioactivity limit that is allowed to be administered without hospitalization depends on individual calculation, based partly on patients' behavior. In this study, Korean patients' behavior in relation to radiation safety in NHLD RIT was surveyed. A total of 218 patients who underwent NH-LD RIT of 1.1 GBq {sup 131}I in a single center were surveyed. The patients underwent RIT with a standard protocol and the survey was performed by interview when they visited subsequently for a whole-body scan. The survey questionnaire included three parts of questions: general information, behavior relating to isolation during RIT, and awareness of radiation safety. After administration of radioiodine, 40% of patients who returned home used mass transportation, and another 47% went home by taxi or in car driven by another person. Isolation at home was generally sufficient. However, 7% of patients did not stay in a separate room. Among the 218 patients, 34% did not go home and chose self-isolation away from home, mostly due to concerns about radiation safety of family members. However, the places were mostly public places, including hotels, resorts, and hospitals. About half of the patients replied that access to radiation safety information was not easy and their awareness of radiation safety was not satisfactory. As a result, 45% of patients wanted hospitalized RIT. In many countries, including Korea, RIT is continuously increasing. Considering the radiation safety of patients' family members or the public and the convenience of patients, the pretreatment education of patients should be enhanced. In addition, the hospitalization of patients having low-dose therapy is recommended to be seriously considered and expanded, with the expansion of dedicated treatment facilities

  11. Behavior and awareness of thyroid cancer patients in Korea having non-hospitalized low-dose radioiodine treatment with regard to radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seog Gyun; Paeng, Jin Chul; Eo, Jae Seon; Shim, Hye Kyung; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Lee, Dong Soo

    2010-01-01

    With the recent increase in incidence of thyroid cancer, non-hospitalized low-dose (NH-LD) radioiodine treatment (RIT) has also increased rapidly. The radioactivity limit that is allowed to be administered without hospitalization depends on individual calculation, based partly on patients' behavior. In this study, Korean patients' behavior in relation to radiation safety in NHLD RIT was surveyed. A total of 218 patients who underwent NH-LD RIT of 1.1 GBq 131 I in a single center were surveyed. The patients underwent RIT with a standard protocol and the survey was performed by interview when they visited subsequently for a whole-body scan. The survey questionnaire included three parts of questions: general information, behavior relating to isolation during RIT, and awareness of radiation safety. After administration of radioiodine, 40% of patients who returned home used mass transportation, and another 47% went home by taxi or in car driven by another person. Isolation at home was generally sufficient. However, 7% of patients did not stay in a separate room. Among the 218 patients, 34% did not go home and chose self-isolation away from home, mostly due to concerns about radiation safety of family members. However, the places were mostly public places, including hotels, resorts, and hospitals. About half of the patients replied that access to radiation safety information was not easy and their awareness of radiation safety was not satisfactory. As a result, 45% of patients wanted hospitalized RIT. In many countries, including Korea, RIT is continuously increasing. Considering the radiation safety of patients' family members or the public and the convenience of patients, the pretreatment education of patients should be enhanced. In addition, the hospitalization of patients having low-dose therapy is recommended to be seriously considered and expanded, with the expansion of dedicated treatment facilities

  12. Comparison of urine iodine/creatinine ratio between patients following stringent and less stringent low iodine diet for radioiodine remnant ablation of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Jee Ho; Kim, Byung Il; Ha, Ji Su; Chang, Sei Joong; Shin, Hye Young; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Do Min; Kim, Chong Soon

    2006-01-01

    A low iodine diet (LID) for 1 ∼ 2 weeks is recommended for patients who undergoing radioiodine remnant ablation. However, the LID educations for patients are different among centers because there is no concrete recommendation for protocol of LID. In this investigation, we compared two representative types of LID protocols performed in several centers in Korea using urine iodine to creatinine tatio (urine I/Cr). From 2006, April to June, patients referred to our center for radioiodine remnant ablation of thyroid cancer from several local hospitals which had different LID protocols were included. We divided into two groups, stringent LID for 1 week and less stringent LID for 2 weeks, then measured their urine I/Cr ratio with spot urine when patients were admitted to the hospital. Total 27 patients were included in this investigation (M:F = 1:26; 13 in one-week stringent LID; 14 in two-week less stringent LID). Average of urine I/Cr ratio was 127.87 ± 78.52 μ g/g in stringent LID for 1 week, and 289.75 ± 188.24 μ g/g in less stringent LID for 2 weeks. It was significantly lower in stringent LID for 1 week group (ρ = 0.008). The number of patients whose urine I/Cr ratios were below 100 μ g/g was 6 of 13 in stringent LID for 1 week group, and 3 of 14 in less stringent LID for 2 weeks group. Stringent LID for 1 week resulted in better urinary I/Cr ratio in our investigation compared with the other protocol. However it still resulted in plenty of inadequate range of I/Cr ratio, so more stringent protocol such as stringent LID for 2 weeks is expected more desirable

  13. Differentiation between healthy thyroid remnants and tumor tissue after radioiodine therapy in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma using in-vitro phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moka, D.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.; Raffelt, K.; Hahn, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In many tumors, tumor growth and spread is triggered by changes in cell membrane metabolism, which can lead to systemic alterations in levels of phospholipids. The aim of this study was to differentiate between healthy remnants of thyroid tissue and residual/recurrent tumor tissue or metastases in patients with thyroid carcinoma by measurement of plasma levels of various phospholipids. Phospholipid concentrations was measured by in-vitro phosphorus-31-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 31 P-MRS) in blood samples from 30 patients with thyroid cancer, who had been rendered hypothyroid in preparation for diagnostic/therapeutic administration of iodine-131. All patients were already thyroidectomized. 131 I-whole-body scintigraphy and measurements of thyroglobulin values in a 2-year-follow-up were used to distinguish between patients in remission, patients with only healthy thyroid remnants and patients with cancerous thyroid tissue and/or metastases. Significantly lower blood plasma levels of systemic sphingomyelin (0.33±0.06 vs. 0.46±0.03 (controls) mmol/l; p 31 P-MRS can be used to differentiate between the presence of tumor tissue, healthy remnants of thyroid tissue not requiring further treatment and remission in patients with thyroid cancer. In future, therefore, plasma 31 P-MRS could be developed as an additional diagnostic tool for the follow-up of differentiated thyroid cancer. (author)

  14. Seasonal variability of iodine and selenium in surface and groundwater as a factor that may contribute to iodine isotope balance in the thyroid gland and its irradiation in case of radioiodine contamination during accidents at the NPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, Elena; Kolmykova, Lyudmila; Ryzhenko, Boris; Berezkin, Viktor; Saraeva, Anastasia

    2016-04-01

    Radioiodine release to the environment during the accident at the Chernobyl NPP led to the increased risk of the thyroid cancer cases within the contaminated areas, the effect being aggravated in conditions of stable iodine and selenium deficiency in local food chains. Although the drinking water iodine is usually believed to contribute not more than 10% to local diet, our estimations accounting of water content in other products and several regional studies (e.g. India and Australia) proved its portion to be at least twice as much. As radioiodine isotopes are short-lived, their absorption depends greatly on stable iodine and selenium sufficiency in thyroid gland in the first few days of contamination and seasonal variation of stable iodine and selenium in local sources of drinking water may be significant as modifying the resulting thyroid irradiation in different seasons of the year. The main goal of the study was to evaluate seasonal variation of levels of iodine and selenium in natural waters of the Bryansk region as a possible factor affecting the radioiodine intake by thyroid gland of animals and humans in case of radioiodine contamination during the accident. Seasonal I and Se concentration was measured in the years of 2014 and 2015 at 14 test points characterizing surface (river and lake) and drinking groundwater. Obtained data proved considerable seasonal variation of I and Se concentration in natural waters (3,7-8,1 μg/l and 0,04-0,4 μg/l respectively) related to physico-chemical water parameters, such as pH, Eh and fluctuations in concentration of dissolved organic matter. The widest I and Se seasonal variability was observed in surface and well waters, maximum I level being found in autumn at the end of vegetation period characterized by active I leaching from the decomposed organic residues by long lasting precipitations. The content of selenium in the surface waters during summer-autumn (0,06-0,3 μg/l) was higher than in spring (0,04-0,05

  15. Thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hypothyroidism in Children and Adolescents Pediatric Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Nodules in Children and Adolescents Thyroiditis Resources Thyroiditis Brochure PDF Thyroiditis FAQs PDF En Español Tiroiditis El folleto de Tiroiditis Tiroiditis, Preguntas Frecuentes (FAQ) Search ...

  16. Thyroid disorders after radiation therapy in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Ivanovna Bobrova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available AimThe aim of our study was to analyze thyroid status in adults after treatment for malignancies in childhood and its relationship with dose and type of radiotherapy.Material and methodsThyroid function (TSH, free T4, anti-TPO, thyroid ultrasound and FNA (in case of thyroid nodules more than 1 cm were evaluated in 106 adults with a history of radiotherapy for brain tumors (BT, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL in childhood and compared with that in healthy controls (n = 33.Group 1 (cranial irradiation 18 Gy: 11 men and 17 women (median age 21.7 ± 4.2 yrs (range 15–30, 14.6 ± 4 years after treatment for ALL.Group 2 (craniospinal irradiation 35 Gy + boost to the tumor 55 Gy: 28 men and 20 women (median age 19.48 ± 2.76 yrs (range 15 – 26, 7.84 ± 4.68 years after treatment for brain tumors (BT.Group 3 (local irradiation of cervix and mediastinum mean dose 30.9 ± 9.17 Gy: 13 men and 16 women (median age 28.2 ± 6.31 yrs (range 17 – 44, 11.37 ± 7.25 years after treatment for HL.ResultsMaximal incidence of hypothyroidism was in the group 2 – 58.3% (35.4% – primary, 4.2% – central, 18.8% – mixed. Prevalence of hypothyroidism in groups 1 (9.09% and 3 (17.24% doesn't significantly differ from controls. Thyroid volume was lower (mean 4.58±2.39 ml in group 2 (p<0.001 in compare with other groups and control. TSH was higher (mean 3.72±2.51 MEd/l in the same group in compare with group 1 and control (p=0.001. Incidence of thyroid nodules (10.34% – group 1; 8.3% – group 2; 20.7% – group 3 doesn't significantly differ between groups and controls (p=0.277.ConclusionsThese data indicate that treatment of cancer in childhood is associated with development of thyroid abnormality later during the life, and there is a possible link between craniospinal irradiation and incidence of hypo-thyroidism.

  17. Modern diagnostic procedures in disorders of the thyroid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebe, S.F.; Mueller, H.

    1984-01-01

    For functional diagnostics the FT4 index is calculated from the T4 and T3U values. Hyperthyroidism is suggested or borderline values an found, the T3 test is carried out. An index of free iodine hormones (IFIH) can be calculated. (IFIH=T4+30 x T3(μg/100 ml)/ST3U). Hypothyroidism and borderline cases require TSH evaluation or even a TRH test. T4 and T3 autoantibodies can cause high or low values in spite of euthyroidism or hypothyroidism. Difference in FT4 values are found if the kits used were not made by the same manufacturer. These values help to determine hyperthyroidism in pregnancy. The FT3 value is better than the TT3 value in determining T3 hyperthyroidism in borderline cases. Autonomy can be guaranteed by the 123 I short test or the 20-min 99 m Tc uptake test before and after administration of T4. Location diagnostics by scintigraphy after administration of 99 m Tc or radioiodine determine localization, size, shape, and distribution of functioning thyroid tissue and metastases by iodine accumulation. This is imaging of biochemical processes. By ultrasonography, a physical method, cysts, disintegration cysts or parenchymal nodes can be recognized. X-ray films of the trachea can determine stenosis caused by a struma. In addition to the exact proof of an intrathoracal struma (front and back mediastine), a retrotracheal or retroesophageal thyroid gland can be seen in CT. RIA determination of the tumor markers calcitonin and TG support the diagnostics of medullar and follicular or papillary thyroid carcinoma. (orig.) [de

  18. Radioiodine Therapy Does Not Change the Atherosclerotic Burden of the Carotid Arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Cour, Jeppe Lerche; Andersen, Ulrik Bjørn; Sørensen, Christian Hjort

    2016-01-01

    of cerebrovascular events has been reported after radioiodine therapy. This study aimed to examine whether atherosclerosis develops early or late after radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease. METHOD: Patients treated for benign thyroid disorders (nontoxic goiter, adenoma, and hyperthyroidism) were examined...... effects, there was no difference in CIMT (p = 0.25) or presence of plaques (p = 0.70) between those treated with radioactive iodine and those treated with surgery (9.8 and 5.6 years since treatment, respectively). Furthermore, the level of thyrotropin (TSH) did not influence these atherosclerosis markers....... CONCLUSION: No early changes in CIMT were detected in patients treated with radioactive iodine for benign thyroid disease. No signs of late effects of radioactive iodine on CIMT or plaque presence were found after 10 years of follow-up. The radiation to the carotid arteries by radioactive iodine therapy...

  19. Studies on the airborne radioiodine-contamination in thyroid therapy with /sup 131/I doses of approx 370 MBq

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krzesniak, J W; Czerminska, M [Centralne Lab. Ochrony Radiologicznej, Warsaw (Poland); Chomicki, O A [Centrum Medyczne Ksztalcenia Podyplomowego, Warsaw (Poland)

    1979-01-01

    The equipment and methods are described and the results presented of /sup 131/I levels in various physical and chemical forms measured at the Endocrinology Clinic of the Center for Postgraduate Medical Training in Warsaw. The analysis was made of the radiation hazards to the personnel and ''nonradioisotope'' patient from /sup 131/I inhaled. Even though the /sup 131/I levels in the air exceeded the permissible levels by a factor 2-5, when the time spent in corresponding areas was taken into consideration, the /sup 131/I uptake in the above persons constituted only between 1 and 10% of the maximum permissible level of the /sup 131/I inhaled. The dynamics of radioiodine exhalation in the euthyroid and hyperthyroid patients treated with /sup 131/I is discussed. No statistical difference was found between the exhalation curves when /sup 131/I was administered as a liquid or in the form of closed capsules.

  20. Evaluation of Mird and Marinelli formalisms in the radiation dosimetry for thyroid of adults and children using 131I (radioiodine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasquez, A.M.; Rocha, J.J.; Castillo, D.C.; Gomez, M.A.; Mendoza, A.A.; Rabanal, M.J.; Cruz, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Using MIRD formalism and Cristy-Eckerman representation for the thyroid adults, children of 15, 10, 5, 1 year old and newborn it is shown that the total dose absorbed by the gland due to 131 I(iodine) is its self-dose. Their results are not significantly different from those reported by the formalism MARINELLI (self-dose), which uses a sphere as glandular representation. Consequently, the kinetic model to the gland is a single compartment and the thyroid can be represented as a sphere

  1. Comparison of thyroid stimulating activities measured by cyclic AMP production, those by radioiodine uptake in FRTL-5 cells and TSH-binding inhibitory activities in patients with hyperthyroid and euthyroid Graves' diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasagi, Kanji; Hatabu, Hiroto; Tokuda, Yasutaka; Arai, Keisuke; Iida, Yasuhiro; Konishi, Junji

    1988-01-01

    By using an assay measuring cAMP production in FRTL-5 thyroid cells, thyroid stimulating antibodies (TSab) were detected in all of 15 patients with euthyroid Graves' disease (EG) and of 26 patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease (HG). There was no signicant difference between TSab activities in Eg and in HG. In an effort to elucidate why EG patients remain euthyroid in spite of having TSab, we investigated the effect of the patient's crude immunoglobulin fractions 125 I uptake in FRTL-5 thyroid cells, one of the indices of stimulation subsequent to cAMP production. The 125 Iuptake stimulation (IUS) activity was positive in 46,7% (7/15) of EG patients and 88.5% (23/26) of HG patients, being significantly lower in the former than in the latter (P 99m Tc thyroid uptake (r = 0.401, P 99m Tc thyroid uptake in comparison to 19 HG patients with a similar range of IUS activities. There was a good correlation between thyroid weight and 99m Tc thyroid uptake (r = 8.827, P 99m Tc and presumably radioiodine in vivo, might be a factor responsible for keeping EG patients euthyroid despite the presence of TSab. (author)

  2. Thyroid disorders in employees of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindler, Stefan; Volzke, Henry

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Aim of the Study: The thyroid gland is a potential target organ for radiation-related damage. The aim of this analysis was to investigate the association between occupational exposure to ionizing radiation and the risk of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in workers of a former nuclear power station. Methods: Seventy-one male power station workers aged 38 to 57 years who were exposed to a life time dose in the upper allowed limit (70-400 m Sv) were compared to two random samples of male persons, who were not exposed to occupational radiation. Both samples were selected from the data set of the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania. Thyroid ultrasonography was performed by the same observers. Laboratory parameters for the study groups were analyzed in a central laboratory. Results: The power station workers with occupational exposure to radiation were more educated than the subjects of the two control groups. The exposed were less often current smokers, but more often never smokers compared to the control groups. After controlling analyses for age and further relevant confounders no significant differences between exposed and controls with respect to thyroid disorders were detected. Conclusion: We conclude that workers of a nuclear power plant with an exposure to ionizing radiation within the upper allowed limit have no increased risk of thyroid disorders. This may at least in part be explained by a healthy worker effect. (author)

  3. Thyroid disorders in mild iodine deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, P; Nøhr, S B; Pedersen, K M

    2000-01-01

    Comparative epidemiologic studies in areas with low and high iodine intake and controlled studies of iodine supplementation have demonstrated that the major consequence of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency for the health of the population is an extraordinarily high occurrence of hyperthyroidism...... endangered but the consequences of severe iodine deficiency for brain development are grave and a considerable safety margin is advisable. Moreover, a shift toward less malignant types of thyroid cancer and a lower radiation dose to the thyroid in case of nuclear fallout support that mild-to-moderate iodine...... deficiency should be corrected. However, there is evidence that a high iodine intake may be associated with more autoimmune hypothyroidism, and that Graves' disease may manifest at a younger age and be more difficult to treat. Hence, the iodine intake should be brought to a level at which iodine deficiency...

  4. Thyroid disorders and bone mineral metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar Dhanwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid diseases have widespread systemic manifestations including their effect on bone metabolism. On one hand, the effects of thyrotoxicosis including subclinical disease have received wide attention from researchers over the last century as it an important cause of secondary osteoporosis. On the other hand, hypothyroidism has received lesser attention as its effect on bone mineral metabolism is minimal. Therefore, this review will primarily focus on thyrotoxicosis and its impact on bone mineral metabolism.

  5. Hashimoto thyroiditis is an independent cardiovascular risk factor in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypothyroidism is a common disorder that confers an increased cardiovascular risk. The most common cause is Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) but it can also be caused by thyroidectomy and radioiodine therapy. The aim of the study is to examine whether there is a relation between the cause of hypothyroidism and ...

  6. Effect of 30 mCi radioiodine on multinodular goiter previously treated with recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz-Filho, G.J.; Mesa-Junior, C.O.; Boguszewski, C.L.; Carvalho, G.A.; Graf, H. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Hospital de Clinicas. Servico de Endocrinologia e Metabologia; Olandoski, M. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Nucleo de Bioestatistica; Woellner, L.C. [Centro de Medicina Nuclear, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Goedert, C.A. [Centro de Tomografia Computadorizada, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2007-12-15

    Recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH) enhances {sup 131}I uptake, permitting a decrease in radiation for the treatment of multinodular goiter (MNG). Our objective was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a single 0.1-mg dose of rhTSH, followed by 30 mCi {sup 131}I, in patients with MNG. Seventeen patients (15 females, 59.0 {+-} 13.1 years), who had never been submitted to {sup 131}I therapy, received a single 0.1-mg injection of rhTSH followed by 30 mCi {sup 131}I on the next day. Mean basal thyroid volume measured by computed tomography was 106.1 {+-} 64.4 mL. {sup 131}I 24-h uptake, TSH, free-T4, T3, thyroglobulin, anti-thyroid antibodies, and thyroid volume were evaluated at regular intervals of 12 months. Mean {sup 131}I 24-h uptake increased from 18.1 {+-} 9.7 to 49.6 {+-} 13.4% (P < 0.001), a median 2.6-fold increase (1.2 to 9.2). Peak hormonal levels were 10.86 {+-} 5.44 mU/L for TSH (a median 15.5-fold increase), 1.80 {+-} 0.48 ng/dL for free-T4, 204.61 {+-} 58.37 ng/dL for T3, and a median of 557.0 ng/mL for thyroglobulin. The adverse effects observed were hyperthyroidism (17.6%), painful thyroiditis (29.4%) and hypothyroidism (52.9%). Thyroid volume was reduced by 34.3 {+-} 14.3% after 6 months (P < 0.001) and by 46.0 {+-} 14.6% after 1 year (P < 0.001). Treatment of MNG with a single 0.1-mg dose of rhTSH, followed by a fixed amount of radioactivity of {sup 131}I, leads to an efficacious decrease in thyroid volume for the majority of the patients, with a moderate incidence of non-serious and readily treatable adverse effects. (author)

  7. Effect of 30 mCi radioiodine on multinodular goiter previously treated with recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.J. Paz-Filho

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH enhances 131I uptake, permitting a decrease in radiation for the treatment of multinodular goiter (MNG. Our objective was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a single 0.1-mg dose of rhTSH, followed by 30 mCi 131I, in patients with MNG. Seventeen patients (15 females, 59.0 ± 13.1 years, who had never been submitted to 131I therapy, received a single 0.1-mg injection of rhTSH followed by 30 mCi 131I on the next day. Mean basal thyroid volume measured by computed tomography was 106.1 ± 64.4 mL. 131I 24-h uptake, TSH, free-T4, T3, thyroglobulin, anti-thyroid antibodies, and thyroid volume were evaluated at regular intervals of 12 months. Mean 131I 24-h uptake increased from 18.1 ± 9.7 to 49.6 ± 13.4% (P < 0.001, a median 2.6-fold increase (1.2 to 9.2. Peak hormonal levels were 10.86 ± 5.44 mU/L for TSH (a median 15.5-fold increase, 1.80 ± 0.48 ng/dL for free-T4, 204.61 ± 58.37 ng/dL for T3, and a median of 557.0 ng/mL for thyroglobulin. The adverse effects observed were hyperthyroidism (17.6%, painful thyroiditis (29.4% and hypothyroidism (52.9%. Thyroid volume was reduced by 34.3 ± 14.3% after 6 months (P < 0.001 and by 46.0 ± 14.6% after 1 year (P < 0.001. Treatment of MNG with a single 0.1-mg dose of rhTSH, followed by a fixed amount of radioactivity of 131I, leads to an efficacious decrease in thyroid volume for the majority of the patients, with a moderate incidence of non-serious and readily treatable adverse effects.

  8. Thyroid volume reduction following radioiodine therapy in patients with autonomous goitre and Graves` disease; Volumenreduktion der Schilddruese nach Radiojodtherapie bei Patienten mit Schilddruesenautonomie und Morbus Basedow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dederichs, B. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Koeln (Germany); Otte, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Koeln (Germany); Klink, J.E. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Koeln (Germany); Schicha, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Koeln (Germany)

    1996-10-01

    Aim: It is well known that radioiodine therapy (RITh) leads to a significant thyroid volume reduction (TVR). But until now only little data has been presented due to the course of time and the extent of TVR. Method: Therefore the data of 33 patients with Graves` disease (GD), 36 patients with multifocal (MAG) and 31 with solitary (SAG) autonomous goitre were analyzed retrospectively. Results: All the patients showed a highly significant (p<0.001) TVR, which continued up to 1 year after RITh. Receiving equal effective radiation doses, the extent of TVR was significantly greater for GD than for MAG. This difference developed within six weeks up to 3 months after RITh. Conclusion: This observation suggests that the underlying thyroid disease affects the therapeutic effect of RITh and may be partially explained by the total suppression of non-autonomous thyroid tissue in AG at the time of RITh. In patients with SAG with a 1.7 times higher effective radiation dose than in MAG relative TVR was about 1.6 times stronger in SAG than in MAG. This demonstrates a direct relation between the effective radiation dose and the extent of the TVR after RITh. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Es ist bekannt, dass die Radiojodtherapie (RJTh) zu einer relvanten Schilddruesenvolumenreduktion (SVR) fuehrt. Bisher wurden jedoch nur vereinzelt systematische Daten zum zeitlichen Verlauf und quantitativen Ausmass der SVR veroeffentlicht. Methode: Daher fuehrten wir eine retrospektive Auswertung der Daten von 33 Patienten mit Morbus Basedow (MB), 36 Patienten mit multifokaler (MFA) und 31 mit unifokaler (UFA) Autonomie der Schilddruese durch. Ergebnisse: Fuer alle Patientengruppen ergab sich eine hochsignifikante (p<0,001) SVR, welche sich bis ein Jahr nach RJTh signifikant fortsetzte. Obwohl die effektive Herddosis nicht signifikant verschieden war, war das Ausmass der SVR fuer Patienten mit MB signifikant groesser als fuer Patienten mit MFA. Dieser Unterschied war bereits innerhalb der ersten 6

  9. Anti-thyroid antibodies and thyroid function in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Yi, Huan; Liu, Jia; Li, Min; Mao, Zhi-Feng; Xu, Li; Peng, Fu-Hua

    2016-07-15

    Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) are complicated neuroautoimmune disorders which can coexist with other organ-specific autoimmune disorders. The most frequently specific organ is the thyroid. The aim of this study is to evaluate the thyroid function of NMOSD patients and detect the difference between anti-thyroid antibodies (ATAbs) seropositive and seronegative NMOSD patients. 88 patients diagnosed with NMOSD were enrolled and their thyroid functions were evaluated. They were divided into two groups by ATAbs abnormalities. In addition, demographic characteristics, clinical symptoms and MRI scan results of brain and spinal cord were assessed. Anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (TGAbs) seropositivities were detected more frequently in patients with NMOSDs when compared with healthy controls (37.5% vs 14.9%, P=0.01, Diff22.6%, 95CI[9.0%, 34.9%]; 31.8% vs 16.2%, P=0.022, Diff15.6%, 95CI[2.27%, 27.9%]). In NMOSD patients, the Expanded disability status scale score (EDSS) score was significantly higher in ATAbs seropositive group than that in ATAbs seronegative group (median 6.5 vs 3.75, P=0.012). However, there is no significant difference for demographic characteristics and other clinical symptoms. Moreover, NMOSD patients with ATAbs abnormalities had more brain and cervical cord lesions when compared with ATAbs negative NMOSD patients (83.8% vs 61.4%, P=0.029, Diff22.4%, 95CI[0.9%, 40.9%]; 93.9% vs 59.6%, P=0.001, Diff34.3%, 95CI[13.6%, 50.4%]). NMOSD patients have a higher frequency of ATAbs abnormalities. ATAbs may be associated with disability status, brain abnormalities and cervical cord lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Recombinant human TSH-aided radioiodine treatment of advanced differentiated thyroid carcinoma: a single-centre study of 54 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarzab, Barbara; Handkiewicz-Junak, Daria; Roskosz, Jozef; Puch, Zbigniew; Wygoda, Zbigniew; Kukulska, Aleksandra; Jurecka-Lubieniecka, Beata; Hasse-Lazar, Kornelia; Turska, Maria; Zajusz, Aleksander

    2003-01-01

    In 54 consecutive patients who had retained bulky metastatic and/or locoregional lesions of DTC despite the exhaustion of other therapeutic options, we gave one to four courses of two consecutive daily intramuscular injections of rhTSH, 0.9 mg, followed by a therapeutic activity of 131 I per os on day 3. Fifty patients had received prior radioiodine treatment aided by l-thyroxine (T 4 ) withdrawal. We included in the study 23 patients who had received a trial of isotretinoin therapy for re-differentiation of confirmed de-differentiated metastases. In a blinded, within-patient comparison of post-therapy whole-body scans after the first rhTSH-aided and latest withdrawal-aided treatments in patients with functional metastases at baseline, 18 of 27 (67%) scan pairs were concordant, four (15%) were discordant in favour of the rhTSH-aided scan and five (19%) were discordant in favour of the withdrawal-aided scan. In total, 37 (74%) of 50 paired scans were concordant, eight (16%) favoured rhTSH and five (10%) favoured withdrawal. All differences appeared to be attributable to clinical causes, not to any difference between endogenous and exogenous TSH stimulation. Reflecting the biochemical activity of rhTSH and the release of thyroglobulin (Tg) due to tumour destruction, median serum Tg concentration rose approximately fourfold between baseline and day 6 of the rhTSH-aided treatment course. rhTSH was well tolerated, with mostly minor, transient toxicity, except for neck oedema in three patients with neck infiltrates and pathological spine fracture in one patient with a large vertebral metastasis. At 6 months, complete response occurred in one (2%), partial response in 12 (26%) and disease stabilisation in 19 (40%) of 47 evaluable patients. The rate of complete + partial response was 41% and that of disease stabilisation, 30%, in the 27 evaluable patients with functional metastases at baseline; the corresponding rates were 10% and 55% in the 20 evaluable patients with non

  11. Prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozdinska, Alina; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Schmid, Matthias; Hirschfelder, Ursula

    2018-05-17

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), also known as Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT), is a degenerative inflammatory disease with high prevalence among women and has been associated with fibromyalgia and widespread chronic pain. The goal was to determine the frequency of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients with HT. In all, 119 women (age 19-60 years) were divided into a study (52 women diagnosed with HT) and a control (67 healthy individuals, of which 15 were excluded) group. Serum concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), anti-thyroglobulin (Tg) and anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody levels were measured. The temporomandibular jaw and muscles were examined using the German Society of Functional Diagnostics and Therapy guidelines. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) was used to assess TMD. Standardized questionnaires, incorporating epidemiological criteria, state and treatment of the thyroid disease, Helkimo Index (HI), and Fonseca Anamnestic Index (FAI), were filled out by all patients. The two groups did not differ in terms of demographic parameters or mandibular jaw mobility. Significantly higher levels of anti-TPO and anti-Tg were attested in all subjects of the HT group. Markedly elevated prevalence of TMD was found in the HT group. Muscle pain and stiffness were found in 45 (86.5%) subjects of the HT group (p < 0.001), of whom 33 (63.4%) also had disc displacement with reposition (p < 0.001). Whereas 50% of the control group showed no TMD symptoms, all subjects in the HT group had symptoms. A significantly elevated prevalence of TMD was found in patients with HT. Thus, patients with TMD who do not respond to therapy should be referred for thyroid diagnostic workup.

  12. Radioiodinated bleomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, S.E.; Liu, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    Radioiodinated bleomycin is a useful imaging agent for body tissues. Its production by iodination of bleomycin with radioactive iodide ions in the presence of an oxidizing agent is described. 7 claims, no drawings

  13. Radioiodine therapy for combined disseminated and nodular thyroid autonomy. Results after using a correction term for the disseminated part; Radioiodtherapie bei kombinierter Schilddruesenautonomie. Ergebnisse nach Korrektur fuer disseminierte Anteile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, H.; Dorn, R.; Otto, I.; Sciuk, J. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum Augsburg (Germany); Wengenmair, H.; Kopp, J. [Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz, Klinikum Augsburg (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Aim: in combined focal and disseminated thyroid autonomy a variety of concepts in the treatment with radioiodine are used. The difference lies mainly in the calculation of the autonomous volume. This retrospective study shows a new method of calculating the autonomous volume. Patients and methods: in 398 patients with combined thyroid autonomy and good correlation of scintigraphically hot nodules and lesions defined by ultrasound the volume of the nodules is ascertained from scintigraphic and ultrasound parameters and the volume of the disseminated autonomous tissue is assessed with a weighting factor (VF). This factor is the ratio of impulse density in a ROI over the disseminated volume divided by the corresponding impulse density over the nodular volume of the thyroid scintigraphy. The sum of nodular volume and weighted perinodular volume gives the total autonomous volume. A standard radioiodine test gives the maximum iodine-131-uptake and effective half-life to calculate the activity to obtain a treatment dose of 400 Gy. Results: the rate of success with and without thyrostatic medication was 97% with an 18.6% rate of hypothyroidism observed from 4 months post therapy onwards. Conclusion: the use of the weighting factor VF in the treatment of combined autonomy leads to an excellent rate of success in patients with good correlation of functional imaging and ultrasound findings. (orig.)

  14. Thyroid disorders in Multan, Pakistan, and hormone levels during Ramadan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.M.; Abbas, H.G.; Sabih, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    Patients with thyroid disorders were analyzed in 1984 with respect to their clinical state, thyroid hormone levels in the blood and the speciality of the referring clinician. There were 815 patients (304 men, 511 women) with ages from 3 months to 80 years. Analysis showed that 310 (38%) of the patients were euthyroid without goitre, the male:female ratio being 3:2; 260 (31.9%) of the patients were euthyroid with goitre, the male:female ratio being 1:5; 61 (7.5%) patients were hypothyroid, with a male:female ratio of 3:4; 175 (21.5%) were thyrotoxic, the ratio being 1:3; and 9 (1.1%) had thyroid carcinoma, the ratio being 1:2. Sources of referral were also taken into account. In June of the same year, another study was conducted to find the effect of fasting on various hormones during Ramadan. One female and 32 male volunteers without thyroid disorders, between 12 and 65 years of age, gave blood samples. Each volunteer gave two blood samples: the first was collected during fasting and the second after fasting. Serum T 3 , T 4 and prolactin (PRL) were measured using radioimmunoassay. Statistical analysis showed that variations in T 3 and T 4 were not significant but that there was a significant increase in PRL during fasting (p<0.05). (author)

  15. Radioiodine Therapy for Graves’ Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhdomi, B.K.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of grave diseases include Antithyroid medications, Iodine-131 therapy and Surgery. First patient treated with radioiodine (Iodine-130) in 1941, while Iodine-131 therapy was introduced in 1946. Factors affecting treatment include Iodine uptake; Size of goitre; Length of time I-131 is retained in the gland; Homogeneity of distribution within the gland; Radiosensitivity of thyroid cells and Drug interactions. Some side effects include Transient sore throat or mild dysphagia; Exacerbation of ophthalmopathy; Radiation thyroiditis and no increase in incidence of thyroid cancer and Leukemia or other malignancies. There no harmful effect upon Health of progeny; Fertility and Reproductive history

  16. Maternal Thyroid Function in Early Pregnancy and Child Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stine Linding; Andersen, Stig; Vestergaard, Peter

    2018-01-01

    of abnormal maternal thyroid function was 12.5% in the sub-cohort and significantly higher among cases of ASD (17.9%; aHR = 1.5 [CI 1.1-2.1]), but not among other types of neurodevelopmental disorders (febrile seizures: 12.7%; epilepsy: 13.1%; SDD: 12.6%; and ADHD: 14.0%). However, evaluation of subtypes......: The design was a case-cohort study within the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003). From the eligible cohort of 71,706 women, a random 12% sub-cohort (n = 7624) was selected, and all women (n = 2276) whose child was diagnosed with seizures, specific developmental disorder (SDD), autism spectrum disorder......BACKGROUND: Maternal thyroid dysfunction may adversely affect fetal brain development, but more evidence is needed to refine this hypothesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate potential fetal programming by abnormal maternal thyroid function on child neurodevelopmental disorders. METHODS...

  17. Application of lithium carbonate on radioiodine treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zha Jinshun; Huang Chunling; Jiang Tingyin; Jiang Yan

    2011-01-01

    Effectiveness of radioiodine for Graves' hyperthyroidism depends on retention time of 131 I in the thyroid, and may be effected by several factors, including previous treatment with antithyroid drugs,goiter volume, 24 h thyroidal radioactive iodine uptake and so on. A short course of therapy with low dose of lithium carbonate increased retention of 131 I in the thyroid and prolong the intrathyroidal effective half-life of 131 I before and after 131 I therapy in patients with Graves' disease, because of the actions that lithium blocks the release of organic iodine and thyroid hormone from the thyroid gland without affecting thyroidal radioactive iodine uptake. Therefore, using lithium as adjunct to radioiodine therapy increases the radiation dose delivered to the thyroid, to result in reduced the activity required and whole-body radiation dose in patients with very short effective half-life, and so improve the cure rate of hyperthyroidism. A short course of lithium carbonate therapy can be considered a useful adjunct to 131 I therapy for obtaining a more rapid control of thyrotoxicosis and avoiding its transient exacerbation because of methimazole withdrawal prior to 131 I administration or in patients who cannot tolerate or do not respond to antithyroid drugs, and for helping to prevent the radioiodine-associated increase in serum free thyroid hormone concentrations. In addition, lithium carbonate enhances the effectiveness of 131 I therapy, in terms of prompter control of hyperthyroidism in patients with small or large goiters. At the same time, lithium also may increases the rate of permanent control of hyperthyroidism in patients with large goiters. In summary, in the short-term lithium plays an important role as an adjunct to 131 I, since it helps to prevent the 131 I-associated increase in serum free thyroid hormone concentrations and allows a more prompt control of thyrotoxicosis. This is of particular importance in high risk patients, such as the elderly

  18. Lenvatinib in Advanced Radioiodine-Refractory Thyroid Cancer - A Retrospective Analysis of the Swiss Lenvatinib Named Patient Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmelli, Catharina; Railic, Nikola; Siano, Marco; Feuerlein, Kristin; Cathomas, Richard; Cristina, Valerie; Güthner, Christiane; Zimmermann, Stefan; Weidner, Sabine; Pless, Miklos; Stenner, Frank; Rothschild, Sacha I

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) accounts for approximately 95% of thyroid carcinomas. In the metastatic RAI-refractory disease, chemotherapy has very limited efficacy and is associated with substantial toxicity. With increasing knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of DTC, novel targeted therapies have been developed. Lenvatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) with promising clinical activity based on the randomized phase III SELECT trial. In Switzerland, a Named Patient Program (NPP) was installed to bridge the time gap to Swissmedic approval. Here, we report the results from the Swiss Lenvatinib NPP including patients with metastatic RAI-refractory DTC. Methods: Main inclusion criteria for the Swiss NPP were RAI-refractory DTC, documented disease progression, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 0-3. The number of previous therapies was not limited. The Swiss Lenvatinib NPP was initiated in June 2014 and was closed in October 2015 with the approval of the drug. Results: Between June 2014 and October 2015, 13 patients with a median age of 72 years have been enrolled. Most patients (69%) had at least one prior systemic therapy, mainly sorafenib. 31% of patients showed a PR and 31% SD. Median progression free survival was 7.2 months and the median overall survival was 22.7 months. Dose reduction due to adverse events was necessary in 7 patients (53%). At the time of analysis 6 patients (47%) were still on treatment with a median time on treatment of 9.98 months. Conclusions: Our results show that lenvatinib has reasonable clinical activity in unselected patients with RAI-refractory thyroid cancer with nearly two-third of patients showing clinical benefit. The toxicity profile of lenvatinib is manageable.

  19. Design of patient rooms and automatic radioiodine-131 waste water management system for a thyroid cancer treatment ward: 'Suandok Model'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilasdechanon, N; Ua-Apisitwong, S; Chatnampet, K; Ekmahachai, M; Vilasdechanon, J

    2014-09-01

    The great benefit of (131)I radionuclide treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) was acknowledged by the long survival rate. The main requirements for (131)I therapy in hospital were treatment facilities and a radiation safety plan that assured radiation protection and safety to patient, hospital worker, public, and environment. To introduce the concepts and methods of radiation safety design for a patient's room in a (131)I treatment ward and a system of radioactive waste water management in hospital. The design was based on principles of external and internal radiation protection for unsealed source and radioactive waste management. Planning for treatment facilities was concluded from clinical evidence, physical and physiological information for (131)I, radiation safety criteria, hospital resources and budget. The three phases of the working process were: construction, software development, and radiation safety assessment. The (131)I treatment facility and automatic radioactive waste water management system was completely implemented in 2009. The radiation waste water management system known as the 'Suandok Model' was highly recommended by the national regulator to hospitals who desire to provide (131)I treatment for thyroid cancer. In 2011, the Nuclear Medicine Division, Chiang Mai University was rewarded by the national authority for a very good radiation practice in development of safe working conditions and environment. The Suandok Model was a facility design that fulfilled requirements for the safe use of high radiation (131)I doses for thyroid cancer treatment in hospital. The facility presented in this study may not be suitable for all hospitals but the design concepts could be applied according to an individual hospital context and resources. People who use or gain benefit from radiation applications have to emphasise the responsibility to control and monitor radiation effects on individuals, communities and the environment.

  20. Randomized prospective study comparing a single radioiodine dose and a single laser therapy session in autonomously functioning thyroid nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Helle; Bennedbaek, Finn Noe; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2007-01-01

    at inclusion and at 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment. RESULTS: Normalization of serum TSH was achieved in 7 out of 14 patients in the ILP group and in all 15 patients in the (131)I group (P=0.0025). In the ILP group, mean thyroid nodule volume reduction was 44+/-5% (s.e.m.; P... 47+/-8% (Phypothyroidism but no major side...... hypothyroidism. Using the present design, ILP seems inferior to (131)I therapy in normalization of serum TSH. The potential value of ILP as a non-surgical alternative to (131)I needs further investigation...

  1. Thyroid Homoeostasis and Reproductive Hormonal Disorders in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.А. Yunusov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the study — to investigate the influence of hypo- and hyperthyroidism on the state of reproductive function for women and to estimate efficiency of treatment. Material and Methods. 156 women of reproductive age are examined concerning inflammatory gynaecological and endocrine disorders. Complex of laboratory and clinical investigations included: anamnesis, examination; unified clinical and biochemical methods of research; studying research hormones in blood plasma (thyroid stimulating hormone, prolactine, Т3, Т4, fТ4, antibodies to thyroglobulin, thyroid peroxidase; luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, estradiol, progesteron, testosteron; ultrasonic examination of thyroid gland, mammary gland, pelvic organs; radiography of sella turcica; fine needle biopsy of the thyroid. Results. The comparative analysis of different pathologies of reproductive function in both clinical groups showed, that infertility, both primary and secondary, prevailed in the group with hypothyroidism — 66 vs 33.3 % in the group of women with hyperthyroidism. In the first clinical group, signs of menstrual disorders (68.2 %, galactorrhea (63.6 %, breast pathology (55 % also prevailed, while in the second group these indexes were 38.8, 22.2 and 33.3 %, respectively. In the structure of menstrual disorders, oligomenorrhea prevailed in both clinical groups — 47 and 57 %. Most women (76.9 % had I degree of galactorrhea and bilateral galactorrhea (80.7 %. Cervical pathology was detected 45 % of women, with predominance of pseudoerosion (55.5 %, and in 12.5% — hysteromyoma. Chronic salpingo-oophoritis was diagnosed in 47.5 % of patients, cystic ovaries — in 10 % of women of clinical group. Conclusions. Thyroid pathology in women of reproductive age is characterized by autoimmune thyroiditis (24.3 %, diffuse toxic goiter (10.8 % and nodular goiter (16.2 %. Women with thyroid hormone deficit have a decline of gonadotropic pituitary

  2. A study on thyroid disorder of Sjoegren's disease in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noma, Koji; Sasaki, Hideo; Ito, Chikako; Hasegawa, Kazuyo.

    1984-01-01

    Thyroid disorders were seen in eight of 25 atomic bomb survivors with Sjoegren's disease -- simple goiter in 2, chronic thyroiditis in 4, and primary hypothyroidism probably arising from chronic thyroiditis in 2. Thyroid disorders associated with Sjoegren's disease seemed to occur frequently in survivors exposed near the explosion. One of the two survivors with primary hypothyroidism had been exposed to atomic bomb 1.7 km from the explosion. As for the other clinical laboratory findings, there was no significant difference between the group with thyroid disorders and the group without them. (Namekawa, K.)

  3. Drainage after total thyroidectomy or lobectomy for benign thyroidal disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tahsin COLAK; Tamer AKCA; Ozgur TURKMENOGLU; Hakan CANBAZ; Bora USTUNSOY; Arzu KANIK; Suha AYDI

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This prospective randomized clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the necessity of drainage after total thyroidectomy or lobectomy for benign thyroidal disorders. Methods: A total of 116 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy or lobectomy for benign thyroidal disorders were randomly allocated to be drained or not. Operative and postoperative outcomes including operating time, postoperative pain assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS), total amount of intramuscular analgesic administration, hospital stay, complications, necessity for re-operation and satisfaction of patients were all assessed. Results: The mean operating time was similar between two groups (the drained and non-drained groups). The mean VAS score was found to be significantly low in the non-drained group patients in postoperative day (POD) 0 and POD 1. The mean amount of intramuscular analgesic requirement was significantly less in the non-drained group. One case of hematoma, two cases of seroma and three cases of transient hypoparathyroidism occurred in the non-drained group, whereas one case of hematoma, two cases of seroma, two cases of wound infections and two cases of transient hypoparathyroidism occurred in the drained group. No patient needed re-operation for any complication. The mean hospital stay was significantly shorter and the satisfaction of patients was superior in the non-drained group. Conclusion: These findings suggest that postoperative complications cannot be prevented by using drains after total thyroidectomy or lobectomy for benign thyroid disorders. Furthermore, the use of drains may increase postoperative pain and the analgesic requirement, and prolong the hospital stay. In the light of these findings, the routine use of drains might not be necessary after thyroid surgery for benign disorders.

  4. Graves' disease in a 3 year-old patient with agranulocytosis due to anti-thyroid drugs: Radioiodine ablation therapy as an effective alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Muñoz, E; Ramírez-Ocaña, D; Martín-García, A M; Ruiz-García, F J; Puentes-Zarzuela, C

    The case is presented of a 3 year-old girl with mitochondrial disease (subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy of Leigh syndrome), v-stage chronic kidney disease of a diffuse mesangial sclerosis, as well as developmental disorders, and diagnosed with hyperthyroidism Graves-Basedow disease. Six weeks after starting the treatment with neo-carbimazole, the patient reported a serious case of agranulocytosis. This led to stopping the anti-thyroid drugs, and was treated successfully with 131 I ablation therapy. The relevance of the article is that Graves' disease is uncommon in the paediatric age range (especially in children younger than 6 years old), and developing complications due to a possible late diagnosis. Agranulocytosis as a potentially serious adverse effect following the use of anti-thyroid drugs, and the few reported cases of ablation therapy with 131 I at this age, makes this case unique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  5. A review of age dependent radioiodine dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Age dependent models of radioiodine metabolism in humans have been described. These models have been used to calculate age dependent committed doses to the thyroid from intakes of radioiodines. A model of fetal iodine metabolism is also described and used to calculate fetal thyroid doses from intakes of radioiodines by the mother. These doses are calculated using model parameter values thought to be representative of average for North American/European populations. Considerable variability from these results can be expected for individuals. In addition, population with significant differences in stable iodine intake, and in body parameters, will have model parameters somewhat different than the ones described in this paper. These different model parameters will result in different doses from intakes of radioiodines, but it is doubtful if the differences in population would be as large as the variation between individuals. 25 refs.; 11 figs.; 1 table

  6. Autoreactive lymphocytes in thyroid disorders. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, J.; Feldt-Rasmussen, U.; Siersbaek-Nielsen, K.; Hoeier-Madsen, M.; Larsen, F.; Husby, S.

    1986-01-01

    Blood mononuclear cells (MNC) from 9 randomly selected patients with autoimmune thyroiditis were stimulated in vitro with pokeweed mitogen (PWM), a polyclonal B lymphocyte activator. The secretion of immunoglobulins (Ig) and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) was assayed by means of haemolytic plaque-forming cell (PFC) assays, radioimmune assay (RIA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Total Ig and TgAb production was maximal using MNC cultured at 1.0 x 10 6 /ml as estimated by PFC, RIA and ELISA. The Ig and TgAb production as measured by RIA and ELISA was 1.5 - 3 times higher after 12 days' culture compared to 6 days' culture. Ig and TgAb production measured by PFC-assays at day 6 correlated positively to the results obtained by RIA and ELISA at day 12. PWM-induced TgAb secretion correlated positively to TgAb titres in serum. As judged by PFC, TgAb production was found in 8/9 patients; about 5% (range 0 - 7.9%) of the total PWM-stimulated IgG-secreting cells were involved in TgAb secretion. TgAb production as measured by ELISA and RIA was found in 6/9 patients. By reference to an affinity-purified human TgAb preparation, the TgAb secretion was about 0.7% (range 0 - 21.3%) of the total PWM-induced IgG secretion. (author)

  7. Optimizing selection of in vitro tests for diagnosing thyroid disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwas, S.T.; Rosenblum, Yossef; Boruchowsky, Sabina

    1987-01-01

    The optimal utilization of the thyroid related radioimmunoassays T3, T4, and TSH-RIA is derived from analysing the clinical and laboratory data for 974 patients with functional thyroid disorders. A statistical computer analysis of the contribution of each of the three tests, and in combination, to the final diagnoses of hypothyroid, euthyroid, and hyper thyroid states was designed. The best contributing test for hypothyroidism and euthyroidism was TSH-RIA (98.5 and 93%, respectively). T4/T3+TSH-RIAs were the optimal dual combination for diagnosing euthyroidism (98.0%). For diagnosing hyperthyroidism T4-RIA was the best single test (82.5%) followed by T3 + T4 as an optimal dual combination (95%). Using all three tests was of no significant additional value over dual combinations. It is concluded that the work and cost of randomly performing three tests routinely is not justified without clinical basis. An algorithm is proposed to guide thyroid studies based on computer analyses of the above-mentioned single or dual-test combinations to establish accurate diagnosis at the lowest laboratory cost. (author)

  8. Extrathyroidal Radioiodine Accumulation in a Fibroadenoma of the Breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Hun Soo; Park, Soon-Ah

    2017-02-01

    A 45-year-old woman with a differentiated thyroid carcinoma received adjuvant radioiodine therapy following total thyroidectomy and left modified radical neck dissection. A posttherapy planar radioiodine scan showed multifocal uptake in the thyroid bed and left chest. SPECT/CT revealed a fibroadenoma in the left breast. Six months later, an I scan showed no iodine avidity in the breast fibroadenoma, whereas ultrasonography showed no significant change in the size of the fibroadenoma. Altered radioiodine uptake of a breast fibroadenoma can be observed on follow-up scans after cytotoxic radioiodide treatment in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

  9. Radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andres-Barrenechea, E.C.

    2001-01-01

    A ten year study (1988-98) was done at the Veterans Memorial Medical Center on radioiodine (RAI) therapy for hyperthyroidism. A total of 162 patients received 131-I after careful selection hence was included in this study. A predominantly female population was seen (81%) compared to only (19%) males. The most frequent age group were in the third and fourth decades of life. Those included had clinical manifestations of thyrotoxicosis aside from the abnormal thyroid function tests and elevated RAI uptake. Almost all were given antithyroid drugs and beta-blockers prior to RAI ablation. Doses ranged from 7 to 12 mCi depending on gland size and degree of toxicity. Success rate of treatment was 92% which meant that the symptoms were abated and there was shrinkage of the thyroid gland after a single dose of iodine. The most common short term complications were sialitis and local neck tenderness while hypothyroidism was the commonest long term complication. (author)

  10. Effect of previous administration of propyl-thiouracil on thyroid distribution of radioiodine. Contribution of secondary ion mass spectrometry microscopy to microdosimetry; Influence de l`administration prealable d`un antithyroidien de synthese (PTU) sur la distribution thyroidienne de l`iode radioactif. Apport de la microscopie ionique analytique a la microdosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makki, B. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 59 - Lille (France); Briancon, C.; Gavoille, A.; Fragu, P. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    1995-12-31

    Radiation dose delivered to thyroid gland after radioiodine treatment for Graves` disease is modified by administration of propyl-thiouracil (PTU) which decreases the radioactive iodine uptake and increases its distribution heterogeneity within the thyroid follicle. Using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) microscopy which is able to map quantitatively chemical elements on histological specimen, we measured stable ({sup 127} I) and radioactive ({sup 129} I) iodine concentration within thyroid follicles of mice. Furthermore, we estimated the size of thyroid follicles and their spacing using image analysis processing. We demonstrated that only SIMS parameters were determinant for microdosimetry in the three experimental groups studied: treated with radioiodine or PTU therapy (A) or after short disrupting (B) and control (C). It is for the group B that the therapeutic conditions are best. Our results underline the interest of SIMS for revisiting dosimetry in metabolic radiotherapy. (authors). 21 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  11. Radioiodine therapy in toxic multinodular goiter- the influence of carbimazole therapy and dietary iodine on relapse rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, S.; Muthu, G.S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The relapse rate of radioiodine therapy in toxic multinodular goiter (TMNG) is reported to be around 34% at one year. The effect of antithyroid drugs on the response rate is controversial with studies reporting a higher relapse rate in patients pretreated with antithyroid drugs. Other studies report no influence of pretreatment with antithyroid drugs. The thyroid clinic at Tata Main Hospital is a referral center for thyroid disorders in Jamshedpur. 63 patients of TMNG (Group A) were treated with Radioiodine between 1995-2003. The demographic profile of these patients was as follows: M/F- 38%: 62%, 76% of patients were above 40 years, 85% had been on anti-thyroid drugs for more than 18 months. Fixed dose radioiodine in an oral dose varying from 5-10 mCi was given in all patients of Group A. 32.4 % of patients continued to be toxic or relapsed after a period of euthyroid status within 1 year of Radioiodine therapy. A change in protocol for radioiodine therapy was introduced in 2003. This included withdrawal of antithyroid drugs for one month before radioiodine therapy and the use of noniodized salt and abstinence from seafood in diet during this period. 33 TMN Goiter patients (Group B) followed this protocol before receiving Radioiodine. The dose of Radioiodine remained 5-10 mCi. The age and sex profile of Group A and B were comparable. However, Group B patients had been on antithyroid drugs for a shorter period (p< 0.001). The dose of Radioiodine in 94% of Group B patients was between 7-10mCi, whereas this was 63.4% in Group A. The rest of the patients had received a dose between 5-7 mCi. The relapse rate in Group B was 9.1% compared to 32.4% in Group A. Improvement in response rates with increase in Radioiodine dose remains controversial.P PThe better response rate in Group B patients may be attributed to the withdrawal of antithyroid drugs for one month before therapy and the reduction in dietary intake of Iodine for a month before therapy. However, a

  12. Low- and high-dose radioiodine therapy for low-/intermediate-risk differentiated thyroid cancer. A preliminary clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Yuan; Huang Rui; Li Lin

    2017-01-01

    To compare the ablation results, therapeutic responses and adverse reactions between a low dose (1.1 GBq) or high dose (3.7 GBq) of 131 I in low-/intermediate-risk differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients. The factors influencing the ablation result and therapeutic response were also analyzed. The researchers used a random number table to randomly assign the enrolled patients to the low-dose group or high-dose group at a 1:1 ratio, and assessment of ablation result, therapeutic response, and adverse reactions evaluated 6 ± 3 months after therapy. A total of 140 patients were enrolled in the study through October 2014-June 2015. Until February 2016, 132 patients completed the trial. 99 patients were re-examined under thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) stimulation 3-9 months after 131 I therapy. For the low-dose and high-dose groups, the success rates of ablation were 52.7% (29/55) and 59.1% (26/44), respectively. The ablation results did not differ significantly between the two groups (P = 0.548). One hundred and thirty two patients were re-examined 2-9 months after 131 I therapy. The low-dose group had an excellent response rate of ∼80% (53/66), an indeterminate response rate of ∼ 20% (13/66), and no cases with a biochemical incomplete response. The high-dose group had an excellent response rate of ∼85% (36/66), an indeterminate response rate of ∼11% (7/66), and a biochemical incomplete response rate of ∼4% (3/66). No significant differences in the therapeutic response were observed between the two groups (P = 0.087). Patients in stage N1b had a significantly lower success rate of ablation than those in stage N0 (P = 0.000). The success rate of ablation increased significantly with lower thyroglobulin (Tg) levels (P = 0.000). A pre-treatment Tg level was significantly associated with a higher excellent response rate (P = 0.002). Pre-treatment-stimulated Tg of 0.47 and 3.09 μg/L were identified as cut-off values for predicting the ablation result and

  13. The clinician and the thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biersack, H.J.; Hotze, A. (Bonn Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Klinische und Experimentelle Nuklearmedizin)

    1991-09-01

    The goiter prevalence in iodine-deficient regions is up to 25%-54%. The most frequent disease in these endemic areas is non-toxic goiter, which is, however, oftentimes connected with autonomously functioning thyroid tissue leading to borderline or overt hyperthyroidism. Other thyroid diseases like cancer, thyroiditis and hypothyroidism play only a miner role in a thyroid clinic, while cases of Graves' disease may be observed more frequently. The most cost-effective tools to evaluate thyroid patients are the hand, ear and mouth of the thyroid clinician. The differential diagnosis of thyroid disorders may be evaluated by a battery of diagnostic tools like in-vitro tests and high performance imaging modalities. Once the diagnosis is established, the appropriate therapeutic procedures (drugs, radioiodine, surgery) have to be chosen. This review should be considered as a guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. In addition, special problems concerning elderly patients and pregnant women are discussed, including the differential diagnosis of thyroid diseases. (orig.).

  14. The clinician and the thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biersack, H.J.; Hotze, A.

    1991-01-01

    The goiter prevalence in iodine-deficient regions is up to 25%-54%. The most frequent disease in these endemic areas is non-toxic goiter, which is, however, oftentimes connected with autonomously functioning thyroid tissue leading to borderline or overt hyperthyroidism. Other thyroid diseases like cancer, thyroiditis and hypothyroidism play only a miner role in a thyroid clinic, while cases of Graves' disease may be observed more frequently. The most cost-effective tools to evaluate thyroid patients are the hand, ear and mouth of the thyroid clinician. The differential diagnosis of thyroid disorders may be evaluated by a battery of diagnostic tools like in-vitro tests and high performance imaging modalities. Once the diagnosis is established, the appropriate therapeutic procedures (drugs, radioiodine, surgery) have to be chosen. This review should be considered as a guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. In addition, special problems concerning elderly patients and pregnant women are discussed, including the differential diagnosis of thyroid diseases. (orig.)

  15. Tumour dosimetry and response in patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer using recombinant human thyrotropin before radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keizer, Bart de; Hoekstra, Anne; Rijk, Peter P. van; Klerk, John M.H. de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Room E02.222, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands); Brans, Boudewijn; Dierckx, Rudi A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Zelissen, Pierre M.J.; Koppeschaar, Hans P.F.; Lips, Cees J.M. [Department of Endocrinology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2003-03-01

    The development of recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) has given clinicians new options for diagnostic follow-up and treatment of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). This paper evaluates the tumour dosimetry and response following -iodine-131 treatment of metastatic thyroid cancer patients after rhTSH stimulation instead of classical hormone withdrawal-induced hypothyroidism. Nineteen consecutive {sup 131}I treatments in 16 patients were performed after rhTSH stimulation. All patients had undergone a near-total thyroidectomy followed by an ablative dosage of {sup 131}I. They all suffered from metastatic or recurrent disease showing tumoral {sup 131}I uptake on previous post-treatment scintigraphy. Dosimetric calculations were performed using {sup 131}I tumour uptake measurements from post-treatment {sup 131}I scintigrams and tumour volume estimations from radiological images. Response was assessed by comparing pre-treatment serum thyroglobulin (Tg) level with the Tg level 3 months post treatment. In 18 out of 19 treatments, uptake of {sup 131}I in metastatic or recurrent lesions was seen. The median tumour radiation dose was 26.3 Gy (range 1.3-368 Gy), and the median effective half-life was 2.7 days (range 0.5-6.5 days). Eleven of 19 treatments (10/16 patients) were evaluable for response after 3 months. {sup 131}I therapy with rhTSH resulted in a biochemical partial response in 3/11 or 27% of treatments (two patients), biochemical stable disease in 2/11 or 18% of treatments and biochemical progressive disease in 6/11 or 55% of treatments. Our study showed that although tumour doses in DTC patients treated with {sup 131}I after rhTSH were highly variable, 45% of treatments led to disease stabilisation or partial remission when using rhTSH in conjunction with {sup 131}I therapy, without serious side-effects and with minimal impact on quality of life. RhTSH is therefore adequately satisfactory as an adjuvant tool in therapeutic settings and is

  16. Primary hyperthyroidism--diagnosis and treatment. Indications and contraindications for radioiodine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgul, Edyta; Sowinski, Jerzy

    2011-01-01

    Isotope therapy is one of the methods used in primary hyperthyroidism. The therapy is based on short-range beta radiation emitted from radioactive iodine. Radioiodine administration must always be preceded by pharmacological normalization of thyroid function. Otherwise, post-radiation thyrocyte destruction and thyroid hormones release may lead to hyperthyroidism exacerbation. Indications for radioiodine therapy in Graves-Basedow disease include recurrent hyperthyroidism after thyrostatic treatment or thyroidectomy and side-effects observed during thyrostatic treatment. In toxic nodule, isotope therapy is the first choice therapy. Radioiodine is absorbed only in autonomous nodule. Therefore, it destroys only this area and does not damage the remaining thyroid tissue. In toxic goitre, radioiodine is used mostly in recurrent nodules. Absolute contraindications for radioiodine treatment are pregnancy and lactation. Relative contraindications are thyroid nodules suspected of malignancy and age under 15 years. In patients with thyroid nodules suspected of malignancy, radioiodine treatment may be applied as a preparation for surgery, if thyrostatic drugs are ineffective or contraindicated. In children, radioiodine therapy should be considered in recurrent toxic goitre and when thyrostatic drugs are ineffective. In patients with Graves-Basedow disease and thyroid-associated orbitopathy, radioiodine treatment may increase the inflammatory process and exacerbate the ophthalmological symptoms. However, thyroid-associated orbitopathy cannot be considered as a contraindication for isotope therapy. The potential carcinogenic properties of radioiodine, especially associated with tissues with high iodine uptake (thyroid, salivary glands, stomach, intestine, urinary tract, breast), have not been confirmed.

  17. The Evaluation of Thyroid Disease in the U.S.A. Resulting from Combined Exposures to Radioiodine Fallout: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baverstock, K. [WHO Regional Office for Europe, Helsinki (Finland); Hoffman, F.O. [SENES Oak Ridge, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pritikin, T. [Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    At the time of weapons testing in Nevada and associated activities elsewhere in mainland USA, the risks to health associated with fission product fallout were not appreciated in the way they are today. In retrospect, however, there is evidence to suggest a reluctance of the scientific community to accept the evolving evidence of harm from {sup 131}I, from the 1980s onwards. Some of this reluctance is based on extensive epidemiological follow-up of patients irradiated with diagnostic medical applications of {sup 131}I, which showed a very small effect. The epidemiological community concerned with the {sup 131}I diagnostic studies have proved to be among the most resistant to the abandonment of the belief in the reduced carcinogenic effectiveness of {sup 131}I. However, as early as 1982 Congress mandated the Department of Health and Human Services to review the doses from {sup 131}I to the public as a result of public concern for a rising incidence of thyroid disease. The Lee et al experiment was published in 1982. The conflict between the results of the Lee et al experiments and the earlier studies of the relative carcinogenicity of external radiation and {sup 131}I, led the National Cancer Inst. to take the unusual step, in the mid 1980s, of arranging an independent evaluation of the work on which the Lee paper was based. The review, the results of which were not published, endorsed the results given in the paper. Finally, the evidence of an increase in thyroid cancer after the Chernobyl accident was published in 1992. What were the factors that contributed to this resistance by the scientific community to abandoning an increasingly untenable belief? One factor could have been the use, in the US, of {sup 131}I for medical diagnostic purposes in children and reluctance to accept that this might have been damaging to health in later life. Another possibility was the recognition that, in the event of an accident to a nuclear power plant, release of radio-iodine

  18. The Evaluation of Thyroid Disease in the U.S.A. Resulting from Combined Exposures to Radioiodine Fallout: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baverstock, K.; Hoffman, F.O.; Pritikin, T.

    2001-01-01

    At the time of weapons testing in Nevada and associated activities elsewhere in mainland USA, the risks to health associated with fission product fallout were not appreciated in the way they are today. In retrospect, however, there is evidence to suggest a reluctance of the scientific community to accept the evolving evidence of harm from 131 I, from the 1980s onwards. Some of this reluctance is based on extensive epidemiological follow-up of patients irradiated with diagnostic medical applications of 131 I, which showed a very small effect. The epidemiological community concerned with the 131 I diagnostic studies have proved to be among the most resistant to the abandonment of the belief in the reduced carcinogenic effectiveness of 131 I. However, as early as 1982 Congress mandated the Department of Health and Human Services to review the doses from 131 I to the public as a result of public concern for a rising incidence of thyroid disease. The Lee et al experiment was published in 1982. The conflict between the results of the Lee et al experiments and the earlier studies of the relative carcinogenicity of external radiation and 131 I, led the National Cancer Inst. to take the unusual step, in the mid 1980s, of arranging an independent evaluation of the work on which the Lee paper was based. The review, the results of which were not published, endorsed the results given in the paper. Finally, the evidence of an increase in thyroid cancer after the Chernobyl accident was published in 1992. What were the factors that contributed to this resistance by the scientific community to abandoning an increasingly untenable belief? One factor could have been the use, in the US, of 131 I for medical diagnostic purposes in children and reluctance to accept that this might have been damaging to health in later life. Another possibility was the recognition that, in the event of an accident to a nuclear power plant, release of radio-iodine, because of its volatility, would be very

  19. Radioiodine therapy and subsequent pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao, Carmen Dolores G.; Miranda, Angelica E.; Corres, Nilson Duarte; Sieiro Neto, Lino; Corbo, Rossana; Vaisman, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate abortion and fetal congenital anomaly rates in women previously submitted to radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Study design: A case-control study of 108 pregnant women, 48 cases whose pregnancies were evaluated after they had undergone radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma, and the control group consisted of 60 healthy pregnant women. Results: Of a total of 66 pregnancies, 14 conceived within the first year, 51 one or more years after the last administration of 131 I, the medical record of one patient was not available. The interval between the last radioiodine therapy administration and conception ranged from 1 month to 10 years. There were a total of 4 miscarriages, 2 of them for unknown reasons. There was one case of congenital anomaly and two preterms birth. Nine women presented the following pregnancy events: placental insufficiency, hypertensive crisis, placental detachment, risk of miscarriage, preterm labour and four miscarriages. No statistical difference was observed between the studied and control groups. Conclusion: Radioiodine was followed by no significant increase in untoward effects in neither the pregnancy nor the offspring. (author)

  20. Functional results of radioiodine therapy with a 300-GY absorbed dose in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willemsen, U.F.; Knesewitsch, P.; Kreisig, T.; Pickardt, C.R.; Kirsch, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the results of high-dose radioiodine therapy given to 43 patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease between 1986 and 1992. We chose an intrathyroidal absorbed dose of 300 Gy and determined the applied activity individually, which ranged from 240 to 3120 MBq with a median of 752 MBq. Hperthyroidism was eliminated in 86% of cases after 3 months and in 100% after 12 months. No patient required a second radioiodine treatment. The incidnece of hyperthyroidism was 63% after 3 months and 93% after 18 months. Neither the pretherapeutic thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin level nor the degree of co-existing endocrine ophthalmopathy was correlated with the time at which hypothyroidism developed. Patients with previous radioiodine therapy developed hypothyroidism earlier than patients with previous thyroid surgery. The results show that ablative radioiodine therapy with a 300-Gy absorbed dose is a very effective treatment of hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease, but it should be restricted to patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism combined with severe co-existing disorders or episodes of unfavourable reactions to antithyroid drugs. (orig.)

  1. Functional results of radioiodine therapy with a 300-GY absorbed dose in Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willemsen, U.F. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)); Knesewitsch, P. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)); Kreisig, T. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)); Pickardt, C.R. (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Muenchen Univ. (Germany)); Kirsch, C.M. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany))

    1993-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the results of high-dose radioiodine therapy given to 43 patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease between 1986 and 1992. We chose an intrathyroidal absorbed dose of 300 Gy and determined the applied activity individually, which ranged from 240 to 3120 MBq with a median of 752 MBq. Hperthyroidism was eliminated in 86% of cases after 3 months and in 100% after 12 months. No patient required a second radioiodine treatment. The incidnece of hyperthyroidism was 63% after 3 months and 93% after 18 months. Neither the pretherapeutic thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin level nor the degree of co-existing endocrine ophthalmopathy was correlated with the time at which hypothyroidism developed. Patients with previous radioiodine therapy developed hypothyroidism earlier than patients with previous thyroid surgery. The results show that ablative radioiodine therapy with a 300-Gy absorbed dose is a very effective treatment of hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease, but it should be restricted to patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism combined with severe co-existing disorders or episodes of unfavourable reactions to antithyroid drugs. (orig.)

  2. Graves' disease and toxic nodular goiter - radioiodine therapy; Morbus Basedow und Autonomie - Radioiodtherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schicha, H.; Dietlein, M. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2002-04-01

    At the 15th conference on the human thyroid in Heidelberg in 2001 the following aspects of the radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disorders were presented: General strategies for therapy of benign thyroid diseases, criterions for conservative or definitive treatment of hyperthyroidism as first line therapy and finally preparation, procedural details, results, side effects, costs and follow-up care of radioiodine therapy as well as legal guidelines for hospitalization in Germany. The diagnosis Graves' hyperthyroidism needs the decision, if rather a conservative treatment or if primary radioiodine therapy is the best therapeutic approach. In the USA 70-90% of these patients are treated with radioiodine as first line therapy, whereas in Germany the conservative therapy for 1-1.5 years is recommended for 90%. This review describes subgroups of patients with Graves' disease showing a higher probability to relapse after conservative treatment. Comparing benefits, adverse effects, costs, and conveniences of both treatment strategies the authors conclude that radioiodine therapy should be preferred as first line therapy in 60-70% of the patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism. (orig.) [German] In dem vorliegenden Beitrag wird ueber die Radioiodtherapie gutartiger Schilddruesenerkrankungen referiert. Dies betrifft gesetzliche Regelungen in Deutschland, grundlegende Ueberlegungen zur Therapie benigner Schilddruesenerkrankungen, die Diskussion konservative versus definitive Therapieindikation der Hyperthyreose und schliesslich die Themenkomplexe Vorbereitung, Durchfuehrung, Ergebnisse, Nebenwirkungen und Komplikationen, Kosten sowie Nachsorge der Radioiodtherapie. Im Vordergrund steht die Abgrenzung der konservativen Therapieindikation gegenueber der primaeren Radioiodtherapie des Morbus Basedow in Deutschland. Waehrend in den USA 70-90% der Morbus-Basedow-Faelle primaer mit Radioiodtherapie behandelt werden, wird in Deutschland bei 90% zunaechst ein

  3. Noninferior response in BRAF{sup V600E} mutant nonmetastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma to radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiao; Zhao, Teng; Lin, Yansong [Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Beijing (China); Liang, Jun [Peking University International Hospital, Department of Oncology, Beijing (China)

    2016-06-15

    As the most frequent and specific genetic alteration in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), BRAF{sup V600E} has an intimate relationship with more invasive tumour and higher postoperative recurrence risk in PTC patients. We investigate the effect of radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy on the clinical outcome in PTC patients with the BRAF{sup V600E} mutation without distant metastases. This retrospective study included PTC 228 patients without distant metastases who underwent total or near-total thyroidectomy and RAI treatment in our hospital from January 2011 to July 2014. The BRAF{sup V600E} status of the primary lesions was determined and the patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of the mutation. Serological and imaging data were collected at a median follow-up of 2.34 years after RAI administration. Suppressed and stimulated thyroglobulin (Tg), Tg antibody, diagnostic whole-body scintigraphy, and other imaging examinations were used to assess clinical outcome, which was defined as excellent response, indeterminate response, biochemical incomplete response and structural incomplete response. The BRAF{sup V600E} mutation was observed in 153 of the 228 patients (67.1 %). The clinicopathological features did not differ between the BRAF{sup V600E} mutatation and wild-type groups except age at diagnosis (P = 0.000), tumour size (P = 0.023) and TNM stage (P = 0.003). Older age and more advanced TNM stage were prevalent in the BRAF{sup V600E} mutatation group, whereas tumours were slightly larger in the BRAF{sup V600E} wild-type group. The response to RAI therapy was evaluated in both the entire series and the patients with a high recurrence risk, and no significant difference in response was found between the BRAF{sup V600E} mutatation and the wild-type groups (P = 0.881 and P = 0.851, respectively). The clinical response to timely postsurgical RAI therapy is not inferior in BRAF{sup V600E} mutation PTC patients without distant metastases, which

  4. Incidence of radiation-induced Graves' disease in patients treated with radioiodine for thyroid autonomy before and after introduction of a high-sensitivity TSH receptor antibody assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkelmann, Simone; Wolf, Ricarda; Koch, Annedore; Kittner, Christian; Groth, Peter; Schuemichen, Carl [University of Rostock, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany)

    2004-10-01

    Autoimmune hyperthyroidism may occur several months after radioiodine therapy (RIT) for functional thyroid autonomy. Exacerbation of pre-existing subclinical Graves' disease (GD) has been held responsible for this phenomenon. Determination of TSH receptor antibody using solubilised porcine epithelial cell membranes is insensitive and may have failed to diagnose GD in these patients before RIT. Following the introduction of a more sensitive assay, using the human TSH receptor as an antigen, it has been expected that the incidence of radiation-induced GD after RIT for functional thyroid autonomy will be reduced. In a first group of 1,428 patients treated between November 1993 and March 1997 (group I) we used the porcine TRAb assay to exclude GD, while in a second group comprising 1,408 patients treated between January 2000 and December 2001 (group II), GD was excluded using the human TRAb assay. A matched control group of 231 patients was derived from group II. In group I a total of 15 (1.05%) patients developed obvious or suspected radiation-induced GD, while in group II 17 (1.2%) did so; the interval until development of GD was 8.4 and 8.8 months, respectively, after RIT. Serum anti-thyroid peroxidase levels before RIT were elevated in 36.4% of group I patients and 47.1% of group II patients, but in only 5.6% of the control group. Other non-specific signs of mild immunopathy of the thyroid were seen retrospectively in 73.3%, 64.7% and 16.0% of the patients in these three groups, respectively. In conclusion, the introduction of a high-sensitivity TRAb assay did not reduce the incidence of autoimmune hyperthyroidism occurring late after RIT for functional thyroid autonomy, but mild immunopathy of the thyroid is seen more frequently in these patients and seems to be a predisposing factor in the development of radiation-induced GD. (orig.)

  5. The influence of saliva flow stimulation on the absorbed radiation dose to the salivary glands during radioiodine therapy of thyroid cancer using {sup 124}I PET(/CT) imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jentzen, Walter; Schmitz, Jochen; Freudenberg, Lutz; Eising, Ernst; Bockisch, Andreas; Stahl, Alexander [Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Essen (Germany); Balschuweit, Dorothee; Hilbel, Thomas [Fachhochschule Gelsenkirchen, Fachbereich Physikalische Technik, Gelsenkirchen (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    A serious side effect of high-activity radioiodine therapy in the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer is radiogenic salivary gland damage. This damage may be diminished by lemon-juice-induced saliva flow immediately after {sup 131}I administration. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of chewing lemon slices on the absorbed (radiation) doses to the salivary glands. Ten patients received (pretherapy) {sup 124}I PET(/CT) dosimetry before their first radioiodine therapy. The patients underwent a series of six PET scans at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 48 and {>=}96 h and one PET/CT scan at 24 h after administration of 27 MBq {sup 124}I. Blood samples were also collected at about 2, 4, 24, 48, and 96 h. Contrary to the standard radioiodine therapy protocol, the patients were not stimulated with lemon juice. Specifically, the patients chewed no lemon slices during the pretherapy procedure and neither ate food nor drank fluids until after completion of the last PET scan on the first day. Organ absorbed doses per administered {sup 131}I activity (ODpAs) as well as gland and blood uptake curves were determined and compared with published data from a control patient group, i.e. stimulated per the standard radioiodine therapy protocol. The calculations for both groups used the same methodology. A within-group comparison showed that the mean ODpA for the submandibular glands was not significantly different from that for the parotid glands. An intergroup comparison showed that the mean ODpA in the nonstimulation group averaged over both gland types was reduced by 28% compared to the mean ODpA in the stimulation group (p=0.01). Within each gland type, the mean ODpA reductions in the nonstimulation group were statistically significant for the parotid glands (p=0.03) but not for the submandibular glands (p=0.23). The observed ODpAs were higher in the stimulation group because of increased initial gland uptake rather than group differences in blood kinetics. The {sup 124}I PET

  6. Use of recombinant, human TSH radioiodine therapy in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma; Radioiodtherapie des differenzierten Schilddruesenkarzinoms nach Vorbehandlung mit rekombinantem, humanem TSH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luster, M. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2001-12-01

    We describe the use of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) in conjunction with ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT) in 11 patients (16 total treatments) with advanced and/or recurrent DTC (5 papillary, 6 follicular) for whom withdrawal of thyroid hormone suppressive therapy (THST) to increase serum TSH was not an option. Indications for rhTSH use in these patients included inability to tolerate withdrawal of thyroid hormones due to poor physical condition or inability to achieve sufficient serum TSH levels after THST withdrawal. All patients had undergone thyroidectomy and most (9/11) had received prior radioablative therapy after THST withdrawal. In 7 cases (5 patients), post-therapy Tg levels assessed at a mean of 4.3 months (range 2-10 months) after I-131 therapy were decreased by at least 30% compared to pre-therapy levels. In an additional 3 patients, whole body scans performed at follow-up indicated decreased or stabilized tumor burden compared to pre-therapy scans or marked clinical improvement was found. Three patients died of progressive disease within 2 months of therapy before follow-up assessments occurred. No adverse events were reported among the 8 surviving patients. The results suggest that rhTSH offers a promising alternative to THST withdrawal to allow radioablative therapy under maximal TSH stimulation in patients with advanced recurrent DTC who would not otherwise be able to receive this treatment. This therapeutic indication extends the clinical potential of the new agent, already demonstrated to be effective for use with I-131 for diagnostic purposes. However in some patients suffering from highly aggressive tumors the poor prognosis will not be improved. (orig.) [German] An unserer Klinik liegen bislang Erfahrungen mit 16 Radioiodtherapien (RIT) (z.T. mehrfache Anwendung) unter rhTSH vor. Die ueberwiegende Mehrzahl der Patienten wurde wegen einer fortgeschrittenen Tumorerkrankung mit dem Risiko einer lebensbedrohlichen Verschlechterung in

  7. Effect of a Low Iodine Diet vs. Restricted Iodine Diet on Postsurgical Preparation for Radioiodine Ablation Therapy in Thyroid Carcinoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chi Young; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Yoon, Mi-Jin; Chang, Hang Seok; Park, Cheong Soo; Chung, Woong Youn

    2015-07-01

    The radioiodine ablation therapy is required for patients who underwent a total thyroidectomy. Through a comparative review of a low iodine diet (LID) and a restricted iodine diet (RID), the study aims to suggest guidelines that are suitable for the conditions of Korea. The study was conducted with 101 patients. With 24-hour urine samples from the patients after a 2-week restricted diet and after a 4-week restricted diet, the amount of iodine in the urine was estimated. The consumed radioiodine amounts for 2 hours and 24 hours were calculated. This study was conducted with 47 LID patients and 54 RID patients. The amounts of iodine in urine, the 2-week case and 4-week case for each group showed no significant differences. The amounts of iodine in urine between the two groups were both included in the range of the criteria for radioiodine ablation therapy. Also, 2 hours and 24 hours radioiodine consumption measured after 4-week restrictive diet did not show statistical differences between two groups. A 2-week RID can be considered as a type of radioiodine ablation therapy after patients undergo a total thyroidectomy.

  8. The principles of radioiodine dosimetry following a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvonova, I.A.

    1996-01-01

    Based upon the experience of radioiodine dosimetry after the Chernobyl accident main principals of radioiodine measurements and dosimetry in thyroid glands of population in case of a radiation accident are discussed in the report. For the correct dose estimation following the radioiodine measurement in the thyroid one should know the ''history'' of radionuclide intake into the body of a contaminated person. So a measurement of radioiodine thyroid content should be accompanied by asking questions of investigated persons about, their life style and feeding after a nuclear incident. These data coincidently with data of radionuclides dynamic in the air and food (especially in milk products) are used for the development of radioiodine intake model and then for thyroid dose estimation. The influence of stable iodine prophylaxis and other countermeasures on values are discussed in dependence on the time of its using. Some methods of thyroid dose reconstruction used after the Chernobyl accident in Russia for a situation of thyroid radioiodine measurements lacking in a contaminated settlement are presented in the report. (author). 16 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  9. The principles of radioiodine dosimetry following a nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zvonova, I A [Institute of Radiation Hygiene, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1996-08-01

    Based upon the experience of radioiodine dosimetry after the Chernobyl accident main principals of radioiodine measurements and dosimetry in thyroid glands of population in case of a radiation accident are discussed in the report. For the correct dose estimation following the radioiodine measurement in the thyroid one should know the ``history`` of radionuclide intake into the body of a contaminated person. So a measurement of radioiodine thyroid content should be accompanied by asking questions of investigated persons about, their life style and feeding after a nuclear incident. These data coincidently with data of radionuclides dynamic in the air and food (especially in milk products) are used for the development of radioiodine intake model and then for thyroid dose estimation. The influence of stable iodine prophylaxis and other countermeasures on values are discussed in dependence on the time of its using. Some methods of thyroid dose reconstruction used after the Chernobyl accident in Russia for a situation of thyroid radioiodine measurements lacking in a contaminated settlement are presented in the report. (author). 16 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs.

  10. Thyrotoxicosis and radioiodine therapy: Does the dose matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Collier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are 3 treatment options for thyrotoxicosis: Antithyroid drugs, Surgery and radioiodine. The choice of treatment varies geographically. Radioiodine therapy is preferred in the United States. The aim of radioiodine is to destroy sufficient thyroid tissue to cure the hyperthyroidism. There is a lack of consensus towards what dose of radioiodine should be used. Several methods are used to determine the dose. In our practice we administer 400 MBq to patients with Graves and in patients with large multinodular goiter, we would administer 800 MBq.

  11. The history of radioiodine therapy beginnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Olegovich Rumiantsev

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This report contains historical review of radioiodine therapy invention and clinical implementation for the treatment of patients with diffuse toxic goiter and differentiated thyroid cancer. In 1923 Henry Plummer has strongly recommended to prescribe stable iodine in patients with Grave’s diseases after surgery in order to prevent thyrotoxic storm. Radioactive isotopes of iodine for the first time were obtained by Enrico Fermi in 1934 in laboratory. Clinical implementation of radioiodine was started in 40th years of past century. In 1940 experimentally have been shown that thyroid gland with Grave’s disease accumulated as much as 80% of radioiodine administered activity. Saul Hertz was the first physician who used radioactive iodine in January, 1941 with purpose to treat diffuse toxic goiter patients. Samuel Seidlin was first who used radioiodine in March, 1943 to treat patient with functioned differentiated thyroid cancer metastases. In Russia radioiodine treatment of patients started since 1982 in Medical Radiological Research Centre (former Institute of Medical Radiology, Obninsk.

  12. Strategy for the diagnosis of thyroid disorders in the developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poshyachinda, M.

    1992-01-01

    Thyroid disorders may manifest as abnormalities of anatomy of function of the gland. Most of them can be diagnosed after a careful clinical history and physical examination. Nevertheless, laboratory evaluation is important for an accurate diagnosis before embarking on treatment. There is also a small but a significant fraction of thyroid diseases that can be diagnosed only on the basis of laboratory findings. Often a diagnosis of thyroid disease may need more than a single test. Hence, it is essential to select appropriate tests for thyroid patients by their reliability, precision and overall cost. Many thyroid function tests are nuclear techniques and this trend is not likely to change in near future. Radionuclides that are commonly used in the evaluation of thyroid disorders include iodine-131 ( 131 I), iodine-123 ( 123 I), iodine-125 ( 125 I) and technetium-99m ( 99 TC m -TcO4)

  13. Myeloid Sarcoma of the Uterine Cervix as Presentation of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia after Treatment with Low-Dose Radioiodine for Thyroid Cancer: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Sophie Weingertner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of acute myeloid leukaemia after low-dose radioiodine therapy and its presentation as a myeloid sarcoma of the uterine cervix are both rare events. We report a case of acute myeloid leukaemia revealed by a myeloid sarcoma of the uterine cervix in a 48-year-old woman, 17 months after receiving a total dose of 100 mCi 131I for papillary thyroid cancer. A strict hematological follow-up of patients treated with any dose of 131I is recommended to accurately detect any hematological complications which might have been underestimated. Unusual presentations, such as chloroma of the uterine cervix, may reveal myeloid malignancy and should be kept in mind.

  14. Investigation of early DNA damage after radioiodine therapy in patients with thyroid cancer using the gamma-H2AX focus assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberlein, U.; Lassmann, M.; Bluemel, C.; Buck, A.K.; Nowak, C.; Meineke, V.; Scherthan, H.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Objectives: the Aim of the study is to investigate the DNA damage formation in blood lymphocytes and the correlation to the absorbed dose to the blood in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) after their first radionuclide therapy with I-131 as measured by the induction, persistence and decay behaviour of γ-H2AX and 53BP1 DNA damage-induced foci. Radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) cause in their vicinity the formation of microscopically visible foci of the phospho-histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) and the 53BP1 protein that binds to and signals damaged chromatin at the DSB site. Nuclear foci containing both markers thus represent radiation-induced DSBs. Methods: we investigated 19 patients with DTC during the first treatment with 3.5±0.3 GBq I-131. Between 7 and 10 sequential peripheral blood samples (at least four within the first 5 hours) were taken before and between 0.5 h and 144 h post administration. The physical dosimetry procedures were performed according to the EANM DTC SOP. White blood cells were recovered by density centrifugation in CPT tubes (BD Biosciences) and subjected to two-colour immunofluorescence staining. The average frequencies of the radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci/nucleus that co localized with 53BP1 foci were derived from immuno-stained mononuclear peripheral blood lymphocyte samples. The number of foci was counted manually using a red/green double band pass filter (Chroma) in a Zeiss microscope by an experienced observer. Results: The mean I-131 absorbed dose to the blood was (0.04±0.01) Gy at t=2 h, (0.07±0.02) Gy at t=4 h, and (0.21±0.05) Gy at t=24 h, respectively. The mean value of the total absorbed dose to the blood was (0.36±0.08) Gy. The highest number of radiation-induced foci per nucleus (RIF) and per absorbed dose (median: 8.8 RIF/Gy, range 3.1-10.9 RIF/Gy) was observed in the first three hours post administration. Four hours after radioiodine administration the number

  15. Thyroid disorders and polycystic ovary syndrome: An emerging relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Singla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the prevalence of these endocrine dysfunctions increases, the association of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS and autoimmune thyroid disease is increasingly being recognised. While the causality of this association is still uncertain, the two conditions share a bidirectional relationship. The exact nature of this link has not been elucidated yet. Both syndromes share certain common characteristics, risk factors, and pathophysiological abnormalities. Simultaneously, certain etiopathogenetic factors that operate to create these dysfunctions are dissimilar. Polycystic appearing ovaries are a clinical feature of hypothyroidism, though hypothyroidism should be excluded before diagnosing PCOS. Adiposity, increased insulin resistance, high leptin, evidence of deranged autoimmunity, all of which are present in both disease states, seem to play a complex role in connecting these two disorders. This brief communication explores the nature of the relationship between PCOS and hypothyroidism. It reviews current data and analyses them to present a unified pathophysiological basis, incorporating these complex relationships, for the same.

  16. Epidemiology, risk factors and prognosis of Interferon alpha induced thyroid disorders. A Prospective Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Obołończyk

    2017-09-01

    In conclusion: Thyroid disorders are common during IFN-α therapy. Previous epidemiological data seem to be underestimated. Important risk factors for IITD development are: female sex, elevated serum TSH concentration (≥2.5 μU/mL, positive TPO-Ab and increased blood velocity in thyroid arteries.

  17. Radioiodine treatment of Grave's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidenreich, P.; Vogt, H.; Dorn, R.; Graf, G.; Kopp, J.

    2001-01-01

    In Germany radioiodine therapy of Grave's disease is performed in patients older than 20 years, after at least one year of unsuccessful antithyroid therapy, intolerance against antithyroid medication, recurrences after surgical interventions and small goiters. Hyperthyroidism is eliminated with an ablative dose concept (300 Gy) in more than 90% associated with rate of hypothyroidism in the outcome of also more than 90%. Adverse prognostic factors are an insufficient dose to the thyroid and/or concomitant antithyreoid medication. Radioiodine therapy in Germany must be an inpatient single time approach due to quality assurance and radiation protection reasons. The mean hospitalization is only 3-4 days with the patient being discharged at an annual dose of less than 1 mSv at 2 m distance (dose rate at discharge [de

  18. Unusual False Positive Radioiodine Uptake on 131I Whole Body Scintigraphy in Three Unrelated Organs with Different Pathologies in Patients of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma: A Case Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranade, Rohit; Pawar, Shwetal; Mahajan, Abhishek; Basu, Sandip

    2016-01-01

    Three cases with unusual false positive radioiodine uptake in three different organs and pathologies (infective old fibrotic lesion in the lung, simple liver cyst, and benign breast lesion) on iodine-131 ( 131 I) whole body scintigraphy. Clinicoradiological correlation was undertaken in all three cases and the pathologies were ascertained. In all the three cases, single-photon emission computerized tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) and ancillary imaging modalities were employed and were helpful in arriving at the final diagnosis

  19. Usefulness of recombinant human TSH-aided radioiodine doses administered in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma Administración de dosis terapéuticas de radioyodo luego de TSH recombinante en pacientes con carcinoma diferenciado de tiroides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabián Pitoia

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The published studies confirming the safety and efficacy of rhTSH for diagnostic purposes have led to an increased interest in its use for preparation for radioiodine (RI dose administration in patients with recurrent or persistent differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC. In order to establish the efficacy of RI therapy after rhTSH, we have reviewed 39 rhTSH-aided radioiodine treatment in a series of 28 DTC patients. Patients were divided into two groups: GI (n=17, with previous thyroid bed uptake and undetectable thyroglobulin (Tg levels under levothyroxine treatment and GII (n=11, with proven metastatic local or distant disease. Median follow-up after the first rhTSH-aided radioiodine treatment was 32 ± 13 months (range 8 to 54 months. Sixteen patients (94% in GI were rendered disease free and one patient was shown to have persistent disease. In GII, the post therapy whole body scan showed pathological uptakes in all cases: in four patients in lungs, in four in mediastinum and in three in lateral neck. In two patients with mediastinum uptake, Tg levels were undetectable after rhTSH. In the follow-up, two patients with lateral neck uptake were rendered disease free, four patients died (three due to thyroid cancer and five out of the remaining patients have persistent disease. In conclusion, rhTSH aided therapy was helpful to eliminate normal thyroid bed remnants in 16/17 (94% patients (GI. rhTSH stimulated Tg was undetectable in two patients with mediastinal metastasis. We believe that rhTSH is a good alternative to levothyroxine withdrawal for the treatment of DTC with radioactive iodine, increasing the quality of life in these patients. Caution should be recommended in the follow-up of unselected DTC patients only with stimulated Tg levels.Los estudios publicados que confirman la seguridad y eficacia de la TSH recombinante (rhTSH llevaron a un incremento en el interés para su uso como adyuvante terapéutico en el CDT (ablación o tratamiento

  20. Radioiodine treatment for pediatric hyperthyroid Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ma; Jiawei, Xie; Guoming, Wang; Jianbin, Liu; Wanxia, Liu; Driedger, Al; Shuyao, Zuo; Qin, Zhang

    2009-10-01

    Grave's disease (GD) is an autoimmune disease in which excessive amounts of thyroid hormones circulate in the blood. Treatment for pediatric GD includes (1) antithyroid drugs (ATD), (2) radioiodine, and (3) thyroidectomy. Yet, the optimal therapy remains controversial. We collected studies from all electronically available sources as well as from conferences held in China. All studies using radioiodine and/or ATD and/or thyroidectomy were included. Information was found on 1,874 pediatric GD patients treated with radioiodine, 1,279 patients treated with ATD and 1,362 patients treated surgically. The cure rate for radioiodine was 49.8%; the incidence of hypothyroidism, 37.8%; of relapse, 6.3%; of adverse effects, 1.55%; and of drop outs, 0.6%. These data show that radioiodine treatment is safe and effective in pediatric GD with significant lower incidence of relapse and adverse effects but significantly higher incidence of hypothyroidism as compared with both ATD and thyroidectomy. For the time being, radioiodine treatment for pediatric GD remains an excellent first-line therapy and a good second-line therapy for patients with ATD failure, severe complications, or poor compliance.

  1. Thyroid disorders in Chernobyl clean-up workers from Latvia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurjane, N.; Orlikovs, G.; Ritenberga, R.; Skudra, M.; Lemane, R.; Lemanis, A.; Curbakova, E.; Groma, V.; Socnevs, A.

    1999-01-01

    The condition of thyroid was examined in 2188 Chernobyl clean-up workers residing in Latvia and a control group consisting of 1041 employees of the Ministry of International Affairs. Thyroid examinations included palpation, ultrasonography, selective scintigraphy and detection of the level of thyroid hormones in blood serum:L STH (thyroid-stimulating hormone), total T3 (triiodothyronine), and T4 (thyroxine). Thyroid was registered in 394 Chernobyl clean-up workers. Of these cases, 28 patients with suspected thyroid cancer were operated, and morphological examinations revealed papillary adenocarcinoma (in 5 patients), follicular adenocarcinoma (2), nodular colloid goiter (16); toxic diffuse goiter (1), papillary-follicular adenoma (3), and chronic thyroiditis (1). It was determined that the thyroid pathology in the Chernobyl clean-up workers had a tendency to progress (27 cases in 1987 versus 394 cases in 1998 in total; and absence of thyroid cancer in 1987, compared with 7 cases in 1998); thyroid nodules increased twice (64 cases in 1997, compare with 126 cases in 1998). (author)

  2. Clinical experience with outpatient radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csenkey-Sinko, I.; Roka, R.; Sera, T.; Csernay, L.; Pavics, L.; Valkusz, Z.; Julesz, J.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1993, outpatient radioiodine therapy has been available in Hungary. The reported study evaluated the efficacy of outpatient radioiodine treatment in subjects with hyperthyroidism. The data on 238 patients with Graves' disease and 123 patients with thyroid autonomy were analyzed retrospectively. All patients were treated within the period 1994 - 1999. The activities of radioiodine were calculated individually. The dose applied in Graves' disease was 150 Gy, and that in thyroid autonomy was 300 Gy. The efficacy of the treatment was evaluated 3,6 and 12 months after radioiodine therapy. In patients with persistent hyperthyroidism, repeated therapy was performed. Overall,the radioiodine therapy was successful in 84% of the Graves' disease patients. In thyroid autonomy, treatment with 300 Gy was successful in 79% of the patients. The efficacy of radioiodine treatment was similar to the results of one-dose application. It was concluded that radioidine therapy with an absorbed dose of 150 Gy in Graves' disease and with an absorbed dose of 300 Gy in thyroid autonomy proved successful by the method applied. (author)

  3. Early diagnostics and treatment of thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismailov, S.I.; Nugmanova, L.B.; Nasirkhodjaev, Ya. B.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Analysis of data of the oncological outpatient clinics of the Republic of Uzbekistan confirms our data obtained in the Institute of Endocrinology showing growth in iodine deficiency disorders. In the Republic of Uzbekistan, during period from 1983 to 1999, 6374 people were detected to have thyroid carcinoma. If in 1989, 1.95 cases of thyroid tumor accounted for 100000 population, in 1999 this index reached to 2.39. Moreover, among metropolitan population this was 4.6 cases in 1989, and 8.0 in 1999. Of the 4280 patients operated for different thyroid pathologies from 1989 to 1999 in the Institute of Endocrinology, 335 (7.9%) were diagnosed to have thyroid carcinoma. Clinical presentation was: multinodular goiter in 50.8%, nodular goiter in 37.3% and autoimmune thyroiditis in 4.2% of cases. The average age of patients operated for thyroid carcinoma was 42.8 years in 1989 and 32 years in 1999. Treatment of patients with thyroid carcinoma should be near total thyroidectomy with selective lymphadenectomy independent of morphologic form of the tumor. Our data showed that only surgical method of treatment was used in 7.4% of patients but in combination of radioiodine in 81.9% of patients. Radioiodine was used to destroy remnant thyroid tissue and iodine concentrating metastases. 131I treatment for destruction of thyroid remnants after measured from the front, back and lateral positions in radical operation was given by fractionation method with average total activity being 25 mCi to 75 mCi. Metastases into neck lymph nodes and mediastinum were treated with radioactivity ranging from 50 mCi to 100 mCi. Of the total patients of differentiated thyroid cancer treated from 1995-1999, 148 were alive on 01.01.2003 with five-year survival rate of 91.4%. Our results highlight that combined surgical and radioiodine treatment of thyroid carcinoma helps in preventing recurrence, metastasis and results in increasing the lifespan of patients. (author)

  4. Predictive value of pyramidal lobe, percentage thyroid uptake and age for ablation outcome after 15 mCi fixed dose of radioiodine-131 in Graves’ disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaman, Maseeh uz; Fatima, Nosheen; Zaman, Unaiza; Sajjad, Zafar; Zaman, Areeba; Tahseen, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    The purpose was to find out the efficacy of fixed 15 mCi radioactive iodine-131 (RAI) dose and predictive values of various factors for inducing hypothyroidism in Graves’ disease (GD). Retrospective study conducted from January 2012 till August 2014. Patients with GD who had a technetium-99m thyroid scan, thyroid antibodies, received fixed 15 mCi RAI and did follow endocrine clinics for at least 6 months were selected. RAI was considered successful if within 6 months of RAI therapy patients developed hypothyroidism. Of the 370 patients with GD who had RAI during study period, 210 (57%) qualified study criteria. Mean age of patients was 48 ± 15 years with female: male ratio of 69:31, positive thyroid antibodies in 61%, means thyroid uptake of 15.09 ± 11.23%, and presence of pyramidal lobe in 40% of total population. Hypothyroidism was achieved in 161 (77%) patients while 49 (23%) patients failed to achieve it (remained either hyperthyroid or euthyroid on antithyroid medication). Patients who became hypothyroid were significantly younger with higher proportion of presence of thyroid antibodies and pyramidal lobe and lower percentage thyroid uptake than those who failed. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that age (odds ratio; OR = 2.074), pyramidal lobe (OR = 3.317), thyroid antibodies (OR = 8.198), and percentage thyroid uptake (OR = 3.043) were found to be significant prognostic risk factors for post-RAI hypothyroidism. Gender was found to have nonsignificant association with the development of hypothyroidism. Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed age <42 years and thyroid uptake <15% as threshold values for the development of post-RAI hypothyroidism. We conclude that fixed (15 mCi) RAI dose is highly effective in rendering hypothyroidism in patients with GD. Age (≤42 years), thyroid uptake (≤15%) and presence of pyramidal lobe are strong predictors of hypothyroidism and must be considered for selecting optimal RAI dose

  5. Iodine intake as a determinant of thyroid disorders in populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, Peter; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Ovesen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    in elderly people, and the prevalence of thyroid enlargement and nodularity is high. The average serum TSH tends to decrease with age in such populations caused by the high frequency of autonomous thyroid hormone production. On the other hand, epidemiological studies have shown that hypothyroidism is more...... by high levels of iodine is especially common in people affected by thyroid autoimmunity (Hashimoto's thyroiditis). In populations with high iodine intake, the average serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) tends to increase with age. This phenomenon is especially pronounced in Caucasian populations...... with a genetically determined high tendency to thyroid autoimmunity. A small tendency to higher serum TSH may be observed already when iodine intake is brought from mildly deficient to adequate, but there is at present no evidence that slightly elevated serum TSH in elderly people leads to an increase in morbidity...

  6. Simultaneous branchial cleft and thyroid disorders may present a management challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Jane L; Veivers, David; Sidhu, Stan B; Sywak, Mark S; Shun, Albert; Delbridge, Leigh W

    2005-09-01

    Cysts, sinuses or abscesses arising from second, third or fourth branchial cleft remnants may lie either within the body of, or in close proximity to the thyroid gland. Given their infrequent nature they may pose both diagnostic and management challenges for the treating surgeon when they occur in association with thyroid disorders. This is a case series. All patients with concomitant thyroid disorders and a branchial cleft anomaly treated in the University of Sydney Endocrine Surgical Unit in the 10-year period 1994-2003 comprised the study group. Patient demographics, clinical presentation, imaging, surgical management, definitive histology and outcomes were documented. Six patients were identified with an age range of 3-76 years and a male : female ratio of 1:5. Five branchial cleft anomalies were left sided, one was right sided. Two patients had second cleft anomalies, both of which were initially thought to represent metastatic lymph nodes in association with thyroid cancer. A further two patients had third cleft abnormalities presenting as suppurative thyroiditis. The final two patients had fourth cleft abnormalities causing intraoperative management problems. Branchial cleft remnants and anomalies are rare but may occur in association with thyroid disease. They may pose a diagnostic and management dilemma either preoperatively, when mistaken for metastatic thyroid cancer, or intraoperatively when mistaken for a thyroid nodule.

  7. Financial impact of outpatient clinic radioiodine therapy with sodium iodide I-131 for the treatment of patients with differentiated low-risk thyroid carcinoma in relation to hospital doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenguer, P.F.; Chang, T.M.C.; Silva, R.A.M.; Neto, A.H.D.; Belo, I.B.; Santos, M.A.P.

    2017-01-01

    Differential thyroid carcinoma (CDT) is the most prevalent endocrine malignancy in the world, with an excellent prognosis and a 10-year survival rate of over 95%. By 2013, the lowest activity of I-131 authorized by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) in the therapy of patients with low-risk CDT was 3,700 MBq, requiring hospitalization. Recent studies have shown similar effectiveness between low and high doses of I-131 in the treatment of low-risk CDT. In 2014, the Ministry of Health included in the list of SUS procedures the use of lower activities (1,110 MBq and 1,850 MBq) for this purpose. The Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) also authorized the outpatient use of activity up to 1,850 MBq of I-131. Objective: To evaluate the financial impact of the adoption of ambulatory radioiodine therapy in patients with CDT of low-risk when compared to the hospital dose. Methods: Analysis of patients with CDT low-risk who were treated with an outpatient dose of I-131 from August / 2014 to January / 2017 at a nuclear medicine service in Recife, PE, Brazil. The cost of outpatient versus hospital doses was calculated. Results: A total of 289 patients underwent low doses of iodine therapy were evaluated, resulting in a savings of R$227,793.80. Conclusion: Outpatient radioiodine therapy in the treatment of patients with CDT of low-risk resulted in a 61.10% reduction in SUS expense, in addition to enabling faster care

  8. Efeitos da radioiodoterapia nas gerações futuras de mulheres com carcinoma diferenciado de tireóide Radioiodine therapy effects on offspring of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Dolores Gonçalves Brandão

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available A radioiodoterapia tem conseguido desempenhar um papel significante no tratamento do carcinoma diferenciado de tireóide. A literatura é limitada em relação a possíveis efeitos secundários do 131I, embora o interesse tenha aumentado nesse campo. A importância de se saber mais sobre os efeitos mutagênicos da radiação em filhos de mães expostas ao 131I para tratamento do carcinoma diferenciado de tireóide é devida à possibilidade de ocorrência de abortos, anormalidades genéticas e aparecimento de malignidades nas crianças. Nesta revisão da literatura vários estudos têm demonstrado a segurança desse tipo de tratamento em mulheres na idade fértil, sendo apenas aconselhadas a evitar gravidez pelo período de, pelo menos, um ano após a administração da radioiodoterapia.Radioiodine therapy has attained a significant role in the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer. The literature addressing possible secondary effects of 131I is limited, although there has been increasingly interest in this field. A more comprehensive understanding of the mutagenic effects of radiation on the offspring of women exposed to 131I is mandatory in view of the possibility of occurrence of miscarriages, congenital abnormalities and malignancies in these children. In this review, we found that many reports on safety of this type of treatment in female patients in reproductive age recommend that pregnancy should be avoided for at least one year after therapeutic administration of radioiodine.

  9. Thyroid disorders in patients with chronic hepatitis C using interferon-alpha and ribavirin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Jesuino de Oliveira Andrade

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the frequency of thyroid disorders (TD in patients with chronic hepatitis C before and during interferon-alpha (IFN-α and ribavirin (RIB treatment. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We prospectively studied 65 anti-HCV and viral RNA positive patients. Free thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO-Ab were systematically tested at entry (m0, week 12 (m3 and week 24 (m6 of treatment. RESULTS: Mean age of the 65 patients (38 females and 27 males was 49.61 ± 11.83 years. Seven (10.76% patients presented baseline thyroid disorders (m0, three had thyroid dysfunction, and four were TPO-Ab positive. Thyroid disorders occurred in the first 12 weeks of treatment in 11 (16.92% patients, four with thyroid dysfunction, and seven with TPO-Ab positive (m3. A total of 18 patients (27.69% developed TD after 24 weeks of treatment, 7 with thyroid dysfunction, and 11 with TPO-Ab positive (m6. The relative risk of developing hypothyroidism found in this study was 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1 to 1.6, hyperthyroidism 1.2 (95% CI: 1.1 to 1.4, and TPO-Ab positivity 7.6 (95% CI: 3.9 to 14.5. The study showed a significant association between female sex and thyroid disease (p = 0.009. CONCLUSION: Thyroid dysfunction and autoimmune TD were observed during IFN-α and RIB therapy.

  10. Frequency of thyroid disorders during interferon and ribavirin therapy in chronic hepatitis C infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masood, N.; Memon, A.; Memon, S.; Jaffri, M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the frequency of thyroid dysfunction in response to combination of interferon and ribavirin therapy in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients and HCV outcome. One hundred cases of CHC, proven by anti-HCV and HCV RNA-positive with baseline TSH, FT4 and FT3 within the normal reference range, who were treated with interferon alpha-2b (3 million unit subcutaneously three times per week) and oral ribavirin (1000-1200 mg per day) were included in this study. All patients were assessed for TSH, FT4, FT3 levels at 12 weeks and 24 weeks during therapy. Among the 100 patients, overt thyroid disease developed in 13 (13%) and sub-clinical thyroid disease in 5 (5%). Out of 13 patients of overt thyroid disorders, 11 (84.6%) had hypothyroidism and 02 (15.3%) hyperthyroidism. Four (80%) patients were of sub-clinical hypothyroidism and 01 (20%) patient was of sub-clinical hyperthyroidism. Overall, thyroid disorders developed in 18 (18%) both as overt and sub-clinical thyroid disorders. Ninety one (91%) patients became negative by HCV RNA. Treatment of HCV with IFN-alpha and ribavirin can be safely continued in patients with over and sub clinical hypothyroidism because thyroid disease responds well to treatment. (author)

  11. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People Who Were Treated with hGH Thyroid Disease & Pregnancy Thyroid disease is a group of disorders that ... prescribes. What role do thyroid hormones play in pregnancy? Thyroid hormones are crucial for normal development of ...

  12. Epidemiological trends of iodine-related thyroid disorders: an example from Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaberšček, Simona; Zaletel, Katja

    2016-06-01

    The epidemiology of thyroid disorders is significantly associated with iodine supply. In 1999, Slovenia increased iodine content in kitchen salt from 10 mg to 25 mg of potassium iodide per kg of salt. According to the WHO criteria, Slovenia shifted from a mildly iodine-deficient country to a country with adequate iodine intake. Ten years after the increase in iodine intake, the incidence of diffuse goitre and thyroid autonomy decreased. Now patients with diffuse goitre and thyroid autonomy reach older age than the patients before the increase in iodine intake. In addition, patients with thyroid autonomy are less frequently hyperthyroid than ten years ago and iodine-induced hyperthyroidism is less severe. The incidence of highly malignant thyroid carcinoma has also dropped. However, the incidence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis increased, most probably in genetically predisposed individuals. Over the last ten years, many animal and in vitro studies evaluated the effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) on various aspects of the thyroid function. They mostly studied the effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dioxins, brominated flame retardants, phthalates, bisphenol A, perfluorinated chemicals, and perchlorate. However, human studies on the effects of EDCs on the thyroid function are very scarce, especially the long-term ones. What they do suggest is that PCBs and dioxins interfere with the transport of thyroid hormones and adversely affect the thyroid function. Many authors agree that iodine deficiency predisposes the thyroid gland to harmful effects of EDCs. Therefore the effects of EDCs in iodine-deficient areas could be more severe than in areas with adequate iodine intake.

  13. Statistical study on the thyroid disorders on Sudanese female undergoing in vitro investigations in Khartoum state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albaba, O. S. A.

    2002-10-01

    In this study 711 Sudanese female have been analyzed for thyroid function. Thyroid related hormones were measured thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). The study had been held during one complete year. The female subjects were referred to Sudan Atomic Energy Commission radioimmunoassay laboratory from different hospitals in Khartoum state. The age of females varied from less than one year up to 70 years. The age was divided into 10 years interval in order to study the dominants thyroid disorder in each interval. Statistical package for social science (SPSS) program was used in the study as data analysis tool, the clear observation from this study was the high incidence of disorders among the age between 20 up to 40 years. (Author)

  14. Immunogenic hyperthyroidism following radioiodine ablation of focal autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boddenberg, B.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H.

    1993-01-01

    Immunogenic hyperthyroidism rarely develops after radioiodine elimination of focal autonomous thyroid tissue. We observed this phenomenon in 8 patients between 1989 and 1992. The occurrence of immunogenic hyperthyroidism shortly after elimination of autonomous nodules has not been studied nor is it properly understood. Most studies known today describe the development of autonomous nodules in the course of immunogenic hyperthyroidism or ignore the chronologic order of occurrence. The possibility that immunogenic hyperthyroidism may occur after radioiodine therapy of autonomous nodules, makes a consequent follow-up within the first year following radioiodine therapy mandatory. (orig.) [de

  15. Clinical research of juvenile hyperthyroidism treatment with radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Ling; Zhang Chunying; Chen Yue

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects and side effects in the radioiodine management of juvenile hyperthyroidism. Methods: 80 patients with poor effects using anti-thyroid drug were assigned to receive 131 I therapy. The follows of therapy outcome were assessed 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after the start of treatment. One follows up per 1-3 years. Results: Among 80 patients followed by 6 months, clinical response was excellent in 65 patients (81%), good in 15 (19%). There were 12 patients with hypothyroidism followed 4 years, and with no other side effects. Conclusion: The good therapeutic effect was obtained in radioiodine treatment for juvenile hyperthyroidism. Radioiodine was effective to juvenile hyperthyroidism

  16. The effect of lithium on thyroid function in patients with bipolar disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Kraszewska, Agnieszka; Abramowicz, Maria; Chłopocka-Woźniak, Maria; Sowiński, Jerzy; Rybakowski, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    Since 1963 lithium treatment has been the best proven long-term pharmacotherapy for bipolar disorder (BD), both in the prevention of depressive and manic episodes, along with the reduction of the suicide risk. Thyroid gland and the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis play a role in the pathophysiology, clinical course and treatment of BD. The influence of lithium on the thyroid gland is one of the key side effects in the long-term therapy with this drug. Lithium is accumulated in the th...

  17. STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL DISORDERS OF THE THYROID GLAND IN DIFFERENT TYPES OF LARYNGEAL CANCER TREATMENT

    OpenAIRE

    I. N. Vorozhtsova; M. R. Mukhamedov; M. A. Cherkasova; V. N. Latypova

    2014-01-01

    The thyroid gland is an important endocrine organ, which has a significant influence on human organism from the perinatal period and throughout the whole life, participating in the regulation of metabolism. The most common variant of thyroid dysfunction is hypothyroidism, which causes different disorders in various organs and systems, including psycho-emotional sphere. This can burden comorbidities and particularly malignant processes.Laryngeal cancer is the most common type of head and neck ...

  18. What is the real significance and management of major thyroid disorders in bipolar patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Pilar; Cámara, Rosa; Tobella, Helena; Livianos, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid disfunction affects negatively emotional stability and worsens the clinical course of bipolar affective disorder. The main stabilizer used in this illness, lithium carbonate has numerous effects on the physiology of the thyroid, with the most significant being the inhibition of thyroid hormone release that may occur at therapeutic levels. These dysfunctions have also been reported most frequently in bipolar patients not undergoing treatment with lithium, and was not completely explained by the effects of this drug. Apart from the numerous medical complications and mood disturbances, the cognitive or perceptual system may also be affected. In fact, the presence of thyroid disease increases the rates of obsessive compulsive disorder, phobias, panic disorder, major depressive disorder, cyclothymia, or bipolar disorder. In severe cases of hypothyroidism, the clinical symptoms and signs can be similar to a melancholic depression or dementia. It is therefore important to know well all these possible complications in daily clinical practice. This review will cover the main thyroid dysfunctions present in bipolar patients, whether ot not produced by treatment with lithium carbonate, and will provide a series of recommendations for clinical management. Copyright © 2013 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Thyroid disorders and the prevalence of antithyroid antibodies in Shiraz population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Fariba; Kalantarhormozi, Mohammad Reza; Dabbaghmanesh, Mohammad Hossein; Ranjbar Omrani, Gholamhossein

    2014-05-01

    Thyroid dysfunction is a common health problem affecting millions of patients worldwide. Autoimmune thyroid disorders are among the most common autoimmune disorders. In this population-based study, we assessed the prevalence of abnormal thyroid function, antithyroid antibodies and the probable relationship between them in Shiraz, southern Iran. Serum thyrotropin (TSH) was determined in 981 subjects (66.8% female and 33.2% male; mean age: 39.1 ± 14.3 years), who were selected with stratified random sampling. Because of the preponderance of females over males, we performed the statistical analyses using sex-weighted data (50% for each sex). Also, antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb), and antithyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) were measured in two random subgroups of 376 and 537 patients respectively). Thyromegaly detected on physical examination. In this cross-sectional study, 8.1% of participants had elevated serum TSH level and 3.4% had low serum TSH level. A statistically significant relationship was found between gender and thyromegaly and TSH values. Positive TPOAb and positive TgAb were detected in 17% and 5.1% of participants respectively. In addition, a significant relationship was observed between elevated TSH levels and positive results for both antibodies. Detectable levels of thyroid antibodies correlated with female sex, while no correlation was observed between detectable levels of thyroid antibodies and thyromegaly. Thyroid disorders, especially elevated TSH level, are common. It seems that autoimmune mechanisms are strongly involved in the etiology of hypothyroidism in this area.

  20. Radioiodine therapy of hyperthyroidism at 25 years experience in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Trong Khoa; Phan Sy An; Phan Van Duyet; Tran Dinh Ha

    2004-01-01

    prevalence of hypothyroidism according to the doses of I-131 received (p > 0.05). No occurring thyroid nodules was detected on thyroid scintigrams and echosonograms of all patients. Before and after (3 months - 3 years) I-131 therapy the mean thyroid volume reduction was 66.1%. TSH receptor antibodies (TRAb) are recognized as cause of organ-specific autoimmune disorder in Graves' disease. So the long-term effects of 131 I treatment for Graves' disease on TRAb have been studied in Vietnam. The TRAb values decreased over a period of more than 2 years after 131I therapy for Graves' disease, and the TRAb values (negative or positive) before treatment may influence the long- term outcome of 1311 therapy. The overall success rate of therapy, recognized as the permanent resolution of hyperthyroidism was 98.7 % with 94.4% achieving resolution in not more than 2 dose.The main problem with radioiodine treatment is hypothyroidism and this is easily managed with L-thyroxine. In summary, radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism is safe, inexpensive and efficacious in Vietnam. (authors)

  1. Reducing the transfer of radioiodine to milk in cows by adding stable iodine to the forage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, P.; Voigt, G.

    1999-05-01

    The publication reports the activities for the study and explains the measured results achieved. The usefulness of stable iodine administration to cows for reducing radioiodine transfer to the milk is explained. It was found that enhanced stable radioiodine doses have an effect on the iodine metabolism of dairy cows that has to be taken into account. Initially, a literature study was carried out, which then served as a basis for defining subsequent study objectives and experiments. The evaluation of the results yields information about the effects of stable iodine on the radioiodine transfer, as well as the metabolic pathways of iodine in dairy cows. In order to achieve a clear transfer reducing effect (by a factor of 2), doses of 1g/d have to be fed to a cow. This dose will lead to a stable iodine concentration in the milk of about 10 mg/kg. The WHO recommends a daily maximum dose of 0.5 mg of stable iodine in order to safely prevent adverse health effects in man. Ingestion of more than 2 mg/d may induce in man thyroid disorders and other metabolic disorders. In some countries, the reference level for dairy milk accepted is 0.5 mg of iodine/kg of milk. (orig./CB) [de

  2. The optimal time of discontinuing methimazole before radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moosavi, Z.; Zakavi, R.

    2001-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a common disease and one of the best methods for its treatment is radioiodine therapy with Treatment with antithyroid drugs brings patients to euthyroidism before radioiodine therapy. Antithyroid drugs should be discontinued before radioiodine therapy to increase thyroid uptake. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal time of methimazole discontinuation. One hundred eighty four patients, who were referred for radioiodine therapy were classified in 3 groups according to the duration of methimazole discontinuation before thyroid uptake (RAIU) measurement. Group 1,2 and 3 were patients who discontinued methimazole (48-72 h rs), (72-120 h rs) and more than 120 h rs before RAIU measurement, respectively. Mean thyroid uptake in group 1, 2 and 3 was (64±151.1%), (60.1±14.1%) and (59.3±12.8), respectively. No significant difference was noted in thyroid uptake between these groups (F= 1.83, P<0.16). This study shows that 48-72 h rs of methimazole discontinuation before radioiodine therapy is enough and longer term abstention is not associated with higher uptake

  3. Thyroid nodule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenney, J.F.

    1975-01-01

    A palpable mass or nodule may represent any one of a large and diverse group of conditions that involve the thyroid. Whether the patient is euthyroid, hypothyroid, or hyperthyroid can be assessed, and the cause of hypofunction or hyperfunction can usually be determined. Scintiscanning provides important information on the anatomic structure of thyroid nodules. A hot nodule should be ablated by either radioiodine or surgery. A warm nodule usually responds to suppression therapy; if regression does not occur, the problem should be reevaluated. A cold nodule should be surgically excised, as microscopic study of such a lesion is mandatory

  4. Long-lived radioiodine in Japanese environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, R.; Watanabe, M.; Kurihara, K.

    2000-01-01

    The amount of long-lived radioiodine, 129 I (half-life 1.57 x 10 7 y) in the Japanese environment has been studied by measuring thyroids of humans and animals. The collected samples thyroids of (1) humans in Ibaraki Prefecture, in Kanto district, the central part of Japan, (2) cattle in Aomori Prefecture, north part of Japan, and (3) wild deer in Chiba Prefecture, in Kanto district. The measured mean isotopic ratio 129 I/ 127 I for thyroids of cattle in Aomori Prefecture is 3.5 ± 1.8 x 10 -9 . A higher value of 14 ± 5 x 10 -9 has been obtained for thyroids of wild deer in Kanto district. On the other hand, the measured ratio for human thyroids in Kanto district is 1 ± 0.2 x 10 -9 . This value is significantly lower than that of cattle thyroids in Aomori and also those reported for human thyroids in Europe and USA. The higher mean ratio for cattle thyroid in Kanto district is possibly explained by the influence of nuclear reprocessing plant. Lower mean ratio for human thyroid might be due to higher dietary intake of algae. (author)

  5. Bilateral breast uptake of radioiodine in a male patient with gynecomastia: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uslu, Lebriz; Ozbayrak, Mustafa; Vatankulu, Betul; Sonmezoglu, Kerim

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old male patient with papillary thyroid carcinoma was given radioiodine for the treatment of persistent disease. Post radioiodine whole body scan revealed uptake at the thyroidal region and bilateral uptake at the upper thoracic region. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) confirmed uptake at the left thyroid lobe, and additional symmetrical mammary gland uptake was observed at both breasts. The patient had obesity-related gynecomastia, but he did not have any history of breast cancer, mastitis, hyperprolactinemia, or galactorrhea. Although breast uptake of radioiodine is a common finding in postpartum or lactating women, it is uncommon in male patients. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a male patient with breast uptake of radioiodine documented with SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT is useful in male patients in the differentiation of benign breast uptake with lung metastases or axillary metastases of thyroid cancer

  6. Hormonal causes of male sexual dysfunctions and their management (hyperprolactinemia, thyroid disorders, GH disorders, and DHEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Mario; Buvat, Jaques; Corona, Giovanni; Guay, André; Torres, Luiz Otavio

    2013-03-01

    Besides hypogonadism, other endocrine disorders have been associated with male sexual dysfunction (MSD). To review the role of the pituitary hormone prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), thyroid hormones, and adrenal androgens in MSD. A systematic search of published evidence was performed using Medline (1969 to September 2011). Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine-Levels of Evidence (March 2009) was applied when possible. The most important evidence regarding the role played by PRL, GH, thyroid, and adrenal hormone was reviewed and discussed. Only severe hyperprolactinemia (>35 ng/mL or 735 mU/L), often related to a pituitary tumor, has a negative impact on sexual function, impairing sexual desire, testosterone production, and, through the latter, erectile function due to a dual effect: mass effect and PRL-induced suppression on gonadotropin secretion. The latter is PRL-level dependent. Emerging evidence indicates that hyperthyroidism is associated with an increased risk of premature ejaculation and might also be associated with erectile dysfunction (ED), whereas hypothyroidism mainly affects sexual desire and impairs the ejaculatory reflex. However, the real incidence of thyroid dysfunction in subjects with sexual problems needs to be evaluated. Prevalence of ED and decreased libido increase in acromegalic patients; however, it is still a matter of debate whether GH excess (acromegaly) may create effects due to a direct overproduction of GH/insulin-like growth factor 1 or because of the pituitary mass effects on gonadotropic cells, resulting in hypogonadism. Finally, although dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate have been implicated in a broad range of biological derangements, controlled trials have shown that DHEA administration is not useful for improving male sexual function. While the association between hyperprolactinemia and hypoactive sexual desire is well defined, more studies are needed to completely understand the role of other hormones in

  7. Transient psychosis due to painless thyroiditis in a patient with anxiety disorder: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Nobuyuki

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There are few reports on thyrotoxic psychosis caused by diseases other than Graves' disease or toxic nodular goiter. Case presentation A 64-year-old Japanese woman was treated for anxiety disorder in our clinic for 10 years. She had five episodes of transient psychosis during the first five years. When she developed psychosis without neck pain 10 years after her first visit, a laboratory reexamination revealed that she had subclinical hyperthyroidism, and tested positive for antithyroid autoantibodies, negative for thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibody and had decreased radioactive iodine uptake. She was diagnosed as having painless thyroiditis. The hyperthyroidism disappeared within a month, and the psychosis lasted for three months. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of psychosis due to painless thyroiditis-induced hyperthyroidism. Physical symptoms of painless thyroiditis are often so mild that careful differential diagnosis is necessary in the cases of transient psychosis.

  8. Thyroid remnant ablation using 1,110 MBq of I-131 after total thyroidectomy. Regulatory considerations on release of patients after unsealed radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusakabe, Kiyoko; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Ito, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to measure the radiation exposure level of caregivers following outpatient NaI (I-131) 1,110 MBq therapy for remnant thyroid ablation after total thyroidectomy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, and to evaluate the influence of activities of daily living on radiation exposure level, with the goal of proposing an optimum method of I-131 therapy. The study included 37 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, who had undergone total thyroidectomy and received outpatient based remnant thyroid ablation using NaI (I-131) 1,110 MBq, who were satisfying the following requirements: patients who have no evidence of distant metastases, whose living environments were appropriate for outpatient I-131 (1,110 MBq) therapy, and patients who gave written informed consent. The dose rate at a distance of 1 m from the body surface of the patient at the moment of release was measured using survey meters of the GM type or ionization chamber type. The dose level for the caregiver was measured with a personal dosimeter in all cases. The dose rate at a distance of 1 m from the patient's body surface 1 h after I-131 administration was in the range of 29-115 μSv/h (mean 63.8 μSv/h). The 7-day cumulative effective dose of caregivers was 0.11±0.08 mSv, on an average, in 34 dosimeters. In 31 of 34 dosimeters, cumulative effective dose of caregivers was below 0.2 mSv. Dose levels exceeding 0.2 mSv were recorded in 3 cases (0.21, 0.35 and 0.43 mSv in one case each). These results suggest that the exposure level of family members (caregiver and others) was minimal and is lower than the radiation levels affecting human environments. Outpatient-based remnant thyroid ablation with I-131 (1,110 MBq) performed after total thyroidectomy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer is safe if applied in accordance with the appropriate supervision and guidance by experts with certain qualifications. (author)

  9. Comparison of imaging modalities for diagnosis of thyroid disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfannenstiel, P.; Hirsch, H.; Stein, N.; Maier, R.; Meindl, S.; Voges, K.; Willmann, L.

    1984-01-01

    From 4-1-1980 to 3-30-1983 in more than 10000 patients scanning of the thyroid was performed by a rectiliniear scanner and predominantly by a gamma-camera using a special collimator and a data processing unit for evaluation of global and regional uptake of sup(99m)TcO 4 or 123 I. The functional scans were compared with the structural information provided by real-time ultrasonography of the thyroid, employing in questionable cases specially developed computer aided pattern recognition methods. Other modalities as a multiwire camera, X-ray fluorescence, CT-imaging, NMR-tomography were also evaluated in selected cases. From the data a diagnostic strategy for the use of imaging modalities to diagnose thyroid diseases was derived. (orig.) [de

  10. Vascular and renal function in experimental thyroid disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Félix; Moreno, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez-Gómez, Isabel; Wangensteen, Rosemary; Osuna, Antonio; Alvarez-Guerra, Miriam; García-Estañ, Joaquín

    2006-02-01

    This review focuses on the effects of thyroid hormones in vascular and renal systems. Special emphasis is given to the mechanisms by which thyroid hormones affect the regulation of body fluids, vascular resistance and, ultimately, blood pressure. Vascular function is markedly affected by thyroid hormones that produce changes in vascular reactivity and endothelial function in hyper- and hypothyroidism. The hypothyroid state is accompanied by a marked decrease in sensitivity to vasoconstrictors, especially to sympathetic agonists, alteration that may play a role in the reduced blood pressure of hypothyroid rats, as well as in the preventive effects of hypothyroidism on experimental hypertension. Moreover, in hypothyroid rats, the endothelium-dependent and nitric oxide donors vasodilation is reduced. Conversely, the vessels from hyperthyroid rats showed an increased endothelium-dependent responsiveness that may be secondary to the shear-stress induced by the hyperdynamic circulation, and that may contribute to the reduced vascular resistance characteristic of this disease. Thyroid hormones also have important effects in the kidney, affecting renal growth, renal haemodynamics, and salt and water metabolism. In hyperthyroidism, there is a resetting of the pressure-natriuresis relationship related to hyperactivity of the renin-angiotensin system, which contributes to the arterial hypertension associated with this endocrine disease. Moreover, thyroid hormones affect the development and/or maintenance of various forms of arterial hypertension. This review also describes recent advances in our understanding of thyroid hormone action on nitric oxide and oxidative stress in the regulation of cardiovascular and renal function and in the long-term control of blood pressure.

  11. The risk for cancer and genetic abnormalities after radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, C.

    1997-01-01

    According to recent studies, the risk for thyroid cancer is not increased after radioiodine treatment in patients with hyperthyroidism. Only the risk of cancer of the stomach seems to be increased slightly in patents treated with I-131 because of functional autonomy. However, the risk for gastric cancer is not increased after higher activities of I-131 because of thyroid cancer. There is no increased risk for genetic abnormalities after radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism. (orig.) [de

  12. Immuno-PET of undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma with radioiodine-labelled antibody cMAb U36: application to antibody tumour uptake studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortin, Marc-Andre [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec and Laval University, Laboratory for Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Quebec City (Canada); Uppsala University, Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Oncology, Radiology, and Clinical Immunology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden); Salnikov, Alexei V. [Uppsala University, BMC, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala (Sweden); German Cancer Research Center, Division of Molecular Immunology, Heidelberg (Germany); Nestor, Marika [Uppsala University, Division of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Heldin, Nils-Erik [Uppsala University, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden); Rubin, Kristofer [Uppsala University, BMC, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Lundqvist, Hans [Uppsala University, Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Oncology, Radiology, and Clinical Immunology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2007-09-15

    We tested the suitability of the chimeric monoclonal anti-human CD44 splice version 6 antibody (cMAb U36) for targeting and visualising human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma with PET. We also performed experiments aimed at elucidating the relation between tumour interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) and the tumour uptake of antibodies. The affinity and specificity of the cMAb U36 for KAT-4 cells were evaluated in vitro, as was the Na{sup +}/I{sup -} symporter (NIS) expression. Biodistribution studies were performed on KAT-4 carcinoma-bearing mice injected with {sup 124}I-cMAb U36 or free iodine. Biodistribution studies were also performed in animals treated with the specific TGF-{beta}1 and -{beta}3 inhibitor Fc:T{beta}RII, which lowers TIFP. Treated and non-treated animals were scanned by microPET. Cultured human undifferentiated/anaplastic thyroid carcinoma KAT-4 cells expressed low levels of NIS and uptake of free iodine was insignificant. The cMAb U36 expressed an affinity (K{sub D}) of 11 {+-} 2 nM. Tumour radioactivity uptake reached maximum values 48 h after injection of {sup 124}I-cMAb U36 ({proportional_to}22%IA/g). KAT-4 carcinomas were readily identified in all {sup 124}I-immuno-PET images. Radioactivity tumour uptake in Fc:T{beta}RII-treated animals was significantly lower at 24 and 48 h after injection, and five times higher thyroid uptake was also noted. We successfully used {sup 124}I-cMAb U36 to visualise CD44v6-expressing human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Given the lack of NIS expression in KAT-4, tumour visualisation is not due to free iodine uptake. Lowering the TIFP in KAT-4 carcinomas did not increase the uptake of mAbs into tumour tissue. (orig.)

  13. A Comparative Analysis Of Thyroid Disorders (Laboratory Features ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hyperthyroidism with substantial quantity of T3 toxicosis was however found to be high and comparable in both the areas. Conclusion: Adequate iodine intake through effective salt iodization programme is advocated to achieve good iodine status with low level of hypothyroidism. Keywords: Thyroidal dysfunction: Jos, Kano, ...

  14. Prognostic impact of incomplete surgical clearance of radioiodine sensitive local lymph node metastases diagnosed by post-operative {sup 124}I-NaI-PET/CT in patients with papillary thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabet, Amir; Binse, Ina; Grafe, Hong; Goerges, Rainer; Poeppel, Thorsten D.; Bockisch, Andreas; Rosenbaum-Krumme, Sandra J. [University Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Ezziddin, Samer [Saarland University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Homburg (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Nodal involvement is an independent risk factor of recurrence in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Neither the international guidelines nor the recently introduced ongoing risk adaptation concept consider the extent of initial surgical clearance of radioiodine sensitive lymph node metastases in their stratification systems. We investigated the prognostic relevance of incomplete initial surgical clearance in patients with purely lymphogeneous metastatic PTC (pN1 M0) despite successful radioiodine therapy. Accurate assessment of pre-ablative nodal status was attempted using PET/CT studies with both {sup 124}I-NaI and {sup 18}F-FDG along with high-resolution cervical ultrasound. Sixty-five patients with histologically diagnosed lymph node metastases (pN1 M0) were retrospectively analyzed. Patients with iodine-negative lymph node metastases diagnosed by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT or distant metastases were excluded from the analysis. The association of disease recurrence with the pre-ablative nodal status, as well as other baseline characteristics, were examined applying nonparametric tests for independent samples and multiple regression analysis. Patients with persistent lymph node metastases in {sup 124}I-NaI PET/CT were further divided according to the additional presence or absence of FDG-uptake in {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. Survival analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier curves and the Cox proportional hazards model for uni- and multivariate analyses to assess the influence of prognostic factors on progression free survival (PFS). Incomplete metastatic lymph node resection captured by {sup 124}I-NaI PET/CT (n = 33) was an independent risk factor for recurrence (61 % vs 25 %, p = 0.006) and shorter PFS (46 months vs not reached, HR 4.0 [95 %-CI, 1.7-9.2], p = 0.001). Ultrasound could detect lymph node metastases only in 19/33 patients (58 %). Among patients with positive nodal status, FDG-avidity of metastatic iodine positive lymph nodes worsened the outcome (16 vs 69

  15. Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders in Iranian Children: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Zamanfar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Type one diabetes mellitus (T1DM is an autoimmune disorder that is yet the most common type of diabetes in children and adolescents. Several genetic risk factors have been associated with T1DM, auto immune thyroiditis and other autoimmune disorder. Among autoimmune disorders, autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD is the most frequent disorder associated with T1DM. Its prevalence varies depending on age, sex and ethnic origin of the subjects and is considerably higher than the general population and increases with duration of T1DM. The aim of this study was to review the prevalence of ATD in Iranian children with T1DM compared with other countries. Evidence Acquisition: We conducted a review on all papers published on the association between autoimmune thyroiditis and T1DM, which was available on Google Scholar, Scientific Information Database (SID, Magiran and Iran Medex databases up to June 2014. Both Persian and English articles were checked. The searched terms were: diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroiditis, prevalence, frequency, Iranian children and adolescents. All papers which were done on patients with age under 20 years old and have used Anti-TPO and Anti-TG to evaluate patients were included. Results: Six papers met all the criteria. A total of 736 participants were included in this review. After review of all the papers, the prevalence of Anti-TPO was reported between 8% and 30% and Anti-TG was reported 6.06% to 23.6% in diabetic children in Iran. Conclusions: Autoimmune thyroid disorders are the most prevalent immunological diseases in patients with type 1 diabetes. All these studies have shown a higher prevalence of the disorder in patients with T1DM compared to the Iranian healthy population. Anti-TPO reported between 8% and 30% and Anti-TG reported 6.06% to 23.6% in diabetic children in Iran that was similar to the studies in other countries.

  16. Thyroid cancer after x-ray treatment of benign disorders of the cervical spine in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damber, Lena; Johansson, Lennart; Johansson, Robert; Larsson, Lars-Gunnar [Univ. Hospital, Umeaa (Sweden). Oncology Centre

    2002-02-01

    While there is very good epidemiological evidence for induction of thyroid cancer by radiation exposure in children, the risk for adults after exposure is still uncertain, especially when concerning relatively small radiation doses. A cohort of 27415 persons which in 1950 through 1964 had received x-ray treatment for various benign disorders in the locomotor system (such as painful arthrosis and spondylosis) was selected from three hospitals in Northern Sweden. A proportion of this cohort, consisting of 8144 persons (4075 men and 4069 women), had received treatment to the cervical spine and thereby received an estimated average dose in the thyroid gland of about 1 Gy. Standard incidence rates (SIR) were calculated by using the Swedish Cancer Register. In the cervical spine cohort, 22 thyroid cancers were found versus 13.77 expected (SIR 1.60; CI 1.00-2.42). The corresponding figures for women were 16 observed cases versus 9.60 expected cases (SIR 1.67; CI 0.75-2.71). Most thyroid cancers (15 out of 22) were diagnosed >15 years after the exposure. In the remaining part of the total cohort, i.e. those without cervical spine exposure, no increased risk of thyroid cancer was found (SIR 0.98; CI 0.64-1.38). The study strongly suggests that external radiation exposure of adults at relatively small doses increases the risk of thyroid cancer but also that this increase is very much lower than that reported after exposure in children.

  17. Thyroid cancer after x-ray treatment of benign disorders of the cervical spine in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damber, Lena; Johansson, Lennart; Johansson, Robert; Larsson, Lars-Gunnar

    2002-01-01

    While there is very good epidemiological evidence for induction of thyroid cancer by radiation exposure in children, the risk for adults after exposure is still uncertain, especially when concerning relatively small radiation doses. A cohort of 27415 persons which in 1950 through 1964 had received x-ray treatment for various benign disorders in the locomotor system (such as painful arthrosis and spondylosis) was selected from three hospitals in Northern Sweden. A proportion of this cohort, consisting of 8144 persons (4075 men and 4069 women), had received treatment to the cervical spine and thereby received an estimated average dose in the thyroid gland of about 1 Gy. Standard incidence rates (SIR) were calculated by using the Swedish Cancer Register. In the cervical spine cohort, 22 thyroid cancers were found versus 13.77 expected (SIR 1.60; CI 1.00-2.42). The corresponding figures for women were 16 observed cases versus 9.60 expected cases (SIR 1.67; CI 0.75-2.71). Most thyroid cancers (15 out of 22) were diagnosed >15 years after the exposure. In the remaining part of the total cohort, i.e. those without cervical spine exposure, no increased risk of thyroid cancer was found (SIR 0.98; CI 0.64-1.38). The study strongly suggests that external radiation exposure of adults at relatively small doses increases the risk of thyroid cancer but also that this increase is very much lower than that reported after exposure in children

  18. Effect of Ecklonia kurome extract on thyroid hormone disorder in rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Ecklonia kurome extract on thyroid hormone disorder in rats. Wen-bo ... Results: T3 and T4 serum levels in mice decreased after the administration of EKE. The relative ... mg/kg) group, and various concentrations of ... to the peroxidation of membrane lipids, according .... peripheral tissues by outer ring mono-.

  19. Treatment of thyroid disorders before conception and in early pregnancy: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissenberg, R.; van den Boogaard, E.; van Wely, M.; van der Post, J. A.; Fliers, E.; Bisschop, P. H.; Goddijn, M.

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid disorders are associated with pregnancy complications. Universal screening is currently not recommended because of a lack of evidence on the effectiveness of treatment. Women with hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism evidently require treatment but this is less clear for women with subclinical

  20. Thyroid function disorders--Guidelines of the Netherlands Association of Internal Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, A. F.; Berghout, A.; Wiersinga, W. M.; Kooy, A.; Smits, J. W. A.; Hermus, A. R. M. M.

    2008-01-01

    Thyroid function disorders are common with a female to male ratio of 4 to 1. In adult women primary hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis have a prevalence of 3.5/1000 and 0.8/1000, respectively. This guideline is aimed at secondary care providers especially internists, but also contains relevant

  1. Endogenous subclinical thyroid disorders, physical and cognitive function, depression, and mortality in older individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, R.T.; Lips, P.T.A.M.; van Schoor, N.M.; Rijs, K.J.; Deeg, D.J.H.; Comijs, H.C.; Kramer, M.H.H.; Vandenbroucke, J.P.; Dekkers, O.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To what extent endogenous subclinical thyroid disorders contribute to impaired physical and cognitive function, depression, and mortality in older individuals remains a matter of debate. Design: A population-based, prospective cohort of the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam. Methods: TSH

  2. Is autoimmune thyroiditis part of the genetic vulnerability (or an endophenotype) for bipolar disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, Ronald; van der Schot, Astrid C.; Kahn, Rene S.; Nolen, Willem A.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Both genetic and environmental factors are involved in the etiology of bipolar disorder; however, biological markers for the transmission of the bipolar genotype ("endophenotypes") have not been found. Autoimmune thyroiditis with raised levels of thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPO-Abs) is

  3. Application of radiopharmaceuticals in iodine disorder studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajurkar, N.S.

    2015-01-01

    Iodine is an essential trace element and is of much interest in nutritional research. It is essential for the production of the hormones in the thyroid gland. However, deficiency or excess of iodine can cause disorders, commonly known as iodine disorders. Total quantity of iodine present in the body is 15-20 mg, mostly in thyroid gland and the safe and adequate intake of iodine is in the range of 50-200 μg.d -1 . Most of the iodine taken from food is accumulated in thyroid glands which plays a vital role in the well being as it controls growth and metabolism. In some people gland becomes over active (hyper thyroiditis) and in some people gland becomes sluggish (hypo thyroiditis). However, both the conditions are unhealthy and lead to serious consequences. The condition can be detected and treated with the help of radioiodine

  4. Design of patient rooms and automatic radioiodine-131 waste water management system for a thyroid cancer treatment ward: ‘Suandok model’

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilasdechanon, N; Ua-apisitwong, S; Chatnampet, K; Ekmahachai, M; Vilasdechanon, J

    2014-01-01

    The great benefit of 131 I radionuclide treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) was acknowledged by the long survival rate. The main requirements for 131 I therapy in hospital were treatment facilities and a radiation safety plan that assured radiation protection and safety to patient, hospital worker, public, and environment. Objective: To introduce the concepts and methods of radiation safety design for a patient’s room in a 131 I treatment ward and a system of radioactive waste water management in hospital. Methods: The design was based on principles of external and internal radiation protection for unsealed source and radioactive waste management. Planning for treatment facilities was concluded from clinical evidence, physical and physiological information for 131 I, radiation safety criteria, hospital resources and budget. The three phases of the working process were: construction, software development, and radiation safety assessment. Results: The 131 I treatment facility and automatic radioactive waste water management system was completely implemented in 2009. The radiation waste water management system known as the ‘Suandok Model’ was highly recommended by the national regulator to hospitals who desire to provide 131 I treatment for thyroid cancer. In 2011, the Nuclear Medicine Division, Chiang Mai University was rewarded by the national authority for a very good radiation practice in development of safe working conditions and environment. Conclusion: The Suandok Model was a facility design that fulfilled requirements for the safe use of high radiation 131 I doses for thyroid cancer treatment in hospital. The facility presented in this study may not be suitable for all hospitals but the design concepts could be applied according to an individual hospital context and resources. People who use or gain benefit from radiation applications have to emphasise the responsibility to control and monitor radiation effects on individuals, communities

  5. Disseminated bone metastases from occult thyroid cancer effectively treated with debulking surgery and a single dosimetry-guided administration of radioiodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsò, Elisa; Boni, Giuseppe; Mazzarri, Sara; Cocciaro, Ardico; Gambacciani, Carlo; Traino, Antonio C; Manca, Giampiero; Grosso, Mariano; Scatena, Cristian; Ortenzi, Valerio; Vannozzi, Riccardo; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Rubello, Domenico; Mariani, Giuliano

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we report on a successful management of multiple bone metastases from differentiated thyroid cancer. In 2007, a 75-year-old female patient, previously referred for thyroidectomy for multinodular goiter, underwent surgical removal of a lumbar mass with histological findings of metastasis from well differentiated thyroid cancer. After surgery, serum thyroglobulin (sTg) was 204.4 ng/mL. A diagnostic/dosimetric (123)I WBS was performed, following stimulation by rTSH. Serial WBSs were acquired, along with SPECT/CT and bone scan for localization of lesions. sTg raised to 3.810 ng/mL, and (123)I WBS showed thyroid remnants and numerous areas with high iodine-uptake corresponding to skeletal sites, the two largest loading on the skull, with osteolytic pattern. Calculated radiation absorbed dose for skull lesions, determined by mean of MIRD methodology, was 63.5 mGy/MBq. The patient underwent surgical removal of the two major skull lesions. Successively, 100 mCi (131)I was administered after stimulation by rTSH, with stimulated sTg 297 ng/mL. After 8 months, diagnostic WBS was negative both for remnants and metastases and rTSH-stimulated Tg was 0.6 ng/mL. To date, the patient has maintained sTg values <1 ng/mL during L-T4 suppressive therapy and after rTSH stimulations. In this unusual case of extensive bone cancerous involvement with high iodine avidity, a multidisciplinary approach based on surgery and dosimetry-guided radiometabolic therapy allowed to accurately assess the patient, execute a small number of treatments and achieve a complete remission of the disease in a very short time, with no additive morbidity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  6. Quality of Life and Cost-Effectiveness Assessment of Radioiodine Ablation Strategies in Patients With Thyroid Cancer: Results From the Randomized Phase III ESTIMABL Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borget, Isabelle; Bonastre, Julia; Catargi, Bogdan; Déandréis, Désirée; Zerdoud, Slimane; Rusu, Daniela; Bardet, Stéphane; Leenhardt, Laurence; Bastie, Delphine; Schvartz, Claire; Vera, Pierre; Morel, Olivier; Benisvy, Daniele; Bournaud, Claire; Bonichon, Francoise; Kelly, Antony; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth; Leboulleux, Sophie; Journeau, Florence; Benhamou, Ellen; Schlumberger, Martin

    2015-09-10

    In the ESTIMABL phase III trial, the thyroid ablation rate was equivalent for the two thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) stimulation methods (thyroid hormone withdrawal [THW] and recombinant human TSH [rhTSH]) and the two iodine-131 ((131)I) activities (1.1 or 3.7 GBq). The objectives of this article were to present health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) results and a cost-effectiveness evaluation performed alongside this trial. HRQoL and utility were longitudinally assessed, from random assignment to the follow-up visit at 8 ± 2 months for the 752 patients with thyroid cancer, using the Short Form-36 and the EuroQoL-5D questionnaires, respectively. A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed from the societal perspective in the French context. Resource use (hospitalization for (131)I administration, rhTSH, sick leaves, and transportation) was collected prospectively. We used the net monetary benefit approach and computed cost-effectiveness acceptability curves for both TSH stimulation methods and (131)I activities. Sensitivity analyses of the costs of rhTSH were performed. At (131)I administration, THW caused a clinically significant deterioration of HRQoL, whereas HRQoL remained stable with rhTSH. This deterioration was transient with no difference 3 months later. rhTSH was more effective than THW in terms of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs; +0.013 QALY/patient) but more expensive (+€474/patient). The probability that rhTSH would be cost effective at a €50,000/QALY threshold was 47% in France. The use of 1.1 GBq of (131)I instead of 3.7 GBq reduced per-patient costs by €955 (US$1,018) but with slightly decreased efficacy (-0.007 QALY/patient). rhTSH avoids the transient THW-induced deterioration of HRQoL but is unlikely to be cost effective at its current price. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. Study on the incidence and etiology of subclinical thyroid function disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Jingxin; Xie Xiuhai; Huang Chenyang; Fu Junyan; Lu Weiguo; Chen Kejing

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the incidence and etiology of subclinical thyroid function disorders in 12592 subjects tested. Methods: The etiology of 874 patients with abnormal serum TSH (with IRMA) found in the tested 12592 patients, whose serum T 3 , T 4 , FT 3 , FT 4 , TSH, TGA and TMA were also detected with RIA was analyzed. Results: 874 of 12592 patients had abnormal TSH levels (6.94%). Among them, TSH was elevated in 397 patients (3.15%) and decreased in 477 patients (3.79%). Most of them were associated with obvious related thyroid or other thronic diseases such as hyperthyroidism after therapy, thyroxine replacement treatment of hypothyroidism and other thyroid diseases (thyroiditis, diffuse nontoxic goiter). In the remaining apparently disease-free 143 subjects, there were with subclinical hypothyroidism and 34 (3.89% of 874) with subclinical hyperthyroidism. Also among the 874 patients, 30.78% (n=269) patients had elevated TGA and TMA[16.82% (n=147) had elevated TSH and TGA, TMA simultaneously, 13.96% (n=122) had decreased TSH and elevated TGA and TMA simultaneously]. In the 874 patients, 256 (29.29%) were older than 60. Conclusion: Elderly people has higher incidence of subclinical thyroid function disorders. We should pay more attention to the detection of this condition, especially in elderly patients. (authors)

  8. Thyroid Nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peer Support Resources Diseases and Conditions Adrenal Disorders Osteoporosis and Bone Health Children and Teen Health Diabetes Heart Health Men's Health Rare Diseases Pituitary Disorders Thyroid Disorders Transgender Health Obesity and Weight Management Women's Health You and Your ...

  9. Results of radioiodine therapy using different radiation doses in patients suffering from immunogenic and non-immunogenic hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, E.

    1992-01-01

    During the past few years high rates of recidivation have increasingly been reported following drug treatment for hyperthyroidism. In view of these unsatisfactory results it is only natural that the use of surgery and ratioiodine treatment is now more often considered in order to achieve complete elimination of the metabolic disorders caused by hyperactivity of the thyroid gland. The aim of this study was to investigate into the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in a large cohort of patients (n = 925). Particular attention was given to the influence of the dose applied to the thyroid tissue on the rates of success achieved in immunogenic hyperthyroidism (IH) and autonomous disorders (non-immunogenic hyperthyroidism = NIH). (orig./GDG) [de

  10. Determination of Therapeutic Dose of I-131 for First High Dose Radioiodine Therapy in Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Comparison of Usefulness between Pathological Staging, Serum Thyroglobulin Level and Finding of I-123 Whole Body Scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Lim, Seok Tae; Youn, Hyun Jo; Sohn, Myung-Hee

    2008-01-01

    Recently, a number of patients needed total thyroidectomy and high dose radioiodine therapy (HD-RAI) get increased more. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether pathological staging (PS) and serum thyroglobulin (sTG) level could replace the diagnostic I-123 scan for the determination of therapeutic dose of HD-RAI in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Fifty eight patients (M:F=13;45, age 44.5±11.5 yrs) who underwent total thyroidectomy and central or regional lymph node dissection due to differentiated thyroid cancer were enrolled. Diagnostic scan of I-123 and sTG assay were also performed on off state of thyroid hormone. The therapeutic doses of I-131 (TD) were determined by the extent of uptakes on diagnostic I-123 scan as a gold standard. PS was graded by the criteria recommended in 6th edition of AJCC cancer staging manual except consideration of age. For comparison of the determination of therapeutic doses, PS and sTG were compared with the results of I-123 scan. All patients were underwent HD-RAI. Among them, five patients (8.6%) were treated with 100 mCi of I-131, forty three (74.1%) with 150 mCi, six (10.3%) with 180 mCi, three (5.2%) with 200 mCi, and one (1.7%) with 250 mCi, respectively. On the assessment of PS, average TDs were 154±25 mCi in stage I (n=9), 175±50 mCi in stage II (n=4), 149±21 mCi in stage III (n=38), and 161±20 mCi in stage IV (n=7). The statistical significance was not shown between PS and TD (p=0.169). Among fifty two patients who had available sTG, 25 patients (48.1%) having below 2 ng/mL of sTG were treated with 149±26 mCi of I-131, 9 patients (17.3%) having 2≤ sTG <5 ng/mL with 156±17 mCi, 5 patients (9.6%) having 5≤ sTG <10 ng/mL with 156±13 mCi, 7 patients (13.5%) having 10≤ sTG <50 ng/mL with 147±24 mCi, and 6 patients (11.5%) having above 50 ng/mL with 175±42 mCi. The statistical significance between sTG level and TD (p=0.252) was not shown. In conclusion, PS and sTG could not replace the

  11. 131I therapy of thyroid cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, C.; Farahati, J.

    1999-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a rare malignancy with wide inter ethnic and geographic variations. In Germany thyroid carcinoma is the 13. most frequent malignancy (2.7 new cases yearly per 100,000 inhabitants). The overall temporal incidence is increasing slightly in recent years. The most common types of cancer are papillary (60-80%) and follicular cancers (10-20%). The relevant prognostic indicators are tumor stage and distant metastases. The mean survival rates in papillary thyroid cancer usually exceed 90%, whereas in follicular thyroid cancer they amount to approximately 80%. The standard treatment procedure in differentiated papillary and follicular thyroid cancer consists of total thyroidectomy followed by adjuvant ablative therapy with radioiodine. Only in papillary thyroid cancer stage pT 1 N 0 M 0 lobectomy alone is considered to be appropriate. In patients with locally invasive differentiated thyroid cancers stage pT 4 adjuvant percutaneous radiation therapy is a treatment option. Radioiodine therapy has to be performed under the stimulative influence of TSH. Usually TSH suppressive medication with Levothyroxine has to be withdrawn approximately 4 weeks prior to radioiodine therapy. In the future, exogenous stimulation by recombinant TSH may be used instead of thyroid hormone withdrawal. It has been proved by different studies that ablative radioiodine therapy reduces the frequency of recurrences and tumor spread in patients with thyroid cancer significantly. In patients with distant metastases, up to 50% of complete responses may be achieved with radioiodine treatment

  12. Recurrent Silent Thyroiditis as a Sequela of Postpartum Thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Thyroiditis encompasses a group of disorders characterized by thyroid inflammation. Though clinically indistinguishable from silent thyroiditis, postpartum thyroiditis occurs in women within 12 months after delivery. Recurrent postpartum thyroiditis in subsequent pregnancies is common, but recurrent silent thyroiditis is rare. We reported a case of patient with recurrent episodes of thyroiditis, unrelated to pregnancy, after an episode of postpartum thyroiditis. It is of interest that postpartum thyroiditis and silent thyroiditis could occur closely to each other; however, the link between these disorders is not well established. This report is to remind physicians of the possibility of recurrent silent thyroiditis in women with a history of postpartum thyroiditis. PMID:24987536

  13. Thyroid cancer treatment : Long-term effects and new developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Hesselink, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is increasingly common. This is especially the case for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), which has a favorable prognosis. Treatment consists of surgical removal of the thyroid gland, radioiodine treatment, and life-long administration of relatively high doses of thyroid hormone.

  14. Hematologic long-term modifications after radio-iodine therapy in carcinoma of the thyroid gland. Pt. 2. Modifications of the bone marrow including leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenter, H H; Schober, O; Schwarzrock, R; Hundeshagen, H

    1987-07-01

    59 posttherapeutic examinations of the bone marrow have been performed in 35 patients out of a group of 296 patients treated from 1969 through 1976 by postoperative iodine-131 irradiations for carcinoma of the thyroid gland. Seven patients had normal findings, twelve patients showed panmyelopathy as principal finding, and fourteen patients presented modifications of the three marrow systems in differents degrees and combinations. Acute myeloid leukemia was demonstrated in two patients by examination of the bone marrow, in another case the same disease was diagnosed by an analysis of the peripheral blood count. Taking into account the dosimetric considerations of the authors and the three cases of leukemia observed within the total group of patients, a risk factor for leukemia of 7.0x10/sup -5/xrd/sup -1/ is calculated which is slightly higher than he leukemia induction rate communicated in literature (22/2646 patients; 1-2/100 000/rd/year).

  15. Silent Thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Peter

    1984-01-01

    Silent or painless thyroiditis is a frequent cause of transient hyperthyroidism, which is characterized by recent onset of symptoms in a patient with a normal to modestly enlarged and firm thyroid gland. The hallmarks of the disease are the absence of thyroidal pain or tenderness and a markedly reduced radioiodine uptake. Histologically, the gland is characterized by an important lymphocytic infiltration, occasionally to the point of lymphoid follicle formation. However, other indices of an autoimmune cause are usually absent. The disease appears to have a predilection for the postpartum period. Relapses may occur with subsequent pregnancies. Otherwise, the course is usually benign and transient, requiring moderate doses of β-adrenergic blocking agents for symptomatic relief. No pathogenetic factors are known, but the disease may conceivably have an autoimmune basis, particularly in the postpartum patient. PMID:21278944

  16. BRAF V600E mutation in papillary thyroid cancer and its effect on postoperative radioiodine (131I) therapy: Should we modify our therapeutic strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez Ayala, Maite; Expósito Rodríguez, Amaia; Bilbao González, Amaia; Mínguez Gabiña, Pablo; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, Teresa; Rodeño Ortiz de Zarate, Emilia; García Carrillo, Maitane; Barrios Treviño, Borja

    2018-03-19

    The BRAF V600E mutation in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) has been associated with resistance to 131 I. Our aim was to quantify the response to 131 I after surgery in patients who had the mutation (BRAF+) and those who did not have the mutated gene (BRAF-). A prospective cohort study was designed, from September 2015 to February 2016, which included patients with PTC receiving therapy after surgical treatment. Variables were described for age, gender, histology, tumor stage, thyroglobulin values before, 48h after and 6months after 131 I; absorbed dose and % activity on days 2 and 7 and elimination time. 41 patients giving in total 67 thyroid remnants were included. 61% were BRAF+. In stagesiii and iv, 80% were BRAF+. In lateral resection, 100% were BRAF+. The number of nodes was higher in BRAF+: 3.4 vs 1.2 (P=.01). The classic variant was predominant in BRAF+ (91.7% vs 8.3%, P=.03). 85.7% vs 14.3% of BRAF+ had desmoplastic reaction (P=.02). The BRAF+ had a lower absorbed dose than the administered activity (5.4Gy/MBq vs 20Gy/MBq, P=.02); lower% activity with respect to the unit of mass at 2 (0.046%/g vs 0.103%/g, P=.02) and at 7days (0.006%/gr vs 0.034%/gr, P=.04) CONCLUSIONS: The mutation of the BRAF V600E gene is related with greater resistance to postoperative treatment with 131 I since the onset of the disease. Copyright © 2018 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Tic disorder probably associated with steroid responsive encephalopathy with autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saygi, Semra; Ozkale, Yasemin; Erol, Ilknur

    2014-10-01

    Steroid responsive encephalopathy with autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT), a rare disorder in individuals of all age groups, including children, is characterized by high titers of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies. The present report concerns a previously healthy 12-y-old boy who presented with motor tics. The patient underwent an extensive work-up to identify the underlying etiologies and risk factors predisposing him to tic disorder. Based on the clinical and laboratory results, a diagnosis of SREAT was made. Although some studies have reported associated behavioral and cognitive changes, myoclonus, seizures, pyramidal tract dysfunction, psychosis, and coma. The authors describe a case of tic disorder, probably due to SREAT, as well as its course of treatment.

  18. A systematic review of genetic studies of thyroid disorders in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Jui Huang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A systematic review of genetic studies of thyroid disorders in Taiwan identified studies of gene mutations involved in the synthesis and binding of thyroid hormone, as well as mutations of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in thyroid cancer. Studies related to gene polymorphisms in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD and thyroid cancer were also reviewed. The most prevalent mutations in the Han-Chinese population were c.2268insT in the thyroid peroxidase (TPO gene and c.919-2A>G in the Pendred syndrome (PDS gene. Additional mutations have also been revealed in the genes encoding TPO (n = 5, thyroglobulin (TG; n = 6, pendrin (n = 2, and thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG; n = 2, which were novel at the time they were reported. The prevalence of various somatic mutations in differentiated thyroid cancer was similar in Taiwan and Western countries, with the RAS kinase mutation and tyrosine receptor kinase (TRK and rearranged during transfection (RET proto-oncogenes being detected in lower frequencies and the B-type RAF kinase (BRAF mutation accounting for the majority of cases. Recent microRNA analysis revealed an association between miR146b and the BRAF mutation, which was associated with poor prognosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC. Susceptibility to Graves' disease (GD was linked to the human leukocyte antigen (HLA region. The associated alleles were different in Han-Chinese and Caucasians; HLA-DPB1*0501, the major allele in Taiwan, has a low frequency in the West. By contrast, a high frequency of HLA-DRB1*0301 was detected in Caucasians but not Han-Chinese. In addition to the HLA region, cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated molecule-4 (CTLA4 gene polymorphisms +49G>A and +6230G>A (CT60 were positively associated with GD. The GG genotype and G allele of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP +49G>A were also related to relapse of Graves' hyperthyroidism after antithyroid drug withdrawal. Differences in the genetic

  19. The radioimmunoassay in revealing preclinical disorders of the pituitary-thyroid system functioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piven', N.V.; Pilatova, N.L.; Lukhverchik, L.N.; Kuz'menkova, E.I.; Solovej, V.V.; Mokhort, T.V.

    2001-01-01

    The main purpose of this research was to study the value of radioimmunoassay (RIA) for assessing the pituitary - thyroid function in healthy persons (aged 18-45). Quantitative criteria have been worked put for estimation of thyroid gland function for the population of Belarus in accordance with regional ecological situation. On this basis, concentrations of thyrotropin, thyroxine, triiodothyronine, thyroglobulin, thyroxine binding globulin were determined by RIA in blood samples. The analysis of the data obtained revealed latent forms of hyperthyroidism (42%) and hypothyroidism (21%), regarded by the authors as late medical consequences of Chernobyl accident. Subclinical stages were diagnosed in most cases. Thus RIA has proved useful for studying the functional state of the regulatory 'pituitary-thyroid gland' system and revealing prenosological disorders in it

  20. Effect of lead nitrate on thyroid function on the Indian palm squirrel, Funambulus pennanti (Wroughton)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, V.K.; Katti, S.R.; Sathyanesan, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Some of the known toxic effects of lead in mammals including man are, impaired heme synthesis, anemia, nepatopathy, nephropathy, behavioral disorders and neuropathy. However, very little is known about the effect of lead on endocrine physiology. Some data are available on lead induced impairment of thyroid function in occupationally exposed men and experimental rats. As lead nitrate is largely consumed through water and food, in this study the wild rodents Funambulus pennanti were administered lead through their drinking water and their thyroid structure, radioiodine 131-I percentage uptake and protein bound iodine (PBI) level were assessed

  1. 2015 American Thyroid Association Management Guidelines for Adult Patients with Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: The American Thyroid Association Guidelines Task Force on Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Erik K.; Bible, Keith C.; Doherty, Gerard M.; Mandel, Susan J.; Nikiforov, Yuri E.; Pacini, Furio; Randolph, Gregory W.; Sawka, Anna M.; Schlumberger, Martin; Schuff, Kathryn G.; Sherman, Steven I.; Sosa, Julie Ann; Steward, David L.; Tuttle, R. Michael; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thyroid nodules are a common clinical problem, and differentiated thyroid cancer is becoming increasingly prevalent. Since the American Thyroid Association's (ATA's) guidelines for the management of these disorders were revised in 2009, significant scientific advances have occurred in the field. The aim of these guidelines is to inform clinicians, patients, researchers, and health policy makers on published evidence relating to the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer. Methods: The specific clinical questions addressed in these guidelines were based on prior versions of the guidelines, stakeholder input, and input of task force members. Task force panel members were educated on knowledge synthesis methods, including electronic database searching, review and selection of relevant citations, and critical appraisal of selected studies. Published English language articles on adults were eligible for inclusion. The American College of Physicians Guideline Grading System was used for critical appraisal of evidence and grading strength of recommendations for therapeutic interventions. We developed a similarly formatted system to appraise the quality of such studies and resultant recommendations. The guideline panel had complete editorial independence from the ATA. Competing interests of guideline task force members were regularly updated, managed, and communicated to the ATA and task force members. Results: The revised guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules include recommendations regarding initial evaluation, clinical and ultrasound criteria for fine-needle aspiration biopsy, interpretation of fine-needle aspiration biopsy results, use of molecular markers, and management of benign thyroid nodules. Recommendations regarding the initial management of thyroid cancer include those relating to screening for thyroid cancer, staging and risk assessment, surgical management, radioiodine remnant ablation and therapy

  2. Radiation-induced thyroid cancer after radiotherapy for childhood cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiravova, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, Faculty Hospital Motol, Uk, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-07-01

    Full text of the publication follows: The thyroid gland in children is among the most sensitive organs to the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation, and very young children are at especially high risk. Due to extreme sensitivity of the thyroid gland in children, there is a risk of radiation - induced thyroid cancer even when the thyroid gland is outside the irradiated field. Increased incidence of thyroid cancer has been noted following radiotherapy not only for childhood Hodgkin disease (majority of observed patients), but also for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, neuroblastoma,